WorldWideScience

Sample records for grand challenge electron

  1. Grand Challenges for Disaster Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    volcanically active nations in the world with nearly 70 active or potentially active volcanoes .13 During the 20th century, volcanic eruptions in...Grand Challenges for Disaster Reduction deformation, gravity changes, gas emissions, magma move- ment, and other parameters to distinguish between mag...address the interdependencies of these lifelines at a systems level (e.g., communications, electricity, financial, gas , sewage, transportation, and

  2. Grand Challenges of Enterprise Integration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brosey, W.D; Neal, R.E.; Marks, D.

    2001-04-01

    Enterprise Integration connects and combines people, processes, systems, and technologies to ensure that the right people and the right processes have the right information and the right resources at the right time. A consensus roadmap for Technologies for Enterprise Integration was created as part of an industry/government/academia partnership in the Integrated Manufacturing Technology Initiative (IMTI). Two of the grand challenges identified by the roadmapping effort will be addressed here--Customer Responsive Enterprises and Totally Connected Enterprises. Each of these challenges is briefly discussed as to the current state of industry and the future vision as developed in the roadmap.

  3. The Grand Challenges of Nanotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, Neal

    2001-01-01

    Amazing breakthroughs and advances continue to be made in nanoscale science and engineering and the rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology, including near-commercial applications in biomedicine, computing and environmental protection. The National Nanotechnology Initiative, begun by the Clinton Administration has placed nanoscale research on a new funding trajectory. But, many 'grand challenges' must be overcome, technical ones as well as those related to funding, science and technology workforce, and the need for stronger collaboration across discipline, organizations, government agencies and with other countries

  4. Coordinated Exploration for Grand Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørding Olsen, Anders; Sofka, Wolfgang; Grimpe, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    to engage in joint search and compete for funding. Prior research on joint search highlights the role of specialized organizations, mainly regarding technological domains, to identify a superior solution. However, stakeholder theory leads us to believe that the success of any solution depends...... on the acceptance and support of important stakeholders. In this study, we suggest that search consortia are more likely to receive funding when they include representatives of stakeholder concerns, so-called advocacy groups. We extend theory on coordinated exploration in joint search by integrating mechanisms from...... stakeholder theory and argue that advocacy groups improve the generation of potential solutions and provide legitimacy. We test our theory with a unique dataset of 35,249 consortia that proposed solutions to 2,349 grand challenge problems as part of a large European funding program. Our results show...

  5. 2010 Panel on the Biomaterials Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, William “Monty”; Ratner, Buddy D.; Anderson, James; Coury, Art; Hoffman, Allan S.; Laurencin, Cato T.; Tirrell, David

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, the National Academy for Engineering issued the Grand Challenges for Engineering in the 21st Century comprised of 14 technical challenges that must be addressed to build a healthy, profitable, sustainable, and secure global community (http://www.engineeringchallenges.org). Although crucial, none of the NEA Grand Challenges adequately addressed the challenges that face the biomaterials community. In response to the NAE Grand Challenges, Monty Reichert of Duke University organized a panel entitled Grand Challenges in Biomaterials at the at the 2010 Society for Biomaterials Annual Meeting in Seattle. Six members of the National Academies—Buddy Ratner, James Anderson, Allan Hoffman, Art Coury, Cato Laurencin, and David Tirrell—were asked to propose a grand challenge to the audience that, if met, would significantly impact the future of biomaterials and medical devices. Successfully meeting these challenges will speed the 60-plus year transition from commodity, off-the-shelf biomaterials to bioengineered chemistries, and biomaterial devices that will significantly advance our ability to address patient needs and also to create new market opportunities. PMID:21171147

  6. Grand Challenges facing Storage Systems

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2004-01-01

    In this talk, we will discuss the future of storage systems. In particular, we will focus on several big challenges which we are facing in storage, such as being able to build, manage and backup really massive storage systems, being able to find information of interest, being able to do long-term archival of data, and so on. We also present ideas and research being done to address these challenges, and provide a perspective on how we expect these challenges to be resolved as we go forward.

  7. Digital Libraries: The Grand Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, John R.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the technical, economic, social, and cultural challenges to building a national digital library system. Selecting and filtering information, building and scaling distributed digital library networks, invoicing, payment, authorizing access, the locus of planning leadership, and the information poor are discussed. (Contains three…

  8. Plasma nanoscience: setting directions, tackling grand challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostrikov, Kostya; Cvelbar, Uros; Murphy, Anthony B

    2011-01-01

    This review paper presents historical perspectives, recent advances and future directions in the multidisciplinary research field of plasma nanoscience. The current status and future challenges are presented using a three-dimensional framework. The first and the largest dimension covers the most important classes of nanoscale objects (nanostructures, nanofeatures and nanoassemblies/nanoarchitectures) and materials systems, namely carbon nanotubes, nanofibres, graphene, graphene nanoribbons, graphene nanoflakes, nanodiamond and related carbon-based nanostructures; metal, silicon and other inorganic nanoparticles and nanostructures; soft organic nanomaterials; nano-biomaterials; biological objects and nanoscale plasma etching. In the second dimension, we discuss the most common types of plasmas and plasma reactors used in nanoscale plasma synthesis and processing. These include low-temperature non-equilibrium plasmas at low and high pressures, thermal plasmas, high-pressure microplasmas, plasmas in liquids and plasma-liquid interactions, high-energy-density plasmas, and ionized physical vapour deposition as well as some other plasma-enhanced nanofabrication techniques. In the third dimension, we outline some of the 'Grand Science Challenges' and 'Grand Socio-economic Challenges' to which significant contributions from plasma nanoscience-related research can be expected in the near future. The urgent need for a stronger focus on practical, outcome-oriented research to tackle the grand challenges is emphasized and concisely formulated as from controlled complexity to practical simplicity in solving grand challenges.

  9. The Arctic Grand Challenge: Abrupt Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkniss, P. E.

    2003-12-01

    Trouble in polar paradise (Science, 08/30/02), significant changes in the Arctic environment are scientifically documented (R.E. Moritz et al. ibid.). More trouble, lots more, "abrupt climate change," (R. B. Alley, et al. Science 03/28/03). R. Corell, Arctic Climate Impact Assessment team (ACIA), "If you want to see what will happen in the rest of the world 25 years from now just look what's happening in the Arctic," (Arctic Council meeting, Iceland, 08/03). What to do? Make abrupt Arctic climate change a grand challenge for the IPY-4 and beyond! Scientifically:Describe the "state" of the Arctic climate system as succinctly as possible and accept it as the point of departure.Develop a hypothesis and criteria what constitutes "abrupt climate change," in the Arctic that can be tested with observations. Observations: Bring to bear existing observations and coordinate new investments in observations through an IPY-4 scientific management committee. Make the new Barrow, Alaska, Global Climate Change Research Facility a major U.S. contribution and focal point for the IPY-4 in the U.S Arctic. Arctic populations, Native peoples: The people of the North are living already, daily, with wrenching change, encroaching on their habitats and cultures. For them "the earth is faster now," (I. Krupnik and D. Jolly, ARCUS, 2002). From a political, economic, social and entirely realistic perspective, an Arctic grand challenge without the total integration of the Native peoples in this effort cannot succeed. Therefore: Communications must be established, and the respective Native entities must be approached with the determination to create well founded, well functioning, enduring partnerships. In the U.S. Arctic, Barrow with its long history of involvement and active support of science and with the new global climate change research facility should be the focal point of choice Private industry: Resource extraction in the Arctic followed by oil and gas consumption, return the combustion

  10. Academia meets industry at the Multimedia Grand Challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, C.G.M.; Slaney, M.

    2011-01-01

    This column is about last year's ACM Multimedia Grand Challenge in Florence, Italy, an event that endeavors to connect (academic) researchers more effectively with the realities of the business world. The authors describe the 10 challenges and present the three winning applications.

  11. EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Road to Success

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-01-31

    Initial progress report for EV Everywhere. The report highlights the significant cost reduction in batteries in 2014, which will enable increased PEV affordability for consumers. Also, the efforts on increasing the convenience of PEVs through the Workplace Charging Challenge, which called on U.S. employers to help develop the nation's charging infrastructure.

  12. Workshop and conference on Grand Challenges applications and software technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    On May 4--7, 1993, nine federal agencies sponsored a four-day meeting on Grand Challenge applications and software technology. The objective was to bring High-Performance Computing and Communications (HPCC) Grand Challenge applications research groups supported under the federal HPCC program together with HPCC software technologists to: discuss multidisciplinary computational science research issues and approaches, identify major technology challenges facing users and providers, and refine software technology requirements for Grand Challenge applications research. The first day and a half focused on applications. Presentations were given by speakers from universities, national laboratories, and government agencies actively involved in Grand Challenge research. Five areas of research were covered: environmental and earth sciences; computational physics; computational biology, chemistry, and materials sciences; computational fluid and plasma dynamics; and applications of artificial intelligence. The next day and a half was spent in working groups in which the applications researchers were joined by software technologists. Nine breakout sessions took place: I/0, Data, and File Systems; Parallel Programming Paradigms; Performance Characterization and Evaluation of Massively Parallel Processing Applications; Program Development Tools; Building Multidisciplinary Applications; Algorithm and Libraries I; Algorithms and Libraries II; Graphics and Visualization; and National HPCC Infrastructure.

  13. Grand challenges in space synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Amor A; Montague, Michael G; Cumbers, John; Hogan, John A; Arkin, Adam P

    2015-12-06

    Space synthetic biology is a branch of biotechnology dedicated to engineering biological systems for space exploration, industry and science. There is significant public and private interest in designing robust and reliable organisms that can assist on long-duration astronaut missions. Recent work has also demonstrated that such synthetic biology is a feasible payload minimization and life support approach as well. This article identifies the challenges and opportunities that lie ahead in the field of space synthetic biology, while highlighting relevant progress. It also outlines anticipated broader benefits from this field, because space engineering advances will drive technological innovation on Earth. © 2015 The Authors.

  14. Scaling up Social: Strategies for Solving Social Work's Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Maria Y.; Ostrow, Laysha; Kemp, Susan P.

    2017-01-01

    The Grand Challenges for Social Work Initiative aims to focus the profession's attention on how social work can play a larger role in mitigating contemporary social problems. Yet a central issue facing contemporary social work is its seeming reticence to engage with social problems, and their solutions, beyond individual-level interventions.…

  15. Grand Challenges Emerging Perspectives For Embedded Processing (BRIEFING CHARTS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-06

    nΗy(n) 0 0 11 1 LKL > Virtual Optical Systemi t l ti l tr Post- Processing Co- Optimization Metrics Page 5 PROCESSING GRAND CHALLENGE 1 EO/IR Space...would be pretty shocked by what’s in a showroom now. Camera stores of the future will surprise us just as much.” -Nathan Myhrvold, former CTO of

  16. Grand societal challenges in information systems research and education

    CERN Document Server

    vom Brocke, Jan; Hofmann, Sara; Tumbas, Sanja

    2015-01-01

    This book examines how information systems research and education can play a major role in contributing to solutions to the Societal Grand Challenges formulated in "The Millennium Project" (millenium-project.org). Individual chapters focus on specific challenges, review existing approaches and contributions towards solutions in information systems research and outline a research agenda for these challenges. The topics considered in this volume range from climate change, population growth, global ICT availability, breakthroughs in science and technology and energy demand to ethical decision-making, policymaking, gender status and transnational crime prevention. It is the first book to present ideas on how the Information Systems discipline can contribute to the solution on this wide spectrum of grand societal challenges.

  17. Challenges faced by multidisplinary new investigators on addressing grand challenges in global health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The grand challenges approach aims to spark innovative and transformative strategies to overcome barriers to significant global health issues. Grand Challenges Canada endorses an ‘Integrated Innovation™’ approach that focuses on the intersection of scientific/technological, social and business innovation. In this article we explore themes emerging from a dialogue between the authors, who are multidisciplinary recipients of the ‘Rising Stars in Global Health’ award from Grand Challenges Canada, regarding benefits of engaging in integrated innovation research, and recommendations for how this approach may develop in the future. Discussion Our dialogue followed a semi-structured interview format that addressed three topics: 1) reflections on applying an Integrated Innovation™ approach for global health; 2) thoughts on participation in the Grand Challenges 2012 meeting; and 3) authors’ visions of Grand Challenges Canada and the Grand Challenge movement towards 2020. The dialogue was transcribed verbatim and we used thematic analysis techniques to identify, analyze and report themes in the data. Benefits of working using the Grand Challenges approach centered on two themes: a) the potential for scientific breakthrough and b) building interdisciplinary collaborations and a community of scholars. Challenges and opportunities for Grand Challenges in moving forward included: a) capacity building, particularly regarding Integrated Innovation™ and scale-up planning; b) interdisciplinary and international mentorship for new investigators; and c) potential for future commercialization. Conclusions Our discussion highlighted that Integrated Innovation™ offers the opportunity to develop new theories, methods and approaches to global health while simultaneously fostering a collaborative spirit grounded in international, interdisciplinary collaborations. However, the arguable over-emphasis on corporatization poses a major challenge for new investigators

  18. Challenges faced by multidisplinary new investigators on addressing grand challenges in global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen; Dimaras, Helen; Fortin, Anny; Ramón-García, Santiago

    2014-04-15

    The grand challenges approach aims to spark innovative and transformative strategies to overcome barriers to significant global health issues. Grand Challenges Canada endorses an 'Integrated Innovation™' approach that focuses on the intersection of scientific/technological, social and business innovation. In this article we explore themes emerging from a dialogue between the authors, who are multidisciplinary recipients of the 'Rising Stars in Global Health' award from Grand Challenges Canada, regarding benefits of engaging in integrated innovation research, and recommendations for how this approach may develop in the future. Our dialogue followed a semi-structured interview format that addressed three topics: 1) reflections on applying an Integrated Innovation™ approach for global health; 2) thoughts on participation in the Grand Challenges 2012 meeting; and 3) authors' visions of Grand Challenges Canada and the Grand Challenge movement towards 2020. The dialogue was transcribed verbatim and we used thematic analysis techniques to identify, analyze and report themes in the data. Benefits of working using the Grand Challenges approach centered on two themes: a) the potential for scientific breakthrough and b) building interdisciplinary collaborations and a community of scholars. Challenges and opportunities for Grand Challenges in moving forward included: a) capacity building, particularly regarding Integrated Innovation™ and scale-up planning; b) interdisciplinary and international mentorship for new investigators; and c) potential for future commercialization. Our discussion highlighted that Integrated Innovation™ offers the opportunity to develop new theories, methods and approaches to global health while simultaneously fostering a collaborative spirit grounded in international, interdisciplinary collaborations. However, the arguable over-emphasis on corporatization poses a major challenge for new investigators. We propose a more balanced way forward

  19. Grand challenges for integrated USGS science—A workshop report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, Karen E.; Goldhaber, Martin B.; Betancourt, Julio L.; Baron, Jill S.; Bristol, R. Sky; Cantrill, Mary; Exter, Paul E.; Focazio, Michael J.; Haines, John W.; Hay, Lauren E.; Hsu, Leslie; Labson, Victor F.; Lafferty, Kevin D.; Ludwig, Kristin A.; Milly, Paul C. D.; Morelli, Toni L.; Morman, Suzette A.; Nassar, Nedal T.; Newman, Timothy R.; Ostroff, Andrea C.; Read, Jordan S.; Reed, Sasha C.; Shapiro, Carl D.; Smith, Richard A.; Sanford, Ward E.; Sohl, Terry L.; Stets, Edward G.; Terando, Adam J.; Tillitt, Donald E.; Tischler, Michael A.; Toccalino, Patricia L.; Wald, David J.; Waldrop, Mark P.; Wein, Anne; Weltzin, Jake F.; Zimmerman, Christian E.

    2017-06-30

    Executive SummaryThe U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has a long history of advancing the traditional Earth science disciplines and identifying opportunities to integrate USGS science across disciplines to address complex societal problems. The USGS science strategy for 2007–2017 laid out key challenges in disciplinary and interdisciplinary arenas, culminating in a call for increased focus on a number of crosscutting science directions. Ten years on, to further the goal of integrated science and at the request of the Executive Leadership Team (ELT), a workshop with three dozen invited scientists spanning different disciplines and career stages in the Bureau convened on February 7–10, 2017, at the USGS John Wesley Powell Center for Analysis and Synthesis in Fort Collins, Colorado.The workshop focused on identifying “grand challenges” for integrated USGS science. Individual participants identified nearly 70 potential grand challenges before the workshop and through workshop discussions. After discussion, four overarching grand challenges emerged:Natural resource security,Societal risk from existing and emerging threats,Smart infrastructure development, andAnticipatory science for changing landscapes.Participants also identified a “comprehensive science challenge” that highlights the development of integrative science, data, models, and tools—all interacting in a modular framework—that can be used to address these and other future grand challenges:Earth Monitoring, Analyses, and Projections (EarthMAP)EarthMAP is our long-term vision for an integrated scientific framework that spans traditional scientific boundaries and disciplines, and integrates the full portfolio of USGS science: research, monitoring, assessment, analysis, and information delivery.The Department of Interior, and the Nation in general, have a vast array of information needs. The USGS meets these needs by having a broadly trained and agile scientific workforce. Encouraging and supporting

  20. US DOE Grand Challenge in Computational Accelerator Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryne, R.; Habib, S.; Qiang, J.; Ko, K.; Li, Z.; McCandless, B.; Mi, W.; Ng, C.; Saparov, M.; Srinivas, V.; Sun, Y.; Zhan, X.; Decyk, V.; Golub, G.

    1998-01-01

    Particle accelerators are playing an increasingly important role in basic and applied science, and are enabling new accelerator-driven technologies. But the design of next-generation accelerators, such as linear colliders and high intensity linacs, will require a major advance in numerical modeling capability due to extremely stringent beam control and beam loss requirements, and the presence of highly complex three-dimensional accelerator components. To address this situation, the U.S. Department of Energy has approved a ''Grand Challenge'' in Computational Accelerator Physics, whose primary goal is to develop a parallel modeling capability that will enable high performance, large scale simulations for the design, optimization, and numerical validation of next-generation accelerators. In this paper we report on the status of the Grand Challenge

  1. Engineering grand challenges and the attributes of the global engineer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida; Ulseth, Ron; Jonhson, Bart

    2017-01-01

    Technology has been changing world in ways never imagined. The ever-evolving society and rapid development posed different demands and challenges to the engineering profession. Addressing these challenges means to re-vision and reform the ways we educate future engineers and the attributes need...... to be enhanced. This paper reports a literature review with aim to (1) understand the different stakeholders’ perspectives, namely students, educators, and employers, (2) understand the profile of the global engineer (i.e. knowledge, competences and skills), and (3) outline and discuss learning strategies....... As a result, the paper presents the main gaps in the existing knowledge, formulates research hypothesis, and proposes a research design for a follow up empirical study to investigate further the engineering grand challenges, the attributes needed to solve them, and the learning environments required....

  2. Engineering grand challenges and the attributes of the global engineer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida; Ulseth, Ron; Jonhson, Bart

    2017-01-01

    to be enhanced. This paper reports a literature review with aim to (1) understand the different stakeholders’ perspectives, namely students, educators, and employers, (2) understand the profile of the global engineer (i.e. knowledge, competences and skills), and (3) outline and discuss learning strategies......Technology has been changing world in ways never imagined. The ever-evolving society and rapid development posed different demands and challenges to the engineering profession. Addressing these challenges means to re-vision and reform the ways we educate future engineers and the attributes need....... As a result, the paper presents the main gaps in the existing knowledge, formulates research hypothesis, and proposes a research design for a follow up empirical study to investigate further the engineering grand challenges, the attributes needed to solve them, and the learning environments required....

  3. Review of GI Science Trends and Grand Challenges (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, M.; Esri Education Team

    2010-12-01

    Geographic Information Science was defined by Goodchild's keynote presentation at the 1990 Symposium on Spatial Data Handling in Zurich and subsequent paper in the International Journal of Geographic Information Systems. Over the past 20 years it has maintained part of its original base but also has grown to accommodate possibilities afforded by new technologies and new societal concerns. Recent review articles and a special session on GI Science grand challenges held at the 2010 meeting of the Association of American Geographers, have provided perspectives on key trends in GI Science, that this AGU presentation now summarizes. The GIS software industry has responded to some and are pending advances on others of these trends.

  4. Is it possible to give scientific solutions to Grand Challenges? On the idea of grand challenges for life science research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efstathiou, Sophia

    2016-04-01

    This paper argues that challenges that are grand in scope such as "lifelong health and wellbeing", "climate action", or "food security" cannot be addressed through scientific research only. Indeed scientific research could inhibit addressing such challenges if scientific analysis constrains the multiple possible understandings of these challenges into already available scientific categories and concepts without translating between these and everyday concerns. This argument builds on work in philosophy of science and race to postulate a process through which non-scientific notions become part of science. My aim is to make this process available to scrutiny: what I call founding everyday ideas in science is both culturally and epistemologically conditioned. Founding transforms a common idea into one or more scientifically relevant ones, which can be articulated into descriptively thicker and evaluatively deflated terms and enable operationalisation and measurement. The risk of founding however is that it can invisibilise or exclude from realms of scientific scrutiny interpretations that are deemed irrelevant, uninteresting or nonsensical in the domain in question-but which may remain salient for addressing grand-in-scope challenges. The paper considers concepts of "wellbeing" in development economics versus in gerontology to illustrate this process. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Fostering Scientific Literacy: Establishing Social Relevance via the Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyford, M. E.; Myers, J. D.; Buss, A.

    2010-12-01

    Numerous studies and polls suggest the general public’s understanding of science and scientific literacy remain woefully inadequate despite repeated calls for improvement over the last 150 years. This inability to improve scientific literacy significantly is a complex problem likely driven by a number of factors. However, we argue that past calls and efforts for improving scientific literacy have failed to: 1) articulate a truly meaningful justification for society to foster a scientifically literate public; 2) provide a rationale that motivates individuals of diverse backgrounds to become scientifically literate; 3) consider the impact of personal perspective, e.g. values, beliefs, attitudes, etc., on learning; and 4) offer a relevant and manageable framework in which to define scientific literacy. For instance, past calls for improving scientific literacy, e.g. the U.S. is behind the Soviets in the space race, U.S students rank below country X in math and science, etc., have lacked justification, personal motivation and a comprehensive framework for defining scientific literacy. In these cases, the primary justification for improving science education and scientific literacy was to regain international dominance in the space race or to advance global standing according to test results. These types of calls also articulate short-term goals that are rendered moot once they have been achieved. At the same time, teaching practices have commonly failed to consider the perspectives students bring to the classroom. Many STEM faculty do not address issues of personal perspective through ignorance or the desire to avoid controversial subjects, e g. evolution, climate change. We propose that the ‘grand challenges’ (e.g., energy, climate change, antibacterial resistance, water, etc.) humankind currently faces provides a compelling framework for developing courses and curricula well-suited for improving scientific literacy. A grand challenge paradigm offers four

  6. Bringing Seismology's Grand Challenges to the Undergraduate Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, M. H.; Taber, J.; Hubenthal, M.

    2011-12-01

    The "Seismological Grand Challenges in Understanding Earth's Dynamic Systems," a community-written long-range science plan for the next decade, poses 10 questions to guide fundamental seismological research. Written in an approachable fashion suitable for policymakers, the broad questions and supporting discussion contained in this document offer an ideal framework for the development of undergraduate curricular materials. Leveraging this document, we have created a collection of inquiry-based classroom modules that utilize authentic data to modernize seismological instruction in 100 and 200 level undergraduate courses. The modules not only introduce undergraduates to the broad questions that the seismological community seeks to answer in the future but also showcase the numerous areas where modern seismological research is actively contributing to our understanding of fundamental Earth processes. To date 6 in-depth explorations that correspond to the Grand Challenges document have been developed. The specific topics for each exploration were selected to showcase modern seismological research while also covering topics commonly included in the curriculum of these introductory classes. Examples of activities that have been created and their corresponding Grand Challenge include: -A guided inquiry that introduces students to episodic tremor and slip and compares the GPS and seismic signatures of ETS with those produced from standard tectonic earthquakes (Grand Challenge "How do faults slip?"). - A laboratory exercise where students engage in b-value mapping of volcanic earthquakes to assess potential eruption hazards (How do magmas ascend and erupt?). - A module that introduce students to glacial earthquakes in Greenland and compares their frequency and spatial distribution to tectonic earthquakes (How do processes in the ocean and atmosphere interact with the solid Earth?). What is the relationship between stress and strain in the lithosphere? - An activity that

  7. First-Year Students' Attitudes towards the Grand Challenges and Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, Joni M.; Han, Yi; Davis, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The "Grand Challenges" for Engineering are an effort to portray engineering as a field that has profound impacts on society. This study explores the level of interest first-year engineering students had in various "Grand Challenges" and in nanotechnology topics. We administered a survey to a large sample of students enrolled in…

  8. 77 FR 51983 - Availability of Department of Energy EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Initial Framing Document and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... of Energy EV Everywhere Grand Challenge Initial Framing Document and Request for Public Comment... the EV Everywhere Challenge on March 7, 2012. The EV Everywhere Initial Framing Document (framing...

  9. On the Grand Challenges in Physical Petrology: the Multiphase Crossroads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergantz, G. W.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid progress in experimental, micro-analytical and textural analysis at the crystal scale has produced an unprecedented record of magmatic processes. However an obstacle to further progress is the lack of understanding of how mass, energy and momentum flux associated with crystal-rich, open-system events produces identifiable outcomes. Hence developing a physically-based understanding of magmatic systems linking micro-scale petrological observations with a physical template operating at the macro-scale presents a so-called "Grand Challenge." The essence of this challenge is that magmatic systems have characteristic length and feedback scales between those accessible by classical continuum and discrete methods. It has become increasingly obvious that the old-school continuum methods have limited resolution and power of explanation for multiphase (real) magma dynamics. This is, in part, because in crystal-rich systems the deformation is non-affine, and so the concept of constitutive behavior is less applicable and likely not even relevant, especially if one is interested in the emergent character of micro-scale processes. One expression of this is the cottage industry of proposing viscosity laws for magmas, which serves as "blunt force" de facto corrections for what is intrinsically multiphase behavior. Even in more fluid-rich systems many of these laws are not suitable for use in the very transport theories they aim to support. The alternative approach is the discrete method, where multiphase interactions are explicitly resolved. This is a daunting prospect given the numbers of crystals in magmas. But perhaps all crystals don't need to be modeled. I will demonstrate how discrete methods can recover critical state behavior, resolve crystal migration, the onset of visco-elastic behavior such as melt-present shear bands which sets the large-scale mixing volumes, some of the general morpho-dynamics that underlies purported rheological models, and transient controls on

  10. The grand challenges of plasma etching: a manufacturing perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chris G N; Kanarik, Keren J; Gottscho, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Plasma etching has been enabling nano-electronic fabrication since the 1980s; during this time, transistor size has shrunk by nearly two orders of magnitude, starting at 1.0 µm in the mid 80s to ∼0.01 µm today. The manufacturing of these devices requires overcoming a series of challenges, ranging from continuous innovation on device integration to extend Moore's law to breaking tradeoffs on the perennial challenge of aspect ratio-dependent etching. In this paper, we will review four key areas in etch manufacturing: uniformity, defects, surface precision and ‘sticky’/non-volatile etch materials. In the uniformity section, we will discuss the challenges for microscopic uniformity, such as localized feature dimension variations; macroscopic uniformity, such as performance at the extreme edge of the wafer; and repeatable uniformity, meaning wafer-to-wafer, lot-to-lot and chamber-to-chamber performance. While defect management is successful with in situ plasma cleans, one must be cognizant of the choice of clean chemistry. In surface precision, we look at the approach of atomic layer etching and how it can be successful in a manufacturing environment. Finally, in the non-volatile material section, we review technology drivers for DRAM (dynamic random access memory) and NAND flash memory in the microelectronics Si industry, with focus on the utilization of such materials and what it means to etch equipment manufacturers. (topical review)

  11. Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: Groundwater contaminant transport. Final project report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    The over-reaching goal of the Groundwater Grand Challenge component of the Partnership in Computational Science (PICS) was to develop and establish the massively parallel approach for the description of groundwater flow and transport and to address the problem of uncertainties in the data and its interpretation. This necessitated the development of innovative algorithms and the implementation of massively parallel computational tools to provide a suite of simulators for groundwater flow and transport in heterogeneous media. This report summarizes the activities and deliverables of the Groundwater Grand Challenge project funded through the High Performance Computing grand challenge program of the Department of Energy from 1995 through 1997

  12. A BLUEPRINT FOR IMPLEMENTING GRAND CHALLENGE SCHOLARS’ PROGRAMME: A CASE STUDY OF TAYLOR’S UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUSHTAK AL-ATABI

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The National Academy for Engineering announced 14 Grand Challenges for the 21st Century engineers to address in order to ensure a sustainable future for the generations to come. These grand challenges are in four broad areas, namely, energy and environment, health, security and learning and computation. This paper reports on a Grand Challenges Scholars’ Programme that is developed to prepare the engineering students to be able to address the grand challenges using the CDIO framework and focusing on five components; research experience, interdisciplinary curriculum, entrepreneurship, global dimension and service learning. The programme is voluntary and the candidates are expected to commit additional learning time. The programme was launched with 16 participants who are expected to graduate in 2016. A preliminary assessment of the programs shows that the participants found the programme useful in developing an array of CDIO skills. The School intends to continue offering this programme with the intention of integrating it with a holistic education approach.

  13. Addressing the Grand Challenge of atmospheric carbon dioxide: geologic sequestration vs. biological recycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Ben J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract On February 15, 2008, the National Academy of Engineering unveiled their list of 14 Grand Challenges for Engineering. Building off of tremendous advancements in the past century, these challenges were selected for their role in assuring a sustainable existence for the rapidly increasing global community. It is no accident that the first five Challenges on the list involve the development of sustainable energy sources and management of environmental resources. While the focus of this review is to address the single Grand Challenge of "develop carbon sequestration methods", is will soon be clear that several other Challenges are intrinsically tied to it through the principles of sustainability. How does the realm of biological engineering play a role in addressing these Grand Challenges?

  14. Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) Electronics Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn how the SMM Electronics Challenge encourage electronic manufacturers to strive to send 100 percent of the used electronics they collect from the public and retailers to certified electronics refurbishers and recyclers.

  15. Sustainable Materials Management (SMM) Electronics Challenge Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — On September 22, 2012, EPA launched the SMM Electronics Challenge. The Challenge encourages electronics manufacturers, brand owners and retailers to strive to send...

  16. Grand challenges in technology enhanced learning outcomes of the 3rd Alpine Rendez-Vous

    CERN Document Server

    Fischer, Frank; Sutherland, Rosamund; Zirn, Lena

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a key piece of the vision and strategy developed in STELLAR. It sets out a new mid-term agenda by defining Grand Challenges for research and development in technology-enhanced learning. Other than mere technology prizes, STELLAR Grand Challenges deal with problems at the interface of social and technical sciences. They pose problems that can be solved only in interdisciplinary collaboration. The descriptions of the Grand Challenge Problems were sent out to a number of stakeholders from industry, academia, and policy-making who responded with insightful, creative and critical comments bringing in their specific perspectives. This book will inspire everyone interested in TEL and its neighboring disciplines in their future projects. All of the listed problems, first hints with respect to the approach, measurable success indicators and funding sources are outlined. The challenges focus on what noted experts regard as important upcoming, pending, and innovative fields of research, the solution o...

  17. Grand challenges in the management and conservation of North American inland fishes and fisheries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Abigail; Cooke, Steven J.; Beard, Douglas; Kao, Yu-Chun; Lorenzen, Kai; Song, Andrew M.; Allen, Micheal S.; Basher, Zeenatul; Bunnell, David B.; Camp, Edward V.; Cowx, Ian G.; Freedman, Jonathan A.; Nguyen, Vivian M.; Nohner, Joel K.; Rogers, Mark W.; Siders, Zachary A.; Taylor, William W.; Youn, So-Jung

    2017-01-01

    Even with long-standing management and extensive science support, North American inland fish and fisheries still face many conservation and management challenges. We used a grand challenges approach to identify critical roadblocks that if removed would help solve important problems in the management and long-term conservation of North American inland fish and fisheries. We identified seven grand challenges within three themes (valuation, governance, and externalities) and 34 research needs and management actions. The major themes identified are to (1) raise awareness of diverse values associated with inland fish and fisheries, (2) govern inland fish and fisheries to satisfy multiple use and conservation objectives, and (3) ensure productive inland fisheries given nonfishing sector externalities. Addressing these grand challenges will help the broader community understand the diverse values of inland fish and fisheries, promote open forums for engagement of diverse stakeholders in fisheries management, and better integrate the inland fish sector into the greater water and land use policy process.

  18. Grand Challenges and Great Potential in Foreign Language Teaching and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlas, Anne Cummings

    2018-01-01

    This article argues for the field of foreign languages to begin to identify and define our Grand Challenges, which are difficult yet solvable problems facing our field. Seeking answers to these challenges can provide new opportunities for collaboration and can spur new directions and innovation within language learning and teaching. Researchable…

  19. A Library in the Grands Moulins de Paris: challenging Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Tresson

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, the University of Paris 7 and its new Main Library will move to Paris Rive Gauche, a recently developed neighbourhood on the left bank of the Seine. The library will occupy most of the city’s former industrial mills, the Grands Moulins de Paris. As part of the project, the library developed a very detailed functional program. The facilities are expected to comprise 1,800 workstations (half of which will be computerized, and upon completion will have a capacity of 300,000 freely accessible documents and 350,000 documents in store over a total surface area of some 12,000 m2. The architect Rudy Ricciotti won the international competition to design the library held in 2001. Perfectly suited to its function, the industrial building in which the library is housed dates from the 1920s. It presents both advantages (vast surfaces, sufficient load-bearing capacity, natural light, etc. and obstacles (restrictions on free circulation, forests of columns in certain areas, interrupted spaces, etc. to being transformed into a library that is functional and adapted to its purposes. The building’s structure and the constraints it imposed profoundly influenced the program which had to be adjusted, and also affected other aspects, including the arrangement and features of the furnishings as well as the building’s system of signs. In agreement with the university, the library worked in close collaboration with the architect from the earliest sketches onwards. As a result, his initial plan also evolved considerably. The installation of the library in the Grands Moulins offers us a chance to observe the nature and effects of the interactions between the transformation of a building and the evolution of a program.

  20. The New Global Governance Architectures on Grand Challenges and State Capacity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana

    During the past decade there has been a rapid emergence of new forms of global governance architectures seeking to address grand challenges. International organizations and other strong actors in the global scene have been setting up new, ambitious, open-ended and solutionoriented architectures....... Aiming to address some specifically identified grand challenges the new governance architectures are creating broader and sustained conditions for problemsolving. But the extent to which they are able to generate the expected transformative change at the domestic level is an empirical question...

  1. Underwater Visual Computing: The Grand Challenge Just around the Corner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lukas, Uwe Freiherr

    2016-01-01

    Visual computing technologies have traditionally been developed for conventional setups where air is the surrounding medium for the user, the display, and/or the camera. However, given mankind's increasingly need to rely on the oceans to solve the problems of future generations (such as offshore oil and gas, renewable energies, and marine mineral resources), there is a growing need for mixed-reality applications for use in water. This article highlights the various research challenges when changing the medium from air to water, introduces the concept of underwater mixed environments, and presents recent developments in underwater visual computing applications.

  2. Megatrends and grand challenges of cybercrime and cyberterrorism policy and research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, Bert Jaap; Akhgar, Babak; Brewster, Ben

    2016-01-01

    What are grand challenges of cybercrime and cyberterrorism policy and research for the coming one or two decades? To answer this question, we first need to grasp some major trends that influence the future of cybercrime and cyberterrorism, and the combatting thereof, in fundamental ways. This

  3. Grand challenge problems in environmental modeling and remediation: groundwater contaminant transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd Arbogast; Steve Bryant; Clint N. Dawson; Mary F. Wheeler

    1998-08-31

    This report describes briefly the work of the Center for Subsurface Modeling (CSM) of the University of Texas at Austin (and Rice University prior to September 1995) on the Partnership in Computational Sciences Consortium (PICS) project entitled Grand Challenge Problems in Environmental Modeling and Remediation: Groundwater Contaminant Transport.

  4. Grand Challenges and Chemical Engineering Curriculum--Developments at TU Dortmund University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kockmann, Norbert; Lutze, Philip; Gorak, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Chemical processing industry is progressively focusing their research activities and product placements in the areas of Grand Challenges (or Global Megatrends) such as mobility, energy, communication, or health care and food. Innovation in all these fields requires solving high complex problems, rapid product development as well as dealing with…

  5. 75 FR 5634 - Grand Challenges of the 21st Century; Request for Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-03

    ... infrastructure. These grand challenges are already beginning to have an impact on undergraduate education. Twenty... can stop an armor-piercing bullet. Educational software that is as compelling as the best video game... understand the world around us through simulation and slashing the time needed to design complex products...

  6. Using Grand Challenges For Innovative Teaching in Structural Geology, Geophysics, and Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaris, J. R.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Wysession, M. E.

    2012-12-01

    An innovative approach to teaching involves using the "Big Ideas" or "Grand Challenges" of a field, as determined by the research community in that area, as the basis for classroom activities. There have been several recent efforts in the areas of structural geology, tectonics, and geophysics to determine these Grand Challenges, including the areas of seismology ("Seismological Grand Challenges in Understanding Earth's Dynamic Systems"), mineral physics ("Unlocking the Building Blocks of the Planet"), EarthScope-related science ("Unlocking the Secrets of the North American Continent: An EarthScope Science Plan for 2010-2020"), and structural geology and tectonics (at the Structural Geology and Tectonics Forum held at Williams College in June, 2012). These research community efforts produced frameworks of the essential information for their fields with the aim of guiding future research. An integral part of this, however, is training the next generation of scientists, and using these Big Ideas as the basis for course structures and activities is a powerful way to make this happen. When activities, labs, and homeworks are drawn from relevant and cutting-edge research topics, students can find the material more fascinating and engaging, and can develop a better sense of the dynamic process of scientific discovery. Many creative ideas for incorporating the Grand Challenges of structural geology, tectonics, and geophysics in the classroom were developed at a Cutting Edge workshop on "Teaching Structural Geology, Geophysics, and Tectonics in the 21st Century" held at the University of Tennessee in July, 2012.

  7. Biofuels and Sustainable Development: An Executive Session on the Grand Challenges of the Sustainability Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Henry [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Clark, William C. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Devereaux, Charan [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2008-05-20

    This report is the result of the second in a series of intense workshops and study sessions on Grand Challenges of the Sustainability Transition, organized by the Sustainability Science Program at Harvard University, hosted by Venice International University, and supported by the Italian Ministry of Environment, Land and Sea.

  8. Biological approaches for addressing the grand challenge of providing access to clean drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. National Academy of Engineering (NAE) recently published a document presenting "Grand Challenges for Engineering". This list was proposed by leading engineers and scientists from around the world at the request of the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF). Fourteen topics were selected for these grand challenges, and at least seven can be addressed using the tools and methods of biological engineering. Here we describe how biological engineers can address the challenge of providing access to clean drinking water. This issue must be addressed in part by removing or inactivating microbial and chemical contaminants in order to properly deliver water safe for human consumption. Despite many advances in technologies this challenge is expanding due to increased pressure on fresh water supplies and to new opportunities for growth of potentially pathogenic organisms. PMID:21453515

  9. Using Grand Challenges to Teach Science: A Biology-Geology Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyford, M.; Myers, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    Three science courses at the University of Wyoming explore the inextricable connections between science and society by centering on grand challenges. Two of these courses are introductory integrated science courses for non-majors while the third is an upper level course for majors and non-majors. Through collaboration, the authors have developed these courses to explore the grand challenges of energy, water and climate. Each course focuses on the fundamental STEM principles required for a citizen to understand each grand challenge. However, the courses also emphasize the non-STEM perspectives (e.g., economics, politics, human well-being, externalities) that underlie each grand challenge and argue that creating equitable, sustainable and just solutions to the grand challenges hinges on an understanding of STEM and non-STEM perspectives. Moreover, the authors also consider the multitude of personal perspectives individuals bring to the classroom (e.g., values, beliefs, empathy misconceptions) that influence any stakeholder's ability to engage in fruitful discussions about grand challenge solutions. Discovering Science (LIFE 1002) focuses on the grand challenges of energy and climate. Students attend three one-hour lectures, one two-hour lab and a one-hour discussion each week. Lectures emphasize the STEM and non-STEM principles underlying each grand challenge. Laboratory activities are designed to be interdisciplinary and engage students in inquiry-driven activities to reinforce concepts from lecture and to model how science is conducted. Labs also expose students to the difficulties often associated with scientific studies, the limits of science, and the inherent uncertainties associated with scientific findings. Discussion sessions provide an opportunity for students to explore the complexity of the grand challenges from STEM and non-STEM perspectives, and expose the multitude of personal perspectives an individual might harbor related to each grand challenge

  10. The grand challenge of managing the petascale facility.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aiken, R. J.; Mathematics and Computer Science

    2007-02-28

    This report is the result of a study of networks and how they may need to evolve to support petascale leadership computing and science. As Dr. Ray Orbach, director of the Department of Energy's Office of Science, says in the spring 2006 issue of SciDAC Review, 'One remarkable example of growth in unexpected directions has been in high-end computation'. In the same article Dr. Michael Strayer states, 'Moore's law suggests that before the end of the next cycle of SciDAC, we shall see petaflop computers'. Given the Office of Science's strong leadership and support for petascale computing and facilities, we should expect to see petaflop computers in operation in support of science before the end of the decade, and DOE/SC Advanced Scientific Computing Research programs are focused on making this a reality. This study took its lead from this strong focus on petascale computing and the networks required to support such facilities, but it grew to include almost all aspects of the DOE/SC petascale computational and experimental science facilities, all of which will face daunting challenges in managing and analyzing the voluminous amounts of data expected. In addition, trends indicate the increased coupling of unique experimental facilities with computational facilities, along with the integration of multidisciplinary datasets and high-end computing with data-intensive computing; and we can expect these trends to continue at the petascale level and beyond. Coupled with recent technology trends, they clearly indicate the need for including capability petascale storage, networks, and experiments, as well as collaboration tools and programming environments, as integral components of the Office of Science's petascale capability metafacility. The objective of this report is to recommend a new cross-cutting program to support the management of petascale science and infrastructure. The appendices of the report document current and projected

  11. Building a Course on Global Sustainability using the grand challenges of Energy-Water-Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J. D.

    2012-12-01

    GEOL1600: Global Sustainability: Managing the Earth's Resources is a lower division integrated science course at the University of Wyoming that fulfills the university's science requirement. Course content and context has been developed using the grand challenge nexus of energy-water-and climate (EWC). The interconnection of these issues, their social relevance and timeliness has provided a framework that gives students an opportunity to recognize why STEM is relevant to their lives regardless of their ultimate professional career choices. The EWC nexus provides the filter to sieve the course's STEM content. It also provides an ideal mechanism by which the non-STEM perspectives important in grand challenge solutions can be seamlessly incorporated in the course. Through a combination of content and context, the relevance of these issues engage students in their own learning. Development of the course followed the Grand Challenge Scientific Literacy (GCSL) model independently developed by the author and two colleagues at the University of Wyoming. This course model stresses science principles centered on the nature of science (e.g., fundamental premises, habits of mind, critical thinking) and unifying scientific concepts (e.g., methods and tools, experimentation, modeling). Grand challenge principles identify the STEM and non-STEM concepts needed to understand the grand challenges, drawing on multiple STEM and non-STEM disciplines and subjects (i.e., economics, politics, unintended consequences, roles of stakeholders). Using the EWC nexus filter and building on the Grand Challenge Principles, specific content included in the course is selected is that most relevant to understanding the Grand Challenges, thereby stressing content depth over breadth. Because quantitative data and reasoning is critical to effectively evaluating challenge solutions, QR is a component of nearly all class activities, while engineering and technology aspects of grand challenges are

  12. The Grand Canyon of the Colorado: a challenge to float, a challenge to manage

    Science.gov (United States)

    David N. Cole

    1989-01-01

    Last summer, I finally got my chance to float the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon, one of the world’s premier adventure trips. For 18 days and 280 miles, my group floated through some of the most spectacular scenery imaginable, spacing our days with hikes through slickrock alcoves, along terraced pools of blue-green water, to waterfalls plunging out of holes on...

  13. Grand Challenges Canada: inappropriate emphasis and missed opportunities in global health research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Charles P; Haddad, Slim; Birn, Anne-Emanuelle; Cole, Donald C; Labonte, Ronald; Roberts, Janet Hatcher; Schrecker, Ted; Sellen, Daniel; Zakus, David

    2011-01-01

    In May 2010, Grand Challenges Canada (GCC) was launched with the mandate to identify global challenges in health that could be supported through the Government of Canada's Development Innovations Fund (DIF: $225 million over five years). The GCC offers a potentially excellent mechanism for taking Canada's participation in global health challenges "to a higher level". Recent GCC announcements raise new questions about the emphasis being placed on technological discovery or "catalytic" research. Missing so far are opportunities that the Fund could offer in order to support innovative research addressing i) health systems strengthening, ii) more effective delivery of existing interventions, and iii) policies and programs that address broader social determinants of health. The Canadian Grand Challenges announced to date risk pushing to the sidelines good translational and implementation science and early career-stage scientists addressing important social, environmental and political conditions that affect disease prevalence, progress and treatment; and the many unresolved challenges faced in bringing to scale proven interventions within resource-constrained health systems. We wish to register our concern at the apparent prioritization of biotechnical innovation research and the subordination of the social, environmental, economic and political context in which human health is either protected or eroded.

  14. A different challenge: the directional drilled crossing for the Yacuiba - Rio Grande Gas Line Project - GASYRG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Wayne; Garcia, Francisco [Bolinter Ltda., Santa Cruz (Bolivia); Montano, Ruben [Transierra, Santa Cruz (Bolivia)

    2003-07-01

    The Rio Grande River's directional drilling, 2002 m. long and 25 m. deep was a great challenge for Transierra - Owner - as well as Laney - Bolinter - Contractor - to accomplish a feat yet to be done in the entire world. The dedication of the people involved showed their degree of professionalism that these companies have obtained and the determination in doing the job overcoming unforeseen obstacles and still being able to finish on time, mitigating environmental impacts and leaving a first class crossing. This document presents a description of the technical, logistic and construction factors that were involved in the project and which allowed to perform 7 directional drillings, including Rio Grande River, which during the pull got the last 60 m. of pipe stuck, being freed only after using a pneumatic hammer. (author)

  15. Grand canonical electronic density-functional theory: Algorithms and applications to electrochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, William A. III; Arias, Tomas A.

    2017-01-01

    First-principles calculations combining density-functional theory and continuum solvation models enable realistic theoretical modeling and design of electrochemical systems. When a reaction proceeds in such systems, the number of electrons in the portion of the system treated quantum mechanically changes continuously, with a balancing charge appearing in the continuum electrolyte. A grand-canonical ensemble of electrons at a chemical potential set by the electrode potential is therefore the ideal description of such systems that directly mimics the experimental condition. We present two distinct algorithms: a self-consistent field method and a direct variational free energy minimization method using auxiliary Hamiltonians (GC-AuxH), to solve the Kohn-Sham equations of electronic density-functional theory directly in the grand canonical ensemble at fixed potential. Both methods substantially improve performance compared to a sequence of conventional fixed-number calculations targeting the desired potential, with the GC-AuxH method additionally exhibiting reliable and smooth exponential convergence of the grand free energy. Lastly, we apply grand-canonical density-functional theory to the under-potential deposition of copper on platinum from chloride-containing electrolytes and show that chloride desorption, not partial copper monolayer formation, is responsible for the second voltammetric peak.

  16. Grand canonical electronic density-functional theory: Algorithms and applications to electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, William A.; Arias, Tomas A.

    2017-03-01

    First-principles calculations combining density-functional theory and continuum solvation models enable realistic theoretical modeling and design of electrochemical systems. When a reaction proceeds in such systems, the number of electrons in the portion of the system treated quantum mechanically changes continuously, with a balancing charge appearing in the continuum electrolyte. A grand-canonical ensemble of electrons at a chemical potential set by the electrode potential is therefore the ideal description of such systems that directly mimics the experimental condition. We present two distinct algorithms: a self-consistent field method and a direct variational free energy minimization method using auxiliary Hamiltonians (GC-AuxH), to solve the Kohn-Sham equations of electronic density-functional theory directly in the grand canonical ensemble at fixed potential. Both methods substantially improve performance compared to a sequence of conventional fixed-number calculations targeting the desired potential, with the GC-AuxH method additionally exhibiting reliable and smooth exponential convergence of the grand free energy. Finally, we apply grand-canonical density-functional theory to the under-potential deposition of copper on platinum from chloride-containing electrolytes and show that chloride desorption, not partial copper monolayer formation, is responsible for the second voltammetric peak.

  17. Grand canonical electronic density-functional theory: Algorithms and applications to electrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaman, Ravishankar; Goddard, William A; Arias, Tomas A

    2017-03-21

    First-principles calculations combining density-functional theory and continuum solvation models enable realistic theoretical modeling and design of electrochemical systems. When a reaction proceeds in such systems, the number of electrons in the portion of the system treated quantum mechanically changes continuously, with a balancing charge appearing in the continuum electrolyte. A grand-canonical ensemble of electrons at a chemical potential set by the electrode potential is therefore the ideal description of such systems that directly mimics the experimental condition. We present two distinct algorithms: a self-consistent field method and a direct variational free energy minimization method using auxiliary Hamiltonians (GC-AuxH), to solve the Kohn-Sham equations of electronic density-functional theory directly in the grand canonical ensemble at fixed potential. Both methods substantially improve performance compared to a sequence of conventional fixed-number calculations targeting the desired potential, with the GC-AuxH method additionally exhibiting reliable and smooth exponential convergence of the grand free energy. Finally, we apply grand-canonical density-functional theory to the under-potential deposition of copper on platinum from chloride-containing electrolytes and show that chloride desorption, not partial copper monolayer formation, is responsible for the second voltammetric peak.

  18. Proposed Grand Challenges in Geoscience Education Research: Articulating a Community Research Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semken, S. C.; St John, K. K.; Teasdale, R.; Ryker, K.; Riggs, E. M.; Pyle, E. J.; Petcovic, H. L.; McNeal, K.; McDaris, J. R.; Macdonald, H.; Kastens, K.; Cervato, C.

    2017-12-01

    Fourteen ago the Wingspread Project helped establish geoscience education research (GER) as an important research field and highlighted major research questions for GER at the time. More recently, the growth and interest in GER is evident from the increase in geoscience education research articles, the establishment of the NAGT GER Division, the creation of the GER Toolbox, an increase in GER graduate programs, and the growth of tenure-eligible GER faculty positions. As an emerging STEM education research field, the GER community is examining the current state of their research and considering the best course forward so that it can have the greatest collective impact on advancing teaching and learning in the geosciences. As part of an NSF-funded effort to meet this need, 45 researchers drafted priority research questions, or "Grand Challenges", that span 10 geoscience education research themes. These include research on: students' conceptual understanding of the solid and the fluid Earth, K-12 teacher preparation, teaching about Earth in the context of societal problems, access and success of underrepresented groups in the geosciences, spatial and temporal reasoning, quantitative reasoning and use of models, instructional strategies to improve geoscience learning, students' self-regulated learning, and faculty professional development and institutional change. For each theme, several Grand Challenges have been proposed; these have undergone one round of peer-review and are now ready for the AGU community to critically examine the proposed Grand Challenges and make suggestions on strategies for addressing them: http://nagt.org/nagt/geoedresearch/grand_challenges/feedback.html. We seek perspectives from geoscience education researchers, scholars, and reflective educators. It is our vision that the final outcomes of this community-grounded process will be a published guiding framework to (1) focus future GER on questions of high interest to the geoscience education

  19. Avoiding collapse: Grand challenges for science and society to solve by 2050

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony D. Barnosky

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We maintain that humanity’s grand challenge is solving the intertwined problems of human population growth and overconsumption, climate change, pollution, ecosystem destruction, disease spillovers, and extinction, in order to avoid environmental tipping points that would make human life more difficult and would irrevocably damage planetary life support systems. These are not future issues: for example, detrimental impacts of climate change (increased wildfires and extreme weather, sea-level rise, ocean acidification, pollution (contaminated drinking water in many parts of the world, rapid population growth in some areas (contributing to poverty, war, and increasingly frequent migration and overconsumption in others (a main driver of overexploitation of resources and greenhouse gas emissions, and new disease outbreaks (Ebola, Zika virus already are apparent today, and if trends of the past half century continue, even more damaging, long-lasting impacts would be locked in within three decades. Solving these problems will require some scientific and technological breakthroughs, but that will not be enough. Even more critical will be effective collaboration of environmental and physical scientists with social scientists and those in the humanities, active exchange of information among practitioners in academics, politics, religion, and business and other stakeholders, and clear communication of relevant issues and solutions to the general public. This special feature offers examples of how researchers are addressing this grand challenge through the process of discovering new knowledge and relevant tools, transferring insights across disciplinary boundaries, and establishing critical dialogues with those outside academia to help effect positive global change.

  20. The Grand Challenges of WCRP and the Climate Observing System of the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasseur, G. P.

    2017-12-01

    The successful implementation the Paris agreement on climate change (COP21) calls for a well-designed global monitoring system of essential climate variables, climate processes and Earth system budgets. The Grand Challenges implemented by the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) provide an opportunity to investigate issues of high societal relevance, directly related to sea level rise, droughts, floods, extreme heat events, food security, and fresh water availability. These challenges would directly benefit from a well-designed suite of systematic climate observations. Quantification of the evolution of the global energy, water and carbon budgets as well as the development and the production of near-term and regional climate predictions require that a comprehensive, focused, multi-platform observing system (satellites, ground-based and in situ observations) be established in an international context. This system must be accompanied by the development of climate services that should translate and disseminate scientific outcomes as actionable information for users and stakeholders.

  1. Contest-driven soft-robotics boost: the RoboSoft Grand Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Calisti

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the design process, the implementation and the results of a novel roboticcontest addressing soft robots, named RoboSoft Grand Challenge. Application-oriented taskswere proposed in three different scenarios where soft robotics is particularly lively: manipulation,terrestrial and underwater locomotion. Starting from about sixty expressions of interest submittedby international teams distributed across the world, nineteen robots were eventually selectedto participate in the challenge in two of the initially proposed scenarios, i.e. manipulation andterrestrial locomotion. Results highlight both the effectiveness and limitations of state of the artsoft robots with respect to the selected tasks. The paper will also focus on some of the advantagesand disadvantages of contests as technology-steering mechanisms, including what we calledreductionist design, a phenomenon in which simplistic solutions are devised to purposely tacklethe proposed tasks, possibly hindering more general and desired technological advancements.

  2. Scientific Grand Challenges: Crosscutting Technologies for Computing at the Exascale - February 2-4, 2010, Washington, D.C.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-02-06

    The goal of the "Scientific Grand Challenges - Crosscutting Technologies for Computing at the Exascale" workshop in February 2010, jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research and the National Nuclear Security Administration, was to identify the elements of a research and development agenda that will address these challenges and create a comprehensive exascale computing environment. This exascale computing environment will enable the science applications identified in the eight previously held Scientific Grand Challenges Workshop Series.

  3. Grand Canonical adaptive resolution simulation for molecules with electrons: A theoretical framework based on physical consistency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Site, Luigi

    2018-01-01

    A theoretical scheme for the treatment of an open molecular system with electrons and nuclei is proposed. The idea is based on the Grand Canonical description of a quantum region embedded in a classical reservoir of molecules. Electronic properties of the quantum region are calculated at constant electronic chemical potential equal to that of the corresponding (large) bulk system treated at full quantum level. Instead, the exchange of molecules between the quantum region and the classical environment occurs at the chemical potential of the macroscopic thermodynamic conditions. The Grand Canonical Adaptive Resolution Scheme is proposed for the treatment of the classical environment; such an approach can treat the exchange of molecules according to first principles of statistical mechanics and thermodynamic. The overall scheme is build on the basis of physical consistency, with the corresponding definition of numerical criteria of control of the approximations implied by the coupling. Given the wide range of expertise required, this work has the intention of providing guiding principles for the construction of a well founded computational protocol for actual multiscale simulations from the electronic to the mesoscopic scale.

  4. Grand Challenges for Biological and Environmental Research: A Long-Term Vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arkin, A.; Baliga, N.; Braam, J.; Church, G.; Collins, J; ; Cottingham, R.; Ecker, J.; Gerstein, M.; Gilna, P.; Greenberg, J.; Handelsman, J.; Hubbard, S.; Joachimiak, A.; Liao, J.; Looger, L.; Meyerowitz, E.; Mjolness, E.; Petsko, G.; Sayler, G.; Simpson, M.; Stacey, G.; Sussman, M.; Tiedje, J.; Bader, D.; Cessi, P.; Collins, W.; Denning, S.; Dickinson, R.; Easterling, D.; Edmonds, J.; Feddema, J.; Field, C.; Fridlind, A.; Fung, I.; Held, I.; Jackson, R.; Janetos, A.; Large, W.; Leinen, M.; Leung, R.; Long, S.; Mace, G.; Masiello, C.; Meehl, G.; Ort, D.; Otto-Bliesner, B.; Penner, J.; Prather, M.; Randall, D.; Rasch, P.; Schneider, E.; Shugart, H.; Thornton, P.; Washington, W.; Wildung, R.; Wiscombe, W.; Zak, D.; Zhang, M.; Bielicki, J.; Buford, M.; Cleland, E.; Dale, V.; Duke, C.; Ehleringer, J.; Hecht, A.; Kammen, D.; Marland, G.; Pataki, D.; Riley, M. Robertson, P.; Hubbard, S.

    2010-12-01

    outcomes and behaviors of complex biological and environmental systems, leading to robust solutions for DOE missions and strategic goals. In March 2010, the Biological and Environmental Research Advisory Committee held the Grand Challenges for Biological and Environmental Research: A Long-Term Vision workshop to identify scientific opportunities and grand challenges for BER science in the coming decades and to develop an overall strategy for drafting a long-term vision for BER. Key workshop goals included: (1) Identifying the greatest scientific challenges in biology, climate, and the environment that DOE will face over a 20-year time horizon. (2) Describing how BER should be positioned to address those challenges. (3) Determining the new and innovative tools needed to advance BER science. (4) Suggesting how the workforce of the future should be trained in integrative system science. This report lays out grand research challenges for BER - in biological systems, climate, energy sustainability, computing, and education and workforce training - that can put society on a path to achieve the scientific evidence and predictive understanding needed to inform decision making and planning to address future energy needs, climate change, water availability, and land use.

  5. 1st oPAC Topical Workshop: Grand Challenges in Accelerator Optimisation

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Accelerators are key instruments for fundamental research, health and industry applications. International collaboration is very important for their continued optimisation. To address this oPAC is organising this two-day international workshop on Grand Challenges in Accelerator Optimisation. The workshop will provide an overview of the current state of the art in beam physics, numerical simulations and beam instrumentation and highlight existing limitations. It will discuss research and development being undertaken and ambitions to further improve the performance of existing and future facilities. In addition to invited talks, there will be industry displays and a special seminar covering recent LHC discoveries. All participants will have an opportunity to contribute a poster.

  6. Managing locality in grand challenge applications: a case study of the gyrokinetic toroidal code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marin, G; Jin, G; Mellor-Crummey, J

    2008-01-01

    Achieving high performance with grand challenge applications on today's large-scale parallel systems requires tailoring applications for the characteristics of the modern microprocessor architectures. As part of the US Department of Energy's Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) program, we studied and tuned the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC), a particle-in-cell code for simulating turbulent transport of particles and energy in burning plasma, developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. In this paper, we present a performance study of the application that revealed several opportunities for improving performance by enhancing its data locality. We tuned GTC by performing three kinds of transformations: static data structure reorganization to improve spatial locality, loop nest restructuring for better temporal locality, and dynamic data reordering at run-time to enhance both spatial and temporal reuse. Experimental results show that these changes improve execution time by more than 20% on large parallel systems, including a Cray XT4

  7. Network discovery, characterization, and prediction : a grand challenge LDRD final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kegelmeyer, W. Philip, Jr.

    2010-11-01

    This report is the final summation of Sandia's Grand Challenge LDRD project No.119351, 'Network Discovery, Characterization and Prediction' (the 'NGC') which ran from FY08 to FY10. The aim of the NGC, in a nutshell, was to research, develop, and evaluate relevant analysis capabilities that address adversarial networks. Unlike some Grand Challenge efforts, that ambition created cultural subgoals, as well as technical and programmatic ones, as the insistence on 'relevancy' required that the Sandia informatics research communities and the analyst user communities come to appreciate each others needs and capabilities in a very deep and concrete way. The NGC generated a number of technical, programmatic, and cultural advances, detailed in this report. There were new algorithmic insights and research that resulted in fifty-three refereed publications and presentations; this report concludes with an abstract-annotated bibliography pointing to them all. The NGC generated three substantial prototypes that not only achieved their intended goals of testing our algorithmic integration, but which also served as vehicles for customer education and program development. The NGC, as intended, has catalyzed future work in this domain; by the end it had already brought in, in new funding, as much funding as had been invested in it. Finally, the NGC knit together previously disparate research staff and user expertise in a fashion that not only addressed our immediate research goals, but which promises to have created an enduring cultural legacy of mutual understanding, in service of Sandia's national security responsibilities in cybersecurity and counter proliferation.

  8. CDOCKER and lambda λ -dynamics for prospective prediction in D3R Grand Challenge 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xinqiang; Hayes, Ryan L.; Vilseck, Jonah Z.; Charles, Murchtricia K.; Brooks, Charles L.

    2018-01-01

    The opportunity to prospectively predict ligand bound poses and free energies of binding to the Farnesoid X Receptor in the D3R Grand Challenge 2 provided a useful exercise to evaluate CHARMM based docking (CDOCKER) and λ-dynamics methodologies for use in "real-world" applications in computer aided drug design. In addition to measuring their current performance, several recent methodological developments have been analyzed retrospectively to highlight best procedural practices in future applications. For pose prediction with CDOCKER, when the protein structure used for rigid receptor docking was close to the crystallographic holo structure, reliable poses were obtained. Benzimidazoles, with a known holo receptor structure, were successfully docked with an average RMSD of 0.97 Å. Other non-benzimidazole ligands displayed less accuracy largely because the receptor structures we chose for docking were too different from the experimental holo structures. However, retrospective analysis has shown that when these ligands were re-docked into their holo structures, the average RMSD dropped to 1.18 Å for all ligands. When sulfonamides and spiros were docked with the apo structure, which agrees more with their holo structure than the structures we chose, five out of six ligands were correctly docked. These docking results emphasize the need for flexible receptor docking approaches. For λ-dynamics techniques, including multisite λ-dynamics (MSλD), reasonable agreement with experiment was observed for the 33 ligands investigated; root mean square errors of 2.08 and 1.67 kcal/mol were obtained for free energy sets 1 and 2, respectively. Retrospectively, soft-core potentials, adaptive landscape flattening, and biasing potential replica exchange (BP-REX) algorithms were critical to model large substituent perturbations with sufficient precision and within restrictive timeframes, such as was required with participation in Grand Challenge 2. These developments, their

  9. Development of a Multi-functional Soft Robot (SNUMAX and Performance in RoboSoft Grand Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Young Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces SNUMAX, the grand winner of the RoboSoft Grand Challenge. SNUMAX was built to complete all the tasks of the challenge. Completing these tasks required robotic compliant components that could adapt to variable situations and environments and generate enough stiffness to maintain performance. SNUMAX has three key components: transformable origami wheels, a polymer-based variable stiffness manipulator, and an adaptive caging gripper. This paper describes the design of these components and how they worked together to allow the robot to perform the contest’s navigation and manipulation tasks.

  10. Team science and the physician-scientist in the age of grand health challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steer, Clifford J; Jackson, Peter R; Hornbeak, Hortencia; McKay, Catherine K; Sriramarao, P; Murtaugh, Michael P

    2017-09-01

    Despite remarkable advances in medical research, clinicians face daunting challenges from new diseases, variations in patient responses to interventions, and increasing numbers of people with chronic health problems. The gap between biomedical research and unmet clinical needs can be addressed by highly talented interdisciplinary investigators focused on translational bench-to-bedside medicine. The training of talented physician-scientists comfortable with forming and participating in multidisciplinary teams that address complex health problems is a top national priority. Challenges, methods, and experiences associated with physician-scientist training and team building were explored at a workshop held at the Second International Conference on One Medicine One Science (iCOMOS 2016), April 24-27, 2016, in Minneapolis, Minnesota. A broad range of scientists, regulatory authorities, and health care experts determined that critical investments in interdisciplinary training are essential for the future of medicine and healthcare delivery. Physician-scientists trained in a broad, nonlinear, cross-disciplinary manner are and will be essential members of science teams in the new age of grand health challenges and the birth of precision medicine. Team science approaches have accomplished biomedical breakthroughs once considered impossible, and dedicated physician-scientists have been critical to these achievements. Together, they translate into the pillars of academic growth and success. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  11. Addressing Grand Challenges in Earth Observation Science: The Earth Observation Data Centre for Water Resources Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, W.; Fröhlich, J.; Wotawa, G.; Stowasser, R.; Staudinger, M.; Hoffmann, C.; Walli, A.; Federspiel, C.; Aspetsberger, M.; Atzberger, C.; Briese, C.; Notarnicola, C.; Zebisch, M.; Boresch, A.; Enenkel, M.; Kidd, R.; von Beringe, A.; Hasenauer, S.; Naeimi, V.; Mücke, W.

    2014-09-01

    Earth observation is entering a new era where the increasing availability of free and open global satellite data sets combined with the computing power offered by modern information technologies opens up the possibility to process high-resolution data sets at global scale and short repeat intervals in a fully automatic fashion. This will not only boost the availability of higher level earth observation data in purely quantitative terms, but can also be expected to trigger a step change in the quality and usability of earth observation data. However, the technical, scientific, and organisational challenges that need to be overcome to arrive at this point are significant. First of all, Petabyte-scale data centres are needed for storing and processing complete satellite data records. Second, innovative processing chains that allow fully automatic processing of the satellite data from the raw sensor records to higher-level geophysical products need to be developed. Last but not least, new models of cooperation between public and private actors need to be found in order to live up to the first two challenges. This paper offers a discussion of how the Earth Observation Data Centre for Water Resources Monitoring (EODC) - a catalyser for an open and international cooperation of public and private organisations - will address these three grand challenges with the aim to foster the use of earth observation for monitoring of global water resources.

  12. DARPA Robotics Grand Challenge Participation and Ski-Type Gait for Rough-Terrain Walking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongfei Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we briefly introduce the history of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA Grand Challenge programs with particular focus on the 2012 Robotics Challenge. As members of team DRC-HUBO, we propose different approaches for the Rough-Terrain task, such as enlarged foot pedals and a transformation into quadruped walking. We also introduce a new gait for humanoid robot locomotion to improve stability performance, called the Ski-Type gait. We analyze the stability performance of this gait and use the stability margin to choose between two candidate step sequences, Crawl-1 and Crawl-2. Next, we perform a force/torque analysis for the redundant closed-chain system in the Ski-Type gait, and determine the joint torques by minimizing the total energy consumption. Based on the stability and force/torque analysis, we design a cane length to support a feasible and stable Crawl-2 gait on the HUBO2 humanoid robot platform. Finally, we compare our experimental results with biped walking to validate the Ski-Type gait. We also present our team performance in the trials of the Robotics Challenge.

  13. Solving the challenges of extended reach well in Brazil; Vencendo desafios em pocos de grande afastamento

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Vicente Abel S.R.; Araujo, Romero G.S.; N. Filho, Aluisio F. [PETROBRAS, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Veneziani, Luciano S. [Halliburton Servicos Ltda., Macae, RJ (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    With the objective of minimizing costs and allowing oil to be produced from reservoirs near the coast in shallow waters (i.e. less than 3 meters) which make the use of standard marine units impractical, several Extended Reach Wells were drilled from special land based locations in an area with increased environmental awareness (mangroves and 'Salinas'). This was the reality faced in the 'Serra Field' located on the north coast of the state of Rio Grande do Norte (Brasil) and under the management of the Rio Grande do Norte and Ceara Business Unit of PETROBRAS.The ratio between the actual displacement and vertical depth of these wells is approximately 2.7, with actual displacement a bit greater than 2,600 meters, with the idea of reaching displacements exceeding 3,000 meters in the future. In order to drill these wells, special new technologies were adopted; the drilling rig was upgraded, specific software for the development of the project considering both the reservoir and planning of the well, along with the integration and commitment of the Team to follow, execution and that of the service companies resulted in significant improvements in the Drilling Times. Tools adopted in the design of the well, and in the monitoring of the drilling and completion included Torque and Drag Analysis, Rock Mechanics, Drilling Fluids, Well Trajectory, Anti-Collision, Hydraulics and Wellbore Cleaning. This paper will describe the actions taken, the results, challenges and lessons learned during this Exploration Programme in the Serra Field. (author)

  14. Addressing China's grand challenge of achieving food security while ensuring environmental sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yonglong; Jenkins, Alan; Ferrier, Robert C; Bailey, Mark; Gordon, Iain J; Song, Shuai; Huang, Jikun; Jia, Shaofeng; Zhang, Fusuo; Liu, Xuejun; Feng, Zhaozhong; Zhang, Zhibin

    2015-02-01

    China's increasingly urbanized and wealthy population is driving a growing and changing demand for food, which might not be met without significant increase in agricultural productivity and sustainable use of natural resources. Given the past relationship between lack of access to affordable food and political instability, food security has to be given a high priority on national political agendas in the context of globalization. The drive for increased food production has had a significant impact on the environment, and the deterioration in ecosystem quality due to historic and current levels of pollution will potentially compromise the food production system in China. We discuss the grand challenges of not only producing more food but also producing it sustainably and without environmental degradation. In addressing these challenges, food production should be considered as part of an environmental system (soil, air, water, and biodiversity) and not independent from it. It is imperative that new ways of meeting the demand for food are developed while safeguarding the natural resources upon which food production is based. We present a holistic approach to both science and policy to ensure future food security while embracing the ambition of achieving environmental sustainability in China. It is a unique opportunity for China to be a role model as a new global player, especially for other emerging economies.

  15. The Global Implications and Grand Challenge of Neutral-Ion Interactions in the Polar Regions (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    That the smallest of interactions occurring between neutrals and ions in the polar thermosphere can impact the largest of scales in thermosphere response is a testament to the primary importance of the Joule heating rate as an energy source for the thermosphere. Yet, our understanding/quantification of this primary energy source is woefully represented by numerical models and poorly sampled by measurement. For numerical models, the Joule heating rate requires parameterizations to account for the presumed “missing” energy in the simulations, while, for measurements, numerous approximations abound. In addition to being a primary thermosphere energy source, the Joule heating rate also represents a collective of neutral and ion interactions that result from solar wind and solar processes and exchange processes among the thermosphere, ionosphere and magnetosphere. Thus, to properly simulate the Joule heating rate requires a system perspective. Furthermore, to properly observe the Joule heating rate requires measurements of the ionosphere-thermosphere system at high temporal and spatial scales. This remains a very difficult task. The estimation and modeling of the Joule heating rate represents a grand challenge that involves the entire sun-earth system. This talk will put into perspective the current state in addressing the challenge of capturing this illusive source of energy.

  16. New capabilities in the HENP grand challenge storage access system and its application at RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardo, L.; Gibbard, B.; Malon, D.; Nordberg, H.; Olson, D.; Porter, R.; Shoshani, A.; Sim, A.; Vaniachine, A.; Wenaus, T.; Wu, K.; Zimmerman, D.

    2000-01-01

    The High Energy and Nuclear Physics Data Access Grand Challenge project has developed an optimizing storage access software system that was prototyped at RHIC. It is currently undergoing integration with the STAR experiment in preparation for data taking that starts in mid-2000. The behavior and lessons learned in the RHIC Mock Data Challenge exercises are described as well as the observed performance under conditions designed to characterize scalability. Up to 250 simultaneous queries were tested and up to 10 million events across 7 event components were involved in these queries. The system coordinates the staging of ''bundles'' of files from the HPSS tape system, so that all the needed components of each event are in disk cache when accessed by the application software. The caching policy algorithm for the coordinated bundle staging is described in the paper. The initial prototype implementation interfaced to the Objectivity/DB. In this latest version, it evolved to work with arbitrary files and use CORBA interfaces to the tag database and file catalog services. The interface to the tag database and the MySQL-based file catalog services used by STAR are described along with the planned usage scenarios

  17. Challenges and roles in electronic data publication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocvirk, Pierre; Genova, Francoise

    2015-08-01

    The promise of electronic astronomical data publication is to allow the discovery and reusability of all relevant data for a given object, model, or region of the sky. The CDS has been a major actor in making this promise come true through its flagship services: SIMBAD, VizieR, Aladin and the definition of astronomical data and metadata standards. The challenges are many: electronic data publication still suffers from relic practices of the paper era and volumes keep increasing. In this framework, guaranteeing the relevance and quality of the data and access requires teams of librarians, engineers and astronomers to work together, as well as continuous collaboration with the major data producers and journals and constant technological innovation. The publication workflow at CDS illustrates the fundamental, necessary interplay and responsibilities of the various actors (data producer, journal, data center) in the current, evolving astronomical publication landscape.

  18. The Grand Challenge of Basin-Scale Groundwater Quality Management Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, G. E.

    2017-12-01

    The last 50+ years of agricultural, urban and industrial land and water use practices have accelerated the degradation of groundwater quality in the upper portions of many major aquifer systems upon which much of the world relies for water supply. In the deepest and most extensive systems (e.g., sedimentary basins) that typically have the largest groundwater production rates and hold fresh groundwaters on decadal to millennial time scales, most of the groundwater is not yet contaminated. Predicting the long-term future groundwater quality in such basins is a grand scientific challenge. Moreover, determining what changes in land and water use practices would avert future, irreversible degradation of these massive freshwater stores is a grand challenge both scientifically and societally. It is naïve to think that the problem can be solved by eliminating or reducing enough of the contaminant sources, for human exploitation of land and water resources will likely always result in some contamination. The key lies in both reducing the contaminant sources and more proactively managing recharge in terms of both quantity and quality, such that the net influx of contaminants is sufficiently moderate and appropriately distributed in space and time to reverse ongoing groundwater quality degradation. Just as sustainable groundwater quantity management is greatly facilitated with groundwater flow management models, sustainable groundwater quality management will require the use of groundwater quality management models. This is a new genre of hydrologic models do not yet exist, partly because of the lack of modeling tools and the supporting research to model non-reactive as well as reactive transport on large space and time scales. It is essential that the contaminant hydrogeology community, which has heretofore focused almost entirely on point-source plume-scale problems, direct it's efforts toward the development of process-based transport modeling tools and analyses capable

  19. Prospective evaluation of shape similarity based pose prediction method in D3R Grand Challenge 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Zhang, Kam Y J

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of ligand three-dimensional (3D) shape similarity is one of the commonly used approaches to identify ligands similar to one or more known active compounds from a library of small molecules. Apart from using ligand shape similarity as a virtual screening tool, its role in pose prediction and pose scoring has also been reported. We have recently developed a method that utilizes ligand 3D shape similarity with known crystallographic ligands to predict binding poses of query ligands. Here, we report the prospective evaluation of our pose prediction method through the participation in drug design data resource (D3R) Grand Challenge 2015. Our pose prediction method was used to predict binding poses of heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) and mitogen activated protein kinase kinase kinase kinase (MAP4K4) ligands and it was able to predict the pose within 2 Å root mean square deviation (RMSD) either as the top pose or among the best of five poses in a majority of cases. Specifically for HSP90 protein, a median RMSD of 0.73 and 0.68 Å was obtained for the top and the best of five predictions respectively. For MAP4K4 target, although the median RMSD for our top prediction was only 2.87 Å but the median RMSD of 1.67 Å for the best of five predictions was well within the limit for successful prediction. Furthermore, the performance of our pose prediction method for HSP90 and MAP4K4 ligands was always among the top five groups. Particularly, for MAP4K4 protein our pose prediction method was ranked number one both in terms of mean and median RMSD when the best of five predictions were considered. Overall, our D3R Grand Challenge 2015 results demonstrated that ligand 3D shape similarity with the crystal ligand is sufficient to predict binding poses of new ligands with acceptable accuracy.

  20. On the added value of forensic science and grand innovation challenges for the forensic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Asten, Arian C

    2014-03-01

    In this paper the insights and results are presented of a long term and ongoing improvement effort within the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI) to establish a valuable innovation programme. From the overall perspective of the role and use of forensic science in the criminal justice system, the concepts of Forensic Information Value Added (FIVA) and Forensic Information Value Efficiency (FIVE) are introduced. From these concepts the key factors determining the added value of forensic investigations are discussed; Evidential Value, Relevance, Quality, Speed and Cost. By unravelling the added value of forensic science and combining this with the future needs and scientific and technological developments, six forensic grand challenges are introduced: i) Molecular Photo-fitting; ii) chemical imaging, profiling and age estimation of finger marks; iii) Advancing Forensic Medicine; iv) Objective Forensic Evaluation; v) the Digital Forensic Service Centre and vi) Real time In-Situ Chemical Identification. Finally, models for forensic innovation are presented that could lead to major international breakthroughs on all these six themes within a five year time span. This could cause a step change in the added value of forensic science and would make forensic investigative methods even more valuable than they already are today. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd on behalf of Forensic Science Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Optimal affinity ranking for automated virtual screening validated in prospective D3R grand challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingert, Bentley M.; Oerlemans, Rick; Camacho, Carlos J.

    2018-01-01

    The goal of virtual screening is to generate a substantially reduced and enriched subset of compounds from a large virtual chemistry space. Critical in these efforts are methods to properly rank the binding affinity of compounds. Prospective evaluations of ranking strategies in the D3R grand challenges show that for targets with deep pockets the best correlations (Spearman ρ 0.5) were obtained by our submissions that docked compounds to the holo-receptors with the most chemically similar ligand. On the other hand, for targets with open pockets using multiple receptor structures is not a good strategy. Instead, docking to a single optimal receptor led to the best correlations (Spearman ρ 0.5), and overall performs better than any other method. Yet, choosing a suboptimal receptor for crossdocking can significantly undermine the affinity rankings. Our submissions that evaluated the free energy of congeneric compounds were also among the best in the community experiment. Error bars of around 1 kcal/mol are still too large to significantly improve the overall rankings. Collectively, our top of the line predictions show that automated virtual screening with rigid receptors perform better than flexible docking and other more complex methods.

  2. Hyperresolution Global Land Surface Modeling: Meeting a Grand Challenge for Monitoring Earth's Terrestrial Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Eric F.; Roundy, Joshua K.; Troy, Tara J.; van Beek, L. P. H.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.; 4 Blyth, Eleanor; de Roo, Ad; Doell. Petra; Ek, Mike; Famiglietti, James; hide

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring Earth's terrestrial water conditions is critically important to many hydrological applications such as global food production; assessing water resources sustainability; and flood, drought, and climate change prediction. These needs have motivated the development of pilot monitoring and prediction systems for terrestrial hydrologic and vegetative states, but to date only at the rather coarse spatial resolutions (approx.10-100 km) over continental to global domains. Adequately addressing critical water cycle science questions and applications requires systems that are implemented globally at much higher resolutions, on the order of 1 km, resolutions referred to as hyperresolution in the context of global land surface models. This opinion paper sets forth the needs and benefits for a system that would monitor and predict the Earth's terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles. We discuss six major challenges in developing a system: improved representation of surface-subsurface interactions due to fine-scale topography and vegetation; improved representation of land-atmospheric interactions and resulting spatial information on soil moisture and evapotranspiration; inclusion of water quality as part of the biogeochemical cycle; representation of human impacts from water management; utilizing massively parallel computer systems and recent computational advances in solving hyperresolution models that will have up to 10(exp 9) unknowns; and developing the required in situ and remote sensing global data sets. We deem the development of a global hyperresolution model for monitoring the terrestrial water, energy, and biogeochemical cycles a grand challenge to the community, and we call upon the international hydrologic community and the hydrological science support infrastructure to endorse the effort.

  3. Principal Challenges Facing Electronic Records Management in Federal Agencies Today.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Giovanna; Sprehe, J. Timothy

    2002-01-01

    Discusses electronic records management in the federal government. Highlights include managing electronic mail; information technology planning, systems design, and architecture; updating conventional records management; integrating electronic records management with other information technology systems; challenges of end-user training; business…

  4. Storm-time Large-Scale Birkeland Currents: Salient Dynamics in Grand Challenge Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korth, H.; Anderson, B. J.; Waters, C. L.; Barnes, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Active Magnetosphere and Planetary Electrodynamics Response Experiment (AMPERE) provides continuous global observations of Birkeland currents on a 10 minute cadence. During geomagnetic storms, currents intensify to over 15 MA, are dynamic both in intensity and distribution, and exhibit features not discernible in statistical analyses. For all of the subject grand challenge storms, AMPERE data reveal a number of novel phenomena illustrating the profound dynamics of the storm-time system. Storm-time onsets associated with shock arrivals are often very prompt and lead to dramatic surges in total current from 1 MA to over 5 MA in less than 20 minutes. The current surges occur predominantly on the dayside at high latitudes prior to any ring current or auroral expansions, indicating that neutral density upwelling is often driven independently of ring current or auroral zone intensifications. Rapid reconfigurations of the currents with IMF BY reversals within the sheath structures of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are also common. This implies that convection of ionospheric density patches over the polar cap may be quite complex, particularly during the early phase of geomagnetic storms related to the CME sheath passage. The 3 September 2012 storm exhibited intense driving with classic quasi-stable Region 1 and 2 currents spanning 55 to 70 degrees magnetic latitude for over 10 hours at the beginning of the day, corresponding to stable southward IMF prior to shock arrival at noon on that day. The shock arrival and IMF southward intensification led to further expansion of the currents below 50 degrees magnetic latitude and to episodic surges in currents on the nightside, which is unique to storms. The resulting current structure showed multiple large-scale alternations in downward-upward-downward-upward direction that often occurs during intense, sustained driving during strong storms.

  5. Comparative psychology and the grand challenge of drug discovery in psychiatry and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Dani; Balcı, Fuat; Ludvig, Elliot A

    2012-02-01

    Drug discovery for brain disorders is undergoing a period of upheaval. Faced with an empty drug pipeline and numerous failures of potential new drugs in clinical trials, many large pharmaceutical companies have been shrinking or even closing down their research divisions that focus on central nervous system (CNS) disorders. In this paper, we argue that many of the difficulties facing CNS drug discovery stem from a lack of robustness in pre-clinical (i.e., non-human animal) testing. There are two main sources for this lack of robustness. First, there is the lack of replicability of many results from the pre-clinical stage, which we argue is driven by a combination of publication bias and inappropriate selection of statistical and experimental designs. Second, there is the frequent failure to translate results in non-human animals to parallel results in humans in the clinic. This limitation can only be overcome by developing new behavioral tests for non-human animals that have predictive, construct, and etiological validity. Here, we present these translational difficulties as a "grand challenge" to researchers from comparative cognition, who are well positioned to provide new methods for testing behavior and cognition in non-human animals. These new experimental protocols will need to be both statistically robust and target behavioral and cognitive processes that allow for better connection with human CNS disorders. Our hope is that this downturn in industrial research may represent an opportunity to develop new protocols that will re-kindle the search for more effective and safer drugs for CNS disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. D3R Grand Challenge 2: blind prediction of protein-ligand poses, affinity rankings, and relative binding free energies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaieb, Zied; Liu, Shuai; Gathiaka, Symon; Chiu, Michael; Yang, Huanwang; Shao, Chenghua; Feher, Victoria A.; Walters, W. Patrick; Kuhn, Bernd; Rudolph, Markus G.; Burley, Stephen K.; Gilson, Michael K.; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2018-01-01

    The Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) ran Grand Challenge 2 (GC2) from September 2016 through February 2017. This challenge was based on a dataset of structures and affinities for the nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR), contributed by F. Hoffmann-La Roche. The dataset contained 102 IC50 values, spanning six orders of magnitude, and 36 high-resolution co-crystal structures with representatives of four major ligand classes. Strong global participation was evident, with 49 participants submitting 262 prediction submission packages in total. Procedurally, GC2 mimicked Grand Challenge 2015 (GC2015), with a Stage 1 subchallenge testing ligand pose prediction methods and ranking and scoring methods, and a Stage 2 subchallenge testing only ligand ranking and scoring methods after the release of all blinded co-crystal structures. Two smaller curated sets of 18 and 15 ligands were developed to test alchemical free energy methods. This overview summarizes all aspects of GC2, including the dataset details, challenge procedures, and participant results. We also consider implications for progress in the field, while highlighting methodological areas that merit continued development. Similar to GC2015, the outcome of GC2 underscores the pressing need for methods development in pose prediction, particularly for ligand scaffolds not currently represented in the Protein Data Bank (http://www.pdb.org), and in affinity ranking and scoring of bound ligands.

  7. Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation Report from the Workshop Held July 31-August 2, 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larzelere, Alex R.; Ashby, Steven F.; Christensen, Dana C.; Crawford, Dona L.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; John, Grosh; Stults, B. Ray; Lee, Steven L.; Hammond, Steven W.; Grover, Benjamin T.; Neely, Rob; Dudney, Lee Ann; Goldstein, Noah C.; Wells, Jack; Peltz, Jim

    2013-03-06

    On July 31-August 2 of 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) held a workshop entitled Grand Challenges of Advanced Computing for Energy Innovation. This workshop built on three earlier workshops that clearly identified the potential for the Department and its national laboratories to enable energy innovation. The specific goal of the workshop was to identify the key challenges that the nation must overcome to apply the full benefit of taxpayer-funded advanced computing technologies to U.S. energy innovation in the ways that the country produces, moves, stores, and uses energy. Perhaps more importantly, the workshop also developed a set of recommendations to help the Department overcome those challenges. These recommendations provide an action plan for what the Department can do in the coming years to improve the nation’s energy future.

  8. Next-Generation Photon Sources for Grand Challenges in Science and Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-05-01

    report identifies two aspects of energy science in which next-generation ultraviolet and X-ray light sources will have the deepest and broadest impact: (1) The temporal evolution of electrons, spins, atoms, and chemical reactions, down to the femtosecond time scale. (2) Spectroscopic and structural imaging of nano objects (or nanoscale regions of inhomogeneous materials) with nanometer spatial resolution and ultimate spectral resolution. The dual advances of temporal and spatial resolution promised by fourth-generation light sources ideally match the challenges of control science. Femtosecond time resolution has opened completely new territory where atomic motion can be followed in real time and electronic excitations and decay processes can be followed over time. Coherent imaging with short-wavelength radiation will make it possible to access the nanometer length scale, where intrinsic quantum behavior becomes dominant. Performing spectroscopy on individual nanometer-scale objects rather than on conglomerates will eliminate the blurring of the energy levels induced by particle size and shape distributions and reveal the energetics of single functional units. Energy resolution limited only by the uncertainty relation is enabled by these advances. Current storage-ring-based light sources and their incremental enhancements cannot meet the need for femtosecond time resolution, nanometer spatial resolution, intrinsic energy resolution, full coherence over energy ranges up to hard X-rays, and peak brilliance required to enable the new science outlined in this report. In fact, the new, unexplored territory is so expansive that no single currently imagined light source technology can fulfill the whole potential. Both technological and economic challenges require resolution as we move forward. For example, femtosecond time resolution and high peak brilliance are required for following chemical reactions in real time, but lower peak brilliance and high repetition rate are needed

  9. Opportunities and challenges in electronic publication

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rákosník, Jiří; Teschke, O.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 93, September (2014), s. 3-5 ISSN 1027-488X Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : electronic publishing * mathematical scholarly literature * archiving http://www.ems-ph.org/journals/newsletter/pdf/2014-09-93.pdf

  10. CHALLENGES OF ELECTRONIC INFORMATION RESOURCES IN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper discusses the role of policy for proper and efficient library services in the electronic era. It points out ... New approaches in acquisition, accessing, selection, preservation and choices on whether to operate digital, or combine traditional print and digital resources in the library have to be worked out and adopted.

  11. Performance of multiple docking and refinement methods in the pose prediction D3R prospective Grand Challenge 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fradera, Xavier; Verras, Andreas; Hu, Yuan; Wang, Deping; Wang, Hongwu; Fells, James I.; Armacost, Kira A.; Crespo, Alejandro; Sherborne, Brad; Wang, Huijun; Peng, Zhengwei; Gao, Ying-Duo

    2018-01-01

    We describe the performance of multiple pose prediction methods for the D3R 2016 Grand Challenge. The pose prediction challenge includes 36 ligands, which represent 4 chemotypes and some miscellaneous structures against the FXR ligand binding domain. In this study we use a mix of fully automated methods as well as human-guided methods with considerations of both the challenge data and publicly available data. The methods include ensemble docking, colony entropy pose prediction, target selection by molecular similarity, molecular dynamics guided pose refinement, and pose selection by visual inspection. We evaluated the success of our predictions by method, chemotype, and relevance of publicly available data. For the overall data set, ensemble docking, visual inspection, and molecular dynamics guided pose prediction performed the best with overall mean RMSDs of 2.4, 2.2, and 2.2 Å respectively. For several individual challenge molecules, the best performing method is evaluated in light of that particular ligand. We also describe the protein, ligand, and public information data preparations that are typical of our binding mode prediction workflow.

  12. A Case Study in Competitive Technical and Market Intelligence Support and Lessons Learned for the uChemLab LDRD Grand Challenge Project; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SOUTHWELL, EDWIN T.; GARCIA, MARIE L.; MEYERS, CHARLES E.

    2001-01-01

    The(mu)ChemLab(trademark) Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Grand Challenge project began in October 1996 and ended in September 2000. The technical managers of the(mu)ChemLab(trademark) project and the LDRD office, with the support of a consultant, conducted a competitive technical and market demand intelligence analysis of the(mu)ChemLab(trademark). The managers used this knowledge to make project decisions and course adjustments. CTI/MDI positively impacted the project's technology development, uncovered potential technology partnerships, and supported eventual industry partner contacts. CTI/MDI analysis is now seen as due diligence and the(mu)ChemLab(trademark) project is now the model for other Sandia LDRD Grand Challenge undertakings. This document describes the CTI/MDI analysis and captures the more important ''lessons learned'' of this Grand Challenge project, as reported by the project's management team

  13. Lessons learned in induced fit docking and metadynamics in the Drug Design Data Resource Grand Challenge 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgartner, Matthew P.; Evans, David A.

    2018-01-01

    Two of the major ongoing challenges in computational drug discovery are predicting the binding pose and affinity of a compound to a protein. The Drug Design Data Resource Grand Challenge 2 was developed to address these problems and to drive development of new methods. The challenge provided the 2D structures of compounds for which the organizers help blinded data in the form of 35 X-ray crystal structures and 102 binding affinity measurements and challenged participants to predict the binding pose and affinity of the compounds. We tested a number of pose prediction methods as part of the challenge; we found that docking methods that incorporate protein flexibility (Induced Fit Docking) outperformed methods that treated the protein as rigid. We also found that using binding pose metadynamics, a molecular dynamics based method, to score docked poses provided the best predictions of our methods with an average RMSD of 2.01 Å. We tested both structure-based (e.g. docking) and ligand-based methods (e.g. QSAR) in the affinity prediction portion of the competition. We found that our structure-based methods based on docking with Smina (Spearman ρ = 0.614), performed slightly better than our ligand-based methods (ρ = 0.543), and had equivalent performance with the other top methods in the competition. Despite the overall good performance of our methods in comparison to other participants in the challenge, there exists significant room for improvement especially in cases such as these where protein flexibility plays such a large role.

  14. Challenges in implementing electronic hand hygiene monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Laurie J

    2016-05-02

    Electronic hand hygiene (HH) monitoring systems offer the exciting prospect of a more precise, less biased measure of HH performance than direct observation. However, electronic systems are challenging to implement. Selecting a system that minimizes disruption to the physical infrastructure and to clinician workflow, and that fits with the organization's culture and budget, is challenging. Getting front-line workers' buy-in and addressing concerns about the accuracy of the system and how the data will be used are also difficult challenges. Finally, ensuring information from the system reaches front-line workers and is used by them to improve HH practice is a complex challenge. We describe these challenges in detail and suggests ways to overcome them. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Relative binding affinity prediction of farnesoid X receptor in the D3R Grand Challenge 2 using FEP+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Christina; Rippmann, Friedrich; Kuhn, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    Physics-based free energy simulations have increasingly become an important tool for predicting binding affinity and the recent introduction of automated protocols has also paved the way towards a more widespread use in the pharmaceutical industry. The D3R 2016 Grand Challenge 2 provided an opportunity to blindly test the commercial free energy calculation protocol FEP+ and assess its performance relative to other affinity prediction methods. The present D3R free energy prediction challenge was built around two experimental data sets involving inhibitors of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) which is a promising anticancer drug target. The FXR binding site is predominantly hydrophobic with few conserved interaction motifs and strong induced fit effects making it a challenging target for molecular modeling and drug design. For both data sets, we achieved reasonable prediction accuracy (RMSD ≈ 1.4 kcal/mol, rank 3-4 according to RMSD out of 20 submissions) comparable to that of state-of-the-art methods in the field. Our D3R results boosted our confidence in the method and strengthen our desire to expand its applications in future in-house drug design projects.

  16. Radical Embodied Cognitive Neuroscience: Addressing Grand Challenges of the Mind Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis H Favela

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available It is becoming ever more accepted that investigations of mind span the brain, body, and environment. To broaden the scope of what is relevant in such investigations is to increase the amount of data scientists must reckon with. Thus, a major challenge facing scientists who study the mind is how to make big data intelligible both within and between fields. One way to face this challenge is to structure the data within a framework and to make it intelligible by means of a common theory. Radical embodied cognitive neuroscience can function as such a framework, with dynamical systems theory as its methodology, and self-organized criticality as its theory.

  17. Scientific Grand Challenges: Challenges in Climate Change Science and the Role of Computing at the Extreme Scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Johnson, Gary M.; Washington, Warren M.

    2009-07-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER) in partnership with the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) held a workshop on the challenges in climate change science and the role of computing at the extreme scale, November 6-7, 2008, in Bethesda, Maryland. At the workshop, participants identified the scientific challenges facing the field of climate science and outlined the research directions of highest priority that should be pursued to meet these challenges. Representatives from the national and international climate change research community as well as representatives from the high-performance computing community attended the workshop. This group represented a broad mix of expertise. Of the 99 participants, 6 were from international institutions. Before the workshop, each of the four panels prepared a white paper, which provided the starting place for the workshop discussions. These four panels of workshop attendees devoted to their efforts the following themes: Model Development and Integrated Assessment; Algorithms and Computational Environment; Decadal Predictability and Prediction; Data, Visualization, and Computing Productivity. The recommendations of the panels are summarized in the body of this report.

  18. Innovation in a warming world. Research tackling Europe's grand challenge of climate change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Usanov, A.; Gehem, M.

    2012-01-01

    Climate change is arguably the largest environmental challenge facing humankind. Though the impact will be gradual and difficult to predict, we slowly start to understand how this process will affect our planet. The study "Innovation in a Warming World" spells out these effects, specifically for

  19. A DHS Skunkworks Project: Defining and Addressing Homeland Security Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    million and one scotch and wine IOUs to Uncle Jay and Aunt Barb for their warm and endless hospitality . Finally, I would like to express my gratitude to...original inspiration for these challenges. To catalyze a new industry of space tourism , Diamandis launched the $10 million XPRIZE. Following high...that space tourism could be a reality beyond the pages of science fiction. It was through these lenses that Diamandis recognized the market failures of

  20. The Grand Challenges of Organ Banking: Proceedings from the first global summit on complex tissue cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jedediah K; Bischof, John C; Braslavsky, Ido; Brockbank, Kelvin G M; Fahy, Gregory M; Fuller, Barry J; Rabin, Yoed; Tocchio, Alessandro; Woods, Erik J; Wowk, Brian G; Acker, Jason P; Giwa, Sebastian

    2016-04-01

    The first Organ Banking Summit was convened from Feb. 27 - March 1, 2015 in Palo Alto, CA, with events at Stanford University, NASA Research Park, and Lawrence Berkeley National Labs. Experts at the summit outlined the potential public health impact of organ banking, discussed the major remaining scientific challenges that need to be overcome in order to bank organs, and identified key opportunities to accelerate progress toward this goal. Many areas of public health could be revolutionized by the banking of organs and other complex tissues, including transplantation, oncofertility, tissue engineering, trauma medicine and emergency preparedness, basic biomedical research and drug discovery - and even space travel. Key remaining scientific sub-challenges were discussed including ice nucleation and growth, cryoprotectant and osmotic toxicities, chilling injury, thermo-mechanical stress, the need for rapid and uniform rewarming, and ischemia/reperfusion injury. A variety of opportunities to overcome these challenge areas were discussed, i.e. preconditioning for enhanced stress tolerance, nanoparticle rewarming, cyroprotectant screening strategies, and the use of cryoprotectant cocktails including ice binding agents. Copyright © 2015.

  1. Lessons learned from participating in D3R 2016 Grand Challenge 2: compounds targeting the farnesoid X receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Rui; Xu, Xianjin; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2018-01-01

    D3R 2016 Grand Challenge 2 focused on predictions of binding modes and affinities for 102 compounds against the farnesoid X receptor (FXR). In this challenge, two distinct methods, a docking-based method and a template-based method, were employed by our team for the binding mode prediction. For the new template-based method, 3D ligand similarities were calculated for each query compound against the ligands in the co-crystal structures of FXR available in Protein Data Bank. The binding mode was predicted based on the co-crystal protein structure containing the ligand with the best ligand similarity score against the query compound. For the FXR dataset, the template-based method achieved a better performance than the docking-based method on the binding mode prediction. For the binding affinity prediction, an in-house knowledge-based scoring function ITScore2 and MM/PBSA approach were employed. Good performance was achieved for MM/PBSA, whereas the performance of ITScore2 was sensitive to ligand composition, e.g. the percentage of carbon atoms in the compounds. The sensitivity to ligand composition could be a clue for the further improvement of our knowledge-based scoring function.

  2. Poor quality drugs: grand challenges in high throughput detection, countrywide sampling, and forensics in developing countries†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Facundo M.; Hostetler, Dana; Powell, Kristen; Kaur, Harparkash; Green, Michael D.; Mildenhall, Dallas C.; Newton, Paul N.

    2012-01-01

    Throughout history, poor quality medicines have been a persistent problem, with periodical crises in the supply of antimicrobials, such as fake cinchona bark in the 1600s and fake quinine in the 1800s. Regrettably, this problem seems to have grown in the last decade, especially afflicting unsuspecting patients and those seeking medicines via on-line pharmacies. Here we discuss some of the challenges related to the fight against poor quality drugs, and counterfeits in particular, with an emphasis on the analytical tools available, their relative performance, and the necessary workflows needed for distinguishing between genuine, substandard, degraded and counterfeit medicines. PMID:21107455

  3. Shared Electronic Health Record Systems: Key Legal and Security Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Ellen K; Skipenes, Eva; Hausken, Marie F; Skeie, Svein; Østbye, Truls; Iversen, Marjolein M

    2017-11-01

    Use of shared electronic health records opens a whole range of new possibilities for flexible and fruitful cooperation among health personnel in different health institutions, to the benefit of the patients. There are, however, unsolved legal and security challenges. The overall aim of this article is to highlight legal and security challenges that should be considered before using shared electronic cooperation platforms and health record systems to avoid legal and security "surprises" subsequent to the implementation. Practical lessons learned from the use of a web-based ulcer record system involving patients, community nurses, GPs, and hospital nurses and doctors in specialist health care are used to illustrate challenges we faced. Discussion of possible legal and security challenges is critical for successful implementation of shared electronic collaboration systems. Key challenges include (1) allocation of responsibility, (2) documentation routines, (3) and integrated or federated access control. We discuss and suggest how challenges of legal and security aspects can be handled. This discussion may be useful for both current and future users, as well as policy makers.

  4. Performance of HADDOCK and a simple contact-based protein–ligand binding affinity predictor in the D3R Grand Challenge 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kurkcuoglu Soner, Zeynep; Koukos, Panos; Citro, Nevia; Trellet, Mikael E.; Garcia Lopes Maia Rodrigues, Joao; de Sousa Moreira, Irina; Roel-touris, Jorge; Melquiond, Adrien S. J.; Geng, Cunliang; Schaarschmidt, Jörg; Xue, Li C.; Vangone, Anna; Bonvin, A. M. J. J.

    2018-01-01

    We present the performance of HADDOCK, our information-driven docking software, in the second edition of the D3R Grand Challenge. In this blind experiment, participants were requested to predict the structures and binding affinities of complexes between the Farnesoid X nuclear receptor and 102

  5. Physics and the canalization of morphogenesis: a grand challenge in organismal biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Von Dassow, Michelangelo; Davidson, Lance A

    2011-01-01

    Morphogenesis takes place against a background of organism-to-organism and environmental variation. Therefore, fundamental questions in the study of morphogenesis include: How are the mechanical processes of tissue movement and deformation affected by that variability, and in turn, how do the mechanic of the system modulate phenotypic variation? We highlight a few key factors, including environmental temperature, embryo size and environmental chemistry that might perturb the mechanics of morphogenesis in natural populations. Then we discuss several ways in which mechanics—including feedback from mechanical cues—might influence intra-specific variation in morphogenesis. To understand morphogenesis it will be necessary to consider whole-organism, environment and evolutionary scales because these larger scales present the challenges that developmental mechanisms have evolved to cope with. Studying the variation organisms express and the variation organisms experience will aid in deciphering the causes of birth defects

  6. Psychological science's contributions to a sustainable environment: extending our reach to a grand challenge of society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazdin, Alan E

    2009-01-01

    Climate change and degradation of the environment are global problems associated with many other challenges (e.g., population increases, reduction of glaciers, and loss of critical habitats). Psychological science can play a critical role in addressing these problems by fostering a sustainable environment. Multiple strategies for fostering a sustainable environment could draw from the diversity of topics and areas of specialization within psychology. Psychological research on fostering environmentally sustainable behaviors is rather well developed, as illustrated by interventions focusing on education of the public, message framing, feedback, decision making, the media, incentives and disincentives, and social marketing. Other sciences and professions as well as religion and ethics are actively involved in fostering a sustainable environment. Psychology ought to be more involved directly, systematically, and visibly to draw on our current knowledge and to have palpable impact. We would serve the world very well and in the process our discipline and profession.

  7. Binding pose and affinity prediction in the 2016 D3R Grand Challenge 2 using the Wilma-SIE method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogues, Hervé; Sulea, Traian; Gaudreault, Francis; Corbeil, Christopher R.; Purisima, Enrico O.

    2018-01-01

    The Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) exhibits significant backbone movement in response to the binding of various ligands and can be a challenge for pose prediction algorithms. As part of the D3R Grand Challenge 2, we tested Wilma-SIE, a rigid-protein docking method, on a set of 36 FXR ligands for which the crystal structures had originally been blinded. These ligands covered several classes of compounds. To overcome the rigid protein limitations of the method, we used an ensemble of publicly available structures for FXR from the PDB. The use of the ensemble allowed Wilma-SIE to predict poses with average and median RMSDs of 2.3 and 1.4 Å, respectively. It was quite clear, however, that had we used a single structure for the receptor the success rate would have been much lower. The most successful predictions were obtained on chemical classes for which one or more crystal structures of the receptor bound to a molecule of the same class was available. In the absence of a crystal structure for the class, observing a consensus binding mode for the ligands of the class using one or more receptor structures of other classes seemed to be indicative of a reasonable pose prediction. Affinity prediction proved to be more challenging with generally poor correlation with experimental IC50s (Kendall tau 0.3). Even when the 36 crystal structures were used the accuracy of the predicted affinities was not appreciably improved. A possible cause of difficulty is the internal energy strain arising from conformational differences in the receptor across complexes, which may need to be properly estimated and incorporated into the SIE scoring function.

  8. Tipping Points and Balancing Acts: Grand Challenges and Synergistic Opportunities of Integrating Research and Education, Science and Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, M. S.; Stroeve, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The "Grand Challenges" to address Global Change identified by the International Council for Science (ICSU) and its partners through the Earth System Sustainability Initiative-improving forecasting, enhancing and integrating observation systems, confining and minimizing global environmental change, responding effectively to change, as well as innovating and evaluating these efforts-require an integrative approach that engages and inspires society in general and young people in particular. What are some of the effective strategies-and stumbling blocks-in being able to make Earth System science and related sustainability efforts relevant and practical to non-technical audiences? Recent climate education projects have pioneered new strategies toward linking and infusing research with education, science with solutions. For example, the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN), a National Science Digital Library Pathway funded by NSF, has approached this integral approach by "closing the loop" between climate and energy topics, identifying and annotating high quality online resources relating to the carbon cycle and related topics. The Inspiring Climate Education Excellence (ICEE) project, funded by NASA, offers professional development for teachers that infuses climate science with solutions as an emerging "best practice" while being sensitive to the emotional, psychological and political aspects of avoiding "gloom and doom" on one hand or advocating for particular policy solutions on another. Other examples includes NASA's climate website (http://climate.nasa.gov ), which serves as a robust, engaging portal for climate research and data, especially for educators. The recent PBS series Earth: The Operators' Manual and related book and website are other recent example of how climate science research, education and solutions can be incorporated in a way that is appealing and informative. The Alliance for Climate Education (ACE) has given assemblies in

  9. CAWR: Two institutions join forces in a cluster by addressing the grand challenges of water research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaeckel, Greta; Braeckevelt, Mareike

    2017-04-01

    The Center for Advanced Water Research (CAWR) brings together the water competences of two German research institutions: Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ and the Technische Universität Dresden (TUD). Highly qualified scientists are jointly tackling some of the key challenges in the water sector in an outstanding breadth of research topics and at the same time with a profound disciplinary expertise. Our mission is: "Save water for humans and environment", because water in a good quality and adequate quantity is a fundamental basis of life for humankind and the environment. In many global challenges, such as food or energy security, human health and ecosystems, flood defence and droughts or the provision of drinking water and sanitation systems, water is becoming a very critical element for a sustainable society in Germany, in Europe and worldwide. The CAWR focusses its work on the fields of research, education & training as well as transfer. The CAWR was established in 2013. Over 3 years the activities within the three pillars and the six thematic priority research fields ( 1) Understanding processes: water cycle and water quality, 2): Water quantity and scarcity in the regional context, 3): Urban Water Systems, 4): Methods of data collection and information processing, 5): Societal and climate change, 6): Water governance) were presented within: • the scientific community (newsletters, publication highlights, workshops with different new formats, conferences) • to national and international stakeholders from policy, industry and society (workshops, opinion papers) • public media (TV, radio stations, Newspapers, brochures, videoclips via youtube…) This PICO presentation by Greta Jäckel (scientific management of CAWR) should show which tools for the presentation of research results are useful and which influence they have on different target groups. A bunch of examples for effective and also less successful instruments to present important

  10. Electronic Payment System in Nigeria: Its Economic Benefits and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okifo, Joseph; Igbunu, Richard

    2015-01-01

    The crux of this study is on the adoption of E-payment system in Nigeria: Its economic benefits and challenges. The arrival of the internet has taken electronic payments and transactions to an exponential growth level. Consumers could purchase goods and services from the internet and send unencrypted credit card numbers across the network, which…

  11. Challenges of Archiving Electronic Records: The Imminent Danger of a

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper looks at the challenges that are likely to face the archivists in their endeavour to preserve electronically generated records. It also suggests issues that the archivist may consider in the preservation of these records. Archivists around the world have been giving warnings that computer files may survive long but the ...

  12. Scientific Grand Challenges: Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-01-01

    This report is an account of the deliberations and conclusions of the workshop on 'Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing' held January 26-28, 2009, co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP) and the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing (ASCR). Representatives from the national and international nuclear physics communities, as well as from the high performance computing community, participated. The purpose of this workshop was to (1) identify forefront scientific challenges in nuclear physics and then determine which-if any-of these could be aided by high performance computing at the extreme scale; (2) establish how and why new high performance computing capabilities could address issues at the frontiers of nuclear science; (3) provide nuclear physicists the opportunity to influence the development of high performance computing; and (4) provide the nuclear physics community with plans for development of future high performance computing capability by DOE ASCR.

  13. The grand challenge of great ape health and conservation in the anthropocene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Dominic A; Lonsorf, Elizabeth V; Gillespie, Thomas R

    2018-01-01

    "Ecosystem Health recognizes the inherent interdependence of the health of humans, animals and ecosystems and explores the perspectives, theories and methodologies emerging at the interface between ecological and health sciences." This broad focus requires new approaches and methods for solving problems of greater complexity at larger scales than ever before. Nowhere is this point more salient than the case of disease emergence and control at the human-non human primate interface in shrinking tropical forests under great anthropogenic pressure. This special edition brings together transdisciplinary experts who have created successful partnerships leading to advances in ecosystem approaches to health for wild ape populations with relevance to all developing country tropical forest environments. It is no coincidence that the advances herein highlight two long term health projects-the Gombe Ecosystem Health Project (Gombe National Park, Tanzania), and the Taï Chimpanzee Project (TCP) in Côte d'Ivoire-since standardizing and validating noninvasive disease surveillance, risk assessment and management methods presents a special series of challenges where time is a major factor. Advances highlighted in this addition include: health surveillance and monitoring, health risk analysis, field immobilization and interventions, human-NHP networks/interfaces, diagnostic tool development, and cutting edge molecular and genetic techniques. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Scientific Grand Challenges: Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2009-10-01

    This report is an account of the deliberations and conclusions of the workshop on "Forefront Questions in Nuclear Science and the Role of High Performance Computing" held January 26-28, 2009, co-sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP) and the DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing (ASCR). Representatives from the national and international nuclear physics communities, as well as from the high performance computing community, participated. The purpose of this workshop was to 1) identify forefront scientific challenges in nuclear physics and then determine which-if any-of these could be aided by high performance computing at the extreme scale; 2) establish how and why new high performance computing capabilities could address issues at the frontiers of nuclear science; 3) provide nuclear physicists the opportunity to influence the development of high performance computing; and 4) provide the nuclear physics community with plans for development of future high performance computing capability by DOE ASCR.

  15. AI in medical education--another grand challenge for medical informatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillehaug, S I; Lajoie, S P

    1998-03-01

    The potential benefits of artificial intelligence in medicine (AIM) were never realized as anticipated. This paper addresses ways in which such potential can be achieved. Recent discussions of this topic have proposed a stronger integration between AIM applications and health information systems, and emphasize computer guidelines to support the new health care paradigms of evidence-based medicine and cost-effectiveness. These proposals, however, promote the initial definition of AIM applications as being AI systems that can perform or aid in diagnoses. We challenge this traditional philosophy of AIM and propose a new approach aiming at empowering health care workers to become independent self-sufficient problem solvers and decision makers. Our philosophy is based on findings from a review of empirical research that examines the relationship between the health care personnel's level of knowledge and skills, their job satisfaction, and the quality of the health care they provide. This review supports addressing the quality of health care by empowering health care workers to reach their full potential. As an aid in this empowerment process we argue for reviving a long forgotten AIM research area, namely, AI based applications for medical education and training. There is a growing body of research in artificial intelligence in education that demonstrates that the use of artificial intelligence can enhance learning in numerous domains. By examining the strengths of these educational applications and the results from previous AIM research we derive a framework for empowering medical personnel and consequently raising the quality of health care through the use of advanced AI based technology.

  16. Communicating Geosciences with Policy-makers: a Grand Challenge for Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, W. J.; Walls, M. R.; Boland, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Geoscientists interested in the broader societal impacts of their research can make a meaningful contribution to policy making in our changing world. Nevertheless, policy and public decision making are the least frequently cited Broader Impacts in proposals and funded projects within NSF's Geosciences Directorate. Academic institutions can play a lead role by introducing this societal dimension of our profession to beginning students, and by enabling interdisciplinary research and promoting communication pathways for experienced career geoscientists. Within the academic environment, the public interface of the geosciences can be presented through curriculum content and creative programs. These include undergraduate minors in economics or public policy designed for scientists and engineers, and internships with policy makers. Federal research institutions and other organizations provide valuable policy-relevant experiences for students. Academic institutions have the key freedom of mission to tackle interdisciplinary research challenges at the interface of geoscience and policy. They develop long-standing relationships with research partners, including national laboratories and state geological surveys, whose work may support policy development and analysis at local, state, regional, and national levels. CSM's Payne Institute for Earth Resources awards mini-grants for teams of researchers to develop collaborative research efforts between engineering/science and policy researchers. Current work in the areas of nuclear generation and the costs of climate policy and on policy alternatives for capturing fugitive methane emissions are examples of work at the interface between the geosciences and public policy. With academic engagement, geoscientists can steward their intellectual output when non-scientists translate geoscience information and concepts into action through public policies.

  17. Large scale free energy calculations for blind predictions of protein-ligand binding: the D3R Grand Challenge 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Nanjie; Flynn, William F; Xia, Junchao; Vijayan, R S K; Zhang, Baofeng; He, Peng; Mentes, Ahmet; Gallicchio, Emilio; Levy, Ronald M

    2016-09-01

    We describe binding free energy calculations in the D3R Grand Challenge 2015 for blind prediction of the binding affinities of 180 ligands to Hsp90. The present D3R challenge was built around experimental datasets involving Heat shock protein (Hsp) 90, an ATP-dependent molecular chaperone which is an important anticancer drug target. The Hsp90 ATP binding site is known to be a challenging target for accurate calculations of ligand binding affinities because of the ligand-dependent conformational changes in the binding site, the presence of ordered waters and the broad chemical diversity of ligands that can bind at this site. Our primary focus here is to distinguish binders from nonbinders. Large scale absolute binding free energy calculations that cover over 3000 protein-ligand complexes were performed using the BEDAM method starting from docked structures generated by Glide docking. Although the ligand dataset in this study resembles an intermediate to late stage lead optimization project while the BEDAM method is mainly developed for early stage virtual screening of hit molecules, the BEDAM binding free energy scoring has resulted in a moderate enrichment of ligand screening against this challenging drug target. Results show that, using a statistical mechanics based free energy method like BEDAM starting from docked poses offers better enrichment than classical docking scoring functions and rescoring methods like Prime MM-GBSA for the Hsp90 data set in this blind challenge. Importantly, among the three methods tested here, only the mean value of the BEDAM binding free energy scores is able to separate the large group of binders from the small group of nonbinders with a gap of 2.4 kcal/mol. None of the three methods that we have tested provided accurate ranking of the affinities of the 147 active compounds. We discuss the possible sources of errors in the binding free energy calculations. The study suggests that BEDAM can be used strategically to discriminate

  18. Grand challenges in developing a predictive understanding of global fire dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randerson, J. T.; Chen, Y.; Wiggins, E. B.; Andela, N.; Morton, D. C.; Veraverbeke, S.; van der Werf, G.

    2017-12-01

    High quality satellite observations of burned area and fire thermal anomalies over the past two decades have transformed our understanding of climate, ecosystem, and human controls on the spatial and temporal distribution of landscape fires. The satellite observations provide evidence for a rapid and widespread loss of fire from grassland and savanna ecosystems worldwide. Continued expansion of industrial agriculture suggests that observed declines in global burned area are likely to continue in future decades, with profound consequences for ecosystem function and the habitat of many endangered species. Satellite time series also highlight the importance of El Niño-Southern Oscillation and other climate modes as drivers of interannual variability. In many regions, lead times between climate indices and fire activity are considerable, enabling the development of early warning prediction systems for fire season severity. With the recent availability of high-resolution observations from Suomi NPP, Landsat 8, and Sentinel 2, the field of global fire ecology is poised to make even more significant breakthroughs over the next decade. With these new observations, it may be possible to reduce uncertainties in the spatial pattern of burned area by several fold. It is difficult to overstate the importance of these new data constraints for improving our understanding of fire impacts on human health and radiative forcing of climate change. A key research challenge in this context is to understand how the loss of global burned area will affect magnitude of the terrestrial carbon sink and trends in atmospheric composition. Advances in prognostic fire modeling will require new approaches linking agriculture with landscape fire dynamics. A critical need in this context is the development of predictive models of road networks and other drivers of land fragmentation, and a closer integration of fragmentation information with algorithms predicting fire spread. Concurrently, a better

  19. Combining Multidisciplinary Science, Quantitative Reasoning and Social Context to Teach Global Sustainability and Prepare Students for 21st Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    The Earth's seven billion humans are consuming a growing proportion of the world's ecosystem products and services. Human activity has also wrought changes that rival the scale of many natural geologic processes, e.g. erosion, transport and deposition, leading to recognition of a new geological epoch, the Anthropocene. Because of these impacts, several natural systems have been pushed beyond the planetary boundaries that made the Holocene favorable for the expansion of humanity. Given these human-induced stresses on natural systems, global citizens will face an increasing number of grand challenges. Unfortunately, traditional discipline-based introductory science courses do little to prepare students for these complex, scientifically-based and technologically-centered challenges. With NSF funding, an introductory, integrated science course stressing quantitative reasoning and social context has been created at UW. The course (GEOL1600: Global Sustainability: Managing the Earth's Resources) is a lower division course designed around the energy-water-climate (EWC) nexus and integrating biology, chemistry, Earth science and physics. It melds lectures, lecture activities, reading questionnaires and labs to create a learning environment that examines the EWT nexus from a global through regional context. The focus on the EWC nexus, while important socially and intended to motivate students, also provides a coherent framework for identifying which disciplinary scientific principles and concepts to include in the course: photosynthesis and deep time (fossil fuels), biogeochemical cycles (climate), chemical reactions (combustion), electromagnetic radiation (solar power), nuclear physics (nuclear power), phase changes and diagrams (water and climate), etc. Lecture activities are used to give students the practice they need to make quantitative skills routine and automatic. Laboratory exercises on energy (coal, petroleum, nuclear power), water (in Bangladesh), energy

  20. Electronics and triggering challenges for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, A.

    2018-02-01

    The High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL), presently being designed by the CMS collaboration to replace the CMS endcap calorimeters for the High Luminosity phase of LHC, will feature six million channels distributed over 52 longitudinal layers. The requirements for the front-end electronics are extremely challenging, including high dynamic range (0.2 fC-10 pC), low noise (~2000 e- to be able to calibrate on single minimum ionising particles throughout the detector lifetime) and low power consumption (~20 mW/channel), as well as the need to select and transmit trigger information with a high granularity. Exploiting the intrinsic precision-timing capabilities of silicon sensors also requires careful design of the front-end electronics as well as the whole system, particularly clock distribution. The harsh radiation environment and requirement to keep the whole detector as dense as possible will require novel solutions to the on-detector electronics layout. Processing the data from the HGCAL imposes equally large challenges on the off-detector electronics, both for the hardware and incorporated algorithms. We present an overview of the complete electronics architecture, as well as the performance of prototype components and algorithms.

  1. Electronic publishing: opportunities and challenges for clinical linguistics and phonetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Thomas W; Müller, Nicole; Ball, Martin J

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses the contributions of informatics technology to the field of clinical linguistics and phonetics. The electronic publication of research reports and books has facilitated both the dissemination and the retrieval of scientific information. Electronic archives of speech and language corpora, too, stimulate research efforts. Although technology provides many opportunities, there remain significant challenges. Establishment and maintenance of scientific archives is largely dependent upon volunteer efforts, and there are few standards to ensure long-term access. Coordinated efforts and peer review are necessary to ensure utility and quality.

  2. Electronic health records challenges in design and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Sittig, Dean F

    2013-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the challenges in electronic health records (EHR) design and implementation along with an introduction to the best practices that have been identified over the past several years. The book examines concerns surrounding EHR use and proposes eight examples of proper EHR use. It discusses the complex strategic planning that accompanies the systemic organizational changes associated with EHR programs and highlights key lessons learned regarding health information-including technology errors and risk management concerns.

  3. Grand Challenge Problem 10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dirckinck-Holmfeld, Lone; Balacheff, Nicolas; Bottino, Rosa Maria

    2016-01-01

    Small and medium sized research labs (SMLs) are dominating European TEL research. This is justified by the great numbers of countries and regions in Europe needing to develop a research and innovation competence to facilitate the diverse educational systems contextualized in various institutional...

  4. Challenges in reduction of dinitrogen by proton and electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Ham, Cornelis J M; Koper, Marc T M; Hetterscheid, Dennis G H

    2014-08-07

    Ammonia is an important nutrient for the growth of plants. In industry, ammonia is produced by the energy expensive Haber-Bosch process where dihydrogen and dinitrogen form ammonia at a very high pressure and temperature. In principle one could also reduce dinitrogen upon addition of protons and electrons similar to the mechanism of ammonia production by nitrogenases. Recently, major breakthroughs have taken place in our understanding of biological fixation of dinitrogen, of molecular model systems that can reduce dinitrogen, and in the electrochemical reduction of dinitrogen at heterogeneous surfaces. Yet for efficient reduction of dinitrogen with protons and electrons major hurdles still have to be overcome. In this tutorial review we give an overview of the different catalytic systems, highlight the recent breakthroughs, pinpoint common grounds and discuss the bottlenecks and challenges in catalytic reduction of dinitrogen.

  5. 3D IC Pixel Electronics- the Next Challenge

    CERN Document Server

    Yarema, R

    2008-01-01

    There is no question that 3D integrated circuit design will play an important role in the continuing development of high performance integrated circuits. This paper will provide a brief introduction to the markets for 3D integrated circuits and the technologies that are used, followed by a review of 3D activities in High Energy Physics (HEP). The paper will review the first 3D chip for HEP and conclude with discussion of a collaborative effort to use a commercial vendor to fabricate 3D ICs as a path forward to meet the next challenge for electronics designers in HEP .

  6. Linnett Double Quartet Theory, Challenging the Pairing Electrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeganeh Khaniani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Linnett proposed his theory 45 years after Lewis's supposition. During these years Pauling, Mulliken and Hund made different molecular structure models based on valance bond and molecular orbital theory. Their theories were seemed to fit many experiences but had some inabilities. Linnett's double quartet theory could solved some important problems about stability of radicals, paramagnetism / diamagnetism in molecular systems, electronic structure in transition states and finally challenge of resonance and aromaticity. In this article we review some basic ideas and concepts concerning different models and then we give a detailed discussion of the LDQ and use it in diverse branches of chemistry.

  7. The Challenges of Becoming Tutors at Electronic Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Eugenia López Hurtado

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a research report of my own experience as a tutor in electronic environments which I have accumulated throughout the guidance for English learners of basic level at a public university. This article looks for illustrating the researcher's own perceptions and challenges as becoming an e-tutor. Therefore, I will introduce an overview of studies and experiences that address this issue in international contexts, and then I will refer to my own experience where I describe the roles that emerged while I was administrating and delivering e- learning pedagogical experiences such as an exploration of some skills and learning activities carried out in an English course; this description embraces three different stages (before, during and after of implementation. Subsequently, some discussion of the results is provided gathered from the research instruments I used. Finally, some conclusions and suggestions are provided in regards to the research question of the study, its outcomes on how tutors' challenges shape tutor's roles in electronic environments.

  8. Electronics and triggering challenges for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter

    CERN Document Server

    Lobanov, Artur

    2017-01-01

    The High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL), presently being designed by the CMS collaboration to replace the CMS endcap calorimeters for the High Luminosity phase of LHC, will feature six million channels distributed over 52 longitudinal layers. The requirements for the front-end electronics are extremely challenging, including high dynamic range (0-10 pC), low noise (~2000e- to be able to calibrate on single minimum ionising particles throughout the detector lifetime) and low power consumption (~10mW/channel), as well as the need to select and transmit trigger information with a high granularity. Exploiting the intrinsic precision-timing capabilities of silicon sensors also requires careful design of the front-end electronics as well as the whole system, particularly clock distribution. The harsh radiation environment and requirement to keep the whole detector as dense as possible will require novel solutions to the on-detector electronics layout. Processing all the data from the HGCAL imposes equally large ch...

  9. Front-end electronics and trigger systems - status and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spieler, Helmuth G; Spieler, Helmuth G

    2007-01-01

    The past quarter century has brought about a revolution in front-end electronics for large-scale detector systems. Custom integrated circuits specifically tailored to the requirements of large detector systems have provided unprecedented performance and enabled systems that once were deemed impossible. The evolution of integrated circuit readouts in strip detectors is summarized, the present status described, and challenges posed by the sLHC and ILC are discussed. Performance requirements increase, but key considerations remain as in the past: power dissipation, material, and services. Smaller CMOS feature sizes will not provide the required electronic noise at lower power, but will improve digital power efficiency. Significant improvements appear to be practical in more efficient power distribution. Enhanced digital electronics have provided powerful trigger processors that greatly improve the trigger efficiency. In data readout systems they also improve data throughput, while reducing power requirements. Concurrently with new developments in high energy physics, detector systems for cosmology and astrophysics have made great strides. As an example, a large-scale readout for superconducting bolometer arrays is described

  10. Meeting the Grand Challenge of Protecting Astronauts Health: Electrostatic Active Space Radiation Shielding for Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ram K.

    2016-01-01

    membrane structure (EIMS) in both charged and uncharged configurations. The amount of charge shielding behind and around the EIMS was studied for different combinations of membrane structure voltages and electron energies. Both passive and active shielding were observed, with active shielding capable of deflecting nearly all incoming electrons. The pattern of charge distribution around the structure was studied as well as the stability of the structures in the charge flow. The charge deflection experiments illustrate that the EIMS remain inflated during charge deflection, but will experience small amplitude oscillations. Investigations were performed to determine a potential cause of the vibrations. It is postulated these vibrations are due to the charge flux causing local membrane charge distribution changes. As the membrane structure inflation pressure is changed, the shape responds, and causes the observed sustained vibration. Having identified this phenomenon is important when considering electrostatically inflated membrane structures (EIMS) in a space environment. Additionally, this project included a study of membrane material impacts, specifically the impact of membrane thickness. Extremely thin materials presented new challenges with vacuum preparation techniques and rapid charging. The thinner and lighter membrane materials were successfully inflated using electrostatic forces in a vacuum chamber. However, care must be taken when varying the potentials of such lighter structures as the currents can cause local heating and melting of the very thin membranes. Lastly, a preliminary analysis is performed to study rough order of magnitude power requirements for using EIMS for radiation shielding. The EIMS power requirement becomes increasingly more challenging as the spacecraft voltage is increased. As a result, the emphasis is on the deflection of charges away from the spacecraft rather than totally stopping them. This significantly alleviates the initial power

  11. Implementing electronic health care predictive analytics: considerations and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasingham, Ruben; Patzer, Rachel E; Huesch, Marco; Nguyen, Nam Q; Xie, Bin

    2014-07-01

    The use of predictive modeling for real-time clinical decision making is increasingly recognized as a way to achieve the Triple Aim of improving outcomes, enhancing patients' experiences, and reducing health care costs. The development and validation of predictive models for clinical practice is only the initial step in the journey toward mainstream implementation of real-time point-of-care predictions. Integrating electronic health care predictive analytics (e-HPA) into the clinical work flow, testing e-HPA in a patient population, and subsequently disseminating e-HPA across US health care systems on a broad scale require thoughtful planning. Input is needed from policy makers, health care executives, researchers, and practitioners as the field evolves. This article describes some of the considerations and challenges of implementing e-HPA, including the need to ensure patients' privacy, establish a health system monitoring team to oversee implementation, incorporate predictive analytics into medical education, and make sure that electronic systems do not replace or crowd out decision making by physicians and patients. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  12. Predicting the affinity of Farnesoid X Receptor ligands through a hierarchical ranking protocol: a D3R Grand Challenge 2 case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réau, Manon; Langenfeld, Florent; Zagury, Jean-François; Montes, Matthieu

    2018-01-01

    The Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) Grand Challenges are blind contests organized to assess the state-of-the-art methods accuracy in predicting binding modes and relative binding free energies of experimentally validated ligands for a given target. The second stage of the D3R Grand Challenge 2 (GC2) was focused on ranking 102 compounds according to their predicted affinity for Farnesoid X Receptor. In this task, our workflow was ranked 5th out of the 77 submissions in the structure-based category. Our strategy consisted in (1) a combination of molecular docking using AutoDock 4.2 and manual edition of available structures for binding poses generation using SeeSAR, (2) the use of HYDE scoring for pose selection, and (3) a hierarchical ranking using HYDE and MM/GBSA. In this report, we detail our pose generation and ligands ranking protocols and provide guidelines to be used in a prospective computer aided drug design program.

  13. Electron Driven Processes; Scientific Challenges and Technical Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron induced processes are prevalent in many disparate areas of science and technology. In this paper we review some of the recent developments in our understanding of electron driven processes with particular attention to electron interactions with biomolecules

  14. Challenges of 4D(ata Model for Electronic Government

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan GHILIC-MICU

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Social evolution pyramid, built on the foundation of the ‘90s capitalist society, lead to the emergence of the informational society – years 1990 to 2005 – and knowledge society – years 2005 to 2020. The literature starts using a new concept, a new form of association – artificial intelligence society – foreseen to be established in the next time frame. All these developments of human society and translations or leaps (most of the times apparently timeless were, are and will be possible only due to the advancing information and communications technologies. The leap to Democracy 3.0, based on information and communication technologies prompts to a radical change in the majority of the classical concepts targeting society structure and the way it is guided and controlled. Thus, concepts become electronic concepts (or e-concepts through the use of new technologies. E-concepts keep the essence of the classical principles of liberty and democracy, adding a major aspect of the new way of communication and spreading ideas between people. The main problem is to quantify, analyze and foresee the way technological changes will influence not only the economic system, but also the daily life of the individual and the society. Unfortunately (or maybe fortunately, depending on the point of view, all these evolutions and technological and social developments are as many challenges for the governments of the world. In this paper we will highlight only four of the challenges facing the governments, grouped in a structured model with the following specific concepts: Big Data, Social Data, Linked Data and Mobile Data. This is an emerging paradigm of the information and communication technology supporting national and global eGovernment projects.

  15. Long-term Water Table Monitoring of Rio Grande Riparian Ecosystems for Restoration Potential Amid Hydroclimatic Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, James R.; Cleverly, James R.; Dahm, Clifford N.

    2017-12-01

    Hydrological processes drive the ecological functioning and sustainability of cottonwood-dominated riparian ecosystems in the arid southwestern USA. Snowmelt runoff elevates groundwater levels and inundates floodplains, which promotes cottonwood germination. Once established, these phreatophytes rely on accessible water tables (WTs). In New Mexico's Middle Rio Grande corridor diminished flooding and deepening WTs threaten native riparian communities. We monitored surface flows and riparian WTs for up to 14 years, which revealed that WTs and surface flows, including peak snowmelt discharge, respond to basin climate conditions and resource management. WT hydrographs influence the composition of riparian communities and can be used to assess if potential restoration sites meet native vegetation tolerances for WT depths, rates of recession, and variability throughout their life stages. WTs were highly variable in some sites, which can preclude native vegetation less adapted to deep drawdowns during extended droughts. Rates of WT recession varied between sites and should be assessed in regard to recruitment potential. Locations with relatively shallow WTs and limited variability are likely to be more viable for successful restoration. Suitable sites have diminished greatly as the once meandering Rio Grande has been constrained and depleted. Increasing demands on water and the presence of invasive vegetation better adapted to the altered hydrologic regime further impact native riparian communities. Long-term monitoring over a range of sites and hydroclimatic extremes reveals attributes that can be evaluated for restoration potential.

  16. Challenges in graphene integration for high-frequency electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannazzo, F.; Fisichella, G.; Greco, G.; Roccaforte, F.

    2016-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of the state-of-the-art research on graphene (Gr) for high-frequency (RF) devices. After discussing current limitations of lateral Gr RF transistors, novel vertical devices concepts such as the Gr Base Hot Electron Transistor (GBHET) will be introduced and the main challenges in Gr integration within these architectures will be discussed. In particular, a GBHET device based on Gr/AlGaN/GaN heterostructure will be considered. An approach to the fabrication of this heterostructure by transfer of CVD grown Gr on copper to the AlGaN surface will be presented. The morphological and electrical properties of this system have been investigated at nanoscale by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM). In particular, local current-voltage measurements by the CAFM probe revealed the formation of a Schottky contact with low barrier height (˜0.41 eV) and excellent lateral uniformity between Gr and AlGaN. Basing on the electrical parameters extracted from this characterization, the theoretical performances of a GBHET formed by a metal/Al2O3/Gr/AlGaN/GaN stack have been evaluated.

  17. Addressing the Challenge: Cataloguing Electronic Books in Academic Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuzhen Zhao

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective ‐ This paper explores the various issues and challenges arising from e‐book cataloguing experienced at the University of Windsor’s Leddy Library and the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL. This discussion uses an evidence based approach to identify and resolve issues relevant to academic libraries as well as to consortia. With the ever rising popularity of e‐books within academic libraries, cataloguing librarians are actively seeking more effective methods of managing this new electronic medium, including the development of new cataloguing policies and procedures. This paper will explore the various issues and challenges surrounding e‐book cataloguing and processing within academic libraries, and will identify new policies and procedures that may be used to effectively assist in e‐book management.Methods ‐ This paper presents a case study of e‐book cataloguing practices undertaken by a Canadian academic library and the consortium with which it is affiliated. Towards this end, the University of Windsor’s Leddy Library will be the prime focus of this study, with its establishment of a new e‐book MARC records database. The research is based on the results of the e‐book MARC project undertaken by the Leddy Library and the Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL.Through analysis of various suppliers’ MARC records and the actual implementation of the e‐book MARC project, the authors developed and evaluated a new approach to e‐book cataloguing for use in academic libraries.Results ‐ This practice‐based approach towards the development of a new method of e‐book cataloguing required continual modification and examination of e‐book MARC records within the target library. The Leddy Library’s e‐book MARC project provided an excellent opportunity to test the library’s existing cataloguing standards and procedures for print format, while at the same time, identifying related e‐books issues

  18. Electronic Waste: A Growing Challenge In Nigeria | Ukem | Global ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a consequence, large numbers of electronic ICT products become obsolete each year, and constitute electronic waste. This paper discusses this growing problem of electronic waste from the Nigerian perspective, and highlights factors that can militate against the successful management of such waste in Nigeria.

  19. Workflows and performances in the ranking prediction of 2016 D3R Grand Challenge 2: lessons learned from a collaborative effort

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying-Duo; Hu, Yuan; Crespo, Alejandro; Wang, Deping; Armacost, Kira A.; Fells, James I.; Fradera, Xavier; Wang, Hongwu; Wang, Huijun; Sherborne, Brad; Verras, Andreas; Peng, Zhengwei

    2018-01-01

    The 2016 D3R Grand Challenge 2 includes both pose and affinity or ranking predictions. This article is focused exclusively on affinity predictions submitted to the D3R challenge from a collaborative effort of the modeling and informatics group. Our submissions include ranking of 102 ligands covering 4 different chemotypes against the FXR ligand binding domain structure, and the relative binding affinity predictions of the two designated free energy subsets of 15 and 18 compounds. Using all the complex structures prepared in the same way allowed us to cover many types of workflows and compare their performances effectively. We evaluated typical workflows used in our daily structure-based design modeling support, which include docking scores, force field-based scores, QM/MM, MMGBSA, MD-MMGBSA, and MacroModel interaction energy estimations. The best performing methods for the two free energy subsets are discussed. Our results suggest that affinity ranking still remains very challenging; that the knowledge of more structural information does not necessarily yield more accurate predictions; and that visual inspection and human intervention are considerably important for ranking. Knowledge of the mode of action and protein flexibility along with visualization tools that depict polar and hydrophobic maps are very useful for visual inspection. QM/MM-based workflows were found to be powerful in affinity ranking and are encouraged to be applied more often. The standardized input and output enable systematic analysis and support methodology development and improvement for high level blinded predictions.

  20. Triggering the GRANDE array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, C.L.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, J.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    A brief description of the Gamma Ray And Neutrino Detector Experiment (GRANDE) is presented. The detector elements and electronics are described. The trigger logic for the array is then examined. The triggers for the Gamma Ray and the Neutrino portions of the array are treated separately. (orig.)

  1. Combining self- and cross-docking as benchmark tools: the performance of DockBench in the D3R Grand Challenge 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmaso, Veronica; Sturlese, Mattia; Cuzzolin, Alberto; Moro, Stefano

    2018-01-01

    Molecular docking is a powerful tool in the field of computer-aided molecular design. In particular, it is the technique of choice for the prediction of a ligand pose within its target binding site. A multitude of docking methods is available nowadays, whose performance may vary depending on the data set. Therefore, some non-trivial choices should be made before starting a docking simulation. In the same framework, the selection of the target structure to use could be challenging, since the number of available experimental structures is increasing. Both issues have been explored within this work. The pose prediction of a pool of 36 compounds provided by D3R Grand Challenge 2 organizers was preceded by a pipeline to choose the best protein/docking-method couple for each blind ligand. An integrated benchmark approach including ligand shape comparison and cross-docking evaluations was implemented inside our DockBench software. The results are encouraging and show that bringing attention to the choice of the docking simulation fundamental components improves the results of the binding mode predictions.

  2. Key Concepts for and Assessment of an Undergraduate Class that Engages Engineering Students in Climate Change Grand Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, S. E.; DeWaters, J.; Dhaniyala, S.

    2015-12-01

    Engineers must take a leading role in addressing the challenges of mitigating climate change and adapting to the inevitable changes that our world is facing. Yet climate change classes targeting engineering students are scarce. Technical education must focus on the problem formulation and solutions that consider multiple, complex interactions between engineered systems and the Earth's climate system and recognize that transformation raises societal challenges, including trade-offs among benefits, costs, and risks. Moreover, improving engineering students' climate science literacy will require strategies that also inspire students' motivation to work toward their solution. A climate science course for engineers has been taught 5 semesters as part of a NASA Innovations in Climate Education program grant (NNXlOAB57A). The basic premise of this project was that effective instruction must incorporate scientifically-based knowledge and observations and foster critical thinking, problem solving, and decision-making skills. Lecture, in-class cooperative and computer-based learning and a semester project provide the basis for engaging students in evaluating effective mitigation and adaptation solutions. Policy and social issues are integrated throughout many of the units. The objective of this presentation is to highlight the content and pedagogical approach used in this class that helped to contribute to significant gains in engineering students' climate literacy and critical thinking competencies. A total of 89 students fully participated in a pre/post climate literacy questionnaire. As a whole, students demonstrated significant gains in climate-related content knowledge (pjob of formulating problem statements and solutions in a manner that incorporated a multidimensional systems perspective. These skills are sometimes foreign to technically focused, number crunching engineering students, but are critical for using their engineering skills and profession to address

  3. Challenges associated with cataloguing of electronic resources in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of the paper is to identify challenges associated with the cataloguing of e resources in some selected university libraries in south –south Nigeria. The descriptive survey design involving the use of questionnaire as the research instrument was adopted. The population comprised of cataloguers in five selected ...

  4. Electronic Invoice in Costa Rica: Challenges for Its Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Jiménez, Juan José; De La O-Selva, Mario; Cortés-Morales, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the current situation that Costa Rica faces around fiscal issues and high evasion rates. Using actors and multidimensional analysis, it proposes the electronic invoice as an e-government strategic solution that will close the gap around tax evasion and the government incomes. The success achieved by Brazil in this area…

  5. Electronic Banking in Nigeria: Concepts, Challenges and Prospects ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study reviewed the concept of electronic banking (e banking), examined its prospects for Nigerian banks and discussed associated risks. It discovered that the increased application of e banking worldwide is a function of improvement in information and communications technology (ICT). E banking, it also observed, ...

  6. Grandes remolques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial, Equipo

    1961-07-01

    Full Text Available El empleo creciente del material pesado auxiliar en la construcción de obras de ingeniería civil ha motivado la fabricación de grandes plataformas, capaces de transportar toda clase de maquinaria auxiliar. En general, este tipo de maquinaria requiere medios de transporte, pues su circulación por carreteras es lenta, obstructiva y cara, siempre que se trate de grandes distancias, caso presente en la mayoría de ocasiones en que se exige un traslado de esta maquinaria de una a otra obra.

  7. Software Engineering Support of the Third Round of Scientific Grand Challenge Investigations: Earth System Modeling Software Framework Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Bryan; Zhou, Shu-Jia; Higgins, Glenn; Zukor, Dorothy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges in large-scale climate modeling, as well as in high-performance computing in other scientific fields, is that of effectively integrating many software models from multiple contributors. A software framework facilitates the integration task, both in the development and runtime stages of the simulation. Effective software frameworks reduce the programming burden for the investigators, freeing them to focus more on the science and less on the parallel communication implementation. while maintaining high performance across numerous supercomputer and workstation architectures. This document surveys numerous software frameworks for potential use in Earth science modeling. Several frameworks are evaluated in depth, including Parallel Object-Oriented Methods and Applications (POOMA), Cactus (from (he relativistic physics community), Overture, Goddard Earth Modeling System (GEMS), the National Center for Atmospheric Research Flux Coupler, and UCLA/UCB Distributed Data Broker (DDB). Frameworks evaluated in less detail include ROOT, Parallel Application Workspace (PAWS), and Advanced Large-Scale Integrated Computational Environment (ALICE). A host of other frameworks and related tools are referenced in this context. The frameworks are evaluated individually and also compared with each other.

  8. The Assurance Challenges of Advanced Packaging Technologies for Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in microelectronic parts performance are driving towards finer feature sizes, three-dimensional geometries and ever-increasing number of transistor equivalents that are resulting in increased die sizes and interconnection (I/O) counts. The resultant packaging necessary to provide assemble-ability, environmental protection, testability and interconnection to the circuit board for the active die creates major challenges, particularly for space applications, Traditionally, NASA has used hermetically packaged microcircuits whenever available but the new demands make hermetic packaging less and less practical at the same time as more and more expensive, Some part types of great interest to NASA designers are currently only available in non-hermetic packaging. It is a far more complex quality and reliability assurance challenge to gain confidence in the long-term survivability and effectiveness of nonhermetic packages than for hermetic ones. Although they may provide more rugged environmental protection than the familiar Plastic Encapsulated Microcircuits (PEMs), the non-hermetic Ceramic Column Grid Array (CCGA) packages that are the focus of this presentation present a unique combination of challenges to assessing their suitability for spaceflight use. The presentation will discuss the bases for these challenges, some examples of the techniques proposed to mitigate them and a proposed approach to a US MIL specification Class for non-hermetic microcircuits suitable for space application, Class Y, to be incorporated into M. IL-PRF-38535. It has recently emerged that some major packaging suppliers are offering hermetic area array packages that may offer alternatives to the nonhermetic CCGA styles but have also got their own inspectability and testability issues which will be briefly discussed in the presentation,

  9. E-FULFILLMENT - A NEW CHALLENGE FOR ELECTRONIC BUSINESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CLAUDIA ISAC

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently, we are witnessing a uniform interconnect solutions that allow easier access of small businesses and start-ups to electronic commerce and even their unprecedented development using specialized intermediaries. Thus, a modern distribution system is the e-Fulfillment presented in this paper. In the first part of the paper by presenting the concept and technological developments we have highlighted several classifications thereof. The biggest part presents the main operations are conducted at the operator e-Fulfillment, from taking products from suppliers, management, logistics information needed to store transactions through electronic transfer of goods to customers using courier companies, settlement and billing services, forms of promotion etc. The paper ends with some aspects of the advantages of using these systems, the costs involved and examples for Romania.

  10. The Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) simulation of turbulent transport in the core plasma: A grand challenge in plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    The long-range goal of the Numerical Tokamak Project (NTP) is the reliable prediction of tokamak performance using physics-based numerical tools describing tokamak physics. The NTP is accomplishing the development of the most advanced particle and extended fluid model's on massively parallel processing (MPP) environments as part of a multi-institutional, multi-disciplinary numerical study of tokamak core fluctuations. The NTP is a continuing focus of the Office of Fusion Energy's theory and computation program. Near-term HPCC work concentrates on developing a predictive numerical description of the core plasma transport in tokamaks driven by low-frequency collective fluctuations. This work addresses one of the greatest intellectual challenges to our understanding of the physics of tokamak performance and needs the most advanced computational resources to progress. We are conducting detailed comparisons of kinetic and fluid numerical models of tokamak turbulence. These comparisons are stimulating the improvement of each and the development of hybrid models which embody aspects of both. The combination of emerging massively parallel processing hardware and algorithmic improvements will result in an estimated 10**2--10**6 performance increase. Development of information processing and visualization tools is accelerating our comparison of computational models to one another, to experimental data, and to analytical theory, providing a bootstrap effect in our understanding of the target physics. The measure of success is the degree to which the experimentally observed scaling of fluctuation-driven transport may be predicted numerically. The NTP is advancing the HPCC Initiative through its state-of-the-art computational work. We are pushing the capability of high performance computing through our efforts which are strongly leveraged by OFE support

  11. Binding affinities of the farnesoid X receptor in the D3R Grand Challenge 2 estimated by free-energy perturbation and docking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Martin A.; García-Sosa, Alfonso T.; Ryde, Ulf

    2018-01-01

    We have studied the binding of 102 ligands to the farnesoid X receptor within the D3R Grand Challenge 2016 blind-prediction competition. First, we employed docking with five different docking software and scoring functions. The selected docked poses gave an average root-mean-squared deviation of 4.2 Å. Consensus scoring gave decent results with a Kendall's τ of 0.26 ± 0.06 and a Spearman's ρ of 0.41 ± 0.08. For a subset of 33 ligands, we calculated relative binding free energies with free-energy perturbation. Five transformations between the ligands involved a change of the net charge and we implemented and benchmarked a semi-analytic correction (Rocklin et al., J Chem Phys 139:184103, 2013) for artifacts caused by the periodic boundary conditions and Ewald summation. The results gave a mean absolute deviation of 7.5 kJ/mol compared to the experimental estimates and a correlation coefficient of R 2 = 0.1. These results were among the four best in this competition out of 22 submissions. The charge corrections were significant (7-8 kJ/mol) and always improved the results. By employing 23 intermediate states in the free-energy perturbation, there was a proper overlap between all states and the precision was 0.1-0.7 kJ/mol. However, thermodynamic cycles indicate that the sampling was insufficient in some of the perturbations.

  12. Improving binding mode and binding affinity predictions of docking by ligand-based search of protein conformations: evaluation in D3R grand challenge 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xianjin; Yan, Chengfei; Zou, Xiaoqin

    2017-08-01

    The growing number of protein-ligand complex structures, particularly the structures of proteins co-bound with different ligands, in the Protein Data Bank helps us tackle two major challenges in molecular docking studies: the protein flexibility and the scoring function. Here, we introduced a systematic strategy by using the information embedded in the known protein-ligand complex structures to improve both binding mode and binding affinity predictions. Specifically, a ligand similarity calculation method was employed to search a receptor structure with a bound ligand sharing high similarity with the query ligand for the docking use. The strategy was applied to the two datasets (HSP90 and MAP4K4) in recent D3R Grand Challenge 2015. In addition, for the HSP90 dataset, a system-specific scoring function (ITScore2_hsp90) was generated by recalibrating our statistical potential-based scoring function (ITScore2) using the known protein-ligand complex structures and the statistical mechanics-based iterative method. For the HSP90 dataset, better performances were achieved for both binding mode and binding affinity predictions comparing with the original ITScore2 and with ensemble docking. For the MAP4K4 dataset, although there were only eight known protein-ligand complex structures, our docking strategy achieved a comparable performance with ensemble docking. Our method for receptor conformational selection and iterative method for the development of system-specific statistical potential-based scoring functions can be easily applied to other protein targets that have a number of protein-ligand complex structures available to improve predictions on binding.

  13. Big Data and Grand Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnemann, Niels Ole

    2016-01-01

    The paper discusses the future of the Humanities and the role of Digital Humanities. Taking the point of departure in Rens Bods “A new History of the humanities” (2013) it is argued that the current crisis within the Humanities and Digital Humanities is not as much about different notions of cult...

  14. Grand challenges for crop science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop science is a highly integrative science using the disciplines of conventional plant breeding, transgenic crop improvement, plant physiology, and cropping system sciences to develop improved varieties of agronomic, turf, and forage crops to produce feed, food, fuel, and fiber for our world's gro...

  15. The lattice QCD grand challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilcup, G.

    1991-01-01

    Until relatively recently, a taxonomist of science would divide most areas of physics into two types: theoretical and experimental. With the advent of large scale computing, however, there is now another recognized field: computational physics. For there is now another recognized field: computational physics. For High Energy Physics one of the most prominent manifestations of this phenomenon is the emergence of the discipline known as lattice Quantum Chromodynamics, or lattice QCD. Problems which a decade ago seemed intractable are not succumbing to large scale numerical simulations. These simulations are consuming vast amounts of computer time these days, and promise to do so for at least the next decade. To take but one example, in each of the last three years, the Department of Energy has allocated several thousand Cray-2 hours at NERSC for the computation of certain weak interaction matrix elements. In the following pages the author will give a brief overview of this and some other projects

  16. Performance of HADDOCK and a simple contact-based protein-ligand binding affinity predictor in the D3R Grand Challenge 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkcuoglu, Zeynep; Koukos, Panagiotis I.; Citro, Nevia; Trellet, Mikael E.; Rodrigues, J. P. G. L. M.; Moreira, Irina S.; Roel-Touris, Jorge; Melquiond, Adrien S. J.; Geng, Cunliang; Schaarschmidt, Jörg; Xue, Li C.; Vangone, Anna; Bonvin, A. M. J. J.

    2018-01-01

    We present the performance of HADDOCK, our information-driven docking software, in the second edition of the D3R Grand Challenge. In this blind experiment, participants were requested to predict the structures and binding affinities of complexes between the Farnesoid X nuclear receptor and 102 different ligands. The models obtained in Stage1 with HADDOCK and ligand-specific protocol show an average ligand RMSD of 5.1 Å from the crystal structure. Only 6/35 targets were within 2.5 Å RMSD from the reference, which prompted us to investigate the limiting factors and revise our protocol for Stage2. The choice of the receptor conformation appeared to have the strongest influence on the results. Our Stage2 models were of higher quality (13 out of 35 were within 2.5 Å), with an average RMSD of 4.1 Å. The docking protocol was applied to all 102 ligands to generate poses for binding affinity prediction. We developed a modified version of our contact-based binding affinity predictor PRODIGY, using the number of interatomic contacts classified by their type and the intermolecular electrostatic energy. This simple structure-based binding affinity predictor shows a Kendall's Tau correlation of 0.37 in ranking the ligands (7th best out of 77 methods, 5th/25 groups). Those results were obtained from the average prediction over the top10 poses, irrespective of their similarity/correctness, underscoring the robustness of our simple predictor. This results in an enrichment factor of 2.5 compared to a random predictor for ranking ligands within the top 25%, making it a promising approach to identify lead compounds in virtual screening.

  17. Leveraging this Golden Age of Remote Sensing and Modeling of Terrestrial Hydrology to Understand Water Cycling in the Water Availability Grand Challenge for North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, T. H.; Famiglietti, J. S.; Stephens, G. L.

    2016-12-01

    We live in a time of increasing strains on our global fresh water availability due to increasing population, warming climate, changes in precipitation, and extensive depletion of groundwater supplies. At the same time, we have seen enormous growth in capabilities to remotely sense the regional to global water cycle and model complex systems with physically based frameworks. The GEWEX Water Availability Grand Challenge for North America is poised to leverage this convergence of remote sensing and modeling capabilities to answer fundamental questions on the water cycle. In particular, we envision an experiment that targets the complex and resource-critical Western US from California to just into the Great Plains, constraining physically-based hydrologic modeling with the US and international remote sensing capabilities. In particular, the last decade has seen the implementation or soon-to-be launch of water cycle missions such as GRACE and GRACE-FO for groundwater, SMAP for soil moisture, GPM for precipitation, SWOT for terrestrial surface water, and the Airborne Snow Observatory for snowpack. With the advent of convection-resolving mesoscale climate and water cycle modeling (e.g. WRF, WRF-Hydro) and mesoscale models capable of quantitative assimilation of remotely sensed data (e.g. the JPL Western States Water Mission), we can now begin to test hypotheses on the nature and changes in the water cycle of the Western US from a physical standpoint. In turn, by fusing water cycle science, water management, and ecosystem management while addressing these hypotheses, this golden age of remote sensing and modeling can bring all fields into a markedly less uncertain state of present knowledge and decadal scale forecasts.

  18. The Challenges of Electronic Health Records and Diabetes Electronic Prescribing: Implications for Safety Net Care for Diverse Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Ratanawongsa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Widespread electronic health record (EHR implementation creates new challenges in the diabetes care of complex and diverse populations, including safe medication prescribing for patients with limited health literacy and limited English proficiency. This review highlights how the EHR electronic prescribing transformation has affected diabetes care for vulnerable patients and offers recommendations for improving patient safety through EHR electronic prescribing design, implementation, policy, and research. Specifically, we present evidence for (1 the adoption of RxNorm; (2 standardized naming and picklist options for high alert medications such as insulin; (3 the widespread implementation of universal medication schedule and language-concordant labels, with the expansion of electronic prescription 140-character limit; (4 enhanced bidirectional communication with pharmacy partners; and (5 informatics and implementation research in safety net healthcare systems to examine how EHR tools and practices affect diverse vulnerable populations.

  19. Using the Electronic Health Record in Nursing Research: Challenges and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Joanne G; McGrath, Robert J; Fetzer, Susan J; Mittal, Prashant; Bourgoine, Derek

    2015-10-01

    Changes in the patient record from the paper to the electronic health record format present challenges and opportunities for the nurse researcher. Current use of data from the electronic health record is in a state of flux. Novel data analytic techniques and massive data sets provide new opportunities for nursing science. Realization of a strong electronic data output future relies on meeting challenges of system use and operability, data presentation, and privacy. Nurse researchers need to rethink aspects of proposal development. Joining ongoing national efforts aimed at creating usable data output is encouraged as a means to affect system design. Working to address challenges and embrace opportunities will help grow the science in a way that answers important patient care questions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Electronics Thermal Management in Information and Communications Technologies: Challenges and Future Directions

    OpenAIRE

    Garimella, S. V.; Persoons, T.; Weibel, J. A.; Gektin, V.

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews thermal management challenges encountered in a wide range of electronics cooling applications from large-scale (data center and telecommunication) to smallscale systems (personal, portable/wearable, and automotive). This paper identifies drivers for progress and immediate and future challenges based on discussions at the 3rd Workshop on Thermal Management in Telecommunication Systems and Data Centers held in Redwood City, CA, USA, on November 4–5, 2015. Participants in this...

  1. Efect of intercellular extracts from banana inoculated leaves with Mycosphaerella fijiensis Morelet, on chloroplast electronic transport of Grande naine (AAA cv.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Leiva-Mora

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Some foliar pathogens colonize intercellular spaces of damage tissues during infection process, mediated by toxins production and diffusion to kill adjacent healthy cells. Due to the absence of reliable bioassays, the physiologic effects of several phytotoxins are still ignored on cellular membranous systems of the affected cells. In the present work it was extracted the intercellular content from not inoculated and inoculated banana leaves with different Mycosphaerella fijiensis strains. Their effects on chloroplasts of Grande naine cv were evaluated by the absorbance evolution (595 nm of Hill reactive (DCPIP, mixture with 810 ì l of chloroplasts suspension and 99 ì l of the intercellular contents. The electronic exchange on chloroplasts suspension was inhibited by intercellular contents of inoculated leaves. The intercellular contents from leaves inoculated with I1 (high virulence strain had a major inhibiter effect respect to leaves inoculates with G1 strain (low virulence, showing a correspondence between the inhibiter effect of intercellular contents and the affection levels of affected tissues. The procedures used in this work will let to make studies concerned with Mycosphaerella fijiensis-Musa spp interactions and the future breeding programs. Key words: banana breeding, black Sigatoka, host pathogen interaction, physiological bioassays

  2. Challenges with Electrical, Electronics, and Electromechanical Parts for James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jah, Muzar A.; Jeffers, Basil S.

    2016-01-01

    James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is the space-based observatory that will extend the knowledge gained by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Hubble focuses on optical and ultraviolet wavelengths while JWST focuses on the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, to see the earliest stars and galaxies that formed in the Universe and to look deep into nearby dust clouds to study the formation of stars and planets. JWST, which commenced creation in 1996, is scheduled to launch in 2018. It includes a suite of four instruments, the spacecraft bus, optical telescope element, Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM, the platform to hold the instruments), and a sunshield. The mass of JWST is approximately 6200 kg, including observatory, on-orbit consumables and launch vehicle adaptor. Many challenges were overcome while providing the electrical and electronic components for the Goddard Space Flight Center hardware builds. Other difficulties encountered included developing components to work at cryogenic temperatures, failures of electronic components during development and flight builds, Integration and Test electronic parts problems, and managing technical issues with international partners. This paper will present the context of JWST from a EEE (electrical, electronic, and electromechanical) perspective with examples of challenges and lessons learned throughout the design, development, and fabrication of JWST in cooperation with our associated partners including the Canadian Space Agency (CSA), the European Space Agency (ESA), Lockheed Martin and their respective associated partners. Technical challenges and lessons learned will be discussed.

  3. Current status and future perspectives of electron interactions with molecules, clusters, surfaces, and interfaces [Workshop on Fundamental challenges in electron-driven chemistry; Workshop on Electron-driven processes: Scientific challenges and technological opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, Kurt H.; McCurdy, C. William; Orlando, Thomas M.; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2000-09-01

    This report is based largely on presentations and discussions at two workshops and contributions from workshop participants. The workshop on Fundamental Challenges in Electron-Driven Chemistry was held in Berkeley, October 9-10, 1998, and addressed questions regarding theory, computation, and simulation. The workshop on Electron-Driven Processes: Scientific Challenges and Technological Opportunities was held at Stevens Institute of Technology, March 16-17, 2000, and focused largely on experiments. Electron-molecule and electron-atom collisions initiate and drive almost all the relevant chemical processes associated with radiation chemistry, environmental chemistry, stability of waste repositories, plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, plasma processing of materials for microelectronic devices and other applications, and novel light sources for research purposes (e.g. excimer lamps in the extreme ultraviolet) and in everyday lighting applications. The life sciences are a rapidly advancing field where the important role of electron-driven processes is only now beginning to be recognized. Many of the applications of electron-initiated chemical processes require results in the near term. A large-scale, multidisciplinary and collaborative effort should be mounted to solve these problems in a timely way so that their solution will have the needed impact on the urgent questions of understanding the physico-chemical processes initiated and driven by electron interactions.

  4. From electronic consumer products to e-wastes: Global outlook, waste quantities, recycling challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, Berrin

    2017-01-01

    Advancements in technology, materials development, and manufacturing processes have changed the consumer products and composition of municipal solid waste (MSW) since 1960s. Increasing quantities of discarded consumer products remain a major challenge for recycling efforts, especially for discarded electronic products (also referred as e-waste). The growing demand for high tech products has increased the e-waste quantities and its cross boundary transport globally. This paper reviews the challenges associated with increasing e-waste quantities. The increasing need for raw materials (especially for rare earth and minor elements) and unregulated e-waste recycling operations in developing and underdeveloped counties contribute to the growing concerns for e-waste management. Although the markets for recycled materials are increasing; there are major challenges for development of the necessary infrastructure for e-waste management and accountability as well as development of effective materials recovery technologies and product design. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Radio-frequency flexible and stretchable electronics: the need, challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yei Hwan; Seo, Jung-Hun; Zhang, Huilong; Lee, Juhwan; Cho, Sang June; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Ma, Zhenqiang

    2017-05-01

    Successful integration of ultrathin flexible or stretchable systems with new applications, such as medical devices and biodegradable electronics, have intrigued many researchers and industries around the globe to seek materials and processes to create high-performance, non-invasive and cost-effective electronics to match those of state-of-the-art devices. Nevertheless, the crucial concept of transmitting data or power wirelessly for such unconventional devices has been difficult to realize due to limitations of radio-frequency (RF) electronics in individual components that form a wireless circuitry, such as antenna, transmission line, active devices, passive devices etc. To overcome such challenges, these components must be developed in a step-by-step manner, as each component faces a number of different challenges in ultrathin formats. Here, we report on materials and design considerations for fabricating flexible and stretchable electronics systems that operate in the microwave level. High-speed flexible active devices, including cost effective Si-based strained MOSFETs, GaAs-based HBTs and GaN-based HEMTs, performing at multi-gigahertz frequencies are presented. Furthermore, flexible or stretchable passive devices, including capacitors, inductors and transmission lines that are vital parts of a microwave circuitry are also demonstrated. We also present unique applications using the presented flexible or stretchable RF components, including wearable RF electronics and biodegradable RF electronics, which were impossible to achieve using conventional rigid, wafer-based technology. Further opportunities like implantable systems exist utilizing such ultrathin RF components, which are discussed in this report as well.

  6. Electronic commerce, automation and online banking in Nigeria: challenges and benefits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Sc., M. Sc. Stephen A. Ojeka

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Electronic banking has been around for some time in the form of automatic teller machines and telephone transactions. More recently, it has been metamorphosed by the Internet; a new look and delivery channel for banking services that benefits both customers and banks. The objective of this paper is to find out the correlation between the anticipated benefits/challenges and encountered benefits/challenges. This paper therefore empirically, adopted the use of survey research to explore in quantitative terms the various challenges and benefits e-business poses to Nigeria businesses, with particular reference to Banking and Finance Industry. It was found out that there is statistically significant difference between the anticipated and encountered benefits and major challenge is the security breach faced the customers. We therefore recommend that workshops should be organized for customers periodically on how to keep their data secret especially on how to combine numbers to form password and Constant training of employees both local and international on new development in online trading should be encouraged.

  7. Modeling radiation belt electron dynamics during GEM challenge intervals with the DREAM3D diffusion model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Weichao; Cunningham, G. S.; Chen, Y.; Henderson, M. G.; Camporeale, E.; Reeves, G. D.

    2013-10-01

    a response to the Geospace Environment Modeling (GEM) "Global Radiation Belt Modeling Challenge," a 3D diffusion model is used to simulate the radiation belt electron dynamics during two intervals of the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES) mission, 15 August to 15 October 1990 and 1 February to 31 July 1991. The 3D diffusion model, developed as part of the Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM) project, includes radial, pitch angle, and momentum diffusion and mixed pitch angle-momentum diffusion, which are driven by dynamic wave databases from the statistical CRRES wave data, including plasmaspheric hiss, lower-band, and upper-band chorus. By comparing the DREAM3D model outputs to the CRRES electron phase space density (PSD) data, we find that, with a data-driven boundary condition at Lmax = 5.5, the electron enhancements can generally be explained by radial diffusion, though additional local heating from chorus waves is required. Because the PSD reductions are included in the boundary condition at Lmax = 5.5, our model captures the fast electron dropouts over a large L range, producing better model performance compared to previous published results. Plasmaspheric hiss produces electron losses inside the plasmasphere, but the model still sometimes overestimates the PSD there. Test simulations using reduced radial diffusion coefficients or increased pitch angle diffusion coefficients inside the plasmasphere suggest that better wave models and more realistic radial diffusion coefficients, both inside and outside the plasmasphere, are needed to improve the model performance. Statistically, the results show that, with the data-driven outer boundary condition, including radial diffusion and plasmaspheric hiss is sufficient to model the electrons during geomagnetically quiet times, but to best capture the radiation belt variations during active times, pitch angle and momentum diffusion from chorus waves are required.

  8. Deployment of German Electronic Citizen Cards in Banking: Opportunities and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büger, Matthias

    The German federal government plans to issue an electronic citizen card (eID) in 2009, replacing the current identity card (Personalausweis). Since the eID should be good for identification in E-government as well as E-business applications, it is aimed to be used in the banking environment. One application would be opening a bank account in the internet. If this was possible, the process would be much easier than today. However, German law still requires a physical ID card. We will discuss the opportunities and the challenges of possible usage of eID in banking.

  9. Process qualification and control in electron beams--requirements, methods, new concepts and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mittendorfer, J.; Gratzl, F.; Hanis, D.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper the status of process qualification and control in electron beam irradiation is analyzed in terms of requirements, concepts, methods and challenges for a state-of-the-art process control concept for medical device sterilization. Aspects from process qualification to routine process control are described together with the associated process variables. As a case study the 10 MeV beams at Mediscan GmbH are considered. Process control concepts like statistical process control (SPC) and a new concept to determine process capability is briefly discussed

  10. Open Access to Digital Information: Opportunities and Challenges Identified During the Electronic Geophysical Year

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W K Peterson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The vision of the Electronic Geophysical Year (eGY is that we can achieve a major step forward in geoscience capability, knowledge, and usage throughout the world for the benefit of humanity by accelerating the adoption of modern and visionary practices such as virtual observatories for managing and sharing data and information. eGY has found that the biggest challenges to implementing the vision are educating program mangers and senior scientists on the need for modern data management techniques and providing incentives for practitioners of the new field of geoinformatics.

  11. Challenges for eco-design of emerging technologies: The case of electronic textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köhler, Andreas R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Recent innovations of electronic textiles and their end-of-life impacts are reviewed. • The properties of e-textiles are examined against Design for Recycling (DfR) principles. • Eco-design strategies for sustainable product development are discussed. • Compatibility standards for e-textiles are proposed as a waste prevention strategy. • Labelling of e-textiles is suggested as a measure to facilitate recycling. - Abstract: The combination of textile and electronic technologies results in new challenges for sustainable product design. Electronic textiles (e-textiles) feature a seamless integration of textiles with electronics and other high-tech materials. Such products may, if they become mass consumer applications, result in a new kind of waste that could be difficult to recycle. The ongoing innovation process of e-textiles holds opportunities to prevent future end-of-life impacts. Implementing eco-design in the technological development process can help to minimise future waste. However, the existing Design for Recycling (DfR) principles for textiles or electronics do not match with the properties of the combined products. This article examines possibilities to advance eco-design of a converging technology. DfR strategies for e-textiles are discussed from the background of contemporary innovation trends. Three waste preventative eco-design approaches for e-textiles are discussed: 1 harnessing the inherent advantages of smart materials for sustainable design; 2 establishing open compatibility standards; 3 labelling the e-textiles to facilitate their recycling. It is argued that life-cycle thinking needs to be implemented concurrent to the technological development process

  12. Consensus Statement on Electronic Health Predictive Analytics: A Guiding Framework to Address Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarasingham, Ruben; Audet, Anne-Marie J; Bates, David W; Glenn Cohen, I; Entwistle, Martin; Escobar, G J; Liu, Vincent; Etheredge, Lynn; Lo, Bernard; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Ram, Sudha; Saria, Suchi; Schilling, Lisa M; Shahi, Anand; Stewart, Walter F; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Xie, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The recent explosion in available electronic health record (EHR) data is motivating a rapid expansion of electronic health care predictive analytic (e-HPA) applications, defined as the use of electronic algorithms that forecast clinical events in real time with the intent to improve patient outcomes and reduce costs. There is an urgent need for a systematic framework to guide the development and application of e-HPA to ensure that the field develops in a scientifically sound, ethical, and efficient manner. Building upon earlier frameworks of model development and utilization, we identify the emerging opportunities and challenges of e-HPA, propose a framework that enables us to realize these opportunities, address these challenges, and motivate e-HPA stakeholders to both adopt and continuously refine the framework as the applications of e-HPA emerge. To achieve these objectives, 17 experts with diverse expertise including methodology, ethics, legal, regulation, and health care delivery systems were assembled to identify emerging opportunities and challenges of e-HPA and to propose a framework to guide the development and application of e-HPA. The framework proposed by the panel includes three key domains where e-HPA differs qualitatively from earlier generations of models and algorithms (Data Barriers, Transparency, and ETHICS) and areas where current frameworks are insufficient to address the emerging opportunities and challenges of e-HPA (Regulation and Certification; and Education and Training). The following list of recommendations summarizes the key points of the framework: Data Barriers: Establish mechanisms within the scientific community to support data sharing for predictive model development and testing.Transparency: Set standards around e-HPA validation based on principles of scientific transparency and reproducibility. Develop both individual-centered and society-centered risk-benefit approaches to evaluate e-HPA.Regulation and Certification: Construct a

  13. Using physics-based pose predictions and free energy perturbation calculations to predict binding poses and relative binding affinities for FXR ligands in the D3R Grand Challenge 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Christina; Vasilakaki, Sofia; Dellis, Dimitris; Cournia, Zoe

    2018-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design has become an integral part of drug discovery and development in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry, and is nowadays extensively used in the lead identification and lead optimization phases. The drug design data resource (D3R) organizes challenges against blinded experimental data to prospectively test computational methodologies as an opportunity for improved methods and algorithms to emerge. We participated in Grand Challenge 2 to predict the crystallographic poses of 36 Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR)-bound ligands and the relative binding affinities for two designated subsets of 18 and 15 FXR-bound ligands. Here, we present our methodology for pose and affinity predictions and its evaluation after the release of the experimental data. For predicting the crystallographic poses, we used docking and physics-based pose prediction methods guided by the binding poses of native ligands. For FXR ligands with known chemotypes in the PDB, we accurately predicted their binding modes, while for those with unknown chemotypes the predictions were more challenging. Our group ranked #1st (based on the median RMSD) out of 46 groups, which submitted complete entries for the binding pose prediction challenge. For the relative binding affinity prediction challenge, we performed free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. FEP/MD calculations displayed a high success rate in identifying compounds with better or worse binding affinity than the reference (parent) compound. Our studies suggest that when ligands with chemical precedent are available in the literature, binding pose predictions using docking and physics-based methods are reliable; however, predictions are challenging for ligands with completely unknown chemotypes. We also show that FEP/MD calculations hold predictive value and can nowadays be used in a high throughput mode in a lead optimization project provided that crystal structures of

  14. Using physics-based pose predictions and free energy perturbation calculations to predict binding poses and relative binding affinities for FXR ligands in the D3R Grand Challenge 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanasiou, Christina; Vasilakaki, Sofia; Dellis, Dimitris; Cournia, Zoe

    2018-01-01

    Computer-aided drug design has become an integral part of drug discovery and development in the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industry, and is nowadays extensively used in the lead identification and lead optimization phases. The drug design data resource (D3R) organizes challenges against blinded experimental data to prospectively test computational methodologies as an opportunity for improved methods and algorithms to emerge. We participated in Grand Challenge 2 to predict the crystallographic poses of 36 Farnesoid X Receptor (FXR)-bound ligands and the relative binding affinities for two designated subsets of 18 and 15 FXR-bound ligands. Here, we present our methodology for pose and affinity predictions and its evaluation after the release of the experimental data. For predicting the crystallographic poses, we used docking and physics-based pose prediction methods guided by the binding poses of native ligands. For FXR ligands with known chemotypes in the PDB, we accurately predicted their binding modes, while for those with unknown chemotypes the predictions were more challenging. Our group ranked #1st (based on the median RMSD) out of 46 groups, which submitted complete entries for the binding pose prediction challenge. For the relative binding affinity prediction challenge, we performed free energy perturbation (FEP) calculations coupled with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. FEP/MD calculations displayed a high success rate in identifying compounds with better or worse binding affinity than the reference (parent) compound. Our studies suggest that when ligands with chemical precedent are available in the literature, binding pose predictions using docking and physics-based methods are reliable; however, predictions are challenging for ligands with completely unknown chemotypes. We also show that FEP/MD calculations hold predictive value and can nowadays be used in a high throughput mode in a lead optimization project provided that crystal structures of

  15. Electronic cigarettes and vaping: a new challenge in clinical medicine and public health. A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzolo, Dominic L

    2013-11-18

    Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette) use, or vaping, in the United States and worldwide is increasing. Their use is highly controversial from scientific, political, financial, psychological, and sociological ideologies. Given the controversial nature of e-cigarettes and vaping, how should medical care providers advise their patients? To effectively face this new challenge, health care professionals need to become more familiar with the existing literature concerning e-cigarettes and vaping, especially the scientific literature. Thus, the aim of this article is to present a review of the scientific evidence-based primary literature concerning electronic cigarettes and vaping. A search of the most current literature using the pubmed database dating back to 2008, and using electronic cigarette(s) or e-cigarette(s) as key words, yielded a total of 66 highly relevant articles. These articles primarily deal with (1) consumer-based surveys regarding personal views on vaping, (2) chemical analysis of e-cigarette cartridges, solutions, and mist, (3) nicotine content, delivery, and pharmacokinetics, and (4) clinical and physiological studies investigating the effects of acute vaping. When compared to the effects of smoking, the scant available literature suggests that vaping could be a "harm reduction" alternative to smoking and a possible means for smoking cessation, at least to the same degree as other Food and Drug Administration-approved nicotine replacement therapies. However, it is unclear if vaping e-cigarettes will reduce or increase nicotine addiction. It is obvious that more rigorous investigations of the acute and long-term health effects of vaping are required to establish the safety and efficacy of these devices; especially parallel experiments comparing the cardiopulmonary effects of vaping to smoking. Only then will the medical community be able to adequately meet the new challenge e-cigarettes and vaping present to clinical medicine and public health.

  16. Primary Care Practices’ Abilities And Challenges In Using Electronic Health Record Data For Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Deborah J.; Dorr, David A.; Knierim, Kyle; DuBard, C. Annette; Hemler, Jennifer R.; Hall, Jennifer D.; Marino, Miguel; Solberg, Leif I.; McConnell, K. John; Nichols, Len M.; Nease, Donald E.; Edwards, Samuel T.; Wu, Winfred Y.; Pham-Singer, Hang; Kho, Abel N.; Phillips, Robert L.; Rasmussen, Luke V.; Duffy, F. Daniel; Balasubramanian, Bijal A.

    2018-01-01

    Federal value-based payment programs require primary care practices to conduct quality improvement activities, informed by the electronic reports on clinical quality measures that their electronic health records (EHRs) generate. To determine whether EHRs produce reports adequate to the task, we examined survey responses from 1,492 practices across twelve states, supplemented with qualitative data. Meaningful-use participation, which requires the use of a federally certified EHR, was associated with the ability to generate reports—but the reports did not necessarily support quality improvement initiatives. Practices reported numerous challenges in generating adequate reports, such as difficulty manipulating and aligning measurement time frames with quality improvement needs, lack of functionality for generating reports on electronic clinical quality measures at different levels, discordance between clinical guidelines and measures available in reports, questionable data quality, and vendors that were unreceptive to changing EHR configuration beyond federal requirements. The current state of EHR measurement functionality may be insufficient to support federal initiatives that tie payment to clinical quality measures. PMID:29608365

  17. Primary Care Practices' Abilities And Challenges In Using Electronic Health Record Data For Quality Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Deborah J; Dorr, David A; Knierim, Kyle; DuBard, C Annette; Hemler, Jennifer R; Hall, Jennifer D; Marino, Miguel; Solberg, Leif I; McConnell, K John; Nichols, Len M; Nease, Donald E; Edwards, Samuel T; Wu, Winfred Y; Pham-Singer, Hang; Kho, Abel N; Phillips, Robert L; Rasmussen, Luke V; Duffy, F Daniel; Balasubramanian, Bijal A

    2018-04-01

    Federal value-based payment programs require primary care practices to conduct quality improvement activities, informed by the electronic reports on clinical quality measures that their electronic health records (EHRs) generate. To determine whether EHRs produce reports adequate to the task, we examined survey responses from 1,492 practices across twelve states, supplemented with qualitative data. Meaningful-use participation, which requires the use of a federally certified EHR, was associated with the ability to generate reports-but the reports did not necessarily support quality improvement initiatives. Practices reported numerous challenges in generating adequate reports, such as difficulty manipulating and aligning measurement time frames with quality improvement needs, lack of functionality for generating reports on electronic clinical quality measures at different levels, discordance between clinical guidelines and measures available in reports, questionable data quality, and vendors that were unreceptive to changing EHR configuration beyond federal requirements. The current state of EHR measurement functionality may be insufficient to support federal initiatives that tie payment to clinical quality measures.

  18. Metal-Halide Perovskite Transistors for Printed Electronics: Challenges and Opportunities

    KAUST Repository

    Lin, Yen-Hung

    2017-10-12

    Following the unprecedented rise in photovoltaic power conversion efficiencies during the past five years, metal-halide perovskites (MHPs) have emerged as a new and highly promising class of solar-energy materials. Their extraordinary electrical and optical properties combined with the abundance of the raw materials, the simplicity of synthetic routes, and processing versatility make MHPs ideal for cost-efficient, large-volume manufacturing of a plethora of optoelectronic devices that span far beyond photovoltaics. Herein looks beyond current applications in the field of energy, to the area of large-area electronics using MHPs as the semiconductor material. A comprehensive overview of the relevant fundamental material properties of MHPs, including crystal structure, electronic states, and charge transport, is provided first. Thereafter, recent demonstrations of MHP-based thin-film transistors and their application in logic circuits, as well as bi-functional devices such as light-sensing and light-emitting transistors, are discussed. Finally, the challenges and opportunities in the area of MHPs-based electronics, with particular emphasis on manufacturing, stability, and health and environmental concerns, are highlighted.

  19. Grand Challenges in School Social Work: Collaboration and Constraint in School Social Workers' Sexuality Support for Children with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolin, Sharon J.; Rueda, Heidi Adams; Linton, Kristen F.

    2018-01-01

    Children with disabilities (CWD) face challenges to the development of their sexuality, in part due to a lack of appropriate, tailored sexual education in schools, role ambiguity regarding provision of sexual health services, and widespread discomfort with the topic. However, CWD have unique sexual health needs, an increased vulnerability to…

  20. Susceptibility and hardening of electronic systems to fast transient threats: new challenges ahead

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabath, F.

    2004-05-01

    The field of susceptibility and hardening of electronic systems to transient threats has experienced a significant growth during the past ten years. Driven by the development in the area of non-lethal electromagnetic weapons it has become necessary to extend the classical set of transient threats, consisting of LEMP, ESD and NEMP, by a fast transient threat with an extreme bandwidth. The investigation of the susceptibility to those UWB threats, characterized by a bandwidth of more than a quarter of the center frequency, rise times of less than 200 ps and pulse durations in the ns regime, is of special interest. This paper presents an overview of current challenges of the hardening against UWB threats. It discusses recent research trends in transient susceptibility measurements, protection concepts and methods of analysis.

  1. Susceptibility and hardening of electronic systems to fast transient threats: new challenges ahead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sabath

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of susceptibility and hardening of electronic systems to transient threats has experienced a significant growth during the past ten years. Driven by the development in the area of non-lethal electromagnetic weapons it has become necessary to extend the classical set of transient threats, consisting of LEMP, ESD and NEMP, by a fast transient threat with an extreme bandwidth. The investigation of the susceptibility to those UWB threats, characterized by a bandwidth of more than a quarter of the center frequency, rise times of less than 200 ps and pulse durations in the ns regime, is of special interest. This paper presents an overview of current challenges of the hardening against UWB threats. It discusses recent research trends in transient susceptibility measurements, protection concepts and methods of analysis.

  2. Electronics and triggering challenges for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter for HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Borg, Johan

    2017-01-01

    The High Granularity Calorimeter (HGCAL) is presently being designedto replace the CMS endcap calorimeters for the HighLuminosity phase at LHC. It will feature six million silicon sensor channelsand 52 longitudinal layers. The requirements for the frontendelectronics include a 0.3 fC-10 pC dynamic range, low noise (2000 e-) and low power consumption (10 mW /channel).In addition, the HGCAL will perform 50 ps resolution time of arrivalmeasurements to combat the effect of the large number of interactions taking placeat each bunch crossing, and will transmit both triggered readoutfrom on-detector buffer memory and reduced resolution real-time trigger data.We present the challenges related to the frontend electronics, data transmissionand off-detector trigger preprocessing that must be overcome, and the designconcepts currently being pursued.

  3. Ranking docking poses by graph matching of protein-ligand interactions: lessons learned from the D3R Grand Challenge 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Figueiredo Celestino Gomes, Priscila; Da Silva, Franck; Bret, Guillaume; Rognan, Didier

    2018-01-01

    A novel docking challenge has been set by the Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) in order to predict the pose and affinity ranking of a set of Farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists, prior to the public release of their bound X-ray structures and potencies. In a first phase, 36 agonists were docked to 26 Protein Data Bank (PDB) structures of the FXR receptor, and next rescored using the in-house developed GRIM method. GRIM aligns protein-ligand interaction patterns of docked poses to those of available PDB templates for the target protein, and rescore poses by a graph matching method. In agreement with results obtained during the previous 2015 docking challenge, we clearly show that GRIM rescoring improves the overall quality of top-ranked poses by prioritizing interaction patterns already visited in the PDB. Importantly, this challenge enables us to refine the applicability domain of the method by better defining the conditions of its success. We notably show that rescoring apolar ligands in hydrophobic pockets leads to frequent GRIM failures. In the second phase, 102 FXR agonists were ranked by decreasing affinity according to the Gibbs free energy of the corresponding GRIM-selected poses, computed by the HYDE scoring function. Interestingly, this fast and simple rescoring scheme provided the third most accurate ranking method among 57 contributions. Although the obtained ranking is still unsuitable for hit to lead optimization, the GRIM-HYDE scoring scheme is accurate and fast enough to post-process virtual screening data.

  4. Approaches and challenges to optimising primary care teams’ electronic health record usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy Pandhi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Although the presence of an electronic health record (EHR alone does not ensure high quality, efficient care, few studies have focused on the work of those charged with optimising use of existing EHR functionality.Objective To examine the approaches used and challenges perceived by analysts supporting the optimisation of primary care teams’ EHR use at a large U.S. academic health care system.Methods A qualitative study was conducted. Optimisation analysts and their supervisor were interviewed and data were analysed for themes.Results Analysts needed to reconcile the tension created by organisational mandates focused on the standardisation of EHR processes with the primary care teams’ demand for EHR customisation. They gained an understanding of health information technology (HIT leadership’s and primary care team’s goals through attending meetings, reading meeting minutes and visiting with clinical teams. Within what was organisationally possible, EHR education could then be tailored to fit team needs. Major challenges were related to organisational attempts to standardise EHR use despite varied clinic contexts, personnel readiness and technical issues with the EHR platform. Forcing standardisation upon clinical needs that current EHR functionality could not satisfy was difficult.Conclusions Dedicated optimisation analysts can add value to health systems through playing a mediating role between HIT leadership and care teams. Our findings imply that EHR optimisation should be performed with an in-depth understanding of the workflow, cognitive and interactional activities in primary care.

  5. Approaches and challenges to optimising primary care teams' electronic health record usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandhi, Nancy; Yang, Wan-Lin; Karp, Zaher; Young, Alexander; Beasley, John W; Kraft, Sally; Carayon, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Although the presence of an electronic health record (EHR) alone does not ensure high quality, efficient care, few studies have focused on the work of those charged with optimising use of existing EHR functionality. To examine the approaches used and challenges perceived by analysts supporting the optimisation of primary care teams' EHR use at a large U.S. academic health care system. A qualitative study was conducted. Optimisation analysts and their supervisor were interviewed and data were analysed for themes. Analysts needed to reconcile the tension created by organisational mandates focused on the standardisation of EHR processes with the primary care teams' demand for EHR customisation. They gained an understanding of health information technology (HIT) leadership's and primary care team's goals through attending meetings, reading meeting minutes and visiting with clinical teams. Within what was organisationally possible, EHR education could then be tailored to fit team needs. Major challenges were related to organisational attempts to standardise EHR use despite varied clinic contexts, personnel readiness and technical issues with the EHR platform. Forcing standardisation upon clinical needs that current EHR functionality could not satisfy was difficult. Dedicated optimisation analysts can add value to health systems through playing a mediating role between HIT leadership and care teams. Our findings imply that EHR optimisation should be performed with an in-depth understanding of the workflow, cognitive and interactional activities in primary care.

  6. Electronic Health Record Adoption In US Hospitals: Progress Continues, But Challenges Persist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler-Milstein, Julia; DesRoches, Catherine M; Kralovec, Peter; Foster, Gregory; Worzala, Chantal; Charles, Dustin; Searcy, Talisha; Jha, Ashish K

    2015-12-01

    Achieving nationwide adoption of electronic health records (EHRs) remains an important policy priority. While EHR adoption has increased steadily since 2010, it is unclear how providers that have not yet adopted will fare now that federal incentives have converted to penalties. We used 2008-14 national data, which includes the most recently available, to examine hospital EHR trends. We found large gains in adoption, with 75 percent of US hospitals now having adopted at least a basic EHR system--up from 59 percent in 2013. However, small and rural hospitals continue to lag behind. Among hospitals without a basic EHR system, the function most often not yet adopted (in 61 percent of hospitals) was physician notes. We also saw large increases in the ability to meet core stage 2 meaningful-use criteria (40.5 percent of hospitals, up from 5.8 percent in 2013); much of this progress resulted from increased ability to meet criteria related to exchange of health information with patients and with other physicians during care transitions. Finally, hospitals most often reported up-front and ongoing costs, physician cooperation, and complexity of meeting meaningful-use criteria as challenges. Our findings suggest that nationwide hospital EHR adoption is in reach but will require attention to small and rural hospitals and strategies to address financial challenges, particularly now that penalties for lack of adoption have begun. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  7. Binding free energy predictions of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists using a linear interaction energy (LIE) approach with reliability estimation: application to the D3R Grand Challenge 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, Eko Aditya; van Dijk, Marc; Vermeulen, Nico P. E.; Geerke, Daan P.

    2018-01-01

    Computational protein binding affinity prediction can play an important role in drug research but performing efficient and accurate binding free energy calculations is still challenging. In the context of phase 2 of the Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) Grand Challenge 2 we used our automated eTOX ALLIES approach to apply the (iterative) linear interaction energy (LIE) method and we evaluated its performance in predicting binding affinities for farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists. Efficiency was obtained by our pre-calibrated LIE models and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at the nanosecond scale, while predictive accuracy was obtained for a small subset of compounds. Using our recently introduced reliability estimation metrics, we could classify predictions with higher confidence by featuring an applicability domain (AD) analysis in combination with protein-ligand interaction profiling. The outcomes of and agreement between our AD and interaction-profile analyses to distinguish and rationalize the performance of our predictions highlighted the relevance of sufficiently exploring protein-ligand interactions during training and it demonstrated the possibility to quantitatively and efficiently evaluate if this is achieved by using simulation data only.

  8. Binding free energy predictions of farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists using a linear interaction energy (LIE) approach with reliability estimation: application to the D3R Grand Challenge 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifai, Eko Aditya; van Dijk, Marc; Vermeulen, Nico P E; Geerke, Daan P

    2018-01-01

    Computational protein binding affinity prediction can play an important role in drug research but performing efficient and accurate binding free energy calculations is still challenging. In the context of phase 2 of the Drug Design Data Resource (D3R) Grand Challenge 2 we used our automated eTOX ALLIES approach to apply the (iterative) linear interaction energy (LIE) method and we evaluated its performance in predicting binding affinities for farnesoid X receptor (FXR) agonists. Efficiency was obtained by our pre-calibrated LIE models and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations at the nanosecond scale, while predictive accuracy was obtained for a small subset of compounds. Using our recently introduced reliability estimation metrics, we could classify predictions with higher confidence by featuring an applicability domain (AD) analysis in combination with protein-ligand interaction profiling. The outcomes of and agreement between our AD and interaction-profile analyses to distinguish and rationalize the performance of our predictions highlighted the relevance of sufficiently exploring protein-ligand interactions during training and it demonstrated the possibility to quantitatively and efficiently evaluate if this is achieved by using simulation data only.

  9. Challenges for single molecule electronic devices with nanographene and organic molecules. Do single molecules offer potential as elements of electronic devices in the next generation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enoki, Toshiaki; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2018-03-01

    Interest in utilizing organic molecules to fabricate electronic materials has existed ever since organic (molecular) semiconductors were first discovered in the 1950s. Since then, scientists have devoted serious effort to the creation of various molecule-based electronic systems, such as molecular metals and molecular superconductors. Single-molecule electronics and the associated basic science have emerged over the past two decades and provided hope for the development of highly integrated molecule-based electronic devices in the future (after the Si-based technology era has ended). Here, nanographenes (nano-sized graphene) with atomically precise structures are among the most promising molecules that can be utilized for electronic/spintronic devices. To manipulate single small molecules for an electronic device, a single molecular junction has been developed. It is a powerful tool that allows even small molecules to be utilized. External electric, magnetic, chemical, and mechanical perturbations can change the physical and chemical properties of molecules in a way that is different from bulk materials. Therefore, the various functionalities of molecules, along with changes induced by external perturbations, allows us to create electronic devices that we cannot create using current top-down Si-based technology. Future challenges that involve the incorporation of condensed matter physics, quantum chemistry calculations, organic synthetic chemistry, and electronic device engineering are expected to open a new era in single-molecule device electronic technology.

  10. Computational cardiology and risk stratification for sudden cardiac death: one of the grand challenges for cardiology in the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Matthew D.; Abi‐Gerges, Najah; Couderc, Jean‐Philippe; Fermini, Bernard; Hancox, Jules C.; Knollmann, Bjorn C.; Mirams, Gary R.; Skinner, Jon; Zareba, Wojciech; Vandenberg, Jamie I.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Risk stratification in the context of sudden cardiac death has been acknowledged as one of the major challenges facing cardiology for the past four decades. In recent years, the advent of high performance computing has facilitated organ‐level simulation of the heart, meaning we can now examine the causes, mechanisms and impact of cardiac dysfunction in silico. As a result, computational cardiology, largely driven by the Physiome project, now stands at the threshold of clinical utility in regards to risk stratification and treatment of patients at risk of sudden cardiac death. In this white paper, we outline a roadmap of what needs to be done to make this translational step, using the relatively well‐developed case of acquired or drug‐induced long QT syndrome as an exemplar case. PMID:27060987

  11. Extracting Surveillance Data from Templated Sections of an Electronic Medical Note: Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlapalli, Adi; Divita, Guy; Carter, Marjorie; Shen, Shuying; Palmer, Miland; Forbush, Tyler; South, Brett; Redd, Andrew; Sauer, Brian; Samore, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    documents as determined by human review. The NLP algorithm successfully extracted concepts from these documents. The H set had an average of 8 concepts related to homelessness per document (median 8, range 1 to 34). The NH set had an average 2 concepts (median 1, range 1 to 13)”. Thirteen template patterns were identified in this set of documents. The three most common were check boxes with square brackets, Yes/No and free text answer after a question. Several positively and negatively asserted concepts were noted to be in the responses to templated questions such as “Are you currently homeless: Yes or No”; “How many times have you been homeless in the past 3 years: (free text response)”; “Have you ever been in jail? [Y] or [N]”; Are you in need of substance abuse services? Yes or No”. Human review of a random sample of documents at the concept level indicated that the NLP algorithm generated 28% false positives in extracting concepts related to homelessness when templates were ignored among the H documents. When the algorithm was refined to include templates, the false positive rate declined to 22%. For the NH documents, the corresponding false positive rates were 56% and 21%. Conclusions To our knowledge, this is one of the first attempts to address the problem of information extraction from templates or templated sections of the EMR. A key challenge of templates is that they will most likely lead to poor performance of NLP algorithms and cause bottlenecks in processing if they are not considered. Acknowledging the presence of templates and refining NLP algorithms to handle them improves information extraction from free text medical notes, thus creating an opportunity for improved surveillance using the EMR. Algorithms will likely need to be customized to the electronic medical record and the surveillance domain of interest. A more detailed analysis of the templated sections is underway.

  12. The challenge of electronic waste (e-waste) management in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osibanjo, O; Nnorom, I C

    2007-12-01

    Information and telecommunications technology (ICT) and computer Internet networking has penetrated nearly every aspect of modern life, and is positively affecting human life even in the most remote areas of the developing countries. The rapid growth in ICT has led to an improvement in the capacity of computers but simultaneously to a decrease in the products lifetime as a result of which increasingly large quantities of waste electrical and electronic equipment (e-waste) are generated annually. ICT development in most developing countries, particularly in Africa, depends more on secondhand or refurbished EEEs most of which are imported without confirmatory testing for functionality. As a result large quantities of e-waste are presently being managed in these countries. The challenges facing the developing countries in e-waste management include: an absence of infrastructure for appropriate waste management, an absence of legislation dealing specifically with e-waste, an absence of any framework for end-of-life (EoL) product take-back or implementation of extended producer responsibility (EPR). This study examines these issues as they relate to practices in developing countries with emphasis on the prevailing situation in Nigeria. Effective management of e-waste in the developing countries demands the implementation of EPR, the establishment of product reuse through remanufacturing and the introduction of efficient recycling facilities. The implementation of a global system for the standardization and certification/labelling of secondhand appliances intended for export to developing countries will be required to control the export of electronic recyclables (e-scarp) in the name of secondhand appliances.

  13. Scientific Grand Challenges: Discovery In Basic Energy Sciences: The Role of Computing at the Extreme Scale - August 13-15, 2009, Washington, D.C.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galli, Giulia [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Workshop Chair; Dunning, Thom [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Workshop Chair

    2009-08-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) and Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) workshop in August 2009 on extreme-scale computing provided a forum for more than 130 researchers to explore the needs and opportunities that will arise due to expected dramatic advances in computing power over the next decade. This scientific community firmly believes that the development of advanced theoretical tools within chemistry, physics, and materials science—combined with the development of efficient computational techniques and algorithms—has the potential to revolutionize the discovery process for materials and molecules with desirable properties. Doing so is necessary to meet the energy and environmental challenges of the 21st century as described in various DOE BES Basic Research Needs reports. Furthermore, computational modeling and simulation are a crucial complement to experimental studies, particularly when quantum mechanical processes controlling energy production, transformations, and storage are not directly observable and/or controllable. Many processes related to the Earth’s climate and subsurface need better modeling capabilities at the molecular level, which will be enabled by extreme-scale computing.

  14. Electronic Health Record Challenges, Workarounds, and Solutions Observed in Practices Integrating Behavioral Health and Primary Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Maribel; Davis, Melinda; Fernald, Doug; Gunn, Rose; Dickinson, Perry; Cohen, Deborah J

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the electronic health record (EHR)-related experiences of practices striving to integrate behavioral health and primary care using tailored, evidenced-based strategies from 2012 to 2014; and the challenges, workarounds and initial health information technology (HIT) solutions that emerged during implementation. This was an observational, cross-case comparative study of 11 diverse practices, including 8 primary care clinics and 3 community mental health centers focused on the implementation of integrated care. Practice characteristics (eg, practice ownership, federal designation, geographic area, provider composition, EHR system, and patient panel characteristics) were collected using a practice information survey and analyzed to report descriptive information. A multidisciplinary team used a grounded theory approach to analyze program documents, field notes from practice observation visits, online diaries, and semistructured interviews. Eight primary care practices used a single EHR and 3 practices used 2 different EHRs, 1 to document behavioral health and 1 to document primary care information. Practices experienced common challenges with their EHRs' capabilities to 1) document and track relevant behavioral health and physical health information, 2) support communication and coordination of care among integrated teams, and 3) exchange information with tablet devices and other EHRs. Practices developed workarounds in response to these challenges: double documentation and duplicate data entry, scanning and transporting documents, reliance on patient or clinician recall for inaccessible EHR information, and use of freestanding tracking systems. As practices gained experience with integration, they began to move beyond workarounds to more permanent HIT solutions ranging in complexity from customized EHR templates, EHR upgrades, and unified EHRs. Integrating behavioral health and primary care further burdens EHRs. Vendors, in cooperation with

  15. The potentials and challenges of electron microscopy in the study of atomic chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banhart, Florian; Torre, Alessandro La; Romdhane, Ferdaous Ben; Cretu, Ovidiu

    2017-04-01

    The article is a brief review on the potential of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the investigation of atom chains which are the paradigm of a strictly one-dimensional material. After the progress of TEM in the study of new two-dimensional materials, microscopy of free-standing one-dimensional structures is a new challenge with its inherent potentials and difficulties. In-situ experiments in the TEM allowed, for the first time, to generate isolated atomic chains consisting of metals, carbon or boron nitride. Besides having delivered a solid proof for the existence of atomic chains, in-situ TEM studies also enabled us to measure the electrical properties of these fundamental linear structures. While ballistic quantum conductivity is observed in chains of metal atoms, electrical transport in chains of sp1-hybridized carbon is limited by resonant states and reflections at the contacts. Although substantial progress has been made in recent TEM studies of atom chains, fundamental questions have to be answered, concerning the structural stability of the chains, bonding states at the contacts, and the suitability for applications in nanotechnology. Contribution to the topical issue "The 16th European Microscopy Congress (EMC 2016)", edited by Richard Brydson and Pascale Bayle-Guillemaud

  16. What if Things Get Worse? Really Grand Challenges for Modeling and Simulation in a Risky and Complex World or Modeling and Simulation for the "Greater Good"?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifrey, Priscilla

    2010-01-01

    electronics and hydraulics, these are effectively the brains of the blowout preventer. No one fixed it, he alleges, they just shut it down and relied on the other control pod -an act deemed unacceptable by petroleum expert, Tad Patzek, at the University of Texas. The US Congress has identified numerous other problems with the blowout preventer, including design problems and unexpected modifications.

  17. Big data from electronic health records for early and late translational cardiovascular research: challenges and potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Harry; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Danesh, John; Dobson, Richard; Maniadakis, Nikolaos; Maggioni, Aldo; van Thiel, Ghislaine J M; Cronin, Maureen; Brobert, Gunnar; Vardas, Panos; Anker, Stefan D; Grobbee, Diederick E; Denaxas, Spiros

    2018-04-21

    Cohorts of millions of people's health records, whole genome sequencing, imaging, sensor, societal and publicly available data present a rapidly expanding digital trace of health. We aimed to critically review, for the first time, the challenges and potential of big data across early and late stages of translational cardiovascular disease research. We sought exemplars based on literature reviews and expertise across the BigData@Heart Consortium. We identified formidable challenges including: data quality, knowing what data exist, the legal and ethical framework for their use, data sharing, building and maintaining public trust, developing standards for defining disease, developing tools for scalable, replicable science and equipping the clinical and scientific work force with new inter-disciplinary skills. Opportunities claimed for big health record data include: richer profiles of health and disease from birth to death and from the molecular to the societal scale; accelerated understanding of disease causation and progression, discovery of new mechanisms and treatment-relevant disease sub-phenotypes, understanding health and diseases in whole populations and whole health systems and returning actionable feedback loops to improve (and potentially disrupt) existing models of research and care, with greater efficiency. In early translational research we identified exemplars including: discovery of fundamental biological processes e.g. linking exome sequences to lifelong electronic health records (EHR) (e.g. human knockout experiments); drug development: genomic approaches to drug target validation; precision medicine: e.g. DNA integrated into hospital EHR for pre-emptive pharmacogenomics. In late translational research we identified exemplars including: learning health systems with outcome trials integrated into clinical care; citizen driven health with 24/7 multi-parameter patient monitoring to improve outcomes and population-based linkages of multiple EHR sources

  18. Waste electrical and electronic equipment management in Botswana: Prospects and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmereki, Daniel; Li, Baizhan; Li'ao, Wang

    2015-01-01

    The management of waste electronic and electrical equipment (WEEE) is a major challenge in developing and transition countries. The paper investigates recent strategies to manage this waste stream in an environmentally sound way. Obsolete electrical and electronic equipment (EEE) are a complex waste category containing both hazardous and valuable substances. Many countries and regions in the world are undertaking extensive scientific research to plan and develop effective collection and treatment systems for end-of-life EEE. In developing countries such as Botswana, effective strategies that cover all stages throughout the lifecycle of products, particularly at the end-of-life, still lag behind. Infrastructure, pre-processing, and end-processing facilities and innovative technologies for end-of-life management of e-waste are noticeably absent due to lack of investment and high costs of its management. The objective of the paper is to present the e-waste situation in Botswana, highlighting (a) measures taken in the form of legislative and policy regulations; (b) existing practices to manage e-waste; and (c) effective solutions for e-waste management in emerging economies. Studies from other countries on e-waste management issues provided insights on the "best" technical and logistical pre-processing and end-processing strategies to treat hazardous waste. The paper also highlights key societal factors that affect successful implementation of cost-effective collection and value recovery of end-of-life EEE. These include unavailability of national "e-waste policy," absence of formal take-back system, absence of financing and subsidies, inadequate source separation programmes, absence of technical and logistical integration of pre-processing and end-processing facilities, and limited infrastructure and access to technologies and investment. Effective strategies such as an "integrated approach" (mixed options), access to technologies, establishment of pre-processing and

  19. THE JEOPARDIZED SITUATION OF ELECTRONIC WASTE IN BANGLADESH: CAN CUSTOMIZED POLICY APPROACH SOLVE THE CHALLENGE?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Md. Bahauddin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electronic waste (e-waste is one of the fastest-growing pollution problems worldwide given the presence if a variety of toxic substances which can contaminate the environment and threaten human health, if disposal protocols are not meticulously managed. In Bangladesh almost 2.7 million metric tons of e-waste generated per year. Of this amountonly 20 to 30 percent is recycled and the rest of the waste is released in to landfills,  rivers, drains lakes, canals, open spaces which are very hazardous for the health and environment. Since Bangladesh is in the stream of rapid technological advancement, it is seldom to take necessary steps to avoid the future jeopardized situation because of e-waste. The current practices of e-waste management in Bangladesh suffer from a number of drawbacks like the difficulty in inventorisation, unhealthy conditions of informal recycling, inadequate legislation and policy, poor awareness and reluctance on part of the corporate to address the critical issues. The paper highlights the associated issues and strategies to address this emerging problem, analyses the policy and its gaps. Therefore, this paper also suggest that e-waste policy development may require a more customized approach where, instead of addressing e-waste in isolation, it should be addressed as part of the national development agenda that integrates green economy assessment and strategic environmental assessment as part of national policy planning. Finally this work also suggests some alternative strategies and approaches to overcome the challenges of e-waste.

  20. Dopant Contrast in Semiconductors as Interpretation Challenge at Imaging by Electrons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Luděk; Mika, Filip; Hovorka, Miloš; Valdaitsev, D.; Schönhense, G.; Müllerová, Ilona

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 5 (2007), s. 936-939 ISSN 1345-9678 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/04/0281 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : electron microscopic contrasts * semiconductors * dopant contrast * scanning electron microscopy * scanning low energy electron microscopy * photoelectron emission microscopy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.018, year: 2007

  1. Grand Hotel prijutil hudozhnikov

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Raadioajakirjanik Lea Veelmaa lindistas "Kunstikanali" 2004. a. esimese saate Grand Hotel Viljandis. Saatekülaliseks oli maalikunstnik Andres Tolts. Toltsi kaheksa akrüülmaali on eksponeeritud hotelli fuajees ja restoranis

  2. Overview on thermal and mechanical challenges of high power RF electronic packaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yuan, C.A.; Kregting, R.; Driel, W. van; Gielen, A.W.J.; Xiao, A.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    High Power RF electronics is one of the essential parts for wireless communication, including the personal communication, broadcasting, microwave radar, etc. Moreover, high efficient high power electronics has entered the ISM market, such as the power generator of microwave oven. Power electronics

  3. Grand Challenges in Protoplanetary Disc Modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haworth, Thomas J.; Ilee, John D.; Forgan, Duncan H.; Facchini, Stefano; Price, Daniel J.; Boneberg, Dominika M.; Booth, Richard A.; Clarke, Cathie J.; Gonzalez, Jean-François; Hutchison, Mark A.; Kamp, Inga; Laibe, Guillaume; Lyra, Wladimir; Meru, Farzana; Mohanty, Subhanjoy; Panić, Olja; Rice, Ken; Suzuki, Takeru; Teague, Richard; Walsh, Catherine; Woitke, Peter; authors, Community

    2016-01-01

    The Protoplanetary Discussions conference-held in Edinburgh, UK, from 2016 March 7th-11th-included several open sessions led by participants. This paper reports on the discussions collectively concerned with the multi-physics modelling of protoplanetary discs, including the self-consistent

  4. Aligning innovation with grand societal challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricard, Lykke Margot

    2016-01-01

    for the ETPs marks a change from a solely evidence-based policy approach to the use of bottom-up policies designed to mobilize human capital based on social actors’ expectations, uncertainties and visions. These two ETPs include hitherto missing ‘key players’ who can enhance commercial legitimacy on both...

  5. Grand Challenges: Nanotechnology and the Social Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfra, Meghan McGlinn

    2013-01-01

    This article explores a multidisciplinary lesson on nanotechnology that can provide an effective means for teaching about both STEM and social studies topics. This approach encourages students to consider the "role that science and technology play in our lives and in our cultures." The extraordinary promise of nanotechnology, however, is…

  6. Grand antiprism and quaternions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koca, Mehmet; Al Ajmi, Mudhahir; Koca, Nazife Ozdes [Department of Physics, College of Science, Sultan Qaboos University, PO Box 36, Al Khoud, 123 Muscat, Sultanate of Oman (Oman)], E-mail: kocam@squ.edu.om, E-mail: mudhahir@squ.edu.om, E-mail: nazife@squ.edu.om

    2009-12-11

    Vertices of the four-dimensional (4D) semi-regular polytope, the grand antiprism and its symmetry group of order 400 are represented in terms of quaternions with unit norm. It follows from the icosian representation of the E{sub 8} root system which decomposes into two copies of the root system of H{sub 4}. The symmetry of the grand antiprism is a maximal subgroup of the Coxeter group W(H{sub 4}). It is the group Aut(H{sub 2} + H'{sub 2}) which is constructed in terms of 20 quaternionic roots of the Coxeter diagram H{sub 2} + H'{sub 2}. The root system of H{sub 4} represented by the binary icosahedral group I of order 120, constitutes the regular 4D polytope 600-cell. When its 20 quaternionic vertices corresponding to the roots of the diagram H{sub 2} + H'{sub 2} are removed from the vertices of the 600-cell the remaining 100 quaternions constitute the vertices of the grand antiprism. We give a detailed analysis of the construction of the cells of the grand antiprism in terms of quaternions. The dual polytope of the grand antiprism has also been constructed.

  7. Challenges for international students in using electronic resources in the Learning Centre : a case study of Oslo University College

    OpenAIRE

    Rahman, Md. Anisur

    2011-01-01

    Joint Master Degree in Digital Library Learning (DILL) The purpose of this study is to find out the challenges facing by international students in using electronic resources in the OUC learning center. This research has used a qualitative approach and purposive, a non-probability techniques used for sampling of this study. A semi-structured face-to-face interviews method is used for the collection of data. The interview questions were open ended and the discourse analysis metho...

  8. Thermo-mechanical challenges in the longevity of micro-electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gielen, A.W.J.

    2010-01-01

    Automotive electronics, solid-state-lighting, and solar cells need have to operate under harsh circumstances, either by the kind of environment they operate in, such as automotive electronics under the hood, or by the long durations of exposure. In both cases traditional lifetime assessment methods

  9. Google Earth Grand Tour Themes

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paor, D. G.; Whitmeyer, S. J.; Bentley, C.; Dordevic, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    As part of an NSF TUES Type 3 project entitled "Google Earth for Onsite and Distance Education (GEODE)," we are assembling a "Grand Tour" of locations on Earth and other terrestrial bodies that every geoscience student should know about and visit at least in virtual reality. Based on feedback from colleagues at previous meetings, we have identified nine Grand Tour themes: "Plates and Plumes," "Rocks and Regions," "Geology Through Time," "The Mapping Challenge*," "U.S. National Parks*," "The Magical Mystery Tour*," "Resources and Hazards," "Planets and Moons," and "Top of the Pops." Themes marked with an asterisk are most developed at this stage and will be demonstrated in real time. The Mapping Challenge invites students to trace geological contacts, measure bedding strike and dip and the plunge, trend, and facing of a fold. There is an advanced tool for modeling periclinal folds. The challenge is presented in a game-like format with an emphasis on puzzle-solving that will appeal to students regardless of gender. For the tour of U.S. national parks, we divided the most geologically important parks into four groups—Western Pacific, West Coast, Rockies, and East Coast. We are combining our own team's GigaPan imagery with imagery already available on the Internet. There is a great deal of imagery just waiting to be annotated for geological education purposes. The Magical Mystery Tour takes students to Google Streetview locations selected by instructors. Students are presented with questions or tasks and are given automatic feedback. Other themes are under development. Within each theme, we are crowd-sourcing contributions from colleagues and inviting colleagues to vote for or against proposed locations and student interactions. The GEODE team includes the authors and: Heather Almquist, Stephen Burgin, Cinzia Cervato, Gene Cooper, Paul Karabinos, Terry Pavlis, Jen Piatek, Bill Richards, Jeff Ryan, Ron Schott, Kristen St. John, and Barb Tewksbury.

  10. Challenges in legislation, recycling system and technical system of waste electrical and electronic equipment in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengen; Ding, Yunji; Liu, Bo; Pan, De'an; Chang, Chein-chi; Volinsky, Alex A

    2015-11-01

    Waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE) has been one of the fastest growing waste streams worldwide. Effective and efficient management and treatment of WEEE has become a global problem. As one of the world's largest electronic products manufacturing and consumption countries, China plays a key role in the material life cycle of electrical and electronic equipment. Over the past 20 years, China has made a great effort to improve WEEE recycling. Centered on the legal, recycling and technical systems, this paper reviews the progresses of WEEE recycling in China. An integrated recycling system is proposed to realize WEEE high recycling rate for future WEEE recycling. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Electronic Government: Challenges to Effective Adoption of the Extensible Markup Language

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2002-01-01

    ...) technology and the challenges the federal government faces in implementing it. XML is a flexible, nonproprietary set of standards designed to facilitate the exchange of information among disparate computer systems, using the Internet's protocols...

  12. Aberration corrected and monochromated environmental transmission electron microscopy: challenges and prospects for materials science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2010-01-01

    The latest generation of environmental transmission electron microscopes incorporates aberration correctors and monochromators, allowing studies of chemical reactions and growth processes with improved spatial resolution and spectral sensitivity. Here, we describe the performance of such an instr...

  13. Computing challenges in the certification of ATLAS Tile Calorimeter front-end electronics during maintenance periods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solans, C; Carrió, F; Valero, A; Kim, H Y; Usai, G; Moreno, P; Reed, R; Sandrock, C; Ruan, X; Shalyugin, A; Schettino, V; Souza, J

    2014-01-01

    After two years of operation of the LHC, the ATLAS Tile calorimeter is undergoing a consolidation process of its front-end electronics. The certification is performed in the experimental area with a portable test-bench which is capable of controlling and reading out one front-end module through dedicated cables. This test-bench has been redesigned to improve the tests of the electronics functionality quality assessment of the data until the end of Phase I.

  14. The quality of information in electronic scientific publications on the Internet: challenges and proposals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo SABBATINI

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work analises the main questions and hurdles involved in the adoption of a electronic scientific publication system, those related to the scientific community practices and rules of conduct. We emphasize the quality certification through peer review, interity and legitimiy maintenance and privacity preservation in the digital environment. Furthermore, we analise the academic community own perception of electronic journals available in Internet and its impacts in tenure and prommotion processes.

  15. The Philippines in the Electronics Global Value Chain: Upgrading Opportunities and Challenges

    OpenAIRE

    Rafaelita M. ALDABA

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the extent and depth of participation of the Philippines in the electronics global value chains (GVC) using Trade in Value Added (TiVA) and extensive margin indicators. While the Philippines remains strong in semiconductors, it is lagging behind other ASEAN countries. According to the TiVA database, the level of participation of the Philippines in the electronics GVC increased substantially between 1995 and 2009. The extensive margins show that the Philippines has been reg...

  16. Democracy and "Grand" Corruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose-Ackerman, Susan

    1996-01-01

    Defines "grand" corruption as that occurring at the higher levels of a political system and involving large sums of money. Discusses the impact and incentives for this level of corruption as well as various government responses. Identifies multinational corporations as the major malefactors. (MJP)

  17. Grand-Bassam

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geo

    l'estuaire du fleuve Comoé (Grand-Bassam, Côte d'Ivoire). Kouassi Laurent ADOPO1*, Apie Colette AKOBE1, Etche Mireille AMANI2,. Sylvain MONDE3 et Kouamé AKA3. (1)Laboratoire de Géologie Marine, Sédimentologie et Environnement, Centre de Recherche en Ecologie,. Université Felix Houphouet Boigny Abidjan, ...

  18. The GRANDE detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, A.; Bond, R.; Coleman, L.; Rollefson, A.; Wold, D.; Bratton, C.B.; Gurr, H.; Kropp, W.; Nelson, M.; Price, L.R.; Reines, F.; Schultz, J.; Sobel, H.; Svoboda, R.; Yodh, G.; Burnett, T.; Chaloupka, V.; Wilkes, R.J.; Cherry, M.; Ellison, S.B.; Guzik, T.G.; Wefel, J.; Gaidos, J.; Loeffler, F.; Sembroski, G.; Wilson, C.; Goodman, J.; Haines, T.J.; Kielczewska, D.; Lane, C.; Steinberg, R.; Lieber, M.; Nagle, D.; Potter, M.; Tripp, R.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we present a detector facility which meets the requirements outlined above for a next-generation instrument. GRANDE (Gamma Ray and Neutrino DEtector) is an imaging, water Cerenkov detector, which combines in one facility an extensive air shower array and a high-energy neutrino detector. (orig.)

  19. CiSE Computational Physics Challenge Winner: Electron Wave Packet Propagation in Graphene Nanoribbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Steven M.

    2008-04-01

    While graphene has been studied by theoreticians for over half a century, the two dimensional crystal lattice has only recently been realized experimentally. As such, theoretical work in the properties of graphene has exploded. A variety of these properties, which are truly exceptional and unique, have engendered much research into carbon based electronics, of which graphene is generally the most fundamental unit. In this thesis, we seek to characterize basic electronic properties of graphene nanoribbons. We begin with a tight-binding model of graphene and an analysis of the electronic band structure of the infinite sheet and semi-infinite nanoribbons. Also employing the spectral method, we create, inject, and propagate various types of wave packets infinite wires. A key effect that is expected is the so called Zitterbewegung oscillation of the wave packet center. Results are compared to theoretical predictions based on analytical methods rather than numerical simulations.

  20. Trends and Challenges of Electronic Auctions as a New Business Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Janeska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The virtual internet based market allowed different forms of trading. Electronic business opens up new markets and market segments. Auctions are a very reliable and competitive trading model which allows to achieve fair prices and to choose the optimal business partners. The purpose of this model is that the system can extend the duration of the auction until they met various commercial applications.The basic motivation for research in this paper is the increasing trend of the use of electronic auctions in the process of selling and buying products and services.

  1. Improving patient safety and quality: what are the challenges and gaps in introducing an integrated electronic adverse incident and recording system within health care industry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kerry; Antony, Jiju

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present the challenges and gaps in using an electronic adverse incident recording and reporting system from a commercial supplier to an acute health care setting. The paper used action diary, documentation and triangulation to obtain an understanding of the challenges and gaps. The paper provides health care with further understanding of the complexity, challenges and gaps of using an electronic adverse incident recording system to improve patient safety. This paper explains the important views of clinicians and managers in relation to improving patient safety by using an electronic adverse incident management system.

  2. Children and Electronic Text: Challenges and Opportunities of the "New Literacy." An Exploratory Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paisley, William; Chen, Milton

    This exploratory study of children's use of electronic text systems drew upon site visits, interviews, and data compilations for an overview and synthesis of issues. Systems studied included Green Thumb (videotext, Kentucky); Channel 2000 (videotext, Ohio); KCET (teletext, California); WETA (teletext, Washington, D.C.); QUBE (interactive cable,…

  3. Modelling the experimental electron density: only the synergy of various approaches can tackle the new challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piero Macchi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Electron density is a fundamental quantity that enables understanding of the chemical bonding in a molecule or in a solid and the chemical/physical property of a material. Because electrons have a charge and a spin, two kinds of electron densities are available. Moreover, because electron distribution can be described in momentum or in position space, charge and spin density have two definitions and they can be observed through Bragg (for the position space or Compton (for the momentum space diffraction experiments, using X-rays (charge density or polarized neutrons (spin density. In recent years, we have witnessed many advances in this field, stimulated by the increased power of experimental techniques. However, an accurate modelling is still necessary to determine the desired functions from the acquired data. The improved accuracy of measurements and the possibility to combine information from different experimental techniques require even more flexibility of the models. In this short review, we analyse some of the most important topics that have emerged in the recent literature, especially the most thought-provoking at the recent IUCr general meeting in Montreal.

  4. Electronic Textiles as Disruptive Designs: Supporting and Challenging Maker Activities in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kafai, Yasmin B.; Fields, Deborah A.; Searle, Kristin A.

    2014-01-01

    Electronic textiles are a part of the increasingly popular maker movement that champions existing do-it-yourself activities. As making activities broaden from Maker Faires and fabrication spaces in children's museums, science centers, and community organizations to school classrooms, they provide new opportunities for learning while challenging…

  5. Opportunities and challenges for comparative effectiveness research (CER) with Electronic Clinical Data: a perspective from the EDM forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holve, Erin; Segal, Courtney; Hamilton Lopez, Marianne

    2012-07-01

    The Electronic Data Methods (EDM) Forum brings together perspectives from the Prospective Outcome Systems using Patient-specific Electronic data to Compare Tests and therapies (PROSPECT) studies, the Scalable Distributed Research Networks, and the Enhanced Registries projects. This paper discusses challenges faced by the research teams as part of their efforts to develop electronic clinical data (ECD) infrastructure to support comparative effectiveness research (CER). The findings reflect a set of opportunities for transdisciplinary learning, and will ideally enhance the transparency and generalizability of CER using ECD. Findings are based on 6 exploratory site visits conducted under naturalistic inquiry in the spring of 2011. Themes, challenges, and innovations were identified in the visit summaries through coding, keyword searches, and review for complex concepts. : The identified overarching challenges and emerging opportunities include: the substantial level of effort to establish and sustain data sharing partnerships; the importance of understanding the strengths and limitations of clinical informatics tools, platforms, and models that have emerged to enable research with ECD; the need for rigorous methods to assess data validity, quality, and context for multisite studies; and, emerging opportunities to achieve meaningful patient and consumer engagement and work collaboratively with multidisciplinary teams. The new infrastructure must evolve to serve a diverse set of potential users and must scale to address a range of CER or patient-centered outcomes research (PCOR) questions. To achieve this aim-to improve the quality, transparency, and reproducibility of CER and PCOR-a high level of collaboration and support is necessary to foster partnership and best practices as part of the EDM Forum.

  6. Time-resolved structural studies at synchrotrons and X-ray free electron lasers: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard; Moffat, Keith

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are potentially revolutionary X-ray sources because of their very short pulse duration, extreme peak brilliance and high spatial coherence, features that distinguish them from today’s synchrotron sources. We review recent time-resolved Laue diffraction and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) studies at synchrotron sources, and initial static studies at XFELs. XFELs have the potential to transform the field of time-resolved structural biology, yet many challenges arise in devising and adapting hardware, experimental design and data analysis strategies to exploit their unusual properties. Despite these challenges, we are confident that XFEL sources are poised to shed new light on ultrafast protein reaction dynamics. PMID:23021004

  7. In-situ Transmission Electron Microscopy and Spectroscopy Studies of Interfaces in Li-ion Batteries: Challenges and Opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chong M.; Xu, Wu; Liu, Jun; Choi, Daiwon; Arey, Bruce W.; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Salmon, Norman

    2010-01-01

    The critical challenge facing the lithium ion battery development is the basic understanding of the structural evolution during the cyclic operation of the battery and the consequence of the structural evolution on the properties of the battery. Although transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and spectroscopy have been evolved to a stage such that it can be routinely used to probe into both the structural and chemical composition of the materials with a spatial resolution of a single atomic column, a direct in-situ TEM observation of structural evolution of the materials in lithium ion battery during the dynamic operation of the battery has never been reported. This is related to three factors: high vacuum operation of a TEM; electron transparency requirement of the region to be observed, and the difficulties dealing with the liquid electrolyte of lithium ion battery. In this paper, we report the results of exploring the in-situ TEM techniques for observation of the interface in lithium ion battery during the operation of the battery. A miniature battery was fabricated using a nanowire and an ionic liquid electrolyte. The structure and chemical composition of the interface across the anode and the electrolyte was studied using TEM imaging, electron diffraction, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. In addition, we also explored the possibilities of carrying out in-situ TEM studies of lithium ion batteries with a solid state electrolyte.

  8. The conversion to electronic hospital notes at Mayo Clinic. Overcoming barriers and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreen, Debra L; Dobie, Linda J; Jasperson, Jan C; Lucas, Thomas A; Wubbenhorst, Cathryn L

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the conversion to electronic hospital notes at a large, multi-specialty group practice: Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. Because of the size of the institution and the barriers to the adoption of electronic notes, the process was a gradual one that took several years. Making a convincing case for change to institutional leaders and maintaining their support was crucial to success. Equally vital was the careful investigation of user requirements and the development of software features that allowed providers to complete their notes quickly in the fast-paced hospital environment. Care providers discovered the value of having immediate access to legible hospital notes throughout the campus and from remote locations.

  9. The electronic structure of organo-f-element complexes: A computational challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bursten, B.E.; Pepper, M.J.M.; Schneider, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    Over the last seven years, the authors have investigated the electronic structure of organoactinide complexes by using a variety of electronic structure methods. The authors early studies employed the Xα-SW molecular orbital method exclusively; the large size of the system and the need to accommodate relativistic effects necessitated the use of this rather severely approximate method. The conclusions concerning the structure and bonding of organoactinide complexes from these studies will be presented. The concurrent growth in access to supercomputers as these studies were ongoing has allowed the authors to use more rigorous methodology. Recent results that use the more-rigorous DV-Xα method will be presented and compared to the Xα-SW results. In addition, their recent applications of ab initio MCSCF and CI methods to actinide molecules will be discussed

  10. Challenges of front-end and triggering electronics for High Granularity Calorimetry

    CERN Document Server

    Puljak, Ivica

    2017-01-01

    A high granularity calorimeter is presently being designed by the CMS Collaboration to replace the existing endcap detectors. It must be able to cope with the very high collision rates, imposing the development of novel filtering and triggering strategies, as well as with the harsh radiation environment of the high-luminosity LHC. In this paper we present an overview of the full electronics architecture and the performance of prototype components and algorithms.

  11. Children's Use of Electronic Games: Choices of Game Mode and Challenge Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy H. P. Sit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Interactive electronic games are popular and are believed to contribute to physical activity accrual. The purpose of this study was to examine children's electronic game use during conditions in which they had free access to selecting interactive and seated screen-based versions of electronic games and during the interactive versions had free choice in making adjustments to the activity intensity. Methods. We systematically observed 60 Hong Kong primary school children during two 60-minute game sessions while simultaneously recording their game mode choices and physical activity levels using SOFIT (System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time. Results. When given free choice, children spent more than half of their available time participating in interactive versions of games. These versions of games provided significantly more moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and greater energy expenditure than the computer screen versions. Children with the opportunity to modify intensity levels spent more time playing the interactive versions and accrued more physical activity. Conclusions. The tenets of behavioral choice theory were supported. Access to new-generation interactive games, particularly those with modifiable intensity levels, may facilitate children's participation in physical activity.

  12. Asymptotically safe grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajc, Borut [J. Stefan Institute,1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Sannino, Francesco [CP-Origins & the Danish IAS, University of Southern Denmark,Campusvej 55, DK-5230 Odense M (Denmark); Université de Lyon, France, Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, UMR5822 IPNL,F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2016-12-28

    Phenomenologically appealing supersymmetric grand unified theories have large gauge representations and thus are not asymptotically free. Their ultraviolet validity is limited by the appearance of a Landau pole well before the Planck scale. One could hope that these theories save themselves, before the inclusion of gravity, by generating an interacting ultraviolet fixed point, similar to the one recently discovered in non-supersymmetric gauge-Yukawa theories. Employing a-maximization, a-theorem, unitarity bounds, as well as positivity of other central charges we nonperturbatively rule out this possibility for a broad class of prime candidates of phenomenologically relevant supersymmetric grand unified theories. We also uncover candidates passing these tests, which have either exotic matter or contain one field decoupled from the superpotential. The latter class of theories contains a model with the minimal matter content required by phenomenology.

  13. LA GRANDE DESCENTE

    CERN Multimedia

    The first endcap disc of CMS being lowered slowly and carefully 100 m underground into the experimental cavern. The disc is one of 15 large pieces to make the grand descent.  The uniquely shaped slice, 16 m high, about 50 cm thick weighs 400 tonnes. The two HF that were lowered earlier in November can also be seen in the foreground and background.  

  14. THE JEOPARDIZED SITUATION OF ELECTRONIC WASTE IN BANGLADESH: CAN CUSTOMIZED POLICY APPROACH SOLVE THE CHALLENGE?

    OpenAIRE

    Khalid Md. Bahauddin; Tariq Muhammad Salahuddin

    2016-01-01

    Electronic waste (e-waste) is one of the fastest-growing pollution problems worldwide given the presence if a variety of toxic substances which can contaminate the environment and threaten human health, if disposal protocols are not meticulously managed. In Bangladesh almost 2.7 million metric tons of e-waste generated per year. Of this amountonly 20 to 30 percent is recycled and the rest of the waste is released in to landfills,  rivers, drains lakes, canals, open spaces which are very hazar...

  15. Challenges for Electronic invoicing systems: A quantitative study of Vietnamese SMEs

    OpenAIRE

    Ngo, Hoang

    2013-01-01

    Alongside the traditional paper invoice, there is another type of invoice that has been around for over a decade but is less popular and less known to firms – the electronic invoice. Today, the e-invoice has gained the attention of many countries in, for example the EU, and Latin America, owing to its major cost saving and increased productivity benefits. In Vietnam, there have been regulations on e-invoices but firms do no show much interest in the system. So far, there have not been any stu...

  16. Electronic assessment of disease activity and functioning in patients with axial spondyloarthritis: challenges and unmet needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiltz, Uta; Boonen, Annelies; Braun, Juergen; Richter, Jutta G

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic clinical course of rheumatic conditions indicates a need for regular collection of information on health status to monitor disease activity and functional status. Patient-reported outcomes measures (PROMs) are playing a key role in the evaluation of symptoms and functioning and health, and are crucial in the initiation of treatment in those patients. In recent years, electronic assessments of PROMs (so called ePROMs) have been introduced. This report summarises some of the rationale, opportunities, and results using ePROMs in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA).

  17. Ultrafast Science Opportunities with Electron Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DURR, HERMANN; Wang, X.J., ed.

    2016-04-28

    X-rays and electrons are two of the most fundamental probes of matter. When the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), the world’s first x-ray free electron laser, began operation in 2009, it transformed ultrafast science with the ability to generate laser-like x-ray pulses from the manipulation of relativistic electron beams. This document describes a similar future transformation. In Transmission Electron Microscopy, ultrafast relativistic (MeV energy) electron pulses can achieve unsurpassed spatial and temporal resolution. Ultrafast temporal resolution will be the next frontier in electron microscopy and can ideally complement ultrafast x-ray science done with free electron lasers. This document describes the Grand Challenge science opportunities in chemistry, material science, physics and biology that arise from an MeV ultrafast electron diffraction & microscopy facility, especially when coupled with linac-based intense THz and X-ray pump capabilities.

  18. Overcoming Challenges in Kinetic Modeling of Magnetized Plasmas and Vacuum Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omelchenko, Yuri; Na, Dong-Yeop; Teixeira, Fernando

    2017-10-01

    We transform the state-of-the art of plasma modeling by taking advantage of novel computational techniques for fast and robust integration of multiscale hybrid (full particle ions, fluid electrons, no displacement current) and full-PIC models. These models are implemented in 3D HYPERS and axisymmetric full-PIC CONPIC codes. HYPERS is a massively parallel, asynchronous code. The HYPERS solver does not step fields and particles synchronously in time but instead executes local variable updates (events) at their self-adaptive rates while preserving fundamental conservation laws. The charge-conserving CONPIC code has a matrix-free explicit finite-element (FE) solver based on a sparse-approximate inverse (SPAI) algorithm. This explicit solver approximates the inverse FE system matrix (``mass'' matrix) using successive sparsity pattern orders of the original matrix. It does not reduce the set of Maxwell's equations to a vector-wave (curl-curl) equation of second order but instead utilizes the standard coupled first-order Maxwell's system. We discuss the ability of our codes to accurately and efficiently account for multiscale physical phenomena in 3D magnetized space and laboratory plasmas and axisymmetric vacuum electronic devices.

  19. Electronic Cigarettes and Vaping: A New Challenge in Clinical Medicine and Public Health.A Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominic L. Palazzolo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarette (e-cigarette use in the United States and worldwide is increasing. These devices closely mimic smoking of conventional cigarettes and can be used by consumers as a substitute for their smoking and nicotine addiction. Reasons for their popularity are that vendors of e-cigarettes have previously marketed their product as a safer alternative to conventional cigarettes, and as a possible smoking cessation tool. Rather than inhaling harmful smoke from burning tobacco, users of electronic cigarettes inhale a potentially less harmful vaporized mist primarily consisting of propylene glycol, nicotine, and water in a process referred to as vaping. Furthermore, the e-cigarette web pages are full of anecdotal claims from ex-smokers on how e-cigarettes helped them to give up traditional cigarettes in favor of these electronic devices. Government agencies and the medical community are skeptical, indicating that there is not enough empirically-derived evidence to substantiate such claims. While vaping e-cigarettes appear to do very little to abate nicotine addiction, and almost certainly carry unknown potential dangers, its supporters believe it is a safer alternative to smoking cigarettes. However, before e-cigarettes and vaping can be considered as a viable harm reduction clinical approach to smoking cessation, the medical community must first face the challenges e-cigarettes and vaping present to public health. For example, what should the primary medical focus be for a patient who has successfully transitioned from conventional cigarettes to e-cigarettes? Should it be to maintain smoking abstinence or should it be to quit vaping? Would it not be prudent for a patient who is unwilling to quit smoking or to give up nicotine to vape instead of smoke? Given these circumstances, how should medical care providers advise their patients? To effectively face these challenges, health care professionals need to become more familiar with the

  20. Electronic cigarettes and thirdhand tobacco smoke: two emerging health care challenges for the primary care provider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Mehrotra

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Ware G Kuschner, Sunayana Reddy, Nidhi Mehrotra, Harman S PaintalDivision of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, CA, USAAbstract: Primary care providers should be aware of two new developments in nicotine addiction and smoking cessation: 1 the emergence of a novel nicotine delivery system known as the electronic (e- cigarette; and 2 new reports of residual environmental nicotine and other biopersistent toxicants found in cigarette smoke, recently described as “thirdhand smoke”. The purpose of this article is to provide a clinician-friendly introduction to these two emerging issues so that clinicians are well prepared to counsel smokers about newly recognized health concerns relevant to tobacco use. E-cigarettes are battery powered devices that convert nicotine into a vapor that can be inhaled. The World Health Organization has termed these devices electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS. The vapors from ENDS are complex mixtures of chemicals, not pure nicotine. It is unknown whether inhalation of the complex mixture of chemicals found in ENDS vapors is safe. There is no evidence that e-cigarettes are effective treatment for nicotine addiction. ENDS are not approved as smoking cessation devices. Primary care givers should anticipate being questioned by patients about the advisability of using e-cigarettes as a smoking cessation device. The term thirdhand smoke first appeared in the medical literature in 2009 when investigators introduced the term to describe residual tobacco smoke contamination that remains after the cigarette is extinguished. Thirdhand smoke is a hazardous exposure resulting from cigarette smoke residue that accumulates in cars, homes, and other indoor spaces. Tobacco-derived toxicants can react to form potent cancer causing compounds. Exposure to thirdhand smoke can occur through the skin, by breathing, and by ingestion long after smoke has cleared from a room

  1. Challenge of engaging all students via self-paced interactive electronic learning tutorials for introductory physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth DeVore

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As research-based, self-paced electronic learning tools become increasingly available, a critical issue educators encounter is implementing strategies to ensure that all students engage with them as intended. Here, we first discuss the effectiveness of electronic learning tutorials as self-paced learning tools in large enrollment brick and mortar introductory physics courses and then propose a framework for helping students engage effectively with the learning tools. The tutorials were developed via research in physics education and were found to be effective for a diverse group of introductory physics students in one-on-one implementation. Instructors encouraged the use of these tools in a self-paced learning environment by telling students that they would be helpful for solving the assigned homework problems and that the underlying physics principles in the tutorial problems would be similar to those in the in-class quizzes (which we call paired problems. We find that many students in the courses in which these interactive electronic learning tutorials were assigned as a self-study tool performed poorly on the paired problems. In contrast, a majority of student volunteers in one-on-one implementation greatly benefited from the tutorials and performed well on the paired problems. The significantly lower overall performance on paired problems administered as an in-class quiz compared to the performance of student volunteers who used the research-based tutorials in one-on-one implementation suggests that many students enrolled in introductory physics courses did not effectively engage with the tutorials outside of class and may have only used them superficially. The findings suggest that many students in need of out-of-class remediation via self-paced learning tools may have difficulty motivating themselves and may lack the self-regulation and time-management skills to engage effectively with tools specially designed to help them learn at their

  2. Prospects and Challenges in Application of Gamma and Electron Beam Processing of Nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampa, M. H.

    2006-01-01

    Application of radiation techniques for nanotechnology has been known for years. X-ray, EB and ion beam lithography are a good example of applications. By using electron beams, ion beams and X-Rays structures as small as 10 nm can be produced. Ion track membranes with track diameters from 10 nm to 100 nm are used as such or as templates for electroplating of nanowires of metal, semiconductor and magnetic materials. In the near future X-Rays, focused ion beams and electron beams will be used for nanolithography and 3D fabrication; heavy ion beams on the other hand can be useful for fabrication of nanopores and nanowires. The use of radiation has proved to be an essential technique in the fabrication of nanostructures with high resolution as the radiation beams can be focused into a few nanomater scales or less. Three groups of products could be considered to be fabricated by radiation techniques: nanoparticles, nanogels and nanocomposites. Nanoparticles has application in electronic devices and bioactive systems. Their radiation synthesis in aqueous dispersions started in the late seventies. Literature describe the radiolytic reduction of many metal ions either single metal or in combination with another metal to generate metallic or bimetallic mixtures as well as core-shell structures. To obtain metallic particles from their parent ions one only needs to ensure reductive conditions during the irradiation. By control over the dose rate delivered to the sample the radiolytic approach can offer the fine control over the rate of generation on the growing species. Nanogels are particles of polymer gels having the dimensions in the order of nanometers. They are applied in pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries, as the bioactive substances delivery systems. Depending on the irradiation parameters (radiation dose, dose rate, polymer concentration, irradiation temperature) molecules with different structures (such as long-chain branches, nanogels, microgel or microgel

  3. Challenge of engaging all students via self-paced interactive electronic learning tutorials for introductory physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVore, Seth; Marshman, Emily; Singh, Chandralekha

    2017-06-01

    As research-based, self-paced electronic learning tools become increasingly available, a critical issue educators encounter is implementing strategies to ensure that all students engage with them as intended. Here, we first discuss the effectiveness of electronic learning tutorials as self-paced learning tools in large enrollment brick and mortar introductory physics courses and then propose a framework for helping students engage effectively with the learning tools. The tutorials were developed via research in physics education and were found to be effective for a diverse group of introductory physics students in one-on-one implementation. Instructors encouraged the use of these tools in a self-paced learning environment by telling students that they would be helpful for solving the assigned homework problems and that the underlying physics principles in the tutorial problems would be similar to those in the in-class quizzes (which we call paired problems). We find that many students in the courses in which these interactive electronic learning tutorials were assigned as a self-study tool performed poorly on the paired problems. In contrast, a majority of student volunteers in one-on-one implementation greatly benefited from the tutorials and performed well on the paired problems. The significantly lower overall performance on paired problems administered as an in-class quiz compared to the performance of student volunteers who used the research-based tutorials in one-on-one implementation suggests that many students enrolled in introductory physics courses did not effectively engage with the tutorials outside of class and may have only used them superficially. The findings suggest that many students in need of out-of-class remediation via self-paced learning tools may have difficulty motivating themselves and may lack the self-regulation and time-management skills to engage effectively with tools specially designed to help them learn at their own pace. We

  4. Qualitative analysis of round-table discussions on the business case and procurement challenges for hospital electronic prescribing systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathrin M Cresswell

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need to understand the challenges surrounding procurement of and business case development for hospital electronic prescribing systems, and to identify possible strategies to enhance the efficiency of these processes in order to assist strategic decision making.We organized eight multi-disciplinary round-table discussions in the United Kingdom. Participants included policy makers, representatives from hospitals, system developers, academics, and patients. Each discussion was digitally audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and, together with accompanying field notes, analyzed thematically with NVivo9.We drew on data from 17 participants (approximately eight per roundtable, six hours of discussion, and 15 pages of field notes. Key challenges included silo planning with systems not being considered as part of an integrated organizational information technology strategy, lack of opportunity for interactions between customers and potential suppliers, lack of support for hospitals in choosing appropriate systems, difficulty of balancing structured planning with flexibility, and the on-going challenge of distinguishing "wants" and aspirations from organizational "needs".Development of business cases for major investments in information technology does not take place in an organizational vacuum. Building on previously identified potentially transferable dimensions to the development and execution of business cases surrounding measurements of costs/benefits and risk management, we have identified additional components relevant to ePrescribing systems. These include: considerations surrounding strategic context, case for change and objectives, future service requirements and options appraisal, capital and revenue implications, timescale and deliverability, and risk analysis and management.

  5. Qualitative analysis of round-table discussions on the business case and procurement challenges for hospital electronic prescribing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cresswell, Kathrin M; Slee, Ann; Coleman, Jamie; Williams, Robin; Bates, David W; Sheikh, Aziz

    2013-01-01

    There is a pressing need to understand the challenges surrounding procurement of and business case development for hospital electronic prescribing systems, and to identify possible strategies to enhance the efficiency of these processes in order to assist strategic decision making. We organized eight multi-disciplinary round-table discussions in the United Kingdom. Participants included policy makers, representatives from hospitals, system developers, academics, and patients. Each discussion was digitally audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and, together with accompanying field notes, analyzed thematically with NVivo9. We drew on data from 17 participants (approximately eight per roundtable), six hours of discussion, and 15 pages of field notes. Key challenges included silo planning with systems not being considered as part of an integrated organizational information technology strategy, lack of opportunity for interactions between customers and potential suppliers, lack of support for hospitals in choosing appropriate systems, difficulty of balancing structured planning with flexibility, and the on-going challenge of distinguishing "wants" and aspirations from organizational "needs". Development of business cases for major investments in information technology does not take place in an organizational vacuum. Building on previously identified potentially transferable dimensions to the development and execution of business cases surrounding measurements of costs/benefits and risk management, we have identified additional components relevant to ePrescribing systems. These include: considerations surrounding strategic context, case for change and objectives, future service requirements and options appraisal, capital and revenue implications, timescale and deliverability, and risk analysis and management.

  6. The front end electronics of the NA62 Gigatracker: challenges, design and experimental measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Ceccucci, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Fiorini, M.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Martin, E.; Mazza, G.; Martoiu, S.; Morel, M.; Perktold, L.; Rivetti, A.; Tiuraniemi, S.

    2011-06-01

    The beam spectrometer of the NA62 experiment consists of 3 Gigatracker (GTK) stations. Each station comprises a pixel detector of 16 cm active area made of an assembly of 10 readout ASICs bump bonded to a 200 μm thick pixel silicon sensor, comprising 18000 pixels of 300 μm×300 μm. The main challenge of the NA62 pixel GTK station is the combination of an extremely high kaon/pion beam rate, where the intensity in the center of the beam reaches up to 1.5 Mhit s mm together with an extreme time resolution of 100 ps. To date, it is the first silicon tracking system with this time resolution. To face this challenge, the pixel analogue front end has been designed with a peaking time of 4 ns, with a planar silicon sensor operating up to 300 V over depletion. Moreover, the radiation level is severe, 2×10 1 MeV n cm per year of operation. Easy replacement of the GTK stations is foreseen as a design requirement. The amount of material of a single station should also be less than 0.5% X to minimize the background, which imposes strong constraints on the mechanics and the cooling system. We report upon the design and architecture of the 2 prototype demonstrator chips both designed in 130 nm CMOS technology, one with a constant fraction discriminator and the time stamp digitisation in each pixel (In-Pixel), and the other with a time-over-threshold discriminator and the processing of the time stamp located in the End of Column (EoC) region at the chip periphery. Some preliminary results are presented.

  7. Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance of irradiated nails: challenges for a dosimetry in radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giannoni, Ricardo A.; Rodrigues Junior, Orlando

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize samples of human nails exposed to high doses of radiation, applying the technique of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The objective is to establish a dose response study that allow determine the absorbed dose by exposed individuals in situations of radiological accidents, in a retrospective form. Samples of human nails were collected and afterward irradiated with gamma radiation, and received dose of 20 Gy. The EPR measurement performed on the samples, before irradiation, permitted the signal identification of the components associated with effects caused by the mechanical stress during the fingernail cutting, the so-called mechanically induced signal (MIS). After the irradiation, different species of free radicals were identified, the so-called radiation induced signal (RIS). (author)

  8. First rib and venous anomalies – Anatomical challenges for transvenous implantation of cardiac electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest W. Lau, MD

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Atypical anatomy may be encountered unexpectedly and undiagnosed in clinical practice, and this is especially important during the performance of interventional procedures such as transvenous implantation of cardiac electronic devices. The body of the first rib can be absent. If this not noticed, pneumo-/haemothroax may be induced during subclavian vein puncture as the needle may enter the first intercostal space rather than the costo-clavicular angle. The cephalic vein may pursue a supraclavicular course, the axillary vein may drain into an intercostal vein rather than the axillary vein, and the entire length of the axillary-subclavian-brachio-cephalic vein may be absent. Device implanters should be vigilant about the possibility of these anatomical variations, and be equipped with the knowledge and spectrum of alternative techniques needed to deal with them.

  9. Using Electronic Health Records for Quality Measurement and Accountability in Care of the Seriously Ill: Opportunities and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, J Randall; Sathitratanacheewin, Seelwan; Starks, Helene; Lee, Robert Y; Kross, Erin K; Downey, Lois; Sibley, James; Lober, William; Loggers, Elizabeth T; Fausto, James A; Lindvall, Charlotta; Engelberg, Ruth A

    2018-03-01

    As our population ages and the burden of chronic illness rises, there is increasing need to implement quality metrics that measure and benchmark care of the seriously ill, including the delivery of both primary care and specialty palliative care. Such metrics can be used to drive quality improvement, value-based payment, and accountability for population-based outcomes. In this article, we examine use of the electronic health record (EHR) as a tool to assess quality of serious illness care through narrative review and description of a palliative care quality metrics program in a large healthcare system. In the search for feasible, reliable, and valid palliative care quality metrics, the EHR is an attractive option for collecting quality data on large numbers of seriously ill patients. However, important challenges to using EHR data for quality improvement and accountability exist, including understanding the validity, reliability, and completeness of the data, as well as acknowledging the difference between care documented and care delivered. Challenges also include developing achievable metrics that are clearly linked to patient and family outcomes and addressing data interoperability across sites as well as EHR platforms and vendors. This article summarizes the strengths and weakness of the EHR as a data source for accountability of community- and population-based programs for serious illness, describes the implementation of EHR data in the palliative care quality metrics program at the University of Washington, and, based on that experience, discusses opportunities and challenges. Our palliative care metrics program was designed to serve as a resource for other healthcare systems. Although the EHR offers great promise for enhancing quality of care provided for the seriously ill, significant challenges remain to operationalizing this promise on a national scale and using EHR data for population-based quality and accountability.

  10. Grande do Sul, Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Alcides-Rezende

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to analyse the integration of information systems and information technology resources in the municipal planning of 14 small cities of Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil. The research methodology consisted of a multiple case study together with a convenient non-probabilistic sample chosen through a research protocol. The results demonstrate the difficulties of these cities to organise the municipal data as well as their struggle for accessibility of information and planning for management and control.

  11. Polychromatic Grand Unification

    CERN Document Server

    Branco, Gustavo Castello; Felipe, R G; Nobre, B M

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of achieving a gauge coupling grand unification by increasing the QCD degrees of freedom at higher energies is investigated. When confronted with precision low-energy data, the generic weak-mixing angle relation sin^2(theta_W) = N/2(N+1) requires N=7 colors at the GUT scale M_U ~ 10^17 GeV. With the exclusive addition of light Higgs doublets to the standard model particle content, such a unification may also occur if N=5 at M_U ~ 10^16 GeV.

  12. The potential, limitations, and challenges of divide and conquer quantum electronic structure calculations on energetic materials.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Jon R.; Magyar, Rudolph J.

    2012-02-01

    High explosives are an important class of energetic materials used in many weapons applications. Even with modern computers, the simulation of the dynamic chemical reactions and energy release is exceedingly challenging. While the scale of the detonation process may be macroscopic, the dynamic bond breaking responsible for the explosive release of energy is fundamentally quantum mechanical. Thus, any method that does not adequately describe bonding is destined to lack predictive capability on some level. Performing quantum mechanics calculations on systems with more than dozens of atoms is a gargantuan task, and severe approximation schemes must be employed in practical calculations. We have developed and tested a divide and conquer (DnC) scheme to obtain total energies, forces, and harmonic frequencies within semi-empirical quantum mechanics. The method is intended as an approximate but faster solution to the full problem and is possible due to the sparsity of the density matrix in many applications. The resulting total energy calculation scales linearly as the number of subsystems, and the method provides a path-forward to quantum mechanical simulations of millions of atoms.

  13. Electronic mail communication between physicians and patients: a review of challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoun, Jumana

    2016-04-01

    Although promising benefits hold for email communication between physicians and patients in terms of lowering the costs of health care while maintaining or improving the quality of disease management and health promotion, physician use of email with patients is still low and lags behind the willingness of patients to communicate with their physicians through email. There is also a discrepancy between physicians' willingness and actual practice of email communication. Several factors may explain these discrepancies. They include physicians differ in their experience and attitude towards information technology; some may not be convinced that patients appreciate, need and can communicate by email with their doctors; others are still waiting for robust evidence on service performance and efficiency in addition to patient satisfaction and outcome that support such practice; and many are reluctant to do so because of perceived barriers. This report is a review of the literature on the readiness for and adoption of physician-patient email communication, and how can challenges be or have been addressed. The need for Governmental support and directives for email communication to move forward is iterated, and opportunities for future research are pointed out. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Data concerns and challenges in health: networks, information systems and electronic records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bourret

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the beginning of the 1980's most industrialized countries have had to cope with the problem of managing the costs of their Health care systems and particularly the costs of hospitalization. The development of information technologies accelerated by the Internet have led to responses that depend greatly on the better management of information. Health care is entering the Information Society: the rise of networks is a key aspect of our Knowledge and Information Society. With information and services developments that allow for greater involvement of the patient, Health data and more particularly medical data represent a very important economic and social concern. This paper analyzes the rise of networks within the Health field from the French experience in Healthcare Networks and compares it with that of the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom and Spain. Then we outline the special properties of Health data: its personal, sensitive and confidential nature as well as how it needs to conform to particular legislation. Finally we study the use of these data, the essential role of Information and Communication Systems with its key element, the patient's Electronic Health Record, in promoting new practices based on information sharing and the quality of data. This marks the beginning of huge changes.

  15. Assessing electronic cigarette effects and regulatory impact: Challenges with user self-reported device power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudy, Alyssa K; Leventhal, Adam M; Goldenson, Nicholas I; Eissenberg, Thomas

    2017-10-01

    Electronic cigarettes (ECIGs) aerosolize liquids for user inhalation that usually contain nicotine. ECIG nicotine emission is determined, in part, by user behavior, liquid nicotine concentration, and electrical power. Whether users are able to report accurately nicotine concentration and device electrical power has not been evaluated. This study's purpose was to examine if ECIG users could provide data relevant to understanding ECIG nicotine emission, particularly liquid nicotine concentration (mg/ml) as well as battery voltage (V) and heater resistance (ohms, Ω) - needed to calculate power (watts, W). Adult ECIG users (N=165) were recruited from Los Angeles, CA for research studies examining the effects of ECIG use. We asked all participants who visited the laboratory to report liquid nicotine concentration, V, and Ω. Liquid nicotine concentration was reported by 89.7% (mean=9.5mg/ml, SD=7.3), and responses were consistent with the distribution of liquids available in commonly marketed products. The majority could not report voltage (51.5%) or resistance (63.6%). Of the 40 participants (24.8%) who reported voltage and resistance, there was a substantial power range (2.2-32,670W) the upper limit of which exceeds that of the highest ECIG reported by any user to our knowledge (i.e., 2512W). If 2512W is taken as the upper limit, only 30 (18.2%) reported valid results (mean 237.3W, SD=370.6; range=2.2-1705.3W). Laboratory, survey, and other researchers interested in understanding ECIG effects to inform users and policymakers may need to use methods other than user self-report to obtain information regarding device power. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Ligeti, Le Grand Macabre (1978)

    OpenAIRE

    Amaral, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Le Grand Macabre, de Györgi Ligeti, uma obra que, em plenos anos setenta, retoma e reinventa a grande tradição da ópera de repertório. Escrita para a Ópera de Estocolmo, estreada em Abril de 1978, Le Grand Macabre é uma das obras mais marcantes e uma das mais consagradas, internacionalmente, no plano da música dramática da segunda metade do século XX. Escrita a partir de uma peça do dramaturgo belga Michel de Ghelderode, “A Balada do Grande Macabro”, de 1934, a obra de Ligeti retoma um...

  17. Packaging Technologies for 500 C SiC Electronics and Sensors: Challenges in Material Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Behelm, Glenn M.; Spry, David J.; Meredith, Roger D.; Hunter, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents ceramic substrates and thick-film metallization based packaging technologies in development for 500C silicon carbide (SiC) electronics and sensors. Prototype high temperature ceramic chip-level packages and printed circuit boards (PCBs) based on ceramic substrates of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) and aluminum nitride (AlN) have been designed and fabricated. These ceramic substrate-based chip-level packages with gold (Au) thick-film metallization have been electrically characterized at temperatures up to 550C. The 96 alumina packaging system composed of chip-level packages and PCBs has been successfully tested with high temperature SiC discrete transistor devices at 500C for over 10,000 hours. In addition to tests in a laboratory environment, a SiC junction field-effect-transistor (JFET) with a packaging system composed of a 96 alumina chip-level package and an alumina printed circuit board was tested on low earth orbit for eighteen months via a NASA International Space Station experiment. In addition to packaging systems for electronics, a spark-plug type sensor package based on this high temperature interconnection system for high temperature SiC capacitive pressure sensors was also developed and tested. In order to further significantly improve the performance of packaging system for higher packaging density, higher operation frequency, power rating, and even higher temperatures, some fundamental material challenges must be addressed. This presentation will discuss previous development and some of the challenges in material science (technology) to improve high temperature dielectrics for packaging applications.

  18. Electronic Currency in the Light of Modern Legal and Economic Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga А. Nikolaychuk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The author gives a brief excursus on the crypto-currency development, the theoretical understanding of a new kind of digital money. Today in the world there is no single interpretation of the crypto-currency, in some sources it is treated as a currency, others as a commodity or raw material. The appearance and use of Bitcoin (the main crypto-currency are considered by some authors as the evolution of the global financial system. The history of the crypto-currency origin, the distinctive features of cryptocurrency from the usual currency, the specifics of their use and relation to these governments are investigated and characterized by their legal status. There are real limitations in Australia, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Singapore, some US States and various offshore, they might constitute restrictive measures, as in Indonesia, China, Russia, and Ukraine. Many governments chose a wait – for example, the EU, UK, Switzerland, USA, Canada, Japan, countries of South-East Asia. The most significant signs of cryptocurrencies, such as decentralization, anonymity and lack of guarantees are marked. Two possible scenarios of crypto-currency development in Russia are proposed. The first scenario is prohibitive and the second one is regulatory. It is noted that the bitcoin should be banned, and should be studied, and then start to gradually adjust. Its benefits and disadvantages of the scenario use are highlighted. In addition, the author emphases the almost complete lack of a legal framework governing relations between clients of the new information network. As a result the study is focused not only on the necessity a detailed scientific study of crypto-currencies, but also on the need to develop institutional norms. Most of the developed countries adapt their legislation to regulate the new electronic money, which will allow slow to adapt innovation of the financial market - a crypto-currency to modern realities. As in Russia the legal basis

  19. Electronic coarse graining enhances the predictive power of molecular simulation allowing challenges in water physics to be addressed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cipcigan, Flaviu S., E-mail: flaviu.cipcigan@ed.ac.uk [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, Edinburgh EH9 3FD (United Kingdom); National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Sokhan, Vlad P. [National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Crain, Jason [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Peter Guthrie Tait Road, Edinburgh EH9 3FD (United Kingdom); National Physical Laboratory, Hampton Road, Teddington, Middlesex TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Martyna, Glenn J. [IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    One key factor that limits the predictive power of molecular dynamics simulations is the accuracy and transferability of the input force field. Force fields are challenged by heterogeneous environments, where electronic responses give rise to biologically important forces such as many-body polarisation and dispersion. The importance of polarisation in the condensed phase was recognised early on, as described by Cochran in 1959 [Philosophical Magazine 4 (1959) 1082–1086] [32]. Currently in molecular simulation, dispersion forces are treated at the two-body level and in the dipole limit, although the importance of three-body terms in the condensed phase was demonstrated by Barker in the 1980s [Phys. Rev. Lett. 57 (1986) 230–233] [72]. One approach for treating both polarisation and dispersion on an equal basis is to coarse grain the electrons surrounding a molecular moiety to a single quantum harmonic oscillator (cf. Hirschfelder, Curtiss and Bird 1954 [The Molecular Theory of Gases and Liquids (1954)] [37]). The approach, when solved in strong coupling beyond the dipole limit, gives a description of long-range forces that includes two- and many-body terms to all orders. In the last decade, the tools necessary to implement the strong coupling limit have been developed, culminating in a transferable model of water with excellent predictive power across the phase diagram. Transferability arises since the environment automatically identifies the important long range interactions, rather than the modeler through a limited set of expressions. Here, we discuss the role of electronic coarse-graining in predictive multiscale materials modelling and describe the first implementation of the method in a general purpose molecular dynamics software: QDO-MD. - Highlights: • Electronic coarse graining unites many-body dispersion and polarisation beyond the dipole limit. • It consists of replacing the electrons of a molecule using a quantum harmonic oscillator, called a

  20. Implementing an electronic point-of-care medical record at an organized athletic event: challenges, pitfalls, and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Hamilton J; Higgins, George L; Baumann, Michael R

    2010-09-01

    We examined the feasibility of implementing an electronic health record (EHR) at an international running event. Institutional review board-approved observational study. An annual international running event supported by an on-site medical facility. All registered athletes. Web-based EHR provided at no cost. Participants were asked to populate it with essential health data. The EHR was accessed for runners requiring medical services. Obstacles to EHR utilization, reliability of EHR functionality in the field, and ability to correctly match runners to their EHR. Only 320 (5%) of the participants utilized the EHR. Repeated notification, no cost, and ready access proved to be insufficient drivers for use. Lack of reliable Internet connectivity hampered full functionality. "Bib swapping" may pose a risk for participant misidentification with resultant electronic medical error. Barriers to the successful utilization of an EHR were identified. Despite education and promotion, voluntary participant enrollment was a challenge. Mandatory enrollment will be required if universal EHR adoption is the goal. Internet connectivity needs to be logistically planned. Future efforts should focus on measures to ensure that EHRs are correctly matched to participants. Bib swapping must be eliminated if athletes are to be identified by their assigned numbers.

  1. The CBM Experiment at FAIR-New challenges for Front-End Electronics, Data Acquisition and Trigger Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Walter F J

    2006-01-01

    The 'Compressed Baryonic Matter' (CBM) experiment at the new 'Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research' (FAIR) in Darmstadt is designed to study the properties of highly compressed baryonic matter produced in nucleus-nucleus collisions in the 10 to 45 A GeV energy range. One of the key observables is hidden (J/ψ) and open (D 0 , D ± ) charm production. To achieve an adequate sensitivity extremely high interaction rates of up to 10 7 events/second are required, resulting in major technological challenges for the detectors, front-end electronics and data processing. The front-end electronics will be self-triggered, autonomously detect particle hits, and output hit parameter together with a precise absolute time-stamp. Several layers of feature extraction and event selection will reduce the primary data flow of about 1 TByte/sec to a level of 1 GByte/sec. This new architecture avoids many limitations of conventional DAQ/Trigger systems and is for example essential for open charm detection, which requires the reconstruction of displaced vertices, in a high-rate heavy ion environment

  2. Albuquerque/Middle Rio Grande Urban Waters Viewer

    Science.gov (United States)

    These data have been compiled in support of the Middle Rio Grande/Albuquerque Urban Waters Partnership for the region including Albuquerque, New Mexico.The Middle Rio Grande/Albuquerque Urban Waters Federal Partnership is co-chaired by the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. There are also a number of other federal agencies engaged in projects with Tribal, State, and local officials, and community stakeholders. Like many western river ecosystems, the Middle Rio Grande faces numerous challenges in balancing competing needs within a finite water supply and other resource constrains. Historical practices by our ancestors and immigrants to the Middle Rio Grande have established the conditions that we have inherited. Long-term drought exacerbated by climate change is changing conditions that affect natural and human communities as we strive to improve our precious Rio Grande.The Middle Rio Grande/Albuquerque Urban Waters Federal Partnership will reconnect our urban communities, particularly those that are overburdened or economically distressed, with the waterway by improving coordination among federal agencies and collaborating with community-led revitalization efforts. Our projects will improve our community water systems and promote their economic, environmental and social benefits. Specifically, the Middle Rio Grande/Albuquerque Urban Waters Federal Partnership will support the development of the Valle de Oro

  3. La Grande Muraille Verte

    OpenAIRE

    Achouak, Wafa; Adjonou, Kossi; Albergel, Jean; Bâ, Amadou; Bâ, Amadou M.; Bally, René; Baudoin, Ezékiel; Bellefontaine, Ronald; Billaz, René; Boetsch, Gilles; Bonnet, Bernard; Broutin, Cécile; Castellanet, Christian; Delville, Philippe Lavigne; Descroix, Luc

    2013-01-01

    La désertification est un phénomène mondial qui affecte près de la moitié de la surface de la planète, notamment en Afrique où 43 % des terres se trouvent dans des zones arides ou semi-arides. La lutte contre la désertification dans ces milieux constitue une des priorités majeures des États sahélo-sahariens du Circum-Sahara. L’ « Initiative africaine Grande Muraille Verte » (IAGMV) répond à ces enjeux via un ensemble d’actions destinées à assurer le développement socio-économique régional. El...

  4. La importancia de ser grande

    OpenAIRE

    Baisre, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    Se responde a las preguntas ¿por qué los mamíferos marinos son los animales más grandes del planeta?, ¿Por qué los peces no pueden ser más grandes?. Éstas y otras interrogantes son respondidas de forma sencilla y clara.

  5. Geo synthetics. a remarkable discipline with great achievements in the past and exciting challenges for a bright future; Geosinteticos: una importante disciplina con grandes logros en el pasado y emocionantes retos para un brillante futuro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giroud, J. P.

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents achievements of the geo synthetics discipline and challenges facing the discipline. The paper shows that one of the main achievements of geo synthetics discipline and challenges facing the discipline. The paper shows that one of the main achievements of geo synthetics is that they have pervaded most branches of geotechnical engineering to the point where it is almost impossible to practice geotechnical engineering without geo synthetics. Then, the paper addresses the challenges facing the geo synthetics discipline. Two major types of challenges are identified: education challenges and technical challenges. Regarding technical challenges, it is recommended that researchers focus on behaviors that are not traditionally considered in geotechnical engineering in order to use geo synthetics to their full potential. Note: this is a significantly expanded version of the keynote paper presented at the 2008 GeoAmericas Conferences. (Author)

  6. Business to Business - Electronic Invoice Processing : A report on the challenges, solutions and outcomes for companies switching from manual to electronic invoice handling

    OpenAIRE

    Matsson, Erik; Dahllöf, Gustav; Nilsson, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Electronic document handling was first used in the automotive industry in the early 1970’s, the way of communicating electronic at the time was concerned with the communication way of EDI (Hsieh, 2004). In the beginning of 2000 a new way of communicating electronic documents was introduced with the emergence of VAN-operators (Hsieh, 2004). This technology of communicating electronic invoices has shown to be less complex for the businesses than the previous EDI connections. The VAN-operators e...

  7. Grand slam on cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Nanette

    2014-01-01

    A winner of 59 Grand Slam championships including a record 9 Wimbledon singles titles, Martina Navratilova is the most successful woman tennis player of the modern era. Martina was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame, named "Tour Player of the Year" seven times by the Women's Tennis Association, declared "Female Athlete of the Year" by the Associated Press, and ranked one of the "Top Forty Athletes of All-Time" by Sports Illustrated. Equally accomplished off the court, Martina is an author, philanthropist, TV commentator, and activist who has dedicated her life to educating people about prejudice and stereotypes. After coming out as a lesbian in 1981, Martina became a tireless advocate of equal rights for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people, and she has contributed generously to the LGBT community. Martina is the author of seven books, including most recently Shape Your Self: My 6-Step Diet and Fitness Plan to Achieve the Best Shape of your Life, an inspiring guide to healthy living and personal fitness. Martina was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010.

  8. Magnetic spectrometer Grand Raiden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, M.; Akimune, H.; Daito, I.; Fujimura, H.; Fujita, Y.; Hatanaka, K.; Ikegami, H.; Katayama, I.; Nagayama, K.; Matsuoka, N.; Morinobu, S.; Noro, T.; Yoshimura, M.; Sakaguchi, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Tamii, A.; Yosoi, M.

    1999-01-01

    A high-resolution magnetic spectrometer called 'Grand Raiden' is operated at the RCNP ring cyclotron facility in Osaka for nuclear physics studies at intermediate energies. This magnetic spectrometer has excellent ion-optical properties. In the design of the spectrometer, the second-order dispersion matching condition has been taken into account, and almost all the aberration terms such as (x vertical bar θ 3 ), (x vertical bar θφ 2 ), (x vertical bar θ 2 δ) and (x vertical bar θδ 2 ) in a third-order matrix calculation are optimized. A large magnetic rigidity of the spectrometer (K = 1400 MeV) gives a great advantage to measure the charge-exchange ( 3 He, t) reactions at 450 MeV. The ability of the high-resolution measurement has been demonstrated. Various coincidence measurements are performed to study the nuclear structures of highly excited states through decay properties of nuclear levels following nuclear reactions at intermediate energies

  9. Investigation Procedures in Terrorist Electronic Crimes and it’s Challenges: A study in the Saudi legal system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehad Farouk Abbas Mohamed

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in information technology (IT form the backbone of the development of everyday life and a knowledge-based society. At present, there is more and more attention being paid to IT because of its extensive use in all spheres of life. Due to this massive cyber development, new type of crimes with complex and multifaceted nature have evolved. This is in contrast to traditional crimes from all angles, whether security or geographical based. Due to this, a number of challenges and dangers or threatening specialist judicial authorities and hamper their work and technical abilities in performing the tasks entrusted to them, particularly in crime investigation and prosecution. Because of the complex nature and detailed technical procedures applied at each stage of crime investigation, much greater efforts are required to reveal the hidden realities of an electronic crime. Therefore, investigation authorities, judiciary and other relevant bodies require an up to date knowledge of new technologies to be able to perform their allocated tasks precisely according to defined rules and regulations, and identify the perpetrator correctly.

  10. Sequential Pattern Mining of Electronic Healthcare Reimbursement Claims: Experiences and Challenges in Uncovering How Patients are Treated by Physicians

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullum, Laura L [ORNL; Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL; Hobson, Tanner C [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We examine the use of electronic healthcare reimbursement claims (EHRC) for analyzing healthcare delivery and practice patterns across the United States (US). We show that EHRCs are correlated with disease incidence estimates published by the Centers for Disease Control. Further, by analyzing over 1 billion EHRCs, we track patterns of clinical procedures administered to patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), heart disease (HD) and breast cancer (BC) using sequential pattern mining algorithms. Our analyses reveal that in contrast to treating HD and BC, clinical procedures for ASD diagnoses are highly varied leading up to and after the ASD diagnoses. The discovered clinical procedure sequences also reveal significant differences in the overall costs incurred across different parts of the US, indicating a lack of consensus amongst practitioners in treating ASD patients. We show that a data-driven approach to understand clinical trajectories using EHRC can provide quantitative insights into how to better manage and treat patients. Based on our experience, we also discuss emerging challenges in using EHRC datasets for gaining insights into the state of contemporary healthcare delivery and practice in the US.

  11. Digital Savings: A Study of Academic Libraries Finds that Going from Print to Electronic Journals Can Save Money, if It's Done Right, but Challenges Remain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schonfeld, Roger C.; Fenton, Eileen Gifford

    2005-01-01

    Without question, the ongoing transition from print to electronic periodicals has challenged librarians to rethink their strategies. While some effects of this change have been immediately apparent--greater breadth of material, easier access, exposure to new sources, publisher package deals, and open access--the broader outcomes on library…

  12. Grand Gestures: A Somatic Ethnography

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Trish

    2015-01-01

    This is a 'Plain English' report on the Arts and Humanities Research Council funded project 'A Somatic Ethnography of Grand Gestures Elders Dance Group'. It is written for the communities of practice around elders dance and participatory arts more generally.

  13. Imaging mass spectrometry tackles interfacial challenges in electrochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiao-Ying

    2017-12-01

    Electrochemistry has played a significant role in many research fields. Owing to its sensitivity and selectivity, in situ electroanalysis has been widely used as a fast and economical means for achieving outstanding results. Although many spectroscopic techniques have been used in electrochemistry, the challenges to capture short-lived intermediate species as a result of electron transfer in the buried solid electrode and electrolyte solution interface remains a grand challenge. In situ imaging mass spectrometry (IMS) recently has been extended to capture transient species in electrochemistry. This review intends to summarize newest development of IMS and its applications in advancing fundamental electrochemistry.

  14. La taille du grand homme

    OpenAIRE

    Tillier, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    Le gigantisme plastique a été l’objet, tant de la part des artistes que des instances politiques, de nombreux débats et controverses, en particulier à propos de la multiplication des sculptures monumentales publiques. Les grands programmes sculptés de Bartholdi — le Lion de Belfort et la Liberté de New-York — n’ont pas été sans susciter de vives polémiques. Mais celles-ci atteignent leur summum quand le monumentalisme concerne les effigies de grands hommes, en lesquelles les adversaires de la...

  15. Grand Rounds in Pediatric Nephrology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Case Presentation. Grand Rounds in Pediatric Nephrology. Elisabeth M. Hodson. Centre for Kidney Research, The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Locked Bag 4001, Westmead NSW 2145, Australia .... nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) with minimal change disease ... and reduced renal function while severe SLE nephropathy.

  16. Ultraviolet and soft X-ray free-electron lasers introduction to physical principles, experimental results, technological challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Schmüser, Peter; Rossbach, Jörg; Fujimori, A; Kühn, J; Müller, T; Steiner, F; Trümper, J; Varma, C; Wölfle, P

    2008-01-01

    In the introduction accelerator-based light sources are considered and a comparison is made between free-electron lasers and conventional quantum lasers. The motion and radiation of relativistic electrons in undulator magnets is discussed. The principle of a low-gain free-electron laser is explained and the pendulum equations are introduced that characterize the electron dynamics in the field of a light wave. The differential equations of the high-gain FEL are derived from the Maxwell equations of electrodynamics. Analytical and numerical solutions of the FEL equations are presented and important FEL parameters are defined, such as gain length, FEL bandwidth and saturation power. A detailed numerical study of the all-important microbunching process is presented. The mechanism of Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission is described theoretically and illustrated with numerous experimental results. Three-dimensional effects such as betatron oscillations and optical diffraction are addressed and their impact on the F...

  17. The problem of the Grand Unification Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treder, H.-J.

    The evolution and fundamental questions of physical theories unifying the gravitational, electromagnetic, and quantum-mechanical interactions are explored, taking Pauli's aphorism as a motto: 'Let no man join what God has cast asunder.' The contributions of Faraday and Riemann, Lorentz, Einstein, and others are discussed, and the criterion of Pauli is applied to Grand Unification Theories (GUT) in general and to those seeking to link gravitation and electromagnetism in particular. Formal mathematical symmetry principles must be shown to have real physical relevance by predicting measurable phenomena not explainable without a GUT; these phenomena must be macroscopic because gravitational effects are to weak to be measured on the microscopic level. It is shown that empirical and theoretical studies of 'gravomagnetism', 'gravoelectricity', or possible links between gravoelectrity and the cosmic baryon assymmetry eventually lead back to basic questions which appear philosophical or purely mathematical but actually challenge physics to seek verifiable answers.

  18. Preface to a GUT (Grand Unified Theory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honig, W.

    1982-01-01

    A Grand Unified Theory (GUT) is proposed exhibiting relativistic invariance and based on a physical model for vacuum space consisting of the superposition of oppositely charged continuous fluids. Models for the photon, electron, neutrino, proton, etc., consist of separate unique variations in the relative densities of the fluids and their flow patterns. This GUT is also based on the use of transfinite axiomatic number forms and on a concept of metrical relativity which hopefully reconciles the many logical dichotomies in and between Special Relativity and Quantum Mechanics. These ideas result in a number of experimental proposals and predicted results which appear to be underivable from present paradigms, first among which is a physical model for the hidden variable of Quantum Mechanics. It is on these features that attention should rest. (Auth.)

  19. Software Engineering Support of the Third Round of Scientific Grand Challenge Investigations: An Earth Modeling System Software Framework Strawman Design that Integrates Cactus and UCLA/UCB Distributed Data Broker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Bryan; Zhou, Shu-Jia; Higgins, Glenn

    2002-01-01

    One of the most significant challenges in large-scale climate modeling, as well as in high-performance computing in other scientific fields, is that of effectively integrating many software models from multiple contributors. A software framework facilitates the integration task. both in the development and runtime stages of the simulation. Effective software frameworks reduce the programming burden for the investigators, freeing them to focus more on the science and less on the parallel communication implementation, while maintaining high performance across numerous supercomputer and workstation architectures. This document proposes a strawman framework design for the climate community based on the integration of Cactus, from the relativistic physics community, and UCLA/UCB Distributed Data Broker (DDB) from the climate community. This design is the result of an extensive survey of climate models and frameworks in the climate community as well as frameworks from many other scientific communities. The design addresses fundamental development and runtime needs using Cactus, a framework with interfaces for FORTRAN and C-based languages, and high-performance model communication needs using DDB. This document also specifically explores object-oriented design issues in the context of climate modeling as well as climate modeling issues in terms of object-oriented design.

  20. Top ten challenges when interfacing a laboratory information system to an electronic health record: Experience at a large academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrides, Athena K; Tanasijevic, Milenko J; Goonan, Ellen M; Landman, Adam B; Kantartjis, Michalis; Bates, David W; Melanson, Stacy E F

    2017-10-01

    Recent U.S. government regulations incentivize implementation of an electronic health record (EHR) with computerized order entry and structured results display. Many institutions have also chosen to interface their EHR to their laboratory information system (LIS). Reported long-term benefits include increased efficiency and improved quality and safety. In order to successfully implement an interfaced EHR-LIS, institutions must plan years in advance and anticipate the impact of an integrated system. It can be challenging to fully understand the technical, workflow and resource aspects and adequately prepare for a potentially protracted system implementation and the subsequent stabilization. We describe the top ten challenges that we encountered in our clinical laboratories following the implementation of an interfaced EHR-LIS and offer suggestions on how to overcome these challenges. This study was performed at a 777-bed, tertiary care center which recently implemented an interfaced EHR-LIS. Challenges were recorded during EHR-LIS implementation and stabilization and the authors describe the top ten. Our top ten challenges were selection and harmonization of test codes, detailed training for providers on test ordering, communication with EHR provider champions during the build process, fluid orders and collections, supporting specialized workflows, sufficient reports and metrics, increased volume of inpatient venipunctures, adequate resources during stabilization, unanticipated changes to laboratory workflow and ordering specimens for anatomic pathology. A few suggestions to overcome these challenges include regular meetings with clinical champions, advanced considerations of reports and metrics that will be needed, adequate training of laboratory staff on new workflows in the EHR and defining all tests including anatomic pathology in the LIS. EHR-LIS implementations have many challenges requiring institutions to adapt and develop new infrastructures. This article

  1. Surface and Interface Physics of Correlated Electron Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millis, Andrew [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)

    2004-09-01

    The {\\it Surface and Interface Physics of Correlated Electron Materials} research program provided conceptual understanding of and theoretical methodologies for understanding the properties of surfaces and interfaces involving materials exhibiting strong electronic correlations. The issues addressed in this research program are important for basic science, because the behavior of correlated electron superlattices is a crucial challenge to and crucial test of our understanding of the grand-challenge problem of correlated electron physics and are important for our nation's energy future because correlated interfaces offer opportunities for the control of phenomena needed for energy and device applications. Results include new physics insights, development of new methods, and new predictions for materials properties.

  2. Anthropocene Age Wicked Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgeman, Rick; Wu, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Grand global challenges, including wicked human caused or influenced ones key to sustainability, characterize the Anthropocene Age. Among these are climate change driven by increased methane and CO2 in the atmosphere; consequent global warming and increasing intensity and incidence of extreme wea...

  3. Results from KASCADE-Grande

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertaina, M., E-mail: bertaina@to.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Apel, W.D. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, KIT - Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Arteaga-Velazquez, J.C. [Universidad Michoacana, Instituto de Fisica y Matematicas, Morelia (Mexico); Bekk, K. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, KIT - Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Bluemer, J. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, KIT - Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, KIT - Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Bozdog, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, KIT - Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); Brancus, I.M. [National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Buchholz, P. [Fachbereich Physik, Universitaet Siegen (Germany); Cantoni, E. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario, INAF Torino (Italy); Chiavassa, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale dell' Universita, Torino (Italy); Cossavella, F. [Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, KIT - Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie (Germany); and others

    2012-11-11

    The KASCADE-Grande experiment, located at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany) is a multi-component extensive air-shower experiment devoted to the study of cosmic rays and their interactions at primary energies 10{sup 14}-10{sup 18} eV. Main goals of the experiment are the measurement of the all-particle energy spectrum and mass composition in the 10{sup 16}-10{sup 18} eV range by sampling charged (N{sub ch}) and muon (N{sub {mu}}) components of the air shower. The method to derive the energy spectrum and its uncertainties, as well as the implications of the obtained result, is discussed. An overview of the analyses performed by KASCADE-Grande to derive the mass composition of the measured high-energy comic rays is presented as well.

  4. Results from KASCADE–Grande

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertaina, M.; Apel, W.D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J.C.; Bekk, K.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I.M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.

    2012-01-01

    The KASCADE–Grande experiment, located at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany) is a multi-component extensive air-shower experiment devoted to the study of cosmic rays and their interactions at primary energies 10 14 –10 18 eV. Main goals of the experiment are the measurement of the all-particle energy spectrum and mass composition in the 10 16 –10 18 eV range by sampling charged (N ch ) and muon (N μ ) components of the air shower. The method to derive the energy spectrum and its uncertainties, as well as the implications of the obtained result, is discussed. An overview of the analyses performed by KASCADE–Grande to derive the mass composition of the measured high-energy comic rays is presented as well.

  5. The tip of the iceberg : challenges of accessing hospital electronic health record data for biological data mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denaxas, Spiros C; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Moore, Jason H

    2016-01-01

    Modern cohort studies include self-reported measures on disease, behavior and lifestyle, sensor-based observations from mobile phones and wearables, and rich -omics data. Follow-up is often achieved through electronic health record (EHR) linkages across primary and secondary healthcare providers.

  6. Design challenges and gaps in standards in developing an interoperable zero footprint DI thin client for use in image-enabled electronic health record solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Arun; Koff, David; Bak, Peter; Bender, Duane; Castelli, Jane

    2015-03-01

    The deployment of regional and national Electronic Health Record solutions has been a focus of many countries throughout the past decade. A major challenge for these deployments has been support for ubiquitous image viewing. More specifically, these deployments require an imaging solution that can work over the Internet, leverage any point of service device: desktop, tablet, phone; and access imaging data from any source seamlessly. Whereas standards exist to enable ubiquitous image viewing, few if any solutions exist that leverage these standards and meet the challenge. Rather, most of the currently available web based DI viewing solutions are either proprietary solutions or require special plugins. We developed a true zero foot print browser based DI viewing solution based on the Web Access DICOM Objects (WADO) and Cross-enterprise Document Sharing for Imaging (XDS-I.b) standards to a) demonstrate that a truly ubiquitous image viewer can be deployed; b) identify the gaps in the current standards and the design challenges for developing such a solution. The objective was to develop a viewer, which works on all modern browsers on both desktop and mobile devices. The implementation allows basic viewing functionalities of scroll, zoom, pan and window leveling (limited). The major gaps identified in the current DICOM WADO standards are a lack of ability to allow any kind of 3D reconstruction or MPR views. Other design challenges explored include considerations related to optimization of the solution for response time and low memory foot print.

  7. The role of electronic assessment of adherence in the education and counseling of children taking growth hormone: progress and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, Fritz; Norgren, Svante; Horne, Rob; Gasteyger, Christoph

    There are numerous issues surrounding adherence in children taking recombinant human growth hormone (rh-GH). New technologies capable of accurately recording/monitoring may highlight some of these issues, and have value in optimizing adherence levels through education and counseling. The intention of this review is to guide healthcare professionals (HCPs). PubMed, Google Scholar and citations in published papers were used to substantiate the views expressed by the authors. Both perceptional and practical factors influence the adherence levels of children taking rh-GH. Understanding such factors may help to identify the characteristics of ideal rh-GH devices and their potential impact on adherence. New technologies, such as electronic monitors, may facilitate patient-provider discussions on adherence, and help identify barriers that are amenable to change. Monitoring adherence may also help differentiate nonadherence from biological low response to rh-GH therapy. However, the medical, psychological, social and ethical aspects of electronic assessment require further investigation.

  8. Brighty, donkeys and conservation in the Grand Canyon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, John

    2006-09-01

    The Grand Canyon is a vast place. It is almost incomprehensible in size. And yet it can also seem strangely crowded. Millions of tourists flock to the Grand Canyon in northern Arizona every year. In 1999, almost 5 million people visited, the highest figure in Canyon history. And each one of them expected to see a wild, free and untrammelled landscape. Despite the obvious natural resources, this expectation has proved anything but easy to satisfy. The US National Park Service (NPS), responsible for the management of most large North American parks (along with several historic sites and museums), has struggled to make or keep the canyon "grand". Park rangers have grappled with a multitude of issues during the past century, including automobile congestion, drying of the Colorado River and uranium mining inside the park. Conservation has posed a unique set of challenges. On a fundamental level, "restoring" the Grand Canyon to its "original" wilderness setting has proved intensely problematic. In the field of wildlife management, restoring the Canyon to its pre-Columbian splendour has entailed some tough decisions--none more so than a 1976 plan to eliminate a sizeable population of feral burros (wild donkeys) roaming the preserve, animals classified as exotics by the NPS.

  9. Grand unification: quo vadis domine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senjanovic, G.

    1985-01-01

    The present theoretical and experimental situation with grand unification is summarized. The issues of proton decay and the Weinberg angle are addressed, going through the predictions of both the standard SU(5) theory and its supersymmetric extension. The SO(10) theory, which provides a minimal one family model, is then studied. The gravitational characteristics of domain walls and strings are then discussed. It is argued that there is a need to go beyond SO(10) in order to incorporate a unified picture of families. This leads to the prediction of mirror fermions, whose physics is analyzed. 31 refs

  10. Graafikatriennaali grand prix Korea kunstnikule

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1998-01-01

    Tallinna XI graafikatriennaali rahvusvaheline žürii andis grand prix korea kunstnikule Chung¡Sang-Gonile, kolm võrdset preemiat - soome kunstnikele Anita Jensenile ja Tapani Mikkonenile ning jaapani kunstnikule Estuko Obatale. Eesti Kunstimuuseumi preemia - Wendy Swallow. Tallinna linna preemia ja Ivar Luki sponsoripreemia - Walter Jule. Sponsoripreemiad : Paletti Eesti AS preemia - Inga Heamägi; Rannila Profiili preemia - Mojca Zlokarnik; UNDP preemia - Andrea Juan. Rotermanni soolalao arhitektuuri- ja kunstikeskuse diplom - Lis Ingram, Heli Päivikki Kurunsaari, Randi Strand, Wendy Swallow

  11. Sustainable Management of Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    To provide information on EPAs strategy for electronics stewardship, certified electronics recyclers and the Challenge; as well as where to donate unwanted electronics, how to calculate benefits, and what's going on with electronics mgmt in their states.

  12. Engineering central metabolism – a grand challenge for plant biologists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sweetlove, Lee J.; Nielsen, Jens; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2017-01-01

    . In this review we discuss new approaches for metabolic engineering that have the potential to address these problems and dramatically improve the success with which we can rationally engineer central metabolism in plants. In particular, we advocate the adoption of an iterative ‘design-build-test-learn’ cycle...... using fast-to-transform model plants as test beds. This approach can be realised by coupling new molecular tools to incorporate multiple transgenes in nuclear and plastid genomes with computational modelling to design the engineering strategy and to understand the metabolic phenotype of the engineered...

  13. Face recognition's grand challenge: uncontrolled conditions under control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boom, B.J.

    2010-01-01

    The number of cameras increases rapidly in squares, shopping centers, railway stations and airport halls. There are hundreds of cameras in the city center of Amsterdam. This is still modest compared to the tens of thousands of cameras in London, where citizens are expected to be filmed by more than

  14. Big Data, Grand Challenges : On digitization and humanities research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijck, José

    2016-01-01

    When I started working on my PhD, in 1987 at the University of California, San Diego (US), I wanted to examine how a public debate on a controversial issue results in consensus. My PhD thesis resulted in a book on the course of the public debate around in vitro fertilization in the US news media

  15. Flexible Environments for Grand-Challenge Simulation in Climate Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierrehumbert, R.; Tobis, M.; Lin, J.; Dieterich, C.; Caballero, R.

    2004-12-01

    Current climate models are monolithic codes, generally in Fortran, aimed at high-performance simulation of the modern climate. Though they adequately serve their designated purpose, they present major barriers to application in other problems. Tailoring them to paleoclimate of planetary simulations, for instance, takes months of work. Theoretical studies, where one may want to remove selected processes or break feedback loops, are similarly hindered. Further, current climate models are of little value in education, since the implementation of textbook concepts and equations in the code is obscured by technical detail. The Climate Systems Center at the University of Chicago seeks to overcome these limitations by bringing modern object-oriented design into the business of climate modeling. Our ultimate goal is to produce an end-to-end modeling environment capable of configuring anything from a simple single-column radiative-convective model to a full 3-D coupled climate model using a uniform, flexible interface. Technically, the modeling environment is implemented as a Python-based software component toolkit: key number-crunching procedures are implemented as discrete, compiled-language components 'glued' together and co-ordinated by Python, combining the high performance of compiled languages and the flexibility and extensibility of Python. We are incrementally working towards this final objective following a series of distinct, complementary lines. We will present an overview of these activities, including PyOM, a Python-based finite-difference ocean model allowing run-time selection of different Arakawa grids and physical parameterizations; CliMT, an atmospheric modeling toolkit providing a library of 'legacy' radiative, convective and dynamical modules which can be knitted into dynamical models, and PyCCSM, a version of NCAR's Community Climate System Model in which the coupler and run-control architecture are re-implemented in Python, augmenting its flexibility and adaptability.

  16. Facing the Grand Challenges through Heuristics and Mindfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powietrzynska, Malgorzata; Tobin, Kenneth; Alexakos, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    We address the nature of mindfulness and its salience to education generally and to science education specifically. In a context of the historical embeddedness of mindfulness in Buddhism we discuss research in social neuroscience, presenting evidence for neuronal plasticity of the brain and six emotional styles, which are not biologically…

  17. Science, technology and the 'grand challenge' of aging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Birgit; Peine, Alexander; Moors, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce the themes addressed and the approaches used in this special issue. We start by briefly discussing the state of the art in research and policy making related to science, technology and ageing. We argue that an important gap characterizes this state of the art: current...... approaches do not consider material practice and materiality to be an inherent part of later life as constituted in contemporary societies. Science and Technology Studies (STS) provide both the theories and methods to address this gap, and thus deploy a theoretical and empirical understanding of science......, technology and ageing that captures how later life co-evolves with the practices of technology use and design. We briefly discuss how the articles in the collection each contribute to such an understanding across various locations. We conclude that, together, the contributions specify a perspective...

  18. Accelerating cooperative systems' development through the Grand Cooperative Driving challenge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk Noordegraaf, D.; Malone, K.M.; Katwijk, R. van; Gerrits, A.

    2009-01-01

    Cooperative driving systems comprise an important research area. They are considered a promising solution for reducing traffic congestion, reducing environmental impact and improving traffic safety and driver comfort. The key to these systems is the communication and interaction between vehicles and

  19. The Grand Challenges of Command and Control Policy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lenahan, Jack; Charles, Phil

    2006-01-01

    .... In 1900, David Hilbert proposed a list of 23 outstanding problems in mathematics, a number of which have now been solved, some of which remain open but have guided mathematics analysis for the last 100 years...

  20. Grand Challenge Portfolio: Driving Innovation in Industrial Energy Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-01-04

    Under the Recovery Act, AMO provided cost-shared funding for early-stage, low-cost, "concept definition studies" of 47 promising innovations for next-generation manufacturing, energy-intensive processes, advanced materials, and greenhouse gas emissions reduction. The brochure provides information on each of these projects.

  1. Facing the grand challenges through heuristics and mindfulness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powietrzynska, Malgorzata; Tobin, Kenneth; Alexakos, Konstantinos

    2015-03-01

    We address the nature of mindfulness and its salience to education generally and to science education specifically. In a context of the historical embeddedness of mindfulness in Buddhism we discuss research in social neuroscience, presenting evidence for neuronal plasticity of the brain and six emotional styles, which are not biologically predetermined, but are responsive to adaptation through life experiences. We raise questions about the role of science education in mediating the structure and function of the brain. Also, we discuss interventions to increase Mindfulness in Education, including meditation and heuristics, that act as reflexive objects to heighten awareness of characteristics of mindfulness and increase the likelihood of changes in the conduct of social life—increasing the mindfulness of those who engage the characteristics included in the heuristic. We present mindfulness and the development of a toolkit for ameliorating emotions when and as necessary as a component of a science curriculum that orientates toward wellness and sustainability. We advocate for changes in the nature of science education to reflect the priorities of the twenty first century that relate to sustainability of the living and nonliving universe and wellness of sentient beings.

  2. Security and Privacy Grand Challenges for the Internet of Things

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Glenn A.; Zarzhitsky, Dimitri V.; Carroll, Thomas E.; Farquhar, Ethan D.

    2015-08-20

    Abstract— The growth of the Internet of Things (IoT) is driven by market pressures, and while security is being considered, the relationship between the unintended consequences of billions of such devices connecting to the Internet cannot be described with existing mathematical methods. The possibilities for illicit surveillance through lifestyle analysis, unauthorized access to information, and new attack vectors will continue to increase by 2020, when up-to 50 billion devices may be connected. This paper discusses various kinds of vulnerabilities that can be expected to arise, and presents a research agenda for mitigating the worst of the impacts. We hope to draw research attention to the potential dangers of IoT so that many of these problems can be avoided.

  3. Understanding rare disease pathogenesis: a grand challenge for model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hieter, Philip; Boycott, Kym M

    2014-10-01

    In this commentary, Philip Hieter and Kym Boycott discuss the importance of model organisms for understanding pathogenesis of rare human genetic diseases, and highlight the work of Brooks et al., "Dysfunction of 60S ribosomal protein L10 (RPL10) disrupts neurodevelopment and causes X-linked microcephaly in humans," published in this issue of GENETICS. Copyright © 2014 by the Genetics Society of America.

  4. Grand Challenges Learning Analytics and Open Online Onderwijs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Manderveld, Jocelyn; Berg, Alan; Schuwer, Robert; Drachsler, Hendrik

    2018-01-01

    Als onderdeel van het programma voor open en online onderwijs werkt SURF samen met de hogescholen en universiteiten aan kennisontwikkeling op allerlei thema’s. Deze uitgave is een eerste verkenning van de mogelijkheden om learning analytics in te zetten bij open en online onderwijs en de uitdagingen

  5. Utilizing patient data from the veterans administration electronic health record to support web-based clinical decision support: informatics challenges and issues from three clinical domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajeevan, Nallakkandi; Niehoff, Kristina M; Charpentier, Peter; Levin, Forrest L; Justice, Amy; Brandt, Cynthia A; Fried, Terri R; Miller, Perry L

    2017-07-19

    The US Veterans Administration (VA) has developed a robust and mature computational infrastructure in support of its electronic health record (EHR). Web technology offers a powerful set of tools for structuring clinical decision support (CDS) around clinical care. This paper describes informatics challenges and design issues that were confronted in the process of building three Web-based CDS systems in the context of the VA EHR. Over the course of several years, we implemented three Web-based CDS systems that extract patient data from the VA EHR environment to provide patient-specific CDS. These were 1) the VACS (Veterans Aging Cohort Study) Index Calculator which estimates prognosis for HIV+ patients, 2) Neuropath/CDS which assists in the medical management of patients with neuropathic pain, and 3) TRIM (Tool to Reduce Inappropriate Medications) which identifies potentially inappropriate medications in older adults and provides recommendations for improving the medication regimen. The paper provides an overview of the VA EHR environment and discusses specific informatics issues/challenges that arose in the context of each of the three Web-based CDS systems. We discuss specific informatics methods and provide details of approaches that may be useful within this setting. Informatics issues and challenges relating to data access and data availability arose because of the particular architecture of the national VA infrastructure and the need to link to that infrastructure from local Web-based CDS systems. Idiosyncrasies of VA patient data, especially the medication data, also posed challenges. Other issues related to specific functional needs of individual CDS systems. The goal of this paper is to describe these issues so that our experience may serve as a useful foundation to assist others who wish to build such systems in the future.

  6. Opportunities and challenges for time-resolved studies of protein structural dynamics at X-ray free-electron lasers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard

    2014-07-17

    X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) are revolutionary X-ray sources. Their time structure, providing X-ray pulses of a few tens of femtoseconds in duration; and their extreme peak brilliance, delivering approximately 10(12) X-ray photons per pulse and facilitating sub-micrometre focusing, distinguish XFEL sources from synchrotron radiation. In this opinion piece, I argue that these properties of XFEL radiation will facilitate new discoveries in life science. I reason that time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering are promising areas of scientific investigation that will be advanced by XFEL capabilities, allowing new scientific questions to be addressed that are not accessible using established methods at storage ring facilities. These questions include visualizing ultrafast protein structural dynamics on the femtosecond to picosecond time-scale, as well as time-resolved diffraction studies of non-cyclic reactions. I argue that these emerging opportunities will stimulate a renaissance of interest in time-resolved structural biochemistry.

  7. Grand unified brane world scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masato; Blaschke, Filip; Eto, Minoru; Sakai, Norisuke

    2017-12-01

    We present a field theoretical model unifying grand unified theory (GUT) and brane world scenario. As a concrete example, we consider S U (5 ) GUT in 4 +1 dimensions where our 3 +1 dimensional spacetime spontaneously arises on five domain walls. A field-dependent gauge kinetic term is used to localize massless non-Abelian gauge fields on the domain walls and to assure the charge universality of matter fields. We find the domain walls with the symmetry breaking S U (5 )→S U (3 )×S U (2 )×U (1 ) as a global minimum and all the undesirable moduli are stabilized with the mass scale of MGUT. Profiles of massless standard model particles are determined as a consequence of wall dynamics. The proton decay can be exponentially suppressed.

  8. Grandes almacenes en Ginebra, Suiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braillard, P.

    1968-10-01

    Full Text Available This large building, whose metal structure is one of the most important ones erected in Switzerland, has 14 storeys. The sales zones occupy all the above ground floor levels, and the basements contain garages and stores. Additionally, there is a restaurant on the third floor, and administrative offices in the fourth floor of this outstanding commercial building, the «La Placette» Stores, of Geneva.Este gran edificio, cuya estructura metálica es una de las mayores construidas en Suiza, fue organizado en 14 niveles. Las plantas baja y superiores están destinadas a «venta»; y los sótanos, a garajes, almacenes, etc. La tercera planta alberga, además, el comedor, restaurante, etc.; y la cuarta, los locales de administración y dirección de este notable edificio comercial: «Grandes Almacenes La Placette», de Ginebra.

  9. Hyacinths Choke the Rio Grande

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    These images acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, demonstrate the potential of satellite-based remote sensors to monitor infestations of non-native plant species. These images show the vigorous growth of water hyacinths along a stretch of the Rio Grande River in Texas. The infestation had grown so dense in some places it was impeding the flow of water and rendered the river impassible for boats. The hyacinth is an aquatic weed native to South America. The plant is exotic looking and, when it blooms, the hyacinth produces a pretty purple flower, which is why it was introduced into North America. However, it has the capacity to grow and spread at astonishing rates so that in the wild it can completely clog the flow of rivers and waterways in a matter of days or weeks. The top image was acquired on March 30, 2002, and the bottom image on May 9, 2002. In the near-infrared region of the spectrum, photosynthetically-active vegetation is highly reflective. Consequently, vegetation appears bright to the near-infrared sensors aboard ASTER; and water, which absorbs near-infrared radiation, appears dark. In these false-color images produced from the sensor data, healthy vegetation is shown as bright red while water is blue or black. Notice a water hyacinth infestation is already apparent on March 30 near the center of the image. By May 9, the hyacinth population has exploded to cover more than half the river in the scene. Satellite-based remote sensors can enable scientists to monitor large areas of infestation like this one rather quickly and efficiently, which is particularly useful for regions that are difficult to reach from on the ground. (For more details, click to read Showdown in the Rio Grande.) Images courtesy Terrametrics; Data provided by the ASTER Science Team

  10. Proton decay: Numerical simulations confront grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brower, R.C.; Maturana, G.; Giles, R.C.; Moriarty, K.J.M.; Samuel, S.

    The Grand Unified Theories of the electromagnetic, weak and strong interactions constitute a far reaching attempt to synthesize our knowledge of theoretical particle physics into a consistent and compelling whole. Unfortunately, many quantitative predictions of such unified theories are sensitive to the analytically intractible effects of the strong subnuclear theory (Quantum Chromodynamics or QCD). The consequence is that even ambitious experimental programs exploring weak and super-weak interaction effects often fail to give definitive theoretical tests. This paper describes large-scale calculations on a supercomputer which can help to overcome this gap between theoretical predictions and experimental results. Our focus here is on proton decay, though the methods described are useful for many weak processes. The basic algorithms for the numerical simulation of QCD are well known. We will discuss the advantages and challenges of applying these methods to weak transitions. The algorithms require a very large data base with regular data flow and are natural candidates for vectorization. Also, 32-bit floating point arithmetic is adequate. Thus they are most naturally approached using a supercomputer alone or in combination with a dedicated special purpose processor. (orig.).

  11. Proton hexality in local grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerste, Stefan; Nilles, Hans Peter [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Bethe Center for Theoretical Physics and Physikalisches Institut; Ramos-Sanchez, Saul [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Muenchen Univ. (Germany). Arnold Sommerfeld Center for Theoretical Physics

    2010-07-15

    Proton hexality is a discrete symmetry that avoids the problem of too fast proton decay in the supersymmetric extension of the standard model. Unfortunately it is inconsistent with conventional grand unification. We show that proton hexality can be incorporated in the scheme of ''Local Grand Unification'' discussed in the framework of model building in (heterotic) string theory. (orig.)

  12. Strategies for improving attendance at medical grand rounds at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Paul S; Litin, Scott C; Sowden, Monica L; Habermann, Thomas M; LaRusso, Nicholas F

    2003-05-01

    To evaluate, in this before-and-after study, the results of 5 strategies for improving attendance at medical grand rounds at a tertiary care academic medical center. The strategies included (1) using electronic card readers to improve understanding of attendance patterns, (2) conducting yearly needs assessment surveys, (3) developing sessions of topical interest, (4) increasing formal participation by residents and faculty researchers, and (5) enhancing publicity. Attendance at medical grand rounds by Mayo Clinic faculty, fellows, residents, and others was measured by card readers between 1998 and 2001. After implementation of the 5 strategies, the mean +/- SD attendance (as measured by card readers) at medical grand rounds increased 39% from 99.0 +/- 24.6 persons in 1998 to 137.4 +/- 25.2 persons in 2001 (P attendance at medical grand rounds at an academic medical center.

  13. La Grande: volver a empezar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Premat

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Este texto, borrador de un trabajo más amplio, pretende despejar algunas pistas de lectura de La grande, en tanto que paradójico final de la producción de Saer. Digo “paradójico” porque puede tomársela como una novela de comienzo o de origen : de un volver a empezar, en todos los sentidos del término. En esa perspectiva podrían estudiarse algunos núcleos temáticos (como el retorno o el recuerdo de cara a la construcción del texto, a la relación planteada con la tradición y a la singular historia de su escritura (y al material genético que rodea y completa esta novela a la vez inacabada y póstuma. En esta intervención, la idea es la de comentar tres textos, escenas o frases del texto, y a partir de allí esbozar pistas para un estudio que está en ciernes.Première ébauche d’un travail de plus d’ampleur, ce texte vise à éclairer quelques pistes de lecture de La grande, en tant que fin paradoxale de la production de Saer. Je dis « paradoxale » parce que l’on peut considérer cette œuvre comme un roman des commencements ou des origines : comme un retour aux débuts, dans tous les sens du terme. Dans cette perspective, plusieurs nœuds thématiques (comme le retour ou le souvenir pourraient être étudiés en relation à la construction du texte, à la relation qui s’établit avec la tradition et à la singulière histoire de son écriture (et au matériau génétique qui entoure et complète ce roman, à la fois inachevé et posthume. Il sera question ici de commenter trois textes, scènes ou phrases du texte, et d’ébaucher à partir de là quelques pistes pour une étude à l’état naissant.The objective of this text, a draft for a broader work, is to outline some reading clues for La grande, inasmuch as it constitutes a paradoxical ending of Saer’s production. I say “paradoxical” because we can consider this work a novel of beginnings or of origins: a return to the beginning, in every meaning of the

  14. The Effects of Water Markets: Evidence from the Rio Grande.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debaere, P.; Li, T.

    2016-12-01

    The Effects of Water Markets: Evidence from the Rio GrandePeter Debaere, University of Virginia Tianshu Li, University of Virginia The Rio Grande water market is one of the oldest water markets in the United States. Employing techniques from the social sciences, we present the first difference-in-difference analysis of the actual impact of water markets on production. We compare from 1954 to 2012 the crop composition in counties in the Rio Grande water market with those in their neighboring control counties before and after the water market was established in 1971. We provide evidence that water markets can facilitate a shift from crops that are on average more to ones that are less water intensive, or, alternatively, from crops that are on average less to ones that are more productive in terms of $ generated per unit of water. In addition, we find that such reallocations are especially prevalent in times of drought. Our findings supports water markets as a tool to manage water more effectively, which is one of the main challenges of an increasingly water-strapped world.

  15. do rio grande do sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darci Alberto Gatto

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted with the objective of quantifying the production of wood in the Area of the Fourth Colony of Italian Immigration in Rio Grande do Sul. Firstly, using a questionnaire, a census of the consuming companies of wood in that area was made, investigating mainly the amount, type, origin of the consumed raw material, and the amount, type and end use of wood products. As principal results, it was verified that such area presents 77 consuming companies and wood processing units. These were classified into micro and small companies, with familiar features and capital, and low industrialization. In the visits made to the industries, it was evident that many technological aspects are not known or are neglected, thus causing loss of the raw material and/or in low quality of the final products. A great amount of raw material (96,8% of the boards and 98,9% of the timber comes from other areas of the State or the country. In the same way the main products are sold abroad (wood frames 86,3%, panelings 99,7%, sawed wood 53%.

  16. The effects of radiation on the outer planets grand tour

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    A handbook is presented which was designed to accompany an oral presentation on the effects of radiation on the outer planets grand tour (OPGT). A summary of OPGT radiation environments expected from natural sources and the radioisotope thermoelectric generators and basic radiation effects and processes are reviewed, and ionization and displacement effects are examined. The presentation summarizes the effects of radiation on miscellaneous spacecraft materials and devices. The annealing and hardening of electronics are described. Special emphasis is placed on microcircuits. Mathematical modeling of circuits affected by radiation and radiation environmental testing are discussed. A review of means of evaluating the performance and correcting failures of irradiated devices is also presented.

  17. A Grande Reportagem no contexto informativo SIC

    OpenAIRE

    Colaço, Vanessa Alexandra Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Os telespectadores querem ver grandes reportagens? Como evoluíram as audiências da Grande Reportagem SIC? É este o produto premium da estação? Terá este formato um investimento e continuidade garantidas? Estas são algumas das questões formuladas e às quais se procurou dar resposta neste Relatório de Estágio. Neste trabalho traça-se o perfil do programa Grande Reportagem SIC, clarificando a linha editorial que lhe serviu de base, procurando perceber as suas dinâmicas e passando em revista mome...

  18. Supersymmetry and supergravity: Phenomenology and grand unification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnowitt, R.; Nath, P.

    1993-01-01

    A survey is given of supersymmetry and supergravity and their phenomenology. Some of the topics discussed are the basic ideas of global supersymmetry, the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and its phenomenology, the basic ideas of local supersymmetry (supergravity), grand unification, supersymmetry breaking in supergravity grand unified models, radiative breaking of SU(2) x U(1), proton decay, cosmological constraints, and predictions of supergravity grand unified models. While the number of detailed derivations are necessarily limited, a sufficient number of results are given so that a reader can get a working knowledge of this field

  19. VAST 2010 Challenge: Arms Dealings and Pandemics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinstein, Georges; Konecni, Shawn; Plaisant, Catherine; Scholtz, Jean; Whiting, Mark A.

    2010-10-23

    The 5th VAST Challenge consisted of three mini-challenges that involved both intelligence analysis and bioinformatics. Teams could solve one, two or all three mini-challenges and assess the overall situation to enter the Grand Challenge. Mini-challenge one involved text reports about people and events giving information about arms dealers, situations in various countries and linkages between different countries. Mini-challenge two involved hospital admission and death records from various countries providing information about the spread of a world wide pandemic. Mini-challenge three involved genetic data to be used to identify the origin of the pandemic and the most dangerous viral mutations. The Grand Challenge was to determine how these various mini-challenges were connected. As always the goal was to analyze the data and provide novel interactive visualizations useful in the analytic process. We received 58 submissions in total and gave 15 awards.

  20. Las cinco grandes dimensiones de la personalidad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan ter Laak

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo revisa las distintas posiciones teóricas sobre las cinco grandes dimensiones de la personalidad, mostrando las semejanzas y diferencias entre las posturas teóricas. Esta contribución presenta lo siguiente: (a la génesis del contenido y la estructura de las cinco dimensiones; (b la fortaleza de las cinco dimensiones; (e la relación de las cinco grandes dimensiones con otros constructos de personalidad; (d discute el valor predictivo de las puntuaciones del perfil de las cinco dimensiones para criterios pertinentes; (e analiza el estatus teórico de las cinco dimensiones; (f discute críticas históricas sobre las cinco grandes dimensiones y se formulan respuestas a estas críticas; (g hace conjeturas para el futuro de las cinco grandes dimensiones; y (h concluye con algunas conclusiones y comentarios.

  1. Rio Grande Channel, El Paso Area, 1852

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Historical map of Rio Grande river between Texas and Mexico. U.S.-Mexican Boundary Survey.The original map is a Xerox of a Photolithographic Copy of Salazar...

  2. Rio Grande Channel, Guadalupe Area, 1852

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Historical map of Rio Grande river between Texas and Mexico. U.S.- Mexican Boundary Survey. The original map is a xerox of a map entitled Boundary between the United...

  3. Grand unification and gravity - selected topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, A.

    1981-09-01

    The material given here was presented in lectures delivered at the 4th Kyoto Summer Institute on Grand Unification and Related Topics. It consists of six sections. The sections are: the family problem, fermion mass hierarchy, maximal local symmetry, operator analysis of new physics, dynamically generated gravity, and Kaluza theory and grand unification. The last section contains a (hopefully) pedagogical introduction to Kaluza theory. For pedagogical completeness, several appendices reviewing some elementary notions of differential geometry have been added

  4. Grand Rounds: A Method for Improving Student Learning and Client Care Continuity in a Student-Run Physical Therapy Pro Bono Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Jill D.; Bauer, Kyle N.; Spano, Georgia E.; Voelkel, Sarah A.; Palombaro, Kerstin M.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose: Grand Rounds is a teaching methodology that has existed in various forms in medical education for centuries. When a student-run pro bono clinic identified a growing challenge of providing continuity of care for clients and a lack of preparedness in students, they implemented a Grand Rounds model of case presentation within…

  5. Electronic and Ionic Conductors from Ordered Microporous Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dincă, Mircea [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2017-10-30

    The proposed work aimed to establish metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as new classes of high-surface area microporous electronic and ionic conductors. MOFs are crystalline materials with pore sizes ranging from 0.2 to ~ 2 nm (or larger for the latter) defined by inorganic or organic building blocks connected by rigid organic linkers. Myriad applications have been found or proposed for these materials, yet those that require electron transport or conductivity in combination with permanent porosity still lag behind because the vast majority of known frameworks are electrical insulators. Prior to our proposal and subsequent work, there were virtually no studies exploring the possibility of electronic delocalization in these materials. Therefore, our primary goal was to understand and control, at a fundamental level, the electron and ion transport properties of this class of materials, with no specific application proposed, although myriad applications could be envisioned for high surface area conductors. Our goals directly addressed one of the DOE-identified Grand Challenges for Basic Energy Sciences: designing perfect atom- and energy-efficient syntheses of revolutionary new forms of matter with tailored properties. Indeed, the proposed work is entirely synthetic in nature; owing to the molecular nature of the building blocks in MOFs, there is the possibility of unprecedented control over the structure and properties of solid crystalline matter. The goals also tangentially addressed the Grand Challenge of controlling materials processes at the level of electrons: the scope of our program is to create new materials where charges (electrons and/or ions) move according to predefined pathways.

  6. Lifeomics leads the age of grand discoveries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fuchu

    2013-03-01

    When our knowledge of a field accumulates to a certain level, we are bound to see the rise of one or more great scientists. They will make a series of grand discoveries/breakthroughs and push the discipline into an 'age of grand discoveries'. Mathematics, geography, physics and chemistry have all experienced their ages of grand discoveries; and in life sciences, the age of grand discoveries has appeared countless times since the 16th century. Thanks to the ever-changing development of molecular biology over the past 50 years, contemporary life science is once again approaching its breaking point and the trigger for this is most likely to be 'lifeomics'. At the end of the 20th century, genomics wrote out the 'script of life'; proteomics decoded the script; and RNAomics, glycomics and metabolomics came into bloom. These 'omics', with their unique epistemology and methodology, quickly became the thrust of life sciences, pushing the discipline to new high. Lifeomics, which encompasses all omics, has taken shape and is now signalling the dawn of a new era, the age of grand discoveries.

  7. General structure of the GRAND program for analysis of the data from a neutrino detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhigunov, V.P.; Kulikov, V.A.; Mukhin, S.A.; Naumov, V.L.; Platonov, V.G.; Spiridonov, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    The general structure of the GRAND (Global Result Analysis for Neutrino Detector) program used for geometrical and kinematic reconstruction of events recorded by a neutrino detector is considered. The detector consists of a calorimeter-target, a shower electron and γ detector and a magnetic spectrometer. While developing the GRAND program the multivariance (different types of the computers used), availability of various algorithms for solving the same problem, solution of separate particlular problems within the frames of one program are taken into account. The KERNLIB library and the HBOOK, ZBOOK, EPIO and FFREAD subroutine packages are used while creating the program as basic libraries

  8. UMTRA project water sampling and analysis plan, Grand Junction, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-07-01

    Surface remedial action will be completed at the Grand Junction processing site during the summer of 1994. Results of 1993 water sampling indicate that ground water flow conditions and ground water quality at the processing site have remained relatively constant with time. Uranium concentrations in ground water continue to exceed the maximum concentration limits, providing the best indication of the extent of contaminated ground water. Evaluation of surface water quality of the Colorado River indicate no impact from uranium processing activities. No compliance monitoring at the Cheney disposal site has been proposed because ground water in the Dakota Sandstone (uppermost aquifer) is classified as limited-use (Class 111) and because the disposal cell is hydrogeologically isolated from the uppermost aquifer. The following water sampling and water level monitoring activities are planned for calendar year 1994: (i) Semiannual (early summer and late fall) sampling of six existing monitor wells at the former Grand Junction processing site. Analytical results from this sampling will be used to continue characterizing hydrogeochemical trends in background ground water quality and in the contaminated ground water area resulting from source term (tailings) removal. (ii) Water level monitoring of approximately three proposed monitor wells projected to be installed in the alluvium at the processing site in September 1994. Data loggers will be installed in these wells, and water levels will be electronically monitored six times a day. These long-term, continuous ground water level data will be collected to better understand the relationship between surface and ground water at the site. Water level and water quality data eventually will be used in future ground water modeling to establish boundary conditions in the vicinity of the Grand Junction processing site. Modeling results will be used to help demonstrate and document the potential remedial alternative of natural flushing

  9. Grand Tour: immaginario, territorio e culture digitali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Ilardi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Il Grand Tour può essere recuperato come asset narrativo utile per un intervento strategico di re-branding del viaggio in Italia? Il contributo analizza il contesto e le condizioni per una progettazione di questo livello nell’ambiente culturale dell’epoca digitale. Considerando gli archetipi moderni della mediazione dei luoghi come una grande riserva di senso, da riattivare sia nelle pratiche basate sui format seriali e transmediali che valorizzano i territori nella produzione creativa, sia nella costruzione di infrastrutture digitali e  transluoghi per la valorizzazione degli attrattori culturali.

  10. Effective Higgs theories in supersymmetric grand unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Sibo [Chongqing University, Department of Physics, Chongqing (China)

    2017-09-15

    The effective Higgs theories at the TeV scale in supersymmetric SU(5) grand unification models are systematically derived. Restricted to extensions on 5{sub H} containing the Higgs sector we show that only two types of real (vector-like) models and one type of chiral model are found to be consistent with perturbative grand unification. While the chiral model has been excluded by the LHC data, the fate of perturbative unification will be uniquely determined by the two classes of vector-like models. (orig.)

  11. Grand Master Perellos : rheumatic fever and syphilis

    OpenAIRE

    Bonello, Giovanni

    2008-01-01

    It is not given to everyone to have his maladies made the subject-matter of a published book. Not so Grand Master Perellos (1697 ­ 1720) who lived to see a 104-page volume about his recalcitrant fevers printed in his lifetime.1 It all started with a letter written on February 15, 1708, by Malta's protomedico (Chief Government Medical Officer) Dr Arcangelo Grech2 at the instance of the Grand Master, addressed to the most eminent physician in Sicily, indirectly asking for guidance about the def...

  12. Test of hadronic interaction models with the KASCADE-Grande muon data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schieler H.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available KASCADE-Grande is an air-shower observatory devoted for the detection of cosmic rays with energies in the interval of 1014 – 1018 eV, where the Grande array is responsible for the higher energy range. The experiment comprises different detection systems which allow precise measurements of the charged, electron and muon numbers of extensive air-showers (EAS. These data is employed not only to reconstruct the properties of the primary cosmic-ray particle but also to test hadronic interaction models at high energies. In this contribution, predictions of the muon content of EAS from QGSJET II-2, SIBYLL 2.1 and EPOS 1.99 are confronted with the experimental measurements performed with the KASCADE-Grande experiment in order to test the validity of these hadronic models commonly used in EAS simulations.

  13. Grand Unification as a Bridge Between String Theory and Phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Jogesh C.

    In the first part of this paper, we explain what empirical evidence points to the need for having an effective grand unification-like symmetry possessing the symmetry SU(4)-color in 4D. If one assumes the premises of a future predictive theory including gravity — be it string/M-theory or a reincarnation — this evidence then suggests that such a theory should lead to an effective grand unification-like symmetry as above in 4D, near the string-GUT-scale, rather than the standard model symmetry. Advantages of an effective supersymmetric G(224) = SU(2)L × SU(2)R × SU(4)c or SO(10) symmetry in 4D in explaining (i) observed neutrino oscillations, (ii) baryogenesis via leptogenesis, and (iii) certain fermion mass-relations are noted. And certain distinguishing tests of a SUSY G(224) or SO(10)-framework involving CP and flavor violations (as in μ → eγ, τ → μγ, edm's of the neutron and the electron) as well as proton decay are briefly mentioned. Recalling some of the successes we have had in our understanding of nature so far, and the current difficulties of string/M-theory as regards the large multiplicity of string vacua, some comments are made on the traditional goal of understanding vis a vis the recently evolved view of landscape and anthropism.

  14. Grand Unification as a Bridge Between String Theory and Phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pati, Jogesh C.

    2006-06-09

    In the first part of the talk, I explain what empirical evidence points to the need for having an effective grand unification-like symmetry possessing the symmetry SU(4)-color in 4D. If one assumes the premises of a future predictive theory including gravity--be it string/M theory or a reincarnation--this evidence then suggests that such a theory should lead to an effective grand unification-like symmetry as above in 4D, near the string-GUT-scale, rather than the standard model symmetry. Advantages of an effective supersymmetric G(224) = SU(2){sub L} x SU(2){sub R} x SU(4){sup c} or SO(10) symmetry in 4D in explaining (1) observed neutrino oscillations, (2) baryogenesis via leptogenesis, and (3) certain fermion mass-relations are noted. And certain distinguishing tests of a SUSY G(224) or SO(10)-framework involving CP and flavor violations (as in {mu} {yields} e{gamma}, {tau} {yields} {mu}{gamma}, edm's of the neutron and the electron) as well as proton decay are briefly mentioned. Recalling some of the successes we have had in our understanding of nature so far, and the current difficulties of string/M theory as regards the large multiplicity of string vacua, some comments are made on the traditional goal of understanding vis a vis the recently evolved view of landscape and anthropism.

  15. Grand Unification as a Bridge Between String Theory and Phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pati, J

    2006-01-01

    In the first part of the talk, I explain what empirical evidence points to the need for having an effective grand unification-like symmetry possessing the symmetry SU(4)-color in 4D. If one assumes the premises of a future predictive theory including gravity--be it string/M theory or a reincarnation--this evidence then suggests that such a theory should lead to an effective grand unification-like symmetry as above in 4D, near the string-GUT-scale, rather than the standard model symmetry. Advantages of an effective supersymmetric G(224) = SU(2) L x SU(2) R x SU(4) c or SO(10) symmetry in 4D in explaining (1) observed neutrino oscillations, (2) baryogenesis via leptogenesis, and (3) certain fermion mass-relations are noted. And certain distinguishing tests of a SUSY G(224) or SO(10)-framework involving CP and flavor violations (as in μ → eγ, τ → μγ, edm's of the neutron and the electron) as well as proton decay are briefly mentioned. Recalling some of the successes we have had in our understanding of nature so far, and the current difficulties of string/M theory as regards the large multiplicity of string vacua, some comments are made on the traditional goal of understanding vis a vis the recently evolved view of landscape and anthropism

  16. Hilbert's Grand Hotel with a series twist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijeratne, Chanakya; Mamolo, Ami; Zazkis, Rina

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a new twist on a familiar paradox, linking seemingly disparate ideas under one roof. Hilbert's Grand Hotel, a paradox which addresses infinite set comparisons is adapted and extended to incorporate ideas from calculus - namely infinite series. We present and resolve several variations, and invite the reader to explore his or her own variations.

  17. "Teine" võitis Prantsusmaal Grand Prix'

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    Prantsusmaal Essonne'is toimuval 8. Euroopa filmifestivalil Cinessonne sai üliõpilaste žürii grand prix rahvusvahelises ühistöös valminud tantsufilm "Teine" ("Another") : režissöör Rene Vilbre. Ka teistest festivalidest, kus film osalenud

  18. Grand Prix Eurovision: Eine Fankultur im Medienzeitalter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Moser

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Der Grand Prix Eurovision ist seit Jahrzehnten eine der bekanntesten Unterhaltungssendungen im europäischen Raum. Dennoch erregte es Verwunderung, wenn der Schreibende Bekannten darüber berichtete, daß dies ein Forschungsgegenstand sei. Wurde von Interviews mit Grand Prix-Fans erzählt, so fielen schnell Aussagen wie: „Wie kann man sich nur für so etwas Abseitiges und Triviales wie den Grand Prix interessieren“. Dennoch bin ich der Meinung, daß Fankulturen für die entstehende Mediengesellschaft ein nicht unwichtiges Forschungsthema darstellen. Zwar geht es nicht um eine medienpädagogische Fragestellung im engeren Sinne; die Fans des Grand Prix Eurovision sind dem Jugendalter längst entwachsen. Dennoch handelt es sich bei Fangemeinschaften um Phänomene, die im Rahmen von Jugend- und Kinderkulturen von besonderer Relevanz sind. So meint Winter (1997, daß jugendliche Fanwelten eine bedeutende Rolle als Kristallisationspunkte kultureller Differenzierung spielen: ,Die Zugehörigkeit zu einer Fan weit ist Teil der jugendlichen Lebensbewältigung in der Postmoderne, denn in der Gemeinschaft der Fans können Jugendliche emotionale Allianzen eingehen, außeralltäglichen Beschäftigungen nachgehen, expressive Identitätsmuster gemeinschaftlich realisieren und sich mit ihrer Lebenssituation als Heranwachsende auseinandersetzen“ (Winter 1997, S. 51f..

  19. The Virtual Grand Tour as Educational Paradigm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Skafte; Mouritsen, Lars

    2001-01-01

    The Virtual Grand Tour as defined here bears some resemblance to its 18th century ancestor: a wide range of individual topics are treated as a whole; a tutor, whether real or simulated, present or remote, is provided; a set of problem solving tools forms an integrated part of the "traveller...

  20. Youth Voice and the Llano Grande Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guajardo, Francisco; Perez, Delia; Guajardo, Miguel A.; Davila, Eric; Ozuna, Juan; Saenz, Maribel; Casaperalta, Nadia

    2006-01-01

    The Llano Grande Center is a non-profit education and community development organization founded in the mid-1990s by youth and teachers out of a public high school classroom in a rural South Texas (USA) community. The Center was created, in large part, to cultivate youth voices as important elements of curriculum development and teacher training…

  1. Future of the Middle Rio Grande

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbara A. Coe

    1999-01-01

    Because decisions made today about the Middle Rio Grande will influence future conditions, symposium participants - the stakeholders - collaborated in a final session to plan improvements for the watershed and river corridor. The result included several action plans focusing on desired future conditions and actions to achieve them.

  2. Reisipakkumine - Grand Tour Itaalias / Mai Levin

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Levin, Mai, 1942-

    2009-01-01

    Tiina Abeli koostatud ja Urmas Viigi kujundatud näitus "Grand Tour. Eesti kunstnikud Itaalias" Kumu Kunstimuuseumis 05. aprillini. Loetletud eksponeeritud tööde autoreid. Näitus annab ülevaate, kes siinsetest kunstnikest 19. sajandi algusest kuni 1930ndate aastateni Itaalias käisid ja kuidas see nende loomingut mõjutas

  3. Middle Rio Grande Basin Research Report 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah M. Finch; Catherine Dold

    2008-01-01

    An ecosystem is rarely static. A natural system composed of plants, animals, and microorganisms interacting with an area's physical factors, an ecosystem is always fluctuating and evolving. But sometimes, often at the hands of humans, ecosystems change too much. Such is the case with many of the ecosystems of the Middle Rio Grande Basin of New Mexico.

  4. SU(9) grand unification model of subquarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xinmin; Xue Xiaozhou

    1986-01-01

    An improved version of the grand unification composite model propose earlier is suggested. Under the hypothesis of partly broken global chiral symmetry, we give the four family of Fermions at low energies to realize unification of four family of Fermions. Neutrino may acquire naturally the Dirac mass. Proton lifetime and weak neutral current at low energy are consistent with experimental results

  5. Rio Branco, grand strategy and naval power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Paulo Alsina Jr.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses Baron of Rio Branco's grand strategy and the role played by the naval reorganization program (1904-1910 in this context. The ensuing case study determined the domestic and international constraints that affected the program, as well as the worldview of the patron of Brazilian diplomacy regarding military power's instrumentality to foreign policy.

  6. Future of Electron Scattering and Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Ernest [GE Global Research, Niskayuna, New York (United States); Stemmer, Susanne [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Zheng, Haimei [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhu, Yimei [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Maracas, George [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2014-02-25

    The ability to correlate the atomic- and nanoscale-structure of condensed matter with physical properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, catalytic, and optical) and functionality forms the core of many disciplines. Directing and controlling materials at the quantum-, atomic-, and molecular-levels creates enormous challenges and opportunities across a wide spectrum of critical technologies, including those involving the generation and use of energy. The workshop identified next generation electron scattering and diffraction instruments that are uniquely positioned to address these grand challenges. The workshop participants identified four key areas where the next generation of such instrumentation would have major impact: A – Multidimensional Visualization of Real Materials B – Atomic-scale Molecular Processes C – Photonic Control of Emergence in Quantum Materials D – Evolving Interfaces, Nucleation, and Mass Transport Real materials are comprised of complex three-dimensional arrangements of atoms and defects that directly determine their potential for energy applications. Understanding real materials requires new capabilities for three-dimensional atomic scale tomography and spectroscopy of atomic and electronic structures with unprecedented sensitivity, and with simultaneous spatial and energy resolution. Many molecules are able to selectively and efficiently convert sunlight into other forms of energy, like heat and electric current, or store it in altered chemical bonds. Understanding and controlling such process at the atomic scale require unprecedented time resolution. One of the grand challenges in condensed matter physics is to understand, and ultimately control, emergent phenomena in novel quantum materials that necessitate developing a new generation of instruments that probe the interplay among spin, charge, orbital, and lattice degrees of freedom with intrinsic time- and length-scale resolutions. Molecules and soft matter require imaging and

  7. Camphor: an herbal medicine causing grand mal seizures

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinney, Theodore G; Soti, Kamal Raj; Shrestha, Poojan; Basnyat, Buddha

    2015-01-01

    Camphor is usually used in the USA to repel insects, but it is widely used in other countries as an herb. We report the case of a 52-year-old previously healthy Nepali man who ingested approximately 10 g of pure camphor with therapeutic intention. He developed grand mal seizures, and was evaluated in an emergency room. He failed to recall the camphor ingestion initially, and was treated with phenytoin for new-onset idiopathic seizures. Examining physicians only later found out about his camphor ingestion. Finding the cause of new-onset seizures is often challenging for emergency room physicians, internists and neurologists. In addition to other well-reported causes of secondary seizures, herbal medications and supplements must also be explored. PMID:26065546

  8. The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam: Source of cooperation or contention?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teferi Taye, Meron; Tadesse, Tsegaye; Senay, Gabriel; Block, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenges and benefits of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD), which is under construction and expected to be operational on the Blue Nile River in Ethiopia in a few years. Like many large-scale projects on transboundary rivers, the GERD has been criticized for potentially jeopardizing downstream water security and livelihoods through upstream unilateral decision making. In spite of the contentious nature of the project, the authors argue that this project can provide substantial benefits for regional development. The GERD, like any major river infrastructure project, will undeniably bring about social, environmental, and economic change, and in this unique case has, on balance, the potential to achieve success on all fronts. It must be stressed, however, that strong partnerships between riparian countries are essential. National success is contingent on regional cooperation.

  9. DAWN GRAND CALIBRATED MARS FLYBY COUNTS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRaND RDR are a time-ordered collection of corrected gamma ray and neutron counting data and calibrated pulse height spectra acquired by GRaND during all phases...

  10. The "Rust" Challenge: On the Correlations between Electronic Structure, Excited State Dynamics, and Photoelectrochemical Performance of Hematite Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grave, Daniel A; Yatom, Natav; Ellis, David S; Toroker, Maytal Caspary; Rothschild, Avner

    2018-03-05

    In recent years, hematite's potential as a photoanode material for solar hydrogen production has ignited a renewed interest in its physical and interfacial properties, which continues to be an active field of research. Research on hematite photoanodes provides new insights on the correlations between electronic structure, transport properties, excited state dynamics, and charge transfer phenomena, and expands our knowledge on solar cell materials into correlated electron systems. This research news article presents a snapshot of selected theoretical and experimental developments linking the electronic structure to the photoelectrochemical performance, with particular focus on optoelectronic properties and charge carrier dynamics. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. The opportunities and challenges of pragmatic point-of-care randomised trials using routinely collected electronic records: evaluations of two exemplar trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Staa, Tjeerd-Pieter; Dyson, Lisa; McCann, Gerard; Padmanabhan, Shivani; Belatri, Rabah; Goldacre, Ben; Cassell, Jackie; Pirmohamed, Munir; Torgerson, David; Ronaldson, Sarah; Adamson, Joy; Taweel, Adel; Delaney, Brendan; Mahmood, Samhar; Baracaia, Simona; Round, Thomas; Fox, Robin; Hunter, Tommy; Gulliford, Martin; Smeeth, Liam

    2014-07-01

    Pragmatic trials compare the effects of different decisions in usual clinical practice. To develop and evaluate methods to implement simple pragmatic trials using routinely collected electronic health records (EHRs) and recruiting patients at the point of care; to identify the barriers and facilitators for general practitioners (GPs) and patients and the experiences of trial participants. Two exemplar randomised trials (Retropro and eLung) with qualitative evaluations. Four hundred and fifty-nine English and Scottish general practices contributing EHRs to a research database, of which 17 participated in the trials. Retropro aimed to recruit 300 patients with hypercholesterolaemia and high cardiovascular risk and eLung aimed to recruit 150 patients with a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease exacerbation. Retropro randomised between simvastatin and atorvastatin and eLung between immediate antibiotics and deferred or non-use. eLung recruited during an unscheduled consultation using EHR flagging. Successful trial completion with implementation of information technology (IT) system for flagging and data processing and documentation of operational and scientific experiences. EHR research database. The governance approval process took over 3 years. A total of 58.8% of the practices (n = 270) expressed interest in participating. The number of interested practices dropped substantially with each stage of the governance process. In Retropro, 6.5% of the practices (n = 30) were eventually approved and 3.7% (n = 17) recruited patients; in eLung, these numbers were 6.8% (n = 31) and 1.3% (n = 6) respectively. Retropro successfully completed recruitment (301 patients) whereas eLung recruited 31 patients. Retropro recruited 20.6% of all statin starters in recruiting practices and 1.1% in the EHR database; the comparable numbers for eLung were 32.3% and 0.9% respectively. The IT system allowed for complex eligibility criteria with central on and off control

  12. Challenges regarding the start-up of an anaerobic biological sulphate reactor using H2 and CO2 as electron donor and carbon sources

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, SP

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Include neutralization and chemical precipitation as well as membrane dependent processes. Biological sulphate reduction is another, environmentally benign option but relies heavily on the availability of an economically viable electron donor...

  13. Microfluidic electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shi; Wu, Zhigang

    2012-08-21

    Microfluidics, a field that has been well-established for several decades, has seen extensive applications in the areas of biology, chemistry, and medicine. However, it might be very hard to imagine how such soft microfluidic devices would be used in other areas, such as electronics, in which stiff, solid metals, insulators, and semiconductors have previously dominated. Very recently, things have radically changed. Taking advantage of native properties of microfluidics, advances in microfluidics-based electronics have shown great potential in numerous new appealing applications, e.g. bio-inspired devices, body-worn healthcare and medical sensing systems, and ergonomic units, in which conventional rigid, bulky electronics are facing insurmountable obstacles to fulfil the demand on comfortable user experience. Not only would the birth of microfluidic electronics contribute to both the microfluidics and electronics fields, but it may also shape the future of our daily life. Nevertheless, microfluidic electronics are still at a very early stage, and significant efforts in research and development are needed to advance this emerging field. The intention of this article is to review recent research outcomes in the field of microfluidic electronics, and address current technical challenges and issues. The outlook of future development in microfluidic electronic devices and systems, as well as new fabrication techniques, is also discussed. Moreover, the authors would like to inspire both the microfluidics and electronics communities to further exploit this newly-established field.

  14. The geology of Piz Pian Grand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huber, M.; Staeuble, J.

    1987-01-01

    Nagra has identified four potential sites for a repository for low- and intermediate-level waste. Exploration work is already underway at Oberbauenstock (UR) and Piz Pian Grand (GR). As part of the investigations in the Piz Pian Grand area, geological surface mapping was carried out between 1984 and 1987. Since the data obtained is still being evaluated, it would be premature to draw any interpretative conclusions at this stage. On the other hand, some of the most significant observations of this work can be summarised here. As a first step, the geological framework in which these investigations are to be seen should be defined. Observations will then be made on the rock content (lithology) and geometric structure (structural geology) of the area. (author) 6 figs

  15. Grand Gulf-prioritization of regulatory requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meisner, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    As cost pressures mount, Grand Gulf nuclear station (GGNS) is relying increasingly on various prioritization approaches to implement, modify, eliminate, or defer regulatory requirements. Regulatory requirements can be prioritized through the use of three measures: (1) safety (or risk) significance; (2) cost; and (3) public policy (or political) significance. This paper summarizes GGNS' efforts to implement solutions to regulatory issues using these three prioritization schemes to preserve a balance between cost and safety benefit

  16. Between two evils: Investors prefer grand corruption!

    OpenAIRE

    Graf Lambsdorff, Johann

    2005-01-01

    Recent empirical studies claim that, in addition to levels of corruption, investors are deterred by its unpredictability. I claim instead that it is petty corruption that deters investors. I employ seven subcomponents of corruption for a sample of 102 countries that appear in the 2003 Global Competitiveness Report of the WEF. The second principal component of this data depicts a grand, political type, embracing corruption in government policymaking and in judicial decisions as opposed to corr...

  17. Neutrino mixing in a grand unified theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, K.; Tanaka, K.

    1980-01-01

    Neutrino mixing in a grand unified theory in which the neutrino mass matrix is determined by the Gell-Mann-Ramond-Slansky mechanism was investigated. With an arbitrary real right-handed Majorana mass matrix which incorporates three neutrino mass scales, the effects of the up-quark mass matrix are found to be dominant and as a result no significant mixing of ν/sub e/ occurs, while ν/sub μ/ - ν/sub γ/ mixing can be substantial

  18. Dans le grand collisionneur du CERN

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2051256

    2014-01-01

    Ce livre fait pénétrer le lecteur non initié dans l’instrument scientifique le plus grand du monde. D’ailleurs, le web fut précisément inventé à Genève en vue d’une collaboration aussi gigantesque. Résultat de vingt ans de recherche, le LHC, Grand collisionneur de hadrons, est l’anneau de 26,7 km creusé sous la frontière francosuisse, où sont accélérés, en sens opposés, des paquets de particules jusqu’à des vitesses et des énergies extrêmes. Ainsi la physique s’est-elle engagée dans une étape nouvelle de nos connaissances. Après les grandes découvertes de l’univers et de la réalité microscopique du siècle dernier, le collisionneur nous fait progresser aujourd’hui dans un «nuage de probabilités» aux frontières de l’antimatière. Dans une bousculade de particules, voici le champ convoité du boson de Higgs. Mario Campanelli, professeur associé à l’Université de Londres et collaborateur au projet ATLAS du LHC, propose, dans cet ouvrage, de s’introduire pas �...

  19. [Grand Banks activity : updates and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruce, G.

    1998-01-01

    An overview of the exploration and on-going activities by the petroleum industry on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland was presented. The two offshore oil developments underway are Hibernia and Terra Nova, both located in the Jeanne d'Arc Basin. Current production from Hibernia is 68,000 bopd, expected to rise to 130,000 bopd in 1999. The Terra Nova Field is still under development. Total recoverable reserves from the 17 discoveries made in the Jeanne d'Arc Basin are estimated at 1.6 billion barrels of oil and 4 trillion cubic feet of gas. Industry participants in the area include Amoco, Petro-Canada, Mobil, Chevron, Husky and Norsk Hydro. Petro-Canada believes the Grand Banks represent one of the best opportunities for oil anywhere in the world. There are currently 21 exploration licenses held on the Grand Banks. Major attractions of the area include the large reserve potential, the relatively low finding costs, the size of the pools being discovered, improvements in offshore technology that have substantially lowered development costs, and a profit-sensitive generic royalty regime that ensures reasonable rates of return for investors. figs

  20. Raptor Use of the Rio Grande Gorge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponton, David A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-20

    The Rio Grande Gorge is a 115 km long river canyon located in Southern Colorado (15 km) and Northern New Mexico (100 km). The majority of the canyon is under the administration of the Bureau of Land Management {BLM), and 77 km of the canyon south of the Colorado/New Mexico border are designated Wild River under the National Wild and Scenic Rivers Act of 1968. Visits I have made to the Rio Grande Gorge over the past 15 .years disclosed some raptor utilization. As the Snake River Birds of Prey Natural Area gained publicity, its similarity to the Rio Grande Gorge became obvious, and I was intrigued by the possibility of a high raptor nesting density in the Gorge. A survey in 1979 of 20 km of the northern end of the canyon revealed a moderately high density of red-tailed hawks and prairie falcons. With the encouragement of that partial survey, and a need to assess the impact of river-running on nesting birds of prey, I made a more comprehensive survey in 1980. The results of my surveys, along with those of a 1978 helicopter survey by the BLM, are presented in this report, as well as general characterization of the area, winter use by raptors, and an assessment of factors influencing the raptor population.

  1. Precision measurement of the cross section of charged-current and neutral current processes at large Q{sup 2} at HERA with the polarized-electron beam; Mesures de precision de la section efficace des processus courant charge et courant neutre a grand Q{sup 2} a HERA avec le faisceau d'electrons polarises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Trong Hieu

    2011-04-15

    The inclusive cross sections for both charged and neutral current processes have been measured in interactions of longitudinally polarized electrons (positrons) with unpolarized protons using the full data samples collected by H1 at HERA-II. The data taken at a center-of-mass energy of 319 GeV correspond to an integrated luminosity of 149.1 pb{sup -1} and 180.0 pb{sup -1} for e{sup -}p and e{sup +}p collisions, representing an increase in statistics of a factor of 10 and 2, respectively, over the data from HERA-I. The measured double differential cross sections d{sup 2}{sigma}/dxdQ{sup 2} cover more than two orders of magnitude in both Q{sup 2}, the negative four-momentum transfer squared, up to 30000 GeV{sup 2}, and Bjorken x, down to 0.003. The cross section data are compared to predictions of the Standard Model which is able to provide a good description of the data. The polarization asymmetry as a function of Q{sup 2} is measured with improved precision, confirming the previous observation of P violation effect in neutral current ep scattering at distances down to 10{sup -18} m. The total cross sections of the charged current process, for Q{sup 2} > 400 GeV{sup 2} and inelasticity y < 0.9 are measured for 4 independent data samples with e{sup {+-}} beams and different polarization values. Together with the corresponding cross section obtained from the previously published unpolarized data, the polarization dependence of the charged current cross section is measured and found to be in agreement with the Standard Model prediction with the absence of right-handed charged current. The cross sections are combined with previously published data from H1 to obtain the most precise unpolarized measurements. These are used to extract the structure function xF{sub 3}{sup {gamma}}{sup Z} which is sensitive to the valence quark distributions down to low x values. The new cross sections have also been used in a combined electroweak and QCD fit to significantly improve the

  2. Repetitive Discrepancy between Espoused and In-Use Action Theories for Fishery Intervention in Grand-Popo, Benin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouevi, Augustin T.; Van Mierlo, Barbara; Leeuwis, Cees

    2011-01-01

    In order to be able to adapt successfully to eco-challenges, interest in change-oriented learning is growing around the world. The authors of this paper aim to assess the occurrence of learning for effective action-taking in successive fishery problem-solving interventions in the municipality of Grand-Popo, South-Western Benin, where interventions…

  3. Advantages of Computer Simulation in Enhancing Students' Learning about Landform Evolution: A Case Study Using the Grand Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Wei; Pelletier, Jon; Duffin, Kirk; Ormand, Carol; Hung, Wei-chen; Shernoff, David J.; Zhai, Xiaoming; Iverson, Ellen; Whalley, Kyle; Gallaher, Courtney; Furness, Walter

    2016-01-01

    The long geological time needed for landform development and evolution poses a challenge for understanding and appreciating the processes involved. The Web-based Interactive Landform Simulation Model--Grand Canyon (WILSIM-GC, http://serc.carleton.edu/landform/) is an educational tool designed to help students better understand such processes,…

  4. The opportunities and challenges of pragmatic point-of-care randomised trials using routinely collected electronic records : evaluations of two exemplar trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Staa, Tjeerd-Pieter; Dyson, Lisa; McCann, Gerard; Padmanabhan, Shivani; Belatri, Rabah; Goldacre, Ben; Cassell, Jackie; Pirmohamed, Munir; Torgerson, David; Ronaldson, Sarah; Adamson, Joy; Taweel, Adel; Delaney, Brendan; Mahmood, Samhar; Baracaia, Simona; Round, Thomas; Fox, Robin; Hunter, Tommy; Gulliford, Martin; Smeeth, Liam

    BACKGROUND: Pragmatic trials compare the effects of different decisions in usual clinical practice. OBJECTIVES: To develop and evaluate methods to implement simple pragmatic trials using routinely collected electronic health records (EHRs) and recruiting patients at the point of care; to identify

  5. Paper electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobjörk, Daniel; Österbacka, Ronald

    2011-05-03

    Paper is ubiquitous in everyday life and a truly low-cost substrate. The use of paper substrates could be extended even further, if electronic applications would be applied next to or below the printed graphics. However, applying electronics on paper is challenging. The paper surface is not only very rough compared to plastics, but is also porous. While this is detrimental for most electronic devices manufactured directly onto paper substrates, there are also approaches that are compatible with the rough and absorptive paper surface. In this review, recent advances and possibilities of these approaches are evaluated and the limitations of paper electronics are discussed. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Needs assessment for the Greenway Grand Forks-East Grand Forks development and public education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munski, Laura

    Following the flood of 1997, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers included the Greenway Grand Forks---East Grand Forks (the Greenway) as a flood control measure for Grand Forks, North Dakota and East Grand Forks, Minnesota. It extends along both the Red River of the North and the Red Lake River, encompassing 2200 acres of land. The cities of Grand Forks and East Grand Forks hired consultants to assist with the postflood planning process. The planning process culminated with the Red River of the North Greenway Final Report (Flink, 1998). The purpose of this study was to determine if the development of the Greenway addressed the objectives of the planning report. The history of the land adjacent to the rivers was reviewed to document the progression of riverfront development. Anecdotal evidence was collected, field observations were made, city council minutes were reviewed, Greenway Technical Committee members were interviewed, Greenway Technical Committee minutes were reviewed, and the Greenway Grand Forks---East Grand Forks survey results were reviewed to determine if the objectives of the Red River of the North Greenway Final Report were addressed. A cross section survey was designed by Laura Munski for this dissertation research. The survey was approved by the Greenway Technical Committee. The survey collected both quantitative and qualitative data from the community. The purpose of the survey portion of the research project was to ascertain how residents were kept informed of activities on the Greenway and what amenities residents were using on the Greenway and to solicit their comments regarding the Greenway. The results of the survey research were used in both marketing and event planning for the Greenway. The singular qualitative survey question gave respondents an opportunity to share their comments regarding the Greenway. The qualitative data analysis provided insight to the amenities and educational programs desired by respondents, their concerns regarding the

  7. Applying Systems Engineering on Energy Challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Safi, J.; Muller, G.; Bonnema, Gerrit Maarten

    2012-01-01

    Systems engineering is a discipline with methods and techniques to address complex problems. We want to study how Systems Engineering methods can help to address today's grand challenges, such as the energy problem. The first step is problem definition which aims at articulating the problem in its

  8. Maternal and fetal outcome in grand multipara

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qamar, A.; Qamar, S.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design: Case control study. Place and Duration of Study: Gynecology and Obstetric Unit-I of the Jinnah Post Graduate and Medical Centre Karachi, from February 2009 to January 2010. Patients and Methods: One hundred (100) patients of grand multipara (GMP), (parity = 5) and 100 patients of multipara (MP) (parity 2-4) were included in the study. Pregnant women with known medical conditions including essential hypertension, diabetes mellitus, epilepsy, primigravidas, women with previous caesarean section and twin pregnancies were excluded. Patients were admitted through antenatal clinic and emergency. A detailed history was taken and a physical examination was done with special emphasis on obstetrical examination. Investigations like blood CP, Urine D/R, blood grouping and sonogram were done. During labour, mother and neonates were managed according to ward protocols. Maternal and fetal outcomes were compared among GMPs and MPs. Results: A high frequency of anaemia (81% vs 20%), pregnancy induced hypertension (45%, vs. 26%) and gestational diabetes (9%, vs1%) were seen in GMP as compared to MP group. Frequency of malpresentations (26% vs 15%), postpartum hemorrhage (15%, vs 10%) and intrauterine deaths (26%, vs 13%) were higher in GMP group along with a high caesarean delivery rate (GMP 21%, MP 14%). A higher maternal mortality (GMP 4%, MP 1%) and low APGAR score (GMP 12%, MP 4%) were observed among babies born to grand multipara group. Conclusion: Grand multiparity is associated with adverse outcome for both mother and fetus. Effort should be directed to reduce high parity in the community through effective family planning initiatives. Specialized antenatal and obstetrical care facilities should be available. (author)

  9. Aldrin at ASVC prior to grand opening

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Apollo 11 Lunar Module Pilot Edward E. 'Buzz' Aldrin, Jr. and his wife, Lois, stand before a painting of an Apollo/Saturn V launch vehicle at the pad in the new Apollo/Saturn V Center (ASVC) at KSC prior to the gala grand opening ceremony for the facility that was held Jan. 8, 1997. The astronauts were invited to participate in the event, which also featured NASA Administrator Dan Goldin and KSC Director Jay Honeycutt. The ASVC also features several other Apollo program spacecraft component displays and multimedia presentations. The facility will be a part of the KSC bus tour that embarks from the KSC Visitor Center.

  10. A Grand Gender Convergence: Its Last Chapter

    OpenAIRE

    Claudia Goldin

    2014-01-01

    The converging roles of men and women are among the grandest advances in society and the economy in the last century. These aspects of the grand gender convergence are figurative chapters in a history of gender roles. But what must the "last" chapter contain for there to be equality in the labor market? The answer may come as a surprise. The solution does not (necessarily) have to involve government intervention and it need not make men more responsible in the home (although that wouldn't hur...

  11. SLAM contraint en environnement de grande taille

    OpenAIRE

    Ramadasan, Datta; Chevaldonné, Marc; Chateau, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    National audience; Ce papier présente un algorithme de localisation et cartographie simultanée (ou SLAM pour Simultaneous Localization And Mapping) utilisant des contraintes issues d'un modèle d'environnement, on parle alors de SLAM contraint. L'objectif est d'utiliser un modèle 3D épars de grande taille issu d'une reconstruction de type SFM (Structure From Motion) afin d'estimer le mouvement de la caméra relativement au modèle, même lorsque ce dernier est peu ou pas observé. Il est nécesaire...

  12. Produccion de plantas grandes usando minicontenedores

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Thomas D. Landis

    2012-01-01

    En América del Norte hay cada vez más interés por la producción híbrida o mixta. La misma consiste en cultivar plantines en contenedores de pequeño volumen y luego trasplantarlos; el trasplante se puede realizar a canteros en el suelo como en la producción a raíz desnuda o bien a contenedores más grandes. Originalmente se llamaban plantines "plug+", "...

  13. String-inspired special grand unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamatsu, Naoki

    2017-10-01

    We discuss a grand unified theory (GUT) based on an SO(32) GUT gauge group broken to its subgroups including a special subgroup. In the SO(32) GUT on the six-dimensional (6D) orbifold space M^4× T^2/\\mathbb{Z}_2, one generation of the standard model fermions can be embedded into a 6D bulk Weyl fermion in the SO(32) vector representation. We show that for a three-generation model, all the 6D and 4D gauge anomalies in the bulk and on the fixed points are canceled out without exotic chiral fermions at low energies.

  14. Lie groups and grand unified theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubitoso, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    This work presents some concepts in group theory and Lie algebras and, at same time, shows a method to study and work with semisimple Lie groups, based on Dynkin diagrams. The aproach taken is not completely formal, but it presents the main points of the elaboration of the method, so its mathematical basis is designed with the purpose of making the reading not so cumbersome to those who are interested only in a general picture of the method and its usefulness. At the end it is shown a brief review of gauge theories and two grand-unification models based on SO(13) and E 7 gauge groups. (author) [pt

  15. The Grand Duchy on the Grand Tour: A Historical Study of Student Migration in Luxembourg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohstock, Anne; Schreiber, Catherina

    2013-01-01

    Since Luxembourg became independent in 1839, practically the entire political, economic and intellectual elite of the country has been socialised abroad. It was only in 2003 that the Grand Duchy set up its own university; before then, young Luxembourgers had to study in foreign countries. Over the past 150 years, Luxembourg has thus experienced…

  16. O conservadorismo patronal da grande imprensa brasileira

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Francisco

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Através da análise da opinião dos editoriais dos quatro principais periódicos diários da grande imprensa, isto é, o Jornal do Brasil, O Globo, a Folha de S. Paulo e O Estado de S. Paulo - aqui considerados "aparelhos privados de hegemonia" -, este artigo procura desvendar os posicionamentos adotados perante a ordem social na Constituinte de 1987/1988, que também contribuem para compreender a reação à Consolidação das Leis do Trabalho. Observa-se, além do mais, as estratégias utilizadas para sua consecução. Conclui-se que, por mecanismos diversos, a grande imprensa contribuiu decisivamente para a introdução da agenda ideológica neoliberal no país, pois atuou de forma a "divulgar e vulgarizar" as idéias pertinentes a este ideário e de forma militantemente conservadora e patronal.

  17. Aprovechamiento de Salto Grande Argentina – Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongiovanni, M.

    1979-12-01

    Full Text Available The power harnessing of Salto Grande will be the first common project carried out by two South American Countries and this will foster greater integration of both countries. The project involves the following: — One 39 m-high dam — Two hydroelectric power plants — One international bridge — One shipping canal The benefits to be obtained from the project include: increase and improvement of the waterway network; increase of electricity production; railways and highway tie-ups between both countries; industrial development; increased availability of irrigation water; new tourist resorts; increase of fishing resources.

    El aprovechamiento hidroeléctrico de Salto Grande será el primer aprovechamiento común a dos países sudamericanos, lo que permitirá una mayor integración entre ellos. Consta de las siguientes obras: _ una presa de 39 m de altura; _ dos centrales hidroeléctricas; _ un puente internacional; _ un canal de navegación, etc. Entre los beneficios que se obtendrán destacan: aumento y mejora de la red de navegación; aumento de la producción eléctrica; enlace de las vías de ferrocarril y carreteras entre los dos países; desarrollo industrial; aumento de la disponibilidad de agua de riego; creación de zonas de turismo, e incremento de la riqueza piscícola.

  18. Cognitive Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Policy Sitemap Learn Engage Donate About TSC Cognitive Challenges Approximately 45% to 60% of individuals with TSC develop cognitive challenges (intellectual disabilities), although the degree of intellectual dysfunction ...

  19. Estimating large complex projects Estimando proyectos grandes y complejos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cliff Schexnayder

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Managing large capital construction projects requires the coordination of a multitude of human, organizational, technical, and natural resources. Quite often, the engineering and construction complexities of such projects are overshadowed by economic, societal, and political challenges. The ramifications and effects, which result from differences between early project cost estimates and the bid price or the final project cost, are significant. Over the time span between the initiation of a project and the completion of construction many factors influence a project's final costs. This time span is normally several years in duration but for highly complex and technologically challenging projects, project duration can easily exceed a decade. Over that period, changes to the project scope often occur. The subject here is a presentation of strategies that support realistic cost estimating. Through literature review and interviews with transportation agencies in the U.S. and internationally the authors developed a database of the factors that are the root causes of cost estimation problemsGestionar proyectos de construcción de grandes capitales requiere de la coordinación de una multitud de recursos humanos, organizacionales, técnicos y naturales. Frecuentemente, las complejidades del diseño y construcción de esos grandes proyectos son tapadas por sus desafíos económicos, políticos y sociales. Las ramificaciones y efectos que resultan de las diferencias entre la estimación de costo inicial, el costo de la propuesta adjudicada y el costo final del proyecto son significativas. Hay numerosos factores que inciden en el costo final del proyecto entre su inicio y finalización. La duración es generalmente de varios años y puede incluso superar la década para aquellos especialmente complejos y desafiantes. En ese período de tiempo, cambios en los alcances del proyecto cambian frecuentemente. El tópico del presente artículo es mostrar

  20. Electronic recordkeeping: An introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deken, J.M.

    2000-01-19

    This paper begins with a brief overview of records and archival management before the advent of the electronic era; then describe the ways in which the definitions and constructs of archives and records management have been altered in the electronic environment; and outlines the various approaches to the challenges of electronic recordkeeping that are currently being investigated and applied.

  1. [Positivism and medical science in Rio Grande do Sul: the Faculdade de Medicina de Porto Alegre].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, B T

    1998-01-01

    The article analyzes conflicts and interests at one of Rio Grande de Sul's main centers for medical science, the Faculdade de Medicina de Porto Alegre. It explores the meaning and impact of the emergence of this specific, exclusive field of knowledge in a state where positivist principles of professional freedom were adopted by successive administrations during the early period of the Republic. Physicians there launched an entrenched war to uphold the principles of science over faith and politics, challenging the positivism of the party which held power in Rio Grande do Sul throughout the years. This perspective grew and developed in a climate of conflict and doubts among physicians, within a political context that differed from the rest of Brazil.

  2. Sustainable Ammonia Synthesis – Exploring the scientific challenges associated with discovering alternative, sustainable processes for ammonia production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nørskov, Jens [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); ; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Chen, Jingguang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Miranda, Raul [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science; Fitzsimmons, Tim [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science; Stack, Robert [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2016-02-18

    Ammonia (NH3) is essential to all life on our planet. Until about 100 years ago, NH3 produced by reduction of dinitrogen (N2) in air came almost exclusively from bacteria containing the enzyme nitrogenase.. DOE convened a roundtable of experts on February 18, 2016. Participants in the Roundtable discussions concluded that the scientific basis for sustainable processes for ammonia synthesis is currently lacking, and it needs to be enhanced substantially before it can form the foundation for alternative processes. The Roundtable Panel identified an overarching grand challenge and several additional scientific grand challenges and research opportunities: -Discovery of active, selective, scalable, long-lived catalysts for sustainable ammonia synthesis. -Development of relatively low pressure (<10 atm) and relatively low temperature (<200 C) thermal processes. -Integration of knowledge from nature (enzyme catalysis), molecular/homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. -Development of electrochemical and photochemical routes for N2 reduction based on proton and electron transfer -Development of biochemical routes to N2 reduction -Development of chemical looping (solar thermochemical) approaches -Identification of descriptors of catalytic activity using a combination of theory and experiments -Characterization of surface adsorbates and catalyst structures (chemical, physical and electronic) under conditions relevant to ammonia synthesis.

  3. Electronic Paramagnetic Resonance of irradiated nails: challenges for a dosimetry in radiation accidents; Ressonancia Paramagnetica Eletronica de unhas irradiadas: desafios para uma dosimetria em acidentes radiologicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannoni, Ricardo A., E-mail: giannoni@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Rodrigues Junior, Orlando [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this work is to characterize samples of human nails exposed to high doses of radiation, applying the technique of Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR). The objective is to establish a dose response study that allow determine the absorbed dose by exposed individuals in situations of radiological accidents, in a retrospective form. Samples of human nails were collected and afterward irradiated with gamma radiation, and received dose of 20 Gy. The EPR measurement performed on the samples, before irradiation, permitted the signal identification of the components associated with effects caused by the mechanical stress during the fingernail cutting, the so-called mechanically induced signal (MIS). After the irradiation, different species of free radicals were identified, the so-called radiation induced signal (RIS). (author)

  4. La masa de los grandes impactores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, M. G.; Brunini, A.

    Los planetas han sido formados fundamentalmente acretando masa a través de colisiones con planetesimales sólidos. La masa más grande de la distribución de planetesimales y las masas máxima y mínima de los impactores, han sido calculadas usando los valores actuales del período y de la inclinación de los planetas (Lissauer & Safronov 1991; Parisi & Brunini 1996). Recientes investigaciones han mostrado, que las órbitas de los planetas gigantes no han sufrido variaciones con el tiempo, siendo su movimiento regular durante su evolución a partir de la finalización de la etapa de acreción (Laskar 1990, 1994). Por lo tanto, la eccentricidad actual de los planetas gigantes se puede utilizar para imponer una cota máxima a las masas y velocidades orbitales de los grandes impactores. Mediante un simple modelo dinámico, y considerando lo arriba mencionado, obtenemos la cota superior para la masa del planetesimal más grande que impactó a cada planeta gigante al final de su etapa de acreción. El resultado más importante de este trabajo es la estimación de la masa máxima permitida para impactar a Júpiter, la cúal es ~ 1.136 × 10 -1, siendo en el caso de Neptuno ~ 3.99 × 10 -2 (expresada en unidades de la masa final de cada planeta). Además, fue posible obtener la velocidad orbital máxima permitida para los impactores como una función de su masa, para cada planeta. Las cotas obtenidas para la masa y velocidad de los impactores de Saturno y Urano (en unidades de la masa y velocidad final de cada planeta respectivamente) son casi las mismas que las obtenidas para Júpiter debido a que estos tres planetas poseen similar eccentricidad actual. Nuestros resultados están en buen acuerdo con los obtenidos por Lissauer & Safronov (1991). Estas cotas podrían ser utilizadas para obtener la distribución de planetesimales en el Sistema Solar primitivo.

  5. Waterfront Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans

    2007-01-01

    An overall view on the waterfront transformation and the planning challenges related to this process. It contributes to the specific challenges and potentials related to Aalborg Waterfront.......An overall view on the waterfront transformation and the planning challenges related to this process. It contributes to the specific challenges and potentials related to Aalborg Waterfront....

  6. EDMS implementation challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De La Torre, Marta

    2002-08-01

    The challenges faced by facilities wishing to implement an electronic medical record system are complex and overwhelming. Issues such as customer acceptance, basic computer skills, and a thorough understanding of how the new system will impact work processes must be considered and acted upon. Acceptance and active support are necessary from Senior Administration and key departments to enable this project to achieve measurable success. This article details one hospital's "journey" through design and successful implementation of an electronic medical record system.

  7. Grand unified models including extra Z bosons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Tiezhong

    1989-01-01

    The grand unified theories (GUT) of the simple Lie groups including extra Z bosons are discussed. Under authors's hypothesis there are only SU 5+m SO 6+4n and E 6 groups. The general discussion of SU 5+m is given, then the SU 6 and SU 7 are considered. In SU 6 the 15+6 * +6 * fermion representations are used, which are not same as others in fermion content, Yukawa coupling and broken scales. A conception of clans of particles, which are not families, is suggested. These clans consist of extra Z bosons and the corresponding fermions of the scale. The all of fermions in the clans are down quarks except for the standard model which consists of Z bosons and 15 fermions, therefore, the spectrum of the hadrons which are composed of these down quarks are different from hadrons at present

  8. Pitié pour les grandes villes !

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérôme Monnet

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Roger Caillois disait, en 1938, qu´il existe "une représentation de la grande ville, assez puissante sur les imaginations pour que jamais en pratique ne soit posée la question de son exactitude, créée de toute pièce par le livre, assez répandue néanmoins pour faire partie de l´atmosphère mentale collective et posséder par suite une certaine force de contrainte"(Le mythe et l´homme, p.156 [c´est lui qui souligne]. En 1996, la presse française a consacré dossiers et articles à "Habitat II...

  9. A unified grand tour of theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lawrie, Ian D

    2013-01-01

    A Unified Grand Tour of Theoretical Physics invites its readers to a guided exploration of the theoretical ideas that shape our contemporary understanding of the physical world at the fundamental level. Its central themes, comprising space-time geometry and the general relativistic account of gravity, quantum field theory and the gauge theories of fundamental forces, and statistical mechanics and the theory of phase transitions, are developed in explicit mathematical detail, with an emphasis on conceptual understanding. Straightforward treatments of the standard models of particle physics and cosmology are supplemented with introductory accounts of more speculative theories, including supersymmetry and string theory. This third edition of the Tour includes a new chapter on quantum gravity, focusing on the approach known as Loop Quantum Gravity, while new sections provide extended discussions of topics that have become prominent in recent years, such as the Higgs boson, massive neutrinos, cosmological perturba...

  10. Higgsless grand unified theory breaking and trinification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carone, Christopher D.; Conroy, Justin M.

    2004-01-01

    Boundary conditions on an extra dimensional interval can be chosen to break bulk gauge symmetries and to reduce the rank of the gauge group. We consider this mechanism in models with gauge trinification. We determine the boundary conditions necessary to break the trinified gauge group directly down to that of the standard model. Working in an effective theory for the gauge-symmetry-breaking parameters on a boundary, we examine the limit in which the grand-unified theory-breaking-sector is Higgsless and show how one may obtain the low-energy particle content of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We find that gauge unification is preserved in this scenario, and that the differential gauge coupling running is logarithmic above the scale of compactification. We compare the phenomenology of our model to that of four dimensional 'trinified' theories

  11. A grand model for chemical product design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fung, Ka Y.; Ng, Ka M.; Zhang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    , ingredients and structure. Market and competitive analysis, government policies and regulations have to be explicitly considered in product design. All these considerations are accounted for in the Grand Product Design Model, which consists of a process model, a property model, a quality model, a cost model......Chemical engineering has been expanding its focus from primarily business-to-business products (B2B) to business-to-consumer (B2C) products. The production of B2B products generally emphasizes on process design and optimization, whereas the production of B2C products focuses on product quality...... product composition changes with market conditions. Another is a hand lotion that illustrates how product quality affects the profit.(C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  12. Elastoplasticidad anisotropa de metales en grandes deformaciones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caminero Torija, Miguel Angel

    El objetivo de este trabajo es el desarrollo de modelos y algoritmos numericos que simulen el comportamiento del material bajo estas condiciones en el contexto de programas de elementos finitos, dando como resultado predicciones mas precisas de los procesos de conformado y deformacion plastica en general. Para lograr este objetivo se han desarrollado diversas tareas destinadas a mejorar las predicciones en tres aspectos fundamentales. El primer aspecto consiste en la mejora de la descripcion del endurecimiento cinematico anisotropo en pequenas deformaciones, lo cual se ha realizado a traves de modelos y algoritmos implicitos de superficies multiples. Ha sido estudiada la consistencia de este tipo de modelos tanto si estan basados en una regla implicita similar a la de Mroz o en la regla de Prager. Ademas se han simulado los ensayos de Lamba y Sidebottom, obteniendo, en contra de la creencia general, muy buenas predicciones con la regla de Prager. Dichos modelos podrian ser extendidos de forma relativamente facil para considerar grandes deformaciones a traves de procedimientos en deformaciones logaritmicas, similares a los desarrollados en esta tesis y detallados a continuacion. El segundo aspecto consiste en la descripcion de la anisotropia elastoplastica inicial. Esto se ha conseguido mediante el desarrollo de modelos y algoritmos para plasticidad anisotropa en grandes deformaciones, bien ignorando la posible anisotropia elastica, bien considerandola simultaneamente con la anisotropia plastica. Para ello ha sido necesario desarrollar primero un nuevo algoritmo de elastoplasticidad anisotropa en pequenas deformaciones consistentemente linealizado y sin despreciar ningun termino, de tal forma que se conserve la convergencia cuadratica de los metodos de Newton. Este algoritmo en pequenas deformaciones ha servido para realizar la correccion plastica de dos algoritmos en grandes deformaciones. El primero de estos algoritmos es una variacion del clasico algoritmo de

  13. 36 CFR 7.4 - Grand Canyon National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grand Canyon National Park. 7.4 Section 7.4 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.4 Grand Canyon National Park. (a) Commercial...

  14. The Distance to L∞ in the Grand Orlicz Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Farroni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish a formula for the distance to L∞ from the grand Orlicz space LΦΩ introduced in Capone et al. (2008. A new formula for the distance to L∞ from the grand Lebesgue space LnΩ introduced in Iwaniec and Sbordone (1992 is also provided.

  15. Rio Grande Basin Consortium: Mission, goals, and activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah A. Potter; Deborah M. Finch

    1996-01-01

    The Rio Grande Basin Consortium (RGBC) serves as a networking group and clearinghouse for scientific information pertaining to the Rio Grande Basin. Its membership consists of natural and social scientists from New Mexico’s three research universities, administrators, and resource managers from federal, state, and local governmental agencies, members of community and...

  16. Fetal Outcomes among Grand Multiparous and Multiparous Women ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To compare fetal outcomes among grand multiparous (para 5-9) and multiparous (para 2-4) delivering in Mulago hospital, Uganda. Design: Prospective cohort study. Setting: Mulago hospital, Uganda. Subjects: One hundred and fifty six grand multiparous and multiparous women were recruited on admission in ...

  17. Plants, arthropods, and birds of the Rio Grande [chapter 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah M. Finch; Gale L. Wolters; Wang Yong; Mary Jean Mund

    1995-01-01

    Human populations have increased dramatically along the Rio Grande since European settlement. Human use of water for irrigation and consumption, and human use of land for agriculture, urban centers, livestock grazing, and recreation have changed Rio Grande ecosystems by altering flood cycles, channel geomorphology, upslope processes, and water quality and quantity....

  18. First report of Phytophthora ramorum infecting grand fir in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    K.L. Riley; G.A. Chastagner

    2011-01-01

    Phytophthora ramorum was detected on grand fir in 2003 and 2005 in a Christmas tree plantation near Los Gatos, CA, in association with infected California bay laurel. Isolates derived from stem lesions were used to inoculate grand fir seedlings in two tests. Isolations from lesions on inoculated plants were positive for P. ramorum...

  19. Research of the Rio Grande Ecosystem Management Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah M. Finch

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the mission, objectives, and preliminary results of the Middle Rio Grande Ecosystem Management Research Program managed at the Rocky Mountain Research Station's Albuquerque laboratory. This program was initiated in 1994 to address growing pressures to effectively manage the limited resources of the middle Rio Grande Basin. The program is...

  20. Phase transitions at finite chemical potential in grand unified theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailin, D.; Love, A.

    1984-01-01

    We discuss the circumstances in which non-zero chemical potentials might prevent symmetry restoration in phase transitions in the early universe at grand unification or partial unification scales. The general arguments are illustrated by consideration of SO(10) and SU(5) grand unified theories. (orig.)

  1. Fast-moving soft electronic fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiefeng; Li, Guorui; Liang, Yiming; Cheng, Tingyu; Dai, Jing; Yang, Xuxu; Liu, Bangyuan; Zeng, Zedong; Huang, Zhilong; Luo, Yingwu; Xie, Tao; Yang, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Soft robots driven by stimuli-responsive materials have unique advantages over conventional rigid robots, especially in their high adaptability for field exploration and seamless interaction with humans. The grand challenge lies in achieving self-powered soft robots with high mobility, environmental tolerance, and long endurance. We are able to advance a soft electronic fish with a fully integrated onboard system for power and remote control. Without any motor, the fish is driven solely by a soft electroactive structure made of dielectric elastomer and ionically conductive hydrogel. The electronic fish can swim at a speed of 6.4 cm/s (0.69 body length per second), which is much faster than previously reported untethered soft robotic fish driven by soft responsive materials. The fish shows consistent performance in a wide temperature range and permits stealth sailing due to its nearly transparent nature. Furthermore, the fish is robust, as it uses the surrounding water as the electric ground and can operate for 3 hours with one single charge. The design principle can be potentially extended to a variety of flexible devices and soft robots.

  2. Extreme environment electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Cressler, John D

    2012-01-01

    Unfriendly to conventional electronic devices, circuits, and systems, extreme environments represent a serious challenge to designers and mission architects. The first truly comprehensive guide to this specialized field, Extreme Environment Electronics explains the essential aspects of designing and using devices, circuits, and electronic systems intended to operate in extreme environments, including across wide temperature ranges and in radiation-intense scenarios such as space. The Definitive Guide to Extreme Environment Electronics Featuring contributions by some of the world's foremost exp

  3. Electronics and electronic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Olsen, George H

    1987-01-01

    Electronics and Electronic Systems explores the significant developments in the field of electronics and electronic devices. This book is organized into three parts encompassing 11 chapters that discuss the fundamental circuit theory and the principles of analog and digital electronics. This book deals first with the passive components of electronic systems, such as resistors, capacitors, and inductors. These topics are followed by a discussion on the analysis of electronic circuits, which involves three ways, namely, the actual circuit, graphical techniques, and rule of thumb. The remaining p

  4. Wicked Challenges in the Anthropocene Age: Supply Chain Implications of Sustainable Enterprise Excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgeman, Rick; Wu, Zhaohui

    Grand global challenges include wicked sustainability ones associated with human influences. Among these are climate change in relation to increased atmospheric presence of CO2 and methane, global warming and increasing intensity and incidence rates of extreme weather events, drought...

  5. Publicaciones electrónicas: experiencias y desafíos en Perú Electronic publications: experiences and challenges in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Esther Mogollón

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available La autora explica sus experiencias en las publicaciones electrónicas y publicaciones impresas muy importantes como la emblemática Fempress. Aborda el uso de las Tecnologías de la información y la comunicación (TIC, que han permitido compartir información y contribuido al monitoreo de acciones, propiciando la rendición de cuentas y fortalecimiento de redes de mujeres. Mediante las TICs, las mujeres han promovido alianzas y articulaciones, favoreciendo la estructuración y construcción de propuestas y consensos y relaciones más equitativas y democráticas en el movimiento feminista y de mujeres. Describe que a través de las publicaciones electrónicas, se genera e intercambia información acerca de los problemas que atraviesan las mujeres; mujeres crecen y se fortalecen, y crece de manera exponencial la información generada por ellas. Pero estas redes están integradas también por mujeres pobres, campesinas, indígenas, analfabetas, de otros idiomas o con discapacidad que no pueden acceder a las TICs y hay que buscar las formas de revertir esta situación.The author explains her experiences on the electronic publication field, and in very important printed publications such as the emblematic Fempress. She approaches the use of the Technologies of information and communication (TIC, that have allowed to share information and contributed to the invigoration and monitoring of actions that propitiate the rendering of information and strengthening of women's nets. By using the TICs, women have promoted alliances and articulations, favoring the structuring and construction of proposals, consents and more equal and democratic relationships in the feminist and women movement. The author describes that through the eletronic publications it is generated and exchanged information about the problems that women live; their efforts and advances are exposed, the solidarity is developed, and a great variety of themes is approached. The nets of women

  6. Overcoming challenges

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... section Back to section menu It's Only Natural Planning ahead Breastfeeding and baby basics Making breastfeeding work ... It's Only Natural Overcoming challenges It's Only Natural Planning ahead Addressing breastfeeding myths Overcoming challenges Common questions ...

  7. Overcoming challenges

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... challenges Common questions about breastfeeding and pain Breastfeeding checklist: How to get a good latch Finding support ... challenges Common questions about breastfeeding and pain Breastfeeding checklist: How to get a good latch Finding support ...

  8. Overcoming challenges

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... receive Breastfeeding email updates Enter email Submit Overcoming challenges Breastfeeding has a long list of benefits for ... getting started. Hear how moms overcame common nursing challenges and stayed committed to breastfeeding. Common questions about ...

  9. Residues of toxaphene in insectivorous birds (Petrochelidon spp.) from the Rio Grande, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruya, K.A.; Smalling, K.L.; Mora, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    Although it has been documented that wildlife in the Rio Grande Valley (RGV) contain increased concentrations of organochlorine (OC) contaminants, particularly DDE, little has been published on residues of toxaphene throughout this major North American watershed. In this study, 28 liver composites from adult swallows (Petrochelidon spp.) collected along the Rio Grande from 1999 through 2000 were analyzed for toxaphene residues using congener-specific gas chromatography–electron-capture negative ionization–mass spectrometry. Estimated total toxaphene concentrations ranged from 12 to 260 ng/g wet wt and were highest in samples from the lower RGV near Llano Grande Lake in Hidalgo and Cameron counties (Texas). Toxaphene congener profiles were relatively invariant throughout the watershed and were dominated by 2,2,5-endo,6-exo,8,8,9,10-octachlorobornane (P-42a or B8-806) with lesser amounts of several other Cl7-Cl9 compounds, many of which remain unidentified. Petrochelidon spp. liver profiles appear to be intermediate in complexity between those in invertebrates and fish (more complex) and mammals (less complex) and differs somewhat from those reported for other avian species. In addition to other legacy OC contaminants, toxaphene residues were most concentrated in the lower RGV and accumulated at up to hundreds of parts per billion in these insect-eating birds, underscoring their utility as avian bioindicators of persistent organic pollutants.

  10. The grand descent has begun for CMS

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Until recently, the CMS experimental cavern looked relatively empty; its detector was assembled entirely at ground level, to be lowered underground in 15 sections. On 2 November, the first hadronic forward calorimeter led the way with a grand descent. The first section of the CMS detector (centre of photo) arriving from the vertical shaft, viewed from the cavern floor. There is something unusual about the construction of the CMS detector. Instead of being built in the experimental cavern, like all the other detectors in the LHC experiments, it was constructed at ground level. This was to allow for easy access during the assembly of the detector and to minimise the size of the excavated cavern. The slightly nerve-wracking task of lowering it safely into the cavern in separate sections came after the complete detector was successfully tested with a magnetic field at ground level. In the early morning of 2 November, the first section of the CMS detector began its eagerly awaited descent into the underground ca...

  11. do Rio Grande do Sul (Brasil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Argemiro Luís Brum

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The agribusiness of the Brazilian rice possess a strategical position, as much for its economic representation how much for its relevance next to the alimentary security. The analysis of the productive chain of the rice, in the Border-West of the Rio Grande Do Sul (Brazil, ahead of a global economy, subject of this work, has as objective to present alternatives and strategies that come to become the sector more competitive rice dealer. In this context, the cooperatives of the Border-West are the central focus of the study for the strong participation in the rice economy sul-rio-grandense. One searchs to identify to the difficulties faced for the productive chain sul-rio-grandense, ahead of the economic globalization, especially, of the Mercosul and the position of the rice cooperatives of the Border-West gaucho, presenting proposals of strategies to become them more competitive and to thus contribute for the supported regional development. As conclusion, the work detaches the necessity of the inter-cooperation and the structuration of a regional central office of purchases that values the products and the marks of the cooperatives.

  12. A unified grand tour of theoretical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, J

    2002-01-01

    Anyone offering a grand tour is faced with several options. Should they concentrate on what may be considered to be essential features, or should they attempt to present a brief glimpse of almost everything? The present offering is a compromise between these two extremes. The area considered - theoretical physics - is now such a vast subject that some kind of compromise is essential. Indeed, the field is now so wide that few could even attempt to review it in a single-authored work. My task here is to assess how well this book has succeeded in its main aim of providing a unified (though introductory) tour of this subject. Constrained within a single volume, this is clearly not an updated Landau-Lifschitz. It cannot be expected to take any particular topic to the level of recent research. Nevertheless, it does seem to cover the broad range of essential topics which now constitute the subject. It starts (most appropriately in my opinion) with geometry. It then covers classical physics, general relativity and qu...

  13. Local grand unification in the heterotic landscape

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Jonas

    2009-07-15

    We consider the possibility that the unification of the electroweak interactions and the strong force arises from string theory, at energies significantly lower than the string scale. As a tool, an effective grand unified field theory in six dimensions is derived from an anisotropic orbifold compactification of the heterotic string. It is explicitly shown that all anomalies cancel in the model, though anomalous Abelian gauge symmetries are present locally at the boundary singularities. In the supersymmetric vacuum additional interactions arise from higher-dimensional operators. We develop methods that relate the couplings of the effective theory to the location of the vacuum, and find that unbroken discrete symmetries play an important role for the phenomenology of orbifold models. An efficient algorithm for the calculation of the superpotential to arbitrary order is developed, based on symmetry arguments. We furthermore present a correspondence between bulk fields of the orbifold model in six dimensions, and the moduli fields that arise from compactifying four internal dimensions on a manifold with non-trivial gauge background. (orig.)

  14. Implementation of Service Differentiation to Achieve Competitive Advantage. Case: Nevsky Hotel Grand.

    OpenAIRE

    Martysevich, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of the thesis was to find out which hotel services could bring competitive advantage to the Nevsky Hotel Grand and differentiate the hotel from the competitors. What could be improved in the services of the hotel or which kind of services could be created in the hotel in order to attract more customers and be competitive on the market. The theoretical framework of the thesis was based on the data gathered from various sources of information in printed and electronic form s...

  15. Les grandes surfaces à dominance alimentaire à Sfax.

    OpenAIRE

    Bennasr, Ali

    2005-01-01

    National audience; A l'image des autres grandes villes du pays, Sfax a connu depuis quelques années une multiplication des magasins de grande surface à dominance alimentaire. Aujourd'hui, quatorze magasins, répartis sur l'espace urbain et totalisant une superficie globale de 10000 m2, se partagent le marché. Les supermarchés à dominance alimentaire marquent aujourd'hui le paysage de la distribution commerciale à Sfax. A l'origine de nouvelles centralités, les grandes surfaces représentent des...

  16. Tres grandes plataformas marinas Mar del Norte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soulas, R.

    1978-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the different building stages of three large sea platforms. After studying the structure's main characteristics, preparing scale models and calculating ail the elements, platform construction was carried out in three stages: — Dry-dock construction of the hull base. — Installation in the water and finishing the structure. — Immersion and bridge installation. Finally, the necessary operations to move the platform to its definite location were carried out. The structures are formed by a parallelepiped hull of reinforced concrete, divided into compartments by means of vertical orthogonals panels on top of which 2 or 4 piles are placed to support the bridge.

    En este artículo se analizan las diversas etapas en la realización de tres grandes plataformas marinas. Después de un estudio de las características principales de la estructura, ensayos en modelo reducido y cálculo de todos los elementos, se procede a la construcción de las plataformas en tres fases: — Construcción en seco de la base del casco. — Colocación en el agua y acabado de la estructura. — Inmersión y colocación del puente. Por último, se realizan las operaciones necesarias para llevar la plataforma a su ubicación definitiva. Las estructuras están formadas por un casco paralelepipédico de hormigón armado, dividido en compartimientos mediante tabiques verticales ortogonales y sobre el que se han colocado 2 ó 4 pilas que soportan el puente.

  17. VT Built Up Lands in Grand Isle County - 1962

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) NRCS mapped historical and current-day built-up lands for Grand Isle County, VT using several vintages of aerial photography: 1941, 1962, 1974,...

  18. VT Built Up Lands in Grand Isle County - 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) NRCS mapped historical and current-day built-up lands for Grand Isle County, VT using several vintages of aerial photography: 1941, 1962, 1974,...

  19. VT Built Up Lands in Grand Isle County - 1941

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) NRCS mapped historical and current-day built-up lands for Grand Isle County, VT using several vintages of aerial photography: 1941, 1962, 1974,...

  20. Engagement: The Nations Premier Grand Strategy, Who's In Charge?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Derrick, Robert

    1998-01-01

    Selective Engagement, one of the premiere post cold war grand strategies, refers to activities between the US and other nations ranging from trade relations to diplomatic recognition to combined military exercises...

  1. American Grand Strategy in an Age of Terrorism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brooks, Paul T

    2006-01-01

    ...: diplomatic, informational, military, economic, and law enforcement. It develops seven fundamental features of a grand strategy, and compares thirteen national strategy documents to these fundamentals to determine areas for future refinement...

  2. Grand Performances: Building Self and Social Ties through Theatrical Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie May de Montigny

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The stories that individuals tell about their experiences on stage and behind-the-scenes at the Grand Opera House of Oshkosh, Wisconsin, contribute to their knowledge of self and social ties.

  3. Albuquerque/Middle Rio Grande Urban Waters Viewer

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — These data have been compiled in support of the Middle Rio Grande/Albuquerque Urban Waters Partnership for the region including Albuquerque, New Mexico.The Middle...

  4. VT Built Up Lands in Grand Isle County - 1977

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) NRCS mapped historical and current-day built-up lands for Grand Isle County, VT using several vintages of aerial photography: 1941, 1962, 1974,...

  5. VT Built Up Lands in Grand Isle County - 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) NRCS mapped historical and current-day built-up lands for Grand Isle County, VT using several vintages of aerial photography: 1941, 1962, 1974,...

  6. VT Built Up Lands in Grand Isle County - 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) NRCS mapped historical and current-day built-up lands for Grand Isle County, VT using several vintages of aerial photography: 1941, 1962, 1974,...

  7. VT Built Up Lands in Grand Isle County - 1980

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) NRCS mapped historical and current-day built-up lands for Grand Isle County, VT using several vintages of aerial photography: 1941, 1962, 1974,...

  8. VT Developed Lands in Grand Isle County - 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) NRCS mapped historical and current-day built-up lands for Grand Isle County, VT using several vintages of aerial photography: 1941, 1962, 1974,...

  9. VT Built Up Lands in Grand Isle County - 1974

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) NRCS mapped historical and current-day built-up lands for Grand Isle County, VT using several vintages of aerial photography: 1941, 1962, 1974,...

  10. DAWN GRAND CALIBRATED (RDR) CERES COUNTS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRaND Reduced Data Records (RDR) contain a time series of calibrated spectra, counting data, and ephemeris, pointing, and geometry (EPG) data. The EPG data are...

  11. DAWN GRAND CALIBRATED (RDR) VESTA COUNTS V1.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GRaND Reduced Data Records (RDR) contain a time series of calibrated spectra, counting data, and ephemeris, pointing, and geometry (EPG) data. The data set is...

  12. Simulations of Precipitation Variability over the Upper Rio Grande Basin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costigan, Keeley R.; Bossert, James E.; Langley, David L.

    1997-12-31

    In this research, we study Albuquerque`s water and how it may be affected by changes in the regional climate, as manifested by variations in Rio Grande water levels. To do this, we rely on the use of coupled atmospheric, runoff, and ground water models. Preliminary work on the project has focused on uncoupled simulations of the aquifer beneath Albuquerque and winter precipitation simulations of the upper Rio Grande Basin. The latter is discussed in this paper.

  13. Analysis of Steles with Libyan Inscriptions of Grande Kabylia, Algeria

    OpenAIRE

    Samia Ait Ali Yahia

    2017-01-01

    Several steles with Libyan inscriptions were discovered in Grande Kabylia (Algeria), but very few researchers were interested in these inscriptions. Our work is to list, if possible all these steles in order to do a descriptive study of the corpus. The steles analysis will be focused on the iconographic and epigraphic level and on the different forms of Libyan characters in order to highlight the alphabet used by the Grande Kabylia.

  14. Simulations of Precipitation Variability over the Upper Rio Grande Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costigan, Keeley R.; Bossert, James E.; Langley, David L.

    1997-10-01

    In this research, we study Albuquerque's water and how it may be affected by changes in the regional climate, as manifested by variations in Rio Grande water levels. To do this, we rely on the use of coupled atmospheric, runoff, and ground water models. Preliminary work on the project has focused on uncoupled simulations of the aquifer beneath Albuquerque and winter precipitation simulations of the upper Rio Grande Basin. The latter is discussed in this paper

  15. Restrictions on SU(5) as a grand unified theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shellard, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Some restrictions imposed upon Grand Unified Theories by dynamical symetry breakdown are examined. They are shown that, in particular, theories SU(5) as symmetry group, with 3 or more fermion families undergo dynamical symmetry breakdown, and some of the fermions will acquire mass at the Grand Unified scale. On the other hand, the SO(10) group, with 3 families is free from this problem. (Author) [pt

  16. Audit Branding Grand Candi Hotel Semarang dalam Mempertahankan Okupansi

    OpenAIRE

    Setiawan, Rony Kristanto; Naryoso, Agus; Rahmiaji, Lintang Ratri; Pradekso, Tandiyo

    2015-01-01

    Grand Candi Hotel merupakan salah satu independent hotel bintang limayang berdiri di Kota Semarang. Okupansi Grand Candi Hotel pada awal tahun2015 sangat rendah, di bawah 60%. Okupansi awal tahun 2015 lebih rendahdibanding dengan tahun-tahun sebelumnya. Rendahnya okupansi disebabkan olehbeberapa faktor, diantaranya: melemahnya kondisi ekonomi Indonesia di tahun2015 yang berdampak krisis pada semua sektor USAha, diterbitkannya surat edaranMen-PAN RB No. 10/2014, dan persaingan bisnis perhotela...

  17. Grand-Mosque’ Projects in Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægaard, Sune

    2010-01-01

    and in the process draw out some general challenges and lessons concerning the practical applicability of these concepts. At the same time it will use the concepts as an interpretative framework to present and evaluate the actual policies regarding the distribution of public space for the building of mosques played...

  18. Os conflitos entre natureza e cultura na implementação do Ecomuseu Ilha Grande Clashes between nature and culture in the implementation of the Ilha Grande Ecomuseum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrian Sepúlveda dos Santos

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho é mostrar três desafios surgidos a partir das primeiras apresentações do projeto Ecomuseu Ilha Grande, todos eles relacionados às diferentes formas de compreensão do que sejam natureza e cultura. O primeiro diz respeito ao equilíbrio entre preservação da natureza e bem-estar dos moradores, objetivos bastante conflitantes atualmente. Em segundo lugar, há a intenção de envolver a população local da Ilha Grande nos projetos de pesquisa acadêmica e de defesa do meio ambiente. Finalmente, há a tentativa de preservar a memória de práticas de violência e de arbitrariedade ética e moral, que são ou estereotipadas ou totalmente ignoradas pela sociedade.The article points to three challenges that arose during initial presentations of the Ilha Grande Ecomuseum project, all of which involved different ways of understanding what constitutes 'nature' and 'culture'. The first issue had to do with balancing environmental protection with the welfare of residents, two aspirations that are quite conflicting at present. Second was the intention to involve the Ilha Grande population in academic research and environmental protection projects. Last was the endeavor to preserve the memory of practices of violence and of ethical and moral irresponsibility, which are either stereotyped or totally ignored by society.

  19. Oxide electronics : increasing trends and future challenges

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnders, Guus; Jones, Val

    2006-01-01

    Oxide materials exhibit a wide range of functional properties, such as isolators, superconductors, ferromagnets and ferroelectrics. This diversity in materials properties opened the very active research area of “oxide electronics”. Nowadays, it is possible to control the growth of oxide thin films

  20. Coesão social e integração regional: a agenda social do MERCOSUL e os grandes desafios das políticas sociais integradas Social cohesion and regional integration: the MERCOSUR social agenda and the integrationist social policy major challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sônia Miriam Draibe

    2007-01-01

    reflection on the current dilemmas and challenges faced by the process. According to the study, MERCOSUR operates with strategies that are difficult to mutually reconcile. On the institutional level, it follows a minimalist strategy, while on the conceptual/ discursive level it adopts a maximalist strategy for supranational unification of social policies. The fact is that it operates a minimalist social policy strategy, since it fails to bring to the field of social integration the debate and proposals on economic and social development models that could sustain the effective construction of regional social citizenship.

  1. 3D View of Grand Canyon, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Grand Canyon is one of North America's most spectacular geologic features. Carved primarily by the Colorado River over the past six million years, the canyon sports vertical drops of 5,000 feet and spans a 445-kilometer-long stretch of Arizona desert. The strata along the steep walls of the canyon form a record of geologic time from the Paleozoic Era (250 million years ago) to the Precambrian (1.7 billion years ago).The above view was acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument aboard the Terra spacecraft. Visible and near infrared data were combined to form an image that simulates the natural colors of water and vegetation. Rock colors, however, are not accurate. The image data were combined with elevation data to produce this perspective view, with no vertical exaggeration, looking from above the South Rim up Bright Angel Canyon towards the North Rim. The light lines on the plateau at lower right are the roads around the Canyon View Information Plaza. The Bright Angel Trail, which reaches the Colorado in 11.3 kilometers, can be seen dropping into the canyon over Plateau Point at bottom center. The blue and black areas on the North Rim indicate a forest fire that was smoldering as the data were acquired on May 12, 2000.Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as

  2. Enterotoxemia em caprinos no Rio Grande do Sul Caprine enterotoxaemia in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson M. Colodel

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available São descritos surtos de enterotoxemia em caprinos em cinco propriedades no Estado do Rio Grande do Sul. Os animais afetados eram, normalmente, encontrados mortos ou apresentavam evolução aguda de 2 a 3 horas com acentuada depressão, cólicas abdominais e diarréia profusa com fibrina. Em duas propriedades relataram-se casos com a evolução de até 12 horas. Em treze animais necropsiados observaram-se aumento de líquidos nas cavidades abdominal, torácica e pericárdica, congestão e hiperemia da serosa e mucosa do intestino, conteúdo do cólon líquido com fibrina além de hemorragias de serosa e fibrina. Em um animal constatou-se microangiopatia cerebral caracterizada por acúmulo de material homogêneo e eosinofílico no espaço perivascular. No conteúdo intestinal, colônias com bastonetes morfológica e bioquimicamente sugestivos de Clostridium perfringens foram caracterizadas no estudo bacteriológico. A soroneutralização em camundongos com conteúdo intestinal dos animais afetados, revelou a presença da toxina épsilon. Estes achados evidenciam a enterotoxemia como doença de importância para criação de caprinos no Rio Grande do Sul.Five outbreaks of caprine enterotoxaemia in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, were studied. The animals were found dead or had a clinical course that usually lasted 2-3 hours. From two farms a clinical manifestation period of 12 hours was reported. Clinical signs were characterized by depression, marked abdominal discomfort, profuse watery diarrhea with fibrin clots, and death. Thirteen necropsies were performed and hydropericardium, hydrothorax and hydroperitoneum were commonly found. The mucosa and serosa of the colon were congested, and its contents was watery with multiple fibrin clots. Serosal hemorrhages and fibrin clots in the gallbladder were also seen. Fibrinous colitis and thyphilitis were the most frequent histological changes. Cerebral microangiopathy was observed in one case, which was

  3. Implantable Devices: Issues and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan V. Jacob

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ageing population and a multitude of neurological and cardiovascular illnesses that cannot be mitigated by medication alone have resulted in a significant growth in the number of patients that require implantable electronic devices. These range from sensors, gastric and cardiac pacemakers, cardioverter defibrillators, to deep brain, nerve, and bone stimulators. Long-term implants present specific engineering challenges, including low energy consumption and stable performance. Resorbable electronics may offer excellent short-term performance without the need for surgical removal. However, most electronic materials have poor bio- and cytocompatibility, resulting in immune reactions and infections. This paper reviews the current situation and highlights challenges for future advancements.

  4. REVIEW: Advances in Electronic Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    YILMAZ, Reviewed By Dr. Ayhan

    2005-01-01

    There are many challenges facing organizations today as they incorporate electronic marketing methods into their strategy. Advances in Electronic Marketing examines these challenges within three major themes: the global environment, the strategic/technological realm, and the buyer behavior of online consumers.

  5. Overcoming challenges

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... into your life Breastfeeding in daily life: At home and in public Laws that support breastfeeding 10 ... and jobs View all pages in this section Home It's Only Natural Overcoming challenges It's Only Natural ...

  6. Overcoming challenges

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Disease and Stroke HIV and AIDS Mental Health Pain Pregnancy Reproductive Health Sexual Health Sexually Transmitted Infections ... breastfeeding Overcoming challenges Common questions about breastfeeding and pain Breastfeeding checklist: How to get a good latch ...

  7. The Grand Tour via Geodesic Interpolation of 2-frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimov, Daniel; Buja, Andreas

    1994-01-01

    Grand tours are a class of methods for visualizing multivariate data, or any finite set of points in n-space. The idea is to create an animation of data projections by moving a 2-dimensional projection plane through n-space. The path of planes used in the animation is chosen so that it becomes dense, that is, it comes arbitrarily close to any plane. One of the original inspirations for the grand tour was the experience of trying to comprehend an abstract sculpture in a museum. One tends to walk around the sculpture, viewing it from many different angles. A useful class of grand tours is based on the idea of continuously interpolating an infinite sequence of randomly chosen planes. Visiting randomly (more precisely: uniformly) distributed planes guarantees denseness of the interpolating path. In computer implementations, 2-dimensional orthogonal projections are specified by two 1-dimensional projections which map to the horizontal and vertical screen dimensions, respectively. Hence, a grand tour is specified by a path of pairs of orthonormal projection vectors. This paper describes an interpolation scheme for smoothly connecting two pairs of orthonormal vectors, and thus for constructing interpolating grand tours. The scheme is optimal in the sense that connecting paths are geodesics in a natural Riemannian geometry.

  8. Perfluoroalkyl substances in waters along the Grand Canal, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, H T; Jiao, X C; Gai, N; Chen, S; Lu, G H; Yin, X C; Yamazaki, E; Yamashita, N; Tan, K Y; Yang, Y L; Pan, J

    2017-07-01

    The Grand Canal, also known as the Beijing-Hangzhou Grand Canal, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and the longest canal in the world. It is an important trunk line of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project in China. The contamination status and spatial distributions of perfluoroalky substances (PFASs) in waters of the Grand Canal were investigated. The total concentrations of PFASs (∑PFASs) range from 7.8 ng/L to 218.0 ng/L, with high ∑PFASs occurring in the southern part of the Grand Canal which is located in a highly urbanized and economically developed region. The dominance of PFOA showed a decreasing trend toward north while shorter chain homologue proportions increased in the northern part of the Canal which mainly traverses underdeveloped and rural areas in Eastern China. Positive correlations were observed between ∑PFASs and the population density as well as GDP per capita. Intersection with large rivers may affect the contamination levels and composition of PFASs in the water of the Grand Canal near the intersection sites. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Internet and Electronic Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    centers to form consortia and share electronic information sources. Although traditional resource sharing arrangements encouraged competition rather... electronic information sources are a challenge for electronic information managers. Libraries and information centers are no longer “the only game in town...

  10. Biomechanical analysis technique choreographic movements (for example, "grand battman jete"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.P. Batieieva

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : biomechanical analysis of the execution of choreographic movement "grand battman jete". Material : the study involved students (n = 7 of the department of classical choreography faculty of choreography. Results : biomechanical analysis of choreographic movement "grand battman jete" (classic exercise, obtained kinematic characteristics (path, velocity, acceleration, force of the center of mass (CM bio parts of the body artist (foot, shin, thigh. Built bio kinematic model (phase. The energy characteristics - mechanical work and kinetic energy units legs when performing choreographic movement "grand battman jete". Conclusions : It was found that the ability of an athlete and coach-choreographer analyze the biomechanics of movement has a positive effect on the improvement of choreographic training of qualified athletes in gymnastics (sport, art, figure skating and dance sports.

  11. Historical records of solar grand minima: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaquero, José M.

    2012-07-01

    Knowing solar activity during the past centuries is of great interest for many purposes. Historical documents can help us to know about the behaviour of the Sun during the last centuries. The observation of aurorae and naked-eye sunspots provides us with continuous information through the last few centuries that can be used to improve our knowledge of the long-term solar activity including solar Grand Minima. We have more or less detailed information on only one Grand minimum (the Maunder minimum in the second half of 17th century), which serves as an archetype for Grand minima in general. Telescopic sunspot records and measurements of solar diameter during Maunder minimum are available. In this contribution, I review some recent progress on these issues.

  12. Electronic Cigarettes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... New FDA Regulations Text Size: A A A Electronic Cigarettes Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are battery operated products designed to ... more about: The latest news and events about electronic cigarettes on this FDA page Electronic cigarette basics on ...

  13. Syringe-injectable electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Fu, Tian-Ming; Cheng, Zengguang; Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M

    2015-07-01

    Seamless and minimally invasive three-dimensional interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating the syringe injection (and subsequent unfolding) of sub-micrometre-thick, centimetre-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 μm. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with >90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe-injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with three-dimensional structures, including (1) monitoring internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (2) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (3) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables the delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, the delivery of large-volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities, and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics.

  14. Syringe injectable electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Guosong; Zhou, Tao; Jin, Lihua; Duvvuri, Madhavi; Jiang, Zhe; Kruskal, Peter; Xie, Chong; Suo, Zhigang; Fang, Ying; Lieber, Charles M.

    2015-01-01

    Seamless and minimally-invasive three-dimensional (3D) interpenetration of electronics within artificial or natural structures could allow for continuous monitoring and manipulation of their properties. Flexible electronics provide a means for conforming electronics to non-planar surfaces, yet targeted delivery of flexible electronics to internal regions remains difficult. Here, we overcome this challenge by demonstrating syringe injection and subsequent unfolding of submicrometer-thick, centimeter-scale macroporous mesh electronics through needles with a diameter as small as 100 micrometers. Our results show that electronic components can be injected into man-made and biological cavities, as well as dense gels and tissue, with > 90% device yield. We demonstrate several applications of syringe injectable electronics as a general approach for interpenetrating flexible electronics with 3D structures, including (i) monitoring of internal mechanical strains in polymer cavities, (ii) tight integration and low chronic immunoreactivity with several distinct regions of the brain, and (iii) in vivo multiplexed neural recording. Moreover, syringe injection enables delivery of flexible electronics through a rigid shell, delivery of large volume flexible electronics that can fill internal cavities and co-injection of electronics with other materials into host structures, opening up unique applications for flexible electronics. PMID:26053995

  15. Uncovering the Transnational Networks, Organisational Techniques and State-Corporate Ties Behind Grand Corruption: Building an Investigative Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian Lasslett

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available While grand corruption is a major global governance challenge, researchers notably lack a systematic methodology for conducting qualitative research into its complex forms. To address this lacuna, the following article sets out and applies the corruption investigative framework (CIF, a methodology designed to generate a systematic, transferable approach for grand corruption research. Its utility will be demonstrated employing a case study that centres on an Australian-led megaproject being built in Papua New Guinea’s capital city, Port Moresby. Unlike conventional analyses of corruption in Papua New Guinea, which emphasise its local characteristics and patrimonial qualities, application of CIF uncovered new empirical layers that centre on transnational state-corporate power, the ambiguity of civil society, and the structural inequalities that marginalise resistance movements. The important theoretical consequences of the findings and underpinning methodology are explored.

  16. Regional economic impacts of Grand Canyon river runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hjerpe, Evan E; Kim, Yeon-Su

    2007-10-01

    Economic impact analysis (EIA) of outdoor recreation can provide critical social information concerning the utilization of natural resources. Outdoor recreation and other non-consumptive uses of resources are viewed as environmentally friendly alternatives to extractive-type industries. While outdoor recreation can be an appropriate use of resources, it generates both beneficial and adverse socioeconomic impacts on rural communities. The authors used EIA to assess the regional economic impacts of rafting in Grand Canyon National Park. The Grand Canyon region of northern Arizona represents a rural US economy that is highly dependent upon tourism and recreational expenditures. The purpose of this research is twofold. The first is to ascertain the previously unknown regional economic impacts of Grand Canyon river runners. The second purpose is to examine attributes of these economic impacts in terms of regional multipliers, leakage, and types of employment created. Most of the literature on economic impacts of outdoor recreation has focused strictly on the positive economic impacts, failing to illuminate the coinciding adverse and constraining economic impacts. Examining the attributes of economic impacts can highlight deficiencies and constraints that limit the economic benefits of recreation and tourism. Regional expenditure information was obtained by surveying non-commercial boaters and commercial outfitters. The authors used IMPLAN input-output modeling to assess direct, indirect, and induced effects of Grand Canyon river runners. Multipliers were calculated for output, employment, and income. Over 22,000 people rafted on the Colorado River through Grand Canyon National Park in 2001, resulting in an estimated $21,100,000 of regional expenditures to the greater Grand Canyon economy. However, over 50% of all rafting-related expenditures were not captured by the regional economy and many of the jobs created by the rafting industry are lower-wage and seasonal. Policy

  17. Environmental Audit of the Grand Junction Projects Office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-01

    The Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) is located in Mesa County, Colorado, immediately south and west of the Grand Junction city limits. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Colorado Raw Materials Office at the present-day Grand Junction Projects Office in 1947, to aid in the development of a viable domestic uranium industry. Activities at the site included sampling uranium concentrate; pilot-plant milling research, including testing and processing of uranium ores; and operation of a uranium mill pilot plant from 1954 to 1958. The last shipment of uranium concentrate was sent from GJPO in January, 1975. Since that time the site has been utilized to support various DOE programs, such as the former National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), and the Technical Measurements Center (TMC). All known contamination at GJPO is believed to be the result of the past uranium milling, analyses, and storage activities. Hazards associated with the wastes impounded at GJPO include surface and ground-water contamination and potential radon and gamma-radiation exposure. This report documents the results of the Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) located in Grand Junction, Colorado. The Grand Junction Baseline Environmental Audit was conducted from May 28 to June 12, 1991, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). This Audit evaluated environmental programs and activities at GJPO, as well as GJPO activities at the State-Owned Temporary Repository. 4 figs., 12 tabs.

  18. Environmental Audit of the Grand Junction Projects Office

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-08-01

    The Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) is located in Mesa County, Colorado, immediately south and west of the Grand Junction city limits. The US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) established the Colorado Raw Materials Office at the present-day Grand Junction Projects Office in 1947, to aid in the development of a viable domestic uranium industry. Activities at the site included sampling uranium concentrate; pilot-plant milling research, including testing and processing of uranium ores; and operation of a uranium mill pilot plant from 1954 to 1958. The last shipment of uranium concentrate was sent from GJPO in January, 1975. Since that time the site has been utilized to support various DOE programs, such as the former National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program, the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP), the Surplus Facilities Management Program (SFMP), and the Technical Measurements Center (TMC). All known contamination at GJPO is believed to be the result of the past uranium milling, analyses, and storage activities. Hazards associated with the wastes impounded at GJPO include surface and ground-water contamination and potential radon and gamma-radiation exposure. This report documents the results of the Baseline Environmental Audit conducted at Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) located in Grand Junction, Colorado. The Grand Junction Baseline Environmental Audit was conducted from May 28 to June 12, 1991, by the Office of Environmental Audit (EH-24). This Audit evaluated environmental programs and activities at GJPO, as well as GJPO activities at the State-Owned Temporary Repository. 4 figs., 12 tabs

  19. Electronic technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su

    2010-07-01

    This book is composed of five chapters, which introduces electronic technology about understanding of electronic, electronic component, radio, electronic application, communication technology, semiconductor on its basic, free electron and hole, intrinsic semiconductor and semiconductor element, Diode such as PN junction diode, characteristic of junction diode, rectifier circuit and smoothing circuit, transistor on structure of transistor, characteristic of transistor and common emitter circuit, electronic application about electronic equipment, communication technology and education, robot technology and high electronic technology.

  20. Challenging Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    depends on the conceptual or ideological constellation in which it takes part. This volume on one hand demonstrates the role of notions of identity in a variety of European contexts, and on the other hand highlights how there may be reasons to challenge the use of the term and corresponding social......, cultural, and political practices. Notions of national identity and national politics are challenged by European integration, as well as by increasing demographic heterogeneity due to migration, and migrants experience conflicts of identification stemming from clashes between cultural heritage...

  1. Falares: a oralidade como elemento construtor da grande-reportagem

    OpenAIRE

    Alex Criado

    2006-01-01

    Esta tese discute a incorporação da oralidade de falantes excluídos social e culturalmente na grande-reportagem. O foco desta pesquisa é refletir como a grande-reportagem no Brasil, em sua missão de desvendamento do real, tem lidado com a questão da oralidade. Discute os desafios para a incorporação dos registros orais de pessoas com baixa escolaridade, tendo em vista o preconceito que existe na sociedade em relação aos falantes que se utilizam de modalidades diferentes da língua padrão. Prop...

  2. Divisão Territorial do Rio Grande do Sul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Augusto Thofehrn

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Versa sobre a Divisão Territorial do Rio Grande do Sul. Dividido em: Conceito de divisão administrativa; Necessidade da Geografia na divisão territorial; Conceito de área; Fatores que compõem uma paisagem geográfica; O problema da análise da paisagem; Análise da posição; Análise da paisagem; Análise das Interrrelações; Aplicação dos processos geográficos para o Rio Grande do Sul; O método; Estabelecimento de médias;

  3. The Grand Geochemistry of 4 Vesta: First Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prettyman, T. H.; Beck, A.; Feldman, W. C.; Forni, O.; Joy, S. P.; Lawrence, D. J.; McCoy T. J.; McFadden, L. A.; McSween, H. Y.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.; hide

    2012-01-01

    On 12-Dec-2011, the Dawn spacecraft commenced low altitude mapping of the giant asteroid, 4 Vesta (264-km mean radius). Dawn's roughly circular, polar, low altitude mapping orbit (LAMO) has a mean radius of 470 km, placing the spacecraft within about 210 km of Vesta's surface. At these altitudes, Dawn s Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) is sensitive to Vesta's elemental com-position (Fig. 1). GRaND will acquire data in LAMO for up to 16 weeks, which is sufficient to map the elemental composition of the entire surface of Vesta. The timing of LAMO enables us to report the first results of our geochemistry investigation at this conference. In this abstract, we present an overview of our initial observations, based on data acquired at high altitude and during the first weeks of LAMO. GRaND overview. A detailed description of the GRaND instrument, science objectives and prospective results is given in [1]. At low altitudes, GRaND is sensitive to gamma rays and neutrons produced by cosmogenic nuclear reactions and radioactive decay occurring within the top few decimeters of the surface and on a spatial scale of a few hundred kilometers. From these nuclear emissions, the abundance of several major- and minor-elements, such as Fe, Mg, Si, K, and Th can be determined. Assuming the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite (HED) meteorites are representative of Vesta s crustal composition [2], then GRaND will be able to map the mixing ratios of whole-rock HED end-members, enabling the determination of the relative proportions of basaltic eucrite, cumulate eucrite, and diogenite as well as the proportions of mafic and plagioclase minerals [1,3]. GRaND will also search for compositions not well-represented in the meteorite collection, such as evolved, K-rich lithologies [4], and outcrops of olivine from Vesta s mantle or igneous intrusions in major impact basins [5]. The search for a possible mesosiderite source region is described in [6]. GRaND will globally map the abundance of

  4. Grand Minima: Is The Sun Going To Sleep?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintosh, S. W.; Leamon, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    We explore recent observational work which indicate that the energetics of the sun's outer atmosphere have been on a steady decline for the past decade and perhaps longer. Futher, we show that new investigations into evolution of the Sun's global magnetic activity appear to demonstrate a path through which the Sun can go into, and exit from, a grand activity minimum without great difficulty while retaining an activity cycle - only losing sunspots. Are we at the begining of a new grand(-ish) minimum? Naturally, only time will tell, but the observational evidence hint that one may not be far off to what impact on the Sun-Earth Connection.

  5. The Electron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomson, George

    1972-01-01

    Electrons are elementary particles of atoms that revolve around and outside the nucleus and have a negative charge. This booklet discusses how electrons relate to electricity, some applications of electrons, electrons as waves, electrons in atoms and solids, the electron microscope, among other things.

  6. The grand challenge of developing in situ observational oceanography in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roberts, M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available , underwater temperature recorders (UTRs), wave buoys, as well as locally developed in situ measurement sensor and platform prototypes (dial-out UTRs, coastal and deep ocean buoys) have been incorporated into a regional in-situ observational network. A modular...

  7. Grand Challenge Problem 3: Empowering Science Teachers Using Technology-Enhanced Scaffolding to Improve Inquiry Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pedaste, Margus; Lazonder, Adrianus W.; Raes, Annelies; Wajeman, Claire; Moore, Emily; Girault, Isabelle; Eberle, Julia; Lund, Kristine; Tchounikine, Pierre; Fischer, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Inquiry learning in technology-enhanced learning (TEL) environments has potential to support science learning. The “symbiosis” between teachers and TEL environments is needed and, therefore, virtual assistants should be “taught” based on pedagogical theories. These assistants should be dynamically

  8. Grand Challenges: Science, Engineering, and Societal Advances, Requiring Networking and Information Technology Research and Development

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — ...the U.S. Government makes critical decisions about appropriate investments in IT R and D to help society forward both socially and economically. To inform that...

  9. FY 1993 Blue Book: Grand Challenges 1993: High Performance Computing and Communications

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — High performance computing and computer communications networks are becoming increasingly important to scientific advancement, economic competition, and national...

  10. FY 1992 Blue Book: Grand Challenges: High Performance Computing and Communications

    Data.gov (United States)

    Networking and Information Technology Research and Development, Executive Office of the President — High performance computing and computer communications networks are becoming increasingly important to scientific advancement, economic competition, and national...

  11. Systems Pharmacology: An opinion on how to turn the impossible into grand challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerhoff, Hans V; Nakayama, Shintaro; Mondeel, Thierry D G A; Barberis, Matteo

    2015-08-01

    A pharmacology that hits single disease-causing molecules with a single drug passively distributing to the target tissue, was almost ready. Such a pharmacology is not (going to be) effective however: a great many diseases are systems biology diseases; complex networks of some hundred thousand types of molecule, determine the functions that constitute human health, through nonlinear interactions. Malfunctions are caused by a variety of molecular failures at the same time; rarely the same variety in different individuals; in complex constellations of OR and AND logics. Few molecules cause disease single-handedly and few drugs will cure the disease all by themselves when dosed for a limited amount of time. We here discuss the implications that this discovery of the network nature of disease should have for pharmacology. We suggest ways in which pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, but also systems biology and genomics may have to change so as better to deal with systems-biology diseases. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. New Capabilities for Hostile Environments on Z Grand Challenge LDRD - Final Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuneo, Michael E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Griffin, P. J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Balch, D. K. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bell, K. S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bierner, J. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Coverdale, C. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Flanagan, T. M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, S. B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Slaboszewicz, V. Harper- [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, B. M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Lamppa, D. C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Martin, W. J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); McKenney, J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Moore, N. W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Parma, E. J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Peebles, H. C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Rovang, D. C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Savage, M. E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Tang, R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Vesey, R. A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop new physical simulation capabilities in order to support the science-based qualification of nonnuclear weapon components in hostile radiation environments. The project contributes directly to the goals of maintaining a safe, secure, and effective US nuclear stockpile, maintaining strategic deterrence at lower nuclear force levels, extending the life of the nuclear deterrent capability, and to be ready for technological surprise.

  13. Preventing Schizophrenia and Severe Mental Illness: A Grand Challenge for Social Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVylder, Jordan E.

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a leading cause of disability and health expenditure worldwide and is associated with homelessness, substance use, familial and social isolation, unemployment, involvement with the criminal justice system, stigma, and excess mortality. Prevention may be feasible through intervention with help-seeking "clinical high-risk"…

  14. From farm to fork and further. Research tackling the grand challenge of food safety in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridder, M. de; Polchar, J.; Gehem, M.

    2012-01-01

    The study From Farm to Fork and Further shows how, as traditional causes of food safety problems such as basic hygiene are successfully dealt with, future food safety risks become ever harder to manage. European countries may have the highest food safety standards, however the trends that go hand in

  15. The American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare: History and Grand Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Richard P.; Gilmore, Grover C.; Flynn, Marilyn S.; Fraser, Mark W.; Brekke, John S.

    2014-01-01

    Conceptualized by social work deans and actualized with the support of major social work organizations, the American Academy of Social Work and Social Welfare was established in 2009. This article describes the historical context and creation of the Academy, whose objectives include recognizing outstanding social work scholars and practitioners;…

  16. GeoInquiries: Addressing a Grand Challenge for Teaching with GIS in Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiBiase, D.; Baker, T.

    2016-12-01

    According to the National Research Council (2006), geographic information systems (GIS) is a powerful tool for expanding students' abilities to think spatially, a critical skill for future STEM professionals. However, educators in mainstream subjects in U.S. education have struggled for decades to use GIS effectively in classrooms. GeoInquiries are no cost, standards-based (NGSS or AP), Creative Commons-licensed instructional activities that guide inquiry around map-based concepts found in key subjects like Earth and environmental science. Web maps developed for GeoInquiries expand upon printed maps in leading textbooks by taking advantage of 21st GIS capabilities. GeoInquiry collections consist of 15 activities, each chosen to offer a map-based activity every few weeks throughout the school year. GeoInquiries use a common inquiry instructional framework, learned by many educators during their teacher preparation coursework. GeoInquiries are instructionally flexible - acting as much like building blocks for crafting custom activities as finished instructional materials. Over a half million geoinquiries will be accessed in the next twelve months - serving an anticipated 15 million students. After a generation of outreach to the educators, GIS is finally finding its way the mainstream.

  17. Hyperresolution global land surface modeling: Meeting a grand challenge for monitoring Earth's terrestrial water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, E.F.; Roundy, J.K.; Troy, T.J.; Beek, L.P.H. van; Bierkens, M.F.P.; Blyth, E.; Roo, A.A. de; Doll, P.; Ek, M.; Famiglietti, J.; Gochis, D.; Giesen, N. van de; Houser, P.; Jaffe, P.R.; Kollet, S.; Lehner, B.; Lettenmaier, D.P.; Peters-Liedard, C.; Sivapalan, M.; Sheffield, J.; Wade, A.; Whitehead, P.

    2011-01-01

    Monitoring Earth’s terrestrial water conditions is critically important to many hydrological applications such as global food production; assessing water resources sustainability; and flood, drought, and climate change prediction. These needs have motivated the development of pilot monitoring and

  18. Grand challenges in evolutionary and population genetics: The importance of integrating epigenetics, genomics, modeling, and experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel A. Cushman

    2014-01-01

    This is a time of explosive growth in the fields of evolutionary and population genetics, with whole genome sequencing and bioinformatics driving a transformative paradigm shift (Morozova and Marra, 2008). At the same time, advances in epigenetics are thoroughly transforming our understanding of evolutionary processes and their implications for populations, species and...

  19. On the added value of forensic science and grand innovation challenges for the forensic community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Asten, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the insights and results are presented of a long term and ongoing improvement effort within the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI) to establish a valuable innovation programme. From the overall perspective of the role and use of forensic science in the criminal justice system, the

  20. A Federal Vision for Future Computing: A Nanotechnology-Inspired Grand Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-29

    physical device technology with scalable manufacturing methods, a compatible computer architecture, and demonstrations of applications performance and...The Nation must preserve its leadership role in creating HPC technology and using it across a wide range of applications .9 Access to advanced...effort among researchers representing all areas—from services and applications down to the nano - architecture and materials level—to research, discover

  1. Chemical mapping and quantification at the atomic scale by scanning transmission electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ming-Wen; Chen, Cheng Hsuan

    2013-06-25

    With innovative modern material-growth methods, a broad spectrum of fascinating materials with reduced dimensions-ranging from single-atom catalysts, nanoplasmonic and nanophotonic materials to two-dimensional heterostructural interfaces-is continually emerging and extending the new frontiers of materials research. A persistent central challenge in this grand scientific context has been the detailed characterization of the individual objects in these materials with the highest spatial resolution, a problem prompting the need for experimental techniques that integrate both microscopic and spectroscopic capabilities. To date, several representative microscopy-spectroscopy combinations have become available, such as scanning tunneling microscopy, tip-enhanced scanning optical microscopy, atom probe tomography, scanning transmission X-ray microscopy, and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Among these tools, STEM boasts unique chemical and electronic sensitivity at unparalleled resolution. In this Perspective, we elucidate the advances in STEM and chemical mapping applications at the atomic scale by energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy with a focus on the ultimate challenge of chemical quantification with atomic accuracy.

  2. Hard electronics; Hard electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    Hard material technologies were surveyed to establish the hard electronic technology which offers superior characteristics under hard operational or environmental conditions as compared with conventional Si devices. The following technologies were separately surveyed: (1) The device and integration technologies of wide gap hard semiconductors such as SiC, diamond and nitride, (2) The technology of hard semiconductor devices for vacuum micro- electronics technology, and (3) The technology of hard new material devices for oxides. The formation technology of oxide thin films made remarkable progress after discovery of oxide superconductor materials, resulting in development of an atomic layer growth method and mist deposition method. This leading research is expected to solve such issues difficult to be easily realized by current Si technology as high-power, high-frequency and low-loss devices in power electronics, high temperature-proof and radiation-proof devices in ultimate electronics, and high-speed and dense- integrated devices in information electronics. 432 refs., 136 figs., 15 tabs.

  3. Challenges at the Frontiers of Matter and Energy: Transformative Opportunities for Discovery Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemminger, John C. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Sarrao, John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Crabtree, George [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); University of Illinois, Chicago; Flemming, Graham [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Ratner, Mark [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2015-11-01

    inverse design approach, through the harmonious convergence of theoretical, mathematical, computational, and experimental capabilities, could usher in a virtual cornucopia of new materials with functionalities far beyond what nature can provide. Similarly, enhanced mathematical and computational capabilities significantly enhance our ability to extract physical and chemical insights from vastly larger data streams gathered during multimodal and multidimensional experiments using advanced characterization facilities. Exploiting Transformative Advances in Imaging Capabilities across Multiple Scales Historically, improvements in imaging capabilities have always resulted in improved understanding of scientific phenomena. A prime challenge today is finding ways to reconstruct raw data, obtained by probing and mapping matter across multiple scales, into analyzable images. BES investments in new and improved imaging facilities, most notably synchrotron x-ray sources, free-electron lasers, electron microscopes, and neutron sources, have greatly advanced our powers of observation, as have substantial improvements in laboratory- scale technologies. Furthermore, BES is now planning or actively discussing exciting new capabilities. Taken together, these advances in imaging capabilities provide an opportunity to expand our ability to observe and study matter from the 3D spatial perspectives of today to true “4D” spatially and temporally resolved maps of dynamics that allow quantitative predictions of time-dependent material properties and chemical processes. The knowledge gained will impact data storage, catalyst design, drug delivery, structural materials, and medical implants, to name just a few key technologies. ENABLING SUCCESS Seizing each of these five Transformative Opportunities, as well as accelerating further progress on Grand Challenge research, will require specific, targeted investments from BES in the areas of synthesis, meaning the ability to make the materials and

  4. Environmental challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conable, B.; Warford, J.; Partow, Z.; Lutz, E.; Munasinghe, M.

    1991-09-01

    The contents include the following: Development and the Environment: A Global Balance; Evolution of the World Bank's Environmental Policy; Accounting for the Environment; Public Policy and the Environment; Managing Drylands; Environmental Action Plans in Africa; Agroforestry in Sub-Saharan Africa; Irrigation and the Environmental Challenge; Curbing Pollution in Developing Countries; Global Warming and the Developing World; and The Global Environment Facility

  5. Overcoming challenges

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contact Us Blog Popular topics Vision and mission Leadership Programs and activities In your community Funding opportunities Internships and jobs View all pages in this section Home It's Only Natural Overcoming challenges It's Only Natural Planning ahead Addressing breastfeeding myths ...

  6. La Grande Guerra fra realtà ed illusione: La Grande Illusion e l’immaginario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Di Blasi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this brief essay is to focus on the relation between the meaning of reality and illusion in the movie La Grande Illusion (1937 by Jean Renoir and therefore to find how these ideas of the author may be productive in a thought about the imaginary. After a short look on the movies made at that time on the First World War, there is an overview of the French director poetics, which redefines the conception of the realism, contextualizing its work at the point of convergence of two imaginary “technological lines”, the cinema and the aviation. It follows the analysis of the movie and the illusions, as social largely shared imaginaries, described by the author. In the end it is showed the importance and the of illusion in Renoir’s poetics. Beyond the relationship realityfiction, he thought a dynamic reciprocity among illusion and reality: so that the reality is as “illusion” (a ruled horizon in which it is possible to enjoy a world of play and the illusion as an activity creating contents of “reality”.

  7. Physics and spirituality: the next grand unification?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josephson, Brian

    1987-01-01

    In what light should a scientist regard the assertions of a religion, or of religions in general? One extreme position is the atheistic one of regarding the assertions of religion as falsehoods. Such a position can be sustained only by regarding the experiences which individuals consider as validating their religious beliefs as being explicable in other ways and, in the absence of an adequate research programme to support it, must be considered more as falling within the field of opinion that as within that of science. The alternative to this atheistic position is that there exists an aspect of reality-that one may for convenience call transcendental-which embraces the subject matter of religion (or as some may prefer to term it, the spiritual aspect of life) and which is not at present encompassed by science. The question then arises whether some future science may be able to cope with this aspect of reality, or whether it will remain forever beyond the scope of science. The author attempts to explain the ways in which current scientific orthodoxies are being challenged and to convey some idea of the alternatives presently emerging. A number of important themes here include the questions of the validity of reductionism and the universality of quantum mechanics, as well as that of the relevance of mystical experience.

  8. Evaluation of intergranular cracks on the ring header cross at Grand Gulf Unit No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czajkowski, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    A metallurgical investigation was performed on a sample of cracked ring header cross material from the Grand Gulf Unit No. 1 Nuclear Power Station. The cracks were located in a 6-7 in (15-17.5 cm) width band running circumferentially below the cross to cap weld with a similar band above the cross to discharger pipe weld. The indications were up to 19 mm in length and 6.0 mm in depth. This particular sample was cut from a cross which had not seen actual service but which had been used to qualify the induction heating stress improvement (IHSI) technique for the Grand Gulf units. The base material was SA 182 material manufactured to SA 403-type WP 304 stainless steel. The investigation consisted of visual/dye penetrant examination, chemical analysis, hardness testing, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. The evaluated cracks were intergranular and initiated on the forging's exterior surface. The grain size of the material was larger than ASTM 00 and no definitive corrosive species were found by Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS). The cracking is considered to be the result of the forging having been overheated/burned during manufacture. (author)

  9. Influence of upwelling saline groundwater on iron and manganese cycling in the Rio Grande floodplain aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirk, Matthew F. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)], E-mail: matthew.f.kirk@gmail.com; Crossey, Laura J. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Takacs-Vesbach, Cristina [Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Newell, Dennis L. [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Bowman, Robert S. [Department of Earth and Environmental Science, New Mexico Tech, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States)

    2009-03-15

    Salinity contributions from upwelling groundwater significantly degrade water quality in the Rio Grande, a major source of water for the southwestern USA. This study considers the influence of this upwelling water on the geochemistry and microbiology of the Rio Grande floodplain alluvial aquifer. The composition of surface water, groundwater, and floodplain sediment samples collected from three transects in the Socorro Basin was examined. Terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) was also used to examine microbial biomass samples. The distribution of salinity in the floodplain groundwater largely reflects the configuration of local groundwater flow and mixing of two major water sources, deeply-sourced saline groundwater and river water. Microbial populations in the shallow aquifer consume O{sub 2} and NO{sub 3}{sup -} and serve to redistribute metal oxides from the saturated zone to locations of groundwater discharge at the surface and possibly near the water table. The upwelling saline groundwater affects floodplain microbial processes by transporting reduced metals and organic electron donors to the alluvial aquifer system. This enhances metal reduction in the saturated zone and ultimately metal oxidation at or near the surface. Geochemical modeling suggests that mixing of the saline groundwater with more dilute water in the floodplain creates conditions more favorable for metal oxidation to occur and thereby influences the distribution of metal oxides.

  10. Electron radiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Frank E.; Morris, Christopher

    2005-05-17

    A system capable of performing radiography using a beam of electrons. Diffuser means receive a beam of electrons and diffuse the electrons before they enter first matching quadrupoles where the diffused electrons are focused prior to the diffused electrons entering an object. First imaging quadrupoles receive the focused diffused electrons after the focused diffused electrons have been scattered by the object for focusing the scattered electrons. Collimator means receive the scattered electrons and remove scattered electrons that have scattered to large angles. Second imaging quadrupoles receive the collimated scattered electrons and refocus the collimated scattered electrons and map the focused collimated scattered electrons to transverse locations on an image plane representative of the electrons' positions in the object.

  11. Reevaluating American Grand Strategy in an Era of Retrenchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    bipartisan support for what was essentially a “liberal institutionalist ” strategy began to breakdown.54 The absence of a military and ideological ...56 12 Synthetic Approach ...political ideology was vindicated after 20 years of doubt. Almost by default, “primacy” became the overarching grand strategy of the United States.3

  12. Johannes Althusius' grand federalism, the role of the Ephors and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article discusses the primary structures Johannes Althusius' constitutionalism, as explained in his Politica: Politics Methodically Set Forth and Illustrated with Sacred and Profane Examples published in 1603. The first of these structures and the theme that Althusius is most famous for, is his scheme of grand republican ...

  13. Condors back after long absence from Grand Canyon

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2007-03-02

    Mar 2, 2007 ... or even for UFOs. Benefield follows the birds closely. Condors are very curious and must be trained to stay away from humans. That requires hazing the birds by throwing pebbles at them or making noise when they get too close to the. Grand Canyon crowds. But visitors who get a glimpse of the scavengers ...

  14. Ecology, diversity, and sustainability of the Middle Rio Grande Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deborah M. Finch; Joseph A. Tainter

    1995-01-01

    This book synthesizes existing information on the ecology, diversity, human uses, and research needs of the Middle Rio Grande Basin of New Mexico. Divided into nine chapters, the volume begins with reviews of the environmental history and human cultures in the Basin, followed by an analysis of the influences and problems of climate and water. Later chapters focus on...

  15. The Grand Coalition and Pension and Health Care Reform

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverland, M.; Stiller, S.J.

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on German pension and health care reform politics under the Grand Coalition. All rich democracies face functional pressures to reform these sectors but are confronted with political and sometimes also institutionalobstacles. This holds in particular for the German party system,

  16. A grand-canonical ensemble of randomly triangulated surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jurkiewicz, J.; Krzywicki, A.; Petersson, B.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm is presented generating the grand-canonical ensemble of discrete, randomly triangulated Polyakov surfaces. The algorithm is used to calculate the susceptibility exponent, which controls the existence of the continuum limit of the considered model, for the dimensionality of the embedding space ranging from 0 to 20. (orig.)

  17. Eesti nukufilm sai järjekordse grand prix

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    XII Rahvusvaheline animafilmifestival "KROK-2005", mis toimus laeval, mis sõitis Kiievist Odessasse. Rao Heidmets ja Hardi Volmer said festivali karnevalil oma jänese kostüümi eest grand prix. Eesti filmidest olid programmis "Karl ja Marilyn", "Frank ja Wendy", "Barbarid", "Laud" ja "Conkistadoor"

  18. Piccolo tõi Soomest taas grand prix'

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2009-01-01

    Tänavuse Lappeenrantas toimunud rahvusvahelise suupillifestivali võistumängimisel osalesid suupilliklubi Piccolo orkester, kvartett ja noored solistid. Grand prix' ehk suure võidukarika pälvis Piccolo suupillikvartett koosseisus Ilmar Tõnisson, Andrus Haugas, Andres Kokk ja Elmar Trink. Noorte kategooria võitjaks tunnistati Martin Merevits, kolmandad kohad saavutasid Janek Sildvee bluusi- ja Eduard Einmann diatoonilise suupilli kategoorias

  19. Cromoblastomicose no Rio Grande do Sul: relato de 12 casos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matte Shirley M.W.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available São relatados 12 casos de cromoblastomicose diagnosticados no interior do Rio Grande do Sul, no período 1988-1995. Os aspectos clínicos e evolutivos são analisados e comparados com a literatura. O único agente isolado foi Fonsecaea pedrosoi.

  20. Nuove prospettive storiografiche sulla Grande guerra: violenze, traumi, esperienze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bizzocchi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Il testo propone, attraverso l’analisi delle recensioni pubblicate sulla rivista internazionale “First World War Studies”, una rassegna su alcuni recenti studi storici sulla Prima guerra mondiale. Dopo la svolta degli anni Settanta-Ottanta, la storiografia sta continuando ad approfondire in particolare il tema dei risvolti sociali e culturali della Grande guerra.