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Sample records for grade steels eafd

  1. A possible recycling method for high grade steels EAFD in polymer composites.

    Niubó, M; Fernández, A I; Chimenos, J M; Haurie, L

    2009-11-15

    This work evaluates the feasibility of incorporating electric arc furnace dust (EAFD), as filler in a polymer matrix, to obtain a moldable heavyweight sheet, useful for acoustic insulation in automotive industry. For this purpose EAFD from a steel factory that manufactures high quality steels, was characterized and different formulations of composites were prepared. Physical and mechanical properties, as well as fire behaviour were tested and compared with a polymer composite compounded with common mineral fillers. Optimum formulation with 25% EAFD fulfils the RoHs Directive used by automotive industry to regulate heavy metals content. Leaching test was also performed on prepared composites to classify the material after use.

  2. Functionally Graded Mo sintered steels

    Manuel Cisneros-Belmonte

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Functionally graded materials (FGM, the multi-materials, strive to satisfy the numerous requirements demanded of parts in a given combination of compositions and microstructures. The required material compatibility lead the manufacturing process and the achieving of an interface, not always diffuse. Powder metallurgy is one of the techniques used in manufacturing functionally graded materials, in particular the compaction matrix of the possible techniques for forming these materials. In this paper, a process of forming a functionally graded steel based on the use of a high molybdenum steel with cooper and other steel with copper, without molybdenum, is proposed with the aim of concentrating this element to the surface of the workpiece, increasing the mechanical strength. The study is completed with the evaluation of physical properties (density and porosity distribution, mechanical properties (hardness, tensile strength and elongation and microstructural analysis by optical and scanning electron microscopy.

  3. Development of nuclear grade stainless steels at KCSSL

    Balachandran, G.; Dhere, M.; Mahadik, A.; Hinge, N.M.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    Kalyani Carpenter Special Steels Ltd is an alloy steel plant, where a variety of alloy steel grades are produced for automotive, defence, nuclear and aerospace applications. The plant has developed expertise in processing of several alloy steel grades of superior quality that meets stringent specifications. Primary steel is processed through a combination of electric arc furnace, ladle furnace and vacuum degassing where stringent control over dephosphorisation, desulphurization, deoxidation is effected to get a refined high quality steel. The molten steel is cast through continuous casting of slabs or ingot casting. In grades specific to nuclear application, the primary cast products are further subjected to electroslag remelting to achieve further freedom from inclusions and to achieve a favourable solidification grain structure, which ultimately improve the hot workability of the alloy steel. Appropriate choice of slag and operating parameters are needed for realising the required ingot quality. The present study would examine the processing and quality aspects of some important grades of steels used in nuclear industry namely ferritic 9Cr-1Mo steel, martensitic stainless steels 403, 410, precipitation hardenable 17-4 PH stainless steel and austenitic 321, 316LN stainless steel, which were made and supplied for applications to Indian nuclear industry. The expertise developed in processing the steels in terms of melting, heat treatment and their relationship to structural features and mechanical properties would be highlighted. (author)

  4. Chemical and microstructural diversity of steel grades

    Zorc, B.

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper is to show, using theoretical and practical analyses, chemical and microstructural differences among individual types of steel grades 355 found in the market. The mechanical properties required for these steels are achieved by alloying or thermomechanical treatment. It was found that the individual types of this steel are poorly weldable, particularly those of large thickness.

    El objetivo del artículo es presentar, en base a un análisis teórico y práctico, las diferencias químicas y microestructurales entre los diferentes tipos de aceros calidad 355 que pueden encontrarse en el mercado. Las características mecánicas requeridas en estos aceros se consiguen con aleaciones, o bien a través de tratamientos termo-mecánicos.Se ha llegado a la conclusión de que determinados tipos de acero son más difíciles de soldar, en especial cuando se trata de espesores grandes.

  5. Hydrometallurgical process for zinc recovery from electric arc furnace dust (EAFD)

    Oustadakis, P.; Tsakiridis, P.E.; Katsiapi, A.; Agatzini-Leonardou, S.

    2010-01-01

    The present paper is the first of a series of two articles dealing with the development of an integrated process for the recovery of zinc from electric arc furnace dust (EAFD), a hazardous industrial waste generated in the collection of particulate material during steelmaking process via electric arc furnace. Part I presents the EAFD characterization and its leaching process by diluted sulphuric acid, whereas Part II deals with the purification of the leach liquor and the recovery of zinc by solvent extraction/electrowinning. The characterization of the examined electric arc furnace dust was carried out by using granulometry analysis, chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric/differential thermal analysis (TG/DTA) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The leaching process was based on the Zn extraction with diluted sulphuric acid from EAFD under atmospheric conditions and without using any preliminary treatment. Statistical design and analysis of experiments were used, in order to determine the main effects and interactions of the leaching process factors, which were: acid normality, temperature and solid to liquid ratio. The zinc recovery efficiency on the basis of EAFD weight reached 80%. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy were used for the characterization of the leached residues.

  6. Semisolid forming of S48C steel grade

    Plata, Gorka; Lozares, Jokin; Azpilgain, Zigor; Hurtado, Iñaki; Loizaga, Iñigo; Idoyaga, Zuriñe

    2017-10-01

    Steel production and component manufacturing industries have to face the challenge of globalization, trying to overcome the economic pressure to remain competitive. Moreover, the lightweighting trend of the latter years implies an even higher challenge to maintain the steel use. Therefore, advanced manufacturing processes will be the cornerstone. In this field, Semisolid forming (SSF) has demonstrated the capability of obtaining complex geometries and saving raw material and energy. Despite it is complicated the SSF of sound components, in Mondragon Unibertsitatea it has been successfully demonstrated the capability of producing strong enough automotive components with 42CrMo4 steel grade. In this work, we demonstrate the capability of SSF S48C steel grade with great mechanical properties.

  7. Heat treatments in a conventional steel to reproduce the microstructure of a nuclear grade steel

    Rosalio G, M.

    2014-01-01

    The ferritic steels used in the manufacture of pressurized vessels of Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) suffer degradation in their mechanical properties due to damage caused by the neutron fluxes of high energy bigger to a Mega electron volt (E> 1 MeV) generated in the reactor core. The materials with which the pressurized vessels of nuclear reactors cooled by light water are built correspond to low alloy ferritic steels. The effect of neutron irradiation on these steels is manifested as an increase in hardness, mechanical strength, with the consequent decrease in ductility, fracture toughness and an increase in temperature of ductile-brittle transition. The life of a BWR is 40 years, its design must be considered sufficient margin of safety because pressure forces experienced during operation, maintenance and testing of postulated accident conditions. It is necessary that under these conditions the vessel to behave ductile and likely to propagate a fracture is minimized. The vessels of light water nuclear reactors have a bainite microstructure. Specifically, the reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde (Veracruz, Mexico) are made of a steel Astm A-533, Grade B Class 1. At present they are carrying out some welding tests for the construction of a model of a BWR, however, to use nuclear grade steel such as Astm A-533 to carry out some of the welding tests, is very expensive; perform these in a conventional material provides basic information. Although the microstructure present in the conventional material does not correspond exactly to the degree of nuclear material, it can take of reference. Therefore, it is proposed to conduct a pilot study to establish the thermal treatment that reproduces the microstructure of nuclear grade steel, in conventional steel. The resulting properties of the conventional steel samples will be compared to a JRQ steel, that is a steel Astm A-533, Grade B Class 1, provided by IAEA. (Author)

  8. Evaluation of the creep cavitation behavior in Grade 91 steels

    Siefert, J.A.; Parker, J.D.

    2016-01-01

    Even in properly processed Grade 91 steel, the long term performance and creep rupture strength of base metal is below that predicted from a simple extrapolation of short term data. One of the mechanisms responsible for this reduction in strength is the development of creep voids. Importantly, nucleation, growth and inter linkage of voids under long term creep conditions also results in a significant loss of creep ductility. Thus, elongations to rupture of around 5% in 100,000 h are now considered normal for creep tests on many tempered martensitic steels. Similarly, creep damage development in the heat affected zones of welds results in low ductility cracking at times below the minimum expected life of base metal. In all cases, the relatively brittle behavior is directly a consequence of creep void development. Indeed, the results of component root cause analysis have shown that crack development in Grade 91 steel in-service components is also a result of the formation of creep voids. The present paper examines background on the nucleation and development of creep voids in 9%Cr type martensitic steels, presents information regarding methods which allow proper characterization of the creep voids and discusses factors affecting creep fracture behavior in tempered martensitic steels. It is apparent that the maximum zone of cavitation observed in Grade 91 steel welds occurred in a region in the heat affected zone which is ∼750 μm in width. This region corresponds to the band where the peak temperature during welding is in the range of ∼1150–920 °C.The cavity density in this band was over about 700 voids/mm"2 at an estimated creep life fraction of ∼99%. - Highlights: • The present paper examines background on the nucleation and development of creep voids in 9%Cr type martensitic steels. • Information regarding methods which allow proper characterization of the creep voids is also presented. • Factors affecting creep fracture behavior in tempered

  9. Creep rupture behavior of welded Grade 91 steel

    Shrestha, Triratna [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Basirat, Mehdi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Alsagabi, Sultan; Sittiho, Anumat [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Charit, Indrajit, E-mail: icharit@uidaho.edu [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States); Potirniche, Gabriel P. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Idaho, Moscow, ID 83844 (United States)

    2016-07-04

    Creep rupture behavior of fusion welded Grade 91 steel was studied in the temperature range of 600 – 700 °C and at stresses of 50–200 MPa. The creep data were analyzed in terms of the Monkman-Grant relation and Larson-Miller parameter. The creep damage tolerance factor was used to identify the origin of creep damage. The creep damage was identified as the void growth in combination with microstructural degradation. The fracture surface morphology of the ruptured specimens was studied by scanning electron microscopy and deformed microstructure examined by transmission electron microscopy, to further elucidate the rupture mechanisms.

  10. Tribological performances of new steel grades for hot stamping tools

    Medea, F.; Venturato, G.; Ghiotti, A.; Bruschi, S.

    2017-09-01

    In the last years, the use of High Strength Steels (HSS) as structural parts in car body-in-white manufacturing has rapidly increased thanks to their favourable strength-to-weight ratio and stiffness, which allow a reduction of the fuel consumption to accommodate the new restricted regulations for CO2 emissions control. The survey of the technical and scientific literature shows a large interest in the development of different coatings for the blanks from the traditional Al-Si up to new Zn-based coatings and on the analysis of hard PVD, CVD coatings and plasma nitriding applied on the tools. By contrast, fewer investigations have been focused on the development and test of new tools steels grades capable to improve the wear resistance and the thermal properties that are required for the in-die quenching during forming. On this base, the paper deals with the analysis and comparison the tribological performances in terms of wear, friction and heat transfer of new tool steel grades for high-temperature applications, characterized by a higher thermal conductivity than the commonly used tools. Testing equipment, procedures as well as measurements analyses to evaluate the friction coefficient, the wear and heat transfer phenomena are presented. Emphasis is given on the physical simulation techniques that were specifically developed to reproduce the thermal and mechanical cycles on the metal sheets and dies as in the industrial practice. The reference industrial process is the direct hot stamping of the 22MnB5 HSS coated with the common Al-Si coating for automotive applications.

  11. Application of ANFIS for analytical modeling of tensile strength of functionally graded steels

    Ali Nazari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the tensile strength of ferritic and austenitic functionally graded steels produced by electroslag remelting has been modeled. To produce functionally graded steels, two slices of plain carbon steel and austenitic stainless steels were spot welded and used as electroslag remelting electrode. Functionally graded steel containing graded layers of ferrite and austenite may be fabricated via diffusion of alloying elements during remelting stage. Vickers microhardness profile of the specimen has been obtained experimentally and modeled with adaptive network-based fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS. To build the model for graded ferritic and austenitic steels, training, testing and validation using respectively 174 and 120 experimental data were conducted. According to the input parameters, in the ANFIS model, the Vickers microhardness of each layer was predicted. A good fit equation which correlates the Vickers microhardness of each layer to its corresponding chemical composition was achieved by the optimized network for both ferritic and austenitic graded steels. Afterwards; the Vickers microhardness of each layer in functionally graded steels was related to the yield stress of the corresponding layer and by assuming Holloman relation for stress-strain curve of each layer, they were acquired. Finally, by applying the rule of mixtures, tensile strength of functionally graded steels configuration was found through a numerical method. The obtained results from the proposed model are in good agreement with those acquired from the experiments.

  12. A two-stage metal valorisation process from electric arc furnace dust (EAFD

    H. Issa

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates possibility of separate zinc and lead recovery from coal composite pellets, composed of EAFD with other synergetic iron-bearing wastes and by-products (mill scale, pyrite-cinder, magnetite concentrate, through a two-stage process. The results show that in the first, low temp erature stage performed in electro-resistant furnace, removal of lead is enabled due to presence of chlorides in the system. In the second stage, performed at higher temperatures in Direct Current (DC plasma furnace, valorisation of zinc is conducted. Using this process, several final products were obtained, including a higher purity zinc oxide, which, by its properties, corresponds washed Waelz oxide.

  13. Hall–Petch and dislocation strengthening in graded nanostructured steel

    Zhang, Xiaodan; Hansen, Niels; Gao, Yukui

    2012-01-01

    The structure and strength of low carbon steel samples have been analyzed after plastic deformation by shot-peening and cold-rolling. The fine scale surface microstructure caused by shot-peening extends to ∼50 μm below the surface. The structure is graded and subdivided by dislocation boundaries...... and high angle boundaries showing a clear resemblance to the lamellar structure, which evolves during conventional rolling of bulk metallic materials from medium to high strain. As the surface is approached, the boundary spacing decreases to ∼50 nm at the surface. In parallel, the misorientation angle...... is the average spacing between the low and high angle boundaries which subdivide the microstructure, σ0 is the friction stress and k2 is a number which is expressed in terms of structural parameters which have been determined by electron backscattered diffraction. It is found that calculated k2 values...

  14. Ductility in hot isostatically pressed 250-grade maraging steel

    German, R.M.; Smugeresky, J.E.

    1978-01-01

    Prealloyed 250-grade maraging steel powder produced by the rotating electrode process was fully consolidated by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) at 1100 and 1200 0 C. The strength following aging (3 h at 480 0 C) equalled that of wrought material; however, ductility was negligible. This lack of ductility in the powder metallurgy product was traced to titanium segregation which occurred at the powder surface during power production. The formation of a titanium intermetallic at the prior particle boundaries during aging caused failure at low plastic strains. Altered aging treatments successfully broke up the embrittling film and resulted in a significant ductility recovery for the HIP material. Analysis of the fracture process indicates that further ductility gains are possible by reducing the titanium content, refining the particle size, and optimizing the thermal cycles

  15. Stress corrosion cracking of A515 grade 60 carbon steel

    Moore, E.L.

    1971-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to evaluate the effect of welding method plate thickness, and subsequent stress relief treatment on the stress corrosion cracking propensity of ASTM A515 Grade 60 carbon steel plate exposed to a 5 M NaNO 3 solution at 190 0 F for eight weeks. It was found that all weld coupons receiving no thermal stress relief treatment cracked within eight weeks; all weld coupons given a vibratory stress relief cracked within eight weeks; two of the eight weld coupons stress relieved at 600 0 F for one hour cracked within eight weeks; none of the weld coupons stress relieved at 1100 0 F for one hour cracked within eight weeks; and that cracking was generally more severe in coupons fabricated from 7/8 inch plate by shielded metal arc welding than it was in coupons fabricated by other welding methods. (U.S.)

  16. Hall–Petch and dislocation strengthening in graded nanostructured steel

    Zhang Xiaodan; Hansen, Niels; Gao Yukui; Huang Xiaoxu

    2012-01-01

    The structure and strength of low carbon steel samples have been analyzed after plastic deformation by shot-peening and cold-rolling. The fine scale surface microstructure caused by shot-peening extends to ∼50 μm below the surface. The structure is graded and subdivided by dislocation boundaries and high angle boundaries showing a clear resemblance to the lamellar structure, which evolves during conventional rolling of bulk metallic materials from medium to high strain. As the surface is approached, the boundary spacing decreases to ∼50 nm at the surface. In parallel, the misorientation angle across boundaries increases to ∼65% of high angle boundaries. The cold-rolled steel shows a low hardening rate at high strain and by assuming additive strength contributions from Hall–Petch and dislocation strengthening, the flow stress has been expressed by the relationship σ-σ 0 =k 2 D av -0.5 , where D av is the average spacing between the low and high angle boundaries which subdivide the microstructure, σ 0 is the friction stress and k 2 is a number which is expressed in terms of structural parameters which have been determined by electron backscattered diffraction. It is found that calculated k 2 values are in accord with an experimental value of 310 MPa μm 0.5 . In the shot-peened steel the increase in D av with increasing distance from the surface is transformed into a stress profile based on the σ - D av relationship established for cold-rolled bulk samples. The calculated stress profile is validated by comparison with the experimental profile based on hardness measurements, and good agreement is found. This result points to a wider application of the suggested method to derive the local flow stress in a deformed microstructure based on a measurement of the local boundary spacing and the stress–structure relationship for the bulk material in the deformed state.

  17. In-service behavior of creep strength enhanced ferritic steels Grade 91 and Grade 92 – Part 1 parent metal

    Parker, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    In creep strength enhanced ferritic steels, such as Grade 91 and Grade 92, control of both composition and heat treatment of the parent steel is necessary to avoid producing components which have creep strength below the minimum expected by applicable ASME and other International Codes. These efforts are required to ensure that the steel develops a homogeneous fully tempered martensitic microstructure, with the appropriate distribution of precipitates and the required dislocation substructure. In-service creep related problems with Grade 91 steel have been reported associated with factors such as incorrect microstructure and heat treatment, welded connections in headers and piping, dissimilar metal welds as well as the manufacture and performance of castings. Difficulties associated with remediation of in-service damage include challenges over detection and removal of damaged material as well as the selection and qualification of appropriate methodologies for repair. Since repeated heat treatment leads to continued tempering, and a potential degradation of properties, specific procedures for performing and then lifing repair welds are a key aspect of Asset Management. This paper presents a summary of in-service experience with Grade 91 steel and outlines approaches for repair welding. Highlights: ► The steel alloy known as Grade 91 is widely used to fabricate critical pressure part components. ► Designers favor Grade 91 because it provides superior elevated temperature strength at substantially lower cost than the austenitic stainless steels. ► Service experience has confirmed that early failures can occur. ► Life management solutions involved attention to detail at Purchase, during design and all stages of fabrication.

  18. Acoustic emission during tensile deformation of M250 grade maraging steel

    Mukhopadhyay, Chandan Kumar; Rajkumar, Kesavan Vadivelu; Chandra Rao, Bhaghi Purna; Jayakumar, Tamanna

    2012-05-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) generated during room temperature tensile deformation of varyingly heat treated (solution annealed and thermally aged) M250 grade maraging steel specimens have been studied. Deformation of microstructure corresponding to different heat treated conditions in this steel could be distinctly characterized using the AE parameters such as RMS voltage, counts and peak amplitude of AE hits (events).

  19. Mechanical characteristics of welded joints between different stainless steels grades

    Topolska, S.; Łabanowski, J.

    2017-08-01

    Investigation of mechanical characteristics of welded joints is one of the most important tasks that allow determining their functional properties. Due to the very high, still rising, cost of some stainless steels it is justified, on economic grounds, welding austenitic stainless steel with steels that are corrosion-resistant like duplex ones. According to forecasts the price of corrosion resistant steels stil can increase by 26 ÷ 30%. For technical reasons welded joints require appropriate mechanical properties such as: tensile strength, bending, ductility, toughness, and resistance to aggressive media. Such joints are applied in the construction of chemical tankers, apparatus and chemical plants and power steam stations. Using the proper binder makes possible the welds directly between the elements of austenitic stainless steels and duplex ones. It causes that such joits behave satisfactorily in service in such areas like maritime constructions and steam and chemical plants. These steels have high mechanical properties such as: the yield strength, the tensile strength and the ductility as well as the resistance to general corrosion media. They are resistant to both pitting and stress corrosions. The relatively low cost of production of duplex steels, in comparison with standard austenitic steels, is inter alia, the result of a reduced amount of scarce and expensive Nickel, which is seen as a further advantage of these steels.

  20. Effect of Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Hardness of Grade 91 Steel

    Triratna Shrestha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Grade 91 steel (modified 9Cr-1Mo steel is considered a prospective material for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant for application in reactor pressure vessels at temperatures of up to 650 °C. In this study, heat treatment of Grade 91 steel was performed by normalizing and tempering the steel at various temperatures for different periods of time. Optical microscopy, scanning and transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with microhardness profiles and calorimetric plots were used to understand the microstructural evolution including precipitate structures and were correlated with mechanical behavior of the steel. Thermo-Calc™ calculations were used to support the experimental work. Furthermore, carbon isopleth and temperature dependencies of the volume fraction of different precipitates were constructed.

  1. Transformation kinetics of selected steel grades after plastic deformation

    R. Kawulok

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article was to assess the impact of previous plastic deformation on the kinetics of transformations of four selected steels. The research was conducted with use of the universal plastometer GLEEBLE 3800, when Continuous Cooling Transformation (CCT and Deformation Continuous Cooling Transformation (DCCT diagrams of selected steels were constructed on the basis of dilatometric tests. The research confirmed that the strain accelerates the particularly the transformations controlled by diffusion. Bainitic transformation was accelerated in three of the four steels. In the case of martensitic transformation the effect of the previous deformation was relatively small, but with clearly discernible trend.

  2. Assessment of long-term creep strength of grade 91 steel

    Kimura, Kazuhiro; Sawada, Kota; Kushima, Hideaki [National Inst. for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    In 2004 and 2005 long-term creep rupture strength of ASME Grade 91 type steels of plate, pipe, forging and tube materials was evaluated in Japan by means of region splitting analysis method in consideration of 50% of 0.2% offset yield stress. According to the evaluated 100,000h creep rupture strength of 94MPa for plate, pipe and forging steels and 92MPa for tube steel at 600 C, allowable tensile stress of the steels regulated in the Interpretation for the Technical Standard for Thermal Power Plant was slightly reduced. New creep rupture data of the steels obtained in the long-term indicate further reduction of long-term creep rupture strength. Not only creep rupture strength, but also creep deformation property of the ASME Grade 91 steel was investigated and need of reevaluation of long-term creep strength of Grade 91 steel was indicated. A refinement of region splitting analysis method for creep rupture like prediction was discussed. (orig.)

  3. Improving production technology of tube steel grades in converter process

    P. V. Kovalev

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nature of formation and evolution special features of nonmetallic inclusions during ladle refining of converter HSLA steels for pipelines have been studied. Nonmetallic inclusions of the CaO-2O3-MgO system, close to calcium monoaluminate CaO∙Al2O3 with up to 5-6% of MgO, have been found as favorable from morphology point of view. These small inclusions nucleate on endogenous MgO substrates at sufficient high content of calcium in steel melt. Hot rolled plates can be rejected due to the coarse calcium bi- and hexa-aluminate inclusions (CaO∙22O3 and CaO∙62O3, usually containing exogenous MgO. These coarse inclusions form under calcium deficiency conditions, especially in the case of longtime steel holding in a ladle.

  4. Gas metal arc weldability of 1.5 GPa grade martensitic steels

    Hwang, Insung; Yun, Hyeonsang; Kim, Dongcheol; Kang, Munjin; Kim, Young-Min

    2018-01-01

    The gas metal arc weldability of 1.5 GPa grade martensitic (MART) steel was evaluated using both inverter direct current (DC) and DC pulse power type welders, under conditions of different welding currents, welding speeds, and shielding gasses. By investigating the bead appearance, tensile strength, and arc stability, it was determined that DC pulse power is better than inverter DC power for arc welding of 1.3 mm thick 1.5 GPa grade MART steel. Further, from the results of the weldability for various shielding gases, it was determined that mixed shielding gas is more effective for welding 1.5 GPa grade MART steel than is pure inert gas (Ar) or active (CO2) gas. In the case of pure shielding gas, no sound bead was formed under any conditions. However, when the mixed shielding gas was used, sound and fine beads were obtained.

  5. Hydrogen induced cold cracking studies on armour grade high strength, quenched and tempered steel weldments

    Magudeeswaran, G.; Balasubramanian, V. [Centre for Materials Joining Research (CEMAJOR), Department of Manufacturing Engineering, Annamalai University, Annamalai Nagar 608 002, Tamil Nadu (India); Madhusudhan Reddy, G. [Metal Joining Section, Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory (DMRL), Kanchanbagh (P.O.) Hyderabad 560 058 Andhra Pradesh (India)

    2008-04-15

    Quenched and tempered (Q and T) steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) in the heat affected zone after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS) consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q and T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic (LHF) steel consumables can be used to weld Q and T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. In this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on hydrogen induced cold cracking of armour grade Q and T steel welds by implant testing. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW) and flux cored arc welding (FCAW) processes were used for making welds using ASS and LHF welding consumables. ASS welds made using FCAW process offered a higher resistance to HIC than all other welds considered in this investigation. (author)

  6. Preventing the embrittling by hydrogen when galvanizing high-grade steel

    Paatsch, W.

    1987-09-01

    Galvanic precipitation of a double layer consisting of a dull nickel layer overlaid with a brilliant zinc layer on low-alloyed high-strength steel grades leads to the forming of zinc-nickel alloy layers during the subsequent heat treatment. According to traction tests carried out on high-strength steel grades, as well as to hydrogen permeability tests, this process prevents embrittling by hydrogen which might be caused by galvanic process sequences - and creates a diffusion block at the same time. The alloy layers have an excellent corrosion resistance and temperature stability.

  7. Selective surface oxidation and segregation upon short term annealing of model alloys and industrial steel grades

    Swaminathan, S.

    2007-07-01

    Segregation and selective oxidation phenomena of minor alloying elements during annealing of steel sheets lead to the formation of bare spots after hot-dip galvanizing. This thesis highlights the influence of annealing conditions and the effect of alloying elements on the selective oxidation in model alloys and some industrial steel grades. Model alloys of binary (Fe-2Si, Fe-2Mn, Fe-0.8Cr), ternary (Fe-2Mn-2Si, Fe-2Mn-0.8Cr, Fe-1Mn-0.8Cr, Fe-1Si-0.8Cr, Fe-2Si-0.8Cr) and quarternary (Fe-2Mn-2Si-0.8Cr) systems were studied. In the case of steels, standard grade interstitial free (IF) steels and experimental grade tensile strength 1000 MPa steel were investigated. All specimens were annealed at 820 C in N{sub 2}-5%H{sub 2} gas atmospheres with the wide range of dew points (i.e. -80 to 0 C). The surface chemistry after annealing and its wettability with liquid Zn have been correlated as a function of dew points by simulating the hot-dip galvanizing process at laboratory scale. (orig.)

  8. Study on the dynamic recrystallization model and mechanism of nuclear grade 316LN austenitic stainless steel

    Wang, Shenglong; Zhang, Mingxian; Wu, Huanchun; Yang, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the dynamic recrystallization behaviors of a nuclear grade 316LN austenitic stainless steel were researched through hot compression experiment performed on a Gleeble-1500 simulator at temperatures of 900–1250 °C and strain rates of 0.01–1 s −1 . By multiple linear regressions of the flow stress-strain data, the dynamic recrystallization mathematical models of this steel as functions of strain rate, strain and temperature were developed. Then these models were verified in a real experiment. Furthermore, the dynamic recrystallization mechanism of the steel was determined. The results indicated that the subgrains in this steel are formed through dislocations polygonization and then grow up through subgrain boundaries migration towards high density dislocation areas and subgrain coalescence mechanism. Dynamic recrystallization nucleation performs in grain boundary bulging mechanism and subgrain growth mechanism. The nuclei grow up through high angle grain boundaries migration. - Highlights: •Establish the DRX mathematical models of nuclear grade 316LN stainless steel •Determine the DRX mechanism of this steel •Subgrains are formed through dislocations polygonization. •Subgrains grow up through subgrain boundaries migration and coalescence mechanism. •DRX nucleation performs in grain boundary bulging mechanism and subgrain growth mechanism.

  9. Stress corrosion cracking of L-grade stainless steels in boiling water reactor (BWR) plants

    Suzuki, Shunichi; Fukuda, Toshihiko; Yamashita, Hironobu

    2004-01-01

    L-grade stainless steels as 316NG, SUS316L and SUS304L have been used for the BWR reactor internals and re-circulation pipes as SCC resistant materials. However, SCC of the L-grade material components were reported recently in many Japanese BWR plants. The detail investigation of the components showed the fabrication process such as welding, machining and surface finishing strongly affected SCC occurrence. In this paper, research results of SCC of L-grade stainless steels, metallurgical investigation of core shrouds and re-circulation pipings, and features of SCC morphology were introduced. Besides, the structural integrity of components with SCC, countermeasures for SCC and future R and D planning were introduced. (author)

  10. Ductile Tearing Resistance Indexing of Automotive Grade DP 590 Steel Sheets: EWF Testing Using DENT Specimens

    Sahoo, Subhadra; Padmapriya, N.; De, Partha Sarathi; Chakraborti, P. C.; Ray, S. K.

    2018-03-01

    The essential work of fracture (EWF) method has been explored for indexing the ductile tearing resistance of DP 590 automotive grade dual-phase steel sheet both in longitudinal (L-T) and transverse (T-L) orientations. The simplest possible test and analysis procedures have been adopted. The EWF method is found to be eminently suitable for routine quality control and product development purposes for such materials. Areas for further research for improving the experimental strategy are highlighted. For the investigated steel sheet, the estimated tearing resistance is found to be distinctly higher for the L-T orientation compared to the T-L orientation; the reason thereof merits further investigation.

  11. Behavior of Low Grade Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Made with Fresh and Recycled Brick Aggregates

    Md. Shariful Islam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, recycled aggregates from construction and demolition waste (CDW have been widely accepted in construction sectors as the replacement of coarse aggregate in order to minimize the excessive use of natural resources. In this paper, an experimental investigation is carried out to observe the influence of low grade steel fiber reinforcements on the stress-strain behavior of concrete made with recycled and fresh brick aggregates. In addition, compressive strength by destructive and nondestructive tests, splitting tensile strength, and Young’s modulus are determined. Hooked end steel wires with 50 mm of length and an aspect ratio of 55.6 are used as fiber reinforcements in a volume fraction of 0% (control case, 0.50%, and 1.00% in concrete mixes. The same gradation of aggregates and water-cement ratio (w/c=0.44 were used to assess the effect of steel fiber in all these concrete mixes. All tests were conducted at 7, 14, and 28 days to perceive the effect of age on different mechanical properties. The experimental results show that around 10%~15% and 40%~60% increase in 28 days compressive strength and tensile strength of steel fiber reinforced concrete, respectively, compared to those of the control case. It is observed that the effect of addition of 1% fiber on the concrete compressive strength is little compared to that of 0.5% steel fiber addition. On the other hand, strain of concrete at failure of steel fiber reinforced concrete has increased almost twice compared to the control case. A simple analytical model is also proposed to generate the ascending portions of the stress-strain curve of concrete. There exists a good correlation between the experimental results and the analytical model. A relatively ductile failure is observed for the concrete made with low grade steel fibers.

  12. Texture evolution of experimental silicon steel grades. Part I: Hot rolling

    Sandoval Robles, J.A., E-mail: jsandoval.uanl@yahoo.com [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Ave. Universidad S/N, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66450 (Mexico); Salas Zamarripa, A.; Guerrero Mata, M.P. [Universidad Autónoma de Nuevo León, Facultad de Ingeniería Mecánica y Eléctrica, Ave. Universidad S/N, Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolás de los Garza, Nuevo León C.P. 66450 (Mexico); Cabrera, J. [Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, Departament de Ciència dels Materials I Enginyeria Metal-lúrgica, Av. Diagonal 647, Barcelona 08028 (Spain)

    2017-05-01

    The metallurgical understanding of the deformation processes during the fabrication of non-oriented electrical steels plays a key role in improving their final properties. Texture control and optimization is critical in these steels for the enhancement of their magnetic properties. The aim of the present work is to study the texture evolution of six non-oriented experimental silicon steel grades during hot rolling. These steels were low carbon steel with a silicon content from 0.5 to 3.0 wt%. The first rolling schedule was performed in the austenitic (γ-Fe) region for the steel with a 0.5 wt% of silicon content, while the 1.0 wt% silicon steel was rolled in the two-phase (α+γ) region. Steels with higher silicon content were rolled in the ferritic (α-Fe) region. The second rolling schedule was performed in the α-Fe region. Samples of each stage were analyzed by means of Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD). Findings showed that the texture was random and heterogeneous in all samples after 60% of rolling reduction, which is due to the low deformation applied during rolling. After the second rolling program, localized deformation and substructured grains near to surface were observed in all samples. The Goss {110}<001>texture-component was found in the 0.5 and 1.0 wt.-%silicon steels. This is due to the thermomechanical conditions and the corresponding hot band microstructure obtained after the first program. Moreover, the α<110>//RD and the γ <111>//ND fiber components of the texture presented a considerable increment as the silicon content increases. Future research to be published soon will be related to the texture evolution during the cold-work rolling process. - Highlights: • We analyze six silicon steel experimental grades alloys trough the rolling process. • Material was subjected to a hot deformation process in the α-γ region. • No recrystalization was observed during-after the rolling schedules. • Rise of the magnetic texture components

  13. High temperature deformation behavior, thermal stability and irradiation performance in Grade 92 steel

    Alsagabi, Sultan

    The 9Cr-2W ferritic-martensitic steel (i.e. Grade 92 steel) possesses excellent mechanical and thermophysical properties; therefore, it has been considered to suit more challenging applications where high temperature strength and creep-rupture properties are required. The high temperature deformation mechanism was investigated through a set of tensile testing at elevated temperatures. Hence, the threshold stress concept was applied to elucidate the operating high temperature deformation mechanism. It was identified as the high temperature climb of edge dislocations due to the particle-dislocation interactions and the appropriate constitutive equation was developed. In addition, the microstructural evolution at room and elevated temperatures was investigated. For instance, the microstructural evolution under loading was more pronounced and carbide precipitation showed more coarsening tendency. The growth of these carbide precipitates, by removing W and Mo from matrix, significantly deteriorates the solid solution strengthening. The MX type carbonitrides exhibited better coarsening resistance. To better understand the thermal microstructural stability, long tempering schedules up to 1000 hours was conducted at 560, 660 and 760°C after normalizing the steel. Still, the coarsening rate of M23C 6 carbides was higher than the MX-type particles. Moreover, the Laves phase particles were detected after tempering the steel for long periods before they dissolve back into the matrix at high temperature (i.e. 720°C). The influence of the tempering temperature and time was studied for Grade 92 steel via Hollomon-Jaffe parameter. Finally, the irradiation performance of Grade 92 steel was evaluated to examine the feasibility of its eventual reactor use. To that end, Grade 92 steel was irradiated with iron (Fe2+) ions to 10, 50 and 100 dpa at 30 and 500°C. Overall, the irradiated samples showed some irradiation-induced hardening which was more noticeable at 30°C. Additionally

  14. Weldability and microstructural analysis of nuclear-grade austenitic stainless steels

    Lee, C.H.

    1988-01-01

    This study evaluated the hot-ductility response, and hot-cracking susceptibility (fusion-zone solidification cracking and HAZ liquation cracking) of modified nuclear-grade and standard austenitic stainless steels. Extensive microstructural characterization using state-of-the-art analytical electron microscopy (TEM and STEM) as well as SEM (EDAX) and OLM was performed to correlate the material behavior with metallurgical characteristics. In addition, studies of the effect of Si, N, and rare earth elements on hot-cracking susceptibility, significance of the ductility dip phenomena and backfilled solidification cracks were also performed. Furthermore, based on the metallurgical evaluation, the possible mechanisms involved in solidification cracking and HAZ liquation cracking of the modified alloys are proposed. Finally, the optimized chemical specifications and requirements for nuclear-grade stainless steels are also suggested

  15. Project of neural network for steel grade selection with the assumed CCT diagram

    S. Malara; L.A. Dobrzański; J. Trzaska

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper was developing a project of neural network for selection of steel grade with the specified CCT diagram – structure and of harness after heat treatment.Design/methodology/approach: The goal has been achieved in the following stages: at the first stage characteristic points of CCT diagram have been determined. At the second stage neural network has been developed and optimized.Findings: The neural network was developed in this paper, that allowed selection of stee...

  16. Characterization of Aging Behavior in M250 Grade Maraging Steel Using Ultrasonic Measurements

    Rajkumar, K. V.; Kumar, Anish; Jayakumar, T.; Raj, Baldev; Ray, K. K.

    2007-02-01

    Ultrasonic measurements have been carried out in M250 grade maraging steel specimens subjected to solution annealing at 1093 K for 1 hour followed by aging at 755 K for various durations in the range of 0.25 to 100 hours. The influence of aging on microstructure, room temperature hardness, and ultrasonic parameters (longitudinal and shear wave velocities and Poisson’s ratio) has been studied in order to derive correlations among these parameters in aged M250 maraging steel. Both hardness and ultrasonic velocities exhibit almost similar behaviors with aging time. They increase with the precipitation of intermetallic phases, Ni3Ti and Fe2Mo, and decrease with the reversion of martensite to austenite. Ultrasonic shear wave velocity is found to be more influenced by the precipitation of intermetallic phases, whereas longitudinal wave velocity is influenced more by the reversion of martensite to austenite. Unlike hardness and ultrasonic velocities, the Poisson’s ratio exhibits a monotonous decrease with aging time and, hence, can be used for unambiguous monitoring of the aging process in M250 maraging steel. Further, none of the parameters, i.e., hardness, ultrasonic velocity, or Poisson’s ratio, alone could identify the initiation of the reversion of austenite at early stage; however, the same could be identified from the correlation between ultrasonic velocity and Poisson’s ratio, indicating the advantage of using the multiparametric approach for comprehensive characterization of complex aging behavior in M250 grade maraging steel.

  17. Optimization of BI test parameters to investigate mechanical properties of Grade 92 steel

    Barbadikar, Dipika R.; Vincent, S.; Ballal, Atul R.; Peshwe, Dilip R.; Mathew, M. D.

    2018-04-01

    The ball indentation (BI) testing is used to evaluate the tensile properties of materials namely yield strength, strength coefficient, ultimate tensile strength, and strain hardening exponent. The properties evaluated depend on a number of BI test parameters. These parameters include the material constants like yield slope (YS), constraint factor (CF), yield offset parameter (YOP). Number of loading/unloading cycles, preload, indenter size and depth of penetration of indenter also affects the properties. In present investigation the effect of these parameters on the stress-strain curve of normalized and tempered Grade 92 steel is evaluated. Grade 92 is a candidate material for power plant application over austenitic stainless steel and derives its strength from M23C6, MX precipitates and high dislocation density. CF, YS and YOP changed the strength properties considerably. Indenter size effect resulted in higher strength for smaller indenter. It is suggested to use larger indenter diameter and higher number of loading cycles for GRADE 92 steel to get best results using BI technique.

  18. Effect of welding processes and consumables on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade quenched and tempered steel joints

    G. Magudeeswaran

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Quenched and Tempered (Q&T steels are widely used in the construction of military vehicles due to its high strength to weight ratio and high hardness. These steels are prone to hydrogen induced cracking (HIC in the heat affected zone (HAZ after welding. The use of austenitic stainless steel (ASS consumables to weld the above steel was the only available remedy because of higher solubility for hydrogen in austenitic phase. The use of stainless steel consumables for a non-stainless steel base metal is not economical. Hence, alternate consumables for welding Q&T steels and their vulnerability to HIC need to be explored. Recent studies proved that low hydrogen ferritic steel (LHF consumables can be used to weld Q&T steels, which can give very low hydrogen levels in the weld deposits. The use of ASS and LHF consumables will lead to distinct microstructures in their respective welds. This microstructural heterogeneity will have a drastic influence in the fatigue crack growth resistance of armour grade Q&T steel welds. Hence, in this investigation an attempt has been made to study the influence of welding consumables and welding processes on fatigue crack growth behaviour of armour grade Q&T Steel joints. Shielded metal arc welding (SMAW and Flux cored arc welding (FCAW were used for fabrication of joints using ASS and LHF consumables. The joints fabricated by SMAW process using LHF consumable exhibited superior fatigue crack growth resistance than all other joints.

  19. Effects of aggregate grading on the properties of steel fibre-reinforced concrete

    Acikgens Ulas, M.; Alyamac, K. E.; Ulucan, Z. C.

    2017-09-01

    This study investigates the effects of changing the aggregate grading and maximum aggregate size (D max ) on the workability and mechanical properties of steel fibre-reinforced concrete (SFRC). Four different gradations and two different D max were used to produce SFRC mixtures with constant cement dosages and water/cement ratios. Twelve different concrete series were tested. To observe the properties of fresh concrete, slump and Ve-Be tests were performed immediately after the mixing process to investigate the effects of time on workability. The hardened properties, such as the compressive, splitting tensile and flexural strengths, were also evaluated. In addition, the toughness of the SFRC was calculated. Based on our test results, we can conclude that the grading of the aggregate and the D max have remarkable effects on the properties of fresh and hardened SFRC. In addition, the toughness of the SFRC was influenced by changing the grading of the aggregate and the D max .

  20. Microstructural Evolution and Constitutive Relationship of M350 Grade Maraging Steel During Hot Deformation

    Chakravarthi, K. V. A.; Koundinya, N. T. B. N.; Narayana Murty, S. V. S.; Nageswara Rao, B.

    2017-03-01

    Maraging steels exhibit extraordinary strength coupled with toughness and are therefore materials of choice for critical structural applications in defense, aerospace and nuclear engineering. Thermo-mechanical processing is an important step in the manufacture of these structural components. This process assumes significance as these materials are expensive and the mechanical properties obtained depend on the microstructure evolved during thermo-mechanical processing. In the present study, M350 grade maraging steel specimens were hot isothermally compressed in the temperature range of 900-1200 °C and in the strain rate range of 0.001-100 s-1, and true stress-true strain curves were generated. The microstructural evolution as a function of strain rate and temperature in the deformed compression specimens was studied. The effect of friction between sample and compression dies was evaluated, and the same was found to be low. The measured flow stress data was used for the development of a constitutive model to represent the hot deformation behavior of this alloy. The proposed equation can be used as an input in the finite element analysis to obtain the flow stress at any given strain, strain rate, and temperature useful for predicting the flow localization or fracture during thermo-mechanical simulation. The activation energy for hot deformation was calculated and is found to be 370.88 kJ/mol, which is similar to that of M250 grade maraging steel.

  1. Material properties of Grade 91 steel at elevated temperature and their comparison with a design code

    Lee, Hyeong Yeon; Kim, Woo Gon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Han Sang; Kim, Yun Jae [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In this study, the material properties of tensile strength, creep properties, and creep crack growth model for Gr.91 steel at elevated temperature were obtained from material tests at KAERI, and the test data were compared with those of the French elevated temperature design code, RCC-MRx. The conservatism of the material properties in the French design code is highlighted. Mod.9Cr-1Mo (ASME Grade 91; Gr.91) steel is widely adopted as candidate material for Generation IV nuclear systems as well as for advanced thermal plants. In a Gen IV sodium-cooled fast reactor of the PGSFR (Prototype Gen IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor) being developed by KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute), Gr.91 steel is selected as the material for the steam generator, secondary piping, and decay heat exchangers. However, as this material has a relatively shorter history of usage in an actual plant than austenitic stainless steel, there are still many issues to be addressed including the long-term creep rupture life extrapolation and ratcheting behavior with cyclic softening characteristics.

  2. Statistical analysis of fatigue crack growth behavior for grade B cast steel

    Li, W.; Sakai, T.; Li, Q.; Wang, P.

    2011-01-01

    Tests for fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) and crack-tip opening displacement (CTOD) were performed to clarify the fatigue crack growth behavior of a railway grade B cast steel. The threshold values of this steel with specific survival probabilities are evaluated, in which the mean value is 8.3516 MPa m 1/2 , very similar to the experimental value, about 8.7279 MPa m 1/2 . Under the conditions of plane strain and small-scale yielding, the values of fracture toughness for this steel with specific survival probabilities are converted from the corresponding critical CTOD values, in which the mean value is about 138.4256 MPa m 1/2 . In consideration of the inherent variability of crack growth rates, six statistical models are proposed to represent the probabilistic FCGR curves of this steel in entire crack propagation region from the viewpoints of statistical evaluation on the number of cycles at a given crack size and the crack growth rate at a given stress intensity factor range, stochastic characteristic of crack growth as well as statistical analysis of coefficient and exponent in FCGR power law equation. Based on the model adequacy checking, result shows that all models are basically in good agreement with test data. Although the probabilistic damage-tolerant design based on some models may involve a certain amount of risk in stable crack propagation region, they just accord with the fact that the dispersion degree of test data in this region is relatively smaller.

  3. Parametric study of development of Inconel-steel functionally graded materials by laser direct metal deposition

    Shah, Kamran; Haq, Izhar ul; Khan, Ashfaq; Shah, Shaukat Ali; Khan, Mushtaq; Pinkerton, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Functionally graded steel and nickel super-alloy structures have been developed. • Mechanical properties of FGMs can be controlled by process input parameters. • SDAS is strongly dependent on the laser power and powder mass flow rate. • Carbides provide a mechanism to control the hardness and wear resistance of FGM. • Tensile strength of FGM is dependent on the laser power and powder mass flow rate. - Abstract: Laser direct metal deposition (LDMD) has developed from a prototyping to a single and multiple metals manufacturing technique. It offers an opportunity to produce graded components, with differing elemental composition, phase and microstructure at different locations. In this work, continuously graded Stainless Steel 316L and Inconel 718 thin wall structures made by direct laser metal deposition process have been explored. The paper considers the effects of process parameters including laser power levels and powder mass flow rates of SS316L and Inconel 718 during the deposition of the Steel–Ni graded structures. Microstructure characterisation and phase identification are performed by optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Mechanical testing, using methods such as hardness, wear resistance and tensile testing have been carried out on the structures. XRD results show the presence of the NbC and Fe 2 Nb phases formed during the deposition. The effect of experimental parameters on the microstructure and physical properties are determined and discussed. Work shows that mechanical properties can be controlled by input parameters and generation of carbides provides an opportunity to selectively control the hardness and wear resistance of the functionally graded material

  4. Mechanical Characteristics of Submerged Arc Weldment in API Gas Pipeline Steel of Grade X65

    Hashemi, S. H.; Mohammadyani, D.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanical properties of submerged arc weldment (SAW) in gas transportation pipeline steel of grade API X65 (65 ksi yield strength) were investigated. This steel is produced by thermo mechanical control rolled (TMC), and is largely used in Iran gas piping systems and networks. The results from laboratory study on three different regions; i.e. base metal (BM), fusion zone (FZ) and heat affected zone (HAZ) were used to compare weldment mechanical characteristics with those specified by API 5L (revision 2004) standard code. Different laboratory experiments were conducted on test specimens taken from 48 inch outside diameter and 14.3 mm wall thickness gas pipeline. The test results showed a gradient of microstructure and Vickers hardness data from the centerline of FZ towards the unaffected MB. Similarly, lower Charpy absorbed energy (compared to BM) was observed in the FZ impact specimens. Despite this, the API specifications were fulfilled in three tested zones, ensuring pipeline structural integrity under working conditions.

  5. Heat Transfer Analysis of Localized Heat-Treatment for Grade 91 Steel

    Walker, Jacob D.

    Many of the projects utilizing Grade 91 steel are large in scale, therefore it is necessary to assemble on site. The assembly of the major pieces requires welding in the assembly; this drastically changes the superior mechanical properties of Grade 91 steel that it was specifically developed for. Therefore, because of the adverse effects of welding on the mechanical properties of Grade 91, it is necessary to do a localized post weld heat treatment. As with most metallic materials grade 91 steel requires a very specific heat treatment process. This process includes a specific temperature and duration at that temperature to achieve the heat treatment desired. Extensive research has been done to determine the proper temperatures and duration to provide the proper microstructure for the superior mechanical properties that are inherent to Grade 91 steel. The welded sections are typically large structures that require local heat treatments and cannot be placed in an oven. The locations of these structures vary from indoors in a controlled environment to outdoors with unpredictable environments. These environments can be controlled somewhat, however in large part the surrounding conditions are unchangeable. Therefore, there is a need to develop methods to accurately apply the surrounding conditions and geometries to a theoretical model in order to provide the proper requirements for the local heat treatment procedure. Within this requirement is the requirement to define unknowns used in the heat transfer equations so that accurate models can be produced and accurate results predicted. This study investigates experimentally and numerically the heat transfer and temperature fields of Grade 91 piping in a local heat treatment. The objective of this thesis research is to determine all of the needed heat transfer coefficients. The appropriate heat transfer coefficients are determined through the inverse heat conduction method utilizing a ceramic heat blanket. This will be done

  6. Erosion-Oxidation Response of Boiler Grade Steels: A Mathematical Investigation

    S. K. Das

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A ductile erosion model embodying the mechanisms of erosion involving cutting wear and repeated plastic deformation has been developed to predict erosion rates of boiler grade steels. The issue of erosion-oxidation interaction has also been addressed to further predict the mass loss resulted from this composite mechanism. A deterministic formalism for the kinetics of oxide-scale growth and a probabilistic approach to characterize the material loss are employed to describe simultaneous actions of high-temperature oxidation and mechanical erosion. The model predictions are in good agreement with the published data.

  7. Variations of microstructure and properties of 690 MPa grade low carbon bainitic steel after tempering

    Feng, Rui [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); Li, Shengli, E-mail: lishengli@sdu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); Li, Zhenshun; Tian, Lei [Key Laboratory for Liquid-Solid Structural Evolution and Processing of Materials, Ministry of Education, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China); School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan Shandong 250061 (China)

    2012-12-15

    The variations of microstructure, mechanical properties and electrical resistivity of 690 MPa grade low carbon bainitic steel tempered at different temperatures were investigated with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and double-arm Bridge. The results show that the appearance of granular bainite, decomposition of retained austenite, variations of dislocation density and solid solution of microalloying elements are the main reasons for variations of mechanical properties and electrical resistivity. Electrical resistivity reflects the solution content of microalloying elements and variations of dislocation density, which can be used as a fast and effective way to analyze the microstructure of materials.

  8. The functionally graded sintered steel WC-Co-NbC matrix

    Santos, A.A.A.; Silva Junior, J.F. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Full text: The high speed steels are used for machining, including cutting tools at high speeds because their wear resistance, high temperature properties and excellent hardness. They are ferrous based alloys of the Fe-C-X component system where X represents a group of elements comprising Cr, W or Mo, V and Co. The aim of this work was to study the feasibility of powder metallurgy technique to develop functionally graded alloy material added by WC, Co and NbC. The morphology of the composite powders and sintered MMC were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and XRD measurements. (author)

  9. Development of a non-destructive method to identify different grades of stainless steel

    Meor Yusoff Meor Sulaiman

    2003-01-01

    One of the non-destructive methods used for the identification and verification of metals is by the energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. EDXRF analysis provides several important advantages such as simultaneous determination of the elements present, enable to analyse a very wide concentration range, fast analysis with no sample preparation. The paper shows how this technique is developed and applied in the identification and verification of different grades of stainless steels. Comparison of the results for certified reference standards obtained from this analysis and that of its certified value shows very small differences between them. (Author)

  10. Development of a non-destructive method to identify different grades of stainless steel

    Meor Yusoff Meor Sulaiman

    2004-01-01

    One of the non-destructive methods used for the identification and verification of metals is by the energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) technique. EDXRF analysis provides several important advantages such as simultaneous determination of the elements present, enable to analyze a very wide concentration range, fast analysis with no tedious sample preparation. The paper shows how this technique is developed and applied in the identification and verification of different grades of stainless steels. Comparison of the results obtained from this analysis with certified reference standards show very small differences between them. (Author)

  11. Understanding and Predicting Effect of Sodium Exposure on Microstructure of Grade 91 Steel

    Li, Meimei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Natesan, K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Chen, Wei-Ying [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This report provides an update on the understanding of the effect of sodium exposures on microstructure and tensile properties of Grade 91 (G91) steel in support of the design and operation of G91 components in sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs). The report is a Level 3 deliverable in FY17 (M3AT-17AN1602018), under the Work Package AT-17AN160201, “SFR Materials Testing” performed by the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of the Advanced Reactor Technologies Program.

  12. Study on creep behavior of Grade 91 heat-resistant steel using theta projection method

    Ren, Facai; Tang, Xiaoying

    2017-10-01

    Creep behavior of Grade 91 heat-resistant steel used for steam cooler was characterized using the theta projection method. Creep tests were conducted at the temperature of 923K under the stress ranging from 100-150MPa. Based on the creep curve results, four theta parameters were established using a nonlinear least square fitting method. Four theta parameters showed a good linearity as a function of stress. The predicted curves coincided well with the experimental data and creep curves were also modeled to the low stress level of 60MPa.

  13. Compositional homogeneity in a medical-grade stainless steel sintered with a Mn–Si additive

    Salahinejad, E.; Hadianfard, M.J.; Ghaffari, M.; Mashhadi, Sh. Bagheri; Okyay, A.K.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, chemical composition uniformity in amorphous/nanocrystallization medical-grade stainless steel (ASTM ID: F2581) sintered with a Mn–Si additive was studied via scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that as a result of sintering at 1000 °C, no dissociation of Mn–Si additive particles embedded in the stainless steel matrix occurs. In contrast, sintering at 1050 °C develops a relatively homogeneous microstructure from the chemical composition viewpoint. The aforementioned phenomena are explained by liquation of the Mn–Si eutectic additive, thereby wetting of the main powder particles, penetrating into the particle contacts and pore zones via capillary forces, and providing a path of high diffusivity. - Highlights: ► Local chemical composition in a sintered stainless steel was studied. ► Due to sintering at 1000 °C, no dissociation of additive particles occurs. ► Sintering at 1050 °C provides a uniform chemical composition.

  14. Characterization of carbon ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel

    Feng, Kai; Wang, Yibo [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Li, Zhuguo, E-mail: lizg@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Key laboratory of Materials Laser Processing and Modification, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Chu, Paul K. [Department of Physics and Materials Science, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-08-15

    Austenitic stainless steel 316L is ion implanted by carbon with implantation fluences of 1.2 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, 2.4 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}, and 4.8 × 10{sup 17} ions-cm{sup −} {sup 2}. The ion implantation induced graded microstructure and phase transformation in stainless steel is investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The corrosion resistance is evaluated by potentiodynamic test. It is found that the initial phase is austenite with a small amount of ferrite. After low fluence carbon ion implantation, an amorphous layer and ferrite phase enriched region underneath are formed. Nanophase particles precipitate from the amorphous layer due to energy minimization and irradiation at larger ion implantation fluence. The morphology of the precipitated nanophase particles changes from circular to dumbbell-like with increasing implantation fluence. The corrosion resistance of stainless steel is enhanced by the formation of amorphous layer and graphitic solid state carbon after carbon ion implantation. - Highlights: • Carbon implantation leads to phase transformation from austenite to ferrite. • The passive film on SS316L becomes thinner after carbon ion implantation. • An amorphous layer is formed by carbon ion implantation. • Nanophase precipitate from amorphous layer at higher ion implantation fluence. • Corrosion resistance of SS316L is improved by carbon implantation.

  15. Calculation of α/γ equilibria in SA508 grade 3 steels for intercritical heat treatment

    Lee, B.J.; Kim, H.D.; Hong, J.H.

    1998-01-01

    An attempt has been made to suggest an optimum temperature for intercritical heat treatment of an SA508 grade 3 steel for nuclear pressure vessels, based on thermodynamic calculation of the α/γ phase equilibria. A thermodynamic database constructed for the Fe-Mn-Ni-Mo-Cr-Si-V-Al-C-N ten-component system and an empirical criterion that the amount of reformed austenite should be around 40 pct were used for thermodynamic calculation and derivation of the optimum heat-treatment temperature, respectively. The calculated optimum temperature, 720 C, was in good agreement with an experimentally determined temperature of 725 C obtained through an independent experimental investigation of the same steel. The agreement between the calculated and measured fraction of reformed austenite during the intercritical heat treatment was also confirmed. Based on the agreement between calculation and experiment, it could be concluded that thermodynamic calculations can be successfully applied to the materials and/or process design as an additive tool to the already established technology, and that the currently constructed thermodynamic database for steel systems shows an accuracy that makes such applications possible

  16. Establishment of quality system program for the manufacture of nuclear grade steels

    Saito, Toru

    1978-01-01

    Recently, the pressure vessels employed in the fields of nuclear power generation, petroleum refining, and chemical industry tend to be large size and high performance, therefore thick steel plates and forgings of high quality are demanded, and the establishment and maintenance of strict quality assurance system for material production are required. In Mizushima Works, Kawasaki Steel Corp., the installations for large forgings and thick plates were constructed from 1969 to 1976, and the researches on the development of production techniques were forwarded in parallel. A Quality System Certificate (Material) has been granted to Mizushima Works on March 11, 1977, by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers for the manufacture of steel plates and forgings of nuclear grade. The quality system manual as the basis of quality assurance activities, the organization for quality assurance, its responsibility and authority, the discrimination of materials, the control of manufacturing processes, the qualification of workers in charge of nondestructive test, welding, heat treatment and others, the management of tests and inspections, the management of products with faults and repairing measures, and internal supervisory system are explained. The wide use of computers is novel in the field of quality system program. (Kako, I.)

  17. Correlation between aging grade of T91 steel and spectral characteristics of the laser-induced plasma

    Li, Jun [Power Electric College in South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Lu, Jidong, E-mail: jdlu@scut.edu.cn [Power Electric College in South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Dai, Yuan [Electric Power Research Institute of Guangdong Power Grid Company, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Dong, Meirong [Power Electric College in South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhong, Wanli [Electric Power Research Institute of Guangdong Power Grid Company, Guangzhou 510080 (China); Yao, Shunchun [Power Electric College in South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2015-08-15

    Highlights: • Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was first employed to estimate the aging grade of T91 steel. • The differences from the ionic-to-atomic ratio of the same elements indicated that the grade is the reason to cause the difference of the plasma characteristics. • Good unique value correlations between the peak intensity ratio of CrI/FeI, MoI/FeI and the aging grade were found. • The research indicates that LIBS technique is a potential way to estimate the aging grade of T91 steel. - Abstract: T91 steel with favorable mechanical performance has become the representative heat-resistant steel used as heat exchange surfaces in supercritical and ultra-supercritical boilers. The organizational structure and mechanical properties change during the service period, called material aging, which affects the service life and the equipment safety. To develop a fast and easy aging predictive technique of heat exchange metal surfaces, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to investigate the plasma characteristics of T91 steel specimens with different aging grades. The metallographic structure, mechanical properties and spectral characteristics of the specimens were analyzed. Then, the correlations between the spectral characteristics and the aging grade were established. The analysis results show that the martensite substructure disappears, and the dimension of the carbide particles among the crystal lattices increases with aging. At the same time, the hardness of the samples gradually decreases. The peak intensities of both the matrix and the alloying element increases then decreases with aging, owing to the change of the metallography structure and mechanical properties. Furthermore, good unique value correlations between the intensity ratio of CrI/FeI, MoI/FeI and the aging grade are found. This demonstrates that LIBS is a possible new way to estimate the aging grade of metal materials.

  18. Correlation between aging grade of T91 steel and spectral characteristics of the laser-induced plasma

    Li, Jun; Lu, Jidong; Dai, Yuan; Dong, Meirong; Zhong, Wanli; Yao, Shunchun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was first employed to estimate the aging grade of T91 steel. • The differences from the ionic-to-atomic ratio of the same elements indicated that the grade is the reason to cause the difference of the plasma characteristics. • Good unique value correlations between the peak intensity ratio of CrI/FeI, MoI/FeI and the aging grade were found. • The research indicates that LIBS technique is a potential way to estimate the aging grade of T91 steel. - Abstract: T91 steel with favorable mechanical performance has become the representative heat-resistant steel used as heat exchange surfaces in supercritical and ultra-supercritical boilers. The organizational structure and mechanical properties change during the service period, called material aging, which affects the service life and the equipment safety. To develop a fast and easy aging predictive technique of heat exchange metal surfaces, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied to investigate the plasma characteristics of T91 steel specimens with different aging grades. The metallographic structure, mechanical properties and spectral characteristics of the specimens were analyzed. Then, the correlations between the spectral characteristics and the aging grade were established. The analysis results show that the martensite substructure disappears, and the dimension of the carbide particles among the crystal lattices increases with aging. At the same time, the hardness of the samples gradually decreases. The peak intensities of both the matrix and the alloying element increases then decreases with aging, owing to the change of the metallography structure and mechanical properties. Furthermore, good unique value correlations between the intensity ratio of CrI/FeI, MoI/FeI and the aging grade are found. This demonstrates that LIBS is a possible new way to estimate the aging grade of metal materials

  19. Suitability of the double Langevin function for description of anhysteretic magnetization curves in NO and GO electrical steel grades

    Simon Steentjes

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares the match obtained using the classical Langevin function, the tanh function as well as a recently by the authors proposed double Langevin function with the measured anhysteretic magnetization curve of three different non-oriented electrical steel grades and one grain-oriented grade. Two standard non-oriented grades and a high-silicon grade (Si content of 6.5% made by CVD are analyzed. An excellent match is obtained using the double Langevin function, whereas the classical solutions are less appropriate. Thereby, problems such as those due to propagation of approximation errors observed in hysteresis modeling can be bypassed.

  20. Development and Technology of Large Thickness TMCP Steel Plate with 390MPA Grade Used for Engineering Machinery

    Wang, Xiaoshu; Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Peng

    Recently, with the rapid upgrading of the equipment in the steel Corp, the rolling technology of TMCP has been rapidly developed and widely applied. A large amount of steel plate has been produced by using the TMCP technology. The TMCP processes have been used more and more widely and replaced the heat treatment technology of normalizing, quenching and tempering heat process. In this paper, low financial input is considered in steel plate production and the composition of the steel has been designed with low C component, a limited alloy element of the Nb, and certain amounts of Mn element. During the continuous casting process, the size of the continuous casting slab section is 300 mm × 2400 mm. The rolling technology of TMCP is controlled at a lower rolling and red temperature to control the transformation of the microstructure. Four different rolling treatments are chosen to test its effects on the 390MPa grade low carbon steel of bainitic microstructure and properties. This test manages to produce a proper steel plate fulfilling the standard mechanical properties. Specifically, low carbon bainite is observed in the microstructure of the steel plate and the maximum thickness of steel plate under this TMCP technology is up to 80mm. The mechanical property of the steel plate is excellent and the KV2 at -40 °C performs more than 200 J. Moreover, the production costs are greatly reduced when the steel plate is produced by this TMCP technology when replacing the current production process of quenching and tempering. The low cost steel plate could well meet the requirements of producing engineering machinery in the steel market.

  1. The Prediction of the Mechanical Properties for Dual-Phase High Strength Steel Grades Based on Microstructure Characteristics

    Emil Evin

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The decrease of emissions from vehicle operation is connected mainly to the reduction of the car’s body weight. The high strength and good formability of the dual phase steel grades predetermine these to be used in the structural parts of the car’s body safety zones. The plastic properties of dual phase steel grades are determined by the ferrite matrix while the strength properties are improved by the volume and distribution of martensite. The aim of this paper is to describe the relationship between the mechanical properties and the parameters of structure and substructure. The heat treatment of low carbon steel X60, low alloyed steel S460MC, and dual phase steel DP600 allowed for them to reach states with a wide range of volume fractions of secondary phases and grain size. The mechanical properties were identified by a tensile test, volume fraction of secondary phases, and grain size were measured by image analysis. It was found that by increasing the annealing temperature, the volume fraction of the secondary phase increased, and the ferrite grains were refined. Regression analysis was used to find out the equations for predicting mechanical properties based on the volume fraction of the secondary phase and grain size, following the annealing temperature. The hardening mechanism of the dual phase steel grades for the states they reached was described by the relationship between the strain-hardening exponent and the density of dislocations. This allows for the designing of dual phase steel grades that are “tailored” to the needs of the automotive industry customers.

  2. Heat treatment evaluation of steel ASTM A-131 grade A by X-Ray diffraction

    Ferreira Junior, Francisco; Feio, Luciana Gaspar; Costa, Ednelson Silva; Rodrigues, Lino Alberto Soares; Braga, Eduardo Magalhaes, E-mail: juniorferrer93@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Pará (UFPA), Belém, PA (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: This study evaluates the residual stress of naval steel ASTM A-131 grade A before and after heat treatment. Residual stresses were determined by the technique of X-ray diffraction (XRD). Before heat treatment the residual stress measurements were made at 36 (thirty six) points distributed in a specimen with dimensions of 400 mm long, 200 mm wide and 95 mm thick, then the plate under analysis was brought to the oven for the implementation of heat treatment. To check the performance of the heat treatment, the plate was again subjected to XRD measurements of the same points previously measured in order to compare the residual stresses. As result, there was a reduction of residual stresses with the application of heat treatment. References: [1] COLPAERT, H. Metalografia dos Produtos Siderurgicos Comuns. 4 Edição. Editora Blucher. Saõ Paulo, SP, 2008. [2] HILL, R. Princípios de Metalurgia Física, 1992. (author)

  3. The Properties of Arc-Sprayed Aluminum Coatings on Armor-Grade Steel

    Marcin Adamiak

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results of an examination of the properties of arc-sprayed aluminum on alloyed armor-grade steel. Thermal arc spraying was conducted with a EuTronic Arc Spray 4 wire arc sprayer. Aluminum wire 1.6 mm in diameter was used to produce dense, abrasion- and erosion-resistant coatings approx. 1.0 mm thick with and without nickel/5% aluminum-buffered subcoating. Aluminum coatings were characterized in accordance with ASTM G 65-00 abrasion resistance test, ASTM G 76-95 erosion resistance tests, ASTM C 633-01 adhesion strength, HV0.1 hardness tests and metallographic analyses. Results demonstrate properties of arc-sprayed aluminum and aluminum-nickel material coatings that are especially promising in industrial applications where erosion-, abrasion- and corrosion-resistant coating properties are required.

  4. Microstructure-property relationships and constitutive response of plastically graded case hardened steels

    Klecka, Michael A.

    Case hardened materials, popularly used in many demanding engineering applications such as bearings, gears, and wear/impact surfaces, have high surface hardness and a gradient in material properties (hardness, yield strength, etc.) as a function of depth; therefore, they behave as plastically graded materials. In the current study, two different commercially available case carburized steels along with two through hardened steels are characterized to obtain relationships among the volume fraction of subsurface carbides, indentation hardness, elastic modulus, and yield strength as a function of depth. A variety of methods including microindentation, nanoindentation, ultrasonic measurements, compression testing, rule of mixtures, and upper and lower bound models are used to determine the relationships for elastic modulus and compare the experimental results with model predictions. In addition, the morphology, composition, and properties of the carbide particles are also determined. The gradient in hardness with depth in graded materials is commonly determined using microindentation on the cross-section of the material which contains the gradation in microstructure or composition. In the current study, a novel method is proposed to predict the hardness gradient profile using solely surface indentations at a range of loads. The method does not require the graded material to be sectioned, and has practical utility in the surface heat-treatment industry. For a material with a decreasing gradient in hardness, higher indent loads result in a lower measured hardness due to the influence of the softer subsurface layers. A power-law model is presented which relates the measured surface indentation hardness under increasing load to the subsurface gradient in hardness. A coordinated experimental and numerical study is presented to extract the constitutive response of graded materials, utilizing relationships between hardness, plastic deformation, and strain hardening response

  5. Microstructural and Mechanical Characterization of Electron Beam Welded Joints of High Strength S960QL and Weldox 1300 Steel Grades

    Błacha S.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the results of metallographic examination and mechanical properties of electron beam welded joints of quenched and tempered S960QL and Weldox 1300 steel grades. The aim of this study was to examine the feasibility of producing good quality electron beam welded joints without filler material.

  6. Effects of the normalizing time and temperature on the impact properties of ASTM A-516 grade 70 steel

    Carneiro, T.; Cescon, T.

    1982-01-01

    The influence of normalizing time and temperature, as well as the plate thickness, on the impact properties of ASTM A-516 grade 70 steel, is studied. Results show that different normalizing conditions may lead to equivalent microstructure with different impact properties. Normalizing conditions that cause low cooling rate in the critical zone exhibit banded microstructure with inferior impact properties. (Author) [pt

  7. Braze alloy process and strength characterization studies for 18 nickel grade 200 maraging steel with application to wind tunnel models

    Bradshaw, James F.; Sandefur, Paul G., Jr.; Young, Clarence P., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A comprehensive study of braze alloy selection process and strength characterization with application to wind tunnel models is presented. The applications for this study include the installation of stainless steel pressure tubing in model airfoil sections make of 18 Ni 200 grade maraging steel and the joining of wing structural components by brazing. Acceptable braze alloys for these applications are identified along with process, thermal braze cycle data, and thermal management procedures. Shear specimens are used to evaluate comparative shear strength properties for the various alloys at both room and cryogenic (-300 F) temperatures and include the effects of electroless nickel plating. Nickel plating was found to significantly enhance both the wetability and strength properties for the various braze alloys studied. The data are provided for use in selecting braze alloys for use with 18 Ni grade 200 steel in the design of wind tunnel models to be tested in an ambient or cryogenic environment.

  8. Effect of residual Al content on microstructure and mechanical properties of Grade B+Steel for castings for locomotives

    Wang Kaifeng

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The bogie made of Grade B+ steel is one of the most important parts of heavy haul trains. Some accidents were found to be the result of fracture failure of the bogies. It is very important to find the reason why the fracture failure occurred. Because Al was added for the final deoxidation during the smelting process of the Grade B+Steel, residual Al existed to some extent in the castings. High residual Al content in the bogie casting was presumed to be the reason for the fracture. In this work, the influence of residual Al content in the range of 0.015wt.% to 0.3wt.% on the microstructure and mechanical properties of the Grade B+ Steel was studied. The experimental results showed that when the residual Al content is between 0.02wt.% and 0.20wt.%, the mechanical properties of the steel meet the requirements of technical specification for heavy haul train parts, and the fracture is typical plastic fractures. If the residual Al content is less than 0.02wt.%, the microstructures are coarse, and the mechanical properties can not meet the demand of bogie steel castings. When the residual Al content is more than 0.2wt.%, the elongation, reduction of area, and low-temperature impact energy markedly deteriorate. The fracture mode then changes from plastic fracture to cleavage brittle fracture. Therefore, the amount of Al addition for the final deoxidation during the smelting process must be strictly controlled. The optimum addition amount needs to be controlled within the range of 0.02wt.% to 0.20wt.% for the Grade B+Steel.

  9. Microstructural Characterization and Mechanical Properties of Electron Beam Welded Joint of High Strength Steel Grade S690QL

    Błacha S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the results of metallographic examination and mechanical properties of electron beam welded joint of quenched and tempered steel grade S690QL are presented. Metallographic examination revealed that the concentrated electron beam significantly affect the changes of microstructure in the steel. Parent material as a delivered condition (quenched and tempered had a bainitic-martensitic microstructure at hardness about 290 HV0.5. After welding, the microstructure of heat affected zone is composed mainly of martensite (in the vicinity of the fusion line of hardness 420 HV0.5. It should be noted, however, that the microstructure of steel in the heat affected zone varies with the distance from the fusion line. The observed microstructural changes were in accordance with the CCT-S transformation diagram for the examined steel.

  10. Temperature effect on API grade steels in CO{sub 2} environments

    Martins, F.A; Bott, I. [Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro, Metallurgical and Materials Science Department, DCMM/PUC RJ, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rodrigues, A.P.C.; Reznik, L.Y.; Freitas, D.S. de [National Institute of Technology, Corrosion and Degradation Department, DCOR/INT (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    There is urgency in optimising and to widen the resources for corrosion control to minimise problems regarding failure and leakage in pipelines. The corrosion control is especially important as it is increasingly associated with mechanical integrity. This means that there is an effort to produce alloys with better mechanical properties which consequently will gradually reduce the thickness of the pipeline walls. However it is necessary to bear in mind that internal corrosion occurs and it can compromise the use of these materials. This is so because as long as the wall thickness is diminished, the corrosion can lead to catastrophic failures and reduce tubes life-time significantly. Therefore, it is necessary to study the behaviour of the steel in critical environments to understand and to obtain a better performance, and moreover, to predict their corrosion rates. The aim of this project is to study the behaviour of the steel X70 and X80 grade, base metal and welded joints, in CO{sub 2} environment. The main focus will be in the stability of iron carbonate film as function of temperature. The methodology of this study will involve several tests and analyses. Electrochemical tests will be carried out in a second part of this work to assess the film formation and to determine, in comparison with gravimetric tests, the corrosion rate. The morphology attack will be determined and metallographic analysis will be carry out to evaluate the steel microstructure. Complementary analysis will be accomplished using SEM/EDX and x-rays diffraction. It is expected to obtain information about the temperature range in which the iron carbonate film on X70 and X80 steels is stable, in such way that it will improve their application. The results of this project will contribute to the leakage control technology in pipelines. Moreover, it will permit a real recommendation of the wall thickness of pipelines to be employed in field, which in return will provide an augment of guarantee in

  11. Investigation of the Microstructural, Mechanical and Corrosion Properties of Grade A Ship Steel-Duplex Stainless Steel Composites Produced via Explosive Welding

    Kaya, Yakup; Kahraman, Nizamettin; Durgutlu, Ahmet; Gülenç, Behçet

    2017-08-01

    Grade A ship-building steel-AISI 2304 duplex stainless steel composite plates were manufactured via explosive welding. The AISI 2304 plates were used to clad the Grade A plates. Optical microscopy studies were conducted on the joining interface for characterization of the manufactured composite plates. Notch impact, tensile-shear, microhardness, bending and twisting tests were carried out to determine the mechanical properties of the composites. In addition, the surfaces of fractured samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and neutral salt spray (NSS) and potentiodynamic polarization tests were performed to examine corrosion behavior. Near the explosion zone, the interface was completely flat, but became wavy as the distance from the explosion zone increased. The notch impact tests indicated that the impact strength of the composites decreased with increasing distance from the explosion zone. The SEM studies detected brittle behavior below the impact transition temperature and ductile behavior above this temperature. Microhardness tests revealed that the hardness values increased with increasing distance from the explosion zone and mechanical tests showed that no visible cracking or separation had occurred on the joining interface. The NSS and potentiodynamic polarization tests determined that the AISI 2304 exhibited higher corrosion resistance than the Grade A steel.

  12. An approach to optimization of the choice of boiler steel grades as to a mixed-integer programming problem

    Kler, Alexandr M.; Potanina, Yulia M.

    2017-01-01

    One of the ways to enhance the energy efficiency of thermal power plants is to increase thermodynamic parameters of steam. A sufficient level of reliability and longevity can be provided by the application of advanced construction materials (in particular, high-alloy steel can be used to manufacture the most loaded heating surfaces of a boiler unit). A rational choice of technical and economic parameters of energy plants as the most complex technical systems should be made using the methods of mathematical modeling and optimization. The paper considers an original approach to an economically sound optimal choice of steel grade to manufacture heating surfaces for boiler units. A case study of optimization of the discrete-continuous parameters of an energy unit operating at ultra-supercritical steam parameters, in combination with construction of a variant selection tree is presented. - Highlights: • A case study on optimization of an ultra-supercritical power plant is demonstrated. • Optimization is based on the minimization of electricity price. • An approach is proposed to optimize the selection of boiler steel grades. • The approach is based on the construction of a variant tree. • The selection of steel grades for a boiler unit is shown.

  13. Investigations on diffusion-controlled transformations in creep resistant steels and graded cemented carbides

    Prat Borquez, Orlando

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this work was to simulate diffusion-controlled transformations on engineering alloys designed by the author and his colleagues. The main challenge of the work is to adapt the existing DICTRA models to the experimental processing and working conditions investigated, as well as to find the adequate boundary conditions for the description of the diffusion-controlled transformations governing the microstructure formation and evolution, in order to obtain reliable simulation results. The simulations were compared with experimental results of the microstructure evolution by scanning electron microscopy and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Two groups of materials were investigated. The first group was 9-12% Cr heat resistant alloys. These alloys are particularly interesting because the microstructure evolves during working conditions. Different compositions were designed in order to form different kinds and amounts of precipitates. For the designed 9-12% Cr creep steels the coarsening of MX and M 23 C 6 particles was modeled by applying the coarsening model implemented in DICTRA. The cell method of DICTRA was applied to investigate the kinetics of the Laves phase growth on 9-12% Cr alloys. The particular objectives of these investigations were: a) to determine the coarsening rate of precipitates, b) to investigate the influence of alloying element on the growth rate of the Laves phase, c) to determine the influence of the M 23 C 6 formation on the growth kinetics of the Laves phase, d) to determine the growth mechanism at the interface of the Laves phase (i.e. up-hill diffusion), e) to investigate the effect of the cell size on the simulation kinetics of Laves phase. The second group of materials was cemented carbides. They are used as cutting tools or wear parts in the automotive, aircraft and mining industry among others. The wear performance of cemented carbides (hardmetals and cermets) can be largely improved by applying wear

  14. Assessment of the integrity of ferritic-austenitic dissimilar weld joints of different grades of Cr-Mo ferritic steels

    Laha, K.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Parameswaran, P.; Goyal, Sunil; Mathew, M.D. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India). Metallurgy and Materials Group

    2010-07-01

    Integrity of the 2.25 Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800, 9Cr-1Mo / Alloy 800 and 9Cr-1Mo-VNb / Alloy 800 ferritic-austenitic dissimilar joints, fusion welded employing Inconel 182 electrode, has been assessed under creep conditions at 823 K. The dissimilar weld joints displayed lower creep rupture strength than their respective ferritic steel base metals. The strength reduction was more for 2.25Cr-1Mo steel joint and least for 9Cr-1Mo steel joint. The failure location in the joints was found to shift from the ferritic steel base metal to the intercritical region of heat-affected zone (HAZ) in ferritic steel (type IV cracking) with decrease in stress. At still lower stresses the failure occurred at the ferritic / austenitic weld interface. Localized creep deformation and cavitation in the soft intercritical HAZ induced type IV failure whereas creep cavitation at the weld interface particles induced ferritic / austenitic interface cracking due to high creep strength mismatch across it. Micromechanisms of type IV failure and interface cracking in the ferritic / austenitic joints and different susceptibility to failure for different grades of ferritic steels are discussed based on microstructural investigation, mechanical testing and finite element analysis. (Note from indexer: paper contains many typographical errors.)

  15. Spinodal Decomposition in Functionally Graded Super Duplex Stainless Steel and Weld Metal

    Hosseini, Vahid A.; Thuvander, Mattias; Wessman, Sten; Karlsson, Leif

    2018-04-01

    Low-temperature phase separations (T duplex stainless steel (SDSS) base and weld metals were investigated for short heat treatment times (0.5 to 600 minutes). A novel heat treatment technique, where a stationary arc produces a steady state temperature gradient for selected times, was employed to fabricate functionally graded materials. Three different initial material conditions including 2507 SDSS, remelted 2507 SDSS, and 2509 SDSS weld metal were investigated. Selective etching of ferrite significantly decreased in regions heat treated at 435 °C to 480 °C already after 3 minutes due to rapid phase separations. Atom probe tomography results revealed spinodal decomposition of ferrite and precipitation of Cu particles. Microhardness mapping showed that as-welded microstructure and/or higher Ni content accelerated decomposition. The arc heat treatment technique combined with microhardness mapping and electrolytical etching was found to be a successful approach to evaluate kinetics of low-temperature phase separations in SDSS, particularly at its earlier stages. A time-temperature transformation diagram was proposed showing the kinetics of 475 °C-embrittlement in 2507 SDSS.

  16. Manufacturing of welded polyblock turbine rotors for pressurized water reactor nuclear plants; Optimization of the steel grade; Effect of impurities

    Pisseloup, J.; Poitrault, I.S.; De Badereau, A.; Bocquet, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    Le Creusot Heavy Forge has been manufacturing low-pressure (LP) disks and shaft ends for 1300-MW nuclear power plants. These forgings, in weldable 1.8Cr-1Ni-0.8Mo steel, are welded by Alsthom Atlantique. With the aim of improved quality, homogeneity of mechanical properties, hardenability, and weldability, this metallurgical research has been carried out: 1. Optimization of the steel grade (the effect of silicon, manganese, and molybdenum). 2. The influence of tempering and stress relief treatment parameters. 3. The effect of impurities. These studies have led the Steel Melting Shop of Creusot-Loire Factory to invest in a high-performance process of steelmaking: the heating ladle refining process. This new process has had spectacular results that have been confirmed by investigations on cut-up industrial forgings

  17. Studies on Corrosion of Annealed and Aged 18 Ni 250 Grade Maraging Steel in Sulphuric Acid Medium

    Poornima, T.; Jagannatha, Nayak; Shetty, A. Nityananda

    2010-01-01

    The corrosion behavior of aged and annealed sample of 18 Ni 250 grade maraging steel was investigated in varied conditions of concentration and temperature of sulphuric acid medium, using electrochemical techniques like Tafel polarization and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results obtained from both the techniques are in good agreement. These results have shown increase in corrosion rate of aged specimen with increase in concentration and temperature of sulphuric acid. With...

  18. Acoustic emission during tensile deformation and fracture of nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel specimens with notches

    Mukhopadhyay, C.K.; Jayakumar, T.; Baldev Raj

    1996-01-01

    Acoustic emission generated during tensile deformation and fracture of nuclear grade AISI type 304 stainless steel specimens with notches has been studied. The extent of acoustic activity generated depends on notch tip severity, notch tip blunting and tearing of the notches. The equation N=AK m applied to the acoustic emission data of the notched specimens has shown good correlation. Acoustic emission technique can be used to estimate the size of an unknown notch. (author)

  19. Fabrication of Hadfield-Cored Multi-layer Steel Sheet by Roll-Bonding with 1.8-GPa-Strength-Grade Hot-Press-Forming Steel

    Chin, Kwang-Geun; Kang, Chung-Yun; Park, Jaeyeong; Lee, Sunghak

    2018-05-01

    An austenitic Hadfield steel was roll-bonded with a 1.8-GPa-strength-grade martensitic hot-press-forming (HPF) steel to fabricate a multi-layer steel (MLS) sheet. Near the Hadfield/HPF interface, the carburized and decarburized layers were formed by the carbon diffusion from the Hadfield (1.2%C) to HPF (0.35%C) layers, and could be regarded as kinds of very thin multi-layers of 35 μm in thickness. The tensile test and fractographic data indicated that the MLS sheet was fractured abruptly within the elastic range by the intergranular fracture occurred in the carburized layer. This was because C was mainly segregated at prior austenite grain boundaries in the carburized layer, which weakened grain boundaries to induce the intergranular fracture. In order to solve the intergranular facture problem, the MLS sheet was tempered at 200 °C. The stress-strain curve of the tempered MLS sheet lay between those of the HPF and Hadfield sheets, and a rule of mixtures was roughly satisfied. Tensile properties of the MLS sheet were dramatically improved after the tempering, and the intergranular fracture was erased completely. In particular, the yield strength up to 1073 MPa along with the high strain hardening and excellent ductility of 32.4% were outstanding because the yield strength over 1 GPa was hardly achieved in conventional austenitic steels.

  20. Microstructural Characterization of the Heat-Affected Zones in Grade 92 Steel Welds: Double-Pass and Multipass Welds

    Xu, X.; West, G. D.; Siefert, J. A.; Parker, J. D.; Thomson, R. C.

    2018-04-01

    The microstructure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of multipass welds typical of those used in power plants and made from 9 wt pct chromium martensitic Grade 92 steel is complex. Therefore, there is a need for systematic microstructural investigations to define the different regions of the microstructure across the HAZ of Grade 92 steel welds manufactured using the traditional arc welding processes in order to understand possible failure mechanisms after long-term service. In this study, the microstructure in the HAZ of an as-fabricated two-pass bead-on-plate weld on a parent metal of Grade 92 steel has been systematically investigated and compared to a complex, multipass thick section weldment using an extensive range of electron and ion-microscopy-based techniques. A dilatometer has been used to apply controlled thermal cycles to simulate the microstructures in distinctly different regions in a multipass HAZ using sequential thermal cycles. A wide range of microstructural properties in the simulated materials were characterized and compared with the experimental observations from the weld HAZ. It has been found that the microstructure in the HAZ can be categorized by a combination of sequential thermal cycles experienced by the different zones within the complex weld metal, using the terminology developed for these regions based on a simpler, single-pass bead-on-plate weld, categorized as complete transformation, partial transformation, and overtempered.

  1. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Gas Metal Arc Welded AISI 409 Grade Ferritic Stainless Steel Joints

    Lakshminarayanan, A. K.; Shanmugam, K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-10-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel, and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behavior of the gas metal arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single ‘V’ butt welded joints. Center cracked tensile specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behavior. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine with a capacity of 100 kN was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behavior of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  2. Numerical and experimental study of creep of grade 91 steel at high temperature

    Lim, R.

    2011-01-01

    Grade 91 steel is a suitable candidate for structural components of the secondary and the vapour of the generation IV nuclear reactors. Their in-service lifetime will be extended to 60 years. It is necessary to consider the mechanisms involved-term during long creep to propose more reliable predictions of creep lifetimes. Necking is the main failure mechanism for creep lifetimes up to 160 kh at 500 C and 94 kh at 600 C. Necking modelling including the material creep softening leads to two bound laws including experimental lifetimes of a large number of tempered martensitic steels loaded up to 200 kh at temperature 500-700 C. The observed creep intergranular cavities are shown to affect very weekly creep strain rate. The prediction of the cavity evolution will allow estimating creep lifetimes out of experimental data domain. Their nucleation and growth, supposed to be associated to vacancy diffusion, are modelled using two classical models. The first one considers instantaneous nucleation (Raj and Ashby) and the second one continuous nucleation obeying the Dyson law (Riedel). The second one leads to two bound laws, more stable with respect to the parameter values. It allows predicting final sizes of cavities in reasonable agreement with the measured ones. Nevertheless, nucleation rate should be estimated from measured cavity densities. Nucleation of cavities by diffusion is simulated using the Raj model. This model does not allow predicted final cavity densities in agreement with the measured ones, even by considering cavity nucleation at precipitates/Laves interfaces experimentally observed and the maximum local stress concentration of a factor 2 computed using finite element calculation in a 2D plane strain hypothesis based on either simulated or real microstructures containing triple points or precipitates/Laves phases. The use of the Dyson law allows us to propose predictions of long-term creep lifetimes. Lifetime predicted using the diffusion-induced growth

  3. Comparison of creep rupture behavior of tungsten inert gas and electron beam welded grade 91 steel

    Dey, H.C.; Vanaja, J.; Laha, K.; Bhaduri, A.K.; Albert, S.K.; Roy, G.G.

    2016-01-01

    Creep rupture behavior of Grade 91 steel weld joints fabricated by multi-pass tungsten inert gas (TIG) and electron beam welding (EBW) processes has been studied and compared with base metal. Cross-weld creep specimens were fabricated from the X-ray radiography qualified and post weld heat treated (760°C/4 h) weld joints. Creep testing of weld joints and base metal was carried out at 650°C over a stress range of 40°120 MPa. Creep life of EBW joint is comparable to base metal; whereas multi-pass TIG joint have shown significant drop in creep life tested for the same stress level. Both types of weld joints show Type IV cracking for all the stress levels. The steady state creep rate of multi-pass TIG is found to be fifteen times than that of EBW joint for stress level of 80 MPa, which may be attributed to over tempering, more re-austenization, and fine grain structure of inter-critical and fine grain heat affected zone regions of the TIG joint. In contrast, single-pass and rapid weld thermal cycles associated with EBW process causes minimum phase transformation in the corresponding regions of heat affected zone. Microstructure studies on creep tested specimens shows creep cavities formed at the primary austenite grain boundaries nucleated on coarse carbide precipitates. The hardness measured across the weld on creep tested specimens shows significant drop in hardness in the inter-critical and fine grain heat affected zone regions of multi-pass TIG (176 VHN) in comparison to 192 VHN in the corresponding locations in EBW joint. (author)

  4. FY17 Status Report on the Initial Development of a Constitutive Model for Grade 91 Steel

    Messner, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Phan, V. -T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sham, T. -L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Grade 91 is a candidate structural material for high temperature advanced reactor applications. Existing ASME Section III, Subsection HB, Subpart B simplified design rules based on elastic analysis are setup as conservative screening tools with the intent to supplement these screening rules with full inelastic analysis when required. The Code provides general guidelines for suitable inelastic models but does not provide constitutive model implementations. This report describes the development of an inelastic constitutive model for Gr. 91 steel aimed at fulfilling the ASME Code requirements and being included into a new Section III Code appendix, HBB-Z. A large database of over 300 experiments on Gr. 91 was collected and converted to a standard XML form. Five families of Gr. 91 material models were identified in the literature. Of these five, two are potentially suitable for use in the ASME code. These two models were implemented and evaluated against the experimental database. Both models have deficiencies so the report develops a framework for developing and calibrating an improved model. This required creating a new modeling method for representing changes in material rate sensitivity across the full ASME allowable temperature range for Gr. 91 structural components: room temperature to 650° C. On top of this framework for rate sensitivity the report describes calibrating a model for work hardening and softening in the material using genetic algorithm optimization. Future work will focus on improving this trial model by including tension/compression asymmetry observed in experiments and necessary to capture material ratcheting under zero mean stress and by improving the optimization and analysis framework.

  5. Estimation of the aging grade of T91 steel by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy coupled with support vector machines

    Lu, Shengzi; Dong, Meirong; Huang, Jianwei; Li, Wenbing; Lu, Jidong; Li, Jun

    2018-02-01

    T91 steel is a representative martensitic heat-resistant steel widely used in high temperature compression components of industrial equipment. During the service period, the operation safety and the service life of the equipment will be affected by the change of structure and mechanical properties of the steel components, which is called material aging. In order to develop a rapid in-situ aging estimation technology of high temperature compression components surface, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) coupled with support vector machine (SVM) was employed in this paper. The spectral characteristics of 10 T91 steel specimens with different aging grades were analyzed. Line intensities and the line intensity ratios (ionic/atomic and alloying element/matrix element) that indicate the change of metallographic structure were used to establish SVM models, and the results using different variable sets were compared. The model was optimized by comparing different pulse number for practical effectiveness, and the robustness of the model was investigated in dealing with the inhomogeneity of steel composition. The study results show that the estimation model obtained the best performance using line intensities and line intensity ratios averaged from 31st-60th laser pulses as input variables. The estimation accuracy of validation set was greatly improved from 75.8% to 95.3%. In addition, the model showed the outstanding capacity for handling the fluctuations of spectral signals between measuring-points (spots), which indicated that the aging estimation based on a few measuring-points is feasible. The studies presented here demonstrate that the LIBS coupled with SVM is a new useful technique for the aging estimation of steel, and would be well-suited for fast safety assessment in industrial field.

  6. In-service behaviour of creep strength enhanced ferritic steels Grade 91 and Grade 92 – Part 2 weld issues

    Parker, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    In Creep Strength Enhanced Ferritic steels control of both composition and heat treatment of the parent steel is necessary to avoid producing components which have properties below the minimum expected by applicable codes. The degree of tempering involved in manufacture will modify the material hardness. While under most conditions hardness is reduced by tempering, exceeding the AC 1 temperature can lead to an increase in hardness. In this heat treatment the properties will be relatively poor even though the measured hardness may be apparently acceptable. Thus, care should be exercised in imposing an acceptance test of components based on simple hardness alone. Differences in parent material heat treatment and composition apparently have remarkably little influence on the creep life of the heat affect zone (HAZ). Thus, Type IV cracking in the fine grained or intercritically heat treated regions of the HAZ does not appear to directly depend on the strength of the base steel. This form of in-service damage is relatively difficult to detect using traditional methods of non-destructive testing. Moreover, since repeated heat treatment leads to over tempering and a degradation of properties, specific procedures for making and then lifing repair welds are required. The present paper summarizes examples of damage and discusses best option repairs. -- Highlights: ► For many components damage in the weld heat affected zone will be the primary source of in-service problems. ► Repair approaches should consider the influence of heat flow on metallurgical transformations. ► Both development of residual stresses and the local properties of the constituent zones influence Type IV damage. ► Serviceability of components in the creep range must consider stress, temperature and applicable material properties

  7. Experimental investigation and optimization of welding process parameters for various steel grades using NN tool and Taguchi method

    Soni, Sourabh Kumar; Thomas, Benedict

    2018-04-01

    The term "weldability" has been used to describe a wide variety of characteristics when a material is subjected to welding. In our analysis we perform experimental investigation to estimate the tensile strength of welded joint strength and then optimization of welding process parameters by using taguchi method and Artificial Neural Network (ANN) tool in MINITAB and MATLAB software respectively. The study reveals the influence on weldability of steel by varying composition of steel by mechanical characterization. At first we prepare the samples of different grades of steel (EN8, EN 19, EN 24). The samples were welded together by metal inert gas welding process and then tensile testing on Universal testing machine (UTM) was conducted for the same to evaluate the tensile strength of the welded steel specimens. Further comparative study was performed to find the effects of welding parameter on quality of weld strength by employing Taguchi method and Neural Network tool. Finally we concluded that taguchi method and Neural Network Tool is much efficient technique for optimization.

  8. Time dependent design curves for a high nitrogen grade of 316LN stainless steel for fast reactor applications

    Ganesh Kumar, J.; Ganesan, V.; Laha, K.; Mathew, M.D., E-mail: mathew@igcar.gov.in

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • 316LN SS is an important high temperature structural material for sodium cooled fast reactors. • Creep strength of 316LN SS has been increased substantially by increasing the nitrogen content. • Creep design curves based on RCC-MR code procedures have been generated for this new material. • 100,000 h allowable stress at 600 °C increased by more than 40% as a result of doubling the nitrogen content in the steel. - Abstract: Type 316L(N) stainless steel (SS) containing 0.06–0.08 wt.% nitrogen is the major material for reactor assembly components of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFRs). With a view to increase the design life of SFRs to 60 years from the current life of 40 years, studies are being carried out to improve the high temperature creep and low cycle fatigue properties of 316LN SS by increasing the nitrogen content above 0.08 wt.%. In this investigation, the creep properties of a high nitrogen grade of 316LN SS containing 0.14 wt.% nitrogen have been studied. Creep tests were carried out at 550 °C, 600 °C and 650 °C at various stress levels in the range of 140–350 MPa. Creep strength was found to be significantly improved by doubling the nitrogen content in this steel. The maximum rupture life in these tests was 33,000 h. The creep data has been analyzed according to RCC-MR nuclear code procedures in order to generate the creep design curves for the high nitrogen grade of 316LN SS. Allowable stress for 100,000 h at 600 °C increased by more than 38% as a result of doubling the nitrogen content in the steel.

  9. GRINDABILITY OF SELECTED GRADES OF LOW-ALLOY HIGH-SPEED STEEL

    Jan Jaworski

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we presents the results of investigations studied the cutting ability and grindability of selected high-speed steels. We analysed the effect of the austenitization temperature on the grain size, the amount of retained austenite and percentage of retained austenite in HS3-1-1 steel. Furthermore, the investigations concerned on the efficiency of the keyway broaches during the whole period of operation were carried out. It was found that the value of average roughness parameter increases together with increases in the grinding depth. The investigations also show the influence of tempering conditions on the volume of carbide phases in HS3-1-1 steel.

  10. Numerical microstructural analysis of automotive-grade steels when joined with an array of welding processes

    Gould, J.E.; Khurana, S.P.; Li, T.

    2004-01-01

    Weld strength, formability, and impact resistance for joints on automotive steels is dependent on the underlying microstructure. A martensitic weld area is often a precursor to reduced mechanical performance. In this paper, efforts are made to predict underlying joint microstructures for a range of processing approaches, steel types, and gauges. This was done first by calculating cooling rates for some typical automotive processes [resistance spot welding (RSW), resistance mash seam welding (RMSEW), laser beam welding (LBW), and gas metal arc welding (GMAW)]. Then, critical cooling rates for martensite formation were calculated for a range of automotive steels using an available thermodynamically based phase transformation model. These were then used to define combinations of process type, steel type, and gauge where welds could be formed avoiding martensite in the weld area microstructure

  11. Steel

    Zorev, N.N.; Astafiev, A.A.; Loboda, A.S.; Savukov, V.P.; Runov, A.E.; Belov, V.A.; Sobolev, J.V.; Sobolev, V.V.; Pavlov, N.M.; Paton, B.E.

    1977-01-01

    Steels also containing Al, N and arsenic, are suitable for the construction of large components for high-power nuclear reactors due to their good mechanical properties such as good through-hardening, sufficiently low brittleness conversion temperature and slight displacement of the latter with neutron irradiation. Defined steels and their properties are described. (IHOE) [de

  12. In-situ ultrasonic characterisation of M250 grade maraging steel

    Sakthipandi, K.; Rajesh Kanna, R.; Lenin, N.; Ahilandeswari, E.

    2016-01-01

    The excellent mechanical properties such as ultrahigh strength combined with good fracture toughness, hardness, ductility and corrosion resistance of maraging steels makes these steels the most preferred materials for nuclear power plants. The high strength and high fracture toughness of these maraging steels are characterised by intermetallic precipitation in iron-nickel martensite. The temperature dependent in-situ microstructural characterisation of maraging steel over wide range of temperatures is used to explore the microstructural changes in maraging steels during aging. An indigenous experimental set-up was used for in-situ measurements of ultrasonic longitudinal velocity (UL) over a wide range of temperatures from 300 to 1200 K at a heating rate of 1 K min -1 . The measured UL as a function of temperature is represented. Zone A (300-735 K) shows a gradual decrease with an increase in temperature and Zone B (735-785 K) are attributed to recovery of martensite i.e., reduction in point defects induced by quenching process. Zone C (785-835 K) is attributed to nucleation and formation of Ni 3 (Ti,Mo) coherent intermetallic precipitates. Coarsening and subsequent dissolution process of Ni 3 (Ti,Mo) intermetallic precipitates with increase in temperature is observed from 835 to 905 K (Zone D). The coarsening and partial dissolution of globular precipitation of Fe 2 Mo occurs during aging of maraging steel in the temperature region connecting to Zone E (905-1005 K). At 1005 K, the maraging steel gets transformed to austenite from martensite state, and hence, the velocity takes rapid decrease instead of taking a gradual decrease as marked by double dotted line. (author)

  13. Comparison of corrosion performance of grade 316 and grade 347H stainless steels in molten nitrate salt

    Trent, M. C.; Goods, S. H.; Bradshaw, R. W.

    2016-05-01

    Stainless steel samples machined from SA-312 TP316 and SA-213 TP347H pipe were exposed to a molten nitrate salt environment at 600°C (1112°F) for up to 3000 hours in order to generate corrosion rates for use in concentrated solar power (CSP) facilities. Descaled weight loss measurements were made at 1000, 2000, and 3000 hours, with optical and scanning electron microscopy being performed on samples at the longest exposure time. The 316 and 347H alloys exhibited metal losses of 4.4 and 4.8 um respectively at 3000 hours. A linear fit to the data sets yielded annualized metal loss rates of 8.4 and 8.8 um/yr. The oxides were relatively uniform in thickness and multilayered. The inner layer consisted of a (Fe, Cr)-spinel with appreciable amounts of Mn while the outer layer was an oxide composed of only Fe. No pitting, intergranular attack, or other localized attack was found, despite the presence of a sensitized microstructure in both alloys and chloride impurity in the salt mixture. The observations presented here indicate that the two alloys perform quite comparably with respect to molten salt-induced corrosion and in that regard; either would be expected to perform satisfactorily in the intended application.

  14. Reaction behavior between B{sub 4}C, 304 grade of stainless steel and Zircaloy at 1473 K

    Sasaki, Ryosuke [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research Advanced Material, Tohoku University, 1-1 Katahira 2, Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan); Ueda, Shigeru, E-mail: tie@tagen.tohokku.ac.jp [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research Advanced Material, Tohoku University, 1-1 Katahira 2, Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan); Kim, Sun-Joong [Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Chosun University, 309, Pilmun-daero, Dong-gu, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Gao, Xu; Kitamura, Shin-ya [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research Advanced Material, Tohoku University, 1-1 Katahira 2, Aoba-ku, Sendai (Japan)

    2016-08-15

    For a better understanding of the decommissioning of the Fukushima-daiichi nuclear power plant, the melting behavior of the control blade and the channel box should be clarified. In Fukushima nuclear reactor, the channel box was made of Zircaloy-4, and the control rode is made of B{sub 4}C together with stainless steel cladding and sheath. In the study, the interaction among B{sub 4}C, stainless steel (SUS), and Zircaloy-4 was investigated at 1473 K in either argon or air atmosphere. In argon, Zircaloy is melted by the diffusion of elements from SUS, and SUS was melted at 1473 K by the diffusion of C and B. In air, SUS reacted with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and formed an oxides melt firstly. Then, the oxidized Zircaloy contacted with this melt and fused. Moreover, the progress of core melting process during severe accident under different atmospheres was firstly discussed. - Highlights: • The interaction among the system of B{sub 4}C, grade 304 stainless steel and Zircaloy-4 were studied at 1473 K in Ar and air. • In argon, Zircaloy is melted by the diffusion of elements from SUS, and SUS was melted by the diffusion of C and B. • In air, SUS reacted with B{sub 2}O{sub 3} and formed an oxides melt. Then, the oxidized Zircaloy contacted with this melt and fused.

  15. Contribution of deformation mechanisms to strength and ductility in two Cr-Mn grade austenitic stainless steels

    Hamada, A.S., E-mail: atef_saleh@s-petrol.suez.edu.eg [Materials Engineering Laboratory, Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Metallurgical and Materials Engineering Department, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Karjalainen, L.P. [Materials Engineering Laboratory, Box 4200, University of Oulu, 90014 Oulu (Finland); Misra, R.D.K. [Center for Structural and Functional Materials and Chemical Engineering Department, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, P.O. Box 44130, Lafayette, LA 70504-4130, USA. (United States); Talonen, J. [Outokumpu Oyj, Box 140, FI-02201 Espoo (Finland)

    2013-01-01

    The role of different deformation mechanisms in controlling mechanical properties were studied in two low-Ni, Cr-Mn austenitic stainless steel grades (Types 201 and 201L) by tensile testing and microstructure examinations. Tensile tests were carried out at two different strain rates, 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -2} s{sup -1}, in the temperature range from -80 Degree-Sign C to 200 Degree-Sign C. It was observed that the flow properties and work hardening rate are affected significantly by temperature and strain rate for the concerned steels through variation of deformation mechanism. Deformation-induced austenite-to-martensite transformation (TRIP effect) is the dominant mechanism at temperatures below room temperature. From 50 Degree-Sign C up to 200 Degree-Sign C, plastic deformation is controlled by mechanical twinning (TWIP effect) and dislocation glide. The electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) technique and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were employed to study the plastic deformation accommodation and identify the primary deformation mechanisms operating in the deformed steels.

  16. Comparison of Crack Growth Test Results at Elevated Temperature and Design Code Material Properties for Grade 91 Steel

    Lee, Hyeong-Yeon; Kim, Woo-Gon; Kim, Nak-Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Reserach Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    The material properties of crack growth models at an elevated temperature were derived from the results of numerous crack growth tests for Mod.9Cr-1Mo (ASME Grade 91) steel specimens under fatigue loading and creep loading at an elevated temperature. These crack growth models were needed for defect assessment under creep-fatigue loading. The mathematical crack growth rate models for fatigue crack growth (FCG) and creep crack growth (CCG) were determined based on the test results, and the models were compared with those of the French design code RCCMRx to investigate the conservatism of the code. The French design code RCC-MRx provides an FCG model and a CCG model for Grade 91 steel in Section III Tome 6. It was shown that the FCG model of RCC-MRx is conservative, while the CCG model is non-conservative compared with the present test data. Thus, it was shown that further validation of the property was required. Mechanical strength tests and creep tests were also conducted, and the test results were compared with those of RCC-MRx.

  17. Irradiated dynamic fracture toughness of ASTM A533, Grade B, Class 1 steel plate and submerged arc weldment. Heavy section steel technology program technical report No. 41

    Davidson, J.A.; Ceschini, L.J.; Shogan, R.P.; Rao, G.V.

    1976-10-01

    As a result of the Heavy Section Steel Technology Program (HSST), sponsored by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Westinghouse Electric Corporation conducted dynamic fracture toughness tests on irradiated HSST Plate 02 and submerged arc weldment material. Testing performed at the Westinghouse Research and Development Laboratory in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, included 0.394T compact tension, 1.9T compact tension, and 4T compact tension specimens. This data showed that, in the transition region, dynamic test procedures resulted in lower (compared to static) fracture toughness results, and that weak direction (WR) oriented specimen data were lower than the strong direction (RW) oriented specimen results. Irradiated lower-bound fracture toughness results of the HSST Program material were well above the adjusted ASME Section III K/sub IR/ curve. An irradiated and nonirradiated 4T-CT specimen was tested during a fracture toughness test as a preliminary study to determine the effect of irradiation on the acoustic emission-stress intensity factor relation in pressure vessel grade steel. The results indicated higher levels of acoustic emission activity from the irradiated sample as compared to the unirradiated one at a given stress intensity factor (K) level

  18. Examining the microtexture evolution in a hole-edge punched into 780 MPa grade hot-rolled steel

    Shin, J.H.; Kim, M.S. [Department of Printed Electronics Engineering, Sunchon National University, 315 Maegok, Sunchon, Jeonnam 540-950 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, S.I.; Seo, S.J. [POSCO Technical Research Laboratories, Gwangyang 545-090 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, S.-H., E-mail: shihoon@sunchon.ac.kr [Department of Printed Electronics Engineering, Sunchon National University, 315 Maegok, Sunchon, Jeonnam 540-950 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    The deformation behavior in the hole-edge of 780 MPa grade hot-rolled steel during the punching process was investigated via microstructure characterization and computational simulation. Microstructure characterization was conducted to observe the edges of punched holes through the thickness direction, and electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) was used to analyze the heterogeneity of the deformation. Finite element analysis (FEA) that could account for a ductile fracture criterion was conducted to simulate the deformation and fracture behaviors of 780 MPa grade hot-rolled steel during the punching process. Calculation of rotation rate fields at the edges of the punched holes during the punching process revealed that metastable orientations in Euler space were confined to specific orientation groups. Rotation-rate fields effectively explained the stability of the initial texture components in the hole-edge region during the punching process. A visco-plastic self-consistent (VPSC) polycrystal model was used to calculate the microtexture evolution in the hole-edge region during the punching process. FEA revealed that the heterogeneous effective strain was closely related to the heterogeneity of the Kernel average misorientation (KAM) distribution in the hole-edge region. A simulation of the deformation microtexture evolution in the hole-edge region using a VPSC model was in good agreement with the experimental results. - Highlights: •We analyzed the microstructure in a hole-edge punched in HR 780HB steel. •Rotation rate fields revealed the stability of the initial texture components. •Heterogeneous effective stain was closely related to the KAM distribution. •VPSC model successfully simulated the deformation microtexture evolution.

  19. Effects of DC bias on magnetic performance of high grades grain-oriented silicon steels

    Ma, Guang; Cheng, Ling [Global Energy Interconnection Research Institute, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Transmission Technology,Beijing 102211 (China); Lu, Licheng [State Grid Corporation of China, Beijing 100031 (China); Yang, Fuyao; Chen, Xin [Global Energy Interconnection Research Institute, State Key Laboratory of Advanced Transmission Technology,Beijing 102211 (China); Zhu, Chengzhi [State Grid Zhejiang Electric Power Company, Hangzhou 310007 (China)

    2017-03-15

    When high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission adopting mono-polar ground return operation mode or unbalanced bipolar operation mode, the invasion of DC current into neutral point of alternating current (AC) transformer will cause core saturation, temperature increasing, and vibration acceleration. Based on the MPG-200D soft magnetic measurement system, the influence of DC bias on magnetic performance of 0.23 mm and 0.27 mm series (P{sub 1.7}=0.70–1.05 W/kg, B{sub 8}>1.89 T) grain-oriented (GO) silicon steels under condition of AC / DC hybrid excitation were systematically realized in this paper. For the high magnetic induction GO steels (core losses are the same), greater thickness can lead to stronger ability of resisting DC bias, and the reasons for it were analyzed. Finally, the magnetostriction and A-weighted magnetostriction velocity level of GO steel under DC biased magnetization were researched. - Highlights: • Magnetic properties of 0.23 mm and 0.27 mm series (P{sub 1.7}=0.70–1.05 W/kg, B{sub 8}>1.89 T) grain-oriented (GO) silicon steels under condition of AC / DC hybrid excitation were systematically analyzed. • Influence of DC biased magnetization on core loss, magnetostriction, and A-weighted magnetostriction velocity level of GO steel were researched. • Greater thickness and relatively lower magnetic induction (B{sub 8}>1.89 T yet) of GO steel can lead to stronger ability of resisting DC bias, and the reasons for it were analyzed.

  20. Ultrasonic Characterization of Aging Behavior in M250 Grade Maraging Steel

    Yeheskel, Ori

    2009-03-01

    The increase in sound velocities during the aging of M250 maraging steel reported by Rajkumar et al. was analyzed. The present article provides a new perspective on why and to what extent the sound velocities change during aging. The main parameter that affects the elastic moduli and the sound velocities in the early and intermediate stages of aging in maraging steel is the depletion of Ni from the martensitic matrix due to Ni3Ti and Ni3Mo formation. The issue of sound velocity increase with aging time was addressed here in a few different ways to support the validity of Ni depletion.

  1. Application Feasibility of PRE 50 grade Super Austenitic Stainless Steel as a Steam Generator Tubing

    Park, Yong Soo [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young sik [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Taek Jun; Kim, Sun Tae; Park, Hui Sang [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the properties of the super austenitic stainless steel, SR-50A for application as steam generator tubing material. The microstructure, mechanical properties, corrosion properties, were analyzed and the results were compared between super austenitic stainless steel and Alloy 600 and Alloy 690. Super austenitic stainless steel, SR-50A is superior to Alloy 600, Alloy 690 and Alloy 800 in the mechanical properties(tensile strength, yield strength, and elongation). It was investigated that thermal conductivity of SR-50A was higher than Alloy 600. As a result of thermal treatment on super stainless steel, SR-50A, caustic SCC resistance was increased and its resistance was as much as Alloy 600TT and Alloy 690TT. In this study, optimum thermal treatment condition to improve the caustic corrosion properties was considered as 650 deg C or 550 deg C 15 hours. However, it is necessary to verify the corrosion mechanism and to prove the above results in the various corrosive environments. 27 refs., 6 tabs., 59 figs. (author)

  2. The effect of low temperatures on the fatigue of high-strength structural grade steels

    Walters, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    It is well-known that for fracture, ferritic steels undergo a sudden transition from ductile behavior at higher temperatures to brittle cleavage failure at lower temperatures. However, this phenomenon has not received much attention in the literature on fatigue. The so-called Fatigue Ductile-Brittle

  3. Statistical model for predicting correct amount of deoxidizer of Al-killed grade casted at slab continuous caster of Pakistan steel

    Siddiqui, A.R.; Khan, M.M.A.; Ismail, B.M.

    1999-01-01

    Oxygen is blown in Converter process to oxidize hot metal. This introduces dissolved oxygen in the metal, which may cause embrittlement, voids, inclusion and other undesirable properties in steel. The steel bath at the time of tapping contains 400 to 800 ppm oxygen. Deoxidation is carried out during tapping by adding into the tap ladle appropriate amounts of ferromanganese, ferrosilicon and/or aluminum or other special deoxidizers. In the research aluminum killed grade steel which are casted at the slab caster of Pakistan Steel were investigated. Amount of aluminum added is very critical because if we add lesser amount of aluminum then the required quantity then there will be an incomplete killing of oxygen which results uncleanness in steel. Addition of larger amount of aluminum not only increases the cost of the production but also results as higher amount of alumina, which results in nozzle clogging and increase, loses. The purpose of the research is to develop a statistical model which would predict correct amount of aluminum addition for complete deoxidation of aluminum killed grade casted at slab continuous caster of Pakistan Steel. In the model aluminum added is taken as dependent variable while tapping temperature, turn down carbon composition, turndown manganese composition and oxygen content in steel would be the independent variable. This work is based on operational practice on 130 tons Basic Oxygen furnace. (author)

  4. Functionally graded material of 304L stainless steel and inconel 625 fabricated by directed energy deposition: Characterization and thermodynamic modeling

    Carroll, Beth E.; Otis, Richard A.; Borgonia, John Paul; Suh, Jong-ook; Dillon, R. Peter; Shapiro, Andrew A.; Hofmann, Douglas C.; Liu, Zi-Kui; Beese, Allison M.

    2016-01-01

    Many engineering applications, particularly in extreme environments, require components with properties that vary with location in the part. Functionally graded materials (FGMs), which possess gradients in properties such as hardness or density, are a potential solution to address these requirements. The laser-based additive manufacturing process of directed energy deposition (DED) can be used to fabricate metallic parts with a gradient in composition by adjusting the volume fraction of metallic powders delivered to the melt pool as a function of position. As this is a fusion process, secondary phases may develop in the gradient zone during solidification that can result in undesirable properties in the part. This work describes experimental and thermodynamic studies of a component built from 304L stainless steel incrementally graded to Inconel 625. The microstructure, chemistry, phase composition, and microhardness as a function of position were characterized by microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and microindentation. Particles of secondary phases were found in small amounts within cracks in the gradient zone. These were ascertained to consist of transition metal carbides by experimental results and thermodynamic calculations. The study provides a combined experimental and thermodynamic computational modeling approach toward the fabrication and evaluation of a functionally graded material made by DED additive manufacturing.

  5. A microstructural comparison of two nuclear-grade martensitic steels using small-angle neutron scattering

    Coppola, R.; Fiori, F.; Little, E. A.; Magnani, M.

    1997-06-01

    Results are presented of a small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) study on two 10-13% Cr martensitic stainless steels of interest for nuclear applications, viz. DIN 1.4914 (MANET specification, for fusion reactors) and AISI 410. The investigation has focussed principally on microstructural effects associated with the differences in chromium content between the two alloys. The size distribution functions determined from nuclear and magnetic SANS components for the two steels given identical heat treatments are in accord with an interpretation based on the presence of ˜ 1 nm size CCr aggregates in the microstructure. Much larger (˜ 10 nm) scattering inhomogeneities with different magnetic contrast are also present and tentatively identified as carbides.

  6. Fabrication of functionally graded materials between P21 tool steel and Cu by using laser aided layered manufacturing

    Jeong, Jong Seol; Shin, Ki Hoon [Seoul Nat' l Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    With the development of layered manufacturing, thermally conductive molds or molds embedding conformal cooling channels can be directly fabricated. Although P21 tool steel is widely used as a mold material because of its dimensional stability, it is not efficient for cooling molds owing to its low thermal conductivity. Hence, the use of functionally graded materials (FGMs) between P21 and Cu may circumvent a tradeoff between the strength and the heat transfer rate. As a preliminary study for the layered manufacturing of thermally conductive molds having FGM structures, one dimensional P21 Cu FGMs were fabricated by using laser aided direct metal tooling (DMT), and then, material properties such as the thermal conductivity and specific heat that are related to the heat transfer were measured and analyzed.

  7. Simulation and analysis of the residual stresses in functionally graded Al2O3 coatings on CLAM steel

    Yan Zilin; Huang Qunying; Song Yong; Guo Zhihui; Wu Yican

    2008-01-01

    Alumina coatings on CLAM steel substrate are proposed to serve as tritium, corrosion and electric insulation barriers in the design of Dual Functional Lithium Lead Test Blanket Module (DFLL-TBM) in China in the frame of ITER. In order to avoid the crack failure due to thermal expansion mismatch of the coating and the substrate, the functionally graded materials (FGM) concept was adopted. In this paper, the residual thermal stresses in the coatings were calculated with the commercial software ANSYS. It is recommended that the compositional factor, numbers of the gradient interlayers and the thickness of the FGM zone are p=0.8, N=8, H=0.6 mm, respectively, according to the simulation results. These results could be helpful and theoretical guidance to the preparation and optimization of the coatings in the future. (authors)

  8. Macrostructural and microstructural features of 1 000 MPa grade TRIP steel joint by CO2 laser welding

    Wang Wenquan; Sun Daqian; Kang Chungyun

    2008-01-01

    Bead-on-plate CO2 laser welding of 1 000 MPa grade transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steel was conducted under different welding powers, welding speeds and shield gases. The macrostructural and microstructural features of the welded joint were investigated. The increase of welding speed reduced the width of the weld bead and the porosities in the weld bead resulting from the different flow mode of melted metal in weld pool. The decrease of welding power or use of shield gas of helium also contributed to the reduction of porosity in the weld bead due to the alleviation of induced plasma formation, thus stabilizing the keyhole. The porosity formation intimately correlated with the evaporation of alloy element Mn in the base metal. The laser welded metal had same martensite microstructure as that of water-quenched base metal. The welding parameters which increased cooling rate all led to fine microstructures of the weld bead.

  9. Cyclic softening based on dislocation annihilation at sub-cell boundary for SA333 Grade-6 C-Mn steel

    Bhattacharjee, S.; Dhar, S.; Acharyya, S. K.; Gupta, S. K.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, the response of SA333 Grade-6 C-Mn steel subjected to uniaxial and in-phase biaxial tension-torsion cyclic loading is experimented and an attempt is made to model the material behaviour. Experimentally observed cyclic softening is modelled based on ‘dislocation annihilation at low angle grain boundary’, while Ohno-Wang kinematic hardening rule is used to simulate the stress-strain hysteresis loops. The relevant material parameters are extracted from the appropriate experimental results and metallurgical investigations. The material model is plugged as user material subroutine into ABAQUS FE platform to simulate pre-saturation low cycle fatigue loops with cyclic softening and other cyclic plastic behaviour under prescribed loading. The stress-strain hysteresis loops and peak stress with cycles were compared with the experimental results and good agreements between experimental and simulated results validated the material model.

  10. Influence of aging condition and reversion austenite on fatigue property of the 300 grade 18Ni maraging steel

    Moriyama, Michihiko; Takaki, Setsuo; Kawagoishi, Norio

    2000-01-01

    The influence of aging condition on fatigue strength of the 300 grade 18Ni maraging steel has been investigated in relation to the behavior of age hardening and the formation of reversion austenite. In this study, rotating bending fatigue tests were performed for three series of specimens with different aging condition; as solution-treated without aging, aged for various time at 753 K which is the temperature applied for the industrial aging treatment, and over-aged to form a small amount of reversion austenite. Effect of reversion austenite on fatigue strength was examined using specimens with the same static strength which had been controlled by varying aging temperature and time, namely under-aging or over-aging. The main results obtained are as follows. (1) In the case of 753 K aging, the fatigue limits of specimens aged for 11 ks to 48 ks were nearly the same value, although an under-aged (2.8 ks) specimen has as much lower value as a solution-treated specimen without aging treatment. (2) A small amount of reversion austenite is effective for increasing fatigue resistance. For instance, 2 vol% of austenite was enough for improving fatigue limit of the maraging steel used, from 580 MPa to 640 MPa at the same hardness level of Hv 610. (author)

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of the conditions of deoxidation and secondary treatment of low-silicon steel grade

    Євген Анатолійович Чичкарьов

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with analysis and production testing of technological solutions aimed at reducing the consumption of aluminium for steel deoxidation and reducing level of metal contamination by oxide non-metal inclusions, as well as preventing silicon reduction during out-of-furnace treatment. The conditions of low-silicon steel deoxidation and out-of-furnace treatment have been analysed. It has been found that the scope of oxygen activity variation in the converter before tapping increases while the mass fraction of carbon in the metal decreases. For the converter meltings with a mass fraction of carbon over the range 0,05-0,07 % [C] before tapping the real range of variation was 150-300 ppm. The effect of meltings carburizing on aluminium consumption and the degree of aluminium assimilation have been analysed. It has been shown that in fact the same specific consumption of ferromanganese and comparable changes within the metal oxidation change range before tapping (400-1100 ppm the addition of the carburizer decreases the consumption of aluminium by 0,15 kg/t (in amounts of pure aluminium. The variation interval of assimilation degree of aluminium, consumed for binding the dissolved oxygen in metal and for dissolution in metal has been found. It has been shown that in the melting of low-silicon steel with out- of-furnace treatment but without the use of furnace-ladle unit the rational limit of variation of mass fraction of magnesium oxide variation in the ladle slag is equal to- 6-8 % by weight

  12. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C.; Gallego, J.

    2010-01-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  13. Corrosion and hydrogen permeation of A216 Grade WCA steel in hydrothermal magnesium-containing brines

    Haberman, J.H.; Frydrych, D.J.; Westerman, R.E.

    1988-03-01

    Corrosion rates determined at 1 month in 150/degree/C brine increased with magnesium concentration. The structure of the corrosion product, as determined by x-ray diffraction, depended upon the magnesium concentration. In brines with less than 10,000 ppM magnesium, the primary corrosion product had a spinel structure characteristic of magnetite or magnesioferrite. In brines containing magnesium concentrations greater than 20,000 ppM, the primary corrosion product had the amakinite structure characteristic of a complex iron-magnesium hydroxide. The high corrosion rates observed in brines containing high magnesium concentrations suggest that the corrosion products having the amakinite structure is less protective than corrosion products having the spinel structure. Corrosion rates in high-magnesium (inclusion) brine determined over a 6-month test duration were essentially constant. Hydrogen permeation rates observed in exposing mild steel to high-Mg/sup 2/plus// brine at 150/degree/C could be potentially damaging to a mild steel waste package container. The rate of hydrogen permeation was proportional to the brine flow rate in the autoclave. Thiourea additions to the brine increased the hydrogen permeation rate; sulfate and bromide ion additions did not. The maximum gaseous hydrogen pressure attainable is not known (based on 3Fe /plus/ 4H 2 O /plus/ Fe(sub 3)O /plus/ 4H 2 , would be /approximately/900 atmospheres), and the dependence of permeation rate on temperature is not known. 8 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs

  14. Novel chitosan/diclofenac coatings on medical grade stainless steel for hip replacement applications

    Finšgar, Matjaž; Uzunalić, Amra Perva; Stergar, Janja; Gradišnik, Lidija; Maver, Uroš

    2016-05-01

    Corrosion resistance, biocompatibility, improved osteointegration, as well the prevention of inflammation and pain are the most desired characteristics of hip replacement implants. In this study we introduce a novel multi-layered coating on AISI 316LVM stainless steel that shows promise with regard to all mentioned characteristics. The coating is prepared from alternating layers of the biocompatible polysaccharide chitosan and the non-steroid anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), diclofenac. Electrochemical methods were employed to characterize the corrosion behavior of coated and uncoated samples in physiological solution. It is shown that these coatings improve corrosion resistance. It was also found that these coatings release the incorporated drug in controlled, multi-mechanism manner. Adding additional layers on top of the as-prepared samples, has potential for further tailoring of the release profile and increasing the drug dose. Biocompatibility was proven on human-derived osteoblasts in several experiments. Only viable cells were found on the sample surface after incubation of the samples with the same cell line. This novel coating could prove important for prolongation of the application potential of steel-based hip replacements, which are these days often replaced by more expensive ceramic or other metal alloys.

  15. FY17 Status Report on the Initial EPP Finite Element Analysis of Grade 91 Steel

    Messner, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sham, T. -L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-07-01

    This report describes a modification to the elastic-perfectly plastic (EPP) strain limits design method to account for cyclic softening in Gr. 91 steel. The report demonstrates that the unmodified EPP strain limits method described in current ASME code case is not conservative for materials with substantial cyclic softening behavior like Gr. 91 steel. However, the EPP strain limits method can be modified to be conservative for softening materials by using softened isochronous stress-strain curves in place of the standard curves developed from unsoftened creep experiments. The report provides softened curves derived from inelastic material simulations and factors describing the transformation of unsoftened curves to a softened state. Furthermore, the report outlines a method for deriving these factors directly from creep/fatigue tests. If the material softening saturates the proposed EPP strain limits method can be further simplified, providing a methodology based on temperature-dependent softening factors that could be implemented in an ASME code case allowing the use of the EPP strain limits method with Gr. 91. Finally, the report demonstrates the conservatism of the modified method when applied to inelastic simulation results and two bar experiments.

  16. Microstructure and properties of 700 MPa grade HSLA steel during high temperature deformation

    Chen, Xizhang; Huang, Yuming; Lei, Yucheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hot deformation behavior of 700 MPa HSLA steel above 1200 °C in was detailed studied. • Uniform and granular bainite is formed when the deformation amount is 40%. • Deformation resistance value under steady-equilibrium state is about 56 MPa. - Abstract: A high temperature deformation experiment was conducted on a high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel Q690 using Thermecmastor-Z thermal/physical simulator. During the experiment, the specimens were heated from room temperature to 1200 °C with the heating rate of 10 °C/s and 50 °C/s, respectively. The deformation temperature was 1200 °C and the deformation amounts were 0%, 10% and 40%, respectively. The microstructures, stress–strain diagram and hardness were obtained. The results revealed that the microstructure transformation of deformed austenite was quite different from that of the normal situation. With the increasing of deformation amount, more lath-shaped microstructure and less granulous microstructure were observed. The compressive deformation effectively prevented the precipitation of carbides. Larger deformation amount or lower heating rate was conducive to the atomic diffusion, which led to the microstructure uniformity and hardness decreasing. The maximum stress was 68.4 MPa and the steady stress was about 56 MPa

  17. Influence and role of ethanol minor constituents of fuel grade ethanol on corrosion behavior of carbon steel

    Samusawa, Itaru; Shiotani, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The pitting factors of the minor contents of ethanol are acetic acid, Cl and H 2 O. • Formic acid in ethanol promotes general corrosion. • The H 2 O content in fuel-grade-ethanol (FGE) affects the corrosion morphology. • Acetic acid generates iron acetate, which has high solubility in FGE environments. • A pitting mechanism based on the rupture of passive film is proposed. - Abstract: The influences of organic acids, chloride and water on the corrosion behavior of carbon steel in fuel grade ethanol (FGE) environments were investigated by immersion testing in simulated FGE. The roles of acetic acid, chloride and water in pitting corrosion were studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and electrochemical experiments. The results indicated that iron acetate is generated on oxide film. Iron(II) acetate shows high solubility in FGE environments. The sites where iron(II) acetate is existed become preferential anodic sites, and chloride promotes anodic dissolution at such sites

  18. Study of the corrosion fatigue resistance of steel grades for automotive suspension springs

    Mougin, J. [Ascometal CREAS, BP70045, F-57301 Hagondange Cedex (France); Mostacchi, A. [Ascometal Developpement, BP17, F-38570 Le Cheylas (France); Hersart, Y. [Allevard Rejna Autosuspensions CRDT, 201 Rue de Sin-le-Noble, BP629, F-59506 Douai Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    In order to reduce the total weight of vehicles for ecological and economical reasons, the car makers use down-sizing for several components of the cars. Concerning helical suspension springs, the size of the bar diameter and the number of spring coils are decreased, leading to an increase of the stress level applied on the spring. In this respect, steels with high mechanical properties are required, to achieve a good fatigue resistance of the springs. The corrosion resistance is also important for this application. Indeed, during service, the protective coating applied on the springs can be scratched by gravels, and bare underlying metal can be put in contact with the atmosphere, including humidity, drops of rain but also de-icing salts. Generally speaking, an increase of mechanical properties decreases the corrosion fatigue resistance of the steels. In this respect, a compromise needs to be found, that is why the study of corrosion fatigue resistance is very important. In order to study the corrosion fatigue resistance of spring steels, an original device and test procedure have been set up. Torsional fatigue on specimens is used to simulate the stress applied on each spring coil. The stress levels are chosen to be representative of the actual inservice loads. The specimens are shot-peened and coated in a same way as the actual springs. Scratching of the painting is performed, giving rise to small areas of bare metal. Three types of tests are performed: fatigue in air (taken as the reference level), fatigue on specimens which have been corroded previously (test similar to the spring-makers practice) and coupled corrosion fatigue. The mechanisms involved in corrosion fatigue have been studied. For all the specimens, crack initiated on corrosion pits. For the specimens corroded prior fatigue testing, the corrosion pits can be quite severe. In this case, these pits act as a surface defect which increases locally the stress concentration and accelerates the crack

  19. Diffusion bonding of IN 718 to VM 350 grade maraging steel

    Crosby, S. R.; Biederman, R. R.; Reynolds, C. C.

    1972-01-01

    Diffusion bonding studies have been conducted on IN 718, VM 350 and the dissimilar alloy couple, IN 718 to maraging steel. The experimental processing parameters critical to obtaining consistently good diffusion bonds between IN 718 and VM 350 were determined. Interrelationships between temperature, pressure and surface preparation were explored for short bending intervals under vacuum conditions. Successful joining was achieved for a range of bonding cycle temperatures, pressures and surface preparations. The strength of the weaker parent material was used as a criterion for a successful tensile test of the heat treated bond. Studies of VM-350/VM-350 couples in the as-bonded condition showed a greater yielding and failure outside the bond region.

  20. Enhanced corrosion resistance of strontium hydroxyapatite coating on electron beam treated surgical grade stainless steel

    Gopi, D., E-mail: dhanaraj_gopi@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Rajeswari, D. [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Department of Physics, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Ramya, S. [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Sekar, M. [Department of Chemistry, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Department of Physics, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); R, Pramod; Dwivedi, Jishnu [Industrial and Medical Accelerator Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013, Madhya Pradesh (India); Kavitha, L., E-mail: louiskavitha@yahoo.co.in [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Department of Physics, Periyar University, Salem 636 011, Tamilnadu (India); Ramaseshan, R. [Thin film and Coatings Section, Surface and Nanoscience Division, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102, Tamilnadu (India)

    2013-12-01

    The surface of 316L stainless steel (316L SS) is irradiated by high energy low current DC electron beam (HELCDEB) with energy of 500 keV and beam current of 1.5 mA followed by the electrodeposition of strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr-HAp) to enhance its corrosion resistance in physiological fluid. The coatings were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and High resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM). The Sr-HAp coating on HELCDEB treated 316L SS exhibits micro-flower structure. Electrochemical results show that the Sr-HAp coating on HELCDEB treated 316L SS possesses maximum corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution.

  1. Enhanced corrosion resistance of strontium hydroxyapatite coating on electron beam treated surgical grade stainless steel

    Gopi, D.; Rajeswari, D.; Ramya, S.; Sekar, M.; R, Pramod; Dwivedi, Jishnu; Kavitha, L.; Ramaseshan, R.

    2013-12-01

    The surface of 316L stainless steel (316L SS) is irradiated by high energy low current DC electron beam (HELCDEB) with energy of 500 keV and beam current of 1.5 mA followed by the electrodeposition of strontium hydroxyapatite (Sr-HAp) to enhance its corrosion resistance in physiological fluid. The coatings were characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and High resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM). The Sr-HAp coating on HELCDEB treated 316L SS exhibits micro-flower structure. Electrochemical results show that the Sr-HAp coating on HELCDEB treated 316L SS possesses maximum corrosion resistance in Ringer's solution.

  2. Investigations into the fatigue behaviour of nuclear grades of austenitic stainless steel

    Mann, J.

    2015-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Fatigue is an important problem within the nuclear industry due to the complex combination of thermal and mechanical loading that components experience during the operation of a nuclear reactor. Austenitic stainless steels are widely used within nuclear reactors for a number of applications including piping systems and pressure vessels. A number of studies have shown that austenitic stainless steel components operating within a light water reactor (LWR) environment may experience a significant reduction in fatigue life under certain circumstances, however the precise mechanisms responsible for the reduction are still not fully understood. The effects of environment are included in some fatigue assessment methods, however these are generally considered to be over-conservative and predicted fatigue lifetimes are not reflected well by service experience. This project aims to enhance the understanding of fatigue in both air and LWR environments through the synergistic use of a wide range of different microscopy techniques. It is expected that a better understanding of each of the different stages of fatigue will lead to more accurate fatigue predictions that ultimately result in better and safer lifetime predictions. This paper focuses on introducing the background behind the project, highlighting the current methods for assessing fatigue lifetimes and the motivations for the current research. The results of various initial microscopic investigations are presented, with a focus on a number of novel applications using laser scanning confocal microscopy to perform large scale analyses of fatigue fracture surfaces and test specimen gauge length surfaces. The use of surface replicas in conjunction with laser scanning confocal microscopy is discussed along with its potential applications for the assessment of fatigue damage in in-service components. Initial finite element modelling of crack growth within fatigue test specimens is discussed

  3. Corrosion Study of Super Ferritic Stainless Steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) and Several Other Stainless Steel Grades (UNS S31603, S32101, and S32205) in Caustic Solution Containing Sodium Sulfide

    Chasse, Kevin R.; Singh, Preet M.

    2013-11-01

    Electrochemical techniques, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used in this study to show how the corrosion mechanism of several commercial grades of stainless steel in hot caustic solution is strongly influenced by the presence of sodium sulfide. Experimental results from super ferritic stainless steel UNS S44660 (26Cr-3Ni-3Mo) were compared to austenitic stainless steel UNS S31603, lean duplex stainless steel (DSS) UNS S32101, and standard DSS UNS S32205 in caustic solution, with and without sodium sulfide, at 443 K (170 °C). Weight loss measurements indicated that corrosion rates of UNS44660 were much lower than the other grades of stainless steel in the presence of the sodium sulfide. Potentiodynamic polarization and linear polarization resistance measurements showed that the electrochemical behavior was altered by the adhesion of sulfur species, which reduced the polarization resistances and increased the anodic current densities. SEM and XPS results imply that the surface films that formed in caustic solution containing sodium sulfide were defective due to the adsorption of sulfide, which destabilized the passive film and led to the formation of insoluble metal sulfide compounds.

  4. FY17 Status Report on the Micromechanical Finite Element Modeling of Creep Fracture of Grade 91 Steel

    Messner, M. C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Truster, T. J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Cochran, K. B. [DR& C Inc.; Parks, D. M. [DR& C Inc.; Sham, T. -L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-09-01

    Advanced reactors designed to operate at higher temperatures than current light water reactors require structural materials with high creep strength and creep-fatigue resistance to achieve long design lives. Grade 91 is a ferritic/martensitic steel designed for long creep life at elevated temperatures. It has been selected as a candidate material for sodium fast reactor intermediate heat exchangers and other advanced reactor structural components. This report focuses on the creep deformation and rupture life of Grade 91 steel. The time required to complete an experiment limits the availability of long-life creep data for Grade 91 and other structural materials. Design methods often extrapolate the available shorter-term experimental data to longer design lives. However, extrapolation methods tacitly assume the underlying material mechanisms causing creep for long-life/low-stress conditions are the same as the mechanisms controlling creep in the short-life/high-stress experiments. A change in mechanism for long-term creep could cause design methods based on extrapolation to be non-conservative. The goal for physically-based microstructural models is to accurately predict material response in experimentally-inaccessible regions of design space. An accurate physically-based model for creep represents all the material mechanisms that contribute to creep deformation and damage and predicts the relative influence of each mechanism, which changes with loading conditions. Ideally, the individual mechanism models adhere to the material physics and not an empirical calibration to experimental data and so the model remains predictive for a wider range of loading conditions. This report describes such a physically-based microstructural model for Grade 91 at 600° C. The model explicitly represents competing dislocation and diffusional mechanisms in both the grain bulk and grain boundaries. The model accurately recovers the available experimental creep curves at higher stresses

  5. Constant Load SCC Initiation Response of Alloy 22 (UNS N06022), Titanium Grade 7 and Stainless Steels at 1050C

    Young, L.M.; Catlin, G.M.; Andresen, P.L.; Gordon, G.M.

    2002-01-01

    This paper provides an update on research addressing the effects of material condition and applied stress on stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in waste package and drip shield materials for the Yucca Mountain Project. Time-to-failure experiments are being performed on smooth bar tensile specimens in a hot, concentrated, mixed-salt solution chosen to simulate concentrated Yucca Mountain water. The effects of applied stress, welding, surface finish, shot peening, cold work, crevicing, and aging treatment are being investigated for Alloy 22 (UNS N06022). Aging treatments were designed to produce topologically close-packed phases (TCP) and long-range ordering (LRO) and are under investigation as worse-case scenarios for possible microstructures in Alloy 22 (UNS N06022). Titanium Grade 7 and 3 16NG stainless steel are included in the matrix, as they are identified for drip shield and waste package components, respectively. Sensitized 304SS specimens are included in the test matrix to provide benchmark data. This research complements high-resolution crack-growth-rate experiments currently being performed in a parallel research project

  6. X-Ray Diffraction Profile Analysis for Characterizing Isothermal Aging Behavior of M250 Grade Maraging Steel

    Mahadevan, S.; Jayakumar, T.; Rao, B. P. C.; Kumar, Anish; Rajkumar, K. V.; Raj, Baldev

    2008-08-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies were carried out to characterize aging behavior of M250 grade maraging steel samples subjected to isothermal aging at 755 K for varying durations of 0.25, 1, 3, 10, 40, 70, and 100 hours. Earlier studies had shown typical features of precipitation hardening, wherein the hardness increased to a peak value due to precipitation of intermetallics and decreased upon further aging (overaging) due to reversion of martensite to austenite. Intermetallic precipitates, while coherent, are expected to increase the microstrain in the matrix. Hence, an attempt has been made in the present study to understand the microstructural changes in these samples using XRD line profile analysis. The anisotropic broadening with diffraction angle observed in the simple Williamson Hall (WH) plot has been addressed using the modified WH (mWH) approach, which takes into account the contrast caused by dislocations on line profiles, leading to new scaling factors in the WH plot. The normalized mean square strain and crystallite size estimated from mWH have been used to infer early precipitation and to characterize aging behavior. The normalized mean square strain has been used to determine the Avrami exponent in the Johnson Mehl Avrami (JMA) equation, which deals with the kinetics of precipitation. The Avrami exponent thus determined has matched well with values found by other methods, as reported in literature.

  7. Prediction Model of Cutting Parameters for Turning High Strength Steel Grade-H: Comparative Study of Regression Model versus ANFIS

    Adel T. Abbas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Grade-H high strength steel is used in the manufacturing of many civilian and military products. The procedures of manufacturing these parts have several turning operations. The key factors for the manufacturing of these parts are the accuracy, surface roughness (Ra, and material removal rate (MRR. The production line of these parts contains many CNC turning machines to get good accuracy and repeatability. The manufacturing engineer should fulfill the required surface roughness value according to the design drawing from first trail (otherwise these parts will be rejected as well as keeping his eye on maximum metal removal rate. The rejection of these parts at any processing stage will represent huge problems to any factory because the processing and raw material of these parts are very expensive. In this paper the artificial neural network was used for predicting the surface roughness for different cutting parameters in CNC turning operations. These parameters were investigated to get the minimum surface roughness. In addition, a mathematical model for surface roughness was obtained from the experimental data using a regression analysis method. The experimental data are then compared with both the regression analysis results and ANFIS (Adaptive Network-based Fuzzy Inference System estimations.

  8. Influence of Hold Time and Stress Ratio on Cyclic Creep Properties Under Controlled Tension Loading Cycles of Grade 91 Steel

    Kim, Woo Gon; Park, Jae Young; Jang, Jin Sung; Ekaputra, I Made Wicaksana; Kim, Seon Jin

    2017-01-01

    Influences of hold time and stress ratio on cyclic creep properties of Grade 91 steel were systemically investigated using a wide range of cyclic creep tests, which were performed with hold times (HTs) of 1 minute, 3 minutes, 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 20 minutes, and 30 minutes and stress ratios (R) of 0.5, 0.8, 0.85, 0.90, and 0.95 under tension loading cycles at 600°C. Under the influence of HT, the rupture time increased to HT = 5 minutes at R = 0.90 and R = 0.95, but there was no influence at R = 0.50, 0.80, and 0.85. The creep rate was constant regardless of an increase in the HT, except for the case of HT = 5 minutes at R = 0.90 and R = 0.95. Under the influence of stress ratio, the rupture time increased with an increase in the stress ratio, but the creep rate decreased. The cyclic creep led to a reduction in the rupture time and an acceleration in the creep rate compared with the case of monotonic creep. Cyclic creep was found to depend dominantly on the stress ratio rather than on the HT. Fracture surfaces displayed transgranular fractures resulting from microvoid coalescence, and the amount of microvoids increased with an increase in the stress ratio. Enhanced coarsening of the precipitates in the cyclic creep test specimens was found under all conditions

  9. Effect of 4-(N,N-diethylamino)benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone on the corrosion of aged 18 Ni 250 grade maraging steel in phosphoric acid solution

    Poornima, T.; Nayak, Jagannath; Nityananda Shetty, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → DEABT as corrosion inhibitor for maraging steel in phosphoric acid. → Inhibition efficiency increases with increase in inhibitor concentration. → Inhibition efficiency decreases with increase in temperature. → Adsorption obeys Langmuir adsorption isotherm. - Abstract: 4-(N,N-diethylamino)benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone (DEABT) was studied for its corrosion inhibition property on the corrosion of aged 18 Ni 250 grade maraging steel in 0.67 M phosphoric acid at 30-50 deg. C by potentiodynamic polarization, EIS and weight loss techniques. Inhibition efficiency of DEABT was found to increase with the increase in DEABT concentration and decrease with the increase in temperature. The activation energy E a and other thermodynamic parameters (ΔG ads 0 , ΔH ads 0 , ΔS ads 0 ) have been evaluated and discussed. The adsorption of DEABT on aged maraging steel surface obeys the Langmuir adsorption isotherm model and the inhibitor showed mixed type inhibition behavior.

  10. The wettability modification of bio-grade stainless steel in contact with simulated physiological liquids by the means of laser irradiation

    Hao, L.; Lawrence, J.; Li, L.

    2005-01-01

    Early surface events that occur rapidly upon implantation of a biomaterial into biological fluids determine the subsequent response. These involve wetting by physiological liquids followed by adsorption of proteins and cells to the biomaterials surface. A CO 2 laser and high power diode laser (HPDL) were used to modify the surface properties of the material and thus manipulate the wettability of the material and its interaction with physiological liquids. The contact angles, θ, of selected test liquids including simulated physiological liquids shows that the wettability of the stainless steel improved after CO 2 and HPDL treatment. The determined adhesion work of stainless steel towards stimulated physiological fluid enhanced after laser treatment, implying better interaction with the biological liquids. It is demonstrated that the laser could be a novel and controllable technique for enhancing the biocompatibility of bio-grade stainless steel

  11. Small punch tensile/fracture test data and 3D specimen surface data on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel from cryogenic to room temperature.

    Bruchhausen, Matthias; Lapetite, Jean-Marc; Ripplinger, Stefan; Austin, Tim

    2016-12-01

    Raw data from small punch tensile/fracture tests at two displacement rates in the temperature range from -196 °C to room temperature on Grade 91 ferritic/martensitic steel are presented. A number of specimens were analyzed after testing by means of X-ray computed tomography (CT). Based on the CT volume data detailed 3D surface maps of the specimens were established. All data are open access and available from Online Data Information Network (ODIN)https://odin.jrc.ec.europa.eu. The data presented in the current work has been analyzed in the research article "On the determination of the ductile to brittle transition temperature from small punch tests on Grade 91 ferritic-martensitic steel" (M. Bruchhausen, S. Holmström, J.-M. Lapetite, S. Ripplinger, 2015) [1].

  12. Required grades of hull steel plates in consideration of fracture toughness; Hakai jinsei wo koryoshita sentaiyo koban shiyo kubun ni kansuru ichikosatsu

    Yajima, H; Yamamoto, M; Ogaki, Y [Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-10-01

    This paper discusses the required grades of hull steel plates based on the steel ship rule of Nippon Kaiji Kyokai (NK). The minimum value of the allowable crack length in NK rule (critical safety crack length at 0degC just before brittle unstable crack causing fatal fracture) was estimated. In the case where the estimated crack tip exists in a matrix, the crack length was a minimum of 200-210mm, while nearly 60mm in a fusion line at high-heat-input welded joint. The allowable crack lengths estimated from a specified value in the NK rule were fairly different. The allowable crack length at 0degC was also estimated from the minimum value in V-notch Charpy impact test. The private proposal on the required grades of hull steel plates in consideration of fracture toughness was discussed. Thirty-five percent of crack lengths found in real ships is 100mm or less, however, cracks of 250-400mm long are frequently found suggesting the allowable crack length of 400mm. The required grade integrally considering required values and design conditions is demanded to secure the reliability of hull strength. 5 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Alloy Design of Martensitic 9Cr-Boron Steel for A-USC Boiler at 650 °C — Beyond Grades 91, 92 and 122

    Abe, Fujio; Tabuchi, M.; Tsukamoto, S.

    Boundary hardening is shown to be the most important strengthening mechanism in creep of tempered martensitic 9% Cr steel base metal and welded joints at 650 °C. The enrichment of soluble boron near prior austenite grain boundaries (PAGBs) by the GB segregation is essential for the reduction of coarsening rate of M23C6 carbides near PAGBs, enhancing the boundary and sub-boundary hardening near PAGBs, and also for the change in α/γ transformation behavior in heat-affected-zone (HAZ) of welded joints during heating of welding, producing the same microstructure in HAZ as in the base metal. Excess addition of nitrogen to the 9Cr-boron steel promotes the formation of boron nitrides during normalizing heat treatment, which consumes most of soluble boron and degrades the creep strength. A NIMS 9Cr steel (MARBN; Martensitic 9Cr steel strengthened by boron and MX nitrides) with 120-150 ppm boron and 60-90 ppm nitrogen, where no boron nitride forms during normalizing heat treatment, exhibits not only much higher creep strength of base metal than Grades 91, 92 and 122 but also substantially no degradation in creep strength due to Type IV fracture in HAZ of welded joints at 650°C. The protective Cr2O3-rich scale forms on the surface of 9Cr steel by pre-oxidation treatment in Ar gas, which significantly improves the oxidation resistance in steam at 650°C.

  14. Investigation of cause of cracking of high-strength 30HGSNA grade steel subjected to stresses and corrosive agents

    Sitko, E.

    1995-01-01

    It has been found out that 30HGSNA steel undergo cracking under action of stresses in aqueous solutions containing oxygen, while it show high resistance in deoxidated solutions. The purpose of such phenomena is the existence of sulfur inclusions in steel which are a centers of denting corrosion. That points acting as a stresses concentrators where pH factor decreases including hydrogen formation and its absorption in the metal. That mechanism is the main purpose of brittle steel cracking observed in oxygen rich solutions. (author)

  15. Effect of Ni Addition on Bainite Transformation and Properties in a 2000 MPa Grade Ultrahigh Strength Bainitic Steel

    Tian, Junyu; Xu, Guang; Jiang, Zhengyi; Hu, Haijiang; Zhou, Mingxing

    2018-05-01

    The effects of Nickle (Ni) addition on bainitic transformation and property of ultrahigh strength bainitic steels are investigated by three austempering processes. The results indicate that Ni addition hinders the isothermal bainite transformation kinetics, and decreases the volume fraction of bainite due to the decrease of chemical driving force for nucleation and growth of bainite transformation. Moreover, the product of tensile strength and total elongation (PSE) of high carbon bainitic steels decreases with Ni addition at higher austempering temperatures (220 and 250 °C), while it shows no significant difference at lower austempering temperature (200 °C). For the same steel (Ni-free or Ni-added steel), the amounts of bainite and RA firstly increase and then decrease with the increase of the austempering temperature, resulting in the highest PSE in the sample austempered at temperature of 220 °C. In addition, the effects of austempering time on bainite amount and property of high carbon bainitic steels are also analyzed. It indicates that in a given transformation time range of 30 h, more volume of bainite and better mechanical property in high carbon bainitic steels can be obtained by increasing the isothermal transformation time.

  16. Construction of continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram using Gleeble for coarse grained heat affected zone of SA106 grade B steel

    Vimalan, G.; Muthupandi, V.; Ravichandran, G.

    2018-05-01

    A continuous cooling transformation diagram is constructed for simulated coarse grain heat affected zone (CGHAZ) of SA106 grade B carbon steel. Samples are heated to a peak temperature of 1200°C in the Gleeble thermo mechanical simulator and then cooled at different cooling rates varying from 0.1°C/s to 100°C/s. Microstructure of the specimens simulated at different cooling rates were characterised by optical microscopy and hardness was assessed by Vicker's hardness test and micro-hardness test. Transformation temperatures and the corresponding phase fields were identified from dilatometric curves and the same could be confirmed by correlating with the microstructures at room temperature. These data were used to construct the CCT diagram. Phase fields were found to have ferrite, pearlite, bainite and martensite or their combinations. With the help of this CCT diagram it is possible to predict the microstructure and hardness of coarse grain HAZ experiencing different cooling rates. The constructed CCT diagram becomes an important tool in evaluating the weldability of SA106 grade B carbon steel.

  17. New stainless steels of ferrite-martensite grade and perspectives of their application in thermonuclear facilities and fast reactors

    Ajtkhozhin, Eh.S.; Maksimkin, O.P.

    2007-01-01

    Review of scientific literature for last 5 years in which results on study of radiation effect on ferrite-martensite steels - construction materials of fast reactors and most probable candidates for first wall and blanket of the thermonuclear facilities ITER and Demo - are presented. Alongside with this a prior experimental data on study of microstructure changing and physical- mechanical properties of ferrite-martensite steel EhP-450 - the material of hexahedral case of spent assembly of BN-350 fast reactor- are cited. Principal attention was paid to considering of radiation effects of structural components content changing and ferrite-martensite steel swelling irradiated at comparatively low values of radiation damage climb rate

  18. Plasma nitriding of steels

    Aghajani, Hossein

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the effect of plasma nitriding on the properties of steels. Parameters of different grades of steels are considered, such as structural and constructional steels, stainless steels and tools steels. The reader will find within the text an introduction to nitriding treatment, the basis of plasma and its roll in nitriding. The authors also address the advantages and disadvantages of plasma nitriding in comparison with other nitriding methods. .

  19. Effects of Testing Method on Stretch-Flangeability of Dual-Phase 980/1180 Steel Grades

    Madrid, Mykal; Van Tyne, Chester J.; Sadagopan, Sriram; Pavlina, Erik J.; Hu, Jun; Clarke, Kester D.

    2018-06-01

    Challenging fuel economy and safety standards in the automotive industry have led to the need for materials with higher strength while maintaining levels of formability that meet component manufacturing requirements. Advanced high-strength steels, such as dual-phase steels with tensile strengths of 980 MPa and 1180 MPa, are of interest to address this need. Increasing the strength of these materials typically comes at the expense of ductility, which may result in problems when stamping parts with trimmed or sheared edges, as cracking at the sheared edge may occur at lower strains. Here, hole expansion tests were performed with different punch geometries (conical and flat-bottom) and different edge conditions (sheared and machined) to understand the effects of testing conditions on performance, and these results are discussed in terms of mechanical properties and microstructures.

  20. Correlation Between Intercritical Heat-Affected Zone and Type IV Creep Damage Zone in Grade 91 Steel

    Wang, Yiyu; Kannan, Rangasayee; Li, Leijun

    2018-04-01

    A soft zone in Cr-Mo steel weldments has been reported to accompany the infamous Type IV cracking, the highly localized creep damage in the heat-affected zone of creep-resistant steels. However, the microstructural features and formation mechanism of this soft zone are not well understood. In this study, using microhardness profiling and microstructural verification, the initial soft zone in the as-welded condition was identified to be located in the intercritical heat-affected zone of P91 steel weldments. It has a mixed structure, consisting of Cr-rich re-austenitized prior austenite grains and fine Cr-depleted, tempered martensite grains retained from the base metal. The presence of these further-tempered retained grains, originating from the base metal, is directly responsible for the hardness reduction of the identified soft zone in the as-welded condition. The identified soft zone exhibits a high location consistency at three thermal stages. Local chemistry analysis and thermodynamic calculation show that the lower chromium concentrations inside these retained grains thermodynamically decrease their potentials for austenitic transformation during welding. Heterogeneous grain growth is observed in the soft zone during postweld heat treatment. The mismatch of strengths between the weak Cr-depleted grains and strong Cr-rich grains enhances the creep damage. Local deformation of the weaker Cr-depleted grains accelerates the formation of creep cavities.

  1. Effect of Welding Heat Input on the Microstructure and Toughness in Simulated CGHAZ of 800 MPa-Grade Steel for Hydropower Penstocks

    Qingfeng Ding

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available To determine the appropriate welding heat input for simulated coarse grained heat affected zone (CGHAZ of 800 MPa-grade steel used in hydropower penstocks, the microstructural evolution, hardness, and 50% fraction appearance transition temperature (50% FATT were investigated. The results indicated that when the cooling rate (heat input is reduced (increased, the impact toughness at −20 °C and hardness of the simulated CGHAZ decreased. When the heat input increased from 18 to 81 kJ/cm, the 50% FATT increased from −80 °C to −11 °C. At 18 kJ/cm, the microstructures consisted of lath bainite and granular bainite, but lath bainite decreased with increasing heat input. The increase in the 50% FATT was attributed mainly to an increase in the austenite grain size and effective grain size, and a decrease in lath bainite and the fraction of HAGBs (misorientation: ≥15°.

  2. Corrosion Effects on the Fatigue Crack Propagation of Giga-Grade Steel and its Heat Affected Zone in pH Buffer Solutions for Automotive Application

    Lee, H. S.

    2018-03-01

    Corrosion fatigue crack propagation test was conducted of giga-grade steel and its heat affected zone in pH buffer solutions, and the results were compared with model predictions. Pure corrosion effect on fatigue crack propagation, particularly, in corrosive environment was evaluated by means of the modified Forman equation. As shown in results, the average corrosion rate determined from the ratio of pure corrosion induced crack length to entire crack length under a cycle load were 0.11 and 0.37 for base metal and heat affected zone, respectively, with load ratio of 0.5, frequency of 0.5 and pH 10.0 environment. These results demonstrate new interpretation methodology for corrosion fatigue crack propagation enabling the pure corrosion effects on the behavior to be determined.

  3. Microstructural and microanalysis investigations of bond titanium grade1/low alloy steel st52-3N obtained by explosive welding

    Gloc, Michal, E-mail: michalgloc@wp.pl [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering (Poland); Wachowski, Marcin [Military University of Technology in Warsaw, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering (Poland); Plocinski, Tomasz; Kurzydlowski, Krzysztof Jan [Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering (Poland)

    2016-06-25

    Explosive welding is a solid state welding process that is used for the metallurgical joining of two or more dissimilar metals. In this process, forces of controlled detonations are utilized to accelerate one metal plate into another. As a result, an atomic bond is created. It is considered as a cold-welding process since it allows metals to be joined without losing their pre-bonding properties. The metal plates are joined under the influence of very high pressure which causes local plastic deformation and grain refining at the bond interface. Moreover, between the parent and flyer plate some local melting zones are formed. The explosively cladded steel plates are used in the chemical, petrochemical and nuclear industry due to their good corrosion resistance and mechanical properties. In this work, microstructural and chemical analyses of clad plates obtained by the explosive method are presented. The clad plates studied were made of titanium grade 1 explosively bonded with a thin layer of st52-3N low alloy steel. The microstructure was evaluated using light (LM) and scanning electron microscopes (SEM), while chemical composition was assessed using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). It was found that the bond area had different microstructure, chemical composition and microhardness than the bonded materials. In the junction between the base steel and the cladding, a strongly defected transient zone with altered chemical composition in comparison with the bonded metals was revealed. - Highlights: • Explosive welding as an effective method for joining similar or dissimilar metals. • Slip brands, elongated grains and twins correlated with high plastic deformations. • Investigations of the local melted zones, formed at the interface of the clads. • Mechanical properties connected with microstructural changes and deformation.

  4. Construction of long-term isochronous stress-strain curves by a modeling of short-term creep curves for a Grade 9Cr-1Mo steel

    Kim, Woo-Gon; Yin, Song-Nan; Koo, Gyeong-Hoi

    2009-01-01

    This study dealt with the construction of long-term isochronous stress-strain curves (ISSC) by a modeling of short-term creep curves for a Grade 9Cr-1Mo steel (G91) which is a candidate material for structural applications in the next generation nuclear reactors as well as in fusion reactors. To do this, tensile material data used in the inelastic constitutive equations was obtained by tensile tests at 550degC. Creep curves were obtained by a series of creep tests with different stress levels of 300MPa to 220MPa at an identical controlled temperature of 550degC. On the basis of these experimental data, the creep curves were characterized by Garofalo's creep model. Three parameters of P 1 , P 2 and P 3 in Garofalo's model were properly optimized by a nonlinear least square fitting (NLSF) analysis. The stress dependency of the three parameters was found to be a linear relationship. But, the P 3 parameter representing the steady state creep rate exhibited a two slope behavior with different stress exponents at a transient stress of about 250 MPa. The long-term creep curves of the G91 steel was modeled by Garofalo's model with only a few short-term creep data. Using the modeled creep curves, the long-term isochronous curves up to 10 5 hours were successfully constructed. (author)

  5. Evaluation of deformation behavior of in grains and grain boundaries of L-grade austenitic stainless steel 316L

    Nagashima, Nobuo; Hayakawa, Masao; Tsukada, Takashi; Kaji, Yoshiyuki; Miwa, Yukio; Ando, Masami; Nakata, Kiyotomo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, micro-hardness tests and AFM observations were performed on SUS 316L low-carbon austenitic stainless steel pre-strained by cold rolling to investigate its deformation behavior. The following results were obtained. Despite the fact that the same plastic strain was applied, post-tensile test AFM showed narrower slip-band spacing in a reduction in area of 30% cold-rolled specimen than the unrolled specimen. Concentrated slip bands were observed near grain boundaries. These were presumably due to slip blocking at grain boundaries. SCC sensitivity increased at a hardness of 300 or higher, the frequency occurrence of a hardness of 300 or higher in the micro-hardness measurements was compared. The micro-hardness did not exceed 300 both within grains and at grain boundaries in the unrolled and up to a reduction in area of 20% cold-rolled specimens of before and after the tensile tests. Micro-hardness exceeding 300 was found to occur frequently in after tensile test specimens with a reduction in area of 30% or more, particularly at grain boundaries. It is suggested that the nonuniformity of deformation at grain boundaries plays an important role of IGSCC crack propagation mechanism of low-carbon austenitic stainless steel. (author)

  6. In situ x-ray diffraction investigations during low energy ion nitriding of austenitic stainless steel grade 1.4571

    Manova, D; Mändl, S; Gerlach, J W; Hirsch, D; Neumann, H; Rauschenbach, B

    2014-01-01

    Insertion of nitrogen into austenitic stainless steel leads to anomalously fast nitrogen diffusion and the formation of an expanded face-centred cubic phase which is known to contain a large amount of mechanical stress. In situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements during low energy nitrogen ion implantation into steel 316Ti at 300–550 °C allow a direct view into diffusion and phase formation. While the layer growth is directly observable from the decreasing substrate reflection intensity, the time evolution of the intensities for the expanded phase reflection is much more complex: several mechanisms including at least formation and annealing of defects, twinning, reduction of the crystal symmetry, or grain rotation may be active inside the expanded phase, besides the thermally activated decay of the metastable expanded phase. This locally varying coherence length or scattering intensity from the expanded phase is furthermore a function of temperature and time, additionally complicating the deconvolution of XRD spectra for stress and concentration gradients. As no concise modelling of this coherence length is possible at present, a simple qualitative model assuming a dependence of the scattering intensity on the depth, influence by stress and plastic flow during the nitriding process is proposed for understanding the underlying processes. (paper)

  7. Effect of aging on impact properties of ASTM A890 Grade 1C super duplex stainless steel

    Martins, Marcelo; Forti, Leonardo Rodrigues Nogueira

    2008-01-01

    Super duplex stainless steels in the solution annealed condition are thermodynamically metastable systems which, when exposed to heat, present a strong tendency to 'seek' the most favorable thermodynamic condition. The main purpose of this study was to characterize the microstructure of a super duplex stainless steel in the as cast and solution annealed conditions, and to determine the influence of aging heat treatments on its impact strength, based on Charpy impact tests applied to V-notched test specimens. The sigma phase was found to begin precipitating at heat treatment temperatures above 760 deg. C and to dissolve completely only above 1040 deg. C, with the highest peak concentration of this phase appearing at close to 850 deg. C. Heat treatments conducted at temperatures of 580 deg. C to 740 deg. C led to a reduction of the energy absorbed in the Charpy impact test in response to the precipitation of a particulate phase with particle sizes ranging from 0.5 μm to 1.0 μm, with a chromium and iron-rich chemical composition

  8. Interpretation of toughness tests performed on A533, grade B steel in the transition regime. Modelling and numerical analysis

    Eripret, C.

    1994-01-01

    Modelling the fracture behaviour of pressure vessel steels is of major importance for related structural integrity assessments. It is essential to understand how the micromechanisms control the transition between ductile and brittle fracture for predicting geometry effects on transition temperature. To meet this goal, a model has been developed at EDF/R and DD in the framework of local approach to fracture. Its experimental validation has been achieved by analysing toughness tests performed by AEA Technology for a pressure vessel steel in the transition regime. This large data base has evidenced the specimen thickness effects on toughness properties of the material, as well as influence of prior ductile crack growth. Predictions of the model have been compared with experiments, which shows that the transition curve K 1C = f (T) can be drawn from model predictions and compared with the RCCM or ASME design curve. Substantial safety margins have been exhibited. They are greater for thin specimens (10 mm) than for thicker specimens (230 mm). However, the transition curve in the upper transition region is still underestimated by the model (for temperatures higher than RTNDT + 50 deg C). Improvement should be made to account for important plasticity development and significant crack growth. (author). 30 figs., 10 tabs., 12 refs

  9. Application of Response Surface Methodology for Modeling of Postweld Heat Treatment Process in a Pressure Vessel Steel ASTM A516 Grade 70.

    Peasura, Prachya

    2015-01-01

    This research studied the application of the response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) experiment in mathematical model and optimizes postweld heat treatment (PWHT). The material of study is a pressure vessel steel ASTM A516 grade 70 that is used for gas metal arc welding. PWHT parameters examined in this study included PWHT temperatures and time. The resulting materials were examined using CCD experiment and the RSM to determine the resulting material tensile strength test, observed with optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The experimental results show that using a full quadratic model with the proposed mathematical model is YTS = -285.521 + 15.706X1 + 2.514X2 - 0.004X1(2) - 0.001X2(2) - 0.029X1X2. Tensile strength parameters of PWHT were optimized PWHT time of 5.00 hr and PWHT temperature of 645.75°C. The results show that the PWHT time is the dominant mechanism used to modify the tensile strength compared to the PWHT temperatures. This phenomenon could be explained by the fact that pearlite can contribute to higher tensile strength. Pearlite has an intensity, which results in increased material tensile strength. The research described here can be used as material data on PWHT parameters for an ASTM A516 grade 70 weld.

  10. Long-term strength and allowable stresses of grade 10Kh9MFB and X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91/P91) chromium heat-resistant steels

    Skorobogatykh, V. N.; Danyushevskiy, I. A.; Schenkova, I. A.; Prudnikov, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    Currently, grade X10CrMoVNb9-1 (T91, P91) and 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh) chromium steels are widely applied in equipment manufacturing for thermal power plants in Russia and abroad. Compilation and comparison of tensile, impact, and long-term strength tests results accumulated for many years of investigations of foreign grade X10CrMoVNb9-1, T91, P91, and domestic grade 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh) steels is carried out. The property identity of metals investigated is established. High strength and plastic properties of steels, from which pipes and other products are made, for operation under creep conditions are confirmed. Design characteristics of long-term strength on the basis of tests with more than one million of hour-samples are determined ( and at temperatures of 500-650°C). The table of recommended allowable stresses for grade 10Kh9MFB, 10Kh9MFB-SH, X10CrMoVNb9-1, T91, and P91 steels is developed. The long-time properties of pipe welded joints of grade 10Kh9MFB+10Kh9MFB, 10Kh9MFB-Sh+10Kh9MFB-Sh, X10CrMoVNb9-1+X10CrMoVNb9-1, P91+P91, T91+T91, 10Kh9MFB (10Kh9MFB-Sh)+X10CrMoVNb9-1(T/P91) steels is researched. The welded joint reduction factor is experimentally determined.

  11. A combined experimental and computational study of deformation in grains of biomedical grade 316LVM stainless steel

    You, X.; Connolley, T.; McHugh, P.E.; Cuddy, H.; Motz, C.

    2006-01-01

    In this work three-dimensional crystal plasticity finite element models are used to simulate the tensile deformation of a thin 316LVM stainless steel specimen. Such models are of interest for predicting the mechanical response of cardiovascular stents, typically made from thin struts of this material. Detailed experimental analysis of the mechanical response of the specimen during deformation is performed using scanning electron microscopy, digital photogrammetry and orientation imaging microscopy to examine microscale strain distribution, plastic slip and grain reorientation. At the macroscale, the models are found to give good predictions of the stress-strain response of the specimen, and at the microscale the models are found to give good predictions of the strain distribution and the active slip systems in the different grains. The models are less successful in predicting grain reorientations. This, however, is shown to be quite sensitive to the choice of latent hardening ratio

  12. A combined experimental and computational study of deformation in grains of biomedical grade 316LVM stainless steel

    You, X. [National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Connolley, T. [National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); McHugh, P.E. [National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland) and Department of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering, National University of Ireland, University Road, Galway (Ireland)]. E-mail: peter.mchugh@nuigalway.ie; Cuddy, H. [National Centre for Biomedical Engineering Science, National University of Ireland, Galway (Ireland); Motz, C. [Erich Schmid Institute, Austrian Academy of Sciences, Jahnstrasse 12, A-8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2006-10-15

    In this work three-dimensional crystal plasticity finite element models are used to simulate the tensile deformation of a thin 316LVM stainless steel specimen. Such models are of interest for predicting the mechanical response of cardiovascular stents, typically made from thin struts of this material. Detailed experimental analysis of the mechanical response of the specimen during deformation is performed using scanning electron microscopy, digital photogrammetry and orientation imaging microscopy to examine microscale strain distribution, plastic slip and grain reorientation. At the macroscale, the models are found to give good predictions of the stress-strain response of the specimen, and at the microscale the models are found to give good predictions of the strain distribution and the active slip systems in the different grains. The models are less successful in predicting grain reorientations. This, however, is shown to be quite sensitive to the choice of latent hardening ratio.

  13. Experimental and numerical analysis concerning the behaviour of OL50 steel grade specimens coated with polyurea layer under dynamics loadings

    Bucur Florina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study refers to an experimental and numerical evaluation of a polyurea coating layer influence on the dynamic behaviour of OL50 specimens. Mechanical quasi-static and dynamic tensile tests were performed in axial loading conditions, for 2 mm steel plate specimens. Several metallic specimens have been previously coated with 1.5 mm and 3 mm respectively thickness polyurea layer and tested in traction. The findings results indicate that the presence of polyurea changes the loading pattern of metallic material in the necking area. In terms of polyurea coated metal specimens fracture, there was clearly observed a change of fracture limit. One possible explanation of this phenomenon is the modification of triaxiality state in the necking zone, fact proven by the numerical simulations. Test results indicate that the presence of polyurea layer delays the necking onset phenomenon which precedes the OL50 metallic specimen fracture.

  14. Creep rupture behavior of 9Cr–1.8W–0.5Mo–VNb (ASME grade 92) ferritic steel weld joint

    Sakthivel, T., E-mail: tsakthivel@igcar.gov.in; Vasudevan, M.; Laha, K., E-mail: laha@igcar.gov.in; Parameswaran, P.; Chandravathi, K.S.; Panneer Selvi, S.; Maduraimuthu, V.; Mathew, M.D.

    2014-01-03

    Creep rupture behavior of 9Cr–1.8W–0.5Mo–VNb (ASME grade 92) ferritic steel weld joint fabricated by activated TIG (A-TIG) welding process have been investigated at 923 K over a stress range of 80–150 MPa. The weld joint was comprise of fusion zone, heat affected zone (HAZ) and base metal. The HAZ consisted of coarse prior-austenite grain (CGHAZ), fine prior-austenite grain (FGHAZ) and intercritical (ICHAZ) regions in an order away from the fusion zone to base metal. A hardness trough was observed at the outer edge of HAZ of the weld joint. TEM investigation revealed the presence of coarse M{sub 23}C{sub 6} precipitates and recovery of martensite lath structure into subgrain in the ICHAZ of the weld joint, leading to the hardness trough. The weld joint exhibited lower creep rupture lives than the base metal at relatively lower stresses. Creep rupture failure location of the weld joint was found to shift with applied stress. At high stresses fracture occurred in the base metal, whereas failure location shifted to FGHAZ at lower stresses with significant decrease in rupture ductility. SEM investigation of the creep ruptured specimens revealed precipitation of Laves phase across the joint, more extensively in the FGHAZ. On creep exposure, the hardness trough was found to shift from the ICHAZ to FGHAZ. Extensive creep cavitation was observed in the FGHAZ and was accompanied with the Laves phase, leading to the premature type IV failure of the steel weld joint at the FGHAZ.

  15. Magnetic and mechanical properties of Cu (75 wt%) – 316L grade stainless steels synthesized by ball milling and annealing

    Mondal, Bholanath, E-mail: bholanath_mondal@yahoo.co.in [Department of Central Scientific Services, Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Jadavpur, Kolkata 700032 (India); Chabri, Sumit [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Sardar, Gargi [Department of Zoology, Baruipur College, South 24 Parganas, 743610 (India); Bhowmik, Nandagopal [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Sinha, Arijit, E-mail: arijitsinha2@yahoo.co.in [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Chattopadhyay, Partha Protim [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)

    2015-05-01

    Elemental powders of Cu (75 wt%) and 316-stainless steel (25 wt%) has been subjected to ball milling upto 70 h followed by isothermal annealing at the temperature range of 350–750 °C for 1 h to investigate the microstructural evolution along with magnetic and mechanical properties. After 40 h of milling, the bcc Fe is almost dissolved in the solid solution of Cu but no significant change has been observed in the XRD pattern after 70 h of milling, Annealing of the alloy has resulted in precipitation of nanocrystalline bcc-Fe in Cu which triggers the soft ferromagnetic properties. The extensive mechanical characterization has been done at the microstructural scale by nanoindentation technique which demonstrates a hardening behavior of the compacted and annealed alloys due to possible precipitation of nanocrystalline bcc-Fe in Cu. - Highlights: • Nanocrystalline phases with partial amorphorization obtained after 70 h of milling. • Precipitation and grain coarsening of Fe and Cu after annealing as observed by XRD. • Annealing of the ball milled sample upto 550 {sup o}C has evolved ferromagnetic behavior. • Nanoindentation predicts a hardening behavior of annealed ball milled samples.

  16. Preparation Femtosecond Laser Prevention for the Cold-Worked Stress Corrosion Crackings on Reactor Grade Low Carbon Stainless Steel

    John Minehara, Eisuke

    2004-01-01

    We report here that the femtosecond lasers like low average power Ti:Sapphire lasers, the JAERI high average power free-electron laser and others could peel off and remove two stress corrosion cracking (SCC) origins of the cold-worked and the cracking susceptible material, and residual tensile stress in hardened and stretched surface of low-carbon stainless steel cubic samples for nuclear reactor internals as a proof of principle experiment except for the third origin of corrosive environment. Because a 143 °C and 43% MgCl2 hot solution SCC test was performed for the samples to simulate the cold-worked SCC phenomena of the internals to show no crack at the laser-peered off strip on the cold-worked side and ten-thousands of cracks at the non-peeled off on the same side, it has been successfully demonstrated that the femtosecond lasers could clearly remove the two SCC origins and could resultantly prevent the cold-worked SCC.

  17. Development of TS590MPa grade high tensile strength steel for automotive anti-collision parts; Shogeki kyushuyo 590MPa kyu kochoryoku koban no kaihatsu

    Miura, K; Takagi, S; Furukimi, O; Hira, T; Obara, T [Kawasaki Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Tanimura, S [University of Osaka Prefecture, Osaka (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    The effects of strain rate on the deformation behavior of steels were investigated to find the most appropriate micro-structure of steel for anti-crash parts of automobiles, such as front-side-members. The dual phase steel absorbed a higher amount of energy during dynamic deformation than other steels with the same static yield strength. The increase of volume fraction of the austenite phase in the dual phase steel deteriorates the dynamic deformation behavior. The FEM analysis for crash test of HAT-sectional sheet box also showed the superior performance of the dual phase steel. 4 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Effect of thermomechanical treatments on the microstructure and mechanical properties of 9%Cr martensitic steel (Grade 91)

    Piozin, Emma

    2014-01-01

    9%Cr tempered martensitic steels are currently used in fossil power and in petrochemical plants. Due to attractive properties and manufacturing costs, there are also potential candidates for structural components of new generation nuclear reactors. To optimize their high temperatures mechanical properties (∼500-650 C), a thermal-mechanical treatment based on 'ausforming' is being considered. It is composed of an austenitization step, followed by warm-rolling of metastable austenite at intermediate temperatures (500-600 C), then quenching and tempering. This study aims at understanding the effects of each of these steps, and particularly the warm-rolling of the metastable austenite, on the resulting microstructure and mechanical properties. After applying a variety of thermal-mechanical treatment conditions, with or without warm rolling, the microstructures were systematically characterized at various scales by SEM, TEM, SANS, and neutron diffraction. Martensite laths are finer and dislocations density is higher in warm-rolled samples compared to thermally treated samples. In some cases, warm-rolled + tempered microstructures were partially recrystallized, showing that tempered martensite keeps a 'memory' of previous rolling of metastable austenite. Contrary to what was expected, warm-rolling did not affect precipitation, which is principally governed by austenitizing and tempering temperatures. Warm-rolling lead to a remarkable increase in tensile and creep strength but strongly impairs ductility and significantly increases the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. Some of the warm-rolled materials are sensitive to intergranular failure at both low (Charpy impact tests) and high temperature (creep tests). Moreover, warm-rolling of metastable austenite does not improve, and even increases cyclic softening. All microstructural features have been quantitatively linked to mechanical properties at 20 C, by applying a structural hardening model

  19. Coating of Bio-mimetic Minerals-Substituted Hydroxyapatite on Surgical Grade Stainless Steel 316L by Electrophoretic Deposition for Hard tissue Applications

    Govindaraj, Dharman; Rajan, Mariappan

    2018-02-01

    Third-era bio-implant materials intend to empower particular live cell reactions at the atomic level, these materials represented with a resorbable and biocompatibility that bodies recuperate once they have been embedded. Necessitate to decrease expenses in public health services has required the utilization of surgical grade stainless steel (SS 316L) as the most inexpensive choice for orthodontic and orthopaedic implants. 316L SS is one of the broadly used implant biomaterials in orthodontic and orthopaedic surgeries. Yet, frequently those discharge for toxic metal ions is confirm from the implants and hence a second surgery is required will remove those implant material. One approach to managing the discharge of toxic metal ions is to coat the implant substance with bio-mimetic minerals in hydroxyapatite (HA). Bio-mimetic minerals such as magnesium (Mg), strontium (Sr), also zinc (Zn) were revealed with animate bone growth furthermore restrain bone resorption both in vitro and in vivo. The present work deals with the electrophoretic deposition (EPD) for multi minerals substituted hydroxyapatite (M-HA) on the surface treated 316L SS under distinctive temperatures (27°C, (room temperature), 60 and 80°C). The resultant coatings were characterized by FT-IR, XRD, SEM-EDX, adhesion strength and leach out analysis.

  20. Study of 13Cr-4Ni-(Mo (F6NM Steel Grade Heat Treatment for Maximum Hardness Control in Industrial Heats

    Massimo De Sanctis

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The standard NACE MR0175 (ISO 15156 requires a maximum hardness value of 23 HRC for 13Cr-4Ni-(Mo steel grade for sour service, requiring a double tempering heat treatment at temperature in the range 648–691 °C for the first tempering and 593–621 °C for the second tempering. Difficulties in limiting alloy hardness after the tempering of forged mechanical components (F6NM are often faced. Variables affecting the thermal behavior of 13Cr-4Ni-(Mo during single and double tempering treatments have been studied by means of transmission electron microscopy (TEM observations, X-ray diffraction measurements, dilatometry, and thermo-mechanical simulations. It has been found that relatively low Ac1 temperatures in this alloy induce the formation of austenite phase above 600 °C during tempering, and that the formed, reverted austenite tends to be unstable upon cooling, thus contributing to the increase of final hardness via transformation to virgin martensite. Therefore, it is necessary to increase the Ac1 temperature as much as possible to allow the tempering of martensite at the temperature range required by NACE without the detrimental formation of virgin martensite upon final cooling. Attempts to do so have been carried out by reducing both carbon (<0.02% C and nitrogen (<100 ppm levels. Results obtained herein show final hardness below NACE limits without an unacceptable loss of mechanical strength.

  1. Development of strontium and magnesium substituted porous hydroxyapatite/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) coating on surgical grade stainless steel and its bioactivity on osteoblast cells.

    Gopi, D; Ramya, S; Rajeswari, D; Surendiran, M; Kavitha, L

    2014-02-01

    The present study deals with the successful development of bilayer coatings by electropolymerisation of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) on surgical grade stainless steel (316L SS) followed by the electrodeposition of strontium (Sr) and magnesium (Mg) substituted porous hydroxyapatite (Sr, Mg-HA). The bilayer coatings were characterised by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and high resolution scanning electron microscopy (HRSEM). Corrosion resistance of the obtained coatings was investigated in Ringer's solution by electrochemical techniques and the results were in good agreement with those obtained from chemical analysis, namely inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). Also, the mechanical and biological properties of the bilayer coatings were analyzed. From the obtained results it was evident that the PEDOT/Sr, Mg-HA bilayer exhibited greater adhesion strength than the Sr, Mg-HA coated 316L SS. In vitro cell adhesion test of the Sr, Mg-HA coating on PEDOT coated specimen is found to be more bioactive compared to that of the single substituted hydroxyapatite (Sr or Mg-HA) on the PEDOT coated 316L SS. Thus, the PEDOT/Sr, Mg-HA bilayer coated 316L SS can serve as a prospective implant material for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Corrosion of stainless steel grades in molten NaOH/KOH eutectic at 250 C: AISI304 austenitic and 2205 duplex

    Bozzini, B.; Bogani, F.; Scarselli, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Universita del Salento, Via per Monteroni, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Barella, S.; Boniardi, M. [Dipartimento di Meccanica, Politecnico di Milano, via La Masa 34, 20156 Milano (Italy); Giovannelli, G.; Natali, S. [Dipartimento DICMA, Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Roma (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    The present paper focuses on the corrosion of an austenitic (AISI304) and a duplex (2205) stainless steel grade in molten KOH/NaOH 50 w/o eutectic at 250 C. Experimental activities have been performed consisting in electrochemical measurements (linear sweep voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectrometry) complemented by metallographic (in-plane and cross-sectional SEM micrography), structural (X-ray diffractometry) and compositional (EDX line-profiles) characterisation of the materials attacked under electrochemically controlled conditions. Electrochemical measurements have shown that AISI304 exhibits a passivating behaviour, characterised by two passivation peaks and a transpassive threshold, while duplex, does not yield a clear indication of passivation. AISI304 was found to fail by intergranular corrosion and to be covered in both passive and transpassive conditions, by an incoherent scale, containing electrolyte species. Duplex samples, instead tends to fail by homogeneous attack and exhibit a range of scale structures, depending on the applied potential. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Role of Chloride in the Corrosion and Fracture Behavior of Micro-Alloyed Steel in E80 Simulated Fuel Grade Ethanol Environment

    Olufunmilayo O. Joseph

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, micro-alloyed steel (MAS material normally used in the production of auto parts has been immersed in an E80 simulated fuel grade ethanol (SFGE environment and its degradation mechanism in the presence of sodium chloride (NaCl was evaluated. Corrosion behavior was determined through mass loss tests and electrochemical measurements with respect to a reference test in the absence of NaCl. Fracture behavior was determined via J-integral tests with three-point bend specimens at an ambient temperature of 27 °C. The mass loss of MAS increased in E80 with NaCl up to a concentration of 32 mg/L; beyond that threshold, the effect of increasing chloride was insignificant. MAS did not demonstrate distinct passivation behavior, as well as pitting potential with anodic polarization, in the range of the ethanol-chloride ratio. Chloride caused pitting in MAS. The fracture resistance of MAS reduced in E80 with increasing chloride. Crack tip blunting decreased with increasing chloride, thus accounting for the reduction in fracture toughness.

  4. Corrosion resistance of API 5L grade B steel with taro leaf (Colocasia esculenta) addition as corrosion inhibitor in HCl 0.1 M

    Lestari, Yulinda; Priyotomo, Gadang

    2018-05-01

    Taro leaf (Colocasia esculenta) has the potential to be used as a corrosion inhibitor because it has a substance called polyphenol that binds to the hydroxyl group and essential amino acids. Taro leaf extract is taken by maceration method. In this study, the specimen was steel API 5L grade B that would measured the corosivity in 0.1 M HCl solution + taro leaf extract with a specific concentration (in ppm). Tests conducted by FTIR method taro leaves, potentiodynamic polarization (Tafel) and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). Based on the results revealed that there is a phenolic group in taro leaves, which has polyphenol content 0.053 % (mg/100 mg). The optimum composition of taro leaf extract is 4000 ppm which generate corrosion rate value of 30.22 mpy and efficiency inhibitor performance of 72.7 %. In this study, the Kads value of taro leaf extract ranged from 0.885 to greater than Kads value of ginger extract in hydrochloric acid solution. The high Kads values indicate a more efficient process of adsorption and better value of inhibition efficiency.

  5. Effect of Long-Term Thermal Exposures on Microstructure and Impression Creep in 304HCu Grade Austenitic Stainless Steel

    Dash, Manmath Kumar; Karthikeyan, T.; Mythili, R.; Vijayanand, V. D.; Saroja, S.

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents the results of microstructural evolution and mechanical properties in 304H Cu grade austenite stainless (SS 304HCu) during long-term exposure at high temperatures. The predicted phase composition as a function of temperature obtained using JMatPro® software was confirmed in conjunction with the microstructural evolution characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Microstructures revealed primary Nb(C,N), M23C6 precipitates at γ-grain boundaries, fine secondary Nb(C,N) intragranular carbides, and a uniform precipitation of <40-nm-sized spherical Cu-rich phase after thermal aging for 10,000 hours at 903 K (630 °C). The impression creep rate at 300 MPa increased by a factor of 20 between 873 K and 923 K (600 °C and 650 °C). The creep rate at 903 K (630 °C) was found to moderately reduce with aging time, signifying the role of Cu-rich phase in improving the creep resistance. The deformation zones and the recrystallization behavior of the plastic zone in creep tested specimen was assessed using Electron backscatter diffraction technique.

  6. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour in fuel-grade bio-ethanol of low-alloy steel modified by plasma nitro-carburizing and post-oxidizing

    Boniatti, Rosiana; Bandeira, Aline L.; Crespi, Ângela E.; Aguzzoli, Cesar; Baumvol, Israel J. R.; Figueroa, Carlos A.

    2013-09-01

    The interaction of bio-ethanol on steel surfaces modified by plasma-assisted diffusion technologies is studied for the first time. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour of AISI 4140 low-alloy steel in fuel-grade bio-ethanol was investigated. The steel surfaces were modified by plasma nitro-carburizing followed plasma oxidizing. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray dispersive spectroscopy, and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the modified surface before and after immersion tests in bio-ethanol up to 77 days. The main corrosion mechanism is pit formation. The pit density and pit size were measured in order to quantify the corrosion resistance which was found to depend more strongly on microstructure and morphology of the oxide layer than on its thickness. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples post-oxidized at 480 °C and 90 min.

  7. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour in fuel-grade bio-ethanol of low-alloy steel modified by plasma nitro-carburizing and post-oxidizing

    Boniatti, Rosiana; Bandeira, Aline L.; Crespi, Ângela E.; Aguzzoli, Cesar; Baumvol, Israel J.R.; Figueroa, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of bio-ethanol on steel surfaces modified by plasma-assisted diffusion technologies is studied for the first time. The influence of surface microstructure and chemical composition on corrosion behaviour of AISI 4140 low-alloy steel in fuel-grade bio-ethanol was investigated. The steel surfaces were modified by plasma nitro-carburizing followed plasma oxidizing. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, X-ray dispersive spectroscopy, and glow-discharge optical emission spectroscopy were used to characterize the modified surface before and after immersion tests in bio-ethanol up to 77 days. The main corrosion mechanism is pit formation. The pit density and pit size were measured in order to quantify the corrosion resistance which was found to depend more strongly on microstructure and morphology of the oxide layer than on its thickness. The best corrosion protection was observed for samples post-oxidized at 480 °C and 90 min.

  8. An evaluation procedure of sodium environmental effects on FBR grade SUS316 (316FR) and Modified 9Cr-1Mo steel. On the basis of the studies up to the fiscal year of 1998

    1999-01-01

    Evaluation of sodium environmental effects on structural materials of fast breeder reactors (FBR's) is one of the key issues for the integrity of the plants. The Elevated Temperature Structural Design Guide for Monju (ETSDG) incorporated an evaluation procedure of sodium environmental effects in the Appendix MA.2, for the conventional steels, such as SUS304, SUS316, SUS321 and 2 1/4Cr-1Mo. Following the establishment of the ETSDG, a new material with superior elevated temperature properties, FBR grade SUS316 (316FR), has been developed, and studies on Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel (Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel) has been performed, for the application to demonstration reactors and successive large-scale reactors. These materials were shown to have, at least equal, or better compatibility with sodium compared with the conventional steels. Moreover, studies have been continued with the conventional steels, particularly with SUS304, for the further validation of the procedure in the ETSDG, especially in terms of long-term properties. Those studies provide basis for the study on 316FR. This report proposed an evaluation procedure of sodium environmental effects on 316FR and Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, which is to be incorporated into the structural design guide for demonstration fast breeder reactors. The procedure is summarized as follows: (1) Corrosion allowance of 316FR and Mod.9Cr-1Mo can be evaluated by the equation determined in the ETSTG. (2) Strength reduction factors on design allowable values are not necessary for either steel. Strength reduction due to the transfer of carbon and nitrogen, etc does not occur with 316FR, which was the same as SUS304. Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel does not show strength reduction, contrary to 2 l/4Cr-1Mo, similar ferritic steel. (3) Corrosion allowance can be determined separately for thin-walled components. The procedure allows design without correction factors for Mod.9Cr-1Mo steel, which was not possible for 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel in the ETSDG. (author)

  9. Effect of weld metal properties on fatigue crack growth behaviour of gas tungsten arc welded AISI 409M grade ferritic stainless steel joints

    Shanmugam, K.; Lakshminarayanan, A.K.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of filler metals such as austenitic stainless steel, ferritic stainless steel and duplex stainless steel on fatigue crack growth behaviour of the gas tungsten arc welded ferritic stainless steel joints was investigated. Rolled plates of 4 mm thickness were used as the base material for preparing single 'V' butt welded joints. Centre cracked tensile (CCT) specimens were prepared to evaluate fatigue crack growth behaviour. Servo hydraulic controlled fatigue testing machine was used to evaluate the fatigue crack growth behaviour of the welded joints. From this investigation, it was found that the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal showed superior fatigue crack growth resistance compared to the joints fabricated by austenitic and ferritic stainless steel filler metals. Higher yield strength, hardness and relatively higher toughness may be the reasons for superior fatigue performance of the joints fabricated by duplex stainless steel filler metal.

  10. Evaluation of creep damage due to stress relaxation in SA533 grade B class 1 and SA508 class 3 pressure vessel steels

    Hoffmann, C.L.; Urko, W.

    1993-01-01

    Creep damage can result from stress relaxation of residual stresses in components when exposed to high temperature thermal cycles. Pressure vessels, such as the reactor vessel of the modular high-temperature gas reactor (MHTGR), which normally operate at temperatures well below the creep range can develop relatively high residual stresses in high stress locations. During short term excursions to elevated-temperatures, creep damage can be produced by the loadings on the vessel. In addition, residual stresses will relax out, causing greater creep damage in the pressure vessel material than might otherwise be calculated. The evaluation described in this paper assesses the magnitude of the creep damage due to relaxation of residual stresses resulting from short term exposure of the pressure vessel material to temperatures in the creep range. Creep relaxation curves were generated for SA533 Grade B, Class 1 and SA508 Class 3 pressure vessel steels using finite element analysis of a simple uniaxial truss loaded under constant strain conditions to produce an initial axial stress equal to 1.25 times the material yield strength at temperature. The strain is held constant for 1000 hours at prescribed temperatures from 700 F to 1000 F. The material creep law is used to calculate the relaxed stress for each time increment. The calculated stress relaxation versus time curves are compared with stress relaxation test data. Creep damage fractions are calculated by integrating the stress relaxation versus time curves and performing a linear creep damage summation using the minimum stress to rupture curves at the respective relaxation temperatures. Cumulative creep damage due to stress relaxation as a function of time and temperature is derived from the linear damage summation

  11. Application of the Materials-by-Design Methodology to Redesign a New Grade of the High-Strength Low-Alloy Class of Steels with Improved Mechanical Properties and Processability

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.

    2016-01-01

    An alternative to the traditional trial-and-error empirical approach for the development of new materials is the so-called materials-by-design approach. Within the latter approach, a material is treated as a complex system and its design and optimization is carried out by employing computer-aided engineering analyses, predictive tools, and available material databases. In the present work, the materials-by-design approach is utilized to redesign a grade of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) class of steels with improved mechanical properties (primarily strength and fracture toughness), processability (e.g., castability, hot formability, and weldability), and corrosion resistance. Toward that end, a number of material thermodynamics, kinetics of phase transformations, and physics of deformation and fracture computational models and databases have been developed/assembled and utilized within a multi-disciplinary, two-level material-by-design optimization scheme. To validate the models, their prediction is compared against the experimental results for the related steel HSLA100. Then the optimization procedure is employed to determine the optimal chemical composition and the tempering schedule for a newly designed grade of the HSLA class of steels with enhanced mechanical properties, processability, and corrosion resistance.

  12. Construction and assembly of pipelines using API 5L grade X80 tubes - considerations to be observed with high-strength steels; Construcao e montagem de dutos terrestres utilizando tubos API 5L Gr. X80

    Oliveira, Ailton C. de; Rabello, Jose Mauricio B. [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2005-07-01

    The use of line pipes API 5L Grade X80, at the point of view of designer allows: reduction of wall thickness and pipe weight or increase of design pressure. In the pipeline construction point of view, the use of line pipes API 5L Grade X80 provide some advantages, however some difficulties must be expected in several stages of the construction and assembly. The implications in cost, productivity, inspection and integrity, with the application of these high resistance steels, complying with PETROBRAS Standard N - 464 Construcao, Montagem e Condicionamento de Dutos Terrestres (Rev. H - 2004 Dec) and the experience consolidated in pipelines construction abroad were presented. At the design stage, a comparison between pipelines designed using API 5L-X70 and API 5L-X80 was carried out approaching the aspects of variation of thickness, pressure design and design factor. An evaluation of the expected gains when choosing API 5L Grade X80 steels were done, regarding reduction of costs and pipe weight. Regarding API 5L-X80 pipe fabrication, the obtained results were reported, proving that this aspect was already overcome, showing the viability of its production in Brazil. Difficulties were detected regarding construction and assembly stage and showing the need of revision of PETROBRAS standard N-464. (author)

  13. The effect of equal channel angular pressing on the tensile properties and microstructure of two medical implant materials: ASTM F-138 austenitic steel and Grade 2 titanium

    Mendes Filho, A. de A.; Sordi, V. L.; Kliauga, A. M.; Ferrante, M.

    2010-07-01

    Titanium and F-138 stainless steel are employed in bone replacement and repair. The former material was ECAP-deformed at room temperature and at 300°C, followed in some cases by cold rolling. The steel was ECAP-deformed at room temperature only. Work-hardening behavior was studied by making use of the Kocks-mecking plots and microstructural evolution was followed by TEM. Conclusions show that for Ti, ECAP combined with cold rolling gives the best strength-ductility combination, whilst room temperature ECAP increases the tensile strength of the steel but caused substantial ductility loss.

  14. The effect of equal channel angular pressing on the tensile properties and microstructure of two medical implant materials: ASTM F-138 austenitic steel and Grade 2 titanium

    Filho, A de A Mendes; Sordi, V L; Kliauga, A M; Ferrante, M, E-mail: ferrante@ufscar.b [Federal University of Sao Carlos, Materials Engineering Department, Sao Carlos, 13565-905 (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    Titanium and F-138 stainless steel are employed in bone replacement and repair. The former material was ECAP-deformed at room temperature and at 300{sup 0}C, followed in some cases by cold rolling. The steel was ECAP-deformed at room temperature only. Work-hardening behavior was studied by making use of the Kocks-mecking plots and microstructural evolution was followed by TEM. Conclusions show that for Ti, ECAP combined with cold rolling gives the best strength-ductility combination, whilst room temperature ECAP increases the tensile strength of the steel but caused substantial ductility loss.

  15. Creep and microstructural processes in a low-alloy 2.25%Cr1.6%W steel (ASTM Grade 23)

    Kuchařová, Květa; Sklenička, Václav; Kvapilová, Marie; Svoboda, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 109, NOV (2015), s. 1-8 ISSN 1044-5803 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA02010260; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Bainitic steel * Low-alloy steel * Creep strength * Microstructural changes * Carbide precipitation Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 2.383, year: 2015

  16. Full-scale locomotive dynamic crash testing and correlations : locomotive consist colliding with steel coil truck at grade crossing (test 3).

    2011-09-01

    This report presents the test results and finite element correlations of a full-scale dynamic collision between a locomotive and a highway truck loaded with two heavy steel coils. The locomotive consist was moving at 58 miles per hour before it struc...

  17. On choice of tempered steels

    Govorov, A.A.; Pan'shin, I.F.; Rakhmanov, V.I.

    1978-01-01

    For the purpose of developing a graphical method for choosing structural steels, a change in the propagation work of a crack and in the critical temperature of brittleness of 40, 40Kh, 40KhN, and 40KhNM steels, was examined depending on the hardness after hardening and tempering. A diagram enabling to choose the grade of steel for making an article of known dimensions according to the preset values of its mechanical properties has been plotted. The developed selection scheme takes into account the hardenability of steels and the influence of the hardness after thermal treatment on the cold-shortness of steel

  18. THE DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY OF THE CORE THERMO-MECHANICALLY HARDENED REINFORC-ING STEEL OF GRADE A700HW OF DIE-ROLLED SECTION NO 12, 14, 16 PRODUCTION ACCORDING TO REQUIREMENT OF FINNISH STANDARDS SFST1216 IN CONDITIONS OF SMALL-SECTION MILL 320 OF RUP «BMZ»

    A. V. Rusalenko

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of technology of the core thermomechanically hardened reinforcing steel of grade А700HW of die-rolled section No 12, 14, 16 production according to requirement of Finnish standards SFST1216 in conditions of small-section mill 320 of RUP «BMZ» is given.

  19. Expanded austenite in nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steel grades; Analise da austenita expandida em camadas nitretadas em acos inoxidaveis austeniticos e superaustenitico

    Casteletti, L.C.; Fernandes, F.A.P.; Heck, S.C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EESC/USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia de Materais, Aeronautica e Automobilistica; Oliveira, A.M. [Instituto de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia do Maranhao (IFMA), Sao Luis, MA (Brazil); Gallego, J., E-mail: gallego@dem.feis.unesp.b [UNESP, Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil). Dept. Engenharia Mecanica

    2010-07-01

    In this work nitrided layers deposited on austenitic and super austenitic stainless steels were analyzed through optical microscopy and X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD). It was observed that the formation of N supersaturated phase, called expanded austenite, has promoted significant increment of hardness (> 1000HV). XRD results have indicated the anomalous displacement of the diffracted peaks, in comparison with the normal austenite. This behavior, combined with peaks broadening, it was analyzed in different nitriding temperatures which results showed good agreement with the literature. (author)

  20. Effect of Reheating Temperature and Cooling Treatment on the Microstructure, Texture, and Impact Transition Behavior of Heat-Treated Naval Grade HSLA Steel

    Sk, Md. Basiruddin; Ghosh, A.; Rarhi, N.; Balamuralikrishnan, R.; Chakrabarti, D.

    2017-07-01

    In order to achieve the desired mechanical properties [YS > 390 MPa, total elongation >16 pct and Charpy impact toughness of 78 J at 213 K (-60 °C)] for naval application, samples from a low-carbon microalloyed steel have been subjected to different austenitization (1223 K to 1523 K) (950 °C to 1250 °C) and cooling treatments (furnace, air, or water cooling). The as-rolled steel and the sample air cooled from 1223 K (950 °C) could only achieve the required tensile properties, while the sample furnace cooled from 1223 K (950 °C) showed the best Charpy impact properties. Water quenching from 1223 K (950 °C) certainly contributed to the strength but affected the impact toughness. Overall, predominantly ferrite matrix with fine effective grain size and intense gamma-fiber texture was found to be beneficial for impact toughness as well as impact transition behavior. Small size and fraction of precipitates (like TiN, Nb, and V carbonitrides) eliminated the possibility of particle-controlled crack propagation and grain size-controlled crack propagation led to cleavage fracture. A simplified analytical approach has been used to explain the difference in impact transition behavior of the investigated samples.

  1. Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Underwater Dry and Local Dry Cavity Welded Joints of 690 MPa Grade High Strength Steel.

    Shi, Yonghua; Sun, Kun; Cui, Shuwan; Zeng, Min; Yi, Jianglong; Shen, Xiaoqin; Yi, Yaoyong

    2018-01-22

    Q690E high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel plays an important role in offshore structures. In addition, underwater local cavity welding (ULCW) technique was widely used to repair important offshore constructions. However, the high cooling rate of ULCW joints results in bad welding quality compared with underwater dry welding (UDW) joints. Q690E high strength low alloy steels were welded by multi-pass UDW and ULCW techniques, to study the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of underwater welded joints. The microstructure and fracture morphology of welded joints were observed by scanning electron microscope and optical microscope. The elemental distribution in the microstructure was determined with an Electron Probe Microanalyzer. The results indicated that the microstructure of both two welded joints was similar. However, martensite and martensite-austenite components were significantly different with different underwater welding methods such that the micro-hardness of the HAZ and FZ in the ULCW specimen was higher than that of the corresponding regions in UDW joint. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the ULCW specimen are 109 MPa lower and 77 MPa lower, respectively, than those of the UDW joint. The impact toughness of the UDW joint was superior to those of the ULCW joint.

  2. Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties of Underwater Dry and Local Dry Cavity Welded Joints of 690 MPa Grade High Strength Steel

    Sun, Kun; Cui, Shuwan; Zeng, Min; Yi, Jianglong; Shen, Xiaoqin; Yi, Yaoyong

    2018-01-01

    Q690E high strength low alloy (HSLA) steel plays an important role in offshore structures. In addition, underwater local cavity welding (ULCW) technique was widely used to repair important offshore constructions. However, the high cooling rate of ULCW joints results in bad welding quality compared with underwater dry welding (UDW) joints. Q690E high strength low alloy steels were welded by multi-pass UDW and ULCW techniques, to study the microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of underwater welded joints. The microstructure and fracture morphology of welded joints were observed by scanning electron microscope and optical microscope. The elemental distribution in the microstructure was determined with an Electron Probe Microanalyzer. The results indicated that the microstructure of both two welded joints was similar. However, martensite and martensite-austenite components were significantly different with different underwater welding methods such that the micro-hardness of the HAZ and FZ in the ULCW specimen was higher than that of the corresponding regions in UDW joint. The yield strength and ultimate tensile strength of the ULCW specimen are 109 MPa lower and 77 MPa lower, respectively, than those of the UDW joint. The impact toughness of the UDW joint was superior to those of the ULCW joint. PMID:29361743

  3. Structure–property relationship in a 960 MPa grade ultrahigh strength low carbon niobium–vanadium microalloyed steel: The significance of high frequency induction tempering

    Xie, Z.J.; Fang, Y.P.; Han, G.; Guo, H.; Misra, R.D.K.; Shang, C.J.

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes the microstructure and precipitation behavior in an ultra-high strength low carbon niobium–vanadium microalloyed steel that was processed by quenching and high frequency induction tempering. Ultrahigh yield strength of ∼1000 MPa with high elongation of ∼15% and high low temperature toughness of 55 J (half thickness) at −40 °C was obtained after quenching from austenitization at 900 °C for 30 min, and tempering at 600 °C for 15 min by induction reheating with a reheating rate of ∼50 °C/s. While the yield strength increase on tempering was similar for both induction reheating and conventional reheating (electrical resistance reheating), there was ∼100% increase in low temperature toughness in induction reheated steel compared to the conventional reheating process. The underlying reason for the increase in toughness was attributed to the transformation of cementite film observed in conventional reheating and tempering to nanoscale cementite in induction reheating and tempering. The precipitation of nanoscale carbides is believed to significantly contribute to ultra-high strength, good ductility, and high toughness in the high frequency induction reheating and tempering process

  4. FY17 Status Report on Testing Supporting the Inclusion of Grade 91 Steel as an Acceptable Material for Application of the EPP Methodology

    Messner, Mark C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sham, Sam [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Wang, Yanli [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    This report summarizes the experiments performed in FY17 on Gr. 91 steels. The testing of Gr. 91 has technical significance because, currently, it is the only approved material for Class A construction that is strongly cyclic softening. Specific FY17 testing includes the following activities for Gr. 91 steel. First, two types of key feature testing have been initiated, including two-bar thermal ratcheting and Simplified Model Testing (SMT). The goal is to qualify the Elastic – Perfectly Plastic (EPP) design methodologies and to support incorporation of these rules for Gr. 91 into the ASME Division 5 Code. The preliminary SMT test results show that Gr. 91 is most damaging when tested with compression hold mode under the SMT creep fatigue testing condition. Two-bar thermal ratcheting test results at a temperature range between 350 to 650o C were compared with the EPP strain limits code case evaluation, and the results show that the EPP strain limits code case is conservative. The material information obtained from these key feature tests can also be used to verify its material model. Second, to provide experimental data in support of the viscoplastic material model development at Argonne National Laboratory, selective tests were performed to evaluate the effect of cyclic softening on strain rate sensitivity and creep rates. The results show the prior cyclic loading history decreases the strain rate sensitivity and increases creep rates. In addition, isothermal cyclic stress-strain curves were generated at six different temperatures, and a nonisothermal thermomechanical testing was also performed to provide data to calibrate the viscoplastic material model.

  5. Recycling of electric arc furnace dust

    Marques Sobrinho, Vicente de Paulo Ferreira; Oliveira, Jose Roberto de; Tenorio, Jorge Alberto Soares; Espinosa, Denise Crocce Romano

    2010-01-01

    This research aims to study the process of incorporation of the metal iron in electric arc furnace dust (EAFD), from a steel mill producing long steel by liquid iron in addition to the changing temperature of 1400 degrees Celsius of EAFD 'as received', the percentage of EAFD to be added (5, 10 and 20% of initial weight of sample pig iron) and the time of withdrawal of the sample of pig iron and slag (30 minutes after the addition of EAFD). Previously, the EAFD will be characterized using the following techniques: chemical analysis, size analysis, specific surface area, Xray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis. . After characterization, the EAFD will be added to the bath of liquid pig iron. It is expected that the results obtained at the end of the research allow the evaluation of the iron metal incorporation of EAFD in pig iron bath. (author)

  6. Recycling of electric arc furnace dust; Reciclagem de poeira de aciaria eletrica

    Marques Sobrinho, Vicente de Paulo Ferreira; Oliveira, Jose Roberto de, E-mail: vicente@ifes.edu.b [Instituto Federal de Ciencia e Tecnologia do Espirito Santo (IFES), Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Tenorio, Jorge Alberto Soares; Espinosa, Denise Crocce Romano [Universidade de Sao Paulo (EPUSP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica

    2010-07-01

    This research aims to study the process of incorporation of the metal iron in electric arc furnace dust (EAFD), from a steel mill producing long steel by liquid iron in addition to the changing temperature of 1400 degrees Celsius of EAFD 'as received', the percentage of EAFD to be added (5, 10 and 20% of initial weight of sample pig iron) and the time of withdrawal of the sample of pig iron and slag (30 minutes after the addition of EAFD). Previously, the EAFD will be characterized using the following techniques: chemical analysis, size analysis, specific surface area, Xray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis. . After characterization, the EAFD will be added to the bath of liquid pig iron. It is expected that the results obtained at the end of the research allow the evaluation of the iron metal incorporation of EAFD in pig iron bath. (author)

  7. Progress in the development of niobium alloyed high speed steel

    Guimaraes, J.R.C.

    1987-01-01

    The development of economy-grades of niobium alloyed high speed steel is described. Both the metallurgical concepts behind the steel design and the results of performance tests are presented. (Author) [pt

  8. Aircraft Steels

    2009-02-19

    component usage. PH 13-8Mo is a precipitation-hardenable martensitic stainless steel combining excellent corrosion resistance with strength. Custom 465 is...a martensitic , age-hardenable stainless steel capable of about 1,724 MPa (250 ksi) UTS when peak-aged (H900 condition). Especially, this steel can...NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Five high strength steels (4340, 300M, AerMet 100, Ferrium S53, and Hy-Tuf) and four stainless steels (High Nitrogen, 13

  9. Effect of temper and hydrogen embrittlement on mechanical properties of 2,25Cr–1Mo steel grades – Application to Minimum Pressurizing Temperature (MPT) issues. Part II: Vintage reactors and MPT determination

    Pillot, Sylvain; Chauvy, Cédric; Corre, Stéphanie; Coudreuse, Lionel; Gingell, Andrew; Héritier, Déborah; Toussaint, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Standard and Vanadium-alloyed 2,25Cr–1Mo steel grades (EN 10028-2 12CrMo9-10/ASTM A387 gr. 22 and 13CrMoV9-10/ASTM A542 tp. D) are commonly used for the fabrication of heavy pressure vessels for applications in petroleum refining plants. These reactors are made of heavy plates, forged shells, forged nozzles and fittings. They are subjected to thermal cycles (stop and go) and to severe service conditions (high temperatures and high hydrogen partial pressures). A primary concern for end-users is the definition of the Minimum Pressurizing Temperature (MPT) of the equipment. This temperature is the lowest temperature at which the vessel can be repressurized after shutdown and insures no risk of brittle failure of the containment body. The MPT is defined by fracture mechanics and/or CVN approaches and calculations. This second part of the paper presents the methodology of MPT determination and the particular case of vintage reactors. MPT determination methodology is explained by using a virtual pressure vessel representative of vessels found in petroleum refineries. A special focus is also set on the evolution of embedded defects

  10. Effect of temper and hydrogen embrittlement on mechanical properties of 2,25Cr–1Mo steel grades – Application to Minimum Pressurizing Temperature (MPT) issues. Part I: General considerations and materials' properties

    Pillot, Sylvain; Chauvy, Cédric; Corre, Stéphanie; Coudreuse, Lionel; Gingell, Andrew; Héritier, Déborah; Toussaint, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Standard and Vanadium-alloyed 2,25Cr–1Mo steel grades (EN 10028-2 12CrMo9-10/ASTM A387 gr. 22 and 13CrMoV9-10/ASTM A542 tp. D) are commonly used for the fabrication of heavy pressure vessels for applications in petroleum refining plants. These reactors are made of heavy plates, forged shells, forged nozzles and fittings. They are subjected to thermal cycles (stop and go) and to severe service conditions (high temperatures and high hydrogen partial pressures). A primary concern for end-users is the definition of the Minimum Pressurizing Temperature (MPT) of the equipment. This temperature is the lowest temperature at which the vessel can be repressurized after shutdown and insures no risk of brittle failure of the containment body. The MPT is defined by fracture mechanics and/or CVN approaches and calculations. This first part of the paper presents the impact of thermal aging and exposure to hydrogen on materials' mechanical properties and consequently on the value of MPT

  11. Oxidation behaviour of ferritic stainless steel grade Crofer 22 APU at 700 °C in flowing Ar−75%CO{sub 2}−12%H{sub 2}O

    Shariff, Nurul Atikah; Othman, Norinsan Kamil [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Jalar, Azman [Institute of Micro Engineering and Nanoelectronics (IMEN), Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2013-11-27

    The oxidation of Ferritic Stainless Steel (FSS) grade Crofer 22 APU has been investigated. FSS alloys were exposed to isothermal conditions in a horizontal tube furnace at a 700 °C in flowing Ar−75%CO{sub 2}−12%H{sub 2}O at a pressure of approximately 1 atm. The results showed that the growth of non protective Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and spinel was observed after 50 h exposure in the presence of 12% H{sub 2}O. The weight was increased significantly with time of exposure. The formation of different oxides is presented on the interface of the specimen such as MnCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} were revealed by X-ray diffraction and supported by EDAX analysis. FSS did not form a protective Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer due to water vapour accelerates the kinetics oxidation. Data of microstructure observation is presented and discussed in this paper in term of water vapour effects.

  12. Kinetics of biofilm formation and desiccation survival of Listeria monocytogenes in single and dual species biofilms with Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia proteamaculans or Shewanella baltica on food-grade stainless steel surfaces.

    Daneshvar Alavi, Hessam Edin; Truelstrup Hansen, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the dynamics of static biofilm formation (100% RH, 15 °C, 48-72 h) and desiccation survival (43% RH, 15 °C, 21 days) of Listeria monocytogenes, in dual species biofilms with the common spoilage bacteria, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia proteamaculans and Shewanella baltica, on the surface of food grade stainless steel. The Gram-negative bacteria reduced the maximum biofilm population of L. monocytogenes in dual species biofilms and increased its inactivation during desiccation. However, due to the higher desiccation resistance of Listeria relative to P. fluorescens and S. baltica, the pathogen survived in greater final numbers. In contrast, S. proteamaculans outcompeted the pathogen during the biofilm formation and exhibited similar desiccation survival, causing the N21 days of Serratia to be ca 3 Log10(CFU cm(-2)) greater than that of Listeria in the dual species biofilm. Microscopy revealed biofilm morphologies with variable amounts of exopolymeric substance and the presence of separate microcolonies. Under these simulated food plant conditions, the fate of L. monocytogenes during formation of mixed biofilms and desiccation depended on the implicit characteristics of the co-cultured bacterium.

  13. Steel making

    Chakrabarti, A K

    2014-01-01

    "Steel Making" is designed to give students a strong grounding in the theory and state-of-the-art practice of production of steels. This book is primarily focused to meet the needs of undergraduate metallurgical students and candidates for associate membership examinations of professional bodies (AMIIM, AMIE). Besides, for all engineering professionals working in steel plants who need to understand the basic principles of steel making, the text provides a sound introduction to the subject.Beginning with a brief introduction to the historical perspective and current status of steel making together with the reasons for obsolescence of Bessemer converter and open hearth processes, the book moves on to: elaborate the physiochemical principles involved in steel making; explain the operational principles and practices of the modern processes of primary steel making (LD converter, Q-BOP process, and electric furnace process); provide a summary of the developments in secondary refining of steels; discuss principles a...

  14. Processing hot-dip galvanized AHSS grades: a challenging task

    Pichler, A.; Hebesberger, T.; Tragl, E.; Traint, S.; Faderl, J.; Angeli, G.; Koesters, K. [voestalpine Stahl GmbH, Linz (Austria)

    2005-07-01

    High-strength thin sheet steel grades have gained a considerable market share. At present a very strong demand has been observed for DP (dual-phase), CP (complex phase) and TRIP grades, which are often summarized as advanced high-strength steel grades (AHSS). The potential benefits of applying AHSS grades were impressively demonstrated in the ULSAC-AVC project, in which a remarkable reduction in mass and an increase in stiffness and crash safety were achieved by using a very high share of AHSS steel grades. The present contribution concentrates on hot-dip galvanized AHSS thin sheet grades. The hot-dip galvanizeability of such grades is critically discussed after an overview is provided of the metallurgy of AHSS grades, including microstructure, mechanical properties, phase transformations and required alloy design. Based on these fundamentals, the processing of AHSS grades in the hot-dip galvanizing line is discussed and the resulting properties presented. (orig.)

  15. Experimental and numerical simulation of carbon manganese steel ...

    Experimental and numerical simulation of carbon manganese steel for cyclic plastic behaviour. J Shit, S Dhar, S Acharyya. Abstract. The paper deals with finite element modeling of saturated low cycle fatigue and the cyclic hardening phenomena of the materials Sa333 grade 6 carbon steel and SS316 stainless steel.

  16. Notch aspects of RSP steel microstructure

    Michal Černý

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For a rather long time, basic research projects have been focused on examinations of mechanical properties for Rapid Solidification Powder (RSP steels. These state-of-art steels are commonly known as “powdered steels“. In fact, they combine distinctive attributes of conventional steel alloys with unusual resistance of construction material manufactured by so called “pseudo-powdered” metallurgy.Choice of suitable materials for experimental verification was carried out based on characteristic application of so called “modern steel”. First, groups of stainless and tool steel types (steel grades ČSN 17 and 19 were selected. These provided representative specimens for the actual comparison experiment. For stainless steel type, two steel types were chosen: hardenable X47Cr14 (ČSN 17 029 stainless steel and non-hardenable X2CrNiMo18-14-3 (ČSN 17 350 steel. They are suitable e.g. for surgical tools and replacements (respectively. For tooling materials, C80U (ČSN 19 152 carbon steel and American D2 highly-alloyed steel (ČSN “equivalent” being 19 572 steel were chosen for the project. Finally, the M390 Böhler steel was chosen as representative of powdered (atomized steels. The goal of this paper is to discuss structural aspects of modern stainless and tool steel types and to compare them against the steel made by the RSP method. Based on the paper's results, impact of powdered steel structural characteristics on the resistance to crack initiation shall be evaluated.

  17. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2013-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel sau...

  18. Advanced high strength steels for automotive industry

    Galan, J.; Samek, L.; Verleysen, P.; Verbeken, K.; Houbert, Y.

    2012-11-01

    The car industry is facing pressure because of the growing demand for more fuel-efficient passenger cars. In order to limit energy consumption and air pollution the weight of the car body has to be reduced. At the same time, high levels of safety have to be guaranteed. In this situation, the choice of material becomes a key decision in car design. As a response to the requirements of the automotive sector, high strength steels and advanced high strength steels have been developed by the steel industry. These modern steel grades offer an excellent balance of low cost, light weight and mechanical properties. (Author) 48 refs.

  19. Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels

    Lippold, John C.; Kotecki, Damian J.

    2005-03-01

    Welding Metallurgy and Weldability of Stainless Steels, the first book in over twenty years to address welding metallurgy and weldability issues associated with stainless steel, offers the most up-to-date and comprehensive treatment of these topics currently available. The authors emphasize fundamental metallurgical principles governing microstructure evolution and property development of stainless steels, including martensistic, ferric, austenitic, duplex, and precipitation hardening grades. They present a logical and well-organized look at the history, evolution, and primary uses of each stainless steel, including detailed descriptions of the associated weldability issues.

  20. Effect of Microstructure on the Wear Behavior of Heat Treated SS-304 Stainless Steel

    S. Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Sliding wear characteristics of some heat treated SS-304 stainless steel against EN-8 steel in dry condition have been studied in the present experimental work. Samples of SS-304 stainless steel have been heated in a muffle furnace in desired temperature and allowed to dwell for two hours. The heated specimen are then cooled in different media namely inside the furnace, open air, cutting grade oil (grade 44) and water at room temperature to obtain different grades of heat treatment. Microstr...

  1. Supply chain of steel industries for the nuclear power plant construction in Indonesia

    Dharu Dewi; Sahala M Lumbanraja

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Construction needs steel materials for the manufacturing of heavy components and civil work construction. National industries is expected to supply steel components especially for non nuclear component needs. Supply chain of steel industries is required to know the potency of steel industries from upstream to downstream industries which can support the NPP construction sustainability. The type of steel needed in the NPP construction consist of structure steel, rebar, steel plate, etc. The aim of the study is to identify supply chain of steel industries from upstream industries to downstream industries so that they can supply steel needs in the NPP construction. The methodology used are literature review and industries survey by purposive sampling test which sent questionnaires and carrying out technical visits to the potential industries to supply steel components for NPP construction. From the analysis of the questionnaires and survey, it has been obtained that the Indonesian steel industries capable of supplying steel for construction materials of non-nuclear parts are PT. Krakatau Steel, PT. Gunung Steel Group (PT Gunung Garuda and PT. Gunung Raja Paksi), PT. Cilegon Fabricators and PT. Ometraco Arya Samanta. While steel materials for primary components with nuclear grade, such as steel materials for reactor vessels and pressure vessels, the Indonesian steel industry has not been able to supply them. Therefore, the Indonesian steel industries must improve its capability, both in raw material processing and fabrication capability in order to meet the requirements of specifications, codes and standards of nuclear grade. (author)

  2. Tool steels

    Højerslev, C.

    2001-01-01

    On designing a tool steel, its composition and heat treatment parameters are chosen to provide a hardened and tempered martensitic matrix in which carbides are evenly distributed. In this condition the matrix has an optimum combination of hardness andtoughness, the primary carbides provide...... resistance against abrasive wear and secondary carbides (if any) increase the resistance against plastic deformation. Tool steels are alloyed with carbide forming elements (Typically: vanadium, tungsten, molybdenumand chromium) furthermore some steel types contains cobalt. Addition of alloying elements...... serves primarily two purpose (i) to improve the hardenabillity and (ii) to provide harder and thermally more stable carbides than cementite. Assuming proper heattreatment, the properties of a tool steel depends on the which alloying elements are added and their respective concentrations....

  3. Advanced cold rolled steels for automotive applications

    Hofmann, Harald; Mattissen, Dorothea; Schaumann, Thomas Wilhelm [ThyssenKrupp Steel AG, Center of Materials Excellence, Dortmund (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    Advanced high-strength steels offer a great potential for the further development of automobile bodies-in-white due to their combined mechanical properties of high formability and strength. They represent the first choice in material selection for strength and crash-relevant parts with challenging geometries. The intensive development of multiphase steels by ThyssenKrupp Steel has led to hot dip galvanizing concepts with an outstanding forming potential. Hot rolled, hot dip galvanized complex-phase steels are currently produced in addition to cold rolled dual phase (DP) and retained austenite (RA) or transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels. New continuously annealed grades of steel are being developed with tensile strength levels of up to 1000 MPa in combination with sufficient ductility for the high demands of structural automobile components. These steels make use of the classic advantages of microalloying as well as the principles of DP steels and RA / TRIP steels. Further improvement of properties will be reached by the new class of high manganese alloyed steels. (orig.)

  4. Distribution of Stress in Deformation Zone of Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    Jandrlić, Ivan; Rešković, Stoja; Brlić, Tin

    2018-07-01

    Microalloyed steels today represent a significant part of total world production and processing of steel. Although widely used, there are scarce data on the stress distribution in the deformation zone of these steels. Research was carried out on two steel grades, both low-carbon structural steels with the same basic chemical composition, with one of them additionally microalloyed with niobium. Differences in the stress distribution in the deformation zone between two tested steels were continuously observed and measured using the methods of digital image correlation and thermography. It has been found out that niobium microalloyed steel has significantly more complex material flow and stress distribution in the deformation zone when compared to the plain low carbon steel.

  5. Distribution of Stress in Deformation Zone of Niobium Microalloyed Steel

    Jandrlić, Ivan; Rešković, Stoja; Brlić, Tin

    2018-03-01

    Microalloyed steels today represent a significant part of total world production and processing of steel. Although widely used, there are scarce data on the stress distribution in the deformation zone of these steels. Research was carried out on two steel grades, both low-carbon structural steels with the same basic chemical composition, with one of them additionally microalloyed with niobium. Differences in the stress distribution in the deformation zone between two tested steels were continuously observed and measured using the methods of digital image correlation and thermography. It has been found out that niobium microalloyed steel has significantly more complex material flow and stress distribution in the deformation zone when compared to the plain low carbon steel.

  6. Gaseous hydrogen embrittlement of an API X80 ferrito-pearlitic steel; Fragilisation par l'hydrogene gazeux d'un acier ferrito-perlitique de grade API X80

    Moro, I.

    2009-11-15

    This work deals with hydrogen embrittlement, at ambient temperature and under a high pressure gaseous way, of an API X80 high elasticity limit steel used for pipelines construction, and with the understanding of the associated physical mechanisms of the embrittlement. At first has been described a bibliographic study of the adsorption, absorption, diffusion, transport and trapping of hydrogen in the steels. Then has been carried out an experimental and numerical study concerning the implantation in the finite element code CASTEM3M of a hydrogen diffusion model coupled to mechanical fields. The hydrogen influence on the mechanical characteristics of the X80 steel, of a ferrito-pearlitic microstructure has been studied with tensile tests under 300 bar of hydrogen and at ambient temperature. The sensitivity of the X80 steel to hydrogen embrittlement has been analyzed by tensile tests at different deformation velocities and under different hydrogen pressures on axisymmetrical notched test specimens. These studies show that the effect of the hydrogen embrittlement vary effectively with the experimental conditions. Moreover, correlated with the results of the tests simulations, it has been shown too that in these experimental conditions and for that steel, the hydrogen embrittlement is induced by three different hydrogen populations: the hydrogen trapped at the ferrite/perlite interfaces, the hydrogen adsorbed on surface and the reticular hydrogen trapped in the material volume. At last, the tensile and rupture tests of specimens, during which atmosphere changes have been carried out, have shown a strong reversibility of the hydrogen embrittlement, associated with its initiation as soon as hydrogen is introduced in the atmosphere. At last, three hydrogen mechanisms, depending of the different hydrogen populations are presented and discussed. (O.M.)

  7. Corrosion of carbon steel welds

    Daniel, B.

    1988-09-01

    This report assesses the factors which cause preferential attack to occur in carbon steel fusion welds. It was concluded that the main factors were: the inclusion content of the weld metal, the potential of the weld metal being less noble than that of the parent, and the presence of low-temperature transformation products in the heat-affected zone of the weld. These factors should be minimized or eliminated as appropriate so that the corrosion allowances determined for carbon steel waste drums is also adequate for the welds. An experimental/theoretical approach is recommended to evaluate the relative corrosion resistance of welds prepared from BS 4360 grade 43A steel to that of the parent material. (author)

  8. Steel alloys

    Bloom, E.E.; Stiegler, J.O.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Leitnaker, J.M.

    1977-01-01

    The invention deals with a fuel element for fast breeder reactors. It consits essentially of a uranium oxide, nitride, or carbide or a mixture of these fuels with a plutonium or thorium oxide, nitride, or carbide. The fuel elements are coated with an austenitic stainless steel alloy. Inside the fuel elements, vacancies or small cavities are produced by neutron effects which causes the steel coating to swell. According to the invention, swelling is prevented by a modification of type 304, 316, 321, or 12 K 72HV commercial steels. They consist mainly of Fe, Cr, and Ni in a ratio determined by a temary diagram. They may also contain 1.8 to 2.3% by weight of Mo and a fraction of Si (0.7 to 2% by weight) and Ti(0.10 to 0.5% by weight) to prevent cavity formation. They are structurally modified by cold working. (IHOE) [de

  9. From the TRIP effect and Quenching and Partitioning steels concepts to the development of new high-performance, lean powder metallurgy steels

    Torralba, José M.; Navarro, Alfonso; Campos, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    A new method of developing lean powder metallurgy steel is proposed. The microstructure of the steel is tailored by combining two different prealloyed steel grades. These materials open a new niche in steel grades for high-performance applications by using a low-cost method of production. Moreover, an alternative route to developing microstructures suitable for manufacturing TRIP and/or Q and P steels is proposed avoiding some of the complex steps that must otherwise be taken to obtain the proper starting microstructure

  10. From the TRIP effect and Quenching and Partitioning steels concepts to the development of new high-performance, lean powder metallurgy steels

    Torralba, José M., E-mail: josemanuel.torralba@imdea.org [IMDEA Materials Institute, C/Eric Kandel 2, 28906 - Getafe, Madrid (Spain); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Universidad Carlos III Av. Universidad, 30, Leganés (Spain); Navarro, Alfonso; Campos, Mónica [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Universidad Carlos III Av. Universidad, 30, Leganés (Spain)

    2013-06-20

    A new method of developing lean powder metallurgy steel is proposed. The microstructure of the steel is tailored by combining two different prealloyed steel grades. These materials open a new niche in steel grades for high-performance applications by using a low-cost method of production. Moreover, an alternative route to developing microstructures suitable for manufacturing TRIP and/or Q and P steels is proposed avoiding some of the complex steps that must otherwise be taken to obtain the proper starting microstructure.

  11. X-ray diffraction study of slags forming during corrosion resistant steel production

    Slavov, V.I.; Zadorozhnaya, V.N.; Shurygina, A.V.

    1990-01-01

    Using X-ray diffraction analysis slags, forming during corrosion-resistant 12Kh18N10T grade steel production by two flowsheets, are studied. Standard two-slag technology of steel production does not provide efficient disintegration of chromospinelides in slags, gives high steel contamination with respect to nonmetallic impurities, coarse structure and, as a consequence, presence of macrodefects on rolled products surface. One-slag steel melting technology with titanium alloying of the steel at vacuum causes fast removal of chromospinelides at the beginning of reduction period, promotes titanium absorption by the steel, refines nonmetallic inclusions, provides more fine structure and steel plasticity, removes surface defects

  12. Electron Microscopy Study of Stainless Steel Radiation Damage Due to Long-Term Irradation by Alpha Particles Emitted From Plutonium

    Unlu, Kenan [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Rios-Martinez, Carlos [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Saglam, Mehmet [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Hart, Ron R. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Shipp, John D. [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Rennie, John [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1998-04-16

    Radiation damage and associated surface and microstructural changes produced in stainless steel encapsulation by high-fluence alpha particle irradiations from weapons-grade plutonium of 316-stainless steel are being investigated.

  13. Modern high strength QT, TM and duplex-stainless steels

    Bocquet, P.; Luxenburger, G.; Porter, D.; Ericsson, C.

    2003-01-01

    Pressure vessels are commonly manufactured with normalised steel grades with a yield strength up to 355 MPa or with austenitic stainless steels when corrosion as to be considered. From three decades, modern steels with higher mechanical properties - up to yield strength of 960 Mpa - are available and largely used for other applications where weight saving is of major importance as per off-shore, bridges, cranes, shipbuilding, line pipes.. The paper presents these modern steel's families - TMCP (Thermo Mechanically Controlled Process), QT (Quenched and Tempered) and Duplex (austeno-ferritic) stainless - in comparison with the normalised and austenitic steel grades. The following aspects are presented: the main mechanical properties (tensile and Charpy) as per the requirements of the standards for pressure equipment; some examples of use of these modern steels in the industry are given; the limitations of the forming conditions are considered; the weldability aspects and welds properties are developed; the interest of the PWHT (Post Weld Heat Treatment) is discussed. (orig.)

  14. Effect of Ethanol Chemistry on SCC of Carbon Steel

    2011-02-22

    Pipeline companies have a keen interest in assessing the feasibility of transporting fuel grade ethanol (FGE) and ethanol blends in existing pipelines. Previous field experience and laboratory research, funded by PRCI and API, has shown that steel ca...

  15. Hegelian Steel

    Kjær, Poul F.

    2015-01-01

    Even in our globalized world the notion of national economies remain incredibly strong, just as a considerable part of the literature on transnational governance and globalization continue to rely on a zero-sum perspective concerning the relationship between the national and the transnational. De...... of the European steel industry....

  16. Microstructural characterisation and corrosion performance of old railway girder bridge steel and modern weathering structural steel

    Tewary, N.K.; Kundu, A.; Nandi, R.; Saha, J.K.; Ghosh, S.K.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Microstructure and corrosion performance are compared for two structural steels. • Microstructure evolution shows primarily ferrite-pearlite in both the steels. • Steels show higher corrosion rate in 1% HCl solution than in 3.5% NaCl solution. • The corrosion products show the presence of oxide, hydroxide and oxy-hydroxides. • The corroded surface reveals morphologies like flowery, cotton balls and rosette. - Abstract: A comparison on microstructure and corrosion performance has been made between the two structural steels used in old railway girder bridge (Sample A) and modern grades of weathering structural steel (Sample B). The microstructures, viewed under optical microscope and scanning electron microscope (SEM), show mainly ferrite-pearlite phase constituents in both the steels, A and B. The phase fraction analysis shows higher amount of pearlite in steel A compared to that of steel B. The grain size of steel A is larger than that of steel B under identical processing condition. The immersion corrosion test in 3.5% NaCl shows that the corrosion rate of steel A increases with time, while the same for steel B decreases with time. On the other hand, corrosion test in 1% HCl shows that the corrosion rate of both steel A and B is higher as compared to that of NaCl which always decreases with time. The XRD analysis of corrosion products show the presence of many oxides, hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide like Lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), Goethite (α-FeOOH), Akaganeite (β-FeOOH), Magnetite (Fe_3O_4) and Maghemite (γ-Fe_2O_3) in both the steels. The SEM images of corroded surfaces reveal different morphologies like flowery, cotton balls and rosette etc. which indicate that the corrosion products primarily contain Lepidocrocite (γ-FeOOH), Goethite (α-FeOOH) and Akaganeite (β-FeOOH).

  17. Abrasive Wear of Alloyed Cast Steels Applied for Heavy Machinery

    Studnicki A.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In the paper the results and analysis of abrasive wear studies were shown for two grades of cast steels: low-alloyed cast steel applied for heavy machinery parts such as housing, covers etc. and chromium cast steels applied for kinetic nodes of pin-sleeve type. Studies were performed using the modified in Department of Foundry pin-on-disc method.

  18. Ultra-Low Carbon Bainitic Steels for Heavy Plate Applications

    1990-12-01

    these steels. The CCT diagrams 7 of steels typical of the HY grades indicate that the nose of the proeutectoid ferrite/pearlite reactions is located...austenite, carbides, and martensite. An example of the type of CCT diagram for one of the steels used in this investigation is presented in Figure 12...introduce a "bay" of unstable austenite which acts to separate the ferrite "nose" from the bainite/martensite regions on TTT or CCT diagrams , see Figure

  19. BEHAVIOR OF STEEL DP 600 UNDER DYNAMIC CONDITIONS

    Miroslav Német

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Dynamic tensile testing of sheet steels is becoming more important. Experimental dynamic tensile technique is depending on the strain rate. For experiments was used two testing method servo hydraulic and single bar method. Experiments was realized on steel grade DP 600. Steel were performed and evaluated static and dynamic tests. Was investigated substructure in static and dynamic loading conditions.

  20. Texture Control During the Manufacturing of Nonoriented Electrical Steels

    Kestens, L.; Jacobs, S.

    2008-01-01

    Methods of modern quantitative texture analysis are applied in order to characterize the crystallographic texture of various non-oriented electrical steel grades in view of their relation with the magnetic properties of the steel sheet. A texture parameter is defined which quantifies the density of

  1. Stabilization of electric-arc furnace dust in concrete

    Carlos Alberto Caldas de Souza

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Electric-arc furnace dust (EAFD is a by-product of steel production and recycling. This fine-grained material contains high amounts of zinc and iron as well as significant amounts of potentially toxic elements such as lead, cadmium and chromium. Therefore, the treatment and stabilization of this industrial residue is necessary. Concrete is a well-known suitable environment for stabilization/solidification of materials which have leachable elements in need of fixation. The effect of the EAFD content on the mechanical and chemical performance of Portland cement concrete is investigated in this paper. The effect of the EAFD content on the setting time of cement slurry was also analyzed. The axial compressive strength of the concrete samples increases with the EAFD addition in the range of 10 to 20 wt. (% EAFD; also the tensile strength increases with the EAFD addition. An increase in EAFD content significantly increases the setting time of the concrete. The acetic acid leaching and water solubilization tests indicate low mobility of the potentially toxic elements from the EAFD concrete composite. The results of the immersion tests show that the addition of EAFD to the concrete seems to reduce chloride penetration, which may help prevent pitting corrosion in reinforced concrete.

  2. Stainless steel leaches nickel and chromium into foods during cooking.

    Kamerud, Kristin L; Hobbie, Kevin A; Anderson, Kim A

    2013-10-02

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan, cooking times of 2-20 h, 10 consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After 6 h of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold, respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34-fold and Cr increased approximately 35-fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, although significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage.

  3. Stainless Steel Leaches Nickel and Chromium into Foods During Cooking

    Kamerud, Kristin L.; Hobbie, Kevin A.; Anderson, Kim A.

    2014-01-01

    Toxicological studies show that oral doses of nickel and chromium can cause cutaneous adverse reactions such as dermatitis. Additional dietary sources, such as leaching from stainless steel cookware during food preparation, are not well characterized. This study examined stainless steel grades, cooking time, repetitive cooking cycles, and multiple types of tomato sauces for their effects on nickel and chromium leaching. Trials included three types of stainless steels and a stainless steel saucepan; cooking times of 2 to 20 hours, ten consecutive cooking cycles, and four commercial tomato sauces. After a simulated cooking process, samples were analyzed by ICP-MS for Ni and Cr. After six hours of cooking, Ni and Cr concentrations in tomato sauce increased up to 26- and 7-fold respectively, depending on the grade of stainless steel. Longer cooking durations resulted in additional increases in metal leaching, where Ni concentrations increased 34 fold and Cr increased approximately 35 fold from sauces cooked without stainless steel. Cooking with new stainless steel resulted in the largest increases. Metal leaching decreases with sequential cooking cycles and stabilized after the sixth cooking cycle, though significant metal contributions to foods were still observed. The tenth cooking cycle, resulted in an average of 88 μg of Ni and 86 μg of Cr leached per 126 g serving of tomato sauce. Stainless steel cookware can be an overlooked source of nickel and chromium, where the contribution is dependent on stainless steel grade, cooking time, and cookware usage. PMID:23984718

  4. Using NJOY99 and MCNP4B2 to Estimate the Radiation Damage Displacements per Atom per Second in Steel Within the Boiling Water Reactor Core Shroud and Vessel Wall from Reactor-Grade Mixed-Oxide/Uranium Oxide Fuel for the Nuclear Power Plant at Laguna Verde, Veracruz, Mexico

    Vickers, Lisa

    2003-01-01

    The government of Mexico has expressed interest in utilizing the Laguna Verde boiling water reactor (BWR) nuclear power plant for the disposition of reprocessed spent uranium oxide (UOX) fuel in the form of reactor-grade mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel. MOX fuel would replace spent UOX fuel as a fraction in the core from 18 to 30% depending on the fuel loading cycle. MOX fuel is expected to increase the neutron fluence, flux, fuel centerline temperature, reactor core pressure, and yield higher energy neutrons.There is concern that a core with a fraction of MOX fuel (i.e., increased 239 Pu wt%) would increase the radiation damage displacements per atom per second (dpa-s -1 ) in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall as compared to only conventional, enriched UOX fuel in the core. The evaluation of radiation damage within the core shroud and vessel wall is a concern because of the potentially adverse affect to personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor.The primary uniqueness of this paper is the computation of radiation damage (dpa-s -1 ) using NJOY99-processed cross sections for steel within the core shroud and vessel wall. Specifically, the unique radiation damage results are several orders of magnitude greater than results of previous works. In addition, the conclusion of this paper was that the addition of the maximum fraction of one-third MOX fuel to the LV1 BWR core did significantly increase the radiation damage in steel within the core shroud and vessel wall such that without mitigation of radiation damage by periodic thermal annealing or reduction in operating parameters such as neutron fluence, core temperature, and pressure, it posed a potentially adverse affect to the personnel and public safety, environment, and operating life of the reactor

  5. High strength reinforcing steel bars : concrete shear friction interface : final report : Part A.

    2017-03-01

    High-strength steel (HSS) reinforcement, specifically ASTM A706 Grade 80 (550), is now permitted by the AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design Specifications for use in reinforced concrete bridge components in non-seismic regions. Using Grade 80 (550) steel reinf...

  6. Determinación de la tenacidad a la fractura de muestras de Acero 45 fundido, empleando las correlaciones entre el KIC y la energía de impacto medida en el ensayo de Charpy. // Determination of the fracture tenacity of cast Steel grade 45 samples, using th

    F. Ramos Morales

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se determinan los valores de tenacidad a la fractura (KIC de muestras de Acero 45 fundido,empleando las correlaciones entre la tenacidad a la fractura y la energía de impacto (CVN obtenida del ensayo de Charpy.Se hace una discusión sobre las correlaciones que más se ajustan en la región de transición y en upper shelf. Se comparanlos valores obtenidos de estas correlaciones a valores de tenacidad a la fractura establecidos en la literatura.Palabras claves: Fractura, energía de impacto, acero fundido.______________________________________________________________________________Abstract.In this paper, the values of fracture toughness (KIC are determined on specimens of cast steel grade 45, using thecorrelations among the fracture toughness (KIC and the impact energy (CVN obtained from a Charpy test. A discussion ismade on the correlations that are better adjusted in the transition region and in upper shelf region. The obtained values arecompared from these correlations to values of fracture toughness (KIC settled down in the literature.Key words. Fracture, impact energy, cast steel.

  7. Forming of High-strength Steels Using a Hot-melt Dry Lubricant

    Hörnström, Sven-Erik; Karlsson, Erik; Olsson, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    during forming resulting in seizure of the tool/steel sheet contact and extensive scratching of the steel sheet surface. As a result, a number of concepts have been developed in order to reduce the tendency to galling in metal forming, including the development of new dry lubricants, new forming tool...... steel grades and improved surface engineering treatments such as the deposition of low friction CVD and PVD coatings. In the present study the performance of a hot-melt dry lubricant in the forming of hot and cold rolled and hot-dip galvanized high strength steel has been evaluated and compared...... with a conventional rust protection oil using four different tests methods, i.e. a strip reduction test, a bending under tension test, a stretch-forming test and a pin-on disc test. In the tests, two different cold work tool steels, a conventional steel grade and a nitrogen alloyed PM steel grade were evaluated...

  8. CHARACTERIZATION OF NEW TOOL STEEL FOR ALUMINUM EXTRUSION DIES

    José Britti Bacalhau

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum extrusion dies are an important segment of application on industrial tools steels, which are manufactured in steels based on AISI H13 steel. The main properties of steels applied to extrusion dies are: wear resistance, impact resistance and tempering resistance. The present work discusses the characteristics of a newly developed hot work steel to be used on aluminum extrusion dies. The effects of Cr and Mo contents with respect to tempering resistance and the Al addition on the nitriding response have been evaluated. From forged steel bars, Charpy impact test and characterization via EPMA have been conducted. The proposed contents of Cr, Mo, and Al have attributed to the new VEX grade a much better tempering resistance than H13, as well as a deeper and harder nitrided layer. Due to the unique characteristics, this new steel provides an interesting alternative to the aluminum extrusion companies to increase their competitiveness.

  9. Ultra low carbon bainitic (ULCB) steels after quenching and tempering

    Lis, A.K.; Lis, J.; Kolan, C.; Jeziorski, L.

    1998-01-01

    The mechanical and Charpy V impact strength properties of new advanced ultra low carbon bainitic (ULBC) steels after water quenching and tempering (WQT) have been investigated. Their chemical compositions are given. The nine continuous cooling transformation diagrams (CCT) of the new ULCB steel grades have been established. The CCT diagrams for ULCB N i steels containing 9% Ni - grade 10N9 and 5% Ni - grade HN5MVNb are given. The comparison between CCT diagrams of 3.5%Ni + 1.5%Cu containing steels grade HSLA 100 and HN3MCu is shown. The effect of the increase in carbon and titanium contents in the chemical composition of ULCB M n steels 04G3Ti, 06G3Ti and 09G3Ti on the kinetics of phase transformations during continuous cooling is presented by the shifting CCT diagrams. The Charpy V impact strength and brittle fracture occurence curves are shown. The effect of tempering temperature on tensile properties of WQT HN3MCu steel is shown and Charpy V impact strength curves after different tempering conditions are shown. The optimum tempering temperatures region of HN3MCu steel for high Charpy V impact toughness at law temperatures - 80 o C(193 K) and -120 o C(153 K) is estimated. The effect of tempering temperature on mechanical properties of HN5MVNb steel is given. The low temperature impact Charpy V toughness of HN5MVNb steel is shown. The optimum range of tempering temperature during 1 hour for high toughness of WQT HN5MVNb steel is given. HN3MCu and HN5MVNb steels after WQT have high yield strength YS≥690 MPa and high Charpy V impact toughness KV≥80 J at -100 o C (173K) and KCV≥50 J/cm 2 at - 120 o C (153K) so they may be used for cryogenic applications

  10. Chemical heat treatment of low alloyed maraging steels

    Malinov, L S; Korotich, I K [Zhdanovskij Metallurgicheskij Inst. (Ukrainian SSR)

    1979-09-01

    The investigation concerned the nitriding, cementation, chromizing, borating of economically alloyed maraging grade 04Kh2N5MFYu steel. The investigated methods of chemothermal treatment were found to considerably increase the hardness of the surface layer of the maraging steel. The high tempering of the grade 04Kh2N5MFYu cemented and hardened steel was found to produce secondary hardening. On chromizing, the diffusion layer is an alloyed ferrite which strengthens because of the dispersion hardening on ageing. The formation of the plastic low-carbon martensite at relatively small cooling rates greatly decreases the tendency of the boride layer to cracking.

  11. Nanoprecipitation in bearing steels

    Barrow, A.T.W.; Rivera-Diaz-del-Castillo, P.E.J.

    2011-01-01

    θ-phase is the main hardening species in bearing steels and appears in both martensitically and bainitically hardened microstructures. This work presents a survey of the microstrucural features accompanying nanoprecipitation in bearing steels. Nanoprecipitate structures formed in 1C-1.5Cr wt.% with additions of Cr, Mn, Mo, Si and Ni are studied. The work is combined with thermodynamic calculations and neural networks to predict the expected matrix composition, and whether this will transform martensitically or bainitically. Martensite tetragonality, composition and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and the type of nanoprecipitate structures in martensitic grades. The θ-phase volume fraction, the duration of the bainite to austenite transformation and the amount of retained austenite are related to hardness and a detailed quantitative description of the precipitate nanostructures. Such description includes compositional studies using energy-dispersive spectroscopy, which shows that nanoprecipitate formation takes place under paraequilibrium. Special attention is devoted to a novel two-step bainite tempering process which shows maximum hardness; we prove that this is the most effective process for incorporating solute into the precipitates, which are finer than those resulting from one-step banitic transformation processes.

  12. The development of EUROFER reduced activation steel

    Schaaf, B. van der E-mail: vanderschaaf@nrg-nl.com; Tavassoli, F.; Fazio, C.; Rigal, E.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; LeMarois, G

    2003-09-01

    Ferritic martensitic steels show limited swelling and susceptibility to helium effects and can be made with low activation chemical compositions. These properties make them the reference steel for the development of breeding blankets in fusion power plants. EUROFER97 is the European implementation of such a steel, where experience gained from an IEA co-operation with Japan and the US is also implemented. Results obtained so far show that EUROFER steel has attractive mechanical properties even after long ageing times. Compatibility tests in water and PbLi17 are in progress. Oxidised aluminium is the most effective protective layer in PbLi17. The displacement damage and helium formation strongly influence the hydrogen transport in the steel. Present experiments should be backed by tests in a more fusion relevant environment, e.g. IFMIF. The 2.5 dpa neutron irradiations at low temperatures result in a higher DBTT. High dose irradiations, up to 80 dpa, are underway. The early results of ODS grades with EUROFER steel composition show potential of these grades for increasing the operating temperature with 100-150 K.

  13. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    Dahmen, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting the weld microstructure the Q+P and the QT steels require weld heat treatment. The HSD steel is weldable without. Due to their applications the ultra-high strength steels are welded in as-rolled and strengthened condition. Also the reaction of the weld on hot stamping is reflected for the martensitic grades. The supra-ductile steels are welded as solution annealed and work hardened by 50%. The results show the general suitability for laser beam welding.

  14. Fracture toughness of welded joints of ASTM A543 steel plate

    Susukida, H.; Uebayashi, T.; Yoshida, K.; Ando, Y.

    1977-01-01

    Fracture toughness and weldability tests have been performed on a high strength steel which is a modification of ASTM A543 Grade B Class 1 steel, with a view to using it for nuclear reactor containment vessels. The results showed that fracture toughness of welded joints of ASTM A543 modified high strength steel is superior and the steel is suitable for manufacturing the containment vessels

  15. Laser beam welding of new ultra-high strength and supra-ductile steels

    Dahmen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Ultra-high strength and supra-ductile are entering fields of new applications. Those materials are excellent candidates for modern light-weight construction and functional integration. As ultra-high strength steels the stainless martensitic grade 1.4034 and the bainitic steel UNS 53835 are investigated. For the supra-ductile steels stand two high austenitic steels with 18 and 28 % manganese. As there are no processing windows an approach from the metallurgical base on is required. Adjusting t...

  16. Evolution of stainless steels in nuclear industry

    Tavassoli, Farhad

    2010-01-01

    Starting with the stainless steels used in the conventional industry, their adoption and successive evolutions in the nuclear industry, from one generation of nuclear reactors to another, is presented. Specific examples for several steels are given, covering fabrication procedures, qualification methods, property databases and design allowable stresses, to show how the ever-increasing demands for better performance and reliability, in particular under neutron irradiation, have been met. Particular attention is paid to the austenitic stainless steels types 304L, 316L, 316L(N), 316L(N)-IG, titanium stabilized grade 321, precipitation strengthened alloy 800, conventional and low activation ferritic/martensitic steels and their oxygen dispersion strengthening (ODS) derivatives. For each material, the evolution of the associated filler metal and welding techniques are also presented. (author)

  17. Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCAT)

    Gary Casuccio (RJ Lee Group); Michael Potter (RJ Lee Group); Fred Schwerer (RJ Lee Group); Dr. Richard J. Fruehan (Carnegie Mellon University); Dr. Scott Story (US Steel)

    2005-12-30

    The objective of this study was to develop the Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCATTM) to permit steelmakers to evaluate the quality of the steel through the analysis of individual inclusions. By characterizing individual inclusions, determinations can be made as to the cleanliness of the steel. Understanding the complicating effects of inclusions in the steelmaking process and on the resulting properties of steel allows the steel producer to increase throughput, better control the process, reduce remelts, and improve the quality of the product. The ASCAT (Figure 1) is a steel-smart inclusion analysis tool developed around a customized next-generation computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (NG-CCSEM) hardware platform that permits acquisition of inclusion size and composition data at a rate never before possible in SEM-based instruments. With built-in customized ''intelligent'' software, the inclusion data is automatically sorted into clusters representing different inclusion types to define the characteristics of a particular heat (Figure 2). The ASCAT represents an innovative new tool for the collection of statistically meaningful data on inclusions, and provides a means of understanding the complicated effects of inclusions in the steel making process and on the resulting properties of steel. Research conducted by RJLG with AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) and SMA (Steel Manufactures of America) members indicates that the ASCAT has application in high-grade bar, sheet, plate, tin products, pipes, SBQ, tire cord, welding rod, and specialty steels and alloys where control of inclusions, whether natural or engineered, are crucial to their specification for a given end-use. Example applications include castability of calcium treated steel; interstitial free (IF) degasser grade slag conditioning practice; tundish clogging and erosion minimization; degasser circulation and optimization; quality assessment/steel

  18. Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCAT)

    Gary Casuccio; Michael Potter; Fred Schwerer; Richard J. Fruehan; Dr. Scott Story

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop the Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCATTM) to permit steelmakers to evaluate the quality of the steel through the analysis of individual inclusions. By characterizing individual inclusions, determinations can be made as to the cleanliness of the steel. Understanding the complicating effects of inclusions in the steelmaking process and on the resulting properties of steel allows the steel producer to increase throughput, better control the process, reduce remelts, and improve the quality of the product. The ASCAT (Figure 1) is a steel-smart inclusion analysis tool developed around a customized next-generation computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (NG-CCSEM) hardware platform that permits acquisition of inclusion size and composition data at a rate never before possible in SEM-based instruments. With built-in customized ''intelligent'' software, the inclusion data is automatically sorted into clusters representing different inclusion types to define the characteristics of a particular heat (Figure 2). The ASCAT represents an innovative new tool for the collection of statistically meaningful data on inclusions, and provides a means of understanding the complicated effects of inclusions in the steel making process and on the resulting properties of steel. Research conducted by RJLG with AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) and SMA (Steel Manufactures of America) members indicates that the ASCAT has application in high-grade bar, sheet, plate, tin products, pipes, SBQ, tire cord, welding rod, and specialty steels and alloys where control of inclusions, whether natural or engineered, are crucial to their specification for a given end-use. Example applications include castability of calcium treated steel; interstitial free (IF) degasser grade slag conditioning practice; tundish clogging and erosion minimization; degasser circulation and optimization; quality assessment/steel cleanliness; slab, billet

  19. Controlling DC permeability in cast steels

    Sumner, Aaran; Gerada, Chris; Brown, Neil; Clare, Adam

    2017-01-01

    Annealing (at multiple cooling rates) and quenching (with tempering) was performed on specimens of cast steel of varying composition. The aim was to devise a method for selecting the steel with the highest permeability, from any given range of steels, and then increasing the permeability by heat treatment. Metallographic samples were imaged using optical microscopy to show the effect of the applied heat treatments on the microstructure. Commonly cast steels can have DC permeability altered by the careful selection of a heat treatment. Increases of up to 381% were achieved by annealing using a cooling rate of 6.0 °C/min. Annealing was found to cause the carbon present in the steel to migrate from grain boundaries and from within ferrite crystals into adjacent pearlite crystals. The migration of the carbon resulted in less carbon at grain boundaries and within ferrite crystals reducing the number of pinning sites between magnetic domains. This gives rise to a higher permeability. Quenching then tempering was found to cause the formation of small ferrite crystals with the carbon content of the steel predominately held in the martensitic crystal structures. The results show that with any given range of steel compositions the highest baseline DC permeability will be found with the steel that has the highest iron content and the lowest carbon content. For the samples tested in this paper a cooling rate of 4.5 °C/min resulted in the relative permeability of the sample with the highest baseline permeability, AS4, increasing from 783 to 1479 at 0.5 T. This paper shows how heat treatments commonly applied to hypoeutectoid cast steels, to improve their mechanical performance, can be used to also enhance electromagnetic properties of these alloys. The use of cast steels allows the creation of DC components for electrical machines not possible by the widely used method of stacking of electrical grade sheet steels. - Highlights: • A range of structural steels had their

  20. Controlling DC permeability in cast steels

    Sumner, Aaran, E-mail: aaran.sumner@nottingham.ac.uk [University of Nottingham, Nottingham University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom); Gerada, Chris, E-mail: chris.gerada@nottingham.ac.uk [Electrical Machines, University of Nottingham, Tower Building, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom); Brown, Neil, E-mail: neil.brown@cummins.com [Advanced Electrical Machines Research and Technology at Cummins Power Generation, Peterborough PE2 6FZ, England (United Kingdom); Clare, Adam, E-mail: adam.clare@nottingham.ac.uk [Advanced Manufacturing, University of Nottingham, University Park Campus, Nottingham NG7 2RD, England (United Kingdom)

    2017-05-01

    Annealing (at multiple cooling rates) and quenching (with tempering) was performed on specimens of cast steel of varying composition. The aim was to devise a method for selecting the steel with the highest permeability, from any given range of steels, and then increasing the permeability by heat treatment. Metallographic samples were imaged using optical microscopy to show the effect of the applied heat treatments on the microstructure. Commonly cast steels can have DC permeability altered by the careful selection of a heat treatment. Increases of up to 381% were achieved by annealing using a cooling rate of 6.0 °C/min. Annealing was found to cause the carbon present in the steel to migrate from grain boundaries and from within ferrite crystals into adjacent pearlite crystals. The migration of the carbon resulted in less carbon at grain boundaries and within ferrite crystals reducing the number of pinning sites between magnetic domains. This gives rise to a higher permeability. Quenching then tempering was found to cause the formation of small ferrite crystals with the carbon content of the steel predominately held in the martensitic crystal structures. The results show that with any given range of steel compositions the highest baseline DC permeability will be found with the steel that has the highest iron content and the lowest carbon content. For the samples tested in this paper a cooling rate of 4.5 °C/min resulted in the relative permeability of the sample with the highest baseline permeability, AS4, increasing from 783 to 1479 at 0.5 T. This paper shows how heat treatments commonly applied to hypoeutectoid cast steels, to improve their mechanical performance, can be used to also enhance electromagnetic properties of these alloys. The use of cast steels allows the creation of DC components for electrical machines not possible by the widely used method of stacking of electrical grade sheet steels. - Highlights: • A range of structural steels had their

  1. Corrosion resistant steel

    Zubchenko, A.S.; Borisov, V.P.; Latyshev, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    Corrosion resistant steel for production of sheets and tubes containing C, Mn, Cr, Si, Fe is suggested. It is alloyed with vanadium and cerium for improving tensile properties and ductility. The steel can be melted by a conventional method in electric-arc or induction furnaces. The mentioned steel is intended to be used as a substitute for nickel-bearing austenitic steels

  2. Interpretation of toughness tests performed on A533, grade B steel in the transition regime. Modelling and numerical analysis; Interpretation des essais de tenacite de l`acier A533, grade B dans le domaine de la transition fragile-ductile. Simulation numerique et modelisation

    Eripret, C.

    1994-01-01

    Modelling the fracture behaviour of pressure vessel steels is of major importance for related structural integrity assessments. It is essential to understand how the micromechanisms control the transition between ductile and brittle fracture for predicting geometry effects on transition temperature. To meet this goal, a model has been developed at EDF/R and DD in the framework of local approach to fracture. Its experimental validation has been achieved by analysing toughness tests performed by AEA Technology for a pressure vessel steel in the transition regime. This large data base has evidenced the specimen thickness effects on toughness properties of the material, as well as influence of prior ductile crack growth. Predictions of the model have been compared with experiments, which shows that the transition curve K{sub 1C} = f (T) can be drawn from model predictions and compared with the RCCM or ASME design curve. Substantial safety margins have been exhibited. They are greater for thin specimens (10 mm) than for thicker specimens (230 mm). However, the transition curve in the upper transition region is still underestimated by the model (for temperatures higher than RTNDT + 50 deg C). Improvement should be made to account for important plasticity development and significant crack growth. (author). 30 figs., 10 tabs., 12 refs.

  3. Steel. A handbook for materials research and engineering. Vol. 1. Fundamentals

    1992-01-01

    This STEEL Textbook is the outcome of reflections within the Materials Committee of the German Iron and Steel Institute on whether to republish the Manual of Special Steels, the highly commendable work by E. Houdremont. Discussions came to the conclusion, however, that for various reasons it was neither possible nor expedient simply to publish a follow-up edition of the famed Houdremont. To begin with and from today's vantage point, there no longer seemed to be any justification for restricting the work to special steels in the sense of the term as understood by E. Houdremont. The term ''special steel'' has never gained acceptance in official circles or standards. If we replace it by the term ''high-grade steel'', which is nowadays defined in standards, and this would appear permissible with certain qualifications, and if we bear in mind that the boundaries between high-grade steels and non-high-grade steels, the commercial and quality steels, although defined in standards (see part A), nonetheless in terms of engineering parameters are quite blurred, so it would seem only fitting for such as work to cover all the various grades of steel, also in view of the great significance of the non-high-grade steels. Because of the very many different grades of steel, this approach necessarily involves the collaboration of very many experts, in other words it entails a joint effort. Moreover, the vast, barely manageable quantity of literature in this field all of which can hardly be analysed by just one person, inevitably leads to the conclusion that there is a need to produce the new work as a joint effort. (orig.).

  4. Fatigue behaviour of friction welded medium carbon steel and austenitic stainless steel dissimilar joints

    Paventhan, R.; Lakshminarayanan, P.R.; Balasubramanian, V.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Fusion welding of dissimilar metals is a problem due to difference in properties. → Solid state welding process such as friction welding is a solution for the above problem. → Fatigue life of friction welded carbon steel and stainless steel joints are evaluated. → Effect of notch on the fatigue life of friction welded dissimilar joints is reported. → Formation of intermetallic is responsible for reduction in fatigue life of dissimilar joints. -- Abstract: This paper reports the fatigue behaviour of friction welded medium carbon steel-austenitic stainless steel (MCS-ASS) dissimilar joints. Commercial grade medium carbon steel rods of 12 mm diameter and AISI 304 grade austenitic stainless steel rods of 12 mm diameter were used to fabricate the joints. A constant speed, continuous drive friction welding machine was used to fabricate the joints. Fatigue life of the joints was evaluated conducting the experiments using rotary bending fatigue testing machine (R = -1). Applied stress vs. number of cycles to failure (S-N) curve was plotted for unnotched and notched specimens. Basquin constants, fatigue strength, fatigue notch factor and notch sensitivity factor were evaluated for the dissimilar joints. Fatigue strength of the joints is correlated with microstructure, microhardness and tensile properties of the joints.

  5. Measuring secondary phases in duplex stainless steels

    Calliari, I.; Brunelli, K.; Dabalà, M.; Ramous, E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of duplex stainless steels is limited by their susceptibility to the formation of dangerous intermetallic phases resulting in detrimental effects on impact toughness and corrosion resistance. This precipitation and the quantitative determinations of the phases have received considerable attention and different precipitation sequences (σ phase, χ phase, and carbides) have been suggested. This study investigates the phase transformation during continuous cooling and isothermal treatments in commercial duplex stainless steel grades and the effects on alloy properties, and compares the most common techniques of analysis.

  6. Applications of nitrogen-alloyed stainless steels

    Sundvall, J.; Olsson, J. [Avesta Sheffield AB (Sweden); Holmberg, B. [Avesta Welding AB (Sweden)

    1999-07-01

    A selected number of applications for different types of nitrogen-alloyed stainless steels are described. The applications and grades are based on how nitrogen improves different properties. Conventional austenitic grades of type 304 and 316 can be alloyed with nitrogen to increase the strength and to maintain the austenite stability after cold deformation when exposed to cryogenic temperatures. Such examples are presented. The addition of nitrogen to duplex grades of stainless steel such as 2205 improves the pitting resistance, among other things, and also enables faster reformation of the austenite in the heat affected zone. This means that heavy plate can be welded without pre-heating or post-weld heating. Such applications are covered. Modern highly alloyed austenitic stainless steels almost always contain nitrogen and all reasons for this are covered, i.e. to stabilise the austenite, to increase the strength, and to improve the pitting resistance. The increased strength is the characteristic exemplified the least, since the higher strength of duplex grades is well known, but examples on austenite stability and improved pitting resistance are presented. (orig.)

  7. Teachers' Grading Decision Making

    Isnawati, Ida; Saukah, Ali

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated teachers' grading decision making, focusing on their beliefs underlying their grading decision making, their grading practices and assessment types, and factors they considered in grading decision making. Two teachers from two junior high schools applying different curriculum policies in grade reporting in Indonesian…

  8. Student Attitudes Toward Grades and Grading Practices.

    Stallings, William M.; Leslie, Elwood K.

    The result of a study designed to assess student attitudes toward grading practices are discussed. Questionnaire responses of 3439 students in three institutions were tabulated. Responses were generally negative toward conventional grading systems. (MS)

  9. Selected properties of new „duplex” cast steel

    S. Pietrowski

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper selected properties of new „duplex” cast steel are presented. The new cast steel was devised in HYDRO-VACUUM company in Grudziądz, where “duplex” cast steel for pump elements is smelted. The goal was to devise a new grade of “duplex” cast steel of better physicochemical properties and cheaper than now applied. It was demonstrated, that there is the possibility of devising the new grade of “duplex” cast steel. It is characterized by higher mechanical properties, similar wear resistance and greater corrosion resistance in 15% water solution of H2SO4 in comparison to now applied “duplex” cast steel. The chemical composition was selected to obtain in microstructure about of 50% ferrite and 50% austenite. It guarantee the highest properties and the lowest costs of its smelting.In the paper results of: the microstructure, Rm, Rp0,2, A5, HB, wear resistance and corrosion resistance in water solution of 15% HCl and H2SO4 acids of new cast steel was presented. They were compared with now applied in HYDRO-VACUUM company “duplex” cast steel.

  10. Engineering Performance of High Strength Concrete Containing Steel Fibre Reinforcement

    Md Azree Othuman Mydin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The development and utilization of the high strength concrete in the construction industry have been increasing rapidly. Fiber reinforced concrete is introduced to overcome the weakness of the conventional concrete because concrete normally can crack under a low tensile force and it is known to be brittle. Steel fibre is proved to be the popular and best combination in the high strength concrete to result the best in the mechanical and durability properties of high strength concrete with consideration of curing time, steel fibre geometry, concrete grade and else more. The incorporation of steel fibre in the mortar mixture is known as steel fibre reinforced concrete have the potential to produce improvement in the workability, strength, ductility and the deformation of high strength concrete. Besides that, steel fibre also increases the tensile strength of concrete and improves the mechanical properties of the steel fibre reinforced concrete. The range for any high strength concrete is between 60MPa-100MPa. Steel fibre reinforced concrete which contains straight fibres has poorer physical properties than that containing hooked end stainless steel fibre due to the length and the hooked steel fibre provide a better effective aspects ratio. Normally, steel fibre tensile strength is in the range of 1100MPa-1700MPa. Addition of less steel fibre volumes in the range of 0.5% to 1.0% can produce better increase in the flexural fatigue strength. The strength can be increased with addition of steel fibre up to certain percentage. This paper will review and present some basic properties of steel fibre reinforced concrete such as mechanical, workability and durability properties.

  11. Alloy-steel bolting materials for special applications

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    This specification covers regular and special-quality alloy steel bolting materials which may be used for nuclear and other special applications. Bolting materials as used in the specification cover rolled or forged bars, rotary pierced or extruded seamless tubes, bored bars, or forged hollows from forged or rolled bar segments to be machined into bolts, studs, washers, and nuts. Several grades of steel are covered and supplementary requirements of an optional nature are provided for use when special quality is desired

  12. Solidification Sequence of Spray-Formed Steels

    Zepon, Guilherme; Ellendt, Nils; Uhlenwinkel, Volker; Bolfarini, Claudemiro

    2016-02-01

    Solidification in spray-forming is still an open discussion in the atomization and deposition area. This paper proposes a solidification model based on the equilibrium solidification path of alloys. The main assumptions of the model are that the deposition zone temperature must be above the alloy's solidus temperature and that the equilibrium liquid fraction at this temperature is reached, which involves partial remelting and/or redissolution of completely solidified droplets. When the deposition zone is cooled, solidification of the remaining liquid takes place under near equilibrium conditions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy (OM) were used to analyze the microstructures of two different spray-formed steel grades: (1) boron modified supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) and (2) D2 tool steel. The microstructures were analyzed to determine the sequence of phase formation during solidification. In both cases, the solidification model proposed was validated.

  13. Stainless steels for cryogenic bolts and nuts

    Leroy, F.; Rabbe, P.; Odin, G.

    1975-01-01

    Stainless steel for cryogenic applications are generally austenitic steels which, under the effect of cold-drawing, can or cannot undergo a partial martensitic transformation according to their composition. It has been shown that very high ductility and endurance characteristics at low temperatures, together with very high yield strength and resistances values, can be attained with grades of nitrogenous steels of types Z2CN18-10N and Z3CMN18-8-6N. Optimum ductility values are obtained by employing to the best possible, the martensitic transformations which develop during cold-drawing. From the plotting of the rational traction curves, it is possible to analyse very simply the influence of the composition on the martensitic transformations [fr

  14. Methods of forging steel

    Pečoler, Primož

    2014-01-01

    The following work presents processes of steel forming, challenges when forging steel, forming machines suitable for forging and which choice of machine is most suitable for forging. We can separate steel forming to free forging and drop forging. Free forging can be divided to hand forging and machine forging. The correct choice of furnaces is also very important. We must reach correct temperature in the furnace for raw steel to melt with less scalings. In diploma I mentioned some machine...

  15. Prospects of structural steels

    Bannykh, O.A.

    2012-01-01

    The current state of world steel production is considered as well as the development strategy of metallurgy industry in the Russian Federation through to 2020. The main factors determining the conservation of steel as perspective material for industry are given: energy expenses on production, the well-proven recirculation technology, the capability of changing steel properties in wide range, temperature range of operation. The conclusion is made that in the immediate future steel will not lose its importance [ru

  16. Trends in steel technology

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    Dual phase steels, composite products, and microalloyed steels are making inroads in the automotive industry applications for bumpers, automotive parts, bodies, mechanical parts, suspension and steering equipment and truck bumpers. New steels are also used to support solar mirrors and cells, in corrosive environments in the oil and gas industry, fusion reactors, and pressure vessels in nuclear power plants

  17. Corrosion resistance of stainless steel pipes in soil

    Sjoegren, L.; Camitz, G. [Swerea KIMAB AB, Box 55970, SE-102 16 Stockholm (Sweden); Peultier, J.; Jacques, S.; Baudu, V.; Barrau, F.; Chareyre, B. [Industeel and ArcelorMittal R and D, 56 rue Clemenceau, BP19, FR-71201 le Creusot, Cedex (France); Bergquist, A. [Outokumpu Stainless AB, P.O. Box 74, SE-774 22 Avesta (Sweden); Pourbaix, A.; Carpentiers, P. [Belgian Centre for Corrosion Study, Avenue des Petits-Champs 4A, BE 1410 Waterloo (Belgium)

    2011-04-15

    To be able to give safe recommendations concerning the choice of suitable stainless steel grades for pipelines to be buried in various soil environments, a large research programme, including field exposures of test specimens buried in soil in Sweden and in France, has been performed. Resistance against external corrosion of austenitic, super austenitic, lean duplex, duplex and super duplex steel grades in soil has been investigated by laboratory tests and field exposures. The grades included have been screened according to their critical pitting-corrosion temperature and according to their time-to-re-passivation after the passive layer has been destroyed locally by scratching. The field exposures programme, being the core of the investigation, uses large specimens: 2 m pipes and plates, of different grades. The exposure has been performed to reveal effects of aeration cells, deposits or confined areas, welds and burial depth. Additionally, investigations of the tendency of stainless steel to corrode under the influence of alternating current (AC) have been performed, both in the laboratory and in the field. Recommendations for use of stainless steels under different soil conditions are given based on experimental results and on operating experiences of existing stainless steel pipelines in soil. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Formability Characterization of a New Generation High Strength Steels

    Sriram Sadagopan; Dennis Urban; Chris Wong; Mai Huang; Benda Yan

    2003-05-16

    Advanced high strength steels (AHSS) are being progressively explored by the automotive industry all around the world for cost-effective solutions to accomplish vehicle lightweighting, improve fuel economy, and consequently reduce greenhouse emissions. Because of their inherent high strength, attractive crash energy management properties, and good formability, the effective use of AHSS such as Duel Phase and TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels, will significantly contribute to vehicle lightweighting and fuel economy. To further the application of these steels in automotive body and structural parts, a good knowledge and experience base must be developed regarding the press formability of these materials. This project provides data on relevant intrinsic mechanical behavior, splitting limits, and springback behavior of several lots of mild steel, conventional high strength steel (HSS), advanced high strength steel (AHSS) and ultra-high strength steel (UHSS), supplied by the member companies of the Automotive Applications Committee (AAC) of the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI). Two lots of TRIP600, which were supplied by ThyssenKrupp Stahl, were also included in the study. Since sheet metal forming encompasses a very diverse range of forming processes and deformation modes, a number of simulative tests were used to characterize the forming behavior of these steel grades. In general, it was found that formability, as determined by the different tests, decreased with increased tensile strength. Consistant with previous findings, the formability of TRIP600 was found to be exceptionally good for its tensile strength.

  19. Development of a lean duplex stainless steel

    Liljas, M.; Johansson, P.; Liu Hui-Ping; Olsson, C.O.A. [Avesta Research Centre, Avesta (Sweden). Outokumpu Stainless

    2008-06-15

    The classic series of duplex stainless steels shows very high corrosion resistance and can be used for very demanding applications. A new lean duplex steel, LDX 2101 {sup registered} (EN 1.4162, UNS S32101), has been developed with corrosion resistance on a par with standard austenitic grades. Application areas include: structural components, chemical industry, tanks and containers. The steel was designed to have equal amounts of ferrite and austenite in annealed condition and with an austenite that is stable against strain-induced martensite. Thanks to its high nitrogen content, the steel has a fast austenite reformation when subjected to thermal cycling, e.g. welding. Unlike conventional duplex grades, the formation of intermetallic phase is very sluggish, although precipitation of nitrides and carbides has a certain impact on material properties after exposure in the temperature range 600 to 800 C. The precipitation behaviour after different isothermal treatments is described and its influence on different product properties is shown. A good agreement was found between impact toughness and corrosion resistance for a wide range of thermal treatments. (orig.)

  20. The structure of the alphinizing coat on alloy steels

    S. Pietrowski

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper results of the structure of the coat alphinizing in AlSi5 silumin on alloy steels: acid-proof 1H18N9T (X6CrNiTi18-10 and high speed SW18 (HS18-0-1 were presented. The temperature of the alphinizing bath was amounts to750±5°C, and immersion time of the element τ = 180s. It was shown, that there is the different “g” coat thickness on testing steels. On the 1H18N9T steel it amounts to g = 52μm, and on the SW18 steel – g = 203μm. Regardless of a grade of testing alloy steels the coat consist of three layers with diversified phasic structure. There is different chemical composition of coat layers on testing steels. The first layer from the base consist of AlFe phase containing alloy addictions of steels: Cr and Ni (1H18N9T and W, V and Cr (SW18. On this layer crystallize the second layer of intermetallic phases. It is the phase containing the main alloy addiction of steels: AlFeCr (1H18N9T and AlFeW (SW18. The last, outside layer consist of silumin containing AlFeNi intermetallic phases on the 1H18N9T steel and AlFeW on the SW18 steel. Regardless of the grade of testing steels there is Si element in all layers of the coat. There are morphological differences in tested layers. The second layer (AlFeW phase inside the coat on the SW18 steel consist of faced crystals growing into in outside silumin layer. On the 1H18N9T steel a boundary between transient and outside layer is more uniform. Free separations of intermetallic phases inside silumin layer on the 1H18N9T steel have lamellar and on the SW18 steel – faced form.

  1. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of shielded metal arc-welded dissimilar joints comprising duplex stainless steel and low alloy steel

    Srinivasan, P. Bala; Muthupandi, V.; Sivan, V.; Srinivasan, P. Bala; Dietzel, W.

    2006-12-01

    This work describes the results of an investigation on a dissimilar weld joint comprising a boiler-grade low alloy steel and duplex stainless steel (DSS). Welds produced by shielded metal arc-welding with two different electrodes (an austenitic and a duplex grade) were examined for their microstructural features and properties. The welds were found to have overmatching mechanical properties. Although the general corrosion resistance of the weld metals was good, their pitting resistance was found to be inferior when compared with the DSS base material.

  2. Weldability of Stainless Steels

    Saida, Kazuyoshi

    2010-01-01

    It gives an outline of metallographic properties of welding zone of stainless steels, generation and mechanisms of welding crack and decreasing of corrosion resistance of welding zone. It consists of seven chapters such as introduction, some kinds of stainless steels and properties, metallographic properties of welding zone, weld crack, toughness of welding zone, corrosion resistance and summary. The solidification modes of stainless steels, each solidification mode on the cross section of Fe-Cr-Ni alloy phase diagram, each solidification mode of weld stainless steels metal by electron beam welding, segregation state of alloy elements at each solidification mode, Schaeffler diagram, Delong diagram, effects of (P + S) mass content in % and Cr/Ni equivalent on solidification cracking of weld stainless steels metal, solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, effects of trace impurity elements on solidification crack susceptibility of weld high purity stainless steels metal, ductile fracture susceptibility of weld austenitic stainless steels metal, effects of H2 and ferrite content on generation of crack of weld 25Cr-5N duplex stainless steels, effects of O and N content on toughness of weld SUS 447J1 metals, effect of ferrite content on aging toughness of weld austenitic stainless steel metal, corrosion morphology of welding zone of stainless steels, generation mechanism of knife line attack phenomenon, and corrosion potential of some kinds of metals in seawater at room temperature are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  3. The steel scrap age.

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Milford, Rachel L; Müller, Daniel B; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-04-02

    Steel production accounts for 25% of industrial carbon emissions. Long-term forecasts of steel demand and scrap supply are needed to develop strategies for how the steel industry could respond to industrialization and urbanization in the developing world while simultaneously reducing its environmental impact, and in particular, its carbon footprint. We developed a dynamic stock model to estimate future final demand for steel and the available scrap for 10 world regions. Based on evidence from developed countries, we assumed that per capita in-use stocks will saturate eventually. We determined the response of the entire steel cycle to stock saturation, in particular the future split between primary and secondary steel production. During the 21st century, steel demand may peak in the developed world, China, the Middle East, Latin America, and India. As China completes its industrialization, global primary steel production may peak between 2020 and 2030 and decline thereafter. We developed a capacity model to show how extensive trade of finished steel could prolong the lifetime of the Chinese steelmaking assets. Secondary steel production will more than double by 2050, and it may surpass primary production between 2050 and 2060: the late 21st century can become the steel scrap age.

  4. New developments in the fabrication of fine-grained structural steels; practical applications in welding engineering

    Uwer, D.

    1986-01-01

    The paper briefly demonstrates the development of weldable construction steels in the FRG exemplified by the development of steel grade St 37 to StE 960. Improvements of steel quality, especially weldability, is expected from the ladle metallurgy process, thermomechanical rolling, intensive cooling after rolling and direct annealing by using rolling heat. Positive effects were achieved above all in lamellar tearing strength, cold cracking behaviour and in the heat-affected zone. (DG) [de

  5. Welding of nickel free high nitrogen stainless steel: Microstructure and mechanical properties

    Raffi Mohammed; G. Madhusudhan Reddy; K. Srinivasa Rao

    2017-01-01

    High nitrogen stainless steel (HNS) is a nickel free austenitic stainless steel that is used as a structural component in defence applications for manufacturing battle tanks as a replacement of the existing armour grade steel owing to its low cost, excellent mechanical properties and better corrosion resistance. Conventional fusion welding causes problems like nitrogen desorption, solidification cracking in weld zone, liquation cracking in heat affected zone, nitrogen induced porosity and poo...

  6. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1985-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast-duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Data from room-temperature Charpy-impact tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450 0 C are presented and compared with results from other studies. Microstructures of cast-duplex stainless steels subjected to long-term aging either in the laboratory or in reactor service have been characterized. The results indicate that at least two processes contribute to the low-temperature embrittleent of duplex stainless steels, viz., weakening of the ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitation and embrittlement of ferrite matrix by the formation of additional phases such as G-phase, Type X, or the α' phase. Carbide precipitation has a significant effect on the onset of embrittlement of CF-8 and -8M grades of stainless steels aged at 400 or 450 0 C. The existing correlations do not accurately represent the embrittlement behavior over the temperature range 300 to 450 0 C. 18 refs., 13 figs

  7. MATHEMATICAL FORMULATION OF PLASTIC CHARACTERISTICS OF WIRE OF STEEL 70 AT HIGH-SPEED WIRE DRAWING

    Yu. L. Bobarikin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The carried out numerical experiments subject to initial and boundary conditions indicate that mathematical model of elastic-plastic characteristics of steel 90 can be used for numerical calculations of wire drawing routes for this grade of steel.

  8. Compact cross-sections of mild and high-strength steel hollow-section beams

    Pavlovic, M.; Veljkovic, M.

    2017-01-01

    The Eurocode 3 rules for the high-strength steel (HSS: fy > 460 MPa) limit the analysis of beams to elastic global analysis and grades up to S700. In order to fully exploit the potential to design lightweight and sustainable steel structures, plastic analysis and the use of higher

  9. Stress-strain relationship of high-strength steel (HSS) reinforcing bars

    Anggraini, Retno; Tavio, Raka, I. Gede Putu; Agustiar

    2018-05-01

    The introduction of High-Strength Steel (HSS) reinforcing bars in reinforced concrete members has gained much attention in recent years and led to many advantages such as construction timesaving. It is also more economical since it can reduce the amount of reinforcing steel bars used in concrete members which in turn alleviates the congestion of reinforcement. Up to present, the building codes, e.g. American Concrete Institute (ACI) 318M-14 and Standard National Indonesia (SNI) 2847:2013, still restrict the use of higher-strength steel reinforcing bars for concrete design up to Grade 420 MPa due to the possible suspected brittle behavior of concrete members. This paper evaluates the characteristics of stress-strain relationships of HSS bars if they are comparable to the characteristics of those of Grade 420 MPa. To achieve the objective of the study, a series of steel bars from various grades (420, 550, 650, and 700 MPa) was selected. Tensile tests of these steel samples were conducted under displacement-controlled mode to capture the complete stress-strain curves and particularly the post-yield response of the steel bars. The results indicate that all the steel bars tested had the actual yield strengths greater than the corresponding specified values. The stress-strain curves of HSS reinforcing bars (Grade 550, 650, and 700 MPa) performed slightly different characteristics with those of Grade 420 MPa.

  10. On key factors influencing ductile fractures of dual phase (DP) steels

    Sun, X.; Choi, K.S.; Soulami, A.; Liu, W.N.; Khaleel, M.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the key factors influencing ductile failure of various grades of dual phase (DP) steels using the microstructure-based modeling approach. Various microstructure-based finite element models are generated based on the actual microstructures of DP steels with different martensite volume fractions. These models are, then, used to investigate the influence of ductility of the constituent ferrite phase and also the influence of voids introduced in the ferrite phase on the overall ductility of DP steels. It is found that with volume fraction of martensite in the microstructure less than 15%, the overall ductility of the DP steels strongly depends on the ductility of the ferrite matrix, hence pre-existing micro-voids in the microstructure significantly reduce the overall ductility of the steel. When the volume fraction of martensite is above 15%, the pre-existing voids in the ferrite matrix does not significantly reduce the overall ductility of the DP steels, and the overall ductility is more influenced by the mechanical property disparity between the two phases. The applicability of the phase inhomogeneity driven ductile failure of DP steels is then discussed based on the obtained computational results for various grades of DP steels, and the experimentally obtained scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures of the corresponding grades of DP steels near fracture surface are used as evidence for result validations.

  11. On arbitrarily graded rings

    58

    paper is devoted to the study of arbitrary rings graded through arbitrary sets. .... which recover certain multiplicative relations among the homogeneous components ... instance the case in which the grading set A is an Abelian group, where the ...

  12. Graded manifolds and supermanifolds

    Batchelor, M.

    1984-01-01

    In this paper, a review is presented on graded manifolds and supermanifolds. Many theorems, propositions, corrollaries, etc. are given with proofs or sketch proofs. Graded manifolds, supereuclidian space, Lie supergroups, etc. are dealt with

  13. Addition of electric arc furnace dust in hot metal changing the form of addition

    Marques Sobrinho, Vicente de Paulo Ferreira; Oliveira, Jose Roberto de; Vieira, Estefano Aparecido; Telles, Victor Bridi; Grillo, Felipe Fardin; Tenorio, Jorge Alberto Soares; Espinosa, Denise Crocce Romano

    2014-01-01

    This research aims to study the incorporation of the mass of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD), by addition in hot metal (1.78% Si) at a temperature of 1,400 degrees Celsius. The EAFD is from a steel plant producing long steel. The addition of the EAFD was as received, in the form of briquettes without agitation of the hot metal and in the form of briquettes with agitation of the hot metal. Previously, the EAFD was characterized using the following techniques: chemical analysis, size analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis. The achievement of fusion experiments in laboratory scale, took place in a vertical tubular furnace with temperature control. The fusion experiments to assess the incorporation of EAFD mass used graphite crucibles. After cooling, the hot metal and the slag, remaining in the crucible, were weighed to do a mass balance. A flow of inert gas (argon) was maintained inside the furnace during the experiments. Results show that the experiment with addition of EAFD as received presents the best result of incorporating the mass of the final hot metal (1.73%) combined with the lowest percentage of volatilized mass of EAFD (46.52%). The experiment addition of EAFD in the form of briquette with agitation of hot metal presents the lowest percentage of slag mass (4.58%). The zinc content of volatilized EAFD (64.30%) is higher than the zinc content of the imported ore concentrate (52%) and zinc content of the national ore concentrate (12% to 39%). The presence of lead and cadmium in the slag characterizing it as a hazardous solid waste. (author)

  14. Addition of electric arc furnace dust in hot metal changing the form of addition; Adicao de poeira de aciaria eletrica em ferro-gusa liquido alterando a forma de adicao

    Marques Sobrinho, Vicente de Paulo Ferreira; Oliveira, Jose Roberto de; Vieira, Estefano Aparecido, E-mail: vicente@ifes.edu.br [Institulo Federal do Espirito Santo (IFES), ES (Brazil); Telles, Victor Bridi; Grillo, Felipe Fardin; Tenorio, Jorge Alberto Soares; Espinosa, Denise Crocce Romano [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Escola Politecnica

    2014-07-01

    This research aims to study the incorporation of the mass of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD), by addition in hot metal (1.78% Si) at a temperature of 1,400 degrees Celsius. The EAFD is from a steel plant producing long steel. The addition of the EAFD was as received, in the form of briquettes without agitation of the hot metal and in the form of briquettes with agitation of the hot metal. Previously, the EAFD was characterized using the following techniques: chemical analysis, size analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) microanalysis. The achievement of fusion experiments in laboratory scale, took place in a vertical tubular furnace with temperature control. The fusion experiments to assess the incorporation of EAFD mass used graphite crucibles. After cooling, the hot metal and the slag, remaining in the crucible, were weighed to do a mass balance. A flow of inert gas (argon) was maintained inside the furnace during the experiments. Results show that the experiment with addition of EAFD as received presents the best result of incorporating the mass of the final hot metal (1.73%) combined with the lowest percentage of volatilized mass of EAFD (46.52%). The experiment addition of EAFD in the form of briquette with agitation of hot metal presents the lowest percentage of slag mass (4.58%). The zinc content of volatilized EAFD (64.30%) is higher than the zinc content of the imported ore concentrate (52%) and zinc content of the national ore concentrate (12% to 39%). The presence of lead and cadmium in the slag characterizing it as a hazardous solid waste. (author)

  15. GRADE Equity Guidelines 3

    Welch, Vivian A; Akl, Elie A; Pottie, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to describe a conceptual framework for how to consider health equity in the GRADE (Grading Recommendations Assessment and Development Evidence) guideline development process. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: Consensus-based guidance developed by the GRADE working grou...

  16. Effect of Heat Input on Geometry of Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Bead on Low Carbon Steel

    Saha, Manas Kumar; Hazra, Ritesh; Mondal, Ajit; Das, Santanu

    2018-05-01

    Among different weld cladding processes, gas metal arc welding (GMAW) cladding becomes a cost effective, user friendly, versatile method for protecting the surface of relatively lower grade structural steels from corrosion and/or erosion wear by depositing high grade stainless steels onto them. The quality of cladding largely depends upon the bead geometry of the weldment deposited. Weld bead geometry parameters, like bead width, reinforcement height, depth of penetration, and ratios like reinforcement form factor (RFF) and penetration shape factor (PSF) determine the quality of the weld bead geometry. Various process parameters of gas metal arc welding like heat input, current, voltage, arc travel speed, mode of metal transfer, etc. influence formation of bead geometry. In the current experimental investigation, austenite stainless steel (316) weld beads are formed on low alloy structural steel (E350) by GMAW using 100% CO2 as the shielding gas. Different combinations of current, voltage and arc travel speed are chosen so that heat input increases from 0.35 to 0.75 kJ/mm. Nine number of weld beads are deposited and replicated twice. The observations show that weld bead width increases linearly with increase in heat input, whereas reinforcement height and depth of penetration do not increase with increase in heat input. Regression analysis is done to establish the relationship between heat input and different geometrical parameters of weld bead. The regression models developed agrees well with the experimental data. Within the domain of the present experiment, it is observed that at higher heat input, the weld bead gets wider having little change in penetration and reinforcement; therefore, higher heat input may be recommended for austenitic stainless steel cladding on low alloy steel.

  17. Modern high strength QT, TM and duplex-stainless steels

    Bocquet, P. [Industeel (France); Luxenburger, G. [Aktiengesellschaft der Dillinger Huettenwerke, Dillingen/Saar (Germany); Porter, D. [Rautaruukki (Finland); Ericsson, C. [Avesta Polarit (Sweden)

    2003-07-01

    Pressure vessels are commonly manufactured with normalised steel grades with a yield strength up to 355 MPa or with austenitic stainless steels when corrosion as to be considered. From three decades, modern steels with higher mechanical properties - up to yield strength of 960 Mpa - are available and largely used for other applications where weight saving is of major importance as per off-shore, bridges, cranes, shipbuilding, line pipes.. The paper presents these modern steel's families - TMCP (Thermo Mechanically Controlled Process), QT (Quenched and Tempered) and Duplex (austeno-ferritic) stainless - in comparison with the normalised and austenitic steel grades. The following aspects are presented: the main mechanical properties (tensile and Charpy) as per the requirements of the standards for pressure equipment; some examples of use of these modern steels in the industry are given; the limitations of the forming conditions are considered; the weldability aspects and welds properties are developed; the interest of the PWHT (Post Weld Heat Treatment) is discussed. (orig.)

  18. Estimation of embrittlement during aging of AISI 316 stainless steel ...

    Unknown

    rical relation connecting the aging temperature, aging time and nitrogen ... strength, high tensile strength, are easy to fabricate and ... However, the ferrite is a metastable phase which ... 2. Experimental. 2.1 Materials. Nuclear grade AISI 316 stainless steel plates ( .... fore, it is desirable to develop empirical relations con-.

  19. Steel: Price and Policy Issues

    Cooney, Stephen

    2006-01-01

    Steel prices remain at historically elevated levels. The rapid growth of steel production and demand in China is widely considered as a major cause of the increases in both steel prices and the prices of steelmaking inputs...

  20. An approach to ductile fracture resistance modelling in pipeline steels

    Pussegoda, L.N.; Fredj, A. [BMT Fleet Technology Ltd., Kanata (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    Ductile fracture resistance studies of high grade steels in the pipeline industry often included analyses of the crack tip opening angle (CTOA) parameter using 3-point bend steel specimens. The CTOA is a function of specimen ligament size in high grade materials. Other resistance measurements may include steady state fracture propagation energy, critical fracture strain, and the adoption of damage mechanisms. Modelling approaches for crack propagation were discussed in this abstract. Tension tests were used to calibrate damage model parameters. Results from the tests were then applied to the crack propagation in a 3-point bend specimen using modern 1980 vintage steels. Limitations and approaches to overcome the difficulties associated with crack propagation modelling were discussed.

  1. Advanced cold rolled steels for automotive applications

    Hofmann, H. [ThyssenKrupp Steel AG, Eberhardstrasse 12, 44145 Dortmund (Germany); Mattissen, D.; Schaumann, T.W. [ThyssenKrupp Steel AG, Duisburg (Germany)

    2006-09-15

    Advanced multiphase steels offer a great potential for bodies-in-white through their combination of formability and achievable component strength levels. They are first choice for strength and crash-relevant parts of challenging geometry. The intensive development of high-strength multiphase steels by ThyssenKrupp has led to hot dip galvanizing concepts with an outstanding forming potential. Hot rolled, hot dip galvanized complex phase steels are currently produced in addition to cold rolled DP and RA steels. New continuously annealed grades with tensile strength levels of up to 1000 MPa in combination with sufficient ductility for applications mainly in the field of structural automobile elements make use of the classic advantages of microalloying as well as the principles of DP and TRIP steels. Further improvement of properties will be reached by the new class of high manganese alloyed steels. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Fortschrittliche Multiphasen-Staehle eroeffnen wegen der inzwischen erreichbaren Kombination aus Umformbarkeit und Bauteilfestigkeit ein enormes Potenzial fuer Rohkarosserien. Sie stellen eine erste Wahl dar, wenn es um Festigkeit und um Crashsicherheit geht und besondere Anforderungen an die Bauteilgeometrien gestellt werden. Bei ThyssenKrupp hat die Entwicklung hochfester Multiphasen-Staehle in Verbindung mit dem Feuerverzinken zur Realisierung von Blechhalbzeugen gefuehrt, die hervorragend formbar sind. Es werden heute feuerverzinkte Komplexphasenstaehle neben den bewaehrten kaltgewalzten Dualphasen(DP) - und Retained Austenit(RA)-Staehlen produziert. Die neuen kontinuierlich gegluehten Stahlvarianten mit Festigkeiten bis zu 1000 MPa in Kombination mit der bei Strukturbauteilen im Automobilbau geforderten Duktilitaet nutzen sowohl die klassischen Vorteile des Mikrolegierens aus und dazu die Prinzipien, die man bei DP- und TRIP-Staehlen anwendet. Eine weitere Verbesserung des Eigenschaftsprofils wird mit dem

  2. Tensile behavior of borated stainless steels

    Stephens, J.J. Jr.; Sorenson, K.B.

    1991-01-01

    Borated stainless steel tensile testing is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The goal of the test program is to provide data to support a code case inquiry to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III. The adoption by ASME facilitates a material's qualification for structural use in transport cask applications. For transport cask basket applications, the potential advantage to using borated stainless steel arises from the fact that the structural and criticality control functions can be combined into one material. This can result in a decrease in net section thickness of the basket web (increased payload capacity) and eliminates the fabrication process and cost of attaching a discrete boron poison material to the basket web. In addition, adding borate stainless steel to the inventory of acceptable structural material provides the Department of Energy (DOE) and its cask contractors an alternative to current proposed materials which have not been qualified for structural service. The test program at SNL involves procuring material, machining test specimens, and conducting the tensile tests. From test measurements obtained so far, general trends indicate that tensile properties (yield strength and ultimate strength) increase with boron content and are in all cases superior to the minimum required properties established in A-240, Type 304, a typical grade of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, in a designed basket, web thicknesses using borated stainless steel would be comparable to or thinner tan an equivalent basket manufactured from a typical stainless steel without boron additions. General trends from test results indicate that ductilities decrease with increasing boron content

  3. Graded gauge theory

    Kerner, R.

    1983-01-01

    The mathematical background for a graded extension of gauge theories is investigated. After discussing the general properties of graded Lie algebras and what may serve as a model for a graded Lie group, the graded fiber bundle is constructed. Its basis manifold is supposed to be the so-called superspace, i.e. the product of the Minkowskian space-time with the Grassmann algebra spanned by the anticommuting Lorentz spinors; the vertical subspaces tangent to the fibers are isomorphic with the graded extension of the SU(N) Lie algebra. The connection and curvature are defined then on this bundle; the two different gradings are either independent of each other, or may be unified in one common grading, which is equivalent to the choice of the spin-statistics dependence. The Yang-Mills lagrangian is investigated in the simplified case. The conformal symmetry breaking is discussed, as well as some other physical consequences of the model. (orig.)

  4. High Temperature Oxidation of Steel in an Oxygen-enriched Low NOX Furnace Environment

    Poirier, D.; Grandmaison, E.W. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Matovic, M.D. [Department of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON K7L 3N6 (Canada); Barnes, K.R. [KB Technical Services, Inc (formerly) Stelco Inc, Research Manager, Stelco Inc., P.O. Box 2030, Hamilton, ON L8N 3T1 (Canada); Nelson, B.D. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Senior Researcher, Dofasco Inc., P.O. Box 2460, Hamilton, ON L8N 3J5 (Canada)

    2006-09-15

    Steel scaling tests have been performed in a research furnace utilizing an oxygen-enriched, low NOX, burner. This work was performed in conjunction with a study of the combustion characteristics for the Canadian Gas Research Institute (CGRI) low NOX burner. The furnace (a facility of the Centre for Advanced Gas Combustion Technology (CAGCT)) was fired with the burner mounted in a sidewall configuration similar to the geometry encountered in steel reheat furnaces. Scale habit, intactness, adhesion and oxidation rates were examined for five grades of steel over a range of stack oxygen concentrations ({approx}0.8% - {approx}4.3%) and oxygen enrichment levels (0-90%) at 1100C. Steel grade had the largest effect on scaling properties examined in this work. Within the tests for each grade, stack oxygen concentration had the largest effect on the scaling properties while oxygen enrichment level had only a small effect.

  5. Microstructure Characterization and Corrosion Resistance Behavior of New Cobalt-Free Maraging Steel Produced Through ESR Techniques

    Seikh, Asiful H.; Halfa, Hossam; Baig, Muneer; Khan, Sohail M. A.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, two different grades (M23 and M29) of cobalt-free low nickel maraging steel have been produced through electroslag remelting (ESR) process. The corrosion resistance of these ESR steels was investigated in 1 M H2SO4 solution using linear potentiodynamic polarization (LPP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The experiments were performed for different immersion time and solution temperature. To evaluate the corrosion resistance of the ESR steels, some significant characterization parameters from LPP and EIS curves were analyzed and compared with that of conventional C250 maraging steel. Irrespective of measurement techniques used, the results show that the corrosion resistance of the ESR steels was higher than the C250 steel. The microstructure of ESR steels was composed of uniform and well-distributed martensite accompanied with little amount of retained austenite in comparison with C250 steel.

  6. The Effect of Different Non-Metallic Inclusions on the Machinability of Steels.

    Ånmark, Niclas; Karasev, Andrey; Jönsson, Pär Göran

    2015-02-16

    Considerable research has been conducted over recent decades on the role of non‑metallic inclusions and their link to the machinability of different steels. The present work reviews the mechanisms of steel fractures during different mechanical machining operations and the behavior of various non-metallic inclusions in a cutting zone. More specifically, the effects of composition, size, number and morphology of inclusions on machinability factors (such as cutting tool wear, power consumption, etc .) are discussed and summarized. Finally, some methods for modification of non-metallic inclusions in the liquid steel are considered to obtain a desired balance between mechanical properties and machinability of various steel grades.

  7. Reference manual on the IAEA JRQ correlation monitor steel for irradiation damage studies

    2001-07-01

    The objective of this report is to provide information on the mechanical properties of the ASTM A533 grade B class 1 steel that was designated as 'JRQ reference steel' and for many years served as a radiation/mechanical property correlation monitor in a number of international and national studies of irradiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel steel. This report provides the most comprehensive listing of material test data obtained on the JRQ manufacturing history and material properties in the initial, and as delivered condition during the implementation of two IAEA co-ordinated research projects (CRPs) on behaviour of reactor pressure vessel steels under neutron irradiation

  8. The electrochemical corrosion of maraging steel in various media

    Iqbal, A.; Hussain, S.W.; Qamar, I.; Salam, I.

    1993-01-01

    Electrochemical corrosion behavior of maraging steel in various media has been studied using electrode kinetic measurements. The media used included IN H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/, IN HCl and artificial sea water, all at room temperature. The steel used was 350 grade of maraging steel and its corrosion behavior was studied in annealed as well as aged condition. In addition to the general behavior observed using potentiodynamic polarization, the corrosion rates were also evaluated using our own method known as Z TCorr . This method has been proved to be robust and accurate as compared to any other known method. The surfaces of corroded specimens were examined in an scanning electron microscope. The pitting observed in samples corroded by sea water was found to be associated with the inclusion present in the steel. Passive behavior was noted in IN H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ but not IN HCl or artificial sea water. (author)

  9. Modification of steel 35 HL surge current during crystallization

    Zhbanova O.M.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The method of electro steel melt modification 35 HL variable polarity current pulses with a duration of more 10-3s frequency within the 5–33 Hz, 5–24 porosity meanders, strength 30–40 A at a voltage of 180–240 V during crystallization, which allows to obtain high-quality castings 35 HL steel grade. Show that electro melt processing improves the structure and reduces the physical heterogeneity of castings and increases the rate of dissolution of metallic impurities and other components in the melt, providing fine-grained structure and increases the homogeneity of metal carbides reduces the amount of manganese reduces gases and nonmetallic inclusions. Modifying steel 35 HL pulse current during crystallization of the melt increases the physical and mechanical properties of tempered steel, increasing yield strength by 30 %, the tensile strength at 7 % elongation of 1,5 % relative narrowing by 2 %, toughness at 20 %.

  10. The reactor vessel steels

    Bilous, W.; Hajewska, E.; Szteke, W.; Przyborska, M.; Wasiak, J.; Wieczorkowski, M.

    2005-01-01

    In the paper the fundamental steels using in the construction of pressure vessel water reactor are discussed. The properties of these steels as well as the influence of neutron irradiation on its degradation in the time of exploitation are also done. (authors)

  11. Steel Industry Wastes.

    Schmidtke, N. W.; Averill, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from steel industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers: (1) coke production; (2) iron and steel production; (3) rolling operations; and (4) surface treatment. A list of 133 references is also presented. (NM)

  12. Advanced high strength steels for automotive industry

    Galán, J.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The car industry is facing pressure because of the growing demand for more fuel-efficient passenger cars. In order to limit energy consumption and air pollution the weight of the carbody has to be reduced. At the same time, high levels of safety have to be guaranteed. In this situation, the choice of material becomes a key decision in car design. As a response to the requirements of the automotive sector, high strength steels and advanced high strength steels have been developed by the steel industry. These modern steel grades offer an excellent balance of low cost, light weight and mechanical properties.

    La industria del automóvil se enfrenta a una creciente demanda de vehículos de pasajeros más eficientes. Con el fin de disminuir el consumo de energía y la contaminación ambiental, el peso del vehículo tiene que ser reducido, al mismo tiempo que se garantizan altos niveles de seguridad. Ante esta situación, la elección de material se convierte en una decisión crucial en el diseño del vehículo. Como respuesta a las necesidades del sector automovilístico, nuevos aceros avanzados y de alta resistencia, han sido desarrollados por la industria siderúrgica. Dichos tipos de acero ofrecen un excelente equilibrio de precio, peso y propiedades mecánicas.

  13. Characterization of Anisotropic Behavior for High Grade Pipes

    Yang, Kun; Huo, Chunyong; Ji, Lingkang; Li, Yang; Zhang, Jiming; Ma, Qiurong

    With the developing requirement of nature gas, the property needs of steel for pipe line are higher and higher, especially in strength and toughness. It is necessary to improve the steel grade in order to ensure economic demand and safety. However, with the rise of steel grade, the differences on properties in different orientations (anisotropic behaviors) become more and more obvious after the process of hot rolling, which may affect the prediction of fracture for the pipes seriously (Thinking of isotropic mechanical properties for material in traditional predict way). In order to get the reason for anisotropic mechanics, a series of tests are carried out for high grade steel pipes, including not only mechanical properties but also microstructures. Result indicates that there are obviously anisotropic behaviors for high grade steel pipes in two orientations (rolling orientation and transverse orientation). Strength is better in T orientation because Rm is higher and Rt 0.5 rises more in T orientation, and toughness is better in L orientation because of the higher Akv and SA in L orientation under a same temperature. Banded structures are formed in T orientation, and the spatial distribution of inclusion and precipitated phases are different in T, L and S orientation. The anisotropic arrangement for the matrix in space (banded structures), which is formed after the process of hot rolling, may affect the mechanical properties in different orientation. Moreover, the elasticity modulus of particles is different from the elasticity modulus of matrix, deformation between particles and matrix may cause stress concentration, and damage forms in this place. Because of the different distribution of particles in space, the level of damage is anisotropic in different orientations, and the anisotropic mechanical properties occur finally. Therefore, the anisotropic mechanical properties are determined by the anisotropic microstructures, both the anisotropic of matrix and the

  14. Application of high strength steel to nuclear reactor containment vessel

    Susukida, H.; Sato, M.; Takano, G.; Uebayashi, T.; Yoshida, K.

    1976-01-01

    Nuclear reactor containment vessels are becoming larger in size with the increase in the power generating capacity of nuclear power plants. For example, a containment vessel for a PWR power plant with an output of 1,000 MWe becomes an extremely large one if it is made of the conventional JIS SGV 49 (ASTM A 516 Gr. 70) steel plates less than 38 mm in thickness. In order to design the steel containment vessel within the conventional dimensional range, therefore, it is necessary to use a high strength steel having a higher tensile strength than SGV 49 steel, good weldability and a higher fracture toughness and moreover, possessing satisfactory properties without undergoing post-weld heat treatment. The authors conducted a series of verification tests on high strength steel developed by modifying the ASTM A 543 Grade B Class 1 steel with a view to adopting it as a material for the nuclear reactor containment vessels. As the result of evaluation of the test results from various angles, we confirmed that the high strength steel is quite suitable for the manufacture of nuclear reactor containment vessels. (auth.)

  15. Additive manufacturing for steels: a review

    Zadi-Maad, A.; Rohib, R.; Irawan, A.

    2018-01-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) of steels involves the layer by layer consolidation of powder or wire feedstock using a heating beam to form near net shape products. For the past decades, the AM technique reaches the maturation of both research grade and commercial production due to significant research work from academic, government and industrial research organization worldwide. AM process has been implemented to replace the conventional process of steel fabrication due to its potentially lower cost and flexibility manufacturing. This paper provides a review of previous research related to the AM methods followed by current challenges issues. The relationship between microstructure, mechanical properties, and process parameters will be discussed. Future trends and recommendation for further works are also provided.

  16. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Luzginova, N.; Tanigawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe-Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7-9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe-8%Cr-2%W-TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe-9%Cr-1%W-TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  17. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    Tavassoli, A.-A.F., E-mail: farhad.tavassoli@cea.fr [Commissariat à l' Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/DEN/DANS/DMN, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Diegele, E., E-mail: eberhard.diegele@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Lindau, R., E-mail: rainer.lindau@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institut of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Luzginova, N., E-mail: Natalia.Luzginova@gmail.com [NRG-Petten, 1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Tanigawa, H., E-mail: tanigawa.hiroyasu@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Authority (JAEA), Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

    2014-12-15

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe–Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7–9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe–8%Cr–2%W–TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe–9%Cr–1%W–TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  18. Graded tensor calculus

    Scheunert, M.

    1982-10-01

    We develop a graded tensor calculus corresponding to arbitrary Abelian groups of degrees and arbitrary commutation factors. The standard basic constructions and definitions like tensor products, spaces of multilinear mappings, contractions, symmetrization, symmetric algebra, as well as the transpose, adjoint, and trace of a linear mapping, are generalized to the graded case and a multitude of canonical isomorphisms is presented. Moreover, the graded versions of the classical Lie algebras are introduced and some of their basic properties are described. (orig.)

  19. Damascus steel ledeburite class

    Sukhanov, D. A.; Arkhangelsky, L. B.; Plotnikova, N. V.

    2017-02-01

    Discovered that some of blades Damascus steel has an unusual nature of origin of the excess cementite, which different from the redundant phases of secondary cementite, cementite of ledeburite and primary cementite in iron-carbon alloys. It is revealed that the morphological features of separate particles of cementite in Damascus steels lies in the abnormal size of excess carbides having the shape of irregular prisms. Considered three hypotheses for the formation of excess cementite in the form of faceted prismatic of excess carbides. The first hypothesis is based on thermal fission of cementite of a few isolated grains. The second hypothesis is based on the process of fragmentation cementite during deformation to the separate the pieces. The third hypothesis is based on the transformation of metastable cementite in the stable of angular eutectic carbide. It is shown that the angular carbides are formed within the original metastable colony ledeburite, so they are called “eutectic carbide”. It is established that high-purity white cast iron is converted into of Damascus steel during isothermal soaking at the annealing. It was revealed that some of blades Damascus steel ledeburite class do not contain in its microstructure of crushed ledeburite. It is shown that the pattern of carbide heterogeneity of Damascus steel consists entirely of angular eutectic carbides. Believe that Damascus steel refers to non-heat-resistant steel of ledeburite class, which have similar structural characteristics with semi-heat-resistant die steel or heat-resistant high speed steel, differing from them only in the nature of excess carbide phase.

  20. Thin slab processing of acicular ferrite steels with high toughness

    Reip, Carl-Peter; Hennig, Wolfgang; Hagmann, Rolf [SMS Demag Aktiengesellschaft, Duesseldorf (Germany); Sabrudin, Bin Mohamad Suren; Susanta, Ghosh; Lee, Weng Lan [Megasteel Sdn Bhd, Banting (Malaysia)

    2005-07-01

    Near-net-shape casting processes today represent an important option in steelmaking. High productivity and low production cost as well as the variety of steel grades that can be produced plus an excellent product quality are key factors for the acceptance of such processes in markets all over the world. Today's research focuses on the production of pipe steel with special requirements in terms of toughness at low temperatures. The subject article describes the production of hot strip made from acicular ferritic / bainitic steel grades using the CSP thin-slab technology. In addition, the resulting strength and toughness levels as a function of the alloying concepts are discussed. Optimal control of the CSP process allows the production of higher-strength hot-rolled steel grades with a fine-grain acicular-ferritic/bainitic microstructure. Hot strip produced in this way is characterized by a high toughness at low temperatures. In a drop weight tear test, transition temperatures of up to -50 deg C can be achieved with a shear-fracture share of 85%. (author)

  1. A new generation of ultra high strength steel pipelines

    Brozda, J.; Zeman, M.; Weglowski, M.

    2008-01-01

    For many years an increased demand for natural gas can be observed. Ultra high-strength pipelines with higher operating pressures and/or reduced wall thickness are a means to reduce transmission costs. Motivated by reduced investment costs (overcharge a few billion of dollars), tend towards the development of a new grade of pipeline steel with microalloying element for example Nb, that potentially lowers the total cost of long-distance gas pipelines by 5 - 15%. New long distance pipelines have budgets in excess of several billion dollars. This paper describes mechanical properties of new generation of pipelines steel with higher content of niobium and the influence the welding thermal cycles on the microstructure and brittle fracture resistance. The resistance to cold cracking has also been determined. It was found that the new steel has close properties to API X70 grade steels, but is cheaper in manufacturing and installation. The steel has been covered by the amended EN 10028-5 standard and proper modifications will also be made in other European standards. (author)

  2. Classroom: Efficient Grading

    Shaw, David D.; Pease, Leonard F., III.

    2014-01-01

    Grading can be accelerated to make time for more effective instruction. This article presents specific time management strategies selected to decrease administrative time required of faculty and teaching assistants, including a multiple answer multiple choice interface for exams, a three-tier grading system for open ended problem solving, and a…

  3. Grain Grading and Handling.

    Rendleman, Matt; Legacy, James

    This publication provides an introduction to grain grading and handling for adult students in vocational and technical education programs. Organized in five chapters, the booklet provides a brief overview of the jobs performed at a grain elevator and of the techniques used to grade grain. The first chapter introduces the grain industry and…

  4. Aging degradation of cast stainless steel

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1986-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. Microstructures of cast materials subjected to long-term aging either in reactor service or in the laboratory have been characterized by TEM, SANS, and APFIM techniques. Two precipitate phases, i.e., the Cr-rich α' and Ni- and Si-rich G phase, have been identified in the ferrite matrix of the aged steels. The results indicate that the low-temperature embrittlement is primarily caused by α' precipitates which form by spinodal decomposition. The relative contribution of G phase to loss of toughness is now known. Microstructural data also indicate that weakening of ferrite/austenite phase boundary by carbide precipitates has a significant effect on the onset and extent of embrittlement of the high-carbon CF-8 and CF-8M grades of stainless steels, particularly after aging at 400 or 450 0 C. Data from Charpy-impact, tensile, and J-R curve tests for several heats of cast stainless steel aged up to 10,000 h at 350, 400, and 450 0 C are presented and correlated with the microstructural results. Thermal aging of the steels results in an increase in tensile strength and a decrease in impact energy, J/sub IC/, and tearing modulus. The fracture toughness results show good agreement with the Charpy-impact data. The effects of compositional and metallurgical variables on loss of toughness are discussed

  5. Vascular grading of angiogenesis

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of angiogenesis by vascular grading of primary breast tumours, and to evaluate the prognostic impact of adding the vascular grade to the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI). The investigation included 836 patients. The median follow-up time was 11...... years and 4 months. The microvessels were immunohistochemically stained by antibodies against CD34. Angiogenesis was graded semiquantitatively by subjective scoring into three groups according to the expected number of microvessels in the most vascular tumour area. The vascular grading between observers...... for 24% of the patients, who had a shift in prognostic group, as compared to NPI, and implied a better prognostic dissemination. We concluded that the angiogenesis determined by vascular grading has independent prognostic value of clinical relevance for patients with breast cancer....

  6. Vascular grading of angiogenesis

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of angiogenesis by vascular grading of primary breast tumours, and to evaluate the prognostic impact of adding the vascular grade to the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI). The investigation included 836 patients. The median follow-up time was 11...... years and 4 months. The microvessels were immunohistochemically stained by antibodies against CD34. Angiogenesis was graded semiquantitatively by subjective scoring into three groups according to the expected number of microvessels in the most vascular tumour area. The vascular grading between observers...... impact for 24% of the patients, who had a shift in prognostic group, as compared to NPI, and implied a better prognostic dissemination. We concluded that the angiogenesis determined by vascular grading has independent prognostic value of clinical relevance for patients with breast cancer....

  7. Structural amorphous steels

    Lu, Z.P.; Liu, C.T.; Porter, W.D.; Thompson, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist's dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed

  8. Performance Steel Castings

    2012-09-30

    system components to be built. Figure la shows the machine design . PSC-2012 Page 94 Glue Application Sheet Transfer Feed Elevator Figure la...Department of Defense such as cleats, ejection chutes , control arms, muzzle brakes, mortar components, clevises, tow bar clamps, ammo conveyor elements...Foundry and the members of Steel Founders’ Society of America. Abstract Weapon system designers and builders need advanced steel casting technology

  9. Life after Steel

    Mangan, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Bobby Curran grew up in a working-class neighborhood in Baltimore, finished high school, and followed his grandfather's steel-toed bootprints straight to Sparrows Point, a 3,000-acre sprawl of industry on the Chesapeake Bay. College was not part of the plan. A gritty but well-paying job at the RG Steel plant was Mr. Curran's ticket to a secure…

  10. The Structure of the Silumin Coat on Alloy Cast Steels

    T. Szymczak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The work presents the analysis results of the structure of the coat obtained by dipping in silumin AlSi5 of two grades of alloy cast steel: GX6CrNiTi18-10 (LH18N9T and GX39Cr13 (LH14. The temperature of the silumin bath was 750±5°C, and the hold-up time of the cast steel element τ = 180 s. The absolute thickness of the coat obtained in the given conditions was g = 104 μm on cast steel GX6CrNiTi18-10 and g = 132 μm on GX39Cr13. The obtained coat consisted of three layers of different phase structure. The first layer from the base “g1`” was constructed of the phase AlFe including Si and alloy additives of the tested cast steel grades: Cr and Ni (GX6CrNiTi18-10 and Cr (GX39Cr13. The second layer “g1``” of intermetallic phases AlFe which also contains Si and Cr crystallizes on it. The last, external layer “g2” of the coat consists of the silumin containing the intermetallic phases AlFeSi which additionally can contain alloy additives of the cast steel. It was shown that there were no carbides on the coat of the tested cast steels which are the component of their microstructure, as it took place in the case of the coat on the high speed steels.

  11. Martensitic transformation in Eurofer-97 and ODS-Eurofer steels: A comparative study

    Zilnyk, K.D.; Oliveira, V.B.; Sandim, H.R.Z.; Möslang, A.; Raabe, D.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Martensitic transformation of RAFM steels promotes significant grain fragmentation. • Austenite grain growth occurs in Eurofer-97 steel but not in ODS-Eurofer steel. • Boundary misorientation distribution of the as-quenched steels show two maxima peaks. • The amount of retained austenite varies from one steel to another. - Abstract: Reduced-activation ferritic–martensitic Eurofer-97 and ODS-Eurofer steels are potential candidates for structural applications in advanced nuclear reactors. Samples of both steel grades in the as-tempered condition were austenitized in vacuum for 1 h from 900 °C to 1300 °C followed by air cooling to room temperature. The microstructure was characterized by dilatometry, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Thermodynamic calculations provided by Thermo-Calc software were used to determine their transformation temperatures. Even having similar chemical composition, important changes were observed after martensitic transformation in these steels. Significant austenitic grain growth was observed in Eurofer-97 steel leading to the development of coarser martensitic packets. Contrastingly, austenitic grain growth was prevented in ODS-Eurofer steel due to fine and stable dispersion of Y-based particles

  12. Investigation on dissimilar laser welding of advanced high strength steel sheets for the automotive industry

    Rossini, M., E-mail: matteo.rossini@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Spena, P. Russo, E-mail: pasquale.russospena@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Cortese, L., E-mail: luca.cortese@unibz.it [Faculty of Science and Technology, Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Piazza Università 5, 39100 Bolzano (Italy); Matteis, P., E-mail: paolo.matteis@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Firrao, D., E-mail: donato.firrao@polito.it [Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2015-03-25

    To support the use of advanced high strength steels in car body design and fabrication, an investigation was carried out on dissimilar butt laser welding between TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) steels, Dual Phase (DP) steels, hot stamping boron (22MnB5) steels, and TRansformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels. The base materials and the weldments were fully characterized by means of metallography, microhardness, and tensile tests. Digital image analysis was also used to provide additional information on the local strain field in the joint during the tensile tests. Fractographic examination was finally performed on the fracture surfaces of the tensile samples. The dissimilar joints between the DP, 22MnB5, and TRIP steels exhibit good resistance properties. On the contrary, the dissimilar joints encompassing the TWIP steel exhibit poor mechanical strength and fail along the weld seam by intergranular fracture, probably due to presence of Mn segregations. Therefore, the laser welding of TWIP steel with other advanced high strength steels is not recommended without the use of proper metal fillers. Dissimilar laser welding of DP, TRIP and 22MnB5 combinations, on the contrary, can be a solution to assemble car body parts made of these steel grades.

  13. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of J55ERW Steel Pipe Processed by On-Line Spray Water Cooling

    Zejun Chen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available An on-line spray water cooling (OSWC process for manufacturing electric resistance welded (ERW steel pipes is presented to enhance their mechanical properties and performances. This technique reduces the processing needed for the ERW pipe and overcomes the weakness of the conventional manufacturing technique. Industrial tests for J55 ERW steel pipe were carried out to validate the effectiveness of the OSWC process. The microstructure and mechanical properties of the J55 ERW steel pipe processed by the OSWC technology were investigated. The optimized OSWC technical parameters are presented based on the mechanical properties and impact the performance of steel pipes. The industrial tests show that the OSWC process can be used to efficiently control the microstructure, enhance mechanical properties, and improve production flexibility of steel pipes. The comprehensive mechanical properties of steel pipes processed by the OSWC are superior to those of other published J55 grade steels.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of a Spanish RAFM steel

    Rodriguez, D.; Serrano, M.; Moran, A.; Artimez, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    One of the main challenges for the realization of the future fusion reactor is the development and qualification of structural materials for first wall and breeding blanket. The fusion reactor application requires materials resistant to radiation damage, with excellent mechanical properties at high temperatures, good corrosion behaviour and reduced activation potential. Reduced Activation (RAFM) 9Cr Ferritic/Martenistic steels are the main candidates for first wall and blanket of fusion reactors, due to their resistance to swelling and excellent structural and thermal properties. These steels are based on the classical Cr-Mo steel grades but with a chemical composition modified in order to fulfil the low activation requirements, substituting the alloying elements with long decay times due to high activation by neutron irradiation. For this purpose the Mo is replaced by W, the Nb by Ta and Ni is removed. A summary of the activities related to the evaluation of the microstructural and mechanical properties of a reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel fabricated at a semi-industrial scale in Spain will be presented in this paper. The steel chemical composition fulfils or is very close to the compositional specifications and metallurgical properties of the EUROFER steel. This activity corresponds to the ITMA and CIEMAT participation on Task 4 of the CONSOLIDER TECNO F US INGENIO 2010, financed by the Spanish Ministry of Science and Innovation. (author)

  15. Electrolytic pickling of duplex stainless steel

    Ipek, N.; Holm, B.; Pettersson, R. [Swedish Institute for Metals Research, Drottning Kristinas vaeg 48, 11428 Stockholm (Sweden); Runnsjoe, G.; Karlsson, M. [Outokumpu Stainless AB, 77422 Avesta (Sweden)

    2005-08-01

    Pickling of duplex stainless steels has proved to be much more difficult than that of standard austenitic grades. Electrolytic pre-pickling is shown to be a key process towards facilitating the pickling process for material annealed both in the production-line and in laboratory experiments. The mechanism for the neutral electrolytic process on duplex 2205 and austenitic 316 steels has been examined and the oxide scale found to become thinner as a function of electrolytic pickling time. Spallation or peeling of the oxide induced by gas evolution did not play a decisive role. A maximum of about 20% of the current supplied to the oxidised steel surface goes to dissolution reactions whereas about 80% of the current was consumed in oxygen gas production. This makes the current utilisation very poor, particularly against the background of reports that in indirect electrolytic pickling only about 30% of the total current, supplied to the process, actually goes into the strip. A parametric study was therefore carried out to determine whether adjustment of process variables could improve the current utilisation. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  16. On phase equilibria in duplex stainless steels

    Wessman, S. [Swerea KIMAB AB, Stockholm (Sweden); Pettersson, R. [Outokumpu Stainless AB, Avesta Research Centre, Avesta (Sweden); Hertzman, S. [Outokumpu Stainless Research Foundation, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-05-15

    The equilibrium conditions of four duplex stainless steels; Fe-23Cr-4.5Ni-0.1N, Fe-22Cr-5.5Ni-3Mo-0.17N, Fe-25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-0.27N and Fe-25Cr-7Ni-4Mo-1W-1.5Cu-0.27N were studied in the temperature region from 700 to 1000 C. Phase compositions were determined with SEM EDS and the phase fractions using image analysis on backscattered SEM images. The results showed that below 1000 C the steels develop an inverse duplex structure with austenite and sigma phase, of which the former is the matrix phase. With decreasing temperature, the microstructure will be more and more complex and finely dispersed. The ferrite is, for the higher alloyed steels, only stable above 1000 C and at lower temperatures disappears in favour of intermetallic phases. The major intermetallic phase is sigma phase with small amounts of chi phase, the latter primarily in high Mo and W grades. Nitrides, not a focus in this investigation, were present as rounded particles and acicular precipitates at lower temperatures. The results were compared to theoretical predictions using the TCFE5 and TCFE6 databases. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Effect of intercritical heat treatment on mechanical properties of reinforcing steel bars

    Abro, M.I.; Memon, R.A.; Soomro, I.A.; Aftab, U.

    2017-01-01

    Intercritical heat treatments attempts were made to enhance the mechanical properties of reinforcing steel bars milled from scrap metal. For this, two grades of steel bars were obtained from different steel mills and their mechanical properties that include hardness, ultimate tensile strength, and percent elongation before and after intercritical heat treatment were determined. Results indicated that 25.5 and 17.6%, improvements in UTS (Ultimate Tensile Strength) and 18.8 and 14.3% improvement in percent elongation in two grades of reinforcing steel samples containing 0.17 and 0.24% carbon respectively was achieved while heating at 750 degree C for 2h. Appreciable improvement in the mechanical properties was noted due to birth of sufficient quantity of martensite along with ferrite. (author)

  18. Effect of cold working and aging on high temperature deformation of high Mn stainless steel

    Yoshikawa, M.; Habara, Y.; Matsuki, R.; Aoyama, H.

    1999-01-01

    By the addition of N, the strength of high Mn stainless steel can be increased. Cold rolling and aging are effective to increase its strength further, and with those treatments this grade is often used for high temperature applications. In this study, creep deformation behavior and high temperature strength of the high Mn stainless steel in cold rolled and aged conditions are discussed as compared to Type 304 stainless steel. It has been revealed that as-rolled specimens show instant elongation at the beginning of creep tests and its amount is larger in the high Mn grade than in Type 304. Also, the creep rate of the high Mn stainless steel is smaller than that of Type 304. These facts may be related to the change in microstructure. (orig.)

  19. CRA Grade Inflation

    Kenneth H. Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Community Reinvestment Act of 1977 (CRA) ratings and performance evaluations are the only bank and thrift exam findings disclosed by financial institution regulators. Inflation of CRA ratings has been alleged by community activists for two decades, but there has been no quantification or empirical investigation of grade inflation. Using a unique grade inflation methodology on actual ratings and evaluation data for 1,407 small banks and thrifts under the revised CRA regulations, this paper con...

  20. Functionally graded materials

    Mahamood, Rasheedat Modupe

    2017-01-01

    This book presents the concept of functionally graded materials as well as their use and different fabrication processes. The authors describe the use of additive manufacturing technology for the production of very complex parts directly from the three dimension computer aided design of the part by adding material layer after layer. A case study is also presented in the book on the experimental analysis of functionally graded material using laser metal deposition process.

  1. Clean steels for fusion

    Gelles, D.S.

    1995-03-01

    Fusion energy production has an inherent advantage over fission: a fuel supply with reduced long term radioactivity. One of the leading candidate materials for structural applications in a fusion reactor is a tungsten stabilized 9% chromium Martensitic steel. This alloy class is being considered because it offers the opportunity to maintain that advantage in the reactor structure as well as provide good high temperature strength and radiation induced swelling and embrittlement resistance. However, calculations indicate that to obtain acceptable radioactivity levels within 500 years after service, clean steel will be required because the niobium impurity levels must be kept below about 2 appm and nickel, molybdenum, nitrogen, copper, and aluminum must be intentionally restricted. International efforts are addressing the problems of clean steel production. Recently, a 5,000 kg heat was vacuum induction melted in Japan using high purity commercial raw materials giving niobium levels less than 0.7 appm. This paper reviews the need for reduced long term radioactivity, defines the advantageous properties of the tungsten stabilized Martensitic steel class, and describes the international efforts to produce acceptable clean steels

  2. Steel fiber reinforced concrete

    Baloch, S.U.

    2005-01-01

    Steel-Fiber Reinforced Concrete is constructed by adding short fibers of small cross-sectional size .to the fresh concrete. These fibers reinforce the concrete in all directions, as they are randomly oriented. The improved mechanical properties of concrete include ductility, impact-resistance, compressive, tensile and flexural strength and abrasion-resistance. These uniqlte properties of the fiber- reinforcement can be exploited to great advantage in concrete structural members containing both conventional bar-reinforcement and steel fibers. The improvements in mechanical properties of cementitious materials resulting from steel-fiber reinforcement depend on the type, geometry, volume fraction and material-properties of fibers, the matrix mix proportions and the fiber-matrix interfacial bond characteristics. Effects of steel fibers on the mechanical properties of concrete have been investigated in this paper through a comprehensive testing-programme, by varying the fiber volume fraction and the aspect-ratio (Lid) of fibers. Significant improvements are observed in compressive, tensile, flexural strength and impact-resistance of concrete, accompanied by marked improvement in ductility. optimum fiber-volume fraction and aspect-ratio of steel fibers is identified. Test results are analyzed in details and relevant conclusions drawn. The research is finally concluded with future research needs. (author)

  3. Steel Slag as an Aggregate Replacement in Malaysian Hot Mix Asphalt

    Hainin, Mohd Rosli; Yusoff, Nur Izzi Md.; Mohammad Sabri, Mohd Fahmi; Abdul Aziz, Mohd Azizi; Sahul Hameed, Mohd Anwar; Farooq Reshi, Wasid

    2012-01-01

    As natural aggregate sources are becoming depleted due to high demand in road construction and the amount of disposed waste material keeps increasing, researchers are exploring the use of alternative materials which could preserve natural sources and save the environment. In this study, steel slag was used as an aggregate replacement in conventional dense graded asphalt mixes (ACW14 and ACB28). Steel slag was selected due to its characteristics, which are almost similar to conventional aggreg...

  4. Method to Predict Tempering of Steels Under Non-isothermal Conditions

    Poirier, D. R.; Kohli, A.

    2017-05-01

    A common way of representing the tempering responses of steels is with a "tempering parameter" that includes the effect of temperature and time on hardness after hardening. Such functions, usually in graphical form, are available for many steels and have been applied for isothermal tempering. In this article, we demonstrate that the method can be extended to non-isothermal conditions. Controlled heating experiments were done on three grades in order to verify the method.

  5. Thermochemical surface engineering of steels

    Thermochemical Surface Engineering of Steels provides a comprehensive scientific overview of the principles and different techniques involved in thermochemical surface engineering, including thermodynamics, kinetics principles, process technologies and techniques for enhanced performance of steels...

  6. Utilization of FEM model for steel microstructure determination

    Kešner, A.; Chotěborský, R.; Linda, M.; Hromasová, M.

    2018-02-01

    Agricultural tools which are used in soil processing, they are worn by abrasive wear mechanism cases by hard minerals particles in the soil. The wear rate is influenced by mechanical characterization of tools material and wear rate is influenced also by soil mineral particle contents. Mechanical properties of steel can be affected by a technology of heat treatment that it leads to a different microstructures. Experimental work how to do it is very expensive and thanks to numerical methods like FEM we can assumed microstructure at low cost but each of numerical model is necessary to be verified. The aim of this work has shown a procedure of prediction microstructure of steel for agricultural tools. The material characterizations of 51CrV4 grade steel were used for numerical simulation like TTT diagram, heat capacity, heat conduction and other physical properties of material. A relationship between predicted microstructure by FEM and real microstructure after heat treatment shows a good correlation.

  7. Adhesiveness of cold rolled steels for car body parts

    Kleiner Marques Marra

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the adhesiveness of uncoated and zinc-electrogalvanized steel sheets used in the automotive industry. Three types of adhesives, one acrylic and two epoxy resins, were employed to join low carbon cold rolled steels, one uncoated and another electrogalvanized, both previously degreased or chemically pickled. Mechanical strength of the joints was evaluated by the T-peel and tensile strength tests. Steel grade, surface condition and heating below the cure temperatures did not influence the joints' mechanical strength. However, their shear strength decreased drastically as the test temperature increased. The exposure of the joints to an atmosphere with 90% relative humidity at 40 °C caused reduction of their shear strength. Epoxy adhesives showed higher mechanical strength, but exhibited higher degradation by humidity.

  8. Thermal analysis of high temperature phase transformations of steel

    K. Gryc

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The series of thermal analysis measurements of high temperature phase transformations of real grain oriented electrical steel grade under conditions of two analytical devices (Netzsch STA 449 F3 Jupiter; Setaram SETSYS 18TM were carried out. Two thermo analytical methods were used (DTA and Direct thermal analysis. The different weight of samples was used (200 mg, 23 g. The stability/reproducibility of results obtained by used methodologies was verified. The liquidus and solidus temperatures for close to equilibrium conditions and during cooling (20 °C/min; 80 °C/min were determined. It has been shown that the higher cooling rate lead to lower temperatures for start and end of solidification process of studied steel grade.

  9. Effects of surface treatments on microstructure in stainless steel

    Mabuchi, Yasuhiro; Tamako, Hiroaki; Kaneda, Junya; Yamashita, Norimichi; Miyakawa, Masahiko

    2009-01-01

    It is revealed that Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) on the surface of the L-grade stainless steels in Nuclear Power Plants is caused by heavily cold work of the materials. The microstructure, hardness and residual stress on the surface of the material are factors for SCC initiation. There are surface treatment methods that is effective reduction on SCC such as Flap Wheel (FW) polishing, Clean N Strip (CNS) polishing, Water Jet Peening (WJP) and Shot Peening (SP). In this paper, the characteristics of the surface cold worked layer of the L-grade stainless steels conducted by above-mentioned surface treatments are analyzed, and effects of the surface treatments on the surface layer are discussed. (author)

  10. Cold formability of steels

    Lafond, G.; Leclerq, G.; Moliexe, F.; Namdar, R.; Roesch, L.; Sanz, G.

    1977-01-01

    This work was essentially aimed to the study of the following three questions. Is it possible to assess the cold formability of steels using simple material properties as criteria. What values of mechanical properties can one expect to reach in cold formed parts. Are there simple ways of characterizing the speroidization treatments carried out on steels before cold forming operations. The present report describes the results obtained during this investigation. It is logically divided into three separate parts. Experimental study of cold formability in wire drawing. Influence of metallurgical variables on mechanical properties of high carbon cold drawn wires. Contribution to the study of characterization methods of cold forming steels subjected to a spheroidization heat treatment

  11. National steel tries wheeling

    Dudak, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    In 1989, National Steel felt the need to take the next step to make its Detroit-based division, Great Lakes Steel, more competitive in the world flat-rolled steel market. In 1988, Great Lakes Steel started flowing natural gas through the first fully litigated bypass (Competitive Sourcing Option) of a local distribution company. In 1989, the second connection with the new supply route for gas transportation, Panhandle Eastern had started flowing and the LDC, Michigan Consolidated Gas Co. (MichCon) had pulled out their piping previously serving the plants. Since we had been able to structure a fully reliable supply route, storage and balancing program for gas in the face of such strong opposition by the LDC, the author felt it was time to attack the next singularly sourced major commodity, electricity. Electricity, at this major integrated steel plant, represented approximately 7% of plant cost yearly. Yet being monopolized, Great Lakes Division (GLD) could not multiple source this commodity like it does with its other 93% of costs, except for labor (25% of the 93%). Multiple sourcing is done to bring competitive pressure to suppliers and to diversify supplies and protect plant operation in the event of failure by one supplier. This paper describes National Steel's strategy to reduce the cost of power, at the minimum of capital costs, the most expedient way possible, that does not sacrifice any major long-term potential cost improvements. The results show that competitively priced power is available across the mid-west, at prices well below many state regulated electric utilities, for at least 5 to 15 years, but with major obstacles in obtaining transmission access

  12. Volatilization from PCA steel alloy

    Hagrman, D.L.; Smolik, G.R.; McCarthy, K.A.; Petti, D.A.

    1996-08-01

    The mobilizations of key components from Primary Candidate Alloy (PCA) steel alloy have been measured with laboratory-scale experiments. The experiments indicate most of the mobilization from PCA steel is due to oxide formation and spalling but that the spalled particles are large enough to settle rapidly. Based on the experiments, models for the volatization of iron, manganese, and cobalt from PCA steel in steam and molybdenum from PCA steel in air have been derived.

  13. Fatigue damage of steel components

    Fæster, Søren; Zhang, Xiaodan; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2014-01-01

    Railway rails and the inner ring in roller bearings in wind turbines are both experiencing steel-to-steel contact in small areas with huge loads resulting in extremely high stresses in the base materials......Railway rails and the inner ring in roller bearings in wind turbines are both experiencing steel-to-steel contact in small areas with huge loads resulting in extremely high stresses in the base materials...

  14. Investigation of corrosion of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Investigation of corrosion resistance of materials is one of the most important tests that allow determining their functional properties. Among these tests the special group consist electrochemical investigations, which let to accelerate the course of the process. These investigations allow rapidly estimating corrosion processes occurring in metal elements under the influence of the analysed environment. In the paper are presented results of investigations of the resistance to pitting corrosion of the steel of next grades: austenitic 316L and duplex 2205. It was also analysed the corrosion resistance of welded joints of these grades of steel. The investigations were conducted in two different corrosion environments: in the neutral one (3.5 % sodium chloride) and in the aggressive one (0.1 M sulphuric acid VI). The obtained results indicate different resistance of analysed grades of steel and their welded joints in relation to the corrosion environment. The austenitic 316L steel characterizes by the higher resistance to the pitting corrosion in the aggressive environment then the duplex 2205 steel. In the paper are presented results of potentiodynamic tests. They showed that all the specimens are less resistant to pitting corrosion in the environment of sulphuric acid (VI) than in the sodium chloride one. The 2205 steel has higher corrosion resistance than the 316L stainless steel in 3.5% NaCl. On the other hand, in 0.1 M H2SO4, the 316L steel has a higher corrosion resistance than the 2205 one. The weld has a similar, very good resistance to pitting corrosion like both steels.

  15. Thermally Stable Nanocrystalline Steel

    Hulme-Smith, Christopher Neil; Ooi, Shgh Woei; Bhadeshia, Harshad K. D. H.

    2017-10-01

    Two novel nanocrystalline steels were designed to withstand elevated temperatures without catastrophic microstructural changes. In the most successful alloy, a large quantity of nickel was added to stabilize austenite and allow a reduction in the carbon content. A 50 kg cast of the novel alloy was produced and used to verify the formation of nanocrystalline bainite. Synchrotron X-ray diffractometry using in situ heating showed that austenite was able to survive more than 1 hour at 773 K (500 °C) and subsequent cooling to ambient temperature. This is the first reported nanocrystalline steel with high-temperature capability.

  16. Joining uranium to steel

    Perkins, M.A.

    1976-05-01

    A method has been devised which will allow the joining of uranium to steel by fusion welding through the use of an intermediate material. Uranium-0.5 titanium was joined to AISI 304L stainless steel by using a vanadium insert. Also, a method is now available for selecting possible filler metals when two entirely dissimilar metals need to be joined. This method allows a quantitative ranking to be made of the possible filler metals and thus the most likely candidate can be selected

  17. Nitrogen-alloyed martensitic steels

    Berns, H.

    1988-01-01

    A report is presented on initial results with pressure-nitrided martensitic steels. In heat-resistant steels, thermal stability and toughness are raised by nitrogen. In cold work steel, there is a more favourable corrosion behaviour. (orig./MM) [de

  18. Crystallographic texture control helps improve pipeline steel resistance to hydrogen-induced cracking

    Caleyo, F; Hallen, J M; Herrera, O; Venegas, V [ESIQIE, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, (Mexico); Baudin, T [Universite de Paris Sud, Orsay, (France)

    2010-07-01

    The resistance to HIC of sour service pipeline steels has been improved through several strategies but none have proven to be totally efficient in the preservation of HIC in difficult operating conditions. The crystallographic texture plays a significant role in determining the behavior of HIC in pipeline steels. The present study tried to prove that crystallographic texture control, through warm rolling schedules, helps improve pipeline steel resistance to HIC. Several samples of an API 5L X52 grade pipeline steel were produced using different thermomechanical processes (austenization, controlled rolling and recrystallization). These samples were subjected to cathodic charging. Scanning electron microscopy and automated FEG/EBSD were used to perform metallographic inspections and to collect microstructure data. The results showed that the strong y fiber texture significantly reduces or even prevents the HIC damage. It is possible to improve the HIC resistance of pipeline steels using crystallography texture control and grain boundary engineering.

  19. Structure, mechanical and corrosion properties of powdered stainless steel Kh13

    Radomysel'skij, I.D.; Napara-Volgina, S.G.; Orlova, L.N.; Apininskaya, L.M.

    1982-01-01

    Structure, mechanical and corrosion properties are studied for compact powdered stainless steel, Grade Kh13, produced from prealloyed powder and a mixture of chromium and iron powders by hot vacuum pressing (HVP) following four schemes: HVP of unsintered billets; HVP of presintered billets; HVP of unsintered billets followed by diffusion annealing; HVP of sintered billets followed by diffusion annealing. Analysis of the structure, mechanical and corrosion properties of Kh13 steel produced according to the four schemes confirmed that production of this steel by the HVP method without presintering of porous billets and diffusion annealing of compact stampings is possible only when prealloyed powder of particular composition is used as a starting material

  20. The influence of assist gas on magnetic properties of electrotechnical steel sheets cut with laser

    Gaworska-Koniarek, Dominika; Szubzda, Bronislaw; Wilczynski, Wieslaw; Drosik, Jerzy; Karas, Kazimierz

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents the influence of assist gas (air and nitrogen) during laser cutting on magnetization, magnetic permeability and loss characteristics of non-oriented electrical steels. The research was made on an non-oriented M330-50A grade electrical steels by means of single sheet tester. In order to enhance the effect of cutting and the same degradation zone on magnetic properties, strips with different width were achieved. Measurements results indicate that application of air as assist gas has more destructive effect on magnetic properties of electrical steels than nitrogen one.

  1. The influence of assist gas on magnetic properties of electrotechnical steel sheets cut with laser

    Gaworska-Koniarek, Dominika; Szubzda, Bronisław; Wilczyński, Wiesław; Drosik, Jerzy; Karaś, Kazimierz

    2011-07-01

    The paper presents the influence of assist gas (air and nitrogen) during laser cutting on magnetization, magnetic permeability and loss characteristics of non-oriented electrical steels. The research was made on an non-oriented M330-50A grade electrical steels by means of single sheet tester. In order to enhance the effect of cutting and the same degradation zone on magnetic properties, strips with different width were achieved. Measurements results indicate that application of air as assist gas has more destructive effect on magnetic properties of electrical steels than nitrogen one.

  2. Influence of microstructure of high-strength low-alloy steels on their weldability

    Cwiek, J.; Labanowski, J.

    2003-01-01

    Microstructure of steel before welding has influence on the steel's susceptibility to cold cracking because it influences hardenability and maximum hardness of heat affected zone (HAZ). Two high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) steel grades 18G2AV and 14HNMBCu, in various heat treatment conditions, were subjected to simulated welding thermal cycles. It was revealed that maximum HAZ hardness is influenced by microstructure presented before thermal cycle was applied. The higher HAZ hardness was observed for quenched and tempered condition, comparing to full annealed and overheated conditions. (author)

  3. Hydrogen pick-up effect on the deformation characteristics of the 20 steel

    Steklov, O.I.; Perunov, B.Vs.; Krovyakova, V.M.

    1977-01-01

    An experiment aimed at ascertaining the possibility of using plasticity characteristis as a criterion of the resistance of a material to slow failure through hydrogenation is set up in a manner to permit an evaluation of the individual effects of mechanical stresses hydrogenation medium and their combined action upon the plasticity characteristics. It is shown that the variation of the rupturing load for hydrogenated specimens of grade 20 steel, held under load, takes place on the initial holding stage, after which the changes in the plasticity characteritics are immaterial. In consequence, the deformation characteristics allow no judgement to be made on the resistance to slow cracking of grade 20 steel due to hydrogenation

  4. The Effect of Si and Mn on Microstructure and Selected Properties of Cr-Ni Stainless Steels

    Kalandyk B.

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Cast stainless steel of the Cr-Ni duplex type is used, among others, for the cast parts of pumps and valves handling various chemically aggressive media. Therefore, the main problem discussed in this article is the problem of abrasion wear resistance in a mixture of SiC and water and resistance to electrochemical corrosion in a 3% NaCl-H2O solution of selected cast steel grades, i.e. typical duplex cast steel, high silicon and manganese duplex cast steel, and Cr-Ni austenitic cast steel (type AISI 316L. The study shows that the best abrasion wear resistance comparable to Ni-Hart cast iron was obtained in the cast duplex steel, where Ni was partially replaced with Mn and N. This cast steel was also characterized by the highest hardness and matrix microhardness among all the tested cast steel grades. The best resistance to electrochemical corrosion in 3% NaCl-H2O solution showed the cast duplex steel with high content of Cr, Mo and N. The addition of Ni plays rather insignificant role in the improvement of corrosion resistance of the materials tested.

  5. Microbial-Influenced Corrosion of Corten Steel Compared with Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel in Oily Wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Mansouri, Hamidreza; Alavi, Seyed Abolhasan; Fotovat, Meysam

    2015-07-01

    The microbial corrosion behavior of three important steels (carbon steel, stainless steel, and Corten steel) was investigated in semi petroleum medium. This work was done in modified nutrient broth (2 g nutrient broth in 1 L oily wastewater) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed culture (as a biotic media) and an abiotic medium for 2 weeks. The behavior of corrosion was analyzed by spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods and at the end was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the degree of corrosion of Corten steel in mixed culture, unlike carbon steel and stainless steel, is less than P. aeruginosa inoculated medium because some bacteria affect Corten steel less than other steels. According to the experiments, carbon steel had less resistance than Corten steel and stainless steel. Furthermore, biofilm inhibits separated particles of those steels to spread to the medium; in other words, particles get trapped between biofilm and steel.

  6. Creep strength and rupture ductility of creep strength enhanced ferritic steels

    Kushima, Hideaki; Sawada, Kota; Kimura, Kazuhiro [National Inst. for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2010-07-01

    Creep strength and rupture ductility of Creep Strength Enhanced Ferritic (CSEF) steels were investigated from a viewpoint of stress dependence in comparison with conventional low alloy ferritic creep resistant steels. Inflection of stress vs. time to rupture curve was observed at 50% of 0.2% offset yield stress for both CSEF and conventional ferritic steels. Creep rupture ductility tends to decrease with increase in creep exposure time, however, those of conventional low alloy steels indicate increase in the long-term. Creep rupture ductility of the ASME Grades 92 and 122 steels indicates drastic decrease with decrease in stress at 50% of 0.2% offset yield stress. Stress dependence of creep rupture ductility of the ASME Grades 92 and 122 steels is well described by stress ratio to 0.2% offset yield stress, regardless of temperature. Drop of creep rupture ductility is caused by inhomogeneous recovery at the vicinity of prior austenite grain boundary, and remarkable drop of creep rupture ductility of CSEF steels should be derived from those stabilized microstructure. (orig.)

  7. Guns, Germs and Steel

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 1. Guns, Germs and Steel - A Short History of Everybody for the Last 13,000 years. Suri Venkatachalam. Book Review Volume 6 Issue 1 January 2001 pp 84-88. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  8. Underwater welding of steel

    Ibarra, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental basis to understand the behavior of wet underwater welding of steel is introduced. Both the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy concepts are discussed. Modifications of welding consumables and practice are suggested. This chapter promotes further contributions of meatllurgical research to improve and promote wet underwater welding. (orig.)

  9. Japan steel mill perspective

    Murase, K. [Kobe Steel Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    The international and Japan's steel industry, the coking coal market, and Japan's expectations from Canada's coal industry are discussed. Japan's steel mills are operating at full capacity. Crude steel production for the first half of 2004 was 55.8 million tons. The steel mills are profitable, but costs are high, and there are difficulties with procuring raw materials. Japan is trying to enhance the quality of coke, in order to achieve higher productivity in the production of pig iron. Economic growth is rising disproportionately in the BRICs (Brazil, Russia, India, and China), with a large increase in coking coal demand from China. On the supply side, there are several projects underway in Australia and Canada to increase production. These include new developments by Elk Valley Coal Corporation, Grande Cache Coal, Western Canadian Coal, and Northern Energy and Mining in Canada. The Elga Mine in the far eastern part of Russia is under development. But the market is expected to remain tight for some time. Japan envisions Canadian coal producers will provide a stable coal supply, expansion of production and infrastructure capabilities, and stabilization of price. 16 slides/overheads are included.

  10. Contractions from grading

    Krishnan, Chethan; Raju, Avinash

    2018-04-01

    We note that large classes of contractions of algebras that arise in physics can be understood purely algebraically via identifying appropriate Zm-gradings (and their generalizations) on the parent algebra. This includes various types of flat space/Carroll limits of finite and infinite dimensional (A)dS algebras, as well as Galilean and Galilean conformal algebras. Our observations can be regarded as providing a natural context for the Grassmann approach of Krishnan et al. [J. High Energy Phys. 2014(3), 36]. We also introduce a related notion, which we call partial grading, that arises naturally in this context.

  11. Creep of A508/533 Pressure Vessel Steel

    Richard Wright

    2014-08-01

    ABSTRACT Evaluation of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels has been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design studies. These design studies have generally focused on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Initially, three candidate materials were identified by this process: conventional light water reactor (LWR) RPV steels A508 and A533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and Grade 91 steel. The low strength of 2¼Cr-1Mo at elevated temperature has eliminated this steel from serious consideration as the VHTR RPV candidate material. Discussions with the very few vendors that can potentially produce large forgings for nuclear pressure vessels indicate a strong preference for conventional LWR steels. This preference is based in part on extensive experience with forging these steels for nuclear components. It is also based on the inability to cast large ingots of the Grade 91 steel due to segregation during ingot solidification, thus restricting the possible mass of forging components and increasing the amount of welding required for completion of the RPV. Grade 91 steel is also prone to weld cracking and must be post-weld heat treated to ensure adequate high-temperature strength. There are also questions about the ability to produce, and very importantly, verify the through thickness properties of thick sections of Grade 91 material. The availability of large components, ease of fabrication, and nuclear service experience with the A508 and A533 steels strongly favor their use in the RPV for the VHTR. Lowering the gas outlet temperature for the VHTR to 750°C from 950 to 1000°C, proposed in early concept studies, further strengthens the justification for this material selection. This steel is allowed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear service up to 371°C (700°F); certain excursions above that temperature are

  12. Advanced metallic structural materials and a new role for microalloyed steels

    Korchynsky, M.

    2004-01-01

    The recent worldwide surge of steel consumption, mainly of low-strength carbon grades, has created raw-materials shortages and price increases. These supply-demand strains could be relaxed by satisfying engineering needs with less steel. However, materials used for such a substitution must combine high weight reducing potential with low cost. Microalloyed (MA) steels are cost-effective substitutes, since their high strength is the result of grain refinement and precipitation hardening. These two strengthening mechanisms are developed by the interaction of micro-additives: niobium or vanadium with the deformation occurring during hot rolling followed by cooling. The physical metallurgy of these phenomena is discussed in the paper. The optimum alloy design of MA steels combines superior properties with lowest processing cost. In many applications, the versatility and adaptability of vanadium steels provides an economic advantage. The monetary value of weight production is sufficient to increase the profitability of steel makers and to lower the material cost to steel users. This 'win-win' situation is financed by the elimination of efforts spent in producing inefficient steel, yielding an increase in wealth formation. The gain acceptance of substitution by the consumer, a long-term strategic plan is needed to be implemented by the beneficiaries - both steel producers and steel users. The successful substitution is of importance to the national economy, resources and energy conservation, and the environment. Since microalloyed steels, used as a replacement for carbon steels, offer low cost weight savings, they deserve to be classified as advanced structural materials. (author)

  13. Challenges in Special Steel Making

    Balachandran, G.

    2018-02-01

    Special bar quality [SBQ] is a long steel product where an assured quality is delivered by the steel mill to its customer. The bars have enhanced tolerance to higher stress application and it is demanded for specialised component making. The SBQ bars are sought for component making processing units such as closed die hot forging, hot extrusion, cold forging, machining, heat treatment, welding operations. The final component quality of the secondary processing units depends on the quality maintained at the steel maker end along with quality maintained at the fabricator end. Thus, quality control is ensured at every unit process stages. The various market segments catered to by SBQ steel segment is ever growing and is reviewed. Steel mills need adequate infrastructure and technological capability to make these higher quality steels. Some of the critical stages of processing SBQ and the critical quality maintenance parameters at the steel mill in the manufacture has been brought out.

  14. Optimisation of welding procedures for duplex and superduplex stainless steels

    Westin, Elin M.

    2014-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are increasingly being replaced by duplex grades that can offer similar corrosion resistance with far higher strength. This increased strength makes it possible to reduce material consumption whilst also decreasing transport and construction costs. Although established welding methods used for austenitic steels can be used for duplex steels, modification of the procedures can lead to improved results. This paper reviews the welding of duplex stainless steel and examines precautions that may be required. The advantages and disadvantages of different welding methods are highlighted and some high productivity solutions are presented. The application of a more efficient process with a high deposition rate (e.g. flux- cored arc welding) can decrease labour costs. Further close control of heat input and interpass temperature can result in more favourable microstructures and final properties. Although welding adversely affects the corrosion resistance of austenitic and duplex stainless steels, particularly the pitting resistance, relative to the parent material, this problem can be minimised by proper backing gas protection and subsequent pickling.

  15. Carburizing treatment of low alloy steels: Effect of technological parameters

    Benarioua, Younes

    2018-05-01

    The surface areas of the parts subjected to mechanical loads influence to a great extent the resistance to wear and fatigue. In majority of cases, producing of a hard superficial layer on a tough substrate is conducive to an increased resistance to mechanical wear and fatigue. Cementation treatment of low alloy steels which bonds superficial martensitic layer of high hardness and lateral compressive to a core of lower hardness and greater toughness is an example of a good solution of the problem. The high hardness of the martensitic layer is due to an increased concentration of interstitial carbon atoms in the austenite before quenching. The lower hardness of the core after quenching is due to the presence of ferrite and pearlite components which appear if the cooling rate after austenitization becomes lower than the critical on. The objective of the present study was to obtain a cemented surface layer on low alloy steel by means of pack carburizing treatment. Different steel grades, austenitization temperatures as well as different soaking times were used as parameters of the pack carburizing treatment. During this treatment, carbon atoms from the pack powder diffuse toward the steels surface and form compounds of iron carbides. The effect of carburizing parameters on the transformation rate of low carbon surface layer of the low alloy steel to the cemented one was investigated by several analytical techniques.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Heat Affected Zone of High Strength Steels

    Sefcikova, K.; Brtnik, T.; Dolejs, J.; Keltamaki, K.; Topilla, R.

    2015-11-01

    High Strength Steels became more popular as a construction material during last decade because of their increased availability and affordability. On the other hand, even though general use of Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) is expanding, the wide utilization is limited because of insufficient information about their behaviour in structures. The most widely used technique for joining steels is fusion welding. The welding process has an influence not only on the welded connection but on the area near this connection, the so-called heat affected zone, as well. For that reason it is very important to be able to determine the properties in the heat affected zone (HAZ). This area of investigation is being continuously developed in dependence on significant progress in material production, especially regarding new types of steels available. There are currently several types of AHSS on the world market. Two most widely used processes for AHSS production are Thermo-Mechanically Controlled Processing (TMCP) and Quenching in connection with Tempering. In the presented study, TMCP and QC steels grade S960 were investigated. The study is focused on the changes of strength, ductility, hardness and impact strength in heat affected zone based on the used amount of heat input.

  17. Heat Treatment and Properties of Iron and Steel

    Digges, Thomas

    1966-01-01

    .... Chemical compositions, heat treatments, and some properties and uses are presented for structural steels, tool steels, stainless and heat-resisting steels, precipitation-hardenable stainless steels...

  18. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part I. Ductility and fracture toughness

    Margolin, B., E-mail: mail@crism.ru; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Minkin, A.; Potapova, V.; Smirnov, V.

    2016-11-15

    The radiation swelling effect on the fracture properties of irradiated austenitic steels under static loading has been studied and analyzed from the mechanical and physical viewpoints. Experimental data on the stress-strain curves, fracture strain, fracture toughness and fracture mechanisms have been represented for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various swelling. Some phenomena in mechanical behaviour of irradiated austenitic steels have been revealed and explained as follows: a sharp decrease of fracture toughness with swelling growth; untypical large increase of fracture toughness with decrease of the test temperature; some increase of fracture toughness after preliminary cyclic loading. Role of channel deformation and channel fracture has been clarified in the properties of irradiated austenitic steel and different tendencies to channel deformation have been shown and explained for the same austenitic steel irradiated at different temperatures and neutron doses.

  19. Correlation between grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra

    Yao, Shunchun; Dong, Meirong; Lu, Jidong; Li, Jun; Dong, Xuan

    2013-12-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) which is used traditionally as a spectrochemical analytical technique was employed to analyze the grade of pearlite spheroidization. Three 12Cr1MoV steel specimens with different grades of pearlite spheroidization were ablated to produce plasma by pulse laser at 266 nm. In order to determine the optimal temporal condition and plasma parameters for correlating the grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra, a set of spectra at different delays were analyzed by the principal component analysis method. Then, the relationship between plasma temperature, intensity ratios of ionic to atomic lines and grade of pearlite spheroidization was studied. The analysis results show that the laser induced spectra of different grades of pearlite spheroidization can be readily identifiable by principal component analysis in the range of 271.941-289.672 nm with 1000 ns delay time. It is also found that a good agreement exists between the Fe ionic to atomic line ratios and the tensile strength, whereas there is no obvious difference in the plasma temperature. Therefore, LIBS may be applied not only as a spectrochemical analytical technique but also as a new way to estimate the grade of pearlite spheroidization.

  20. Correlation between grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra

    Yao, Shunchun; Dong, Meirong; Lu, Jidong; Li, Jun; Dong, Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) which is used traditionally as a spectrochemical analytical technique was employed to analyze the grade of pearlite spheroidization. Three 12Cr1MoV steel specimens with different grades of pearlite spheroidization were ablated to produce plasma by pulse laser at 266 nm. In order to determine the optimal temporal condition and plasma parameters for correlating the grade of pearlite spheroidization and laser induced spectra, a set of spectra at different delays were analyzed by the principal component analysis method. Then, the relationship between plasma temperature, intensity ratios of ionic to atomic lines and grade of pearlite spheroidization was studied. The analysis results show that the laser induced spectra of different grades of pearlite spheroidization can be readily identifiable by principal component analysis in the range of 271.941–289.672 nm with 1000 ns delay time. It is also found that a good agreement exists between the Fe ionic to atomic line ratios and the tensile strength, whereas there is no obvious difference in the plasma temperature. Therefore, LIBS may be applied not only as a spectrochemical analytical technique but also as a new way to estimate the grade of pearlite spheroidization. (paper)

  1. Endangered Animals. Second Grade.

    Popp, Marcia

    This second grade teaching unit centers on endangered animal species around the world. Questions addressed are: What is an endangered species? Why do animals become extinct? How do I feel about the problem? and What can I do? Students study the definition of endangered species and investigate whether it is a natural process. They explore topics…

  2. Calculating Student Grades.

    Allswang, John M.

    1986-01-01

    This article provides two short microcomputer gradebook programs. The programs, written in BASIC for the IBM-PC and Apple II, provide statistical information about class performance and calculate grades either on a normal distribution or based on teacher-defined break points. (JDH)

  3. Grades as Information

    Grant, Darren

    2007-01-01

    We determine how much observed student performance in microeconomics principles can be attributed, inferentially, to three kinds of student academic "productivity," the instructor, demographics, and unmeasurables. The empirical approach utilizes an ordered probit model that relates student performance in micro to grades in prior…

  4. First Grade Baseline Evaluation

    Center for Innovation in Assessment (NJ1), 2013

    2013-01-01

    The First Grade Baseline Evaluation is an optional tool that can be used at the beginning of the school year to help teachers get to know the reading and language skills of each student. The evaluation is composed of seven screenings. Teachers may use the entire evaluation or choose to use those individual screenings that they find most beneficial…

  5. The Fifth Grade Classroom.

    Hartman, Michael; And Others

    An interdisciplinary design project report investigates the relationship of the fifth grade educational facility to the student and teacher needs in light of human and environmental factors. The classroom, activity and teaching spaces are analyzed with regard to the educational curriculum. Specifications and design criteria concerning equipment…

  6. Cutting Class Harms Grades

    Taylor, Lewis A., III

    2012-01-01

    An accessible business school population of undergraduate students was investigated in three independent, but related studies to determine effects on grades due to cutting class and failing to take advantage of optional reviews and study quizzes. It was hypothesized that cutting classes harms exam scores, attending preexam reviews helps exam…

  7. Study of Irradiation Effects on the Fracture Properties of A533-Series Ferritic Steels

    Lee, Yong Bok; Lee, Gyeong Geun; Kwon, Jun Hyun

    2011-01-01

    Since the Kori nuclear power plant unit 3 (Kori-3) was founded in 1986, the surveillance tests have been conducted five times. One of the primary objectives of the surveillance test is to determine the effects of irradiation on reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel embrittlement. The RPV is made out of ferritic steels such as SA533 type B class 1, which were used for early nuclear power plants industry including Kori-2, 3, 4 and Yonggwang-1, 2 units in Korea. The Westinghouse supplied Kori-3 with the RPV steels ASTM A533 grade B class 1, which is equivalent to SA533 type B class 1. The irradiation effects on tensile properties in ASTM A533 grade B class 1 steel had been studied by Steichen and Williams. They experimentally determined the effect of strain rate and temperature on the tensile properties of unirradiated and irradiated A533 grade B steel 1. The effects of neutron irradiation on ferritic steels could be determined from tensile properties, as well as the fracture strength and toughness measurements. Hunter and Williams have reported that the strength and ductility for unirradiated material at a low strain rate increase with decreasing test temperature. Also, neutron irradiation increases strength and decreases ductility. Crosley and Ripling revealed that the yield strength of unirradiated material rapidly increases with the strain rate. Therefore, yield strength for unirradiated and irradiated materials should be determined by test parameters along with strain rate and temperature. In this study we compare ASTM A533 grad B class 1 steel obtained from several papers with SA533 type B class 1 steel taken from the surveillance data of Kori-3 unit, whose mechanical property of unirradiated and irradiated materials was correlated with the rate-temperature parameter

  8. In Situ Local Measurement of Austenite Mechanical Stability and Transformation Behavior in Third-Generation Advanced High-Strength Steels

    Abu-Farha, Fadi; Hu, Xiaohua; Sun, Xin; Ren, Yang; Hector, Louis G.; Thomas, Grant; Brown, Tyson W.

    2018-05-01

    Austenite mechanical stability, i.e., retained austenite volume fraction (RAVF) variation with strain, and transformation behavior were investigated for two third-generation advanced high-strength steels (3GAHSS) under quasi-static uniaxial tension: a 1200 grade, two-phase medium Mn (10 wt pct) TRIP steel, and a 980 grade, three-phase TRIP steel produced with a quenching and partitioning heat treatment. The medium Mn (10 wt pct) TRIP steel deforms inhomogeneously via propagative instabilities (Lüders and Portevin Le Châtelier-like bands), while the 980 grade TRIP steel deforms homogenously up to necking. The dramatically different deformation behaviors of these steels required the development of a new in situ experimental technique that couples volumetric synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurement of RAVF with surface strain measurement using stereo digital image correlation over the beam impingement area. Measurement results with the new technique are compared to those from a more conventional approach wherein strains are measured over the entire gage region, while RAVF measurement is the same as that in the new technique. A determination is made as to the appropriateness of the different measurement techniques in measuring the transformation behaviors for steels with homogeneous and inhomogeneous deformation behaviors. Extension of the new in situ technique to the measurement of austenite transformation under different deformation modes and to higher strain rates is discussed.

  9. Steel for nuclear applications

    Zorev, N.N.; Astafiev, A.A.; Loboda, A.S.

    1978-01-01

    A steel contains, in percent by weight, the following constituents: carbon from 0.13 to 0.18, silicon from 0.17 to 0.37, manganese from 0.30 to 0.60, chromium from 1.7 to 2.4, nickel from 1.0 to 1.5, molybdenum from 0.5 to 0.7, vanadium from 0.05 to 0.12, aluminium from 0.01 to 0.035, nitrogen from 0.05 to 0.012, copper from 0.11 to 0.20, arsenic from 0.0035 to 0.0055, iron and impurities, the balance. This steel is preferable for use in the manufacture of nuclear reactors. 1 table

  10. Advances in stainless steels

    Baldev Raj; Jayakumar, T.; Saibaba, Saroja; Sivaprasad, P.V.; Shankar, P.

    2010-01-01

    This book covers a broad spectrum of topics spanning the entire life cycle of stainless steel-from alloy design and characterization to engineering design, fabrication, mechanical properties, corrosion, quality assurance of components, in-service performance assessment, life prediction and finally failure analysis of materials and components. The contents provide useful feedback for further developments aimed at effective utilization of this class of materials. The book comprises articles that bring out contemporary developments in stainless steels and is thematically classified into the following sections. 1. Component design, modelling and structural integrity, 2. Manufacturing technology, 3. Property evaluation, 4. Alloy development and applications, 5. NDE methods, 6. Corrosion and surface modification. The book commences with articles on component design and structural integrity, thus opening up the areas of challenge for researchers and academia. The articles in the book relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  11. Steel containment buckling

    Bennett, J.G.; Fly, G.W.; Baker, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The Steel Containment Buckling program is in its fourth phase of work directed at the evaluation of the effects of the structural failure mode of steel containments when the membrane stresses are compressive. The structural failure mode for this state of stress is instability or buckling. The program to date has investigated: (1) the effect on overall buckling capacity of the ASME area replacement method for reinforcing around circular penetrations; (2) a set of benchmark experiments on ring-stiffened shells having reinforced and framed penetrations; (3) large and small scale experiments on knuckle region buckling from internal pressure and post-buckling behavior to failure for vessel heads having torispherical geometries; and (4) buckling under time-dependent loadings (dynamic buckling). The first two investigations are complete, the knuckle buckling experimental efforts are complete with data analysis and reporting in progress, and the dynamic buckling experimental and analytical work is in progress

  12. Steel containment buckling

    Butler, T.A.; Baker, W.E.

    1986-01-01

    Two aspects of buckling of a free-standing nuclear steel containment building were investigated in a combined experimental and analytical program. In the first part of the study, the response of a scale model of a containment building to dynamic base excitation is investigated. A simple harmonic signal was used for preliminary studies followed by experiments with scaled earthquake signals as the excitation source. The experiments and accompanying analyses indicate that the scale model response to earthquake-type excitations is very complex and that current analytical methods may require a dynamic capacity reduction factor to be incorporated. The second part of the study quantified the effects of framing at large penetrations on the static buckling capacity of scale model containments. Results show little effect from the framing for the scale models constructed from the polycarbonate, Lexan. However, additional studies with a model constructed of the prototypic steel material are suggested

  13. AIS/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Strip Casting: Anticipating New Routes To Steel Sheet

    Prof. Alan W. Camb; Prof. Anthony Rollett

    2001-08-31

    To determine the potential for strip casting in the steel industry and to develop the fundamental knowledge necessary to allow the role of strip casting in the modern steel industry to be understood. Based upon a study of carbon steel strip castings that were either produced for the program at British Steel or were received from a pre-commercial production machine, the following conclusions were made. Strip casting of carbon steels is technically feasible for sheet material from slightly less than 1 mm thick to 3 mm thick, and, assuming that it is economically viable, it will be first applied in carbon steel markets that do not require stringent surface quality or extensive forming. The potential of strip casting as a casting process to be developed for steel castings is very high as the cast strip has some very novel characteristics. Direct cast carbon strip has better surface quality, shape and profile than any other casting process currently available. The more rapidly solidified structure of direct cast strip tends to be strong with low ductility; however, with adequate thermal treatment, it is possible to develop a variety of properties from the same grade. The process is more amenable at this time to production tonnages per year of the order of 500,000 tons and as such will first find niche type applications. This technology is an additional technology for steel production and will be in addition to, rather than a replacement for, current casting machines.

  14. Reactor pressure vessel steels

    Van De Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaouuadi, R.

    1998-01-01

    Research and development activities related to reactor pressure vessel steels during 1997 are reported. The objectives of activities of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK/CEN in this domain are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate a methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use

  15. Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Van de Velde, J.; Fabry, A.; Van Walle, E.; Chaoudi, R

    1998-07-01

    SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels in performed in support of the RVP integrity assessment. Its main objectives are: (1) to develop enhanced surveillance concepts by applying micromechanics and fracture-toughness tests to small specimens, and by performing damage modelling and microstructure characterization; (2) to demonstrate the applied methodology on a broad database; (3) to achieve regulatory acceptance and industrial use. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  16. Steele Richardson Olszewski syndrome

    Vijayashree S Gokhale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson′s disease and its plus syndromes are an important cause of morbidity in the geriatric age group. Its plus syndromes show a myriad of clinical features characterized by progressive symptoms. Here we present a 65-year-old woman with progressive "Parkinsonian-like features," i.e., mask-like face, slowness of all movements and tendency to fall, and difficulty in eye movements, leading to the diagnosis of Steele Richardson Olszewski Syndrome or progressive supranuclear palsy.

  17. Steels and welding nuclear

    Sessa, M.; Milella, P.P.

    1987-01-01

    This ENEA Data-Base regards mechanical properties, chemical composition and heat treatments of nuclear pressure vessel materials: type A533-B, A302-B, A508 steel plates and forgings, submerged arc welds and HAZ before and after nuclear irradiation. Irradiation experiments were generally performed in high flux material test reactors. Data were collected from international available literature about water nuclear reactors pressure vessel materials embrittlement

  18. Elevated temperature tensile properties of borated 304 stainless steel

    Stephens, J.J.; Sorenson, K.B.; McConnell, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the tensile properties of Powder Metallurgy (PM) 'Grade A' material with that of the conventional IM 'Grade B' material for two selected Types (i.e., boron contents) as defined by the ASTM A887 specification: Types 304B5 and 304B7. Tensile properties have been generated for these materials at temperatures ranging from room temperature to 400degC (752degF). The data at higher temperatures are required for ASME Code Case purposes, since the use temperature of a basket under 'worst case' cask conditions may be as high as 343degC (650degF), due to self-heating by the activated fuel elements. We will also discuss the current status of efforts aimed at obtaining an ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Case for selected grades of borated stainless steel covered by the ASTM A887 specification. (J.P.N.)

  19. Contaminated Mexican steel incident

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the circumstances contributing to the inadvertent melting of cobalt 60 (Co-60) contaminated scrap metal in two Mexican steel foundries and the subsequent distribution of contaminated steel products into the United States. The report addresses mainly those actions taken by US Federal and state agencies to protect the US population from radiation risks associated with the incident. Mexico had much more serious radiation exposure and contamination problems to manage. The United States Government maintained a standing offer to provide technical and medical assistance to the Mexican Government. The report covers the tracing of the source to its origin, response actions to recover radioactive steel in the United States, and return of the contaminated materials to Mexico. The incident resulted in significant radiation exposures within Mexico, but no known significant exposure within the United States. Response to the incident required the combined efforts of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), Department of Energy, Department of Transportation, Department of State, and US Customs Service (Department of Treasury) personnel at the Federal level and representatives of all 50 State Radiation Control Programs and, in some instances, local and county government personnel. The response also required a diplomatic interface with the Mexican Government and cooperation of numerous commercial establishments and members of the general public. The report describes the factual information associated with the event and may serve as information for subsequent recommendations and actions by the NRC. 8 figures

  20. Study on Spheroidization and Related Heat Treatments of Medium Carbon Alloy Steels

    Harisha S. R.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of medium carbon steels as engineering materials is reflected by the fact that out of the vast majority of engineering grade ferrous alloys available and used in the market today, a large proportion of them are from the family of medium carbon steels. Typically medium carbon steels have a carbon range of 0.25 to 0.65% by weight, and a manganese content ranging from 0.060 to 1.65% by weight. Medium carbon steels are more resistive to cutting, welding and forming as compared to low carbon steels. From the last two decades a number of research scholars reported the use of verity of heat treatments to tailor the properties of medium carbon steels. Spheroidizing is the novel industrial heat treatment employed to improve formability and machinability of medium/high carbon low alloy steels. This exclusive study covers procedure, the effects and possible outcomes of various heat treatments on medium carbon steels. In the present work, other related heat treatments like annealing and special treatments for property alterations which serve as pretreatments for spheroidizing are also reviewed. Medium carbon steels with property alterations by various heat treatment processes are finding increased responsiveness in transportation, aerospace, space, underwater along with other variegated fields. Improved tribological and mechanical properties consisting of impact resistance, stiffness, abrasion and strength are the main reasons for the increased attention of these steels in various industries. In the present scenario for the consolidation of important aspects of various heat treatments and effects on mechanical properties of medium carbons steel, a review of different research papers has been attempted. This review may be used as a guide to provide practical data for heat treatment industry, especially as a tool to enhance workability and tool life.

  1. Fracture Mechanisms in Steel Castings

    Stradomski Z.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The investigations were inspired with the problem of cracking of steel castings during the production process. A single mechanism of decohesion - the intergranular one - occurs in the case of hot cracking, while a variety of structural factors is decisive for hot cracking initiation, depending on chemical composition of the cast steel. The low-carbon and low-alloyed steel castings crack due to the presence of the type II sulphides, the cause of cracking of the high-carbon tool cast steels is the net of secondary cementite and/or ledeburite precipitated along the boundaries of solidified grains. Also the brittle phosphor and carbide eutectics precipitated in the final stage solidification are responsible for cracking of castings made of Hadfield steel. The examination of mechanical properties at 1050°C revealed low or very low strength of high-carbon cast steels.

  2. Inflated Grades, Enrollments & Budgets

    J. E. Stone

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Reports of the past 13 years that call attention to deficient academic standards in American higher education are enumerated. Particular attention is given the Wingspread Group's recent An American Imperative: Higher Expectations for Higher Education. Low academic standards, grade inflation, and budgetary incentives for increased enrollment are analyzed and a call is made for research at the state level. Reported trends in achievement and GPAs are extrapolated to Tennessee and combined with local data to support the inference that 15% of the state's present day college graduates would not have earned a diploma by mid 1960s standards. A conspicuous lack of interest by public oversight bodies is noted despite a growing public awareness of low academic expectations and lenient grading and an implicit budgetary impact of over $100 million. Various academic policies and the dynamics of bureaucratic control are discussed in relationship to the maintenance of academic standards. The disincentives for challenging course requirements and responsible grading are examined, and the growing movement to address academic quality issues through better training and supervision of faculty are critiqued. Recommendations that would encourage renewed academic integrity and make learning outcomes visible to students, parents, employers, and the taxpaying public are offered and briefly discussed.

  3. Effect of Microstructure on the Wear Behavior of Heat Treated SS-304 Stainless Steel

    S. Kumar

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sliding wear characteristics of some heat treated SS-304 stainless steel against EN-8 steel in dry condition have been studied in the present experimental work. Samples of SS-304 stainless steel have been heated in a muffle furnace in desired temperature and allowed to dwell for two hours. The heated specimen are then cooled in different media namely inside the furnace, open air, cutting grade oil (grade 44 and water at room temperature to obtain different grades of heat treatment. Microstructures and corresponding micro hardness of the samples have been measured along with Feritscopic studies. Wear characteristics have been studied in a multi tribo-tester (Ducom in dry sliding condition against EN-8 steel roller. Speed, load on job and duration of test run have been considered as the experimental parameters. The wear of the samples have been obtained directly from ‘Winducom 2006’ software. Mass loss of the samples before and after operation has also been considered as the measure of wear in the present study. All the samples have been slid against EN-8 steel roller with fixed experimental parameters. The data have been plotted, compared and analyzed. Effect of microstructures as well as micro hardness on the wear behavior has been studied and concluded accordingly.

  4. An Overview on the Tribological Behaviour of Nitro-Carburised Steels for Various Industrial Applications

    G. Pantazopoulos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study is focused on elucidating the wear mechanisms taking place during sliding friction of five (5 steel grades subjected to Trufftriding. For this purpose, three sliding friction experimental configurations were used and the friction coefficients, real-time-recorded during testing, were correlated to the post-testing microscopic observations of the worn surfaces. Finally, the experimental findings were evaluated with respect to the initial microstructure of the tool steels in their as-received and/or heat-treated state. In the case of non-conformal point contact against ceramic counterbodies, the friction coefficient was found to depend only on the steel grade and the particular counterbody, tending to a constant value, regardless of the applied load and/or its heat- or surface treatment. In the case of conformal plane contact against hardened steel, each steel grade exhibited an applied pressure range within which the wear coefficient remains practically constant, whereas for higher pressure values, seizure occurred. Nitrocarburising “displaced” the constant wear coefficient range towards higher pressure values, resulting in seizure retardation.

  5. TCGA_LowerGradeGliomas

    TCGA researchers analyzed nearly 300 cases of diffuse low- and intermediate-grade gliomas, which together comprise lower-grade gliomas. LGGs occur mainly in adults and include astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas and oligoastrocytomas.

  6. Hydrogen effects in stainless steel

    Caskey, G.R. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen on stainless steels have been reviewed and are summarized in this paper. Discussion covers hydrogen solution and transport in stainless steels as well as the effects of hydrogen on deformation and fracture under various loading conditions. Damage is caused also by helium that arises from decay of the hydrogen isotope tritium. Austenitic, ferritic, martensite, and precipitation-hardenable stainless steels are included in the discussion. 200 references

  7. Feasibility analysis of recycling radioactive scrap steel

    Nichols, F.; Balhiser, B.; Cignetti, N.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to: (1) establish a conceptual design that integrates commercial steel mill technology with radioactive scrap metal (RSM) processing to produce carbon and stainless steel sheet and plate at a grade suitable for fabricating into radioactive waste containers; (2) determine the economic feasibility of building a micro-mill in the Western US to process 30,000 tons of RSM per year from both DOE and the nuclear utilities; and (3) provide recommendations for implementation. For purposes of defining the project, it is divided into phases: economic feasibility and conceptual design; preliminary design; detail design; construction; and operation. This study comprises the bulk of Phase 1. It is divided into four sections. Section 1 provides the reader with a complete overview extracting pertinent data, recommendations and conclusions from the remainder of the report. Section 2 defines the variables that impact the design requirements. These data form the baseline to create a preliminary conceptual design that is technically sound, economically viable, and capitalizes on economies of scale. Priorities governing the design activities are: (1) minimizing worker exposure to radionuclide hazards, (2) maximizing worker safety, (3) minimizing environmental contamination, (4) minimizing secondary wastes, and (5) establishing engineering controls to insure that the plant will be granted a license in the state selected for operation. Section 3 provides details of the preliminary conceptual design that was selected. The cost of project construction is estimated and the personnel needed to support the steel-making operation and radiological and environmental control are identified. Section 4 identifies the operational costs and supports the economic feasibility analysis. A detailed discussion of the resulting conclusions and recommendations is included in this section

  8. Mechanism of improvement on strength and toughness of H13 die steel by nitrogen

    Li, Jing-Yuan; Chen, Yu-Lai; Huo, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of nitrogen addition to AISI H13 die steel is proposed and supported using thermodynamic calculations in addition to observed changes in precipitate, microstructure, crystal structure, and macroproperties. The results indicate that the average impact toughness ak of the novel nitrogen H13 steel is maximally 17.6 J cm −2 and minimally 13.4 J cm −2 . These values result in die steel that reaches premium grade and approximate the superior grade as specified in NADCA#207-2003, additionally the hardness is improved 3–5HRC. Experimental findings indicate that the residual V(C,N) particles undissolved during nitrogen H13 steel austenitizing by quenching helps to suppress growth of original austenitic crystal grains, this in turn results in finer martensitic structures after quenching. In the subsequent tempering process all N atoms are dissolved in the solid state matrix a result of C atoms displacing N atoms in V(C,N). Solid dissolution of N atoms produces a distorted lattice of Fe matrix which results in an increase in the hardness of the steel. Additionally this displacement reaction is important for slow growth of secondary particles in nitrogen H13 steel during the tempering process which helps to increase impact toughness compared to its nitrogen-free counterpart given the same condition of heat-treatment

  9. Hydrogen assisted stress-cracking behaviour of electron beam welded supermartensitic stainless steel weldments

    Bala Srinivasan, P.; Sharkawy, S.W.; Dietzel, W.

    2004-01-01

    Supermartensitic stainless steel (SMSS) grades are gaining popularity as an alternate material to duplex and super duplex stainless steels for applications in oil and gas industries. The weldability of these steels, though reported to be better when compared to conventional martensitic stainless steels, so far has been addressed with duplex stainless steel electrodes/fillers. This work addresses the stress-cracking behaviour of weldments of a high-grade supermartensitic stainless steel (11% Cr, 6.5% Ni and 2% Mo) in the presence of hydrogen. Welds were produced with matching consumables, using electron beam welding (EBW) process. Weldments were subjected to slow strain rate tests in 0.1 M NaOH solution, with introduction of hydrogen into the specimens by means of potentiostatic cathodic polarisation at a potential of -1200 mV versus Ag/AgCl electrode. Reference tests were performed in air for comparison, and the results suggest that both the SMSS base material and the EB weld metal are susceptible to embrittlement under the conditions of hydrogen charging

  10. Influence of deformation process on the improvement of non-oriented electrical steel

    Fischer, O.; Schneider, J.

    2003-01-01

    World-wide there is a trend to develop higher permeability grades of non-oriented electrical steels. The paper discusses the practical relevance of these developments and describes the progress in higher permeability materials utilizing optimized hot rolling and cold rolling processes

  11. International convention on clean, green and sustainable technologies in iron and steel making

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The presentations (overheads/viewgraphs) discussed energy efficiency and conservation in iron and steel making, air pollution control, carbon trading, reclamation of iron ore mines, utilisation of low grade coal and iron ore, Corex and Finex processes, HIsmelt, sinter technology, energy recovery, reduction gas from coal, coal gasification and syngas based DRI, and resettlement of people.

  12. Let's End the Grading Game.

    Edwards, Clifford H.; Edwards, Laurie

    1999-01-01

    Argues that grades have negative effects on learning and self-concept. States that while grading has a long tradition of sorting children for college entrance, there is limited evidence that grades serve a valid purpose. Argues that this practice should be abolished and an evaluation system established that provides a more valid estimate of…

  13. Four Steps in Grading Reform

    Guskey, Thomas R.; Jung, Lee Ann

    2012-01-01

    The field of education is moving rapidly toward a standards-based approach to grading. School leaders have become increasingly aware of the tremendous variation that exists in grading practices, even among teachers of the same courses in the same department in the same school. Consequently, students' grades often have little relation to their…

  14. ADVANTAGES OF RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINING SCALE MASS AND DECARBURIZED LAYER OF ROLLED COIL STEEL

    E. V. Parusov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the universal empirical relationships that allow for operational calculation of scale mass and decarbonized layer depth based on the parameters of the technological process for rolled coil steel production. Methodology. The research is carried out on the industrial batches of the rolled steel of SAE 1006 and SAE 1065 grades. Scale removability was determined in accordance with the procedure of «Bekaert» company by the specifi-cations: GA-03-16, GA-03-18, GS-03-02, GS-06-01. The depth of decarbonized layer was identified in accordance with GOST 1763-68 (M method. Findings. Analysis of experimental data allowed us to determine the rational temperature of coil formation of the investigated steel grades, which provide the best possible removal of scale from the metal surface, a minimal amount of scale, as well as compliance of the metal surface color with the require-ments of European consumers. Originality. The work allowed establishing correlation of the basic quality indicators of the rolled coil high carbon steel (scale mass, depth of decarbonized layer and inter-laminar distance in pearlite with one of the main parameters (coil formation temperature of the deformation and heat treatment mode. The re-sulting regression equations, without metallographic analysis, can be used to determine, with a minimum error, the quantitative values of the total scale mass, depth of decarbonized layer and the average inter-lamellar distance in pearlite of the rolled coil high carbon steel. Practical value. Based on the specifications of «Bekaert» company (GA-03-16, GA-03-18, GS-03-02 and GS-06-01 the method of testing descaling by mechanical means from the surface of the rolled coil steel of low- and high-carbon steel grades was developed and approved in the environment of PJSC «ArcelorMittal Kryvyi Rih». The work resulted in development of the rapid method for determination of total and remaining scale mass on the rolled coil steel

  15. Formation of Wear Resistant Steel Surfaces by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    Mändl, S.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2003-08-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a versatile and fast method for implanting energetic ions into large and complex shaped three-dimensional objects where the ions are accelerated by applying negative high voltage pulses to a substrate immersed in a plasma. As the line-of-sight restrictions of conventional implanters are circumvented, it results in a fast and cost-effective technology. Implantation of nitrogen at 30 - 40 keV at moderate temperatures of 200 - 400 °C into steel circumvents the diminishing thermal nitrogen activation encountered, e.g., in plasma nitriding in this temperature regime, thus enabling nitriding of additional steel grades. Nitride formation and improvement of the mechanical properties after PIII are presented for several steel grades, including AISI 316Ti (food industry), AISI D2 (used for bending tools) and AISI 1095 (with applications in the textile industry).

  16. Formation of Wear Resistant Steel Surfaces by Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation

    Maendl, S.; Rauschenbach, B.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) is a versatile and fast method for implanting energetic ions into large and complex shaped three-dimensional objects where the ions are accelerated by applying negative high voltage pulses to a substrate immersed in a plasma. As the line-of-sight restrictions of conventional implanters are circumvented, it results in a fast and cost-effective technology. Implantation of nitrogen at 30 - 40 keV at moderate temperatures of 200 - 400 deg. C into steel circumvents the diminishing thermal nitrogen activation encountered, e.g., in plasma nitriding in this temperature regime, thus enabling nitriding of additional steel grades. Nitride formation and improvement of the mechanical properties after PIII are presented for several steel grades, including AISI 316Ti (food industry), AISI D2 (used for bending tools) and AISI 1095 (with applications in the textile industry)

  17. Critical study of test methods in stress corrosion cracking. Application to stainless steels in chloride environment

    Ajana, Lotfi

    1985-01-01

    The transposition of results obtained in laboratory to the prediction of in-service material resistance is a crucial problem in the case of stress corrosion cracking (SCC). The search for a SCC test which allows a reliable and realistic classification of stainless steels in chloride environments requires a choice of adequate electrolytes and of mechanical solicitation mode. In this research, the author first justifies the choice of an environment which could be representative of actual service conditions in the case of 5 grades of austenitic steels and 1 grade of austeno-ferric steel. Using a computerized data acquisition and processing system, the author compares the information obtained with two types of test: under constant load and under slow strain rate [fr

  18. An Experimental Investigation on Hardness and Microstructure of Heat Treated EN 9 Steel

    Biswas, Palash; Kundu, Arnab; Mondal, Dhiraj

    2017-08-01

    In the modern engineering world, extensive research has led to the development of some special grades of steel, often suited for enhanced functions. EN 9 steel is one such grade, having major applications in power plants, automobile and aerospace industry. Different heat treatment processes are employed to achieve high hardness and high wear resistance, but machinability subsequently decreases. Existing literature is not sufficient to achieve a balance between hardness and machinability. The aim of this experimental work is to determine the hardness values and observe microstructural changes in EN9 steel, when it is subjected to annealing, normalizing and quenching. Finally, the effects of tempering after each of these heat treatments on hardness and microstructure have also been shown. It is seen that the tempering after normalizing the specimen achieved satisfactory results. The microstructure was also observed to be consisting of fine grains.

  19. Milled Die Steel Surface Roughness Correlation with Steel Sheet Friction

    Berglund, J.; Brown, C.A.; Rosén, B.-G.

    2010-01-01

    This work investigates correlations between the surface topography ofmilled steel dies and friction with steel sheet. Several die surfaces were prepared by milling. Friction was measured in bending under tension testing. Linear regression coefficients (R2) between the friction and texture...

  20. X-ray analysis in the steel industry

    Bourke, T.; Turner, K.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The steel industry makes extensive use of X-ray analysis at all stages of the steelmaking process. XRF and XRD techniques, together with the associated techniques of electron probe microanalysis and electron microscopy are key tools for exploration and mine site and process development where detailed grade and mineralogical data is required. In production X-ray analysis is used to monitor and control: mine product grade (eg iron ore, coal and other raw materials), steel making production processes (eg iron ore sinter, incoming raw materials), waste products (eg coal watery refuse, slags) and final products (eg paint coatings, customer complaints). The demands put on X-ray analysis by the Steel Industry are severe. Iron ore mining and steelmaking is a continuous process, hence instrumentation has to be robust and reliable. In addition, with ever tightening environmental controls there is an increasing demand for trace heavy element analysis in both raw and waste materials. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  1. Trial manufacturing of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack

    Honma, Nobuyuki; Chiba, Takahiko; Tanai, Kenji

    1999-11-01

    This paper reports the results of design analysis and trial manufacturing of full-scale titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks. The overpack is one of the key components of the engineered barrier system, hence, it is necessary to confirm the applicability of current technique in their manufacture. The required thickness was calculated according to mechanical resistance analysis, based on models used in current nuclear facilities. The Adequacy of the calculated dimensions was confirmed by finite-element methods. To investigate the necessity of a radiation shielding function of the overpack, the irradiation from vitrified waste has been calculated. As a result, it was shown that shielding on handling and transport equipment is a more reasonable and practical approach than to increase thickness of overpack to attain a self-shielding capability. After the above investigation, trial manufacturing of full-scale model of titanium-carbon steel composite overpack has been carried out. For corrosion-resistant material, ASTM Grade-2 titanium was selected. The titanium layer was bonded individually to a cylindrical shell and fiat cover plates (top and bottom) made of carbon steel. For the cylindrical shell portion, a cylindrically formed titanium layer was fitted to the inner carbon steel vessel by shrinkage. For the flat cover plates (top and bottom), titanium plate material was coated by explosive bonding. Electron beam welding and gas metal arc welding were combined to weld of the cover plates to the body. No significant failure was evident from inspections of the fabrication process, and the applicability of current technology for manufacturing titanium-carbon steel composite overpack was confirmed. Future research and development items regarding titanium-carbon steel composite overpacks are also discussed. (author)

  2. Steels for nuclear power. I

    Bohusova, O.; Brumovsky, M.; Cukr, B.; Hatle, Z.; Protiva, K.; Stefec, R.; Urban, A.; Zidek, M.

    1976-01-01

    The principles are listed of nuclear reactor operation and the reactors are classified by neutron energy, fuel and moderator designs, purpose and type of moderator. The trend and the development of light-water reactor applications are described. The fundamental operating parameters of the WWER type reactors are indicated. The effect is discussed of neutron radiation on reactor structural materials. The characteristics are described of steel corrosion due to the contact of the steel with steam or sodium in the primary coolant circuit. The reasons for stress corrosion are given and the effects of radiation on corrosion are listed. The requirements and criteria are given for the choice of low-alloy steel for the manufacture of pressure vessels, volume compensators, steam generators, cooling conduits and containment. A survey is given of most frequently used steels for pressure vessels and of the mechanical and structural properties thereof. The basic requirements for the properties of steel used in the primary coolant circuit are as follows: sufficient strength in operating temperature, toughness, good weldability, resistance to corrosion and low brittleness following neutron irradiation. The materials are listed used for the components of light-water and breeder reactors. The production of corrosion-resistant steels is discussed with a view to raw materials, technology, steel-making processes, melting processes, induction furnace steel-making, and to selected special problems of the chemical composition of steels. The effects are mainly discussed of lead, bismuth and tin as well as of some other elements on hot working of high-alloy steels and on their structure. The problems of corrosion-resistant steel welding and of pressure vessel cladding are summed up. Also discussed is the question of the concept and safeguards of the safety of nuclear installation operation and a list is presented of most commonly used nondestructive materials testing methods. The current

  3. An Assessment of the Ductile Fracture Behaviour of Hot Isostatically Pressed and Forged 304L Stainless Steel

    Cooper, Adam; Smith, R. J.; Sherry, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Type 300 austenitic stainless steel manufactured by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has recently been shown to exhibit subtly different fracture behavior from that of equivalent graded forged steel, whereby the oxygen remaining in the component after HIP manifests itself in the austenite matrix as nonmetallic oxide inclusions. These inclusions facilitate fracture by acting as nucleation sites for the initiation, growth, and coalescence of microvoids in the plastically deforming austenite matrix....

  4. INFLUENCE OF HEAT TREATMENT ON THE MICROSTRUCTURE AND TOUGHNESS OF BÖHLER M333 ISOPLAST STEEL

    Perko, J.; Redl, C.; Leitner, H.

    2009-01-01

    In this work the through hardenability and the influence of the heat treatment parameters (austenitizingtemperature, cooling parameter ? and tempering temperature) on the microstructure and the achievabletoughness level of Böhler M333 ISOPLAST are investigated. The results are compared to the standardizedtool steel grade DIN 1.2083. The investigations showed that the cooling parameter ? has a strong influenceon the impact toughness of M333 ISOPLAST plastic mould steel. The toughness is reduce...

  5. Steel designers' handbook

    Gorenc, Branko; Tinyou, Ron

    2012-01-01

    The Revised 7th Edition of Steel Designers' Handbook is an invaluable tool for all practising structural, civil and mechanical engineers as well as engineering students at university and TAFE in Australia and New Zealand. It has been prepared in response to changes in the design Standard AS 4100, the structural Design Actions Standards, AS /ANZ 1170, other processing Standards such as welding and coatings, updated research as well as feedback from users. This edition is based on Australian Standard (AS) 4100: 1998 and subsequent amendments. The worked numerical examples in the book have been e

  6. Strategy of Cooling Parameters Selection in the Continuous Casting of Steel

    Falkus J.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a strategy of the cooling parameters selection in the process of continuous steel casting. Industrial tests were performed at a slab casting machine at the Arcelor Mittal Poland Unit in Krakow. The tests covered 55 heats for 7 various steel grades. Based on the existing casting technology a numerical model of the continuous steel casting process was formulated. The numerical calculations were performed for three casting speeds - 0.6, 0.8 and 1 m min-1. An algorithm was presented that allows us to compute the values of the heat transfer coefficients for the secondary cooling zone. The correctness of the cooling parameter strategy was evaluated by inspecting the shell thickness, the length of the liquid core and the strand surface temperature. The ProCAST software package was used to construct the numerical model of continuous casting of steel.

  7. Effect of microstructure on the impact toughness of high strength steels

    Gutierrez, I.

    2014-07-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of new steel grades is to get increasingly high strength combined with a low ductile brittle transition temperature and a high upper shelf energy. This requires the appropriate microstructural design. Toughness in steels is controlled by different microstructural constituents. Some of them, like inclusions, are intrinsic while others happening at different microstructural scales relate to processing conditions. A series of empirical equations express the transition temperature as a sum of contributions from substitutional solutes, free nitrogen, carbides, pearlite, grain size and eventually precipitation strengthening. Aimed at developing a methodology that could be applied to high strength steels, microstructures with a selected degree of complexity were produced at laboratory in a Nb-microalloyed steel. As a result a model has been developed that consistently predicts the Charpy curves for ferrite-pearlite, bainitic and quenched and tempered microstructures using as input data microstructural parameters. This model becomes a good tool for microstructural design. (Author)

  8. Steel Fibres: Effective Way to Prevent Failure of the Concrete Bonded with FRP Sheets

    V. Gribniak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the efficiency of steel fibres for improving mechanical properties (cracking resistance and failure toughness of the concrete has been broadly discussed in the literature, the number of studies dedicated to the fibre effect on structural behaviour of the externally bonded elements is limited. This experimental study investigates the influence of steel fibres on the failure character of concrete elements strengthened with external carbon fibre reinforced polymer sheets. The elements were subjected to different loading conditions. The test data of four ties and eight beams are presented. Different materials were used for the internal bar reinforcement: in addition to the conventional steel, high-grade steel and glass fibre reinforced polymer bars were also considered. The experimental results indicated that the fibres, by significantly increasing the cracking resistance, alter the failure character from splitting of the concrete to the bond loss of the external sheets and thus noticeably increase the load bearing capacity of the elements.

  9. Quench and partitioning steel: a new AHSS concept for automotive anti-intrusion applications

    De Cooman, B.C. [Graduate Inst. for Ferrous Technology, Pohang Univ. of Science and Technology, Pohang (Korea); Speer, J.G. [Advanced Steel Processing and Products Research Centre, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2006-09-15

    A new type of high strength, high toughness, martensitic steel, based on a newly proposed quench and partitioning (Q and P) process, is presented. This high strength martensitic grade is produced by the controlled low temperature partitioning of carbon from as-quenched martensite laths to retained inter-lath austenite under conditions where both low temperature transition carbide formation and cementite precipitation are suppressed. The contribution focuses on both the current understanding of the fundamental processes involved and includes a discussion of the technical feasibility of large-scale industrial production of these steels as sheet products. The Q and P process, which is carried out on steels with a lean composition, should be implemented easily on some current industrial continuous annealing and galvanizing lines. In addition, martensitic Q and P sheet steel is characterized by very favourable combinations of strength, ductility and toughness, which are particularly relevant for high strength anti-intrusion automotive parts. (orig.)

  10. Corrosion of stainless and carbon steels in molten mixtures of industrial nitrates

    Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Prairie, M.R.; Chavez, J.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Corrosion behavior of two stainless steels and carbon steel in mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} was evaluated to determine if impurities found in commodity grades of alkali nitrates aggravate corrosivity as applicable to an advanced solar thermal energy system. Corrosion tests were conducted for 7000 hours with Types 304 and 316 stainless steels at 570C and A36 carbon steel at 316C in seven mixtures of NaNO{sub 3} and KNO{sub 3} containing variations in impurity concentrations. Corrosion tests were also conducted in a ternary mixture of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, and Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}. Corrosion rates were determined by descaled weight losses while oxidation products were examined by scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe analysis, and X-ray diffraction. The nitrate mixtures were periodically analyzed for changes in impurity concentrations and for soluble corrosion products.

  11. A real-time surface inspection system for precision steel balls based on machine vision

    Chen, Yi-Ji; Tsai, Jhy-Cherng; Hsu, Ya-Chen

    2016-07-01

    Precision steel balls are one of the most fundament components for motion and power transmission parts and they are widely used in industrial machinery and the automotive industry. As precision balls are crucial for the quality of these products, there is an urgent need to develop a fast and robust system for inspecting defects of precision steel balls. In this paper, a real-time system for inspecting surface defects of precision steel balls is developed based on machine vision. The developed system integrates a dual-lighting system, an unfolding mechanism and inspection algorithms for real-time signal processing and defect detection. The developed system is tested under feeding speeds of 4 pcs s-1 with a detection rate of 99.94% and an error rate of 0.10%. The minimum detectable surface flaw area is 0.01 mm2, which meets the requirement for inspecting ISO grade 100 precision steel balls.

  12. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of the earthquake resistant NOM B457 Mexican steel

    Arganis J, C.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Mexican construction code was modified after the Mexico city 1985 earthquake, substituted the medium carbon reinforced steel NOM B6 by the new micro alloyed steel NOM B457 in 42 Kg/mm 2 grade. The present study reports the evaluation of the NOM B457 steel behavior in mortar with and without 2% wt. in chlorides and in Ca(OH) 2 saturated solutions. The results are compared with the NOM B6 steel behavior in the same conditions. The Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) is not present in all the conditions used in this study and there are not susceptibility potential range to SCC when the material is evaluated by electrochemical Tests, Constant Extension Rate Tests (CERT) and Constant Load Test at 80 % of yield stress. A susceptibility potential range to Hydrogen Induced Cracking (HIC) is detected, below -900 mV. vs Standard Calomel Electrode (SCE) by CERT at constant potential

  13. Characterization by transmission electron microscopy of a JRQ steel subjected to different heat treatments

    Moreno G, N.

    2014-01-01

    In this work a study was conducted on the steel Astm A-533, Grade B, Class 1 of reference JRQ, for the purpose of carrying out a study by transmission electron microscopy on the size and distribution of precipitates in steel samples JRQ previously subjected to heat treatments. This because the reactor vessels of the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde, are made of a steel Astm A-533 Grade B, Class 1. It is known that the neutron radiation causes damage primarily embrittlement in materials that are exposed to it. However, observable damage through mechanical tests result from microstructural defects and atomic, induced by the neutron radiation. In previous studies hardening by precipitation of a JRQ steel (provided by the IAEA) was induced by heat treatments, finding that the conditions of heat treatment that reproduce the hardness and stress mechanical properties of a steel Astm A-533, Grade B, Class 1 irradiated for 8 years to a fluence of 3.5 x 10 17 neutrons/cm 2 and to a temperature of 290 grades C are achieved with annealing treatments at 550 grades C. In the studied samples it was found that the more hardening phase both the heat treatments as the neutron radiation, is the bainite, being the ferrite practically unchanged. Which it gave the tone to believe that the ferrite is the phase that provides at level macro the mechanical properties in stress, since in the irradiated samples such properties remained unchanged with respect to the non-irradiated material, however changes were observed in material ductility, which may be attributable to the change of hardness in the bainite, which opens a possibility for modeling the micromechanical behavior of this material. (Author)

  14. The industrial ecology of steel

    Considine, Timothy J.; Jablonowski, Christopher; Considine, Donita M.M.; Rao, Prasad G.

    2001-03-26

    This study performs an integrated assessment of new technology adoption in the steel industry. New coke, iron, and steel production technologies are discussed, and their economic and environmental characteristics are compared. Based upon detailed plant level data on cost and physical input-output relations by process, this study develops a simple mathematical optimization model of steel process choice. This model is then expanded to a life cycle context, accounting for environmental emissions generated during the production and transportation of energy and material inputs into steelmaking. This life-cycle optimization model provides a basis for evaluating the environmental impacts of existing and new iron and steel technologies. Five different plant configurations are examined, from conventional integrated steel production to completely scrap-based operations. Two cost criteria are used to evaluate technology choice: private and social cost, with the latter including the environmental damages associated with emissions. While scrap-based technologies clearly generate lower emissions in mass terms, their emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are significantly higher. Using conventional damage cost estimates reported in the literature suggests that the social costs associated with scrap-based steel production are slightly higher than with integrated steel production. This suggests that adopting a life-cycle viewpoint can substantially affect environmental assessment of new technologies. Finally, this study also examines the impacts of carbon taxes on steel production costs and technology choice.

  15. Stainless steels low temperature nitriding

    Roux, T.; Darbeida, A.; Von Stebut, J.; Michel, H.; Lebrun, J.P.; Hertz, D.

    1995-01-01

    Nitrogen ions implantation of 316L stainless steel leads to monophasic diffusion layers, which are constituted of a solid solution (γ N ) fcc, metastable, nitrogen sur-saturated, and without order. This article shows that for 316L stainless steels,these layers improve the tribological properties without degradation of the corrosion resistance. (A.B.). 13 refs. 6 figs

  16. Metadynamic recrystallization in C steels

    Unknown

    EN24 and EN2 steels, a drop from 4000 s to 6 s for similar temperature rise was observed. Metadynamic ... carbon–manganese or silicon–manganese steels, but stops after a reduction at ... growth by strain-induced grain boundary migration;.

  17. Mechanics in Steels through Microscopy

    Tirumalasetty, G.K.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the study consolidated in this thesis is to understand the mechanics in steels using microscopy. In particular, the mechanical response of Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels is correlated with their microstructures. Chapter 1 introduces the current state of the art of TRIP

  18. A Tale of Wootz Steel

    manufacture of steel in south India by a crucible process at ... indicates that the production of wootz steel was almost on an industrial scale in ... in an Age of Design marked by ... The Russian Anasoff also studied the process of manufacturing.

  19. Irradiation creep in ferritic steels

    Vandermeulen, W.; Bremaecker, A. de; Burbure, S. de; Huet, J.J.; Asbroeck, P. van

    Pressurized and non-pressurized capsules of several ferritic steels have been irradiated in Rapsodie between 400 and 500 0 C up to 3.7 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E>0.1 MeV). Results of the diameter measurements are presented and show that the total in-pile deformation is lower than for austenitic steels

  20. Steel structures for nuclear facilities

    1993-01-01

    In the guide the requirements concerning design and fabrication of steel structures for nuclear facilities and documents to be submitted to the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) are presented. Furthermore, regulations concerning inspection of steel structures during construction of nuclear facilities and during their operation are set forth

  1. Corrosion of steel tendons used in prestressed concrete pressure vessels

    Griess, J.C.; Naus, D.J.

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the corrosion behavior of a high strength steel (ASTM A416-74 grade 270), typical of those used as tensioning tendons in prestressed concrete pressure vessels, in several corrosive environments and to demonstrate the protection afforded by coating the steel with either of two commercial petroleum-base greases or Portland Cement grout. In addition, the few reported incidents of prestressing steel failures in concrete pressure vessels used for containment of nuclear reactors are reviewed. The susceptibility of the steel to stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement and its general corrosion rate were determined in several salt solutions. Wires coated with the greases and grout were soaked for long periods in the same solutions and changes in their mechanical properties were subsequently determined. All three coatings appeared to give essentially complete protection but small flaws in the grease coatings were detrimental; flaws or cracks less than 1 mm wide in the grout were without effect

  2. Effects of solute interstitial elements on swelling of stainless steel

    Stiegler, J.O.; Leitnaker, J.M.; Bloom, E.E.

    1975-01-01

    High-purity stainless steel (HPS), equivalent to type 316 stainless steel in major alloy elements but with greatly reduced interstitial elements and manganese contents, was irradiated in the temperature range 725 to 875 K to fluences ranging from 1.0 to 3.5 x 10 26 neutrons/m 2 (>0.1 MeV). The HPS swelled 20 to 50 times more than commercial grade 316 stainless steel (316 SS), and about the same as commercial-purity nickel, which has about the same interstitial content as HPS. A fine-grained 316 SS in which interstitial elements but not manganese were precipitated by thermomechanical treatments also showed exaggerated swelling, approaching that of HPS, which suggests that swelling in commercial stainless steels is retarded by small amounts of interstitial elements normally present in them and not by the major alloying elements. Interstitials tend to precipitate from solution during irradiation, and bulk extractions of precipitate particles were made to evaluate the extent of the precipitation reactions. At both 643 and 853 K precipitation was clearly enhanced by irradiation significantly enough to alter the matrix composition, which suggests that swelling may be increased at high fluences over that predicted by extrapolation of lower fluence data. These observations are discussed in terms of potential behaviour of fuel cladding materials and of the validity and interpretation of accelerated schemes for simulating neutron damage. (author)

  3. Characteristics in Paintability of Advanced High Strength Steels

    Park, Ha Sun

    2007-01-01

    It is expected that advanced high strength steels (AHSS) would be widely used for vehicles with better performance in automotive industries. One of distinctive features of AHSS is the high value of carbon equivalent (Ceq), which results in the different properties in formability, weldability and paintability from those of common grade of steel sheets. There is an exponential relation between Ceq and electric resistance, which seems also to have correlation with the thickness of electric deposition (ED) coat. higher value of Ceq of AHSS lower the thickness of ED coat of AHSS. Some elements of AHSS such as silicon, if it is concentrated on the surface, affect negatively the formation of phosphates. In this case, silicon itself doesn't affect the phosphate, but its oxide does. This phenomenon is shown dramatically in the welding area. Arc welding or laser welding melts the base material. In the process of cooling of AHSS melt, the oxides of Si and Mn are easily concentrated on the surface of boundary between welded and non welded area because Si and Mn cold be oxidized easier than Fe. More oxide on surface results in poor phosphating and ED coating. This is more distinctive in AHSS than in mild steel. General results on paintability of AHSS would be reported, being compared to those of mild steel

  4. Application of low energy electron beam to precoated steel plates

    Koshiishi, Kenji

    1989-01-01

    Recently in the fields of home electric appliances, machinery and equipment and interior building materials, the needs for the precoated steel plates having the design and function of high class increase rapidly. In order to cope with such needs, the authors have advanced the examination on the application of electron beam hardening technology to precoated steel plates, and developed the precoated steel plates of high grade and high design 'Super Tecstar EB Series' by utilizing low energy electron beam. The features of this process are (1) hardening can be done at room temperature in a short time-thermally weak films can be adhered, (2) high energy irradiation-the hardening of thick enamel coating and the adhesion of colored films are feasible, (3) the use of monomers of low molecular weight-by high crosslinking, the performance of high sharpness, high hardness, anti-contamination property and so on can be given. The application to precoated steel plate production process is the coating and curing of electron beam hardening type paints, the coating of films with electron beam hardening type adhesives, and the reforming of surface polymer layers by impregnating monomers and causing graft polymerization with electron beam irradiation. The outline of the Super Tecstar EB Series is described. (K.I.)

  5. Behavior of stainless steels in pressurized water reactor primary circuits

    Féron, D.; Herms, E.; Tanguy, B.

    2012-01-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in primary circuits of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Operating experience with the various grades of stainless steels over several decades of years has generally been excellent. Nevertheless, stress corrosion failures have been reported in few cases. Two main factors contributing to SCC susceptibility enhancement are investigated in this study: cold work and irradiation. Irradiation is involved in the stress corrosion cracking and corrosion of in-core reactor components in PWR environment. Irradiated assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is a complex and multi-physics phenomenon for which a predictive modeling able to describe initiation and/or propagation is not yet achieved. Experimentally, development of initiation smart tests and of in situ instrumentation, also in nuclear reactors, is an important axis in order to gain a better understanding of IASCC kinetics. A strong susceptibility for SCC of heavily cold worked austenitic stainless steels is evidenced in hydrogenated primary water typical of PWRs. It is shown that for a given cold-working procedure, SCC susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels materials increases with increasing cold-work. Results have shown also strong influences of the cold work on the oxide layer composition and of the maximum stress on the time to fracture.

  6. Development and Application of High-Cr Ferritic Stainless Steels as Building Exterior Materials

    Kim, Yeong H.; Lee, Yong H.; Lee, Yong D.

    2008-01-01

    Stainless Steels have been widely used as a building exterior materials in Asian countries for the last decade. It is required for the materials in this field to have an aesthetic appearance,a relatively high strength, and an excellent corrosion resistance. Other metallic materials such as copper, aluminum, and carbon steels have been also used as the exterior materials. Considering the cost of maintenance, stainless steel, having the outstanding corrosion resistance, is replacing other materials in the several parts in the building exteriors. Ferritic stainless steel has been applied as the roofing materials because its thermal expansion is much smaller than that of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, it is suitable for the large-scale construction such as airport terminal, convention center, and football stadium. To improve the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels, the modification of alloy composition has been studied to develop new grade materials and the progress in the surface technology has been introduced. Corrosion properties, of these materials were evaluated in the laboratory and in the field for longer than two years. High-Cr ferritic stainless steel showed excellent corrosion resistance to the atmospheric environments. In the region close to the sea, the corrosion resistance of high-Cr ferritic stainless steel was much superior to that of other materials, which may prove this steel to be the appropriate materials for the construction around seashore. In some of the large constructions around seashore in South Korea, high-Cr ferritic stainless steels have been used as the building exterior materials for six years

  7. Development and Application of High-Cr Ferritic Stainless Steels as Building Exterior Materials

    Kim, Yeong H.; Lee, Yong H.; Lee, Yong D. [POSCO Technical Reseaarch Lab., Pohang (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Stainless Steels have been widely used as a building exterior materials in Asian countries for the last decade. It is required for the materials in this field to have an aesthetic appearance,a relatively high strength, and an excellent corrosion resistance. Other metallic materials such as copper, aluminum, and carbon steels have been also used as the exterior materials. Considering the cost of maintenance, stainless steel, having the outstanding corrosion resistance, is replacing other materials in the several parts in the building exteriors. Ferritic stainless steel has been applied as the roofing materials because its thermal expansion is much smaller than that of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, it is suitable for the large-scale construction such as airport terminal, convention center, and football stadium. To improve the corrosion resistance of the ferritic stainless steels, the modification of alloy composition has been studied to develop new grade materials and the progress in the surface technology has been introduced. Corrosion properties, of these materials were evaluated in the laboratory and in the field for longer than two years. High-Cr ferritic stainless steel showed excellent corrosion resistance to the atmospheric environments. In the region close to the sea, the corrosion resistance of high-Cr ferritic stainless steel was much superior to that of other materials, which may prove this steel to be the appropriate materials for the construction around seashore. In some of the large constructions around seashore in South Korea, high-Cr ferritic stainless steels have been used as the building exterior materials for six years.

  8. Strain rate dependent tensile behavior of advanced high strength steels: Experiment and constitutive modeling

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Daeyong; Han, Heung Nam; Barlat, F.; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    High strain rate tensile tests were conducted for three advanced high strength steels: DP780, DP980 and TRIP780. A high strain rate tensile test machine was used for applying the strain rate ranging from 0.1/s to 500/s. Details of the measured stress–strain responses were comparatively analyzed for the DP780 and TRIP780 steels which show similar microstructural feature and ultimate tensile strength, but different strengthening mechanisms. The experimental observations included: usual strain rate dependent plastic flow stress behavior in terms of the yield stress (YS), the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the uniform elongation (UE) and the total elongation (TE) which were observed for the three materials. But, higher strain hardening rate at early plastic strain under quasi-static condition than that of some increased strain rates was featured for TRIP780 steel, which might result from more active transformation during deformation with lower velocity. The uniform elongation that explains the onset of instability and the total elongation were larger in case of TRIP steel than the DP steel for the whole strain rate range, but interestingly the fracture strain measured by the reduction of area (RA) method showed that the TRIP steel has lower values than DP steel. The fractographs using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at the fractured surfaces were analyzed to relate measured fracture strain and the microstructural difference of the two materials during the process of fracture under various strain rates. Finally, constitutive modeling for the plastic flow stresses under various strain rates was provided in this study. The proposed constitutive law could represent both Hollomon-like and Voce-like hardening laws and the ratio between the two hardening types was efficiently controlled as a function of strain rate. The new strength model was validated successfully under various strain rates for several grades of steels such as mild steels, DP780, TRIP780, DP980 steels.

  9. Steels from materials science to structural engineering

    Sha, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Steels and computer-based modelling are fast growing fields in materials science as well as structural engineering, demonstrated by the large amount of recent literature. Steels: From Materials Science to Structural Engineering combines steels research and model development, including the application of modelling techniques in steels.  The latest research includes structural engineering modelling, and novel, prototype alloy steels such as heat-resistant steel, nitride-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steel and low nickel maraging steel.  Researchers studying steels will find the topics vital to their work.  Materials experts will be able to learn about steels used in structural engineering as well as modelling and apply this increasingly important technique in their steel materials research and development. 

  10. An Assessment of the Ductile Fracture Behavior of Hot Isostatically Pressed and Forged 304L Stainless Steel

    Cooper, A. J.; Smith, R. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2017-05-01

    Type 300 austenitic stainless steel manufactured by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has recently been shown to exhibit subtly different fracture behavior from that of equivalent graded forged steel, whereby the oxygen remaining in the component after HIP manifests itself in the austenite matrix as nonmetallic oxide inclusions. These inclusions facilitate fracture by acting as nucleation sites for the initiation, growth, and coalescence of microvoids in the plastically deforming austenite matrix. Here, we perform analyses based on the Rice-Tracey (RT) void growth model, supported by instrumented Charpy and J-integral fracture toughness testing at ambient temperature, to characterize the degree of void growth ahead of both a V-notch and crack in 304L stainless steel. We show that the hot isostatically pressed (HIP'd) 304L steel exhibits a lower critical void growth at the onset of fracture than that observed in forged 304L steel, which ultimately results in HIP'd steel exhibiting lower fracture toughness at initiation and impact toughness. Although the reduction in toughness of HIP'd steel is not detrimental to its use, due to the steel's sufficiently high toughness, the study does indicate that HIP'd and forged 304L steel behave as subtly different materials at a microstructural level with respect to their fracture behavior.

  11. Structure and strength of carbide-steel cermet and their changes during heat treatment

    Dariel, M.P.; Frage, N.R.; Kaputkina, L.M.; Kaputkin, D.M.; Sverdlova, N.R.

    2004-01-01

    Both homogeneous and 'graded' materials were produced by pressing and sintering of titanium carbide TiC x (0.7 x takes place during the joining. If the titanium carbide is carbon deficient that the carbon goes from the steel binder to TiC x , and this redistribution intensity with the x decreases. So-named graded cermets were produced on controlled distribution of TiC x with different x. An additional flow of carbon from C-rich to C-poor TiC x layers was obtained in these cermets. These changes both in the steel and TiC x compositions result in changes in such processes as austenitization, carbide dissolution and precipitation, and martensitic transformation. Both general strength of the material and the gradient of properties in graded cermets can be increased using kinetic factors of element redistribution and structure changes resulted from the heat treatment. (author)

  12. Optimum Compressive Strength of Hardened Sandcrete Building Blocks with Steel Chips

    Alohan Omoregie

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The recycling of steel chips into an environmentally friendly, responsive, and profitable commodity in the manufacturing and construction industries is a huge and difficult challenge. Several strategies designed for the management and processing of this waste in developed countries have been largely unsuccessful in developing countries mainly due to its capital-intensive nature. To this end, this investigation attempts to provide an alternative solution to the recycling of this material by maximizing its utility value in the building construction industry. This is to establish their influence on the compressive strength of sandcrete hollow blocks and solid cubes with the aim of specifying the range percent of steel chips for the sandcrete optimum compressive strength value. This is particularly important for developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa, and even Latin America where most sandcrete blocks exhibit compressive strengths far below standard requirements. Percentages of steel chips relative to the weight of cement were varied and blended with the sand in an attempt to improve the sand grading parameters. The steel chips variations were one, two, three, four, five, ten and fifteen percent respectively. It was confirmed that the grading parameters were improved and there were significant increases in the compressive strength of the blocks and cube samples. The greatest improvement was noticed at four percent steel chips and sand combination. Using the plotted profile, the margin of steel chips additions for the optimum compressive strength was also established. It is recommended that steel chip sandcrete blocks are suitable for both internal load bearing, and non-load bearing walls, in areas where they are not subjected to moisture ingress. However, for external walls, and in areas where they are liable to moisture attack after laying, the surfaces should be well rendered. Below ground level, the surfaces should be coated with a water

  13. Phase stability of high manganese austenitic steels for cryogenic applications

    Couturier, K

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to study the austenitic stability against a' martensitic transformation of three non-magnetic austenitic steels : a new stainless steel X2CrMnNiMoN 19-12-11-1 grade, a traditional X8CrMnNiN 19-11-6 grade and a high manganese X8MnCrNi 28-7-1 grade. Measurements of relative magnetic susceptibility at room temperature are performed on strained tensile specimens at 4.2 K. A special extensometer for high precision strain measurements at low temperature has been developed at CERN to test specimens up to various levels of plastic strain. Moreover, the high precision strain recording of the extensometer enables a detailed study of the serrated yield phenomena associated with 4.2 K tensile testing and their influence on the evolution of magnetic susceptibility. The results show that high Mn contents increase the stability of the austenitic structure against a' martensitic transformation, while keeping high strength at cryogenic temperature. Moreover, proper elaboration through primary and possi...

  14. Material development for grade X80 heavy-wall hot induction bends

    Wang Xu; Xiao Furen; Fu Yanhong; Chen Xiaowei; Liao Bo

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► The new material for X80 heavy wall thickness hot induction bend was designed. ► The continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams were determined. ► The steel adapts to manufacture of X80 heavy-wall thickness hot induction bend. ► The optimum manufactural processes were obtained. ► The bending temperature is about 990 °C, and tempering is about 600 °C. - Abstract: A new steel for grade X80 heavy wall thickness hot induction bends was designed based on the chemical compositions of commercial X80 steels in this work. Then, its continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram was determined with Gleeble-3500 thermo-mechanical simulator. Furthermore, the effects of heat treatment technology on its microstructure and mechanical property were investigated, and the technology parameters of the heat treatment were optimized. The results show that the acicular ferrite and/or bainite transformations are promoted, the polygonal ferrite and pearlite transformation are restrained, because proper amount of alloying elements were added into the new steel. Therefore, the strength of this new steel is improved markedly, even if the cooling rate is lower, which ensure the higher strength distribution along cross section of the heavy wall thickness. It is significant for the manufacture of grade X80 heavy wall thickness hot induction bends in the second West-to-East gas transportation pipeline project of China.

  15. Material development for grade X80 heavy-wall hot induction bends

    Wang Xu [Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); CNPC Bohai Petroleum Equipment Manufacture Co. Ltd., Qingxian 062658 (China); Xiao Furen, E-mail: frxiao@ysu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Fu Yanhong [CNPC Bohai Petroleum Equipment Manufacture Co. Ltd., Qingxian 062658 (China); Chen Xiaowei [Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); CNPC Bohai Petroleum Equipment Manufacture Co. Ltd., Qingxian 062658 (China); Liao Bo, E-mail: cyddjyjs@263.net [Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The new material for X80 heavy wall thickness hot induction bend was designed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagrams were determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The steel adapts to manufacture of X80 heavy-wall thickness hot induction bend. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimum manufactural processes were obtained. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The bending temperature is about 990 Degree-Sign C, and tempering is about 600 Degree-Sign C. - Abstract: A new steel for grade X80 heavy wall thickness hot induction bends was designed based on the chemical compositions of commercial X80 steels in this work. Then, its continuous cooling transformation (CCT) diagram was determined with Gleeble-3500 thermo-mechanical simulator. Furthermore, the effects of heat treatment technology on its microstructure and mechanical property were investigated, and the technology parameters of the heat treatment were optimized. The results show that the acicular ferrite and/or bainite transformations are promoted, the polygonal ferrite and pearlite transformation are restrained, because proper amount of alloying elements were added into the new steel. Therefore, the strength of this new steel is improved markedly, even if the cooling rate is lower, which ensure the higher strength distribution along cross section of the heavy wall thickness. It is significant for the manufacture of grade X80 heavy wall thickness hot induction bends in the second West-to-East gas transportation pipeline project of China.

  16. Requirements to cuban reinforcing steel under seismic demand; Exigencias al acero de refuerzo cubano ante la demanda sismica

    Frometa Salas, Z. P.; Villalonga Vianez, J. A.

    2009-07-01

    The behaviour of steel manufactured according to the Cuban standard NC 7:02 is studied, in order to evaluate about the conformance to requirements of the seismic design. Steel bars of Grade G-40 and G-60, of all commercial diameters between 10 and 32 mm, were test with this purpose. An experimental program was developed, that include dimensional verifications, tensile testing, ben and rebend, hardness testing and chemical composition tests. The results showed that steel bars satisfy geometric and tensile requirements of Cuban standard, however, some tested samples fulfill the demands that establish some codes about the required ductility to adequate perform of building of reinforced concrete where prevalence the earthquake. Conclusions about the necessity to consider in the future Cuban standard, special requirements to steel that assist the necessities of the earthquake engineering. Proposals are suggested to guarantee the ductile behaviour of the steel of national production. (Author)

  17. The influence of the structure of the metal load removal from liquid steel in electric arc furnaces

    Pǎcurar, Cristina; Hepuť, Teodor; Crisan, Eugen

    2016-06-01

    One of the main technical and economic indicators in the steel industry and steel respectively the development it is the removal of liquid steel. This indicator depends on several factors, namely technology: the structure and the quality metal load, the degree of preparedness of it, and the content of non-metallic material accompanying the unit of drawing up, the technology for the elaboration, etc. research has been taken into account in drawing up steel electric arc furnace type spring EBT (Electric Bottom taping), seeking to load and removing components of liquid steel. Metal load has been composed of eight metal grades, in some cases with great differences in terms of quality. Data obtained were processed in the EXCEL spreadsheet programs and MATLAB, the results obtained being presented both graphically and analytically. On the basis of the results obtained may opt for a load optimal structure metal.

  18. The radiation swelling effect on fracture properties and fracture mechanisms of irradiated austenitic steels. Part II. Fatigue crack growth rate

    Margolin, B., E-mail: margolinbz@yandex.ru; Minkin, A.; Smirnov, V.; Sorokin, A.; Shvetsova, V.; Potapova, V.

    2016-11-15

    The experimental data on the fatigue crack growth rate (FCGR) have been obtained for austenitic steel of 18Cr-10Ni-Ti grade (Russian analog of AISI 321 steel) irradiated up to neutron dose of 150 dpa with various radiation swelling. The performed study of the fracture mechanisms for cracked specimens under cyclic loading has explained why radiation swelling affects weakly FCGR unlike its effect on fracture toughness. Mechanical modeling of fatigue crack growth has been carried out and the dependencies for prediction of FCGR in irradiated austenitic steel with and with no swelling are proposed and verified with the obtained experimental results. As input data for these dependencies, FCGR for unirradiated steel and the tensile mechanical properties for unirradiated and irradiated steels are used.

  19. Effect of joint design on ballistic performance of quenched and tempered steel welded joints

    Balakrishnan, M.; Balasubramanian, V.; Madhusudhan Reddy, G.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Traditional usage of austenitic stainless steel filler for armour steel welding shows poor ballistic performance. • Earlier efforts show dubious success on ballistic resistance of armour steel joints. • Comparative evaluation of equal/unequal joint design on ballistic performance. • Effect of joint design covers the main aspects of successful bullet stoppage. - Abstract: A study was carried out to evaluate the effect of joint design on ballistic performance of armour grade quenched and tempered steel welded joints. Equal double Vee and unequal double Vee joint configuration were considered in this study. Targets were fabricated using 4 mm thick tungsten carbide hardfaced middle layer; above and below which austenitic stainless steel layers were deposited on both sides of the hardfaced interlayer in both joint configurations. Shielded metal arc welding process was used to deposit for all layers. The fabricated targets were evaluated for its ballistic performance and the results were compared in terms of depth of penetration on weld metal. From the ballistic test results, it was observed that both the targets successfully stopped the bullet penetration at weld center line. Of the two targets, the target made with unequal double Vee joint configuration offered maximum resistance to the bullet penetration at weld metal location without any bulge at the rear side. The higher volume of austenitic stainless steel front layer and the presence of hardfaced interlayer after some depth of soft austenitic stainless steel front layer is the primary reason for the superior ballistic performance of this joint

  20. Connections: Superplasticity, Damascus Steels, Laminated Steels, and Carbon Dating

    Wadsworth, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a description is given of the connections that evolved from the initial development of a family of superplastic plain carbon steels that came to be known as Ultra-High Carbon Steels (UHCS). It was observed that their very high carbon contents were similar, if not identical, to those of Damascus steels. There followed a series of attempts to rediscover how the famous patterns found on Damascus steels blades were formed. At the same time, in order to improve the toughness at room temperature of the newly-developed UHCS, laminated composites were made of alternating layers of UHCS and mild steel (and subsequently other steels and other metals). This led to a study of ancient laminated composites, the motives for their manufacture, and the plausibility of some of the claims relating to the number of layers in the final blades. One apparently ancient laminated composite, recovered in 1837 from the great pyramid of Giza which was constructed in about 2750 B.C., stimulated a carbon dating study of ancient steels. The modern interest in "Bladesmithing" has connections back to many of these ancient weapons.

  1. Annealing treatments for producing cold-rolled low-silicon multi-phase steels for automotive applications

    Vrieze, J.; Vortrefflich, W.; Winter, L. de [Applied Physical Metallurgy, Hoogovens Research and Development, Ijmuiden (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    Laboratory simulations of a hot-dip galvanizing line have been carried out on a 0.16%C-1.5%Mn-0.4%Si steel. It has been demonstrated that based on this steel composition materials with typical multi-phase properties can be produced on hot-dip galvanizing lines. By varying the process conditions a tensile strength between 570 and 650 MPa has been obtained. In addition, tensile tests at high strain rates have been carried out and the results have been compared with those of other non-multi-phase steel grades. (orig.)

  2. High purity ferritic Cr-Mo stainless steel

    Knoth, J.

    1977-01-01

    In five years, E-BRITE 26-1 ferritic stainless steel has won an important place in the spectrum of materials suitable for use in chemical process equipment. It provides, in stainless steel, performance-capability characteristics comparable to more expensive alloys. It has demonstrated cost-effectiveness in equipment used for caustic, nitric-urea, organic chemicals, pulping liquors, refinery streams, and elsewhere. User confidence in the reliability and integrity of Grade XM 27 has increased to the point where large critical systems are now routinely specified in the alloy. The market acceptance of this material has attracted attempts to produce substitute versions of the alloy. Imitation, should be viewed with caution. Stabilized 26-IS must be examined over a lengthy period of time to determine if its own corrosion resistance, ductility, fabricability and reproducibility properties could ever be likened to those of E-BRITE 26-1. (orig.) [de

  3. Dependence of magnetic permeability on residual stresses in alloyed steels

    Hristoforou, E.; Ktena, A.; Vourna, P.; Argiris, K.

    2018-04-01

    A method for the monitoring of residual stress distribution in steels has been developed based on non-destructive surface magnetic permeability measurements. In order to investigate the potential utilization of the magnetic method in evaluating residual stresses, the magnetic calibration curves of various ferromagnetic alloyed steels' grade (AISI 4140, TRIP and Duplex) were examined. X-Ray diffraction technique was used for determining surface residual stress values. The overall measurement results have shown that the residual stress determined by the magnetic method was in good agreement with the diffraction results. Further experimental investigations are required to validate the preliminary results and to verify the presence of a unique normalized magnetic stress calibration curve.

  4. Relative merits of duplex and austenitic stainless steels for applications in the oil and gas industry

    Johansson, Elisabeth; Wegrelius, Lena; Pettersson, Rachel [Outokumpu Stainless AB, Avesta (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    The broad range of available stainless steel grades means that these materials can fulfil a wide variety of requirements within the oil and gas industry. The duplex grades have the advantage of higher strength than standard austenitic grades, while the superaustenitic grades provide a cost-effective alternative to nickel-base alloys in a number of cases. The paper presents the results of various types of laboratory testing to rank the grades in terms of resistance to pitting, crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Results from field testing in actual or simulated service conditions are discussed and a number of application examples, including process piping flexible, heat exchangers and topside equipment are presented. (author)

  5. Studies on the welding of heavy-section ASTM A542 Cl. 1 steel for large-sized pressure vessels

    Shimizu, Shigeki; Aota, Toshiichi; Kasahara, Masayuki

    1977-01-01

    ASTM A 542, Cl. 1 steel was developed and standardized recently, and is excellent in the high temperature strength and toughness as compared with conventionally used A 387, Grade 22 steel, accordingly the application to large pressure vessels is planned. This steel is a low alloy steel, and in case of large thickness, the possibility of cracking in the welded part is large. Also many times of annealing are required for the prevention of welding cracking, the relieving of residual stress, and the softening of hardened portion, but the possibility of cracking during stress-relieving annealing is large. In this study, Tekken type cracking test was carried out by coated electrode welding, and restricted cracking test was carried out by submerged arc welding of the A 542, Cl. 1 steel and A 387, Grade 22 steel, thus the welding cracking property was investigated, and the optimal welding conditions were selected. Also the test of cracking during the stress-relieving annealing of both steels was carried out, and the method of preventing the cracking was studied. The optimal conditions of stress-relieving annealing were selected, and the mechanism of the cracking was clarified. The mechanical properties of the joints welded and stress-relieved under the selected conditions were confirmed. (Kako, I.)

  6. Functionally Graded Materials Database

    Kisara, Katsuto; Konno, Tomomi; Niino, Masayuki

    2008-02-01

    Functionally Graded Materials Database (hereinafter referred to as FGMs Database) was open to the society via Internet in October 2002, and since then it has been managed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). As of October 2006, the database includes 1,703 research information entries with 2,429 researchers data, 509 institution data and so on. Reading materials such as "Applicability of FGMs Technology to Space Plane" and "FGMs Application to Space Solar Power System (SSPS)" were prepared in FY 2004 and 2005, respectively. The English version of "FGMs Application to Space Solar Power System (SSPS)" is now under preparation. This present paper explains the FGMs Database, describing the research information data, the sitemap and how to use it. From the access analysis, user access results and users' interests are discussed.

  7. The Implications of Grade Inflation

    Smith, David E.; Fleisher, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The authors review current and past practices of the grade inflation controversy and present ways to return to each institution’s established grading guidelines. Students are graded based on knowledge gathered. Certain faculty members use thorough evaluative methods, such as written and oral pres...... have been profiled in the news. The model is provided to ensure that degree candidates are academic experts in their field, having earned the credential through rigorous study....

  8. The Effect of Different Delivery Conditions on the Accelerated Degradation of Structural Steel in the Coal Mine Environment / Wpływ Różnego Stanu Dostawy Na Przyspieszoną Degradację Stali Konstrukcyjnej W Środowisku Kopalnianym

    Pawłowski, Bogdan; Bała, Piotr

    2012-12-01

    The main objective of this work was to determine the effect of different delivery conditions on the accelerated degradation of structural steels used for lifting beams (rails) of the monorail transport systems. Some of these rails, made of the same steel grade as others, undergoes accelerated corrosion in the coal mine environment. Corrosion degradation occurs much faster (more than two times faster), comparing to the same steel grade rails operated under the same conditions but with different microstructures. However, all the provided rails meet the requirements of appropriate standards for steel on the lifting beams of the monorail transport systems. The investigations were carried out on rails made of the same steel grade but with different microstructures and showed that the main factor influencing the accelerated corrosion degradation of tested steels is the delivery condition, so-called "as rolled" condition. The greatest resistance to the accelerated corrosion showed rails in the normalized or normalizing rolling condition.

  9. Occupational Profiles in the European Steel Industry.

    Franz, Hans-Werner; And Others

    The steel industry in Europe has faced great changes, with resulting layoffs and restructuring. Now that the most basic changes seem to be over, it has become evident that the remaining steel industry requires more highly trained workers than was the case previously. Although steel maintenance employees were always highly skilled, steel production…

  10. Methods of making bainitic steel materials

    Bakas, Michael Paul; Chu, Henry Shiu-Hung; Zagula, Thomas Andrew; Langhorst, Benjamin Robert

    2018-01-16

    Methods of making bainitic steels may involve austenitizing a quantity of steel by exposing the quantity of steel to a first temperature. A composition of the quantity of steel may be configured to impede formation of non-bainite ferrite, pearlite, and Widmanstatten ferrite. The quantity of steel may be heat-treated to form bainite by exposing the quantity of steel to a second, lower temperature. The second, lower temperature may be stabilized by exposing the quantity of steel to the second, lower temperature in the presence of a thermal ballast.

  11. Stahlschüssel key to steel

    Wegst, W S

    2016-01-01

    The Key to Steel (Stahlschlüssel/Stahlschluessel) cross reference book will help you to decode / decipher steel designations and find equivalent materials worldwide. The 2016 edition includes more than 70,000 standard designations and trade names from approximately 300 steelmakers and suppliers. Presentation is trilingual: English, French, and German. Materials covered include structural steels, tool steels, valve steels, high temperature steels and alloys, stainless and heat-resisting steels, and more. Standards and designations from 25 countries are cross-referenced.

  12. Advanced steel reheat furnace

    Moyeda, D.; Sheldon, M.; Koppang, R. [Energy and Environmental Research Corp., Irvine, CA (United States); Lanyi, M.; Li, X.; Eleazer, B. [Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Allentown, PA (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Energy and Environmental Research Corp. (EER) under a contract from the Department of Energy is pursuing the development and demonstration of an Advanced Steel Reheating Furnace. This paper reports the results of Phase 1, Research, which has evaluated an advanced furnace concept incorporating two proven and commercialized technologies previously applied to other high temperature combustion applications: EER`s gas reburn technology (GR) for post combustion NOx control; and Air Product`s oxy-fuel enrichment air (OEA) for improved flame heat transfer in the heating zones of the furnace. The combined technologies feature greater production throughput with associated furnace efficiency improvements; lowered NOx emissions; and better control over the furnace atmosphere, whether oxidizing or reducing, leading to better control over surface finish.

  13. Stainless steel decontamination manipulators

    Sullivan, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Three, large-volume coverage manipulator systems were designed and built for the Defense Water Processing Facility at the Savannah River Laboratory. These stainless steel systems will be used for high-pressure spray decontamination of waste containers and large process equipment modules. Each system has a manipulator arm, folding boom, and vertical drive and guide structure. Handling capacity is 45 kg, horizontal reach is 4.6 m with a 180-deg swing motion, and the vertical travel is 6 m. The system is remotely removable and replaceable in modules using an overhead crane and an impact wrench. The manipulator arm has seven motions: Shoulder rotation and pivot, elbow pivot, wrist pivot and rotation, and grip open-close. All motions are variable speed and are slip-clutch protected to prevent overloading from external forces (collisions)

  14. Steel containment buckling

    Butler, T.A.; Baker, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two aspects of buckling of a free-standing nuclear containment building were investigated in a combined experimental and analytical program. In the first part of the study, the response of a scale model of a containment building to dynamic base excitation is investigated. A simple harmonic signal was used for preliminary studies followed by experiments with scaled earthquake signals as the excitation source. The experiments and accompanying analyses indicate that the scale model response to earthquake-type excitations is very complex and that current analytical methods may require that a dynamic capacity reduction factor be incorporated. The second part of the study quantified the effects of framing at large penetrations on the static buckling capacity of scale model containments. Results show little effect from the framing for the scale models constructed from the polycarbonate, Lexan. However, additional studies with a model constructed of the prototypic steel material are recommended. (orig.)

  15. Cold-formed steel design

    Yu, Wei-Wen

    2010-01-01

    The definitive text in the field, thoroughly updated and expanded Hailed by professionals around the world as the definitive text on the subject, Cold-Formed Steel Design is an indispensable resource for all who design for and work with cold-formed steel. No other book provides such exhaustive coverage of both the theory and practice of cold-formed steel construction. Updated and expanded to reflect all the important developments that have occurred in the field over the past decade, this Fourth Edition of the classic text provides you with more of the detailed, up-to-the-minute techni

  16. Micropurity in stainless steel making

    Motloch, Z.

    1981-01-01

    New technologies were developed by the Vitkovice research institutes in response to high requirements for the quality of high-alloy steels for nuclear power, viz., duplex technology with double vacuum degassing at the DH unit and oxidation vacuum degassing using the VAKUVIT equipment. The steel produced shows low contents of impurities and high micropurity. A study was conducted into changes in carbon content and the formation of titanium nitrides and carbonitrides in austenitic steels during their production, and optimum technological parameters were found for eliminating their formation in forgings. (author)

  17. Steel fiber replacement of mild steel in prestressed concrete beams

    2010-10-01

    In traditional prestressed concrete beams, longitudinal prestressed tendons serve to resist bending moment and : transverse mild steel bars (or stirrups) are used to carry shear forces. However, traditional prestressed concrete I-beams : exhibit earl...

  18. Steel fiber replacement of mild steel in prestressed concrete beams.

    2011-01-01

    In traditional prestressed concrete beams, longitudinal prestressed tendons serve to resist bending moment and transverse mild : steel bars (or stirrups) are used to carry shear forces. However, traditional prestressed concrete I-beams exhibit early-...

  19. [The Steel factor].

    Cáceres-Cortés, J R

    1997-01-01

    Mice bearing mutations at either of two loci, dominant White spotting(W) or Steel(Sl), exhibit development defects in hematopoietic, melanocytic and germ cells. Genetics studies have shown that the SI locus encodes the Steel factor (SF), which is the ligand for the tyrosine kinase receptor c-kit, the product of the W locus. SF is synthesized in membrane-bound form and can be processed to produce a soluble form. Cell-cell interaction is important in the production of normal blood cells in vivo and in vitro and in the cellular expansion of leukemic cells. We discuss here how SF decreases the requirements in cell interaction for blast colony formation in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) and the presence of membrane-bound SF possibly contributes to the density-dependent growth of the AML blasts. We explain that SF is mainly a survival factor for hematopoietic cells, of little proliferative effect, which maintains CD34+ hematopoietic cells in an undifferentiated state. These properties would potentially allow the maintenance of hematopoietic cells in culture for the purpose of marrow purging or gene therapy. The activation of the c-kit signal transduction pathway may play a significant role in the development of many types of non-hematological malignancies by disrupting normal cell-cell interactions and allowing the growth of cancer cell populations. In summary, the properties of the SF indicate it has a role for survival signals during the process of normal differentiation, AML proliferation and in the maintenance of many c-kit+ tumors.

  20. 2169 steel waveform experiments.

    Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

    2012-11-01

    In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mmthick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

  1. IMPACT OF STRAIN RATE ON MICROALLOYED STEEL SHEET BREAKING

    Mária Mihaliková

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Strain rate is a significant external factor and its influence on material behavior in forming process is a function of its internal structure. The contribution is analysis of the impact of loading rate from 1.6 x 10-4 ms-1 to 24 ms-1 to changes in the fracture of steel sheet used for bodywork components in cars. Experiments were performed on samples taken from HC420LA grade strips produced by cold rolling and hot dip galvanizing. Material strength properties were compared based on measured values, and changes to fracture surface character were observed.

  2. Recommendations on X80 steel for the design of hydrogen gas transmission pipelines

    Briottet, L.; Batisse, R.; De Dinechin, G.; Langlois, P.; Thiers, L.

    2012-01-01

    By limiting the pipes thickness necessary to sustain high pressure, high-strength steels could prove economically relevant for transmitting large gas quantities in pipelines on long distance. Up to now, the existing hydrogen pipelines have used lower-strength steels to avoid any hydrogen embrittlement. The CATHY-GDF project, funded by the French National Agency for Research, explored the ability of an industrial X80 grade for the transmission of pressurized hydrogen gas in large diameter pipelines. This project has developed experimental facilities to test the material under hydrogen gas pressure. Indeed, tensile, toughness, crack propagation and disc rupture tests have been performed. From these results, the effect of hydrogen pressure on the size of some critical defects has been analyzed allowing proposing some recommendations on the design of X80 pipe for hydrogen transport. Cost of Hydrogen transport could be several times higher than natural gas one for a given energy amount. Moreover, building hydrogen pipeline using high grade steels could induce a 10 to 40% cost benefit instead of using low grade steels, despite their lower hydrogen susceptibility. (authors)

  3. Development of advanced austenitic stainless steels resistant to void swelling under irradiation

    Rouxel, Baptiste

    2016-01-01

    In the framework of studies about Sodium Fast Reactors (SFR) of generation IV, the CEA is developing new austenitic steel grades for the fuel cladding. These steels demonstrate very good mechanical properties but their use is limited because of the void swelling under irradiation. Beyond a high irradiation dose, cavities appear in the alloys and weaken the material. The reference material in France is a 15Cr/15Ni steel, named AIM1, stabilized with titanium. This study try to understand the role played by various chemical elements and microstructural parameters on the formation of the cavities under irradiation, and contribute to the development of a new grade AIM2 more resistant to swelling. In an analytical approach, model materials were elaborated with various chemical compositions and microstructures. Ten grades were cast with chemical variations in Ti, Nb, Ni and P. Four specific microstructures for each alloy highlighted the effect of dislocations, solutes or nano-precipitates on the void swelling. These materials were characterized using TEM and SANS, before irradiation with Fe"2"+ (2 MeV) ions in the order to simulate the damages caused by neutrons. Comparing the irradiated microstructures, it is demonstrated that the solutes have a dominating effect on the formation of cavities. Specifically titanium in solid solution reduces the swelling whereas niobium does not show this effect. Finally, a matrix enriched by 15% to 25% of nickel is still favorable to limit swelling in these advanced austenitic stainless steels. (author) [fr

  4. Nondestructive characterization of embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel steels -- A feasibility study

    McHenry, H.I.; Alers, G.A.

    1998-01-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission recently initiated a study by NIST to assess the feasibility of using physical-property measurements for evaluating radiation embrittlement in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Ultrasonic and magnetic measurements provide the most promising approaches for nondestructive characterization of RPV steels because elastic waves and magnetic fields can sense the microstructural changes that embrittle materials. The microstructural changes of particular interest are copper precipitation hardening, which is the likely cause of radiation embrittlement in RPV steels, and the loss of dislocation mobility that is an attribute of the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements were made on a 1% copper steel, ASTM grade A710, in the annealed, peak-aged and overaged conditions, and on an RPV steel, ASTM grade A533B. Nonlinear ultrasonic and micromagnetic techniques were the most promising measures of precipitation hardening. Ultrasonic velocity measurements and the magnetic properties associated with hysteresis-loop measurements were not particularly sensitive to either precipitation hardening or the ductile-to-brittle transition. Measurements of internal friction using trapped ultrasonic resonance modes detected energy losses due to the motion of pinned dislocations; however, the ultrasonic attenuation associated with these measurements was small compared to the attenuation caused by beam spreading that would occur in conventional ultrasonic testing of RPVs

  5. Corrosion of low alloy steels in natural seawater. Influence of alloying elements and bacteria

    Dajoux Malard, Emilie

    2006-01-01

    Metallic infrastructures immersed in natural seawater are exposed to important corrosion phenomena, sometimes characterised as microbiologically influenced corrosion. The presence of alloying elements in low alloy steels could present a corrosion resistance improvement of the structures. In this context, tests are performed with commercial steel grades, from 0,05 wt pc Cr to 11,5 wt pc Cr. They consist in 'on site' immersion in natural seawater on the one hand, and in laboratory tests with immersion in media enriched with marine sulphide-producing bacteria on the other hand. Gravimetric, microbiological, electrochemical measurements and corrosion product analyses are carried out and show that corrosion phenomenon is composed of several stages. A preliminary step is the reduction of the corrosion kinetics and is correlated with the presence of sessile sulphide-producing bacteria and an important formation of sulphur-containing species. This phase is shorter when the alloying element content of the steel increases. This phase is probably followed by an increase of corrosion, appearing clearly after an 8-month immersion in natural seawater for some of the grade steels. Chromium and molybdenum show at the same time a beneficial influence to generalised corrosion resistance and a toxic effect on sulphide-producing bacteria. This multidisciplinary study reflects the complexity of the interactions between bacteria and steels; sulphide-producing bacteria seem to be involved in corrosion processes in natural seawater and complementary studies would have to clarify occurring mechanisms. (author) [fr

  6. Possible influences on textures in unalloyed steels and their effects on steel properties

    Grossterlinden, R.; Imlau, K.P.; Kawalla, R.; Lotter, U.; Reip, C.-P.

    1996-01-01

    Textures in steels play an essential role for applications where anisotropic properties are favourable. For the example of deep-drawing steel sheet the correlation between parameters characterising the behaviour in the deep-drawing process, as Lankford r-value and planar anisotropy Δr, and the crystallographic texture is considered. Furthermore, the development of texture in the course of manufacturing cold strip is followed for unalloyed and microalloyed deep-drawing grades. For representation of typical features of textures the method of orientation distribution functions (ODF) together with the description of texture by characteristic fibres is used. In detail, the parameters influencing textures, such as chemical composition, finishing temperature in the hot-rolling mill (in relation to the austenite or ferrite region), transformation behaviour, cold-rolling reduction and the course of temperature during recrystallizing annealing, are discussed. From the given survey it may be concluded, that in the manufacturing process there are many possibilities to control the texture of the finished product. Finally, it is shown that the impact of textures on the r-value can be calculated with high precision. On the other hand, the formation of texture itself, particularly during hot-rolling, transformation and recrystallization after cold-rolling, at present can be calculated and modelled only in simple cases. (orig.)

  7. Practicing Good Habits, Grade 4.

    Van Cong Lau; And Others

    This illustrated textbook was designed for teaching civics and values to fourth grade students in Vietnam. It is divided into six chapters: (1) At School (recapitulation of the grade three program, friendship, respect for the teacher, team work, discipline, honor); (2) In the Street: Traffic Regulations; (3) At Home (the extended family spirit,…

  8. Graded geometry and Poisson reduction

    Cattaneo, A S; Zambon, M

    2009-01-01

    The main result of [2] extends the Marsden-Ratiu reduction theorem [4] in Poisson geometry, and is proven by means of graded geometry. In this note we provide the background material about graded geometry necessary for the proof in [2]. Further, we provide an alternative algebraic proof for the main result. ©2009 American Institute of Physics

  9. Compositionally Graded Multilayer Ceramic Capacitors.

    Song, Hyun-Cheol; Zhou, Jie E; Maurya, Deepam; Yan, Yongke; Wang, Yu U; Priya, Shashank

    2017-09-27

    Multilayer ceramic capacitors (MLCC) are widely used in consumer electronics. Here, we provide a transformative method for achieving high dielectric response and tunability over a wide temperature range through design of compositionally graded multilayer (CGML) architecture. Compositionally graded MLCCs were found to exhibit enhanced dielectric tunability (70%) along with small dielectric losses (filters and power converters.

  10. Austenitic stainless steel weld inspection

    Mech, S.J.; Emmons, J.S.; Michaels, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    Analytical techniques applied to ultrasonic waveforms obtained from inspection of austenitic stainless steel welds are described. Experimental results obtained from a variety of geometric and defect reflectors are presented. Specifically, frequency analyses parameters, such as simple moments of the power spectrum, cross-correlation techniques, and adaptive learning network analysis, all represent improvements over conventional time domain analysis of ultrasonic waveforms. Results for each of these methods are presented, and the overall inspection difficulties of austenitic stainless steel welds are discussed

  11. High-strength maraging steels

    Grachev, S.V.; Shejn, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    Analysis of data on technological and operation properties of maraging steels on Fe-Cr-Ni, Fe-Ni, Fe-Cr-Co-Mo bases is given. Their advantages and drawbacks are pointed out. The scheme of strengthening heat treatment is considered. The fields of the most effective application of maraging steels for instance, for products operating under conditions of low-cycle and shock cyclic loading are mentioned

  12. Steel refining possibilities in LF

    Dumitru, M. G.; Ioana, A.; Constantin, N.; Ciobanu, F.; Pollifroni, M.

    2018-01-01

    This article presents the main possibilities for steel refining in Ladle Furnace (LF). These, are presented: steelmaking stages, steel refining through argon bottom stirring, online control of the bottom stirring, bottom stirring diagram during LF treatment of a heat, porous plug influence over the argon stirring, bottom stirring porous plug, analysis of porous plugs disposal on ladle bottom surface, bottom stirring simulation with ANSYS, bottom stirring simulation with Autodesk CFD.

  13. MICROALLOYED STEELS FOR THE AUTOMOTIVE INDUSTRY

    Debanshu Bhattacharya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Two major drivers for the use of newer steels in the automotive industry are fuel efficiency and increased safety performance. Fuel efficiency is mainly a function of weight of steel parts, which in turn, is controlled by gauge and design. Safety is determined by the energy absorbing capacity of the steel used to make the part. All of these factors are incentives for the U.S. automakers to use both Highly Formable and Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS to replace the conventional steels used to manufacture automotive parts in the past. AHSS is a general term used to describe various families of steels. The most common AHSS is the dual-phase steel that consists of a ferrite-martensite microstructure. These steels are characterized by high strength, good ductility, low tensile to yield strength ratio and high bake hardenability. Another class of AHSS is the complex-phase or multi-phase steel which has a complex microstructure consisting of various phase constituents and a high yield to tensile strength ratio. Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP steels is another class of AHSS steels finding interest among the U.S. automakers. These steels consist of a ferrite-bainite microstructure with significant amount of retained austenite phase and show the highest combination of strength and elongation, so far, among the AHSS in use. High level of energy absorbing capacity combined with a sustained level of high n value up to the limit of uniform elongation as well as high bake hardenability make these steels particularly attractive for safety critical parts and parts needing complex forming. A relatively new class of AHSS is the Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P steels. These steels seem to offer higher ductility than the dual-phase steels of similar strengths or similar ductility as the TRIP steels at higher strengths. Finally, martensitic steels with very high strengths are also in use for certain parts. The most recent initiative in the area of AHSS

  14. Safety conditions of using structural steels under high temperature and pressures in hydrogen containing environment

    Asviyan, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    The method for establishing full-strength conditions was suggested on the base of results of creep-rupture test of tube samples under hydrogen pressure and according to permissible stresses in neutral medium. Applicability of the method was considered taking St3 and 12KhM steels as examples. It was shown that the use of suggested dependences and special efficiency factors enables to forecast endurance limit for the given steel grade and assigned partial hydrogen pressure without labour-intensive test conducting

  15. 221-U Facility concrete and reinforcing steel evaluations specification for the canyon disposition initiative (CDI)

    Baxter, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    This describes a test program to establish the in-situ material properties of the reinforced concrete in Building 221-U for comparison to the original design specifications. Field sampling and laboratory testing of concrete and reinforcing steel structural materials in Building 221-U for design verification will be undertaken. Forty seven samples are to be taken from radiologically clean exterior walls of the canyon. Laboratory testing program includes unconfined compressive strength of concrete cores, tensile strength of reinforcing steel, and petrographic examinations of concrete cores taken from walls below existing grade

  16. Laser cut hole matrices in novel armour plate steel for appliqué battlefield vehicle protection

    Thomas, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    During this research, experimental rolled homogeneous armour steel was cast, annealed and laser cut to form an appliqué plate. This Martensitic–Bainitic microstructure steel grade was used to test a novel means of engineering lightweight armour. It was determined that a laser cutting speed of 1200 mm/min produced optimum hole formations with limited distortion. The array of holes acts as a double-edged solution, in that they provide weight saving of 45%, providing a protective advantage and i...

  17. Effect of Temperature on the Fracture Toughness of Hot Isostatically Pressed 304L Stainless Steel

    Cooper, A. J.; Brayshaw, W. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2018-03-01

    Herein, we have performed J- Resistance multi-specimen fracture toughness testing of hot isostatically pressed (HIP'd) and forged 304L austenitic stainless steel, tested at elevated (300 °C) and cryogenic (- 140 °C) temperatures. The work highlights that although both materials fail in a pure ductile fashion, stainless steel manufactured by HIP displays a marked reduction in fracture toughness, defined using J 0.2BL, when compared to equivalently graded forged 304L, which is relatively constant across the tested temperature range.

  18. Modification of the Steel Surface Treated by a Volume Discharge Plasma in Nitrogen at Atmospheric Pressure

    Erofeev, M. V.; Shulepov, M. A.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Oskomov, K. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2016-03-01

    Effect of volume discharge plasma initiated by an avalanche electron beam on the composition, structure, and properties of the surface steel layer is investigated. Voltage pulses with incident wave amplitude up to 30 kV, full width at half maximum of about 4 ns, and wave front of about 2.5 ns were applied to the gap with an inhomogeneous electric field. Changes indicating the hardening effect of the volume discharge initiated by an avalanche electron beam are revealed in St3-grade steel specimens treated by the discharge of this type.

  19. The effect of grain size on the mechanical response of a metastable austenitic stainless steel

    Sinclair C.W.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The combination of high environmental resistance and excellent strength, elongation and energy absorption make austenitic stainless steels potentially attractive for transportation applications. In the case of metastable grades that undergo a strain induced martensitic transformation it is possible to significantly change the mechanical properties simply by changing the austenite grain size. Predicting such behaviour using physically based models is, however, extremely challenging. Here, some recent work on the coupling between grain size and mechanical response will be presented for a metastable AISI 301 LN stainless steel. Successes and continuing challenges will be highlighted.

  20. Effect of Temperature on the Fracture Toughness of Hot Isostatically Pressed 304L Stainless Steel

    Cooper, Adam J.; Sherry, Andrew

    2018-01-01

    Herein, we have performed J-Resistance multi-specimen fracture toughness testing of hot isostatically pressed (HIP’d) and forged 304L austenitic stainless steel, tested at elevated (300 °C) and cryogenic (− 140 °C) temperatures. The work highlights that although both materials fail in a pure ductile fashion, stainless steel manufactured by HIP displays a marked reduction in fracture toughness, defined using J0.2BL, when compared to equivalently graded forged 304L, which is relatively constant...

  1. Impact Strength of Austenitic and Ferritic-Austenitic Cr-Ni Stainless Cast Steel in -40 and +20°C Temperature

    Kalandyk B.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Studies described in this paper relate to common grades of cast corrosion resistant Cr-Ni steel with different matrix. The test materials were subjected to heat treatment, which consisted in the solution annealing at 1060°C followed by cooling in water. The conducted investigations, besides the microstructural characteristics of selected cast steel grades, included the evaluation of hardness, toughness (at a temperature of -40 and +20oC and type of fracture obtained after breaking the specimens on a Charpy impact testing machine. Based on the results of the measured volume fraction of ferrite, it has been found that the content of this phase in cast austenitic steel is 1.9%, while in the two-phase ferritic-austenitic grades it ranges from 50 to 58%. It has been demonstrated that within the scope of conducted studies, the cast steel of an austenitic structure is characterised by higher impact strength than the two-phase ferritic-austenitic (F-A grade. The changing appearance of the fractures of the specimens reflected the impact strength values obtained in the tested materials. Fractures of the cast austenitic Cr-Ni steel obtained in these studies were of a ductile character, while fractures of the cast ferritic-austenitic grade were mostly of a mixed character with the predominance of brittle phase and well visible cleavage planes.

  2. Difference in metallic wear distribution released from commercially pure titanium compared with stainless steel plates.

    Krischak, G D; Gebhard, F; Mohr, W; Krivan, V; Ignatius, A; Beck, A; Wachter, N J; Reuter, P; Arand, M; Kinzl, L; Claes, L E

    2004-03-01

    Stainless steel and commercially pure titanium are widely used materials in orthopedic implants. However, it is still being controversially discussed whether there are significant differences in tissue reaction and metallic release, which should result in a recommendation for preferred use in clinical practice. A comparative study was performed using 14 stainless steel and 8 commercially pure titanium plates retrieved after a 12-month implantation period. To avoid contamination of the tissue with the elements under investigation, surgical instruments made of zirconium dioxide were used. The tissue samples were analyzed histologically and by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) for accumulation of the metals Fe, Cr, Mo, Ni, and Ti in the local tissues. Implant corrosion was determined by the use of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). With grades 2 or higher in 9 implants, steel plates revealed a higher extent of corrosion in the SEM compared with titanium, where only one implant showed corrosion grade 2. Metal uptake of all measured ions (Fe, Cr, Mo, Ni) was significantly increased after stainless steel implantation, whereas titanium revealed only high concentrations for Ti. For the two implant materials, a different distribution of the accumulated metals was found by histological examination. Whereas specimens after steel implantation revealed a diffuse siderosis of connective tissue cells, those after titanium exhibited occasionally a focal siderosis due to implantation-associated bleeding. Neither titanium- nor stainless steel-loaded tissues revealed any signs of foreign-body reaction. We conclude from the increased release of toxic, allergic, and potentially carcinogenic ions adjacent to stainless steel that commercially pure Ti should be treated as the preferred material for osteosyntheses if a removal of the implant is not intended. However, neither material provoked a foreign-body reaction in the local tissues, thus cpTi cannot be

  3. Ductile fracture toughness of heavy section pressure vessel steel plate. A specimen-size study of ASTM A 533 steels

    Williams, J.A.

    1979-09-01

    The ductile fracture toughness, J/sub Ic/, of ASTM A 533, Grade B, Class 1 and ASTM A 533, heat treated to simulate irradiation, was determined for 10- to 100-mm thick compact specimens. The toughness at maximum specimen load was also measured to determine the conservatism of J/sub Ic/. The toughness of ASTM A 533, Grade B, Class 1 steel was 349 kJ/m 2 and at the equivalent upper shelf temperature, the heat treated material exhibited 87 kJ/m 2 . The maximum load fracture toughness was found to be linearly proportional to specimen size, and only specimens which failed to meet ASTM size criteria exhibited maximum load toughness less than J/sub Ic/

  4. Properties of hot rolled steels for enamelling

    Gavrilovski, Dragica; Gavrilovski, Milorad

    2003-01-01

    The results of an investigation of the structure and properties of experimental produced hot rolled steels suitable for enamelling are presented in the paper. Hot rolled steels for enamelling represent a special group of the steels for conventional enamelling. Their quality has to be adapted to the method and conditions of enamelling. Therefore, these steels should meet some specific requirements. In addition to usual investigation of the chemical composition and mechanical properties, microstructure and quality of the steel surface also were investigated. The basic aim was to examine steels capability for enamelling, i. e. steels resistance to the fish scales phenomena, by trial enamelling, as well as quality of the steel - enamel contact surface, to evaluate the binding. Also, the changes of the mechanical properties, especially the yield point, during thermal treatment, as a very specific requirement, were investigated, by simplified method. Good results were obtained confirming the steels capability for enamelling. (Original)

  5. Final Scientific Report - "Novel Steels for High Temperature Carburizing"

    McKimpson, Marvin G.; Liu, Tianjun; Maniruzzaman, Md

    2012-07-27

    This program was undertaken to develop a microalloy-modified grade of standard carburizing steel that can successfully exploit the high temperature carburizing capabilities of current commercial low pressure (i.e. 'vacuum') carburizing systems. Such steels can lower the amount of energy required for commercial carburizing operations by reducing the time required for deep-case carburizing operations. The specific technical objective of the work was to demonstrate a carburizing steel composition capable of maintaining a prior austenite grain size no larger than ASTM grain size number 5 after exposure to simulated carburizing conditions of 1050 C for 8 hr. Such thermal exposure should be adequate for producing carburized case depths up to about 2 mm. Such carburizing steels are expected to be attractive for use across a wide range of industries, including the petroleum, chemical, forest products, automotive, mining and industrial equipment industries. They have potential for reducing energy usage during low pressure carburizing by more than 25%, as well as reducing cycle times and process costs substantially. They also have potential for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from existing low pressure carburizing furnaces by more than 25%. High temperature carburizing can be done in most modern low pressure carburizing systems with no additional capital investment. Accordingly, implementing this technology on carburizing furnaces will provide a return on investment significantly greater than 10%. If disseminated throughout the domestic carburizing community, the technology has potential for saving on the order of 23 to 34 trillion BTU/year in industrial energy usage. Under the program, two compositions of microalloyed, coarsening-resistant low alloy carburizing steels were developed, produced and evaluated. After vacuum annealing at 1050oC for 8 hrs and high pressure gas quenching, both steels exhibited a prior austenite ASTM grain size number of 5.0 or finer

  6. Effect of decreased hot-rolling reduction treatment on fracture toughness of low-alloy structural steels

    Tomita, Yoshiyuki

    1990-09-01

    Commercial low-alloy structural steels, 0.45 pct C (AISI 1045 grade), 0.40 pct C-Cr-Mo (AISI 4140 grade), and 0.40 pct C-Ni-Cr-Mo (AISI 4340 grade), have been studied to determine the effect of the decreased hot-rolling reduction treatment (DHRRT) from 98 to 80 pct on fracture toughness of quenched and highly tempered low-alloy structural steels. The significant conclusions are as follows: (1) the sulfide inclusions were modified through the DHRRT from a stringer (mean aspect ratio: 16.5 to 17.6) to an ellipse (mean aspect ratio: 3.8 to 4.5), independent of the steels studied; (2) the DHRRT significantly improved J Ic in the long-transverse and shorttransverse orientations, independent of the steels studied; and (3) the shelf energy in the Charpy V-notch impact test is also greatly improved by the DHRRT, independent of testing orientation and steels studied; however, (4) the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature was only slightly affected by the DHRRT. The beneficial effect on the J Ic is briefly discussed in terms of a crack extension model involving the formation of voids at the inclusion sites and their growth and eventual linking up through the rupture of the intervening ligaments by local shear.

  7. The relationship between microstructure and mechanical properties of ferritic chromium steel weldments

    Mayr, Peter; Cerjak, Horst [Graz Univ. of Technology (Austria); Toda, Yoshiaki; Hara, Toru; Abe, Fujio [National Institute for Materials Science (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Welding as the major joining and repair technology for steels in thermal power plants has a significant influence on the steels microstructure and, therefore, on its properties. Heat-resistant martensitic 9-12% chromium steels show an affinity to the retention of delta ferrite in the heat-affected zone of their weldments. This is related to their high level of ferrite stabilizing alloying elements such as Cr, W or Mo. Retained delta ferrite in martensitic steel grades has a significant negative influence on creep strength, fatigue strength, toughness and oxidation resistance. In the long-term range of creep exposure, many weldments of martensitic heatresistant steels fail by Type IV cracking in the fine-grained region of the heat-affected zone. In this work, the formation of the heat-affected zone microstructures in martensitic chromium steels is studied by in-situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation, optical microscopy as well as most advanced electron microscopical methods. The observed microstructure is directly linked to the mechanical properties, i.e. ductility, toughness and creep strength. Characteristic failure modes are discussed in detail. (orig.)

  8. Influence of boron on strain hardening behaviour and ductility of low carbon hot rolled steel

    Deva, Anjana; Jha, B.K.; Mishra, N.S.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Unique feature of low strain hardening exponent (n) with high total elongation has been discussed in industrially produced low carbon boron containing steel. → n has been correlated with the micro structural changes occurring during deformation of steel. → This feature of low n and high % elongation has potential for higher cold reducibility. → The work is being reported for the first time on industrially produced low carbon boron containing steel. - Abstract: The beneficial effect of boron on mechanical properties of low carbon Al-killed steel has been reported in recent past. However, the effect of boron on strain hardening exponent (n) and ductility has not been fully understood. This aspect has been discussed in present work. The results of mill trials with reference to n and ductility with boron added steel are compared to those for commercial grade. The lowering of 'n' with increased total elongation in boron bearing steel has been related to the microstructural evolution as a result of boron addition.

  9. Determination of Proper Austenitization Temperatures for Hot Stamping of AISI 4140 Steel

    Samadian, Pedram; Parsa, Mohammad Habibi; Shakeri, Amid

    2014-04-01

    High strength steels are desirable materials for use in automobile bodies in order to reduce vehicle weight and increase the safety of car passengers, but steel grades with high strength commonly show poor formability. Recently, steels with controlled microstructures and compositions are used to gain adequate strength after hot stamping while maintaining good formability during processing. In this study, microstructure evolutions and changes in mechanical properties of AISI 4140 steel sheets resulting from the hot stamping process at different austenitization temperatures were investigated. To determine the proper austenitization temperatures, the results were compared with those of the cold-worked and cold-worked plus quench-tempered specimens. Comparisons showed that the austenitization temperatures of 1000 and 1100 °C are proper for hot stamping of 3-mm-thick AISI 4140 steel sheets due to the resultant martensitic microstructure which led to the yield and ultimate tensile strength of 1.3 and 2.1 GPa, respectively. Such conditions resulted in more favorable simultaneous strength and elongation than those of hot-stamped conventional boron steels.

  10. Mechanical and wear behaviour of steel chips reinforced Zn27Al composites

    Kenneth Kanayo ALANEME

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical and wear behaviour of Zn27Al alloy reinforced with steel machining chips (an industrial waste was investigated. Two step stir casting process was used to produce the Zn27Al based composites consisting of 5, 7.5 and 10 wt.% of the steel machining chips while unreinforced Zn27Al alloy and a composition consisting of 5 wt.% alumina were also prepared as control samples. Microstrutural analysis; mechanical and wear behaviour were assessed for these composites. The results show that the hardness and wear resistance of the composites increased with increase in weight percent of the steel chips from 5 to 10 wt.%. The UTS, strain to fracture, and the fracture toughness were however highest for the 5 wt.% steel chips reinforced composite grade; and decreased with increase in the weight percent of the steel chips from 5 to 10 wt.%. Generally the Zn27Al alloy based composites reinforced with steel machining chips, exhibited superior mechanical and wear properties in comparison to the unreinforced Zn27Al alloy and the 5 wt.% alumina reinforced Zn27Al alloy composite.

  11. Conversion of MX Nitrides to Modified Z-Phase in 9-12%Cr Ferritic Steels

    Cipolla, Leonardo

    for Z-phase formation was highlighted during the studies. Several 9-12%Cr commercial steels with prolonged high-temperature exposures have been investigated, too. The same mechanism of Z-phase formation observed in 12%Cr model alloys was identified in industrial 9-12%Cr steels after thousands of hours......The 9-12%Cr ferritic steels are extensively used in modern steam power plants at service temperature up to 620°C. Currently the best perform ing ferritic creep resistance steel is the ASTM Grade 92, whose high temperature strength has recently been assessed by European Creep Collaborative Committee...... in 2005 as 600°C/113MPa/10 5h. All previous attempts made in the last twenty years to develop ferritic steels for 650°C applications have failed due to the incapacity to combine the superior oxidation resistance, given by 12%Cr content, with excellent creep resistance of high-alloyed ferritic steels...

  12. Constitutive Model Of Graded Micro-Structure Obtained Via Strain Induced Phase Transformation

    Ortwein, Rafał

    The literature review has been divided into three main sub-chapters. The first one is concentrated on the general information about stainless steels and their applications. It is important to perform a general overview and get an idea where the results of the present thesis could be applied. Description of all the brands of stainless steels, their microstructures and properties are important, as similar characteristics can be found in the newly created functionally graded structures. The second sub-chapter is an overview of the most important constitutive models and the experimental results for materials that undergo plastic strain induced phase transformation. Finally, the last one is devoted to functionally graded microstructures obtained via strain induced martensitic transformation – the subject of particular importance for the present thesis. As a general note, the literature review is organized mainly in a chronological order. In some cases similar publications or publications of the same Authors were...

  13. Effect of Grade Retention in First Grade on Psychosocial Outcomes

    Wu, Wei; West, Stephen G.; Hughes, Jan N.

    2010-01-01

    In a 4-year longitudinal study, the authors investigated effects of retention in first grade on children’s externalizing and internalizing behaviors; social acceptance; and behavioral, cognitive, and affective engagement. From a large multiethnic sample (n = 784) of children below the median on literacy at school entrance, 124 retained children were matched with 251 promoted children on the basis of propensity scores (probability of being retained in first grade estimated from 72 baseline var...

  14. High temperature oxidation behavior of ODS steels

    Kaito, T.; Narita, T.; Ukai, S.; Matsuda, Y.

    2004-08-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels are being developing for application as advanced fast reactor cladding and fusion blanket materials, in order to allow increased operation temperature. Oxidation testing of ODS steel was conducted under a controlled dry air atmosphere to evaluate the high temperature oxidation behavior. This showed that 9Cr-ODS martensitic steels and 12Cr-ODS ferritic steels have superior high temperature oxidation resistance compared to 11 mass% Cr PNC-FMS and 17 mass% Cr ferritic stainless steel. This high temperature resistance is attributed to earlier formation of the protective α-Cr 2O 3 on the outer surface of ODS steels.

  15. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Md Tahir, Mahmood; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  16. Optimization of Packing Density of M30 Concrete With Steel Slag As Coarse Aggregate Using Fuzzy Logic

    Arivoli M.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete plays a vital role in the design and construction of the infrastructure. To meet the global demand of concrete in future, it is becoming a challenging task to find suitable alternatives to natural aggregates. Steel slag is a by-product of steel making process. The steel slag aggregates are characterized by studying particle size and shape, physical and chemical properties, and mechanical properties as per IS: 2386-1963. The characterization study reveals the better performance of steel slag aggregate over natural coarse aggregate. M30 grade of concrete is designed and natural coarse aggregate is completely replaced by steel slag aggregate. Packing density of aggregates affects the characteristics of concrete. The present paper proposes a fuzzy system for concrete mix proportioning which increases the packing density. The proposed fuzzy system have four sub fuzzy system to arrive compressive strength, water cement ratio, ideal grading curve and free water content for concrete mix proportioning. The results show, the concrete mix proportion of the given fuzzy model agrees with IS method. The comparison of results shows that both proposed fuzzy system and IS method, there is a remarkable increase in compressive strength and bulk density, with increment in the percentage replacement of steel slag.

  17. submitter Physical Properties of a High-Strength Austenitic Stainless Steel for the Precompression Structure of the ITER Central Solenoid

    Sgobba, Stefano; Arauzo, Ana; Roussel, Pascal; Libeyre, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The ITER central solenoid (CS) consists of six independent coils kept together by a precompression support structure that must react vertical tensile loads and provide sufficient preload to maintain coil-to-coil contact when the solenoid is energized. The CS precompression system includes tie plates, lower and upper key blocks, load distribution and isolation plates and other attachment, support and insulating hardware. The tie plates operating at 4 K are manufactured starting from forgings in a high-strength austenitic stainless steel (FXM-19) with a stringent specification. Moreover, forged components for the lower and upper key blocks have to be provided in the same FXM-19 grade with comparably strict requirements. FXM-19 is a high-nitrogen austenitic stainless steel, featuring high strength and toughness, ready weldability, and forgeability. It features as well higher integral thermal contraction down to 4 K compared with the very high Mn steel grade selected for the CS coil jackets, hence providing an ad...

  18. Factors influencing the surface quality of polished tool steels

    Rebeggiani, S; Rosén, B-G

    2014-01-01

    Today’s demands on surface quality of moulds for injection moulding of plastic components involve no/low defect contents and roughness levels in the nm-range for high gloss applications. Material properties as well as operating conditions influence the mould finish, and thus the final surface of moulded products. This paper focuses on how particle content and different polishing strategies influence final surface qualities of moulds. Visual estimations of polished tool steel samples were combined with non-contact 3D-surface texture analysis in order to correlate traditional assessments to more quantitative methods, and to be able to analyse the surfaces at nanometre-level. It was found that steels with a lower proportion of particles, like carbides and oxides, gave rise to smoother polished surfaces. In a comparative study of polishers from different polishing shops, it was found that while different surface preparation strategies can lead to similar final roughness, similar preparation techniques can produce high-quality surfaces from different steel grades. However, the non-contact 3D-surface texture analysis showed that not all smooth polished surfaces have desirable functional topographies for injection moulding of glossy plastic components. (paper)

  19. Image Registration-Based Bolt Loosening Detection of Steel Joints

    2018-01-01

    Self-loosening of bolts caused by repetitive loads and vibrations is one of the common defects that can weaken the structural integrity of bolted steel joints in civil structures. Many existing approaches for detecting loosening bolts are based on physical sensors and, hence, require extensive sensor deployment, which limit their abilities to cost-effectively detect loosened bolts in a large number of steel joints. Recently, computer vision-based structural health monitoring (SHM) technologies have demonstrated great potential for damage detection due to the benefits of being low cost, easy to deploy, and contactless. In this study, we propose a vision-based non-contact bolt loosening detection method that uses a consumer-grade digital camera. Two images of the monitored steel joint are first collected during different inspection periods and then aligned through two image registration processes. If the bolt experiences rotation between inspections, it will introduce differential features in the registration errors, serving as a good indicator for bolt loosening detection. The performance and robustness of this approach have been validated through a series of experimental investigations using three laboratory setups including a gusset plate on a cross frame, a column flange, and a girder web. The bolt loosening detection results are presented for easy interpretation such that informed decisions can be made about the detected loosened bolts. PMID:29597264

  20. Image Registration-Based Bolt Loosening Detection of Steel Joints.

    Kong, Xiangxiong; Li, Jian

    2018-03-28

    Self-loosening of bolts caused by repetitive loads and vibrations is one of the common defects that can weaken the structural integrity of bolted steel joints in civil structures. Many existing approaches for detecting loosening bolts are based on physical sensors and, hence, require extensive sensor deployment, which limit their abilities to cost-effectively detect loosened bolts in a large number of steel joints. Recently, computer vision-based structural health monitoring (SHM) technologies have demonstrated great potential for damage detection due to the benefits of being low cost, easy to deploy, and contactless. In this study, we propose a vision-based non-contact bolt loosening detection method that uses a consumer-grade digital camera. Two images of the monitored steel joint are first collected during different inspection periods and then aligned through two image registration processes. If the bolt experiences rotation between inspections, it will introduce differential features in the registration errors, serving as a good indicator for bolt loosening detection. The performance and robustness of this approach have been validated through a series of experimental investigations using three laboratory setups including a gusset plate on a cross frame, a column flange, and a girder web. The bolt loosening detection results are presented for easy interpretation such that informed decisions can be made about the detected loosened bolts.