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Sample records for grade iv glioblastoma

  1. Re-do Craniotomy for Recurrent Grade IV Glioblastomas: Impact and Outcomes from the National Neuroscience Institute Singapore.

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    Chen, Min Wei; Morsy, Ahmed A; Liang, Sai; Ng, Wai Hoe

    2016-03-01

    We hypothesize that re-do craniotomy for recurrent grade IV glioblastomas improves survival while preserving outcome in selected patients. A retrospective analysis was conducted of 141 patients, from a prospectively collected database from 2004-2014, with grade IV glioblastomas who underwent craniotomy and excision. Sixty-five patients were included in our analysis. Twenty patients underwent re-do craniotomy at recurrence and were compared with 45 patients who received nonsurgical therapy for recurrences. Primary end point was overall survival from time of diagnosis. Demographic and disease factors were analyzed using Cox regression analysis for significance. The median survival for those with re-do craniotomy was 25.4 months compared with 11.6 months (P craniotomy were significant for positive outcomes. Our results show that in a select group of patients with recurrent grade IV glioblastomas, repeated excision, aiming for gross total resection where safely possible, has significant survival benefit without severely compromising functionality and should be considered. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Analysis of the cytotoxicity of hierarchical nanoporous graphenic carbon against human glioblastoma grade IV cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaworski, Sławomir; Biniecka, Paulina; Bugajska, Żaneta

    2017-01-01

    A newly produced hierarchical, nanoporous carbon (HNC) material is studied for the first time in a biological model. The material consists of uniform particles and is characterized by a mean diameter well-developed porosity, and high electrical...... with the U87 cells can also lead to the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activate apoptotic mechanisms in cancer cells. The investigation was performed using U87 human glioblastoma and PCS-201–010 normal fibroblast cell lines, where cell morphology and ultrastructure, viability, ROS...

  3. A Grade IV Isthmic Spondylolisthesis.

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    Kolber, Morey J; Hanney, William J

    2017-12-01

    A 15-year-old adolescent boy was referred by an orthopaedic surgeon for treatment of right gluteal and thigh pain. Following treatment that reduced his pain, he experienced acute onset of bilateral radiculopathy. He was referred back to the physician, who ordered radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging, which identified a grade IV isthmic spondylolisthesis at the L5-S1 level. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(12):971. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7547.

  4. Molecular subtypes of glioblastoma are relevant to lower grade glioma.

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    Xiaowei Guan

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most common primary malignant brain tumors in adults with great heterogeneity in histopathology and clinical course. The intent was to evaluate the relevance of known glioblastoma (GBM expression and methylation based subtypes to grade II and III gliomas (ie. lower grade gliomas.Gene expression array, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP array and clinical data were obtained for 228 GBMs and 176 grade II/II gliomas (GII/III from the publically available Rembrandt dataset. Two additional datasets with IDH1 mutation status were utilized as validation datasets (one publicly available dataset and one newly generated dataset from MD Anderson. Unsupervised clustering was performed and compared to gene expression subtypes assigned using the Verhaak et al 840-gene classifier. The glioma-CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (G-CIMP was assigned using prediction models by Fine et al.Unsupervised clustering by gene expression aligned with the Verhaak 840-gene subtype group assignments. GII/IIIs were preferentially assigned to the proneural subtype with IDH1 mutation and G-CIMP. GBMs were evenly distributed among the four subtypes. Proneural, IDH1 mutant, G-CIMP GII/III s had significantly better survival than other molecular subtypes. Only 6% of GBMs were proneural and had either IDH1 mutation or G-CIMP but these tumors had significantly better survival than other GBMs. Copy number changes in chromosomes 1p and 19q were associated with GII/IIIs, while these changes in CDKN2A, PTEN and EGFR were more commonly associated with GBMs.GBM gene-expression and methylation based subtypes are relevant for GII/III s and associate with overall survival differences. A better understanding of the association between these subtypes and GII/IIIs could further knowledge regarding prognosis and mechanisms of glioma progression.

  5. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Oral 5-Fluorocytosine and Genetically-Modified Neural Stem Cells Expressing E.Coli Cytosine Deaminase for Treatment of Recurrent High Grade Gliomas

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    2017-11-07

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Recurrent Grade III Glioma; Recurrent Grade IV Glioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor; Adult Anaplastic Oligoastrocytoma; Recurrent High Grade Glioma

  6. Two-peaked 5-ALA-induced PpIX fluorescence emission spectrum distinguishes glioblastomas from low grade gliomas and infiltrative component of glioblastomas.

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    Montcel, Bruno; Mahieu-Williame, Laurent; Armoiry, Xavier; Meyronet, David; Guyotat, Jacques

    2013-04-01

    5-ALA-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence enables to guiding in intra-operative surgical glioma resection. However at present, it has yet to be shown that this method is able to identify infiltrative component of glioma. In extracted tumor tissues we measured a two-peaked emission in low grade gliomas and in the infiltrative component of glioblastomas due to multiple photochemical states of PpIX. The second emission peak appearing at 620 nm (shifted by 14 nm from the main peak at 634 nm) limits the sensibility of current methods to measured PpIX concentration. We propose new measured parameters, by taking into consideration the two-peaked emission, to overcome these limitations in sensitivity. These parameters clearly distinguish the solid component of glioblastomas from low grade gliomas and infiltrative component of glioblastomas.

  7. Noninvasive Tumor Grading of Glioblastomas Before Surgery Using Arterial Spin Labeling. A Cohort Study.

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    Gao, Fei; Guo, Rui; Hu, Xiao-Jing; Li, Chun-Jing; Li, Meng

    2015-12-01

    To assess the clinical value of using arterial spin labeling (ASL) technique preoperatively for non-invasive tumor grading in glioblastoma (GBM) patients. Forty-nine patients with GBMs were selected, including 21 patients with high-grade gliomas and 28 patients with low-grade gliomas. ASL perfusion imaging was performed with GE Signa Excite HD 3.0 T MR scanning system (GE Healthcare). Relative cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and relative tumor blood flow (rTBF) were quantified in all patients. Statistical analysis was performed with STATA version 12.0 software. Further, relevant human cohort studies published in Chinese and English languages were identified by database searches and screened. Data was extracted and meta-analysis was performed using Comprehensive Meta-analysis version 2.0 software. The ratios of rTBF to rCBF in the contralateral white matter, contralateral gray matter, and contralateral hemisphere of high-grade gliomas were higher than low-grade gliomas (all p 0.05) when 2 and 5 cm distances from tumor margin were compared. Importantly, rCBF values showed statistical differences when the 2 cm distance was compared with the 5 cm distance from tumor margin (all p < 0.05). Finally, meta-analysis results supported the conclusion that rCBF and rTBF values were significantly higher in high-grade GBM as compared to low-grade GBM. We present convincing data that ASL is highly effective in differentiating between high-grade and low-grade gliomas, and thus is a useful tool for preoperative evaluation of GBM.

  8. PREVENTION OF SPINAL DISORDERS IN CHILDRENI- IV GRADE

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    Dejаn Gojković

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Problem physical activities children younger school-age children, with the basic tasks research is construction kinesitherapy adequate prevention and avoid postural disorders spinal column, optimal ontogenetic level morphological( anthropological development.The main objective research is contents teaching physical education as well as and content that can be put in regular program teaching physical education with the basic task prevention potential and eliminate disorders spinal column, with auxiliary a harmonious biological development. The entities from which he was carried out sample size for this research is defined as population students male primary schools I- IV grade.The first and basic condition was that they are included in teaching physical education in the course of this research sample is taked 400 respondents.-according to the manner elections respondents sample was targeted selected.were taken I- IV grade elementary schools in Bijeljina, Teslic, Foca and Pale.

  9. Nonoperative management for patients with grade IV blunt hepatic trauma

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    Zago Thiago

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The treatment of complex liver injuries remains a challenge. Nonoperative treatment for such injuries is increasingly being adopted as the initial management strategy. We reviewed our experience, at a University teaching hospital, in the nonoperative management of grade IV liver injuries with the intent to evaluate failure rates; need for angioembolization and blood transfusions; and in-hospital mortality and complications. Methods This is a retrospective analysis conducted at a single large trauma centre in Brazil. All consecutive, hemodynamically stable, blunt trauma patients with grade IV hepatic injury, between 1996 and 2011, were analyzed. Demographics and baseline characteristics were recorded. Failure of nonoperative management was defined by the need for surgical intervention. Need for angioembolization and transfusions, in-hospital death, and complications were also assessed Results Eighteen patients with grade IV hepatic injury treated nonoperatively during the study period were included. The nonoperative treatment failed in only one patient (5.5% who had refractory abdominal pain. However, no missed injuries and/or worsening of bleeding were observed during the operation. None of the patients died nor need angioembolization. No complications directly related to the liver were observed. Unrelated complications to the liver occurred in three patients (16.7%; one patient developed a tracheal stenosis (secondary to tracheal intubation; one had pleural effusion; and one developed an abscess in the pleural cavity. The hospital length of stay was on average 11.56 days. Conclusions In our experience, nonoperative management of grade IV liver injury for stable blunt trauma patients is associated with high success rates without significant complications.

  10. Accuracy of high-field intraoperative MRI in the detectability of residual tumor in glioma grade IV resections

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    Hesselmann, Volker; Mager, Ann-Kathrin [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Radiology/Neurologie; Goetz, Claudia; Kremer, Paul [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Detsch, Oliver [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine; Theisgen, Hannah-Katharina [Universitaetsklinikum Schleswig-Holstein, Kiel (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Friese, Michael; Gottschalk, Joachim [Asklepios-Klinik Nord, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Pathology and Neuropathology; Schwindt, Wolfram [Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology

    2017-06-15

    To assess the sensitivity/specificity of tumor detection by T1 contrast enhancement in intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) in comparison to histopathological assessment as the gold standard in patients receiving surgical resection of grade IV glioblastoma. 68 patients with a primary or a recurrent glioblastoma scheduled for surgery including fluorescence guidance and neuronavigation were included (mean age: 59 years, 26 female, 42 male patients). The ioMRI after the first resection included transverse FLAIR, DWI, T2-FFE and T1 - 3 d FFE ± GD-DPTA. The second resection was performed whenever residual contrast-enhancing tissue was detected on ioMRI. Resected tissue samples were histopathologically evaluated (gold standard). Additionally, we evaluated the early postoperative MRI scan acquired within 48 h post-OP for remaining enhancing tissue and compared them with the ioMRI scan. In 43 patients ioMRI indicated residual tumorous tissue, which could be confirmed in the histological specimens of the second resection. In 16 (4 with recurrent, 12 with primary glioblastoma) cases, ioMRI revealed truly negative results without residual tumor and follow-up MRI confirmed complete resection. In 7 cases (3 with recurrent, 4 with primary glioblastoma) ioMRI revealed a suspicious result without tumorous tissue in the histopathological workup. In 2 (1 for each group) patients, residual tumorous tissue was detected in spite of negative ioMRI. IoMRI had a sensitivity of 95 % (94 % recurrent and 96 % for primary glioblastoma) and a specificity of 69.5 % (57 % and 75 %, respectively). The positive predictive value was 86 % (84 % for recurrent and 87 % for primary glioblastoma), and the negative predictive value was 88 % (80 % and 92 %, respectively). ioMRI is effective for detecting remaining tumorous tissue after glioma resection. However, scars and leakage of contrast agent can be misleading and limit specificity. Intraoperative MRI (ioMRI) presents with a high sensitivity for residual

  11. Mirizzi syndrome grades III and IV: surgical treatment.

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    Reverdito, Ronald; Moricz, André DE; Campos, Tércio DE; Pacheco, Adhemar Monteiro; Silva, Rodrigo Altenfelder

    2016-01-01

    : to evaluate the epidemiology and outcomes of surgical treatment of patients with Mirizzi Syndrome (MS) grades III and IV, the most advanced according to Csendes classification. : we conducted a retrospective, cross-sectional study by reviewing records of thirteen patients with grades III and IV MS operated from December 2001 to September 2013, among the 3,691 cholecystectomies performed in the period. : the incidence of MS was 0.6% (23 cases) and grades III and IV amounted to 0.35% of this number. There was a predominance of type IV (12 cases). The preoperative diagnosis was possible in 53.8% of cases. The preferred approach was biliary-digestive derivation (10 cases), and "T" tube drainage with suture of the bile duct was the choice in three special occasions. Three patients had biliary fistula resolved with clinical management, and one coliperitoneum case required reoperation. In the outpatient follow-up of patients who underwent biliodigestive anastomosis (eight), 50% are asymptomatic, 25% had anastomotic stricture and 25% lost follow-up. The mean follow-up was 41.8 months. : MS in advanced degrees has low incidence, preoperative diagnosis in only half of cases, and has the biliodigestive anastomosis as the best conduct, but not without morbidity. avaliar a epidemiologia e os resultados do tratamento cirúrgico de doentes portadores de graus III e IV, mais avançados, da Síndrome de Mirizzi (SM) de acordo com a classificação de Csendes. estudo retrospectivo, de corte transversal através da revisão de prontuários de 13 pacientes portadores de graus III e IV da SM operados de dezembro de 2001 a setembro de 2013, entre 3691 colecistectomias realizadas neste período. a incidência da SM foi 0,6% (23 casos) e os graus III e IV perfizeram 0,35% deste número. Houve um predomínio de tipo IV (12 casos). O diagnóstico pré-operatório foi possível em 53,8% dos casos. A conduta preferencial foi derivação biliodigestiva (10 casos) e foi optado por drenagem

  12. Fast neutron boost for the treatment of grade IV astrocytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breteau, N.; Destembert, B.; Favre, A.; Pheline, C.; Schlienger, M.

    1989-01-01

    A previous study, on grade IV astrocytomas, compared a combination of photons and fast neutron boost to photons only, both treatments being delivered following a concentrated irradiation schedule. A slight improvement in survival was observed after neutron boost for non operated patients, but not for operated patients. Since death was always related to local recurrence and since no complication occurred after neutron boost, the neutron dose was increased from 6 to 7 Gy in January 1985. No improvement in survival was observed for patients treated with neutron boost after complete resection. After subtotal resection, the group that was treated with the higher neutron boost (7 Gy) showed a significant benefit in survival at twelve months. When patients had only a biopsy before irradiation, there was a benefit in survival after neutron boost, but no additional benefit was gained when the size of the neutron boost was increased from 6 to 7 Gy. (orig.) [de

  13. PROX1 is a novel pathway-specific prognostic biomarker for high-grade astrocytomas; results from independent glioblastoma cohorts stratified by age and IDH mutation status.

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    Roodakker, Kenney R; Elsir, Tamador; Edqvist, Per-Henrik D; Hägerstrand, Daniel; Carlson, Joseph; Lysiak, Malgorzata; Henriksson, Roger; Pontén, Fredrik; Rosell, Johan; Söderkvist, Peter; Stupp, Roger; Tchougounova, Elena; Nistér, Monica; Malmström, Annika; Smits, Anja

    2016-11-08

    PROX1 is a transcription factor with an essential role in embryonic development and determination of cell fate. In addition, PROX1 has been ascribed suppressive as well as oncogenic roles in several human cancers, including brain tumors. In this study we explored the correlation between PROX1 expression and patient survival in high-grade astrocytomas. For this purpose, we analyzed protein expression in tissue microarrays of tumor samples stratified by patient age and IDH mutation status. We initially screened 86 unselected high-grade astrocytomas, followed by 174 IDH1-R132H1 immunonegative glioblastomas derived from patients aged 60 years and older enrolled in the Nordic phase III trial of elderly patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Representing the younger population of glioblastomas, we studied 80 IDH-wildtype glioblastomas from patients aged 18-60 years. There was no correlation between PROX1 protein and survival for patients with primary glioblastomas included in these cohorts. In contrast, high expression of PROX1 protein predicted shorter survival in the group of patients with IDH-mutant anaplastic astrocytomas and secondary glioblastomas. The prognostic impact of PROX1 in IDH-mutant 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas, as well as the negative findings in primary glioblastomas, was corroborated by gene expression data extracted from the Cancer Genome Atlas. We conclude that PROX1 is a new prognostic biomarker for 1p19q non-codeleted high-grade astrocytomas that have progressed from pre-existing low-grade tumors and harbor IDH mutations.

  14. DNA copy number analysis of Grade II-III and Grade IV gliomas reveals differences in molecular ontogeny including chromothripsis associated with IDH mutation status.

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    Cohen, Adam; Sato, Mariko; Aldape, Kenneth; Mason, Clinton C; Alfaro-Munoz, Kristin; Heathcock, Lindsey; South, Sarah T; Abegglen, Lisa M; Schiffman, Joshua D; Colman, Howard

    2015-06-20

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation status and grade define subgroups of diffuse gliomas differing based on age, tumor location, presentation, and prognosis. While some biologic differences between IDH mutated (IDH (mut)) and wild-type (IDH (wt)) gliomas are clear, the distinct alterations associated with progression of the two subtypes to glioblastoma (GBM, Grade IV) have not been well described. We analyzed copy number alterations (CNAs) across grades (Grade II-III and GBM) in both IDH (mut) and IDH (wt) infiltrating gliomas using molecular inversion probe arrays. Ninety four patient samples were divided into four groups: Grade II-III IDH (wt) (n = 17), Grade II-III IDH (mut) (n = 28), GBM IDH (wt) (n = 25), and GBM IDH (mut) (n = 24). We validated prior observations that IDH (wt) GBM have a high frequency of chromosome 7 gain (including EGFR) and chromosome 10 loss (including PTEN) compared with IDH (mut) GBM. Hierarchical clustering of IDH (mut) gliomas demonstrated distinct CNA patterns distinguishing lower grade gliomas versus GBM. However, similar hierarchical clustering of IDH (wt) gliomas demonstrated no CNA distinction between lower grade glioma and GBM. Functional analyses showed that IDH (wt) gliomas had more chromosome gains in regions containing receptor tyrosine kinase pathways. In contrast, IDH (mut) gliomas more commonly demonstrated amplification of cyclins and cyclin dependent kinase genes. One of the most common alterations associated with transformation of lower grade to GBM IDH (mut) gliomas was the loss of chromosomal regions surrounding PTEN. IDH (mut) GBM tumors demonstrated significantly higher levels of overall CNAs compared to lower grade IDH (mut) tumors and all grades of IDH (wt) tumors, and IDH (mut) GBMs also demonstrated significant increase in incidence of chromothripsis. Taken together, these analyses demonstrate distinct molecular ontogeny between IDH (wt) and IDH (mut) gliomas. Our data also support the novel

  15. Immediate Effect of Grade IV Inferior Hip Joint Mobilization on Hip Abductor Torque: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Makofsky, Howard; Panicker, Siji; Abbruzzese, Jeanine; Aridas, Cynthia; Camp, Michael; Drakes, Jonelle; Franco, Caroline; Sileo, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Joint mobilization and manipulation stimulate mechanoreceptors, which may influence the joint and surrounding muscles. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effect of grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization on hip abductor torque. Thirty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (grade I inferior hip joint mobilization) or an experimental group (grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization). Subjects performed a pre- and post-intervention test of five isometric re...

  16. A 16-gene signature distinguishes anaplastic astrocytoma from glioblastoma.

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    Soumya Alige Mahabala Rao

    Full Text Available Anaplastic astrocytoma (AA; Grade III and glioblastoma (GBM; Grade IV are diffusely infiltrating tumors and are called malignant astrocytomas. The treatment regimen and prognosis are distinctly different between anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma patients. Although histopathology based current grading system is well accepted and largely reproducible, intratumoral histologic variations often lead to difficulties in classification of malignant astrocytoma samples. In order to obtain a more robust molecular classifier, we analysed RT-qPCR expression data of 175 differentially regulated genes across astrocytoma using Prediction Analysis of Microarrays (PAM and found the most discriminatory 16-gene expression signature for the classification of anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma. The 16-gene signature obtained in the training set was validated in the test set with diagnostic accuracy of 89%. Additionally, validation of the 16-gene signature in multiple independent cohorts revealed that the signature predicted anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma samples with accuracy rates of 99%, 88%, and 92% in TCGA, GSE1993 and GSE4422 datasets, respectively. The protein-protein interaction network and pathway analysis suggested that the 16-genes of the signature identified epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT pathway as the most differentially regulated pathway in glioblastoma compared to anaplastic astrocytoma. In addition to identifying 16 gene classification signature, we also demonstrated that genes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition may play an important role in distinguishing glioblastoma from anaplastic astrocytoma.

  17. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Goffart, Nicolas; KROONEN, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV) is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC) properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays sti...

  18. Tectal glioblastoma Glioblastoma tetal

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    Feres Chaddad Neto

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Brain stem gliomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms arising mostly in paediatric patients. Tectal plate gliomas represent a particular type of brain stem tumours usually with a benign, indolent clinical course, presenting with signs of raised intracranial hipertension due to supra-tentorialhydrocephalous caused by aqueductal stenosis. Seldom high-grade lesions arise in this location with tremendous therapeutic implications. When a malignant tumour is clinically and radiographically suspected a biopsy should be performed to obtain histhological confirmation. Treatment is then planned in a case-by-case basis. We present the case of a glioblastoma of the tectal plate in a 22 years-old woman operated upon by a supracerebellar-infratentorial approach.Os gliomas do tronco cerebral são um grupo heterogêneo de neoplasias que acometem habitualmente crianças. Os gliomas da placa quadrigeminal representam um tipo particular de tumores do tronco cerebral, habitualmente com um curso benigno e indolente, surgindo com sinais de hipertensão intracraniana devido a hidrocefalia supra-tentorial provocada por compressão do aqueduto cerebral. Raramente surgem lesões de alto grau nesta região, mas as implicações terapêuticas são tremendas. Quando existe suspeita clínica e imagiológica de que se trata de lesão maligna, esta deve ser biopsada para se obter confirmação histológica. O tratamento deve então ser planejado caso a caso. Apresentamos o caso de glioblastoma da placa quadrigeminal em uma paciente de 22 anos intervencionado por via supracerebelar-infratentorial.

  19. High grade glioma: Imaging combined with pathological grade defines management and predicts prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnet, Neil G.; Lynch, Andrew G.; Jefferies, Sarah J.; Price, Stephen J.; Jones, Phil H.; Antoun, Nagui M.; Xuereb, John H.; Pohl, Ute

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: There is ambiguity in pathological grading of high grade gliomas within the WHO 2000 classification, especially those with predominant oligodendroglial differentiation. Patients and methods: All adult high grade gliomas treated radically, 1996-2005, were assessed. Cases in which pathology was grade III but radiology suggested glioblastoma (GBM) were classified as 'grade III/IV'; their pathology was reviewed. Results: Data from 245 patients (52 grade III, 18 grade III/IV, 175 GBM) were analysed using a Cox Proportional Hazards model. On pathology review, features suggestive of more aggressive behaviour were found in all 18 grade III/IV tumours. Oligodendroglial components with both necrosis and microvascular proliferation were present in 7. MIB-1 counts for the last 8 were all above 14%, mean 27%. Median survivals were: grade III 34 months, grade III/IV 10 months, GBM 11 months. Survival was not significantly different between grade III/IV and GBM. Patients with grade III/IV tumours had significantly worse outcome than grade III, with a hazard of death 3.7 times higher. Conclusions: The results highlight the current inconsistency in pathological grading of high grade tumours, especially those with oligodendroglial elements. Patients with histological grade III tumours but radiological appearances suggestive of GBM should be managed as glioblastoma

  20. A paediatric case of AAST grade IV duodenal injury with application ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-03

    Aug 3, 2013 ... A paediatric case of AAST grade IV duodenal injury with application of damage control surgery. G L Laing, MB ChB, FCS (SA); F Ghimenton, MB ChB, MMed, FCS (SA); D L Clarke, MB ChB, FCS (SA), MBA, MMedSci, MPhil. Grey's Hospital, Pietermaritzburg, KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. Corresponding ...

  1. A paediatric case of AAST grade IV duodenal injury with application ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Isolated severe blunt duodenal injuries are rare. We present an American Association for the Surgery of Trauma grade IV duodenal injury in a paediatric patient. The strategic use of damage control surgical principles, involving an initial abbreviated laparotomy followed by a delayed reconstruction, resulted in a successful ...

  2. Immediate Effect of Grade IV Inferior Hip Joint Mobilization on Hip Abductor Torque: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makofsky, Howard; Panicker, Siji; Abbruzzese, Jeanine; Aridas, Cynthia; Camp, Michael; Drakes, Jonelle; Franco, Caroline; Sileo, Ray

    2007-01-01

    Joint mobilization and manipulation stimulate mechanoreceptors, which may influence the joint and surrounding muscles. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the effect of grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization on hip abductor torque. Thirty healthy subjects were randomly assigned to a control group (grade I inferior hip joint mobilization) or an experimental group (grade IV inferior hip joint mobilization). Subjects performed a pre- and post-intervention test of five isometric repetitions on the Cybex Normö dynamometer; the average torque was determined for both pre- and post-intervention measurements. These data were analyzed using the independent samples t-test with the significance level set at Phip abductor torque in the experimental group (P=0.03). The experimental group demonstrated a 17.35% increase in average torque whereas the control group demonstrated a 3.68% decrease in average torque. These findings are consistent with other studies demonstrating that the use of grade IV non-thrust mobilization improves strength immediately post-intervention in healthy individuals. The results of this pilot study provide physical therapists with further support for the utilization of manual therapy in conjunction with therapeutic exercise to enhance muscle strength.

  3. Modeling Grade IV Gas Emboli using a Limited Failure Population Model with Random Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Laura A.; Conkin, Johnny; Chhikara, Raj S.; Powell, Michael R.

    2002-05-01

    Venous gas emboli (VGE) (gas bubbles in venous blood) are associated with an increased risk of decompression sickness (DCS) in hypobaric environments. A high grade of VGE can be a precursor to serious DCS. In this paper, we model time to Grade IV VGE considering a subset of individuals assumed to be immune from experiencing VGE. Our data contain monitoring test results from subjects undergoing up to 13 denitrogenation test procedures prior to exposure to a hypobaric environment. The onset time of Grade IV VGE is recorded as contained within certain time intervals. We fit a parametric (lognormal) mixture survival model to the interval-and right-censored data to account for the possibility of a subset of "cured" individuals who are immune to the event. Our model contains random subject effects to account for correlations between repeated measurements on a single individual. Model assessments and cross-validation indicate that this limited failure population mixture model is an improvement over a model that does not account for the potential of a fraction of cured individuals. We also evaluated some alternative mixture models. Predictions from the best fitted mixture model indicate that the actual process is reasonably approximated by a limited failure population model.

  4. [Biology molecular of glioblastomas].

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    Franco-Hernández, C; Martínez-Glez, V; Rey, J A

    2007-10-01

    Glioblastomas, the most frequent and malignant human brain tumors, may develop de novo (primary glioblastoma) or by progression from low-grade or anapalsic astrocytoma (secondary glioblastoma). The molecular alteration most frequent in these tumor-like types is the loss of heterozygosity on chromosome 10, in which several genes have been identified as tumors suppressor. The TP53/MDM2/P14arf and CDK4/RB1/ P16ink4 genetic pathways involved in cycle control are deregulated in the majority of gliomas as well as genes that promote the cellular division, EGFR. Finally the increase of growth and angiogenics factors is also involved in the development of glioblastomas. One of the objectives of molecular biology in tumors of glial ancestry is to try to find the genetic alterations that allow to approach better the classification of glioblastomas, its evolution prediction and treatment. The new pathmolecular classification of gliomas should improve the old one, especially being concerned about the oncogenesis and heterogeneity of these tumors. It is desirable that this classification had clinical applicability and integrates new molecular findings with some known histological features with pronostic value. In this paper we review the most frequent molecular mechanisms involved in the patogenesis of glioblastomas.

  5. Analysis of the cytotoxicity of hierarchical nanoporous graphenic carbon against human gliblastoma grade IV cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaworski, Sławomir; Biniecka, Paulina; Bugajska, Zaneta

    2017-01-01

    with the U87 cells can also lead to the excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and activate apoptotic mechanisms in cancer cells. The investigation was performed using U87 human glioblastoma and PCS-201–010 normal fibroblast cell lines, where cell morphology and ultrastructure, viability, ROS...... pathway, without inducing necrosis. Our research indicates the potential applicability of HNC in cancer therapy....

  6. Tumor stem cells from glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. N. Nikiforova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme, a World Health Organization grade IV malignant glioma, is the most common and lethal primary brain tumor with the median survival of approximately 15–25 months after treatment. Glioblastoma multiforme has been shown to be resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy and invariably recurs following surgical resection and chemoradiation. The characteristics of this tumor are exemplified by heterogeneous cell population with diverse biologic properties and genetic changes, the ability to form cancer stem cells (CSC and divided into four molecular subtypes – proneural, neural, classical and mesenchymal. Despite some success, the mechanisms leading to the formation of the most malignant tumor subtype are unclear. The aim of this review was a synthesis of modern information about the role and biological characteristics of tumor stem cells in tumor progression and the pathogenesis of glioblastoma multiforme. CSCs reside in niches, which are anatomically distinct regions within the tumor microenvironment. These niches maintain the principle properties of CSCs, preserve their phenotypic plasticity, adhesion, survival, resistance to standard cancer treatment and metastatic potential. The presence of aberrant signaling pathways (Notch, Hedgehog-Gli, Wnt/β-catenin, TGF-β/SMAD, PI3K/Akt/mTOR, both in the tumor and in the population of CSC, the dysregulation of microRNAs (miR-21, miR-128, miR-326, miR-34a, influence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition explains the availability of typical biological characteristics of the CSC. One needs to consider the influence of the therapy on normal stem cells in the development of drugs directed against the CSC. Regulatory mechanisms and markers found over the last decade can be used as the basis for creation of the new drugs with targeted action in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

  7. Developing Worksheet (LKS) Base on Process Skills in Curriculum 2013 at Elementary School Grade IV,V,VI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhan, M.; Oktolita, N.; Kn, M.

    2018-04-01

    The Lacks of students' skills in the learning process is due to lacks of exercises in the form of LKS. In the curriculum of 2013, there is no LKS as a companion to improve the students' skills. In order to solve those problem, it is necessary to develop LKS based on process skills as a teaching material to improve students' process skills. The purpose of this study is to develop LKS Process Skills based elementary school grade IV, V, VI which is integrated by process skill. The development of LKS can be used to develop the thematic process skills of elementary school students grade IV, V, VI based on curriculum 2013. The expected long-term goal is to produce teaching materials LKS Process Skill based of Thematic learning that is able to develop the process skill of elementary school students grade IV, V, VI. This development research refers to the steps developed by Borg & Gall (1983). The development process is carried out through 10 stages: preliminary research and gathering information, planning, draft development, initial test (limited trial), first product revision, final trial (field trial), product operational revision, Desemination and implementation. The limited subject of the this research is the students of SDN in Dharmasraya grade IV, V, VI. The field trial subjects in the experimental class are the students of SDN Dharmasraya grade IV, V, VI who have implemented the curriculum 2013. The data are collected by using LKS validation sheets, process skill observation sheets, and Thematic learning test (pre-test And post-test). The result of LKS development on the validity score is 81.70 (very valid), on practical score is 83.94 (very practical), and on effectiveness score is 86.67 (very effective). In the trial step the use of LKS using One Group Pretest-Posttest Design research design. The purpose of this trial is to know the effectiveness level of LKS result of development for improving the process skill of students in grade IV, V, and VI of elementary

  8. A theoretical investigation into post-operative, intracavitary beta therapy of high-grade glioblastomas using yttrium-90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanou, S. S.; Sparks, R. B.; Dale, R. G.

    2006-10-01

    Beta therapy with yttrium-90 (90Y) has recently been introduced as a post-operative intra-cavitary treatment for malignant glioblastoma, a generally radioresistant tumour for which cure rates with conventional radiotherapy are usually very disappointing. This short theoretical study investigates the conditions under which 90Y treatment might be most effective and assesses the likely amounts of activity which must be infused in order to successfully cope with the low radiosensitivities which characterize such tumours. The radiobiological and physical analysis is investigated using the linear quadratic (LQ) model and a range of possible scenarios for the distribution and density of the tumour cells surrounding the surgically formed cavities are considered. The results suggest that, in the absence of diffusion of 90Y from the cavity, the activity typically required for 50% tumour cure is well over 40 mCi (1480 MBq), this being considerably more than the clinically determined activities which may be tolerated. Suggestions are provided for improving the versatility of the model.

  9. The early etiological diagnosis and endovascular embolization therapy of Hunt-Hess IV-V grade subarachnoid hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Jinning; Liu Shouxun; Bao Gang; Wang Tuo; Zhang Ming; Chen Jingyu; Zhang Xiaodong; Xu Gaofeng

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the methods of early etiological diagnosis and principles of endovascular embolization in Hunt-Hess IV-V grade subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), and to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy. Methods: Thirty-one patients underwent imaging examinations such as CT and DSA to make the early diagnosis of SAH. Meanwhile, Guglielmi detachable microcoil (GDC) was used to applying aneurysmal intracapsular embolization in the ruptured aneurysms, and efficient symptomatic treatment was adopted early postoperatively. The results were tested by χ 2 test. Results: All 31 cases were diagnosed early and operated successfully. Among them, the aneurysm lumen was 100% occluded in 26 cases, 95% occluded in 3 cases; 90% occluded in 2 cases. There were 5 cases complicating with cerebral vasospasm. One case recurrent was cured with secondary complementary GDC embolization. Nine cases (29.0%) had permanent sequelae associated with SAH. According to the Glasgow prognosis score, the therapeutic efficacy was as following: 6 patients were in grade I, 9 in grade II, 4 in grade III, 2 in grade IV, and 10 in grade V; 10 patients died, and the morality rate was 32.3%. None of them exhibited re-bleeding with follow-up period of 3 to 68 months postoperatively. Morality rates were significantly different between the group with aneurysmal diameter of 11-25 mm and the group of 5-10 mm (χ 2 =6.60, P 2 =11.24, P 2 =6.35, P<0.05). Conclusions: CT and DSA can make the early etiological diagnosis of the Hunt-Hess IV-V grade aneurysmal SAH, and GDC can be used early to perform the aneurysmal intracapsular embolization. Dealing with hemorrhage and using efficient symptomatic treatment earlier postoperatively are important methods to improve the curative rate and reduce the mortality rate and mutilation rate. (authors)

  10. Longevity-Related Gene Transcriptomic Signature in Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manal S. Fawzy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM (grade IV astrocytoma has been assumed to be the most fatal type of glioma with low survival and high recurrence rates, even after prompt surgical removal and aggressive courses of treatment. Transcriptional reprogramming to stem cell-like state could explain some of the deregulated molecular signatures in GBM disease. The present study aimed to quantify the expression profiling of longevity-related transcriptional factors SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG to evaluate their diagnostic and performance values in high-grade gliomas. Forty-four specimens were obtained from glioblastoma patients (10 females and 34 males. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction was applied for relative gene expression quantification. In silico network analysis was executed. NANOG and OCT3/4 mRNA expression levels were significantly downregulated while that of SOX2 was upregulated in cancer compared to noncancer tissues. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed high diagnostic performance of NANOG and OCT3/4 than SOX2. However, the aberrant expressions of the genes studied were not associated with the prognostic variables in the current population. In conclusion, the current study highlighted the aberrant expression of certain longevity-associated transcription factors in glioblastoma multiforme which may direct the attention towards new strategies in the treatment of such lethal disease.

  11. Results of Treatment of Grades IV and V Vesicoureteral Reflux with Endoscopic Injection of Polyacrylate Polyalcohol Copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Badiola, Francisco Ignacio; Soria, Ricardo; Vagni, Roberto Luis; Ormaechea, María Nieves; Moldes, Juan Manuel; Benmaor, César

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the results of a review of a prospectively maintained database of the use polyacrylate polyalcohol copolymer (PPC) injection to correct grades IV and V VUR. All children with grades IV and V primary VUR that presented with febrile urinary tract infection while on prophylaxis, in a 3-year period, were treated with a sub-ureteral injection of PPC. Institutional ethical approval was obtained. Exclusion criteria were incomplete bladder emptying documented on videourodynamic study, ureteral duplication, paraureteral diverticula, and poor ureteral emptying observed during fluoroscopy and previous open surgical or endoscopic treatment. Pre- and post-operative evaluation included urinalysis, renal and bladder ultrasonography, DMSA scan, and videourodynamic studies. Thirty-three children [36 renal units (RU)] were included with a median age of 57 months (range 7-108). There were 18 boys and 15 girls. Thirty RU had grade IV and 6 grade V VUR. Median follow-up time was 32 months (range 7-58). Reflux was cured in 32/36 RU with the first injection, but another two patients were reimplanted because of dilatation. Complications included early urinary tract infection in seven children, transient lower urinary tract symptoms in five children. Progressive ureteral dilatation was noted in four children and was treated with insertion of a double J stent. Two of these children eventually required an ureteroneocystostomy. The use of PPC to treat grades IV and V vesicoureteral reflux in young children has an overall success rate of 83.3%. Persistent ureteral dilatation was present in 11% associated with high injection volume. Future studies will attempt to maintain a high success rate reducing the volume of injection and the incidence of dilatation.

  12. SEVERE (GRADE III-IV ACUTE GRAFT VERSUS HOST DISEASE AFTER ALLOGENEIC HAEMATOPOIETIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

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    Irena Preložnik-Zupan

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Background. Beside greater susceptibility to infections, acute graft host disease is a consequence of the activation of donor T-cells against host antigens. Most common target organs are skin, liver and intestinal mucosis.Methods. In the 6-year period between January 1995 and December 2000, 49 patients were treated with allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT in Transplant unit, Department of Hematology, Clinical Centre Ljubljana. The standard GVHD prophylaxis regimen consisted of cyclosporine and short-course methotrexate. Severe, grade III-IV aGVHD with skin and/or gastrointestinal and/or liver involvement appeared in 16 (32% of the 49 patients.Results. Among the 16 patients with severe aGVHD, 14 had liver involvement, ten gastrointestinal and eight skin involvement. One patient had skin involvement only, the rest of them had combined involvement of two or three organ systems. Routine first-line treatment for aGVHD, given to all 16 pts with severe forms of the disease, was methylprednisolone (MP 2mg/ kg. Six patients with predominant skin involvement responded to MP. Other ten patients with mainly liver and gastrointestinal involvement needed second or even third line aGVHD treatment. These were anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG and/or monoclonal antibodies (OKT3 and/or mycophenolate mofetil (MMF and/or FK506 (tacrolimus. Seven patients died of advanced aGVHD and treatment related infection.Conclusions. Based on our experiences, we conclude that in critically ill patients with severe aGVHD, neutropenia and high risk for opportunistic infection, each day of ineffective MP therapy may have fatal consequences. Simultaneous institution of a combination of corticosteroids and a second-line drug might prove more appropriate for patients with a severe form of aGVHD.

  13. Hypernatremia and grade III/IV intraventricular hemorrhage among extremely low birth weight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, W-H; Lien, R; Chiang, M-C; Fu, R-H; Lin, J-J; Chu, S-M; Hsu, J-F; Yang, P-H

    2011-03-01

    To identify the risk factors contributing to intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) in extremely low birth weight infants during early postnatal life, after appropriate matching for gestational age (GA) and birth body weight (BBW). A case-control retrospective study was designed to evaluate preterm infants with a GA ≤ 26 weeks and a BBW ≤ 1000 g admitted to our hospital during a 7.5-year period. From a cohort of 347 preterm infants, 36 infants (10.7%) had severe IVH (grades III and/or IV). We selected a control group of 36 preterm infants without IVH who were closely matched for GA (± 1 week) and body weight (± 100 g). Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors for severe IVH. The GA and BBW of the IVH and control groups were 24.6 ± 1 weeks and 764.4 ± 118.5 g, and 24.8 ± 0.9 weeks and 771.5 ± 125.9 g, respectively. Vaginal delivery, male sex, resuscitation in the delivery room, high sodium serum levels (meq l(-1)) (162.6 vs 148.8), fluctuation of serum sodium (meq l(-1)) (17.3 vs 6.2), pH, PaCO(2), hemoglobin and platelet counts were associated with an increased risk of severe IVH. Multivariate logistic regression indicated that sodium fluctuations >13 meq l(-1), vaginal delivery, male sex and hemoglobin fluctuations are strongly associated with the development of severe IVH. Hypernatremia and fluctuations of sodium seem to be related to early severe IVH among preterm infants; however, further studies are required to clarify the causal relationship.

  14. Bevacizumab for the treatment of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Gil, Miguel J; Mesia, Carlos; Rey, Montserrat; Bruna, Jordi

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) or grade IV glioma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. Standard treatment median overall survival (OS) is only 14-15 months and less than 10% of patients will survive 5 years after diagnosis. There is no standard treatment in recurrent GBM and OS ranges from 3 to 9 months. GBM is 1 of the most vascularized human tumors and GBM cells produce vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody against VEGF, has demonstrated activity in vitro and in phase II trials in relapse, as well as in 1 phase III trial as first line therapy. Bevacizumab also improves quality of life for patients suffering GBM. This paper reviews the mechanism of action of bevacizumab, its metabolism and pharmacokinetic profile. It summarizes the clinical studies in recurrent and newly diagnosed GBM, its potential side effects and complications and its place in therapy.

  15. Glioblastoma Multiforme Therapy and Mechanisms of Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulian P. Ramirez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a grade IV brain tumor characterized by a heterogeneous population of cells that are highly infiltrative, angiogenic and resistant to chemotherapy. The current standard of care, comprised of surgical resection followed by radiation and the chemotherapeutic agent temozolomide, only provides patients with a 12–14 month survival period post-diagnosis. Long-term survival for GBM patients remains uncommon as cells with intrinsic or acquired resistance to treatment repopulate the tumor. In this review we will describe the mechanisms of resistance, and how they may be overcome to improve the survival of GBM patients by implementing novel chemotherapy drugs, new drug combinations and new approaches relating to DNA damage, angiogenesis and autophagy.

  16. Endocannabinoid metabolism in human glioblastomas and meningiomas compared to human non-tumour brain tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, G.; Moesgaard, B.; Hansen, Harald S.

    2005-01-01

    The endogenous levels of the two cannabinoid receptor ligands 2-arachidonoyl glycerol and anandamide, and their respective congeners, monoacyl glycerols and N-acylethanolamines, as well as the phospholipid precursors of N-acylethanolamines, were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in...... in glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) tissue and meningioma (WHO grade I) tissue and compared with human non-tumour brain tissue. Furthermore, the metabolic turnover of N-acylethanolamines was compared by measurements of the enzymatic activity of N-acyltransferase, N...

  17. Molecular heterogeneity in glioblastoma: potential clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Renee Parker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas, (grade 4 astrocytomas, are aggressive primary brain tumors characterized by histopathological heterogeneity. High resolution sequencing technologies have shown that these tumors also feature significant inter-tumoral molecular heterogeneity. Molecular subtyping of these tumors has revealed several predictive and prognostic biomarkers. However, intra-tumoral heterogeneity may undermine the use of single biopsy analysis for determining tumor genotype and has implications for potential targeted therapies. The clinical relevance and theories of tumoral molecular heterogeneity in glioblastoma are discussed.

  18. The Auto Industry. Grade Nine. Resource Unit (Unit IV). Project Social Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Project Social Studies Curriculum Center.

    Unit four of this curriculum plan for ninth grade social studies outlines a study of the automobile industry in the United States. Objectives state the desired generalizations, skills, and attitudes to be developed. A condensed outline of course content precedes expanded guidelines for teaching procedures and suggested resource materials. A…

  19. The Museum Connection, Grade Five: Slater Print Shop. Unit IV, Draft #2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chastain, Marsha; Glendenning, Owen

    This instructional unit designed to develop higher-level cognitive skills in fifth grade students focuses on a mid-nineteenth century newspaper from the Old Stater Print Shop. Purposes include: (1) to compare and contrast a century-old newspaper with a modern-day paper; (2) to begin planning for a newspaper and to organize a newspaper staff; (3)…

  20. Comparative study of different treatment options of grade III and IV diabetic foot ulcers to reduce the incidence of amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poras Chaudhary

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to compare the efficacy of antiseptic dressings, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and recombinant human platelet derived growth factor (rhPDGF for two reasons: i to reduce the incidence of lower limb amputations in diabetic foot ulcer; ii to limit the duration of stay in the hospital. A prospective randomized trial was conducted on 60 patients with stage III and IV diabetic foot ulcers (International Association of Enterostomal Therapy classification and patients were divided randomly in three different therapy groups - antiseptics, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, recombinant platelet derived growth factor, with 20 patients in each group. Patients were managed initially on inpatient and then on outpatient basis till the ulcer healed completely. Results among three groups were compared using unpaired T test and the level of significance was set at P<0.05 using ANOVA. This study compares the efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen therapy, antiseptic dressings, and rhPDGF in grade III and IV diabetic foot ulcers. P value (0.0348 was significant for complete wound contraction while p value healing time (0.6534 and ulcer size (0.0593 in the groups was not significant. PDGF is safe, effective and easy to apply. Results are comparable with hyperbaric oxygen (HBO therapy and cost of treatment is lower than other therapies. Diabetic foot ulcer management requires multidisciplinary and aggressive approach. PDGF should be recommended for all grade III and IV diabetic foot ulcer at least 8 weeks old. HBO is equally good an option but has limitations and side effects.

  1. Cancer in the oropharynx: Cost calculation of different treatment modalities for controlled primaries, relapses and grade III/IV complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijdam, Wideke; Levendag, Peter; Noever, Inge; Groot, Carin Uyl-de; Agthoven, Michel van

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: This paper presents a model for cost calculation using the different treatment modalities for oropharyngeal (OPh) cancers used in our hospital. We compared full hospital costs, the associated costs of localregional relapses (LRR) and/or treatment related grade III/IV complications. Materials and methods: Patients with OPh cancer are treated in the Erasmus MC preferably by an organ function preservation protocol. That is, by external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) followed by a brachytherapy (BT) boost, and neck dissection in case of N+ disease (BT-group: 157 patients). If BT is not feasible, resection with postoperative EBRT (S-group [S=Surgery]: 110 patients) or EBRT-alone (EBRT-group: 77 patients) is being pursued. Actuarial localregional control (LRC), disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) at 5-years were calculated according to the Kaplan-Meier method. The mean costs per treatment group for diagnosis, primary Tx per se, follow-up, (salvage of) locoregional relapse (LRR), distant metastasis (DM), and/or grade III/IV complications needing clinical admission, were computed. Results: For the BT-, S-, or EBRT treatment groups, LRC rates at 5-years were 85, 82, and 55%, for the DFS, 61, 48, and 43%, and for the OS 65, 52, and 40%, respectively. The mean costs of primary Tx in case of the BT-group is EURO 13,466; for the S-group EURO 24,219, and EURO 12,502 for the EBRT-group. The mean costs of S (the main salvage modality) for a LRR of the BT group or EBRT-group, were EURO 17,861 and EURO 15,887, respectively. The mean costs of clinical management of Grade III/IV complications were EURO 7184 (BT-group), EURO 16,675 (S-group) and EURO 6437 (EBRT-group). Conclusion: The clinical outcome illustrates excellent LRC rates at 5-years for BT (85%), as well as for S (82%). The relatively low 55% LRC rate at 5-years for EBRT probably reflects a negative selection of patients. It is of interest that the total mean costs of patients alive

  2. [Crops: Classifying, Selecting, Harvesting, Grading, and Packing.] Student Materials. V.A. III. [IV-B-1 through IV-B-2; IV-C-1 through IV-C-2].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas A and M Univ., College Station. Vocational Instructional Services.

    Part of a series of eight student learning modules in vocational agriculture, this booklet deals with crop-related activities. The first section is on harvesting methods and equipment. The following portions address the handling, grading, and packing of crops; and the classification and selection of fruits, vegetables, and ornamental plants. There…

  3. Histomorphological and Histomorphometric Analyses of Grade IV Commercially Pure Titanium and Grade V Ti-6Al-4V Titanium Alloy Implant Substrates: An In Vivo Study in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro da Silva, Jonathan; Castellano, Arthur; Malta Barbosa, João Pedro; Gil, Luiz F; Marin, Charles; Granato, Rodrigo; Bonfante, Estevam A; Tovar, Nick; Janal, Malvin N; Coelho, Paulo G

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate the bone response to grade IV commercially pure titanium (G4) relative to Ti-6Al-4V (G5). Implant surface topography was characterized by optical interferometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thirty-six implants (Signo Vinces, n = 18 per group) were installed in the radius of 18 dogs. The animals were killed at 1, 3, and 6 weeks, resulting in 6 implants per group and time in vivo for bone morphology, bone-to-implant contact (BIC), and bone area fraction occupancy (BAFO) evaluation. SEM depicted a more uniform topography of G4 than G5. Surfaces were statistically homogeneous for Sa, Sq, and Sdr. At 1 week, new bone formation was observed within the healing connective tissue in contact with the implant surface. At 3 weeks, new bone in direct contact with the implant surface was observed at all bone regions. At 6 weeks, the healing chambers filled with woven bone depicted an onset of replacement by lamellar bone. No significant effect of substrate was detected. Time presented an effect on BIC and BAFO (P < 0.001). Both titanium substrates were biocompatible and osseoconductive at the bone tissue level.

  4. Metformin repositioning as antitumoral agent: selective antiproliferative effects in human glioblastoma stem cells, via inhibition of CLIC1-mediated ion current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Federica; Peretti, Marta; Pizzi, Erika; Pattarozzi, Alessandra; Carra, Elisa; Sirito, Rodolfo; Daga, Antonio; Curmi, Paul M.G.; Mazzanti, Michele; Florio, Tullio

    2014-01-01

    Epidemiological and preclinical studies propose that metformin, a first-line drug for type-2 diabetes, exerts direct antitumor activity. Although several clinical trials are ongoing, the molecular mechanisms of this effect are unknown. Here we show that chloride intracellular channel-1 (CLIC1) is a direct target of metformin in human glioblastoma cells. Metformin exposure induces antiproliferative effects in cancer stem cell-enriched cultures, isolated from three individual WHO grade IV human glioblastomas. These effects phenocopy metformin-mediated inhibition of a chloride current specifically dependent on CLIC1 functional activity. CLIC1 ion channel is preferentially active during the G1-S transition via transient membrane insertion. Metformin inhibition of CLIC1 activity induces G1 arrest of glioblastoma stem cells. This effect was time-dependent, and prolonged treatments caused antiproliferative effects also for low, clinically significant, metformin concentrations. Furthermore, substitution of Arg29 in the putative CLIC1 pore region impairs metformin modulation of channel activity. The lack of drugs affecting cancer stem cell viability is the main cause of therapy failure and tumor relapse. We identified CLIC1 not only as a modulator of cell cycle progression in human glioblastoma stem cells but also as the main target of metformin's antiproliferative activity, paving the way for novel and needed pharmacological approaches to glioblastoma treatment. PMID:25361004

  5. Toxicity after radiochemotherapy for glioblastoma using temozolomide - a retrospective evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niewald, Marcus; Berdel, Christian; Fleckenstein, Jochen; Licht, Norbert; Ketter, Ralf; Rübe, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective evaluation of toxicity and results after radiochemotherapy for glioblastoma. 46 patients with histopathologically proven glioblastoma received simultaneous radiochemotherapy (RCT). The mean age at the beginning of therapy was 59 years, the mean Karnofsky performance index 80%. 44 patients had been operated on before radiotherapy, two had not. A total dose of 60 Gy was applied in daily single fractions of 2.0 Gy within six weeks, 75 mg/m 2 /day Temozolomide were given orally during the whole radiotherapy period. A local progression could be diagnosed in 34/46 patients (70%). The median survival time amounted to 13.6 months resulting in one-year and two-year survival probabilities of 48% and 8%, respectively. Radiotherapy could be applied completely in 89% of the patients. Chemotherapy could be completed according to schedule only in 56.5%, the main reason being blood toxicity (50% of the interruptions). Most of those patients suffered from leucopenia and/or thrombopenia grade III and IV CTC (Common toxicity criteria). Further reasons were an unfavourable general health status or a rise of liver enzymes. The mean duration of thrombopenia and leucopenia amounted to 64 and 20 days. In two patients, blood cell counts remained abnormal until death. In two patients we noticed a rise of liver enzymes. In one of these in the healing phase of hepatitis a rise of ASAT and ALAT CTC grade IV was diagnosed. These values normalized after termination of temozolomide medication. One patient died of pneumonia during therapy. Our survival data were well within the range taken from the literature. However, we noticed a considerable frequency and intensity of side effects to bone marrow and liver. These lead to the recommendations that regular examinations of blood cell count and liver enzymes should be performed during therapy and temozolomide should not be applied or application should be terminated according to the criteria given by the manufacturer

  6. Irinotecan and bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Jan Nyrop; Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Stockhausen, Marie-Thérése

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common high grade primary brain tumor in adults. Despite significant advances in treatment, the prognosis remains poor. Bevacizumab (BVZ) and irinotecan (CPT-11) are currently being investigated in the treatment of GBM patients. Although...

  7. The Role of Hypoxia in Glioblastoma Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Monteiro

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, a grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common and deadly type of primary malignant brain tumor, with a patient’s median survival rate ranging from 15 to 17 months. The current treatment for GBM involves tumor resection surgery based on MRI image analysis, followed by radiotherapy and treatment with temozolomide. However, the gradual development of tumor resistance to temozolomide is frequent in GBM patients leading to subsequent tumor regrowth/relapse. For this reason, the development of more effective therapeutic approaches for GBM is of critical importance. Low tumor oxygenation, also known as hypoxia, constitutes a major concern for GBM patients, since it promotes cancer cell spreading (invasion into the healthy brain tissue in order to evade this adverse microenvironment. Tumor invasion not only constitutes a major obstacle to surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, but it is also the main cause of death in GBM patients. Understanding how hypoxia triggers the GBM cells to become invasive is paramount to developing novel and more effective therapies against this devastating disease. In this review, we will present a comprehensive examination of the available literature focused on investigating how GBM hypoxia triggers an invasive cancer cell phenotype and the role of these invasive proteins in GBM progression.

  8. Endoscopic treatment of grades IV and V vesicoureteral reflux with two bulking substances: Dextranomer hyaluronic acid copolymer versus polyacrylate polyalcohol copolymer in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaoglu, Canan

    2016-10-01

    We aimed at evaluating the efficacy and complications of two bulking substances: dextranomer/hyaluronic acid copolymer(Dx/Ha;Dexell®) versus polyacrylate polyalcohol copolymer(PPC;Vantris®) in subureteric injection treatment of children with high grades (grades IV-V) vesicoureteral reflux(VUR). Data of patients undergoing endoscopic treatment of high grade VUR (January 2009-August 2015) were retrospectively investigated. Patients with high grade VUR caused by posterior urethral valve, duplex system, paraureteral diverticula and neurogenic bladder were excluded. Classical subureteric injection method (STING) was used. Seventy-three children (45 girls and 28 boys) who had 88 refluxing renal units (RRUs) with grades IV-V VUR (n=64/n=24) underwent endoscopic treatment using Dx/Ha (n=63 RRUs) and PPC (n=25 RRUs). Mean age of patients in Dx/Ha and PPC groups were 6 (3) and 6 (3.75) year (p=0.81), and volumes of these substances given were 1.3 (1) and 1 (0.5) mL (p=0.003), respectively. Overall, for the first endoscopic injection, success rate of grades IV-V VUR per RRU was 53.9% with Dx/Ha, compared to 80% in PPC-injected group, (p=0.024). Late ureterovesical junction obstruction developed only in one patient in PPC-injected group. No ureteral obstruction was observed in Dx/Ha-injected group. Endoscopic injection of PPC resulted in significantly higher success rate, compared to Dx/Ha in subureteric injection treatment of children with high grade VUR. However, the development of late ureterovesical junction obstruction should also be taken into account in PPC injection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene Expression Profiling of Chemokines and Their Receptors in Low and High Grade Astrocytoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ira; Singh, Avninder; Sharma, Karam Chand; Saxena, Sunita

    2017-05-01

    Background: Despite intense interest in molecular characterization and searches for novel therapeutic targets, the glioblastoma remains a formidable clinical challenge. Among many contributors to gliomagenesis, chemokines have drawn special attention due to their involvement in a plethora of biological processes and pathological conditions. In the present study we aimed to elucidate any pro-gliomagenic chemokine axis and probable roles in development of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Method: An array of 84 chemokines, chemokine receptors and related genes were studied by real time PCR with comparison between low grade astrocytoma (diffuse astrocytoma – grade II) and high grade astrocytoma (glioblastoma multiforme – grade IV). Gene ontology analysis and database mining were performed to funnel down the important axis in GBM followed by validation at the protein level by immunohistochemistry on tissue microarrays. Results: Gene expression and gene ontology analysis identified CXCL8 as an important chemokine which was more frequently up-regulated in GBM as compared to diffuse astrocytoma. Further we demonstrated localization of CXCL8 and its receptors in glioblastoma possibly affecting autocrine and paracrine signalling that promotes tumor cell proliferation and neovascularisation with vascular mimicry. Conclusion: From these results CXCL8 appears to be an important gliomagenic chemokine which may be involved in GBM growth by promoting tumor cell proliferation and neovascularization via vascular mimicry. Further in vitro and in vivo investigations are required to explore its potential candidature in anti-GBM therapy. Creative Commons Attribution License

  10. Fluorescein-guided surgery for grade IV gliomas with a dedicated filter on the surgical microscope: preliminary results in 12 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acerbi, Francesco; Broggi, Morgan; Eoli, Marica; Anghileri, Elena; Cuppini, Lucia; Pollo, Bianca; Schiariti, Marco; Visintini, Sergio; Orsi, Chiara; Franzini, Angelo; Broggi, Giovanni; Ferroli, Paolo

    2013-07-01

    Fluorescein is widely used as a fluorescent tracer for many applications. Its capability to accumulate in cerebral areas with blood-brain barrier damage makes it an ideal dye for intraoperative visualization of malignant gliomas (MG). We report our preliminary experience in fluorescein-guided removal of grade IV gliomas using a dedicated filter on the surgical microscope. In September 2011 we started a prospective phase II trial (FLUOGLIO) to evaluate the safety and obtain initial indications about the efficacy of fluorescein-guided surgery for MG. Patients with suspected MG amenable to complete resection of contrast-enhancing areas were eligible to participate in this study. This report is based on a preliminary analysis of the results of 12 patients with grade IV gliomas out of 15 consecutive cases (age range 48-72 years) enrolled since September 2011. Fluorescein was injected intravenously (i.v.) after intubation (5-10 mg/kg). The tumor was removed using a microsurgical technique and fluorescence visualization by BLU 400 or YELLOW 560 filters on a Pentero microscope (Carl Zeiss, Germany). The study was approved by our ethics committee and registered on the European Regulatory Authorities website (EudraCT no. 2011-002527-18). Histological analysis confirmed grade IV gliomas in 12/15 cases. Median preoperative tumor volume was 33.15 cm(3) (9.6-87.8 cm(3)). No adverse reaction related to the administration of fluorescein was registered. Contrast-enhanced tumor was completely removed in 75 % of the patients. This preliminary analysis suggested that the use of intravenous fluorescein during surgery on grade IV gliomas is safe and allows a high rate of complete resection of contrast-enhanced tumor at the early postoperative MRI.

  11. Application of skin traction for surgical treatment of grade IV pressure sore: a clinical report of 160 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, X; Jiang, Z; Chen, Z; Wang, D

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective clinical study. To assess the method of primary surgical closure of pressure sores developed by the Ruixin Hospital for burns. Nanjing, China. The study included 235 grade IV pressure sores of 160 patients, M:F = 119:41. Their age ranged from 19 to 93 years (mean = 47.4, s.d. ± 15.7). The primary disease was spinal cord injury in 141 patients (88.1%). The location of sore spread over ischial, sacrococcygeal and trochanteric regions. The largest pressure sore measured 15 × 25 cm(2). The time from onset of sore to admission ranged from 3 months to 22 years (mean = 35.5 months, s.d. ± 55.8). Local preoperative preparation included external skin traction using adhesive tapes, wound cleaning and change of dressing. General condition was checked and improved by supportive measures. Operation procedures included thorough debridement, excision of hidden minor scars, mobilizing opposing skin flaps and meticulous haemostasis before closure. Skin traction continued after the operation until the wound was healed. All but 10 sores healed primarily. These 10 sores healed after a revision. The length of stay in hospital ranged from 20 to 140 days (mean = 45.1 days, s.d. ± 21.1). Follow-up period was 2-51 months (mean = 22 months, s.d. ± 12.5). Two ischial sores recurred owing to long sitting. They were cured with the same method. Three illustrative cases are presented. The method is simple and enjoys a high success rate with a short stay in hospital and hence is cost effective. The recurrence is rare.

  12. Dipeptidyl peptidase IV in two human glioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sedo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that dipeptidyl peptidase IV [DPP-IV, EC 3.4.14.5] takes part in the metabolism of biologically active peptides participating in the regulation of growth and transformation of glial cells. However, the knowledge on the DPP-IV expression in human glial and glioma cells is still very limited. In this study, using histochemical and biochemical techniques, the DPP-IV activity was demonstrated in two commercially available human glioma cell lines of different transformation degree, as represented by U373 astrocytoma (Grade III and U87 glioblastoma multiforme (Grade IV lines. Higher total activity of the enzyme, as well as its preferential localisation in the plasma membrane, was observed in U87 cells. Compared to U373 population, U87 cells were morphologically more pleiomorphic, they were cycling at lower rate and expressing less Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein. The data revealed positive correlation between the degree of transformation of cells and activity of DPP-IV. Great difference in expression of this enzyme, together with the phenotypic differences of cells, makes these lines a suitable standard model for further 57 studies of function of this enzyme in human glioma cells.

  13. Hard and Soft Skills Enhancement in Entrepreunership Learning for the Twelfth Grade Students of SMK Kartika IV-1 Malang

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayuningtyas, Lidya Pradina; Djatmika, Ery Tri; Wardana, Ludi Wishnu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to describe the following things: (1) contributions of both hard and soft skills in entrepreneurship learning in SMK Kartika IV-1 Malang; (2) how to increase hard and soft skills on entrepreneurship learning in SMK Kartika IV-1 Malang; and (3) the purpose hard and the soft skills. The research findings showed that: (1)…

  14. Histidine-rich glycoprotein can prevent development of mouse experimental glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Kärrlander

    Full Text Available Extensive angiogenesis, formation of new capillaries from pre-existing blood vessels, is an important feature of malignant glioma. Several antiangiogenic drugs targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF or its receptors are currently in clinical trials as therapy for high-grade glioma and bevacizumab was recently approved by the FDA for treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. However, the modest efficacy of these drugs and emerging problems with anti-VEGF treatment resistance welcome the development of alternative antiangiogenic therapies. One potential candidate is histidine-rich glycoprotein (HRG, a plasma protein with antiangiogenic properties that can inhibit endothelial cell adhesion and migration. We have used the RCAS/TV-A mouse model for gliomas to investigate the effect of HRG on brain tumor development. Tumors were induced with platelet-derived growth factor-B (PDGF-B, in the presence or absence of HRG. We found that HRG had little effect on tumor incidence but could significantly inhibit the development of malignant glioma and completely prevent the occurrence of grade IV tumors (glioblastoma.

  15. Is there a role for hyperbaric oxygen as primary treatment for grade IV radiation-induced haemorrhagic cystitis? a prospective pilot-feasibility study and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dellis, Athanasios; Deliveliotis, Charalambos; Kalentzos, Vasileios; Vavasis, Pavlos; Skolarikos, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen as the primary treatment for Grade IV radiation-induced haemorrhagic cystitis. Materials and Methods: Hyperbaric oxygen was prospectively applied as a primary treatment option in 11 patients with Grade IV radiation cystitis. Primary endpoint was the incidence of complete and partial response to treatment. Secondary endpoints included the duration of response, the correlation of treatment success-rate to the interval between the onset of haematuria and initiation of therapy, blood transfusion need and total radiation dose, the number of sessions to success, the avoidance of surgery and the overall survival. Results: All patients completed therapy without complications for a mean follow-up of 17.82 months (range 3 to 34). Mean number of sessions needed was 32.8 (range 27 to 44). Complete and partial response rate was 81.8% and 18.2%, respectively. However, in three patients the first treatment session was not either sufficient or durable giving a 72.7% rate of durable effect. Interestingly, all 9 patients with complete response received therapy within 6 months of the haematuria onset compared to the two patients with partial response who received therapy at 8 and 10 months from the haematuria onset, respectively (p = 0.018). The need for blood transfusion (p = 0.491) and the total radiation dose (p = 0.259) were not correlated to success-rate. One patient needed cystectomy, while all patients were alive at the end of follow-up. Conclusions: Early primary use of hyperbaric oxygen to treat radiation-induced grade IV cystitis is an effective and safe treatment option. (author)

  16. Is there a role for hyperbaric oxygen as primary treatment for grade IV radiation-induced haemorrhagic cystitis? a prospective pilot-feasibility study and review of literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dellis, Athanasios [Surgical Department, University of Athens, Aretaieion Hospital (Greece); Deliveliotis, Charalambos [Urologic Department, University of Athens, Sismanoglio General Hospital (Greece); Kalentzos, Vasileios; Vavasis, Pavlos; Skolarikos, Andreas [Diving and Hyperbaric Oxygen Department, Naval and Veterans Hospital, Athens (Greece)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To examine the safety and efficacy of hyperbaric oxygen as the primary treatment for Grade IV radiation-induced haemorrhagic cystitis. Materials and Methods: Hyperbaric oxygen was prospectively applied as a primary treatment option in 11 patients with Grade IV radiation cystitis. Primary endpoint was the incidence of complete and partial response to treatment. Secondary endpoints included the duration of response, the correlation of treatment success-rate to the interval between the onset of haematuria and initiation of therapy, blood transfusion need and total radiation dose, the number of sessions to success, the avoidance of surgery and the overall survival. Results: All patients completed therapy without complications for a mean follow-up of 17.82 months (range 3 to 34). Mean number of sessions needed was 32.8 (range 27 to 44). Complete and partial response rate was 81.8% and 18.2%, respectively. However, in three patients the first treatment session was not either sufficient or durable giving a 72.7% rate of durable effect. Interestingly, all 9 patients with complete response received therapy within 6 months of the haematuria onset compared to the two patients with partial response who received therapy at 8 and 10 months from the haematuria onset, respectively (p = 0.018). The need for blood transfusion (p = 0.491) and the total radiation dose (p = 0.259) were not correlated to success-rate. One patient needed cystectomy, while all patients were alive at the end of follow-up. Conclusions: Early primary use of hyperbaric oxygen to treat radiation-induced grade IV cystitis is an effective and safe treatment option. (author)

  17. Reverse Engineering of Modified Genes by Bayesian Network Analysis Defines Molecular Determinants Critical to the Development of Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkle, Brian W.; Yoo, Changwon; Roy, Deodutta

    2013-01-01

    In this study we have identified key genes that are critical in development of astrocytic tumors. Meta-analysis of microarray studies which compared normal tissue to astrocytoma revealed a set of 646 differentially expressed genes in the majority of astrocytoma. Reverse engineering of these 646 genes using Bayesian network analysis produced a gene network for each grade of astrocytoma (Grade I–IV), and ‘key genes’ within each grade were identified. Genes found to be most influential to development of the highest grade of astrocytoma, Glioblastoma multiforme were: COL4A1, EGFR, BTF3, MPP2, RAB31, CDK4, CD99, ANXA2, TOP2A, and SERBP1. All of these genes were up-regulated, except MPP2 (down regulated). These 10 genes were able to predict tumor status with 96–100% confidence when using logistic regression, cross validation, and the support vector machine analysis. Markov genes interact with NFkβ, ERK, MAPK, VEGF, growth hormone and collagen to produce a network whose top biological functions are cancer, neurological disease, and cellular movement. Three of the 10 genes - EGFR, COL4A1, and CDK4, in particular, seemed to be potential ‘hubs of activity’. Modified expression of these 10 Markov Blanket genes increases lifetime risk of developing glioblastoma compared to the normal population. The glioblastoma risk estimates were dramatically increased with joint effects of 4 or more than 4 Markov Blanket genes. Joint interaction effects of 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 or 10 Markov Blanket genes produced 9, 13, 20.9, 26.7, 52.8, 53.2, 78.1 or 85.9%, respectively, increase in lifetime risk of developing glioblastoma compared to normal population. In summary, it appears that modified expression of several ‘key genes’ may be required for the development of glioblastoma. Further studies are needed to validate these ‘key genes’ as useful tools for early detection and novel therapeutic options for these tumors. PMID:23737970

  18. Expression and enzymatic activity of dipeptidyl peptidase-IV in human astrocytic tumours are associated with tumour grade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stremeňová, J.; Křepela, E.; Mareš, Vladislav; Trim, J.; Dbalý, V.; Marek, J.; Vaníčková, Z.; Lisá, Věra; Yea, Ch.; Šedo, A.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 31, č. 4 (2007), s. 785-792 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8105 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV * human brain tumors * DASH molecules Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 2.295, year: 2007

  19. Long-term outcome of stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) versus stapled hemorrhoidopexys (STH) for grade III-IV hemorrhoids: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, Simone; Spirch, Saverio; Scarpa, Marco; Ricci, Francesco; Lumachi, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Circular stapled transanal hemorrhoidopexy (STH) was first introduced by A. Longo for the correction of internal mucosal prolapse and obstructed defecation and in 1998, was proposed as alternative to conventional excisional hemorrhoidectomy. More recently, stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) has gradually gained popularity, as the Longo procedure, in the treatment of hemorrhoids. The aim of our study was to evaluate the usefulness of STARR as alternative to STH in patients with grade III (n=218, 68.1%) and IV (n=102, 31.9%) hemorrhoids. A group of 320 consecutive patients (median age=51 years; range=16-85) underwent STH (n=281) or STARR (n=39) procedure. The rate of postoperative bleeding (53.8% vs. 74.4%, pSTH group. In conclusion, according to our preliminary results, the STARR procedure leads to a lower incidence of complications and recurrences and should be considered for patients with grade III or IV hemorrhoids previously selected for stapled hemorrhoidectomy, as a promising alternative to STH. Copyright © 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  20. Early microsurgery in a paradigm of “intervention first” for skull base Cognard grade IV dural arteriovenous fistulas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Bernard, MD

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Surgical occlusion of skull base Cognard IV DAVFs yields excellent exclusion rate. However, complete occlusion of the shunt may not lead to clinical improvement if symptoms had been progressing for an excessively long period of time before curative treatment was initiated. Hence the patient remains at risk of rebleeding as long as the shunt is open. We do believe that a single stage endovascular attempt can be decided, but a failed procedure should lead to immediate surgery.

  1. Selective dorsal rhizotomy for the treatment of severe spastic cerebral palsy: efficacy and therapeutic durability in GMFCS grade IV and V children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aquino, Daniel; Moussa, Ahmad A; Ammar, Amr; Ingale, Harshal; Vloeberghs, Michael

    2018-04-01

    Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR) has been established as an effective surgical treatment for spastic diplegia. The applicability of SDR to the full spectrum of spastic cerebral palsy and the durability of its therapeutic effects remain under investigation. There are currently limited data in the literature regarding efficacy and outcomes following SDR in Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS) IV and V patients. Intrathecal baclofen has traditionally been the surgical treatment of choice for these patients. When utilised primarily as a treatment for the relief of spasticity, it is proposed that SDR represents a rational and effective treatment option for this patient group. We report our outcomes of SDR performed on children with severe cerebral palsy (GMFCS grade IV and V). The commensurate improvement in upper as well as lower limb spasticity is highlighted. Apparent benefit to urological function following SDR in this patient group is also discussed. A retrospective review of prospectively collected data for 54 paediatric patients with severe cerebral palsy (GMFCS IV-V) who received SDR plus specialised physiotherapy. Mean age was 10.2 years (range, 3.0-19.5). SDR guided by electrophysiological monitoring was performed by a single experienced neurosurgeon. All subjects received equivalent physiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was change to the degree of spasticity following SDR. Spasticity of upper and lower limb muscle groups were quantified and standardised using the Ashworth score. Measures were collected at baseline and at 2-, 8- and 14-month postoperative intervals. In addition, baseline and 6-month postoperative urological function was also evaluated as a secondary outcome measure. The mean lower limb Ashworth score at baseline was 3.2 (range, 0-4). Following SDR, significant reduction in lower limb spasticity scores was observed at 2 months and maintained at 8 and 14 months postoperatively (Wilcoxon rank, p SDR was also observed (mean

  2. RELATIONS BETWEEN GENERAL MOTOR SKILLS AND HANDBALL SPECIFIC TEST "BALL SLALOM" IN STUDENTS OF THE IV GRADE OF PRIMARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Branković

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Teaching physical education and physical training of children, should be appropriate to their age abilities and needs. Acquire the diversified movement experience is a priority of physical education in junior school age. Students fourth grade of primary school - age 10-11 years, in the sensitive period for developing coordination and speed capabilities. Sports game handball and mode of the game "mini-handball", which is adapted to students age abilities and spatial characteristics of the majority of primary schools, abundant with various tasks, specifically dominated by natural forms of movement - running, jumping, throwing. Therefore, handball has a significant role in solving the tasks of physical education. The specific motor tests and relations with the general motor skills are particularly important for continuous monitoring of motor development of children. The survey was conducted on 79 boys fourth grade of primary school who participated in the electoral sport of handball in the regular physical education classes. The results of the handball test "ball slalom" and its relation with general motor skills of students fourth grade of primary school, should contribute to the perception of the value of handball as the content of physical education, but also to contribute to the selection and forecast performance of children in handball.

  3. Glioblastoma-initiating cells: relationship with neural stem cells and the micro-environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffart, Nicolas; Kroonen, Jérôme; Rogister, Bernard

    2013-08-14

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV) is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC) properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays still unclear whether GICs derive from NSCs, neural progenitor cells or differentiated cells such as astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, NSCs are located in specific regions of the adult brain called neurogenic niches that have been shown to control critical stem cell properties, to nourish NSCs and to support their self-renewal. This "seed-and-soil" relationship has also been adapted to cancer stem cell research as GICs also require a specific micro-environment to maintain their "stem cell" properties. In this review, we will discuss the controversies surrounding the origin and the identification of GBM stem cells and highlight the micro-environment impact on their biology.

  4. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Goffart

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays still unclear whether GICs derive from NSCs, neural progenitor cells or differentiated cells such as astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, NSCs are located in specific regions of the adult brain called neurogenic niches that have been shown to control critical stem cell properties, to nourish NSCs and to support their self-renewal. This “seed-and-soil” relationship has also been adapted to cancer stem cell research as GICs also require a specific micro-environment to maintain their “stem cell” properties. In this review, we will discuss the controversies surrounding the origin and the identification of GBM stem cells and highlight the micro-environment impact on their biology.

  5. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goffart, Nicolas [Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, GIGA-Neurosciences Research Center, University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); Kroonen, Jérôme [Human Genetics, CHU and University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); The T& P Bohnenn Laboratory for Neuro-Oncology, Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, UMC Utrecht, Utrecht 3556 (Netherlands); Rogister, Bernard, E-mail: Bernard.Register@ulg.ac.be [Laboratory of Developmental Neurobiology, GIGA-Neurosciences Research Center, University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); Department of Neurology, CHU and University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium); GIGA-Development, Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine, University of Liège, Liège 4000 (Belgium)

    2013-08-14

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV) is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC) properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays still unclear whether GICs derive from NSCs, neural progenitor cells or differentiated cells such as astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, NSCs are located in specific regions of the adult brain called neurogenic niches that have been shown to control critical stem cell properties, to nourish NSCs and to support their self-renewal. This “seed-and-soil” relationship has also been adapted to cancer stem cell research as GICs also require a specific micro-environment to maintain their “stem cell” properties. In this review, we will discuss the controversies surrounding the origin and the identification of GBM stem cells and highlight the micro-environment impact on their biology.

  6. Glioblastoma-Initiating Cells: Relationship with Neural Stem Cells and the Micro-Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goffart, Nicolas; Kroonen, Jérôme; Rogister, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, WHO grade IV) is the most common and lethal subtype of primary brain tumor with a median overall survival of 15 months from the time of diagnosis. The presence in GBM of a cancer population displaying neural stem cell (NSC) properties as well as tumor-initiating abilities and resistance to current therapies suggests that these glioblastoma-initiating cells (GICs) play a central role in tumor development and are closely related to NSCs. However, it is nowadays still unclear whether GICs derive from NSCs, neural progenitor cells or differentiated cells such as astrocytes or oligodendrocytes. On the other hand, NSCs are located in specific regions of the adult brain called neurogenic niches that have been shown to control critical stem cell properties, to nourish NSCs and to support their self-renewal. This “seed-and-soil” relationship has also been adapted to cancer stem cell research as GICs also require a specific micro-environment to maintain their “stem cell” properties. In this review, we will discuss the controversies surrounding the origin and the identification of GBM stem cells and highlight the micro-environment impact on their biology

  7. Correlation Between Intercritical Heat-Affected Zone and Type IV Creep Damage Zone in Grade 91 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiyu; Kannan, Rangasayee; Li, Leijun

    2018-02-01

    A soft zone in Cr-Mo steel weldments has been reported to accompany the infamous Type IV cracking, the highly localized creep damage in the heat-affected zone of creep-resistant steels. However, the microstructural features and formation mechanism of this soft zone are not well understood. In this study, using microhardness profiling and microstructural verification, the initial soft zone in the as-welded condition was identified to be located in the intercritical heat-affected zone of P91 steel weldments. It has a mixed structure, consisting of Cr-rich re-austenitized prior austenite grains and fine Cr-depleted, tempered martensite grains retained from the base metal. The presence of these further-tempered retained grains, originating from the base metal, is directly responsible for the hardness reduction of the identified soft zone in the as-welded condition. The identified soft zone exhibits a high location consistency at three thermal stages. Local chemistry analysis and thermodynamic calculation show that the lower chromium concentrations inside these retained grains thermodynamically decrease their potentials for austenitic transformation during welding. Heterogeneous grain growth is observed in the soft zone during postweld heat treatment. The mismatch of strengths between the weak Cr-depleted grains and strong Cr-rich grains enhances the creep damage. Local deformation of the weaker Cr-depleted grains accelerates the formation of creep cavities.

  8. Correlation Between Intercritical Heat-Affected Zone and Type IV Creep Damage Zone in Grade 91 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiyu; Kannan, Rangasayee; Li, Leijun

    2018-04-01

    A soft zone in Cr-Mo steel weldments has been reported to accompany the infamous Type IV cracking, the highly localized creep damage in the heat-affected zone of creep-resistant steels. However, the microstructural features and formation mechanism of this soft zone are not well understood. In this study, using microhardness profiling and microstructural verification, the initial soft zone in the as-welded condition was identified to be located in the intercritical heat-affected zone of P91 steel weldments. It has a mixed structure, consisting of Cr-rich re-austenitized prior austenite grains and fine Cr-depleted, tempered martensite grains retained from the base metal. The presence of these further-tempered retained grains, originating from the base metal, is directly responsible for the hardness reduction of the identified soft zone in the as-welded condition. The identified soft zone exhibits a high location consistency at three thermal stages. Local chemistry analysis and thermodynamic calculation show that the lower chromium concentrations inside these retained grains thermodynamically decrease their potentials for austenitic transformation during welding. Heterogeneous grain growth is observed in the soft zone during postweld heat treatment. The mismatch of strengths between the weak Cr-depleted grains and strong Cr-rich grains enhances the creep damage. Local deformation of the weaker Cr-depleted grains accelerates the formation of creep cavities.

  9. MGMT methylation analysis of glioblastoma on the Infinium methylation BeadChip identifies two distinct CpG regions associated with gene silencing and outcome, yielding a prediction model for comparisons across datasets, tumor grades, and CIMP-status

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Bady (Pierre); D. Sciuscio (Davide); A.C. Diserens; J. Bloch (Jocelyne); M.J. van den Bent (Martin); C. Marosi (Christine); P-Y. Dietrich (Pierre Yves); M. Weller (Michael); L. Mariani (Luigi); F.L. Heppner (Frank ); D.R. Mcdonald (David ); D. Lacombe (Denis); R. Stupp (Roger); M. Delorenzi (Mauro); M.E. Hegi (Monika)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe methylation status of the O6-methylguanine- DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene is an important predictive biomarker for benefit from alkylating agent therapy in glioblastoma. Recent studies in anaplastic glioma suggest a prognostic value for MGMT methylation. Investigation of

  10. Glioblastoma: Molecular Pathways, Stem Cells and Therapeutic Targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhanwar-Uniyal, Meena, E-mail: meena_jhanwar@nymc.edu; Labagnara, Michael; Friedman, Marissa; Kwasnicki, Amanda; Murali, Raj [Department of Neurosurgery, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States)

    2015-03-25

    Glioblastoma (GBM), a WHO-defined Grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common and aggressive CNS malignancy. Despite current treatment modalities, the survival time remains dismal. The main cause of mortality in patients with this disease is reoccurrence of the malignancy, which is attributed to treatment-resistant cancer stem cells within and surrounding the primary tumor. Inclusion of novel therapies, such as immuno- and DNA-based therapy, may provide better means of treating GBM. Furthermore, manipulation of recently discovered non-coding microRNAs, some of which regulate tumor growth through the development and maintenance of GBM stem cells, could provide new prospective therapies. Studies conducted by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) also demonstrate the role of molecular pathways, specifically the activated PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway, in GBM tumorigenesis. Inhibition of the aforementioned pathway may provide a more direct and targeted method to GBM treatment. The combination of these treatment modalities may provide an innovative therapeutic approach for the management of GBM.

  11. Predictors of acute grade 4 swallowing toxicity in patients with stages III and IV squamous carcinoma of the head and neck treated with radiotherapy alone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poulsen, Michael Geoffrey; Riddle, Bena; Keller, Jacqui; Porceddu, Sandro V.; Tripcony, Lee

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study was to investigate the predictive factors for acute grade 4 swallowing toxicity in an attempt to identify which patients may benefit from early intervention with enteral feeding during curative radiation treatment for localised Stages 3-4 squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. It was hypothesised that craniocaudal length of the treatment field to the upper neck and pharynx would correlate with grade 4 swallowing toxicity due to the increased volume of pharynx irradiated. Patients and methods: Toxicity data were collected prospectively as part of a phase III randomised trial (TROG 91:01) that assigned patients to either conventional (CRT) or accelerated radiotherapy (ART). Patients were randomly assigned to either CRT, using a single 2 Gy per day to a dose of 70 Gy in 35 fractions in 49 days or to ART, using 1.8 Gy twice a day to a dose of 59.4 Gy in 33 fractions in 24 days. Treatment allocation was stratified for site and stage. Accrual commenced in 1991 and the trial was closed in 1998 when the target of 350 patients was reached. Potential factors were analysed that predicted for Grade IV swallowing toxicity. Results: The treatment field lengths >82 mm for the second phase increased the probability of requiring intervention with percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy (PEG) or Nasogastric tube (NGT). The probability of grade 4 swallowing was 36% if the phase 2 treatment length was >82 mm vs 16% for less ≤82 mm (p = 0.0001). A predictive enteral grading score (PEG score) was derived using the Cox regression coefficients: Field length of the boost volume >82 mm scored 3 points, Stage grouping greater than 1 scored 1 point, altered fractionation scored 2 points, ECOG greater than 1 scored 1 point. The PEG score was 45% if the score was ≥6 and 19% if the score was <6 (p = 0.0). Conclusions: More attention needs to be focused on developing robust dose and volume constraints for the pharyngeal mucosa and the musculature in order

  12. Elevated chemokine CC-motif receptor-like 2 (CCRL2) promotes cell migration and invasion in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fengqiong; Xu, Zhenhua; Wang, Zifeng; Yao, Hong; Shen, Zan; Yu, Fang; Tang, Yiping; Fu, Dengli; Lin, Sheng; Lu, Gang; Kung, Hsiang-Fu; Poon, Wai Sang; Huang, Yunchao; Lin, Marie Chia-Mi

    2012-12-14

    Chemokine CC-motif receptor-like 2 (CCRL2) is a 7-transmembrane G protein-coupled receptor which plays a key role in lung dendritic cell trafficking to peripheral lymph nodes. The function and expression of CCRL2 in cancer is not understood at present. Here we report that CCRL2 expression level is elevated in human glioma patient samples and cell lines. The magnitude of increase is positively associated with increasing tumor grade, with the highest level observed in grade IV glioblastoma. By gain-of-function and loss-of-function studies, we further showed that CCRL2 did not regulate the growth of human glioblatoma U87 and U373 cells. Importantly, we demonstrated that over-expression of CCRL2 significantly enhanced the migration rate and invasiveness of the glioblastoma cells. Taken together, these results suggest for the first time that elevated CCRL2 in glioma promotes cell migration and invasion. The potential roles of CCRL2 as a novel therapeutic target and biomarker warrant further investigations. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nanotechnology Applications for Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nduom, Edjah; Bouras, Alexandros; Kaluzova, Milota; Hadjipanayis, Costas G.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis Glioblastoma remains one of the most difficult cancers to treat and represents the most common primary malignancy of the brain. While conventional treatments have found modest success in reducing the initial tumor burden, infiltrating cancer cells beyond the main mass are responsible for tumor recurrence and ultimate patient demise. Targeting the residual infiltrating cancer cells requires the development of new treatment strategies. The emerging field of cancer nanotechnology holds much promise in the use of multifunctional nanoparticles for the imaging and targeted therapy of GBM.. Nanoparticles have emerged as potential “theranostic” agents that can permit the diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of GBM tumors. A recent human clinical trial with magnetic nanoparticles has provided feasibility and efficacy data for potential treatment of GBM patients with thermotherapy. Here we examine the current state of nanotechnology in the treatment of glioblastoma and interesting directions of further study. PMID:22748656

  14. FBXW7/hCDC4 controls glioma cell proliferation in vitro and is a prognostic marker for survival in glioblastoma patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagedorn Martin

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the quest for novel molecular mediators of glioma progression, we studied the regulation of FBXW7 (hCDC4/hAGO/SEL10, its association with survival of patients with glioblastoma and its potential role as a tumor suppressor gene in glioma cells. The F-box protein Fbxw7 is a component of SCFFbxw7, a Skp1-Cul1-F-box E3 ubiquitin ligase complex that tags specific proteins for proteasome degradation. FBXW7 is mutated in several human cancers and functions as a haploinsufficient tumor suppressor in mice. Any of the identified targets, Cyclin E, c-Myc, c-Jun, Notch1/4 and Aurora-A may have oncogenic properties when accumulated in tumors with FBXW7 loss. Results We tested the expression of FBXW7 in human glioma biopsies by quantitative PCR and compared the transcript levels of grade IV glioma (glioblastoma, G-IV with those of grade II tumors (G-II. In more than 80% G-IV, expression of FBXW7 was significantly reduced. In addition, levels of FBXW7 were correlated with survival indicating a possible implication in tumor aggressiveness. Locus 4q31.3 which carries FBXW7 was investigated by in situ hybridization on biopsy touchprints. This excluded allelic loss as the principal cause for low expression of FBXW7 in G-IV tumors. Two targets of Fbxw7, Aurora-A and Notch4 were preferentially immunodetected in G-IV biopsies. Next, we investigated the effects of FBXW7 misregulation in glioma cells. U87 cells overexpressing nuclear isoforms of Fbxw7 lose the expression of the proliferation markers PCNA and Ki-67, and get counterselected in vitro. This observation fits well with the hypothesis that Fbxw7 functions as a tumor suppressor in astroglial cells. Finally, FBXW7 knockdown in U87 cells leads to defects in mitosis that may promote aneuploidy in progressing glioma. Conclusion Our results show that FBXW7 expression is a prognostic marker for patients with glioblastoma. We suggest that loss of FBXW7 plays an important role in glioma

  15. Is There Pseudoprogression in Secondary Glioblastomas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juratli, Tareq A., E-mail: Tareq.Juratli@uniklinikum-dresden.de [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Engellandt, Kay [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Lautenschlaeger, Tim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center/Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard L. Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University College of Medicine Columbus, Ohio (United States); Geiger, Kathrin D. [Institute of Neuropathology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Kummer, Rüdiger von; Cerhova, Jana [Institute of Neuroradiology, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden (Germany); Chakravarti, Arnab [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center/Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard L. Solove Research Institute, The Ohio State University College of Medicine Columbus, Ohio (United States); Krex, Dietmar; Schackert, Gabriele [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Carl Gustav Carus, Technical University of Dresden, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Pseudoprogression (PP) during adjuvant treatment of glioblastoma (GBM) is frequent and is a clinically and radiologically challenging problem. While there are several reports of the frequency of PP in GBM cohorts including mainly patients with primary GBM, there are few data on the incidence of PP in patients with secondary glioblastomas (sGBM). Therefore, the goal of this study was to evaluate the frequency of PP in sGBM. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively evaluated the incidence of PP in adult patients with sGBM treated with chemoradiation therapy (CRTx) using temozolomide (TMZ) and sought to assess if there was an association between PP and MGMT promoter methylation status, IDH mutations status, or 1p/19q codeletion. The definition of PP according to the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology Working Group was used. Results: None of the evaluable 15 sGBM patients in our series demonstrated a PP. Of the 9 sGBM patients who received concomitant CRTx with TMZ, 6 patients had the methylated MGMT promoter, and 6 patients had IDH mutations. There also was no PP identified in sGBM patients who received sequential CRTx, irrespective of MGMT or IDH status. The median time of follow-up was 3.4 years after diagnosis of an sGBM, and the median overall survival was 18.2 months (range, 14.3-45.2 months). Three of 15 patients had previously received radiation therapy for their World Health Organization low-grade 2 glioma, while none of them had received chemotherapy at that stage. Conclusions: Based on this small series of sGBM patients treated with CRTx (concomitantly or sequentially) the frequency of PP appears to be very low in sGBM, even in those patients with methylated MGMT promoter or IDH mutations. Our results highlight the differences between primary glioblastomas and sGBM in particular as they relate to PP.

  16. In vitro Analysis of Neurospheres Derived from Glioblastoma Primary Culture: A Novel Methodology Paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavon, Lorena Favaro; Marti, Luciana C; Sibov, Tatiana Tais; Malheiros, Suzana M F; Brandt, Reynaldo Andre; Cavalheiro, Sergio; Gamarra, Lionel F

    2014-01-07

    Glioblastomas are the most lethal primary brain tumor that frequently relapse or progress as focal masses after radiation, suggesting that a fraction of tumor cells are responsible for the tumor regrowth. The identification of a brain tumor cell subpopulation with potent tumorigenic activity supports the cancer stem cell hypothesis in solid tumors. The goal of this study is to determine a methodology for the establishment of primary human glioblastoma cell lines. Our aim is achieved by taking the following approaches: (i) the establishment of primary glioblastoma cell culture; (ii) isolation of neurospheres derived from glioblastoma primary cultures; (iii) selection of CD133 cells from neurospheres, (iv) formation of subspheres in the CD133-positive population, (v) study of the expression level of GFAP, CD133, Nestin, Nanog, CD34, Sox2, CD44, and CD90 markers on tumor subspheres. Hence, we described a successful method for isolation of CD133-positive cell population and establishment of glioblastoma neurospheres from this primary culture, which are more robust than the ones derived straight from the tumor. Pointed out that the neurospheres derived from glioblastoma primary culture showed 29% more cells expressing CD133 then the ones straight tumor-derived, denoting a higher concentration of CD133-positive cells in the neurospheres derived from glioblastoma primary culture. These CD133-positive fractions were able to further generate subspheres. The subspheres derived from glioblastoma primary culture presented a well-defined morphology while the ones derived from the fresh tumor were sparce and less robust. And the negative fraction of CD133 cells was unable to generate subspheres. The tumor subspheres expressed GFAP, CD133, Nestin, Nanog, CD44, and CD90. Also, the present study describes an optimization of neurospheres/subspheres isolation from glioblastoma primary culture by selection of CD133-positive adherent stem cell.

  17. A double-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) of Titanium-13Zirconium versus Titanium Grade IV small-diameter bone level implants in edentulous mandibles--results from a 1-year observation period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Nawas, Bilal; Brägger, Urs; Meijer, Henny J A; Naert, Ignace; Persson, Rigmor; Perucchi, Alessandro; Quirynen, Marc; Raghoebar, Gerry M; Reichert, Torsten E; Romeo, Eugenio; Santing, Hendrik J; Schimmel, Martin; Storelli, Stefano; ten Bruggenkate, Christiaan; Vandekerckhove, Betty; Wagner, Wilfried; Wismeijer, Daniel; Müller, Frauke

    2012-12-01

    The use of endosseous dental implants has become common practice for the rehabilitation of edentulous patients, and a two-implant overdenture has been recommended as the standard of care. The use of small-diameter implants may extend treatment options and reduce the necessity for bone augmentation. However, the mechanical strength of titanium is limited, so titanium alloys with greater tensile and fatigue strength may be preferable. This randomized, controlled, double-blind, multicenter study investigated in a split-mouth model whether small-diameter implants made from Titanium-13Zirconium alloy (TiZr, Roxolid™) perform at least as well as Titanium Grade IV implants. Patients with an edentulous mandible received one TiZr and one Ti Grade IV small-diameter bone level implant (3.3 mm, SLActive®) in the interforaminal region. The site distribution was randomized and double-blinded. Outcome measures included change in radiological peri-implant bone level from surgery to 12 months post-insertion (primary), implant survival, success, soft tissue conditions, and safety (secondary). Of 91 treated patients, 87 were available for the 12-month follow-up. Peri-implant bone level change (-0.3 ± 0.5 mm vs -0.3 ± 0.6 mm), plaque, and sulcus bleeding indices were not significantly different between TiZr and Ti Grade IV implants. Implant survival rates were 98.9 percent and 97.8 percent, success rates were 96.6 percent and 94.4 percent, respectively. Nineteen minor and no serious adverse events were related to the study devices. This study confirms that TiZr small-diameter bone level implants provide at least the same outcomes after 12 months as Ti Grade IV bone level implants. The improved mechanical properties of TiZr implants may extend implant therapy to more challenging clinical situations. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Dopamine signaling: target in glioblastoma

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bartek, Jiří; Hodný, Zdeněk

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 5, č. 5 (2014), 1116-1117 ISSN 1949-2553 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : Dopamine signaling * glioblastoma * MAPK Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 6.359, year: 2014

  19. Radiation induced sarcoma after treatment of glioblastoma: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosa, Victor Domingos Lisita; Anjos, Caroline Souza dos; Candido, Priscila Barile Marchi; Dias Junior, Antonio Soares; Santos, Evandro Airton Sordi dos; Godoy, Antonio Carlos Cavalcante; Saggioro, Fabiano P.; Carlotti Junior, Carlos Gilberto; Oliveira, Harley Francisco de; Peria, Fernanda Maris

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Glioblastoma multiform is the most lethal central nervous system neoplasm, with a median survival of around 13 months and the worst prognosis among all gliomas. The therapeutic approach of glioblastoma consists in neurosurgery with maximum possible resection of tumor volume, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy reduces the risk of tumor recurrence through direct and indirect damage to tumor deoxyribonucleic acid. The long-term effects of radiation therapy include tissue necrosis, vasculopathy, and radiation-induced neoplasia. The most reported secondary intracranial malignant tumors include meningiomas, gliomas, and sarcomas. The latency period between skull radiotherapy and the appearance of radioinduced lesions varies in the literature from six months to 47 years, with an average of 18.7 years. Case report: The present report describes the appearance of high-grade spindle cell sarcoma after ten months in a patient who received glioblastoma treatment at Hospital das Clínicas of Ribeirão Preto of the University of São Paulo. Conclusion: The rarity of this association is probably due to the poor survival of patients with glioblastoma, thus limiting the time to development of secondary neoplasia

  20. CPEB4 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation and predicts poor outcome of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Xiang; Qin, Rong; Mao, Jian; Huang, Qi-Lin; Hong, Fan; Li, Feng; Gong, Zhen-Yu; Xu, Tao; Yan, Yong; Chao, Shao-Hui; Zhang, Shi-Kun; Chen, Ju-Xiang

    2018-04-03

    Cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein 4 (CPEB4) is a regulator of gene expression at transcriptional level and has been reported to be associated with biological malignancy in cancers. However, little was known about the correlation between CPEB4 and glioblastoma cell proliferation and the prognostic significance in patients. Our aim was to investigate the functional role and prognostic value of CPEB4 in glioblastoma. We determined the expression of CPEB4 protein using immunohistochemistry in tissue microarrays containing 278 glioma patients (including 98 primary glioblastomas) and evaluated its association with pathological grades and clinical outcome by univariate and multivariate analyses. And then, lentiviral-mediated RNAi targeting CPEB4 was utilized to study the role of CPEB4 in glioblastoma cell proliferation. In our cohort, CPEB4 expression was positively related to glioma pathological grade (p < 0.01) and elevated in glioblastoma (p < 0.01). High expression of CPEB4 was associated with significantly poor prognosis, and could be identified as an independent risk factor for overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) of glioblastoma patients (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.730, p = 0.014 and HR = 1.877, p = 0.004, respectively). In vitro studies further showed that downregulation of CPEB4 significantly reduced the growth rate of T98G and U251 cells comparing with the controls. Our study indicated that increased expression of CPEB4 in primary glioblastoma is a novel biomarker for predicting poor outcome of patients and suppression of CPEB4 inhibit tumor cell proliferation, suggesting a potential therapeutic target for glioblastoma. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Overexpression of FADD and Caspase-8 inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis of human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong-Bin; Li, Tao; Ma, Dong-Zhou; Ji, Yan-Xin; Zhi, Hua

    2017-09-01

    The study aimed at exploring the effects involved in Fas-Associated protein with Death Domain (FADD) expression and cysteine-aspartic acid specific protease-8 (Caspase-8) in relation to the proliferation and apoptosis of human glioblastoma (GBM) cells. 93 GBM tissues and 64 normal brain tissues were the central mediums used for the investigation of the study. Cultured human GBM SC189 cells were divided into separate groups including the blank negative control (NC), FADD and Caspase-8 groups. The mRNA and protein expressions of FADD and Caspase-8 in tissues and human glioblastoma (GBM) cells were detected using qRT-PCR and Western blotting techniques. Cell proliferation was tested by CCK-8. Flow cytometry was used for the measure of cell cycle and apoptosis rates. The mRNA and protein expressions of FADD and Caspase-8 in GBM tissues were less than the levels of expression displayed in normal brain tissues. Correlations between the expressions of FADD and Caspase-8 in GBM tissues were analyzed as being linked with the clinical grades of GBM patients. Patients in stage III+IV displayed lower expressions of FADD and Caspase-8 than patients in stage I+II. In comparison with the blank group, the FADD and Caspase-8 groups showed decreased proliferation rates of SHG44 cells and lower ratios of cells in the S phase and Bcl-2 expression. Greater ratios of cells in the G0/G1 stage as well as increased cell apoptosis and expressions of Caspase-8 and Bax were exhibited. The expression of FADD in the FADD group was higher than the blank group, however no significant differences in FADD expression was observed between the blank and Caspase-8 groups. The data obtained during the study demonstrated that overexpression of FADD and Caspase-8 suppresses proliferation whilst promoting the apoptosis of human GBM cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  2. Proteome and Secretome Characterization of Glioblastoma-Derived Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okawa, Satoshi; Gagrica, Sladjana; Blin, Carla; Ender, Christine; Pollard, Steven M; Krijgsveld, Jeroen

    2017-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) (grade IV astrocytoma) is the most common and aggressive primary brain tumor. GBM consists of heterogeneous cell types including a subset of stem cell-like cells thought to sustain tumor growth. These tumor-initiating glioblastoma multiforme-derived neural stem (GNS) cells as well as their genetically normal neural stem (NS) counterparts can be propagated in culture as relatively pure populations. Here, we perform quantitative proteomics to globally characterize and compare total proteome plus the secreted proteome (secretome) between GNS cells and NS cells. Proteins and pathways that distinguish malignant cancer (GNS) stem cells from their genetically normal counterparts (NS cells) might have value as new biomarkers or therapeutic targets. Our analysis identified and quantified ∼7,500 proteins in the proteome and ∼2,000 in the secretome, 447 and 138 of which were differentially expressed, respectively. Notable tumor-associated processes identified using gene set enrichment analysis included: extracellular matrix interactions, focal adhesion, cell motility, and cell signaling. We focused on differentially expressed surface proteins, and identified 26 that participate in ligand-receptor pairs that play a prominent role in tumorigenesis. Immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting confirmed that CD9, a recently identified marker of adult subventricular zone NS cells, was consistently enriched across a larger set of primary GNS cell lines. CD9 may, therefore, have value as a GNS-specific surface marker and a candidate therapeutic target. Altogether, these findings support the notion that increased cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion molecules play a crucial role in promoting the tumor initiating and infiltrative properties of GNS cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:967-980. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  3. Can the prognosis of individual patients with glioblastoma be predicted using an online calculator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Christopher; Heald, James; Hall, Gregory; Kamaly-Asl, Ian

    2013-08-01

    In an exploratory subanalysis of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer and National Cancer Institute of Canada (EORTC/NCIC) trial data, Gorlia et al. identified a variety of factors that were predictive of overall survival, including therapy administered, age, extent of surgery, mini-mental score, administration of corticosteroids, World Health Organization (WHO) performance status, and O-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status. Gorlia et al. developed 3 nomograms, each intended to predict the survival times of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma on the basis of individual-specific combinations of prognostic factors. These are available online as a "GBM Calculator" and are intended for use in patient counseling. This study is an external validation of this calculator. One hundred eighty-seven patients from 2 UK neurosurgical units who had histologically confirmed glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) had their information at diagnosis entered into the GBM calculator. A record was made of the actual and predicted median survival time for each patient. Statistical analysis was performed to assess the accuracy, precision, correlation, and discrimination of the calculator. The calculator gives both inaccurate and imprecise predictions. Only 23% of predictions were within 25% of the actual survival, and the percentage bias is 140% in our series. The coefficient of variance is 76%, where a smaller percentage would indicate greater precision. There is only a weak positive correlation between the predicted and actual survival among patients (R(2) of 0.07). Discrimination is inadequate as measured by a C-index of 0.62. The authors would not recommend the use of this tool in patient counseling. If departments were considering its use, we would advise that a similar validating exercise be undertaken.

  4. A comprehensive profile of recurrent glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Campos, B.; Olsen, Lars Rønn; Urup, T.

    2016-01-01

    In spite of relentless efforts to devise new treatment strategies, primary glioblastomas invariably recur as aggressive, therapy-resistant relapses and patients rapidly succumb to these tumors. Many therapeutic agents are first tested in clinical trials involving recurrent glioblastomas. Remarkab...

  5. Reliable diagnosis of IDH-mutant glioblastoma by 2-hydroxyglutarate detection: a study by 3-T magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsumeda, Manabu; Motohashi, Kunio; Igarashi, Hironaka; Nozawa, Takanori; Abe, Hideaki; Tsukamoto, Yoshihiro; Ogura, Ryosuke; Okada, Masayasu; Kobayashi, Tsutomu; Aoki, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Nakada, Tsutomu; Fujii, Yukihiko

    2017-09-27

    We have previously reported that reliable detection of 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) in isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutant WHO grade 2 and 3 gliomas is possible utilizing 3.0-T single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy (SVMRS). We set out to determine whether the same method could be applied to detect 2HG in IDH-mutant glioblastoma. Forty-four patients harboring glioblastoma underwent pre-operative MRS evaluation to detect 2HG and other metabolites. Presence of IDH-mutations was determined by IDH1 R132H immunohistochemical analysis and DNA sequencing of surgically obtained tissues. Six out of 44 (13.6%) glioblastomas were IDH-mutant. IDH-mutant glioblastoma exhibited significantly higher accumulation of 2HG (median 3.191 vs. 0.000 mM, p IDH-mutation in glioblastoma. Glioblastoma with high 2HG accumulation did not have significantly longer overall survival than glioblastoma with low 2HG accumulation (p = 0.107, log-rank test). Non-invasive and reliable detection of 2HG in IDH-mutant glioblastoma was possible by 3.0-T SVMRS.

  6. Supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme with spinal metastases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhidha Shah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common malignant brain tumor in adults. Metastasis of intracranial glioblastoma via the cerebrospinal fluid to the spine is a rare occurrence. We present two cases of glioblastoma multiforme with spinal leptomeningeal spread who presented with back pain and paraparesis.

  7. Retrospective study of carmustine or lomustine with bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma patients who have failed prior bevacizumab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Rifaquat; Hempfling, Kelly; Norden, Andrew D.; Reardon, David A.; Nayak, Lakshmi; Rinne, Mikael L.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Doherty, Lisa; Ruland, Sandra; Rai, Arun; Rifenburg, Jennifer; LaFrankie, Debra; Alexander, Brian M.; Huang, Raymond Y.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Lee, Eudocia Q.

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, there are no known effective treatments for recurrent glioblastoma once patients have progressed on a bevacizumab-containing regimen. We examined the efficacy of adding nitrosoureas to bevacizumab in patients who progressed while on an initial bevacizumab-containing regimen. Methods In this retrospective study, we identified adult patients with histologically confirmed glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) who were treated with lomustine or carmustine in combination with bevacizumab as a second or third regimen after failing an alternative initial bevacizumab-containing regimen. Response rate (RR), 6-month progression free survival (PFS6), and progression-free survival (PFS) were assessed for each treatment. Results Forty-two patients were identified (28 males) with a median age of 49 years (range, 24–78 y). Of 42 patients, 28 received lomustine (n = 22) or carmustine (n = 6) with bevacizumab as their second bevacizumab-containing regimen, and 14 received lomustine (n = 11) or carmustine (n = 3) as their third bevacizumab-containing regimen. While the median PFS for the initial bevacizumab-containing regimen was 16.3 weeks, the median PFS for the nitrosourea-containing bevacizumab regimen was 6.3 weeks. Patients had an RR of 44% and a PFS6 rate of 26% during the initial bevacizumab regimen and an RR of 0% and a PFS6 rate of 3% during the nitrosourea-containing bevacizumab regimen. There was increased grade 3–4 toxicity (45% vs 19%, P = .010) during the nitrosourea-containing bevacizumab regimen relative to the initial bevacizumab regimen. Median overall survival was 18.7 weeks from initiation of the nitrosourea-containing bevacizumab regimen. Conclusion The addition of lomustine or carmustine to bevacizumab after a patient has already progressed on a bevacizumab-containing regimen does not appear to provide benefit for most patients and is associated with additional toxicity with the doses used in this cohort. PMID:24958095

  8. Eosinophils in glioblastoma biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curran Colleen S

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common primary brain tumor in adults. The development of this malignant glial lesion involves a multi-faceted process that results in a loss of genetic or epigenetic gene control, un-regulated cell growth, and immune tolerance. Of interest, atopic diseases are characterized by a lack of immune tolerance and are inversely associated with glioma risk. One cell type that is an established effector cell in the pathobiology of atopic disease is the eosinophil. In response to various stimuli, the eosinophil is able to produce cytotoxic granules, neuromediators, and pro-inflammatory cytokines as well as pro-fibrotic and angiogenic factors involved in pathogen clearance and tissue remodeling and repair. These various biological properties reveal that the eosinophil is a key immunoregulatory cell capable of influencing the activity of both innate and adaptive immune responses. Of central importance to this report is the observation that eosinophil migration to the brain occurs in response to traumatic brain injury and following certain immunotherapeutic treatments for GBM. Although eosinophils have been identified in various central nervous system pathologies, and are known to operate in wound/repair and tumorstatic models, the potential roles of eosinophils in GBM development and the tumor immunological response are only beginning to be recognized and are therefore the subject of the present review.

  9. Emerging Biomarkers in Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McNamara, Mairéad G.; Sahebjam, Solmaz; Mason, Warren P., E-mail: warren.mason@uhn.ca [Pencer Brain Tumor Centre, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5G 2M9 (Canada)

    2013-08-22

    Glioblastoma, the most common primary brain tumor, has few available therapies providing significant improvement in survival. Molecular signatures associated with tumor aggressiveness as well as with disease progression and their relation to differences in signaling pathways implicated in gliomagenesis have recently been described. A number of biomarkers which have potential in diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy have been identified and along with imaging modalities could contribute to the clinical management of GBM. Molecular biomarkers including O(6)-methlyguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) methylation, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of chromosomes 1p and 19q, loss of heterozygosity 10q, isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutations, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), epidermal growth factor, latrophilin, and 7 transmembrane domain-containing protein 1 on chromosome 1 (ELTD1), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tumor suppressor protein p53, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN), p16INK4a gene, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO), phospholipid metabolites, telomerase messenger expression (hTERT messenger ribonucleic acid [mRNA]), microRNAs (miRNAs), cancer stem cell markers and imaging modalities as potential biomarkers are discussed. Inclusion of emerging biomarkers in prospective clinical trials is warranted in an effort for more effective personalized therapy in the future.

  10. Emerging Biomarkers in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren P. Mason

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most common primary brain tumor, has few available therapies providing significant improvement in survival. Molecular signatures associated with tumor aggressiveness as well as with disease progression and their relation to differences in signaling pathways implicated in gliomagenesis have recently been described. A number of biomarkers which have potential in diagnosis, prognosis and prediction of response to therapy have been identified and along with imaging modalities could contribute to the clinical management of GBM. Molecular biomarkers including O(6-methlyguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT promoter and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA methylation, loss of heterozygosity (LOH of chromosomes 1p and 19q, loss of heterozygosity 10q, isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH mutations, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, epidermal growth factor, latrophilin, and 7 transmembrane domain-containing protein 1 on chromosome 1 (ELTD1, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, tumor suppressor protein p53, phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN, p16INK4a gene, cytochrome c oxidase (CcO, phospholipid metabolites, telomerase messenger expression (hTERT messenger ribonucleic acid [mRNA], microRNAs (miRNAs, cancer stem cell markers and imaging modalities as potential biomarkers are discussed. Inclusion of emerging biomarkers in prospective clinical trials is warranted in an effort for more effective personalized therapy in the future.

  11. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy in high-grade gliomas: Clinical and dosimetric results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayana, Ashwatha; Yamada, Josh; Berry, Sean; Shah, Priti B.S.; Hunt, Margie; Gutin, Philip H.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To report preliminary clinical and dosimetric data from intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for malignant gliomas. Methods and Materials: Fifty-eight consecutive high-grade gliomas were treated between January 2001 and December 2003 with dynamic multileaf collimator IMRT, planned with the inverse approach. A dose of 59.4-60 Gy at 1.8-2.0 Gy per fraction was delivered. A total of three to five noncoplanar beams were used to cover at least 95% of the target volume with the prescription isodose line. Glioblastoma accounted for 70% of the cases, and anaplastic oligodendroglioma histology (pure or mixed) was seen in 15% of the cases. Surgery consisted of biopsy only in 26% of the patients, and 80% received adjuvant chemotherapy. Results: With a median follow-up of 24 months, 85% of the patients have relapsed. The median progression-free survival time for anaplastic astrocytoma and glioblastoma histology was 5.6 and 2.5 months, respectively. The overall survival time for anaplastic glioma and glioblastoma was 36 and 9 months, respectively. Ninety-six percent of the recurrences were local. No Grade IV/V late neurologic toxicities were noted. A comparative dosimetric analysis revealed that regardless of tumor location, IMRT did not significantly improve target coverage compared with three-dimensional planning. However, IMRT resulted in a decreased maximum dose to the spinal cord, optic nerves, and eye by 16%, 7%, and 15%, respectively, owing to its improved dose conformality. The mean brainstem dose also decreased by 7%. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy delivered with a limited number of beams did not result in an increased dose to the normal brain. Conclusions: It is unlikely that IMRT will improve local control in high-grade gliomas without further dose escalation compared with conventional radiotherapy. However, it might result in decreased late toxicities associated with radiotherapy

  12. Novel Peripherally Derived Neural‐Like Stem Cells as Therapeutic Carriers for Treating Glioblastomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbrair, Alexander; Sattiraju, Anirudh; Zhu, Dongqin; Zulato, Gilberto; Batista, Izadora; Nguyen, Van T.; Messi, Maria Laura; Solingapuram Sai, Kiran Kumar; Marini, Frank C.; Delbono, Osvaldo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Glioblastoma (GBM), an aggressive grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common primary malignant adult brain tumor characterized by extensive invasiveness, heterogeneity, and angiogenesis. Standard treatment options such as radiation and chemotherapy have proven to be only marginally effective in treating GBM because of its invasive nature. Therefore, extensive efforts have been put forth to develop tumor‐tropic stem cells as viable therapeutic vehicles with potential to treat even the most invasive tumor cells that are harbored within areas of normal brain. To this end, we discovered a newly described NG2‐expressing cell that we isolated from a distinct pericyte subtype found abundantly in cultures derived from peripheral muscle. In this work, we show the translational significance of these peripherally derived neural‐like stem cells (NLSC) and their potential to migrate toward tumors and act as therapeutic carriers. We demonstrate that these NLSCs exhibit in vitro and in vivo GBM tropism. Furthermore, NLSCs did not promote angiogenesis or transform into tumor‐associated stromal cells, which are concerns raised when using other common stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells and induced neural stem cells, as therapeutic carriers. We also demonstrate the potential of NLSCs to express a prototype therapeutic, tumor necrosis factor α‐related apoptosis‐inducing ligand and kill GBM cells in vitro. These data demonstrate the therapeutic potential of our newly characterized NLSC against GBM. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:471–481 PMID:28191774

  13. Glioblastoma Presenting with Steroid-Induced Pseudoregression of Contrast Enhancement on Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus D. Mazur

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Corticosteroid-induced reduction in contrast enhancement on radiographic imaging is most commonly associated with lymphoma but has been reported in other entities, including glioma. This finding may represent a diagnostic dilemma. Concern that steroid-induced cytotoxicity obscures histological diagnosis of suspected lymphoma may lead to postponement of a biopsy. If glioma is not considered in the differential diagnosis, reduction in tumor contrast enhancement may be misinterpreted as disease regression rather than a transient radiographic change. We report a case of a patient with an enhancing right temporoparietal mass adjacent to the atrium of the lateral ventricle. After treatment with dexamethasone was started, the mass exhibited marked reduction in contrast enhancement, with symptom improvement. The clinical course suggested lymphoma, and surgery was not performed. Subsequent screening for extra-axial lymphoma was negative. Two weeks later, the patient developed worsening symptoms, and repeat T1-weighted imaging showed interval increase in size and enhancement. The findings suggested a possible diagnosis of malignant glioma. The patient underwent a stereotactic-guided craniotomy for excision of the right temporoparietal mass lesion. Final histological diagnosis was glioblastoma multiforme, World Health Organization grade IV.

  14. The Synergistic Effect of Combination Progesterone and Temozolomide on Human Glioblastoma Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahim Atif

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common and most aggressive malignant brain tumor. Despite optimal treatment and evolving standard of care, the median survival of patients diagnosed with GBM is only 12-15 months. In this study, we combined progesterone (PROG and temozolomide (TMZ, a standard chemotherapeutic agent for human GBM, to test whether PROG enhances the antitumor effects of TMZ and reduces its side effects. Two WHO grade IV human GBM cells lines (U87MG and U118MG and primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs were repeatedly exposed to PROG and TMZ either alone or in combination for 3 and 6 days. Cell death was measured by MTT reduction assay. PROG and TMZ individually induced tumor cell death in a dose-dependent manner. PROG at high doses produced more cell death than TMZ alone. When combined, PROG enhanced the cell death-inducing effect of TMZ. In HDFs, PROG did not reduce viability even at the same high cytotoxic doses, but TMZ did so in a dose-dependent manner. In combination, PROG reduced TMZ toxicity in HDFs. PROG alone and in combination with TMZ suppressed the EGFR/PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway and MGMT expression in U87MG cells, thus suppressing cell proliferation. PROG and TMZ individually reduced cell migration in U87MG cells but did so more effectively in combination. PROG enhances the cytotoxic effects of TMZ in GBM cells and reduces its toxic side effects in healthy primary cells.

  15. Intra-articular Hyaluronic Acid (HA) and Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) injection versus Hyaluronic acid (HA) injection alone in Patients with Grade III and IV Knee Osteoarthritis (OA): A Retrospective Study on Functional Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saturveithan, C; Premganesh, G; Fakhrizzaki, S; Mahathir, M; Karuna, K; Rauf, K; William, H; Akmal, H; Sivapathasundaram, N; Jaspreet, K

    2016-07-01

    Introduction: Intra-articular hyaluronic acid (HA) is widely utilized in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis whereas platelet rich plasma (PRP) enhances the regeneration of articular cartilage. This study analyses the efficacy of HA and PRP in grade III and IV knee osteoarthritis. Methodology: This is a cross sectional study with retrospective review of 64 patients (101 knees) which includes 56 knees injected with HA+ PRP, and 45 knees with HA only. Results: During the post six months International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) evaluation, HA+PRP group showed marked improvement of 24.33 compared to 12.15 in HA group. Decrement in visual analogue score (VAS) in HA+PRP was 1.9 compared to 0.8 in HA group. Conclusion: We propose intra-articular HA and PRP injections as an optional treatment modality in Grade III and IV knee osteoarthritis in terms of functional outcome and pain control for up to six months when arthroplasty is not an option.

  16. Health Curriculum Materials: Grades 7, 8, and 9. Strand IV, Environmental and Community Health; Consumer Health Education. Special Edition for Evaluation and Discussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hooft, Gordon E.; And Others

    This publication contains curriculum suggestions for teaching Environmental and Community Health-Consumer Health, for grades seven, eight, and nine. Outcomes desired at this level include: 1) being aware of the practice of health quackery and being able to recognize those traits that characterize the health fraud, his techniques, and his products;…

  17. MiR-18a regulates the proliferation, migration and invasion of human glioblastoma cell by targeting neogenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yichen, E-mail: jeff200064017@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Wang, Ping, E-mail: pingwang8000@163.com [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Zhao, Wei, E-mail: 15669746@qq.com [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Yao, Yilong, E-mail: yaoyilong_322@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liu, Xiaobai, E-mail: paganizonda1991@qq.com [The 96th Class, 7-year Program, China Medical University, Shenyang, Liaoning Province 110001 (China); Ma, Jun, E-mail: majun_724@163.com [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Xue, Yixue, E-mail: xueyixue888@163.com [Department of Neurobiology, College of Basic Medicine, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Institute of Pathology and Pathophysiology, China Medical University, Shenyang 110001 (China); Liu, Yunhui, E-mail: liuyh@sj-hospital.org [Department of Neurosurgery, Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University, Shenyang 110004 (China)

    2014-05-15

    MiR-17-92 cluster has recently been reported as an oncogene in some tumors. However, the association of miR-18a, an important member of this cluster, with glioblastoma remains unknown. Therefore, this study aims to investigate the expression of miR-18a in glioblastoma and its role in biological behavior of U87 and U251 human glioblastoma cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that miR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines compared with that in human brain tissues and primary normal human astrocytes, and the expression levels were increased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a by dual-luciferase reporter assays. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that its expression levels were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. Inhibition of miR-18a expression was established by transfecting exogenous miR-18a inhibitor into U87 and U251 cells, and its effects on the biological behavior of glioblastoma cells were studied using CCK-8 assay, transwell assay and flow cytometry. Inhibition of miR-18a expression in U87 and U251 cells significantly up-regulated neogenin, and dramatically suppressed the abilities of cell proliferation, migration and invasion, induced cell cycle arrest and promoted cellular apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that miR-18a may regulate biological behavior of human glioblastoma cells by targeting neogenin, and miR-18a can serve as a potential target in the treatment of glioblastoma. - Highlights: • MiR-18a was highly expressed in glioblastoma tissues and U87 and U251 cell lines. • Neogenin was identified as the target gene of miR-18a. • Neogenin expressions were decreased along with the rising pathological grades of glioblastoma. • Inhibition of miR-18a suppressed biological behavior of glioma cells by up-regulating neogenin.

  18. Response of recurrent high-grade glioma to treatment with (90)Y-DOTATOC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heute, Dirk; Kostron, Herwig; von Guggenberg, Elisabeth; Ingorokva, Shota; Gabriel, Michael; Dobrozemsky, Georg; Stockhammer, Günther; Virgolini, Irene J

    2010-03-01

    The treatment of patients with high-grade malignant glioma still represents an unsolved clinical problem. We report the treatment of 3 patients who had World Health Organization grade IV recurrent glioblastoma: a 23-y-old woman and 2 men aged 61 and 62 y. All 3 patients were treated with the somatostatin receptor radiopharmaceutical (90)Y-labeled [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid(0)-d-Phe(1),Tyr(3)]octreotide (DOTATOC). A cumulated dose of 1.7-2.2 GBq given in 3 or 4 cycles was locally injected into a previously implanted catheter system. Treatment was successful in all 3 patients, with only minor side effects reported. After treatment, MRI and PET showed complete remission in one patient and partial remission in the other patients. These findings correlated well with clinical improvement and improved quality of life. Receptor-mediated radionuclide therapy by locally injected (90)Y-DOTATOC is feasible and well tolerated. This approach represents an attractive strategy for the treatment of locally recurring or progressing glioblastoma.

  19. Self-diffusion nuclear magnetic resonance, microstructure transitions, and solubilization capacity of phytosterols and cholesterol in Winsor IV food-grade microemulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spernath, Aviram; Yaghmur, Anan; Aserin, Abraham

    2003-01-01

    Microemulsions are of growing interest to the food industry as vehicles for delivering and enhancing solubilization of natural food supplements with nutritional and health benefits. The incorporation of molecular phytosterols, cholesterol-lowering agents, in food products is of great interest...... to the food industry. In this work is demonstrated the use of water dilutable food-grade microemulsions consisting of ethoxylated sorbitan ester (Tween 60), water, R-(+)-limonene, ethanol, and propylene glycol as vehicles for enhancing the phytosterols solubilization. Phytosterols were solubilized up to 12...

  20. The role of IDH1 mutated tumour cells in secondary glioblastomas: an evolutionary game theoretical view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basanta, David; Scott, Jacob G.; Rockne, Russ; Swanson, Kristin R.; Anderson, Alexander R. A.

    2011-02-01

    Recent advances in clinical medicine have elucidated two significantly different subtypes of glioblastoma which carry very different prognoses, both defined by mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH-1). The mechanistic consequences of this mutation have not yet been fully clarified, with conflicting opinions existing in the literature; however, IDH-1 mutation may be used as a surrogate marker to distinguish between primary and secondary glioblastoma multiforme (sGBM) from malignant progression of a lower grade glioma. We develop a mathematical model of IDH-1 mutated secondary glioblastoma using evolutionary game theory to investigate the interactions between four different phenotypic populations within the tumor: autonomous growth, invasive, glycolytic, and the hybrid invasive/glycolytic cells. Our model recapitulates glioblastoma behavior well and is able to reproduce two recent experimental findings, as well as make novel predictions concerning the rate of invasive growth as a function of vascularity, and fluctuations in the proportions of phenotypic populations that a glioblastoma will experience under different microenvironmental constraints.

  1. The role of IDH1 mutated tumour cells in secondary glioblastomas: an evolutionary game theoretical view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basanta, David; Scott, Jacob G; Anderson, Alexander R A; Rockne, Russ; Swanson, Kristin R

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in clinical medicine have elucidated two significantly different subtypes of glioblastoma which carry very different prognoses, both defined by mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase-1 (IDH-1). The mechanistic consequences of this mutation have not yet been fully clarified, with conflicting opinions existing in the literature; however, IDH-1 mutation may be used as a surrogate marker to distinguish between primary and secondary glioblastoma multiforme (sGBM) from malignant progression of a lower grade glioma. We develop a mathematical model of IDH-1 mutated secondary glioblastoma using evolutionary game theory to investigate the interactions between four different phenotypic populations within the tumor: autonomous growth, invasive, glycolytic, and the hybrid invasive/glycolytic cells. Our model recapitulates glioblastoma behavior well and is able to reproduce two recent experimental findings, as well as make novel predictions concerning the rate of invasive growth as a function of vascularity, and fluctuations in the proportions of phenotypic populations that a glioblastoma will experience under different microenvironmental constraints

  2. Bacterial Carriers for Glioblastoma Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Mehta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of aggressive glioblastoma brain tumors is challenging, largely due to diffusion barriers preventing efficient drug dosing to tumors. To overcome these barriers, bacterial carriers that are actively motile and programmed to migrate and localize to tumor zones were designed. These carriers can induce apoptosis via hypoxia-controlled expression of a tumor suppressor protein p53 and a pro-apoptotic drug, Azurin. In a xenograft model of human glioblastoma in rats, bacterial carrier therapy conferred a significant survival benefit with 19% overall long-term survival of >100 days in treated animals relative to a median survival of 26 days in control untreated animals. Histological and proteomic analyses were performed to elucidate the safety and efficacy of these carriers, showing an absence of systemic toxicity and a restored neural environment in treated responders. In the treated non-responders, proteomic analysis revealed competing mechanisms of pro-apoptotic and drug-resistant activity. This bacterial carrier opens a versatile avenue to overcome diffusion barriers in glioblastoma by virtue of its active motility in extracellular space and can lead to tailored therapies via tumor-specific expression of tumoricidal proteins.

  3. The Invasive Region of Glioblastoma Defined by 5ALA Guided Surgery Has an Altered Cancer Stem Cell Marker Profile Compared to Central Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J. Smith

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, a WHO grade IV astrocytoma, is a highly aggressive and heterogeneous tumour that infiltrates deeply into surrounding brain parenchyma, making complete surgical resection impossible. Despite chemo-radiotherapy, the residual cell population within brain parenchyma post-surgery causes inevitable recurrence. Previously, the tumour core has been the focus of research and the basis for targeted therapeutic regimes, which have failed to improve survival in clinical trials. Here, we focus on the invasive margin as defined by the region with 5-aminolevulinic acid (5ALA (GliolanTM fluorescence at surgery beyond the T1 enhancing region on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. This area is hypothesized to constitute unique microenvironmental pressures, and consequently be molecularly distinct to tumour core and enhancing rim regions. We conducted hematoxylin and eosin (H&E, array real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and immunohistochemistry staining on various intra-tumour regions of glioblastoma to determine molecular heterogeneity between regions. We analyzed 73 tumour samples from 21 patients and compared cellular density, cell proliferation, and the degree of vascularity. There is a statistically significant difference between the core, invasive margin and other regions for cell density (p < 0.001, cell proliferation (p = 0.029, and vascularity (p = 0.007. Aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1 and Nestin immunohistochemistry were used as a measure of stem-like properties, showing significantly decreased Nestin expression (p < 0.0001 in the invasive margin. Array PCR of the core, rim, and invasive regions showed significantly increased fibroblast growth factor (FGF and ALDH1 expression in the invasive zone, with elevated hypoxia inducing factor 1-alpha (HIF1α in the rim region, adjacent to the hypoxic core. The influence of varying microenvironments in the intra-tumour regions is a major key to understanding intra-tumour heterogeneity. This

  4. Amnesia due to bilateral hippocampal glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimauchi, M.; Wakisaka, S.; Kinoshita, K.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report a unique case of glioblastoma which caused permanent amnesia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the lesion to be limited to the hippocampal formation bilaterally. Although glioblastoma extends frequently into fiber pathways and expands into the opposite cerebral hemisphere, making a 'butterfly' lesion, it is unusual for it to invade the limbic system selectively to this extent. (orig.)

  5. (IV) phosphates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M(IV) phosphates of the class of tetravalent metal acid (TMA) salts where M (IV) = Zr, Ti, Sn has been synthesized by the sol-gel method. These materials have been characterized for elemental analysis (ICP-AES), thermal analysis (TGA, DSC), X-ray analysis and FTIR spectroscopy. Chemical resistivity of these materials ...

  6. Non-Gaussian diffusion MR imaging of glioma: comparisons of multiple diffusion parameters and correlation with histologic grade and MIB-1 (Ki-67 labeling) index

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Ren; Haopeng, Pang; Xiaoyuan, Feng; Jiawen, Zhang; Zhenwei, Yao; Jinsong, Wu; Chengjun, Yao; Tianming, Qiu; Ji, Xiong; Mao, Sheng; Yueyue, Ding; Yong, Zhang; Jianfeng, Luo

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the association of Gaussian and non-Gaussian magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived parameters with histologic grade and MIB-1 (Ki-67 labeling) index (MI) in brain glioma. Sixty-five patients with pathologically confirmed glioma, who underwent diffusion-weighted MRI with 2 b values (0, 1000 s/mm 2 ) and 22 b values (≤5000 s/mm 2 ), respectively, were divided into three groups of grade II (n = 35), grade III (n = 8), and grade IV (n = 22). Comparisons by two groups were made for apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), slow diffusion coefficient (Dslow), distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC), and heterogeneity index α. Analyses of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were performed to maximize the area under the curve (AUC) for differentiating grade III + IV (high-grade glioma, HGG) from grade II (low-grade glioma, LGG) and grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme, GBM) from grade II + III (other grade glioma, OGG). Correlations with MI were analyzed for the MRI parameters. On tumor regions, the values of ADC, Dslow, DDC, and α were significantly higher in grade II [(1.37 ± 0.29, 0.70 ± 0.11, 1.39 ± 0.34) (x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) and 0.88 ± 0.05, respectively] than in grade III [(0.99 ± 0.13, 0.55 ± 0.07, 1.04 ± 0.20) (x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) and 0.80 ± 0.03, respectively] and grade IV [(1.03 ± 0.14, 0.50 ± 0.05, 1.02 ± 0.16) (x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) and 0.76 ± 0.04, respectively] (all P < 0.001). The parameter α showed the highest AUCs of 0.950 and 0.922 in discriminating HGG from LGG and GBM from OGG, respectively. Significant correlations with histologic grade and MI were observed for the MRI parameters. The non-Gaussian MRI-derived parameters α and Dslow are superior to ADC in glioma grading, which are comparable with ADC as reliable biomarkers in noninvasively predicting the proliferation level of glioma malignancy. (orig.)

  7. Non-Gaussian diffusion MR imaging of glioma: comparisons of multiple diffusion parameters and correlation with histologic grade and MIB-1 (Ki-67 labeling) index

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Ren; Haopeng, Pang; Xiaoyuan, Feng; Jiawen, Zhang; Zhenwei, Yao [Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Jinsong, Wu; Chengjun, Yao; Tianming, Qiu [Fudan University, Department of Neurosurgery, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Ji, Xiong [Fudan University, Department of Neuropathology, Huashan Hospital, Shanghai (China); Mao, Sheng; Yueyue, Ding [Department of Imaging, Suzhou Children' s Hospital, Suzhou, Jiangsu (China); Yong, Zhang [MR Research, GE Healthcare, Shanghai (China); Jianfeng, Luo [Fudan University, Department of Biostatistics, Public Health School, Shanghai (China)

    2016-02-15

    This study was conducted to compare the association of Gaussian and non-Gaussian magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived parameters with histologic grade and MIB-1 (Ki-67 labeling) index (MI) in brain glioma. Sixty-five patients with pathologically confirmed glioma, who underwent diffusion-weighted MRI with 2 b values (0, 1000 s/mm{sup 2}) and 22 b values (≤5000 s/mm{sup 2}), respectively, were divided into three groups of grade II (n = 35), grade III (n = 8), and grade IV (n = 22). Comparisons by two groups were made for apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), slow diffusion coefficient (Dslow), distributed diffusion coefficient (DDC), and heterogeneity index α. Analyses of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve were performed to maximize the area under the curve (AUC) for differentiating grade III + IV (high-grade glioma, HGG) from grade II (low-grade glioma, LGG) and grade IV (glioblastoma multiforme, GBM) from grade II + III (other grade glioma, OGG). Correlations with MI were analyzed for the MRI parameters. On tumor regions, the values of ADC, Dslow, DDC, and α were significantly higher in grade II [(1.37 ± 0.29, 0.70 ± 0.11, 1.39 ± 0.34) (x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) and 0.88 ± 0.05, respectively] than in grade III [(0.99 ± 0.13, 0.55 ± 0.07, 1.04 ± 0.20) (x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) and 0.80 ± 0.03, respectively] and grade IV [(1.03 ± 0.14, 0.50 ± 0.05, 1.02 ± 0.16) (x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) and 0.76 ± 0.04, respectively] (all P < 0.001). The parameter α showed the highest AUCs of 0.950 and 0.922 in discriminating HGG from LGG and GBM from OGG, respectively. Significant correlations with histologic grade and MI were observed for the MRI parameters. The non-Gaussian MRI-derived parameters α and Dslow are superior to ADC in glioma grading, which are comparable with ADC as reliable biomarkers in noninvasively predicting the proliferation level of glioma malignancy. (orig.)

  8. MR Imaging-derived Oxygen Metabolism and Neovascularization Characterization for Grading and IDH Gene Mutation Detection of Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadlbauer, Andreas; Zimmermann, Max; Kitzwögerer, Melitta; Oberndorfer, Stefan; Rössler, Karl; Dörfler, Arnd; Buchfelder, Michael; Heinz, Gertraud

    2017-06-01

    Purpose To explore the diagnostic performance of physiological magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of oxygen metabolism and neovascularization activity for grading and characterization of isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) gene mutation status of gliomas. Materials and Methods This retrospective study had institutional review board approval; written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Eighty-three patients with histopathologically proven glioma (World Health Organization [WHO] grade II-IV) were examined with quantitative blood oxygen level-dependent imaging and vascular architecture mapping. Biomarker maps of neovascularization activity (microvessel radius, microvessel density, and microvessel type indicator [MTI]) and oxygen metabolism (oxygen extraction fraction [OEF] and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen [CMRO 2 ]) were calculated. Receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine diagnostic performance for grading and detection of IDH gene mutation status. Results Low-grade (WHO grade II) glioma showed areas with increased OEF (+18%, P < .001, n = 20), whereas anaplastic glioma (WHO grade III) and glioblastoma (WHO grade IV) showed decreased OEF when compared with normal brain tissue (-54% [P < .001, n = 21] and -49% [P < .001, n = 41], respectively). This allowed clear differentiation between low- and high-grade glioma (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve [AUC], 1) for the patient cohort. MTI had the highest diagnostic performance (AUC, 0.782) for differentiation between gliomas of grades III and IV among all biomarkers. CMRO 2 was decreased (P = .037) in low-grade glioma with a mutated IDH gene, and MTI was significantly increased in glioma grade III with IDH mutation (P = .013) when compared with the IDH wild-type counterparts. CMRO 2 showed the highest diagnostic performance for IDH gene mutation detection in low-grade glioma (AUC, 0.818) and MTI in high-grade glioma (AUC, 0.854) and for all WHO grades (AUC, 0

  9. Radiation induced sarcoma after treatment of glioblastoma: case report; Sarcoma radioinduzido pós-tratamento de glioblastoma: relato de caso

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, Victor Domingos Lisita; Anjos, Caroline Souza dos; Candido, Priscila Barile Marchi; Dias Junior, Antonio Soares; Santos, Evandro Airton Sordi dos; Godoy, Antonio Carlos Cavalcante; Saggioro, Fabiano P.; Carlotti Junior, Carlos Gilberto; Oliveira, Harley Francisco de; Peria, Fernanda Maris, E-mail: fernandaperia@fmrp.usp.br, E-mail: victor_lisita@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: carolinesanjos@gmail.com, E-mail: priscilabarile@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas

    2016-07-01

    Introduction: Glioblastoma multiform is the most lethal central nervous system neoplasm, with a median survival of around 13 months and the worst prognosis among all gliomas. The therapeutic approach of glioblastoma consists in neurosurgery with maximum possible resection of tumor volume, followed by radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Radiotherapy reduces the risk of tumor recurrence through direct and indirect damage to tumor deoxyribonucleic acid. The long-term effects of radiation therapy include tissue necrosis, vasculopathy, and radiation-induced neoplasia. The most reported secondary intracranial malignant tumors include meningiomas, gliomas, and sarcomas. The latency period between skull radiotherapy and the appearance of radioinduced lesions varies in the literature from six months to 47 years, with an average of 18.7 years. Case report: The present report describes the appearance of high-grade spindle cell sarcoma after ten months in a patient who received glioblastoma treatment at Hospital das Clínicas of Ribeirão Preto of the University of São Paulo. Conclusion: The rarity of this association is probably due to the poor survival of patients with glioblastoma, thus limiting the time to development of secondary neoplasia.

  10. Effects of the selective MPS1 inhibitor MPS1-IN-3 on glioblastoma sensitivity to antimitotic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannous, Bakhos A; Kerami, Mariam; Van der Stoop, Petra M; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Wang, Jinhua; Zhou, Wenjun; Kessler, Almuth F; Lewandrowski, Grant; Hiddingh, Lotte; Sol, Nik; Lagerweij, Tonny; Wedekind, Laurine; Niers, Johanna M; Barazas, Marco; Nilsson, R Jonas A; Geerts, Dirk; De Witt Hamer, Philip C; Hagemann, Carsten; Vandertop, W Peter; Van Tellingen, Olaf; Noske, David P; Gray, Nathanael S; Würdinger, Thomas

    2013-09-04

    Glioblastomas exhibit a high level of chemotherapeutic resistance, including to the antimitotic agents vincristine and taxol. During the mitotic agent-induced arrest, glioblastoma cells are able to perform damage-control and self-repair to continue proliferation. Monopolar spindle 1 (MPS1/TTK) is a checkpoint kinase and a gatekeeper of the mitotic arrest. We used glioblastoma cells to determine the expression of MPS1 and to determine the effects of MPS1 inhibition on mitotic errors and cell viability in combination with vincristine and taxol. The effect of MPS1 inhibition was assessed in different orthotopic glioblastoma mouse models (n = 3-7 mice/group). MPS1 expression levels were examined in relation to patient survival. Using publicly available gene expression data, we determined that MPS1 overexpression corresponds positively with tumor grade and negatively with patient survival (two-sided t test, P < .001). Patients with high MPS1 expression (n = 203) had a median and mean survival of 487 and 913 days (95% confidence intervals [CI] = 751 to 1075), respectively, and a 2-year survival rate of 35%, whereas patients with intermediate MPS1 expression (n = 140) had a median and mean survival of 858 and 1183 days (95% CI = 1177 to 1189), respectively, and a 2-year survival rate of 56%. We demonstrate that MPS1 inhibition by RNAi results in sensitization to antimitotic agents. We developed a selective small-molecule inhibitor of MPS1, MPS1-IN-3, which caused mitotic aberrancies in glioblastoma cells and, in combination with vincristine, induced mitotic checkpoint override, increased aneuploidy, and augmented cell death. MPS1-IN-3 sensitizes glioblastoma cells to vincristine in orthotopic mouse models (two-sided log-rank test, P < .01), resulting in prolonged survival without toxicity. Our results collectively demonstrate that MPS1, a putative therapeutic target in glioblastoma, can be selectively inhibited by MPS1-IN-3 sensitizing glioblastoma cells to antimitotic

  11. A unique four-hub protein cluster associates to glioblastoma progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Simeone

    Full Text Available Gliomas are the most frequent brain tumors. Among them, glioblastomas are malignant and largely resistant to available treatments. Histopathology is the gold standard for classification and grading of brain tumors. However, brain tumor heterogeneity is remarkable and histopathology procedures for glioma classification remain unsatisfactory for predicting disease course as well as response to treatment. Proteins that tightly associate with cancer differentiation and progression, can bear important prognostic information. Here, we describe the identification of protein clusters differentially expressed in high-grade versus low-grade gliomas. Tissue samples from 25 high-grade tumors, 10 low-grade tumors and 5 normal brain cortices were analyzed by 2D-PAGE and proteomic profiling by mass spectrometry. This led to identify 48 differentially expressed protein markers between tumors and normal samples. Protein clustering by multivariate analyses (PCA and PLS-DA provided discrimination between pathological samples to an unprecedented extent, and revealed a unique network of deranged proteins. We discovered a novel glioblastoma control module centered on four major network hubs: Huntingtin, HNF4α, c-Myc and 14-3-3ζ. Immunohistochemistry, western blotting and unbiased proteome-wide meta-analysis revealed altered expression of this glioblastoma control module in human glioma samples as compared with normal controls. Moreover, the four-hub network was found to cross-talk with both p53 and EGFR pathways. In summary, the findings of this study indicate the existence of a unifying signaling module controlling glioblastoma pathogenesis and malignant progression, and suggest novel targets for development of diagnostic and therapeutic procedures.

  12. STAT6 expression in glioblastoma promotes invasive growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Corinne M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma (GBM is a highly aggressive malignant primary brain tumor, characterized by rapid growth, diffuse infiltration of cells into both adjacent and remote brain regions, and a generalized resistance to currently available treatment modalities. Recent reports in the literature suggest that Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STATs play important roles in the regulation of GBM pathophysiology. Methods STAT6 protein expression was analyzed by Western blotting in GBM cell lines and by immunohistochemistry in a tissue microarray (TMA of glioma patient tissues. We utilized shRNA against STAT6 to investigate the effects of prolonged STAT6 depletion on the growth and invasion of two STAT6-positive GBM cell lines. Cell proliferation was assessed by measuring 3H-Thymidine uptake over time. Invasion was measured using an in vitro transwell assay in which cells invade through a type IV collagen matrix toward a chemoattractant (Fetal Bovine Serum. Cells were then stained and counted. Kaplan-Meyer survival curves were generated to show the correlation between STAT6 gene expression and patient survival in 343 glioma patients and in a subset of patients with only GBM. Gene expression microarray and clinical data were acquired from the Rembrandt 1 public data depository (https://caintegrator.nci.nih.gov/rembrandt/. Lastly, a genome-wide expression microarray analysis was performed to compare gene expression in wild-type GBM cells to expression in stable STAT6 knockdown clones. Results STAT6 was expressed in 2 GBM cell lines, U-1242MG and U-87MG, and in normal astrocytes (NHA but not in the U-251MG GBM cell line. In our TMA study, STAT6 immunostaining was visible in the majority of astrocytomas of all grades (I-IV but not in normal brain tissue. In positive cells, STAT6 was localized exclusively in the nuclei over 95% of the time. STAT6-deficient GBM cells showed a reduction in 3H-Thymidine uptake compared to the wild

  13. Acute Ischemic Stroke Secondary to Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Sofia; Carneiro, Ângelo; Rodrigues, Tiago; Samões, Raquel; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Pereira, Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    Summary Glioblastoma is a malignant infiltrative glial tumor occurring most often over 50 years of age, with diverse clinical presentations. We describe a case of temporal lobe glioblastoma with a rare presentation as an acute ischemic stroke, discussing the imaging and histopathological findings, and reviewing the literature. A 77-year-old woman had sudden onset of left hemiparesis and hemihypoesthesia. The neuroradiological studies revealed an acute ischemic lesion in the right lenticulostriate arteries territory and a right anterior temporal lobe tumor, enhancing heterogeneously after contrast with enhancement of the right middle cerebral artery wall. Histopathological analysis of the resected temporal lesion revealed a glioblastoma multiforme with tumoral infiltration of the vascular wall. Glioblastoma should be considered in the etiology of acute ischemic stroke, where neuroimaging plays an important diagnostic role, enabling a more immediate therapeutic approach, with a consequent impact on survival. PMID:24571837

  14. Combining Immunotherapy with Standard Glioblastoma Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    This clinical trial is testing standard therapy (surgery, radiation and temozolomide) plus immunotherapy with pembrolizumab with or without a cancer treatment vaccine for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma, a common and deadly type of brain tumor.

  15. Toward a noncytotoxic glioblastoma therapy: blocking MCP-1 with the MTZ Regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salacz ME

    2016-04-01

    drug cost. Four core observations support this approach: 1 malignant glioblastoma cells require a reciprocal trophic relationship with nonmalignant macrophages or microglia to thrive; 2 glioblastoma cells secrete MCP-1 to start the cycle, attracting MLCs, which subsequently also secrete MCP-1 perpetuating the recruitment cycle; 3 increasing cytokine levels in the tumor environment generate further immunosuppression and tumor growth; and 4 MTZ regimen may impede MCP-1-driven processes, thereby interfering with glioblastoma growth. Keywords: cognition-sparing, high-grade glioma, immunosuppression, macrophage, microglia, monocyte

  16. Immunotherapy for the Treatment of Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alissa A.; Ernstoff, Marc S.; Fadul, Camilo E.

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma, the most aggressive primary brain tumor, thrives in a microenvironment of relative immunosuppression within the relatively immune-privileged central nervous system. Despite treatments with surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, prognosis remains poor. The recent success of immunotherapy in the treatment of other cancers has renewed interest in vaccine therapy for the treatment of gliomas. In this article, we outline various immunotherapeutic strategies, review recent clinical trials data, and discuss the future of vaccine therapy for glioblastoma. PMID:22290259

  17. Novel Peripherally Derived Neural-Like Stem Cells as Therapeutic Carriers for Treating Glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birbrair, Alexander; Sattiraju, Anirudh; Zhu, Dongqin; Zulato, Gilberto; Batista, Izadora; Nguyen, Van T; Messi, Maria Laura; Solingapuram Sai, Kiran Kumar; Marini, Frank C; Delbono, Osvaldo; Mintz, Akiva

    2017-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM), an aggressive grade IV astrocytoma, is the most common primary malignant adult brain tumor characterized by extensive invasiveness, heterogeneity, and angiogenesis. Standard treatment options such as radiation and chemotherapy have proven to be only marginally effective in treating GBM because of its invasive nature. Therefore, extensive efforts have been put forth to develop tumor-tropic stem cells as viable therapeutic vehicles with potential to treat even the most invasive tumor cells that are harbored within areas of normal brain. To this end, we discovered a newly described NG2-expressing cell that we isolated from a distinct pericyte subtype found abundantly in cultures derived from peripheral muscle. In this work, we show the translational significance of these peripherally derived neural-like stem cells (NLSC) and their potential to migrate toward tumors and act as therapeutic carriers. We demonstrate that these NLSCs exhibit in vitro and in vivo GBM tropism. Furthermore, NLSCs did not promote angiogenesis or transform into tumor-associated stromal cells, which are concerns raised when using other common stem cells, such as mesenchymal stem cells and induced neural stem cells, as therapeutic carriers. We also demonstrate the potential of NLSCs to express a prototype therapeutic, tumor necrosis factor α-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and kill GBM cells in vitro. These data demonstrate the therapeutic potential of our newly characterized NLSC against GBM. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:471-481. © 2016 The Authors Stem Cells Translational Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of AlphaMed Press.

  18. Proton MR spectroscopic imaging of human glioblastomas at 1.5 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hnilicová, Petra; Richterová, Romana; Kantorová, Ema; Bittšanský, Michal; Baranovičová, Eva; Dobrota, Dušan

    2017-12-01

    In this study we evaluated clinical feasibility of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy metabolite mapping (1H MRSI) by using 1.5 Tesla MR-scanner in 10 patients with high-grade glioblastoma. In vivo 1H MRSI performed with a relatively short scan time of 20 minutes enabled to obtain comprehensive information about metabolic changes in glioblastoma and adjacent tissues namely in the peritumoral edema, in the middle and solid part of the tumor, and in the normal-appearing brain tissue. Spectroscopically it was possible to identify initiation of neuronal cell death in the solid tumorous tissue via decreased N-acetyl-aspartate to creatine ratio (↓ tNAA/tCr) and expanding carcinogenesis reflected in elevated choline ratios (↑ tCho/tCr and tCho/tNAA). We showed also the central necrosis of glioblastoma accompanied by the tissue hypoxia, which were apparent as increased lactate and lipids ratios (↑ Lac/tCr and lip/Lac). Metabolic changes were noticeable also in the peritumoral area, showing the glioblastoma infiltration into the surrounding tissues. In intracranial tumors, 1H MRSI performed on 1.5 Tesla field strength was sufficient to provide information about the stage of carcinogenesis, tumor expansion or necrotization and thus it could be considered as a useful diagnostic tool in oncology.

  19. OX40 ligand expressed in glioblastoma modulates adaptive immunity depending on the microenvironment: a clue for successful immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibahara, Ichiyo; Saito, Ryuta; Zhang, Rong; Chonan, Masashi; Shoji, Takuhiro; Kanamori, Masayuki; Sonoda, Yukihiko; Kumabe, Toshihiro; Kanehira, Masahiko; Kikuchi, Toshiaki; So, Takanori; Watanabe, Takashi; Takahashi, Hiroaki; Iwabuchi, Erina; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Shibahara, Yukiko; Sasano, Hironobu; Ishii, Naoto; Tominaga, Teiji

    2015-02-15

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant human brain tumor and has a dismal prognosis; however, some patients show long-term survival. The interaction between the costimulatory molecule OX40 and its ligand OX40L generates key signals for T-cell activation. The augmentation of this interaction enhances antitumor immunity. In this present study, we explored whether OX40 signaling is responsible for antitumor adaptive immunity against glioblastoma and also established therapeutic antiglioma vaccination therapy. Tumor specimens were obtained from patients with primary glioblastoma (n = 110) and grade III glioma (n = 34). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry, and immunohistochemistry were used to analyze OX40L expression in human glioblastoma specimens. Functional consequences of OX40 signaling were studied using glioblastoma cell lines, mouse models of glioma, and T cells isolated from human subjects and mice. Cytokine production assay with mouse regulatory T cells was conducted under hypoxic conditions (1.5% O2). OX40L mRNA was expressed in glioblastoma specimens and higher levels were associated with prolonged progression-free survival of patients with glioblastoma, who had undergone gross total resection. In this regard, OX40L protein was expressed in A172 human glioblastoma cells and its expression was induced under hypoxia, which mimics the microenvironment of glioblastoma. Notably, human CD4 T cells were activated when cocultured in anti-CD3-coated plates with A172 cells expressing OX40L, as judged by the increased production of interferon-γ. To confirm the survival advantage of OX40L expression, we then used mouse glioma models. Mice bearing glioma cells forced to express OX40L did not die during the observed period after intracranial transplantation, whereas all mice bearing glioma cells lacking OX40L died. Such a survival benefit of OX40L was not detected in nude mice with an impaired immune system. Moreover, compared with systemic

  20. Molecular biology of glioblastoma: Classification and mutational locations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soomro, Shahid Hussain; Ting, Li Rui; Qing, Yang Yi; Ren, Mingxin

    2017-09-01

    Glioblastomas are regarded as the most common malignant brain tumours with great morphological and genetical heterogeneity. They comprise 12% to 15% of all intracranial tumours, with its peak observed in the 8th decade of life. The five-year survival is only 5%. Primary glioblastomas are more common in elders while secondary glioblastomas mostly involve younger people. Based upon gene expression profile, researchers have classified glioblastomas into several subtypes. Genetic mutations provide an advanced standard platform essential for diagnosis, therapeutic remedies and prognosis of glioblastomas. Common mutations observed in glioblastomas are loss of heterozygosity at 10q followed by epidermal growth factor receptor amplification (34%) and others. Vascular occlusion model and tumour stem cell model can explain the possible mechanism in glioblastomas pathogenesis. This review highlights glioblastomas' classifications, genetic mutations, pathogenesis and prognosis of different sub-types.

  1. Bevacizumab in high-grade gliomas: a review of its uses, toxicity assessment, and future treatment challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmathulla G

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Gazanfar Rahmathulla,1 Elizabeth J Hovey,2,3 Neda Hashemi-Sadraei,4 Manmeet S Ahluwalia4 1Department of Neurological Surgery, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, 2Department of Medical Oncology, Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 3School of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, Australia; 4Department of Medical Oncology, Neurological and Taussig Cancer Institutes, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: High-grade gliomas continue to have dismal prognosis despite advances made in understanding the molecular genetics, signaling pathways, cytoskeletal dynamics, and the role of stem cells in gliomagenesis. Conventional treatment approaches, including surgery, radiotherapy, and cytotoxic chemotherapy, have been used with limited success. Therapeutic advances using molecular targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and others such as dietary treatments have not been able to halt tumor progression and disease-related death. High-grade gliomas (World Health Organization grades III/IV are histologically characterized by cellular and nuclear atypia, neoangiogenesis, and necrosis. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a molecular mediator, plays a key role in vascular proliferation and tumor survival. Targeting vascular endothelial growth factor has demonstrated promising results, with improved quality of life and progression-free survival. Bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor, is approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a single agent in recurrent glioblastoma and is associated with manageable toxicity. This review discusses the efficacy, practical aspects, and response assessment challenges with the use of bevacizumab in the treatment of high-grade gliomas. Keywords: bevacizumab, antiangiogenesis, glioma, glioblastoma, vascular endothelial growth factor

  2. High levels of c-Met is associated with poor prognosis in glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petterson, Stine Asferg; Dahlrot, Rikke Hedegaard; Hermansen, Simon Kjær

    2015-01-01

    . Measurements of high c-Met intensity correlated with high WHO grade (p = 0.006) but no association with survival was observed in patients with WHO grade II (p = 0.09) or III (p = 0.17) tumors. High expression of c-Met was associated with shorter overall survival in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (p = 0...... and the clinical variables age (HR 1.01, 95 % CI 0.99-1.03, p = 0.30), performance status (HR 1.34, 95 % CI 1.17-1.53, p

  3. Overview of Cellular Immunotherapy for Patients with Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Vauleon

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available High grade gliomas (HGG including glioblastomas (GBM are the most common and devastating primary brain tumours. Despite important progresses in GBM treatment that currently includes surgery combined to radio- and chemotherapy, GBM patients' prognosis remains very poor. Immunotherapy is one of the new promising therapeutic approaches that can specifically target tumour cells. Such an approach could also maintain long term antitumour responses without inducing neurologic defects. Since the past 25 years, adoptive and active immunotherapies using lymphokine-activated killer cells, cytotoxic T cells, tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes, autologous tumour cells, and dendritic cells have been tested in phase I/II clinical trials with HGG patients. This paper inventories these cellular immunotherapeutic strategies and discusses their efficacy, limits, and future perspectives for optimizing the treatment to achieve clinical benefits for GBM patients.

  4. New perspectives in glioblastoma antiangiogenic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisa Madalina Popescu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GB is highly vascularised tumour, known to exhibit enhanced infiltrative potential. One of the characteristics of glioblastoma is microvascular proliferation surrounding necrotic areas, as a response to a hypoxic environment, which in turn increases the expression of angiogenic factors and their signalling pathways (RAS/RAF/ERK/MAPK pathway, PI3K/Akt signalling pathway and WTN signalling cascade. Currently, a small number of anti-angiogenic drugs, extending glioblastoma patients survival, are available for clinical use. Most medications are ineffective in clinical therapy of glioblastoma due to acquired malignant cells or intrinsic resistance, angiogenic receptors cross-activation and redundant intracellular signalling, or the inability of the drug to cross the blood-brain barrier and to reach its target in vivo . Researchers have also observed that GB tumours are different in many aspects, even when they derive from the same tissue, which is the reason for personalised therapy. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating glioblastoma angiogenesis and invasion may be important in the future development of curative therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this devastating disease.

  5. Advance Care Planning in Glioblastoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara Fritz

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite multimodal treatment with surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, glioblastoma is an incurable disease with a poor prognosis. During the disease course, glioblastoma patients may experience progressive neurological deficits, symptoms of increased intracranial pressure such as drowsiness and headache, incontinence, seizures and progressive cognitive dysfunction. These patients not only have cancer, but also a progressive brain disease. This may seriously interfere with their ability to make their own decisions regarding treatment. It is therefore warranted to involve glioblastoma patients early in the disease trajectory in treatment decision-making on their future care, including the end of life (EOL care, which can be achieved with Advance Care Planning (ACP. Although ACP, by definition, aims at timely involvement of patients and proxies in decision-making on future care, the optimal moment to initiate ACP discussions in the disease trajectory of glioblastoma patients remains controversial. Moreover, the disease-specific content of these ACP discussions needs to be established. In this article, we will first describe the history of patient participation in treatment decision-making, including the shift towards ACP. Secondly, we will describe the possible role of ACP for glioblastoma patients, with the specific aim of treatment of disease-specific symptoms such as somnolence and dysphagia, epileptic seizures, headache, and personality changes, agitation and delirium in the EOL phase, and the importance of timing of ACP discussions in this patient population.

  6. Adoptive Cell Therapies for Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin James Bielamowicz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common and most aggressive primary brain malignancy and, as it stands, is virtually incurable. With the current standard-of-care, maximum feasible surgical resection followed by radical radiotherapy and adjuvant temozolomide, survival rates are at a median of 14.6 months from diagnosis in molecularly unselected patients(1. Collectively, the current knowledge suggests that the continued tumor growth and survival is in part due to failure to mount an effective immune response. While this tolerance is subtended by the tumor being utterly self, it is to a great extent due to local and systemic immune compromise mediated by the tumor. Different cell modalities including lymphokine-activated killer (LAK cells, natural killer (NK cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL, and transgenic chimeric antigen receptor (CAR- or αβ T cell receptor (TCR grafted T cells are being explored to recover and or redirect the specificity of the cellular arm of the immune system towards the tumor complex. Promising phase I/II trials of such modalities have shown early indications of potential efficacy while maintaining a favorable toxicity profile. Efficacy will need to be formally tested in phase II/III clinical trials. Given the high morbidity and mortality of GBM, it is imperative to further investigate and possibly integrate such novel cell-based therapies into the current standards-of-care and herein we collectively assess and critique the state-of-the-knowledge pertaining to these efforts.

  7. Treatment of Glioblastoma in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Kelly; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S

    2017-10-26

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor diagnosed in the USA and is associated with a poor prognosis. The outcomes in elderly patients (more than 65 years of age) are worse when compared to those younger than age 65 at the time of diagnosis. Older patients are not always offered treatments that would otherwise be considered standard of care due to comorbidities and concerns about toxicity and tolerability. The initial European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer study that led to approval of temozolomide in glioblastoma excluded patients more than 70 years of age. This review outlines challenges that arise in the treatment of glioblastoma in the elderly population and discusses results of recent studies that established the role of adjuvant chemotherapy in addition to radiation and surgery. There is evidence that these patients can benefit from a more aggressive and safe resection, from hypofractionated radiation treatments, and from adjuvant temozolomide.

  8. Walking ability in patients with glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liljehult, Monique Mesot; Buus, Lise; Mesot Liljehult, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    ability and 1 year mortality. Data were gathered from prospective recordings in a brain cancer database supplemented by retrospective review of electronic patient records. We included 109 patients with glioblastoma, 47 women and 62 men with mean age 65 years. At admission 84 patients were tested with Berg......Primary brain tumors frequently cause considerable functional impairments and the survival time when diagnosed with glioblastoma is 14.6 months. The aim of this study was to examine if baseline postural control and walking ability in patients with glioblastoma could predict long term walking...... higher in patients who lost their ability to walk within 4-8 months of the first admission. This study showed that Berg Balance Scale has some ability to predict the loss of walking ability 4-8 months after admission. This could be an important indicator pin pointing patients most in need of more...

  9. Advances in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment: New Models for Nanoparticle Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elif Ozdemir-Kaynak

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The most lethal form of brain cancer, glioblastoma multiforme, is characterized by rapid growth and invasion facilitated by cell migration and degradation of the extracellular matrix. Despite technological advances in surgery and radio-chemotherapy, glioblastoma remains largely resistant to treatment. New approaches to study glioblastoma and to design optimized therapies are greatly needed. One such approach harnesses computational modeling to support the design and delivery of glioblastoma treatment. In this paper, we critically summarize current glioblastoma therapy, with a focus on emerging nanomedicine and therapies that capitalize on cell-specific signaling in glioblastoma. We follow this summary by discussing computational modeling approaches focused on optimizing these emerging nanotherapeutics for brain cancer. We conclude by illustrating how mathematical analysis can be used to compare the delivery of a high potential anticancer molecule, delphinidin, in both free and nanoparticle loaded forms across the blood-brain barrier for glioblastoma.

  10. Secretome Signature of Invasive Glioblastoma Multiforme

    OpenAIRE

    Formolo, Catherine A.; Williams, Russell; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Lee, Norman H.; Hathout, Yetrib

    2011-01-01

    The incurability of malignant glioblastomas is mainly attributed to their highly invasive nature coupled with resistance to chemo- and radiation therapy. Because invasiveness is partially dictated by the proteins these tumors secrete we used SILAC to characterize the secretomes of four glioblastoma cell lines (LN18, T98, U118 and U87). Although U87 and U118 cells both secreted high levels of well-known invasion promoting proteins, a Matrigel invasion assay showed U87 cells to be eight times m...

  11. Coordination of glioblastoma cell motility by PKCι

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldwin R Mitchell

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma is one of the deadliest forms of cancer, in part because of its highly invasive nature. The tumor suppressor PTEN is frequently mutated in glioblastoma and is known to contribute to the invasive phenotype. However the downstream events that promote invasion are not fully understood. PTEN loss leads to activation of the atypical protein kinase C, PKCι. We have previously shown that PKCι is required for glioblastoma cell invasion, primarily by enhancing cell motility. Here we have used time-lapse videomicroscopy to more precisely define the role of PKCι in glioblastoma. Results Glioblastoma cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically were unable to coordinate the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod. Instead, some cells generated multiple small, short-lived protrusions while others generated a diffuse leading edge that formed around the entire circumference of the cell. Confocal microscopy showed that this behavior was associated with altered behavior of the cytoskeletal protein Lgl, which is known to be inactivated by PKCι phosphorylation. Lgl in control cells localized to the lamellipod leading edge and did not associate with its binding partner non-muscle myosin II, consistent with it being in an inactive state. In PKCι-depleted cells, Lgl was concentrated at multiple sites at the periphery of the cell and remained in association with non-muscle myosin II. Videomicroscopy also identified a novel role for PKCι in the cell cycle. Cells in which PKCι was either depleted by shRNA or inhibited pharmacologically entered mitosis normally, but showed marked delays in completing mitosis. Conclusions PKCι promotes glioblastoma motility by coordinating the formation of a single leading edge lamellipod and has a role in remodeling the cytoskeleton at the lamellipod leading edge, promoting the dissociation of Lgl from non-muscle myosin II. In addition PKCι is required

  12. Antibody-guided three-step therapy for high grade glioma with yttrium-90 biotin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganelli, G.; Grana, C.; Chinol, M.; Cremonesi, M.; De Cicco, C.; Zoboli, S. [Div. of Nuclear Medicine, European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy); De Braud, F. [Div. of Medical Oncology, European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Robertson, C. [Div. of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Zurrida, S.; Veronesi, U. [Scientific Director Office, European Institute of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Casadio, C. [Div. of Pathology and Lab. Medicine, European Inst. of Oncology, Milan (Italy); Siccardi, A.G. [San Raffaele Scientific Institute and University of Milan (Italy)

    1999-04-29

    While the incidence of brain tumours seems to be increasing, median survival in patients with glioblastoma remains less than 1 year, despite improved diagnostic imaging and neurosurgical techniques, and innovations in treatment. We have developed an avidin-biotin pre-targeting approach for delivering therapeutic radionuclides to gliomas, using anti-tenascin monoclonal antibodies, which seems potentially effective for treating these tumours. We treated 48 eligible patients with histologically confirmed grade III or IV glioma and documented residual disease or recurrence after conventional treatment. Three-step radionuclide therapy was performed by intravenous administration of 35 mg/m{sup 2} of biotinylated anti-tenascin monoclonal antibody (1st step), followed 36 h later by 30 mg of avidin and 50 mg of streptavidin (2nd step), and 18-24 h later by 1-2 mg of yttrium-90-labelled biotin (3rd step). {sup 90}Y doses of 2.22-2.96 GBq/m{sup 2} were administered; maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was determined at 2.96 GBq/m{sup 2}. Tumour mass reduction (>25%-100%), documented by computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, occurred in 12/48 patients (25%), with 8/48 having a duration of response of at least 12 months. At present, 12 patients are still in remission, comprising four with a complete response, two with a parital response, two with a minor response and four with stable disease. Median survival from {sup 90}Y treatment is 11 months for grade IV glioblastoma and 19 months for grade III anaplastic gliomas. Avidin-biotin based three-step radionuclide therapy is well tolerated at the dose of 2.2 GBq/m{sup 2}, allowing the injection of {sup 90}Y-biotin without bone marrow transplantation. This new approach interferes with the progression of high-grade glioma and may produce tumour regression in patients no longer responsive to other therapies. (orig.) With 5 figs., 4 tabs., 34 refs.

  13. Difficult diagnosis of brainstem glioblastoma multiforme in a woman: a case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakhan Shaheen E

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Brainstem gliomas are rare in adults. They most commonly occur in the pons and are most likely to be high-grade lesions. The diagnosis of a high-grade brainstem glioma is usually reached due to the presentation of rapidly progressing brainstem, cranial nerve and cerebellar symptoms. These symptoms do, however, overlap with a variety of other central nervous system disorders. Magnetic resonance imaging is the radiographic modality of choice, but can still be misleading. Case presentation A 48-year-old Caucasian woman presented with headache and vomiting followed by cerebellar signs and confusion. Magnetic resonance imaging findings were suggestive of a demyelinating process, but the patient failed to respond to therapy. Her condition rapidly progressed and she died. At autopsy, a high-grade invasive pontine tumor was identified. Histological evaluation revealed glioblastoma multiforme. Conclusion While pontine gliomas are rare in adults, those that do occur tend to be high-grade and rapidly progressive. Progression of symptoms from non-specific findings of headache and vomiting to rapid neurological deterioration, as occurred in our patient, is common in glioblastoma multiforme. While radiographic findings are often suggestive of the underlying pathology, this case represents the possibility of glioblastoma multiforme presenting as a deceptively benign appearing lesion.

  14. Bevacizumab in high-grade gliomas: a review of its uses, toxicity assessment, and future treatment challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Hovey, Elizabeth J; Hashemi-Sadraei, Neda; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S

    2013-01-01

    High-grade gliomas continue to have dismal prognosis despite advances made in understanding the molecular genetics, signaling pathways, cytoskeletal dynamics, and the role of stem cells in gliomagenesis. Conventional treatment approaches, including surgery, radiotherapy, and cytotoxic chemotherapy, have been used with limited success. Therapeutic advances using molecular targeted therapy, immunotherapy, and others such as dietary treatments have not been able to halt tumor progression and disease-related death. High-grade gliomas (World Health Organization grades III/IV) are histologically characterized by cellular and nuclear atypia, neoangiogenesis, and necrosis. The expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, a molecular mediator, plays a key role in vascular proliferation and tumor survival. Targeting vascular endothelial growth factor has demonstrated promising results, with improved quality of life and progression-free survival. Bevacizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor, is approved by the Food and Drug Administration as a single agent in recurrent glioblastoma and is associated with manageable toxicity. This review discusses the efficacy, practical aspects, and response assessment challenges with the use of bevacizumab in the treatment of high-grade gliomas.

  15. Dynamic CT perfusion imaging of intra-axial brain tumours: differentiation of high-grade gliomas from primary CNS lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, Peter; Xyda, Argyro; Knauth, Michael; Klotz, Ernst; Tronnier, Volker; Hartmann, Marius

    2010-01-01

    Perfusion computed tomography (PCT) allows to quantitatively assess haemodynamic characteristics of brain tissue. We investigated if different brain tumor types can be distinguished from each other using Patlak analysis of PCT data. PCT data from 43 patients with brain tumours were analysed with a commercial implementation of the Patlak method. Four patients had low-grade glioma (WHO II), 31 patients had glioblastoma (WHO IV) and eight patients had intracerebral lymphoma. Tumour regions of interest (ROIs) were drawn in a morphological image and automatically transferred to maps of cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and permeability (K Trans ). Mean values were calculated, group differences were tested using Wilcoxon and Mann Whitney U-tests. In comparison with normal parenchyma, low-grade gliomas showed no significant difference of perfusion parameters (p > 0.05), whereas high-grade gliomas demonstrated significantly higher values (p Trans , p Trans values compared with unaffected cerebral parenchyma (p = 0.0078) but no elevation of CBV. High-grade gliomas show significant higher CBV values than lymphomas (p = 0.0078). PCT allows to reliably classify gliomas and lymphomas based on quantitative measurements of CBV and K Trans . (orig.)

  16. Does gender matter in glioblastoma?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verger, E; Valduvieco, I; Caral, Ll; Pujol, T; Ribalta, T; Viñolas, N; Boget, T; Oleaga, L; Blanco, Y; Graus, F

    2011-10-01

    BACKGROUND The clinical outcome of glioblastoma (GBM) patients who receive radiotherapy alone or with chemotherapy is well established. However, little is known about how many patients do not receive this treatment. We consider it is important to investigate why a proportion of operated patients do not receive further treatment after surgery. METHODS We reviewed all consecutive GBM patients operated on in our hospital between January 2000 and December 2008. RESULTS A total of 216 patients with GBM were identified. Fifty-five (25%) did not receive any treatment after surgery. Univariate analysis showed that factors associated with no further treatment after surgery were older than 60 years (p=0.002), of female gender (p=0.03), had a KPS<70 (p<0.001) and had had a biopsy (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis indicated that age =60 years and KPS <70 were independent predictors of no further treatment after surgery. Gender was not an independent variable. However, women in the whole series were older than 60 years (p=0.01), and they had a worse KPS (p=0.02) and more biopsies (p=0.04) than men. In the whole group, median survival time was 10.4 months for men (n=125) vs. 7.2 months for women (n=91), log rank p<0.04. This difference was not observed in the group that was treated after surgery. CONCLUSIONS One out of four patients could not be treated after surgery. Independent predictors were older age and low KPS. These poor risk variables were more frequent in women and their survival was therefore lower than men in our series.

  17. Asteroids IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  18. Radiation induced glioblastoma. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Naoki; Kayama, Takamasa; Sakurada, Kaori; Saino, Makoto; Kuroki, Akira [Yamagata Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-05-01

    We report a surgical case of a 54-year-old woman with a radiation induced glioblastoma. At the age of 34, the patient was diagnosed to have a non-functioning pituitary adenoma. It was partially removed followed by 50 Gy focal irradiation with a 5 x 5 cm lateral opposed field. Twenty years later, she suffered from rapidly increasing symptoms such as aphasia and right hemiparesis. MRI showed a large mass lesion in the left temporal lobe as well as small mass lesions in the brain stem and the right medial temporal lobe. These lesions situated within the irradiated field. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy revealed relatively high lactate signal and decreased N-acetyl aspartate, choline, creatine and phosphocreatine signals. Increased lactate signal meant anaerobic metabolism that suggested the existence of a rapidly growing malignant tumor. Thus, we planned surgical removal of the left temporal lesion with the diagnosis of a radiation induced malignant glioma. The histological examination revealed a glioblastoma with radiation necrosis. MIB-1 staining index was 65%. Postoperatively, her symptoms improved, but she died from pneumonia 1 month after the surgery. A autopsy was obtained. The lesion of the left temporal lobe was found to have continuity to the lesion in the midbrain, the pons and the right temporal lobe as well. High MIB-1 staining index suggested that a radiation induced glioblastoma had high proliferative potential comparing with a de novo and secondary glioblastoma. (author)

  19. [Nursing strategy in the face of glioblastoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Stéphanie

    2017-02-01

    Hospitalisation forces patients with glioblastoma and their family to face a new life made up of numerous constraints and uncertainties. In this context of anxiety, nursing care is based on global support which combines technical, organisational and relational skills. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. PICTORIAL REVIEW Glioblastoma multiforme has many faces

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anaplastic astrocytomas that undergo de-differentiation.4 Glioblastoma is the most common brain tumour, accounting for 12 - 15% of intracranial neoplasms and 50 - 60% of astrocytic tumours.4. Imaging. MR imaging is crucial in lesion characterisation. Lesions are typically hypo-intense on T1WI and hyperintense on T2WI ...

  1. Small cell glioblastoma or small cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilbrandt, Christine; Sathyadas, Sathya; Dahlrot, Rikke H

    2013-01-01

    was admitted to the hospital with left-sided loss of motor function. A MRI revealed a 6 cm tumor in the right temporoparietal area. The histology was consistent with both glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) and small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) but IHC was suggestive of a SCLC metastasis. PET-CT revealed...

  2. Phase II Radiation therapy oncology group trial of weekly paclitaxel and conventional external beam radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, Corey J.; Ruffer, James; Rhodes, Harker; Paulus, Rebecca; Murray, Kevin; Movsas, Benjamin; Curran, Walter

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Fractionated external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) ± carmustine (BCNU) is the standard of care for patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), but survival results remain poor. Preclinical studies indicate synergy between RT and paclitaxel (TAX) in astrocytoma cell lines. Phase I studies in GBM have demonstrated a maximum tolerated dose for TAX of 225 mg/m 2 /3 h/week x 6, during EBRT, with no exacerbation of typical RT-induced toxicities. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) therefore mounted a Phase II study to determine the feasibility and efficacy of conventional EBRT and concurrent weekly TAX at its MTD. Patients and Methods: Sixty-two patients with histologic diagnosis of GBM were enrolled from 8/16/96 through 3/21/97 in a multi-institutional Phase II trial of EBRT and TAX 225 mg/m 2 /3 h (1-3 h before EBRT), administered the first treatment day of each RT week. Total EBRT dose was 60 Gy (200 cGy/fraction), 5 days per week. A smaller treatment field, to include gross disease plus a margin only, was used after 46 Gy. Results: Sixty-one patients (98%) were evaluable. Median age was 55 years (range, 28-78). Seventy-four percent were ≥50 years. Recursive partitioning analysis (RPA) Classes III, IV, V, VI included 10 (17%), 21 (34%), 25 (41%), and 5 (8%) patients, respectively. Gross total resection was performed in only 16%. There was no Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia or thrombocytopenia. Hypersensitivity reactions precluding further use of TAX occurred in 4 patients. There were 2 instances of late neurotoxicity (4% Grade 3 or 4). Ninety-one percent of patients received treatment per protocol. Seventy-seven percent completed prescribed treatment (6 weeks). Of 35 patients with measurable disease, CR/PR was observed in 23%, MR in 17%, and SD in 43%. Seventeen percent demonstrated progression at first follow-up. Median potential follow-up time is 20 months. Median survival is 9.7 months, with median survivals for RPA classes III, IV, V, and VI of 16.3, 10

  3. Phase I trial of dovitinib (TKI258) in recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Niklas; Gielen, Gerrit H; Kebir, Sied; Wieland, Anja; Till, Andreas; Mack, Frederic; Schaub, Christina; Tzaridis, Theophilos; Reinartz, Roman; Niessen, Michael; Fimmers, Rolf; Simon, Matthias; Coch, Christoph; Fuhrmann, Christine; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Scheffler, Björn; Glas, Martin

    2016-07-01

    Dovitinib (TKI258) is an oral multi-tyrosine kinase inhibitor of FGFR, VEGFR, PDGFR β, and c-Kit. Since dovitinib is able to cross the blood-brain barrier and targets brain tumor-relevant pathways, we conducted a phase I trial to demonstrate its safety in recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). Patients with first or second GBM recurrence started treatment with the maximal tolerated dose (MTD) previously established in systemic cancer patients (500 mg/d, 5 days on/2 days off). A modified 3 + 3 design in three cohorts (500, 400, 300 mg) was used. Twelve patients were enrolled. Seventy-two adverse events (AEs) occurred and 16.7 % of AEs were classified as ≥CTC grade 3 toxicity, mainly including hepatotoxicity and hematotoxicity. Only one out of six patients of the 300-mg cohort showed grade 3 toxicity. The PFS-6 rate was 16.7 %, and it was not associated with detection of the FGFR-TACC gene fusion in the tumor. Dovitinib is safe in patients with recurrent GBM and showed efficacy in only some patients unselected for target expression. The recommended phase II dose of 300 mg would be substantially lower than the recently established MTD in systemic cancer patients. Further personalized trials are recommended.

  4. Characterization of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9, ADAM-10 and N-cadherin expression in human glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumeci, Giuseppe; Magro, Gaetano; Cardile, Venera; Coco, Marinella; Marzagalli, Rubina; Castrogiovanni, Paola; Imbesi, Rosa; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Barone, Fabio; Di Rosa, Michelino; Castorina, Sergio; Castorina, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and aggressive malignant primary brain tumor in humans, whose invasiveness and proliferation are associated with poor prognosis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and the related family of "a disintegrin and metalloproteinase" (ADAM) both contribute to increase cell invasion, and its substrate N-cadherin is involved in proliferation and metastatic capacities of tumor cells. However, these molecular determinants of aggressiveness have not been adequately characterized in GBM. In an attempt to better define these pathogenetic signatures, in the present study we evaluated the comparative expression of two main MMPs (MMP-2 and -9), as well as of ADAM-10 and N-cadherin in surgical samples from patients diagnosed with WHO grade IV GBM (n = 25) and in cortical tissue specimens obtained from untreatable epileptic patients (controls, n = 8) through a series of histopathological, immunohistochemical and biochemical tests. Our studies revealed that both MMP-2 and -9 immunoreactivities (IRs) were upregulated in 13 of 25 (52 %) and 19 of 25 (76 %) GBMs, respectively, and the extent of the increase was highly significant with respect to controls (p < 0.001). ADAM-10 IR was also found to be increased (p < 0.001) in 16 of 25 GBM specimens (64 %). Conversely, N-cadherin IR was remarkably decreased (p < 0.001) in almost the totality of tumor samples (22 of 25, 88 %). A similar trend was also obtained at the mRNA and protein level by qPCR and western blot analyses, respectively. Collectively, the current study provides a comprehensive molecular portrayal of some of the major pathological hallmarks of GBM aggressiveness, which could be exploitable as potential targets for a new therapeutic approach.

  5. A combination of TERT promoter mutation and MGMT methylation status predicts clinically relevant subgroups of newly diagnosed glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Hideyuki; Yamasaki, Kai; Matsushita, Yuko; Nakamura, Taishi; Shimokawa, Asanao; Takami, Hirokazu; Tanaka, Shota; Mukasa, Akitake; Shirahata, Mitsuaki; Shimizu, Saki; Suzuki, Kaori; Saito, Kuniaki; Kobayashi, Keiichi; Higuchi, Fumi; Uzuka, Takeo; Otani, Ryohei; Tamura, Kaoru; Sumita, Kazutaka; Ohno, Makoto; Miyakita, Yasuji; Kagawa, Naoki; Hashimoto, Naoya; Hatae, Ryusuke; Yoshimoto, Koji; Shinojima, Naoki; Nakamura, Hideo; Kanemura, Yonehiro; Okita, Yoshiko; Kinoshita, Manabu; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Shofuda, Tomoko; Kodama, Yoshinori; Mori, Kanji; Tomogane, Yusuke; Fukai, Junya; Fujita, Koji; Terakawa, Yuzo; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Moriuchi, Shusuke; Nonaka, Masahiro; Suzuki, Hiroyoshi; Shibuya, Makoto; Maehara, Taketoshi; Saito, Nobuhito; Nagane, Motoo; Kawahara, Nobutaka; Ueki, Keisuke; Yoshimine, Toshiki; Miyaoka, Etsuo; Nishikawa, Ryo; Komori, Takashi; Narita, Yoshitaka; Ichimura, Koichi

    2016-08-08

    The prognostic impact of TERT mutations has been controversial in IDH-wild tumors, particularly in glioblastomas (GBM). The controversy may be attributable to presence of potential confounding factors such as MGMT methylation status or patients' treatment. This study aimed to evaluate the impact of TERT status on patient outcome in association with various factors in a large series of adult diffuse gliomas. We analyzed a total of 951 adult diffuse gliomas from two cohorts (Cohort 1, n = 758; Cohort 2, n = 193) for IDH1/2, 1p/19q, and TERT promoter status. The combined IDH/TERT classification divided Cohort 1 into four molecular groups with distinct outcomes. The overall survival (OS) was the shortest in IDH wild-type/TERT mutated groups, which mostly consisted of GBMs (P MGMT methylation on survival of patients with GBM, samples from a combined cohort of 453 IDH-wild-type GBM cases treated with radiation and temozolomide were analyzed. A multivariate Cox regression model revealed that the interaction between TERT and MGMT was significant for OS (P = 0.0064). Compared with TERT mutant-MGMT unmethylated GBMs, the hazard ratio (HR) for OS incorporating the interaction was the lowest in the TERT mutant-MGMT methylated GBM (HR, 0.266), followed by the TERT wild-type-MGMT methylated (HR, 0.317) and the TERT wild-type-MGMT unmethylated GBMs (HR, 0.542). Thus, patients with TERT mutant-MGMT unmethylated GBM have the poorest prognosis. Our findings suggest that a combination of IDH, TERT, and MGMT refines the classification of grade II-IV diffuse gliomas.

  6. The role of cerebral blood flow gradient in peritumoral edema for differentiation of glioblastomas from solitary metastatic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lin; Xue, Yunjing; Duan, Qing; Sun, Bin; Lin, Hailong; Huang, Xinming; Chen, Xiaodan

    2016-10-18

    Differentiation of glioblastomas from solitary brain metastases using conventional MRI remains an important unsolved problem. In this study, we introduced the conception of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) gradient in peritumoral edema-the difference in CBF values from the proximity of the enhancing tumor to the normal-appearing white matter, and investigated the contribution of perfusion metrics on the discrimination of glioblastoma from a metastatic lesion. Fifty-two consecutive patients with glioblastoma or a solitary metastatic lesion underwent three-dimensional arterial spin labeling (3D-ASL) before surgical resection. The CBF values were measured in the peritumoral edema (near: G1; Intermediate: G2; Far: G3). The CBF gradient was calculated as the subtractions CBFG1 -CBFG3, CBFG1 - CBFG2 and CBFG2 - CBFG3. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to seek for the best cutoff value permitting discrimination between these two tumors. The absolute/related CBF values and the CBF gradient in the peritumoral regions of glioblastomas were significantly higher than those in metastases(P edema appears to be a more promising ASL perfusion metrics in differentiating high grade glioma from a solitary metastasis.

  7. IDH mutation and neuroglial developmental features define clinically distinct subclasses of lower grade diffuse astrocytic glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorovets, Daniel; Kannan, Kasthuri; Shen, Ronglai; Kastenhuber, Edward R; Islamdoust, Nasrin; Campos, Carl; Pentsova, Elena; Heguy, Adriana; Jhanwar, Suresh C; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Chan, Timothy A; Huse, Jason T

    2012-05-01

    Diffuse gliomas represent the most prevalent class of primary brain tumor. Despite significant recent advances in the understanding of glioblastoma [World Health Organization (WHO) IV], its most malignant subtype, lower grade (WHO II and III) glioma variants remain comparatively understudied, especially in light of their notable clinical heterogeneity. Accordingly, we sought to identify and characterize clinically relevant molecular subclasses of lower grade diffuse astrocytic gliomas. We conducted multidimensional molecular profiling, including global transcriptional analysis, on 101 lower grade diffuse astrocytic gliomas collected at our own institution and validated our findings using publically available gene expression and copy number data from large independent patient cohorts. We found that IDH mutational status delineated molecularly and clinically distinct glioma subsets, with IDH mutant (IDH mt) tumors exhibiting TP53 mutations, platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)A overexpression, and prolonged survival, and IDH wild-type (IDH wt) tumors exhibiting EGFR amplification, PTEN loss, and unfavorable disease outcome. Furthermore, global expression profiling revealed three robust molecular subclasses within lower grade diffuse astrocytic gliomas, two of which were predominantly IDH mt and one almost entirely IDH wt. IDH mt subclasses were distinguished from each other on the basis of TP53 mutations, DNA copy number abnormalities, and links to distinct stages of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone. This latter finding implicates discrete pools of neuroglial progenitors as cells of origin for the different subclasses of IDH mt tumors. We have elucidated molecularly distinct subclasses of lower grade diffuse astrocytic glioma that dictate clinical behavior and show fundamental associations with both IDH mutational status and neuroglial developmental stage. ©2012 AACR.

  8. PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Echizen, Kanae [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Nakada, Mitsutoshi, E-mail: mnakada@med.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, 13-1, Takara-machi, Kanazawa 920-8641 (Japan); Hayashi, Tomoatsu [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Sabit, Hemragul; Furuta, Takuya [Department of Neurosurgery, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kanazawa University, 13-1, Takara-machi, Kanazawa 920-8641 (Japan); Nakai, Miyuki; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Nishimura, Yukiko; Taniue, Kenzui [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Morishita, Yasuyuki [Department of Molecular Pathology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Hirano, Shinji [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, Kochi Medical School, Kochi University, Okoh-cho, Nangoku-City, Kochi 783-8505 (Japan); Terai, Kenta [Laboratory of Function and Morphology, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Todo, Tomoki; Ino, Yasushi; Mukasa, Akitake; Takayanagi, Shunsaku; Ohtani, Ryohei; Saito, Nobuhito [Department of Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1, Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Akiyama, Tetsu, E-mail: akiyama@iam.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Laboratory of Molecular and Genetic Information, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)

    2014-01-31

    Highlights: • PCDH10 is required for the proliferation, survival and self-renewal of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 is required for glioblastoma cell migration and invasion. • PCDH10 is required for the tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. • PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma. - Abstract: Protocadherin10 (PCDH10)/OL-protocadherin is a cadherin-related transmembrane protein that has multiple roles in the brain, including facilitating specific cell–cell connections, cell migration and axon guidance. It has recently been reported that PCDH10 functions as a tumor suppressor and that its overexpression inhibits proliferation or invasion of multiple tumor cells. However, the function of PCDH10 in glioblastoma cells has not been elucidated. In contrast to previous reports on other tumors, we show here that suppression of the expression of PCDH10 by RNA interference (RNAi) induces the growth arrest and apoptosis of glioblastoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, we demonstrate that knockdown of PCDH10 inhibits the growth of glioblastoma cells xenografted into immunocompromised mice. These results suggest that PCDH10 is required for the proliferation and tumorigenicity of glioblastoma cells. We speculate that PCDH10 may be a promising target for the therapy of glioblastoma.

  9. Diffuse glioblastoma resembling acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettino, Carla; Caranci, Ferdinando; Lus, Giacomo; Signoriello, Elisabetta; Eoli, Marica; Anghileri, Elena; Pollo, Bianca; Melone, Mariarosa A B; Di Iorio, Giuseppe; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Ugga, Lorenzo; Tedeschi, Enrico

    2017-10-01

    We report the case of a young man with sudden onset of diplopia after an upper respiratory tract infection. Based on the first radiological findings acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis, a variant of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, was suspected and treatment with high dose intravenous dexamethasone was started but it was stopped for intolerance. The patient clinically worsened, developing gait instability, ataxia and ophthalmoplegia; brain MRI performed 20 days later showed severe progression of the disease with subependymal dissemination. After brain biopsy of the right temporal lesion the histological diagnosis was glioblastoma. These findings suggest that MRI features of acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis may dissimulate the diagnosis of diffuse glioma/glioblastoma. This case underscores the importance of considering diffuse glioma in the differential diagnosis of atypical signs and symptoms of acute hemorrhagic leukoencephalitis and underlines the relevant role of integrating neuroradiologic findings with neuropathology.

  10. HOTAIR is a therapeutic target in glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xuan; Ren, Yu; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Chuanbao; Zhang, Kailiang; Han, Lei; Kong, Lingping; Wei, Jianwei; Chen, Luyue; Yang, Jingxuan; Wang, Qixue; Zhang, Jianning; Yang, Yuqi; Jiang, Tao; Li, Min

    2015-01-01

    HOTAIR is a negative prognostic factor and is overexpressed in multiple human cancers including glioblastoma multiform (GBM). Survival analysis of Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA) patient data indicated that high HOTAIR expression was associated with poor outcome in GBM patients. NLK (Nemo-like kinase), a negative regulator of the ?-catenin pathway, was negatively correlated with HOTAIR expression. When the ?-catenin pathway was inhibited, GBM cells became susceptible to cell cycle arrest a...

  11. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    MPS IV; Morquio syndrome; Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA; MPS IVA; Galactosamine-6-sulfatase deficiency; Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVB; MPS IVB; Beta galactosidase deficiency; Lysosomal storage disease - mucopolysaccharidosis type IV

  12. Biomarker-based prognostic stratification of young adult glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Qi; Shi, Zhifeng; Chen, Hong; Chung, Nellie Yuk-Fei; Yin, Zi; Li, Kay Ka-Wai; Chan, Danny Tat-Ming; Poon, Wai Sang; Wu, Jinsong; Zhou, Liangfu; Chan, Aden Ka-Yin; Mao, Ying; Ng, Ho-Keung

    2016-01-26

    While the predominant elderly and the pediatric glioblastomas have been extensively investigated, young adult glioblastomas were understudied. In this study, we sought to stratify young adult glioblastomas by BRAF, H3F3A and IDH1 mutations and examine the clinical relevance of the biomarkers. In 107 glioblastomas aged from 17 to 35 years, mutually exclusive BRAF-V600E (15%), H3F3A-K27M (15.9%), H3F3A-G34R/V (2.8%) and IDH1-R132H (16.8%) mutations were identified in over half of the cases. EGFR amplification and TERTp mutation were only detected in 3.7% and 8.4% in young adult glioblastomas, respectively. BRAF-V600E identified a clinically favorable subset of glioblastomas with younger age, frequent CDKN2A homozygous deletion, and was more amendable to surgical resection. H3F3A-K27M mutated glioblastomas were tightly associated with midline locations and showed dismal prognosis. IDH1-R132H was associated with older age and favorable outcome. Interestingly, tumors with positive PDGFRA immunohistochemical expression exhibited poorer prognosis and identified an aggressive subset of tumors among K27M mutated glioblastomas. Combining BRAF, H3F3A and IDH1 mutations allowed stratification of young adult glioblastomas into four prognostic subgroups. In summary, our study demonstrates the clinical values of stratifying young adult glioblastomas with BRAF, H3F3A and IDH1 mutations, which has important implications in refining prognostic classification of glioblastomas.

  13. [Nutritional status in patients with recurrent glioblastoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokcek, D; Tran, J-D; Gonzalez-Aguilar, A; Alentorn, A; Liou, A; Delattre, J-Y; Idbaih, A

    2013-11-01

    Nutritional status is a major clinical parameter in multiple cancers. Indeed, nutritional status is a prognostic factor and a predictor of response and toxicity to treatments in breast and lung cancers for instance. To our knowledge, in patients suffering from malignant primary brain tumors, nutritional status has been poorly investigated. Nutritional status of 26 glioblastoma patients relapsing after a first line of treatment was studied. The body mass index (BMI), the prognostic inflammatory and nutritional index (PINI) and the instant nutritional score (INS) were assessed. The BMI was abnormal in 12 patients, two were malnourished while 10 were overweight. The BMI was not correlated to age of patients. Overweight status did not impact patient survival but it was associated with reduced performance status. The PINI was abnormal in three patients. Finally, the INS was abnormal in 24 patients, noted 2 (n=22) or 4 (n=4). Our results were not in favor of systematic nutritional support in patients with recurrent glioblastoma after a first line of treatment. Being overweight does not influence prognosis but may influence performance status. Steroid therapy and chemotherapy (inducing sodium and water retention and lymphopenia) weaken the relevance of BMI and INS for nutritional assessment in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Further studies using additional nutritional tests in larger, independent and prospective cohorts of patients are warranted to obtain more details. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Secretome signature of invasive glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formolo, Catherine A; Williams, Russell; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; MacDonald, Tobey J; Lee, Norman H; Hathout, Yetrib

    2011-07-01

    The incurability of malignant glioblastomas is mainly attributed to their highly invasive nature coupled with resistance to chemo- and radiation therapy. Because invasiveness is partially dictated by the proteins these tumors secrete we used SILAC to characterize the secretomes of four glioblastoma cell lines (LN18, T98, U118 and U87). Although U87 and U118 cells both secreted high levels of well-known invasion promoting proteins, a Matrigel invasion assay showed U87 cells to be eight times more invasive than U118 cells, suggesting that additional proteins secreted by U87 cells may contribute to the highly invasive phenotype. Indeed, we identified a number of proteins highly or exclusively expressed by U87 cells as compared to the less invasive cell lines. The most striking of these include ADAM9, ADAM10, cathepsin B, cathepsin L1, osteopontin, neuropilin-1, semaphorin-7A, suprabasin, and chitinase-3-like protein 1. U87 cells also expressed significantly low levels of some cell adhesion proteins such as periostin and EMILIN-1. Correlation of secretome profiles with relative levels of invasiveness using Pavlidis template matching further indicated potential roles for these proteins in U87 glioblastoma invasion. Antibody inhibition of CH3L1 reduced U87 cell invasiveness by 30%.

  15. A preclinical orthotopic model for glioblastoma recapitulates key features of human tumors and demonstrates sensitivity to a combination of MEK and PI3K pathway inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaa El Meskini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the highest grade malignant brain tumor, are mostly ineffective, and better preclinical model systems are needed to increase the successful translation of drug discovery efforts into the clinic. Previous work describes a genetically engineered mouse (GEM model that contains perturbations in the most frequently dysregulated networks in GBM (driven by RB, KRAS and/or PI3K signaling and PTEN that induce development of Grade IV astrocytoma with properties of the human disease. Here, we developed and characterized an orthotopic mouse model derived from the GEM that retains the features of the GEM model in an immunocompetent background; however, this model is also tractable and efficient for preclinical evaluation of candidate therapeutic regimens. Orthotopic brain tumors are highly proliferative, invasive and vascular, and express histology markers characteristic of human GBM. Primary tumor cells were examined for sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and targeted drugs. PI3K and MAPK pathway inhibitors, when used as single agents, inhibited cell proliferation but did not result in significant apoptosis. However, in combination, these inhibitors resulted in a substantial increase in cell death. Moreover, these findings translated into the in vivo orthotopic model: PI3K or MAPK inhibitor treatment regimens resulted in incomplete pathway suppression and feedback loops, whereas dual treatment delayed tumor growth through increased apoptosis and decreased tumor cell proliferation. Analysis of downstream pathway components revealed a cooperative effect on target downregulation. These concordant results, together with the morphologic similarities to the human GBM disease characteristics of the model, validate it as a new platform for the evaluation of GBM treatment.

  16. Amnesia due to bilateral hippocampal glioblastoma. MRI finding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimauchi, M.; Wakisaka, S.; Kinoshita, K. (Miyazaki Medical Coll., Kiyotake (Japan). Dept. of Neurosurgery)

    1989-11-01

    The authors report a unique case of glioblastoma which caused permanent amnesia. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the lesion to be limited to the hippocampal formation bilaterally. Although glioblastoma extends frequently into fiber pathways and expands into the opposite cerebral hemisphere, making a 'butterfly' lesion, it is unusual for it to invade the limbic system selectively to this extent. (orig.).

  17. Apoptotic Signaling Pathways in Glioblastoma and Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Anahi Valdés-Rives

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most hostile type of brain cancer. Its aggressiveness is due to increased invasion, migration, proliferation, angiogenesis, and a decreased apoptosis. In this review, we discuss the role of key regulators of apoptosis in GBM and glioblastoma stem cells. Given their importance in the etiology and pathogenesis of GBM, these signaling molecules may represent potential therapeutic targets.

  18. Therapeutic Advances using Combinational Therapy in the Treatment of Glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staberg, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant brain tumor in adults. Median survival is only about 15 months despite aggressive treatment, consisting of surgery followed by radio- and chemotherapy, stressing the need for new therapies. Development of glioblastoma is thought to be a result of both genetic...... of glioblastoma cells, an effect that is even more pronounced when combined with traditional chemotherapeutic agents. The EGFR and Notch pathways are shown to be of great importance for glioblastoma cell survival and for the formation of new blood vessels, a process known as angiogenesis. Results presented herein...... suggests that targeting redundant signaling pathways can overcome required or initial treatment resistance, thus leading to improved tumor cell elimination. We hypothesize that future therapies will likely be a result of combination therapies for glioblastoma patients based on their molecular tumor profile...

  19. Myc-Driven Glycolysis Is a Therapeutic Target in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Kensuke; Iafrate, A John; Ho, Quan; Curry, William T; Batchelor, Tracy T; Flaherty, Keith T; Onozato, Maristela L; Lelic, Nina; Sundaram, Sudhandra; Cahill, Daniel P; Chi, Andrew S; Wakimoto, Hiroaki

    2016-09-01

    Deregulated Myc drives an oncogenic metabolic state, including pseudohypoxic glycolysis, adapted for the constitutive production of biomolecular precursors to feed rapid tumor cell growth. In glioblastoma, Myc facilitates renewal of the tumor-initiating cell reservoir contributing to tumor maintenance. We investigated whether targeting the Myc-driven metabolic state could be a selectively toxic therapeutic strategy for glioblastoma. The glycolytic dependency of Myc-driven glioblastoma was tested using (13)C metabolic flux analysis, glucose-limiting culture assays, and glycolysis inhibitors, including inhibitors of the NAD(+) salvage enzyme nicotinamide phosphoribosyl-transferase (NAMPT), in MYC and MYCN shRNA knockdown and lentivirus overexpression systems and in patient-derived glioblastoma tumorspheres with and without MYC/MYCN amplification. The in vivo efficacy of glycolyic inhibition was tested using NAMPT inhibitors in MYCN-amplified patient-derived glioblastoma orthotopic xenograft mouse models. Enforced Myc overexpression increased glucose flux and expression of glycolytic enzymes in glioblastoma cells. Myc and N-Myc knockdown and Myc overexpression systems demonstrated that Myc activity determined sensitivity and resistance to inhibition of glycolysis. Small-molecule inhibitors of glycolysis, particularly NAMPT inhibitors, were selectively toxic to MYC/MYCN-amplified patient-derived glioblastoma tumorspheres. NAMPT inhibitors were potently cytotoxic, inducing apoptosis and significantly extended the survival of mice bearing MYCN-amplified patient-derived glioblastoma orthotopic xenografts. Myc activation in glioblastoma generates a dependency on glycolysis and an addiction to metabolites required for glycolysis. Glycolytic inhibition via NAMPT inhibition represents a novel metabolically targeted therapeutic strategy for MYC or MYCN-amplified glioblastoma and potentially other cancers genetically driven by Myc. Clin Cancer Res; 22(17); 4452-65. ©2016 AACR

  20. Altered expression of polycomb group genes in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    Full Text Available The Polycomb group (PcG proteins play a critical role in histone mediated epigenetics which has been implicated in the malignant evolution of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. By systematically interrogating The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, we discovered widespread aberrant expression of the PcG members in GBM samples compared to normal brain. The most striking differences were upregulation of EZH2, PHF19, CBX8 and PHC2 and downregulation of CBX7, CBX6, EZH1 and RYBP. Interestingly, changes in EZH2, PHF19, CBX7, CBX6 and EZH1 occurred progressively as astrocytoma grade increased. We validated the aberrant expression of CBX6, CBX7, CBX8 and EZH2 in GBM cell lines by Western blotting and qRT-PCR, and further the aberrant expression of CBX6 in GBM tissue samples by immunohistochemical staining. To determine if there was functional significance to the diminished CBX6 levels in GBM, CBX6 was overexpressed in GBM cells resulting in decreased proliferative capacity. In conclusion, aberrant expression of PcG proteins in GBMs may play a role in the development or maintenance of the malignancy.

  1. Phase II open-label study of nintedanib in patients with recurrent glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muhic, Aida; Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Mau-Sørensen, Paul Morten

    2013-01-01

    Nintedanib (BIBF 1120) is a small, orally available, triple angiokinase inhibitor in phase III development (various indications) that targets VEGFR 1-3, FGFR 1-3, and PDGFR-α/β. This open-label, uncontrolled, phase II study assessed the efficacy and safety of nintedanib in patients with recurrent....... Nintedanib had an acceptable safety profile, with no CTCAE grade 3-4 adverse events. Common adverse events were CTCAE grade 1-2 fatigue, loss of appetite, diarrhea, and nausea. Single-agent nintedanib (200 mg bid) demonstrated limited, but clinically non-relevant antitumor activity in patients with recurrent...... glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) who had previously failed radiotherapy plus temozolomide as first-line therapy (STUPP), or the same regimen with subsequent bevacizumab-based therapy as second-line treatment (BEV). Patients with a performance status of 0-1, histologically proven GBM, and measurable disease (by...

  2. Statin use and survival following glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaist, David; Hallas, Jesper; Friis, Søren

    2014-01-01

    AIM: While some studies indicate a potential chemopreventive effect of statin use on the risk of glioma, the effect of statins on the prognosis of brain tumours has not yet been examined. We thus conducted a cohort study evaluating the influence of statin use on survival in patients...... with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). METHODS: We identified 1562 patients diagnosed with GBM during 2000-2009 from the Danish Cancer Registry and linked this cohort to Danish nationwide demographic and health registries. Within the GBM cohort, each patient recorded as using statins prior to diagnosis (defined as ≥2...... redeemed prescriptions) was matched to two statin non-users (

  3. MRI and the diagnosis of glioblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowe, S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper is based on an oral presentation given at the Sydney conference in February 2000. Two cases will be presented to demonstrate the use of this imaging modality in the diagnosis of glioblastomas, MRI has superior soft tissue imaging abilities making it ideal for imaging the brain. Conventional MRI is good for evaluating oedema and haemorrhage and offers high resolution without associated bone artefacts. However, as with all imaging modalities there are some disadvantages. Patients with pacemakers, certain types of metallic clips, or claustrophobia may not be suitable for an MRI scan. Copyright (2002) Australian Institute of Radiography

  4. MGMT promoter methylation determined by HRM in comparison to MSP and pyrosequencing for predicting high-grade glioma response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzeny, Olivier J; Christmann, Markus; Renovanz, Mirjam; Giese, Alf; Sommer, Clemens; Kaina, Bernd

    2016-01-01

    The DNA repair protein O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) causes resistance of cancer cells to alkylating agents and, therefore, is a well-established predictive marker for high-grade gliomas that are routinely treated with alkylating drugs. Since MGMT is highly epigenetically regulated, the MGMT promoter methylation status is taken as an indicator of MGMT silencing, predicting the outcome of glioma therapy. MGMT promoter methylation is usually determined by methylation specific PCR (MSP), which is a labor intensive and error-prone method often used semi-quantitatively. Searching for alternatives, we used closed-tube high resolution melt (HRM) analysis, which is a quantitative method, and compared it with MSP and pyrosequencing regarding its predictive value. We analyzed glioblastoma cell lines with known MGMT activity and formalin-fixed samples from IDH1 wild-type high-grade glioma patients (WHO grade III/IV) treated with radiation and temozolomide by HRM, MSP, and pyrosequencing. The data were compared as to progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) of patients exhibiting the methylated and unmethylated MGMT status. A promoter methylation cut-off level relevant for PFS and OS was determined. In a multivariate Cox regression model, methylation of MGMT promoter of high-grade gliomas analyzed by HRM, but not MSP, was found to be an independent predictive marker for OS. Univariate Kaplan-Meier analyses revealed for PFS and OS a significant and better discrimination between methylated and unmethylated tumors when quantitative HRM was used instead of MSP. Compared to MSP and pyrosequencing, the HRM method is simple, cost effective, highly accurate and fast. HRM is at least equivalent to pyrosequencing in quantifying the methylation level. It is superior in predicting PFS and OS of high-grade glioma patients compared to MSP and, therefore, can be recommended being used routinely for determination of the MGMT status of gliomas.

  5. Bevacizumab for glioblastoma: current indications, surgical implications, and future directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Brandyn A.; Aghi, Manish K.

    2016-01-01

    Initial enthusiasm after promising Phase II trials for treating recurrent glioblastomas with the antiangiogenic drug bevacizumab—a neutralizing antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor—was tempered by recent Phase III trials showing no efficacy for treating newly diagnosed glioblastomas. As a result, there is uncertainty about the appropriate indications for the use of bevacizumab in glioblastoma treatment. There are also concerns about the effects of bevacizumab on wound healing that neurosurgeons must be aware of. In addition, biochemical evidence suggests a percentage of tumors treated with bevacizumab for an extended period of time will undergo transformation into a more biologically aggressive and invasive phenotype with a particularly poor prognosis. Despite these concerns, there remain numerous examples of radiological and clinical improvement after bevacizumab treatment, particularly in patients with recurrent glioblastoma with limited therapeutic options. In this paper, the authors review clinical results with bevacizumab for glioblastoma treatment to date, ongoing trials designed to address unanswered questions, current clinical indications based on existing data, neurosurgical implications of bevacizumab use in patients with glioblastoma, the current scientific understanding of the tumor response to short- and long-term bevacizumab treatment, and future studies that will need to be undertaken to enable this treatment to fulfill its therapeutic promise for glioblastoma. PMID:25581938

  6. Prognostic value of preoperative dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI perfusion parameters for high-grade glioma patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulyte, Agne [Vilnius University, Faculty of Medicine, Vilnius (Lithuania); Katsaros, Vasileios K. [General Anticancer and Oncological Hospital ' ' St. Savvas' ' , Department of Advanced Imaging Modalities - CT and MRI, Athens (Greece); University of Athens, Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece); Liouta, Evangelia; Stranjalis, Georgios [University of Athens, Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece); Boskos, Christos [University of Athens, Department of Neurosurgery, Evangelismos Hospital, Athens (Greece); General Anticancer and Oncological Hospital ' ' St. Savvas' ' , Department of Radiation Oncology, Athens (Greece); Papanikolaou, Nickolas [Champalimaud Foundation, Department of Radiology, Centre for the Unknown, Lisbon (Portugal); Usinskiene, Jurgita [National Cancer Institute, Vilnius (Lithuania); Affidea Lietuva, Vilnius (Lithuania); Bisdas, Sotirios [University College London Hospitals, Department of Neuroradiology, The National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-12-15

    The prognostic value of the dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI perfusion and its histogram analysis-derived metrics is not well established for high-grade glioma (HGG) patients. The aim of this prospective study was to investigate DCE perfusion transfer coefficient (K{sup trans}), vascular plasma volume fraction (v{sub p}), extracellular volume fraction (v{sub e}), reverse transfer constant (k{sub ep}), and initial area under gadolinium concentration time curve (IAUGC) as predictors of progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in HGG patients. Sixty-nine patients with suspected anaplastic astrocytoma or glioblastoma underwent preoperative DCE-MRI scans. DCE perfusion whole tumor region histogram parameters, clinical details, and PFS and OS data were obtained. Univariate, multivariate, and Kaplan-Meier survival analyses were conducted. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was employed to identify perfusion parameters with the best differentiation performance. On univariate analysis, v{sub e} and skewness of v{sub p} had significant negative impacts, while k{sub ep} had significant positive impact on OS (P < 0.05). v{sub e} was also a negative predictor of PFS (P < 0.05). Patients with lower v{sub e} and IAUGC had longer median PFS and OS on Kaplan-Meier analysis (P < 0.05). K{sup trans} and v{sub e} could also differentiate grade III from IV gliomas (area under the curve 0.819 and 0.791, respectively). High v{sub e} is a consistent predictor of worse PFS and OS in HGG glioma patients. v{sub p} skewness and k{sub ep} are also predictive for OS. K{sup trans} and v{sub e} demonstrated the best diagnostic performance for differentiating grade III from IV gliomas. (orig.)

  7. Rapid progression to glioblastoma in a subset of IDH-mutated astrocytomas: a genome-wide analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Timothy E; Snuderl, Matija; Serrano, Jonathan; Karajannis, Matthias A; Heguy, Adriana; Oliver, Dwight; Raisanen, Jack M; Maher, Elizabeth A; Pan, Edward; Barnett, Samuel; Cai, Chunyu; Habib, Amyn A; Bachoo, Robert M; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J

    2017-05-01

    According to the recently updated World Health Organization (WHO) classification (2016), grade II-III astrocytomas are divided into IDH-wildtype and IDH-mutant groups, the latter being significantly less aggressive in terms of both progression-free and total survival. We identified a small cohort of WHO grade II-III astrocytomas that harbored the IDH1 R132H mutation, as confirmed by both immunohistochemistry and molecular sequence analysis, which nonetheless had unexpectedly rapid recurrence and subsequent progression to glioblastoma. Among these four cases, the mean time to recurrence as glioblastoma was only 16 months and the mean total survival among the three patients who have died during the follow-up was only 31 months. We hypothesized that these tumors had other, unfavorable genetic or epigenetic alterations that negated the favorable effect of the IDH mutation. We applied genome-wide profiling with a methylation array (Illumina Infinium Human Methylation 450k) to screen for genetic and epigenetic alterations in these tumors. As expected, the methylation profiles of all four tumors were found to match most closely with IDH-mutant astrocytomas. Compared with a control group of four indolent, age-similar WHO grade II-III astrocytomas, the tumors showed markedly increased levels of overall copy number changes, but no consistent specific genetic alterations were seen across all of the tumors. While most IDH-mutant WHO grade II-III astrocytomas are relatively indolent, a subset may rapidly recur and progress to glioblastoma. The precise underlying cause of the increased aggressiveness in these gliomas remains unknown, although it may be associated with increased genomic instability.

  8. IV treatment at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other IV treatments you may receive after you leave the hospital include: Treatment for hormone deficiencies Medicines for severe nausea that cancer chemotherapy or pregnancy may cause Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for pain (this is IV ...

  9. 5-ALA based photodynamic management of glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühm, Adrian; Stepp, Herbert; Beyer, Wolfgang; Hennig, Georg; Pongratz, Thomas; Sroka, Ronald; Schnell, Oliver; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Kreth, Friedrich-Wilhelm

    2014-03-01

    Objective: Improvement of the clinical outcome of glioblastoma (GBM) patients by employment of fluorescence and photosensitization on the basis of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX). Methods: In this report the focus is laid on the use of tumor selective PpIX fluorescence for stereotactic biopsy sampling and intra-operative treatment monitoring. In addition, our current concept for treatment planning is presented. For stereotactic interstitial photodynamic therapy (iPDT), radial diffusers were implanted into the contrast enhancing tumor volume. Spectroscopic measurements of laser light transmission and fluorescence between adjacent fibers were performed prior, during and post PDT. Results: PpIX concentrations in primary glioblastoma tissue show high intra- and inter-patient variability, but are usually sufficient for an effective PDT. During individual treatment attempts with 5-ALA based GBM-iPDT, transmission and fluorescence measurements between radial diffusers gave the following results: 1. In some cases, transmission after PDT is considerably reduced compared to the value before PDT, which may be attributable to a depletion of oxygenated hemoglobin and/or diffuse bleeding. 2. PpIX fluorescence is efficiently photobleached during PDT in all cases. Conclusion: iPDT with assessment of PpIX fluorescence and photobleaching is a promising treatment option. Individualization of treatment parameters appears to bear a potential to further improve clinical outcomes.

  10. A Retrospective Comparative Study of Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy followed by Adjuvant Temozolomide Versus Radiotherapy Alone In Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme - An Experience at Radium Institute, Patna Medical College and Hospital, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S; Pandit, P N; Kishor, K

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (WHO grade IV glioma) still remains a dreadful diagnosis in oncology with the median survival ranging between 12 to 17 months, despite the recent advances in its management. It is the most common malignant primary tumour in adults(13). The standard of care is Maximal Safe Resection followed by Concomitant ChemoRadiotherapy. During the period 2006 to 2010 at Radium Institute, Patna Medical College and Hospital (PMCH) in India, a study was conducted on 37 newly diagnosed GBM cases in which the control-arm (c-arm) received Conventional Radiotherapy (60Gy/30#) only whereas the study arm (s-arm) received Concomitant Chemoradiotherapy followed by Adjuvant Temozolomide. The median survival was 15.4 months in the s-arm as compared to 12.4 months in the c-arm. The OS showed a significant improvement with p-value of 0.05 and PFS also showed a benefit with a p-value of 0.005. The results were encouraging with improvement in OS as well as PFS in the s-arm and were at par with the other similar studies conducted in different parts of the world.

  11. BRM270, a Compound from Natural Plant Extracts, Inhibits Glioblastoma Stem Cell Properties and Glioblastoma Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Hee-Young; Park, Cheol Gyu; Ham, Seok Won; Choi, Sang-Hun; Lee, Seon Yong; Kim, Jung Yun; Seo, Sunyoung; Jin, Xiong; Kim, Jun-Kyum; Eun, Kiyoung; Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hyunggee

    2017-09-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the most aggressive and lethal human brain tumors, and the median survival of patients with GBM is only 14 months. Glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) are regarded as a main cause of GBM recurrence, because of their self-renewal and drug resistance properties. Therefore, targeting GSCs is an important therapeutic strategy for GBM. In this study, we show the effects of BRM270, a compound from natural plant extracts, on GSCs in vitro and GBM recurrence in vivo. BRM270 induced apoptotic cell death and inhibited cell growth and "stemness" both in vitro and in vivo. Combining BRM270 treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) dramatically increased mice survival and tumor growth inhibition. Taken together, our results suggested that BRM270 synergizes with CCRT as a therapeutic agent to target GSCs.

  12. Assessment and treatment relevance in elderly glioblastoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchet, Luc; Zouaoui, Sonia; Darlix, Amélie; Menjot de Champfleur, Nicolas; Ferreira, Ernestine; Fabbro, Michel; Kerr, Christine; Taillandier, Luc

    2014-11-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor. Its incidence continues to increase in the elderly because the older segment of the population is growing faster than any other age group. Most clinical studies exclude elderly patients, and "standards of care" do not exist for GBM patients aged >70 years. We review epidemiology, tumor biology/molecular factors, prognostic factors (clinical, imaging data, therapeutics), and their assessments as well as classic and specific endpoints plus recent and ongoing clinical trials for elderly GBM patients. This work includes perspectives and personal opinions on this topic. Although there are no standards of care for elderly GBM patients, we can hypothesize that (i) Karnofsky performance status (KPS), probably after steroid treatment, is one of the most important clinical factors for determining our oncological strategy; (ii) resection is superior to biopsy, at least in selected patients (depending on location of the tumor and associated comorbidities); (iii) specific schedules of radiotherapy yield a modest but significant improvement; (iv) temozolomide has an acceptable tolerance, even when KPS patients; and (v) the addition of concomitant temozolomide to radiotherapy has not yet been validated but shows promising results in some studies, yet the optimal schedule of radiotherapy remains to be determined. In the future, specific assessments (geriatric, imaging, biology) and use of new endpoints (quality of life and toxicity measures) will aid clinicians in determining the balance of potential benefits and risks of each oncological strategy. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Contemporary management of high-grade gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Hao-Wen; Morgan, Erin R; Mason, Warren P

    2018-01-01

    High-grade gliomas, including glioblastoma, are the most common malignant brain tumors in adults. Despite intensive efforts to develop new therapies for these diseases, treatment options remain limited and prognosis is poor. Recently, there have been important advances in our understanding of the molecular basis of glioma, leading to refinements in our diagnostic and management approach. There is new evidence to guide the treatment of elderly patients. A multitude of new agents have been investigated, including targeted therapies, immunotherapeutics and tumor-treating fields. This review summarizes the key findings from this research, and presents a perspective on future opportunities to advance the field.

  14. Extent and patterns of MGMT promoter methylation in glioblastoma- and respective glioblastoma-derived spheres

    OpenAIRE

    Sciuscio D.; Diserens A. C.; van Dommelen K.; Martinet D.; Jones G.; Janzer R. C.; Pollo C.; Hamou M. F.; Kaina B.; Stupp R.; Levivier M.; Hegi M. E.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Quantitative methylation specific tests suggest that not all cells in a glioblastoma with detectable promoter methylation of the O6 methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) gene carry a methylated MGMT allele. This observation may indicate cell subpopulations with distinct MGMT status raising the question of the clinically relevant cutoff of MGMT methylation therapy. Epigenetic silencing of the MGMT gene by promoter methylation blunts repair of O6 methyl guanine and has been shown ...

  15. THE EFFECT OF PICURE STORY VIDEO MEDIA ON THE SPEAKING SKILLS IMPROVEMENT OF CHILDREN WITH INTELLECTUAL CHALLENGES AT GRADE IV SPECIAL EDUCATION SCHOOL CLASS C (SPLB-C OF CIPAGANTI SPECIAL EDUCATION FOUNDATION (YPLB CIPAGANTI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nia Sutisna

    2015-06-01

    Masalah yang ditemukan pada anak tunagrahita yaitu berkaitan dengan hambatan berkomunikasi atau mengembangkan kemampuan bahasa lisan/berbicara sesuai dengan norma lingkungan dan dapat menangkap perasan dan gagasan lawan bicara serta berperan aktif dalam lingkungan. Untuk merealisasikan usaha tersebut perlu adanya latihan berbicara atau speech education yaitu melalui media video cerita yang memadai dan bentuk kegiatan yang menunjang. berdasarkan latar belakang masalah tersebut timbullah sebuah rumusan masalah dalam penelitian ini, yaitu: “Adakah pengaruh penggunaan media cerita bergambar terhadap peningkatan kemampuan berbicara Anak Tunagrahita Ringan?” Dalam menjawab permasalahan penelitian tersebut, peneliti menggunakan metode eksperimen dengan bentuk One Group Pre test Post test Design uji Wilcoxon. Adapun subjek dalam penelitian ini adalah empat orang siswa tunagrahita kelas IV SPLB-C YPLB Cipaganti Kata kunci: media video, tunagrahita, kemampuan berbicara

  16. Evolution of DNA repair defects during malignant progression of low-grade gliomas after temozolomide treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thuijl, Hinke F.; Mazor, Tali; Johnson, Brett E.; Fouse, Shaun D.; Aihara, Koki; Hong, Chibo; Malmström, Annika; Hallbeck, Martin; Heimans, Jan J.; Kloezeman, Jenneke J.; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Lamfers, Martine L M; Saito, Nobuhito; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Mukasa, Akitake; Berger, Mitchell S.; Söderkvist, Peter; Taylor, Barry S.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Wesseling, Pieter; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Chang, Susan M.; Ylstra, Bauke; Costello, Joseph F.

    2015-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) increases the overall survival of patients with glioblastoma (GBM), but its role in the clinical management of diffuse low-grade gliomas (LGG) is still being defined. DNA hypermethylation of the O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is associated with an improved

  17. Evolution of DNA repair defects during malignant progression of low-grade gliomas after temozolomide treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Thuijl, Hinke F.; Mazor, Tali; Johnson, Brett E.; Fouse, Shaun D.; Aihara, Koki; Hong, Chibo; Malmström, Annika; Hallbeck, Martin; Heimans, Jan J.; Kloezeman, Jenneke J.; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Lamfers, Martine L. M.; Saito, Nobuhito; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Mukasa, Akitake; Berger, Mitchell S.; Söderkvist, Peter; Taylor, Barry S.; Molinaro, Annette M.; Wesseling, Pieter; Reijneveld, Jaap C.; Chang, Susan M.; Ylstra, Bauke; Costello, Joseph F.

    2015-01-01

    Temozolomide (TMZ) increases the overall survival of patients with glioblastoma (GBM), but its role in the clinical management of diffuse low-grade gliomas (LGG) is still being defined. DNA hypermethylation of the O (6) -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter is associated with an

  18. Acute ischemic stroke secondary to glioblastoma. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pina, Sofia; Carneiro, Ângelo; Rodrigues, Tiago; Samões, Raquel; Taipa, Ricardo; Melo-Pires, Manuel; Pereira, Cláudia

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma is a malignant infiltrative glial tumor occurring most often over 50 years of age, with diverse clinical presentations. We describe a case of temporal lobe glioblastoma with a rare presentation as an acute ischemic stroke, discussing the imaging and histopathological findings, and reviewing the literature. A 77-year-old woman had sudden onset of left hemiparesis and hemihypoesthesia. The neuroradiological studies revealed an acute ischemic lesion in the right lenticulostriate arteries territory and a right anterior temporal lobe tumor, enhancing heterogeneously after contrast with enhancement of the right middle cerebral artery wall. Histopathological analysis of the resected temporal lesion revealed a glioblastoma multiforme with tumoral infiltration of the vascular wall. Glioblastoma should be considered in the etiology of acute ischemic stroke, where neuroimaging plays an important diagnostic role, enabling a more immediate therapeutic approach, with a consequent impact on survival.

  19. Cellular Effects of the Antiepileptic Drug Valproic Acid in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marita Eckert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Valproic acid (VPA, an anticonvulsant and mood-stabilizing drug is used to treat epileptic seizure of glioblastoma patients. Besides its antiepileptic activity, VPA has been attributed further functions that improve the clinical outcome of glioblastoma patients. Those comprise the inhibition of some histone deacetylase (HDAC isoforms which reportedly may result in radiosensitization. Retrospective analysis of patient data, however, could not unequivocally confirm a prolonged survival of glioblastoma patients receiving VPA. The present study aimed to identify potential VPA targets at the cellular level. Methods: To this end, the effect of VPA on metabolism, Ca2+-, biochemical and electro-signaling, cell-cycling, clonogenic survival and transfilter migration was analyzed in three human glioblastoma lines (T98G, U-87MG, U251 by MTT assay, Ca2+ imaging, immunoblotting, patch-clamp recording, flow cytometry, delayed plating colony formation and modified Boyden chamber assays, respectively. In addition, the effect of VPA on clonogenic survival of primary glioblastoma spheroid cultures treated with temozolomide and fractionated radiation was assessed by limited dilution assay. Results: In 2 of 3 glioblastoma lines, clinical relevant concentrations of VPA slightly slowed down cell cycle progression and decreased clonogenic survival. Furthermore, VPA induced Ca2+ signaling which was accompanied by pronounced K+ channel activity and transfilter cell migration. VPA did not affect metabolic NAD(PH formation or radioresistance of the glioblastoma lines. Finally, VPA did not impair clonogenic survival or radioresistance of temozolomide-treated primary spheroid cultures. Conclusions: Combined, our in vitro data do not propose a general use of VPA as a radiosensitizer in anti-glioblastoma therapy.

  20. Lomustine and Bevacizumab in Progressive Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, Wolfgang; Gorlia, Thierry; Bendszus, Martin; Taphoorn, Martin; Sahm, Felix; Harting, Inga; Brandes, Alba A; Taal, Walter; Domont, Julien; Idbaih, Ahmed; Campone, Mario; Clement, Paul M; Stupp, Roger; Fabbro, Michel; Le Rhun, Emilie; Dubois, Francois; Weller, Michael; von Deimling, Andreas; Golfinopoulos, Vassilis; Bromberg, Jacoline C; Platten, Michael; Klein, Martin; van den Bent, Martin J

    2017-11-16

    Bevacizumab is approved for the treatment of patients with progressive glioblastoma on the basis of uncontrolled data. Data from a phase 2 trial suggested that the addition of bevacizumab to lomustine might improve overall survival as compared with monotherapies. We sought to determine whether the combination would result in longer overall survival than lomustine alone among patients at first progression of glioblastoma. We randomly assigned patients with progression after chemoradiation in a 2:1 ratio to receive lomustine plus bevacizumab (combination group, 288 patients) or lomustine alone (monotherapy group, 149 patients). The methylation status of the promoter of O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) was assessed. Health-related quality of life and neurocognitive function were evaluated at baseline and every 12 weeks. The primary end point of the trial was overall survival. A total of 437 patients underwent randomization. The median number of 6-week treatment cycles was three in the combination group and one in the monotherapy group. With 329 overall survival events (75.3%), the combination therapy did not provide a survival advantage; the median overall survival was 9.1 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 8.1 to 10.1) in the combination group and 8.6 months (95% CI, 7.6 to 10.4) in the monotherapy group (hazard ratio for death, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.21; P=0.65). Locally assessed progression-free survival was 2.7 months longer in the combination group than in the monotherapy group: 4.2 months versus 1.5 months (hazard ratio for disease progression or death, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.39 to 0.61; Pbevacizumab to lomustine affected neither health-related quality of life nor neurocognitive function. The MGMT status was prognostic. Despite somewhat prolonged progression-free survival, treatment with lomustine plus bevacizumab did not confer a survival advantage over treatment with lomustine alone in patients with progressive glioblastoma. (Funded by an

  1. Development and Characterization of Methylene Blue Oleate Salt-Loaded Polymeric Nanoparticles and their Potential Application as a Treatment for Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda-Gill, JM; Ranjan, AP; Vishwanatha, JK

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is an aggressive, grade IV brain tumor that develops from astrocytes located within the cerebrum, resulting in poor prognosis and survival rates following an accepted treatment regimen of surgery, radiation, and temozolomide. Thus, development of new therapeutics is necessary. During the last two decades, methylene blue (MB) has received increased attention as a potential neurotherapeutic due to its duality in brain cancers and neurodegenerative diseases. While MB is capable of easily permeating the blood-brain barrier, its therapeutic concentrations in GBM are known to induce off-target cytotoxicity and thus, another mode of drug delivery must be considered. To this end, encapsulation of formerly unusable compounds into nanoparticles (NPs) made from the biodegradable/biocompatible, FDA approved co-polymer poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) has been more commonplace when developing novel therapeutics. In this study, we formulated and characterized Pluronic F68-coated PLGA NPs containing a sodium oleate conjugate of MB (MBOS) via solvent displacement. Conjugation of sodium oleate to MB was shown to reduce its release from PLGA NPs compared to unmodified MB, leading to potential improvements in drug accumulation and therapeutic effectiveness. Our drug-loaded NP preparations, which were ~170 nm in size and had drug loading values of ~2%, were shown to reduce cell viability and cell compartment-specific, as well as overall cell, functions equivalenty, if not more so, when compared to free drug in two GBM cell lines. Following bio-distribution analysis of free MBOS compared to its nano-encapsulated counterpart, drug-loaded NPs were shown to more effectively permeate the BBB, which could lead to improvements in therapeutic effectiveness upon further examination in a tumor-bearing mouse model. Based on these results, we believe that the further development and eventual utilization of this nanoformulation could lead to an effective GBM therapy that could

  2. The ZEB1 pathway links glioblastoma initiation, invasion and chemoresistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebzehnrubl, Florian A; Silver, Daniel J; Tugertimur, Bugra; Deleyrolle, Loic P; Siebzehnrubl, Dorit; Sarkisian, Matthew R; Devers, Kelly G; Yachnis, Antony T; Kupper, Marius D; Neal, Daniel; Nabilsi, Nancy H; Kladde, Michael P; Suslov, Oleg; Brabletz, Simone; Brabletz, Thomas; Reynolds, Brent A; Steindler, Dennis A

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma remains one of the most lethal types of cancer, and is the most common brain tumour in adults. In particular, tumour recurrence after surgical resection and radiation invariably occurs regardless of aggressive chemotherapy. Here, we provide evidence that the transcription factor ZEB1 (zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1) exerts simultaneous influence over invasion, chemoresistance and tumourigenesis in glioblastoma. ZEB1 is preferentially expressed in invasive glioblastoma cells, where the ZEB1-miR-200 feedback loop interconnects these processes through the downstream effectors ROBO1, c-MYB and MGMT. Moreover, ZEB1 expression in glioblastoma patients is predictive of shorter survival and poor Temozolomide response. Our findings indicate that this regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition orchestrates key features of cancer stem cells in malignant glioma and identify ROBO1, OLIG2, CD133 and MGMT as novel targets of the ZEB1 pathway. Thus, ZEB1 is an important candidate molecule for glioblastoma recurrence, a marker of invasive tumour cells and a potential therapeutic target, along with its downstream effectors. Glioblastoma have a poor prognosis, mainly due to infiltrating and therapy resistant cells leading to cancer recurrence. Here, tumor formation, invasion and resistance are not independent but intertwined processes regulated by the EMT activator ZEB1. PMID:23818228

  3. Comparison of solitary cerebral metastasis and glioblastoma multiform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyun Cheol; Choi, Woo Suk; Kim, Eui Jong; Oh, Joo Hyeong; Yoon, Yup

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the MR images of solitary cerebral metastasis and glioblastoma multiform to determine the differential findings. Ten cases of solitary cerebral metastasis and 14 cases of glioblastoma multiform were retrospectively reviewed, all of which were proved by pathologically. The MR findings were compared in regard to tumor size and location, degree of edema, enhancement pattern, and shape of rime enhancement. Mean maximum diameter or solitary cerebral metastasis was 3.85 cm(s.d. 1.47). Metastatic lesions were located in corticomedullary junction(70%) with cerebellum in 2 cases. The locations of glioblastoma multiform were white matter(64%) without cerebellar involvement and the mean maximum diameter was 5.43 cm(s.d. 0.99). In solitary cerebral metastasis, the size of edema was larger than the tumor diameter in 50%, but glioblastoma multiform did not show severe degree of edema. Rim enhancement seen in 7 cases of solitary cerebral metastasis showed unilocular shape and complete rim in 6 cases, and even thickness and smooth inner margine in 5 cases. However, rim enhancement seen in 11 cases of glioblastoma multiform showed multilocular appearance with septa in all cases, incomplete rim in 5 cases, and uneven thickness and irregular inner margin in 10 cases. Tumor location, degree of edema, and rim enhancement pattern on Gd-enhanced MR may be useful in differentiation between solitary cerebral metastasis and glioblastoma multiform

  4. Glioblastoma Stem Cells Microenvironment: The Paracrine Roles of the Niche in Drug and Radioresistance

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    Alessia Fidoamore

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Among all solid tumors, the high-grade glioma appears to be the most vascularized one. In fact, “microvascular hyperplasia” is a hallmark of GBM. An altered vascular network determines irregular blood flow, so that tumor cells spread rapidly beyond the diffusion distance of oxygen in the tissue, with the consequent formation of hypoxic or anoxic areas, where the bulk of glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs reside. The response to this event is the induction of angiogenesis, a process mediated by hypoxia inducible factors. However, this new capillary network is not efficient in maintaining a proper oxygen supply to the tumor mass, thereby causing an oxygen gradient within the neoplastic zone. This microenvironment helps GSCs to remain in a “quiescent” state preserving their potential to proliferate and differentiate, thus protecting them by the effects of chemo- and radiotherapy. Recent evidences suggest that responses of glioblastoma to standard therapies are determined by the microenvironment of the niche, where the GSCs reside, allowing a variety of mechanisms that contribute to the chemo- and radioresistance, by preserving GSCs. It is, therefore, crucial to investigate the components/factors of the niche in order to formulate new adjuvant therapies rendering more efficiently the gold standard therapies for this neoplasm.

  5. Clinicopathological study of high-dose fractionated radiation therapy in the treatment of glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Masaru; Inoue, Hiroshi; Kunimine, Hideo; Nakamura, Masaru; Ono, Nobuo; Zama, Akira; Ohye, Chihiro; Niibe, Hideo; Ishida, Yoichi

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-six adults with glioblastoma multiforme (grade 4 astrocytoma) were postoperatively given high-dose fractionated radiation therapy (5 Gy twice weekly) with Linac X-rays. The results were compared with those in 26 patients treated by conventional fractionated radiation therapy (2 Gy 5 times weekly). The survival rates following treatment with high-dose fractionated radiation therapy and conventional fractionated radiation therapy were 65 % vs. 65 % at 1 year, 31 % vs. 8 % at 2 years, 14 % vs. 4 % at 3 years, and 4 % vs. 0 % at 5 years. The difference in length of survival between the two treatment groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.423). Autopsies were performed on 11 patients given high-dose radiation therapy and 13 who received conventional irradiation. In the high-dose group one patient had no residual tumor (vs. none in the conventional group); four had small residual tumors (vs. three); one had extensive coagulative necrosis of the tumor and surrounding brain tissue (vs. four); four had proliferative tumor growth (vs. four); and one had mixed glioblastoma and fibrosarcoma (vs. two). Complete cure may be possible in some cases, if extensive tumor removal is feasible and is followed by high-dose fractionated radiation therapy. The biological effect appears to be much greater with high-dose than with conventional fractionated radiation therapy. Therefore, in cases of tumor recurrence, a second course of radiation therapy must be undertaken cautiously. (author)

  6. Insular primary glioblastomas with IDH mutations: Clinical and biological specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Nobuhiro; Hatae, Ryusuke; Yoshimoto, Koji; Murata, Hideki; Kuga, Daisuke; Akagi, Yojiro; Sangatsuda, Yuhei; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Iwaki, Toru; Mizoguchi, Masahiro; Iihara, Koji

    2017-06-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation is a good prognostic marker for glioblastoma (GBM). Although it is infrequent in primary tumors, it is found in most lower-grade gliomas. Thus, it is unclear whether IDH mutation is a marker for a specific phenotype of apparently primary de novo GBMs (pGBMs), or a marker for secondary tumors (sGBMs). We addressed this issue by analyzing clinical, radiographic and molecular findings in our institutional case series. Our cases included 92 pGBMs, with five cases of IDH1 mutations at R132 and no IDH2 mutations. The median overall survival of these five patients was 29 months (range: 4 to >40 months), which is considered good prognoses. Clinical and radiographic characteristics were distinct from IDH-wildtype (IDH-wt) pGBMs. IDH-mutant (IDH-mut) tumors consistently involved insular lesions and were subdivided into: (i) the two cases of elderly patients with long clinical histories and features implying multistep tumor development; and (ii) the three cases of younger patients with diffusely swelling insular tumors, slight contrast enhancement and no necrosis. Genetic and expression analyses of IDH-mut pGBMs were similar to those of sGBMs, suggesting that they are indeed distinct from their IDH-wt counterparts. TERT promoter mutation, a genetic marker of oligodendroglial derivation, was detected in one long-surviving case, but genetic alterations in the astrocyte-sGBM pathway were generally prevalent in IDH-mut pGBMs. Our results present a unique phenotype of IDH-mut pGBMs arising from insular cortex region, the molecular backgrounds of which are similar to sGBMs. © 2017 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  7. A reproducible brain tumour model established from human glioblastoma biopsies

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    Li Xingang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Establishing clinically relevant animal models of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM remains a challenge, and many commonly used cell line-based models do not recapitulate the invasive growth patterns of patient GBMs. Previously, we have reported the formation of highly invasive tumour xenografts in nude rats from human GBMs. However, implementing tumour models based on primary tissue requires that these models can be sufficiently standardised with consistently high take rates. Methods In this work, we collected data on growth kinetics from a material of 29 biopsies xenografted in nude rats, and characterised this model with an emphasis on neuropathological and radiological features. Results The tumour take rate for xenografted GBM biopsies were 96% and remained close to 100% at subsequent passages in vivo, whereas only one of four lower grade tumours engrafted. Average time from transplantation to the onset of symptoms was 125 days ± 11.5 SEM. Histologically, the primary xenografts recapitulated the invasive features of the parent tumours while endothelial cell proliferations and necrosis were mostly absent. After 4-5 in vivo passages, the tumours became more vascular with necrotic areas, but also appeared more circumscribed. MRI typically revealed changes related to tumour growth, several months prior to the onset of symptoms. Conclusions In vivo passaging of patient GBM biopsies produced tumours representative of the patient tumours, with high take rates and a reproducible disease course. The model provides combinations of angiogenic and invasive phenotypes and represents a good alternative to in vitro propagated cell lines for dissecting mechanisms of brain tumour progression.

  8. Glioblastoma Multiforme Presenting as Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cagatay Ozdol

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Brain tumors with concomitant intracerebral hemorrhage are rarely encountered. Hemorrhage as the initial presentation of a brain tumour may pose some diagnostic problems, especially if the tumour is small or the hemorrhage is abundant. We present a 47-year-old man who admitted to the emergency department with sudden onset headache, right blurred vision and gait disturbance. A non-contrast cranial computerized tomography scan performed immediately after his admission revealed a well circumscribed right occipitoparietal haematoma with intense peripheral edema causing compression of the ipsilateral ventricles. On 6th hour of his admission the patient%u2019s neurological status deteriorated and he subsequently underwent emergent craniotomy and microsurgical evacuation of the haematoma. The histopathological examination of the mass was consistent with a glioblastoma multiforme. Neoplasms may be hidden behind each case of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage. Histological sampling and investigation is mandatory in the presence of preoperative radiological features suggesting a neoplasm.

  9. Growth factors and kinases in glioblastoma growth

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    Miguel Ángel Peña-Ortiz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive type of brain cancer, having the highest invasion, migration, proliferation, and angiogenesis rates. Several signaling pathways are involved in the regulation of these processes including growth factors and their tyrosine kinase receptors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ, fibroblast growth factor (FGF, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF, and insulin-like growth factor–I (IGF–I. Different kinases and regulators also participate in signaling pathways initiated by growth factors, such as mitogen-activated kinases (MAPK, protein kinases C (PKC, phosphatidylinositol-3 kinases (PI3K, protein kinase B (PKB or Akt, glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β, the mTOR complex, and Bcl-2. In this review, we will focus on the role of these proteins as possible therapeutic targets in GBM.

  10. Combination therapies in a patient-derived glioblastoma model : A step towards precision medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M.E. Berghauser Pont (Lotte)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Glioblastoma is the most malignant primary brain tumor. Glioblastoma is originating from the supportive tissue of the brain, the glial cells. Despite increased research, mortality rates have not decreased significantly. Standard therapy consists of surgical resection,

  11. TRIM28 and β-actin identified via nanobody-based reverse proteomics approach as possible human glioblastoma biomarkers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Jovčevska

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are among the rarest brain tumours, and they have the worst prognosis. Grade IV astrocytoma, known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, is a highly lethal disease where the standard therapies of surgery, followed by radiation and chemotherapy, cannot significantly prolong the life expectancy of the patients. Tumour recurrence shows more aggressive form compared to the primary tumour, and results in patient survival from 12 to 15 months only. Although still controversial, the cancer stem cell hypothesis postulates that cancer stem cells are responsible for early relapse of the disease after surgical intervention due to their high resistance to therapy. Alternative strategies for GBM therapy are thus urgently needed. Nanobodies are single-domain antigen-binding fragments of heavy-chain antibodies, and together with classical antibodies, they are part of the camelid immune system. Nanobodies are small and stable, and they share a high degree of sequence identity to the human heavy chain variable domain, and these characteristics offer them advantages over classical antibodies or antibody fragments. We first immunised an alpaca with a human GBM stem-like cell line prepared from primary GBM cultures. Next, a nanobody library was constructed in a phage-display vector. Using nanobody phage-display technology, we selected specific GBM stem-like cell binders through a number of affinity selections, using whole cell protein extracts and membrane protein-enriched extracts from eight different GBM patients, and membrane protein-enriched extracts from two established GBM stem-like cell lines (NCH644 and NCH421K cells. After the enrichment, periplasmic extract ELISA was used to screen for specific clones. These nanobody clones were recloned into the pHEN6 vector, expressed in Escherichia coli WK6, and purified using immobilised metal affinity chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography. Specific nanobody:antigen pairs were obtained and mass

  12. TRIM28 and β-actin identified via nanobody-based reverse proteomics approach as possible human glioblastoma biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jovčevska, Ivana; Zupanec, Neja; Kočevar, Nina; Cesselli, Daniela; Podergajs, Neža; Stokin, Clara Limbaeck; Myers, Michael P; Muyldermans, Serge; Ghassabeh, Gholamreza Hassanzadeh; Motaln, Helena; Ruaro, Maria Elisabetta; Bourkoula, Evgenia; Turnšek, Tamara Lah; Komel, Radovan

    2014-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are among the rarest brain tumours, and they have the worst prognosis. Grade IV astrocytoma, known as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), is a highly lethal disease where the standard therapies of surgery, followed by radiation and chemotherapy, cannot significantly prolong the life expectancy of the patients. Tumour recurrence shows more aggressive form compared to the primary tumour, and results in patient survival from 12 to 15 months only. Although still controversial, the cancer stem cell hypothesis postulates that cancer stem cells are responsible for early relapse of the disease after surgical intervention due to their high resistance to therapy. Alternative strategies for GBM therapy are thus urgently needed. Nanobodies are single-domain antigen-binding fragments of heavy-chain antibodies, and together with classical antibodies, they are part of the camelid immune system. Nanobodies are small and stable, and they share a high degree of sequence identity to the human heavy chain variable domain, and these characteristics offer them advantages over classical antibodies or antibody fragments. We first immunised an alpaca with a human GBM stem-like cell line prepared from primary GBM cultures. Next, a nanobody library was constructed in a phage-display vector. Using nanobody phage-display technology, we selected specific GBM stem-like cell binders through a number of affinity selections, using whole cell protein extracts and membrane protein-enriched extracts from eight different GBM patients, and membrane protein-enriched extracts from two established GBM stem-like cell lines (NCH644 and NCH421K cells). After the enrichment, periplasmic extract ELISA was used to screen for specific clones. These nanobody clones were recloned into the pHEN6 vector, expressed in Escherichia coli WK6, and purified using immobilised metal affinity chromatography and size-exclusion chromatography. Specific nanobody:antigen pairs were obtained and mass spectrometry

  13. Comprehensive, Integrative Genomic Analysis of Diffuse Lower-Grade Gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brat, Daniel J; Verhaak, Roel G W; Aldape, Kenneth D; Yung, W K Alfred; Salama, Sofie R; Cooper, Lee A D; Rheinbay, Esther; Miller, C Ryan; Vitucci, Mark; Morozova, Olena; Robertson, A Gordon; Noushmehr, Houtan; Laird, Peter W; Cherniack, Andrew D; Akbani, Rehan; Huse, Jason T; Ciriello, Giovanni; Poisson, Laila M; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Berger, Mitchel S; Brennan, Cameron; Colen, Rivka R; Colman, Howard; Flanders, Adam E; Giannini, Caterina; Grifford, Mia; Iavarone, Antonio; Jain, Rajan; Joseph, Isaac; Kim, Jaegil; Kasaian, Katayoon; Mikkelsen, Tom; Murray, Bradley A; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Pachter, Lior; Parsons, Donald W; Sougnez, Carrie; Sulman, Erik P; Vandenberg, Scott R; Van Meir, Erwin G; von Deimling, Andreas; Zhang, Hailei; Crain, Daniel; Lau, Kevin; Mallery, David; Morris, Scott; Paulauskis, Joseph; Penny, Robert; Shelton, Troy; Sherman, Mark; Yena, Peggy; Black, Aaron; Bowen, Jay; Dicostanzo, Katie; Gastier-Foster, Julie; Leraas, Kristen M; Lichtenberg, Tara M; Pierson, Christopher R; Ramirez, Nilsa C; Taylor, Cynthia; Weaver, Stephanie; Wise, Lisa; Zmuda, Erik; Davidsen, Tanja; Demchok, John A; Eley, Greg; Ferguson, Martin L; Hutter, Carolyn M; Mills Shaw, Kenna R; Ozenberger, Bradley A; Sheth, Margi; Sofia, Heidi J; Tarnuzzer, Roy; Wang, Zhining; Yang, Liming; Zenklusen, Jean Claude; Ayala, Brenda; Baboud, Julien; Chudamani, Sudha; Jensen, Mark A; Liu, Jia; Pihl, Todd; Raman, Rohini; Wan, Yunhu; Wu, Ye; Ally, Adrian; Auman, J Todd; Balasundaram, Miruna; Balu, Saianand; Baylin, Stephen B; Beroukhim, Rameen; Bootwalla, Moiz S; Bowlby, Reanne; Bristow, Christopher A; Brooks, Denise; Butterfield, Yaron; Carlsen, Rebecca; Carter, Scott; Chin, Lynda; Chu, Andy; Chuah, Eric; Cibulskis, Kristian; Clarke, Amanda; Coetzee, Simon G; Dhalla, Noreen; Fennell, Tim; Fisher, Sheila; Gabriel, Stacey; Getz, Gad; Gibbs, Richard; Guin, Ranabir; Hadjipanayis, Angela; Hayes, D Neil; Hinoue, Toshinori; Hoadley, Katherine; Holt, Robert A; Hoyle, Alan P; Jefferys, Stuart R; Jones, Steven; Jones, Corbin D; Kucherlapati, Raju; Lai, Phillip H; Lander, Eric; Lee, Semin; Lichtenstein, Lee; Ma, Yussanne; Maglinte, Dennis T; Mahadeshwar, Harshad S; Marra, Marco A; Mayo, Michael; Meng, Shaowu; Meyerson, Matthew L; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Moore, Richard A; Mose, Lisle E; Mungall, Andrew J; Pantazi, Angeliki; Parfenov, Michael; Park, Peter J; Parker, Joel S; Perou, Charles M; Protopopov, Alexei; Ren, Xiaojia; Roach, Jeffrey; Sabedot, Thaís S; Schein, Jacqueline; Schumacher, Steven E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seth, Sahil; Shen, Hui; Simons, Janae V; Sipahimalani, Payal; Soloway, Matthew G; Song, Xingzhi; Sun, Huandong; Tabak, Barbara; Tam, Angela; Tan, Donghui; Tang, Jiabin; Thiessen, Nina; Triche, Timothy; Van Den Berg, David J; Veluvolu, Umadevi; Waring, Scot; Weisenberger, Daniel J; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Wong, Tina; Wu, Junyuan; Xi, Liu; Xu, Andrew W; Yang, Lixing; Zack, Travis I; Zhang, Jianhua; Aksoy, B Arman; Arachchi, Harindra; Benz, Chris; Bernard, Brady; Carlin, Daniel; Cho, Juok; DiCara, Daniel; Frazer, Scott; Fuller, Gregory N; Gao, JianJiong; Gehlenborg, Nils; Haussler, David; Heiman, David I; Iype, Lisa; Jacobsen, Anders; Ju, Zhenlin; Katzman, Sol; Kim, Hoon; Knijnenburg, Theo; Kreisberg, Richard Bailey; Lawrence, Michael S; Lee, William; Leinonen, Kalle; Lin, Pei; Ling, Shiyun; Liu, Wenbin; Liu, Yingchun; Liu, Yuexin; Lu, Yiling; Mills, Gordon; Ng, Sam; Noble, Michael S; Paull, Evan; Rao, Arvind; Reynolds, Sheila; Saksena, Gordon; Sanborn, Zack; Sander, Chris; Schultz, Nikolaus; Senbabaoglu, Yasin; Shen, Ronglai; Shmulevich, Ilya; Sinha, Rileen; Stuart, Josh; Sumer, S Onur; Sun, Yichao; Tasman, Natalie; Taylor, Barry S; Voet, Doug; Weinhold, Nils; Weinstein, John N; Yang, Da; Yoshihara, Kosuke; Zheng, Siyuan; Zhang, Wei; Zou, Lihua; Abel, Ty; Sadeghi, Sara; Cohen, Mark L; Eschbacher, Jenny; Hattab, Eyas M; Raghunathan, Aditya; Schniederjan, Matthew J; Aziz, Dina; Barnett, Gene; Barrett, Wendi; Bigner, Darell D; Boice, Lori; Brewer, Cathy; Calatozzolo, Chiara; Campos, Benito; Carlotti, Carlos Gilberto; Chan, Timothy A; Cuppini, Lucia; Curley, Erin; Cuzzubbo, Stefania; Devine, Karen; DiMeco, Francesco; Duell, Rebecca; Elder, J Bradley; Fehrenbach, Ashley; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Friedman, William; Fulop, Jordonna; Gardner, Johanna; Hermes, Beth; Herold-Mende, Christel; Jungk, Christine; Kendler, Ady; Lehman, Norman L; Lipp, Eric; Liu, Ouida; Mandt, Randy; McGraw, Mary; Mclendon, Roger; McPherson, Christopher; Neder, Luciano; Nguyen, Phuong; Noss, Ardene; Nunziata, Raffaele; Ostrom, Quinn T; Palmer, Cheryl; Perin, Alessandro; Pollo, Bianca; Potapov, Alexander; Potapova, Olga; Rathmell, W Kimryn; Rotin, Daniil; Scarpace, Lisa; Schilero, Cathy; Senecal, Kelly; Shimmel, Kristen; Shurkhay, Vsevolod; Sifri, Suzanne; Singh, Rosy; Sloan, Andrew E; Smolenski, Kathy; Staugaitis, Susan M; Steele, Ruth; Thorne, Leigh; Tirapelli, Daniela P C; Unterberg, Andreas; Vallurupalli, Mahitha; Wang, Yun; Warnick, Ronald; Williams, Felicia; Wolinsky, Yingli; Bell, Sue; Rosenberg, Mara; Stewart, Chip; Huang, Franklin; Grimsby, Jonna L; Radenbaugh, Amie J; Zhang, Jianan

    2015-06-25

    Diffuse low-grade and intermediate-grade gliomas (which together make up the lower-grade gliomas, World Health Organization grades II and III) have highly variable clinical behavior that is not adequately predicted on the basis of histologic class. Some are indolent; others quickly progress to glioblastoma. The uncertainty is compounded by interobserver variability in histologic diagnosis. Mutations in IDH, TP53, and ATRX and codeletion of chromosome arms 1p and 19q (1p/19q codeletion) have been implicated as clinically relevant markers of lower-grade gliomas. We performed genomewide analyses of 293 lower-grade gliomas from adults, incorporating exome sequence, DNA copy number, DNA methylation, messenger RNA expression, microRNA expression, and targeted protein expression. These data were integrated and tested for correlation with clinical outcomes. Unsupervised clustering of mutations and data from RNA, DNA-copy-number, and DNA-methylation platforms uncovered concordant classification of three robust, nonoverlapping, prognostically significant subtypes of lower-grade glioma that were captured more accurately by IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than by histologic class. Patients who had lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation and 1p/19q codeletion had the most favorable clinical outcomes. Their gliomas harbored mutations in CIC, FUBP1, NOTCH1, and the TERT promoter. Nearly all lower-grade gliomas with IDH mutations and no 1p/19q codeletion had mutations in TP53 (94%) and ATRX inactivation (86%). The large majority of lower-grade gliomas without an IDH mutation had genomic aberrations and clinical behavior strikingly similar to those found in primary glioblastoma. The integration of genomewide data from multiple platforms delineated three molecular classes of lower-grade gliomas that were more concordant with IDH, 1p/19q, and TP53 status than with histologic class. Lower-grade gliomas with an IDH mutation either had 1p/19q codeletion or carried a TP53 mutation. Most

  14. NETRIN-4 protects glioblastoma cells FROM temozolomide induced senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common primary tumor of the central nervous system. The drug temozolomide (TMZ prolongs lifespan in many glioblastoma patients. The sensitivity of glioblastoma cells to TMZ is interfered by many factors, such as the expression of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT and activation of AKT signaling. We have recently identified the interaction between netrin-4 (NTN4 and integrin beta-4 (ITGB4, which promotes glioblastoma cell proliferation via activating AKT-mTOR signaling pathway. In the current work we have explored the effect of NTN4/ITGB4 interaction on TMZ induced glioblastoma cell senescence. We report here that the suppression of either ITGB4 or NTN4 in glioblastoma cell lines significantly enhances cellular senescence. The sensitivity of GBM cells to TMZ was primarily determined by the expression of MGMT. To omit the effect of MGMT, we concentrated on the cell lines devoid of expression of MGMT. NTN4 partially inhibited TMZ induced cell senescence and rescued AKT from dephosphorylation in U251MG cells, a cell line bearing decent levels of ITGB4. However, addition of exogenous NTN4 displayed no significant effect on TMZ induced senescence rescue or AKT activation in U87MG cells, which expressed ITGB4 at low levels. Furthermore, overexpression of ITGB4 combined with exogenous NTN4 significantly attenuated U87MG cell senescence induced by TMZ. These data suggest that NTN4 protects glioblastoma cells from TMZ induced senescence, probably via rescuing TMZ triggered ITGB4 dependent AKT dephosphorylation. This suggests that interfering the interaction between NTN4 and ITGB4 or concomitant use of the inhibitors of the AKT pathway may improve the therapeutic efficiency of TMZ.

  15. Stark Broadening of Se IV, Sn IV, Sb IV and Te IV Spectral Lines

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    Milan S. Dimitrijević

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Stark broadening parameters, line width and shift, are needed for investigations, analysis and modelling of astrophysical, laboratory, laser produced and technological plasmas. Especially in astrophysics, due to constantly increasing resolution of satellite borne spectrographs, and large terrestrial telescopes, data on trace elements, which were previously insignificant, now have increasing importance. Using the modified semiempirical method of Dimitrijević and Konjević, here, Stark widths have been calculated for 2 Se IV, 6 Sn IV, 2 Sb IV and 1 Te IV transitions. Results have been compared with existing theoretical data for Sn IV. Obtained results will be implemented in the STARK-B database, which is also a part of Virtual atomic and molecular data center (VAMDC.

  16. Multifuntional Nanotherapeutics for the Combinatorial Drug and Gene Therapy in the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hourigan, Breanne

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), a grade IV glioma, is the most common primary brain tumor, affecting about 3 out of 100,000 persons per year in the United States. GBM accounts for about 80% of primary malignant brain tumors, and is also the most aggressive of malignant brain tumors. With exhaustive treatment, survival only averages between 12 and 15 months, with a 2-year survival rate less than 25%. New therapeutic strategies are necessary to improve the outcomes of this disease. Chemotherapy with temozolomide (TMZ), a DNA alkylating agent, is used as a first-line of treatment for GBM. However, GBM tumors develop resistance to TMZ over time due to increased expression of O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a gene responsible for DNA repair. We previously developed cationic, amphiphilic copolymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-g-polyethylenimine (PgP) and demonstrated its utility for nucleic acid delivery. Here, we examine the ability of PgP polyplexes to overcome TMZ resistance and improve therapeutic efficacy through combination drug and gene therapy for GBM treatment. In this study, we evaluated the ability of PgP to deliver siRNA targeting to MGMT (siMGMT), a gene responsible for drug resistance in GBM. Our results demonstrated that PgP effectively forms stable complex with siRNA and protects siRNAs from heparin competition assay, serum- and ribonuclease-mediated degradation, confirming the potential of the polyplex for in vivo delivery. Results from MTT assays showed that PgP/siRNA polyplexes exhibited minimal cytotoxicity compared to untreated cells when incubated with T98G human GBM cells. We also demonstrated that PgP/siMGMT polyplexes mediate knockdown of MGMT protein as well as a significant ˜56% and ˜68% knockdown of MGMT mRNA in T98G GBM cells compared to cells treated with PgP complexed with non-targeting siRNA (siNT) at a 60:1 and 80:1 nitrogen:phosphate (N:P) ratio, respectively. Further, co-incubation of PgP/siMGMT polyplexes with TMZ

  17. Fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery with concurrent temozolomide chemotherapy for locally recurrent glioblastoma multiforme: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenspoon JN

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey Noah Greenspoon,1 Waseem Sharieff,1 Holger Hirte,1 Andrew Overholt,1 Rocco Devillers,2 Thorsteinn Gunnarsson,2 Anthony Whitton11Department of Oncology, McMaster University, ON, Canada; 2Department of Surgery, McMaster University, ON, CanadaAbstract: Local recurrence represents a significant challenge in the management of patients with glioblastoma multiforme. Salvage treatment options are limited by lack of clinical efficacy. Recent studies have demonstrated a significant response rate and acceptable toxicity with the use of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery in this patient population. Our primary objective was to determine the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery combined with concurrent temozolomide chemotherapy as a salvage treatment for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme. We prospectively collected treatment and outcome data for patients having fractionated stereotactic radiosurgery for locally recurrent glioblastoma multiforme after radical radiotherapy. Eligible patients had a maximum recurrence diameter of 60 mm without causing significant mass effect. The gross tumor volume was defined as the enhancing lesion on an enhanced fine-slice T1 (spin–lattice magnetic resonance imaging, and a circumferential setup margin of 1 mm was used to define the planning target volume. All patients were treated using robotic radiosurgery with three dose/fractionation schedules ranging from 25 to 35 Gy in five fractions, depending on the maximum tumor diameter. Concurrent temozolomide 75 mg/m2 was prescribed to all patients. Tumor response was judged using the Macdonald criteria, and toxicity was assessed using the CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events. A total of 31 patients were enrolled in this study. The median overall survival was 9 months, and progression-free survival was 7 months. The 6-month progression-free survival was 60% with a 95% confidence interval of 43%–77%. The a priori

  18. Age groups related glioblastoma study based on radiomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zeju; Wang, Yuanyuan; Yu, Jinhua; Guo, Yi; Zhang, Qi

    2017-12-01

    Glioblastoma is the most aggressive malignant brain tumor with poor prognosis. Radiomics is a newly emerging and promising technique to reveal the complex relationships between high-throughput medical image features and deep information of disease including pathology, biomarkers and genomics. An approach was developed to investigate the internal relationship between magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features and the age-related origins of glioblastomas based on a quantitative radiomics method. A fully automatic image segmentation method was applied to segment the tumor regions from three dimensional MRI images. 555 features were then extracted from the image data. By analyzing large numbers of quantitative image features, some predictive and prognostic information could be obtained by the radiomics approach. 96 patients diagnosed with glioblastoma pathologically have been divided into two age groups (age groups (T test, p age difference (T test, p= .006). In conclusion, glioblastoma in different age groups present different radiomics-feature patterns with statistical significance, which indicates that glioblastoma in different age groups should have different pathologic, protein, or genic origins.

  19. Impact of radiotherapy delay on survival in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valduvieco, Izaskun; Verger, Eugènia; Bruna, Jordi; Caral, Lluís; Pujol, Teresa; Ribalta, Teresa; Boget, Teresa; Oleaga, Laura; Pineda, Estela; Graus, Francesc

    2013-04-01

    Previous studies in glioblastoma have concluded that there is no decrease in survival with increasing time to initiation of RT up to 6 weeks after surgery. Unfortunately, the number of glioblastoma patients who start RT beyond 6 weeks is not small in some countries. The aim of our study was to evaluate the effect of RT delay beyond 6 weeks on survival of patients who have undergone completed resection of a glioblastoma. We reviewed 107 consecutive glioblastoma patients who had a complete surgical resection at our hospital. Clinical data, including delay in initiation of RT, were prospectively collected. The impact of single parameters on overall survival was determined by univariate and multivariate analyses. According to univariate analysis, variables that had a prognostic influence on survival were age (p = 0.036), KPS (p = 0.031), additional treatment with CHT (p < 0.0001), and initiation of RT before 42 days (p = 0.009). Multivariate analysis indicated that Karnofsky performance scale, additional treatment with chemotherapy, and initiation of RT before 6 weeks after surgery were favorable, independent prognostic factors of survival. Survival is significantly reduced in glioblastoma patients if RT is not initiated within the 6 weeks after complete resection of the tumor.

  20. Personalized treatment strategies in glioblastoma: MGMT promoter methylation status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thon N

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Niklas Thon,1 Simone Kreth,2 Friedrich-Wilhelm Kreth1 1Department of Neurosurgery, 2Department of Anaesthesiology, Hospital of the University of Munich, Campus Grosshadern, Munich, Germany Abstract: The identification of molecular genetic biomarkers considerably increased our current understanding of glioma genesis, prognostic evaluation, and treatment planning. In glioblastoma, the most malignant intrinsic brain tumor entity in adults, the promoter methylation status of the gene encoding for the repair enzyme O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT indicates increased efficacy of current standard of care, which is concomitant and adjuvant chemoradiotherapy with the alkylating agent temozolomide. In the elderly, MGMT promoter methylation status has recently been introduced to be a predictive biomarker that can be used for stratification of treatment regimes. This review gives a short summery of epidemiological, clinical, diagnostic, and treatment aspects of patients who are currently diagnosed with glioblastoma. The most important molecular genetic markers and epigenetic alterations in glioblastoma are summarized. Special focus is given to the physiological function of DNA methylation – in particular, of the MGMT gene promoter, its clinical relevance, technical aspects of status assessment, its correlation with MGMT mRNA and protein expressions, and its place within the management cascade of glioblastoma patients. Keywords: glioblastoma, MGMT, temozolomide, personalized treatment, outcome

  1. Toxicity and efficacy of re-irradiation of high-grade glioma in a phase I dose- and volume escalation trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Costa, Junia

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of PET and MRI guided re-irradiation of recurrent high-grade glioma (HGG) and to assess the impact of radiotherapy dose, fractionation and irradiated volume. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with localized, recurrent HGG...... (grades III-IV) and no other treatment options were eligible for a prospective phase I trial. Gross tumor volumes for radiotherapy were defined using T1-contrast enhanced MRI and (18)F-fluoro-ethyl tyrosine PET. Radiotherapy was delivered using volumetric modulated arc therapy with a 2-mm margin. The dose...... prescription of four consecutive groups was (1) 35 Gy/10fr., (2) 42 Gy/10fr., (3) 29.5 Gy/5fr. and (4) 35 Gy/10fr. to larger tumor volumes (100-300 cm(3)), respectively. RESULTS: Thirty-one patients were treated of which 81% had glioblastoma. The median progression-free survival was 2.8 months (95%CI: 2.1-3...

  2. Treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme with carmustine, cisplatin and etoposide followed by radiotherapy. A phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Kristjansen, P E; Wagner, A

    1999-01-01

    radiation 44% had PR, 37% SD and 19% PD. Non-hematological toxicity and leukopenia was mild, but thrombocytopenia (TP) frequent. Grade III and IV TP occurred in 25% and 57% respectively, and grade III bleeding in 45%. No severe or fatal complications was seen. Median time to progression (TTP) was 7.6 months...

  3. The challenges of management of high-grade gliomas in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chika Anele Ndubuisi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: High-grade gliomas (HGG are among the most challenging brain tumors despite many research efforts worldwide. Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the local challenges that may influence outcome of HGG managed in a neurosurgical center in Nigeria. Methodology: Retrospective analysis of prospectively recorded data of patients managed for intracranial HGG at Memfys Hospital for Neurosurgery, Enugu, Nigeria, between the year 2006 and 2015. Only cases with conclusive histology following surgery were analyzed. Results: Glioma was 60 (23.8% of 252 histology confirmed brain tumors. HGG represented 53.8% of gliomas with male:female ratio of 2.2:1.0 and peaked from fifth decade of life. Glioblastoma multiforme accounted for 69% of HGG. At 1-year postsurgery, 53% of HGGs were dead and 88% of these deaths were in the World Health Organization Grade IV group. Only 40% of cases could receive adjuvant treatment with only 15% mortality at 1 year in this subgroup that received adjuvant therapy. In addition, 19% of cases had surgery at Karnofsky score (Ks of ≥70%. However, 94% of mortality at 1 year was related to surgery at Ks of ≤60%. Only four patients had a tumor volume of ≤50 cm3, and among these cases, three patients were independent at 1 year. Patients with tumor volume above 50 cm3 accounted for 94% of mortality. Conclusion: The peak age incidence for HGG seems to be lower than in Caucasians. Most cases present late with poor Ks and big tumor volume. The proportion with access to adjuvant treatment is still poor. Preoperative Karnofsky, extent of resection, duration of hospital, and Intensive Care Unit stay have impact on outcome.

  4. Heterogeneity maintenance in glioblastoma: a social network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavia, Rudy; Inda, Maria-del-Mar; Cavenee, Webster K; Furnari, Frank B

    2011-06-15

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common intracranial tumor in adults, is characterized by extensive heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. This insidious feature arises inevitably in almost all cancers and has great significance for the general outcome of the malignancy, because it confounds our understanding of the disease and also intrinsically contributes to the tumor's aggressiveness and poses an obstacle to the design of effective therapies. The classic view that heterogeneity arises as the result of a tumor's "genetic chaos" and the more contemporary cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis tend to identify a single cell population as the therapeutic target: the prevailing clone over time in the first case and the CSC in the latter. However, there is growing evidence that the different tumor cell populations may not be simple bystanders. Rather, they can establish a complex network of interactions between each other and with the tumor microenvironment that eventually strengthens tumor growth and increases chances to escape therapy. These differing but complementary ideas about the origin and maintenance of tumor heterogeneity and its importance in GBM are reviewed here.

  5. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S., E-mail: mviapiano@partners.org [Department of Neurosurgery, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2013-10-22

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy.

  6. Strategies in Gene Therapy for Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwiatkowska, Aneta; Nandhu, Mohan S.; Behera, Prajna; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Viapiano, Mariano S.

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive form of brain cancer, with a dismal prognosis and extremely low percentage of survivors. Novel therapies are in dire need to improve the clinical management of these tumors and extend patient survival. Genetic therapies for GBM have been postulated and attempted for the past twenty years, with variable degrees of success in pre-clinical models and clinical trials. Here we review the most common approaches to treat GBM by gene therapy, including strategies to deliver tumor-suppressor genes, suicide genes, immunomodulatory cytokines to improve immune response, and conditionally-replicating oncolytic viruses. The review focuses on the strategies used for gene delivery, including the most common and widely used vehicles (i.e., replicating and non-replicating viruses) as well as novel therapeutic approaches such as stem cell-mediated therapy and nanotechnologies used for gene delivery. We present an overview of these strategies, their targets, different advantages, and challenges for success. Finally, we discuss the potential of gene therapy-based strategies to effectively attack such a complex genetic target as GBM, alone or in combination with conventional therapy

  7. Use of bevacizumab in recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiaseddin, Ashley; Peters, Katherine B

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common adult primary brain neoplasm. Despite advances in treatment, GBM continues to be associated with considerable morbidity and mortality as compared with other malignancies. Standard treatment for GBM results in survival of 12.9 months (95% CI: 12.3-13.7 months) with a median progression-free survival of 7.2 months (95% CI: 6.4-8.2 months) in a modern GBM cohort. These aggressive tumors recur and treatment for recurrent GBM continues to have very poor outcomes. Prior to the use of bevacizumab, monoclonal antibody to VEGF, 6-month progression-free survival in clinical trials for recurrent GBM ranged from 9 to 15%. Trials utilizing bevacizumab and its subsequent US FDA approval have given more hope to recurrent GBM and this concise review discusses bevacizumab in recurrent GBM. This review focuses on time-to-event outcomes (overall survival, progression-free survival and 6-month progression-free survival) in clinical trials utilizing bevacizumab for the treatment of recurrent GBM. For this review, we have chosen to focus primarily on Phase II clinical trials that have been published and available in the literature (PubMed). While we focused primarily on time-to-event variables, toxicity and safety of bevacizumab is very important and this agent can be associated with serious life-threatening toxicities. We have included a general section of toxicities but for a more lengthy review please see the excellent study by Odia and colleagues.

  8. NTRK1 fusion in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinkuk Kim

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most aggressive form of brain tumor, yet with no targeted therapy with substantial survival benefit. Recent studies on solid tumors showed that fusion genes often play driver roles and are promising targets for pharmaceutical intervention. To survey potential fusion genes in GBMs, we analysed RNA-Seq data from 162 GBM patients available through The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA, and found that 3' exons of neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor type 1 (NTRK1, encoding TrkA are fused to 5' exons of the genes that are highly expressed in neuronal tissues, neurofascin (NFASC and brevican (BCAN. The fusions preserved both the transmembrane and kinase domains of NTRK1 in frame. NTRK1 is a mediator of the pro-survival signaling of nerve growth factor (NGF and is a known oncogene, found commonly altered in human cancer. While GBMs largely lacked NTRK1 expression, the fusion-positive GBMs expressed fusion transcripts in high abundance, and showed elevated NTRK1-pathway activity. Lentiviral transduction of the NFASC-NTRK1 fusion gene in NIH 3T3 cells increased proliferation in vitro, colony formation in soft agar, and tumor formation in mice, suggesting the possibility that the fusion contributed to the initiation or maintenance of the fusion-positive GBMs, and therefore may be a rational drug target.

  9. Cancer stem cell contribution to glioblastoma invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortensi, Barbara; Setti, Matteo; Osti, Daniela; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2013-02-28

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive and lethal brain tumor in adults. Its invasive nature currently represents the most challenging hurdle to surgical resection. The mechanism adopted by GBM cells to carry out their invasive strategy is an intricate program that recalls what takes place in embryonic cells during development and in carcinoma cells during metastasis formation, the so-called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. GBM cells undergo a series of molecular and conformational changes shifting the tumor toward mesenchymal traits, including extracellular matrix remodeling, cytoskeletal re-patterning, and stem-like trait acquisition. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms driving the whole infiltrative process represents the first step toward successful treatment of this pathology. Here, we review recent findings demonstrating the invasive nature of GBM cancer stem cells, together with novel candidate molecules associated with both cancer stem cell biology and GBM invasion, like doublecortin and microRNAs. These findings may affect the design of effective therapies currently not considered for GBM invasive progression.

  10. Targeting aggressive cancer stem cells in glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy Christina Seymour

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common and fatal type of primary brain tumor. Gliosarcoma (GSM is a rarer and more aggressive variant of GBM that has recently been considered a potentially different disease. Current clinical treatment for both GBM and GSM includes maximal surgical resection followed by post-operative radiotherapy and concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy. Despite recent advances in treating other solid tumors, treatment for GBM and GSM still remains palliative, with a very poor prognosis and a median survival rate of 12 to 15 months. Treatment failure is a result of a number of causes, including resistance to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Recent research has applied the cancer stem cells theory of carcinogenesis to these tumors, suggesting the existence of a small subpopulation of glioma stem cells (GSCs within these tumors. GSCs are thought to contribute to tumor progression, treatment resistance and tumor recapitulation post-treatment and have become the focus of novel therapy strategies. Their isolation and investigation suggests that GSCs share critical signalling pathways with normal embryonic and somatic stem cells, but with distinct alterations. Research must focus on identifying these variations as they may present novel therapeutic targets. Targeting pluripotency transcription factors SOX2, OCT4 and NANOG demonstrates promising therapeutic potential that if applied in isolation or together with current treatments may improve overall survival, reduce tumor relapse and achieve a cure for these patients.

  11. The response of human glioblastoma in culture to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Koji; Aramaki, Ryoji; Takagi, Tosuke

    1980-01-01

    Cells from two human glioblastoma multiforme and one mouse glioma were grown in tissue cultures and their X-ray survival curve parameters were determined under oxygenated and hypoxic conditions. These were compared with the survival parameters for mouse fibroblasts (L5) and established cell lines from human carcinoma coli (HeLa S3) irradiated under identical conditions. There was no significant difference in response among the cell lines used. Repair of potentially lethal damage for human glioblastoma and HeLa S3 was assessed by the increase in survival which occurred as the cells were held in density inhibited stationary phase. The magnitude of repair of potentially lethal damage (slope modifying factors) for the glioblastoma and HeLa were 1.9 and 1.1, respectively. (author)

  12. Glioblastoma and the significance of MGMT gene methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payam Izadpanahi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this research Glioblastoma has been studied as one of the most common brain tumors and a short review of the available therapeutic methods have presented including surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy and particularly adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide, as the most effective developed treatment. Moreover, MGMT gene promoter methylation has been introduced as an important predictive factor of treatment response to temozolamide. The different mechanisms of methylation and the availableliterature on its association with patient survival and disease recurrence have been summarized. Taken together, Glioblastoma is a tumor in which the MGMT gene expression can potentially deliver the highest amount of data in comparison to other tumors; as almost every related study has emphasized on the direct association between MGMT methylation and patient survival. Regarding this debate, the pseudoprogression pattern in Glioblastoma patients and the laboratory methods studying MGMT gene methylation have been examined. At the end of this review, the obstacles to its development have been briefly mentioned.

  13. Expression of EGFRvIII in Glioblastoma: Prognostic Significance Revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Montano

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The epidermal growth factor receptor variant III (EGFRvIII is associated with increased proliferation of glioma cells. However, the impact of EGFRvIII on survival of patients with glioblastoma (GBM has not been definitively established. In the present study, we prospectively evaluated 73 patients with primary GBM treated with surgical resection and standard radio/chemotherapy. The EGFRvIII was assessed by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction (PCR, O6-methylguanine methyltransferase (MGMT promoter methylation was assessed by methylation-specific PCR, and phosphatase and tension homolog (PTEN expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. In 14 patients of this series, who presented with tumor recurrence, EGFRvIII was determined by real-time PCR. Sensitivity to temozolomide (TMZ was assessed in vitro on GBM neurosphere cell cultures with different patterns of EGFRvIII expression. Age 60 years or younger, preoperative Karnofsky Performance Status score of 70 or higher, recursive partitioning analysis score III and IV, methylated MGMT, and Ki67 index of 20% or less were significantly associated with longer overall survival (OS; P = .0069, P =.0035, P = .0007, P = .0437, and P = .0286, respectively. EGFRvIII identified patients with significantly longer OS (P = .0023 and the association of EGFRvIII/Ki67 of 20% or less, EGFRvIII/normal PTEN, EGFRvIII/methylated MGMT, and EGFRvIII/normal PTEN/methylated MGMT identified subgroups of GBM patients with better prognosis. In recurred GBMs, EGFRvIII expression was approximately two-fold lower than in primary tumors. In vitro, the EGFRvIII-negative GBM neurosphere cells were more resistant to TMZ than the positive ones. In conclusion, in contrast with previous studies, we found that EGFRvIII is associated with prolonged survival of GBM patients treated with surgery and radio/chemotherapy. Depletion of EGFRvIII in recurrent GBMs as well as differential sensitivity to TMZ in vitro indicates that

  14. Prognostic Value of YKL-40 in Patients with Glioblastoma: a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Gang; Li, Xianfeng; Chen, Zilong; Liao, Guangcha; Su, Yu; Chen, Yaode; Zhang, Wei

    2017-07-01

    YKL-40 is the most highly expressed gene in glioblastoma compared with normal brain tissues. Previous studies assessing the association between YKL-40 and survival in glioblastoma patients reported varying magnitude of estimates. The objective of this meta-analysis was to determine the prognostic value of YKL-40 in glioblastoma patients. PubMed and Embase databases were searched for studies relating to YKL-40 and prognosis of glioblastoma patients. Studies reporting estimates for overall survival by YKL-40 expression in glioblastoma patients were considered eligible. A meta-analysis of included studies was performed using fixed- or random-effect model to calculate the pooled hazard ratio (HR) and 95 % confidence interval (95%CI). Eight studies were ultimately considered eligible and included into the meta-analysis. Those eight studies included 1241 glioblastoma patients. Meta-analysis of those studies showed that high YKL-40 expression was associated with worse overall survival in glioblastoma patients (HR = 1.46, 95%CI 1.33-1.61, P 40 expression was independently associated with worse overall survival in glioblastoma patients (HR = 1.50, 95%CI 1.35-1.66, P 40 expression and worse overall survival in glioblastoma patients. High YKL-40 expression is independently and markedly associated with worse overall survival in glioblastoma patients. YKL-40 is a good predictive biomarker of prognosis in glioblastoma patients.

  15. Nuclear receptor TLX inhibits TGF-β signaling in glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Erik; Zhai, Qiwei [Sahlgrenska Cancer Center at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 425, SE 405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden); Zeng, Zhao-jun [Sahlgrenska Cancer Center at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 425, SE 405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden); Molecular Biology Research Center, School of Life Sciences, Central South University, 110, Xiangya Road, Changsha, Hunan 410078 (China); Yoshida, Takeshi [Sahlgrenska Cancer Center at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 425, SE 405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden); Funa, Keiko, E-mail: keiko.funa@gu.se [Sahlgrenska Cancer Center at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Box 425, SE 405 30 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2016-05-01

    TLX (also called NR2E1) is an orphan nuclear receptor that maintains stemness of neuronal stem cells. TLX is highly expressed in the most malignant form of glioma, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), and is important for the proliferation and maintenance of the stem/progenitor cells of the tumor. Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) is a cytokine regulating many different cellular processes such as differentiation, migration, adhesion, cell death and proliferation. TGF-β has an important function in cancer where it can work as either a tumor suppressor or oncogene, depending on the cancer type and stage of tumor development. Since glioblastoma often have dysfunctional TGF-β signaling we wanted to find out if there is any interaction between TLX and TGF-β in glioblastoma cells. We demonstrate that knockdown of TLX enhances the canonical TGF-β signaling response in glioblastoma cell lines. TLX physically interacts with and stabilizes Smurf1, which can ubiquitinate and target TGF-β receptor II for degradation, whereas knockdown of TLX leads to stabilization of TGF-β receptor II, increased nuclear translocation of Smad2/3 and enhanced expression of TGF-β target genes. The interaction between TLX and TGF-β may play an important role in the regulation of proliferation and tumor-initiating properties of glioblastoma cells. - Highlights: • TLX knockdown enhances TGF-β dependent Smad signaling in glioblastoma cells • TLX knockdown increases the protein level of TGF-β receptor II. • TLX stabilizes and retains Smurf1 in the cytoplasm. • TLX enhances Smurf1-dependent ubiquitination and degradation of TGF-β receptor II.

  16. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2016.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  17. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2014.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  18. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2015.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  19. SAGE IV Pathfinder

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Utilizing a unique, new occultation technique involving imaging, the SAGE IV concept will meet or exceed the quality of previous SAGE measurements at a small...

  20. Tumor Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peer Review and Funding Outcomes Step 4: Award Negotiation & Issuance Manage Your Award Grants Management Contacts Monitoring ... may require immediate or more aggressive treatment. The importance of tumor grade in planning treatment and determining ...

  1. Clinical significance of CRNDE transcript variants in glioblastoma multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karrie M.Y. Kiang

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The long non-coding RNA CRNDE is an oncogene that promotes tumor growth in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. At least five CRNDE transcript variants with possibly different functional roles have been described in recent studies. Here, we report our preliminary findings on the differential expressions of CRNDE transcript variants in GBM, and their prognostic significance. Our preliminary data suggest that different transcript variants of CRNDE might have different functions in GBM and should be further studied as potential biomarkers for clinical prognostication. Keywords: Long non-coding RNA, CRNDE, Transcript variant, Glioblastoma

  2. Micro RNAs as molecular markers of glioblastoma multiform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farace, M.G.; Finocchiaro, G.; Ricci Vitiani, L.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this project was to unravel the role that miR-221 and miR-222, of which we had already demonstrated the specific differential expression in glioblastoma multiforme compared to normal brain, play in the control of cell proliferation, with the ultimate goal to provide new insights in the molecular basis of cancer. The results of our research allowed to identify an important molecular target for miRNA-221 and miR-222, highly expressed in glioblastoma multiforme tissues and cell lines, and to precisely recognize the mRNA regions responsible for this regulation

  3. Phase II study of MEDI-575, an anti-platelet-derived growth factor-α antibody, in patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuphanich, Surasak; Raizer, Jeffrey; Chamberlain, Marc; Canelos, Paola; Narwal, Rajesh; Hong, Shengyan; Miday, Robert; Nade, Minal; Laubscher, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    MEDI-575, an immunoglobulin G2κ monoclonal antibody, selectively binds to platelet-derived growth factor-α receptor (PDGFR-α) with high specificity. This multicenter, single-arm, open-label, phase II study evaluated the efficacy and safety of MEDI-575 in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Adults with first recurrence of glioblastoma following surgery, temozolomide, and radiation received MEDI-575 25 mg/kg intravenously over 60 min every 21 days until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Six-month progression-free survival rate (PFS-6) was the primary end point; secondary measures included response rate, overall survival (OS), and safety/tolerability. PDGFR-α expression was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. Fifty-six patients were enrolled; median age was 56.5 years (range 23-79), 66 % were male, and 66 % were aged ≥65 years. PFS-6 was 15.4 % [90 % confidence interval (CI) 8.1-24.9]. No complete or partial responses were observed; 23 (41.1 %) patients had stable disease as best response. Median PFS was 1.4 months (90 % CI 1.4, 1.8); median OS was 9.7 months (90 % CI 6.5, 11.8). The most common treatment-related adverse events (AEs) were diarrhea (16 %), nausea (13 %), and fatigue (13 %). Twelve (21 %) patients reported grade ≥3 AEs, with hydrocephalus (n = 3), dysphagia (n = 2), and convulsion (n = 2) reported in more than 1 patient. Two patients had treatment-related Grade ≥3 AEs of decreased lymphocyte count and asthenia (n = 1 each). Seven patients (13 %) discontinued MEDI-575 owing to AEs. Labeling of PDGFRα in glioblastoma cells and tumor-associated stromal cells was highly variable, with no correlation with PFS. MEDI-575, although well tolerated, had limited clinical activity in recurrent glioblastoma.

  4. A Phase II trial of tandutinib (MLN 518) in combination with bevacizumab for patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odia, Yazmin; Sul, Joohee; Shih, Joanna H; Kreisl, Teri N; Butman, John A; Iwamoto, Fabio M; Fine, Howard A

    2016-01-01

    A Phase II trial of bevacizumab plus tandutinib. We enrolled 41 recurrent, bevacizumab-naive glioblastoma patients for a trial of bevacizumab plus tandutinib. Median age was 55 and 71% were male. Treatment consisted of tandutinib 500 mg two-times a day (b.i.d.) and bevacizumab 10 mg/kg every 2 weeks starting day 15. Of 37 (90%) evaluable, nine (24%) had partial response. Median overall and progression-free survival was 11 and 4.1 months; progression-free survival at 6 months was 23%. All patients suffered treatment-related toxicities; common grade ≥3 toxicities were hypertension (17.1%), muscle weakness (17.1%), lymphopenia (14.6%) and hypophosphatemia (9.8%). Four of six with grade ≥3 tandutinib-related myasthenic-like muscle weakness had electromyography-proven neuromuscular junction pathology. Tandutinib with bevacizumab was as effective but more toxic than bevacizumab monotherapy.

  5. Tumor Grade versus Expression of Invasion-Related Molecules in Astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virga, József; Bognár, László; Hortobágyi, Tibor; Zahuczky, Gábor; Csősz, Éva; Kalló, Gergő; Tóth, Judit; Hutóczki, Gábor; Reményi-Puskár, Judit; Steiner, László; Klekner, Almos

    2018-01-01

    Peritumoral infiltration is characteristic of astrocytomas even in low-grade tumors. Tumor cells migrate to neighbouring tissue and cause recurrence. The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a role in tumor invasion; expression levels of its components' have been linked to tumor invasion. This study determines the mRNA and protein expression of 20 invasion-related ECM components by examining non-tumor brain; grade I-II-III astrocytoma and glioblastoma samples. Expression levels were measured by QRT-PCR and mass-spectroscopy. The connection between the expression pattern and tumor grade is statistically analyzed. During the analysis of data, key molecules (brevican, cadherin-12, fibronectin and integrin-β1) correlating the most with tumor grade were selected. While the mRNA level of brevican, ErbB2, fibronectin, integrin-β1 and versican discriminates low-grade from high-grade gliomas, of proteins RHAMM, integrin-α1 and MMP2 seems important. The expression pattern was found to be distinctive for tumor grade, as statistical classifiers are capable of identifying an unknown sample's grade using them. Furthermore, normal brain and glioma expression patterns, along with low-grade astrocytoma and glioblastoma samples, differ the most. Determining the invasion-related molecules' expression profile provides extra information regarding the tumor's clinical behavior. Additionally, identifying molecules playing a key role in glioma invasion could uncover potential therapeutic targets in the future.

  6. Restricted calorie ketogenic diet for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maroon, Joseph; Bost, Jeffrey; Amos, Austin; Zuccoli, Giulio

    2013-08-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults and generally considered to be universally fatal. Glioblastoma multiforme accounts for 12% to 15% of all intracranial neoplasms and affects 2 to 3 adults per every 100,000 in the United States annually. In children glioblastoma multiforme accounts for only approximately 7% to 9% of central nervous system tumors. The mean survival rate in adults after diagnosis ranges from 12 to 18 months with standard therapy and 3 to 6 months without therapy. The prognosis in children is better compared to adult tumor onset with a mean survival of approximately 4 years following gross total surgical resection and chemotherapy. There have been few advances in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme in the past 40 years beyond surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and corticosteroids. For this reason a restrictive calorie ketogenic diet, similar to that used in children to control drug resistant seizure activity, has been advanced as an alternative adjunctive treatment to help prolonged survival. This article reviews the science of tumor metabolism and discusses the mechanism of calorie restriction, cellular energy metabolism, and how dietary induced ketosis can inhibit cancer cell's energy supply to slow tumor growth.

  7. Nestin expression in the cell lines derived from glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veselska, Renata; Kuglik, Petr; Cejpek, Pavel; Svachova, Hana; Neradil, Jakub; Loja, Tomas; Relichova, Jirina

    2006-01-01

    Nestin is a protein belonging to class VI of intermediate filaments that is produced in stem/progenitor cells in the mammalian CNS during development and is consecutively replaced by other intermediate filament proteins (neurofilaments, GFAP). Down-regulated nestin may be re-expressed in the adult organism under certain pathological conditions (brain injury, ischemia, inflammation, neoplastic transformation). Our work focused on a detailed study of the nestin cytoskeleton in cell lines derived from glioblastoma multiforme, because re-expression of nestin together with down-regulation of GFAP has been previously reported in this type of brain tumor. Two cell lines were derived from the tumor tissue of patients treated for glioblastoma multiforme. Nestin and other cytoskeletal proteins were visualized using imunocytochemical methods: indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold-labelling. Using epifluorescence and confocal microscopy, we described the morphology of nestin-positive intermediate filaments in glioblastoma cells of both primary cultures and the derived cell lines, as well as the reorganization of nestin during mitosis. Our most important result came through transmission electron microscopy and provided clear evidence that nestin is present in the cell nucleus. Detailed information concerning the pattern of the nestin cytoskeleton in glioblastoma cell lines and especially the demonstration of nestin in the nucleus represent an important background for further studies of nestin re-expression in relationship to tumor malignancy and invasive potential

  8. Rosmarinic Acid and Melissa officinalis Extracts Differently Affect Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Ramanauskiene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lemon balm (Melissa officinalis L. has many biological effects but especially important is its neuroprotective activity. The aim of the study is to produce different extracts of Melissa officinalis and analyse their chemical composition and biological properties on rat glioblastoma C6 cells. Results revealed that rosmarinic acid (RA is the predominant compound of lemon balm extracts. RA has cytotoxic effect on glioblastoma cells (LC50 290.5 μM after the incubation of 24 h and LC50 171.3 μM after 48 h. RA at concentration 80–130 μM suppresses the cell proliferation and has an antioxidant effect. 200 μM and higher concentrations of RA have a prooxidant effect and initiate cell death through necrosis. The aqueous extract of lemon balm is also enriched in phenolic compounds: protocatechuic, caftaric, caffeic, ferulic, and cichoric acids and flavonoid luteolin-7-glucoside. This extract at concentrations 50 μM–200 μM RA has cytotoxic activity and initiates cell death through apoptosis. Extracts prepared with 70% ethanol contain the biggest amount of active compounds. These extracts have the highest cytotoxic activity on glioblastoma cells. They initiate generation of intracellular ROS and cell death through apoptosis and necrosis. Our data suggest that differently prepared lemon balm extracts differently affect glioblastoma cells and can be used as neuroprotective agents in several therapeutic strategies.

  9. Target-specific delivery of doxorubicin to human glioblastoma cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abdullah Tahir Bayraç

    2018-01-29

    Jan 29, 2018 ... aptamer-mediated drug delivery can be applied successfully for clinical use. Keywords. A-172; aptamer; doxorubicin; .... Although developed for one cell line, GMT-3 aptamer can recognize many glioblastoma cell ... lines were supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS,. GIBCO.26140079) and 100 ...

  10. Target-specific delivery of doxorubicin to human glioblastoma cell ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Targeted drug delivery approaches have been implementing significant therapeutic gain for cancer treatment since lastdecades. Aptamers are one of the mostly used and highly selective targeting agents for cancer cells. Herein, we address anano-sized targeted drug delivery approach adorned with A-172 glioblastoma ...

  11. The integrated landscape of driver genomic alterations in glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frattini, Veronique; Trifonov, Vladimir; Chan, Joseph Minhow; Castano, Angelica; Lia, Marie; Abate, Francesco; Keir, Stephen T.; Ji, Alan X.; Zoppoli, Pietro; Niola, Francesco; Danussi, Carla; Dolgalev, Igor; Porrati, Paola; Pellegatta, Serena; Heguy, Adriana; Gupta, Gaurav; Pisapia, David J.; Canoll, Peter; Bruce, Jeffrey N.; McLendon, Roger E.; Yan, Hai; Aldape, Ken; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Mikkelsen, Tom; Privé, Gilbert G.; Bigner, Darell D.; Lasorella, Anna; Rabadan, Raul; Iavarone, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma remains one of the most challenging forms of cancer to treat. Here, we develop a computational platform that integrates the analysis of copy number variations and somatic mutations and unravels the landscape of in-frame gene fusions in glioblastoma. We find mutations with loss of heterozygosity of LZTR-1, an adaptor of Cul3-containing E3 ligase complexes. Mutations and deletions disrupt LZTR-1 function, which restrains self-renewal and growth of glioma spheres retaining stem cell features. Loss-of-function mutations of CTNND2 target a neural-specific gene and are associated with transformation of glioma cells along the very aggressive mesenchymal phenotype. We also report recurrent translocations that fuse the coding sequence of EGFR to several partners, with EGFR-SEPT14 as the most frequent functional gene fusion in human glioblastoma. EGFR-SEPT14 fusions activate Stat3 signaling and confer mitogen independency and sensitivity to EGFR inhibition. These results provide important insights into the pathogenesis of glioblastoma and highlight new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23917401

  12. Role of bevacizumab therapy in the management of glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott J Peak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Scott J Peak, Victor A LevinNeuro-Oncology Program, Department of Neurosurgery and Neuroscience, Kaiser Permanente, Redwood City, CA, USAAbstract: Glioblastoma is one of the most common primary brain tumors and one of the most difficult to treat. In population-based studies only 30% of patients will survive 1 year and in the most efficacious surgery, irradiation, and chemotherapy clinical trials approximately 20% will live 2 years. Bevacizumab is a recombinant, antivascular epidermal growth factor receptor (VEGF monoclonal antibody with 6 VEGF-binding residues that binds to VEGF, preventing VEGF from binding to its target, VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2, on endothelial cells. Through its binding to VEGF ligands bevacizumab reduces tumor angiogenesis and vasogenic brain edema; the consequences are that bevacizumab reduces the rate of glioblastoma tumor growth and its associated tumoral edema, thereby improving quality of life and survival for patients suffering from cerebral glioblastoma. In this review, we will summarize the studies that led to the use of bevacizumab in glioblastoma and the potential side-effects and complications that can be associated with its use and, finally, new opportunities for drug combinations with bevacizumab.Keywords: chemotherapy, VEGF, edema, central nervous system

  13. Detection of MGMT promoter methylation in glioblastoma using pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hao; Tubbs, Raymond; Yang, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Recent clinical trials on patients with glioblastoma revealed that O(6)-Methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) methylation status significantly predicts patient's response to alkylating agents. In this study, we sought to develop and validate a quantitative MGMT methylation assay using pyrosequencing on glioblastoma. We quantified promoter methylation of MGMT using pyrosequencing on paraffin-embedded fine needle aspiration biopsy tissues from 43 glioblastoma. Using a 10% cutoff, MGMT methylation was identified in 37% cases of glioblastoma and 0% of the non-neoplastic epileptic tissue. Methylation of any individual CpG island in MGMT promoter ranged between 33% and 95%, with a mean of 65%. By a serial dilution of genomic DNA of a homogenously methylated cancer cell line with an unmethylated cell line, the analytical sensitivity is at 5% for pyrosequencing to detect MGMT methylation. The minimal amount of genomic DNA required is 100 ng (approximately 3,000 cells) in small fine needle biopsy specimens. Compared with methylation-specific PCR, pyrosequencing is comparably sensitive, relatively specific, and also provides quantitative information for each CpG methylation.

  14. MGMT promoter methylation in Peruvian patients with glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmar-Lopez, Carolina; Castaneda, Carlos A; Castillo, Miluska; García-Corrochano, Pamela; Orrego, Enrique; Meléndez, Barbara; Casavilca, Sandro; Flores, Claudio; Orrego, Enrique

    2018-01-01

    O 6 -methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase ( MGMT ) promoter methylation predicts the outcome and response to alkylating chemotherapy in glioblastoma. The aim of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of MGMT methylation in Peruvian glioblastoma cases. We evaluated retrospectively 50 cases of resected glioblastoma during the period 2008-2013 at Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplasicas in Peru. Samples consisted of paraffin embedded and frozen tumour tissue. MGMT -promoter methylation status and the expression level of MGMT gene were evaluated by methylation-specific PCR and real-time PCR, respectively. Unmethylated, methylated and partially methylated statuses were found in 54%, 20% and 26% of paraffin-embedded samples, respectively. Methylation status was confirmed in the Virgen de la Salud Hospital and frozen samples. There was an association between the status of MGMT -promoter methylation and the level of gene expression ( p = 0.001). Methylation was associated with increased progression-free survival ( p = 0.002) and overall survival (OS) ( p MGMT -promoter methylation frequency in Peruvian glioblastoma is similar to that reported in other populations and the detection test has been standardised.

  15. MGMT gene silencing and benefit from temozolomide in glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hegi, ME; Diserens, A; Gorlia, T; Hamou, M; de Tribolet, N; Weller, M; Kros, JM; Hainfellner, JA; Mason, W; Mariani, L; Bromberg, JEC; Hau, P; Mirimanoff, RO; Cairncross, JG; Janzer, RC; Stupp, R

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epigenetic silencing of the MGMT (O(sup 6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase) DNA-repair gene by promoter methylation compromises DNA repair and has been associated with longer survival in patients with glioblastoma who receive alkylating agents. METHODS: We tested the relationship

  16. Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodzik, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Wierzbicki, Mateusz

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the effect of carbon nanoparticles produced by different methods on the growth of brain tumor and the development of blood vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme cells were cultured on the chrioallantoic membrane of chicken embryo and after 7 days of incubati...

  17. Prognostic Relevance of Tumor Purity and Interaction with MGMT Methylation in Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze Heuling, Eva; Knab, Felix; Radke, Josefine; Eskilsson, Eskil; Martinez-Ledesma, Emmanuel; Koch, Arend; Czabanka, Marcus; Dieterich, Christoph; Verhaak, Roel G; Harms, Christoph; Euskirchen, Philipp

    2017-05-01

    Promoter methylation status of O-6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair enzyme, is a critical biomarker in glioblastoma (GBM), as treatment decisions and clinical trial inclusion rely on its accurate assessment. However, interpretation of results is complicated by poor interassay reproducibility as well as a weak correlation between methylation status and expression levels of MGMT. This study systematically investigates the influence of tumor purity on tissue subjected to MGMT analysis. A quantitative, allele-specific real-time PCR (qAS-PCR) assay was developed to determine genotype and mutant allele frequency of telomerase promoter (pTERT) mutations as a direct measure of tumor purity. We studied tumor purity, pTERT mutation by Sanger sequencing, MGMT methylation by pyrosequencing, IDH1 mutation status, and clinical parameters in a cohort of high-grade gliomas ( n = 97). The qAS-PCR reliably predicted pTERT genotype and tumor purity compared with independent methods. Tumor purity positively and significantly correlated with the extent of methylation in MGMT methylated GBMs. Extent of MGMT methylation differed significantly with respect to pTERT mutation hotspot (C228T vs. C250T). Interestingly, frontal lobe tumors showed greater tumor purity than those in other locations. Above all, tumor purity was identified as an independent prognostic factor in GBM. In conclusion, we determined mutual associations of tumor purity with MGMT methylation and pTERT mutations and found that the extent of MGMT methylation reflects tumor purity. In turn, tumor purity is prognostic in IDH1 wild-type GBM. Implications: Tumor purity is an independent prognostic marker in glioblastoma and is associated with the extent of MGMT methylation. Mol Cancer Res; 15(5); 532-40. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Effectiveness of Radiotherapy for Elderly Patients With Glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, Jacob; Tsai, Ya-Yu; Chinnaiyan, Prakash; Yu, Hsiang-Hsuan Michael

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Radiotherapy plays a central role in the definitive treatment of glioblastoma. However, the optimal management of elderly patients with glioblastoma remains controversial, as the relative benefit in this patient population is unclear. To better understand the role that radiation plays in the treatment of glioblastoma in the elderly, we analyzed factors influencing patient survival using a large population-based registry. Methods and Materials: A total of 2,836 patients more than 70 years of age diagnosed with glioblastoma between 1993 and 2005 were identified from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registry. Demographic and clinical variables used in the analysis included gender, ethnicity, tumor size, age at diagnosis, surgery, and radiotherapy. Cancer-specific survival and overall survival were evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed using Cox regression. Results: Radiotherapy was administered in 64% of these patients, and surgery was performed in 68%. Among 2,836 patients, 46% received surgery and radiotherapy, 22% underwent surgery only, 18% underwent radiotherapy only, and 14% did not undergo either treatment. The median survival for patients who underwent surgery and radiotherapy was 8 months. The median survival for patients who underwent radiotherapy only was 4 months, and for patients who underwent surgery only was 3 months. Those who received neither surgery nor radiotherapy had a median survival of 2 months (p < 0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that radiotherapy significantly improved cancer-specific survival (hazard ratio [HR], 0.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.38-0.49) after adjusting for surgery, tumor size, gender, ethnicity, and age at diagnosis. Other factors associated with Cancer-specific survival included surgery, tumor size, age at diagnosis, and ethnicity. Analysis using overall survival as the endpoint yielded very similar results. Conclusions: Elderly

  19. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  20. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review

  1. Dibromidodimethyldipyridineplatinum(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairéad E. Kelly

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [PtBr2(CH32(C5H5N2], the PtIV metal centre lies on a twofold rotation axis and adopts a slightly distorted octahedral coordination geometry. The structure displays weak intramolecular C—H...Br hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  2. MicroRNA-566 activates EGFR signaling and its inhibition sensitizes glioblastoma cells to nimotuzumab

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Kai-Liang; Zhou, Xuan; Han, Lei; Chen, Lu-Yue; Chen, Ling-Chao; Shi, Zhen-Dong; Yang, Ming; Ren, Yu; Yang, Jing-Xuan; Frank, Thomas S; Zhang, Chuan-Bao; Zhang, Jun-Xia; Pu, Pei-Yu; Zhang, Jian-Ning; Jiang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is amplified in 40% of human glioblastomas. However, most glioblastoma patients respond poorly to anti-EGFR therapy. MicroRNAs can function as either oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes, and have been shown to play an important role in cancer cell proliferation, invasion and apoptosis. Whether microRNAs can impact the therapeutic effects of EGFR inhibitors in glioblastoma is unknown. Methods miR-566 expression levels were detected in glioma c...

  3. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, N.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations (CRWMS M and O 1999b) and (CRWMS M and O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as line load. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding their 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.6) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance. The EDA IV concept includes more defense-in-depth layers than the VA reference design because of its backfill, drip shield, waste package shielding, and integral filler features. These features contribute to the low dose-rate to the public achieved during the first 10,000 years of repository life as shown in Figure 3. Investigation of the EDA IV concept has led to the following general conclusions: (1) The total life cycle cost for EDA IV is about $21.7 billion which equates to a $11.3 billion net present value (both figures rounded up). (2) The incidence of design basis events for EDA IV is similar to the VA reference design. (3) The emplacement of the waste packages in drifts will be similar to the VA reference design. However, heavier equipment may be required because the shielded waste package will be heavier. (4) The heavier

  4. Deregulation of a STAT3-IL8 Signaling Pathway Promotes Human Glioblastoma Cell Proliferation and Invasiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Iglesia, Núria; Konopka, Genevieve; Lim, Kah Leong; Nutt, Catherine L.; Bromberg, Jacqueline F.; Frank, David A.; Mischel, Paul S.; Louis, David N.; Bonni, Azad

    2009-01-01

    Inactivation of the tumor suppressor PTEN is recognized as a major event in the pathogenesis of the brain tumor glioblastoma. However, the mechanisms by which PTEN loss specifically impacts the malignant behavior of glioblastoma cells including their proliferation and propensity for invasiveness remain poorly understood. Genetic studies suggest that the transcription factor STAT3 harbors a PTEN-regulated tumor suppressive function in mouse astrocytes. Here, we report that STAT3 plays a critical tumor suppressive role in PTEN-deficient human glioblastoma cells. Endogenous STAT3 signaling is specifically inhibited in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma cells. Strikingly, reactivation of STAT3 in PTEN-deficient glioblastoma cells inhibits their proliferation, invasiveness, and ability to spread on myelin. We also identify the chemokine IL8 as a novel target gene of STAT3 in human glioblastoma cells. Activated STAT3 occupies the endogenous IL8 promoter and directly represses IL8 transcription. Consistent with these results, IL8 is upregulated in PTEN-deficient human glioblastoma tumors. Importantly, IL8 repression mediates STAT3-inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation, invasiveness, and spreading on myelin. Collectively, our findings uncover a novel link between STAT3 and IL8 whose deregulation plays a key role in the malignant behavior of PTEN-deficient glioblastoma cells. These studies suggest that STAT3 activation or IL8 inhibition may have potential in patient-tailored treatment of PTEN-deficient brain tumors. PMID:18524891

  5. Creutzfeldt astrocytes may be seen in IDH-wildtype glioblastoma and retain expression of DNA repair and chromatin binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballester, Leomar Y; Boghani, Zain; Baskin, David S; Britz, Gavin W; Olsen, Randall; Fuller, Gregory N; Powell, Suzanne Z; Cykowski, Matthew D

    2018-03-06

    Astrocytes with multiple micronuclei ("Creutzfeldt cells") in a brain biopsy are classically associated with demyelinating disease. However, glioblastoma may also have prominent Creutzfeldt astrocytes, along with granular mitoses. Therefore, Creutzfeldt cells may raise the diagnostic dilemma of high-grade glioma versus tumefactive demyelination. While cases of glioblastoma (GBM) with Creutzfeldt astrocytes have been reported, their clinicopathologic spectrum and genetic features are not understood. Studies have proposed that micronuclei in Creutzfeldt cells are a consequence of DNA damage, or may be susceptible to DNA damage and chromothripsis, but their biology in the context of glioblastoma remains unclear. Based on a challenging index case of GBM with mild hypercellularity, Creutzfeldt astrocytes and granular mitoses on biopsy, we searched our archives for additional cases with similar histopathologic features. We identified 13 cases, reviewed their clinico-radiologic and pathologic features, and examined them for recurrent genetic alterations via NGS (9 cases) and for evidence of DNA damage by immunohistochemistry for DNA repair and chromatin remodeling proteins. We found that Creutzfeldt cell-rich GBMs were IDH-wildtype with no recurring genetic alterations. To test our hypothesis that micronuclei demonstrate loss of DNA repair or chromatin remodeling proteins, we examined the expression of various proteins (MDM2, p53, MLH1, MSH2, PMS2, MSH6, ATRX, INI1, SATB2, Ki67, pHH3) in Creutzfeldt cell rich-GBM. There was intact expression of DNA repair and chromatin remodeling proteins, with accumulation of p53 and reduced MDM2 expression within micronuclei. In contrast, granular mitosis showed pHH3 expression, confirming these cells are undergoing mitoses, with no accumulation of p53 and reduced expression of DNA repair proteins. Our results emphasize that Creutzfeldt cells are part of the morphologic spectrum of IDH-wildtype glioblastoma. We did not find a role for

  6. A Phase I Dose Escalation Study of Hypofractionated IMRT Field-in-Field Boost for Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monjazeb, Arta M., E-mail: arta.monjazeb@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [U.C. Davis School of Medicine, Department of Radiation Oncology, Sacramento, CA (United States); Ayala, Deandra; Jensen, Courtney [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Case, L. Douglas [Biostatistical Sciences, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Bourland, J. Daniel; Ellis, Thomas L. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); McMullen, Kevin P.; Chan, Michael D. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Tatter, Stephen B. [Neurosurgery, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Lesser, Glen J. [Hematology Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States); Shaw, Edward G. [Radiation Oncology, Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, NC (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Objectives: To describe the results of a Phase I dose escalation trial for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) using a hypofractionated concurrent intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost. Methods: Twenty-one patients were enrolled between April 1999 and August 2003. Radiotherapy consisted of daily fractions of 1.8 Gy with a concurrent boost of 0.7 Gy (total 2.5 Gy daily) to a total dose of 70, 75, or 80 Gy. Concurrent chemotherapy was not permitted. Seven patients were enrolled at each dose and dose limiting toxicities were defined as irreversible Grade 3 or any Grade 4-5 acute neurotoxicity attributable to radiotherapy. Results: All patients experienced Grade 1 or 2 acute toxicities. Acutely, 8 patients experienced Grade 3 and 1 patient experienced Grade 3 and 4 toxicities. Of these, only two reversible cases of otitis media were attributable to radiotherapy. No dose-limiting toxicities were encountered. Only 2 patients experienced Grade 3 delayed toxicity and there was no delayed Grade 4 toxicity. Eleven patients requiring repeat resection or biopsy were found to have viable tumor and radiation changes with no cases of radionecrosis alone. Median overall and progression-free survival for this cohort were 13.6 and 6.5 months, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 57% and 19%. At recurrence, 15 patients received chemotherapy, 9 underwent resection, and 5 received radiotherapy. Conclusions: Using a hypofractionated concurrent IMRT boost, we were able to safely treat patients to 80 Gy without any dose-limiting toxicity. Given that local failure still remains the predominant pattern for GBM patients, a trial of dose escalation with IMRT and temozolomide is warranted.

  7. Advanced case of glioblastoma multiforme and pregnancy. An ethical dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Rasheedy, Intisar M; Al-Hameed, Fahad M

    2015-10-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and malignant form of the glial tumors. Advanced and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy for many reasons. Glioblastoma multiforme presenting during pregnancy carries unique challenges to the patient, baby, family, and health care providers. We describe an unusual case of advanced GBM that was treated with maximum doses of chemotherapy and radiations, and she became pregnant and presented at eighteenth weeks of gestation. Her medical management was associated with a significant ethical dilemma. We managed to deliver the baby safely through cesarean section at week 28 despite the critical condition of the mother. Unfortunately, the mother died 2 weeks post delivery. We concluded that although recurrent and treated GBM is rarely associated with pregnancy and carries dismal prognosis, but if it occurs, it can still be carried, and a multidisciplinary team work is the key for successful outcome.

  8. Targeting glioblastoma via intranasal administration of Ff bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dor-On, Eyal; Solomon, Beka

    2015-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) are ubiquitous viruses that control the growth and diversity of bacteria. Although they have no tropism to mammalian cells, accumulated evidence suggests that phages are not neutral to the mammalian macro-host and can promote immunomodulatory and anti-tumorigenic activities. Here we demonstrate that Ff phages that do not display any proteins or peptides could inhibit the growth of subcutaneous glioblastoma tumors in mice and that this activity is mediated in part by lipopolysaccharide molecules attached to their virion. Using the intranasal route, a non-invasive approach to deliver therapeutics directly to the CNS, we further show that phages rapidly accumulate in the brains of mice and could attenuate progression of orthotopic glioblastoma. Taken together, this study provides new insight into phages non-bacterial activities and demonstrates the feasibility of delivering Ff phages intranasally to treat brain malignancies.

  9. Practical Management of Bevacizumab-Related Toxicities in Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartolotti, Marco; Tosoni, Alicia; Poggi, Rosalba; Franceschi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Bevacizumab, currently an option for treatment of different types of tumors including glioblastoma, has a peculiar toxicity profile related to its antiangiogenic effect. Because some bevacizumab-related adverse events can be life threatening, it is important to identify risk factors and to establish treatment protocols to minimize treatment-related morbidity and mortality. In glioblastoma patients, the risk of developing certain side effects, such as gastrointestinal perforation, venous thromboembolism, and intracranial hemorrhages, is slightly higher than in patients treated with bevacizumab for other tumor types. We performed a systematic review of the side effects of bevacizumab and their incidence, causal mechanisms, and available treatments. Finally, we identified risk factors and proposed preventive and therapeutic measures for these adverse events. PMID:25568148

  10. Multifaceted role of galectin-3 on human glioblastoma cell motility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debray, Charles; Vereecken, Pierre; Belot, Nathalie; Teillard, Peggy; Brion, Jean-Pierre; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pochet, Roland

    2004-01-01

    Astrocytic tumors' aggressiveness results from an imbalance between cell proliferation and cell death favoring growth, but also from the propensity of tumor cells to detach from the primary tumor site, migrate, and invade the surrounding parenchyma. Astrocytic tumor progression is known to be associated with an increased expression of galectin-3. We investigated in cell culture how galectin-3 expression affects astrocytoma cell motility. Galectin-3 deficient cells were obtained by stable transfection of the U373 glioblastoma cell line with a specific expression antisense plasmid. Cultured galectin-3 deficient glioblastoma cells showed increased motility potential on laminin and modifications in the cytoskeleton reorganization. In addition, c-DNA microarrays and quantitative immunofluorescence analysis showed that galectin-3 deficient U373 cells have an increased expression of integrins-α6 and -β1, proteins known to be implicated in the regulation of cell adhesion

  11. Synergistic anti-tumor actions of luteolin and silibinin prevented cell migration and invasion and induced apoptosis in glioblastoma SNB19 cells and glioblastoma stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Ray, Swapan K

    2015-12-10

    Glioblastoma is the most lethal brain tumor. Failure of conventional chemotherapies prompted the search for natural compounds for treatment of glioblastoma. Plant-derived flavonoids could be alternative medicine for inhibiting not only glioblastoma cells but also glioblastoma stem cells (GSC). Two plant-derived flavonoids are luteolin (LUT) and silibinin (SIL). We investigated anti-tumor mechanisms of LUT and SIL in different human glioblastoma cells and GSC and found significant synergistic inhibition of human glioblastoma LN18 and SNB19 cells and GSC following treatment with combination of 20µM LUT and 50µM SIL. Combination of 20µM LUT and 50µM SIL was more effective than a conventional chemotherapeutic agent (BCNU or TMZ). We continued our studies with SNB19 cells and GSC and found dramatic inhibition of cell migration from spheroids and also cell invasion through matrigel following treatment with combination of LUT and SIL. This combination was highly effective to block angiogenesis and survival pathways leading to induction of apoptosis. Inhibition of PKCα, XIAP, and iNOS ultimately caused induction of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of apoptosis. Collectively, synergistic efficacy of LUT and SIL could be a promising therapy to inhibit cell migration and invasion and induce apoptosis in different glioblastoma cells including GSC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme with carmustine, cisplatin and etoposide followed by radiotherapy. A phase II study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, U; Kristjansen, P E; Wagner, A

    1999-01-01

    A meta-analysis and several studies of patients with grade III and IV gliomas have indicated that the addition of nitrosurea based chemotherapy to surgery and radiation may improve survival. We performed a phase II study of pre-irradiative chemotherapy with BCNU, cisplatin and etoposide. This imp......A meta-analysis and several studies of patients with grade III and IV gliomas have indicated that the addition of nitrosurea based chemotherapy to surgery and radiation may improve survival. We performed a phase II study of pre-irradiative chemotherapy with BCNU, cisplatin and etoposide...

  13. Indirect costs associated with glioblastoma: Experience at one hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Undabeitia, J; Torres-Bayona, S; Samprón, N; Arrázola, M; Bollar, A; Armendariz, M; Torres, P; Ruiz, I; Caballero, M C; Egaña, L; Querejeta, A; Villanua, J; Pardo, E; Etxegoien, I; Liceaga, G; Urtasun, M; Michan, M; Emparanza, J I; Aldaz, P; Matheu, A; Úrculo, E

    2018-03-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumour. Despite advances in treatment, its prognosis remains dismal, with a mean survival time of about 14 months. Many articles have addressed direct costs, those associated with the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Indirect costs, those associated with loss of productivity due to the disease, have seldom been described. We conducted a retrospective study in patients diagnosed with glioblastoma at Hospital Universitario Donostia between January 1, 2010 and December 31, 2013. We collected demographics, data regarding the treatment received, and survival times. We calculated the indirect costs with the human capital approach, adjusting the mean salaries of comparable individuals by sex and age and obtaining mortality data for the general population from the Spanish National Statistics Institute. Past salaries were updated to 2015 euros according to the annual inflation rate and we applied a discount of 3.5% compounded yearly to future salaries. We reviewed the records of 99 patients: 46 women (mean age 63.53) and 53 men (mean age 59.94); 29 patients underwent a biopsy and the remaining 70 underwent excisional surgery. Mean survival was 18.092 months for the whole series. The total indirect cost for the series was €11 080 762 (2015). Mean indirect cost per patient was €111 926 (2015). Although glioblastoma is a relatively uncommon type of tumour, accounting for only 4% of all cancers, its poor prognosis and potential sequelae generate disproportionately large morbidity and mortality rates which translate to high indirect costs. Clinicians should be aware of the societal impact of glioblastoma and indirect costs should be taken into account when cost effectiveness studies are performed to better illustrate the overall consequences of this disease. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restall, Ian J; Parolin, Doris A E; Daneshmand, Manijeh; Hanson, Jennifer E L; Simard, Manon A; Fitzpatrick, Megan E; Kumar, Ritesh; Lavictoire, Sylvie J; Lorimer, Ian A J

    2015-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a tumor suppressor mechanism where cells enter a permanent growth arrest following cellular stress. Oncogene-induced senescence (OIS) is induced in non-malignant cells following the expression of an oncogene or inactivation of a tumor suppressor. Previously, we have shown that protein kinase C iota (PKCι) depletion induces cellular senescence in glioblastoma cells in the absence of a detectable DNA damage response. Here we demonstrate that senescent glioblastoma cells exhibit an aberrant centrosome morphology. This was observed in basal levels of senescence, in p21-induced senescence, and in PKCι depletion-induced senescence. In addition, senescent glioblastoma cells are polyploid, Ki-67 negative and arrest at the G1/S checkpoint, as determined by expression of cell cycle regulatory proteins. These markers are all consistent with cells that have undergone mitotic slippage. Failure of the spindle assembly checkpoint to function properly can lead to mitotic slippage, resulting in the premature exit of mitotic cells into the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Although in G1, these cells have the replicated DNA and centrosomal phenotype of a cell that has entered mitosis and failed to divide. Overall, we demonstrate that PKCι depletion initiates mitotic slippage-induced senescence in glioblastoma cells. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence of markers of mitotic slippage directly in senescent cells by co-staining for senescence-associated β-galactosidase and immunofluorescence markers in the same cell population. We suggest that markers of mitotic slippage be assessed in future studies of senescence to determine the extent of mitotic slippage in the induction of cellular senescence.

  15. Glioblastoma mimicking a cerebral contusion: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    LI, XINWEI; WANG, KUN; ZHANG, ANLING; SONG, ZHENGFEI; YANG, SHUXU; QIAN, CONG; WANG, YIRONG

    2013-01-01

    A 61-year-old male presented with a rare case of glioblastoma mimicking a cerebral contusion subsequent to collapsing. The patient had been medicated for hypertension for seven years and diabetes for eight years prior to hospitalization. Brain computed tomography (CT) revealed a cerebral contusion and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in the left temporal region. The patient was initially administered intravenous drugs to reduce the intracranial pressure following the diagnosis of a cerebral con...

  16. CAR T-Cell Therapies in Glioblastoma: A First Look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorini, Denis; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Stupp, Roger; Linette, Gerald P; Posey, Avery D; June, Carl H

    2018-02-01

    Glioblastoma is an aggressive malignancy with a poor prognosis. The current standard of care for newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients includes surgery to the extent, temozolomide combined with radiotherapy, and alternating electric fields therapy. After recurrence, there is no standard therapy and survival is less than 9 months. Recurrent glioblastoma offers a unique opportunity to investigate new treatment approaches in a malignancy known for remarkable genetic heterogeneity, an immunosuppressive microenvironment, and a partially permissive anatomic blood-brain barrier. Results from three first-in-man chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell trials targeting IL13Rα2, Her2/CMV, and EGFRvIII have recently been reported. Each one of these trials addresses important questions, such as T-cell trafficking to CNS, engraftment and persistence, tumor microenvironment remodeling, and monitoring of glioma response to CAR T cells. Objective radiologic responses have been reported. Here, we discuss and summarize the results of these trials and suggest opportunities for the field. Clin Cancer Res; 24(3); 535-40. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Fenofibrate Induces Ketone Body Production in Melanoma and Glioblastoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grabacka, Maja M.; Wilk, Anna; Antonczyk, Anna; Banks, Paula; Walczyk-Tytko, Emilia; Dean, Matthew; Pierzchalska, Malgorzata; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Ketone bodies [beta-hydroxybutyrate (bHB) and acetoacetate] are mainly produced in the liver during prolonged fasting or starvation. bHB is a very efficient energy substrate for sustaining ATP production in peripheral tissues; importantly, its consumption is preferred over glucose. However, the majority of malignant cells, particularly cancer cells of neuroectodermal origin such as glioblastoma, are not able to use ketone bodies as a source of energy. Here, we report a novel observation that fenofibrate, a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa) agonist, induces bHB production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells, as well as in neurospheres composed of non-transformed cells. Unexpectedly, this effect is not dependent on PPARa activity or its expression level. The fenofibrate-induced ketogenesis is accompanied by growth arrest and downregulation of transketolase, but the NADP/NADPH and GSH/GSSG ratios remain unaffected. Our results reveal a new, intriguing aspect of cancer cell biology and highlight the benefits of fenofibrate as a supplement to both canonical and dietary (ketogenic) therapeutic approaches against glioblastoma. PMID:26869992

  18. Quantitative radiomic profiling of glioblastoma represents transcriptomic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Doo-Sik; Kim, Junhyung; Ryu, Gyuha; You, Hye-Jin; Sung, Joon Kyung; Han, Yong Hee; Shin, Hye-Mi; Lee, In-Hee; Kim, Sung-Tae; Park, Chul-Kee; Choi, Seung Hong; Choi, Jeong Won; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; Nam, Do-Hyun

    2018-01-19

    Quantitative imaging biomarkers have increasingly emerged in the field of research utilizing available imaging modalities. We aimed to identify good surrogate radiomic features that can represent genetic changes of tumors, thereby establishing noninvasive means for predicting treatment outcome. From May 2012 to June 2014, we retrospectively identified 65 patients with treatment-naïve glioblastoma with available clinical information from the Samsung Medical Center data registry. Preoperative MR imaging data were obtained for all 65 patients with primary glioblastoma. A total of 82 imaging features including first-order statistics, volume, and size features, were semi-automatically extracted from structural and physiologic images such as apparent diffusion coefficient and perfusion images. Using commercially available software, NordicICE, we performed quantitative imaging analysis and collected the dataset composed of radiophenotypic parameters. Unsupervised clustering methods revealed that the radiophenotypic dataset was composed of three clusters. Each cluster represented a distinct molecular classification of glioblastoma; classical type, proneural and neural types, and mesenchymal type. These clusters also reflected differential clinical outcomes. We found that extracted imaging signatures does not represent copy number variation and somatic mutation. Quantitative radiomic features provide a potential evidence to predict molecular phenotype and treatment outcome. Radiomic profiles represents transcriptomic phenotypes more well.

  19. Prognostic factors in recurrent glioblastoma patients treated with bevacizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaub, Christina; Tichy, Julia; Schäfer, Niklas; Franz, Kea; Mack, Frederic; Mittelbronn, Michel; Kebir, Sied; Thiepold, Anna-Luisa; Waha, Andreas; Filmann, Natalie; Banat, Mohammed; Fimmers, Rolf; Steinbach, Joachim P; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Rieger, Johannes; Glas, Martin; Bähr, Oliver

    2016-08-01

    The value of bevacizumab (BEV) in recurrent glioblastoma is unclear. Imaging parameters and progression-free survival (PFS) are problematic endpoints. Few data exist on clinical factors influencing overall survival (OS) in unselected patients with recurrent glioblastoma exposed to BEV. We retrospectively analyzed 174 patients with recurrent glioblastoma treated with BEV at two German brain tumor centers. We evaluated general patient characteristics, MGMT status, pretreatment, concomitant oncologic treatment and overall survival. Karnofsky performance score, number of prior chemotherapies, number of prior recurrences and combined treatment with irinotecan (IRI) were significantly associated with OS in univariate analysis. We did not find differences in OS related to sex, age, histology, MGMT status, prior surgical treatment or number of prior radiotherapies. Combined treatment with IRI and higher KPS both remained significantly associated with prolonged survival in multivariate analysis, but patients receiving IRI co-treatment had less advanced disease. Grouping into clinically relevant categories revealed an OS of 16.9 months from start of BEV in patients with first recurrence and KPS ≥ 80 % (n = 25). In contrast, in patients with second recurrence and KPS < 80 %, OS was 3.6 months (n = 27). Our observational data support an early use of BEV in patients with good performance status. The benefit of co-treatment with IRI in our cohort seems to be the result of biased patient recruitment.

  20. MiRNA expression patterns predict survival in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Zehentmayr, Franz; Niemöller, Olivier M; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Kretzschmar, Hans; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Atkinson, Mike; Mörtl, Simone; Belka, Claus

    2011-11-10

    In order to define new prognostic subgroups in patients with glioblastoma a miRNA screen (> 1000 miRNAs) from paraffin tissues followed by a bio-mathematical analysis was performed. 35 glioblastoma patients treated between 7/2005 - 8/2008 at a single institution with surgery and postoperative radio(chemo)therapy were included in this retrospective analysis. For microarray analysis the febit biochip "Geniom® Biochip MPEA homo-sapiens" was used. Total RNA was isolated from FFPE tissue sections and 1100 different miRNAs were analyzed. It was possible to define a distinct miRNA expression pattern allowing for a separation of distinct prognostic subgroups. The defined miRNA pattern was significantly associated with early death versus long-term survival (split at 450 days) (p = 0.01). The pattern and the prognostic power were both independent of the MGMT status. At present, this is the first dataset defining a prognostic role of miRNA expression patterns in patients with glioblastoma. Having defined such a pattern, a prospective validation of this observation is required.

  1. Outcome in unresectable glioblastoma: MGMT promoter methylation makes the difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thon, Niklas; Thorsteinsdottir, Jun; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Schüller, Ulrich; Lutz, Jürgen; Kreth, Simone; Belka, Claus; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Niyazi, Maximilian; Kreth, Friedrich Wilhelm

    2017-02-01

    In 2011, we reported a predominant prognostic/predictive role of MGMT promoter methylation status on progression-free survival (PFS) in unresectable glioblastoma patients undergoing upfront radiotherapy plus concomitant and maintenance temozolomide (RTX/TMZ → TMZ). We, here, present the final results of this prospective study focussing on the prognostic/predictive value of MGMT promoter methylation status for death risk stratification. Overall, 56 adult patients with unresectable, biopsy proven glioblastoma were prospectively assigned to upfront RTX/TMZ → TMZ treatment between March 2006 and August 2008. Last follow-up was performed in June 2016. MGMT promoter methylation was determined using methylation-specific PCR (MSP) and sodium bisulfite sequencing. Analyses were done by intention to treat. Prognostic factors were obtained from proportional hazard models. At the time of the final analysis 55 patients showed progressive disease and 53 patients had died. MGMT promoter was methylated (unmethylated) in 30 (26) patients. Methylation of the MGMT promoter was the strongest favorable predictor for overall survival (OS, median: 20.3 vs. 7.3 months, p MGMT promoter methylation status is essential for patients' counseling, prognostic evaluation, and for the design of future trials dealing with unresectable glioblastomas.

  2. MiRNA expression patterns predict survival in glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niyazi Maximilian

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In order to define new prognostic subgroups in patients with glioblastoma a miRNA screen (> 1000 miRNAs from paraffin tissues followed by a bio-mathematical analysis was performed. Methods 35 glioblastoma patients treated between 7/2005 - 8/2008 at a single institution with surgery and postoperative radio(chemotherapy were included in this retrospective analysis. For microarray analysis the febit biochip "Geniom® Biochip MPEA homo-sapiens" was used. Total RNA was isolated from FFPE tissue sections and 1100 different miRNAs were analyzed. Results It was possible to define a distinct miRNA expression pattern allowing for a separation of distinct prognostic subgroups. The defined miRNA pattern was significantly associated with early death versus long-term survival (split at 450 days (p = 0.01. The pattern and the prognostic power were both independent of the MGMT status. Conclusions At present, this is the first dataset defining a prognostic role of miRNA expression patterns in patients with glioblastoma. Having defined such a pattern, a prospective validation of this observation is required.

  3. MiRNA expression patterns predict survival in glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niyazi, Maximilian; Belka, Claus; Zehentmayr, Franz; Niemöller, Olivier M; Eigenbrod, Sabina; Kretzschmar, Hans; Osthoff, Klaus-Schulze; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Atkinson, Mike; Mörtl, Simone

    2011-01-01

    In order to define new prognostic subgroups in patients with glioblastoma a miRNA screen (> 1000 miRNAs) from paraffin tissues followed by a bio-mathematical analysis was performed. 35 glioblastoma patients treated between 7/2005 - 8/2008 at a single institution with surgery and postoperative radio(chemo)therapy were included in this retrospective analysis. For microarray analysis the febit biochip 'Geniom ® Biochip MPEA homo-sapiens' was used. Total RNA was isolated from FFPE tissue sections and 1100 different miRNAs were analyzed. It was possible to define a distinct miRNA expression pattern allowing for a separation of distinct prognostic subgroups. The defined miRNA pattern was significantly associated with early death versus long-term survival (split at 450 days) (p = 0.01). The pattern and the prognostic power were both independent of the MGMT status. At present, this is the first dataset defining a prognostic role of miRNA expression patterns in patients with glioblastoma. Having defined such a pattern, a prospective validation of this observation is required

  4. Fenofibrate induces ketone body production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja M Grabacka

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Ketone bodies (beta-hydroxybutyrate, bHB, acetoacetate are mainly produced in the liver during prolonged fasting or starvation. bHB is a very efficient energy substrate for sustaining ATP production in peripheral tissues; importantly its consumption is preferred over glucose. However, the majority of malignant cells, particularly cancer cells of neuroectodermal origin such as glioblastoma, are not able to use ketone bodies as a source of energy. Here, we report a novel observation that fenofibrate, a synthetic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARa agonist, induces bHB production in melanoma and glioblastoma cells, as well as in neurospheres composed of nontransformed cells. Unexpectedly, this effect is not dependent on PPARa activity or its expression level. The fenofibrate-induced ketogenesis is accompanied by growth arrest and down-regulation of transketolase, but the NADP/NADPH and GSH/GSSG ratios remain unaffected. Our results reveal a new, intriguing aspect of cancer cell biology and highlight the benefits of fenofibrate as a supplement to both canonical and dietary (ketogenic therapeutic approaches against glioblastoma.

  5. Hypofractionated radiation induces a decrease in cell proliferation but no histological damage to organotypic multicellular spheroids of human glioblastomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, P.; Troost, D.; Sminia, P.; Hulshof, M. C.; van der Kracht, A. H.; Leenstra, S.; Bosch, D. A.

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of radiation on glioblastoma, using an organotypic multicellular spheroid (OMS) model. Most glioblastoma cell lines are, in contrast to glioblastomas in vivo, relatively radiosensitive. This limits the value of using cell lines for studying the

  6. 18F-FET and 18F-FCH uptake in human glioblastoma T98G cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Persico Marco Giovanni

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Despite complex treatment of surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, high grade gliomas often recur. Differentiation between post-treatment changes and recurrence is difficult. 18F-methyl-choline (18F-FCH is frequently used in staging and detection of recurrent prostate cancer disease as well as some brain tumours; however accumulation in inflammatory tissue limits its specificity. The 18F-ethyl-tyrosine (18F-FET shows a specific uptake in malignant cells, resulting from increased expression of amino acid transporters or diffusing through the disrupted blood-brain barrier. 18F-FET exhibits lower uptake in machrophages and other inflammatory cells. Aim of this study was to evaluate 18F-FCH and 18F-FET uptake by human glioblastoma T98G cells.

  7. Prospective evaluation of angiogenic, hypoxic and EGFR-related biomarkers in recurrent glioblastoma multiforme treated with cetuximab, bevacizumab and irinotecan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Broholm, Helle

    2010-01-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated a beneficial effect of anti-angiogenic treatment with the vascular endothelial growth factor-neutralizing antibody bevacizumab in recurrent high-grade glioma. In the current study, immunohistochemical evaluation of biomarkers involved in angiogenesis......, hypoxia and mediators of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway were investigated. Tumor tissue was obtained from a previous phase II study, treating recurrent primary glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients with the EGFR inhibitor cetuximab in combination with bevacizumab and irinotecan....... Of the 37 patients with available tumor tissue, 29 were evaluable for response. We concurrently performed immunohistochemical stainings on tumor tissue from 21 GBM patients treated with bevacizumab and irinotecan. We found a tendency of correlation between the hypoxia-related markers, indicating...

  8. Expression of autocrine motility factor mRNA is a poor prognostic factor in high-grade astrocytoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanizaki, Yoshinori; Sato, Yuichi; Oka, Hidehiro; Utsuki, Satoshi; Kondo, Koji; Miyajima, Yoshiteru; Nagashio, Ryo; Fujii, Kiyotaka

    2006-09-01

    It has been reported that tumor infiltration is correlated with the expression of autocrine motility factor (AMF) and its receptor 78 kDa glycoprotein (gp78). The purpose of the present study was to detect AMF and gp78 mRNA expression levels and their localization in high-grade astrocytomas (glioblastoma and anaplastic astrocytoma) and to determine whether AMF and gp78 are important prognostic factors. A total of 32 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded glioblastomas and 23 formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded anaplastic astrocytomas was used. The expressions of AMF and gp78 mRNA were detected using the highly sensitive in situ hybridization method. The expression of AMF mRNA was detected in 27 of 32 glioblastomas (84.4%) and 11 of 23 anaplastic astrocytomas (47.8%). The positivity of AMF mRNA was significantly higher in glioblastomas than in anaplastic astrocytomas (P = 0.0094), but gp78 mRNA was detected in most cases and no statistical significance was observed. The overall survival of patients with AMF expression was significantly shorter than patients without AMF expression (P = 0.0175). In anaplastic astrocytomas, the overall survival of patients with AMF expression was also significantly shorter than in patients without AMF expression (P = 0.0058). This study demonstrated that AMF is a poor prognostic factor in high-grade astrocytomas.

  9. Screen for IDH1, IDH2, IDH3, D2HGDH and L2HGDH mutations in glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Krell

    Full Text Available Isocitrate dehydrogenases (IDHs catalyse oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (α-KG. IDH1 functions in the cytosol and peroxisomes, whereas IDH2 and IDH3 are both localized in the mitochondria. Heterozygous somatic mutations in IDH1 occur at codon 132 in 70% of grade II-III gliomas and secondary glioblastomas (GBMs, and in 5% of primary GBMs. Mutations in IDH2 at codon 172 are present in grade II-III gliomas at a low frequency. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations cause both loss of normal enzyme function and gain-of-function, causing reduction of α-KG to D-2-hydroxyglutarate (D-2HG which accumulates. Excess hydroxyglutarate (2HG can also be caused by germline mutations in D- and L-2-hydroxyglutarate dehydrogenases (D2HGDH and L2HGDH. If loss of IDH function is critical for tumourigenesis, we might expect some tumours to acquire somatic IDH3 mutations. Alternatively, if 2HG accumulation is critical, some tumours might acquire somatic D2HGDH or L2HGDH mutations. We therefore screened 47 glioblastoma samples looking for changes in these genes. Although IDH1 R132H was identified in 12% of samples, no mutations were identified in any of the other genes. This suggests that mutations in IDH3, D2HGDH and L2HGDH do not occur at an appreciable frequency in GBM. One explanation is simply that mono-allelic IDH1 and IDH2 mutations occur more frequently by chance than the bi-allelic mutations expected at IDH3, D2HGDH and L2HGDH. Alternatively, both loss of IDH function and 2HG accumulation might be required for tumourigenesis, and only IDH1 and IDH2 mutations have these dual effects.

  10. Automatic multi-modal MR tissue classification for the assessment of response to bevacizumab in patients with glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberman, Gilad [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Gonda Multidisciplinary Brain Research Center, Bar Ilan University, Ramat-Gan (Israel); Louzoun, Yoram [Mathematics Department, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat-Gan (Israel); Aizenstein, Orna [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix [Neuro-Oncology Service, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Palmon, Mika [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Corn, Benjamin W. [Institute of Radiotherapy, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Ben Bashat, Dafna, E-mail: dafnab@tlvmc.gov.il [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2013-02-15

    Background: Current methods for evaluation of treatment response in glioblastoma are inaccurate, limited and time-consuming. This study aimed to develop a multi-modal MRI automatic classification method to improve accuracy and efficiency of treatment response assessment in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GB). Materials and methods: A modification of the k-Nearest-Neighbors (kNN) classification method was developed and applied to 59 longitudinal MR data sets of 13 patients with recurrent GB undergoing bevacizumab (anti-angiogenic) therapy. Changes in the enhancing tumor volume were assessed using the proposed method and compared with Macdonald's criteria and with manual volumetric measurements. The edema-like area was further subclassified into peri- and non-peri-tumoral edema, using both the kNN method and an unsupervised method, to monitor longitudinal changes. Results: Automatic classification using the modified kNN method was applicable in all scans, even when the tumors were infiltrative with unclear borders. The enhancing tumor volume obtained using the automatic method was highly correlated with manual measurements (N = 33, r = 0.96, p < 0.0001), while standard radiographic assessment based on Macdonald's criteria matched manual delineation and automatic results in only 68% of cases. A graded pattern of tumor infiltration within the edema-like area was revealed by both automatic methods, showing high agreement. All classification results were confirmed by a senior neuro-radiologist and validated using MR spectroscopy. Conclusion: This study emphasizes the important role of automatic tools based on a multi-modal view of the tissue in monitoring therapy response in patients with high grade gliomas specifically under anti-angiogenic therapy.

  11. Automatic multi-modal MR tissue classification for the assessment of response to bevacizumab in patients with glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liberman, Gilad; Louzoun, Yoram; Aizenstein, Orna; Blumenthal, Deborah T.; Bokstein, Felix; Palmon, Mika; Corn, Benjamin W.; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2013-01-01

    Background: Current methods for evaluation of treatment response in glioblastoma are inaccurate, limited and time-consuming. This study aimed to develop a multi-modal MRI automatic classification method to improve accuracy and efficiency of treatment response assessment in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GB). Materials and methods: A modification of the k-Nearest-Neighbors (kNN) classification method was developed and applied to 59 longitudinal MR data sets of 13 patients with recurrent GB undergoing bevacizumab (anti-angiogenic) therapy. Changes in the enhancing tumor volume were assessed using the proposed method and compared with Macdonald's criteria and with manual volumetric measurements. The edema-like area was further subclassified into peri- and non-peri-tumoral edema, using both the kNN method and an unsupervised method, to monitor longitudinal changes. Results: Automatic classification using the modified kNN method was applicable in all scans, even when the tumors were infiltrative with unclear borders. The enhancing tumor volume obtained using the automatic method was highly correlated with manual measurements (N = 33, r = 0.96, p < 0.0001), while standard radiographic assessment based on Macdonald's criteria matched manual delineation and automatic results in only 68% of cases. A graded pattern of tumor infiltration within the edema-like area was revealed by both automatic methods, showing high agreement. All classification results were confirmed by a senior neuro-radiologist and validated using MR spectroscopy. Conclusion: This study emphasizes the important role of automatic tools based on a multi-modal view of the tissue in monitoring therapy response in patients with high grade gliomas specifically under anti-angiogenic therapy

  12. Prognostic value of plasma transforming growth factor-beta in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulshof, M. C.; Sminia, P.; Barten-van Rijbroek, A. D.; Gonzalez Gonzalez, D.

    2001-01-01

    We investigated whether the postoperative concentration of circulating transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta) yields prognostic value in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (gbm). Blood was collected from 20 healthy volunteers and in 28 patients with mainly glioblastoma multiforme (gbm), both

  13. CXCL12 mediates glioblastoma resistance to radiotherapy in the subventricular zone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goffart, Nicolas; Lombard, Arnaud; Lallemand, François; Kroonen, Jérôme; Nassen, Jessica; Di Valentin, Emmanuel; Berendsen, Sharon; Dedobbeleer, Matthias; Willems, Estelle; Robe, Pierre; Bours, Vincent; Martin, Didier; Martinive, Philippe; Maquet, Pierre; Rogister, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Background. Patients with glioblastoma (GBM) have an overall median survival of 15 months despite multimodal therapy. These catastrophic survival rates are to be correlated to systematic relapses that might arise from remaining glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) left behind after surgery. In this line,

  14. Necrosis de médula espinal, edema cerebral y glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Iglesias Rozas, José Rafael, 1942-

    1987-01-01

    Cinco imágenes de una necrosis de la médula espinal, un edema cerebral y un glioblastoma en una paciente de 76 años. Five pictures of a spinal cord necrosis, a cerebral edema and a glioblastoma in a 76-year-old female patient.

  15. Analysis of fractional anisotropy facilitates differentiation of glioblastoma and brain metastases in a clinical setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bette, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.bette@tum.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Huber, Thomas; Wiestler, Benedikt; Boeckh-Behrens, Tobias [Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Gempt, Jens; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard [Department of Neurosurgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Zimmer, Claus; Kirschke, Jan S. [Department of Neuroradiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Purpose: Differentiating glioblastoma from brain metastases is important for therapy planning. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was described as a promising tool, however with conflicting results. Aim: of this study was to analyze the clinical utility of DTI for the differentiation of brain metastases and glioblastoma. Methods: 294 patients (165 glioblastoma, 129 brain metastases) with preoperative DTI were included in this retrospective study. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was measured via regions of interest (ROIs) in the contrast-enhancing tumor, the necrosis and the FLAIR-hyperintense non-enhancing peritumoral region (NEPTR). Two neuroradiologists classified patient cases as glioblastoma or brain metastases without and with knowledge of FA values. Results: Glioblastoma showed significantly higher FA{sub contrast} (median glioblastoma = 0.33, metastases = 0.23; P < 0.001) whereas no significant difference was observed for FA{sub NEPTR} (0.21 vs. 0.22; P = 0.28) and for FA{sub necrosis} (0.17 vs. 0.18, P = 0.37). FA improved diagnostic accuracy of the neuroradiologists significantly from an AUC of 0.84/0.85 (Reader1/Reader2) to 0.89/0.92. Conclusions: Glioblastoma show significantly higher FA values in the contrast enhancing tumor part than brain metastases. Implementation of a ROI-based measurement of FA values and FA color maps in clinical routine helps to differentiate between glioblastoma and brain metastases.

  16. Periarteriolar Glioblastoma Stem Cell Niches Express Bone Marrow Hematopoietic Stem Cell Niche Proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hira, Vashendriya V. V.; Wormer, Jill R.; Kakar, Hala; Breznik, Barbara; van der Swaan, Britt; Hulsbos, Renske; Tigchelaar, Wikky; Tonar, Zbynek; Khurshed, Mohammed; Molenaar, Remco J.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2018-01-01

    In glioblastoma, a fraction of malignant cells consists of therapy-resistant glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) residing in protective niches that recapitulate hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches in bone marrow. We have previously shown that HSC niche proteins stromal cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α),

  17. Clinico-pathological studies of CSF dissemination of glioblastoma and medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Kyozo; Yoshida, Jun; Kageyama, Naoki

    1986-01-01

    Clinico-pathological findings of CSF dissemination which was diagnosed on CT scan, were studied on 13 cases of glioblastoma and 9 cases of medulloblastoma. The type of CSF dissemination and the prognosis of patients were both different between glioblastoma and medulloblastoma. In the former, the dissemination was predominantly in ventricular walls and in the latter, in basal cisterns. The mean survival time after the diagnosis of dissemination is 6 months of glioblastoma as compared with 13 months of medulloblastoma. The Pathological studies show that subependymal and/or subpial infiltration of tumor cells, and thickness of arachnoid membrane by marked mesodermal reaction were demonstrated in cases of glioblastoma. On the contrary, tumor cells of medulloblastoma grow markedly in the subarachnoid space and/or on the ependymal layers. From these pathological findings of CSF dissemination, it will be resulted that the prognosis of glioblastoma is much more poor that of medulloblastoma. (author)

  18. Pro-inflammatory gene expression in solid glioblastoma microenvironment and in hypoxic stem cells from human glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santoro Antonio

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adaptation to hypoxia and consequent pro-inflammatory gene expression of prostate and breast carcinomas have been implicated in the progression toward cancer malignant phenotype. Only partial data are available for the human tumor glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. The aim of our study was to analyze the hypoxic and pro-inflammatory microenvironment in GBMs and to demonstrate that in a stem/progenitor cell line derived from human glioblastoma (GBM-SCs, hypoxia activates a coordinated inflammatory response, evidencing an invasive and migratory phenotype. Methods From each of 10 human solid glioblastomas, clinically and histopathologically characterized, we obtained three surgical samples taken from the center and the periphery of the tumor, and from adjacent host normal tissue. Molecular and morphological analyses were carried out using quantitative real-time PCR and western blot (WB. GBM stem and differentiated cells were incubated under hypoxic conditions and analyzed for pro-inflammatory gene expression and for invasive/migratory behavior. Results A panel of selected representative pro-inflammatory genes (RAGE and P2X7R, COX2, NOS2 and, PTX3 were analyzed, comparing tumor, peritumor and host normal tissues. Tumors containing leukocyte infiltrates (as assessed using CD45 immunohistochemistry were excluded. Selected genes were overexpressed in the central regions of the tumors (i.e. in the more hypoxic areas, less expressed in peripheral regions, and poorly expressed or absent in adjacent normal host tissues. Western blot analysis confirmed that the corresponding pro-inflammatory proteins were also differently expressed. Hypoxic stem cell lines showed a clear time-dependent activation of the entire panel of pro-inflammatory genes as compared to differentiated tumor cells. Biological assays showed that invasive and migratory behavior was strengthened by hypoxia only in GBM stem cells. Conclusions In human solid glioblastoma we have

  19. Foraminal syringomyelia: suggestion for a grading system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Versari, P P; D'Aliberti, G; Talamonti, G; Collice, M

    1993-01-01

    The standard treatment of foraminal syringomyelia includes foramen magnum decompression and duraplasty. Improvement or stabilization of the disease are achieved in most of cases. However, at least one third of patients are reported to receive little or no benefit. In this paper we retrospectively reviewed a series of 40 consecutive foramen magnum decompressions in order to identify the possible pre-operative outcome predictors. Based on clinical evolution, neurological impairment and radiological features, a scale of severity was fixed and retrospectively tested. A pre-operative score was obtained for each patient and was correlated with the surgical results. Then a four level grading system was derived. All grade I and grade II patients achieved good results (improvement or stabilization), whereas grade III patients showed intermediate behaviour and grade IV invariably worsened. On this basis, surgical results of foramen magnum decompression might be further improved provided that a careful pre-operative selection is made.

  20. Gene Expression Profile of Glioblastoma Multiforme Invasive Phenotype Points to New Therapeutic Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique B. Hoelzinger

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The invasive phenotype of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a hallmark of malignant process, yet molecular mechanisms that dictate this locally invasive behavior remain poorly understood. Gene expression profiles of human glioma cells were assessed from laser capture-microdissected GBM cells collected from paired patient tumor cores and white matterinvading cell populations. Changes in gene expression in invading GBM cells were validated by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (QRTPCR and immunohistochemistry in an independent sample set. QRT-PCR confirmed the differential expression in 19 of 21 genes tested. Immunohistochemical analyses of autotaxin (ATX, ephrin 133, B-cell lymphoma-w (BCLW, and protein tyrosine kinase 2 beta showed them to be expressed in invasive glioma cells. The known GBM markers, insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 and vimentin, were robustly expressed in the tumor core. A glioma invasion tissue microarray confirmed the expression of ATX and BCLW in invasive cells of tumors of various grades. GBM phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity is well documented. In this study, we show an additional layer of complexity: transcriptional differences between cells of tumor core and invasive cells located in the brain parenchyma. Gene products supporting invasion may be novel targets for manipulation of brain tumor behavior with consequences on treatment outcome.

  1. Tryptophan PET Imaging of the Kynurenine Pathway in Patient-Derived Xenograft Models of Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastella, Anthony R; Michelhaugh, Sharon K; Klinger, Neil V; Kupsky, William J; Polin, Lisa A; Muzik, Otto; Juhász, Csaba; Mittal, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates the immunosuppressive kynurenine pathway's (KP) role in the pathophysiology of human gliomas. To study the KP in vivo, we used the noninvasive molecular imaging tracer α-[(11)C]-methyl-l-tryptophan (AMT). The AMT-positron emission tomography (PET) has shown high uptake in high-grade gliomas and predicted survival in patients with recurrent glioblastoma (GBM). We generated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from dissociated cells, or tumor fragments, from 5 patients with GBM. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were imaged with AMT-PET, and tumors were analyzed to detect the KP enzymes indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) 1, IDO2, tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase, kynureninase, and kynurenine 3-monooxygenase. Overall, PET imaging showed robust tumoral AMT uptake in PDX mice with prolonged tracer accumulation over 60 minutes, consistent with AMT trapping seen in humans. Immunostained tumor tissues demonstrated positive detection of multiple KP enzymes. Furthermore, intracranial implantation of GBM cells was performed with imaging at both 9 and 14 days postimplant, with a marked increase in AMT uptake at 14 days and a corresponding high level of tissue immunostaining for KP enzymes. These results indicate that our PDX mouse models recapitulate human GBM, including aberrant tryptophan metabolism, and offer an in vivo system for development of targeted therapeutics for patients with GBM. © The Author(s) 2016.

  2. Hypofractionated High-Dose Irradiation with Positron Emission Tomography Data for the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Miwa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research paper presents clinical outcomes of hypofractionated high-dose irradiation by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (Hypo-IMRT with 11C-methionine positron emission tomography (MET-PET data for the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM. A total of 45 patients with GBM were treated with Hypo-IMRT after surgery. Gross tumor volume (GTV was defined as the area of enhanced lesion on MRI, including MET-PET avid region; clinical target volume (CTV was the area with 5 mm margin surrounding the GTV; planning target volume (PTV was the area with 15 mm margin surrounding the CTV, including MET-PET moderate region. Hypo-IMRT was performed in 8 fractions; planning the dose for GTV was escalated to 68 Gy and that for CTV was escalated to 56 Gy, while keeping the dose delivered to the PTV at 40 Gy. Concomitant and adjuvant TMZ chemotherapy was administered. At a median follow-up of 18.7 months, median overall survival (OS was 20.0 months, and median progression-free survival was 13.0 months. The 1- and 2-year OS rates were 71.2% and 26.3%, respectively. Adjuvant TMZ chemotherapy was significantly predictive of OS on multivariate analysis. Late toxicity included 7 cases of Grade 3-4 radiation necrosis. Hypo-IMRT with MET-PET data appeared to result in favorable survival outcomes for patients with GBM.

  3. Vaccination elicits correlated immune and clinical responses in glioblastoma multiforme patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Christopher J; Black, Keith L; Liu, Gentao; Mazer, Mia; Zhang, Xiao-xue; Pepkowitz, Samuel; Goldfinger, Dennis; Ng, Hiushan; Irvin, Dwain; Yu, John S

    2008-07-15

    Cancer vaccine trials have failed to yield robust immune-correlated clinical improvements as observed in animal models, fueling controversy over the utility of human cancer vaccines. Therapeutic vaccination represents an intriguing additional therapy for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM; grade 4 glioma), which has a dismal prognosis and treatment response, but only early phase I vaccine trial results have been reported. Immune and clinical responses from a phase II GBM vaccine trial are reported here. IFN-gamma responsiveness was quantified in peripheral blood of 32 GBM patients given therapeutic dendritic cell vaccines. Posttreatment times to tumor progression (TTP) and survival (TTS) were compared in vaccine responders and nonresponders and were correlated with immune response magnitudes. GBM patients (53%) exhibited >or=1.5-fold vaccine-enhanced cytokine responses. Endogenous antitumor responses of similar magnitude occurred in 22% of GBM patients before vaccination. Vaccine responders exhibited significantly longer TTS and TTP relative to nonresponders. Immune enhancement in vaccine responders correlated logarithmically with TTS and TTP spanning postvaccine chemotherapy, but not with initial TTP spanning vaccination alone. This is the first report of a progressive correlation between cancer clinical outcome and T-cell responsiveness after therapeutic vaccination in humans and the first tracing of such correlation to therapeutically exploitable tumor alteration. As such, our findings offer unique opportunities to identify cellular and molecular components of clinically meaningful antitumor immunity in humans.

  4. Interstitial photodynamic therapy and glioblastoma: light fractionation study on a preclinical model: preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Henri-Arthur; Vermandel, Maximilien; Tétard, Marie-Charlotte; Lejeune, Jean-Paul; Mordon, Serge; Reyns, Nicolas

    2015-03-01

    Background Glioblastoma is a high-grade cerebral tumor with local recurrence and poor outcome. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a local treatment based on the light activation of a photosensitizer (PS) in the presence of oxygen to form cytotoxic species. Fractionation of light delivery may enhance treatment efficiency by restoring tissue oxygenation. Objectives To evaluate the efficiency of light fractionation using MRI imaging, including diffusion and perfusion, compared to histological data. Materials and Methods Thirty-nine "Nude" rats were grafted with human U87 cells into the right putamen. After PS precursor intake (5-ALA), an optic fiber was introduced into the tumor. The rats were randomized in three groups: without illumination, with monofractionated illumination and the third one with multifractionated light. Treatment effects were assessed with early MRI including diffusion and perfusion sequences. The animals were eventually sacrificed to perform brain histology. Results On MRI, we observed elevated diffusion values in the center of the tumor among treated animals, especially in multifractionated group. Perfusion decreased around the treatment site, all the more in the multifractionated group. Histology confirmed our MRI findings, with a more extensive necrosis and associated with a rarified angiogenic network in the treatment area, after multifractionated PDT. However, we observed more surrounding edema and neovascularization in the peripheral ring after multifractionated PDT. Conclusion Fractionated interstitial PDT induced specific tumoral lesions. The multifractionated scheme was more efficient, inducing increased tumoral necrosis, but it also caused significant peripheral edema and neovascularization. Diffusion and perfusion MRI imaging were able to predict the histological lesions.

  5. Cellular heterogeneity contributes to subtype-specific expression of ZEB1 in human glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Euskirchen

    Full Text Available The transcription factor ZEB1 has gained attention in tumor biology of epithelial cancers because of its function in epithelial-mesenchymal transition, DNA repair, stem cell biology and tumor-induced immunosuppression, but its role in gliomas with respect to invasion and prognostic value is controversial. We characterized ZEB1 expression at single cell level in 266 primary brain tumors and present a comprehensive dataset of high grade gliomas with Ki67, p53, IDH1, and EGFR immunohistochemistry, as well as EGFR FISH. ZEB1 protein expression in glioma stem cell lines was compared to their parental tumors with respect to gene expression subtypes based on RNA-seq transcriptomic profiles. ZEB1 is widely expressed in glial tumors, but in a highly variable fraction of cells. In glioblastoma, ZEB1 labeling index is higher in tumors with EGFR amplification or IDH1 mutation. Co-labeling studies showed that tumor cells and reactive astroglia, but not immune cells contribute to the ZEB1 positive population. In contrast, glioma cell lines constitutively express ZEB1 irrespective of gene expression subtype. In conclusion, our data indicate that immune infiltration likely contributes to differential labelling of ZEB1 and confounds interpretation of bulk ZEB1 expression data.

  6. Glioblastoma multiforme subterfuge as acute cerebral hemorrhage: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seidu A. Richard

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Hemorrhagic related Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM are rare and characterizes with severe clinical scuffle. The etiology of this presentation although not well known is believed to be multifactorial. We present a case as well as review on the pathogenesis of evolution of the hematoma into ring enhancing features of GBM on imaging studies. We present a case of 28 years old man who suddenly went into coma for 9 hours preceded with seizures that latest for 10 minutes. He had no focal neurological signs. CT-Scans images indicated acute cerebral hemorrhage near the frontal horn of the left ventricle with brain edema about the hemorrhagic lesion and MRI done a week later revealed a cerebral ring enhancing lesion. The lesion was partially resected during surgery and immunohistochemical staining confirmed GBM (WHO, grade 4. The diagnosis of intratumoral hemorrhage in GBM was very challenging at the initial stages but with time the hematoma evolved into ring enhancing images typical of GBM. It’s not every intracranial hematoma that is of pure vascular origin.

  7. Diaquatetrabromidotin(IV trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [SnBr4(H2O2]·3H2O, forms large colourless crystals in originally sealed samples of tin tetrabromide. It constitutes the first structurally characterized hydrate of SnBr4 and is isostructural with the corresponding hydrate of SnCl4. It is composed of SnIV atoms octahedrally coordinated by four Br atoms and two cis-related water molecules. The octahedra exhibit site symmetry 2. They are arranged into columns along [001] via medium–strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds involving the two lattice water molecules (one situated on a twofold rotation axis while the chains are interconnected via longer O—H...Br hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network.

  8. Gene expression analysis of PTEN positive glioblastoma stem cells identifies DUB3 and Wee1 modulation in a cell differentiation model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Forte

    Full Text Available The term astrocytoma defines a quite heterogeneous group of neoplastic diseases that collectively represent the most frequent brain tumors in humans. Among them, glioblastoma multiforme represents the most malignant form and its associated prognosis is one of the poorest among tumors of the central nervous system. It has been demonstrated that a small population of tumor cells, isolated from the brain neoplastic tissue, can reproduce the parental tumor when transplanted in immunodeficient mouse. These tumor initiating cells are supposed to be involved in cancer development and progression and possess stem cell-like features; like their normal counterpart, these cells remain quiescent until they are committed to differentiation. Many studies have shown that the role of the tumor suppressor protein PTEN in cell cycle progression is fundamental for tumor dynamics: in low grade gliomas, PTEN contributes to maintain cells in G1 while the loss of its activity is frequently observed in high grade gliomas. The mechanisms underlying the above described PTEN activity have been studied in many tumors, but those involved in the maintenance of tumor initiating cells quiescence remain to be investigated in more detail. The aim of the present study is to shed light on the role of PTEN pathway on cell cycle regulation in Glioblastoma stem cells, through a cell differentiation model. Our results suggest the existence of a molecular mechanism, that involves DUB3 and WEE1 gene products in the regulation of Cdc25a, as functional effector of the PTEN/Akt pathway.

  9. Terahertz reflectometry imaging for low and high grade gliomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Young Bin; Oh, Seung Jae; Kang, Seok-Gu; Heo, Jung; Kim, Sang-Hoon; Choi, Yuna; Song, Seungri; Son, Hye Young; Kim, Se Hoon; Lee, Ji Hyun; Haam, Seung Joo; Huh, Yong Min; Chang, Jong Hee; Joo, Chulmin; Suh, Jin-Suck

    2016-01-01

    Gross total resection (GTR) of glioma is critical for improving the survival rate of glioma patients. One of the greatest challenges for achieving GTR is the difficulty in discriminating low grade tumor or peritumor regions that have an intact blood brain barrier (BBB) from normal brain tissues and delineating glioma margins during surgery. Here we present a highly sensitive, label-free terahertz reflectometry imaging (TRI) that overcomes current key limitations for intraoperative detection of World Health Organization (WHO) grade II (low grade), and grade III and IV (high grade) gliomas. We demonstrate that TRI provides tumor discrimination and delineation of tumor margins in brain tissues with high sensitivity on the basis of Hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained image. TRI may help neurosurgeons to remove gliomas completely by providing visualization of tumor margins in WHO grade II, III, and IV gliomas without contrast agents, and hence, improve patient outcomes. PMID:27782153

  10. miR-340 predicts glioblastoma survival and modulates key cancer hallmarks through down-regulation of NRAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiore, Danilo; Donnarumma, Elvira; Roscigno, Giuseppina; Iaboni, Margherita; Russo, Valentina; Affinito, Alessandra; Adamo, Assunta; De Martino, Fabio; Quintavalle, Cristina; Romano, Giulia; Greco, Adelaide; Soini, Ylermi; Brunetti, Arturo; Croce, Carlo M; Condorelli, Gerolama

    2016-04-12

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain tumor in adults; with a survival rate of 12 months from diagnosis. However, a small subgroup of patients, termed long-term survivors (LTS), has a survival rate longer then 12-14 months. There is thus increasing interest in the identification of molecular signatures predicting glioblastoma prognosis and in how to improve the therapeutic approach. Here, we report miR-340 as prognostic tumor-suppressor microRNA for glioblastoma. We analyzed microRNA expression in > 500 glioblastoma patients and found that although miR-340 is strongly down-regulated in glioblastoma overall, it is up-regulated in LTS patients compared to short-term survivors (STS). Indeed, miR-340 expression predicted better prognosis in glioblastoma patients. Coherently, overexpression of miR-340 in glioblastoma cells was found to produce a tumor-suppressive activity. We identified NRAS mRNA as a critical, direct target of miR-340: in fact, miR-340 negatively influenced multiple aspects of glioblastoma tumorigenesis by down-regulating NRAS and downstream AKT and ERK pathways. Thus, we demonstrate that expression of miR-340 in glioblastoma is responsible for a strong tumor-suppressive effect in LTS patients by down-regulating NRAS. miR-340 may thus represent a novel marker for glioblastoma diagnosis and prognosis, and may be developed into a tool to improve treatment of glioblastoma.

  11. Education for Self-Responsibility IV: Nutrition Education Curriculum Guide. Grade 5-Grade 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This is the second part of a three part curriculum guide dedicated to improving the nutritional status of children and adolescents as well as inspiring lifetime habits of healthy eating. It is also a total nutrition education program that encompasses nutritional aspects of the child's daily life both at school and at home. Teachers are provided…

  12. Education for Self-Responsibility IV: Nutrition Education Curriculum Guide. Grade 9-Grade 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This is the third part of a three-part curriculum guide dedicated to improving the nutritional status of children and adolescents as well as inspiring lifetime habits of healthy eating. It is also a total nutrition education program that encompasses nutritional aspects of a student's daily life both at school and at home. Teachers are provided…

  13. The combined incidence of Grade II and Grade IV astrocytoma in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    capsaicin, piperine and monosodium glutamate, have excitotoxic, apoptotic or tumourigenic potentials. The focus of this histological study however, is to determine the tumourigenic potentials of Yaji in the brain of rats. Eight weeks old white ...

  14. Improved survival for elderly married glioblastoma patients. Better treatment delivery, less toxicity, and fewer disease complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Putz, Florian; Goerig, Nicole; Knippen, Stefan; Gryc, Thomas; Semrau, Sabine; Lettmaier, Sebastian; Fietkau, Rainer [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Putz, Tobias [University of Bamberg, Professorship of Demography, Bamberg (Germany); Eyuepoglu, Ilker; Roessler, Karl [Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Neurosurgery, Erlangen (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Marital status is a well-described prognostic factor in patients with gliomas but the observed survival difference is unexplained in the available population-based studies. A series of 57 elderly glioblastoma patients (≥70 years) were analyzed retrospectively. Patients received radiotherapy or chemoradiation with temozolomide. The prognostic significance of marital status was assessed. Disease complications, toxicity, and treatment delivery were evaluated in detail. Overall survival was significantly higher in married than in unmarried patients (median, 7.9 vs. 4.0 months; p = 0.006). The prognostic significance of marital status was preserved in the multivariate analysis (HR, 0.41; p = 0.011). Married patients could receive significantly higher daily temozolomide doses (mean, 53.7 mg/m{sup 2} vs. 33.1 mg/m{sup 2}; p = 0.020), were more likely to receive maintenance temozolomide (45.7 % vs. 11.8 %; p = 0.016), and had to be hospitalized less frequently during radiotherapy (55.0 % vs. 88.2 %; p = 0.016). Of the patients receiving temozolomide, married patients showed significantly lower rates of hematologic and liver toxicity. Most complications were infectious or neurologic in nature. Complications of any grade were more frequent in unmarried patients (58.8 % vs. 30.0 %; p = 0.041) with the incidence of grade 3-5 complications being particularly elevated (47.1 % vs. 15.0 %; p = 0.004). We found poorer treatment delivery as well as an unexpected severe increase in toxicity and disease complications in elderly unmarried glioblastoma patients. Marital status may be an important predictive factor for clinical decision-making and should be addressed in further studies. (orig.) [German] Fuer verheiratete Patienten mit malignen Gliomen ist ein verbessertes Gesamtueberleben gut beschrieben. Die zugrunde liegenden Mechanismen konnten bislang jedoch in den verfuegbaren bevoelkerungsbezogenen Arbeiten nicht erklaert werden. Eine Serie von 57 aelteren Patienten mit

  15. Outcome in elderly patients undergoing definitive surgery and radiation therapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme at a tertiary care institution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohan, Dasarahally S.; Suh, John H.; Phan, Jennifer L.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Cohen, Bruce H.; Barnett, Gene H.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of definitive surgery and radiation in patients aged 70 years and older with supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: We selected elderly patients (≥ 70 years) who had primary treatment for glioblastoma multiforme at our tertiary care institution from 1977 through 1996. The study group (n = 102) included 58 patients treated with definitive radiation, 19 treated with palliative radiation, and 25 who received no radiation. To compare our results with published findings, we grouped our patients according to the applicable prognostic categories developed by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG): RTOG group IV (n = 6), V (n = 70), and VI (n = 26). Patients were retrospectively assigned to prognostic group IV, V, or VI based on age, performance status, extent of surgery, mental status, neurologic function, and radiation dose. Treatment included surgical resection and radiation (n 49), biopsy alone (n = 25), and biopsy followed by radiation (n = 28). Patients were also stratified according to whether they were optimally treated (gross total or subtotal resection with postoperative definitive radiation) or suboptimally treated (biopsy, biopsy + radiation, surgery alone, or surgery + palliative radiation). Patients were considered to have a favorable prognosis (n = 39) if they were optimally treated and had a Karnofsky Performance Status (KPS) score of at least 70. Results: The median survival for patients according to RTOG groups IV, V, and VI was 9.2, 6.6, and 3.1 months, respectively (log-rank, p < 0.0004). The median overall survival was 5.3 months. The definitive radiation group (n = 58) had a median survival of 7.3 months compared to 4.5 months in the palliative radiation group (n = 19) and 1.2 months in the biopsy-alone group (p < 0.0001). Optimally treated patients had a median survival of 7.4 months compared to 2.4 months in those suboptimally treated (p < 0.0001). The favorable prognosis group had an

  16. Glioblastoma in Children: A Single-Institution Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, Stephanie M.; Rubin, Joshua B.; Leonard, Jeffrey R.; Smyth, Matthew D.; El Naqa, Issam; Michalski, Jeff M.; Simpson, Joseph R.; Limbrick, David L.; Park, Tae S.; Mansur, David B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Current treatment recommendations for pediatric glioblastoma include surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation therapy. However, even with this multispecialty approach, overall survival remains poor. To assess outcome and evaluate treatment-related prognostic factors, we retrospectively reviewed the experience at our institution. Methods and Materials: Twenty-four glioblastoma patients under the age of 21 were treated with radiation therapy with curative intent at Washington University, St. Louis, from 1970 to 2008. Patients underwent gross total resection, subtotal resection or biopsy alone. Fourteen (58%) of the patients received chemotherapy. All patients received radiation therapy. Radiation consisted of whole-brain radiation therapy in 7 (29%) patients with a median dose of 50.4 Gy. Seventeen (71%) patients received three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with a median dose of 54 Gy. Results: Median follow-up was 12.5 months from diagnosis. One and 2-year overall survival rates were 57% and 32%, respectively. Median overall survival was 13.5 months. There were no differences in overall survival based on patients' age, race, gender, tumor location, radiation volume, radiation dose, or the use of chemotherapy. There was a significant improvement in overall survival for patients in whom gross total resection was achieved (p = 0.023). Three patients were alive 5 years after gross total resection, and 2 patients were alive at 10 and 24 years after diagnosis. Conclusions: Survival for children with glioblastoma remains poor. Data from this and other studies demonstrate the importance of achieving a gross total resection. Continued investigation into new treatment options is needed in an attempt to improve outcome for these patients.

  17. A role for the transcription factor HEY1 in glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulleman, Esther; Quarto, Micaela; Vernell, Richard

    2009-01-01

    , such as the Notch and Ras signalling pathways, seem to play an important role in the formation of GBM. In the present study, we show by in situ hybridization on primary tumour material that the transcription factor HEY1, a target of the Notch signalling pathway, is specifically upregulated in glioma......, we show that ectopic expression of HEY1 induces cell proliferation in neural stem cells, while depletion of HEY1 by RNA interference reduces proliferation of glioblastoma cells in tissue culture. Together, these data imply a role for HEY1 in the progression of GBM, and therefore we propose that HEY1...

  18. Glioblastoma, gadolinium (III) and NCT. An in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercanti, D.; Casalbore, P.; Sanita, F.; Rosi, F.; Festinesi, A.; Pallini, R.; Gilbert, B.; Stasio, G. de

    2000-01-01

    We treated cultured human glioblastoma cells with gadolinium (III) [gadopentetic acid] and we found that: a) cells do internalise this element; b) gadolinium can be localised in the cells nuclei; c) exposure of the cultures to a neutron beam produced a significant and immediate cell death. Although cell survival was also influenced in the irradiated controls it was further reduced (about 50%) in cells pre-exposed to 10 mg/ml gadopentetic acid. We also found that Gd uptake, as measured by ICP-AES, was concentration dependent. (author)

  19. Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells—Biology and Therapeutic Implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gürsel, Demirkan B.; Shin, Benjamin J.; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Schlaff, Cody D.; Boockvar, John A.

    2011-01-01

    The cancer stem-cell hypothesis proposes that malignant tumors are likely to encompass a cellular hierarchy that parallels normal tissue and may be responsible for the maintenance and recurrence of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in patients. The purpose of this manuscript is to review methods for optimizing the derivation and culturing of stem-like cells also known as tumor stem cells (TSCs) from patient-derived GBM tissue samples. The hallmarks of TSCs are that they must be able to self-renew and retain tumorigenicity. The isolation, optimization and derivation of TSCs as outlined in this review, will be important in understanding biology and therapeutic applications related to these cells

  20. Inhibitory Kinetics and Mechanism of Flavonoids Extracted from Cotinus coggygria Scop. Against Glioblastoma Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Wang, Jun-Jie; Du, Li; Fei, Li; To, Shing-Shun Tony

    2016-01-01

    This proposal seeks to study the potential therapeutic modality of chemoprevention and anticancer effects and mechanisms of the flavonoids from Cotinus coggygria Scop. on glioblastoma cancer. In the current study, the total flavonoids (TFs) isolated from Cotinus coggygria Scop. var. cinerea Engl. (Cotinus coggygria Scop.) and the major flavonoids of Cotinus coggygria Scop. (CCFs) were identified, and the inhibitory kinetics of TF and CCF on glioblastoma cell lines were calculated. We also investigated whether TF or CCF regulated the apoptotic mechanism in cellular models of glio-blastoma cells. Finally, we evaluated whether treatment with TF or CCF suppressed tumor growth and inhibited migration in orthotopic mouse models of glioblastoma in vivo. In this study, the CCFs were identified as rutin, myricetin, and fisetin. TF and CCF remarkably inhibited cell proliferation and downregulated the PI3K/Akt and ERK signaling pathway in glioblastoma cell lines. Furthermore, the mitochondrial caspase-dependent cascade was regulated by TF and myricetin. In addition, TF and myricetin exhibited significant antitumor effects on glioblastoma in vivo. Taken together, these results suggest that phytochemical and biological data provide evidence for the active components in Cotinus coggygria, and that the TFs are responsible for the anticancer effects on glioblastoma cell growth via induction of apoptosis. In addition, the representative compound myricetin could provide a clinically relevant therapeutic opportunity. Therefore, our data strongly suggest that myricetin-deprived CCF can serve as a potent chemopreventive herbal medicine.

  1. Student Attitudes Toward Grades and Grading Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, William M.; Leslie, Elwood K.

    The result of a study designed to assess student attitudes toward grading practices are discussed. Questionnaire responses of 3439 students in three institutions were tabulated. Responses were generally negative toward conventional grading systems. (MS)

  2. MSH6 mutations arise in glioblastomas during temozolomide therapy and mediate temozolomide resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Stephen; Miao, Jiangyong; Cahill, Daniel P.; Iafrate, A. John; Aldape, Ken; Nutt, Catherine L.; Louis, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Over the past few years, the alkylating agent temozolomide (TMZ) has become the standard-of-care therapy for patients with glioblastoma, the most common brain tumor. Recently, large-scale cancer genome sequencing efforts have identified a hypermutation phenotype and inactivating MSH6 mismatch repair gene mutations in recurrent, post-TMZ glioblastomas, particularly those growing more rapidly during TMZ treatment. This study aimed to clarify the timing and role of MSH6 mutations in mediating glioblastoma TMZ resistance. Experimental Design MSH6 sequence and microsatellite instability (MSI) status were determined in matched pre- and post-chemotherapy glioblastomas identified by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) as having post-treatment MSH6 mutations. TMZ-resistant lines were derived in vitro via selective growth under TMZ and the MSH6 gene was sequenced in resistant clones. The role of MSH6 inactivation in mediating resistance was explored using lentiviral shRNA knockdown and MSH6 reconstitution. Results MSH6 mutations were confirmed in post-treatment TCGA glioblastomas but absent in matched pre-treatment tumors. The post-treatment hypermutation phenotype displayed a signature bias toward CpC transitions and was not associated with MSI. In vitro modeling via exposure of an MSH6-wildtype glioblastoma line to TMZ resulted in resistant clones; one clone showed an MSH6 mutation, Thr1219Ile, that had been independently noted in two treated TCGA glioblastomas. Knockdown of MSH6 in the glioblastoma line U251 increased resistance to TMZ cytotoxicity and reconstitution restored cytotoxicity in MSH6-null glioma cells. Conclusions MSH6 mutations are selected for in glioblastomas during TMZ therapy both in vitro and in vivo, and are causally associated with TMZ resistance. PMID:19584161

  3. Enhancement of insulin-like growth factor 2 receptors in glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sara, V.; Prisell, Per; Sjoegren, Barbro; Enberg, Goesta

    1986-01-01

    The somatomedins (IGF-1/IGF-2) are a family of growth-promoting hormones which have been identified in the human central nervous system where their specific receptors are distributed. The present study identified somatomedin receptors in glioblastoma and compared them with those found in normal brain. A significant enhancement in the binding of 125 1-IGF-2 but not 125 1-IGF-1 to glioblastoma membranes was found. A fourfold increase in IGF-2 receptor concentration was observed. These findings indicate enhanced expression of the IGF-2 receptor in glioblastoma. (author)

  4. A Phase 1 trial of intravenous boronophenylalanine-fructose complex in patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergland, R.; Elowitz, E.; Chadha, M. [Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, NY (United States); Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of glioblastoma multiforme was initially performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory in the early 1950`s While this treatment for malignant brain tumors has continued in Japan, new worldwide interest has been stimulated by the development of new and more selective boron compounds. Boronophenylalanine (BPA) is a blood-brain barrier penetrating compound that has been used in BNCT of malignant melanomas. SPA has been employed experimentally in BNCT of rat gliosarcoma and has potential use in the treatment of human glioblastoma. As a preface to clinical BNCT trials, we studied the biodistribution of SPA in patients with glioblastoma.

  5. Preferential Iron Trafficking Characterizes Glioblastoma Stem-like Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schonberg, David L; Miller, Tyler E; Wu, Qiulian

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastomas display hierarchies with self-renewing cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). RNA sequencing and enhancer mapping revealed regulatory programs unique to CSCs causing upregulation of the iron transporter transferrin, the top differentially expressed gene compared with tissue-specific progeni......Glioblastomas display hierarchies with self-renewing cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). RNA sequencing and enhancer mapping revealed regulatory programs unique to CSCs causing upregulation of the iron transporter transferrin, the top differentially expressed gene compared with tissue......-specific progenitors. Direct interrogation of iron uptake demonstrated that CSCs potently extract iron from the microenvironment more effectively than other tumor cells. Systematic interrogation of iron flux determined that CSCs preferentially require transferrin receptor and ferritin, two core iron regulators......, to propagate and form tumors in vivo. Depleting ferritin disrupted CSC mitotic progression, through the STAT3-FoxM1 regulatory axis, revealing an iron-regulated CSC pathway. Iron is a unique, primordial metal fundamental for earliest life forms, on which CSCs have an epigenetically programmed, targetable...

  6. Modeling microenvironmental regulation of glioblastoma stem cells: a biomaterials perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffernan, John M.; Sirianni, Rachael W.

    2018-02-01

    Following diagnosis of a glioblastoma (GBM) brain tumor, surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiation together yield a median patient survival of only 15 months. Importantly, standard treatments fail to address the dynamic regulation of the brain tumor microenvironment that actively supports tumor progression and treatment resistance. It is becoming increasingly recognized that specialized niches within the tumor microenvironment maintain a population of highly malignant glioblastoma stem-like cells (GSCs). GSCs are resistant to traditional chemotherapy and radiation therapy, suggesting that they may be responsible for the near universal rates of tumor recurrence and associated morbidity in GBM. Thus, disrupting microenvironmental support for GSCs could be critical to developing more effective GBM therapies. Three-dimensional (3D) culture models of the tumor microenvironment are powerful tools for identifying key biochemical and biophysical inputs that impact malignant behaviors. Such systems have been used effectively to identify conditions that regulate GSC proliferation, invasion, stem-specific phenotypes, and treatment resistance. Considering the significant role that GSC microenvironments play in regulating this tumorigenic sub-population, these models may be essential for uncovering mechanisms that limit GSCs malignancy.

  7. A prospective PET study of patients with glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Preben B.; Blinkenberg, M; Lassen, U

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the post-surgical metabolic and structural cerebral changes in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined ten patients prospectively with newly diagnosed GBM. All patients were primarily treated with surgery, followed by chemotherapy (carmu...... compared with structural imaging in the prospective evaluation of GBM. We found a difference in metabolic increase and tumor growth between the two treatment regimens, although this finding has limited relevance due to the design of the study.......OBJECTIVE: To study the post-surgical metabolic and structural cerebral changes in patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined ten patients prospectively with newly diagnosed GBM. All patients were primarily treated with surgery, followed by chemotherapy...... (carmustine, cisplatine and etoposide) and radiotherapy. Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to measure tumor- and cerebral metabolism. CT or MRI was used to estimate tumor volume by measurements of tumor area. RESULTS: Tumor metabolism was not increased during chemotherapy (P = 0.71), but increased...

  8. Visualizing molecular profiles of glioblastoma with GBM-BioDP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orieta Celiku

    Full Text Available Validation of clinical biomarkers and response to therapy is a challenging topic in cancer research. An important source of information for virtual validation is the datasets generated from multi-center cancer research projects such as The Cancer Genome Atlas project (TCGA. These data enable investigation of genetic and epigenetic changes responsible for cancer onset and progression, response to cancer therapies, and discovery of the molecular profiles of various cancers. However, these analyses often require bulk download of data and substantial bioinformatics expertise, which can be intimidating for investigators. Here, we report on the development of a new resource available to scientists: a data base called Glioblastoma Bio Discovery Portal (GBM-BioDP. GBM-BioDP is a free web-accessible resource that hosts a subset of the glioblastoma TCGA data and enables an intuitive query and interactive display of the resultant data. This resource provides visualization tools for the exploration of gene, miRNA, and protein expression, differential expression within the subtypes of GBM, and potential associations with clinical outcome, which are useful for virtual biological validation. The tool may also enable generation of hypotheses on how therapies impact GBM molecular profiles, which can help in personalization of treatment for optimal outcome. The resource can be accessed freely at http://gbm-biodp.nci.nih.gov (a tutorial is included.

  9. Gaussian graphical modeling reveals specific lipid correlations in glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Nikola S.; Krumsiek, Jan; Theis, Fabian J.; Böhm, Christian; Meyer-Bäse, Anke

    2011-06-01

    Advances in high-throughput measurements of biological specimens necessitate the development of biologically driven computational techniques. To understand the molecular level of many human diseases, such as cancer, lipid quantifications have been shown to offer an excellent opportunity to reveal disease-specific regulations. The data analysis of the cell lipidome, however, remains a challenging task and cannot be accomplished solely based on intuitive reasoning. We have developed a method to identify a lipid correlation network which is entirely disease-specific. A powerful method to correlate experimentally measured lipid levels across the various samples is a Gaussian Graphical Model (GGM), which is based on partial correlation coefficients. In contrast to regular Pearson correlations, partial correlations aim to identify only direct correlations while eliminating indirect associations. Conventional GGM calculations on the entire dataset can, however, not provide information on whether a correlation is truly disease-specific with respect to the disease samples and not a correlation of control samples. Thus, we implemented a novel differential GGM approach unraveling only the disease-specific correlations, and applied it to the lipidome of immortal Glioblastoma tumor cells. A large set of lipid species were measured by mass spectrometry in order to evaluate lipid remodeling as a result to a combination of perturbation of cells inducing programmed cell death, while the other perturbations served solely as biological controls. With the differential GGM, we were able to reveal Glioblastoma-specific lipid correlations to advance biomedical research on novel gene therapies.

  10. Stem Cell Niches in Glioblastoma: A Neuropathological View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Schiffer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM stem cells (GSCs, responsible for tumor growth, recurrence, and resistance to therapies, are considered the real therapeutic target, if they had no molecular mechanisms of resistance, in comparison with the mass of more differentiated cells which are insensitive to therapies just because of being differentiated and nonproliferating. GSCs occur in tumor niches where both stemness status and angiogenesis are conditioned by the microenvironment. In both perivascular and perinecrotic niches, hypoxia plays a fundamental role. Fifteen glioblastomas have been studied by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence for stemness and differentiation antigens. It has been found that circumscribed necroses develop inside hyperproliferating areas that are characterized by high expression of stemness antigens. Necrosis developed inside them because of the imbalance between the proliferation of tumor cells and endothelial cells; it reduces the number of GSCs to a thin ring around the former hyperproliferating area. The perinecrotic GSCs are nothing else that the survivors remnants of those populating hyperproliferating areas. In the tumor, GSCs coincide with malignant areas so that the need to detect where they are located is not so urgent.

  11. Blastomycosis and Histoplasmosis in a Patient with Glioblastoma Receiving Temozolomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jbeli, Aiham H; Yu, John

    2016-10-01

    Malignant glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common primary malignancy of the brain in the U.S. Temozolomide (TMZ) is the cornerstone of management along with surgical resection and radiotherapy. Because of the reduction in the CD4+ lymphocyte count as a side effect of TMZ use, this patient population is under risk for opportunistic infections like Pneumocystis jiroveci. A male patient with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiform presented with non-productive cough and chest pain. Before presentation, the patient received the standard therapy including surgical resection, radiation and TMZ. Computerized tomography of the chest showed a very large cavitary lesion in the upper segment of the right lower lobe and multiple nodular lesions with some starting to cavitate. Cytology of the bronchioalveolar lavage with special stain showed large, broad based budding yeast-like cells, morphologically consistent with blastomyces and macrophages filled with yeast-like forms, morphologically consistent with histoplasma. The patient was treated with intraconazole intended for 12 months. To the best of our knowledge, our case represents the first documented case of lung infection with both blastomyces and histoplasma in a patient after receiving TMZ for newly diagnosed GBM. Copyright© South Dakota State Medical Association.

  12. Should elderly patients with glioblastoma be proposed to radiotherapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, S.; Taillibert, S.; Idbaih, A.; Simon, J.M.; Mazeron, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    In glioblastoma multiform-patients, advanced age has been associated with poor prognosis and decreased tolerance to treatments. The optimal management, especially with irradiation, was not definitively determined in the eighth and ninth decades. The Association of French-speaking neuro-oncologists (Anocef) has recently conducted a randomized clinical trial comparing radiotherapy plus supportive care versus supportive care alone in such patients. Patients aged 70-years and older with newly diagnosed glioblastoma and a Karnofsky performance score of 70 or above were randomly assigned to receive focal irradiation in daily fraction of 1.8 Gy given five days per week for a total dose of 50 Gy plus supportive care or supportive care only. Radiotherapy resulted in a modest but significant improvement in overall survival without reducing quality of life or cognition. However, the optimal regimen of radiotherapy in this fragile population remains uncertain. Abbreviated course of radiotherapy (40 Gy in 15 fractions over 19 days) has been proposed. Analysis of preliminary results showed that efficacy and safety of this hypo-fractionated accelerated regimen compared favourably with those of classically fractionated treatments. Finally, the potential contribution of surgery and chemotherapy should be evaluated in prospective clinical trials. (authors)

  13. Clinical results of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageji, T.; Mizobuchi, Y.; Nagahiro, S.; Nakagawa, Y.; Kumada, H.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of BSH-based intra-operative BNCT (IO-BNCT) and BSH and BPA-based non-operative BNCT (NO-BNCT). We have treated 23 glioblastoma patients with BNCT without any additional chemotherapy since 1998. The median survival time (MST) of BNCT was 19.5 months, and 2-year, 3-year and 5-year survival rates were 26.1%, 17.4% and 5.8%, respectively. This clinical result of BNCT in patients with GBM is superior to that of single treatment of conventional radiotherapy compared with historical data of conventional treatment. - Highlights: ► In this study, we evaluate the clinical outcome of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant brain tumors. ► We have treated 23 glioblastoma (GBM) patients with BNCT without any additional chemotherapy. ► Clinical results of BNCT in patients with GBM are superior to that of single treatment of conventional radiotherapy compared with historical data of conventional treatment.

  14. Revisit the Candidacy of Brain Cell Types as the Cell(s) of Origin for Human High-Grade Glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Fangjie; Liu, Chong

    2018-01-01

    High-grade glioma, particularly, glioblastoma, is the most aggressive cancer of the central nervous system (CNS) in adults. Due to its heterogeneous nature, glioblastoma almost inevitably relapses after surgical resection and radio-/chemotherapy, and is thus highly lethal and associated with a dismal prognosis. Identifying the cell of origin has been considered an important aspect in understanding tumor heterogeneity, thereby holding great promise in designing novel therapeutic strategies for glioblastoma. Taking advantage of genetic lineage-tracing techniques, performed mainly on genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), multiple cell types in the CNS have been suggested as potential cells of origin for glioblastoma, among which adult neural stem cells (NSCs) and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs) are the major candidates. However, it remains highly debated whether these cell types are equally capable of transforming in patients, given that in the human brain, some cell types divide so slowly, therefore may never have a chance to transform. With the recent advances in studying adult NSCs and OPCs, particularly from the perspective of comparative biology, we now realize that notable differences exist among mammalian species. These differences have critical impacts on shaping our understanding of the cell of origin of glioma in humans. In this perspective, we update the current progress in this field and clarify some misconceptions with inputs from important findings about the biology of adult NSCs and OPCs. We propose to re-evaluate the cellular origin candidacy of these cells, with an emphasis on comparative studies between animal models and humans.

  15. Analysis of diffusion tensor imaging metrics for gliomas grading at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Server, Andrés; Graff, Bjørn A; Josefsen, Roger; Orheim, Tone E D; Schellhorn, Till; Nordhøy, Wibeke; Nakstad, Per H

    2014-03-01

    To assess the diagnostic accuracy of axial diffusivity (AD), radial diffusivity (RD), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values derived from DTI for grading of glial tumors, and to estimate the correlation between DTI parameters and tumor grades. Seventy-eight patients with glial tumors underwent DTI. AD, RD, ADC and FA values of tumor, peritumoral edema and contralateral normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and AD, RD, ADC and FA ratios: lowest average AD, RD, ADC and FA values in tumor or peritumoral edema to AD, RD, ADC and FA of NAWM were calculated. DTI parameters and tumor grades were analyzed statistically and with Pearson correlation. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was also performed. The differences in ADC, AD and RD tumor values, and ADC and RD tumor ratios were statistically significant between grades II and III, grades II and IV, and between grades II and III-IV. The AD tumor ratio differed significantly among all tumor grades. Tumor ADC, AD, RD and glial tumor grades were strongly correlated. In the ROC curve analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) of the parameter tumor ADC was the largest for distinguishing grade II from grades III to IV (98.5%), grade II from grade IV (98.9%) and grade II from grade III (97.0%). ADC, RD and AD are useful DTI parameters for differentiation between low- and high-grade gliomas with a diagnostic accuracy of more than 90%. Our study revealed a good inverse correlation between ADC, RD, AD and WHO grades II-IV astrocytic tumors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. PARPi-FL - a Fluorescent PARP1 Inhibitor for Glioblastoma Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Irwin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available New intravital optical imaging technologies have revolutionized our understanding of mammalian biology and continue to evolve rapidly. However, there are only a limited number of imaging probes available to date. In this study, we investigated in mouse models of glioblastoma whether a fluorescent small molecule inhibitor of the DNA repair enzyme PARP1, PARPi-FL, can be used as an imaging agent to detect glioblastomas in vivo. We demonstrated that PARPi-FL has appropriate biophysical properties, low toxicity at concentrations used for imaging, high stability in vivo, and accumulates selectively in glioblastomas due to high PARP1 expression. Importantly, subcutaneous and orthotopic glioblastoma xenografts were imaged with high contrast clearly defining tumor tissue from normal surrounding tissue. This research represents a step toward exploring and developing PARPi-FL as an optical intraoperative imaging agent for PARP1 in the clinic.

  17. Autopsy findings in a long-term survivor with glioblastoma multiforme. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shozo; Endo, Yuzo; Takada, Koji; Usui, Masaaki; Hara, Mitsuru; Hirose, Takanori.

    1998-01-01

    Autopsy detected no tumor tissues in a patient who died 6.5 years after the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiforme. A 54-year-old male developed left hemiparesis one month prior to admission. Computed tomography demonstrated a cystic lesion in the right frontal region with irregular ring-like enhancement. The tumor was extensively removed together with the surrounding tissues followed by irradiation (whole brain 32.4 Gy, local 28.8 Gy), and intravenous administration of interferon-β. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of glioblastoma multiform. He died of accidental head trauma 6.5 years after surgery. Autopsy of the brain detected no evidence of glioblastoma multiform. The only findings were cerebral edema and hematoma caused by head trauma, as well as histological changes due to radiation damage. This case apparently confirms the histological disappearance of tumor tissue in a long-term survivor with glioblastoma multiform. (author)

  18. Postoperative extracranial metastasis from glioblastoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenjiao; Zhong, Dequan; Zhao, Zhan; Wang, Wentao; Li, Jun; Zhang, Wei

    2017-12-29

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor. Extraneural metastases are rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of a 38-year-old patient who was diagnosed with glioblastoma in 2015. Four months after surgery, local relapse was found and the patient received a second surgery. After another 4 months, we found a hard mass in the right posterior neck when she admitted to our department for fourth cycle of adjuvant chemotherapy. Immunohistochemical investigation supported the diagnosis of glioblastoma metastases to the neck after resection of the right neck mass. A few days later, spinal vertebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed multiple metastases in the thoracic, lumbar, sacral, and bilateral iliac bones. Glioblastoma is the most common primary malignant brain tumor. Whole tumor resection and early radiotherapy and chemotherapy can delay recurrence and prolong survival. Extracranial metastases are extremely rare. We report this case with the aim of bringing attention to extracranial metastasis of brain glioma.

  19. A 4-miRNA signature to predict survival in glioblastomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Simon K; Sørensen, Mia D; Hansen, Anker

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastomas are among the most lethal cancers; however, recent advances in survival have increased the need for better prognostic markers. microRNAs (miRNAs) hold great prognostic potential being deregulated in glioblastomas and highly stable in stored tissue specimens. Moreover, miRNAs control...... multiple genes representing an additional level of gene regulation possibly more prognostically powerful than a single gene. The aim of the study was to identify a novel miRNA signature with the ability to separate patients into prognostic subgroups. Samples from 40 glioblastoma patients were included...... that expression patterns of miRNAs; particularly the four miRNAs: hsa-miR-107_st, hsa-miR-548x_st, hsa-miR-3125_st and hsa-miR-331-3p_st could determine short- and long-term survival with a predicted accuracy of 78%. Heatmap dendrograms dichotomized glioblastomas into prognostic subgroups with a significant...

  20. The impact of bevacizumab treatment on survival and quality of life in newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Hans Skovgaard; Urup, Thomas; Michaelsen, Signe Regner

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains one of the most devastating tumors, and patients have a median survival of 15 months despite aggressive local and systemic therapy, including maximal surgical resection, radiation therapy, and concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide. The purpose of antineoplastic...

  1. Effect of a computer-aided diagnosis system on radiologists' performance in grading gliomas with MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Li-Chun Hsieh

    Full Text Available The effects of a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD system based on quantitative intensity features with magnetic resonance (MR imaging (MRI were evaluated by examining radiologists' performance in grading gliomas. The acquired MRI database included 71 lower-grade gliomas and 34 glioblastomas. Quantitative image features were extracted from the tumor area and combined in a CAD system to generate a prediction model. The effect of the CAD system was evaluated in a two-stage procedure. First, a radiologist performed a conventional reading. A sequential second reading was determined with a malignancy estimation by the CAD system. Each MR image was regularly read by one radiologist out of a group of three radiologists. The CAD system achieved an accuracy of 87% (91/105, a sensitivity of 79% (27/34, a specificity of 90% (64/71, and an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (Az of 0.89. In the evaluation, the radiologists' Az values significantly improved from 0.81, 0.87, and 0.84 to 0.90, 0.90, and 0.88 with p = 0.0011, 0.0076, and 0.0167, respectively. Based on the MR image features, the proposed CAD system not only performed well in distinguishing glioblastomas from lower-grade gliomas but also provided suggestions about glioma grading to reinforce radiologists' confidence rating.

  2. Total System Performance Assessment: Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P.D. Mattie

    1999-06-23

    The purpose of this calculation is to document total system performance assessment modeling of Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) Feature IV. Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) calculations for EDA IV are based on the TSPA-VA Base Case which has been modified with a quartz sand invert, quartz sand backfill, line loading and 21 PWR waste packages that have 2-cm thick titanium grade 7 corrosion resistant material (CRM) drip shields that are placed over a 30 cm thick carbon steel (A5 16) waste package with an integral filler material (CRWMS M&O 1999a & 1999b). This document details the changes and assumptions made to the VA reference Performance Assessment Model (CRWMS M&O 1998a) to incorporate the design changes detailed for EDA IV. The performance measure for this evaluation is the expected value dose-rate history at 20 km from the repository boundary.

  3. The Modern RPG IV Language

    CERN Document Server

    Cozzi, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This updated, classic work on the RPG language covers all the new functions and features that have been added since 2003, including new op codes and built-in functions, new chapters on free-format RPG IV and Web programming interfaces, information on implementing XML within RPG IV, and expanded information on procedures. This reference guide takes both novice and experienced RPG IV programmers through the language, from its foundation to its most advanced techniques. More than 100 charts and tables, as well as 350 real-life code samples of functions and operations are included, showing readers

  4. Phase I/II trial of vorinostat combined with temozolomide and radiation therapy for newly diagnosed glioblastoma: results of Alliance N0874/ABTC 02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanis, Evanthia; Anderson, S Keith; Miller, C Ryan; Sarkaria, Jann N; Jaeckle, Kurt; Buckner, Jan C; Ligon, Keith L; Ballman, Karla V; Moore, Dennis F; Nebozhyn, Michael; Loboda, Andrey; Schiff, David; Ahluwalia, Manmeet Singh; Lee, Eudocia Q; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Lesser, Glenn J; Prados, Michael; Grossman, Stuart A; Cerhan, Jane; Giannini, Caterina; Wen, Patrick Y

    2018-03-27

    Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, has shown radiosensitizing properties in preclinical studies. This open-label, single-arm trial evaluated the maximum tolerated dose (MTD; phase I) and efficacy (phase II) of vorinostat combined with standard chemoradiation in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Patients received oral vorinostat (300 or 400 mg/day) on days 1-5 weekly during temozolomide chemoradiation. Following a 4- to 6-week rest, patients received up to 12 cycles of standard adjuvant temozolomide and vorinostat (400 mg/day) on days 1-7 and 15-21 of each 28-day cycle. Association between vorinostat response signatures and progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was assessed based on RNA sequencing of baseline tumor tissue. Phase I and phase II enrolled 15 and 107 patients, respectively. The combination therapy MTD was vorinostat 300 mg/day and temozolomide 75 mg/m2/day. Dose-limiting toxicities were grade 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia and grade 3 aspartate aminotransferase elevation, hyperglycemia, fatigue, and wound dehiscence. The primary efficacy endpoint in the phase II cohort, OS rate at 15 months, was 55.1% (median OS 16.1 mo), and consequently, the study did not meet its efficacy objective. Most common treatment-related grade 3/4 toxicities in the phase II component were lymphopenia (32.7%), thrombocytopenia (28.0%), and neutropenia (21.5%). RNA expression profiling of baseline tumors (N = 76) demonstrated that vorinostat resistance (sig-79) and sensitivity (sig-139) signatures had a reverse and positive association with OS/PFS, respectively. Vorinostat combined with standard chemoradiation had acceptable tolerability in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Although the primary efficacy endpoint was not met, vorinostat sensitivity and resistance signatures could facilitate patient selection in future trials.

  5. Asterisk Grade Study Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokorsky, Eileen A.

    A study was conducted at Passaic County Community College (PCCC) to investigate the operation of a grading system which utilized an asterisk (*) grade to indicate progress in a course until a letter grade was assigned. The study sought to determine the persistence of students receiving the "*" grade, the incidence of cases of students receiving…

  6. Limited role for extended maintenance temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatzki, Dorothee; Kickingereder, Philipp; Hentschel, Bettina; Felsberg, Jörg; Herrlinger, Ulrich; Schackert, Gabriele; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Westphal, Manfred; Sabel, Michael; Schlegel, Uwe; Wick, Wolfgang; Pietsch, Torsten; Reifenberger, Guido; Loeffler, Markus; Bendszus, Martin; Weller, Michael

    2017-04-11

    To explore an association with survival of modifying the current standard of care for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma of surgery followed by radiotherapy plus concurrent and 6 cycles of maintenance temozolomide chemotherapy (TMZ/RT → TMZ) by extending TMZ beyond 6 cycles. The German Glioma Network cohort was screened for patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma who received TMZ/RT → TMZ and completed ≥6 cycles of maintenance chemotherapy without progression. Associations of clinical patient characteristics, molecular markers, and residual tumor determined by magnetic resonance imaging after 6 cycles of TMZ with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were analyzed with the log-rank test. Multivariate analyses using the Cox proportional hazards model were performed to assess associations of prolonged TMZ use with outcome. Sixty-one of 142 identified patients received at least 7 maintenance TMZ cycles (median 11, range 7-20). Patients with extended maintenance TMZ treatment had better PFS (20.5 months, 95% confidence interval [CI] 17.7-23.3, vs 17.2 months, 95% CI 10.2-24.2, p = 0.035) but not OS (32.6 months, 95% CI 28.9-36.4, vs 33.2 months, 95% CI 25.3-41.0, p = 0.126). However, there was no significant association of prolonged TMZ chemotherapy with PFS (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.8, 95% CI 0.4-1.6, p = 0.559) or OS (HR = 1.6, 95% CI 0.8-3.3, p = 0.218) adjusted for age, extent of resection, Karnofsky performance score, presence of residual tumor, O 6 -methylguanine DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter methylation status, or isocitrate dehydrogenase ( IDH ) mutation status. These data may not support the practice of prolonging maintenance TMZ chemotherapy beyond 6 cycles. This study provides Class III evidence that in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma, prolonged TMZ chemotherapy does not significantly increase PFS or OS. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  7. Hypoxic glucose metabolism in glioblastoma as a potential prognostic factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyonaga, Takuya; Hirata, Kenji; Kobayashi, Kentaro; Manabe, Osamu; Watanabe, Shiro; Hattori, Naoya; Shiga, Tohru; Tamaki, Nagara [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Yamaguchi, Shigeru [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido (Japan); Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Sapporo (Japan); Terasaka, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Neurosurgery, Sapporo (Japan); Kuge, Yuji [Hokkaido University, Central Institute of Isotope Science, Sapporo (Japan); Tanaka, Shinya [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Cancer Pathology, Sapporo (Japan); Ito, Yoichi M. [Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Department of Biostatistics, Sapporo (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Metabolic activity and hypoxia are both important factors characterizing tumor aggressiveness. Here, we used F-18 fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to define metabolically active hypoxic volume, and investigate its clinical significance in relation to progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in glioblastoma patients. Glioblastoma patients (n = 32) underwent FMISO PET, FDG PET, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) before surgical intervention. FDG and FMISO PET images were coregistered with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MR images. Volume of interest (VOI) of gross tumor volume (GTV) was manually created to enclose the entire gadolinium-positive areas. The FMISO tumor-to-normal region ratio (TNR) and FDG TNR were calculated in a voxel-by-voxel manner. For calculating TNR, standardized uptake value (SUV) was divided by averaged SUV of normal references. Contralateral frontal and parietal cortices were used as the reference region for FDG, whereas the cerebellar cortex was used as the reference region for FMISO. FDG-positive was defined as the FDG TNR ≥1.0, and FMISO-positive was defined as FMISO TNR ≥1.3. Hypoxia volume (HV) was defined as the volume of FMISO-positive and metabolic tumor volume in hypoxia (hMTV) was the volume of FMISO/FDG double-positive. The total lesion glycolysis in hypoxia (hTLG) was hMTV x FDG SUVmean. The extent of resection (EOR) involving cytoreduction surgery was volumetric change based on planimetry methods using MRI. These factors were tested for correlation with patient prognosis. All tumor lesions were FMISO-positive and FDG-positive. Univariate analysis indicated that hMTV, hTLG, and EOR were significantly correlated with PFS (p = 0.007, p = 0.04, and p = 0.01, respectively) and that hMTV, hTLG, and EOR were also significantly correlated with OS (p = 0.0028, p = 0.037, and p = 0.014, respectively). In contrast, none of FDG TNR, FMISO TNR, GTV, HV

  8. PENGARUH PEMBELAJARAN STUDENT TEAM ACHIEVEMENT DIVISION DAN DISKUSI TERHADAP HASIL BELAJAR IPA KELAS IV SD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalu Warige Hadinata

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The research aims to determine the effect of STAD and discussion on learning outcomes of classroom learning for science at 4th grade. The design of this research used a quasi-experimental design with nonequivalent control group design. Research was conducted in the 4th grade students of SDN 2 Kekeri West Lombok It’s consist of 19 students in 4th grade/a as an STAD and 19 students at 4th grade/b as the discussion. Analysis of learning outcomes data using the Independent Sample T Test with IBM SPSS 24. The analysis showed: (1 there were no significant differences in learning outcomes among students that learned STAD and students that learned discussion. (2 STAD and discussion has an effect on student learning outcomes of 4th grade. Penelitian bertujuan untuk mengetahui perbedaan hasil belajar STAD dan diskusi pelajaran IPA kelas IV. Rancangan penelitian ini menggunakan eksperimen semu dengan bentuk nonequivalent control group design. Penelitian dilaksanakan pada siswa kelas IV SDN 2 Kekeri Lombok Barat terdiri dari 19 siswa kelas IV/a dengan STAD dan 19 siswa kelas IV/b dengan diskusi. Analisis data hasil belajar menggunakan Independent Sample T Test dengan IBM SPSS 24. Hasil analisis menunjukkan (1 tidak ada perbedaan hasil belajar yang signifikan antara siswa yang dibelajarkan STAD dan siswa yang dibelajarkan diskusi. (2 STAD dan diskusi mampu meningkatkan hasil belajar siswa pada kelas IV.

  9. Immunotherapeutic Potential of Oncolytic H-1 Parvovirus: Hints of Glioblastoma Microenvironment Conversion towards Immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Assia L; Barf, Milena; Geletneky, Karsten; Unterberg, Andreas; Rommelaere, Jean

    2017-12-15

    Glioblastoma, one of the most aggressive primary brain tumors, is characterized by highly immunosuppressive microenvironment. This contributes to glioblastoma resistance to standard treatment modalities and allows tumor growth and recurrence. Several immune-targeted approaches have been recently developed and are currently under preclinical and clinical investigation. Oncolytic viruses, including the autonomous protoparvovirus H-1 (H-1PV), show great promise as novel immunotherapeutic tools. In a first phase I/IIa clinical trial (ParvOryx01), H-1PV was safe and well tolerated when locally or systemically administered to recurrent glioblastoma patients. The virus was able to cross the blood-brain (tumor) barrier after intravenous infusion. Importantly, H-1PV treatment of glioblastoma patients was associated with immunogenic changes in the tumor microenvironment. Tumor infiltration with activated cytotoxic T cells, induction of cathepsin B and inducible nitric oxide (NO) synthase (iNOS) expression in tumor-associated microglia/macrophages (TAM), and accumulation of activated TAM in cluster of differentiation (CD) 40 ligand (CD40L)-positive glioblastoma regions was detected. These are the first-in-human observations of H-1PV capacity to switch the immunosuppressed tumor microenvironment towards immunogenicity. Based on this pilot study, we present a tentative model of H-1PV-mediated modulation of glioblastoma microenvironment and propose a combinatorial therapeutic approach taking advantage of H-1PV-induced microglia/macrophage activation for further (pre)clinical testing.

  10. Epilepsy in Adults with Supratentorial Glioblastoma: Incidence and Influence Factors and Prophylaxis in 184 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Shuli; Zhang, Junchen; Zhang, Shaohui; Fu, Xiangping

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the incidence of epilepsy in adult patients with supratentorial glioblastoma, assess the factors influencing the development of epilepsy in these cases, and evaluate patients' response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) in a series of 184 patients. We retrospectively analyzed the 184 adult patients diagnosed with supratentorial glioblastoma. All subjects were treated within our hospital and subsequently died between 2003 and 2013. The incidence of epilepsy was assessed before and after initial resection and reexamined every 2 months thereafter. We evaluated the efficacy of prophylactic AEDs in this patient population based on the gathered incidence data. Of 184 patients, 43 (23.37%) were diagnosed with epilepsy before their initial resection. The total incidence of epilepsy (both pre- and postoperative) was 68.48%. The prevalence of active epilepsy reached over 80% in patients with epilepsy and survival of greater than 13 months postoperatively. Patients with glioblastoma in the frontal and/or temporal lobes had a higher prevalence of epilepsy. In the 43 patients with preoperative epilepsy, total resection of glioblastoma resulted in significantly lower seizure frequency. Patients who received epilepsy prophylaxis with AEDs for at least 6 months had significantly fewer seizures and higher Karnofsky scores than those receiving AEDs for less than one month or not at all. The incidence of epilepsy in adult patients with glioblastoma was high and responded poorly to AEDs in the short term. However, when taken for longer periods, AEDs can reduce the frequency of seizures in patients with glioblastoma.

  11. Autophagy suppression potentiates the anti-glioblastoma effect of asparaginase in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qicheng; Ye, Li; Fan, Jiajun; Zhang, Xuyao; Wang, Huan; Liao, Siyang; Song, Ping; Wang, Ziyu; Wang, Shaofei; Li, Yubin; Luan, Jingyun; Wang, Yichen; Chen, Wei; Zai, Wenjing; Yang, Ping; Cao, Zhonglian; Ju, Dianwen

    2017-01-01

    Asparaginase has been reported to be effective in the treatment of various leukemia and several malignant solid cancers. However, the anti-tumor effect of asparaginase is always restricted due to complicated mechanisms. Herein, we investigated the mechanisms of how glioblastoma resisted asparaginase treatment and reported a novel approach to enhance the anti-glioblastoma effect of asparaginase. We found that asparaginase could induce growth inhibition and caspase-dependent apoptosis in U87MG/U251MG glioblastoma cells. Meanwhile, autophagy was activated as indicated by autophagosomes formation and upregulated expression of LC3-II. Importantly, abolishing autophagy using chloroquine (CQ) and LY294002 enhanced the cytotoxicity and apoptosis induced by asparaginase in U87MG/U251MG cells. Further study proved that Akt/mTOR and Erk signaling pathways participated in autophagy induction, while reactive oxygen species (ROS) served as an intracellular regulator for both cytotoxicity and autophagy in asparaginase-treated U87MG/U251MG cells. Moreover, combination treatment with autophagy inhibitor CQ significantly enhanced anti-glioblastoma efficacy of asparaginase in U87MG cell xenograft model. Taken together, our results demonstrated that inhibition of autophagy potentiated the anti-tumor effect of asparagine depletion on glioblastoma, indicating that targeting autophagy and asparagine could be a potential approach for glioblastoma treatment. PMID:29207624

  12. Bee venom induces apoptosis and suppresses matrix metaloprotease-2 expression in human glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Sisakht

    Full Text Available Abstract Glioblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor representing with poor prognosis, therapy resistance and high metastasis rate. Increased expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2, a member of matrix metalloproteinase family proteins, has been reported in many cancers including glioblastoma. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression has resulted in reduced aggression of glioblastoma tumors in several reports. In the present study, we evaluated effect of bee venom on expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 as well as potential toxicity and apoptogenic properties of bee venom on glioblastoma cells. Human A172 glioblastoma cells were treated with increasing concentrations of bee venom. Then, cell viability, apoptosis, matrix metalloproteinase-2 expression, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity were measured using MMT assay, propidium iodide staining, real time-PCR, and zymography, respectively. The IC50 value of bee venom was 28.5 µg/ml in which it leads to decrease of cell viability and induction of apoptosis. Incubation with bee venom also decreased the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 in this cell line (p < 0.05. In zymography, there was a reverse correlation between bee venom concentration and total matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity. Induction of apoptosis as well as inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-2 activity and expression can be suggested as molecular mechanisms involved in cytotoxic and antimetastatic effects of bee venom against glioblastoma cells.

  13. Overexpression of endothelin B receptor in glioblastoma: a prognostic marker and therapeutic target?

    KAUST Repository

    Vasaikar, Suhas

    2018-02-06

    BackgroundGlioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant brain tumor with median survival of 12-15 months. Owing to uncertainty in clinical outcome, additional prognostic marker(s) apart from existing markers are needed. Since overexpression of endothelin B receptor (ETBR) has been demonstrated in gliomas, we aimed to test whether ETBR is a useful prognostic marker in GBM and examine if the clinically available endothelin receptor antagonists (ERA) could be useful in the disease treatment.MethodsData from The Cancer Genome Atlas and the Gene Expression Omnibus database were analyzed to assess ETBR expression. For survival analysis, glioblastoma samples from 25 Swedish patients were immunostained for ETBR, and the findings were correlated with clinical history. The druggability of ETBR was assessed by protein-protein interaction network analysis. ERAs were analyzed for toxicity in in vitro assays with GBM and breast cancer cells.ResultsBy bioinformatics analysis, ETBR was found to be upregulated in glioblastoma patients, and its expression levels were correlated with reduced survival. ETBR interacts with key proteins involved in cancer pathogenesis, suggesting it as a druggable target. In vitro viability assays showed that ERAs may hold promise to treat glioblastoma and breast cancer.ConclusionsETBR is overexpressed in glioblastoma and other cancers and may be a prognostic marker in glioblastoma. ERAs may be useful for treating cancer patients.

  14. IDH1-associated primary glioblastoma in young adults displays differential patterns of tumour and vascular morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Popov

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma is a highly aggressive tumour with marked heterogeneity at the morphological level in both the tumour cells and the associated highly prominent vasculature. As we begin to develop an increased biological insight into the underlying processes driving the disease, fewer attempts have thus far been made to understand these phenotypic differences. We sought to address this by carefully assessing the morphological characteristics of both the tumour cells and the associated vasculature, relating these observations to the IDH1/MGMT status, with a particular focus on the early onset population of young adults who develop primary glioblastoma. 276 primary glioblastoma specimens were classified into their predominant cell morphological type (fibrillary, gemistocytic, giant cell, small cell, oligodendroglial, sarcomatous, and assessed for specific tumour (cellularity, necrosis, palisades and vascular features (glomeruloid structures, arcades, pericyte proliferation. IDH1 positive glioblastomas were associated with a younger age at diagnosis, better clinical outcome, prominent oligodendroglial and small cell tumour cell morphology, pallisading necrosis and glomeruloid vascular proliferation in the absence of arcade-like structures. These features widen the phenotype of IDH1 mutation-positive primary glioblastoma in young adults and provide correlative evidence for a functional role of mutant IDH1 in the differential nature of neo-angiogenesis in different subtypes of glioblastoma.

  15. Global survival in patients with glioblastoma treated with hypofractionated radiation therapy at Hospital Mexico of Costa Rica during the period from January 2010 to February 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramirez Zamora, Juliana

    2014-01-01

    Survival is analyzed in patients with glioblastoma treated with hypofractionated radiation therapy at Hospital Mexico. The characteristics of the patients are determined within the study. Survival is stableshed in patients who have received hypofractionated regimen. Functional status according to ECOG scale and Karnofsky index is known prior to radiotherapy. The degree of resection to which these patients were submitted is diagnosed before being referred to radiotherapy. The RPA scale adapted from the EORTC of patients is related to overall survival. The mean survival time of the patients have been 5,8 months, and a greater overall survival in the first 6 months. Survival has been more favorable for patients with predicted RPA IV, those older than 60 years and with a degree of complete resection [es

  16. Temozolomide 3 weeks on and 1 week off as first-line therapy for recurrent glioblastoma: phase II study from gruppo italiano cooperativo di neuro-oncologia (GICNO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandes, A A; Tosoni, A; Cavallo, G; Bertorelle, R; Gioia, V; Franceschi, E; Biscuola, M; Blatt, V; Crinò, L; Ermani, M

    2006-11-06

    The efficacy of temozolomide strongly depends on O(6)-alkylguanine DNA-alkyl transferase (AGAT), which repairs DNA damage caused by the drug itself. Low-dose protracted temozolomide administration can decrease AGAT activity. The main end point of the present study was therefore to test progression-free survival at 6 months (PFS-6) in glioblastoma patients following a prolonged temozolomide schedule. Chemonaïve glioblastoma patients with disease recurrence or progression after surgery and standard radiotherapy were considered eligible. Chemotherapy cycles consisted of temozolomide 75 mg/m(2)/daily for 21 days every 28 days until disease progression. O(6)-methyl-guanine-DNA-methyl-tranferase (MGMT) was determined in 22 patients (66.7%). A total of 33 patients (median age 57 years, range 31-71) with a median KPS of 90 (range 60-100) were accrued. The overall response rate was 9%, and PFS-6 30.3% (95% CI:18-51%). No correlation was found between the MGMT promoter methylation status of the tumours and the overall response rate, time to progression and survival. In 153 treatment cycles delivered, the most common grade 3/4 event was lymphopoenia. The prolonged temozolomide schedule considered in the present study is followed by a high PFS-6 rate; toxicity is acceptable. Further randomised trials should therefore be conducted to confirm the efficacy of this regimen.

  17. Phase I trial of verubulin (MPC-6827) plus carboplatin in patients with relapsed glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossmann, Kenneth F; Colman, Howard; Akerley, Wallace A; Glantz, Michael; Matsuoko, Yuko; Beelen, Andrew P; Yu, Margaret; De Groot, John F; Aiken, Robert D; Olson, Jeffrey J; Olsen, Jeffery J; Evans, Brent A; Jensen, Randy L

    2012-11-01

    Verubulin (MPC-6827) is a microtubule-destabilizing agent that achieves high concentrations in the brain. Verubulin disrupts newly formed blood vessels in xenografts. We determined the safety and tolerability of verubulin administered in combination with carboplatin in patients with relapsed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Three pre-selected doses of verubulin were tested: 2.1, 2.7, and 3.3 mg/m(2) in a standard "3+3" design. Verubulin was given every second week of a 6-week cycle in the 2.1 mg/m(2) cohort or weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle in subsequent cohorts. Carboplatin was administered intravenously at an area under the curve (AUC) dosage 4 every 2 weeks for the 2.1 mg/m(2) cohort or on day 1 of each 4-week cycle in subsequent cohorts. Nineteen patients with GBM in first or second relapse were enrolled. Four patients (21 %) experienced a grade 3 or greater verubulin- or carboplatin-related adverse event, including hypesthesia, cerebral ischemia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia. The mean plasma half life of verubulin was 3.2 h (SD = 0.82). Two patients achieved at least a partial response by Macdonald criteria. One of these patients remains progression free and off treatment more than 24 months beyond his initiation of verubulin. Five patients had stable disease. Median progression-free survival (PFS) across all patients was 8 weeks, and the 6-month PFS rate was 21 %. The combination of verubulin at the previously determined single-agent maximum tolerated dose of 3.3 mg/m(2) with carboplatin in patients with recurrent/refractory GBM is safe and well tolerated. In this patient population with a highly vascularized tumor, no cerebral hemorrhage was observed.

  18. Repeatability of Cerebral Perfusion Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI in Glioblastoma Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Emblem, Kyrre E; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Bjørnerud, Atle; Vangel, Mark G; Gerstner, Elizabeth R; Schmainda, Kathleen M; Paynabar, Kamran; Wu, Ona; Wen, Patrick Y; Batchelor, Tracy; Rosen, Bruce; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2015-06-01

    This study evaluates the repeatability of brain perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a variety of post-processing methods. Thirty-two patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were recruited. On a 3-T MRI using a dual-echo, gradient-echo spin-echo DSC-MRI protocol, the patients were scanned twice 1 to 5 days apart. Perfusion maps including cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were generated using two contrast agent leakage correction methods, along with testing normalization to reference tissue, and application of arterial input function (AIF). Repeatability of CBV and CBF within tumor regions and healthy tissues, identified by structural images, was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and repeatability coefficients (RCs). Coefficients of variation (CVs) were reported for selected methods. CBV and CBF were highly repeatable within tumor with ICC values up to 0.97. However, both CBV and CBF showed lower ICCs for healthy cortical tissues (up to 0.83), healthy gray matter (up to 0.95), and healthy white matter (WM; up to 0.93). The values of CV ranged from 6% to 10% in tumor and 3% to 11% in healthy tissues. The values of RC relative to the mean value of measurement within healthy WM ranged from 22% to 42% in tumor and 7% to 43% in healthy tissues. These percentages show how much variation in perfusion parameter, relative to that in healthy WM, we expect to observe to consider it statistically significant. We also found that normalization improved repeatability, but AIF deconvolution did not. DSC-MRI is highly repeatable in high-grade glioma patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Repeatability of Cerebral Perfusion Using Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI in Glioblastoma Patients12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari-Khouzani, Kourosh; Emblem, Kyrre E.; Kalpathy-Cramer, Jayashree; Bjørnerud, Atle; Vangel, Mark G.; Gerstner, Elizabeth R.; Schmainda, Kathleen M.; Paynabar, Kamran; Wu, Ona; Wen, Patrick Y.; Batchelor, Tracy; Rosen, Bruce; Stufflebeam, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES This study evaluates the repeatability of brain perfusion using dynamic susceptibility contrast magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) with a variety of post-processing methods. METHODS Thirty-two patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma were recruited. On a 3-T MRI using a dual-echo, gradient-echo spin-echo DSC-MRI protocol, the patients were scanned twice 1 to 5 days apart. Perfusion maps including cerebral blood volume (CBV) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) were generated using two contrast agent leakage correction methods, along with testing normalization to reference tissue, and application of arterial input function (AIF). Repeatability of CBV and CBF within tumor regions and healthy tissues, identified by structural images, was assessed with intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and repeatability coefficients (RCs). Coefficients of variation (CVs) were reported for selected methods. RESULTS CBV and CBF were highly repeatable within tumor with ICC values up to 0.97. However, both CBV and CBF showed lower ICCs for healthy cortical tissues (up to 0.83), healthy gray matter (up to 0.95), and healthy white matter (WM; up to 0.93). The values of CV ranged from 6% to 10% in tumor and 3% to 11% in healthy tissues. The values of RC relative to the mean value of measurement within healthy WM ranged from 22% to 42% in tumor and 7% to 43% in healthy tissues. These percentages show how much variation in perfusion parameter, relative to that in healthy WM, we expect to observe to consider it statistically significant. We also found that normalization improved repeatability, but AIF deconvolution did not. CONCLUSIONS DSC-MRI is highly repeatable in high-grade glioma patients. PMID:26055170

  20. The radiosensitivity of glioblastoma cell lines after hypoxia-induced Bax expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.K.; Hu, L.J.; Kong, E.L.; Lamborn, K.R.; Deen, D.F.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Radiation therapy is the most effective treatment after surgery for patients with malignant gliomas. However, the hypoxic cells exclusive to tumor tissue have proven resistant to both radiotherapy and many forms of chemotherapy. In order to specifically target these hypoxic cells, U-251 MG and U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells were stably transfected with constructs containing the suicide gene Bax under the regulation of nine copies of hypoxia-responsive elements (HREs). During hypoxia, the transcriptional complex hypoxia-inducible-factor 1 (HIF-1) binds to HRE and facilitates the transcription of downstream genes. Previously, hypoxia-induced Bax expression in transfected U-251 and U-87 clone cells has been shown to increase cell killing. The benefits of the gene therapy could be further expanded if Bax also acted to increase the sensitivity of these clone cells to radiation. To determine whether this was the case, parent and clone cells were irradiated with graded doses of X-rays under hypoxic conditions. These cells were then left hypoxic for varying durations of time, after which they were incubated for two weeks under aerated conditions to assay for clonogenic cell survival. After less than an hour under hypoxia, both U-251 and U-87 clone cells appeared significantly more sensitive to radiation than their respective parent cells. However, after longer amounts of time under anoxia, higher surviving fractions were found in each clone that were consistent with those of their respective parent cell line, showing that potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) had occurred in the clone cells. Parent cells did not exhibit PLDR. Results are inconclusive at this point in time. Western blot analyses detailing the amount of Bax expression at each time point as well as further research exploring different durations of hypoxia will be necessary to reveal the nature of the correlation between Bax expression and radiosensitivity. Supported by NS-42927 and CA-85356

  1. Interstitial photodynamic therapy and glioblastoma: Light fractionation in a preclinical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Henri-Arthur; Vermandel, Maximilien; Vignion-Dewalle, Anne-Sophie; Leroux, Bertrand; Maurage, Claude-Alain; Duhamel, Alain; Mordon, Serge; Reyns, Nicolas

    2017-07-01

    Glioblastoma is a high-grade cerebral tumor with local recurrence and poor outcome. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a localized treatment based on the light activation of a photosensitizer (PS) in the presence of oxygen, which results in the formation of cytotoxic species. The delivery of fractionated light may enhance treatment efficacy by reoxygenating tissues. To evaluate the efficiency of two light-fractionation schemes using immunohistological data. Human U87 cells were grafted into the right putamen of 39 nude rats. After PS precursor intake (5-ALA), an optic fiber was introduced into the tumor. The rats were randomly divided into three groups: without light, with light split into 2 fractions and with light split into 5 fractions. Treatment effects were assessed using brain immunohistology. Fractionated treatments induced intratumoral necrosis (P < 0.001) and peritumoral edema (P = 0.009) associated with a macrophagic infiltration (P = 0.006). The ratio of apoptotic cells was higher in the 5-fraction group than in either the sham (P = 0.024) or 2-fraction group (P = 0.01). Peripheral vascularization increased after treatment (P = 0.017), and these likely new vessels were more frequently observed in the 5-fraction group (P = 0.028). Interstitial PDT with fractionated light resulted in specific tumoral lesions. The 5-fraction scheme induced more apoptosis but led to greater peripheral neovascularization. Lasers Surg. Med. 49:506-515, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The critical role of ERK in death resistance and invasiveness of hypoxia-selected glioblastoma cells

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    Kim, Jee-Youn; Kim, Yong-Jun; Lee, Sun; Park, Jae-Hoon

    2009-01-01

    The rapid growth of tumor parenchyma leads to chronic hypoxia that can result in the selection of cancer cells with a more aggressive behavior and death-resistant potential to survive and proliferate. Thus, identifying the key molecules and molecular mechanisms responsible for the phenotypic changes associated with chronic hypoxia has valuable implications for the development of a therapeutic modality. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular basis of the phenotypic changes triggered by chronic repeated hypoxia. Hypoxia-resistant T98G (HRT98G) cells were selected by repeated exposure to hypoxia and reoxygenation. Cell death rate was determined by the trypan blue exclusion method and protein expression levels were examined by western blot analysis. The invasive phenotype of the tumor cells was determined by the Matrigel invasion assay. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze the expression of proteins in the brain tumor samples. The Student T-test and Pearson Chi-Square test was used for statistical analyses. We demonstrate that chronic repeated hypoxic exposures cause T98G cells to survive low oxygen tension. As compared with parent cells, hypoxia-selected T98G cells not only express higher levels of anti-apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, Bcl-X L , and phosphorylated ERK, but they also have a more invasive potential in Matrigel invasion chambers. Activation or suppression of ERK pathways with a specific activator or inhibitor, respectively, indicates that ERK is a key molecule responsible for death resistance under hypoxic conditions and a more invasive phenotype. Finally, we show that the activation of ERK is more prominent in malignant glioblastomas exposed to hypoxia than in low grade astrocytic glial tumors. Our study suggests that activation of ERK plays a pivotal role in death resistance under chronic hypoxia and phenotypic changes related to the invasive phenotype of HRT98G cells compared to parent cells

  3. Invariant delineation of nuclear architecture in glioblastoma multiforme for clinical and molecular association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hang; Han, Ju; Borowsky, Alexander; Loss, Leandro; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T; Parvin, Bahram

    2013-04-01

    Automated analysis of whole mount tissue sections can provide insights into tumor subtypes and the underlying molecular basis of neoplasm. However, since tumor sections are collected from different laboratories, inherent technical and biological variations impede analysis for very large datasets such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Our objective is to characterize tumor histopathology, through the delineation of the nuclear regions, from hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue sections. Such a representation can then be mined for intrinsic subtypes across a large dataset for prediction and molecular association. Furthermore, nuclear segmentation is formulated within a multi-reference graph framework with geodesic constraints, which enables computation of multidimensional representations, on a cell-by-cell basis, for functional enrichment and bioinformatics analysis. Here, we present a novel method, multi-reference graph cut (MRGC), for nuclear segmentation that overcomes technical variations associated with sample preparation by incorporating prior knowledge from manually annotated reference images and local image features. The proposed approach has been validated on manually annotated samples and then applied to a dataset of 377 Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) whole slide images from 146 patients. For the GBM cohort, multidimensional representation of the nuclear features and their organization have identified 1) statistically significant subtypes based on several morphometric indexes, 2) whether each subtype can be predictive or not, and 3) that the molecular correlates of predictive subtypes are consistent with the literature. Data and intermediaries for a number of tumor types (GBM, low grade glial, and kidney renal clear carcinoma) are available at: http://tcga.lbl.gov for correlation with TCGA molecular data. The website also provides an interface for panning and zooming of whole mount tissue sections with/without overlaid segmentation results for quality

  4. Impact of antiepileptic drugs on thrombocytopenia in glioblastoma patients treated with standard chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simó, Marta; Velasco, Roser; Graus, Francesc; Verger, Eugenia; Gil, Miguel; Pineda, Estela; Blasco, Jaume; Bruna, Jordi

    2012-07-01

    Epilepsy in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients is common. Hematological toxicity is a potential side effect of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and a frequent limiting-dose effect of temozolomide (TMZ). The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of AEDs on thrombocytopenia in GBM patients treated with radiotherapy and TMZ. A cohort of 101 newly diagnosed GBM patients treated with radiotherapy and TMZ was reviewed. Clinical data, presence of seizures, AEDs use, platelet count, and accumulated TMZ dose were analyzed at each cycle. Thrombocytopenia was operationalized as a continuous platelet count and a dichotomic variable (cut-off <100.000/mm(3)). This cut-off represents the threshold beyond which TMZ treatment is modified. A linear and a probit pooled cross-sectional regression analysis were used to study the impact of age, gender, AEDs, and accumulated TMZ on thrombocytopenia. Impact of AEDs on survival was also analyzed. Thirty-five patients (35%) presented seizures at onset and 18 (27%) during follow-up. Seven (13%) needed two or more AEDs for seizure control. Grade 3-4 thrombocytopenia was found in 8%. Decrease in platelet count was related to accumulated TMZ (p < 0.001), age (p < 0.001), and valproate (p = 0.004). Platelet count <100.000/mm(3) was only associated with accumulated TMZ (p = 0.001). Recursive Partitioning Analysis prognostic class was the only variable with significant impact on survival. Valproate and age had an independent negative effect on total platelet count, although neither had an effect on critical thrombocytopenia (<100.000/mm(3)). Therefore, the systematic withhold of valproate in GBM patients might not be justified. Nevertheless, this negative effect may be taken into account especially in elderly patients.

  5. VEGF promotes tumorigenesis and angiogenesis of human glioblastoma stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Naoki; Soeda, Akio; Inagaki, Akihito; Onodera, Masafumi; Maruyama, Hidekazu; Hara, Akira; Kunisada, Takahiro; Mori, Hideki; Iwama, Toru

    2007-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) in malignant brain tumors, and these CSCs may play a pivotal role in tumor initiation, growth, and recurrence. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) promotes the proliferation of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and the neurogenesis of neural stem cells. Using CSCs derived from human glioblastomas and a retrovirus expressing VEGF, we examined the effects of VEGF on the properties of CSCs in vitro and in vivo. Although VEGF did not affect the property of CSCs in vitro, the injection of mouse brains with VEGF-expressing CSCs led to the massive expansion of vascular-rich GBM, tumor-associated hemorrhage, and high morbidity, suggesting that VEGF promoted tumorigenesis via angiogenesis. These results revealed that VEGF induced the proliferation of VEC in the vascular-rich tumor environment, the so-called stem cell niche

  6. Reciprocal Supportive Interplay between Glioblastoma and Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Wenchao; Bao, Shideng, E-mail: baos@ccf.org [Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2014-03-26

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most lethal and aggressive type of primary brain malignancy. Failures of the traditional therapies in treating GBMs raise the urgent requirement to develop new approaches with more responsive targets. The phenomenon of the high infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) into GBMs has been observed for a long time. Regardless of the limited knowledge about TAMs, the high percentage of supportive TAM in GBM tumor mass makes it possible to be a good target for GBM treatment. In this review, we discussed the unique features of TAMs in GBMs, including their origin, the tumor-supportive properties, the secreted cytokines, and the relevant mechanisms. In addition, we tried to interpret the current understandings about the interplay between GBM cancer cells and TAMs. Finally, the translational studies of targeting TAMs were also described.

  7. Brain Cancer Stem Cells: Current Status on Glioblastoma Multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Facchino, Sabrina; Abdouh, Mohamed; Bernier, Gilbert

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), an aggressive brain tumor of astrocytic/neural stem cell origin, represents one of the most incurable cancers. GBM tumors are highly heterogeneous. However, most tumors contain a subpopulation of cells that display neural stem cell characteristics in vitro and that can generate a new brain tumor upon transplantation in mice. Hence, previously identified molecular pathways regulating neural stem cell biology were found to represent the cornerstone of GBM stem cell self-renewal mechanism. GBM tumors are also notorious for their resistance to radiation therapy. Notably, GBM “cancer stem cells” were also found to be responsible for this radioresistance. Herein, we will analyze the data supporting or not the cancer stem cell model in GBM, overview the current knowledge regarding GBM stem cell self-renewal and radioresistance molecular mechanisms, and discuss the potential therapeutic application of these findings

  8. Dapsone induced methemoglobinemia in a patient with glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Julie G.; Kadia, Tapan; Brown, Latrondria; Juneja, Harinder S.; de Groot, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Primary brain tumor patients have multiple risk factors for Pneumocystis jiroveci and may require prophylaxis with TMP-SMZ or dapsone. Although dapsone is generally safe and efficacious, we present a case of a patient diagnosed with a brain stem glioblastoma who developed methemoglobinemia and haemolytic anemia after presenting with worsening confusion and cardiopulmonary system dysfunction. This case highlights one of the potentially severe complications associated with dapsone therapy. Although this illustrates an unusual toxicity of dapsone, a high index of suspicion should be given to high-risk patients due to ethnic heritage, anemia, or advanced age. Furthermore, given the toxicities of TMP-SMZ and dapsone, further work is needed to determine the threshold CD4+ count at which empiric prophylaxis should be initiated. PMID:19219404

  9. Cerebellar giant cell glioblastoma multiforme in an adult

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhansu Sekhar Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is a rare tumor that accounts for only 1% of all cases of GBM and its giant cell variant is even much rarely encountered in adults. A case of cerebellar giant cell GBM managed at our institution reporting its clinical presentation, radiological and histological findings, and treatment instituted is described. In conjunction, a literature review, including particular issues, clinical data, advances in imaging studies, pathological characteristics, treatment options, and the behavior of such malignant tumor is presented. It is very important for the neurosurgeon to make the differential diagnosis between the cerebellar GBM, and other diseases such as metastasis, anaplastic astrocytomas, and cerebellar infarct because their treatment modalities, prognosis, and outcome are different.

  10. Protocols for BNCT of glioblastoma multiforme at Brookhaven: Practical considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chanana, A.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Joel, D.D.; Slatkin, D.N.

    1996-12-31

    In this report we discuss some issues considered in selecting initial protocols for boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) of human glioblastoma multiforme. First the tolerance of normal tissues, especially the brain, to the radiation field. Radiation doses limits were based on results with human and animal exposures. Estimates of tumor control doses were based on the results of single-fraction photon therapy and single fraction BNCT both in humans and experimental animals. Of the two boron compounds (BSH and BPA), BPA was chosen since a FDA-sanctioned protocol for distribution in humans was in effect at the time the first BNCT protocols were written and therapy studies in experimental animals had shown it to be more effective than BSH.

  11. AKT2-knockdown suppressed viability with enhanced apoptosis, and attenuated chemoresistance to temozolomide of human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Y

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Yong Cui,1,* Jing Lin,1,* Jianling Zuo,2 Lei Zhang,1 Yan Dong,1 Guohan Hu,1 Chun Luo,1 Juxiang Chen,1 Yicheng Lu1 1Department of Neurosurgery, Changzheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Neurosurgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The AKT2 kinase (protein kinase Bβ is overexpressed in high-grade gliomas. Upregulation of the AKT2 gene has been previously observed in glioblastoma patients suffering from chemotherapy failure and tumor progress. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the effect of AKT2 on viability and chemoresistance in the human glioblastoma cell line U251. The U251 cell line was stably transfected with short hairpin RNA (shRNA targeting AKT2. U251 cells underexpressing AKT2 were then examined for viability with temozolomide (TMZ treatment, and tested for cell apoptosis both in vitro and in tumor-implanted mice. Next, expressions of several chemoresistance-related molecules were measured by quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR and western blot analysis. The results showed that the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 of AKT2 shRNA-transfected cells was significantly lower compared with Lenti-GFP-transfected and nontransfected controls and that the tumor growth of the AKT2-shRNA and TMZ combined-treated mice was obviously suppressed in either mass or volume. Concomitantly, the apoptosis of TMZ-treated tumor cells was significantly enhanced after knockdown of AKT2, as measured by flow cytometry and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL analysis. Furthermore, AKT2-inhibition in TMZ-treated glioblastoma U251 cells upregulated apoptotic effector caspase-3, whereas it downregulated antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, DNA repairing protein MGMT, and drug efflux pump protein MRP1. Our study

  12. ERGO: a pilot study of ketogenic diet in recurrent glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, Johannes; Bähr, Oliver; Maurer, Gabriele D; Hattingen, Elke; Franz, Kea; Brucker, Daniel; Walenta, Stefan; Kämmerer, Ulrike; Coy, Johannes F; Weller, Michael; Steinbach, Joachim P

    2014-06-01

    Limiting dietary carbohydrates inhibits glioma growth in preclinical models. Therefore, the ERGO trial (NCT00575146) examined feasibility of a ketogenic diet in 20 patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Patients were put on a low-carbohydrate, ketogenic diet containing plant oils. Feasibility was the primary endpoint, secondary endpoints included the percentage of patients reaching urinary ketosis, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival. The effects of a ketogenic diet alone or in combination with bevacizumab was also explored in an orthotopic U87MG glioblastoma model in nude mice. Three patients (15%) discontinued the diet for poor tolerability. No serious adverse events attributed to the diet were observed. Urine ketosis was achieved at least once in 12 of 13 (92%) evaluable patients. One patient achieved a minor response and two patients had stable disease after 6 weeks. Median PFS of all patients was 5 (range, 3-13) weeks, median survival from enrollment was 32 weeks. The trial allowed to continue the diet beyond progression. Six of 7 (86%) patients treated with bevacizumab and diet experienced an objective response, and median PFS on bevacizumab was 20.1 (range, 12-124) weeks, for a PFS at 6 months of 43%. In the mouse glioma model, ketogenic diet alone had no effect on median survival, but increased that of bevacizumab-treated mice from 52 to 58 days (pketogenic diet is feasible and safe but probably has no significant clinical activity when used as single agent in recurrent glioma. Further clinical trials are necessary to clarify whether calorie restriction or the combination with other therapeutic modalities, such as radiotherapy or anti-angiogenic treatments, could enhance the efficacy of the ketogenic diet.

  13. Different angiogenic phenotypes in primary and secondary glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Sibylle; Steiner, Hans-Herbert; Ahmadi, Rezvan; Zoubaa, Saida; Vasvari, Gergely; Bauer, Harry; Unterberg, Andreas; Herold-Mende, Christel

    2006-05-01

    Primary and secondary glioblastomas (pGBM, sGBM) are supposed to evolve through different genetic pathways, including EGF receptor and PDGF and its receptor and thus genes that are involved in tumor-induced angiogenesis. However, whether other angiogenic cytokines are also differentially expressed in these glioblastoma subtypes is not known so far, but this knowledge might be important to optimize an antiangiogenic therapy. Therefore, we studied the expression of several angiogenic cytokines, including VEGF-A, HGF, bFGF, PDGF-AB, PDGF-BB, G-CSF and GM-CSF in pGBMs and sGBMs as well as in gliomas WHO III, the precursor lesions of sGBMs. In tumor tissues, expression of all cytokines was observed albeit with marked differences concerning intensity and distribution pattern. Quantification of the cytokines in the supernatant of 30 tissue-corresponding glioma cultures revealed a predominant expression of VEGF-A in pGBMs and significantly higher expression levels of PDGF-AB in sGBMs. HGF and bFGF were determined in nearly all tumor cultures but with no GBM subtype or malignancy-related differences. Interestingly, GM-CSF and especially G-CSF were produced less frequently by tumor cells. However, GM-CSF secretion occurred together with an increased number of simultaneously secreted cytokines and correlated with a worse patient prognosis and may thus represent a more aggressive angiogenic phenotype. Finally, we confirmed an independent contribution of each tumor-derived cytokine analyzed to tumor-induced vascularization. Our data indicate that an optimal antiangiogenic therapy may require targeting of multiple angiogenic pathways that seem to differ markedly in pGBMs and sGBMs. 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Clinical Implications of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor overexpression in the High-grade Astrocytomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Seong Eon; Kang, Jin Oh; Lee, Hye Kyoung; Yang, Moon Ho; Leem, Won; Cho, Kyung Sam

    1996-01-01

    To determine the incidence and prognostic effects of EGFR overexpression in the high-grade astrocytomas. With 23 paraffin blocks of the high-garde astrocytomas, expression of EGFR were evaluated by immunohistochemical staining employing polyclonal antibody raised to short cytoplasmic domain of the molecule. Two out of 7 anaplastic astrocytomas and 9 out of 16 glioblastoma multiform patients showed overexpression of EGFR(p=0.44). Three out of 11 patients of age below 55 and 8 out of 12 patients of age over 54 showed EGFR overexpression(p=0.141). Median survival of the EGFR negative anaplastic astrocytoma patient was 37 months. Median survival of the glioblastoma multiform patients were 11 months in EGFR negative group and 7 months in EGFR positive group. But survival difference was not significant(p=0.17). There was a marked trend of increasing overexpression of EGFR in older patients. But survival of the glioblastoma multiform decreased by the overexpression of the EGFR without significant

  15. Plutonium(IV) and thorium(IV) hydrous polymer chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.L.; Toth, L.M.

    1978-05-01

    The recent attention given to Pu(IV) polymers has warranted a review of plutonium and thorium hydrolysis chemistry with respect to the various experimental approaches and insights gained therein. Differing terminologies used in the experimental procedures have often confused the understanding of the chemical processes which occur between the first hydrolysis reaction of the tetravalent actinide and its final dehydration to form the crystalline oxide. This report focuses on the polymer aging reaction which is defined here in terms of A. W. Thomas' ol to oxo conversion reaction and involves simply the conversion of hydroxyl-bridged polymer links to oxygen-bridged linkages. Thorium(IV) hydrolytic reactions are included because they are analogous in many respects to those of Pu(IV) and offer a simpler chemical system for experimental study. Future work using spectroscopic techniques should significantly improve the description of this aging phenomenon

  16. 5-Iodo-2-Pyrimidinone-2'-Deoxyribose-Mediated Cytotoxicity and Radiosensitization in U87 Human Glioblastoma Xenografts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinsella, Timothy J.; Kinsella, Michael T.; Seo, Yuji; Berk, Gregory

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: 5-Iodo-2-pyrimidinone-2'-deoxyribose (IPdR) is a novel orally administered (p.o.) prodrug of 5-iododeoxyuridine. Because p.o. IPdR is being considered for clinical testing as a radiosensitizer in patients with high-grade gliomas, we performed this in vivo study of IPdR-mediated cytotoxicity and radiosensitization in a human glioblastoma xenograft model, U87. Methods and Materials: Groups of 8 or 9 athymic male nude mice (6-8 weeks old) were implanted with s.c. U87 xenograft tumors (4 x 10 6 cells) and then randomized to 10 treatment groups receiving increasing doses of p.o. IPdR (0, 100, 250, 500, and 1000 mg/kg/d) administered once daily (q.d.) x 14 days with or without radiotherapy (RT) (0 or 2 Gy/d x 4 days) on days 11-14 of IPdR treatment. Systemic toxicity was determined by body weight measurements during and after IPdR treatment. Tumor response was assessed by changes in tumor volumes. Results: IPdR alone at doses of ≥500 mg/kg/d resulted in moderate inhibition of tumor growth. The combination of IPdR plus RT resulted in a significant IPdR dose-dependent tumor growth delay, with the maximum radiosensitization using ≥500 mg/kg/d. IPdR doses of 500 and 1000 mg/kg/d resulted in transient 5-15% body weight loss during treatment. Conclusions: In U87 human glioblastoma s.c. xenografts, p.o. IPdR given q.d. x 14 days and RT given 2 Gy/d x 4 days (days 11-14 of IPdR treatment) results in a significant tumor growth delay in an IPdR dose-dependent pattern. The use of p.o. IPdR plus RT holds promise for Phase I/II testing in patients with high-grade gliomas

  17. Inhibitors of GLUT/SLC2A Enhance the Action of BCNU and Temozolomide against High-Grade Gliomas

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    Alberto Azzalin

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Glucose transport across glioblastoma membranes plays a crucial role in maintaining the enhanced glycolysis typical of high-grade gliomas and glioblastoma. We tested the ability of two inhibitors of the glucose transporters GLUT/SLC2A superfamily, indinavir (IDV and ritonavir (RTV, and of one inhibitor of the Na/glucose antiporter type 2 (SGLT2/SLC5A2 superfamily, phlorizin (PHZ, in decreasing glucose consumption and cell proliferation of human and murine glioblastoma cells. We found in vitro that RTV, active on at least three different GLUT/SLC2A transporters, was more effective than IDV, a specific inhibitor of GLUT4/SLC2A4, both in decreasing glucose consumption and lactate production and in inhibiting growth of U87MG and Hu197 human glioblastoma cell lines and primary cultures of human glioblastoma. PHZ was inactive on the same cells. Similar results were obtained when cells were grown in adherence or as 3D multicellular tumor spheroids. RTV treatment but not IDV treatment induced AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPKα phosphorylation that paralleled the decrease in glycolytic activity and cell growth. IDV, but not RTV, induced an increase in GLUT1/SLC2A1 whose activity could compensate for the inhibition of GLUT4/SLC2A4 by IDV. RTV and IDV pass poorly the blood brain barrier and are unlikely to reach sufficient liquoral concentrations in vivo to inhibit glioblastoma growth as single agents. Isobologram analysis of the association of RTV or IDV and 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU or 4-methyl-5-oxo-2,3,4,6,8-pentazabicyclo[4.3.0]nona-2,7,9-triene-9-carboxamide (TMZ indicated synergy only with RTV on inhibition of glioblastoma cells. Finally, we tested in vivo the combination of RTV and BCNU on established GL261 tumors. This drug combination increased the overall survival and allowed a five-fold reduction in the dose of BCNU.

  18. MGMT, GATA6, CD81, DR4, and CASP8 gene promoter methylation in glioblastoma

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    Skiriute Daina

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methylation of promoter region is the major mechanism affecting gene expression in tumors. Recent methylome studies of brain tumors revealed a list of new epigenetically modified genes. Our aim was to study promoter methylation of newly identified epigenetically silenced genes together with already known epigenetic markers and evaluate its separate and concomitant role in glioblastoma genesis and patient outcome. Methods The methylation status of MGMT, CD81, GATA6, DR4, and CASP8 in 76 patients with primary glioblastomas was investigated. Methylation-specific PCR reaction was performed using bisulfite treated DNA. Evaluating glioblastoma patient survival time after operation, patient data and gene methylation effect on survival was estimated using survival analysis. Results The overwhelming majority (97.3% of tumors were methylated in at least one of five genes tested. In glioblastoma specimens gene methylation was observed as follows: MGMT in 51.3%, GATA6 in 68.4%, CD81 in 46.1%, DR4 in 41.3% and CASP8 in 56.8% of tumors. Methylation of MGMT was associated with younger patient age (p CASP8 with older (p MGMT methylation was significantly more frequent event in patient group who survived longer than 36 months after operation (p CASP8 was more frequent in patients who survived shorter than 36 months (p MGMT, GATA6 and CASP8 as independent predictors for glioblastoma patient outcome (p MGMT and GATA6 were independent predictors for patient survival in younger patients’ group, while there were no significant associations observed in older patients’ group when adjusted for therapy. Conclusions High methylation frequency of tested genes shows heterogeneity of glioblastoma epigenome and the importance of MGMT, GATA6 and CASP8 genes methylation in glioblastoma patient outcome.

  19. Glioblastoma stem cell differentiation into endothelial cells evidenced through live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Xin; Chen, Yin-Sheng; Chen, Fu-Rong; Xi, Shao-Yan; Chen, Zhong-Ping

    2017-08-01

    Glioblastoma cell-initiated vascularization is an alternative angiogenesis called vasculogenic mimicry. However, current knowledge on the mechanism of de novo vessel formation from glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs) is limited. Sixty-four glioblastoma samples from patients and 10 fluorescent glioma xenograft samples were examined by immunofluorescence staining for endothelial marker (CD34 and CD31) and glial cell marker (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP]) expression. GSCs were then isolated from human glioblastoma tissue and CD133+/Sox2+ red fluorescent protein-containing (RFP)-GSC-1 cells were established. The ability of these cells to form vascular structures was examined by live-cell imaging of 3D cultures. CD34-GFAP or CD31-GFAP coexpressing glioblastoma-derived endothelial cells (GDEC) were found in 30 of 64 (46.9%) of clinical glioblastoma samples. In those 30 samples, GDEC were found to form vessel structures in 21 (70%) samples. Among 21 samples with GDEC vessels, the CD34+ GDEC vessels and CD31+ GDEC vessels accounted for about 14.16% and 18.08% of total vessels, respectively. In the xenograft samples, CD34+ GDEC were found in 7 out of 10 mice, and 4 out of 7 mice had CD34+ GDEC vessels. CD31+ GDEC were also found in 7 mice, and 4 mice had CD31+ GDEC vessels (10 mice in total). Through live-cell imaging, we observed gradual CD34 expression when cultured with vascular endothelial growth factor in some glioma cells, and a dynamic increase in endothelial marker expression in RFP-GSC-1 in vitro was recorded. Cells expressed CD34 (9.46%) after 6 hours in culture. The results demonstrated that GSCs may differentiate into endothelial cells and promote angiogenesis in glioblastomas. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. Promoter Methylation of RASSF1A Associates to Adult Secondary Glioblastomas and Pediatric Glioblastomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Jorge; Inda, María Del Mar; Lázcoz, Paula; Zazpe, Idoya; Fan, Xing; Alfaro, Jorge; Tuñón, Teresa; Rey, Juan A; Castresana, Javier S

    2012-01-01

    While allelic losses and mutations of tumor suppressor genes implicated in the etiology of astrocytoma have been widely assessed, the role of epigenetics is still a matter of study. We analyzed the frequency of promoter hypermethylation by methylation-specific PCR (MSP) in five tumor suppressor genes (PTEN, MGMT, RASSF1A, p14(ARF), and p16(INK4A)), in astrocytoma samples and cell lines. RASSF1A was the most frequently hypermethylated gene in all grades of astrocytoma samples, in cell lines, and in adult secondary GBM. It was followed by MGMT. PTEN showed a slight methylation signal in only one GBM and one pilocytic astrocytoma, and in two cell lines; while p14(ARF) and p16(INK4A) did not show any evidence of methylation in primary tumors or cell lines. In pediatric GBM, RASSF1A was again the most frequently altered gene, followed by MGMT; PTEN, p14 and p16 showed no alterations. Lack or reduced expression of RASSF1A in cell lines was correlated with the presence of methylation. RASSF1A promoter hypermethylation might be used as a diagnostic marker for secondary GBM and pediatric GBM. Promoter hypermethylation might not be an important inactivation mechanism in other genes like PTEN, p14(ARF) and p16(INK4A), in which other alterations (mutations, homozygous deletions) are prevalent.

  1. Molecular and Morphologic Correlates of the Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres Phenotype in High Grade Astrocytomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Doreen N.; Heaphy, Christopher M.; de Wilde, Roeland F.; Orr, Brent A.; Odia, Yazmin; Eberhart, Charles G.; Meeker, Alan K.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the telomere maintenance mechanism known as Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) is relatively more common in specific glioma subsets and strongly associated with ATRX mutations. We retrospectively examined 116 high grade astrocytomas (32 pediatric glioblastomas, 65 adult glioblastomas,19 anaplastic astrocytomas) with known ALT status using tissue microarrays to identify associations with molecular and phenotypic features. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against ATRX, DAXX, p53 and IDH1R132H mutant protein. EGFR amplification was evaluated by FISH. When focusing on histologic subtypes, almost half of fibrillary and gemistocytic astrocytomas (44%) demonstrated ALT. Conversely all gliosarcomas (n=4), epithelioid (n=2), giant cell (n=2) and adult small cell astrocytomas (n=7) were ALT negative. The ALT phenotype was positively correlated with the presence of round cells (p=0.002), microcysts (p<0.0002), IDH1 mutant protein (p<0.0001), ATRX protein loss (p<0.0001), strong P53 expression (p<0.0001), and absence of EGFR amplification (p=0.004). There was no significant correlation with DAXX expression. We conclude that ALT represents a specific phenotype in high grade astrocytomas with distinctive pathologic and molecular features. Future studies are required to clarify the clinical and biological significance of ALT in high grade astrocytomas, and its possible utility as a diagnostic and/or therapeutic target. PMID:22928601

  2. Molecular and morphologic correlates of the alternative lengthening of telomeres phenotype in high-grade astrocytomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Doreen N; Heaphy, Christopher M; de Wilde, Roeland F; Orr, Brent A; Odia, Yazmin; Eberhart, Charles G; Meeker, Alan K; Rodriguez, Fausto J

    2013-05-01

    Recent studies suggest that the telomere maintenance mechanism known as alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) is relatively more common in specific glioma subsets and strongly associated with ATRX mutations. We retrospectively examined 116 high-grade astrocytomas (32 pediatric glioblastomas, 65 adult glioblastomas, 19 anaplastic astrocytomas) with known ALT status using tissue microarrays to identify associations with molecular and phenotypic features. Immunohistochemistry was performed using antibodies against ATRX, DAXX, p53 and IDH1(R132H) mutant protein. EGFR amplification was evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Almost half of fibrillary and gemistocytic astrocytomas (44%) demonstrated ALT. Conversely all gliosarcomas (n = 4), epithelioid (n = 2), giant cell (n = 2) and adult small cell astrocytomas (n = 7) were ALT negative. The ALT phenotype was positively correlated with the presence of round cells (P = 0.002), microcysts (P < 0.0002), IDH1 mutant protein (P < 0.0001), ATRX protein loss (P < 0.0001), strong P53 immunostaining (P < 0.0001) and absence of EGFR amplification (P = 0.004). There was no significant correlation with DAXX expression. We conclude that ALT represents a specific phenotype in high-grade astrocytomas with distinctive pathologic and molecular features. Future studies are required to clarify the clinical and biological significance of ALT in high-grade astrocytomas. © 2012 The Authors; Brain Pathology © 2012 International Society of Neuropathology.

  3. Expression of aquaporin8 in human astrocytomas: Correlation with pathologic grade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Shu-juan; Wang, Ke-jian; Gan, Sheng-wei; Xu, Jin; Xu, Shi-ye; Sun, Shan-quan

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •AQP8 is mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of human astrocytoma cells. •AQP8 over-expressed in human astrocytomas, especially glioblastoma. •The up-regulation of AQP8 is related to the pathological grade of human astrocytomas. •AQP8 may contribute to the growth and proliferation of astrocytomas. -- Abstract: Aquaporin8 (AQP8), a member of the aquaporin (AQP) protein family, is weakly distributed in mammalian brains. Previous studies on AQP8 have focused mainly on the digestive and the reproductive systems. AQP8 has a pivotal role in keeping the fluid and electrolyte balance. In this study, we investigated the expression changes of AQP8 in 75 cases of human brain astrocytic tumors using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that AQP8 was mainly distributed in the cytoplasm of astrocytoma cells. The expression levels and immunoreactive score of AQP8 protein and mRNA increased in low-grade astrocytomas, and further increased in high-grade astrocytomas, especially in glioblastoma. Therefore, AQP8 may contribute to the proliferation of astrocytomas, and may be a biomarker and candidate therapy target for patients with astrocytomas

  4. Gleason grading system

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000920.htm Gleason grading system To use the sharing features on this page, ... score of between 5 and 7. Gleason Grading System Sometimes, it can be hard to predict how ...

  5. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdnack, James A; Xiaobin Zhou; Larrabee, Glenn J; Millis, Scott R; Salthouse, Timothy A

    2011-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV Adult battery (i.e., age 16-69 years) co-norming sample (n = 900) to test 13 measurement models. The results indicated that two models fit the data equally well. One model is a seven-factor solution without a hierarchical general ability factor: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Auditory Working Memory, Visual Working Memory, Auditory Memory, and Visual Memory. The second model is a five-factor model composed of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Memory with a hierarchical general ability factor. Interpretative implications for each model are discussed.

  6. Free-format RPG IV

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This how-to guide offers a concise and thorough introduction to the increased productivity, better readability, and easier program maintenance that comes with the free-format style of programming in RPG IV. Although free-format information is available in IBM manuals, it is not separated from everything else, thereby requiring hours of tedious research to track down the information needed. This book provides everything one needs to know to write RPG IV in the free-format style, and author Jim Martin not only teaches rules and syntax but also explains how this new style of coding has the pot

  7. BAHAN AJAR BERBASIS PENDIDIKAN KARAKTER UNTUK SISWA KELAS IV SEKOLAH DASAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pity Asriani

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to produce character education based teaching materials for grade IV elementary school. The writer used the 4D model (Thiagarajan, et al., 1974 for his research and development. The 4D model consists of four stages. They are defining, designing, developing, and disseminating. Types of data used are qualitative. Data were collected by validity testing, questionnaire, observation, and character assessment. This study produced a character education based teaching materials for grade IV elementary school. That is the student book and the teacher book. The results showed that character education based teaching materials for grade IV elementary school is compliant to use in learning since it has met the expected criteria according to the assessment of the material experts, linguists, media experts, teachers, and students. Penelitian ini bertujuan menghasilkan bahan ajar berbasis pendidikan karakter untuk kelas IV Sekolah Dasar. Model penelitian dan pengembangan yang digunakan adalah model pengembangan 4D (Thiagarajan, dkk., 1974. Model 4-D ini terdiri atas tahap pendefinisian (define, perancangan (design, pengembangan (develop, dan penyebaran (disseminate. Jenis data yang digunakan yaitu data kualitatif. Data dikumpulkan melalui uji validasi, angket, observasi, dan penilaian karakter. Penelitian ini menghasilkan bahan ajar berbasis pendidikan karakter untuk kelas IV Sekolah Dasar yang terdiri atas Buku Siswa dan Buku Guru. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa bahan ajar berbasis pendidikan karakter untuk kelas IV Sekolah Dasar ini telah memenuhi persyaratan untuk digunakan dalam pembelajaran karena telah memenuhi kriteria menurut penilaian ahli materi, ahli bahasa, ahli desain, guru, dan siswa.

  8. Comparative Analysis of Matrix Metalloproteinase Family Members Reveals That MMP9 Predicts Survival and Response to Temozolomide in Patients with Primary Glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingbin Li

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiform (GBM is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults. Radiotherapy plus concomitant and adjuvant TMZ chemotherapy is the current standard of care for patients with GBM. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs, a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases, are key modulators of tumor invasion and metastasis due to their ECM degradation capacity. The aim of the present study was to identify the most informative MMP member in terms of prognostic and predictive ability for patients with primary GBM.The mRNA expression profiles of all MMP genes were obtained from the Chinese Glioma Genome Atlas (CGGA, the Repository for Molecular Brain Neoplasia Data (REMBRANDT and the GSE16011 dataset. MGMT methylation status was also examined by pyrosequencing. The correlation of MMP9 expression with tumor progression was explored in glioma specimens of all grades. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to investigate the association of MMP9 expression with survival and response to temozolomide.MMP9 was the only significant prognostic factor in three datasets for primary glioblastoma patients. Our results indicated that MMP9 expression is correlated with glioma grade (p<0.0001. Additionally, low expression of MMP9 was correlated with better survival outcome (OS: p = 0.0012 and PFS: p = 0.0066, and MMP9 was an independent prognostic factor in primary GBM (OS: p = 0.027 and PFS: p = 0.032. Additionally, the GBM patients with low MMP9 expression benefited from temozolomide (TMZ chemotherapy regardless of the MGMT methylation status.Patients with primary GBMs with low MMP9 expression may have longer survival and may benefit from temozolomide chemotherapy.

  9. Temozolomide during radiotherapy of glioblastoma multiforme. Daily administration improves survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachbichler, Silke Birgit; Schupp, Gabi; Ballhausen, Hendrik; Niyazi, Maximilian; Belka, Claus [LMU Munich, Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany)

    2017-11-15

    Temozolomide-(TMZ)-based chemoradiotherapy defines the current gold standard for the treatment of newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Data regarding the influence of TMZ dose density during chemoradiotherapy are currently not available. We retrospectively compared outcomes in patients receiving no TMZ, TMZ during radiotherapy on radiotherapy days only, and TMZ constantly 7 days a week. From 2002-2012, a total of 432 patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma received radiotherapy in our department: 118 patients had radiotherapy alone, 210 had chemoradiotherapy with TMZ (75 mg/m{sup 2}) daily (7/7), and 104 with TMZ only on radiotherapy days (5/7). Radiotherapy was applied to a total dose of 60 Gy. Median survival after radiotherapy alone was 9.1 months, compared to 12.6 months with 5/7-TMZ and to 15.7 months with 7/7-TMZ. The 1-year survival rates were 33, 52, and 64%, respectively. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed a significant improvement of TMZ-7/7 vs. 5/7 (p = 0.01 by the log-rank test), while 5/7-TMZ was still superior to no TMZ at all (p = 0.02). Multivariate Cox regression showed a significant influence of TMZ regimen (p = 0.009) on hazard rate (+58% between groups) even in the presence of confounding factors age, sex, resection status, and radiotherapy dose concept. Our results confirm the findings of the EORTC/NCIC trial. It seems that also a reduced TMZ scheme can at first prolong the survival of glioblastoma patients, but not as much as the daily administration. (orig.) [German] Eine Temozolomid-(TMZ-)basierte Radiochemotherapie ist der gegenwaertige Goldstandard in der Behandlung von neu diagnostizierten Glioblastomen. Daten bezueglich des Einflusses der TMZ-Dosisdichte waehrend der Radiochemotherapie sind derzeit nicht vorhanden. Wir haben retrospektiv die Ergebnisse von Patienten verglichen, die entweder kein TMZ, TMZ zur Strahlentherapie nur an Bestrahlungstagen oder TMZ konstant 7 Tage/Woche erhalten hatten. Von 2002-2012 bekamen insgesamt 432 Patienten mit

  10. The prognostic IDH1( R132 ) mutation is associated with reduced NADP+-dependent IDH activity in glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleeker, Fonnet E.; Atai, Nadia A.; Lamba, Simona; Jonker, Ard; Rijkeboer, Denise; Bosch, Klazien S.; Tigchelaar, Wikky; Troost, Dirk; Vandertop, W. Peter; Bardelli, Alberto; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 gene (IDH1) occur at high frequency in gliomas and seem to be a prognostic factor for survival in glioblastoma patients. In our set of 98 glioblastoma patients, IDH1 ( R132 ) mutations were associated with improved survival of 1 year on average,

  11. Diamond, graphite, and graphene oxide nanoparticles decrease migration and invasiveness in glioblastoma cell lines by impairing extracellular adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wierzbicki, Mateusz; Jaworski, Slawomir; Kutwin, Marta

    2017-01-01

    The highly invasive nature of glioblastoma is one of the most significant problems regarding the treatment of this tumor. Diamond nanoparticles (ND), graphite nanoparticles (NG), and graphene oxide nanoplatelets (nGO) have been explored for their biomedical applications, especially for drug...... that nanoparticles could be used in biomedical applications as a low toxicity active compound for glioblastoma treatment....

  12. Changes in chromatin state reveal ARNT2 at a node of a tumorigenic transcription factor signature driving glioblastoma cell aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogeas, Alexandra; Morvan-Dubois, Ghislaine; El-Habr, Elias A; Lejeune, François-Xavier; Defrance, Matthieu; Narayanan, Ashwin; Kuranda, Klaudia; Burel-Vandenbos, Fanny; Sayd, Salwa; Delaunay, Virgile; Dubois, Luiz G; Parrinello, Hugues; Rialle, Stéphanie; Fabrega, Sylvie; Idbaih, Ahmed; Haiech, Jacques; Bièche, Ivan; Virolle, Thierry; Goodhardt, Michele; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Junier, Marie-Pierre

    2018-02-01

    Although a growing body of evidence indicates that phenotypic plasticity exhibited by glioblastoma cells plays a central role in tumor development and post-therapy recurrence, the master drivers of their aggressiveness remain elusive. Here we mapped the changes in active (H3K4me3) and repressive (H3K27me3) histone modifications accompanying the repression of glioblastoma stem-like cells tumorigenicity. Genes with changing histone marks delineated a network of transcription factors related to cancerous behavior, stem state, and neural development, highlighting a previously unsuspected association between repression of ARNT2 and loss of cell tumorigenicity. Immunohistochemistry confirmed ARNT2 expression in cell sub-populations within proliferative zones of patients' glioblastoma. Decreased ARNT2 expression was consistently observed in non-tumorigenic glioblastoma cells, compared to tumorigenic cells. Moreover, ARNT2 expression correlated with a tumorigenic molecular signature at both the tissue level within the tumor core and at the single cell level in the patients' tumors. We found that ARNT2 knockdown decreased the expression of SOX9, POU3F2 and OLIG2, transcription factors implicated in glioblastoma cell tumorigenicity, and repressed glioblastoma stem-like cell tumorigenic properties in vivo. Our results reveal ARNT2 as a pivotal component of the glioblastoma cell tumorigenic signature, located at a node of a transcription factor network controlling glioblastoma cell aggressiveness.

  13. Hypofractionated radiation induces a decrease in cell proliferation but no histological damage to organotypic multicellular spheroids of human glioblastomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaaijk, P.; Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam; Troost, D.; Leenstra, S.; Bosch, D.A.; Sminia, P.; Hulshof, M.C.C.M..; Kracht, A.H.W. van der

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of radiation on glioblastoma, using an organotypic multicellular spheroid (OMS) model. Most glioblastoma cell lines are, in contrast to glioblastomas in vivo, relatively radiosensitive. This limits the value of using cell lines for studying the radiation effect of glioblastomas. The advantage of OMS is maintenance of the characteristics of the original tumour, which is lost in conventional cell cultures. OMS prepared from four glioblastomas were treated with hypofractionated radiation with a radiobiologically equivalent dose to standard radiation treatment for glioblastomas patients. After treatment, the histology as well as the cell proliferation of the OMS was examined. After radiation, a significant decrease in cell proliferation was found, although no histological damage to the OMS was observed. The modest effects of radiation on the OMS are in agreement with the limited therapeutic value of radiotherapy for glioblastoma patients. Therefore, OMS seems to be a good alternative for cell lines to study the radiobiological effect on glioblastomas. (author)

  14. Targeting EGFR induced oxidative stress by PARP1 inhibition in glioblastoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitta, Masayuki; Kozono, David; Kennedy, Richard; Stommel, Jayne; Ng, Kimberly; Zinn, Pascal O; Kushwaha, Deepa; Kesari, Santosh; Inda, Maria-del-Mar; Wykosky, Jill; Furnari, Frank; Hoadley, Katherine A; Chin, Lynda; DePinho, Ronald A; Cavenee, Webster K; D'Andrea, Alan; Chen, Clark C

    2010-05-24

    Despite the critical role of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) in glioblastoma pathogenesis, EGFR targeted therapies have achieved limited clinical efficacy. Here we propose an alternate therapeutic strategy based on the conceptual framework of non-oncogene addiction. A directed RNAi screen revealed that glioblastoma cells over-expressing EGFRvIII, an oncogenic variant of EGFR, become hyper-dependent on a variety of DNA repair genes. Among these, there was an enrichment of Base Excision Repair (BER) genes required for the repair of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-induced DNA damage, including poly-ADP ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1). Subsequent studies revealed that EGFRvIII over-expression in glioblastoma cells caused increased levels of ROS, DNA strand break accumulation, and genome instability. In a panel of primary glioblastoma lines, sensitivity to PARP1 inhibition correlated with the levels of EGFR activation and oxidative stress. Gene expression analysis indicated that reduced expression of BER genes in glioblastomas with high EGFR expression correlated with improved patient survival. These observations suggest that oxidative stress secondary to EGFR hyper-activation necessitates increased cellular reliance on PARP1 mediated BER, and offer critical insights into clinical trial design.

  15. Targeting EGFR induced oxidative stress by PARP1 inhibition in glioblastoma therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Nitta

    Full Text Available Despite the critical role of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR in glioblastoma pathogenesis, EGFR targeted therapies have achieved limited clinical efficacy. Here we propose an alternate therapeutic strategy based on the conceptual framework of non-oncogene addiction. A directed RNAi screen revealed that glioblastoma cells over-expressing EGFRvIII, an oncogenic variant of EGFR, become hyper-dependent on a variety of DNA repair genes. Among these, there was an enrichment of Base Excision Repair (BER genes required for the repair of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS-induced DNA damage, including poly-ADP ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1. Subsequent studies revealed that EGFRvIII over-expression in glioblastoma cells caused increased levels of ROS, DNA strand break accumulation, and genome instability. In a panel of primary glioblastoma lines, sensitivity to PARP1 inhibition correlated with the levels of EGFR activation and oxidative stress. Gene expression analysis indicated that reduced expression of BER genes in glioblastomas with high EGFR expression correlated with improved patient survival. These observations suggest that oxidative stress secondary to EGFR hyper-activation necessitates increased cellular reliance on PARP1 mediated BER, and offer critical insights into clinical trial design.

  16. Molecular Mechanisms of Fenofibrate-Induced Metabolic Catastrophe and Glioblastoma Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Anna; Wyczechowska, Dorota; Zapata, Adriana; Dean, Matthew; Mullinax, Jennifer; Marrero, Luis; Parsons, Christopher; Peruzzi, Francesca; Culicchia, Frank; Ochoa, Augusto; Grabacka, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Fenofibrate (FF) is a common lipid-lowering drug and a potent agonist of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). FF and several other agonists of PPARα have interesting anticancer properties, and our recent studies demonstrate that FF is very effective against tumor cells of neuroectodermal origin. In spite of these promising anticancer effects, the molecular mechanism(s) of FF-induced tumor cell toxicity remains to be elucidated. Here we report a novel PPARα-independent mechanism explaining FF's cytotoxicity in vitro and in an intracranial mouse model of glioblastoma. The mechanism involves accumulation of FF in the mitochondrial fraction, followed by immediate impairment of mitochondrial respiration at the level of complex I of the electron transport chain. This mitochondrial action sensitizes tested glioblastoma cells to the PPARα-dependent metabolic switch from glycolysis to fatty acid β-oxidation. As a consequence, prolonged exposure to FF depletes intracellular ATP, activates the AMP-activated protein kinase–mammalian target of rapamycin–autophagy pathway, and results in extensive tumor cell death. Interestingly, autophagy activators attenuate and autophagy inhibitors enhance FF-induced glioblastoma cytotoxicity. Our results explain the molecular basis of FF-induced glioblastoma cytotoxicity and reveal a new supplemental therapeutic approach in which intracranial infusion of FF could selectively trigger metabolic catastrophe in glioblastoma cells. PMID:25332241

  17. Mechanism of Anti-glioblastoma Effect of Temzolomide Involved in ROS-Mediated SIRT 1 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the new molecular mechanism of anti-tumor effect of temzolomide (TMZon glioblastoma cell strain. Methods: MTT methods and Hoechst 33342 staining method were applied to determine the effect of TMZ on the proliferation and apoptosis of glioblastoma cell strains U251 and SHG44, while flow cytometry was used to detect the impact of TMZ on cellular cycles. Additionally, DCFH-DA probe was adopted to test intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level while Real-time PCR and Western blot tests were applied to determine the influence of TMZ on SIRT1 expression. Results: TMZ in different concentrations added into glioblastoma cell strain for 72 h could concentration-dependently inhibit the proliferation of glioblastoma cells, 100 μmol/L of which could also block cells in phase G2/M and improve cellular apoptosis. In addition, TMZ could evidently increase intracellular ROS level so as to activate SIRT1. Conclusion: The mechanism of anti-tumor effect of TMZ on glioblastoma may be associated with ROS-induced SIRT1 pathway, providing theoretical basis for the clinical efficacy of TMZ.

  18. Identification of a novel fusion gene HMGA2-EGFR in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komuro, Akiyoshi; Raja, Erna; Iwata, Caname; Soda, Manabu; Isogaya, Kazunobu; Yuki, Keiko; Ino, Yasushi; Morikawa, Masato; Todo, Tomoki; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Hiromichi; Ranjit, Melissa; Natsume, Atsushi; Mukasa, Akitake; Saito, Nobuhito; Okada, Hitoshi; Mano, Hiroyuki; Miyazono, Kohei; Koinuma, Daizo

    2018-04-15

    Glioblastoma is one of the most malignant forms of cancer, for which no effective targeted therapy has been found. Although The Cancer Genome Atlas has provided a list of fusion genes in glioblastoma, their role in progression of glioblastoma remains largely unknown. To search for novel fusion genes, we obtained RNA-seq data from TGS-01 human glioma-initiating cells, and identified a novel fusion gene (HMGA2-EGFR), encoding a protein comprising the N-terminal region of the high-mobility group AT-hook protein 2 (HMGA2) fused to the C-terminal region of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), which retained the transmembrane and kinase domains of the EGFR. This fusion gene product showed transforming potential and a high tumor-forming capacity in cell culture and in vivo. Mechanistically, HMGA2-EGFR constitutively induced a higher level of phosphorylated STAT5B than EGFRvIII, an in-frame exon deletion product of the EGFR gene that is commonly found in primary glioblastoma. Forced expression of HMGA2-EGFR enhanced orthotopic tumor formation of the U87MG human glioma cell line. Furthermore, the EGFR kinase inhibitor erlotinib blocked sphere formation of TGS-01 cells in culture and inhibited tumor formation in vivo. These findings suggest that, in addition to gene amplification and in-frame exon deletion, EGFR signaling can also be activated by gene fusion, suggesting a possible avenue for treatment of glioblastoma. © 2017 UICC.

  19. Integrative genome analysis reveals an oncomir/oncogene cluster regulating glioblastoma survivorship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunsoo; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Xiuli; Pennicooke, Brenton; Park, Peter J.; Johnson, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Using a multidimensional genomic data set on glioblastoma from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we identified hsa-miR-26a as a cooperating component of a frequently occurring amplicon that also contains CDK4 and CENTG1, two oncogenes that regulate the RB1 and PI3 kinase/AKT pathways, respectively. By integrating DNA copy number, mRNA, microRNA, and DNA methylation data, we identified functionally relevant targets of miR-26a in glioblastoma, including PTEN, RB1, and MAP3K2/MEKK2. We demonstrate that miR-26a alone can transform cells and it promotes glioblastoma cell growth in vitro and in the mouse brain by decreasing PTEN, RB1, and MAP3K2/MEKK2 protein expression, thereby increasing AKT activation, promoting proliferation, and decreasing c-JUN N-terminal kinase-dependent apoptosis. Overexpression of miR-26a in PTEN-competent and PTEN-deficient glioblastoma cells promoted tumor growth in vivo, and it further increased growth in cells overexpressing CDK4 or CENTG1. Importantly, glioblastoma patients harboring this amplification displayed markedly decreased survival. Thus, hsa-miR-26a, CDK4, and CENTG1 comprise a functionally integrated oncomir/oncogene DNA cluster that promotes aggressiveness in human cancers by cooperatively targeting the RB1, PI3K/AKT, and JNK pathways. PMID:20080666

  20. Antiproliferative effects of Tubi-bee propolis in glioblastoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleiton Silva Borges

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is a resin formed by a complex chemical composition of substances that bees collect from plants. Since ancient times, propolis has been used in folk medicine, due to its biological properties, that include antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antitumoral and immunomodulatory activities. Glioblastoma is the most common human brain tumor. Despite the improvements in GBM standard treatment, patients' prognosis is still very poor. The aim of this work was to evaluate in vitro the Tubi-bee propolis effects on human glioblastoma (U251 and U343 and fibroblast (MRC-5 cell lines. Proliferation, clonogenic capacity and apoptosis were analyzed after treatment with 1 mg/mL and 2 mg/mL propolis concentrations for different time periods. Additionally, glioblastoma cell lines were submitted to treatment with propolis combined with temozolomide (TMZ. Data showed an antiproliferative effect of tubi-bee propolis against glioblastoma and fibroblast cell lines. Combination of propolis with TMZ had a synergic antiproliferative effect. Moreover, propolis caused decrease in colony formation in glioblastoma cell lines. Propolis treatment had no effects on apoptosis, demonstrating a cytostatic action. Further investigations are needed to elucidate the molecular mechanism of the antitumor effect of propolis, and the study of its individual components may reveal specific molecules with antiproliferative capacity.

  1. Targeting Oncogenic ALK and MET: A Promising Therapeutic Strategy for Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Gerald C; Dixon-Mah, Yaenette N; Vandergrift, W Alex; Ray, Swapan K; Haar, Catherine P; Mittendorf, Amber M; Patel, Sunil J; Banik, Naren L; Giglio, Pierre; Das, Arabinda

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common aggressive, highly glycolytic, and lethal brain tumor. In fact, it is among the most commonly diagnosed lethal malignancies, with thousands of new cases reported in the United States each year. Glioblastoma's lethality is derived from a number of factors including highly active pro-mitotic and pro-metastatic pathways. Two factors increasingly associated with the intracellular signaling and transcriptional machinery required for such changes are anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) and the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (HGFR or, more commonly MET). Both receptors are members of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family, which has itself gained much attention for its role in modulating mitosis, migration, and survival in cancer cells. ALK was first described as a vital oncogene in lymphoma studies, but it has since been connected to many carcinomas, including non-small cell lung cancer and glioblastoma. As the receptor for HGF, MET has also been highly characterized and regulates numerous developmental and wound healing events which, when upregulated in cancer, can promote tumor progression. The wealth of information gathered over the last 30 years regarding these RTKs suggests three downstream cascades that depend upon activation of STAT3, Ras, and AKT. This review outlines the significance of ALK and MET as they relate to glioblastoma, explores the significance of STAT3, Ras, and AKT downstream of ALK/MET, and touches on the potential for new chemotherapeutics targeting ALK and MET to improve glioblastoma patient prognosis. PMID:23543207

  2. Phase II Trial of Erlotinib during and after Radiotherapy in Children with Newly Diagnosed High-Grade Gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim eQaddoumi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Epidermal growth factor receptor is overexpressed in most pediatric high-grade gliomas (HGG. Since erlotinib had shown activity in adults with HGG, we conducted a phase II trial of erlotinib and local radiotherapy in children with newly diagnosed HGG. Methods. Following maximum surgical resection, patients between 3 and 21 years with nonmetastatic HGG received local radiotherapy at 59.4 Gy (54 Gy for spinal tumors and those with ≥70% brain involvement. Erlotinib started on day 1 of radiotherapy (120 mg/m2 per day and continued for 2 years unless there was tumor progression or intolerable toxicities. The 2-year progression-free survival (PFS was estimated for patients with intracranial anaplastic astrocytoma (AA and glioblastoma.Results. Median age at diagnosis for 41 patients with intracranial tumors (21 with glioblastoma and 20 with AA was 10.9 years (range, 3.3 to 19 years. The 2-year PFS for patients with AA and glioblastoma was 15% ± 7% and 19% ± 8%, respectively. Only five patients remained alive without tumor progression. Twenty-six patients had at least one grade 3 or 4 toxicity irrespective of association with erlotinib; only four required dose modifications. The main toxicities were gastrointestinal (n=11, dermatologic (n=5, and metabolic (n=4. One patient with gliomatosis cerebri who required prolonged corticosteroids died of septic shock associated with pancreatitis. Conclusions. Although therapy with erlotinib was mostly well tolerated, it did not change the poor outcome of our patients. Our results showed that erlotinib is not a promising medication in the treatment of children with intracranial AA and glioblastoma.

  3. Pseudoprogression as an adverse event of glioblastoma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaña, Carmen; Capellades, Jaume; Pineda, Estela; Estival, Anna; Puig, Josep; Domenech, Sira; Verger, Eugenia; Pujol, Teresa; Martinez-García, Maria; Oleaga, Laura; Velarde, JoseMaria; Mesia, Carlos; Fuentes, Rafael; Marruecos, Jordi; Del Barco, Sonia; Villà, Salvador; Carrato, Cristina; Gallego, Oscar; Gil-Gil, Miguel; Craven-Bartle, Jordi; Alameda, Francesc

    2017-12-01

    We explored predictive factors of pseudoprogression (PsP) and its impact on prognosis in a retrospective series of uniformly treated glioblastoma patients. Patients were classified as having PsP, early progression (eP) or neither (nP). We examined potential associations with clinical, molecular, and basal imaging characteristics and compared overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), post-progression survival (PPS) as well as the relationship between PFS and PPS in the three groups. Of the 256 patients studied, 56 (21.9%) were classified as PsP, 70 (27.3%) as eP, and 130 (50.8%) as nP. Only MGMT methylation status was associated to PsP. MGMT methylated patients had a 3.5-fold greater possibility of having PsP than eP (OR: 3.48; 95% CI: 1.606-7.564; P = 0.002). OS was longer for PsP than eP patients (18.9 vs. 12.3 months; P = 0.0001) but was similar for PsP and nP patients (P = 0.91). OS was shorter-though not significantly so-for PsP than nP patients (OS: 19.5 vs. 27.9 months; P = 0.63) in methylated patients. PPS was similar for patients having PsP, eP or nP (PPS: 7.2 vs. 5.4 vs. 6.7; P = 0.43). Neurological deterioration occurred in 64.3% of cases at the time they were classified as PsP and in 72.8% of cases of eP (P = 0.14). PsP confounds the evaluation of disease and does not confer a survival advantage in glioblastoma. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Prolonged Temozolomide Maintenance Therapy in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardelly, Marco; Dangel, Elena; Gohde, Julia; Noell, Susan; Behling, Felix; Lepski, Guilherme; Borchers, Christian; Koch, Marilin; Schittenhelm, Jens; Bisdas, Sotirios; Naumann, Aline; Paulsen, Frank; Zips, Daniel; von Hehn, Ulrike; Ritz, Rainer; Tatagiba, Marcos Soares; Tabatabai, Ghazaleh

    2017-05-01

    The impact of prolonging temozolomide (TMZ) maintenance beyond six cycles in newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GBM) remains a topic of discussion. We investigated the effects of prolonged TMZ maintenance on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). In this retrospective single-center cohort study, we included patients with GBM who were treated with radiation therapy with concomitant and adjuvant TMZ. For analysis, patients were considered who either completed six TMZ maintenance cycles (group B), continued with TMZ therapy beyond six cycles (group C), or stopped TMZ maintenance therapy within the first six cycles (group A). Patients with progression during the first six TMZ maintenance cycles were excluded. Clinical data from 107 patients were included for Kaplan-Meier analyses and 102 for Cox regressions. Median PFS times were 8.1 months (95% confidence interval [CI] 6.1-12.4) in group A, 13.7 months (95% CI 10.6-17.5) in group B, and 20.9 months (95% CI 15.2-43.5) in group C. At first progression, response rates of TMZ/lomustine rechallenge were 47% in group B and 13% in group C. Median OS times were 12.7 months (95% CI 10.3-16.8) in group A, 25.2 months (95% CI 17.7-55.5) in group B, and 28.6 months (95% CI 24.4-open) in group C. Nevertheless, multivariate Cox regression for patients in group C compared with group B that accounted for imbalances of other risk factors showed no different relative risk (RR) for OS (RR 0.77, p  = .46). Our data do not support a general extension of TMZ maintenance therapy beyond six cycles. The Oncologist 2017;22:570-575 IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Radiation therapy with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ) maintenance therapy is still the standard of care in patients below the age of 65 years in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. However, in clinical practice, many centers continue TMZ maintenance therapy beyond six cycles. The impact of this continuation is controversial and has not yet been addressed in

  5. Volumetric and MGMT parameters in glioblastoma patients: Survival analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iliadis, Georgios; Kotoula, Vassiliki; Chatzisotiriou, Athanasios; Televantou, Despina; Eleftheraki, Anastasia G; Lambaki, Sofia; Misailidou, Despina; Selviaridis, Panagiotis; Fountzilas, George

    2012-01-01

    In this study several tumor-related volumes were assessed by means of a computer-based application and a survival analysis was conducted to evaluate the prognostic significance of pre- and postoperative volumetric data in patients harboring glioblastomas. In addition, MGMT (O 6 -methylguanine methyltransferase) related parameters were compared with those of volumetry in order to observe possible relevance of this molecule in tumor development. We prospectively analyzed 65 patients suffering from glioblastoma (GBM) who underwent radiotherapy with concomitant adjuvant temozolomide. For the purpose of volumetry T1 and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) sequences were used, acquired both pre- and postoperatively (pre-radiochemotherapy). The volumes measured on preoperative MR images were necrosis, enhancing tumor and edema (including the tumor) and on postoperative ones, net-enhancing tumor. Age, sex, performance status (PS) and type of operation were also included in the multivariate analysis. MGMT was assessed for promoter methylation with Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA), for RNA expression with real time PCR, and for protein expression with immunohistochemistry in a total of 44 cases with available histologic material. In the multivariate analysis a negative impact was shown for pre-radiochemotherapy net-enhancing tumor on the overall survival (OS) (p = 0.023) and for preoperative necrosis on progression-free survival (PFS) (p = 0.030). Furthermore, the multivariate analysis confirmed the importance of PS in PFS and OS of patients. MGMT promoter methylation was observed in 13/23 (43.5%) evaluable tumors; complete methylation was observed in 3/13 methylated tumors only. High rate of MGMT protein positivity (> 20% positive neoplastic nuclei) was inversely associated with pre-operative tumor necrosis (p = 0.021). Our findings implicate that volumetric parameters may have a significant role in the prognosis of GBM patients. Furthermore

  6. Unsupervised deep learning reveals prognostically relevant subtypes of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jonathan D; Cai, Chunhui; Lu, Xinghua

    2017-10-03

    One approach to improving the personalized treatment of cancer is to understand the cellular signaling transduction pathways that cause cancer at the level of the individual patient. In this study, we used unsupervised deep learning to learn the hierarchical structure within cancer gene expression data. Deep learning is a group of machine learning algorithms that use multiple layers of hidden units to capture hierarchically related, alternative representations of the input data. We hypothesize that this hierarchical structure learned by deep learning will be related to the cellular signaling system. Robust deep learning model selection identified a network architecture that is biologically plausible. Our model selection results indicated that the 1st hidden layer of our deep learning model should contain about 1300 hidden units to most effectively capture the covariance structure of the input data. This agrees with the estimated number of human transcription factors, which is approximately 1400. This result lends support to our hypothesis that the 1st hidden layer of a deep learning model trained on gene expression data may represent signals related to transcription factor activation. Using the 3rd hidden layer representation of each tumor as learned by our unsupervised deep learning model, we performed consensus clustering on all tumor samples-leading to the discovery of clusters of glioblastoma multiforme with differential survival. One of these clusters contained all of the glioblastoma samples with G-CIMP, a known methylation phenotype driven by the IDH1 mutation and associated with favorable prognosis, suggesting that the hidden units in the 3rd hidden layer representations captured a methylation signal without explicitly using methylation data as input. We also found differentially expressed genes and well-known mutations (NF1, IDH1, EGFR) that were uniquely correlated with each of these clusters. Exploring these unique genes and mutations will allow us to

  7. Treatment options and outcomes for glioblastoma in the elderly patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvold ND

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nils D Arvold,1 David A Reardon2 1Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, Boston, MA, USA; 2Center for Neuro-Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Age remains the most powerful prognostic factor among glioblastoma (GBM patients. Half of all patients with GBM are aged 65 years or older at the time of diagnosis, and the incidence rate of GBM in patients aged over 65 years is increasing rapidly. Median survival for elderly GBM patients is less than 6 months and reflects less favorable tumor biologic factors, receipt of less aggressive care, and comorbid disease. The standard of care for elderly GBM patients remains controversial. Based on limited data, extensive resection appears to be more beneficial than biopsy. For patients with favorable Karnofsky performance status (KPS, adjuvant radiotherapy (RT has a demonstrated survival benefit with no observed decrement in quality of life. Concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide (TMZ along with RT to 60 Gy have not been prospectively studied among patients aged over 70 years but should be considered for patients aged 65–70 years with excellent KPS. Based on the recent NOA-08 and Nordic randomized trials, testing for O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT promoter methylation should be performed routinely immediately after surgery to aid in adjuvant treatment decisions. Patients aged over 70 years with favorable KPS, or patients aged 60–70 years with borderline KPS, should be considered for monotherapy utilizing standard TMZ dosing for patients with MGMT-methylated tumors, and hypofractionated RT (34 Gy in ten fractions or 40 Gy in 15 fractions for patients with MGMT-unmethylated tumors. The ongoing European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer/National Cancer Institute of Canada trial will help clarify the role for concurrent TMZ with hypofractionated RT. For elderly patients with poor KPS, reasonable

  8. Volumetric and MGMT parameters in glioblastoma patients: Survival analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iliadis Georgios

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study several tumor-related volumes were assessed by means of a computer-based application and a survival analysis was conducted to evaluate the prognostic significance of pre- and postoperative volumetric data in patients harboring glioblastomas. In addition, MGMT (O6-methylguanine methyltransferase related parameters were compared with those of volumetry in order to observe possible relevance of this molecule in tumor development. Methods We prospectively analyzed 65 patients suffering from glioblastoma (GBM who underwent radiotherapy with concomitant adjuvant temozolomide. For the purpose of volumetry T1 and T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR sequences were used, acquired both pre- and postoperatively (pre-radiochemotherapy. The volumes measured on preoperative MR images were necrosis, enhancing tumor and edema (including the tumor and on postoperative ones, net-enhancing tumor. Age, sex, performance status (PS and type of operation were also included in the multivariate analysis. MGMT was assessed for promoter methylation with Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA, for RNA expression with real time PCR, and for protein expression with immunohistochemistry in a total of 44 cases with available histologic material. Results In the multivariate analysis a negative impact was shown for pre-radiochemotherapy net-enhancing tumor on the overall survival (OS (p = 0.023 and for preoperative necrosis on progression-free survival (PFS (p = 0.030. Furthermore, the multivariate analysis confirmed the importance of PS in PFS and OS of patients. MGMT promoter methylation was observed in 13/23 (43.5% evaluable tumors; complete methylation was observed in 3/13 methylated tumors only. High rate of MGMT protein positivity (> 20% positive neoplastic nuclei was inversely associated with pre-operative tumor necrosis (p = 0.021. Conclusions Our findings implicate that volumetric parameters may have a significant role in

  9. Glioblastoma: a pathogenic crosstalk between tumor cells and pericytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta M Caspani

    Full Text Available Cancers likely originate in progenitor zones containing stem cells and perivascular stromal cells. Much evidence suggests stromal cells play a central role in tumor initiation and progression. Brain perivascular cells (pericytes are contractile and function normally to regulate vessel tone and morphology, have stem cell properties, are interconvertible with macrophages and are involved in new vessel formation during angiogenesis. Nevertheless, how pericytes contribute to brain tumor infiltration is not known. In this study we have investigated the underlying mechanism by which the most lethal brain cancer, Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM interacts with pre-existing blood vessels (co-option to promote tumor initiation and progression. Here, using mouse xenografts and laminin-coated silicone substrates, we show that GBM malignancy proceeds via specific and previously unknown interactions of tumor cells with brain pericytes. Two-photon and confocal live imaging revealed that GBM cells employ novel, Cdc42-dependent and actin-based cytoplasmic extensions, that we call flectopodia, to modify the normal contractile activity of pericytes. This results in the co-option of modified pre-existing blood vessels that support the expansion of the tumor margin. Furthermore, our data provide evidence for GBM cell/pericyte fusion-hybrids, some of which are located on abnormally constricted vessels ahead of the tumor and linked to tumor-promoting hypoxia. Remarkably, inhibiting Cdc42 function impairs vessel co-option and converts pericytes to a phagocytic/macrophage-like phenotype, thus favoring an innate immune response against the tumor. Our work, therefore, identifies for the first time a key GBM contact-dependent interaction that switches pericyte function from tumor-suppressor to tumor-promoter, indicating that GBM may harbor the seeds of its own destruction. These data support the development of therapeutic strategies directed against co-option (preventing

  10. VeVeRa-IV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evelien Eggink; Debbie Oudijk; Klarita Sadiraj

    2012-01-01

    Original title: VeVeRa-IV The Dutch population is set to age rapidly in the coming years. More and more people will also attain a very great age. This means that the need for home care and care provided in nursing or residential care homes will also increase. As part of the Long-term Care

  11. 11. IV avati Draakoni galeriis...

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Tanel Saare (sünd. 1979) näitus "Gott und huhn episode IV: seed shower". Eksponeeritakse väljavõtteid aktsioonidest aastatel 2000-2004 Turus, Nürnbergis, Berliinis, Lohusalus ja Soulis. Osa aktsioone toimus koos rühmitusega Non Grata

  12. Phase IV of Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viraj Suvarna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT. No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan. Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  13. A chiral Mn(IV)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Singlecrystal X-ray analysis revealed that compound 1 crystallises in the monoclinic 21 space group with six mononuclear [MnIVL2] units in the asymmetric unit along with three solvent DMF molecules. In the crystal structure, each Mn(IV) complex, acting as the building unit, undergoes supramolecular linking through C-H ...

  14. New perspective for GdNCT. Gd-DTPA reaches the nucleus of glioblastoma cells in culture and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stasio, G. de; Gilbert, B.; Frazer, B.H.

    2000-01-01

    We investigated the prospects of gadolinium as a neutron capture therapy agent by combining three independent techniques to study the uptake of Gd-DTPA in vitro, in cultured glioblastoma cells, and in vivo, in the glioblastoma tissue sections after injection of Gd-DTPA and tumor extraction. We show that gadolinium not only penetrates the plasma membrane of glioblastoma cells grown in culture, but we also observe a statistically significant higher concentration of Gd in the nucleus relative to the cytoplasm. For the in vivo experiments, Gd-DTPA was administered to 6 glioblastoma patients before neurosurgery. The extracted bioptic tissue was then analyzed with spectromictroscopy, showing Gd localized in the nuclei of glioblastoma cells in 5 patients out of the 6 analyzed. (author)

  15. An Optimized Method for Manufacturing a Clinical Scale Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccine for the Treatment of Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogliani, Simona; Pellegatta, Serena; Antozzi, Carlo; Baggi, Fulvio; Gellera, Cinzia; Pollo, Bianca; Parati, Eugenio A.; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Frigerio, Simona

    2012-01-01

    Immune-based treatments represent a promising new class of therapy designed to boost the immune system to specifically eradicate malignant cells. Immunotherapy may generate specific anti-tumor immune responses, and dendritic cells (DC), professional antigen-presenting cells, are widely used in experimental cancer immunotherapy. Several reports describe methods for the generation of mature, antigen-pulsed DC for clinical use. Improved quality and standardization are desirable to obtain GMP-compliant protocols. In this study we describe the generation of DC from 31 Glioblastoma (GB) patients starting from their monocytes isolated by immunomagnetic CD14 selection using the CliniMACS® device. Upon differentiation of CD14+ with IL-4 and GM-CSF, DC were induced to maturation with TNF-α, PGE2, IL-1β, and IL-6. Whole tumor lysate was obtained, for the first time, in a closed system using the semi-automated dissociator GentleMACS®. The yield of proteins improved by 130% compared to the manual dissociation method. Interestingly the Mean Fluorescence Intensity for CD83 increased significantly in DC pulsed with “new method” lysate compared to DC pulsed with “classical method” lysate. Our results indicate that immunomagnetic isolation of CD14+ monocytes using the CliniMACS® device and their pulsing with whole tumor lysate proteins is a suitable method for clinical-scale generation of high quality, functional DC under GMP-grade conditions. PMID:23284979

  16. Role of Redox Status in Development of Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Ramiro, Aleli; Ramírez-Ortega, Daniela; Pérez de la Cruz, Verónica; Hérnandez-Pedro, Norma Y.; González-Esquivel, Dinora Fabiola; Sotelo, Julio; Pineda, Benjamín

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly aggressive neoplasia, prognosis remains dismal, and current therapy is mostly palliative. There are no known risk factors associated with gliomagenesis; however, it is well established that chronic inflammation in brain tissue induces oxidative stress in astrocytes and microglia. High quantities of reactive species of oxygen into the cells can react with several macromolecules, including chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA, leading to damage and malfunction of DNA repair enzymes. These changes bring genetic instability and abnormal metabolic processes, favoring oxidative environment and increase rate of cell proliferation. In GBM, a high metabolic rate and increased basal levels of reactive oxygen species play an important role as chemical mediators in the regulation of signal transduction, protecting malignant cells from apoptosis, thus creating an immunosuppressive environment. New redox therapeutics could reduce oxidative stress preventing cellular damage and high mutation rate accompanied by chromosomal instability, reducing the immunosuppressive environment. In addition, therapies directed to modulate redox rate reduce resistance and moderate the high rate of cell proliferation, favoring apoptosis of tumoral cells. This review describes the redox status in GBM, and how this imbalance could promote gliomagenesis through genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, inducing the pro-oxidant and proinflammatory environment involved in tumor cell proliferation, resistance, and immune escape. In addition, some therapeutic agents that modulate redox status and might be advantageous in therapy against GBM are described. PMID:27199982

  17. Role of redox status in development of glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleli eSalazar-Ramiro

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is a highly aggressive neoplasia, prognosis remains dismal and current therapy is mostly palliative. There are no known risk factors associated with gliomagenesis; however, it is well established that chronic inflammation in brain tissue induces oxidative stress in astrocytes and microglia. High quantities of reactive species of oxygen into the cells can react with several macromolecules, including chromosomal and mitochondrial DNA, leading to damage and malfunction of DNA repair enzymes. These changes bring genetic instability and abnormal metabolic processes favoring oxidative environment and increase rate of cell proliferation. In GBM, a high metabolic rate and increased basal levels of ROS play an important role as chemical mediators in the regulation of signal transduction, protecting malignant cells from apoptosis, thus creating an immunosuppressive environment. New redox therapeutics could reduce oxidative stress preventing cellular damage and high mutation rate accompanied by chromosomal instability, reducing the immunosuppressive environment. In addition, therapies directed to modulate redox rate reduce resistance and moderate the high rate of cell proliferation, favoring apoptosis of tumoral cells. This review describes the redox status in GBM and how this imbalance could promote gliomagenesis through genomic and mitochondrial DNA damage, inducing the pro-oxidant and pro-inflammatory environment involved in tumor cell proliferation, resistance and immune scape. In addition, are described some therapeutic agents that modulate redox status and might be advantageous in therapy against GBM.

  18. A New Investigational Perspective for Purines Against Glioblastoma Invasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Patricia; Zuccarini, Mariachiara; Carluccio, Marzia; Ziberi, Sihana; Di Iorio, Patrizia; Caciagli, Francesco; Ciccarelli, Renata

    2018-02-26

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most common and lethal brain malignancy. Recent evidence suggests that the presence of stem-like cells (GSCs) inside the tumor with high self-renewal, resistance to chemotherapy and invasiveness/migration potential is associated with poor GBM prognosis. GSC aggressiveness seems to be linked to an important process involved in tumorigenesis and cancer metastasis called epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is responsible for several biochemical changes and the acquisition of a more mesenchymal phenotype by GSCs, that enhance their migration, invasiveness and resistance to apoptosis. Since previous reports demonstrated that purines, interacting with their own receptors, exerted anti-tumor effects in GBM and derived cells, we tried to investigate the ability of these compounds to reduce tumor cell migration/invasion acting on EMT-associated genes/activators and/or signal pathways. Search in literature of relevant articles related to the objective. Papers examining the activity of purines on EMT signaling pathways/markers in GSCs are still few whereas literature is more abundant as for other kinds of tumors. Considering the significance of EMT in GBM aggressiveness and the promising involvement of purines in this process, we think that further research in this regard may open the way towards a new therapeutic approach for the control of GBM invasiveness/recurrence. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  19. Recurrent glioblastoma: Current patterns of care in an Australian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parakh, Sagun; Thursfield, Vicky; Cher, Lawrence; Dally, Michael; Drummond, Katharine; Murphy, Michael; Rosenthal, Mark A; Gan, Hui K

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective population-based survey examined current patterns of care for patients with recurrent glioblastoma (rGBM) who had previously undergone surgery and post-operative therapy at original diagnosis. The patients were identified from the Victorian Cancer Registry (VCR) from 2006 to 2008. Patient demographics, tumour characteristics and oncological management were extracted using a standardised survey by the treating clinicians/VCR staff and results analysed by the VCR. Kaplan-Meier estimates of overall survival (OS) at diagnosis and progression were calculated. A total of 95 patients (48%) received treatment for first recurrence; craniotomy and post-operative treatment (38), craniotomy only (34) and non-surgical treatment (23). Patients receiving treatment at first progression had a higher median OS than those who did not (7 versus 3 months, pera where post-operative "Stupp" chemo-radiation is standard. First and second line therapy for rGBM is common and associated with significant benefit. Treatment generally includes re-resection and/or systemic therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Investigation of platinum nanoparticle properties against U87 glioblastoma multiforme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kutwin, Marta; Sawosz, Ewa; Jaworski, Slawomir

    2017-01-01

    and morphology of tumor tissue, but they also upregulated p53 and caspase-3 mRNA expression. Conclusions: The comparison between the effectiveness of glioblastoma treatment by NP-Pt vs cisplatin showed promising results for future studies. The results indicate that the properties of NP-Pt might be utilized......-Pt and cisplatin were compared through the morphology, viability, mortality, genotoxicity and the type of cell death of U87 glioma cells, the morphology and ultrastructure of glioma tumor, and expression of caspase-3, p53 and PCNA mRNA. Results: NP-Pt at concentrations of 0.14 μM/ml, 0.29 μM/ml and 0.65 μM/ml had...... of platinum nanoparticles and cisplatin and their anticancer properties in examination with a U87 glioma cell line and tumor. Material and methods: Nanoparticles of platinum (NP-Pt) and cisplatin were incubated with U87 glioma cells or injected directly into tumor tissue. The biological properties of NP...

  1. Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Look Inside Its Heterogeneous Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-del-Mar Inda

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape.

  2. Glioblastoma multiforme: a look inside its heterogeneous nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Maria-Del-Mar; Bonavia, Rudy; Seoane, Joan

    2014-01-27

    Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape.

  3. Glioblastoma Multiforme: A Look Inside Its Heterogeneous Nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inda, Maria-del-Mar, E-mail: mminda@vhio.net; Bonavia, Rudy [Translational Research Program, Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, 119-129 Passeig Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona 08035 (Spain); Seoane, Joan [Translational Research Program, Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO), Vall d’Hebron University Hospital, 119-129 Passeig Vall d’Hebron, Barcelona 08035 (Spain); Catalan Institution of Research and Advanced Studies (ICREA), Barcelona 08035 (Spain)

    2014-01-27

    Heterogeneity is a hallmark of tumors and has a crucial role in the outcome of the malignancy, because it not only confounds diagnosis, but also challenges the design of effective therapies. There are two types of heterogeneity: inter-tumor and intra-tumor heterogeneity. While inter-tumor heterogeneity has been studied widely, intra-tumor heterogeneity has been neglected even though numerous studies support this aspect of tumor pathobiology. The main reason has been the technical difficulties, but with new advances in single-cell technology, intra-tumor heterogeneity is becoming a key area in the study of cancer. Several models try to explain the origin and maintenance of intra-tumor heterogeneity, however, one prominent model compares cancer with a tree where the ubiquitous mutations compose the trunk and mutations present in subpopulations of cells are represented by the branches. In this review we will focus on the intra-tumor heterogeneity of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common brain tumor in adults that is characterized by a marked heterogeneity at the cellular and molecular levels. Better understanding of this heterogeneity will be essential to design effective therapies against this devastating disease to avoid tumor escape.

  4. Methionine Uptake and Required Radiation Dose to Control Glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iuchi, Toshihiko, E-mail: tiuchi@chiba-cc.jp [Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hatano, Kazuo [Division of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Bay Advanced Imaging and Radiation Oncology Clinic, Makuhari, Chiba (Japan); Uchino, Yoshio [Division of Nuclear Medicine, Chiba Ryogo Center, Chiba (Japan); Itami, Makiko [Division of Surgical Pathology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hasegawa, Yuzo; Kawasaki, Koichiro; Sakaida, Tsukasa [Division of Neurological Surgery, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan); Hara, Ryusuke [Division of Radiation Oncology, Chiba Cancer Center, Chiba (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to retrospectively assess the feasibility of radiation therapy planning for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) based on the use of methionine (MET) positron emission tomography (PET), and the correlation among MET uptake, radiation dose, and tumor control. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two patients with GBM who underwent MET-PET prior to radiation therapy were enrolled. MET uptake in 30 regions of interest (ROIs) from 22 GBMs, biologically effective doses (BEDs) for the ROIs and their ratios (MET uptake:BED) were compared in terms of whether the ROIs were controlled for >12 months. Results: MET uptake was significantly correlated with tumor control (odds ratio [OR], 10.0; P=.005); however, there was a higher level of correlation between MET uptake:BED ratio and tumor control (OR, 40.0; P<.0001). These data indicated that the required BEDs for controlling the ROIs could be predicted in terms of MET uptake; BED could be calculated as [34.0 × MET uptake] Gy from the optimal threshold of the MET uptake:BED ratio for tumor control. Conclusions: Target delineation based on MET-PET was demonstrated to be feasible for radiation therapy treatment planning. MET-PET could not only provide precise visualization of infiltrating tumor cells but also predict the required radiation doses to control target regions.

  5. Association of collagen architecture with glioblastoma patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pointer, Kelli B; Clark, Paul A; Schroeder, Alexandra B; Salamat, M Shahriar; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Kuo, John S

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most malignant primary brain tumor. Collagen is present in low amounts in normal brain, but in GBMs, collagen gene expression is reportedly upregulated. However, to the authors' knowledge, direct visualization of collagen architecture has not been reported. The authors sought to perform the first direct visualization of GBM collagen architecture, identify clinically relevant collagen signatures, and link them to differential patient survival. METHODS Second-harmonic generation microscopy was used to detect collagen in a GBM patient tissue microarray. Focal and invasive GBM mouse xenografts were stained with Picrosirius red. Quantitation of collagen fibers was performed using custom software. Multivariate survival analysis was done to determine if collagen is a survival marker for patients. RESULTS In focal xenografts, collagen was observed at tumor brain boundaries. For invasive xenografts, collagen was intercalated with tumor cells. Quantitative analysis showed significant differences in collagen fibers for focal and invasive xenografts. The authors also found that GBM patients with more organized collagen had a longer median survival than those with less organized collagen. CONCLUSIONS Collagen architecture can be directly visualized and is different in focal versus invasive GBMs. The authors also demonstrate that collagen signature is associated with patient survival. These findings suggest that there are collagen differences in focal versus invasive GBMs and that collagen is a survival marker for GBM.

  6. Tumor cells and neovasculature dual targeting delivery for glioblastoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huile; Yang, Zhi; Cao, Shijie; Xiong, Yang; Zhang, Shuang; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), one of the most common primary malignant brain tumors, was characterized by angiogenesis and tumor cells proliferation. Antiangiogenesis and antitumor combination treatment gained much attention because of the potency in dual inhibition of both the tumor proliferation and the tumor invasion. In this study, a neovasculature and tumor cell dual targeting delivery system was developed through modification of nanoparticles with interleukin-13 peptide and RGD (IRNPs), in which interleukin-13 peptide was targeting GBM cells and RGD was targeting neovasculature. To evaluate the potency in GBM treatment, docetaxel was loaded into IRNPs. In vitro, interleukin-13 peptide and RGD could enhance the corresponding cells (C6 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells) uptake and cytotoxicity. In combination, IRNPs showed high uptake in both cells and increased the cytotoxicity on both cells. In vivo, IRNPs could effectively deliver cargoes to GBM with higher intensity than mono-modified nanoparticles. Correspondingly, docetaxel-IRNPs displayed best anti-tumor effect with a median survival time of 35 days, which was significantly longer than that of mono-modified and unmodified nanoparticles. Importantly, treatment with docetaxel-IRNPs could avoid the accumulation of HIF1α in GBM site, which was crucial for the tumor invasion. After the treatment, there was no obvious change in normal organs of mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh K. Singh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs. Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2 transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2 and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1, which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo.

  8. A comprehensive characterization of mitochondrial DNA mutations in glioblastoma multiforme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidone, Michele; Clima, Rosanna; Santorsola, Mariangela; Calabrese, Claudia; Girolimetti, Giulia; Kurelac, Ivana; Amato, Laura Benedetta; Iommarini, Luisa; Trevisan, Elisa; Leone, Marco; Soffietti, Riccardo; Morra, Isabella; Faccani, Giuliano; Attimonelli, Marcella; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant brain cancer in adults, with a poor prognosis, whose molecular stratification still represents a challenge in pathology and clinics. On the other hand, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations have been found in most tumors as modifiers of the bioenergetics state, albeit in GBM a characterization of the mtDNA status is lacking to date. Here, a characterization of the burden of mtDNA mutations in GBM samples was performed. First, investigation of tumor-specific vs. non tumor-specific mutations was carried out with the MToolBox bioinformatics pipeline by analyzing 45 matched tumor/blood samples, from whole genome or whole exome sequencing datasets obtained from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) consortium. Additionally, the entire mtDNA sequence was obtained in a dataset of 104 fresh-frozen GBM samples. Mitochondrial mutations with potential pathogenic interest were prioritized based on heteroplasmic fraction, nucleotide variability, and in silico prediction of pathogenicity. A preliminary biochemical analysis of the activity of mitochondrial respiratory complexes was also performed on fresh-frozen GBM samples. Although a high number of mutations was detected, we report that the large majority of them does not pass the prioritization filters. Therefore, a relatively limited burden of pathogenic mutations is indeed carried by GBM, which did not appear to determine a general impairment of the respiratory chain. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Exosome Proteome of U-87MG Glioblastoma Cells

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    Sohyun Chun

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are small membrane vesicles between 30 and 100 nm in diameter secreted by many cell types, and are associated with a wide range of physiological and/or pathological processes. Exosomes containing proteins, lipids, mRNA, and microRNA contribute to cell-to-cell communication and cell-to-environment regulation, however, their biological functions are not yet fully understood. In this report, exosomes in the glioblastoma cell line, U-87MG, were isolated and the proteome was investigated. In addition, exosome proteome changes in U-87MG cells exposed to a low temperature were investigated to elucidate whether the exosome proteome could respond to an external stimulus. Cell culture medium was collected, and exosomes were isolated by continuous centrifugation eliminating cell debris, nucleic acids, and other particles. The morphology of exosomes was observed by cryo-tunneling electron microscopy. According to 2-dimensional electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry, certain proteins including collagen type VI alpha 1, putative RNA-binding protein 15B chain A, substrate induced remodeling of the active site regulates HTRA1, coatomer protein complex-subunit beta 2, myosin-heavy chain 1, and keratin-type I cytoskeletal 9 showed differences between the control proteome and the low temperature-exposed proteome.

  10. Oncogenes Activate an Autonomous Transcriptional Regulatory Circuit That Drives Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dinesh K; Kollipara, Rahul K; Vemireddy, Vamsidara; Yang, Xiao-Li; Sun, Yuxiao; Regmi, Nanda; Klingler, Stefan; Hatanpaa, Kimmo J; Raisanen, Jack; Cho, Steve K; Sirasanagandla, Shyam; Nannepaga, Suraj; Piccirillo, Sara; Mashimo, Tomoyuki; Wang, Shan; Humphries, Caroline G; Mickey, Bruce; Maher, Elizabeth A; Zheng, Hongwu; Kim, Ryung S; Kittler, Ralf; Bachoo, Robert M

    2017-01-24

    Efforts to identify and target glioblastoma (GBM) drivers have primarily focused on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). Clinical benefits, however, have been elusive. Here, we identify an SRY-related box 2 (SOX2) transcriptional regulatory network that is independent of upstream RTKs and capable of driving glioma-initiating cells. We identified oligodendrocyte lineage transcription factor 2 (OLIG2) and zinc-finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (ZEB1), which are frequently co-expressed irrespective of driver mutations, as potential SOX2 targets. In murine glioma models, we show that different combinations of tumor suppressor and oncogene mutations can activate Sox2, Olig2, and Zeb1 expression. We demonstrate that ectopic co-expression of the three transcription factors can transform tumor-suppressor-deficient astrocytes into glioma-initiating cells in the absence of an upstream RTK oncogene. Finally, we demonstrate that the transcriptional inhibitor mithramycin downregulates SOX2 and its target genes, resulting in markedly reduced proliferation of GBM cells in vivo. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Data Analysis and Tissue Type Assignment for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqian Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is characterized by high infiltration. The interpretation of MRSI data, especially for GBMs, is still challenging. Unsupervised methods based on NMF by Li et al. (2013, NMR in Biomedicine and Li et al. (2013, IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Engineering have been proposed for glioma recognition, but the tissue types is still not well interpreted. As an extension of the previous work, a tissue type assignment method is proposed for GBMs based on the analysis of MRSI data and tissue distribution information. The tissue type assignment method uses the values from the distribution maps of all three tissue types to interpret all the information in one new map and color encodes each voxel to indicate the tissue type. Experiments carried out on in vivo MRSI data show the feasibility of the proposed method. This method provides an efficient way for GBM tissue type assignment and helps to display information of MRSI data in a way that is easy to interpret.

  12. Post progression survival in glioblastoma: where are we?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, Enrico; Ermani, Mario; Bartolini, Stefania; Bartolotti, Marco; Poggi, Rosalba; Tallini, Giovanni; Marucci, Gianluca; Fioravanti, Antonio; Tosoni, Alicia; Agati, Raffaele; Bacci, Antonella; Pozzati, Eugenio; Morandi, Luca; Balestrini, Damiano; Ghimenton, Claudio; Crisi, Girolamo; Brandes, Alba A

    2015-01-01

    The optimal end point for phase II studies for recurrent glioblastoma (GBM) is unclear and a matter of debate. Moreover, data about post-progression survival (PPS) after the first disease progression in GBM patients treated according to EORTC 26981/22981/NCIC CE.3 trial are limited. The aim of this study was to evaluate the PPS in GBM patients. The analysis was made with a database on 1,006 GBM patients followed prospectively between 06/2005 and 06/2010. Eligibility criteria for the study were: age ≥ 18 years; PS: 0-2; chemotherapy given at disease progression after RT/TMZ. 232 patients (mean age 52 years, range 18-77 years) were enrolled. The median PFS following second line chemotherapy (PFS2) was 2.5 months (95 % CI 2.1-2.9) and the rate of patients free of progression at 6 months (PFS2-6 mo), was 21.6 % (95 % CI 16.3-26.9 %). The median PPS was 8.6 months (95 % CI 7.4-9.8), PPS rates were: PPS-6: 66 % (95 % CI 60.3-72.9 %), PPS-9: 48.2 % (95 % CI 41.5-54.9 %) and PPS-12: 31.7 % (95 % CI 25.2-38.2 %). PPS in unselected patients treated with alkylating agents is about 8 months. PPS rates could be of interest as an end point in future studies in recurrent GBM.

  13. Differential Connexin Function Enhances Self-Renewal in Glioblastoma

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    Masahiro Hitomi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The coordination of complex tumor processes requires cells to rapidly modify their phenotype and is achieved by direct cell-cell communication through gap junction channels composed of connexins. Previous reports have suggested that gap junctions are tumor suppressive based on connexin 43 (Cx43, but this does not take into account differences in connexin-mediated ion selectivity and intercellular communication rate that drive gap junction diversity. We find that glioblastoma cancer stem cells (CSCs possess functional gap junctions that can be targeted using clinically relevant compounds to reduce self-renewal and tumor growth. Our analysis reveals that CSCs express Cx46, while Cx43 is predominantly expressed in non-CSCs. During differentiation, Cx46 is reduced, while Cx43 is increased, and targeting Cx46 compromises CSC maintenance. The difference between Cx46 and Cx43 is reflected in elevated cell-cell communication and reduced resting membrane potential in CSCs. Our data demonstrate a pro-tumorigenic role for gap junctions that is dependent on connexin expression.

  14. Hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy for recurrent glioblastoma: single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciammella, Patrizia; Podgornii, Ala; Galeandro, Maria; D’Abbiero, Nunziata; Pisanello, Anna; Botti, Andrea; Cagni, Elisabetta; Iori, Mauro; Iotti, Cinzia

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain tumor in adults. Tumor control and survival have improved with the use of radiotherapy (RT) plus concomitant and adjuvant chemotherapy, but the prognosis remain poor. In most cases the recurrence occurs within 7–9 months after primary treatment. Currently, many approaches are available for the salvage treatment of patients with recurrent GBM, including resection, re-irradiation or systemic agents, but no standard of care exists. We analysed a cohort of patients with recurrent GBM treated with frame-less hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy with a total dose of 25 Gy in 5 fractions. Of 91 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed GBM treated between 2007 and 2012 with conventional adjuvant chemo-radiation therapy, 15 underwent salvage RT at recurrence. The median time interval between primary RT and salvage RT was 10.8 months (range, 6–54 months). Overall, patients undergoing salvage RT showed a longer survival, with a median survival of 33 vs. 9.9 months (p= 0.00149). Median overall survival (OS) from salvage RT was 9.5 months. No patients demonstrated clinically significant acute morbidity, and all patients were able to complete the prescribed radiation therapy without interruption. Our results suggest that hypofractionated stereotactic radiation therapy is effective and safe in recurrent GBM. However, until prospective randomized trials will confirm these results, the decision for salvage treatment should remain individual and based on a multidisciplinary evaluation of each patient

  15. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy Treatment for Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    Liu Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most malignant glioma and patients diagnosed with this disease had poor outcomes even treated with the combination of conventional treatment (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Dendritic cells (DCs are the most powerful antigen presenting cells and DC-based vaccination has the potential to target and eliminate GBM cells and enhance the responses of these cells to the existing therapies with minimal damage to the healthy tissues around them. It can enhance recognition of GBM cells by the patients’ immune system and activate vast, potent, and long-lasting immune reactions to eliminate them. Therefore, this therapy can prolong the survival of GBM patients and has wide and bright future in the treatment of GBM. Also, the efficacy of this therapy can be strengthened in several ways at some degree: the manipulation of immune regulatory components or costimulatory molecules on DCs; the appropriate choices of antigens for loading to enhance the effectiveness of the therapy; regulation of positive regulators or negative regulators in GBM microenvironment.

  16. [Foundation of preoperative prognosis estimation model for glioblastoma multiforme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, H H; Feng, G Y; Liu, D; Ren, X H; Cui, Y; Lin, S

    2017-08-15

    Objective: This study explored the preoperative prognostic factors of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) in order to propose a preoperative prognosis estimation model. Methods: The clinical data of 416 patients diagnosed with GBM in Beijing Tiantan Hospital affiliated to Capital Medical University from 2008 to 2015 were retrospectively reviewed.A total of nine factors: gender, age, duration of symptoms, preoperative epilepsy, preoperative muscle weakness, preoperative headache, preoperative KPS score, tumor location and tumor diameter were enrolled in the survival analysis.The significant factors identified by Kaplan-Meier plot were further collected in the multivariate Cox regression analysis.On the basis of multivariate analysis results, a preoperative prognosis estimation model was founded. Results: Univariate analysis showed that Age ≥50 years, without preoperative epilepsy, tumor located in non-frontotemporal lobe, tumor diameter ≥6 cm and preoperative KPS score preoperative epilepsy, tumor located in non-frontotemporal lobe were independent risk factors ( P <0.05). The prognostic estimation model based on the independent risk factors divided the whole cohort into three subgroups with different survival ( P <0.001). Conclusions: The more risk factors, the higher score but poorer prognosis. Patients in the high-risk group had lower gross total resection degree but higher rate of postoperative complications, which suggested that aggressive resection was not suitable for high-risk patients.

  17. Nanoparticles of carbon allotropes inhibit glioblastoma multiforme angiogenesis in ovo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grodzik M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Marta Grodzik1, Ewa Sawosz1, Mateusz Wierzbicki1, Piotr Orlowski1, Anna Hotowy2, Tomasz Niemiec1, Maciej Szmidt3, Katarzyna Mitura4, André Chwalibog21Division of Biotechnology and Biochemistry of Nutrition, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; 2Department of Basic Animal and Veterinary Science, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; 3Division of Histology and Embryology, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Warsaw, Poland; 4Department of Biomedical Engineering, Koszalin University of Technology, Koszalin, PolandAbstract: The objective of the study was to determine the effect of carbon nanoparticles produced by different methods on the growth of brain tumor and the development of blood vessels. Glioblastoma multiforme cells were cultured on the chorioallantoic membrane of chicken embryo and after 7 days of incubation, were treated with carbon nanoparticles administered in ovo to the tumor. Both types of nanoparticles significantly decreased tumor mass and volume, and vessel area. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed downregulated fibroblast growth factor-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor expression at the messenger ribonucleic acid level. The present results demonstrate antiangiogenic activity of carbon nanoparticles, making them potential factors for anticancer therapy.Keywords: cancer, nanoparticle, embryo, angiogenesis, FGF-2, VEGF

  18. CD133 is essential for glioblastoma stem cell maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brescia, Paola; Ortensi, Barbara; Fornasari, Lorenzo; Levi, Daniel; Broggi, Giovanni; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2013-05-01

    The role of the cell surface CD133 as a cancer stem cell marker in glioblastoma (GBM) has been widely investigated, since it identifies cells that are able to initiate neurosphere growth and form heterogeneous tumors when transplanted in immune-compromised mice. However, evidences of CD133-negative cells exhibiting similar properties have also been reported. Moreover, the functional role of CD133 in cancer stem/progenitor cells remains poorly understood. We studied the biological effects of CD133 downregulation in GBM patient-derived neurospheres. Our results indicate that there is not a hierarchical relation between CD133-positive and CD133-negative cells composing the neurospheres. Indeed, CD133 appears in an interconvertible state, changing its subcellular localization between the cytoplasm and the plasmamembrane of neurosphere cells. Silencing of CD133 in human GBM neurospheres using lentivirus-mediated short hairpin RNA impairs the self-renewal and tumorigenic capacity of neurosphere cells. These results imply that CD133 could be used as a therapeutic target in GBMs. Copyright © 2013 AlphaMed Press.

  19. Current Trends in Targeted Therapies for Glioblastoma Multiforme

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    Fumiharu Ohka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is one of the most frequently occurring tumors in the central nervous system and the most malignant tumor among gliomas. Despite aggressive treatment including surgery, adjuvant TMZ-based chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, GBM still has a dismal prognosis: the median survival is 14.6 months from diagnosis. To date, many studies report several determinants of resistance to this aggressive therapy: (1 O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT, (2 the complexity of several altered signaling pathways in GBM, (3 the existence of glioma stem-like cells (GSCs, and (4 the blood-brain barrier. Many studies aim to overcome these determinants of resistance to conventional therapy by using various approaches to improve the dismal prognosis of GBM such as modifying TMZ administration and combining TMZ with other agents, developing novel molecular-targeting agents, and novel strategies targeting GSCs. In this paper, we review up-to-date clinical trials of GBM treatments in order to overcome these 4 hurdles and to aim at more therapeutical effect than conventional therapies that are ongoing or are about to launch in clinical settings and discuss future perspectives.

  20. Tumor-initiating cell frequency is relevant for glioblastoma aggressiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richichi, Cristina; Osti, Daniela; Del Bene, Massimiliano; Fornasari, Lorenzo; Patanè, Monica; Pollo, Bianca; DiMeco, Francesco; Pelicci, Giuliana

    2016-11-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is maintained by a small subpopulation of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). The arduous assessment of TIC frequencies challenges the prognostic role of TICs in predicting the clinical outcome in GBM patients. We estimated the TIC frequency in human GBM injecting intracerebrally in mice dissociated cells without any passage in culture.All GBMs contained rare TICsand were tumorigenic in vivo but only 54% of them grew in vitro as neurospheres. We demonstrated that neurosphere formation in vitro did not foretell tumorigenic ability in vivo and frequencies calculated in vitro overestimated the TIC content.Our findings assert the pathological significance of GBM TICs. TIC number correlated positively with tumor incidence and inversely with survival of tumor-bearing mice. Stratification of GBM patients according to TIC content revealed that patients with low TIC frequency experienced a trend towards a longer progression free survival. The expression of either putative stem-cell markers or markers associated with different GBM molecular subtypes did not associate with either TIC content or neurosphere formation underlying the limitations of TIC identification based on the expression of some putative stem cell-markers.

  1. Glioblastoma angiogenesis: VEGF resistance solutions and new strategies based on molecular mechanisms of tumor vessel formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Shingo

    2012-04-01

    Glioblastomas are highly vascular tumors. Recent preclinical and clinical investigations have revealed that agents targeting angiogenesis may have efficacy against this type of tumor. Antibodies to vascular endothelial growth factor are being studied in this patient population. Unfortunately, treatment inevitably fails. This review provides an update on recent research on the mechanisms by which tumor cells acquire resistance, and discusses recent preclinical and experimental development of novel new-generation anti-angiogenic agents that overcome this problem, especially those based on the molecular mechanisms of tumor vessel formation. The tumor vasculature not only nourishes glioblastomas, but also provides a specialized microenvironment for tumor stem-like cells and for the brain tumor. The factors, pathways, and interactions described in this review provide information about the cell biology of glioblastomas which may ultimately result in new modes of treatment.

  2. Acute hypoxia induces upregulation of microRNA-210 expression in glioblastoma spheroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Tine Agerbo; Thomassen, Mads; Jensen, Stine Skov

    2015-01-01

    AIM: Tumor hypoxia and presence of tumor stem cells are related to therapeutic resistance and tumorigenicity in glioblastomas. The aim of the present study was therefore to identify microRNAs deregulated in acute hypoxia and to identify possible associated changes in stem cell markers. MATERIALS...... & METHODS: Glioblastoma spheroid cultures were grown in either 2 or 21% oxygen. Subsequently, miRNA profiling was performed and expression of ten stem cell markers was examined. RESULTS: MiRNA-210 was significantly upregulated in hypoxia in patient-derived spheroids. The stem cell markers displayed...... a complex regulatory pattern. CONCLUSION: MiRNA-210 appears to be upregulated in hypoxia in immature glioblastoma cells. This miRNA may represent a therapeutic target although it is not clear from the results whether this miRNA may be related to specific cancer stem cell functions....

  3. Tumor treating fields therapy device for glioblastoma: physics and clinical practice considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Edwin; Swanson, Kenneth D; Wong, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    Alternating electric fields therapy, as delivered by the tumor treating fields device, is a new modality of cancer treatment that has been approved by the US FDA for recurrent glioblastoma. At a frequency of 200 kHz, these fields emanate from transducer arrays on the surface of the patient's scalp into the brain and perturb processes necessary for cytokinesis during tumor cell mitosis. In the registration Phase III trial for recurrent glioblastoma patients, the efficacy of the tumor treating fields as monotherapy was equivalent to chemotherapy, while scalp irritation was its major adverse event compared with systemic toxicities that were associated with cytotoxic chemotherapies. Alternating electric fields therapy is, therefore, an essential option for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the physics, cell biology and clinical data supporting the use of the tumor treating fields therapy.

  4. Angiotensinogen and HLA class II predict bevacizumab response in recurrent glioblastoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urup, Thomas; Michaelsen, Signe Regner; Olsen, Lars Rønn

    2016-01-01

    Background: Bevacizumab combination therapy is among the most frequently used treatments in recurrent glioblastoma and patients who achieve response to bevacizumab have improved survival as well as quality of life. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to identify predictive biomarkers...... for bevacizumab response in recurrent glioblastoma patients. Methods: The study included a total of 82 recurrent glioblastoma patients treated with bevacizumab combination therapy whom were both response and biomarker evaluable. Gene expression of tumor tissue was analyzed by using a customized Nano.......0009) and high expression of a HLA class II gene (2-fold increase in HLA-DQA1; OR = 1.22; 95% CI: 1.01-1.47; P = 0.04). These two genes were included in a model that is able predict response to bevacizumab combination therapy in clinical practice. When stratified for a validated prognostic index, the predictive...

  5. Epilepsy in glioblastoma patients: basic mechanisms and current problems in treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruna, Jordi; Miró, Júlia; Velasco, Roser

    2013-05-01

    Glioblastoma-related epilepsy requires paying careful attention to a combination of factors with an integrated approach. Major interrelated issues must be considered in the seizure care of glioblastoma patients. Seizure control frequently requires the administration of antiepileptic drugs simultaneously with other treatments, including surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, with complete seizure relief often being difficult to achieve. The pharmacological interactions between antiepileptic drugs and antineoplastic agents can modify the activity of both treatments, compromising their efficacy and increasing the probability of developing adverse events related to both therapies. This review summarizes the new pathophysiological pathways involved in the epileptogenesis of glioblastoma-related seizures and the interactions between antiepileptic drugs and oncological treatment, paying special attention to its impact on survival and the current evidence of the antiepileptic treatment efficacy, including the potential usefulness of new third-generation compounds.

  6. Metabolic reprogramming in glioblastoma: the influence of cancer metabolism on epigenetics and unanswered questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotri, Sameer; Zadeh, Gelareh

    2016-02-01

    A defining hallmark of glioblastoma is altered tumor metabolism. The metabolic shift towards aerobic glycolysis with reprogramming of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, regardless of oxygen availability, is a phenomenon known as the Warburg effect. In addition to the Warburg effect, glioblastoma tumor cells also utilize the tricarboxylic acid cycle/oxidative phosphorylation in a different capacity than normal tissue. Altered metabolic enzymes and their metabolites are oncogenic and not simply a product of tumor proliferation. Here we highlight the advantages of why tumor cells, including glioblastoma cells, require metabolic reprogramming and how tumor metabolism can converge on tumor epigenetics and unanswered questions in the field. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Glioblastoma Inhibition by Cell Surface Immunoglobulin Protein EWI-2, In Vitro and In Vivo

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    Tatiana V. Kolesnikova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available EWI-2, a cell surface IgSF protein, is highly expressed in normal human brain but is considerably diminished in glioblastoma tumors and cell lines. Moreover, loss of EWI-2 expression correlated with a shorter survival time in human glioma patients, suggesting that EWI-2 might be a natural inhibitor of glioblastoma. In support of this idea, EWI-2 expression significantly impaired both ectopic and orthotopic tumor growth in nude mice in vivo. In vitro assays provided clues regarding EWI-2 functions. Expression of EWI-2 in T98G and/or U87-MG malignant glioblastoma cell lines failed to alter two-dimensional cell proliferation but inhibited glioblastoma colony formation in soft agar and caused diminished cell motility and invasion. At the biochemical level, EWI-2 markedly affects the organization of four molecules (tetraspanin proteins CD9 and CD81 and matrix metalloproteinases MMP-2 and MT1-MMP, which play key roles in the biology of astrocytes and gliomas. EWI-2 causes CD9 and CD81 to become more associated with each other, whereas CD81 and other tetraspanins become less associated with MMP-2 and MT1-MMP. We propose that EWI-2 inhibition of glioblastoma growth in vivo is at least partly explained by the capability of EWI-2 to inhibit growth and/or invasion in vitro. Underlying these functional effects, EWI-2 causes a substantial molecular reorganization of multiple molecules (CD81, CD9, MMP-2, and MT1-MMP known to affect proliferation and/or invasion of astrocytes and/or glioblastomas.

  8. Quantitative susceptibility mapping differentiates between blood depositions and calcifications in patients with glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Deistung

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The application of susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI in brain tumor imaging is mainly used to assess tumor-related "susceptibility based signals" (SBS. The origin of SBS in glioblastoma is still unknown, potentially representing calcifications or blood depositions. Reliable differentiation between both entities may be important to evaluate treatment response and to identify glioblastoma with oligodendroglial components that are supposed to present calcifications. Since calcifications and blood deposits are difficult to differentiate using conventional MRI, we investigated whether a new post-processing approach, quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM, is able to distinguish between both entities reliably. MATERIALS AND METHODS: SWI, FLAIR, and T1-w images were acquired from 46 patients with glioblastoma (14 newly diagnosed, 24 treated with radiochemotherapy, 8 treated with radiochemotherapy and additional anti-angiogenic medication. Susceptibility maps were calculated from SWI data. All glioblastoma were evaluated for the appearance of hypointense or hyperintense correlates of SBS on the susceptibility maps. RESULTS: 43 of 46 glioblastoma presented only hyperintense intratumoral SBS on susceptibility maps, indicating blood deposits. Additional hypointense correlates of tumor-related SBS on susceptibility maps, indicating calcification, were identified in 2 patients being treated with radiochemotherapy and in one patient being treated with additional anti-angiogenic medication. Histopathologic reports revealed an oligodendroglial component in one patient that presented calcifications on susceptibility maps. CONCLUSIONS: QSM provides a quantitative, local MRI contrast, which reliably differentiates between blood deposits and calcifications. Thus, quantitative susceptibility mapping appears promising to identify rare variants of glioblastoma with oligodendroglial components non-invasively and may allow monitoring the role of

  9. Correlation of MGMT promoter methylation status with gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Miyuki; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko; Camargo, Anamaria Aranha; Moura, Ricardo Pereira; de Aguiar, Paulo Henrique; Cabrera, Hector Navarro; Begnami, Marcos; Rosemberg, Sérgio; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: 1) To correlate the methylation status of the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT) promoter to its gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma and 2) to determine the most reliable method for using MGMT to predict the response to adjuvant therapy in patients with glioblastoma. BACKGROUND: The MGMT gene is epigenetically silenced by promoter hypermethylation in gliomas, and this modification has emerged as a relevant predictor of therapeutic response. METHODS: Fifty-one cases of glioblastoma were analyzed for MGMT promoter methylation by methylation-specific PCR and pyrosequencing, gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: MGMT promoter methylation was found in 43.1% of glioblastoma by methylation-specific PCR and 38.8% by pyrosequencing. A low level of MGMT gene expression was correlated with positive MGMT promoter methylation (p = 0.001). However, no correlation was found between promoter methylation and MGMT protein expression (p = 0.297). The mean survival time of glioblastoma patients submitted to adjuvant therapy was significantly higher among patients with MGMT promoter methylation (log rank = 0.025 by methylation-specific PCR and 0.004 by pyrosequencing), and methylation was an independent predictive factor that was associated with improved prognosis by multivariate analysis. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: MGMT promoter methylation status was a more reliable predictor of susceptibility to adjuvant therapy and prognosis of glioblastoma than were MGMT protein or gene expression levels. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing methods were both sensitive methods for determining MGMT promoter methylation status using DNA extracted from frozen tissue. PMID:22012047

  10. Correlation of MGMT promoter methylation status with gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miyuki Uno

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: 1 To correlate the methylation status of the O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase (MGMT promoter to its gene and protein expression levels in glioblastoma and 2 to determine the most reliable method for using MGMT to predict the response to adjuvant therapy in patients with glioblastoma. BACKGROUND: The MGMT gene is epigenetically silenced by promoter hypermethylation in gliomas, and this modification has emerged as a relevant predictor of therapeutic response. METHODS: Fifty-one cases of glioblastoma were analyzed for MGMT promoter methylation by methylation-specific PCR and pyrosequencing, gene expression by real time polymerase chain reaction, and protein expression by immunohistochemistry. RESULTS: MGMT promoter methylation was found in 43.1% of glioblastoma by methylation-specific PCR and 38.8% by pyrosequencing. A low level of MGMT gene expression was correlated with positive MGMT promoter methylation (p = 0.001. However, no correlation was found between promoter methylation and MGMT protein expression (p = 0.297. The mean survival time of glioblastoma patients submitted to adjuvant therapy was significantly higher among patients with MGMT promoter methylation (log rank = 0.025 by methylation-specific PCR and 0.004 by pyrosequencing, and methylation was an independent predictive factor that was associated with improved prognosis by multivariate analysis. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: MGMT promoter methylation status was a more reliable predictor of susceptibility to adjuvant therapy and prognosis of glioblastoma than were MGMT protein or gene expression levels. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and pyrosequencing methods were both sensitive methods for determining MGMT promoter methylation status using DNA extracted from frozen tissue.

  11. Over-expression of CHAF1A promotes cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in glioblastoma cells via AKT/FOXO3a/Bim pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Honghai; Du, Bin [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250013 (China); Jiang, Huili [Friendship Nephrology and Blood Purification Center, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250013 (China); Gao, Jun, E-mail: gaoj1666@126.com [Department of Neurosurgery, Jinan Central Hospital Affiliated to Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong 250013 (China)

    2016-01-22

    Chromatinassembly factor 1 subunit A (CHAF1A) has been reported to be involved in several human diseases including cancer. However, the biological and clinical significance of CHAF1A in glioblastoma progression remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that up-regulation of CHAF1A happens frequently in glioblastoma tissues and is associated with glioblastoma prognosis. Knockout of CHAF1A by CRISPR/CAS9 technology induce G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in glioblastoma cell U251 and U87. In addition, inhibition of CHAF1A influenced the signal transduction of the AKT/FOXO3a/Bim axis, which is required for glioblastoma cell proliferation. Taken together, these results show that CHAF1A contributes to the proliferation of glioblastoma cells and may be developed as a de novo drug target and prognosis biomarker of glioblastoma.

  12. Over-expression of CHAF1A promotes cell proliferation and apoptosis resistance in glioblastoma cells via AKT/FOXO3a/Bim pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Honghai; Du, Bin; Jiang, Huili; Gao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Chromatinassembly factor 1 subunit A (CHAF1A) has been reported to be involved in several human diseases including cancer. However, the biological and clinical significance of CHAF1A in glioblastoma progression remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that up-regulation of CHAF1A happens frequently in glioblastoma tissues and is associated with glioblastoma prognosis. Knockout of CHAF1A by CRISPR/CAS9 technology induce G1 phase arrest and apoptosis in glioblastoma cell U251 and U87. In addition, inhibition of CHAF1A influenced the signal transduction of the AKT/FOXO3a/Bim axis, which is required for glioblastoma cell proliferation. Taken together, these results show that CHAF1A contributes to the proliferation of glioblastoma cells and may be developed as a de novo drug target and prognosis biomarker of glioblastoma.

  13. Recurrent MET fusion genes represent a drug target in pediatric glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sehested, Astrid Marie

    2016-01-01

    fusions activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling and, in cooperation with lesions compromising cell cycle regulation, induced aggressive glial tumors in vivo. MET inhibitors suppressed MET tumor growth in xenograft models. Finally, we treated a pediatric patient bearing a MET-fusion......Pediatric glioblastoma is one of the most common and most deadly brain tumors in childhood. Using an integrative genetic analysis of 53 pediatric glioblastomas and five in vitro model systems, we identified previously unidentified gene fusions involving the MET oncogene in ∼10% of cases. These MET...

  14. Evaluation of the impact of tumour hypoxia on the response of glioblastoma to radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deviers, A.; Moyal, E.; Laprie, A.; Ken, S.; Franceries, X.; Lotterie, J.A.; Celsis, P.; Berry, I.; Mboup, A.K.; Mogicato, G.

    2011-01-01

    The study aimed at characterizing hypoxic areas of a glioblastoma by spectroscopic magnetic resonance imagery (MRI), and at correlating the presence of metabolites of interest in these areas with the glioblastoma response to radiotherapy, and with survival. The analysis is based on 68 MRI and spectroscopic MRI examinations made on 17 patients. Lactate metabolite maps have been established. It appears that studying these lactates by spectroscopic MRI is a promising method for the definition of predictive factors of local evolution and of survival. Short communication

  15. Aplastic anemia as a cause of death in a patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with temozolomide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kopecky, Jindrich; Priester, Peter; Slovacek, Ladislav; Petera, Jiri; Macingova, Zuzana [Dept. of Clinical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Charles Univ. Hospital and Faculty of Medicine in Hradec Kralove (Czech Republic); Kopecky, Otakar [Clinical Oncology, Regional Hospital Nachod (Czech Republic)

    2010-08-15

    Background: Standard treatment of glioblastoma multiforme consists of postoperative radiochemotherapy with temozolomide, followed by a 6-month chemotherapy. Serious hematologic complications are rarely reported. Case Report and Results: The authors present the case of a 61-year-old female patient with glioblastoma multiforme treated with external-beam radiation therapy and concomitant temozolomide. After completion of treatment, the patient developed symptoms of serious aplastic anemia that eventually led to death due to prolonged neutro- and thrombocytopenia followed by infectious complications. Conclusion: Lethal complications following temozolomide are, per se, extremely rare, however, a total of four other cases of aplastic anemia have been reported in the literature so far. (orig.)

  16. Phase II trial of upfront bevacizumab and temozolomide for unresectable or multifocal glioblastoma

    OpenAIRE

    Lou, Emil; Peters, Katherine B; Sumrall, Ashley L; Desjardins, Annick; Reardon, David A; Lipp, Eric S; Herndon, James E; Coan, April; Bailey, Leighann; Turner, Scott; Friedman, Henry S; Vredenburgh, James J

    2013-01-01

    Patients with unresectable glioblastomas have a poor prognosis, with median survival of 6?10 months. We conducted a phase II trial of upfront 5-day temozolomide (TMZ) and bevacizumab (BV) in patients with newly diagnosed unresectable or multifocal glioblastoma. Patients received up to four cycles of TMZ at 200 mg/m2 on days 1?5, and BV at 10 mg/kg on days 1 and 15 of a 28-day cycle. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed monthly. Therapy was continued as long as there was no tum...

  17. Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendroth-Asmussen, Lisa; Aksglaede, Lise; Gernow, Anne B

    2016-01-01

    molecular genetic analyses confirmed glycogen storage disease Type IV with the finding of compound heterozygosity for 2 mutations (c.691+2T>C and c.1570C>T, p.R524X) in the GBE1 gene. We conclude that glycogen storage disease Type IV can cause early miscarriage and that diagnosis can initially be made......A 30-yr-old woman presented with 2 consecutive miscarriages within 7 mo. Histopathologic examination of the placental tissue showed intracytoplasmic inclusion vacuoles with a strong reaction in Periodic acid-Schiff staining and a slightly pallor reaction in alcian blue staining. Additional...... on histopathologic examination. Genetic analysis is required to confirm the diagnosis and to offer prenatal genetic testing in future pregnancies....

  18. Addition of Bevacizumab to Standard Radiation Therapy and Daily Temozolomide Is Associated With Minimal Toxicity in Newly Diagnosed Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vredenburgh, James J., E-mail: vrede001@mc.duke.edu [Department of Medicine, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Desjardins, Annick [Department of Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kirkpatrick, John P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Reardon, David A. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Peters, Katherine B. [Department of Neurology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Herndon, James E.; Marcello, Jennifer [Department of Cancer Center Biostatistics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Bailey, Leighann; Threatt, Stevie; Sampson, John; Friedman, Allan [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Friedman, Henry S. [Department of Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the safety of the addition of bevacizumab to standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide for newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). Methods and Materials: A total of 125 patients with newly diagnosed GBM were enrolled in the study, and received standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide. All patients underwent a craniotomy and were at least 2 weeks postoperative. Radiation therapy was administered in 1.8-Gy fractions, with the clinical target volume for the primary course treated to a dose of 45 to 50.4 Gy, followed by a boost of 9 to 14.4 Gy, to a total dose of 59.4 Gy. Patients received temozolomide at 75 mg/m{sup 2} daily throughout the course of radiation therapy. Bevacizumab was given at 10 mg/kg intravenously every 14 days, beginning a minimum of 4 weeks postoperatively. Results: Of the 125 patients, 120 (96%) completed the protocol-specified radiation therapy. Five patients had to stop the protocol therapy, 2 patients with pulmonary emboli, and 1 patient each with a Grade 2 central nervous system hemorrhage, Grade 4 pancytopenia, and wound dehiscence requiring surgical intervention. All 5 patients ultimately finished the radiation therapy. After radiation therapy, 3 patients had progressive disease, 2 had severe fatigue and decreased performance status, 1 patient had a colonic perforation, and 1 had a rectal fissure; these 7 patients therefore did not proceed with the protocol-specified adjuvant temozolomide, bevacizumab, and irinotecan. However, 113 patients (90%) were able to continue on study. Conclusions: The addition of bevacizumab to standard radiation therapy and daily temozolomide was found to be associated with minimal toxicity in patients newly diagnosed with GBM.

  19. Uruguay; 2011 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2011-01-01

    This 2011 Article IV Consultation highlights that the growth momentum in Uruguay has continued into 2011 but a slowdown is under way, led by weaker exports and slower public investment. Uruguay’s economic and financial vulnerabilities are modest, and the government has reduced debt vulnerabilities significantly and built important financial buffers. Executive Directors have commended authorities’ skillful macroeconomic management that has underpinned Uruguay’s excellent economic performance, ...

  20. Vascular grading of angiogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, S; Grabau, D A; Sørensen, Flemming Brandt

    2000-01-01

    The study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of angiogenesis by vascular grading of primary breast tumours, and to evaluate the prognostic impact of adding the vascular grade to the Nottingham Prognostic Index (NPI). The investigation included 836 patients. The median follow-up time was 11...... was moderately reproduced (kappa = 0.59). Vascular grade was significantly associated with axillary node involvement, tumour size, malignancy grade, oestrogen receptor status and histological type. In univariate analyses vascular grade significantly predicted recurrence free survival and overall survival for all...... impact for 24% of the patients, who had a shift in prognostic group, as compared to NPI, and implied a better prognostic dissemination. We concluded that the angiogenesis determined by vascular grading has independent prognostic value of clinical relevance for patients with breast cancer....

  1. Inherited variant on chromosome 11q23 increases susceptibility to IDH-mutated but not IDH-normal gliomas regardless of grade or histology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Terri; Zheng, Shichun; Decker, Paul A; Walsh, Kyle M; Bracci, Paige; Xiao, Yuanyuan; McCoy, Lucie S; Smirnov, Ivan; Patoka, Joseph S; Hansen, Helen M; Hsuang, George; Wiemels, Joe L; Tihan, Tarik; Pico, Alexander R; Prados, Michael D; Chang, Susan M; Berger, Mitchel S; Caron, Alissa; Fink, Stephanie; Kollmeyer, Thomas; Rynearson, Amanda; Voss, Jesse; Kosel, Matthew L; Fridley, Brooke L; Lachance, Daniel H; Eckel-Passow, Jeanette E; Sicotte, Hugues; O'Neill, Brian Patrick; Giannini, Caterina; Wiencke, John K; Jenkins, Robert B; Wrensch, Margaret R

    2013-05-01

    Recent discoveries of inherited glioma risk loci and acquired IDH mutations are providing new insights into glioma etiology. IDH mutations are common in lower grade gliomas and secondary glioblastomas and uncommon in primary glioblastomas. Because the inherited variant in 11q23 has been associated with risk of lower grade glioma and not with glioblastomas, we hypothesized that this variant increases susceptibility to IDH-mutated gliomas, but not to IDH-wild-type gliomas. We tested this hypothesis in patients with glioma and controls from the San Francisco Adult Glioma Study, the Mayo Clinic, and Illumina controls (1102 total patients, 5299 total controls). Case-control additive associations of 11q23 risk alleles (rs498872, T allele) were calculated using logistic regression, stratified by tumor IDH status (mutated or wild-type) and by histology and grade. We also adjusted for the recently discovered 8q24 glioma risk locus rs55705857 G allele. The 11q23 glioma risk locus was associated with increased risk of IDH-mutated gliomas of all histologies and grades (odds ratio [OR] = 1.50; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.29-1.74; P = 1.3X10(-7)) but not with IDH-wild-type gliomas of any histology or grade (OR = 0.91; 95% CI = 0.81-1.03; P = 0.14). The associations were independent of the rs55705857 G allele. A variant at the 11q23 locus increases risk for IDH-mutated but not IDH-wild-type gliomas, regardless of grade or histology.

  2. Assessment of tissue heterogeneity using diffusion tensor and diffusion kurtosis imaging for grading gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raja, Rajikha; Sinha, Neelam [International Institute of Information Technology-Bangalore, Bangalore (India); Saini, Jitender; Mahadevan, Anita; Rao, K.V.L. Narasinga; Swaminathan, Aarthi [National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences, Bangalore (India)

    2016-12-15

    In this work, we aim to assess the significance of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) parameters in grading gliomas. Retrospective studies were performed on 53 subjects with gliomas belonging to WHO grade II (n = 19), grade III (n = 20) and grade IV (n = 14). Expert marked regions of interest (ROIs) covering the tumour on T2-weighted images. Statistical texture measures such as entropy and busyness calculated over ROIs on diffusion parametric maps were used to assess the tumour heterogeneity. Additionally, we propose a volume heterogeneity index derived from cross correlation (CC) analysis as a tool for grading gliomas. The texture measures were compared between grades by performing the Mann-Whitney test followed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis for evaluating diagnostic accuracy. Entropy, busyness and volume heterogeneity index for all diffusion parameters except fractional anisotropy and anisotropy of kurtosis showed significant differences between grades. The Mann-Whitney test on mean diffusivity (MD), among DTI parameters, resulted in the highest discriminability with values of P = 0.029 (0.0421) for grade II vs. III and P = 0.0312 (0.0415) for III vs. IV for entropy (busyness). In DKI, mean kurtosis (MK) showed the highest discriminability, P = 0.018 (0.038) for grade II vs. III and P = 0.022 (0.04) for III vs. IV for entropy (busyness). Results of CC analysis illustrate the existence of homogeneity in volume (uniformity across slices) for lower grades, as compared to higher grades. Hypothesis testing performed on volume heterogeneity index showed P values of 0.0002 (0.0001) and 0.0003 (0.0003) between grades II vs. III and III vs. IV, respectively, for MD (MK). In summary, the studies demonstrated great potential towards automating grading gliomas by employing tumour heterogeneity measures on DTI and DKI parameters. (orig.)

  3. Graded tensor calculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheunert, M.

    1982-10-01

    We develop a graded tensor calculus corresponding to arbitrary Abelian groups of degrees and arbitrary commutation factors. The standard basic constructions and definitions like tensor products, spaces of multilinear mappings, contractions, symmetrization, symmetric algebra, as well as the transpose, adjoint, and trace of a linear mapping, are generalized to the graded case and a multitude of canonical isomorphisms is presented. Moreover, the graded versions of the classical Lie algebras are introduced and some of their basic properties are described. (orig.)

  4. [18F]-fluoro-l-thymidine PET and advanced MRI for preoperative grading of gliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Collet

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Whereas advanced MRI parameters give indications for the grading of gliomas, the addition of [18F]-FLT-PET could be of interest for the accurate preoperative classification of diffuse gliomas, particularly for identification of doubtful grade III and IV gliomas.

  5. A simplified approach for the molecular classification of glioblastomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Le Mercier

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common malignant primary brain tumors in adults and exhibit striking aggressiveness. Although GBM constitute a single histological entity, they exhibit considerable variability in biological behavior, resulting in significant differences in terms of prognosis and response to treatment. In an attempt to better understand the biology of GBM, many groups have performed high-scale profiling studies based on gene or protein expression. These studies have revealed the existence of several GBM subtypes. Although there remains to be a clear consensus, two to four major subtypes have been identified. Interestingly, these different subtypes are associated with both differential prognoses and responses to therapy. In the present study, we investigated an alternative immunohistochemistry (IHC-based approach to achieve a molecular classification for GBM. For this purpose, a cohort of 100 surgical GBM samples was retrospectively evaluated by immunohistochemical analysis of EGFR, PDGFRA and p53. The quantitative analysis of these immunostainings allowed us to identify the following two GBM subtypes: the "Classical-like" (CL subtype, characterized by EGFR-positive and p53- and PDGFRA-negative staining and the "Proneural-like" (PNL subtype, characterized by p53- and/or PDGFRA-positive staining. This classification represents an independent prognostic factor in terms of overall survival compared to age, extent of resection and adjuvant treatment, with a significantly longer survival associated with the PNL subtype. Moreover, these two GBM subtypes exhibited different responses to chemotherapy. The addition of temozolomide to conventional radiotherapy significantly improved the survival of patients belonging to the CL subtype, but it did not affect the survival of patients belonging to the PNL subtype. We have thus shown that it is possible to differentiate between different clinically relevant subtypes of GBM by using IHC

  6. Biocomputing: numerical simulation of glioblastoma growth using diffusion tensor imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Clatz, Olivier; Sermesant, Maxime; Marcy, Pierre-Yves; Delingette, Herve; Frenay, Marc; Ayache, Nicholas

    2008-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforma (GBM) is one of the most aggressive tumors of the central nervous system. It can be represented by two components: a proliferative component with a mass effect on brain structures and an invasive component. GBM has a distinct pattern of spread showing a preferential growth in the white fiber direction for the invasive component. By using the architecture of white matter fibers, we propose a new model to simulate the growth of GBM. This architecture is estimated by diffusion tensor imaging in order to determine the preferred direction for the diffusion component. It is then coupled with a mechanical component. To set up our growth model, we make a brain atlas including brain structures with a distinct response to tumor aggressiveness, white fiber diffusion tensor information and elasticity. In this atlas, we introduce a virtual GBM with a mechanical component coupled with a diffusion component. These two components are complementary, and can be tuned independently. Then, we tune the parameter set of our model with an MRI patient. We have compared simulated growth (initialized with the MRI patient) with observed growth six months later. The average and the odd ratio of image difference between observed and simulated images are computed. Displacements of reference points are compared to those simulated by the model. The results of our simulation have shown a good correlation with tumor growth, as observed on an MRI patient. Different tumor aggressiveness can also be simulated by tuning additional parameters. This work has demonstrated that modeling the complex behavior of brain tumors is feasible and will account for further validation of this new conceptual approach.

  7. Adaptive Global Innovative Learning Environment for Glioblastoma: GBM AGILE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Brian M; Ba, Sujuan; Berger, Mitchel S; Berry, Donald A; Cavenee, Webster K; Chang, Susan M; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Jiang, Tao; Khasraw, Mustafa; Li, Wenbin; Mittman, Robert; Poste, George H; Wen, Patrick Y; Yung, W K Alfred; Barker, Anna D

    2018-02-15

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a deadly disease with few effective therapies. Although much has been learned about the molecular characteristics of the disease, this knowledge has not been translated into clinical improvements for patients. At the same time, many new therapies are being developed. Many of these therapies have potential biomarkers to identify responders. The result is an enormous amount of testable clinical questions that must be answered efficiently. The GBM Adaptive Global Innovative Learning Environment (GBM AGILE) is a novel, multi-arm, platform trial designed to address these challenges. It is the result of the collective work of over 130 oncologists, statisticians, pathologists, neurosurgeons, imagers, and translational and basic scientists from around the world. GBM AGILE is composed of two stages. The first stage is a Bayesian adaptively randomized screening stage to identify effective therapies based on impact on overall survival compared with a common control. This stage also finds the population in which the therapy shows the most promise based on clinical indication and biomarker status. Highly effective therapies transition in an inferentially seamless manner in the identified population to a second confirmatory stage. The second stage uses fixed randomization to confirm the findings from the first stage to support registration. Therapeutic arms with biomarkers may be added to the trial over time, while others complete testing. The design of GBM AGILE enables rapid clinical testing of new therapies and biomarkers to speed highly effective therapies to clinical practice. Clin Cancer Res; 24(4); 737-43. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Response of intracerebral human glioblastoma xenografts to multifraction radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Tomoko; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Hu, Lily J.; Bollen, Andrew W.; Lamborn, Kathleen R.; Deen, Dennis F.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: We investigated the effects of fractionated radiation treatments on the life spans of athymic rats bearing intracerebral brain tumors. Methods and Materials: U-251 MG or U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells were implanted into the brains of athymic rats, and the resulting tumors were irradiated once daily with various doses of ionizing radiation for 5 consecutive days or for 10 days with a 2-day break after Day 5. Results: Five daily doses of 1 and 1.5 Gy, and 10 doses of 0.75 and 1 Gy, cured some U-251 MG tumors. However, five daily doses of 0.5 Gy increased the survival time of animals bearing U-251 MG tumors 5 days without curing any animals of their tumors. Ten doses of 0.3 Gy given over 2 weeks extended the lifespan of the host animals 9 days without curing any animals. For U-87 MG tumors, 5 daily doses of 3 Gy produced an increased lifespan of 8 days without curing any animals, and 10 doses of 1 Gy prolonged lifespan 5.5 days without curing any animals. The differences in extension of life span between the 5- and 10-fraction protocols were minor for either tumor type. Conclusion: The finding that the U-251 MG tumors are more sensitive than U-87 MG tumors, despite the fact that U-251 MG tumors contain many more hypoxic cells than U-87 MG tumors, suggests the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivities of these cell lines are more important than hypoxia in determining their in vivo radiosensitivities

  9. Evaluation of early imaging response criteria in glioblastoma multiforme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladwish, Adam; Koh, Eng-Siew; Hoisak, Jeremy; Lockwood, Gina; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Mason, Warren; Yu, Eugene; Laperriere, Normand J; Ménard, Cynthia

    2011-01-01

    Early and accurate prediction of response to cancer treatment through imaging criteria is particularly important in rapidly progressive malignancies such as Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM). We sought to assess the predictive value of structural imaging response criteria one month after concurrent chemotherapy and radiotherapy (RT) in patients with GBM. Thirty patients were enrolled from 2005 to 2007 (median follow-up 22 months). Tumor volumes were delineated at the boundary of abnormal contrast enhancement on T1-weighted images prior to and 1 month after RT. Clinical Progression [CP] occurred when clinical and/or radiological events led to a change in chemotherapy management. Early Radiologic Progression [ERP] was defined as the qualitative interpretation of radiological progression one month post-RT. Patients with ERP were determined pseudoprogressors if clinically stable for ≥6 months. Receiver-operator characteristics were calculated for RECIST and MacDonald criteria, along with alternative thresholds against 1 year CP-free survival and 2 year overall survival (OS). 13 patients (52%) were found to have ERP, of whom 5 (38.5%) were pseudoprogressors. Patients with ERP had a lower median OS (11.2 mo) than those without (not reached) (p < 0.001). True progressors fared worse than pseudoprogressors (median survival 7.2 mo vs. 19.0 mo, p < 0.001). Volume thresholds performed slightly better compared to area and diameter thresholds in ROC analysis. Responses of > 25% in volume or > 15% in area were most predictive of OS. We show that while a subjective interpretation of early radiological progression from baseline is generally associated with poor outcome, true progressors cannot be distinguished from pseudoprogressors. In contrast, the magnitude of early imaging volumetric response may be a predictive and quantitative metric of favorable outcome

  10. Subclassification of newly diagnosed glioblastomas through an immunohistochemical approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siobhan Conroy

    Full Text Available Molecular signatures in Glioblastoma (GBM have been described that correlate with clinical outcome and response to therapy. The Proneural (PN and Mesenchymal (MES signatures have been identified most consistently, but others including Classical (CLAS have also been reported. The molecular signatures have been detected by array techniques at RNA and DNA level, but these methods are costly and cannot take into account individual contributions of different cells within a tumor. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether subclasses of newly diagnosed GBMs could be assessed and assigned by application of standard pathology laboratory procedures. 123 newly diagnosed GBMs were analyzed for the tumor cell expression of 23 pre-identified proteins and EGFR amplification, together allowing for the subclassification of 65% of the tumors. Immunohistochemistry (IHC-based profiling was found to be analogous to transcription-based profiling using a 9-gene transcriptional signature for PN and MES subclasses. Based on these data a novel, minimal IHC-based scheme for subclass assignment for GBMs is proposed. Positive staining for IDH1R132H can be used for PN subclass assignment, high EGFR expression for the CLAS subtype and a combined high expression of PTEN, VIM and/or YKL40 for the MES subclass. The application of the proposed scheme was evaluated in an independent tumor set, which resulted in similar subclass assignment rates as those observed in the training set. The IHC-based subclassification scheme proposed in this study therefore could provide very useful in future studies for stratification of individual patient samples.

  11. Allopregnanolone Alters the Gene Expression Profile of Human Glioblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen J. Zamora-Sánchez

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas (GBM are the most frequent and aggressive brain tumors. In these malignancies, progesterone (P4 promotes proliferation, migration, and invasion. The P4 metabolite allopregnanolone (3α-THP similarly promotes cell proliferation in the U87 human GBM cell line. Here, we evaluated global changes in gene expression of U87 cells treated with 3α-THP, P4, and the 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride (F. 3α-THP modified the expression of 137 genes, while F changed 90. Besides, both steroids regulated the expression of 69 genes. After performing an over-representation analysis of gene ontology terms, we selected 10 genes whose products are cytoskeleton components, transcription factors, and proteins involved in the maintenance of DNA stability and replication to validate their expression changes by RT-qPCR. 3α-THP up-regulated six genes, two of them were also up-regulated by F. Two genes were up-regulated by P4 alone, however, such an effect was blocked by F when cells were treated with both steroids. The remaining genes were regulated by the combined treatments of 3α-THP + F or P4 + F. An in-silico analysis revealed that promoters of the six up-regulated genes by 3α-THP possess cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP responsive elements along with CCAAT/Enhancer binding protein alpha (CEBPα binding sites. These findings suggest that P4 and 3α-THP regulate different sets of genes that participate in the growth of GBMs.

  12. Abscess within a glioblastoma: mimicking a matryoshka doll.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishore, Kislay; Beniwal, Manish; Rao, Shilpa; Rao, K V L N; Vazhayil, Vikas; Srinivas, Dwarkanath; Somanna, Sampath

    2018-02-14

    Abscess co-existing within a brain tumor is a rare entity. Case reports in literature primarily consist of sellar pathology and parenchymal lesions including meningioma, glioma, and metastases. We report a case of glioblastoma with an intra-tumoral abscess in a middle-aged lady with no prior invasive procedure or systemic focus of infection. A 45-year old lady presented with new onset generalized seizures and rapidly progressive left hemiparesis. Imaging showed right frontal necrotic lesion with peripherally enhancing wall with solid component posteriorly. There was no diffusion restriction within the lesion. She was non-toxic and there was no systemic focus of infection. With the provisional diagnosis of malignant glioma, she underwent surgical resection of the lesion. A differential of abscess, however, was considered pre-operatively because of the rapid increase in the size of the lesion. At surgery, there was a pus-filled cavity with few areas of greyish, soft, flimsy wall and thrombosed veins. This raised a strong suspicion of a co-existing abscess within a malignant glioma and was confirmed by histopathological and microbiological examination. It is important for neurosurgeons to be aware of this rare entity. The treatment protocol remains controversial and is primarily guided by expert opinion. It is important to aggressively treat the patient with antibiotics followed by adjuvant therapy for malignancy. The timing and administration of adjuvant therapy are unclear. We suggest a delay of chemotherapy until at least 4 weeks of therapy with sensitive antibiotics. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Automated network analysis identifies core pathways in glioblastoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan Cerami

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most common and aggressive type of brain tumor in humans and the first cancer with comprehensive genomic profiles mapped by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA project. A central challenge in large-scale genome projects, such as the TCGA GBM project, is the ability to distinguish cancer-causing "driver" mutations from passively selected "passenger" mutations.In contrast to a purely frequency based approach to identifying driver mutations in cancer, we propose an automated network-based approach for identifying candidate oncogenic processes and driver genes. The approach is based on the hypothesis that cellular networks contain functional modules, and that tumors target specific modules critical to their growth. Key elements in the approach include combined analysis of sequence mutations and DNA copy number alterations; use of a unified molecular interaction network consisting of both protein-protein interactions and signaling pathways; and identification and statistical assessment of network modules, i.e. cohesive groups of genes of interest with a higher density of interactions within groups than between groups.We confirm and extend the observation that GBM alterations tend to occur within specific functional modules, in spite of considerable patient-to-patient variation, and that two of the largest modules involve signaling via p53, Rb, PI3K and receptor protein kinases. We also identify new candidate drivers in GBM, including AGAP2/CENTG1, a putative oncogene and an activator of the PI3K pathway; and, three additional significantly altered modules, including one involved in microtubule organization. To facilitate the application of our network-based approach to additional cancer types, we make the method freely available as part of a software tool called NetBox.

  14. Multi-modal glioblastoma segmentation: man versus machine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Porz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Reproducible segmentation of brain tumors on magnetic resonance images is an important clinical need. This study was designed to evaluate the reliability of a novel fully automated segmentation tool for brain tumor image analysis in comparison to manually defined tumor segmentations. METHODS: We prospectively evaluated preoperative MR Images from 25 glioblastoma patients. Two independent expert raters performed manual segmentations. Automatic segmentations were performed using the Brain Tumor Image Analysis software (BraTumIA. In order to study the different tumor compartments, the complete tumor volume TV (enhancing part plus non-enhancing part plus necrotic core of the tumor, the TV+ (TV plus edema and the contrast enhancing tumor volume CETV were identified. We quantified the overlap between manual and automated segmentation by calculation of diameter measurements as well as the Dice coefficients, the positive predictive values, sensitivity, relative volume error and absolute volume error. RESULTS: Comparison of automated versus manual extraction of 2-dimensional diameter measurements showed no significant difference (p = 0.29. Comparison of automated versus manual segmentation of volumetric segmentations showed significant differences for TV+ and TV (p0.05 with regard to the Dice overlap coefficients. Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (ρ of TV+, TV and CETV showed highly significant correlations between automatic and manual segmentations. Tumor localization did not influence the accuracy of segmentation. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, we demonstrated that BraTumIA supports radiologists and clinicians by providing accurate measures of cross-sectional diameter-based tumor extensions. The automated volume measurements were comparable to manual tumor delineation for CETV tumor volumes, and outperformed inter-rater variability for overlap and sensitivity.

  15. Study of interaction of GNR with glioblastoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hole, Arti; Cardoso-Avila, P. E.; Sridharan, Sangita; Sahu, Aditi; Nair, Jyothi; Dongre, Harsh; Goda, Jayant S.; Sawant, Sharada; Dutt, Shilpee; Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Murali Krishna, C.

    2018-01-01

    Radiation resistance is one of the major causes of recurrence and failure of radiotherapy. Different methods have been used to increase the efficacy of radiation therapy and at the same time restrict the radiation resistivity. From last few years nanoparticles have played a key role in the enhancement of radiosensitization. The densely packed nanoparticles can selectively scatter or absorb the high radiations, which allow better targeting of cellular components within the tumor hence resulting in increased radiation damage to the cancer cells. Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is one of the highly radioresistant brain cancer. Current treatment methods are surgical resection followed by concurrent chemo and radiation therapy. In this study we have used in-house engineered gold nano rodes (GNR) and analyzed their effect on U-87MG cell lines. MTT assay was employed to determine the cytotoxic concentration of the nanoparticles. Raman spectroscopy was used to analyze the effect of gold nanoparticles on glioma cells, which was followed by transmission electron microscopic examinations to visualize their cellular penetration. Our data shows that GNR were able to penetrate the cells and induce cytotoxicity at the concentration of 198 μM as determined by MTT assay at 24 post GNP treatment. Additionally, we show that Raman spectroscopy, could classify spectra between untreated and cells treated with nanoparticles. Taken together, this study shows GNR penetration and cytotoxicity in glioma cells thereby providing a rationale to use them in cancer therapeutics. Future studies will be carried out to study the biological activity of the formulation as a radiosensitizer in GBM.

  16. PARP Inhibition Restores Extrinsic Apoptotic Sensitivity in Glioblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpel-Massler, Georg; Pareja, Fresia; Aimé, Pascaline; Shu, Chang; Chau, Lily; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Halatsch, Marc-Eric; Crary, John F.; Canoll, Peter; Siegelin, Markus D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistance to apoptosis is a paramount issue in the treatment of Glioblastoma (GBM). We show that targeting PARP by the small molecule inhibitors, Olaparib (AZD-2281) or PJ34, reduces proliferation and lowers the apoptotic threshold of GBM cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods The sensitizing effects of PARP inhibition on TRAIL-mediated apoptosis and potential toxicity were analyzed using viability assays and flow cytometry in established GBM cell lines, low-passage neurospheres and astrocytes in vitro. Molecular analyses included western blots and gene silencing. In vivo, effects on tumor growth were examined in a murine subcutaneous xenograft model. Results The combination treatment of PARP inhibitors and TRAIL led to an increased cell death with activation of caspases and inhibition of formation of neurospheres when compared to single-agent treatment. Mechanistically, pharmacological PARP inhibition elicited a nuclear stress response with up-regulation of down-stream DNA-stress response proteins, e.g., CCAAT enhancer binding protein (C/EBP) homology protein (CHOP). Furthermore, Olaparib and PJ34 increased protein levels of DR5 in a concentration and time-dependent manner. In turn, siRNA-mediated suppression of DR5 mitigated the effects of TRAIL/PARP inhibitor-mediated apoptosis. In addition, suppression of PARP-1 levels enhanced TRAIL-mediated apoptosis in malignant glioma cells. Treatment of human astrocytes with the combination of TRAIL/PARP inhibitors did not cause toxicity. Finally, the combination treatment of TRAIL and PJ34 significantly reduced tumor growth in vivo when compared to treatment with each agent alone. Conclusions PARP inhibition represents a promising avenue to overcome apoptotic resistance in GBM. PMID:25531448

  17. Learning from Graded Readers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodinsky, Marilyn; Nation, Paul

    1988-01-01

    A word frequency study of two graded readers and an unsimplified text indicated that graded readers facilitated better foreign-language reading and vocabulary learning than did unsimplified texts. It was found that students needed to read several same-level texts to master vocabulary, and that vocabulary mastery was not necessary for successful…

  18. Improvement of ASME NH for Grade 91

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernard Riou

    2007-10-09

    This report has been prepared in the context of Task 3 of the ASME/DOE Gen IV material project. It has been identified that creep-fatigue evaluation procedures presently available in ASME (1) and RCC-MR (2) have been mainly developed for austenitic stainless steels and may not be suitable for cyclic softening materials such as mod 9 Cr 1 Mo steel (grade 91). The aim of this document is, starting from experimental test results, to perform a review of the procedures and, if necessary, provide recommendations for their improvements.

  19. Determination of U(IV) by spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho, C.M.C.; Bastos, E.T.R.; Bastos, M.B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The determination of uranium (IV) concentration in acid solutions in the presence of U (IV), Fe (II) and Ti (IV) by spectrophotometry is studied, aiming at controlling the solutions in the ion exchange columns, used for uranium enrichment by isotope exchange. (E.G.) [pt

  20. International Differences in Treatment and Clinical Outcomes for High Grade Glioma

    OpenAIRE

    Chien, Li-Nien; Ostrom, Quinn T.; Gittleman, Haley; Lin, Jia-Wei; Sloan, Andrew E.; Barnett, Gene H.; Elder, J. Bradley; McPherson, Christopher; Warnick, Ronald; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Lin, Chieh-Min; Rogers, Lisa R.; Chiou, Hung-Yi; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.

    2015-01-01

    Background High grade gliomas are the most common type of malignant brain tumor, and despite their rarity, cause significant morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to compare the treatment patterns of high grade glioma to examine survival patterns in patients who receive specific treatments between cohorts in Ohio and Taiwan. Method Patients aged 18 years and older at age of diagnosis with World Health Organization (WHO) grade III or IV astrocytoma from 2007-2012 were selected from the Ohi...

  1. Adult IDH wild-type lower-grade gliomas should be further stratified.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aibaidula, Abudumijit; Chan, Aden Ka-Yin; Shi, Zhifeng; Li, Yanxi; Zhang, Ruiqi; Yang, Rui; Li, Kay Ka-Wai; Chung, Nellie Yuk-Fei; Yao, Yu; Zhou, Liangfu; Wu, Jinsong; Chen, Hong; Ng, Ho-Keung

    2017-10-01

    Astrocytoma of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) wild-type gene is described as a provisional entity within the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification. Some groups believe that IDH wild-type lower-grade gliomas, when interrogated for other biomarkers, will mostly turn out to be glioblastoma. We hypothesize that not all IDH wild-type lower-grade gliomas have very poor outcomes and the group could be substratified prognostically. Seven hundred and eighteen adult WHO grades II and III patients with gliomas from our hospitals were re-reviewed and tested for IDH1/2 mutations. One hundred and sixty-six patients with IDH wild-type cases were identified for further studies, and EGFR and MYB amplifications, mutations of histone H3F3A, TERT promoter (TERTp), and BRAF were examined. EGFR amplification, BRAF, and H3F3A mutations were observed in 13.8%, 6.9%, and 9.5% of patients, respectively, in a mutually exclusive pattern in IDH wild-type lower-grade gliomas. TERTp mutations were detected in 26.8% of cases. Favorable outcome was observed in patients with young age, oligodendroglial phenotype, and grade II histology. Independent adverse prognostic values of older age, nontotal resection, grade III histology, EGFR amplification, and H3F3A mutation were confirmed by multivariable analysis. Tumors were further classified into "molecularly" high grade (harboring EGFR, H3F3A, or TERTp) (median overall survival = 1.23 y) and lower grade (lacking all of the 3) (median overall survival = 7.63 y) with independent prognostic relevance. The most favorable survival was noted in molecularly lower-grade gliomas with MYB amplification. Adult IDH wild-type lower-grade gliomas are prognostically heterogeneous and do not have uniformly poor prognosis. Clinical information and additional markers, including MYB, EGFR, TERTp, and H3F3A, should be examined to delineate discrete favorable and unfavorable prognostic groups.

  2. Preoperative inflammation markers and IDH mutation status predict glioblastoma patient survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng-Fei; Song, Hong-Wang; Cai, Hong-Qing; Kong, Ling-Wei; Yao, Kun; Jiang, Tao; Li, Shou-Wei; Yan, Chang-Xiang

    2017-07-25

    Recent studies suggest that inflammation response biomarkers are prognostic indicators of solid tumor outcomes. Here, we quantify the prognostic value of the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR), platelet-to-lymphocyte ratio (PLR), and lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR) in glioblastomas (GBMs), taking into consideration the role of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) mutation status. We examined 141 primary glioblastomas (pGBMs) and 25 secondary glioblastomas (sGBMs). NLRs, PLRs, and LMRs were calculated before surgery. IDH mutations were detected immunohistochemically after tumor resection, and patients' clinical outcomes were analyzed after classification into GBM, pGBM, and IDH-wild type glioblastoma (IDH-wt GBM) groups. To make comparisons, we set cutoffs for NLR, PLR and LMR of 4.0, 175.0, and 3.7, respectively. In a multivariate analysis, both NLR (HR=1.712, 95% CI 1.026-2.858, p=0.040) and PLR (HR=2.051, 95% CI 1.288-3.267, p=0.002) had independent prognostic value. While a low NLR was associated with a better prognosis only in the IDH-wt GBM group, PLR was predictive of patient survival in the GBM, pGBM, and IDH-wt GBM groups. By contrast, LMR exhibited no prognostic value for any of the 3 types of GBM.

  3. RNA expression patterns in serum microvesicles from patients with glioblastoma multiforme and controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerholm, Mikkel; Balaj, Leonora; Limperg, Tobias; Salehi, Afshin; Zhu, Lin Dan; Hochberg, Fred H; Breakefield, Xandra O; Carter, Bob S; Skog, Johan

    2012-01-01

    RNA from exosomes and other microvesicles contain transcripts of tumour origin. In this study we sought to identify biomarkers of glioblastoma multiforme in microvesicle RNA from serum of affected patients. Microvesicle RNA from serum from patients with de-novo primary glioblastoma multiforme (N = 9) and normal controls (N = 7) were analyzed by microarray analysis. Samples were collected according to protocols approved by the Institutional Review Board. Differential expressions were validated by qRT-PCR in a separate set of samples (N = 10 in both groups). Expression profiles of microvesicle RNA correctly separated individuals in two groups by unsupervised clustering. The most significant differences pertained to down-regulated genes (121 genes > 2-fold down) in the glioblastoma multiforme patient microvesicle RNA, validated by qRT-PCR on several genes. Overall, yields of microvesicle RNA from patients was higher than from normal controls, but the additional RNA was primarily of size < 500 nt. Gene ontology of the down-regulated genes indicated these are coding for ribosomal proteins and genes related to ribosome production. Serum microvesicle RNA from patients with glioblastoma multiforme has significantly down-regulated levels of RNAs coding for ribosome production, compared to normal healthy controls, but a large overabundance of RNA of unknown origin with size < 500 nt

  4. Integrative Modeling Reveals Annexin A2-mediated Epigenetic Control of Mesenchymal Glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, Teresia; Ferrarese, Roberto; Ó hAilín, Darren; Johansson, Patrik; Heiland, Dieter Henrik; Dai, Fangping; Vasilikos, Ioannis; Weyerbrock, Astrid; Jörnsten, Rebecka; Carro, Maria Stella; Nelander, Sven

    2016-10-01

    Glioblastomas are characterized by transcriptionally distinct subtypes, but despite possible clinical relevance, their regulation remains poorly understood. The commonly used molecular classification systems for GBM all identify a subtype with high expression of mesenchymal marker transcripts, strongly associated with invasive growth. We used a comprehensive data-driven network modeling technique (augmented sparse inverse covariance selection, aSICS) to define separate genomic, epigenetic, and transcriptional regulators of glioblastoma subtypes. Our model identified Annexin A2 (ANXA2) as a novel methylation-controlled positive regulator of the mesenchymal subtype. Subsequent evaluation in two independent cohorts established ANXA2 expression as a prognostic factor that is dependent on ANXA2 promoter methylation. ANXA2 knockdown in primary glioblastoma stem cell-like cultures suppressed known mesenchymal master regulators, and abrogated cell proliferation and invasion. Our results place ANXA2 at the apex of a regulatory cascade that determines glioblastoma mesenchymal transformation and validate aSICS as a general methodology to uncover regulators of cancer subtypes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Integrative Modeling Reveals Annexin A2-mediated Epigenetic Control of Mesenchymal Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresia Kling

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastomas are characterized by transcriptionally distinct subtypes, but despite possible clinical relevance, their regulation remains poorly understood. The commonly used molecular classification systems for GBM all identify a subtype with high expression of mesenchymal marker transcripts, strongly associated with invasive growth. We used a comprehensive data-driven network modeling technique (augmented sparse inverse covariance selection, aSICS to define separate genomic, epigenetic, and transcriptional regulators of glioblastoma subtypes. Our model identified Annexin A2 (ANXA2 as a novel methylation-controlled positive regulator of the mesenchymal subtype. Subsequent evaluation in two independent cohorts established ANXA2 expression as a prognostic factor that is dependent on ANXA2 promoter methylation. ANXA2 knockdown in primary glioblastoma stem cell-like cultures suppressed known mesenchymal master regulators, and abrogated cell proliferation and invasion. Our results place ANXA2 at the apex of a regulatory cascade that determines glioblastoma mesenchymal transformation and validate aSICS as a general methodology to uncover regulators of cancer subtypes.

  6. RNA expression patterns in serum microvesicles from patients with glioblastoma multiforme and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noerholm Mikkel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA from exosomes and other microvesicles contain transcripts of tumour origin. In this study we sought to identify biomarkers of glioblastoma multiforme in microvesicle RNA from serum of affected patients. Methods Microvesicle RNA from serum from patients with de-novo primary glioblastoma multiforme (N = 9 and normal controls (N = 7 were analyzed by microarray analysis. Samples were collected according to protocols approved by the Institutional Review Board. Differential expressions were validated by qRT-PCR in a separate set of samples (N = 10 in both groups. Results Expression profiles of microvesicle RNA correctly separated individuals in two groups by unsupervised clustering. The most significant differences pertained to down-regulated genes (121 genes > 2-fold down in the glioblastoma multiforme patient microvesicle RNA, validated by qRT-PCR on several genes. Overall, yields of microvesicle RNA from patients was higher than from normal controls, but the additional RNA was primarily of size Conclusions Serum microvesicle RNA from patients with glioblastoma multiforme has significantly down-regulated levels of RNAs coding for ribosome production, compared to normal healthy controls, but a large overabundance of RNA of unknown origin with size

  7. Active CREB1 promotes a malignant TGFβ2 autocrine loop in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodón, Laura; Gonzàlez-Juncà, Alba; Inda, María del Mar; Sala-Hojman, Ada; Martínez-Sáez, Elena; Seoane, Joan

    2014-10-01

    In advanced cancer, including glioblastoma, the TGFβ pathway acts as an oncogenic factor. Some tumors exhibit aberrantly high TGFβ activity, and the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood. We have observed that TGFβ can induce TGFβ2, generating an autocrine loop leading to aberrantly high levels of TGFβ2. We identified cAMP-responsive element-binding protein 1 (CREB1) as the critical mediator of the induction of TGFβ2 by TGFβ. CREB1 binds to the TGFB2 gene promoter in cooperation with SMAD3 and is required for TGFβ to activate transcription. Moreover, the PI3K-AKT and RSK pathways regulate the TGFβ2 autocrine loop through CREB1. The levels of CREB1 and active phosphorylated CREB1 correlate with TGFβ2 in glioblastoma. In addition, using patient-derived in vivo models of glioblastoma, we found that CREB1 levels determine the expression of TGFβ2. Our results show that CREB1 can be considered a biomarker to stratify patients for anti-TGFβ treatments and a therapeutic target in glioblastoma. TGFβ is considered a promising therapeutic target, and several clinical trials using TGFβ inhibitors are generating encouraging results. Here, we discerned the molecular mechanisms responsible for the aberrantly high levels of TGFβ2 found in certain tumors, and we propose biomarkers to predict the clinical response to anti-TGFβ therapies. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. The angiopoietin 1/angiopoietin 2 balance as a prognostic marker in primary glioblastoma multiforme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, Mariska; Wagemakers, Michiel; Molema, Grietje; Mooij, Jan Jakob A.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; den Dunnen, Wilfred F. A.

    Object. In the present study, the authors analyzed the ANGPT1/ANGPT2 balance in the context of therapeutic outcome in 62 patients with primary glioblastomas multiforme (GBMs). Methods. The tumor tissue used was obtained in adult patients who underwent neurosurgical debulking. Microvessel density was

  9. Effects of Flavonoids from Food and Dietary Supplements on Glial and Glioblastoma Multiforme Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Vidak

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Quercetin, catechins and proanthocyanidins are flavonoids that are prominently featured in foodstuffs and dietary supplements, and may possess anti-carcinogenic activity. Glioblastoma multiforme is the most dangerous form of glioma, a malignancy of the brain connective tissue. This review assesses molecular structures of these flavonoids, their importance as components of diet and dietary supplements, their bioavailability and ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, their reported beneficial health effects, and their effects on non-malignant glial as well as glioblastoma tumor cells. The reviewed flavonoids appear to protect glial cells via reduction of oxidative stress, while some also attenuate glutamate-induced excitotoxicity and reduce neuroinflammation. Most of the reviewed flavonoids inhibit proliferation of glioblastoma cells and induce their death. Moreover, some of them inhibit pro-oncogene signaling pathways and intensify the effect of conventional anti-cancer therapies. However, most of these anti-glioblastoma effects have only been observed in vitro or in animal models. Due to limited ability of the reviewed flavonoids to access the brain, their normal dietary intake is likely insufficient to produce significant anti-cancer effects in this organ, and supplementation is needed.

  10. Overcoming the blood-brain tumor barrier for effective glioblastoma treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tellingen, O. van; Yetkin-Arik, B.; Gooijer, M.C. de; Wesseling, P.; Wurdinger, T.; Vries, H.E. de

    2015-01-01

    Gliomas are the most common primary brain tumors. Particularly in adult patients, the vast majority of gliomas belongs to the heterogeneous group of diffuse gliomas, i.e. glial tumors characterized by diffuse infiltrative growth in the preexistent brain tissue. Unfortunately, glioblastoma, the most

  11. Glioblastoma with Rhabdoid Features: Report of Two Young Adult Cases and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyahara, Makiko; Nobusawa, Sumihito; Inoue, Masato; Okamoto, Kouichiro; Mochizuki, Makoto; Hara, Tetsuo

    2016-02-01

    There are few previous reports of glioblastoma in young adults, in particular, of the very rare recently proposed rhabdoid or epithelioid types. We report 2 cases of glioblastoma with rhabdoid features involving a 27-year-old woman and a 41-year-old man. In case 1, the patient presented with generalized seizures, and the initial magnetic resonance imaging showed a very small region of contrast in the left parahippocampal area. After 1 year, the mass suddenly increased in size. Treatment with multiple therapies was administered, but 5 months later, the patient died from multiple systemic metastases. In case 2, the patient presented with a chief complaint of headache for a few weeks. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed a left parietal mass with calcification and meningeal dissemination. After undergoing surgical removal, his condition rapidly deteriorated until brain death occurred. Glioblastoma with rhabdoid features may represent a specific pattern of clinical progression that emerges from histologic glioblastoma types. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Protective Effect of Gwakhyangjeonggisan Herbal Acupuncture Solution in Glioblastoma Cells: Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Seok Lee

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Neurological disorders have been one of main therapeutic targets of acupuncture. The present study investigated the protective effects of Gwakhyangjeonggisan herbal acupuncture solution (GHAS. Methods : We performed 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay in glioblastoma cells, and did microarray analysis with cells exposed to reactive oxigen species (ROS of hydrogen peroxide by 8.0 k Human cDNA, with cut-off level of 2-fold changes in gene expression. Results : MTT assay showed protective effect of GHAS on the glioblastoma cells exposed to hydrogen peroxide. When glioblastoma cells were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, 24 genes were downregulated. When the cells were pretreated with GHAS before exposure to hydrogen peroxide, 46 genes were downregulated. Many of the genes downregulated by hydrogen peroxide stimulation were decreased in the amount of downregulation or reversed to upregulation. Conclusions : The gene expression changes observed in the present study are supposed to be related to the protective molecular mechanism of GHAS in the glioblastoma cells exposed to ROS stress.

  13. GPR56/ADGRG1 Inhibits Mesenchymal Differentiation and Radioresistance in Glioblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moreno, Marta; Pedrosa, Leire; Pare, Laia; Pineda, Estela; Bejarano, Leire; Martinez, Josefina; Balasubramaniyan, Veerakumar; Ezhilarasan, Ravesanker; Kallarackal, Naveen; Kim, Sung-Hak; Wang, Jia; Audia, Alessandra; Conroy, Siobhan; Marin, Mercedes; Ribalta, Teresa; Pujol, Teresa; Herreros, Antoni; Tortosa, Avelina; Mira, Helena; Alonso, Marta M.; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Graus, Francesc; Sulman, Erik P.; Piao, Xianhua; Nakano, Ichiro; Prat, Aleix; Bhat, Krishna P.; de la Iglesia, Nuria

    2017-01-01

    A mesenchymal transition occurs both during the natural evolution of glioblastoma (GBM) and in response to therapy. Here, we report that the adhesion G-protein-coupled receptor, GPR56/ADGRG1, inhibits GBM mesenchymal differentiation and radioresistance. GPR56 is enriched in proneural and

  14. Targeting beta III-tubulin in glioblastoma multiforme: from cell biology and histopathology to cancer therapeutics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Dráber, Pavel; Kavallaris, M.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 8 (2011), s. 719-728 ISSN 1871-5206 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP302/10/1759 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : glioblastoma multiforme * tubulin binding agent * epothilones Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.862, year: 2011

  15. Tubulin targets in the pathobiology and therapy of glioblastoma multiforme. I. class III beta-tubulin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Dráberová, Eduarda; Legido, A.; Dumontet, C.; Dráber, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 221, č. 3 (2009), s. 505-513 ISSN 0021-9541 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Beta-II-tubulin * glioblastoma Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.586, year: 2009

  16. The prognostic value of FET PET at radiotherapy planning in newly diagnosed glioblastoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejklint Poulsen, Sidsel [The Finsen Center, Rigshospitalet, Department of Radiation Biology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center of Diagnostic Investigation, Rigshospitalet, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Copenhagen (Denmark); Urup, Thomas; Grunnet, Kirsten; Skovgaard Poulsen, Hans [The Finsen Center, Rigshospitalet, Department of Radiation Biology, Copenhagen (Denmark); The Finsen Center, Rigshospitalet, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Jarle Christensen, Ib [University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre Hospital, Laboratory of Gastroenterology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Larsen, Vibeke Andree [Center of Diagnostic Investigation, Rigshospitalet, Department of Radiology, Copenhagen (Denmark); Lundemann Jensen, Michael; Munck af Rosenschoeld, Per [The Finsen Center, Rigshospitalet, Department of Oncology, Copenhagen (Denmark); The Finsen Center, Rigshospitalet, Section of Radiotherapy, Copenhagen (Denmark); Law, Ian [Center of Diagnostic Investigation, Rigshospitalet, Department of Clinical Physiology, Nuclear Medicine and PET, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2017-03-15

    Glioblastoma patients show a great variability in progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). To gain additional pretherapeutic information, we explored the potential of O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine (FET) PET as an independent prognostic biomarker. We retrospectively analyzed 146 consecutively treated, newly diagnosed glioblastoma patients. All patients were treated with temozolomide and radiation therapy (RT). CT/MR and FET PET scans were obtained postoperatively for RT planning. We used Cox proportional hazards models with OS and PFS as endpoints, to test the prognostic value of FET PET biological tumor volume (BTV). Median follow-up time was 14 months, and median OS and PFS were 16.5 and 6.5 months, respectively. In the multivariate analysis, increasing BTV (HR = 1.17, P < 0.001), poor performance status (HR = 2.35, P < 0.001), O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase protein status (HR = 1.61, P = 0.024) and higher age (HR = 1.32, P = 0.013) were independent prognostic factors of poor OS. For poor PFS, only increasing BTV (HR = 1.18; P = 0.002) was prognostic. A prognostic index for OS was created based on the identified prognostic factors. Large BTV on FET PET is an independent prognostic factor of poor OS and PFS in glioblastoma patients. With the introduction of FET PET, we obtain a prognostic index that can help in glioblastoma treatment planning. (orig.)

  17. Two distinct tumor phenotypes isolated from glioblastomas show different MRS characteristics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Thorsen, F.; Jirák, D.; Wang, J.; Syková, Eva; Bjerkvig, R.; Enger, P.O.; van der Kogel, A.; Hájek, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 8 (2008), s. 830-838 ISSN 0952-3480 Grant - others:EU(NO) LSHC-CT-2004-504743 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Glioblastoma * Proton MRS * Creatine Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.329, year: 2008

  18. Time factor of BSH from intravenous infusion to neutron irradiation for BNCT in patients with glioblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageji, T.; Nagahiro, S.; Kitamura, K.; Nakagawa, Y.; Hatanaka, H.; Haritz, D.; Grochulla, F.; Haselsberger, K.; Gabel, D.

    2000-01-01

    The present report evaluates the time factor of BSH from infusion to irradiation in patients with glioblastoma as a cooperative study in Europe and Japan. For BNCT with BSH after intravenous infusion, this work confirms that the planned neutron irradiation after intravenous BSH infusion appears to be optimal around 12-19 hours after the infusion. (author)

  19. Cetuximab, bevacizumab, and irinotecan for patients with primary glioblastoma and progression after radiation therapy and temozolomide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Benedikte; Lassen, Ulrik; Hansen, Steinbjørn

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this clinical trial was to investigate safety and efficacy when combining cetuximab with bevacizumab and irinotecan in patients with recurrent pr