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Sample records for gq-coupled purinergic receptors

  1. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

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    Ana Guzman-Aranguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A, and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101 have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation.

  2. Role of purinergic receptors in CNS function and neuroprotection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tozaki-Saitoh, Hidetoshi; Tsuda, Makoto; Inoue, Kazuhide

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic receptor family contains some of the most abundant receptors in living organisms. A growing body of evidence indicates that extracellular nucleotides play important roles in the regulation of neuronal and glial functions in the nervous system through purinergic receptors. Nucleotides are released from or leaked through nonexcitable cells and neurons during normal physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Ionotropic P2X and metabotropic P2Y purinergic receptors are expressed in the central nervous system (CNS), participate in the synaptic processes, and mediate intercellular communications between neuron and gila and between glia and other glia. Glial cells in the CNS are classified into astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, and microglia. Astrocytes express many types of purinergic receptors, which are integral to their activation. Astrocytes release adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a "gliotransmitter" that allows communication with neurons, the vascular walls of capillaries, oligodendrocytes, and microglia. Oligodendrocytes are myelin-forming cells that construct insulating layers of myelin sheets around axons, and using purinergic receptor signaling for their development and for myelination. Microglia also express many types of purinergic receptors and are known to function as immunocompetent cells in the CNS. ATP and other nucleotides work as "warning molecules" especially by activating microglia in pathophysiological conditions. Studies on purinergic signaling could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for disorder of the CNS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Biology of Platelet Purinergic Receptors and Implications for Platelet Heterogeneity

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    Milka Koupenova

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Platelets are small anucleated cells present only in mammals. Platelets mediate intravascular hemostatic balance, prevent interstitial bleeding, and have a major role in thrombosis. Activation of platelet purinergic receptors is instrumental in initiation of hemostasis and formation of the hemostatic plug, although this activation process becomes problematic in pathological settings of thrombosis. This review briefly outlines the roles and function of currently known platelet purinergic receptors (P1 and P2 in the setting of hemostasis and thrombosis. Additionally, we discuss recent novel studies on purinergic receptor distribution according to heterogeneous platelet size, and the possible implication of this distribution on hemostatic function.

  4. Purinergic receptors expressed in human skeletal muscle fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornø, A; Ploug, Thorkil; Bune, L T

    2012-01-01

    in immunolabelled transverse sections of muscle biopsies. The receptors P2Y(4), P2Y(11) and likely P2X(1) were present intracellularly or in the plasma membrane of muscle fibres and were thus selected for further detailed morphological analysis. P2X(1) receptors were expressed in intracellular vesicles...... of purinergic receptors in skeletal muscle fibres in patients with type 2 diabetes and age-matched controls. Muscle biopsies from vastus lateralis were obtained from six type 2 diabetic patients and seven age-matched controls. Purinergic receptors were analysed using light and confocal microscopy...... and sarcolemma. P2Y(4) receptors were present in sarcolemma. P2Y(11) receptors were abundantly and diffusely expressed intracellularly and were more explicitly expressed in type I than in type II fibres, whereas P2X(1) and P2Y(4) showed no fibre-type specificity. Both diabetic patients and healthy controls...

  5. Role of purinergic receptor polymorphisms in human bone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wesselius, Anke; Bours, Martijn J L; Agrawal, Ankita

    2011-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a multifactorial disease with a strong genetic component. Variations in a number of genes have been shown to associate with bone turnover and risk of osteoporosis. P2 purinergic receptors are proteins that have ATP or other nucleotides as their natural ligands. Various P2Y and P2X...

  6. Purinergic Receptors: Key Mediators of HIV-1 infection and inflammation

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    Talia H Swartz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 causes a chronic infection that afflicts more than 38 million individuals worldwide. While the infection can be suppressed with potent anti-retroviral therapies, individuals infected with HIV have elevated levels of inflammation as indicated by increased T cell activation, soluble biomarkers, and associated morbidity and mortality. A single mechanism linking HIV pathogenesis to this inflammation has yet to be identified. Purinergic receptors are known to mediate inflammation and have been shown to be required for HIV-1 infection at the level of HIV-1 membrane fusion. Here we review the literature on the role of purinergic receptors in HIV-1 infection and associated inflammation and describe a role for these receptors as potential therapeutic targets.

  7. Purinergic receptors in the endocrine and exocrine pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, I

    2008-09-01

    The pancreas is a complex gland performing both endocrine and exocrine functions. In recent years there has been increasing evidence that both endocrine and exocrine cells possess purinergic receptors, which influence processes such as insulin secretion and epithelial ion transport. Most commonly, these processes have been viewed separately. In beta cells, stimulation of P2Y(1) receptors amplifies secretion of insulin in the presence of glucose. Nucleotides released from secretory granules could also contribute to autocrine/paracrine regulation in pancreatic islets. In addition to P2Y(1) receptors, there is also evidence for other P2 and adenosine receptors in beta cells (P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(6), P2X subtypes and A(1) receptors) and in glucagon-secreting alpha cells (P2X(7), A(2) receptors). In the exocrine pancreas, acini release ATP and ATP-hydrolysing and ATP-generating enzymes. P2 receptors are prominent in pancreatic ducts, and several studies indicate that P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(11), P2X(4) and P2X(7) receptors could regulate secretion, primarily by affecting Cl(-) and K(+) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) signalling. In order to understand the physiology of the whole organ, it is necessary to consider the full complement of purinergic receptors on different cells as well as the structural and functional relation between various cells within the whole organ. In addition to the possible physiological function of purinergic receptors, this review analyses whether the receptors could be potential therapeutic targets for drug design aimed at treatment of pancreatic diseases.

  8. The role of purinergic receptors in stem cell differentiation

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    Constanze Kaebisch

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A major challenge modern society has to face is the increasing need for tissue regeneration due to degenerative diseases or tumors, but also accidents or warlike conflicts. There is great hope that stem cell-based therapies might improve current treatments of cardiovascular diseases, osteochondral defects or nerve injury due to the unique properties of stem cells such as their self-renewal and differentiation potential. Since embryonic stem cells raise severe ethical concerns and are prone to teratoma formation, adult stem cells are still in the focus of research. Emphasis is placed on cellular signaling within these cells and in between them for a better understanding of the complex processes regulating stem cell fate. One of the oldest signaling systems is based on nucleotides as ligands for purinergic receptors playing an important role in a huge variety of cellular processes such as proliferation, migration and differentiation. Besides their natural ligands, several artificial agonists and antagonists have been identified for P1 and P2 receptors and are already used as drugs. This review outlines purinergic receptor expression and signaling in stem cells metabolism. We will briefly describe current findings in embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells as well as in cancer-, hematopoietic-, and neural crest-derived stem cells. The major focus will be placed on recent findings of purinergic signaling in mesenchymal stem cells addressed in in vitro and in vivo studies, since stem cell fate might be manipulated by this system guiding differentiation towards the desired lineage in the future.

  9. Role for purinergic receptors in memory processing in young chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cronin, Catherine; Edwards, Thomas M; Gibbs, Marie E

    2011-10-01

    The current study used a single trial bead discrimination task for the young chick to ascertain if inhibitors of P2 purinergic receptors would impair memory retention. Suramin and PPADS provided similar retention profiles. Loss of memory retention was evident by 60 min post-training. Both drugs caused persistent memory loss which was still evident 24h post-training. These findings suggest that P2 receptors have a role in memory processing. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Purinergic P2 receptors as targets for novel analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2006-06-01

    Following hints in the early literature about adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) injections producing pain, an ion-channel nucleotide receptor was cloned in 1995, P2X3 subtype, which was shown to be localized predominantly on small nociceptive sensory nerves. Since then, there has been an increasing number of papers exploring the role of P2X3 homomultimer and P2X2/3 heteromultimer receptors on sensory nerves in a wide range of organs, including skin, tongue, tooth pulp, intestine, bladder, and ureter that mediate the initiation of pain. Purinergic mechanosensory transduction has been proposed for visceral pain, where ATP released from epithelial cells lining the bladder, ureter, and intestine during distension acts on P2X3 and P2X2/3, and possibly P2Y, receptors on subepithelial sensory nerve fibers to send messages to the pain centers in the brain as well as initiating local reflexes. P1, P2X, and P2Y receptors also appear to be involved in nociceptive neural pathways in the spinal cord. P2X4 receptors on spinal microglia have been implicated in allodynia. The involvement of purinergic signaling in long-term neuropathic pain and inflammation as well as acute pain is discussed as well as the development of P2 receptor antagonists as novel analgesics.

  11. Membrane-initiated estrogen signaling via Gq-coupled GPCR in the central nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Gwyndolin; Roepke, Troy A

    2018-01-29

    The last few decades have revealed increasing complexity and depth to our knowledge of receptor-mediated estrogen signaling. Nuclear estrogen receptors (ERs) ERα and ERβ remain the fundamental dogma, but recent research targeting membrane-bound ERs urges for a more expanded view on ER signaling. ERα and ERβ are also involved in membrane-delineated signaling alongside membrane-specific G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1), ER-X, and the Gq-coupled membrane ER (Gq-mER). Membrane ERs are responsible for eliciting rapid responses to estrogen signaling, and their importance has been increasingly indicated in central nervous system (CNS) regulation of such functions as reproduction, energy homeostasis, and stress. While the Gq-mER signaling pathway is well characterized, the receptor structure and gene remains uncharacterized, although it is not similar to the nuclear ERα/β. This review will describe the current knowledge of this putative membrane ER and its selective ligand, STX, from its initial characterization in hypothalamic melanocortin circuitry to recent research exploring its role in the CNS outside of the hypothalamus. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Attenuated purinergic receptor function in patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thaning, Pia; Bune, Laurids T.; Hellsten, Ylva

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Extra cellular nucleotides and nucleosides are involved in regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow. Diabetes induces cardiovascular dysregulation but the extent to which the vasodilatatory capacity of nucleotides and nucleosides are affected in type 2 diabetes is unknown. The present...... study investigated: 1) the vasodilatatory effect of ATP, UTP, and adenosine (ADO) and 2) the expression and distribution of P2Y(2) and P2X(1) receptors in skeletal muscles of diabetic subjects. Research Design and Methods: In 10 diabetic patients and 10 age-matched controls, leg blood flow (LBF......) was measured during intrafemoral artery infusion of ATP, UTP, and ADO eliciting a blood flow equal to knee-extensor exercise at 12 watts ( approximately 2.6 L/min). Results: The vasodilatatory effect of the purinergic system was 50 % lower in the diabetic group as exemplified by a LBF increase by 274+/-37 vs...

  13. Expression and Characterization of Purinergic Receptors in Rat Middle Meningeal Artery–Potential Role in Migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Edvinsson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    pathophysiology of migraine. The aim of the present study was to isolate the middle meningeal artery (MMA) from rodents and characterize their purinergic receptors using a sensitive wire myograph method and RT-PCR. The data presented herein suggest that blood flow through the MMA is, at least in part, regulated...... by purinergic receptors. P2X1 and P2Y6 receptors are the strongest contractile receptors and, surprisingly, ADPβS caused contraction most likely via P2Y1 or P2Y13 receptors, which is not observed in other arteries. Adenosine addition, however, caused relaxation of the MMA. The adenosine relaxation could...... with the functional findings. Together these observations could be used as targets for future understanding of the in vivo role of purinergic receptors in the MMA....

  14. P2X4: A fast and sensitive purinergic receptor

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    Jaanus Suurväli

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular nucleotides have been recognized as important mediators of activation, triggering multiple responses via plasma membrane receptors known as P2 receptors. P2 receptors comprise P2X ionotropic receptors and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are expressed in many tissues, where they are involved in a number of functions including synaptic transmission, muscle contraction, platelet aggregation, inflammation, macrophage activation, differentiation and proliferation, neuropathic and inflammatory pain. P2X4 is one of the most sensitive purinergic receptors (at nanomolar ATP concentrations, about one thousand times more than the archetypal P2X7. P2X4 is widely expressed in central and peripheral neurons, in microglia, and also found in various epithelial tissues and endothelial cells. It localizes on the plasma membrane, but also in intracellular compartments. P2X4 is preferentially localized in lysosomes, where it is protected from proteolysis by its glycosylation. High ATP concentration in the lysosomes does not activate P2X4 at low pH; P2X4 gets activated by intra-lysosomal ATP only in its fully dissociated tetra-anionic form, when the pH increases to 7.4. Thus, P2X4 is functioning as a Ca2+-channel after the fusion of late endosomes and lysosomes. P2X4 modulates major neurotransmitter systems and regulates alcohol-induced responses in microglia. P2X4 is one of the key receptors mediating neuropathic pain. However, injury-induced upregulation of P2X4 expression is gender dependent and plays a key role in pain difference between males and females. P2X4 is also involved in inflammation. Extracellular ATP being a pro-inflammatory molecule, P2X4 can trigger inflammation in response to high ATP release. It is therefore involved in multiple pathologies, like post-ischemic inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, airways inflammation in asthma, neurodegenerative diseases and even metabolic syndrome. Although P2X4 remains poorly

  15. The Role of Purinergic Receptors in Cancer-Induced Bone Pain

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    Sarah Falk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer-induced bone pain severely compromises the quality of life of many patients suffering from bone metastasis, as current therapies leave some patients with inadequate pain relief. The recent development of specific animal models has increased the understanding of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying cancer-induced bone pain including the involvement of ATP and the purinergic receptors in the progression of the pain state. In nociception, ATP acts as an extracellular messenger to transmit sensory information both at the peripheral site of tissue damage and in the spinal cord. Several of the purinergic receptors have been shown to be important for the development and maintenance of neuropathic and inflammatory pain, and studies have demonstrated the importance of both peripheral and central mechanisms. We here provide an overview of the current literature on the role of purinergic receptors in cancer-induced bone pain with emphasis on some of the difficulties related to studying this complex pain state.

  16. Dependence of purinergic P2X receptor activity on ectodomain structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    He, M. L.; Zemková, Hana; Stojilkovic, S. S.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 278, č. 12 (2003), s. 10182-10188 ISSN 0021-9258 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : P2X purinergic receptor * calcium signaling * membrane current Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 6.482, year: 2003

  17. Expression and characterization of purinergic receptors in rat middle meningeal artery-potential role in migraine.

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    Kristian Agmund Haanes

    Full Text Available The dura mater and its vasculature have for decades been central in the hypothesis of migraine and headache pathophysiology. Although recent studies have questioned the role of the vasculature as the primary cause, dural vessel physiology is still relevant in understanding the complex pathophysiology of migraine. The aim of the present study was to isolate the middle meningeal artery (MMA from rodents and characterize their purinergic receptors using a sensitive wire myograph method and RT-PCR. The data presented herein suggest that blood flow through the MMA is, at least in part, regulated by purinergic receptors. P2X1 and P2Y6 receptors are the strongest contractile receptors and, surprisingly, ADPβS caused contraction most likely via P2Y1 or P2Y13 receptors, which is not observed in other arteries. Adenosine addition, however, caused relaxation of the MMA. The adenosine relaxation could be inhibited by SCH58261 (A2A receptor antagonist and caffeine (adenosine receptor antagonist. This gives one putative molecular mechanism for the effect of caffeine, often used as an adjuvant remedy of cranial pain. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR expression data for the receptors correlate well with the functional findings. Together these observations could be used as targets for future understanding of the in vivo role of purinergic receptors in the MMA.

  18. The role of purinergic receptors in cancer-induced bone pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Sarah; Uldall, Maria; Heegaard, Anne-Marie

    2012-01-01

    mechanisms underlying cancer-induced bone pain including the involvement of ATP and the purinergic receptors in the progression of the pain state. In nociception, ATP acts as an extracellular messenger to transmit sensory information both at the peripheral site of tissue damage and in the spinal cord......Cancer-induced bone pain severely compromises the quality of life of many patients suffering from bone metastasis, as current therapies leave some patients with inadequate pain relief. The recent development of specific animal models has increased the understanding of the molecular and cellular....... Several of the purinergic receptors have been shown to be important for the development and maintenance of neuropathic and inflammatory pain, and studies have demonstrated the importance of both peripheral and central mechanisms. We here provide an overview of the current literature on the role...

  19. Molecular structure of purinergic P2X receptors and their expression in hypothalamus and pituitary

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemková, Hana; Balík, Aleš; Jindřichová, Marie; Vávra, Vojtěch

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 57, Suppl.3 (2008), S23-S38 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0681; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011408; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110702; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : purinergic P2X receptors * hypothalamus * pituitary Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 1.653, year: 2008

  20. Purinergic receptor antagonists inhibit odorant-mediated CREB phosphorylation in sustentacular cells of mouse olfactory epithelium.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Extracellular nucleotides have long been known to play neuromodulatory roles and to be involved in intercellular signalling. In the olfactory system, ATP is released by olfactory neurons, and exogenous ATP can evoke an increase in intracellular calcium concentration in sustentacular cells, the nonneuronal supporting cells of the olfactory epithelium. Here we investigate the hypothesis that olfactory neurons communicate with sustentacular cells via extracellular ATP and purinergic receptor activation. RESULTS: Here we show that exposure of mice to a mixture of odorants induced a significant increase in the levels of the transcription factor CREB phosphorylated at Ser-133 in the nuclei of both olfactory sensory neurons and sustentacular cells. This activation was dependent on adenylyl cyclase III-mediated olfactory signaling and on activation of P2Y purinergic receptors on sustentacular cells. Purinergic receptor antagonists inhibited odorant-dependent CREB phosphorylation specifically in the nuclei of the sustentacular cells. CONCLUSION: Our results point to a possible role for extracellular nucleotides in mediating intercellular communication between the neurons and sustentacular cells of the olfactory epithelium in response to odorant exposure. Maintenance of extracellular ionic gradients and metabolism of noxious chemicals by sustentacular cells may therefore be regulated in an odorant-dependent manner by olfactory sensory neurons.

  1. Purinergic receptor antagonists inhibit odorant-mediated CREB phosphorylation in sustentacular cells of mouse olfactory epithelium

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    Hatt Hanns

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extracellular nucleotides have long been known to play neuromodulatory roles and to be involved in intercellular signalling. In the olfactory system, ATP is released by olfactory neurons, and exogenous ATP can evoke an increase in intracellular calcium concentration in sustentacular cells, the nonneuronal supporting cells of the olfactory epithelium. Here we investigate the hypothesis that olfactory neurons communicate with sustentacular cells via extracellular ATP and purinergic receptor activation. Results Here we show that exposure of mice to a mixture of odorants induced a significant increase in the levels of the transcription factor CREB phosphorylated at Ser-133 in the nuclei of both olfactory sensory neurons and sustentacular cells. This activation was dependent on adenylyl cyclase III-mediated olfactory signaling and on activation of P2Y purinergic receptors on sustentacular cells. Purinergic receptor antagonists inhibited odorant-dependent CREB phosphorylation specifically in the nuclei of the sustentacular cells. Conclusion Our results point to a possible role for extracellular nucleotides in mediating intercellular communication between the neurons and sustentacular cells of the olfactory epithelium in response to odorant exposure. Maintenance of extracellular ionic gradients and metabolism of noxious chemicals by sustentacular cells may therefore be regulated in an odorant-dependent manner by olfactory sensory neurons.

  2. Purinergic receptor antagonists inhibit odorant-mediated CREB phosphorylation in sustentacular cells of mouse olfactory epithelium

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2011-08-22

    Abstract Background Extracellular nucleotides have long been known to play neuromodulatory roles and to be involved in intercellular signalling. In the olfactory system, ATP is released by olfactory neurons, and exogenous ATP can evoke an increase in intracellular calcium concentration in sustentacular cells, the nonneuronal supporting cells of the olfactory epithelium. Here we investigate the hypothesis that olfactory neurons communicate with sustentacular cells via extracellular ATP and purinergic receptor activation. Results Here we show that exposure of mice to a mixture of odorants induced a significant increase in the levels of the transcription factor CREB phosphorylated at Ser-133 in the nuclei of both olfactory sensory neurons and sustentacular cells. This activation was dependent on adenylyl cyclase III-mediated olfactory signaling and on activation of P2Y purinergic receptors on sustentacular cells. Purinergic receptor antagonists inhibited odorant-dependent CREB phosphorylation specifically in the nuclei of the sustentacular cells. Conclusion Our results point to a possible role for extracellular nucleotides in mediating intercellular communication between the neurons and sustentacular cells of the olfactory epithelium in response to odorant exposure. Maintenance of extracellular ionic gradients and metabolism of noxious chemicals by sustentacular cells may therefore be regulated in an odorant-dependent manner by olfactory sensory neurons.

  3. Purinergic receptors in the endocrine and exocrine pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, I

    2008-01-01

    , there is also evidence for other P2 and adenosine receptors in beta cells (P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(6), P2X subtypes and A(1) receptors) and in glucagon-secreting alpha cells (P2X(7), A(2) receptors). In the exocrine pancreas, acini release ATP and ATP-hydrolysing and ATP-generating enzymes. P2 receptors...... are prominent in pancreatic ducts, and several studies indicate that P2Y(2), P2Y(4), P2Y(11), P2X(4) and P2X(7) receptors could regulate secretion, primarily by affecting Cl(-) and K(+) channels and intracellular Ca(2+) signalling. In order to understand the physiology of the whole organ, it is necessary......, these processes have been viewed separately. In beta cells, stimulation of P2Y(1) receptors amplifies secretion of insulin in the presence of glucose. Nucleotides released from secretory granules could also contribute to autocrine/paracrine regulation in pancreatic islets. In addition to P2Y(1) receptors...

  4. Expression of purinergic P2X receptor subtypes 1, 2, 3 and 7 in equine laminitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamboulis, Danae E; Senior, Mark; Clegg, Peter D; Milner, Peter I

    2013-11-01

    Tissue sensitisation and chronic pain have been described in chronic-active laminitis in the horse, making treatment of such cases difficult. Purinergic P2X receptors are linked to chronic pain and inflammation. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of purinergic P2X receptor subtypes 1, 2, 3 and 7 in the hoof, palmar digital vessels and nerve, dorsal root ganglia and spinal cord in horses with chronic-active laminitis (n=5) compared to non-laminitic horses (n=5). Immunohistochemical analysis was performed on tissue sections using antibodies against P2X receptor subtypes 1-3 and 7. In horses with laminitis, there was a reduction in the thickness of the tunica media layer of the palmar digital vein as a proportion of the whole vessel diameter (0.48±0.05) compared to the non-laminitic group (0.57±0.04; P=0.02). P2X receptor subtype 3 was expressed in the smooth muscle layer (tunica media) of the palmar digital artery of horses with laminitis, but was absent in horses without laminitis. There was strong expression of P2X receptor subtype 7 in the proliferating, partially keratinised, epidermal cells of the secondary epidermal lamellae in the hooves of horses with laminitis, but no immunopositivity in horses without laminitis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuronal and glial purinergic receptors functions in neuron development and brain disease.

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    Ana edel Puerto

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Brain development requires the interaction of complex signalling pathways, involving different cell types and molecules. For a long time, most attention has focused on neurons in a neuronocentric conceptualization of CNS development, these cells fulfilling an intrinsic programme that establishes the brain’s morphology and function. By contrast, glia have mainly been studied as support cells, offering guidance or as the cells that react to brain injury. However, new evidence is appearing that demonstrates a more fundamental role of glial cells in the control of different aspects of neuronal development and function, events in which the influence of neurons is at best weak. Moreover, it is becoming clear that the function and organization of the nervous system depends heavily on reciprocal neuron-glia interactions. During development, neurons are often generated far from their final destination and while intrinsic mechanisms are responsible for neuronal migration and growth, they need support and regulatory influences from glial cells in order to migrate correctly. Similarly, the axons emitted by neurons often have to reach faraway targets and in this sense, glia help define the way that axons grow. Moreover, oligodendrocytes and Schwann cells ultimately envelop axons, contributing to the generation of Nodes of Ranvier. Finally, recent publications show that astrocytes contribute to the modulation of synaptic transmission. In this sense, purinergic receptors are expressed widely by glial cells and neurons, and recent evidence points to multiple roles of purines and purinergic receptors in neuronal development and function, from neurogenesis to axon growth and functional axonal maturation, as well as in pathological conditions in the brain. This review will focus on the role of glial and neuronal secreted purines, and on the purinergic receptors, fundamentally in the control of neuronal development and function, as well as in diseases of the

  6. Purinergic receptor P2RY12-dependent microglial closure of the injured blood-brain barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lou, Nanhong; Takano, Takahiro; Pei, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are integral functional elements of the central nervous system, but the contribution of these cells to the structural integrity of the neurovascular unit has not hitherto been assessed. We show here that following blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, P2RY12 (purinergic receptor P2Y, G......-protein coupled, 12)-mediated chemotaxis of microglia processes is required for the rapid closure of the BBB. Mice treated with the P2RY12 inhibitor clopidogrel, as well as those in which P2RY12 was genetically ablated, exhibited significantly diminished movement of juxtavascular microglial processes and failed...

  7. Purinergic receptor X7 mediates leptin induced GLUT4 function in stellate cells in nonalcoholic steatohepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrashekaran, Varun; Das, Suvarthi; Seth, Ratanesh Kumar; Dattaroy, Diptadip; Alhasson, Firas; Michelotti, Gregory; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Diehl, Anna Mae; Chatterjee, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic oxidative stress via CYP2E1 can act as a second hit in NASH progression. Our previous studies have shown that oxidative stress in NASH causes higher leptin levels and induces purinergic receptor X7 (P2X7r). We tested the hypothesis that higher circulating leptin due to CYP2E1-mediated oxidative stress induces P2X7r. P2X7r in turn activates stellate cells and causes increased proliferation via modulating Glut4, the glucose transporter, and increased intracellular glucose. Using a hig...

  8. Intracellular calcium measurements as a method in studies on activity of purinergic P2X receptor channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    He, M. L.; Zemková, Hana; Koshimizu, T.; Tomič, M.; Stojilkovic, S. S.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 285, č. 2 (2003), s. C467-C479 ISSN 0363-6143 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : P2X purinergic receptor * calcium signaling * membrane current Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.103, year: 2003

  9. ATP induced vasodilatation and purinergic receptors in the human leg: roles of nitric oxide, prostaglandins and adenosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan P; Gonzalez-Alonso, Jose; Bune, Laurids

    2009-01-01

    Plasma adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) is thought to contribute to the local regulation of skeletal muscle blood flow. Intravascular ATP infusion can induce profound limb muscle vasodilatation, but the purinergic receptors and downstream signals involved in this response remain unclear. This study...

  10. P2X receptor-mediated ATP purinergic signaling in health and disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang LH

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Lin-Hua JiangSchool of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Biological Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, United KingdomAbstract: Purinergic P2X receptors are plasma membrane proteins present in a wide range of mammalian cells where they act as a cellular sensor, enabling cells to detect and respond to extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP, an important signaling molecule. P2X receptors function as ligand-gated Ca2+-permeable cationic channels that open upon ATP binding to elevate intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and cause membrane depolarization. In response to sustained activation, P2X receptors induce formation of a pore permeable to large molecules. P2X receptors also interact with distinct functional proteins and membrane lipids to form specialized signaling complexes. Studies have provided compelling evidence to show that such P2X receptor-mediated ATP-signaling mechanisms determine and regulate a growing number and diversity of important physiological processes, including neurotransmission, muscle contraction, and cytokine release. There is accumulating evidence to support strong causative relationships of altered receptor expression and function with chronic pain, inflammatory diseases, cancers, and other pathologies or diseases. Numerous high throughput screening drug discovery programs and preclinical studies have thus far demonstrated the proof of concepts that the P2X receptors are druggable targets and selective receptor antagonism is a promising therapeutics approach. This review will discuss the recent progress in understanding the mammalian P2X receptors with respect to the ATP-signaling mechanisms, physiological and pathophysiological roles, and development and preclinical studies of receptor antagonists.Keywords: extracellular ATP, ion channel, large pore, signaling complex, chronic pain, inflammatory diseases

  11. ADP ribose is an endogenous ligand for the purinergic P2Y1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Amanda Jabin; Muraro, Lucia; Dahlberg, Carin; Migaud, Marie; Chevallier, Olivier; Khanh, Hoa Nguyen; Krishnan, Kalaiselvan; Li, Nailin; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2011-02-10

    The mechanism by which extracellular ADP ribose (ADPr) increases intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) remains unknown. We measured [Ca(2+)](i) changes in fura-2 loaded rat insulinoma INS-1E cells, and in primary β-cells from rat and human. A phosphonate analogue of ADPr (PADPr) and 8-Bromo-ADPr (8Br-ADPr) were synthesized. ADPr increased [Ca(2+)](i) in the form of a peak followed by a plateau dependent on extracellular Ca(2+). NAD(+), cADPr, PADPr, 8Br-ADPr or breakdown products of ADPr did not increase [Ca(2+)](i). The ADPr-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase was not affected by inhibitors of TRPM2, but was abolished by thapsigargin and inhibited when phospholipase C and IP(3) receptors were inhibited. MRS 2179 and MRS 2279, specific inhibitors of the purinergic receptor P2Y1, completely blocked the ADPr-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase. ADPr increased [Ca(2+)](i) in transfected human astrocytoma cells (1321N1) that express human P2Y1 receptors, but not in untransfected astrocytoma cells. We conclude that ADPr is a specific agonist of P2Y1 receptors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Gene expression of muscarinic, tachykinin and purinergic receptors in porcine bladder: comparison with cultured cells

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    Forough eBahadory

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Urothelial cells, myofibroblasts, and smooth muscle cells are important cell types contributing to bladder function. Multiple receptors including muscarinic (M3/M5, tachykinin (NK1/NK2 and purinergic (P2X1/P2Y6 receptors are involved in bladder motor and sensory actions. Using female pig bladder, our aim was to differentiate between various cell types in bladder by genetic markers. We compared the molecular expression pattern between the fresh tissue layers and their cultured cell counterparts. We also examined responses to agonists for these receptors in cultured cells. Urothelial, suburothelial (myofibroblasts and smooth muscle cells isolated from pig bladder were cultured (10-14 days and identified by marker antibodies. Gene (mRNA expression level was demonstrated by real-time PCR. The receptor expression pattern was very similar between suburothelium and detrusor, and higher than urothelium. The gene expression of all receptors decreased in culture compared with the fresh tissue, although the reduction in cultured urothelial cells appeared less significant compared to suburothelial and detrusor cells. Cultured myofibroblasts and detrusor cells did not contract in response to the agonists acetylcholine, neurokinin A and β,γ-MeATP, up to concentrations of 0.1 and 1 mM. The significant reduction of M3, NK2 and P2X1 receptors under culture conditions may be associated with the unresponsiveness of cultured suburothelial and detrusor cells to their respective agonists. These results suggest that under culture conditions, bladder cells lose the receptors that are involved in contraction, as this function is no longer required. The study provides further evidence that cultured cells do not necessarily mimic the actions exerted by intact tissues.

  13. Kinetics of activation of phospholipase C by P2Y purinergic receptor agonists and guanine nucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, J L; Downes, C P; Harden, T K

    1989-01-15

    Membranes prepared from [3H]inositol-labeled turkey erythrocytes express a phospholipase C that is markedly stimulated by stable analogs of GTP (Harden, T. K., Stephens, L., Hawkins, P. T., and Downes, C. P. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 9057-9061). We now report that P2-purinergic receptor-mediated regulation of the enzyme occurs in the membrane preparation. The order of potency of a series of ATP and ADP analogs for stimulation of inositol phosphate formation, i.e. 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-triphosphate (2MeSATP) greater than adenosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) greater than adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) greater than ATP greater than 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate approximately ADP greater than alpha, beta-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate greater than beta, gamma-methyleneadenosine 5'-triphosphate, was consistent with that for the P2Y-purinergic receptor subtype. Agonist-stimulated effects were completely dependent on the presence of guanine nucleotide. Activation of phospholipase C by guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S) occurred with a considerable time lag. The rate of activation followed first order kinetics and was markedly increased by increasing concentrations of a P2Y receptor agonist; in contrast, the rate of activation at a fixed agonist concentration was independent of guanine nucleotide concentration. Addition of guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) prior to addition of agonist and GTP, 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p), or GTP gamma S blocked in a concentration-dependent manner the stimulatory effect of guanine nucleotide. GDP beta S, added subsequent to preactivation of membranes with 2MeSATP and GTP gamma S or Gpp(NH)p had only small inhibitory effects on the rate of inositol phosphate production observed over the subsequent 10 min. In contrast, addition of GDP beta S to GTP-preactivated membranes resulted in a rapid return of enzyme activity to the basal state within 60 s. Taken together, the data are consistent with

  14. Roles of purinergic P2X receptors as pacemaking channels and modulators of calcium-mobilizing pathway in pituitary gonadotrophs

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemková, Hana; Balík, Aleš; Jiang, Y.; Kretschmannová, K.; Stojilkovic, S. S.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 6 (2006), s. 1423-1436 ISSN 0888-8809 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011408; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011103; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : purinergic receptors * electrical activity * pituitary Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.967, year: 2006

  15. Hypoxia attenuates purinergic P2X receptor-induced inflammatory gene expression in brainstem microglia

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    Smith SMC

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie MC Smith,1,2 Gordon S Mitchell,1,2 Scott A Friedle,3 Christine M Sibigtroth,1 Stéphane Vinit,1 Jyoti J Watters1–31Department of Comparative Biosciences, 2Comparative Biomedical Sciences Training Program, 3Program in Cellular and Molecular Biology, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI, USAAbstract: Hypoxia and increased extracellular nucleotides are frequently coincident in the brainstem. Extracellular nucleotides are potent modulators of microglial inflammatory gene expression via P2X purinergic receptor activation. Although hypoxia is also known to modulate inflammatory gene expression, little is known about how hypoxia or P2X receptor activation alone affects inflammatory molecule production in brainstem microglia, nor how hypoxia and P2X receptor signaling interact when they occur together. In the study reported here, we investigated the ability of a brief episode of hypoxia (2 hours in the presence and absence of the nonselective P2X receptor agonist 2′(3′-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyladenosine-5′-triphosphate (BzATP to promote inflammatory gene expression in brainstem microglia in adult rats. We evaluated inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα, and interleukin (IL-6 messenger RNA levels in immunomagnetically isolated brainstem microglia. While iNOS and IL-6 gene expression increased with hypoxia and BzATP alone, TNFα expression was unaffected. Surprisingly, BzATP-induced inflammatory effects were lost after hypoxia, suggesting that hypoxia impairs proinflammatory P2X-receptor signaling. We also evaluated the expression of key P2X receptors activated by BzATP, namely P2X1, P2X4, and P2X7. While hypoxia did not alter their expression, BzATP upregulated P2X4 and P2X7 mRNAs; these effects were ablated in hypoxia. Although both P2X4 and P2X7 receptor expression correlated with increased microglial iNOS and IL-6 levels in microglia from normoxic rats, in hypoxia, P2X7 only correlated with IL-6, and P2X

  16. Loss of muscarinic and purinergic receptors in urinary bladder of rats with hydrochloric acid-induced cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akira; Kageyama, Aiko; Fujino, Tomomi; Nozawa, Yoshihisa; Yamada, Shizuo

    2010-10-01

    To clarify the basic mechanism involved in the pathophysiology of cystitis by characterizing the urodynamic parameters, pharmacologically relevant (muscarinic and purinergic) receptors, and the in vivo release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in the bladder of hydrochloric acid (HCl)-treated rats. The muscarinic and purinergic receptors in rat tissue were measured by radioreceptor assays using (N-methyl-³H) scopolamine methyl chloride ([³H]NMS) and αβ-methylene-ATP (2,8-³H) tetrasodium salt ([³H]αβ-MeATP), respectively. The urodynamic parameters and ATP levels were measured using a cystometric method and the luciferin-luciferase assay, respectively. In the HCl-treated rats, the micturition interval and micturition volume were significantly (48% and 55%, respectively, P acid tetrasodium, and MRS2273 was significantly (5.5, 11, and 7.6-fold, respectively, P <.001) increased. Furthermore, the in vivo release of ATP was significantly (P <.05) enhanced in the HCl-treated rat bladder. Both muscarinic and purinergic mechanisms might be, at least in part, associated with the urinary dysfunction due to cystitis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Purinergic P2X7 receptor regulates lung surfactant secretion in a paracrine manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Amarjit; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Guo, Yujie; Weng, Tingting; Su, Lijing; Liu, Lin

    2011-01-01

    Alveolar epithelium is composed of alveolar epithelial cells of type I (AEC I) and type II (AEC II). AEC II secrete lung surfactant by means of exocytosis. P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), a P2 purinergic receptor, has been implicated in the regulation of synaptic transmission and inflammation. Here, we report that P2X7R, which is expressed in AEC I but not AEC II, is a novel mediator for the paracrine regulation of surfactant secretion in AEC II. In primary co-cultures of AEC I and AEC II benzoyl ATP (BzATP; an agonist of P2X7R) increased surfactant secretion, which was blocked by the P2X7R antagonist Brilliant Blue G. This effect was observed in AEC II co-cultured with human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells stably expressing rat P2X7R, but not when co-cultured with AEC I in which P2X7R was knocked down or in co-cultures of AEC I and AEC II isolated from P2X7R−/− mice. BzATP-mediated secretion involved P2Y2 receptor signaling because it was reduced by the addition of the ATP scavengers apyrase and adenosine deaminase and the P2Y2 receptor antagonist suramin. However, the stimulation with BzATP might also release other substances that potentially increase surfactant secretion as a greater stimulation of secretion was observed in AEC II incubated with BzATP when co-cultured with E10 or HEK-293-P2X7R cells than with ATP alone. P2X7R−/− mice failed to increase surfactant secretion in response to hyperventilation, pointing to the physiological relevance of P2X7R in maintaining surfactant homeostasis in the lung. These results suggest that the activation of P2X7R increases surfactant secretion by releasing ATP from AEC I and subsequently stimulating P2Y2 receptors in AEC II. PMID:21266468

  18. Identification of ionotrophic purinergic receptors in Huh-7 cells and their response towards structural proteins of HCV genotype 3a

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    Fatima Kaneez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a major health problem in developing countries including Pakistan. Chronic HCV infection results in progressive liver disease including fibrosis, cirrhosis, insulin resistance and eventually hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Ionotrophic purinergic (P2X receptors are identified to involve in a spectrum of physiological and pathophysiological processes. However, the role of P2X receptors in HCV liver associated diseases still remains to be investigated. The current study was designed to identify the presence of P2X receptors in human liver cells. Furthermore, it investigates the response of P2X receptors towards HCV structural proteins (E1E2. To determine that how many isoforms of P2X receptors are expressed in human liver cells, human hepatoma cell line (Huh-7 was used. Transcripts (mRNA of five different isoforms of P2X receptors were identified in Huh-7 cells. To examine the gene expression of identified isoforms of P2X receptors in presence of HCV structural proteins E1E2, Huh-7/E1E2 cell line (stably expressing HCV structural proteins E1E2 was used. The results showed significant increase (6.2 fold in gene expression of P2X4 receptors in Huh-7/E1E2 cells as compared to control Huh-7 cells. The findings of present study confirmed the presence of transcripts of five different isoforms of P2X receptors in human liver cells and suggest that P2X4 receptors could be represented an important component of the purinergic signaling complex in HCV induced liver pathogenesis.

  19. Long-term heart transplant survival by targeting the ionotropic purinergic receptor P2X7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergani, Andrea; Tezza, Sara; D'Addio, Francesca; Fotino, Carmen; Liu, Kaifeng; Niewczas, Monika; Bassi, Roberto; Molano, R Damaris; Kleffel, Sonja; Petrelli, Alessandra; Soleti, Antonio; Ammirati, Enrico; Frigerio, Maria; Visner, Gary; Grassi, Fabio; Ferrero, Maria E; Corradi, Domenico; Abdi, Reza; Ricordi, Camillo; Sayegh, Mohamed H; Pileggi, Antonello; Fiorina, Paolo

    2013-01-29

    Heart transplantation is a lifesaving procedure for patients with end-stage heart failure. Despite much effort and advances in the field, current immunosuppressive regimens are still associated with poor long-term cardiac allograft outcomes, and with the development of complications, including infections and malignancies, as well. The development of a novel, short-term, and effective immunomodulatory protocol will thus be an important achievement. The purine ATP, released during cell damage/activation, is sensed by the ionotropic purinergic receptor P2X7 (P2X7R) on lymphocytes and regulates T-cell activation. Novel clinical-grade P2X7R inhibitors are available, rendering the targeting of P2X7R a potential therapy in cardiac transplantation. We analyzed P2X7R expression in patients and mice and P2X7R targeting in murine recipients in the context of cardiac transplantation. Our data demonstrate that P2X7R is specifically upregulated in graft-infiltrating lymphocytes in cardiac-transplanted humans and mice. Short-term P2X7R targeting with periodate-oxidized ATP promotes long-term cardiac transplant survival in 80% of murine recipients of a fully mismatched allograft. Long-term survival of cardiac transplants was associated with reduced T-cell activation, T-helper cell 1/T-helper cell 17 differentiation, and inhibition of STAT3 phosphorylation in T cells, thus leading to a reduced transplant infiltrate and coronaropathy. In vitro genetic upregulation of the P2X7R pathway was also shown to stimulate T-helper cell 1/T-helper cell 17 cell generation. Finally, P2X7R targeting halted the progression of coronaropathy in a murine model of chronic rejection as well. P2X7R targeting is a novel clinically relevant strategy to prolong cardiac transplant survival.

  20. Ion transport in human pancreatic duct epithelium, Capan-1 cells, is regulated by secretin, VIP, acetylcholine, and purinergic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Novak, Ivana

    2013-04-01

    The objective of the study was to establish a solid model of polarized epithelium for human pancreatic ducts, where electrical parameters could be measured as indicators of ion transport. Further, we aimed to determine functional expression of several receptors, in particular, purinergic receptors, and determine their effects on ion transport. Human adenocarcinoma cell line Capan-1 cells were grown on permeable supports and set in Ussing chambers for electrophysiological recordings. Transepithelial voltage (Vte), resistance, and short-circuit currents (Isc) were measured in response to agonists. Secretin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), acetylcholine, forskolin, ionomycin, adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), uridine 5'-triphosphate (UTP), 3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl ATP, and adenosine induced lumen negative Vte and Isc. These changes were consistent with anion secretion, as verified in forskolin-stimulated preparations. Extracellular nucleotides, ATP, and UTP, applied from luminal and basolateral sides, caused largest responses: Vte increased up to -5 mV, Isc increased to 20 to 30 μA/cm, and resistance decreased by up to 200 Ω·cm. Transepithelial transport in human pancreatic duct epithelium, Capan-1 cells, is regulated by secretin, VIP, acetylcholine, adenosine, and purinergic P2 receptors; and this human model has a good potential for studies of physiology and pathophysiology of pancreatic duct ion transport.

  1. Communication between corneal epithelial cells and trigeminal neurons is facilitated by purinergic (P2 and glutamatergic receptors.

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    Duane J Oswald

    Full Text Available Previously, we demonstrated that nucleotides released upon mechanical injury to corneal epithelium activate purinergic (P2 receptors resulting in mobilization of a Ca(2+ wave. However, the tissue is extensively innervated and communication between epithelium and neurons is critical and not well understood. Therefore, we developed a co-culture of primary trigeminal neurons and human corneal limbal epithelial cells. We demonstrated that trigeminal neurons expressed a repertoire of P2Yand P2X receptor transcripts and responded to P2 agonists in a concentration-dependent manner. Mechanical injuries to epithelia in the co-cultures elicited a Ca(2+ wave that mobilized to neurons and was attenuated by Apyrase, an ectonucleotidase. To elucidate the role of factors released from each cell type, epithelial and neuronal cells were cultured, injured, and the wound media from one cell type was collected and added to the other cell type. Epithelial wound media generated a rapid Ca(2+ mobilization in neuronal cells that was abrogated in the presence of Apyrase, while neuronal wound media elicited a complex response in epithelial cells. The rapid Ca(2+ mobilization was detected, which was abrogated with Apyrase, but it was followed by Ca(2+ waves that occurred in cell clusters. When neuronal wound media was preincubated with a cocktail of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor inhibitors, the secondary response in epithelia was diminished. Glutamate was detected in the neuronal wound media and epithelial expression of NMDA receptor subunit transcripts was demonstrated. Our results indicate that corneal epithelia and neurons communicate via purinergic and NMDA receptors that mediate the wound response in a highly orchestrated manner.

  2. Purinergic receptor stimulation reduces cytotoxic edema and brain infarcts in mouse induced by photothrombosis by energizing glial mitochondria.

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    Wei Zheng

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatments to improve the neurological outcome of edema and cerebral ischemic stroke are severely limited. Here, we present the first in vivo single cell images of cortical mouse astrocytes documenting the impact of single vessel photothrombosis on cytotoxic edema and cerebral infarcts. The volume of astrocytes expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP increased by over 600% within 3 hours of ischemia. The subsequent growth of cerebral infarcts was easily followed as the loss of GFP fluorescence as astrocytes lysed. Cytotoxic edema and the magnitude of ischemic lesions were significantly reduced by treatment with the purinergic ligand 2-methylthioladenosine 5' diphosphate (2-MeSADP, an agonist with high specificity for the purinergic receptor type 1 isoform (P2Y(1R. At 24 hours, cytotoxic edema in astrocytes was still apparent at the penumbra and preceded the cell lysis that defined the infarct. Delayed 2MeSADP treatment, 24 hours after the initial thrombosis, also significantly reduced cytotoxic edema and the continued growth of the brain infarction. Pharmacological and genetic evidence are presented indicating that 2MeSADP protection is mediated by enhanced astrocyte mitochondrial metabolism via increased inositol trisphosphate (IP(3-dependent Ca(2+ release. We suggest that mitochondria play a critical role in astrocyte energy metabolism in the penumbra of ischemic lesions, where low ATP levels are widely accepted to be responsible for cytotoxic edema. Enhancement of this energy source could have similar protective benefits for a wide range of brain injuries.

  3. Involvement of the P2X7 purinergic receptor in colonic motor dysfunction associated with bowel inflammation in rats.

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    Luca Antonioli

    Full Text Available Recent evidence indicates an involvement of P2X7 purinergic receptor (P2X7R in the fine tuning of immune functions, as well as in driving enteric neuron apoptosis under intestinal inflammation. However, the participation of this receptor in the regulation of enteric neuromuscular functions remains undetermined. This study was aimed at investigating the role of P2X7Rs in the control of colonic motility in experimental colitis.Colitis was induced in rats by 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonic acid. P2X7R distribution was examined by immunofluorescence analysis. The effects of A804598 (selective P2X7R antagonist and BzATP (P2X7R agonist were tested on contractions of longitudinal smooth muscle evoked by electrical stimulation or by carbachol in the presence of tetrodotoxin.P2X7Rs were predominantly located in myenteric neurons, but, in the presence of colitis, their expression increased in the neuromuscular layer. In normal preparations, A804598 elicited a negligible increase in electrically induced contractions, while a significant enhancement was recorded in inflamed tissues. In the presence of Nω-propyl-L-arginine (NPA, neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor the A804598 effects were lost. P2X7R stimulation with BzATP did not significantly affect electrical-induced contractions in normal colon, while a marked reduction was recorded under inflammation. The inhibitory effect of BzATP was antagonized by A804598, and it was also markedly blunted by NPA. Both P2X7R ligands did not affect carbachol-induced contractions.The purinergic system contributes to functional neuromuscular changes associated with bowel inflammation via P2X7Rs, which modulate the activity of excitatory cholinergic nerves through a facilitatory control on inhibitory nitrergic pathways.

  4. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990’s when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine) receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and ...

  5. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990's when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine) receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry of purinergic signalling. More recently, the focus has been on the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential. There was early recognition of the use of P1 receptor agonists for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia and A 2A receptor antagonists are promising for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Clopidogrel, a P2Y 12 antagonist, is widely used for the treatment of thrombosis and stroke, blocking P2Y 12 receptor-mediated platelet aggregation. Diquafosol, a long acting P2Y 2 receptor agonist, is being used for the treatment of dry eye. P2X3 receptor antagonists have been developed that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of chronic cough, bladder incontinence, visceral pain and hypertension. Antagonists to P2X7 receptors are being investigated for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Other investigations are in progress for the use of purinergic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy, atherosclerosis, depression, autism, diabetes, and cancer.

  6. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Burnstock

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990’s when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry of purinergic signalling. More recently, the focus has been on the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential. There was early recognition of the use of P1 receptor agonists for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia and A2A receptor antagonists are promising for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Clopidogrel, a P2Y12 antagonist, is widely used for the treatment of thrombosis and stroke, blocking P2Y12 receptor-mediated platelet aggregation. Diquafosol, a long acting P2Y2 receptor agonist, is being used for the treatment of dry eye. P2X3 receptor antagonists have been developed that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of chronic cough, bladder incontinence, visceral pain and hypertension. Antagonists to P2X7 receptors are being investigated for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Other investigations are in progress for the use of purinergic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy, atherosclerosis, depression, autism, diabetes, and cancer.

  7. Central sensitization of nociceptive neurons in rat medullary dorsal horn involves purinergic P2X7 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, K; Chiang, C-Y; Li, Z; Lee, J-C; Dostrovsky, J O; Sessle, B J

    2011-09-29

    Central sensitization is a crucial process underlying the increased neuronal excitability of nociceptive pathways following peripheral tissue injury and inflammation. Our previous findings have suggested that extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) molecules acting at purinergic receptors located on presynaptic terminals (e.g., P2X2/3, P2X3 subunits) and glial cells are involved in the glutamatergic-dependent central sensitization induced in medullary dorsal horn (MDH) nociceptive neurons by application to the tooth pulp of the inflammatory irritant mustard oil (MO). Since growing evidence indicates that activation of P2X7 receptors located on glia is involved in chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain, the aim of the present study was to test in vivo for P2X7 receptor involvement in this acute inflammatory pain model. Experiments were carried out in anesthetized Sprague-Dawley male rats. Single unit recordings were made in MDH functionally identified nociceptive neurons for which mechanoreceptive field, mechanical activation threshold and responses to noxious stimuli were tested. We found that continuous intrathecal (i.t.) superfusion over MDH of the potent P2X7 receptor antagonists brilliant blue G and periodated oxidized ATP could each significantly attenuate the MO-induced MDH central sensitization. MDH central sensitization could also be produced by i.t. superfusion of ATP and even more effectively by the P2X7 receptor agonist benzoylbenzoyl ATP. Superfusion of the microglial blocker minocycline abolished the MO-induced MDH central sensitization, consistent with reports that dorsal horn P2X7 receptors are mostly expressed on microglia. In control experiments, superfusion over MDH of vehicle did not produce any significant changes. These novel findings suggest that activation of P2X7 receptors in vivo may be involved in the development of central sensitization in an acute inflammatory pain model. Copyright © 2011 IBRO. All rights reserved.

  8. Theobromine-Induced Changes in A1 Purinergic Receptor Gene Expression and Distribution in a Rat Brain Alzheimer's Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendiola-Precoma, Jesus; Padilla, Karla; Rodríguez-Cruz, Alfredo; Berumen, Laura C; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2017-01-01

    Dementia caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD) is mainly characterized by accumulation in the brain of extra- and intraneuronal amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau proteins, respectively, which selectively affect specific regions, particularly the neocortex and the hippocampus. Sporadic AD is mainly caused by an increase in apolipoprotein E, a component of chylomicrons, which are cholesterol transporters in the brain. Recent studies have shown that high lipid levels, especially cholesterol, are linked to AD. Adenosine is an atypical neurotransmitter that regulates a wide range of physiological functions by activating four P1 receptors (A1, A2A, A2B, and A3) and P2 purinergic receptors that are G protein-coupled. A1 receptors are involved in the inhibition of neurotransmitter release, which could be related to AD. The aim of the present work was to study the effects of a lard-enriched diet (LED) on cognitive and memory processes in adult rats (6 months of age) as well as the effect of theobromine on these processes. The results indicated that the fat-enriched diet resulted in a long-term deterioration in cognitive and memory functions. Increased levels of Aβ protein and IL-1β were also observed in the rats fed with a high-cholesterol diet, which were used to validate the AD animal model. In addition, the results of qPCR and immunohistochemistry indicated a decrease in gene expression and distribution of A1 purinegic receptor, respectively, in the hippocampus of LED-fed rats. Interestingly, theobromine, at both concentrations tested, restored A1 receptor levels and improved cognitive functions and Aβ levels for a dose of 30 mg/L drinking water.

  9. Subfailure overstretch injury leads to reversible functional impairment and purinergic P2X7 receptor activation in intact vascular tissue

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    Weifeng Luo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Vascular stretch injury is associated with blunt trauma, vascular surgical procedures, and harvest of human saphenous vein for use in vascular bypass grafting. A model of subfailure overstretch in rat abdominal aorta was developed to characterize surgical vascular stretch injury. Longitudinal stretch of rat aorta was characterized ex vivo. Stretch to the haptic endpoint where the tissues would no longer lengthen, occurred at twice the resting length. The stress produced at this length was greater than physiologic mechanical forces but well below the level of mechanical disruption. Functional responses were determined in a muscle bath and this subfailure overstretch injury led to impaired smooth muscle function that was partially reversed by treatment with purinergic receptor (P2X7R antagonists. These data suggest that vasomotor dysfunction caused by subfailure overstretch injury may be due to activation of P2X7R. These studies have implications for our understanding of mechanical stretch injury of blood vessels and offer novel therapeutic opportunities.

  10. Remodeling of purinergic receptor-mediated Ca2+ signaling as a consequence of EGF-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition in breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity M Davis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The microenvironment plays a pivotal role in tumor cell proliferation, survival and migration. Invasive cancer cells face a new set of environmental challenges as they breach the basement membrane and colonize distant organs during the process of metastasis. Phenotypic switching, such as that which occurs during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT, may be associated with a remodeling of cell surface receptors and thus altered responses to signals from the tumor microenvironment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We assessed changes in intracellular Ca(2+ in cells loaded with Fluo-4 AM using a fluorometric imaging plate reader (FLIPR(TETRA and observed significant changes in the potency of ATP (EC(50 0.175 µM (-EGF versus 1.731 µM (+EGF, P<0.05, and the nature of the ATP-induced Ca(2+ transient, corresponding with a 10-fold increase in the mesenchymal marker vimentin (P<0.05. We observed no change in the sensitivity to PAR2-mediated Ca(2+ signaling, indicating that these alterations are not simply a consequence of changes in global Ca(2+ homeostasis. To determine whether changes in ATP-mediated Ca(2+ signaling are preceded by alterations in the transcriptional profile of purinergic receptors, we analyzed the expression of a panel of P2X ionotropic and P2Y metabotropic purinergic receptors using real-time RT-PCR and found significant and specific alterations in the suite of ATP-activated purinergic receptors during EGF-induced EMT in breast cancer cells. Our studies are the first to show that P2X(5 ionotropic receptors are enriched in the mesenchymal phenotype and that silencing of P2X(5 leads to a significant reduction (25%, P<0.05 in EGF-induced vimentin protein expression. CONCLUSIONS: The acquisition of a new suite of cell surface purinergic receptors is a feature of EGF-mediated EMT in MDA-MB-468 breast cancer cells. Such changes may impart advantageous phenotypic traits and represent a novel mechanism for the targeting of

  11. The evolution of purinergic receptors involved in recognition of a blood meal by hematophagous insects

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    Rachel Galun

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Many blood feeders use adenine nucleotides as cues for locating blood meal. Structure-activity relationship of adenine nucleotides as phagostimulants varies between closely-related species of blood feeders. It is suggested that a preexisting diverse pool of nucleotide-binding proteins present in all living cells, serves as a source of receptor proteins for the gustatory receptors involved in blood detection. It is proposed that the selection of any such nucleotide-binding protein is random.

  12. Purinergic control of inflammation and thrombosis: Role of P2X1 receptors

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    Cécile Oury

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation shifts the hemostatic mechanisms in favor of thrombosis. Upon tissue damage or infection, a sudden increase of extracellular ATP occurs, that might contribute to the crosstalk between inflammation and thrombosis. On platelets, P2X1 receptors act to amplify platelet activation and aggregation induced by other platelet agonists. These receptors critically contribute to thrombus stability in small arteries. Besides platelets, studies by our group indicate that these receptors are expressed by neutrophils. They promote neutrophil chemotaxis, both in vitro and in vivo. In a laser-induced injury mouse model of thrombosis, it appears that neutrophils are required to initiate thrombus formation and coagulation activation on inflamed arteriolar endothelia. In this model, by using P2X1−/− mice, we recently showed that P2X1 receptors, expressed on platelets and neutrophils, play a key role in thrombus growth and fibrin generation. Intriguingly, in a model of endotoxemia, P2X1−/− mice exhibited aggravated oxidative tissue damage, along with exacerbated thrombocytopenia and increased activation of coagulation, which translated into higher susceptibility to septic shock. Thus, besides its ability to recruit neutrophils and platelets on inflamed endothelia, the P2X1 receptor also contributes to limit the activation of circulating neutrophils under systemic inflammatory conditions. Taken together, these data suggest that P2X1 receptors are involved in the interplay between platelets, neutrophils and thrombosis. We propose that activation of these receptors by ATP on neutrophils and platelets represents a new mechanism that regulates thrombo-inflammation.

  13. Purinergic 2Y1 receptor stimulation decreases cerebral edema and reactive gliosis in a traumatic brain injury model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley Watts, Lora; Sprague, Shane; Zheng, Wei; Garling, R Justin; Jimenez, David; Digicaylioglu, Murat; Lechleiter, James

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children and young adults. Neuroprotective agents that may promote repair or counteract damage after injury do not currently exist. We recently reported that stimulation of the purinergic receptor subtype P2Y(1)R using 2-methylthioladenosine 5' diphosphate (2MeSADP) significantly reduced cytotoxic edema induced by photothrombosis. Here, we tested whether P2Y(1)R stimulation was neuroprotective after TBI. A controlled closed head injury model was established for mice using a pneumatic impact device. Brains were harvested at 1, 3, or 7 days post-injury and assayed for morphological changes by immunocytochemistry, Western blot analysis, and wet/dry weight. Cerebral edema and expression of both aquaporin type 4 and glial fibrillary acidic protein were increased at all time points examined. Immunocytochemical measurements in both cortical and hippocampal slices also revealed significant neuronal swelling and reactive gliosis. Treatment of mice with 2MeSADP (100 μM) or MRS2365 (100 μM) 30 min after trauma significantly reduced all post-injury symptoms of TBI including edema, neuronal swelling, reactive gliosis, and AQ4 expression. The neuroprotective effect was lost in IP(3)R2-/- mice treated with 2MeSADP. Immunocytochemical labeling of brain slices confirmed that P2Y(1)R expression was defined to cortical and hippocampal astrocytes, but not neurons. Taken together, the data show that stimulation of astrocytic P2Y(1)Rs significantly reduces brain injury after acute trauma and is mediated by the IP(3)-signaling pathway. We suggest that enhancing astrocyte mitochondrial metabolism offers a promising neuroprotective strategy for a broad range of brain injuries.

  14. Glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation are essential for purinergic receptor-mediated angiogenic responses in vasa vasorum endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapel, Martin; Weston, Philip; Strassheim, Derek; Karoor, Vijaya; Burns, Nana; Lyubchenko, Taras; Paucek, Petr; Stenmark, Kurt R; Gerasimovskaya, Evgenia V

    2017-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an energy-demanding process; however, the role of cellular energy pathways and their regulation by extracellular stimuli, especially extracellular nucleotides, remain largely unexplored. Using metabolic inhibitors of glycolysis (2-deoxyglucose) and oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) (oligomycin, rotenone, and FCCP), we demonstrate that glycolysis and OXPHOS are both essential for angiogenic responses of vasa vasorum endothelial cell (VVEC). Treatment with P2R agonists, ATP, and 2-methylthioadenosine diphosphate trisodium salt (MeSADP), but not P1 receptor agonist, adenosine, increased glycolytic activity in VVEC (measured by extracellular acidification rate and lactate production). Stimulation of glycolysis was accompanied by increased levels of phospho-phosphofructokinase B3, hexokinase (HK), and GLUT-1, but not lactate dehydrogenase. Moreover, extracellular ATP and MeSADP, and to a lesser extent adenosine, increased basal and maximal oxygen consumption rates in VVEC. These effects were potentiated when the cells were cultured in 20 mM galactose and 5 mM glucose compared with 25 mM glucose. Treatment with P2R agonists decreased phosphorylation of pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH)-E1α and increased succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), cytochrome oxidase IV, and β-subunit of F 1 F 0 ATP synthase expression. In addition, P2R stimulation transiently elevated mitochondrial Ca 2+ concentration, implying involvement of mitochondria in VVEC angiogenic activation. We also demonstrated a critical role of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Akt pathways in lactate production, PDH-E1α phosphorylation, and the expression of HK, SDH, and GLUT-1 in ATP-stimulated VVEC. Together, our findings suggest that purinergic and metabolic regulation of VVEC energy pathways is essential for VV angiogenesis and may contribute to pathologic vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Purinergic signalling in the musculoskeletal system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Arnett, Timothy R; Orriss, Isabel R

    2013-12-01

    It is now widely recognised that extracellular nucleotides, signalling via purinergic receptors, participate in numerous biological processes in most tissues. It has become evident that extracellular nucleotides have significant regulatory effects in the musculoskeletal system. In early development, ATP released from motor nerves along with acetylcholine acts as a cotransmitter in neuromuscular transmission; in mature animals, ATP functions as a neuromodulator. Purinergic receptors expressed by skeletal muscle and satellite cells play important pathophysiological roles in their development or repair. In many cell types, expression of purinergic receptors is often dependent on differentiation. For example, sequential expression of P2X5, P2Y1 and P2X2 receptors occurs during muscle regeneration in the mdx model of muscular dystrophy. In bone and cartilage cells, the functional effects of purinergic signalling appear to be largely negative. ATP stimulates the formation and activation of osteoclasts, the bone-destroying cells. Another role appears to be as a potent local inhibitor of mineralisation. In osteoblasts, the bone-forming cells, ATP acts via P2 receptors to limit bone mineralisation by inhibiting alkaline phosphatase expression and activity. Extracellular ATP additionally exerts significant effects on mineralisation via its hydrolysis product, pyrophosphate. Evidence now suggests that purinergic signalling is potentially important in several bone and joint disorders including osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and cancers. Strategies for future musculoskeletal therapies might involve modulation of purinergic receptor function or of the ecto-nucleotidases responsible for ATP breakdown or ATP transport inhibitors.

  16. Characterization of purinergic P2X4 receptor channels expressed in anterior pituitary cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemková, Hana; Kučka, M.; Li, S.; Gonzales-Iglesias, A. E.; Tomic, M.; Stojilkovic, S. S.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 298, č. 3 (2010), E664-E651 ISSN 0193-1849 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0681 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : P2X4 receptor * ATP * pituitary Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.686, year: 2010

  17. The effect of purinergic P2 receptor blockade on skeletal muscle exercise hyperemia in miniature swine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Stefan Peter; McAllister, R M; Yang, H T

    2014-01-01

    -microsphere technique and systemic hemodynamics before and after arterial infusion of the P2 receptor antagonist reactive blue 2 during treadmill exercise (5.2 km/h, ~60 % VO2max) and arterial ATP infusion in female Yucatan miniature swine (~29 kg). RESULTS: Mean blood flow during exercise from the 16 sampled skeletal...

  18. The role of the purinergic P2X7 receptor in inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi Adriano G

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The inflammatory process, orchestrated against a variety of injurious stimuli, is composed of three inter-related phases; initiation, propagation and resolution. Understanding the interplay between these three phases and harnessing the beneficial properties of inflammation whilst preventing its damaging effects, will undoubtedly lead to the advent of much needed therapies, particularly in chronic disease states. The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R is increasingly recognised as an important cell surface regulator of several key inflammatory molecules including IL-1β, IL-18, TNF-α and IL-6. Moreover, as P2X7R-dependent cytokine production is driven by activating the inflammasome, antagonists of this receptor are likely to have therapeutic potential as novel anti-inflammatory therapies. The function of the P2X7R in inflammation, immunity and its potential role in disease will be reviewed and discussed.

  19. Purinergic glio-endothelial coupling during neuronal activity: role of P2Y1 receptors and eNOS in functional hyperemia in the mouse somatosensory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Peter; Tarantini, Stefano; Davila, Antonio; Valcarcel-Ares, M Noa; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Varamini, Behzad; Ballabh, Praveen; Sonntag, William E; Baur, Joseph A; Csiszar, Anna; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2015-12-01

    Impairment of moment-to-moment adjustment of cerebral blood flow (CBF) via neurovascular coupling is thought to play a critical role in the genesis of cognitive impairment associated with aging and pathological conditions associated with accelerated cerebromicrovascular aging (e.g., hypertension, obesity). Although previous studies demonstrate that endothelial dysfunction plays a critical role in neurovascular uncoupling in these conditions, the role of endothelial NO mediation in neurovascular coupling responses is not well understood. To establish the link between endothelial function and functional hyperemia, neurovascular coupling responses were studied in mutant mice overexpressing or deficient in endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), and the role of P2Y1 receptors in purinergic glioendothelial coupling was assessed. We found that genetic depletion of eNOS (eNOS(-/-)) and pharmacological inhibition of NO synthesis significantly decreased the CBF responses in the somatosensory cortex evoked by whisker stimulation and by administration of ATP. Overexpression of eNOS enhanced NO mediation of functional hyperemia. In control mice, the selective and potent P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2179 attenuated both whisker stimulation-induced and ATP-mediated CBF responses, whereas, in eNOS(-/-) mice, the inhibitory effects of MRS2179 were blunted. Collectively, our findings provide additional evidence for purinergic glio-endothelial coupling during neuronal activity, highlighting the role of ATP-mediated activation of eNOS via P2Y1 receptors in functional hyperemia. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Heavy metals modulate the activity of the purinergic P2X4 receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coddou, Claudio; Lorca, Ramon A.; Acuna-Castillo, Claudio; Grauso, Marta; Rassendren, Francois; Huidobro-Toro, J.Pablo

    2005-01-01

    To further characterize the nature of the regulatory metal-binding sites of the rat P2X 4 receptor, several transition heavy metals were tested to examine their ability to mimic the facilitator action of zinc or the inhibitory action of copper. cDNA coding for the rat P2X 4 receptor was injected into Xenopus laevis oocytes; the two-electrode voltage-clamp technique was used to measure and quantify the ATP-evoked currents in the absence or presence of the metals. Cadmium facilitated the ATP-gated currents in a reversible and voltage-independent manner; maximal potentiation occurred within less than 1 min. Cadmium displaced leftward, in a concentration-dependent manner, the ATP concentration-response curve. In contrast, mercury reduced the ATP-gated currents in a reversible, time, and concentration manner. Maximal inhibition occurred after about 5 min of metal application. Cobalt also augmented the ATP-evoked currents, but its action was long lasting and did not reverse even after 45 min of metal washout. Other metals such as lead, nickel, manganese, silver, or gallium did not significantly alter the ATP-gated currents. The co-application of cadmium plus zinc or mercury plus copper caused additive effects. Mutation of H140 by alanine (H140A) augmented both the cadmium-induced facilitation and the mercury-induced inhibition. In contrast, the H241A mutant showed characteristics indistinguishable from the wild type. The H286A mutant showed a normal cadmium-induced potentiation, but an increased mercury inhibition. Out of the metals examined, only cadmium mimicked closely the action of zinc, evidencing commonalities. While mercury mimicked the action of copper, both metals apparently interact at distinct metal-binding sites. The present findings allow us to infer that heavy metals modulate the P2X 4 receptor by acting in at least three separate metal-binding sites

  1. Guanine nucleotide-sensitive interaction of a radiolabeled agonist with a phospholipase C-linked P2y-purinergic receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C L; Morris, A J; Harden, T K

    1989-04-15

    Analogs of ATP and ADP produce a guanine nucleotide-dependent activation of phospholipase C in turkey erythrocyte membranes with pharmacological properties consistent with those of a P2y-purinergic receptor (Boyer, J. L., Downes, C. P., and Harden, T.K. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 884-890). This study describes the interaction of adenosine-5'-O-2-thio[35S] diphosphate ([35S]ADP beta S) with this putative P2y-purinergic receptor on purified plasma membranes prepared from turkey erythrocytes. In binding assays performed at 30 degrees C, the association rate constant of [35S] was 1.1 x 10(7) M-1 min-1 and the dissociation rate constant was 3.8 x 10(-2) min-1. [35S]ADP beta S bound with high affinity (Kd = 6-10 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of sites (Bmax = 2-4 pmol/mg protein). ATP and ADP analogs (2-methylthio ATP, ADP beta S, ATP, ADP, 5'-adenylyl imidodiphosphate, alpha, beta-methylene adenosine-5'-triphosphate, and beta, gamma-methylene adenosine 5'-triphosphate) inhibited the binding of [35S]ADP beta S with properties consistent with ligand interaction by simple law of mass action kinetics at a single site. The rank order of potency for inhibition of [35S]ADP beta S binding was identical to the potency order observed for these same agonists for stimulation of phospholipase C in turkey erythrocyte ghosts. Guanine nucleotides inhibited [35S]ADP beta S binding in a noncompetitive manner with the following potency order: guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) greater than 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate greater than GTP = GDP greater than guanosine 5'-O-2-(thiodiphosphate). The data are consistent with the idea that [35S]ADP beta S may be used to radiolabel the P2y-purinergic receptor linked to activation of phospholipase C in turkey erythrocyte membranes. In addition, interaction of radiolabeled agonist with the receptor is modified by guanine nucleotides, providing evidence that an agonist-induced receptor/guanine nucleotide regulatory protein complex may be

  2. Purinergic signaling in the airways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Brouns, Inge; Adriaensen, Dirk; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2012-10-01

    Evidence for a significant role and impact of purinergic signaling in normal and diseased airways is now beyond dispute. The present review intends to provide the current state of knowledge of the involvement of purinergic pathways in the upper and lower airways and lungs, thereby differentiating the involvement of different tissues, such as the epithelial lining, immune cells, airway smooth muscle, vasculature, peripheral and central innervation, and neuroendocrine system. In addition to the vast number of well illustrated functions for purinergic signaling in the healthy respiratory tract, increasing data pointing to enhanced levels of ATP and/or adenosine in airway secretions of patients with airway damage and respiratory diseases corroborates the emerging view that purines act as clinically important mediators resulting in either proinflammatory or protective responses. Purinergic signaling has been implicated in lung injury and in the pathogenesis of a wide range of respiratory disorders and diseases, including asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, inflammation, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, and pulmonary hypertension. These ostensibly enigmatic actions are based on widely different mechanisms, which are influenced by the cellular microenvironment, but especially the subtypes of purine receptors involved and the activity of distinct members of the ectonucleotidase family, the latter being potential protein targets for therapeutic implementation.

  3. Purinergic receptors stimulate Na+/Ca2+ exchange in pancreatic duct cells: possible role of proteins handling and transporting Ca2+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mette R; Krabbe, Simon; Ankorina-Stark, Ieva

    2009-01-01

    Most purinergic receptors activate intracellular Ca(2+) signalling, and in epithelia they stimulate transport of major ions. Aim of the present study on pancreatic ducts was to find whether P2 receptors also regulate cellular Ca(2+) transport, such as that via the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX......). Since NCX can also be connected with epithelial Ca(2+) transport, we also investigated expression of some Ca(2+)-handling/transporting proteins. Expression analysis revealed that pancreatic ducts of rat and human duct cell line CFPAC-1 (also PANC-1 and Capan-1) express the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (splice...... in human and rat duct cells. Application of ATP to CFPAC-1 monolayers also stimulated Ca(2+) transport from the luminal to the basolateral side. Taken together, these results show that pancreatic ducts express a number of Ca(2+)-handling/transporting proteins and we propose that these together...

  4. A Lys49-PLA2 myotoxin of Bothrops asper triggers a rapid death of macrophages that involves autocrine purinergic receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonello, F; Simonato, M; Aita, A; Pizzo, P; Fernández, J; Lomonte, B; Gutiérrez, J M; Montecucco, C

    2012-07-05

    Lys49-PLA(2) myotoxins, an important component of various viperid snake venoms, are a class of PLA(2)-homolog proteins deprived of catalytic activity. Similar to enzymatically active PLA(2) (Asp49) and to other classes of myotoxins, they cause severe myonecrosis. Moreover, these toxins are used as tools to study skeletal muscle repair and regeneration, a process that can be very limited after snakebites. In this work, the cytotoxic effect of different myotoxins, Bothrops asper Lys49 and Asp49-PLA(2), Notechis scutatus notexin and Naja mossambica cardiotoxin, was evaluated on macrophages, cells that have a key role in muscle regeneration. Only the Lys49-myotoxin was found to trigger a rapid asynchronous death of mouse peritoneal macrophages and macrophagic cell lines through a process that involves ATP release, ATP-induced ATP release and that is inhibited by various purinergic receptor antagonists. ATP leakage is induced also at sublytical doses of the Lys49-myotoxin, it involves Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores, and is reduced by inhibitors of VSOR and the maxi-anion channel. The toxin-induced cell death is different from that caused by high concentration of ATP and appears to be linked to localized purinergic signaling. Based on present findings, a mechanism of cell death is proposed that can be extended to other cytolytic proteins and peptides.

  5. Comparison of P2 purinergic receptors of aortic endothelial cells with those of adrenal medulla: evidence for heterogeneity of receptor subtype and of inositol phosphate response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsup, D J; Boarder, M R

    1990-07-01

    Vascular endothelial cells from different parts of the circulation are known to show different functional responses, presumably corresponding to physiological roles. Previous studies have shown that ATP acts on P2 purinergic receptors of endothelial cells of major blood vessels, stimulating the formation of inositol phosphates. Here we have compared the action of ATP and congeners acting on endothelial cells of bovine thoracic aorta with cells derived from the microvasculature of bovine adrenal medulla. With measurement of total inositol phosphates, cells from the aorta showed a rank order of agonist potency of 2-methylthio-ATP greater than adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (ATP gamma S) greater than ADP greater than ATP greater than beta, gamma-imido-ATP greater than beta, gamma-methylene-ATP, consistent with action at receptors of the P2Y subtype. However, with adrenal cells the rank order of potency was ATP gamma S greater than ATP greater than beta, gamma-imido-ATP greater than ADP greater than beta, gamma-methylene-ATP = 2-methylthio-ATP. This profile is not consistent with either P2X or P2Y receptors. When the nature of this inositol phosphate response was analyzed with anion exchange chromatography, it was found that the aortic cells showed an inositol trisphosphate stimulation that peaked within a few seconds and rapidly declined, whereas the response of the adrenal medulla cells continued to rise through 5 min. Analysis of isomers of inositol phosphates revealed a different pattern of metabolism between the two cell types, which may account for the different time course of response. With adrenal cells, ATP at low micromolar concentrations caused a dose-dependent increase in levels of cyclic AMP and had a greater than additive effect on cyclic AMP levels when combined with submaximal stimulation by prostaglandin E2. These results suggest the presence of a P2Y receptor on aortic endothelial cells, with an 'atypical' purinocepter, i.e., neither P2X nor P2Y

  6. Functionally diverse purinergic P2Y-receptors mediate prostanoid synthesis in cultured rat astrocytes: the role of ATP-induced phosphatidyl-inositol breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seregi, A; Doll, S; Schobert, A; Hertting, G

    1992-01-01

    Cultured rat astrocytes possess purinergic P2Y-receptors. Stimulation of these receptors with ATP (10(-3) M) results in increased phosphatidylinositol biphosphate (PIP2)-breakdown and prostanoid formation. We have investigated the relevance of the PIP2-pathway in prostanoid synthesis. The intracellular Ca(2+)-mobilizing agent thapsigargin (TG) (10(-6) M) and the diacylglycerol (DAG)-mimetic tetradecaoylphorbol acetate (TPA) (10(-8)-10(-6) M) both stimulate prostaglandin D2 production. ATP-induced prostanoid formation can be mimicked by combined addition of TG and TPA, suggesting the importance of the second messengers IP3 and DAG, generated during P2Y-receptor mediated PIP2-breakdown. Inhibition of ATP-induced PIP2-hydrolysis by TPA (IC50 about 5 x 10(-8) M) or by 10(-4) M neomycine, however, does not affect astroglial prostanoid synthesis, showing that P2Y-receptor mediated prostanoid formation may occur also in the absence of PIP2-hydrolysis. These findings suggest that additional postreceptor mechanisms exist in the signal transduction chain of ATP-induced astroglial prostanoid synthesis. A possible involvement of phospholipase A2 and/or of Ca(2+)-channels, directly coupled to P2Y-receptors is proposed.

  7. Purinergic signaling during Porphyromonas gingivalis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Luiz Coutinho Almeida-da-Silva

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite recent advances unraveling mechanisms of host–pathogen interactions in innate immunity, the participation of purinergic signaling in infection-driven inflammation remains an emerging research field with many unanswered questions. As one of the most-studied oral pathogens, Porphyromonas gingivalis is considered as a keystone pathogen with a central role in development of periodontal disease. This pathogen needs to evade immune-mediated defense mechanisms and tolerate inflammation in order to survive in the host. In this review, we summarize evidence showing that purinergic signaling modulates P. gingivalis survival and cellular immune responses, and discuss the role played by inflammasome activation and cell death during P. gingivalis infection. Keywords: Purinergic receptors, Innate immunity, Porphyromonas gingivalis, P2X7 receptor, Oral microbes, Inflammasome

  8. GPR17: Molecular modeling and dynamics studies of the 3-D structure and purinergic ligand binding features in comparison with P2Y receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranghino Graziella

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background GPR17 is a G-protein-coupled receptor located at intermediate phylogenetic position between two distinct receptor families: the P2Y and CysLT receptors for extracellular nucleotides and cysteinyl-LTs, respectively. We previously showed that GPR17 can indeed respond to both classes of endogenous ligands and to synthetic compounds active at the above receptor families, thus representing the first fully characterized non-peptide "hybrid" GPCR. In a rat brain focal ischemia model, the selective in vivo knock down of GPR17 by anti-sense technology or P2Y/CysLT antagonists reduced progression of ischemic damage, thus highlighting GPR17 as a novel therapeutic target for stroke. Elucidation of the structure of GPR17 and of ligand binding mechanisms are the necessary steps to obtain selective and potent drugs for this new potential target. On this basis, a 3-D molecular model of GPR17 embedded in a solvated phospholipid bilayer and refined by molecular dynamics simulations has been the first aim of this study. To explore the binding mode of the "purinergic" component of the receptor, the endogenous agonist UDP and two P2Y receptor antagonists demonstrated to be active on GPR17 (MRS2179 and cangrelor were then modeled on the receptor. Results Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that GPR17 nucleotide binding pocket is similar to that described for the other P2Y receptors, although only one of the three basic residues that have been typically involved in ligand recognition is conserved (Arg255. The binding pocket is enclosed between the helical bundle and covered at the top by EL2. Driving interactions are H-bonds and salt bridges between the 6.55 and 6.52 residues and the phosphate moieties of the ligands. An "accessory" binding site in a region formed by the EL2, EL3 and the Nt was also found. Conclusion Nucleotide binding to GPR17 occurs on the same receptor regions identified for already known P2Y receptors. Agonist

  9. Double P2X2/P2X3 Purinergic Receptor Knockout Mice Do Not Taste NaCl or the Artificial Sweetener SC45647

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Meghan C.; Eschle, Benjamin K.; Barrows, Jennell; Hallock, Robert M.; Finger, Thomas E.

    2009-01-01

    The P2X ionotropic purinergic receptors, P2X2 and P2X3, are essential for transmission of taste information from taste buds to the gustatory nerves. Mice lacking both P2X2 and P2X3 purinergic receptors (P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/−) exhibit no taste-evoked activity in the chorda tympani and glossopharyngeal nerves when stimulated with taste stimuli from any of the 5 classical taste quality groups (salt, sweet, sour, bitter, and umami) nor do the mice show taste preferences for sweet or umami, or avoidance of bitter substances (Finger et al. 2005. ATP signaling is crucial for communication from taste buds to gustatory nerves. Science. 310[5753]:1495–1499). Here, we compare the ability of P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice and P2X2/P2X3Dbl+/+ wild-type (WT) mice to detect NaCl in brief-access tests and conditioned aversion paradigms. Brief-access testing with NaCl revealed that whereas WT mice decrease licking at 300 mM and above, the P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice do not show any change in lick rates. In conditioned aversion tests, P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice did not develop a learned aversion to NaCl or the artificial sweetener SC45647, both of which are easily avoided by conditioned WT mice. The inability of P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice to show avoidance of these taste stimuli was not due to an inability to learn the task because both WT and P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice learned to avoid a combination of SC45647 and amyl acetate (an odor cue). These data suggest that P2X2/P2X3Dbl−/− mice are unable to respond to NaCl or SC45647 as taste stimuli, mirroring the lack of gustatory nerve responses to these substances. PMID:19833661

  10. Two different mechanosensitive calcium responses in Müller glial cells of the guinea pig retina: Differential dependence on purinergic receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agte, Silke; Pannicke, Thomas; Ulbricht, Elke; Reichenbach, Andreas; Bringmann, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Tractional forces or mechanical stimulation are known to induce calcium responses in retinal glial cells. The aim of the study was to determine the characteristics of calcium responses in Müller glial cells of the avascular guinea pig retina induced by focal mechanical stimulation. Freshly isolated retinal wholemounts were loaded with Mitotracker Deep Red (to fill Müller cells) and the calcium-sensitive dye Fluo-4/AM. The inner retinal surface was mechanically stimulated with a micropipette tip for 10 ms. Stimulation induced two different cytosolic calcium responses in Müller cells with different kinetics in dependence on the distance from the stimulation site. Müller cells near the stimulation site displayed an immediate and long-lasting calcium response with high amplitude. This response was mediated by calcium influx from the extracellular space likely triggered by activation of ATP-insensitive P2 receptors. More distant Müller cells displayed, with a delay of 2.4 s, transient calcium responses which propagated laterally in a wave-like fashion. Propagating calcium waves were induced by a calcium-independent release of ATP from Müller cells near the stimulation site, and were mediated by a release of calcium from internal stores triggered by ATP, acting in part at P2Y 1 receptors. The data suggest that mechanically stimulated Müller cells of the guinea pig retina release ATP which induces a propagating calcium wave in surrounding Müller cells. Propagating calcium waves may be implicated in the spatial regulation of the neuronal activity and homeostatic glial functions, and may transmit gliosis-inducing signals across the retina. Mechanical stimulation of guinea pig Müller cells induces two calcium responses: an immediate response around the stimulation site and propagating calcium waves. Both responses are differentially mediated by activation of purinergic receptors. GLIA 2016 GLIA 2017;65:62-74. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin Are Required for the Purinergic P2X7 Receptor (P2X7R)-dependent Processing of the Amyloid Precursor Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmellah, Amaria; Rayah, Amel; Auger, Rodolphe; Cuif, Marie-Hélène; Prigent, Magali; Arpin, Monique; Alcover, Andres; Delarasse, Cécile; Kanellopoulos, Jean M.

    2012-01-01

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) can be cleaved by α-secretases in neural cells to produce the soluble APP ectodomain (sAPPα), which is neuroprotective. We have shown previously that activation of the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) triggers sAPPα shedding from neural cells. Here, we demonstrate that the activation of ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins is required for the P2X7R-dependent proteolytic processing of APP leading to sAPPα release. Indeed, the down-regulation of ERM by siRNA blocked the P2X7R-dependent shedding of sAPPα. We also show that P2X7R stimulation triggered the phosphorylation of ERM. Thus, ezrin translocates to the plasma membrane to interact with P2X7R. Using specific pharmacological inhibitors, we established the order in which several enzymes trigger the P2X7R-dependent release of sAPPα. Thus, a Rho kinase and the MAPK modules ERK1/2 and JNK act upstream of ERM, whereas a PI3K activity is triggered downstream. For the first time, this work identifies ERM as major partners in the regulated non-amyloidogenic processing of APP. PMID:22891241

  12. Ezrin/radixin/moesin are required for the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R)-dependent processing of the amyloid precursor protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmellah, Amaria; Rayah, Amel; Auger, Rodolphe; Cuif, Marie-Hélène; Prigent, Magali; Arpin, Monique; Alcover, Andres; Delarasse, Cécile; Kanellopoulos, Jean M

    2012-10-05

    The amyloid precursor protein (APP) can be cleaved by α-secretases in neural cells to produce the soluble APP ectodomain (sAPPα), which is neuroprotective. We have shown previously that activation of the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) triggers sAPPα shedding from neural cells. Here, we demonstrate that the activation of ezrin, radixin, and moesin (ERM) proteins is required for the P2X7R-dependent proteolytic processing of APP leading to sAPPα release. Indeed, the down-regulation of ERM by siRNA blocked the P2X7R-dependent shedding of sAPPα. We also show that P2X7R stimulation triggered the phosphorylation of ERM. Thus, ezrin translocates to the plasma membrane to interact with P2X7R. Using specific pharmacological inhibitors, we established the order in which several enzymes trigger the P2X7R-dependent release of sAPPα. Thus, a Rho kinase and the MAPK modules ERK1/2 and JNK act upstream of ERM, whereas a PI3K activity is triggered downstream. For the first time, this work identifies ERM as major partners in the regulated non-amyloidogenic processing of APP.

  13. Purinergic signalling and diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    The pancreas is an organ with a central role in nutrient breakdown, nutrient sensing and release of hormones regulating whole body nutrient homeostasis. In diabetes mellitus, the balance is broken-cells can be starving in the midst of plenty. There are indications that the incidence of diabetes...... molecules in purinergic signalling cascades. This signalling takes place at the level of the pancreas, where the close apposition of various cells-endocrine, exocrine, stromal and immune cells-contributes to the integrated function. Following an introduction to diabetes, the pancreas and purinergic...... signalling, we will focus on the role of purinergic signalling and its changes associated with diabetes in the pancreas and selected tissues/organ systems affected by hyperglycaemia and other stress molecules of diabetes. Since this is the first review of this kind, a comprehensive historical angle is taken...

  14. Leukocyte Expression of Type 1 and Type 2 Purinergic Receptors and Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines during Total Sleep Deprivation and/or Sleep Extension in Healthy Subjects

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    Mounir Chennaoui

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purinergic type P1 (adenosine A1 and A2A receptors and the type P2 (X7 receptor have been suggested to mediate physiological effects of adenosine and adenosine triphosphate on sleep. We aimed to determine gene expression of A1R (receptor, A2AR, and P2RX7 in leukocytes of healthy subjects during total sleep deprivation followed by sleep recovery. Expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were also determined as they have been characterized as sleep regulatory substances, via P2RX7 activation. Blood sampling was performed on 14 young men (aged 31.9 ± 3.9 at baseline (B, after 24 h of sleep deprivation (24 h-SD, and after one night of sleep recovery (R. We compared gene expression levels after six nights of habitual (22.30–07.00 or extended (21.00–07.00 bedtimes. Using quantitative real-time PCR, the amount of mRNA for A1R, A2AR, P2RX7, TNF-α, and IL-1β was analyzed. After 24 h-SD compared to B, whatever prior sleep condition, a significant increase of A2AR expression was observed that returned to basal level after sleep recovery [day main effect, F(2, 26 = 10.8, p < 0.001]. In both sleep condition, a day main effect on P2RX7 mRNA was observed [F(2, 26 = 6.7, p = 0.005] with significant increases after R compared with 24 h-SD. TNF-α and IL-1β expressions were not significantly altered. Before 24 h-SD (baseline, the A2AR expression was negatively correlated with the latency of stage 3 sleep during the previous night, while that of the A1R positively. This was not observed after sleep recovery following 24 h-SD. This is the first study showing increased A2AR and not A1 gene expression after 24 h-SD in leukocytes of healthy subjects, and this even if bedtime was initially increased by 1.5 h per night for six nights. In conclusion, prolonged wakefulness induced an up-regulation of the A2A receptor gene expression in leukocytes from healthy subjects. Significant correlations between baseline expression of A1 and A2A

  15. Deficiency of the Purinergic Receptor 2X7 Attenuates Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis Induced by High-Fat Diet: Possible Role of the NLRP3 Inflammasome

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    Claudia Blasetti Fantauzzi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular mechanisms driving transition from simple steatosis to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, a critical step in the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD to cirrhosis, are poorly defined. This study aimed at investigating the role of the purinergic receptor 2X7 (PR2X7, through the NLRP3 inflammasome, in the development of NASH. To this end, mice knockout for the Pr2x7 gene (Pr2x7−/− and coeval wild-type (WT mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD or normal-fat diet for 16 weeks. NAFLD grade and stage were lower in Pr2x7−/− than WT mice, and only 1/7 Pr2x7−/− animals showed evidence of NASH, as compared with 4/7 WT mice. Molecular markers of inflammation, oxidative stress, and fibrosis were markedly increased in WT-HFD mice, whereas no or significantly reduced increments were detected in Pr2x7−/− animals, which showed also decreased modulation of genes of lipid metabolism. Deletion of Pr2x7 gene was associated with blunted or abolished activation of NLRP3 inflammasome and expression of its components, which were induced in liver sinusoidal endothelial cells challenged with appropriate stimuli. These data show that Pr2x7 gene deletion protects mice from HFD-induced NASH, possibly through blunted activation of NLRP3 inflammasome, suggesting that PR2X7 and NLRP3 may represent novel therapeutic targets.

  16. Opposing Roles of Calcium and Intracellular ATP on Gating of the Purinergic P2X2 Receptor Channel

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    Milos B. Rokic

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available P2X2 receptors (P2X2R exhibit a slow desensitization during the initial ATP application and a progressive, calcium-dependent increase in rates of desensitization during repetitive stimulation. This pattern is observed in whole-cell recordings from cells expressing recombinant and native P2X2R. However, desensitization is not observed in perforated-patched cells and in two-electrode voltage clamped oocytes. Addition of ATP, but not ATPγS or GTP, in the pipette solution also abolishes progressive desensitization, whereas intracellular injection of apyrase facilitates receptor desensitization. Experiments with injection of alkaline phosphatase or addition of staurosporine and ATP in the intracellular solution suggest a role for a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation in receptor desensitization. Mutation of residues that are potential phosphorylation sites identified a critical role of the S363 residue in the intracellular ATP action. These findings indicate that intracellular calcium and ATP have opposing effects on P2X2R gating: calcium allosterically facilitates receptor desensitization and ATP covalently prevents the action of calcium. Single cell measurements further revealed that intracellular calcium stays elevated after washout in P2X2R-expressing cells and the blockade of mitochondrial sodium/calcium exchanger lowers calcium concentrations during washout periods to basal levels, suggesting a role of mitochondria in this process. Therefore, the metabolic state of the cell can influence P2X2R gating.

  17. Purinergic receptors P2Y12R and P2X7R: potential targets for PET imaging of microglia phenotypes in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaino, Wissam; Janssen, Bieneke; Kooij, Gijs; van der Pol, Susanne M A; van Het Hof, B; van Horssen, Jack; Windhorst, Albert D; de Vries, Helga E

    2017-12-22

    Microglia are major players in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS) and may play a dual role in disease progression. The activation status of microglia in vivo is highly dynamic and occurs as a continuum, with the pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory phenotypes on either end of this spectrum. Little is known about in vivo dynamics of microglia phenotypes in MS due to the lack of diagnostic tools. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is a powerful non-invasive technique that allows real-time imaging of microglia activation phenotypes in the central nervous system, depending on the availability of selective PET tracers. Our objective is to investigate and characterize the expression of the purinergic receptors P2Y12R and P2X7R as potential targets for PET tracer development and subsequent PET imaging in order to evaluate the dynamics of microglia status in vivo. We used immunohistochemical analysis to explore the expression of P2Y12R and P2X7R in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) post-mortem tissues and different stages of well-characterized MS lesions. We evaluated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction the expression of P2Y12R and P2X7R in human polarized microglia, and we performed autoradiography binding assay with radiolabeled P2Y12R and P2X7R antagonists using MS and rat EAE tissues. Here, we demonstrate that P2X7R is associated with a pro-inflammatory phenotype of human microglia in vitro, and is highly expressed in microglia in MS lesions as well as during the peak of EAE. In contrast, P2Y12R was associated with an anti-inflammatory phenotype in human microglia in vitro and was expressed at lower levels in active inflammatory MS lesions compared to normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) and similarly in EAE, while its expression increased in the remission phase of EAE. Binding of radiolabeled tracers specific for P2Y12R and P2X7R on ex vivo tissues validated the value of these receptors as PET imaging targets for

  18. Purinergic Signaling Pathways in Endocrine System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelobaba, Ivana; Janjic, Marija M.; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine-5′-triphosphate is released by neuroendocrine, endocrine, and other cell types and acts as an extracellular agonist for ligand-gated P2X cationic channels and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors in numerous organs and tissues, including the endocrine system. The breakdown of ATP by ectonucleotidases not only terminates its extracellular messenger functions, but also provides a pathway for the generation of two additional agonists: adenosine 5′-diphosphate, acting via some P2Y receptors, and adenosine, a native agonist for G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, also expressed in the endocrine system. This article provides a review of purinergic signaling pathways in the hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory cells and neurohypophysis, hypothalamic parvocellular neuroendocrine system, adenohypophysis, and effector glands organized in five axes: hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, hypothalamic-pituitary-growth hormone, and hypothalamic-pituitary-prolactin. We attempted to summarize current knowledge of purinergic receptor subtypes expressed in the endocrine system, including their roles in intracellular signaling, hormone secretion, and other cell functions. We also briefly review the release mechanism for adenosine-5′-triphosphate by neuroendocrine, endocrine and surrounding cells, the enzymes involved in adenosine-5′-triphosphate hydrolysis to adenosine-5′-diphosphate and adenosine, and the relevance of this pathway for sequential activation of receptors and termination of signaling. PMID:25960051

  19. Purinergic signaling pathways in endocrine system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjelobaba, Ivana; Janjic, Marija M; Stojilkovic, Stanko S

    2015-09-01

    Adenosine-5'-triphosphate is released by neuroendocrine, endocrine, and other cell types and acts as an extracellular agonist for ligand-gated P2X cationic channels and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors in numerous organs and tissues, including the endocrine system. The breakdown of ATP by ectonucleotidases not only terminates its extracellular messenger functions, but also provides a pathway for the generation of two additional agonists: adenosine 5'-diphosphate, acting via some P2Y receptors, and adenosine, a native agonist for G protein-coupled adenosine receptors, also expressed in the endocrine system. This article provides a review of purinergic signaling pathways in the hypothalamic magnocellular neurosecretory cells and neurohypophysis, hypothalamic parvocellular neuroendocrine system, adenohypophysis, and effector glands organized in five axes: hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal, hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal, hypothalamic-pituitary-growth hormone, and hypothalamic-pituitary-prolactin. We attempted to summarize current knowledge of purinergic receptor subtypes expressed in the endocrine system, including their roles in intracellular signaling, hormone secretion, and other cell functions. We also briefly review the release mechanism for adenosine-5'-triphosphate by neuroendocrine, endocrine and surrounding cells, the enzymes involved in adenosine-5'-triphosphate hydrolysis to adenosine-5'-diphosphate and adenosine, and the relevance of this pathway for sequential activation of receptors and termination of signaling. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Purinergic Signaling in the Cardiovascular System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2017-01-06

    There is nervous control of the heart by ATP as a cotransmitter in sympathetic, parasympathetic, and sensory-motor nerves, as well as in intracardiac neurons. Centers in the brain control heart activities and vagal cardiovascular reflexes involve purines. Adenine nucleotides and nucleosides act on purinoceptors on cardiomyocytes, AV and SA nodes, cardiac fibroblasts, and coronary blood vessels. Vascular tone is controlled by a dual mechanism. ATP, released from perivascular sympathetic nerves, causes vasoconstriction largely via P2X1 receptors. Endothelial cells release ATP in response to changes in blood flow (via shear stress) or hypoxia, to act on P2 receptors on endothelial cells to produce nitric oxide, endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor, or prostaglandins to cause vasodilation. ATP is also released from sensory-motor nerves during antidromic reflex activity, to produce relaxation of some blood vessels. Purinergic signaling is involved in the physiology of erythrocytes, platelets, and leukocytes. ATP is released from erythrocytes and platelets, and purinoceptors and ectonucleotidases are expressed by these cells. P1, P2Y 1 , P2Y 12 , and P2X1 receptors are expressed on platelets, which mediate platelet aggregation and shape change. Long-term (trophic) actions of purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and nucleotides promote migration and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells via P1 and P2Y receptors during angiogenesis, vessel remodeling during restenosis after angioplasty and atherosclerosis. The involvement of purinergic signaling in cardiovascular pathophysiology and its therapeutic potential are discussed, including heart failure, infarction, arrhythmias, syncope, cardiomyopathy, angina, heart transplantation and coronary bypass grafts, coronary artery disease, diabetic cardiomyopathy, hypertension, ischemia, thrombosis, diabetes mellitus, and migraine. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. New Approaches to Thyroid Hormones and Purinergic Signaling

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    Gabriel Fernandes Silveira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that thyroid hormones influence a wide variety of events at the molecular, cellular, and functional levels. Thyroid hormones (TH play pivotal roles in growth, cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, development, and metabolic homeostasis via thyroid hormone receptors (TRs by controlling the expression of TR target genes. Most of these effects result in pathological and physiological events and are already well described in the literature. Even so, many recent studies have been devoted to bringing new information on problems in controlling the synthesis and release of these hormones and to elucidating mechanisms of the action of these hormones unconventionally. The purinergic system was recently linked to thyroid diseases, including enzymes, receptors, and enzyme products related to neurotransmitter release, nociception, behavior, and other vascular systems. Thus, throughout this text we intend to relate the relationship between the TH in physiological and pathological situations with the purinergic signaling.

  2. Sensory input to the central nervous system from the lungs and airways: A prominent role for purinergic signalling via P2X2/3 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaensen, Dirk; Brouns, Inge; Timmermans, Jean-Pierre

    2015-09-01

    Specific subpopulations of lung-related primary afferent neurons in dorsal root and vagal sensory ganglia have been reported to express P2X2 and P2X3 receptors both in the neuronal cell bodies and in their peripheral terminals. The afferent innervation of airways and lungs is organised as sensory receptor structures, of which at least seven types with a vagal origin and two with a spinal origin have been reported. In view of the recently suggested therapeutic promise of ATP antagonism - specifically at P2X3 receptor expressing nociceptive fibres - in respiratory disorders, the present work focusses on four distinct populations of pulmonary sensory receptors that have so far been reported to express P2X2/3 receptors. Three of them originate from myelinated nerve fibres that display similar mechanosensor-like morphological and neurochemical characteristics. Two of the latter concern vagal nodose sensory fibres, either related to pulmonary neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs), or giving rise to smooth muscle-associated airway receptors (SMARs); the third gives rise to visceral pleura receptors (VPRs) and most likely arises from dorsal root ganglia. The fourth population concerns C-fibre receptors (CFRs) that also derive from neuronal cell bodies located in vagal nodose ganglia. Although the majority of the airway- and lung-related sensory receptors that express P2X2/3 receptors apparently do not belong to accepted nociceptive populations, these data definitely point out that ATP may be an important player in the physiological transduction of different lung-related afferent signals from the periphery to the CNS. The observed variety within the populations of pulmonary sensory receptors that express P2X2/3 receptors argues for a critical and careful interpretation of the functional data. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. ATP release and purinergic signaling in NLRP3 inflammasome activation

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    Isabelle eCOUILLIN

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The NLRP3 inflammasome is a protein complex involved in IL-1β and IL-18 processing that senses pathogen- and danger-associated molecular patterns. One step- or two step- models have been proposed to explain the tight regulation of IL-1β production during inflammation. Moreover, cellular stimulation triggers ATP release and subsequent activation of purinergic receptors at the cell surface. Importantly some studies have reported roles for extracellular ATP (eATP, in NLRP3 inflammasome activation in response to PAMPs and DAMPs. In this mini review, we will discuss the link between active ATP release, purinergic signaling and NLRP3 inflammasome activation. We will focus on the role of autocrine or paracrine ATP export in particle-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation and discuss how particle activators are competent to induce maturation and secretion of IL-1β through a process that involves, as a first event, extracellular release of endogenous ATP through hemichannel opening, and as a second event, signaling through purinergic receptors that trigger NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Finally, we will review the evidence for ATP as a key proinflammatory mediator released by dying cells. In particular we will discuss how cancer cells dying via autophagy trigger ATP-dependent NLRP3 inflammasome activation in the macrophages engulfing them, eliciting an immunogenic response against tumors.

  4. Purinergic Signaling in Mast Cell Degranulation and Asthma

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    Zhan-Guo Gao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are responsible for the majority of allergic conditions. It was originally thought that almost all allergic events were mediated directly only via the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptors. However, recent evidence showed that many other receptors, such as G protein-coupled receptors and ligand-gated ion channels, are also directly involved in mast cell degranulation, the release of inflammatory mediators such as histamine, serine proteases, leukotrienes, heparin, and serotonin. These mediators are responsible for the symptoms in allergic conditions such as allergic asthma. In recent years, it has been realized that purinergic signaling, induced via the activation of G protein-coupled adenosine receptors and P2Y nucleotide receptors, as well as by ATP-gated P2X receptors, plays a significant role in mast cell degranulation. Both adenosine and ATP can induce degranulation and bronchoconstriction on their own and synergistically with allergens. All three classes of receptors, adenosine, P2X and P2Y are involved in tracheal mucus secretion. This review will summarize the currently available knowledge on the role of purinergic signaling in mast cell degranulation and its most relevant disease, asthma.

  5. Natural Products as a Source for New Anti-Inflammatory and Analgesic Compounds through the Inhibition of Purinergic P2X Receptors

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    Rômulo José Soares-Bezerra

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural products have reemerged in traditional medicine as a potential source of new molecules or phytomedicines to help with health disorders. It has been established that members of the P2X subfamily, ATP-gated ion channels, are crucial to the inflammatory process and pain signalization. As such, several preclinical studies have demonstrated that P2X2R, P2X3R, P2X4R and P2X7R are promising pharmacological targets to control inflammatory and pain disorders. Several studies have indicated that natural products could be a good source of the new specific molecules needed for the treatment of diseases linked to inflammation and pain disorders through the regulation of these receptors. Herein, we discuss and give an overview of the applicability of natural products as a source to obtain P2X receptors (P2XR selective antagonists for use in clinical treatment, which require further investigation.

  6. The role of purinergic signalling in exocrine pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haanes, Kristian Agmund

    ATP is a fundamentally important molecule in intracellular processes, especially recognised as the molecular source of energy. ATP is however also released as a signal from most cell types, and extracellular signalling by ATP goes under the common name purinergic signalling and it includes release...... mechanisms, receptors and br akdown enzymes. The work presented herein illustrates that ATP is present and is taken up into the zymogen granules of pancreatic acinar cells by the vesicular nucleotide transporter. Zymogen granules also contain the digestive enzymes in the acinar cells. Various stimuli release...

  7. Effects of ionizing radiation on purinergic signaling modulation in rat brain nerve cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanojevic, I.; Milosevic, M.; Drakulic, D.; Horvat, A.; Stanojevic, I.)

    2007-01-01

    Purinergic signaling is composed of three modulatory components: a) source of extracellular nucleotides, b) specific receptor expression for these transmitter molecules and c) ectonucleotidase selection that dictate cell response gradually degradation extracellular nucleotides to nucleosides. ATP acts as a fast excitatory transmitter in the CNS. Postsynaptic actions of ATP are mediated by an extended family of purinergic, P2X receptors, widely expressed throughout the CNS. NTPDases hydrolyse extracellular ATP and ADP to AMP and are responsive for purinergfic termination. To investigate if ionizing irradiation could modulate CNS purinergic signalization we monitored activity of NTPDases and abundance of P2X7 receptor in synaptic plasma membranes after whole-body acute irradiation using low (0,5Gy) or therapeutic (2Gy) doses, 1h i 72h after irradiating juvenile (15-day old) and adult (90-day old) rats. Acute irradiation modulate purinergic system components investigated at the different ways in the rat development brain SPM and in the adult brain dependent of dose and time after irradiation [sr

  8. Purinergic signalling in autoimmunity: A role for the P2X7R in systemic lupus erythematosus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Virgilio, Francesco; Giuliani, Anna Lisa

    2016-10-01

    Purinergic signalling plays a crucial role in immunity and autoimmunity. Among purinergic receptors, the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has an undisputed role as it is expressed to high level by immune cells, triggers cytokine release and modulates immune cell differentiation. In this review, we focus on evidence supporting a possible role of the P2X7R in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Copyright © 2016 Chang Gung University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Purinergic signalling in autoimmunity: A role for the P2X7R in systemic lupus erythematosus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Di Virgilio

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic signalling plays a crucial role in immunity and autoimmunity. Among purinergic receptors, the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R has an undisputed role as it is expressed to high level by immune cells, triggers cytokine release and modulates immune cell differentiation. In this review, we focus on evidence supporting a possible role of the P2X7R in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Keywords: Extracellular ATP, P2X7R, Systemic lupus erythematosus, NLRP3 inflammasome, Interleukin-1β

  10. Bile acid effects are mediated by ATP release and purinergic signalling in exocrine pancreatic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, Justyna Magdalena; Haanes, Kristian Agmund; Christensen, Nynne

    2015-01-01

    ) and duct cells (Capan-1). Taurine and glycine conjugated forms of CDCA had smaller effects on ATP release in Capan-1 cells. In duct monolayers, CDCA stimulated ATP release mainly from the luminal membrane; the releasing mechanisms involved both vesicular and non-vesicular secretion pathways. Duct cells......BACKGROUND: In many cells, bile acids (BAs) have a multitude of effects, some of which may be mediated by specific receptors such the TGR5 or FXR receptors. In pancreas systemic BAs, as well as intra-ductal BAs from bile reflux, can affect pancreatic secretion. Extracellular ATP and purinergic...... increase [Ca(2+)]i. The TGR5 receptor is not involved in these processes but can play a protective role at high intracellular Ca(2+) conditions. We propose that purinergic signalling could be taken into consideration in other cells/organs, and thereby potentially explain some of the multifaceted effects...

  11. Purinergic signaling to terminate TLR responses in macrophages

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    Kajal eHamidzadeh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages undergo profound physiological alterations when they encounter pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs. These alterations can result in the elaboration of cytokines and mediators that promote immune responses and contribute to the clearance of pathogens. These innate immune responses by myeloid cells are transient. The termination of these secretory responses is not due to the dilution of stimuli, but rather to the active down-regulation of innate responses induced by the very PAMPs that initiated them. Here we describe a purinergic autoregulatory program whereby TLR-stimulated macrophages control their activation state. In this program, TLR stimulated macrophages undergo metabolic alterations that result in the production of ATP and its release through membrane pannexin channels. This purine nucleotide is rapidly hydrolyzed to adenosine by ectoenzymes on the macrophage surface, CD39 and CD73. Adenosine then signals through the P1 class of seven transmembrane receptors to induce a regulatory state that is characterized by the down-regulation of inflammatory cytokines and the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors. This purinergic autoregulatory system mitigates the collateral damage that would be caused by the prolonged activation of macrophages, and rather allows the macrophage to maintain homeostasis. The transient activation of macrophages can be prolonged by treating macrophages with IFN-γ. IFN-γ treated macrophages become less sensitive to the regulatory effects of adenosine, allowing them to sustain macrophage activation for the duration of an adaptive immune response.

  12. The Purinergic System and Glial Cells: Emerging Costars in Nociception

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    Giulia Magni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available It is now well established that glial cells not only provide mechanical and trophic support to neurons but can directly contribute to neurotransmission, for example, by release and uptake of neurotransmitters and by secreting pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. This has greatly changed our attitude towards acute and chronic disorders, paving the way for new therapeutic approaches targeting activated glial cells to indirectly modulate and/or restore neuronal functions. A deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in neuron-to-glia and glia-to-glia communication that can be pharmacologically targeted is therefore a mandatory step toward the success of this new healing strategy. This holds true also in the field of pain transmission, where the key involvement of astrocytes and microglia in the central nervous system and satellite glial cells in peripheral ganglia has been clearly demonstrated, and literally hundreds of signaling molecules have been identified. Here, we shall focus on one emerging signaling system involved in the cross talk between neurons and glial cells, the purinergic system, consisting of extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides and their membrane receptors. Specifically, we shall summarize existing evidence of novel “druggable” glial purinergic targets, which could help in the development of innovative analgesic approaches to chronic pain states.

  13. Purinergic regulation of CFTR and Ca2+ -activated Cl- channels and K+ channels in human pancreatic duct epithelium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; Haanes, Kristian A; Novak, Ivana

    2013-01-01

    dependent on intracellular Ca(2+). Apically applied ATP/UTP stimulated CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) (CaCC) channels, which were inhibited by CFTRinh-172 and niflumic acid, respectively. The basolaterally applied ATP stimulated CFTR. In CFPAC-1 cells, which have.......1). The apical effects of ATP/UTP were greatly potentiated by the IK channel opener DC-EBIO. Determination of RNA and protein levels revealed that Capan-1 cells have high expression of TMEM16A (ANO1), a likely CaCC candidate. We conclude that in human pancreatic duct cells ATP/UTP regulates via purinergic......Purinergic agonists have been considered for the treatment of respiratory epithelia in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. The pancreas, one of the most seriously affected organs in CF, expresses various purinergic receptors. Studies on the rodent pancreas show that purinergic signaling regulates...

  14. Señales purinérgicas Purinergic signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo R Lazarowski

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available En la última década se ha aportado clara evidencia de que tanto nucleósidos como nucleótidos de adenina y uridina pueden funcionar como factores de señalización extracelular. Su acción es mediada por dos tipos principales de receptores de superficie denominados purinérgicos. Los receptores P1 se activan por adenosina, y son todos metabotrópicos, mientras que los receptores de nucleótidos (ATP, ADP, UTP y UDP y nucleótidos-azúcares (UDP-glucosa y UDP-galactosa pueden ser metabotrópicos (P2Y o ionotrópicos (P2X. La importancia y complejidad de este sistema de señalización se evidencia por la diversidad de mecanismos de liberación de nucleótidos al medio extracelular y por la distribución ubicua de varios grupos de ectonucleotidasas capaces de catalizar la degradación y conversión de nucleótidos. Hasta el momento se han descrito y clonado una veintena de estos receptores que modulan una variedad de respuestas, como el impulso nervioso, la respuesta inflamatoria, la secreción de insulina, la regulación del tono vascular y la percepción del dolor. En la presente revisión se describen las características estructurales y farmacológicas de los receptores purinérgicos y se analiza la interacción dinámica entre estos receptores, los nucleósidos y nucleótidos, y las ectonucleotidasas, con especial atención a la dinámica de la agregación plaquetaria, la respuesta inmune y la hidratación de las mucosas respiratorias.In the last decade evidence accumulated that nucleosides and nucleotides of both uridine and adenine can act as extracellular signaling factors. Their action is mediated by two main types of surface receptors commonly known as purinergic. P1 receptors are metabotropic and activated by adenosine, whereas receptors for nucleotides (ATP, ADP, UTP and UDP and nucleotide-sugars (UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose can be either metabotropic (P2Y or ionotropic (P2X. The importance and complexity of this signaling system

  15. Arrestin orchestrates crosstalk between G protein-coupled receptors to modulate the spatiotemporal activation of ERK MAPK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, David; Crosby, Catherine; Xiang, Yang

    2010-01-08

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) respond to diversified extracellular stimuli to modulate cellular function. Despite extensive studies investigating the regulation of single GPCR signaling cascades, the effects of concomitant GPCR activation on downstream signaling and cellular function remain unclear. We aimed to characterize the cellular mechanism by which GPCR crosstalk regulates mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) activation. Adrenergic receptors on cardiac fibroblasts were manipulated to examine the role of arrestin in the spatiotemporal regulation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 MAPK signaling. We show a general mechanism in which arrestin activation by one GPCR is capable of regulating signaling originating from another GPCR. Activation of Gq coupled-receptor signaling leads to prolonged ERK1/2 MAPK phosphorylation, nuclear accumulation, and cellular proliferation. Interestingly, coactivation of these receptors with the beta-adrenergic receptors induced transient ERK signaling localized within the cytosol, which attenuated cell proliferation. Further studies revealed that recruitment of arrestin3 to the beta2-adrenergic receptor orchestrates the sequestration of Gq-coupled receptor-induced ERK to the cytosol through direct binding of ERK to arrestin. This is the first evidence showing that arrestin3 acts as a coordinator to integrate signals from multiple GPCRs. Our studies not only provide a novel mechanism explaining the integration of mitogenic signaling elicited by different GPCRs, but also underscore the critical role of signaling crosstalk among GPCRs in vivo.

  16. Purinergic control of vascular tone in the retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kur, Joanna; Newman, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Purinergic control of vascular tone in the CNS has been largely unexplored. This study examines the contribution of endogenous extracellular ATP, acting on vascular smooth muscle cells, in controlling vascular tone in the in vivo rat retina. Retinal vessels were labelled by i.v. injection of a fluorescent dye and imaged with scanning laser confocal microscopy. The diameters of primary arterioles were monitored under control conditions and following intravitreal injection of pharmacological agents. Apyrase (500 units ml−1), an ATP hydrolysing enzyme, dilated retinal arterioles by 40.4 ± 2.8%, while AOPCP (12.5 mm), an ecto-5′-nucleotidase inhibitor that increases extracellular ATP levels, constricted arterioles by 58.0 ± 3.8% (P fluorocitrate (150 μm) dilated retinal vessels by 52.3 ± 1.1% (P < 0.001) and inhibited the vasodilatory response to NF023 (50 μm, 7.9 ± 2.0%; P < 0.01). These findings suggest that vascular tone in rat retinal arterioles is maintained by tonic release of ATP from the retina. ATP acts on P2X1 receptors, although contributions from other P2X and P2Y receptors cannot be ruled out. Retinal glial cells are a possible source of the vasoconstricting ATP. PMID:24277867

  17. Involvement of purinergic signaling on nitric oxide production by neutrophils stimulated with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; De Carli, Geraldo Attilio; Bonan, Carla Denise; Tasca, Tiana

    2012-03-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a parasite from the human urogenital tract that causes trichomonosis, the most prevalent non-viral sexually transmitted disease. The neutrophil infiltration has been considered to be primarily responsible for cytological changes observed at infection site, and the chemoattractants can play an important role in this leukocytic recruitment. Nitric oxide (NO) is one of the most widespread mediator compounds, and it is implicated in modulation of immunological mechanisms. Extracellular nucleotides and nucleosides are signaling molecules involved in several processes, including immune responses and control of leukocyte trafficking. Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase members, ecto-5'-nucleotidase, and adenosine deaminase (ectoADA) have been characterized in T. vaginalis. Herein, we investigated the effects of purinergic system on NO production by neutrophils stimulated with T. vaginalis. The trophozoites were able to induce a high NO synthesis by neutrophils through iNOS pathway. The extracellular nucleotides ATP, ADP, and ATPγS (a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog) showed no significant change in NO secretion. In contrast, adenosine and its degradation product, inosine, promoted a low production of the compound. The immunosuppressive effect of adenosine upon NO release by neutrophils occurred due to adenosine A(2A) receptor activation. The ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity displayed by T. vaginalis was shown to be important in adenosine generation, indicating the efficiency of purinergic cascade. Our data suggest the influence of purinergic signaling, specifically adenosinergic system, on NO production by neutrophils in T. vaginalis infection, contributing to the immunological aspects of disease.

  18. P2X-selective purinergic antagonists are strong inhibitors of HIV-1 fusion during both cell-to-cell and cell-free infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Talia H; Esposito, Anthony M; Durham, Natasha D; Hartmann, Boris M; Chen, Benjamin K

    2014-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is chronic and presently still incurable. Antiretroviral drugs effectively suppress replication; however, persistent activation of inflammatory pathways remains a key cause of morbidity. Recent studies proposed that purinergic signaling is required for HIV-1 infection. Purinergic receptors are distributed throughout a wide variety of tissue types and detect extracellular ATP as a danger signal released from dying cells. We have explored how these pathways are involved in the transmission of HIV-1 from cell to cell through virological synapses. Infection of CD4+ T lymphocytes with HIV-1 in the presence of an inhibitor of P2X receptors effectively inhibited HIV-1 infection through both cell-free and cell-to-cell contact in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of direct cell-to-cell infection did not affect the formation of virological synapses or the subsequent cell-to-cell transfer of HIV-1. During both cell-free and cell-to-cell CD4+ T lymphocyte infection, purinergic antagonists blocked infection at the level of viral membrane fusion. During cell-to-cell transmission, we observed CXCR4 colocalization with the newly internalized virus particles within target lymphocytes and found that the purinergic antagonists did not impair the recruitment of the coreceptor CXCR4 to the site of Gag internalization in the target cell. In a screen of a library of purinergic antagonists, we found that the most potent inhibitors of HIV-1 fusion were those that target P2X receptors, while P2Y-selective receptor antagonists or adenosine receptor antagonists were ineffective. Our results suggest that P2X receptors may provide a therapeutic target and that purinergic antagonists may have potent activity against viral infection of CD4+ T lymphocytes by both cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission. This study identifies purinergic antagonists to be potent inhibitors of HIV-1 cell-free and cell-to-cell-mediated infection and provides a

  19. Purinergic Ligands as Potential Therapeutic Tools for the Treatment of Inflammation-Related Intestinal Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Dal Ben

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation-related intestinal diseases are a set of various conditions presenting an overactive enteric immune system. A continuous overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines and a decreased production of anti-inflammatory modulators are generally observed, while morpho-functional alterations of the enteric nervous system lead to intestinal secretory and motor dysfunctions. The factors at the basis of these conditions are still to be totally identified and current therapeutic strategies are aimed only at achieving and maintaining remission states, by using therapeutic tools like aminosalicylates, corticosteroids, immunomodulators, biological drugs (i.e., monoclonal antibodies, and eventually surgery. Recent reports described a key role of purinergic mediators (i.e., adenosine and its nucleotides ATP and ADP in the regulation of the activity of immune cells and enteric nervous system, showing also that alterations of the purinergic signaling are linked to pathological conditions of the intestinal tract. These data prompted to a series of investigations to test the therapeutic potential for inflammation-related intestinal conditions of compounds able to restore or modulate an altered purinergic signaling within the gut. This review provides an overview on these investigations, describing the results of preclinical and/or clinical evaluation of compounds able to stimulate or inhibit specific P2 (i.e., P2X7 or P1 (i.e., A2A or A3 receptor signaling and to modify the adenosine levels through the modulation of enzymes activity (i.e., Adenosine Deaminase or nucleoside transporters. Recent developments in the field are also reported and the most promising purine-based therapeutic strategies for the treatment of inflammation-related gastrointestinal disorders are schematically summarized.

  20. Paracrine effect of carbon monoxide - astrocytes promote neuroprotection through purinergic signaling in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroga, Cláudia S F; Alves, Raquel M A; Conde, Sílvia V; Alves, Paula M; Vieira, Helena L A

    2016-08-15

    The neuroprotective role of carbon monoxide (CO) has been studied in a cell-autonomous mode. Herein, a new concept is disclosed - CO affects astrocyte-neuron communication in a paracrine manner to promote neuroprotection. Neuronal survival was assessed when co-cultured with astrocytes that had been pre-treated or not with CO. The CO-pre-treated astrocytes reduced neuronal cell death, and the cellular mechanisms were investigated, focusing on purinergic signaling. CO modulates astrocytic metabolism and extracellular ATP content in the co-culture medium. Moreover, several antagonists of P1 adenosine and P2 ATP receptors partially reverted CO-induced neuroprotection through astrocytes. Likewise, knocking down expression of the neuronal P1 adenosine receptor A2A-R (encoded by Adora2a) reverted the neuroprotective effects of CO-exposed astrocytes. The neuroprotection of CO-treated astrocytes also decreased following prevention of ATP or adenosine release from astrocytic cells and inhibition of extracellular ATP metabolism into adenosine. Finally, the neuronal downstream event involves TrkB (also known as NTRK2) receptors and BDNF. Pharmacological and genetic inhibition of TrkB receptors reverts neuroprotection triggered by CO-treated astrocytes. Furthermore, the neuronal ratio of BDNF to pro-BDNF increased in the presence of CO-treated astrocytes and decreased whenever A2A-R expression was silenced. In summary, CO prevents neuronal cell death in a paracrine manner by targeting astrocytic metabolism through purinergic signaling. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. Blast shockwaves propagate Ca2+ activity via purinergic astrocyte networks in human central nervous system cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravin, Rea; Blank, Paul S.; Busse, Brad; Ravin, Nitay; Vira, Shaleen; Bezrukov, Ludmila; Waters, Hang; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Lee, Philip R.; Fields, R. Douglas; Bezrukov, Sergey M.; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    In a recent study of the pathophysiology of mild, blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI) the exposure of dissociated, central nervous system (CNS) cells to simulated blast resulted in propagating waves of elevated intracellular Ca2+. Here we show, in dissociated human CNS cultures, that these calcium waves primarily propagate through astrocyte-dependent, purinergic signaling pathways that are blocked by P2 antagonists. Human, compared to rat, astrocytes had an increased calcium response and prolonged calcium wave propagation kinetics, suggesting that in our model system rat CNS cells are less responsive to simulated blast. Furthermore, in response to simulated blast, human CNS cells have increased expressions of a reactive astrocyte marker, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and a protease, matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP-9). The conjoint increased expression of GFAP and MMP-9 and a purinergic ATP (P2) receptor antagonist reduction in calcium response identifies both potential mechanisms for sustained changes in brain function following primary bTBI and therapeutic strategies targeting abnormal astrocyte activity. PMID:27162174

  2. Nanobody-Based Biologics for Modulating Purinergic Signaling in Inflammation and Immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Menzel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+ are released as danger signals from cells during infection and sterile inflammation. In the extracellular compartment ATP is converted by CD39, CD73, and other ecto-enzymes into metabolites that modulate the activity of T cells and macrophages. While ATP mediates pro-inflammatory signals via P2X7 and other P2 receptors, adenosine triggers anti-inflammatory signaling via the adenosine 2a receptor (Adora2a and other P1 receptors. The latter also plays a role in maintaining an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. NAD+ is converted by CD38, CD203 and other ecto-enzymes to the Ca2+ mobilizing messengers cyclic ADP-ribose and ADP-ribose, and to adenosine. Recent findings on the roles of CD38, CD39, CD73, CD203, P2X7, and Adora2a in inflammation and immunity underscore the potential of these proteins as drug targets. However, available small molecule inhibitors often lack specificity and mediate unwanted off-target toxicity. Nanobodies – single domain antibodies derived from heavy chain antibodies that naturally occur in camelids – display a propensity to bind functional epitopes not accessible to conventional antibodies. Like conventional antibodies, nanobodies and nanobody-based biologics are highly specific and have well-understood, tunable in vivo pharmacodynamics with little if any toxicity. Nanobodies thus represent attractive alternatives to small molecule inhibitors for modulating purinergic signaling in inflammation and immunity. Here we review recent progress made in developing nanobodies against key targets of purinergic signaling.

  3. Nanobody-Based Biologics for Modulating Purinergic Signaling in Inflammation and Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, Stephan; Schwarz, Nicole; Haag, Friedrich; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich

    2018-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD + ) are released as danger signals from cells during infection and sterile inflammation. In the extracellular compartment ATP is converted by CD39, CD73, and other ecto-enzymes into metabolites that modulate the activity of T cells and macrophages. While ATP mediates pro-inflammatory signals via P2X7 and other P2 receptors, adenosine triggers anti-inflammatory signaling via the adenosine 2a receptor (Adora2a) and other P1 receptors. The latter also plays a role in maintaining an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. NAD + is converted by CD38, CD203 and other ecto-enzymes to the Ca 2+ mobilizing messengers cyclic ADP-ribose and ADP-ribose, and to adenosine. Recent findings on the roles of CD38, CD39, CD73, CD203, P2X7, and Adora2a in inflammation and immunity underscore the potential of these proteins as drug targets. However, available small molecule inhibitors often lack specificity and mediate unwanted off-target toxicity. Nanobodies - single domain antibodies derived from heavy chain antibodies that naturally occur in camelids - display a propensity to bind functional epitopes not accessible to conventional antibodies. Like conventional antibodies, nanobodies and nanobody-based biologics are highly specific and have well-understood, tunable in vivo pharmacodynamics with little if any toxicity. Nanobodies thus represent attractive alternatives to small molecule inhibitors for modulating purinergic signaling in inflammation and immunity. Here we review recent progress made in developing nanobodies against key targets of purinergic signaling.

  4. Purinergic signaling mediates oxidative stress in UVA-exposed THP-1 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayumi Kawano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultraviolet A (UVA radiation, the major UV component of solar radiation, can penetrate easily to the dermis, where it causes significant damage to cellular components by inducing formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. On the other hand, extracellular ATP is released in response to various stimuli, and activates purinergic P2X7 receptor, triggering ROS production and cell death. Here, we examined the hypothesis that ATP release followed by activation of P2X7 receptor plays a role in UVA-induced oxidative cell damage, using human acute monocytic leukemia cell line THP-1. Indeed, UVA irradiation of THP-1 cells induced ATP release and activation of P2X7 receptor. Irradiated cells showed a rapid increase of both p67phox in membrane fraction and intracellular ROS. Pretreatment with ecto-nucleotidase or P2X7 receptor antagonist blocked the UVA-initiated membrane translocation of p67phox and ROS production. Furthermore, pretreatment with antioxidant or P2X7 receptor antagonist efficiently protected UVA-irradiated cells from caspase-dependent cell death. These findings show that autocrine signaling through release of ATP and activation of P2X7 receptor is required for UVA-induced stimulation of oxidative stress in monocytes.

  5. Purinergic Receptors in Quiescence and Localization of Leukemic Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    samples, five human acute leukemia samples (AML) (M0 or M1) were chosen based on FAB classification , cytogenetic abnormalities, CD34 and CD14...treatment) to xenotransplanted human leukemia cells. 9 Patient Age FAB Cytogenetic abnormalities Blast CD34+ CD14+ 104 66 M0/M1 Negative PML-RARA...Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT How leukemia stem cells gained resistance to

  6. Extracellular Adenosine Diphosphate Ribose Mobilizes Intracellular Ca2+ via Purinergic-Dependent Ca2+ Pathways in Rat Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

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    Chun Huang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Adenosine diphosphate ribose (ADPR, a product of β-NAD+ metabolism generated by the multifunctional enzyme CD38, is recognized as a novel signaling molecule. The catalytic site of CD38 orients extracellularly or intracellularly, capable of generating ADPR outside and inside the cells. CD38-dependent pathways have been characterized in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs; however the physiological function of extracellular ADPR is unclear. Methods: Ca2+ mobilizing and proliferative effects of extracellular ADPR were characterized and compared with the ATP-induced responses in rat PASMCs; and the expression of purinergic receptor (P2X and P2Y subtypes were examined in pulmonary arteries. Results: ADPR elicited concentration-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i with a fast transient and a sustained phase in PASMCs. The sustained phase was abolished by Ca2+ removal and inhibited by the non-selective cation channel blocker SKF-96365, but was unaffected by TRPM2 antagonists or nifedipine. The purinergic receptor (P2X antagonist pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2', 4'-disulfonate inhibited partially the transient and the sustained Ca2+ response, while the P2(XY inhibitor suramin and the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122 abolished the sustained Ca2+ influx. The P2Y1 antagonist MRS2179 had no effect on the response. By contrast, ATP and ADP activated Ca2+ response exhibited a high and a low affinity component, and the pharmacological profile of ATP-induced Ca2+ response was distinctive from that of ADPR. BrdU incorporation assay showed that ADPR caused significant inhibition whereas ATP caused slight stimulation of PASMC proliferation. RT-PCR analysis found that almost all P2X and P2Y subtypes are expressed in PAs. Conclusion: ADPR and ATP activate Ca2+ responses through different combinations of multiple purinergic receptor subtypes; and extracellular ADPR may exert an autocrine/paracrine action via purinergic receptors on PASMCs.

  7. Purinergic transmission and transglial signaling between neuron somata in the dorsal root ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Gabriela M; Li, Qi; Kim, Hyunhee; Stanley, Elise F

    2013-02-01

    Most dorsal root ganglion neuronal somata (NS) are isolated from their neighbours by a satellite glial cell (SGC) sheath. However, some NS are associated in pairs, separated solely by the membrane septum of a common SGC to form a neuron-glial cell-neuron (NGlN) trimer. We reported that stimulation of one NS evokes a delayed, noisy and long-duration inward current in both itself and its passive partner that was blocked by suramin, a general purinergic antagonist. Here we test the hypothesis that NGlN transmission involves purinergic activation of the SGC. Stimulation of the NS triggered a sustained current noise in the SGC. Block of transmission through the NGlN by reactive blue 2 or thapsigargin, a Ca(2+) store-depletion agent, implicated a Ca(2+) store discharge-linked P2Y receptor. P2Y2 was identified by simulation of the NGlN-like transmission by puffing UTP onto the SGC and by immunocytochemical localization to the SGC membrane septum. Block of the UTP effect by BAPTA, an intracellular Ca(2+) scavenger, supported the involvement of SGC Ca(2+) stores in the signaling pathway. We infer that transmission through the NGlN trimer involves secretion of ATP from the NS and triggering of SGC Ca(2+) store discharge via P2Y2 receptors. Presumably, cytoplasmic Ca(2+) elevation leads to the release of an as-yet unidentified second transmitter from the glial cell to complete transmission. Thus, the two NS of the NGlN trimer communicate via a 'sandwich synapse' transglial pathway, a novel signaling mechanism that may contribute to information transfer in other regions of the nervous system. © 2012 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. Purinergic Signaling Pathways in Endocrine System

    OpenAIRE

    Bjelobaba, Ivana; Janjic, Marija M.; Stojilkovic, Stanko S.

    2015-01-01

    Adenosine-5′-triphosphate is released by neuroendocrine, endocrine, and other cell types and acts as an extracellular agonist for ligand-gated P2X cationic channels and G protein-coupled P2Y receptors in numerous organs and tissues, including the endocrine system. The breakdown of ATP by ectonucleotidases not only terminates its extracellular messenger functions, but also provides a pathway for the generation of two additional agonists: adenosine 5′-diphosphate, acting via some P2Y receptors,...

  9. Trichomoniasis immunity and the involvement of the purinergic signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Braz Menezes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Innate and adaptive immunity play a significant role in trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. In the urogenital tract, innate immunity is accomplished by a defense physical barrier constituted by epithelial cells, mucus, and acidic pH. During infection, immune cells, antimicrobial peptides, cytokines, chemokines, and adaptive immunity evolve in the reproductive tract, and a proinflammatory response is generated to eliminate the invading extracellular pathogen Trichomonas vaginalis. However, the parasite has developed complex evolutionary mechanisms to evade the host immune response through cysteine proteases, phenotypic variation, and molecular mimicry. The purinergic system constitutes a signaling cellular net where nucleotides and nucleosides, enzymes, purinoceptors and transporters are involved in almost all cells and tissues signaling pathways, especially in central and autonomic nervous systems, endocrine, respiratory, cardiac, reproductive, and immune systems, during physiological as well as pathological processes. The involvement of the purinergic system in T. vaginalis biology and infection has been demonstrated and this review highlights the participation of this signaling pathway in the parasite immune evasion strategies. Keywords: Trichomoniasis, Innate immune response, Adaptive immune response, Evasion mechanisms, Purinergic signaling

  10. Purinergic signalling in epithelial ion transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana

    2011-01-01

    studies to date indicate that the P2Y2 receptor is one common denominator in regulating ion channels on both the luminal and basolateral membranes of both secretory and absorptive epithelia. In exocrine glands though, P2X4 and P2X7 receptors act as cation channels and, possibly, as co......Intracellular ATP, the energy source for many reactions, is crucial for the activity of plasma membrane pumps and, thus, for the maintenance of transmembrane ion gradients. Nevertheless, ATP and other nucleotides/nucleosides are also extracellular molecules that regulate diverse cellular functions....... This multitude of system components may enable differentiated regulation of diverse epithelial functions. As epithelia probably face the widest variety of potential ATP-releasing stimuli, a special attention will be given to stimuli and mechanisms of ATP release with a focus on exocytosis. Subsequently, I...

  11. Connexin-purinergic signaling in enteric glia mediates the prolonged effect of morphine on constipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhave, Sukhada; Gade, Aravind; Kang, Minho; Hauser, Kurt F; Dewey, William L; Akbarali, Hamid I

    2017-06-01

    Morphine is one of the most widely used drugs for the treatment of pain. However, side effects, including persistent constipation and antinociceptive tolerance, limit its clinical efficacy. Prolonged morphine treatment results in a "leaky" gut, predisposing to colonic inflammation that is facilitated by microbial dysbiosis and associated bacterial translocation. In this study, we examined the role of enteric glia in mediating this secondary inflammatory response to prolonged treatment with morphine. We found that purinergic P2X receptor activity was significantly enhanced in enteric glia that were isolated from mice with long-term morphine treatment ( in vivo ) but not upon direct exposure of glia to morphine ( in vitro ). LPS, a major bacterial product, also increased ATP-induced currents, as well as expression of P2X4, P2X7, IL6, IL-1β mRNA in enteric glia. LPS increased connexin43 (Cx43) expression and enhanced ATP release from enteric glia cells. LPS-induced P2X currents and proinflammatory cytokine mRNA expression were blocked by the Cx43 blockers Gap26 and carbenoxolone. Likewise, colonic inflammation related to prolonged exposure to morphine was significantly attenuated by carbenoxolone (25 mg/kg). Carbenoxolone also prevented gut wall disruption and significantly reduced morphine-induced constipation. These findings imply that enteric glia activation is a significant modulator of morphine-related inflammation and constipation.-Bhave, S., Gade, A., Kang, M., Hauser, K. F., Dewey, W. L., Akbarali, H. I. Connexin-purinergic signaling in enteric glia mediates the prolonged effect of morphine on constipation. © FASEB.

  12. Block of purinergic P2X7R inhibits tumor growth in a C6 glioma brain tumor animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jae K; Jantaratnotai, Nattinee; Serrano-Perez, Maria C; McGeer, Patrick L; McLarnon, James G

    2011-01-01

    We examined the expression and pharmacological modulation of the purinergic receptor P2X7R in a C6 glioma model. Intrastriatal injection of C6 cells induced a time-dependent growth of tumor; at 2 weeks postinjection immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated higher levels of P2X7R in glioma-injected versus control vehicle-injected brains. P2X7R immunoreactivity colocalized with tumor cells and microglia, but not endogenous astrocytes. Intravenous administration of the P2X7R antagonist brilliant blue G (BBG) inhibited tumor growth in a spatially dependent manner from the C6 injection site. Treatment with BBG reduced tumor volume by 52% versus that in controls. Double immunostaining indicated that BBG treatment did not alter microgliosis, astrogliosis, or vasculature vessels in C6-injected animals. In vitro, BBG reduced the expression of P2X7R and glioma chemotaxis induced by the P2X7R ligand, 2',3'-O-(4-benzoyl-benzoyl)adenosine triphosphate (BzATP). Immunohistochemical staining of human glioblastoma tissue samples demonstrated greater expression of P2X7R compared to control nontumor samples. These results suggest that the efficacy of BBG in inhibiting tumor growth is primarily mediated by direct actions of the compound on P2X7R in glioma cells and that pharmacological inhibition of this purinergic receptor might serve as a strategy to slow the progression of brain tumors.

  13. Purinergic mechanosensory transduction and visceral pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnstock Geoffrey

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this review, evidence is presented to support the hypothesis that mechanosensory transduction occurs in tubes and sacs and can initiate visceral pain. Experimental evidence for this mechanism in urinary bladder, ureter, gut, lung, uterus, tooth-pulp and tongue is reviewed. Potential therapeutic strategies are considered for the treatment of visceral pain in such conditions as renal colic, interstitial cystitis and inflammatory bowel disease by agents that interfere with mechanosensory transduction in the organs considered, including P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptor antagonists that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and agents that inhibit or enhance ATP release and breakdown.

  14. Flow-induced [Ca2+]i increase depends on nucleotide release and subsequent purinergic signaling in the intact nephron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, Mikkel E.; Odgaard, Elvin V. P.; Christensen, Mette Høgh

    2007-01-01

    that the flow-induced [Ca2+]i response in the renal tubule involves mechanically stimulated nucleotide release. This study investigated (1) the expression of P2 receptors in mouse medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL) using P2Y2 receptor knockout (KO) mice, (2) whether flow increases induce [Ca2+]i elevations...... in mTAL, and (3) whether this flow response is affected in mice that are deplete of the main purinergic receptor. [Ca2+]i was imaged in perfused mTAL with fura-2 or fluo-4. It is shown that luminal and basolateral P2Y2 receptors are the main purinergic receptor in this segment. Moreover, the data...... suggest presence of basolateral P2X receptors. Increases of tubular flow were imposed by promptly rising the inflow pressure, which triggered a marked increase of [Ca2+]i. This [Ca2+]i response was significantly reduced in P2Y2 receptor KO tubules (fura-2 ratio increase WT 0.44 +/- 0.09 [n = 28] versus KO...

  15. THE PURINERGIC NEUROTRANSMITTER REVISITED: A SINGLE SUBSTANCE OR MULTIPLE PLAYERS?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutafova-Yambolieva, Violeta N.; Durnin, Leonie

    2014-01-01

    The past half century has witnessed tremendous advances in our understanding of extracellular purinergic signaling pathways. Purinergic neurotransmission, in particular, has emerged as a key contributor in the efficient control mechanisms in the nervous system. The identity of the purine neurotransmitter, however, remains controversial. Identifying it is difficult because purines are present in all cell types, have a large variety of cell sources, and are released via numerous pathways. Moreover, studies on purinergic neurotransmission have relied heavily on indirect measurements of integrated postjunctional responses that do not provide direct information for neurotransmitter identity. This paper discusses experimental support for adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) as a neurotransmitter and recent evidence for possible contribution of other purines, in addition to or instead of ATP, in chemical neurotransmission in the peripheral, enteric and central nervous systems. Sites of release and action of purines in model systems such as vas deferens, blood vessels, urinary bladder and chromaffin cells are discussed. This is preceded by a brief discussion of studies demonstrating storage of purines in synaptic vesicles. We examine recent evidence for cell type targets (e.g., smooth muscle cells, interstitial cells, neurons and glia) for purine neurotransmitters in different systems. This is followed by brief discussion of mechanisms of terminating the action of purine neurotransmitters, including extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis and possible salvage and reuptake in the cell. The significance of direct neurotransmitter release measurements is highlighted. Possibilities for involvement of multiple purines (e.g., ATP, ADP, NAD+, ADP-ribose, adenosine, and diadenosine polyphosphates) in neurotransmission are considered throughout. PMID:24887688

  16. Purinergic signalling - a possible mechanism for KCNQ1 channel response to cell volume challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bomholtz, Sofia Hammami; Willumsen, Niels J.; Meinild, A.-K.

    2013-01-01

    to ion channel stimulation and cell volume back-regulation. Our aim was to investigate whether volume sensitivity of the voltage-gated K(+) channel, KCNQ1, is dependent on ATP release and regulation by purinergic signalling. METHODS: We used Xenopus oocytes heterologously expressing human KCNQ1, KCNE1...... stimuli. Basal ATP release was approx. three times higher in the KCNQ1 + AQP1 and KCNQ1 injected oocytes compared to the non-injected ones. Exogenously added ATP (0.1 mm) did not have any substantial effect on volume-induced KCNQ1 currents. Nevertheless, apyrase decreased all currents by about 50......%. Suramin inhibited about 23% of the KCNQ1 volume sensitivity. Expression of P2Y2 receptors stimulated endogenous Cl(-) channels, but it also led to 68% inhibition of the KCNQ1 currents. Adenosine (0.1 mm) also inhibited the KCNQ1 currents by about 56%. CONCLUSION: Xenopus oocytes release ATP in response...

  17. The impact of simulated microgravity on purinergic signaling in an endothelial and smooth muscle cell co-culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Lau, Patrick; Pansky, Andreas; Kassack, Matthias; Tobiasch, Edda

    Astronauts suffer from cardiovascular deconditioning when they are exposed to microgravity conditions during space missions. Thus, current research focuses on the identification of the underlying mechanism also with respect to therapy and countermeasures. Endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) play a key role in a variety of vascular functions. Gene expression, cytoskeleton morphology and apoptosis in both, ECs and SMCs, have shown alterations under simulated and real microgravity condition. However, all these data were observed during single culturing of either ECs or SMCs under microgravity conditions, which is different from the in vivo situation. Purinergic 2 (P2) receptors bind extracellular nucleotides and can regulate the vascular tone and vascular cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis. In this study primary ECs and SMCs were obtained from bovine aorta and characterized using specific markers. Here we show for the first time that the P2-receptor expressions pattern in ECs and in SMCs is altered after 24h in simulated microgravity. Specific receptors are down- or up-regulated on the gene and protein level. In addition the supernatant of ECs during culture was used as conditioned medium for SMCs and vice visa to investigate the influence of either cell type on the other. ECs and SMCs secret cytokines which induce pathogenic proliferation and an altered migration behavior under simulated microgravity conditions. Interestingly, co-culturing with condition medium could compensate this change. In detail, P2X7 was down-regulated in ECs after 24h clinorotation but recovered to the 1 g level when cultured with conditioned medium from SMCs collected under normal gravity. In conclusion, our data indicate that the paracrine effect between ECs and SMCs is an important regulator of cell behavior, also under altered gravity conditions. P2-receptor gene and protein expression were altered during microgravity. Since several P2-receptor artificial

  18. Purinergic signaling induces cyclooxygenase-1-dependent prostanoid synthesis in microglia: roles in the outcome of excitotoxic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Anrather

    Full Text Available Cyclooxygenases (COX are prostanoid synthesizing enzymes constitutively expressed in the brain that contribute to excitotoxic neuronal cell death. While the neurotoxic role of COX-2 is well established and has been linked to prostaglandin E(2 synthesis, the role of COX-1 is not clearly understood. In a model of N-Methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA induced excitotoxicity in the mouse cerebral cortex we found a distinctive temporal profile of COX-1 and COX-2 activation where COX-1, located in microglia, is responsible for the early phase of prostaglandin E(2 synthesis (10 minutes after NMDA, while both COX-1 and COX-2 contribute to the second phase (3-24 hours after NMDA. Microglial COX-1 is strongly activated by ATP but not excitatory neurotransmitters or the Toll-like receptor 4 ligand bacterial lipopolysaccharide. ATP induced microglial COX-1 dependent prostaglandin E(2 synthesis is dependent on P2X7 receptors, extracellular Ca(2+ and cytoplasmic phospholipase A2. NMDA receptor activation induces ATP release from cultured neurons leading to microglial P2X7 receptor activation and COX-1 dependent prostaglandin E(2 synthesis in mixed microglial-neuronal cultures. Pharmacological inhibition of COX-1 has no effect on the cortical lesion produced by NMDA, but counteracts the neuroprotection exerted by inhibition of COX-2 or observed in mice lacking the prostaglandin E(2 receptor type 1. Similarly, the neuroprotection exerted by the prostaglandin E(2 receptor type 2 agonist butaprost is not observed after COX-1 inhibition. P2X7 receptors contribute to NMDA induced prostaglandin E(2 production in vivo and blockage of P2X7 receptors reverses the neuroprotection offered by COX-2 inhibition. These findings suggest that purinergic signaling in microglia triggered by neuronal ATP modulates excitotoxic cortical lesion by regulating COX-1 dependent prostanoid production and unveil a previously unrecognized protective role of microglial COX-1 in excitotoxic brain

  19. Purinergic modulation in the development of the rat uncrossed retinotectal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares Gomes, A L; Maia, F B; Oliveira-Silva, P; Marques Ventura, A L; Paes-De-Carvalho, R; Serfaty, C A; Campello-Costa, P

    2009-11-10

    Adenosine is a neuromodulator implicated in nervous system development and plasticity and its effects are mediated by inhibitory (A(1), A(3)) and excitatory (A(2a), A(2b)) receptors. The role of adenosine in the synaptic activity depends mainly on a balanced activation of A(1) and A(2a) receptors which are activated by various ranges of adenosine concentrations. Herein, we investigated the expression of A(1) and A(2a) receptors and also the accumulation of cAMP in the superior colliculus at different stages of development. Furthermore, we examined the effects of an acute in vivo blockade of adenosine deaminase during the critical period when the elimination of misplaced axons/terminals takes place with a simultaneous fine tuning of terminal arbors into appropriate terminal zones. Lister Hooded rats ranging from postnatal days (PND) 0-70 were used for ontogeny studies. Our results indicate that A(1) expression in the visual layers of the superior colliculus is higher until PND 28, while A(2a) expression increases after PND 28 in a complementary developmental pattern. Accordingly, the incubation of collicular slices with 5'-N-ethylcarboxamido-adenosine, a non-specific adenosine receptor agonist, showed a significant reduction in cAMP accumulation at PND 14 and an increase in adults. For the anatomical studies, the uncrossed retinotectal projections were traced after the intraocular injection of horseradish peroxidase. One group received daily injections of an adenosine deaminase inhibitor (erythro-9(2-hydroxy-3-nonyl adenine), 10 mg/kg i.p.) between PND 10 and 13, while control groups were treated with vehicle injections (NaCl 0.9%, i.p.). We found that a short-term blockade of adenosine deaminase during the second postnatal week induced an expansion of retinotectal terminal fields in the rostrocaudal axis of the tectum. Taken together, the results suggest that a balance of purinergic A(1) and A(2a) receptors through cAMP signaling plays a pivotal role during the

  20. Post-inflammatory Ileitis Induces Non-neuronal Purinergic Signaling Adjustments of Cholinergic Neurotransmission in the Myenteric Plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cátia Vieira

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Uncoupling between ATP overflow and extracellular adenosine formation changes purinergic signaling in post-inflammatory ileitis. Adenosine neuromodulation deficits were ascribed to feed-forward inhibition of ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73 by high extracellular adenine nucleotides in the inflamed ileum. Here, we hypothesized that inflammation-induced changes in cellular density may also account to unbalance the release of purines and their influence on [3H]acetylcholine release from longitudinal muscle-myenteric plexus preparations of the ileum of 2,4,6-trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS-treated rats. The population of S100β-positive glial cells increase, whereas Ano-1-positive interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs diminished, in the ileum 7-days after the inflammatory insult. In the absence of changes in the density of VAChT-positive cholinergic nerves detected by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, the inflamed myenteric plexus released smaller amounts of [3H]acetylcholine which also became less sensitive to neuronal blockade by tetrodotoxin (1 μM. Instead, [3H]acetylcholine release was attenuated by sodium fluoroacetate (5 mM, carbenoxolone (10 μM and A438079 (3 μM, which prevent activation of glial cells, pannexin-1 hemichannels and P2X7 receptors, respectively. Sodium fluoroacetate also decreased ATP overflow without significantly affecting the extracellular adenosine levels, thus indicating that surplus ATP release parallels reactive gliosis in post-inflammatory ileitis. Conversely, loss of ICCs may explain the lower amounts of adenosine detected in TNBS-treated preparations, since blockade of Cav3 (T-type channels existing in ICCs with mibefradil (3 μM or inhibition of the equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 with dipyridamole (0.5 μM, both decreased extracellular adenosine. Data indicate that post-inflammatory ileitis operates a shift on purinergic neuromodulation reflecting the upregulation of ATP-releasing enteric glial cells and

  1. Neurodevelopmental alterations and seizures developed by mouse model of infantile hypophosphatasia are associated with purinergic signalling deregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastián-Serrano, Álvaro; Engel, Tobias; de Diego-García, Laura; Olivos-Oré, Luis A.; Arribas-Blázquez, Marina; Martínez-Frailes, Carlos; Pérez-Díaz, Carmen; Millán, José Luis; Artalejo, Antonio R.; Miras-Portugal, María Teresa; Henshall, David C.; Díaz-Hernández, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Hypomorphic mutations in the gene encoding the tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) enzyme, ALPL in human or Akp2 in mice, cause hypophosphatasia (HPP), an inherited metabolic bone disease also characterized by spontaneous seizures. Initially, these seizures were attributed to the impairment of GABAergic neurotransmission caused by altered vitamin B6 (vit-B6) metabolism. However, clinical cases in human newborns and adults whose convulsions are refractory to pro-GABAergic drugs but controlled by the vit-B6 administration, suggest that other factors are involved. Here, to evaluate whether neurodevelopmental alterations are underlying the seizures associated to HPP, we performed morphological and functional characterization of postnatal homozygous TNAP null mice, a model of HPP. These analyses revealed that TNAP deficient mice present an increased proliferation of neural precursors, an altered neuronal morphology, and an augmented neuronal activity. We found that these alterations were associated with a partial downregulation of the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). Even though deficient P2X7R mice present similar neurodevelopmental alterations, they do not develop neonatal seizures. Accordingly, we found that the additional blockage of P2X7R prevent convulsions and extend the lifespan of mice lacking TNAP. In agreement with these findings, we also found that exogenous administration of ATP or TNAP antagonists induced seizures in adult wild-type mice by activating P2X7R. Finally, our results also indicate that the anticonvulsive effects attributed to vit-B6 may be due to its capacity to block P2X7R. Altogether, these findings suggest that the purinergic signalling regulates the neurodevelopmental alteration and the neonatal seizures associated to HPP. PMID:27466191

  2. Purinergic control of lysenin's transport and voltage-gating properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Sheenah; Shrestha, Nisha; Carnig, Paul; Kosydar, Samuel; Belzeski, Philip; Hanna, Charles; Fologea, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Lysenin, a pore-forming protein extracted from the coelomic fluid of the earthworm Eisenia foetida, manifests cytolytic activity by inserting large conductance pores in host membranes containing sphingomyelin. In the present study, we found that adenosine phosphates control the biological activity of lysenin channels inserted into planar lipid membranes with respect to their macroscopic conductance and voltage-induced gating. Addition of ATP, ADP, or AMP decreased the macroscopic conductance of lysenin channels in a concentration-dependent manner, with ATP being the most potent inhibitor and AMP the least. ATP removal from the bulk solutions by buffer exchange quickly reinstated the macroscopic conductance and demonstrated reversibility. Single-channel experiments pointed to an inhibition mechanism that most probably relies on electrostatic binding and partial occlusion of the channel-conducting pathway, rather than ligand gating induced by the highly charged phosphates. The Hill analysis of the changes in macroscopic conduction as a function of the inhibitor concentration suggested cooperative binding as descriptive of the inhibition process. Ionic screening significantly reduced the ATP inhibitory efficacy, in support of the electrostatic binding hypothesis. In addition to conductance modulation, purinergic control over the biological activity of lysenin channels has also been observed to manifest as changes of the voltage-induced gating profile. Our analysis strongly suggests that not only the inhibitor's charge but also its ability to adopt a folded conformation may explain the differences in the observed influence of ATP, ADP, and AMP on lysenin's biological activity.

  3. A critical look at the function of the P2Y11 receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreisig, Karin; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2016-01-01

    The P2Y11 receptor is a member of the purinergic receptor family. It has been overlooked, somewhat due to the lack of a P2ry11 gene orthologue in the murine genome, which prevents the generation of knockout mice, which have been so helpful for defining the roles of other P2Y receptors. Furthermor...

  4. Purinergic Signaling in Neuron-Astrocyte Interactions, Circadian Rhythms, and Alcohol Use Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lindberg

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use disorder (AUD is a debilitating condition marked by cyclic patterns of craving, use, and withdrawal. These pathological behaviors are mediated by multiple neurotransmitter systems utilizing glutamate, GABA, dopamine, ATP, and adenosine. In particular, purines such as ATP and adenosine have been demonstrated to alter the phase and function of the circadian clock and are reciprocally regulated by the clock itself. Importantly, chronic ethanol intake has been demonstrated to disrupt the molecular circadian clock and is associated with altered circadian patterns of activity and sleep. Moreover, ethanol has been demonstrated to disrupt purinergic signaling, while dysfunction of the purinergic system has been implicated in conditions of drug abuse such as AUD. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge regarding circadian disruption by ethanol, focusing on the reciprocal relationship that exists between oscillatory neurotransmission and the molecular circadian clock. In particular, we offer detailed explanations and hypotheses regarding the concerted regulation of purinergic signaling and circadian oscillations by neurons and astrocytes, and review the diverse mechanisms by which purinergic dysfuction may contribute to circadian disruption or alcohol abuse. Finally, we describe the mechanisms by which ethanol may disrupt or hijack endogenous circadian rhythms to induce the maladaptive behavioral patterns associated with AUD.

  5. Tripartite purinergic modulation of central respiratory networks during perinatal development: the influence of ATP, ectonucleotidases, and ATP metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huxtable, Adrianne G; Zwicker, Jennifer D; Poon, Betty Y; Pagliardini, Silvia; Vrouwe, Sebastian Q; Greer, John J; Funk, Gregory D

    2009-11-25

    ATP released during hypoxia from the ventrolateral medulla activates purinergic receptors (P2Rs) to attenuate the secondary hypoxic depression of breathing by a mechanism that likely involves a P2Y(1)R-mediated excitation of preBötzinger complex (preBötC) inspiratory rhythm-generating networks. In this study, we used rhythmically active in vitro preparations from embryonic and postnatal rats and ATP microinjection into the rostral ventral respiratory group (rVRG)/preBötC to reveal that these networks are sensitive to ATP when rhythm emerges at embryonic day 17 (E17). The peak frequency elicited by ATP at E19 and postnatally was the same ( approximately 45 bursts/min), but relative sensitivity was threefold greater at E19, reflecting a lower baseline frequency (5.6 +/- 0.9 vs 19.0 +/- 1.3 bursts/min). Combining microinjection techniques with ATP biosensors revealed that ATP concentration in the rVRG/preBötC falls rapidly as a result of active processes and closely correlates with inspiratory frequency. A phosphate assay established that preBötC-containing tissue punches degrade ATP at rates that increase perinatally. Thus, the agonist profile [ATP/ADP/adenosine (ADO)] produced after ATP release in the rVRG/preBötC will change perinatally. Electrophysiology further established that the ATP metabolite ADP is excitatory and that, in fetal but not postnatal animals, ADO at A(1) receptors exerts a tonic depressive action on rhythm, whereas A(1) antagonists extend the excitatory action of ATP on inspiratory rhythm. These data demonstrate that ATP is a potent excitatory modulator of the rVRG/preBötC inspiratory network from the time it becomes active and that ATP actions are determined by a dynamic interaction between the actions of ATP at P2 receptors, ectonucleotidases that degrade ATP, and ATP metabolites on P2Y and P1 receptors.

  6. P2X receptor channels in endocrine glands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stojilkovic, S. S.; Zemková, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (2013), s. 173-180 ISSN 2190-460X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ATP * purinergic P2X receptor channels * pituitary * endocrine glands Subject RIV: ED - Physiology

  7. Vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT): appearance of an actress on the stage of purinergic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Yoshinori; Hiasa, Miki; Sakamoto, Shohei; Omote, Hiroshi; Nomura, Masatoshi

    2017-09-01

    Vesicular storage of ATP is one of the processes initiating purinergic chemical transmission. Although an active transport mechanism was postulated to be involved in the processes, a transporter(s) responsible for the vesicular storage of ATP remained unidentified for some time. In 2008, SLC17A9, the last identified member of the solute carrier 17 type I inorganic phosphate transporter family, was found to encode the vesicular nucleotide transporter (VNUT) that is responsible for the vesicular storage of ATP. VNUT transports various nucleotides in a membrane potential-dependent fashion and is expressed in the various ATP-secreting cells. Mice with knockout of the VNUT gene lose vesicular storage and release of ATP from neurons and neuroendocrine cells, resulting in blockage of the initiation of purinergic chemical transmission. Thus, VNUT plays an essential role in the vesicular storage and release of ATP. The VNUT knockout mice exhibit resistance for neuropathic pain and a therapeutic effect against diabetes by way of increased insulin sensitivity. Thus, VNUT inhibitors and suppression of VNUT gene expression may be used for therapeutic purposes through suppression of purinergic chemical transmission. This review summarizes the studies to date on VNUT and discusses what we have learned about the relevance of vesicular ATP release as a potential drug target.

  8. New Approaches to Thyroid Hormones and Purinergic Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Gabriel Fernandes; Buffon, Andréia; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar

    2013-01-01

    It is known that thyroid hormones influence a wide variety of events at the molecular, cellular, and functional levels. Thyroid hormones (TH) play pivotal roles in growth, cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, development, and metabolic homeostasis via thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) by controlling the expression of TR target genes. Most of these effects result in pathological and physiological events and are already well described in the literature. Even so, many recent studies hav...

  9. Selective Disruption of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor 5-Homer Interactions Mimics Phenotypes of Fragile X Syndrome in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Weirui; Molinaro, Gemma; Collins, Katie A; Hays, Seth A; Paylor, Richard; Worley, Paul F; Szumlinski, Karen K; Huber, Kimberly M

    2016-02-17

    Altered function of the Gq-coupled, Group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors, specifically mGlu5, is implicated in multiple mouse models of autism and intellectual disability. mGlu5 dysfunction has been most well characterized in the fragile X syndrome mouse model, the Fmr1 knock-out (KO) mouse, where pharmacological and genetic reduction of mGlu5 reverses many phenotypes. mGlu5 is less associated with its scaffolding protein Homer in Fmr1 KO mice, and restoration of mGlu5-Homer interactions by genetic deletion of a short, dominant negative of Homer, H1a, rescues many phenotypes of Fmr1 KO mice. These results suggested that disruption of mGlu5-Homer leads to phenotypes of FXS. To test this idea, we examined mice with a knockin mutation of mGlu5 (F1128R; mGlu5(R/R)) that abrogates binding to Homer. Although FMRP levels were normal, mGlu5(R/R) mice mimicked multiple phenotypes of Fmr1 KO mice, including reduced mGlu5 association with the postsynaptic density, enhanced constitutive mGlu5 signaling to protein synthesis, deficits in agonist-induced translational control, protein synthesis-independent LTD, neocortical hyperexcitability, audiogenic seizures, and altered behaviors, including anxiety and sensorimotor gating. These results reveal new roles for the Homer scaffolds in regulation of mGlu5 function and implicate a specific molecular mechanism in a complex brain disease. Abnormal function of the metabotropic, or Gq-coupled, glutamate receptor 5 (mGlu5) has been implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders, including a genetic cause of intellectual disability and autism called fragile X syndrome. In brains of a mouse model of fragile X, mGlu5 is less associated with its binding partner Homer, a scaffolding protein that regulates mGlu5 localization to synapses and its ability to activate biochemical signaling pathways. Here we show that a mouse expressing a mutant mGlu5 that cannot bind to Homer is sufficient to mimic many of the biochemical, neurophysiological, and

  10. Purinergic modulation of adult guinea pig cardiomyocytes in long term cultures and co-cultures with extracardiac or intrinsic cardiac neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horackova, M; Huang, M H; Armour, J A

    1994-05-01

    To determine the capacity of ATP to modify cardiomyocytes directly or indirectly via peripheral autonomic neurones, the effects of various purinergic agents were studied on long term cultures of adult guinea pig ventricular myocytes and their co-cultures with extracardiac (stellate ganglion) or intrinsic cardiac neurones. Ventricular myocytes and cardiac neurones were enzymatically dissociated and plated together or alone (myocytes only). Myocyte cultures were used for experiments after three to six weeks. The electrical and contractile properties of cultured myocytes and myocyte-neuronal networks were investigated. The spontaneous beating frequency of ventricular myocytes co-cultured with stellate ganglion neurones increased by approximately 140% (p under control conditions, but when beta adrenergic receptors of tetrodotoxin sensitive neural responses were blocked, ATP induced greater augmentation (> 100%). In contrast, ATP induced much smaller effects in non-innervated myocyte cultures (approximately 26%, p UTP > MSATP > beta gamma ATP > alpha beta ATP. Adenosine (10(-4) M) attenuated the beating frequency of myocytes in both types of co-culture, while not significantly affecting non-innervated myocyte cultures. The experimental model used in this study showed that extrinsic and intrinsic cardiac neurones which possess P2 receptors can greatly enhance cardiac myocyte contractile rate when activated by ATP. Since adenosine reduced contractile rate in both types of co-cultures while not affecting non-innervated myocytes, it is concluded that some of these neurones possess P1 receptors.

  11. SPINK9 Stimulates Metalloprotease/EGFR-Dependent Keratinocyte Migration via Purinergic Receptor Activation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sperrhacke, M.; Fischer, J.; Wu, Z.H.; Klunder, S.; Sedláček, Radislav; Schroeder, J.M.; Meyer-Hoffert, U.; Reiss, K.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 134, č. 6 (2014), s. 1645-1654 ISSN 0022-202X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/10/2044 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : SPINK * ADAM * keratinocyte Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.216, year: 2014

  12. Carbetocin is a Functional Selective Gq Agonist That Does Not Promote Oxytocin Receptor Recycling After Inducing β-Arrestin-Independent Internalisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passoni, I; Leonzino, M; Gigliucci, V; Chini, B; Busnelli, M

    2016-04-01

    Carbetocin, a long-acting oxytocin analogue, has been reported to elicit interesting and peculiar behavioural effects. The present study investigated the molecular pharmacology of carbetocin, aiming to better understand the molecular basis of its action in the brain. Using bioluminescence resonance energy transfer biosensors, we characterised the effects of carbetocin on the three human oxytocin/vasopressin receptors expressed in the nervous system: the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) and the vasopressin V1a (V1aR) and V1b (V1bR) receptors. Our results indicate that (i) carbetocin activates the OXTR but not the V1aR and V1bR at which it may act as an antagonist; (ii) carbetocin selectively activates only the OXTR/Gq pathway displaying a strong functional selectivity; (iii) carbetocin is a partial agonist at the OXTR/Gq coupling; (iv) carbetocin promotes OXTR internalisation via a previously unreported β-arrestin-independent pathway; and (v) carbetocin does not induce OXTR recycling to the plasma membrane. Altogether, these molecular pharmacology features identify carbetocin as a substantially different analogue compared to the endogenous oxytocin and, consequently, carbetocin is not expected to mimic oxytocin in the brain. Whether these unique features of carbetocin could be exploited therapeutically remains to be established. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Neuroendocrinology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  13. Dual Gating Mechanism and Function of P2X7 Receptor Channels

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Khadra, A.; Tomic, M.; Yan, Z.; Zemková, Hana; Sherman, A.; Stojilkovic, S. S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 104, č. 12 (2013), s. 2612-2621 ISSN 0006-3495 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : purinergic P2X7 receptors * ATP-gated channels * BzATP * dilation * Markov -state model Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.832, year: 2013

  14. Modulation of P2X7 Receptor during Inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amadio, Susanna; Parisi, Chiara; Piras, Eleonora; Fabbrizio, Paola; Apolloni, Savina; Montilli, Cinzia; Luchetti, S.; Ruggieri, Serena; Gasperini, Claudio; Laghi-Pasini, Franco; Battistini, Luca; Volonté, Cinzia

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by macrophage accumulation and inflammatory infiltrates into the CNS contributing to demyelination. Because purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is known to be abundantly expressed on cells of the hematopoietic lineage and of the nervous system, we further

  15. Significance of the Melanocortin 1 and Endothelin B Receptors in Melanocyte Homeostasis and Prevention of Sun-Induced Genotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalfa A. Abdel-Malek

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The membrane bound melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R, and the endothelin B receptor (ENDBR are two G-protein coupled receptors that play important roles in constitutive regulation of melanocytes and their response to ultraviolet radiation (UVR, the main etiological factor for melanoma. The human MC1R is a Gs protein-coupled receptor, which is activated by its agonists α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-melanocortin; α-MSH and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH. The ENDBR is a Gq coupled-receptor, which is activated by Endothelin (ET-3 during embryonic development, and ET-1 postnatally. Pigmentation and the DNA repair capacity are two major factors that determine the risk for melanoma. Activation of the MC1R by its agonists stimulates the synthesis of eumelanin, the dark brown photoprotective pigment. In vitro studies showed that α-MSH and ET-1 interact synergistically in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF to stimulate human melanocyte proliferation and melanogenesis, and to inhibit UVR-induced apoptosis. An important function of the MC1R is reduction of oxidative stress and activation of DNA repair pathways. The human MC1R is highly polymorphic, and MC1R variants, particularly those that cause loss of function of the expressed receptor, are associated with increased melanoma risk independently of pigmentation. These variants compromise the DNA repair and antioxidant capacities of human melanocytes. Recently, activation of ENDBR by ET-1 was reported to reduce the induction and enhance the repair of UVR-induced DNA photoproducts. We conclude that α-MSH and ET-1 and their cognate receptors MC1R and ENDBR reduce the risk for melanoma by maintaining genomic stability of melanocytes via modulating the DNA damage response to solar UVR. Elucidating the response of melanocytes to UVR should improve our understanding of the process of melanomagenesis, and lead to effective melanoma chemoprevention, as well as therapeutic strategies.

  16. Effect of P2X(7) receptor knockout on exocrine secretion of pancreas, salivary glands and lacrimal glands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Jans, Ida M; Wohlfahrt, Louise

    2010-01-01

    The purinergic P2X(7) receptors are expressed in different cell types where they have varied functions, including regulation of cell survival. The P2X(7) receptors are also expressed in exocrine glands, but their integrated role in secretion is unclear. The aim of our study was to determine whether...... between purinergic and cholinergic receptor signalling and that function of the P2X(7) receptor is suppressed in females. We conclude that the P2X(7) receptors are important in short-term physiological regulation of exocrine gland secretion....... the P2X(7) receptors affect fluid secretion in pancreas, salivary glands and tear glands. We monitored gland secretions in in vivo preparations of wild-type and P2X(7)(-/-) (Pfizer) mice stimulated with pilocarpine. In cell preparations from pancreas, parotid and lacrimal glands we measured ATP release...

  17. receptores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salete Regina Daronco Benetti

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Se trata de un estudio etnográfico, que tuvo lo objetivo de interpretar el sistema de conocimiento y del significado atribuidos a la sangre referente a la transfusión sanguínea por los donadores y receptores de un banco de sangre. Para la colecta de las informaciones se observaron los participantes y la entrevista etnográfica se realizó el análisis de dominio, taxonómicos y temáticos. Los dominios culturales fueron: la sangre es vida: fuente de vida y alimento valioso; creencias religiosas: fuentes simbólicas de apoyos; donación sanguínea: un gesto colaborador que exige cuidarse, gratifica y trae felicidad; donación sanguínea: fuente simbólica de inseguridad; estar enfermo es una condición para realizar transfusión sanguínea; transfusión sanguínea: esperanza de vida; Creencias populares: transfusión sanguínea como riesgo para la salud; donadores de sangre: personas benditas; donar y recibir sangre: como significado de felicidad. Temática: “líquido precioso que origina, sostiene, modifica la vida, provoca miedo e inseguridad”.

  18. Modulation of the TGF-β1-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) mediated by P1 and P2 purine receptors in MDCK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuccarini, Mariachiara; Giuliani, Patricia; Buccella, Silvana; Di Liberto, Valentina; Mudò, Giuseppa; Belluardo, Natale; Carluccio, Marzia; Rossini, Margherita; Condorelli, Daniele Filippo; Rathbone, Michel Piers; Caciagli, Francesco; Ciccarelli, Renata; Di Iorio, Patrizia

    2017-12-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurs during embryogenesis or under pathological conditions such as hypoxia, injury, chronic inflammation, or tissue fibrosis. In renal tubular epithelial cells (MDCK), TGF-β1 induces EMT by reducing or increasing epithelial or mesenchymal marker expression, respectively. In this study, we confirmed that the cAMP analogues, 8-CPT-cAMP or N6-Ph-cAMP, inhibited the TGF-β1-driven overexpression of the mesenchymal markers ZEB-1, Slug, Fibronectin, and α-SMA. Furthermore, we showed that A1, A2A, P2Y1, P2Y11, and P2X7 purine receptor agonists modulated the TGF-β1-induced EMT through the involvement of PKA and/or MAPK/ERK signaling. The stimulation of A2A receptor reduced the overexpression of the EMT-related markers, mainly through the cAMP-dependent PKA pathway, as confirmed by cell pre-treatment with Myr-PKI. Both A1 and P2Y1 receptor stimulation exacerbated the TGF-β1-driven effects, which were reduced by cell pre-treatment with the MAPK inhibitor PD98059, according to the increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation upon receptor activation. The effects induced by P2Y11 receptor activation were oppositely modulated by PKA or MAPK inhibition, in line with the dual nature of the Gs- and Gq-coupled receptor. Differently, P2X7 receptor induced, per se, similar and not additive effects compared to TGF-β1, after prolonged cell exposure to BzATP. These results suggest a putative role of purine receptors as target for anti-fibrotic agents.

  19. Highly conserved tyrosine 37 stabilizes desensitized states and restricts calcium permeability of ATP-gated P2X3 receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindřichová, Marie; Khafizov, K.; Skorinkin, A.; Fayuk, D.; Bart, G.; Zemková, Hana; Giniatullin, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 4 (2011), s. 676-685 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : purinergic receptors * desensitization * patch clamp Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.061, year: 2011

  20. Adenosine activates brown adipose tissue and recruits beige adipocytes via A2A receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnad, Thorsten; Scheibler, Saskia; von Kügelgen, Ivar

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is specialized in energy expenditure, making it a potential target for anti-obesity therapies. Following exposure to cold, BAT is activated by the sympathetic nervous system with concomitant release of catecholamines and activation of β-adrenergic receptors. Because BAT...... therapies based on cold exposure or β-adrenergic agonists are clinically not feasible, alternative strategies must be explored. Purinergic co-transmission might be involved in sympathetic control of BAT and previous studies reported inhibitory effects of the purinergic transmitter adenosine in BAT from...... receptor is the most abundant adenosine receptor in human and murine BAT. Pharmacological blockade or genetic loss of A2A receptors in mice causes a decrease in BAT-dependent thermogenesis, whereas treatment with A2A agonists significantly increases energy expenditure. Moreover, pharmacological stimulation...

  1. Role of the ERC motif in the proximal part of the second intracellular loop and the C-terminal domain of the human prostaglandin F2alpha receptor (hFP-R) in G-protein coupling control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathe-Neuschäfer-Rube, Andrea; Neuschäfer-Rube, Frank; Püschel, Gerhard P

    2005-05-15

    The human FP-R (F2alpha prostaglandin receptor) is a Gq-coupled heptahelical ectoreceptor, which is of significant medical interest, since it is a potential target for the treatment of glaucoma and preterm labour. On agonist exposure, it mediates an increase in intracellular inositol phosphate formation. Little is known about the structures that govern the agonist-dependent receptor activation. In other prostanoid receptors, the C-terminal domain has been inferred in the control of agonist-dependent receptor activation. A DRY motif at the beginning of the second intracellular loop is highly conserved throughout the G-protein-coupled receptor family and appears to be crucial for controlling agonist-dependent receptor activation. It is replaced by an ERC motif in the FP-R and no evidence for the relevance of this motif in ligand-dependent activation of prostanoid receptors has been provided so far. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the potential role of the C-terminal domain and the ERC motif in agonist-controlled intracellular signalling in FP-R mutants generated by site-directed mutagenesis. It was found that substitution of the acidic Glu(132) in the ERC motif by a threonine residue led to full constitutive activation, whereas truncation of the receptor's C-terminal domain led to partial constitutive activation of all three intracellular signal pathways that had previously been shown to be activated by the FP-R, i.e. inositol trisphosphate formation, focal adhesion kinase activation and T-cell factor signalling. Inositol trisphosphate formation and focal adhesion kinase phosphorylation were further enhanced by ligand binding in cells expressing the truncation mutant but not the E132T (Glu132-->Thr) mutant. Thus C-terminal truncation appeared to result in a receptor with partial constitutive activation, whereas substitution of Glu132 by threonine apparently resulted in a receptor with full constitutive activity.

  2. Involvement of purinergic system in inflammation and toxicity induced by copper in zebrafish larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, Carlos Eduardo, E-mail: carlos.leite@pucrs.br [Instituto de Toxicologia e Farmacologia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Medicina: Ciências Médicas, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90035-003 (Brazil); Maboni, Lucas de Oliveira [Instituto de Toxicologia e Farmacologia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Faculdade de Biociências, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Cruz, Fernanda Fernandes [Instituto de Toxicologia e Farmacologia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Faculdade de Farmácia, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, CEP 90619-900 (Brazil); Rosemberg, Denis Broock [Programa de Pós-graduação em Ciências Ambientais, Universidade Comunitária da Região de Chapecó, Chapecó, CEP 89809-000 (Brazil); and others

    2013-11-01

    The use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) is increasing as an intermediate preclinical model, to prioritize drug candidates for mammalian testing. As the immune system of the zebrafish is quite similar to that of mammals, models of inflammation are being developed for the screening of new drugs. The characterization of these models is crucial for studies that seek for mechanisms of action and specific pharmacological targets. It is well known that copper is a metal that induces damage and cell migration to hair cells of lateral line of zebrafish. Extracellular nucleotides/nucleosides, as ATP and adenosine (ADO), act as endogenous signaling molecules during tissue damage by exerting effects on inflammatory and immune responses. The present study aimed to characterize the inflammatory status, and to investigate the involvement of the purinergic system in copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. Fishes of 7 days post-fertilization were exposed to 10 μM of copper for a period of 24 h. The grade of oxidative stress, inflammatory status, copper uptake, the activity and the gene expression of the enzymes responsible for controlling the levels of nucleotides and adenosine were evaluated. Due to the copper accumulation in zebrafish larvae tissues, the damage and oxidative stress were exacerbated over time, resulting in an inflammatory process involving IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-2 and PGE{sub 2}. Within the purinergic system, the mechanisms that control the ADO levels were the most involved, mainly the reactions performed by the isoenzyme ADA 2. In conclusion, our data shed new lights on the mechanisms related to copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. - Graphical abstract: This scheme provides a chronological proposition for the biochemical events induced by copper in zebrafish larvae. The dashed line shows the absorption of copper over the exposure time. After 1 h of exposure to copper, the release of PGE{sub 2} occurs, followed by an increase of MPO (as a consequence

  3. Involvement of purinergic system in inflammation and toxicity induced by copper in zebrafish larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, Carlos Eduardo; Maboni, Lucas de Oliveira; Cruz, Fernanda Fernandes; Rosemberg, Denis Broock

    2013-01-01

    The use of zebrafish (Danio rerio) is increasing as an intermediate preclinical model, to prioritize drug candidates for mammalian testing. As the immune system of the zebrafish is quite similar to that of mammals, models of inflammation are being developed for the screening of new drugs. The characterization of these models is crucial for studies that seek for mechanisms of action and specific pharmacological targets. It is well known that copper is a metal that induces damage and cell migration to hair cells of lateral line of zebrafish. Extracellular nucleotides/nucleosides, as ATP and adenosine (ADO), act as endogenous signaling molecules during tissue damage by exerting effects on inflammatory and immune responses. The present study aimed to characterize the inflammatory status, and to investigate the involvement of the purinergic system in copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. Fishes of 7 days post-fertilization were exposed to 10 μM of copper for a period of 24 h. The grade of oxidative stress, inflammatory status, copper uptake, the activity and the gene expression of the enzymes responsible for controlling the levels of nucleotides and adenosine were evaluated. Due to the copper accumulation in zebrafish larvae tissues, the damage and oxidative stress were exacerbated over time, resulting in an inflammatory process involving IL-1β, TNF-α, COX-2 and PGE 2 . Within the purinergic system, the mechanisms that control the ADO levels were the most involved, mainly the reactions performed by the isoenzyme ADA 2. In conclusion, our data shed new lights on the mechanisms related to copper-induced inflammation in zebrafish larvae. - Graphical abstract: This scheme provides a chronological proposition for the biochemical events induced by copper in zebrafish larvae. The dashed line shows the absorption of copper over the exposure time. After 1 h of exposure to copper, the release of PGE 2 occurs, followed by an increase of MPO (as a consequence of

  4. Enteric Glia Mediate Neuron Death in Colitis Through Purinergic Pathways That Require Connexin-43 and Nitric OxideSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isola A.M. Brown

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: The concept of enteric glia as regulators of intestinal homeostasis is slowly gaining acceptance as a central concept in neurogastroenterology. Yet how glia contribute to intestinal disease is still poorly understood. Purines generated during inflammation drive enteric neuron death by activating neuronal P2X7 purine receptors (P2X7R; triggering adenosine triphosphate (ATP release via neuronal pannexin-1 channels that subsequently recruits intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i in surrounding enteric glia. We tested the hypothesis that the activation of enteric glia contributes to neuron death during inflammation. Methods: We studied neuroinflammation in vivo using the 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid model of colitis and in situ using whole-mount preparations of human and mouse intestine. Transgenic mice with a targeted deletion of glial connexin-43 (Cx43 [GFAP::CreERT2+/−/Cx43f/f] were used to specifically disrupt glial signaling pathways. Mice deficient in inducible nitric oxide (NO synthase (iNOS−/− were used to study NO production. Protein expression and oxidative stress were measured using immunohistochemistry and in situ Ca2+ and NO imaging were used to monitor glial [Ca2+]i and [NO]i. Results: Purinergic activation of enteric glia drove [Ca2+]i responses and enteric neuron death through a Cx43-dependent mechanism. Neurotoxic Cx43 activity, driven by NO production from glial iNOS, was required for neuron death. Glial Cx43 opening liberated ATP and Cx43-dependent ATP release was potentiated by NO. Conclusions: Our results show that the activation of glial cells in the context of neuroinflammation kills enteric neurons. Mediators of inflammation that include ATP and NO activate neurotoxic pathways that converge on glial Cx43 hemichannels. The glial response to inflammatory mediators might contribute to the development of motility disorders. Keywords: Enteric Nervous System, Hemichannels

  5. Effects of Hypoxia on Erythrocyte Membrane Properties—Implications for Intravascular Hemolysis and Purinergic Control of Blood Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Grygorczyk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular hemolysis occurs in hereditary, acquired, and iatrogenic hemolytic conditions but it could be also a normal physiological process contributing to intercellular signaling. New evidence suggests that intravascular hemolysis and the associated release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP may be an important mechanism for in vivo local purinergic signaling and blood flow regulation during exercise and hypoxia. However, the mechanisms that modulate hypoxia-induced RBC membrane fragility remain unclear. Here, we provide an overview of the role of RBC ATP release in the regulation of vascular tone and prevailing assumptions on the putative release mechanisms. We show importance of intravascular hemolysis as a source of ATP for local purinergic regulation of blood flow and discuss processes that regulate membrane propensity to rupture under stress and hypoxia.

  6. Role of the Ectodomain Serine 275 in Shaping the Binding Pocket of the ATP-Gated P2X3 Receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Petrenko, N.; Khafizov, K.; Tvrdoňová, Vendula; Skorinkin, A.; Giniatullin, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 50, č. 39 (2011), s. 8427-8436 ISSN 0006-2960 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 3446/2011 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : P2X3 * purinergic * ATP * ATP-binding pocket * receptor Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.422, year: 2011

  7. Alkaloid extracts from Jimson weed (Datura stramonium L.) modulate purinergic enzymes in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ademiluyi, Adedayo O; Ogunsuyi, Opeyemi B; Oboh, Ganiyu

    2016-09-01

    Although some findings have reported the medicinal properties of Jimson weed (Datura stramonium L.), there exist some serious neurological effects such as hallucination, loss of memory and anxiety, which has been reported in folklore. Consequently, the modulatory effect of alkaloid extracts from leaf and fruit of Jimson weed on critical enzymes of the purinergic [ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase), ecto-5'-nucleotidase (E-NTDase), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and Na + /K + ATPase] system of neurotransmission was the focus of this study. Alkaloid extracts were prepared by solvent extraction method and their interaction with the activities of these enzymes were assessed (in vitro) in rat brain tissue homogenate and in vivo in rats administered 100 and 200mg/kg body weight (p.o) of the extracts for thirty days, while administration of single dose (1mg/kg body weight; i.p.) of scopolamine served as the positive control. The extracts were also investigated for their Fe 2+ and Cu 2+ chelating abilities and GC-MS characterization of the extracts was also carried out. The results revealed that the extracts inhibited activates of E-NTPDase, E-NTDase and ALP in a concentration dependent manner, while stimulating the activity of Na + /K + ATPase (in vitro). Both extracts also exhibited Fe 2+ and Cu 2+ chelating abilities. Considering the EC 50 values, the fruit extract had significantly higher (P0.05) in both extracts' inhibitory effects on E-NTDase. The in vivo study revealed reduction in the activities of ENTPDase, E-NTDase, and Na + /K + ATPase in the extract-administered rat groups compared to the control group, while an elevation in ALP activity was observed in the extract-administered rat groups compared to the control group. GC-MS characterization revealed the presence of atropine, scopolamine, amphetamine, 3-methyoxyamphetamine, 3-ethoxyamhetamine cathine, spermine, phenlyephirine and 3-piperidinemethanol, among others in the extracts. Hence

  8. Alpha-hemolysin from Escherichia coli uses endogenous amplification through P2X receptor activation to induce hemolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skals, Marianne; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Leipziger, Jens

    2009-01-01

    frequently produce virulence factors such as alpha-hemolysin (HlyA), which causes hemolysis by forming pores in the erythrocyte membrane. The present study reveals that this pore formation triggers purinergic receptor activation to mediate the full hemolytic action. Non-selective ATP-receptor (P2...... augment hemolysis induced by the bacterial toxin, HlyA. These findings potentially have clinical perspectives as P2 antagonists may ameliorate symptoms during sepsis with hemolytic bacteria....

  9. α-hemolysin from Escherichia coli uses endogenous amplification through P2X receptor activation to induce hemolysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skals, Marianne Gerberg; Jørgensen, Niklas R; Leipziger, Jens Georg

    2009-01-01

    frequently produce virulence factors such as alpha-hemolysin (HlyA), which causes hemolysis by forming pores in the erythrocyte membrane. The present study reveals that this pore formation triggers purinergic receptor activation to mediate the full hemolytic action. Non-selective ATP-receptor (P2...... augment hemolysis induced by the bacterial toxin, HlyA. These findings potentially have clinical perspectives as P2 antagonists may ameliorate symptoms during sepsis with hemolytic bacteria....

  10. Potentiation of insulin secretion and improvement of glucose intolerance by combining a novel G protein-coupled receptor 40 agonist DS-1558 with glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, Ryutaro; Yano, Tatsuya; Ogawa, Junko; Tanaka, Naomi; Toda, Narihiro; Yoshida, Masao; Takano, Rieko; Inoue, Masahiro; Honda, Takeshi; Kume, Shoen; Matsumoto, Koji

    2014-08-15

    G protein-coupled receptor 40 (GPR40) is a Gq-coupled receptor for free fatty acids predominantly expressed in pancreatic β-cells. In recent years, GPR40 agonists have been investigated for use as novel therapeutic agents in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. We discovered a novel small molecule GPR40 agonist, (3S)-3-ethoxy-3-(4-{[(1R)-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2,3-dihydro-1H-inden-1-yl]oxy}phenyl)propanoic acid (DS-1558). The GPR40-mediated effects of DS-1558 on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion were evaluated in isolated islets from GPR40 knock-out and wild-type (littermate) mice. The GPR40-mediated effects on glucose tolerance and insulin secretion were also confirmed by an oral glucose tolerance test in these mice. Furthermore, oral administration of DS-1558 (0.03, 0.1 and 0.3mg/kg) significantly and dose-dependently improved hyperglycemia and increased insulin secretion during the oral glucose tolerance test in Zucker fatty rats, the model of insulin resistance and glucose intolerance. Next, we examined the combination effects of DS-1558 with glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1). DS-1558 not only increased the glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by GLP-1 but also potentiated the maximum insulinogenic effects of GLP-1 after an intravenous glucose injection in normal Sprague Dawley rats. Furthermore, the glucose lowering effects of exendin-4, a GLP-1 receptor agonist, were markedly potentiated by the DS-1558 (3mg/kg) add-on in diabetic db/db mice during an intraperitoneal glucose tolerance test. In conclusion, our results indicate that add-on GPR40 agonists to GLP-1 related agents might be a potential treatment compared to single administration of these compounds. Therefore the combinations of these agents are a novel therapeutic option for type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interleukin-6 Attenuates Serotonin 2A Receptor Signaling by Activating the JAK-STAT Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donegan, Jennifer J.; Patton, Michael S.; Chavera, Teresa S.; Berg, Kelly A.; Morilak, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor and the proinflammatory cytokine, interleukin-6 (IL-6), have both been implicated in psychiatric disorders. Previously, we demonstrated that these molecules both facilitate cognitive flexibility, a prefrontal cortex-mediated executive function impaired in multiple mental illnesses. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that IL-6 influences 5-HT2A receptor signaling, providing a potential mechanism by which this cytokine may influence behavior. We first demonstrated that 5-HT2A receptors and IL-6–mediated STAT3 phosphorylation colocalize in cells of the prefrontal cortex, providing the neuroanatomical substrate for a potential interaction. In the neuronally derived A1A1 cell line, which expresses both IL-6 and 5-HT2A receptors, we found that IL-6 attenuates inositol phosphate (IP) accumulation in response to the 5-HT2 agonist, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine (DOI), suggesting that IL-6 can regulate 5-HT2A receptor function. To identify the signaling pathway(s) that mediate this effect, we measured DOI-mediated IP accumulation in the presence of IL-6 and either the JAK-STAT inhibitor 124 [(9β,10α,16α,23E)-2,16,20,25-tetrahydroxy-9-methyl-19-norlanosta-1,5,23-triene-3,11,22-trione], JSI-124, or the extracellular signal-regulated kinase inhibitor, 2-(2-amino-3-methoxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one (PD-98059). The IL-6 effect was blocked by JSI-124 but not PD-98059. Furthermore, silencing RNA knockdown of either JAK or STAT blocked the IL-6 effect, suggesting that IL-6–induced JAK-STAT activation can regulate 5-HT2A receptor signaling. Finally, to determine if IL-6 specifically regulates the 5-HT2A receptor system, we measured IP production mediated by another Gq-coupled receptor, bradykinin B2. IL-6 had no effect on bradykinin-mediated IP accumulation, suggesting that regulation may occur at the 5-HT2A receptor. These results may provide clues to the pathologic mechanisms underlying certain psychiatric disorders and may

  12. Quercetin changes purinergic enzyme activities and oxidative profile in platelets of rats with hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Santi, Adriana; Schmatz, Roberta; Zanini, Daniela; Cardoso, Andréia M; Abadalla, Fátima H; Thomé, Gustavo R; Murussi, Camila; Polachini, Carla R N; Delenogare, Diéssica P; Loro, Vania L; Morsch, Vera M; Schetinger, Maria R C

    2016-12-01

    Diseases related to thyroid hormones have been extensively studied because affect a large number of individuals, and these hormones participate in the regulation of the whole organism homeostasis. However, little is known about the involvement of purinergic signaling related to oxidative stress in hypothyroidism and possible therapeutic adjuncts for treatment of this disorder. Thus, the present study investigates the effects of quercetin on NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities, platelet aggregation and oxidative profile in platelets of rats with methimazole (MMI)-induced hypothyroidism. Methimazole at a concentration of 20mg/100mL was administered for 90days. From the second month the animals received quercetin 10 or 25mg/kg for 60days. Results showed that: Ecto-5'-nucleotidase activity decreased in methimazole/water group and the treatment with quercetin 25mg/kg decreased NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities. Moreover, platelet aggregation increased in methimazole/water group. Lipid peroxidation increased while superoxide dismutase and catalase activities decreased, but, interestingly, the treatment with quercetin reversed these changes. These results demonstrated that quercetin modulates adenine nucleotide hydrolysis decreasing the ADP formation and adenosine deamination. At the same time quercetin improves the oxidative profile, as well as reduces platelet aggregation, which together with the modulation in the nucleotides levels can contribute to the prevention of platelet disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Injury-induced purinergic signalling molecules upregulate pluripotency gene expression and mitotic activity of progenitor cells in the zebrafish retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Matías P; Bejarano, Claudio A; Battista, Ariadna G; Venera, Graciela D; Bernabeu, Ramón O; Faillace, Maria Paula

    2017-12-01

    Damage in fish activates retina repair that restores sight. The purinergic signalling system serves multiple homeostatic functions and has been implicated in cell cycle control of progenitor cells in the developing retina. We examined whether changes in the expression of purinergic molecules were instrumental in the proliferative phase after injury of adult zebrafish retinas with ouabain. P2RY 1 messenger RNA (mRNA) increased early after injury and showed maximal levels at the time of peak progenitor cell proliferation. Extracellular nucleotides, mainly ADP, regulate P2RY 1 transcriptional and protein expression. The injury-induced upregulation of P2RY 1 is mediated by an autoregulated mechanism. After injury, the transcriptional expression of ecto-nucleotidases and ecto-ATPases also increased and ecto-ATPase activity inhibitors decreased Müller glia-derived progenitor cell amplification. Inhibition of P2RY 1 endogenous activation prevented progenitor cell proliferation at two intervals after injury: one in which progenitor Müller glia mitotically activates and the second one in which Müller glia-derived progenitor cells amplify. ADPβS induced the expression of lin28a and ascl1a genes in mature regions of uninjured retinas. The expression of these genes, which regulate multipotent Müller glia reprogramming, was significantly inhibited by blocking the endogenous activation of P2RY 1 early after injury. We consistently observed that the number of glial fibrillary acidic protein-BrdU-positive Müller cells after injury was larger in the absence than in the presence of the P2RY 1 antagonist. Ecto-ATPase activity inhibitors or P2RY 1 -specific antagonists did not modify apoptotic cell death at the time of peak progenitor cell proliferation. The results suggested that ouabain injury upregulates specific purinergic signals which stimulates multipotent progenitor cell response.

  14. Allosteric regulation of the P2X4 receptor channel pore dilation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zemková, Hana; Khadra, A.; Rokic, Milos Boro; Tvrdoňová, Vendula; Sherman, A.; Stojilkovic, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 467, č. 4 (2015), s. 713-726 ISSN 0031-6768 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ATP * purinergic receptor channel * ivermectin * pore dilation * Markov state model Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.654, year: 2015

  15. Functional relevance of aromatic residues in the first transmembrane domain of P2X receptors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindřichová, Marie; Vávra, Vojtěch; Obšil, Tomáš; Stojilkovic, S. S.; Zemková, Hana

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 3 (2009), s. 923-934 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011408; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110702; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110910 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : purinergic receptors * gating * transmembrane domain Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.999, year: 2009

  16. A polycystin-type transient receptor potential (Trp channel that is activated by ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Traynor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available ATP and ADP are ancient extra-cellular signalling molecules that in Dictyostelium amoebae cause rapid, transient increases in cytosolic calcium due to an influx through the plasma membrane. This response is independent of hetero-trimeric G-proteins, the putative IP3 receptor IplA and all P2X channels. We show, unexpectedly, that it is abolished in mutants of the polycystin-type transient receptor potential channel, TrpP. Responses to the chemoattractants cyclic-AMP and folic acid are unaffected in TrpP mutants. We report that the DIF morphogens, cyclic-di-GMP, GABA, glutamate and adenosine all induce strong cytoplasmic calcium responses, likewise independently of TrpP. Thus, TrpP is dedicated to purinergic signalling. ATP treatment causes cell blebbing within seconds but this does not require TrpP, implicating a separate purinergic receptor. We could detect no effect of ATP on chemotaxis and TrpP mutants grow, chemotax and develop almost normally in standard conditions. No gating ligand is known for the human homologue of TrpP, polycystin-2, which causes polycystic kidney disease. Our results now show that TrpP mediates purinergic signalling in Dictyostelium and is directly or indirectly gated by ATP.

  17. Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS and Adenosine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Sebastião

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In the present review we discuss the potential involvement of adenosinergic signaling, in particular the role of adenosine receptors, in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. Though the literature on this topic is not abundant, the information so far available on adenosine receptors in animal models of ALS highlights the interest to continue to explore the role of these receptors in this neurodegenerative disease. Indeed, all motor neurons affected in ALS are responsive to adenosine receptor ligands but interestingly, there are alterations in pre-symptomatic or early symptomatic stages that mirror those in advanced disease stages. Information starts to emerge pointing toward a beneficial role of A2A receptors (A2AR, most probably at early disease states, and a detrimental role of caffeine, in clear contrast with what occurs in other neurodegenerative diseases. However, some evidence also exists on a beneficial action of A2AR antagonists. It may happen that there are time windows where A2AR prove beneficial and others where their blockade is required. Furthermore, the same changes may not occur simultaneously at the different synapses. In line with this, it is not fully understood if ALS is a dying back disease or if it propagates in a centrifugal way. It thus seems crucial to understand how motor neuron dysfunction occurs, how adenosine receptors are involved in those dysfunctions and whether the early changes in purinergic signaling are compensatory or triggers for the disease. Getting this information is crucial before starting the design of purinergic based strategies to halt or delay disease progression.

  18. Astrocytes in the retrotrapezoid nucleus sense H+ by inhibition of a Kir4.1-Kir5.1-like current and may contribute to chemoreception by a purinergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenker, Ian C; Kréneisz, Orsolya; Nishiyama, Akiko; Mulkey, Daniel K

    2010-12-01

    Central chemoreception is the mechanism by which CO(2)/pH sensors regulate breathing in response to tissue pH changes. There is compelling evidence that pH-sensitive neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) are important chemoreceptors. Evidence also indicates that CO(2)/H(+)-evoked adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) release in the RTN, from pH-sensitive astrocytes, contributes to chemoreception. However, mechanism(s) by which RTN astrocytes sense pH is unknown and their contribution to chemoreception remains controversial. Here, we use the brain slice preparation and a combination of patch-clamp electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry to confirm that RTN astrocytes are pH sensitive and to determine mechanisms by which they sense pH. We show that pH-sensitive RTN glia are immunoreactive for aldehyde dehydrogenase 1L1, a marker of astrocytes. In HEPES buffer the pH-sensitive current expressed by RTN astrocytes reversed near E(K(+)) (the equilibrium potential for K(+)) and was inhibited by Ba(2+) and desipramine (blocker of Kir4.1-containing channels), characteristics most consistent with heteromeric Kir4.1-Kir5.1 channels. In bicarbonate buffer, the sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter also contributed to the CO(2)/H(+)-sensitive current in RTN astrocytes. To test the hypothesis that RTN astrocytes contribute to chemoreception by a purinergic mechanism, we used fluorocitrate to selectively depolarize astrocytes while measuring neuronal activity. We found that fluorocitrate increased baseline activity and pH sensitivity of RTN neurons by a P2-receptor-dependent mechanism, suggesting that astrocytes may release ATP to activate RTN chemoreceptors. We also found in bicarbonate but not HEPES buffer that P2-receptor antagonists decreased CO(2) sensitivity of RTN neurons. We conclude that RTN astrocytes sense CO(2)/H(+) in part by inhibition of a Kir4.1-Kir5.1-like current and may provide an excitatory purinergic drive to pH-sensitive neurons.

  19. Multiple Roles of the Extracellular Vestibule Amino Acid Residues in the Function of the Rat P2X4 Receptor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rokic, Milos Boro; Stojilkovic, S. S.; Vávra, Vojtěch; Kuzyk, Pavlo; Tvrdoňová, Vendula; Zemková, Hana

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 3 (2013), e59411 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110910; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ATP * purinergic P2X receptor channels * transmembrane domain * extracellular vestibule * gating * ivermectin Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.534, year: 2013

  20. Tissue-nonspecific Alkaline Phosphatase Regulates Purinergic Transmission in the Central Nervous System During Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Sebastián-Serrano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP is one of the four isozymes in humans and mice that have the capacity to hydrolyze phosphate groups from a wide spectrum of physiological substrates. Among these, TNAP degrades substrates implicated in neurotransmission. Transgenic mice lacking TNAP activity display the characteristic skeletal and dental phenotype of infantile hypophosphatasia, as well as spontaneous epileptic seizures and die around 10 days after birth. This physiopathology, linked to the expression pattern of TNAP in the central nervous system (CNS during embryonic stages, suggests an important role for TNAP in neuronal development and synaptic function, situating it as a good target to be explored for the treatment of neurological diseases. In this review, we will focus mainly on the role that TNAP plays as an ectonucleotidase in CNS regulating the levels of extracellular ATP and consequently purinergic signaling.

  1. Extracellular gentamicin reduces the activity of connexin hemichannels and interferes with purinergic Ca2+ signaling in HeLa cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Vania A.; Retamal, Mauricio A.; Cea, Luis A.; Salas, José D.; Vargas, Aníbal A.; Verdugo, Christian A.; Jara, Oscar; Martínez, Agustín D.; Sáez, Juan C.

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction channels (GJCs) and hemichannels (HCs) are composed of protein subunits termed connexins (Cxs) and are permeable to ions and small molecules. In most organs, GJCs communicate the cytoplasm of adjacent cells, while HCs communicate the intra and extracellular compartments. In this way, both channel types coordinate physiological responses of cell communities. Cx mutations explain several genetic diseases, including about 50% of autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss. However, the possible involvement of Cxs in the etiology of acquired hearing loss remains virtually unknown. Factors that induce post-lingual hearing loss are diverse, exposure to gentamicin an aminoglycoside antibiotic, being the most common. Gentamicin has been proposed to block GJCs, but its effect on HCs remains unknown. In this work, the effect of gentamicin on the functional state of HCs was studied and its effect on GJCs was reevaluated in HeLa cells stably transfected with Cxs. We focused on Cx26 because it is the main Cx expressed in the cochlea of mammals where it participates in purinergic signaling pathways. We found that gentamicin applied extracellularly reduces the activity of HCs, while dye transfer across GJCs was not affected. HCs were also blocked by streptomycin, another aminoglycoside antibiotic. Gentamicin also reduced the adenosine triphosphate release and the HC-dependent oscillations of cytosolic free-Ca2+ signal. Moreover, gentamicin drastically reduced the Cx26 HC-mediated membrane currents in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Therefore, the extracellular gentamicin-induced inhibition of Cx HCs may adversely affect autocrine and paracrine signaling, including the purinergic one, which might partially explain its ototoxic effects. PMID:25237294

  2. Purinergic-induced signaling in C11-MDCK cells inhibits the secretory Na-K-Cl cotransporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindikova, Tatyana A; Bourcier, Nathalie; Torres, Brian; Pchejetski, Dimitri; Gekle, Michel; Maximov, Georgy V; Montminy, Valérie; Insel, Paul A; Orlov, Sergei N; Isenring, Paul

    2003-12-01

    Purinergic inhibition of Na-K-Cl cotransport has been noted in various renal epithelial cells derived from the collecting tubule, including Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. In recent studies, we have observed purinergic inhibition of Na-K-Cl cotransport in C11-MDCK subclones (alpha-intercalated-like cells). Interestingly, Na-K-Cl cotransport activity was also detected in C7-MDCK subclones (principal-like cells) but was not affected by ATP. In this investigation, we have transfected the human Na-K-Cl cotransporter (huNKCC1) in both C11 and C7 cells to determine whether these differences in NKCC regulation by ATP were due to cell-specific purinoceptor signaling pathways or to cell-specific isoforms/splice variants of the transporter. In both cell lines, we found that endogenous as well as huNKCC1-derived cotransport activity was restricted to the basolateral side. In addition, we were able to show that extracellular application of 100 microM ATP or 100 microM UTP abolished NKCC activity in both mock- and huNKCC1-transfected C11 cells but not in mock- and huNKCC1-transfected C7 cells; in C11 cells, intriguingly, this inhibition was not affected by inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis and occurred even though expression levels of UTP-sensitive P2Y2-, P2Y4-, and P2Y6-purinoceptors were not different from those observed in C7 cells. These results suggest that C11 cells express an undetermined type of UTP-sensitive P2-purinoceptors or a unique P2Y-purinoceptor-triggered signaling cascade that leads to inhibition of NKCC1.

  3. Astrocytes in the Retrotrapezoid Nucleus Sense H+ by Inhibition of a Kir4.1–Kir5.1-Like Current and May Contribute to Chemoreception by a Purinergic Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenker, Ian C.; Kréneisz, Orsolya; Nishiyama, Akiko

    2010-01-01

    Central chemoreception is the mechanism by which CO2/pH sensors regulate breathing in response to tissue pH changes. There is compelling evidence that pH-sensitive neurons in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) are important chemoreceptors. Evidence also indicates that CO2/H+-evoked adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) release in the RTN, from pH-sensitive astrocytes, contributes to chemoreception. However, mechanism(s) by which RTN astrocytes sense pH is unknown and their contribution to chemoreception remains controversial. Here, we use the brain slice preparation and a combination of patch-clamp electrophysiology and immunohistochemistry to confirm that RTN astrocytes are pH sensitive and to determine mechanisms by which they sense pH. We show that pH-sensitive RTN glia are immunoreactive for aldehyde dehydrogenase 1L1, a marker of astrocytes. In HEPES buffer the pH-sensitive current expressed by RTN astrocytes reversed near EK+ (the equilibrium potential for K+) and was inhibited by Ba2+ and desipramine (blocker of Kir4.1-containing channels), characteristics most consistent with heteromeric Kir4.1–Kir5.1 channels. In bicarbonate buffer, the sodium/bicarbonate cotransporter also contributed to the CO2/H+-sensitive current in RTN astrocytes. To test the hypothesis that RTN astrocytes contribute to chemoreception by a purinergic mechanism, we used fluorocitrate to selectively depolarize astrocytes while measuring neuronal activity. We found that fluorocitrate increased baseline activity and pH sensitivity of RTN neurons by a P2-receptor–dependent mechanism, suggesting that astrocytes may release ATP to activate RTN chemoreceptors. We also found in bicarbonate but not HEPES buffer that P2-receptor antagonists decreased CO2 sensitivity of RTN neurons. We conclude that RTN astrocytes sense CO2/H+ in part by inhibition of a Kir4.1–Kir5.1-like current and may provide an excitatory purinergic drive to pH-sensitive neurons. PMID:20926613

  4. Purinergic effects on Na,K-ATPase activity differ in rat and human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel, Carsten; Nordsborg, Nikolai Baastrup; Bangsbo, Jens

    2014-01-01

    P2Y receptor activation may link the effect of purines to increased maximal in vitro activity of the Na,K-ATPase in rat muscle. The hypothesis that a similar mechanism is present in human skeletal muscle was investigated with membranes from rat and human skeletal muscle.......P2Y receptor activation may link the effect of purines to increased maximal in vitro activity of the Na,K-ATPase in rat muscle. The hypothesis that a similar mechanism is present in human skeletal muscle was investigated with membranes from rat and human skeletal muscle....

  5. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor activation blocks long-term potentiation at cerebellar parallel fiber–Purkinje cell synapses via cannabinoid signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Hansel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are known to modulate synaptic plasticity in various brain areas. A signaling pathway triggered by mAChR activation is the production and release of endocannabinoids that bind to type 1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R) located on synaptic terminals. Using whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from rat cerebellar slices, we have demonstrated that the muscarinic agonist oxotremorine-m (oxo-m) blocks the induction of presynaptic long-term potentiation (LTP) at parallel fiber (PF)–Purkinje cell synapses in a CB1R-dependent manner. Under control conditions, LTP was induced by delivering 120 PF stimuli at 8 Hz. In contrast, no LTP was observed when oxo-m was present during tetanization. PF-LTP was restored when the CB1R antagonist N-1-(2,4-dichlorophenyl)-5-(4-iodophenyl)-4-methyl-N-1-piperidinyl-1H-pyrazole-3-carboxamide (AM251) was coapplied with oxo-m. Furthermore, the suppressive effect of oxo-m on PF-LTP was abrogated by the GDP analog GDP-β-S (applied intracellularly), the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122, and the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor tetrahydrolipstatin (THL), suggesting that cannabinoid synthesis results from the activation of Gq-coupled mAChRs present on Purkinje cells. The oxo-m–mediated suppression of LTP was also prevented in the presence of the M3 receptor antagonist DAU 5884, and was absent in M1/M3 receptor double-KO mice, identifying M3 receptors as primary oxo-m targets. Our findings allow for the possibility that cholinergic signaling in the cerebellum—which may result from long-term depression (LTD)-related disinhibition of cholinergic neurons in the vestibular nuclei—suppresses presynaptic LTP to prevent an up-regulation of transmitter release that opposes the reduction of postsynaptic responsiveness. This modulatory capacity of mAChR signaling could promote the functional penetrance of LTD. PMID:23776234

  6. A3 adenosine receptor agonist prevents the development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by modulating spinal glial-restricted redox-dependent signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janes, Kali; Esposito, Emanuela; Doyle, Timothy; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Tosh, Dillip K; Jacobson, Kenneth A; Salvemini, Daniela

    2014-12-01

    Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy accompanied by chronic neuropathic pain is the major dose-limiting toxicity of several anticancer agents including the taxane paclitaxel (Taxol). A critical mechanism underlying paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain is the increased production of peroxynitrite in spinal cord generated in response to activation of the superoxide-generating enzyme, NADPH oxidase. Peroxynitrite in turn contributes to the development of neuropathic pain by modulating several redox-dependent events in spinal cord. We recently reported that activation of the Gi/Gq-coupled A3 adenosine receptor (A3AR) with selective A3AR agonists (ie, IB-MECA) blocked the development of chemotherapy induced-neuropathic pain evoked by distinct agents, including paclitaxel, without interfering with anticancer effects. The mechanism or mechanisms of action underlying these beneficial effects has yet to be explored. We now demonstrate that IB-MECA attenuates the development of paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain by inhibiting the activation of spinal NADPH oxidase and two downstream redox-dependent systems. The first relies on inhibition of the redox-sensitive transcription factor (NFκB) and mitogen activated protein kinases (ERK and p38) resulting in decreased production of neuroexcitatory/proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β) and increased formation of the neuroprotective/anti-inflammatory IL-10. The second involves inhibition of redox-mediated posttranslational tyrosine nitration and modification (inactivation) of glia-restricted proteins known to play key roles in regulating synaptic glutamate homeostasis: the glutamate transporter GLT-1 and glutamine synthetase. Our results unravel a mechanistic link into biomolecular signaling pathways employed by A3AR activation in neuropathic pain while providing the foundation to consider use of A3AR agonists as therapeutic agents in patients with chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy. Copyright © 2014

  7. Adenosine receptors and muscarinic receptors cooperate in acetylcholine release modulation in the neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santafe, M M; Priego, M; Obis, T; Garcia, N; Tomàs, M; Lanuza, M A; Tomàs, J

    2015-07-01

    Adenosine receptors (ARs) are present in the motor terminals at the mouse neuromuscular junction. ARs and the presynaptic muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) share the functional control of the neuromuscular junction. We analysed their mutual interaction in transmitter release modulation. In electrophysiological experiments with unaltered synaptic transmission (muscles paralysed by blocking the voltage-dependent sodium channel of the muscle cells with μ-conotoxin GIIIB), we found that: (i) a collaborative action between different AR subtypes reduced synaptic depression at a moderate activity level (40 Hz); (ii) at high activity levels (100 Hz), endogenous adenosine production in the synaptic cleft was sufficient to reduce depression through A1 -type receptors (A1 Rs) and A2 A-type receptors (A2 A Rs); (iii) when the non-metabolizable 2-chloroadenosine (CADO) agonist was used, both the quantal content and depression were reduced; (iv) the protective effect of CADO on depression was mediated by A1 Rs, whereas A2 A Rs seemed to modulate A1 Rs; (v) ARs and mAChRs absolutely depended upon each other for the modulation of evoked and spontaneous acetylcholine release in basal conditions and in experimental conditions with CADO stimulation; (vi) the purinergic and muscarinic mechanisms cooperated in the control of depression by sharing a common pathway although the purinergic control was more powerful than the muscarinic control; and (vii) the imbalance of the ARs created by using subtype-selective and non-selective inhibitory and stimulatory agents uncoupled protein kinase C from evoked transmitter release. In summary, ARs (A1 Rs, A2 A Rs) and mAChRs (M1 , M2 ) cooperated in the control of activity-dependent synaptic depression and may share a common protein kinase C pathway. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. N-terminal tagging of human P2X7 receptor disturbs calcium influx and dye uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreisig, Karin; Kristensen, Nikolaj Pagh; Dommer, Maja Wallentin

    2018-01-01

    uptake in response to BzATP stimulation in transfected cells. We found that tagging at the N-terminal of the human P2X7 receptor with the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) disturbed channel opening and pore formation despite intact surface expression. A triple hemagglutinin (3HA) fused to the N......The P2X7 receptor is a frequently studied member of the purinergic receptor family signalling via channel opening and membrane pore formation. Fluorescent imaging is an important molecular method for studying cellular receptor expression and localization. Fusion of receptors to fluorescent proteins...... might cause major functional changes and requires careful functional evaluation such as has been done for the rat P2X7 receptor. This study examines fusion constructs of the human P2X7 receptor. We assessed surface expression, channel opening with calcium influx, and pore formation using YO-PRO-1 dye...

  9. Transformation of Astrocytes to a Neuroprotective Phenotype by Microglia via P2Y1 Receptor Downregulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youichi Shinozaki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Microglia and astrocytes become reactive following traumatic brain injury (TBI. However, the coordination of this reactivity and its relation to pathophysiology are unclear. Here, we show that microglia transform astrocytes into a neuroprotective phenotype via downregulation of the P2Y1 purinergic receptor. TBI initially caused microglial activation in the injury core, followed by reactive astrogliosis in the peri-injured region and formation of a neuroprotective astrocyte scar. Equivalent changes to astrocytes were observed in vitro after injury. This change in astrocyte phenotype resulted from P2Y1 receptor downregulation, mediated by microglia-derived cytokines. In mice, astrocyte-specific P2Y1 receptor overexpression (Astro-P2Y1OE counteracted scar formation, while astrocyte-specific P2Y1 receptor knockdown (Astro-P2Y1KD facilitated scar formation, suggesting critical roles of P2Y1 receptors in the transformation. Astro-P2Y1OE and Astro-P2Y1KD mice showed increased and reduced neuronal damage, respectively. Altogether, our findings indicate that microglia-astrocyte interaction, involving a purinergic signal, is essential for the formation of neuroprotective astrocytes.

  10. Transformation of Astrocytes to a Neuroprotective Phenotype by Microglia via P2Y1Receptor Downregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinozaki, Youichi; Shibata, Keisuke; Yoshida, Keitaro; Shigetomi, Eiji; Gachet, Christian; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Tanaka, Kenji F; Koizumi, Schuichi

    2017-05-09

    Microglia and astrocytes become reactive following traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, the coordination of this reactivity and its relation to pathophysiology are unclear. Here, we show that microglia transform astrocytes into a neuroprotective phenotype via downregulation of the P2Y 1 purinergic receptor. TBI initially caused microglial activation in the injury core, followed by reactive astrogliosis in the peri-injured region and formation of a neuroprotective astrocyte scar. Equivalent changes to astrocytes were observed in vitro after injury. This change in astrocyte phenotype resulted from P2Y 1 receptor downregulation, mediated by microglia-derived cytokines. In mice, astrocyte-specific P2Y 1 receptor overexpression (Astro-P2Y 1 OE) counteracted scar formation, while astrocyte-specific P2Y 1 receptor knockdown (Astro-P2Y 1 KD) facilitated scar formation, suggesting critical roles of P2Y 1 receptors in the transformation. Astro-P2Y 1 OE and Astro-P2Y 1 KD mice showed increased and reduced neuronal damage, respectively. Altogether, our findings indicate that microglia-astrocyte interaction, involving a purinergic signal, is essential for the formation of neuroprotective astrocytes. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. P2X7 receptor-deficient mice are susceptible to bone cancer pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, RR; Nielsen, CK; Nasser, A

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor is implicated in both neuropathic and inflammatory pain, and has been suggested as a possible target in pain treatment. However, the specific role of the P2X7 receptor in bone cancer pain is unknown. We demonstrated that BALB/cJ P2X7 receptor knockout (P2X7R KO) mice...... of the P2X7R KO mouse. Further experiments are needed to elucidate the exact role of the P2X7 receptors in bone cancer pain. Pain-related behaviours had an earlier onset in bone cancer-bearing, P2X7 receptor-deficient mice, and treatment with A-438079 failed to alleviate pain-related behaviours....

  12. 5HT2 receptor activation facilitates P2X receptor mediated excitatory neurotransmission to cardiac vagal neurons in the nucleus ambiguus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dergacheva, Olga; Wang, Xin; Kamendi, Harriet; Cheng, Qi; Pinol, Ramon Manchon; Jameson, Heather; Gorini, Christopher; Mendelowitz, David

    2008-06-01

    Parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac vagal neurons (CVNs) which dominate the control of heart rate are located within the nucleus ambiguus (NA). Serotonin (5HT), and in particular 5HT2 receptors, play an important role in cardiovascular function in the brainstem. However, there is a lack of information on the mechanisms of action of 5HT2 receptors in modulating parasympathetic cardiac activity. This study tests whether activation of 5HT2 receptors alters excitatory glutamatergic and purinergic neurotransmission to CVNs. Application of alpha-methyl-5-hydroxytryptamine (alpha-Me-5HT), a 5HT2 agonist, reversibly increased both the frequency and amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in CVNs. Similar responses were obtained with alpha-methyl-5-(2-thienylmethoxy)-1H-indole-3-ethanamine hydrochloride (BW723C86), and m-chlorophenylpiperazine (m-CPP), 5HT2B and 5HT2B/C receptor agonists, respectively. The facilitation evoked by alpha-Me-5HT was prevented by the 5HT2B/C receptor antagonist SB206553 hydrochloride (SB206553). Interestingly, the blockage of both NMDA and non-NMDA glutamatergic receptors did not prevent alpha-Me-5HT-evoked facilitation of mEPSCs, however, the responses were blocked by the P2 receptor antagonist pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid (PPADS). The responses evoked by alpha-Me-5HT were mimicked by application of alpha,beta-methylene ATP (alpha,beta-Me-ATP), a P2X receptor agonist, which were also blocked by PPADS. In summary, these results indicate activation of 5HT2 receptors facilitates excitatory purinergic, but not glutamatergic, neurotransmission to CVNs.

  13. Histamine acting on H1 receptor promotes inhibition of proliferation via PLC, RAC, and JNK-dependent pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notcovich, Cintia [Laboratorio de Patologia y Farmacologia Molecular, Instituto de Biologia y Medicina Experimental (Argentina); Laboratorio de Farmacologia de Receptores, Catedra de Quimica Medicinal, Departamento de Farmacologia, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Diez, Federico [Laboratorio de Farmacologia de Receptores, Catedra de Quimica Medicinal, Departamento de Farmacologia, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Tubio, Maria Rosario [Laboratorio de Patologia y Farmacologia Molecular, Instituto de Biologia y Medicina Experimental (Argentina); Laboratorio de Farmacologia de Receptores, Catedra de Quimica Medicinal, Departamento de Farmacologia, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Baldi, Alberto [Laboratorio de Patologia y Farmacologia Molecular, Instituto de Biologia y Medicina Experimental (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Kazanietz, Marcelo G. [Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Davio, Carlos [Laboratorio de Farmacologia de Receptores, Catedra de Quimica Medicinal, Departamento de Farmacologia, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Shayo, Carina, E-mail: cshayo@dna.uba.ar [Laboratorio de Patologia y Farmacologia Molecular, Instituto de Biologia y Medicina Experimental (Argentina); Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2010-02-01

    It is well established that histamine modulates cell proliferation through the activation of the histamine H1 receptor (H1R), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is known to couple to phospholipase C (PLC) activation via Gq. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether H1R activation modulates Rho GTPases, well-known effectors of Gq/G{sub 11}-coupled receptors, and whether such modulation influences cell proliferation. Experiments were carried out in CHO cells stably expressing H1R (CHO-H1R). By using pull-down assays, we found that both histamine and a selective H1R agonist activated Rac and RhoA in a time- and dose-dependent manner without significant changes in the activation of Cdc42. Histamine response was abolished by the H1R antagonist mepyramine, RGS2 and the PLC inhibitor U73122, suggesting that Rac and RhoA activation is mediated by H1R via Gq coupling to PLC stimulation. Histamine caused a marked activation of serum response factor activity via the H1R, as determined with a serum-responsive element (SRE) luciferase reporter, and this response was inhibited by RhoA inactivation with C3 toxin. Histamine also caused a significant activation of JNK which was inhibited by expression of the Rac-GAP {beta}2-chimaerin. On the other hand, H1R-induced ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by U73122 but not affected by C3 or {beta}2-chimaerin, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation was dependent on PLC and independent of RhoA or Rac. [{sup 3}H]-Thymidine incorporation assays showed that both histamine and the H1R agonist inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and that the effect was independent of RhoA but partially dependent on JNK and Rac. Our results reveal that functional coupling of the H1R to Gq-PLC leads to the activation of RhoA and Rac small GTPases and suggest distinct roles for Rho GTPases in the control of cell proliferation by histamine.

  14. Histamine acting on H1 receptor promotes inhibition of proliferation via PLC, RAC, and JNK-dependent pathways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notcovich, Cintia; Diez, Federico; Tubio, Maria Rosario; Baldi, Alberto; Kazanietz, Marcelo G.; Davio, Carlos; Shayo, Carina

    2010-01-01

    It is well established that histamine modulates cell proliferation through the activation of the histamine H1 receptor (H1R), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that is known to couple to phospholipase C (PLC) activation via Gq. In the present study, we aimed to determine whether H1R activation modulates Rho GTPases, well-known effectors of Gq/G 11 -coupled receptors, and whether such modulation influences cell proliferation. Experiments were carried out in CHO cells stably expressing H1R (CHO-H1R). By using pull-down assays, we found that both histamine and a selective H1R agonist activated Rac and RhoA in a time- and dose-dependent manner without significant changes in the activation of Cdc42. Histamine response was abolished by the H1R antagonist mepyramine, RGS2 and the PLC inhibitor U73122, suggesting that Rac and RhoA activation is mediated by H1R via Gq coupling to PLC stimulation. Histamine caused a marked activation of serum response factor activity via the H1R, as determined with a serum-responsive element (SRE) luciferase reporter, and this response was inhibited by RhoA inactivation with C3 toxin. Histamine also caused a significant activation of JNK which was inhibited by expression of the Rac-GAP β2-chimaerin. On the other hand, H1R-induced ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by U73122 but not affected by C3 or β2-chimaerin, suggesting that ERK1/2 activation was dependent on PLC and independent of RhoA or Rac. [ 3 H]-Thymidine incorporation assays showed that both histamine and the H1R agonist inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner and that the effect was independent of RhoA but partially dependent on JNK and Rac. Our results reveal that functional coupling of the H1R to Gq-PLC leads to the activation of RhoA and Rac small GTPases and suggest distinct roles for Rho GTPases in the control of cell proliferation by histamine.

  15. Lifelong physical activity preserves functional sympatholysis and purinergic signalling in the ageing human leg

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, S P; Nyberg, Michael; Winding, K

    2012-01-01

    and exercise hyperaemia in the leg and whether ATP signalling is altered by ageing and physical activity. Leg haemodynamics, interstitial [ATP] and P2Y(2) receptor content was determined in eight young (23 ± 1 years), eight lifelong sedentary elderly (66 ± 2 years) and eight lifelong active elderly (62 ± 2...... not alter the vasodilator response to ATP infusion in any of the three groups. Plasma [noradrenaline] increased more during tyramine infusion in both elderly groups compared to young (P physically active lifestyle can maintain an intact functional sympatholysis during exercise......Ageing is associated with an impaired ability to modulate sympathetic vasoconstrictor activity (functional sympatholysis) and a reduced exercise hyperaemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether a physically active lifestyle can offset the impaired functional sympatholysis...

  16. 4-Alkyloxyimino derivatives of uridine-5'-triphosphate: distal modification of potent agonists as a strategy for molecular probes of P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y6 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayasekara, P Suresh; Barrett, Matthew O; Ball, Christopher B; Brown, Kyle A; Hammes, Eva; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Harden, T Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2014-05-08

    Extended N(4)-(3-arylpropyl)oxy derivatives of uridine-5'-triphosphate were synthesized and potently stimulated phospholipase C stimulation in astrocytoma cells expressing G protein-coupled human (h) P2Y receptors (P2YRs) activated by UTP (P2Y2/4R) or UDP (P2Y6R). The potent P2Y4R-selective N(4)-(3-phenylpropyl)oxy agonist was phenyl ring-substituted or replaced with terminal heterocyclic or naphthyl rings with retention of P2YR potency. This broad tolerance for steric bulk in a distal region was not observed for dinucleoside tetraphosphate agonists with both nucleobases substituted. The potent N(4)-(3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-propyl)oxy analogue 19 (EC50: P2Y2R, 47 nM; P2Y4R, 23 nM) was functionalized for chain extension using click tethering of fluorophores as prosthetic groups. The BODIPY 630/650 conjugate 28 (MRS4162) exhibited EC50 values of 70, 66, and 23 nM at the hP2Y2/4/6Rs, respectively, and specifically labeled cells expressing the P2Y6R. Thus, an extended N(4)-(3-arylpropyl)oxy group accessed a structurally permissive region on three Gq-coupled P2YRs, and potency and selectivity were modulated by distal structural changes. This freedom of substitution was utilized to design of a pan-agonist fluorescent probe of a subset of uracil nucleotide-activated hP2YRs.

  17. P2Y2 receptor knock-out mice display normal NaCl absorption in medullary thick ascending limb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marques, Rita D; Praetorius, Helle A; Leipziger, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Local purinergic signals modulate renal tubular transport. Acute activation of renal epithelial P2 receptors causes inhibition of epithelial transport and thus, should favor increased water and salt excretion by the kidney. So far only a few studies have addressed the effects of extracellular...... nucleotides on ion transport in the thick ascending limb (TAL). In the medullary thick ascending limb (mTAL), basolateral P2X receptors markedly (~25%) inhibit NaCl absorption. Although this segment does express both apical and basolateral P2Y2 receptors, acute activation of the basolateral P2Y2 receptors had...... no apparent effect on transepithelial ion transport. Here we studied, if the absence of the P2Y2 receptor causes chronic alterations in mTAL NaCl absorption by comparing basal and AVP-stimulated transepithelial transport rates. We used perfused mouse mTALs to electrically measure NaCl absorption in juvenile...

  18. P2X receptor-ion channels in the inflammatory response in adipose tissue and pancreas-potential triggers in onset of type 2 diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Solini, Anna

    2018-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is reaching an alarming prevalence worldwide. Its complex pathogenesis certainly includes a pivotal role of low-grade inflammation, which could be triggered by excessive purinergic signaling. In this complex scenario, extracellular ATP impairs the function of two key players: β......, the P2X7 receptor promotes the release of inflammatory cytokines, at least in part via inflammasome activation, likely contributing to systemic insulin resistance. This receptor-inflammasome system is also strongly activated in macrophages infiltrating both pancreas and adipose tissue, mediating...

  19. Effect of P2X(7) receptor knockout on exocrine secretion of pancreas, salivary glands and lacrimal glands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Ivana; Jans, Ida M; Wohlfahrt, Louise

    2010-09-15

    The purinergic P2X(7) receptors are expressed in different cell types where they have varied functions, including regulation of cell survival. The P2X(7) receptors are also expressed in exocrine glands, but their integrated role in secretion is unclear. The aim of our study was to determine whether the P2X(7) receptors affect fluid secretion in pancreas, salivary glands and tear glands. We monitored gland secretions in in vivo preparations of wild-type and P2X(7)(-/-) (Pfizer) mice stimulated with pilocarpine. In cell preparations from pancreas, parotid and lacrimal glands we measured ATP release and intracellular Ca(2+) activity using Fura-2. The data showed that pancreatic secretion and salivary secretions were reduced in P2X(7)(-/-) mice, and in contrast, tear secretion was increased in P2X(7)(-/-) mice. The secretory phenotype was also dependent on the sex of the animal, such that males were more dependent on the P2X(7) receptor expression. ATP release in all cell preparations could be elicited by carbachol and other agonists, and this was independent of the P2X(7) receptor expression. ATP and carbachol increased intracellular Ca(2+) activity, but responses depended on the gland type, presence of the P2X(7) receptor and the sex of the animal. Together, these results demonstrate that cholinergic stimulation leads to release of ATP that can via P2X(7) receptors up-regulate pancreatic and salivary secretion but down-regulate tear secretion. Our data also indicate that there is an interaction between purinergic and cholinergic receptor signalling and that function of the P2X(7) receptor is suppressed in females. We conclude that the P2X(7) receptors are important in short-term physiological regulation of exocrine gland secretion.

  20. Effect of P2X7 receptor knockout on exocrine secretion of pancreas, salivary glands and lacrimal glands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Ivana; Jans, Ida M; Wohlfahrt, Louise

    2010-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptors are expressed in different cell types where they have varied functions, including regulation of cell survival. The P2X7 receptors are also expressed in exocrine glands, but their integrated role in secretion is unclear. The aim of our study was to determine whether the P2X7 receptors affect fluid secretion in pancreas, salivary glands and tear glands. We monitored gland secretions in in vivo preparations of wild-type and P2X7−/− (Pfizer) mice stimulated with pilocarpine. In cell preparations from pancreas, parotid and lacrimal glands we measured ATP release and intracellular Ca2+ activity using Fura-2. The data showed that pancreatic secretion and salivary secretions were reduced in P2X7−/− mice, and in contrast, tear secretion was increased in P2X7−/− mice. The secretory phenotype was also dependent on the sex of the animal, such that males were more dependent on the P2X7 receptor expression. ATP release in all cell preparations could be elicited by carbachol and other agonists, and this was independent of the P2X7 receptor expression. ATP and carbachol increased intracellular Ca2+ activity, but responses depended on the gland type, presence of the P2X7 receptor and the sex of the animal. Together, these results demonstrate that cholinergic stimulation leads to release of ATP that can via P2X7 receptors up-regulate pancreatic and salivary secretion but down-regulate tear secretion. Our data also indicate that there is an interaction between purinergic and cholinergic receptor signalling and that function of the P2X7 receptor is suppressed in females. We conclude that the P2X7 receptors are important in short-term physiological regulation of exocrine gland secretion. PMID:20643770

  1. The adenosine A2B receptor is involved in anion secretion in human pancreatic duct Capan-1 epithelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, M.; Inagaki, A.; Novak, Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine modulates a wide variety of biological processes via adenosine receptors. In the exocrine pancreas, adenosine regulates transepithelial anion secretion in duct cells and is considered to play a role in acini-to-duct signaling. To identify the functional adenosine receptors and Cl...... by CFTRinh-172, a cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel inhibitor. The adenosine A2B receptor agonist, BAY 60-6583, increased Isc and whole-cell Cl− currents through CFTR Cl− channels, whereas the A2A receptor agonist, CGS 21680, had negligible effects. The A2B receptor....... These results demonstrate that luminal adenosine regulates anion secretion by activating CFTR Cl− channels via adenosine A2B receptors on the luminal membranes of Capan-1 cells. The present study endorses that purinergic signaling is important in the regulation of pancreatic secretion....

  2. AMP is an adenosine A1 receptor agonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittiner, Joseph E; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P; Frye, Stephen V; Zylka, Mark J

    2012-02-17

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5'-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A(1) receptor (A(1)R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A(2B) receptor (A(2B)R) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5'-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A(1)R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A(1)R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4'-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A(1)R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A(1)R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine.

  3. P2X7 Receptors in Neurohypophysial Terminals: Evidence for their Role in Arginine-Vasopressin Secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Cuadra, Adolfo E.; Custer, Edward E.; Bosworth, Elizabeth L.; Lemos, José R.

    2014-01-01

    Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) plays a major role in maintaining cardiovascular function and related pathologies. The mechanism involved in its release into the circulation is complex and highly regulated. Recent work has implicated the purinergic receptor, P2X7R, in a role for catecholamine-enhanced AVP release in the rat hypothalamic-neurohypophysial (NH) system. However, the site of P2X7R action in this endocrine system and whether or not it directly mediates release in secretory neurons have ...

  4. Insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahn, C.R.; Harrison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on insulin receptors. Part A: Methods for the study of structure and function. Topics covered include: Method for purification and labeling of insulin receptors, the insulin receptor kinase, and insulin receptors on special tissues

  5. P2X7 receptor activation regulates rapid unconventional export of transglutaminase-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, Magdalena; Griffiths, Rhiannon; Dewitt, Sharon; Knäuper, Vera; Aeschlimann, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transglutaminases (denoted TG or TGM) are externalized from cells via an unknown unconventional secretory pathway. Here, we show for the first time that purinergic signaling regulates active secretion of TG2 (also known as TGM2), an enzyme with a pivotal role in stabilizing extracellular matrices and modulating cell–matrix interactions in tissue repair. Extracellular ATP promotes TG2 secretion by macrophages, and this can be blocked by a selective antagonist against the purinergic receptor P2X7 (P2X7R, also known as P2RX7). Introduction of functional P2X7R into HEK293 cells is sufficient to confer rapid, regulated TG2 export. By employing pharmacological agents, TG2 release could be separated from P2X7R-mediated microvesicle shedding. Neither Ca2+ signaling alone nor membrane depolarization triggered TG2 secretion, which occurred only upon receptor membrane pore formation and without pannexin channel involvement. A gain-of-function mutation in P2X7R associated with autoimmune disease caused enhanced TG2 externalization from cells, and this correlated with increased pore activity. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for a link between active TG2 secretion and inflammatory responses, and aberrant enhanced TG2 activity in certain autoimmune conditions. PMID:26542019

  6. P2X₇ receptor of rat dorsal root ganglia is involved in the effect of moxibustion on visceral hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuangmei; Shi, Qingming; Zhu, Qicheng; Zou, Ting; Li, Guilin; Huang, An; Wu, Bing; Peng, Lichao; Song, Miaomiao; Wu, Qin; Xie, Qiuyu; Lin, Weijian; Xie, Wei; Wen, Shiyao; Zhang, Zhedong; Lv, Qiulan; Zou, Lifang; Zhang, Xi; Ying, Mofeng; Li, Guodong; Liang, Shangdong

    2015-06-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) and inflammatory bowel disease often display visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral nociceptors after inflammatory stimulation generate afferent nerve impulses through dorsal root ganglia (DRG) transmitting to the central nervous system. ATP and its activated-purinergic 2X7 (P2X7) receptor play an important role in the transmission of nociceptive signal. Purinergic signaling is involved in the sensory transmission of visceral pain. Moxibustion is a therapy applying ignited mugwort directly or indirectly at acupuncture points or other specific parts of the body to treat diseases. Heat-sensitive acupoints are the corresponding points extremely sensitive to moxa heat in disease conditions. In this study, we aimed to investigate the relationship between the analgesic effect of moxibustion on a heat-sensitive acupoint "Dachangshu" and the expression levels of P2X7 receptor in rat DRG after chronic inflammatory stimulation of colorectal distension. Heat-sensitive moxibustion at Dachangshu acupoint inhibited the nociceptive signal transmission by decreasing the upregulated expression levels of P2X7 mRNA and protein in DRG induced by visceral pain, and reversed the abnormal expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, a marker of satellite glial cells) in DRG. Consequently, abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) score in a visceral pain model was reduced, and the pain threshold was elevated. Therefore, heat-sensitive moxibustion at Dachangshu acupoint can produce a therapeutic effect on IBS via inhibiting the nociceptive transmission mediated by upregulated P2X7 receptor.

  7. GPR40 (FFAR1) – Combined Gs and Gq signaling in vitro is associated with robust incretin secretagogue action ex vivo and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Maria Hauge; Bentsen, Marie Aare; Husted, Anna S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: GPR40 (FFAR1), a clinically proven anti-diabetes target, is a Gq-coupled receptor for long chain fatty acids (LCFA) stimulating insulin secretion directly and mediating a major part of the dietary triglyceride-induced secretion of the incretins GLP-1 and GIP. In phase-II studies the G...

  8. Purinergic signaling is required for fluid shear stress-induced NF-{kappa}B translocation in osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genetos, Damian C., E-mail: dgenetos@ucdavis.edu [Department of Anatomy, Cell Biology, and Physiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Karin, Norman J. [Cell Biology and Biochemistry, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States); Geist, Derik J. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Donahue, Henry J. [Division of Musculoskeletal Sciences, Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, Pennsylvania State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA (United States); Duncan, Randall L. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-04-01

    Fluid shear stress regulates gene expression in osteoblasts, in part by activation of the transcription factor NF-{kappa}B. We examined whether this process was under the control of purinoceptor activation. MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts under static conditions expressed the NF-{kappa}B inhibitory protein I{kappa}B{alpha} and exhibited cytosolic localization of NF-{kappa}B. Under fluid shear stress, I{kappa}B{alpha} levels decreased, and concomitant nuclear localization of NF-{kappa}B was observed. Cells exposed to fluid shear stress in ATP-depleted medium exhibited no significant reduction in I{kappa}B{alpha}, and NF-{kappa}B remained within the cytosol. Similar results were found using oxidized ATP or Brilliant Blue G, P2X{sub 7} receptor antagonists, indicating that the P2X{sub 7} receptor is responsible for fluid shear-stress-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation and nuclear accumulation of NF-{kappa}B. Pharmacologic blockage of the P2Y6 receptor also prevented shear-induced I{kappa}B{alpha} degradation. These phenomena involved neither ERK1/2 signaling nor autocrine activation by P2X{sub 7}-generated lysophosphatidic acid. Our results suggest that fluid shear stress regulates NF-{kappa}B activity through the P2Y{sub 6} and P2X{sub 7} receptor.

  9. Functional characterization of mutants in the transmembrane domains of the rat P2X7 receptor that regulate pore conductivity and agonist sensitivity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jindřichová, Marie; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Rupert, Marian; Škopek, Petr; Obšil, T.; Zemková, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 133, č. 6 (2015), s. 815-827 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GPP304/12/P371; GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ATP * purinergic receptor channel * P2X7 * pore dilation * YO-PRO-1 uptake Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.842, year: 2015

  10. Identification of Functionally Important Residues of the Rat P2X4 Receptor by Alanine Scanning Mutagenesis of the Dorsal Fin and Left Flipper Domains

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tvrdoňová, Vendula; Rokic, Milos Boro; Stojilkovic, S. S.; Zemková, Hana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 11 (2014), e112902 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0025 Grant - others:Univerzita Karlova(CZ) 3446/11 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : purinergic receptor * P2X * ATP * binding pocket * gating * signal transmission * partial agonists Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  11. Differential regulation of P2X7 receptor activation by extracellular NAD and ecto-ARTs in murine macrophages and T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Shiyuan; Schwarz, Nicole; Brass, Anette; Seman, Michel; Haag, Friedrich; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Schilling, William P.; Dubyak, George R.

    2009-01-01

    Extracellular NAD induces the ATP-independent activation of the ionotropic P2X7 purinergic receptor (P2X7R) in murine T lymphocytes via a novel covalent pathway involving ADP-ribosylation of arginine residues on the P2X7R ecto-domain. This modification is catalyzed by ART2.2, a GPI-anchored ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) that is constitutively expressed in murine T cells. We previously reported that ART2.1, a related ecto-ART, is up-regulated in inflammatory murine macrophages that constitutive...

  12. Facilitation of glutamate and GABA release by P2X receptor activation in supraoptic neurons from freshly isolated rat brain slices

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vávra, Vojtěch; Bhattacharya, Anirban; Zemková, Hana

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 188, - (2011), s. 1-12 ISSN 0306-4522 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110910; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/07/0681; GA ČR(CZ) GD305/08/H037; GA MŠk(CZ) LC554 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : ATP * purinergic P2X receptors * GABA * glutamate * supraoptic nucleus * patch clamp Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.380, year: 2011

  13. S-Nitrosothiols modulate G protein-coupled receptor signaling in a reversible and highly receptor-specific manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mönkkönen Kati S

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent studies indicate that the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR signaling machinery can serve as a direct target of reactive oxygen species, including nitric oxide (NO and S-nitrosothiols (RSNOs. To gain a broader view into the way that receptor-dependent G protein activation – an early step in signal transduction – might be affected by RSNOs, we have studied several receptors coupling to the Gi family of G proteins in their native cellular environment using the powerful functional approach of [35S]GTPγS autoradiography with brain cryostat sections in combination with classical G protein activation assays. Results We demonstrate that RSNOs, like S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO and S-nitrosocysteine (CysNO, can modulate GPCR signaling via reversible, thiol-sensitive mechanisms probably involving S-nitrosylation. RSNOs are capable of very targeted regulation, as they potentiate the signaling of some receptors (exemplified by the M2/M4 muscarinic cholinergic receptors, inhibit others (P2Y12 purinergic, LPA1lysophosphatidic acid, and cannabinoid CB1 receptors, but may only marginally affect signaling of others, such as adenosine A1, μ-opioid, and opiate related receptors. Amplification of M2/M4 muscarinic responses is explained by an accelerated rate of guanine nucleotide exchange, as well as an increased number of high-affinity [35S]GTPγS binding sites available for the agonist-activated receptor. GSNO amplified human M4 receptor signaling also under heterologous expression in CHO cells, but the effect diminished with increasing constitutive receptor activity. RSNOs markedly inhibited P2Y12 receptor signaling in native tissues (rat brain and human platelets, but failed to affect human P2Y12 receptor signaling under heterologous expression in CHO cells, indicating that the native cellular signaling partners, rather than the P2Y12 receptor protein, act as a molecular target for this action. Conclusion These in vitro studies

  14. Inflammatory early events associated to the role of P2X7 receptor in acute murine toxoplasmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrêa, Gladys; Almeida Lindenberg, Carolina de; Moreira-Souza, Aline Cristina de Abreu; Savio, Luiz Eduardo Baggio; Takiya, Christina Maeda; Marques-da-Silva, Camila; Vommaro, Rossiane Claudia; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2017-04-01

    Activation of the purinergic P2X7 receptor by extracellular ATP (eATP) potentiates proinflammatory responses during infections by intracellular pathogens. Extracellular ATP triggers an antimicrobial response in macrophages infected with Toxoplasma gondii in vitro, suggesting that purinergic signaling may stimulate host defense mechanisms against toxoplasmosis. Here, we provide in vivo evidence in support of this hypothesis, by showing that P2X7 -/- mice are more susceptible than P2X7 +/+ mice to acute infection by the RH strain of T. gondii, and that this phenomenon is associated with a deficient proinflammatory response. Four days post-infection, peritoneal washes from infected P2X7 -/- mice had no or little increase in the levels of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12, IL-1β, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, whose levels increased markedly in samples from infected P2X7 +/+ mice. Infected P2X7 -/- mice displayed an increase in organ weight and histological alterations in some of the 'shock organs' in toxoplasmosis - the liver, spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes. The liver of infected P2X7 -/- mice had smaller granulomas, but increased parasite load/granuloma. Our results confirm that the P2X7 receptor is involved in containing T. gondii spread in vivo, by stimulating inflammation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Vasoactivity of rucaparib, a PARP-1 inhibitor, is a complex process that involves myosin light chain kinase, P2 receptors, and PARP itself.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cian M McCrudden

    Full Text Available Therapeutic inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP, as monotherapy or to supplement the potencies of other agents, is a promising strategy in cancer treatment. We previously reported that the first PARP inhibitor to enter clinical trial, rucaparib (AG014699, induced vasodilation in vivo in xenografts, potentiating response to temozolomide. We now report that rucaparib inhibits the activity of the muscle contraction mediator myosin light chain kinase (MLCK 10-fold more potently than its commercially available inhibitor ML-9. Moreover, rucaparib produces additive relaxation above the maximal degree achievable with ML-9, suggesting that MLCK inhibition is not solely responsible for dilation. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthesis using L-NMMA also failed to impact rucaparib's activity. Rucaparib contains the nicotinamide pharmacophore, suggesting it may inhibit other NAD+-dependent processes. NAD+ exerts P2 purinergic receptor-dependent inhibition of smooth muscle contraction. Indiscriminate blockade of the P2 purinergic receptors with suramin abrogated rucaparib-induced vasodilation in rat arterial tissue without affecting ML-9-evoked dilation, although the specific receptor subtypes responsible have not been unequivocally identified. Furthermore, dorsal window chamber and real time tumor vessel perfusion analyses in PARP-1-/- mice indicate a potential role for PARP in dilation of tumor-recruited vessels. Finally, rucaparib provoked relaxation in 70% of patient-derived tumor-associated vessels. These data provide tantalising evidence of the complexity of the mechanism underlying rucaparib-mediated vasodilation.

  16. Dual effects of radiation bystander signaling in urothelial cancer: purinergic-activation of apoptosis attenuates survival of urothelial cancer and normal urothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, Malgorzata A; Srivastava, Kirtiman; Breen, Conor; Butterworth, Karl T; McMahon, Stephen J; Prise, Kevin M; McCloskey, Karen D

    2017-11-14

    Radiation therapy (RT) delivers tumour kill, directly and often via bystander mechanisms. Bladder toxicity is a dose limiting constraint in pelvic RT, manifested as radiation cystitis and urinary symptoms. We aimed to investigate the impact of radiation-induced bystander signaling on normal/cancer urothelial cells. Human urothelial cancer cells T24, HT1376 and normal urothelial cells HUC, SV-HUC were used. Cells were irradiated and studied directly, or conditioned medium from irradiated cells (CM) was transferred to naïve, cells. T24 or SV-HUC cells in the shielded half of irradiated flasks had increased numbers of DNA damage foci vs non-irradiated cells. A physical barrier blocked this response, indicating release of transmitters from irradiated cells. Clonogenic survival of shielded T24 or SV-HUC was also reduced; a physical barrier prevented this phenomenon. CM-transfer increased pro-apoptotic caspase-3 activity, increased cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved PARP expression and reduced survival protein XIAP expression. This effect was mimicked by ATP. ATP or CM evoked suramin-sensitive Ca 2+ -signals. Irradiation increased [ATP] in CM from T24. The CM-inhibitory effect on T24 clonogenic survival was blocked by apyrase, or mimicked by ATP. We conclude that radiation-induced bystander signaling enhances urothelial cancer cell killing via activation of purinergic pro-apoptotic pathways. This benefit is accompanied by normal urothelial damage indicating RT bladder toxicity is also bystander-mediated.

  17. A2BR adenosine receptor modulates sweet taste in circumvallate taste buds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Kataoka

    Full Text Available In response to taste stimulation, taste buds release ATP, which activates ionotropic ATP receptors (P2X2/P2X3 on taste nerves as well as metabotropic (P2Y purinergic receptors on taste bud cells. The action of the extracellular ATP is terminated by ectonucleotidases, ultimately generating adenosine, which itself can activate one or more G-protein coupled adenosine receptors: A1, A2A, A2B, and A3. Here we investigated the expression of adenosine receptors in mouse taste buds at both the nucleotide and protein expression levels. Of the adenosine receptors, only A2B receptor (A2BR is expressed specifically in taste epithelia. Further, A2BR is expressed abundantly only in a subset of taste bud cells of posterior (circumvallate, foliate, but not anterior (fungiform, palate taste fields in mice. Analysis of double-labeled tissue indicates that A2BR occurs on Type II taste bud cells that also express Gα14, which is present only in sweet-sensitive taste cells of the foliate and circumvallate papillae. Glossopharyngeal nerve recordings from A2BR knockout mice show significantly reduced responses to both sucrose and synthetic sweeteners, but normal responses to tastants representing other qualities. Thus, our study identified a novel regulator of sweet taste, the A2BR, which functions to potentiate sweet responses in posterior lingual taste fields.

  18. Action of Natural Products on P2 Receptors: A Reinvented Era for Drug Discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Alves

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Natural products contribute significantly to available drug therapies and have been a rich source for scientific investigation. In general, due to their low cost and traditional use in some cultures, they are an object of growing interest as alternatives to synthetic drugs. With several diseases such as cancer, and inflammatory and neuropathic diseases having been linked to the participation of purinergic (P2 receptors, there has been a flurry of investigations on ligands within natural products. Thirty-four different sources of these compounds have been found so far, that have shown either agonistic or antagonistic effects on P2 receptors. Of those, nine different plant sources demonstrated effects on P2X2, P2X3, P2X7, and possibly P2Y12 receptor subtypes. Microorganisms, which represent the largest group, with 26 different sources, showed effects on both receptor subtypes, ranging from P2X1 to P2X4 and P2X7, and P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y6. In addition, there were seventeen animal sources that affected P2X7 and P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors. Natural products have provided some fascinating new mechanisms and sources to better understand the P2 receptor antagonism. Moreover, current investigations should clarify further pharmacological mechanisms in order to consider these products as potential new medicines.

  19. Important roles of P2Y receptors in the inflammation and cancer of digestive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Han-Xing; Hu, Jian-Hong; Xie, Rei; Yang, Shi-Ming; Dong, Hui

    2016-05-10

    Purinergic signaling is important for many biological processes in humans. Purinoceptors P2Y are widely distributed in human digestive system and different subtypes of P2Y receptors mediate different physiological functions from metabolism, proliferation, differentiation to apoptosis etc. The P2Y receptors are essential in many gastrointestinal functions and also involve in the occurrence of some digestive diseases. Since different subtypes of P2Y receptors are present on the same cell of digestive organs, varying subtypes of P2Y receptors may have opposite or synergetic functions on the same cell. Recently, growing lines of evidence strongly suggest the involvement of P2Y receptors in the pathogenesis of several digestive diseases. In this review, we will focus on their important roles in the development of digestive inflammation and cancer. We anticipate that as the special subtypes of P2Y receptors are studied in depth, specific modulators for them will have good potentials to become promising new drugs to treat human digestive diseases in the near future.

  20. AMP Is an Adenosine A1 Receptor Agonist*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittiner, Joseph E.; Korboukh, Ilia; Hull-Ryde, Emily A.; Jin, Jian; Janzen, William P.; Frye, Stephen V.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous receptors for ATP, ADP, and adenosine exist; however, it is currently unknown whether a receptor for the related nucleotide adenosine 5′-monophosphate (AMP) exists. Using a novel cell-based assay to visualize adenosine receptor activation in real time, we found that AMP and a non-hydrolyzable AMP analog (deoxyadenosine 5′-monophosphonate, ACP) directly activated the adenosine A1 receptor (A1R). In contrast, AMP only activated the adenosine A2B receptor (A2BR) after hydrolysis to adenosine by ecto-5′-nucleotidase (NT5E, CD73) or prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP, ACPP). Adenosine and AMP were equipotent human A1R agonists in our real-time assay and in a cAMP accumulation assay. ACP also depressed cAMP levels in mouse cortical neurons through activation of endogenous A1R. Non-selective purinergic receptor antagonists (pyridoxalphosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid and suramin) did not block adenosine- or AMP-evoked activation. Moreover, mutation of His-251 in the human A1R ligand binding pocket reduced AMP potency without affecting adenosine potency. In contrast, mutation of a different binding pocket residue (His-278) eliminated responses to AMP and to adenosine. Taken together, our study indicates that the physiologically relevant nucleotide AMP is a full agonist of A1R. In addition, our study suggests that some of the physiological effects of AMP may be direct, and not indirect through ectonucleotidases that hydrolyze this nucleotide to adenosine. PMID:22215671

  1. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    therefore been acknowledged to be a third endogenous ligand at SRIF receptors. This review goes through mechanisms of signal transduction, pharmacology, and anatomical distribution of SRIF receptors. Structurally, SRIF receptors belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled (GPC) receptors, sharing....... The generation of knock-out (KO) mice, intended as a means to define the contributions made by individual receptor subtypes, necessarily marks but an approximation. Furthermore, we must now take into account the stunning complexity of receptor co-operation indicated by the observation of receptor homo......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  2. Somatostatin receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Lars Neisig; Stidsen, Carsten Enggaard; Hartmann, Bolette

    2003-01-01

    therefore been acknowledged to be a third endogenous ligand at SRIF receptors. This review goes through mechanisms of signal transduction, pharmacology, and anatomical distribution of SRIF receptors. Structurally, SRIF receptors belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled (GPC) receptors, sharing......- and heterodimerisation, let alone oligomerisation. Theoretically, this phenomenon adds a novel series of functional megareceptors/super-receptors, with varied pharmacological profiles, to the catalogue of monomeric receptor subtypes isolated and cloned in the past. SRIF analogues include both peptides and non......-peptides, receptor agonists and antagonists. Relatively long half lives, as compared to those of the endogenous ligands, have been paramount from the outset. Motivated by theoretical puzzles or the shortcomings of present-day diagnostics and therapy, investigators have also aimed to produce subtype...

  3. P2X7 receptor-deficient mice are susceptible to bone cancer pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Rikke Rie; Nielsen, Christian K.; Nasser, Arafat

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor is implicated in both neuropathic and inflammatory pain, and has been suggested as a possible target in pain treatment. However, the specific role of the P2X7 receptor in bone cancer pain is unknown. We demonstrated that BALB/cJ P2X7 receptor knockout (P2X7R KO) mice...... were susceptible to bone cancer pain and moreover had an earlier onset of pain-related behaviours compared with cancer-bearing, wild-type mice. Furthermore, acute treatment with the selective P2X7 receptor antagonist, A-438079, failed to alleviate pain-related behaviours in models of bone cancer pain...... with and without astrocyte activation (BALB/cJ or C3H mice inoculated with 4T1 mammary cancer cells or NCTC 2472 osteosarcoma cells, respectively), suggesting that astrocytic P2X7 receptors play a negligible role in bone cancer pain. The results support the hypothesis that bone cancer pain is a separate pain state...

  4. Proteoglycans act as cellular hepatitis delta virus attachment receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Lamas Longarela

    Full Text Available The hepatitis delta virus (HDV is a small, defective RNA virus that requires the presence of the hepatitis B virus (HBV for its life cycle. Worldwide more than 15 million people are co-infected with HBV and HDV. Although much effort has been made, the early steps of the HBV/HDV entry process, including hepatocyte attachment and receptor interaction are still not fully understood. Numerous possible cellular HBV/HDV binding partners have been described over the last years; however, so far only heparan sulfate proteoglycans have been functionally confirmed as cell-associated HBV attachment factors. Recently, it has been suggested that ionotrophic purinergic receptors (P2XR participate as receptors in HBV/HDV entry. Using the HBV/HDV susceptible HepaRG cell line and primary human hepatocytes (PHH, we here demonstrate that HDV entry into hepatocytes depends on the interaction with the glycosaminoglycan (GAG side chains of cellular heparan sulfate proteoglycans. We furthermore provide evidence that P2XR are not involved in HBV/HDV entry and that effects observed with inhibitors for these receptors are a consequence of their negative charge. HDV infection was abrogated by soluble GAGs and other highly sulfated compounds. Enzymatic removal of defined carbohydrate structures from the cell surface using heparinase III or the obstruction of GAG synthesis by sodium chlorate inhibited HDV infection of HepaRG cells. Highly sulfated P2XR antagonists blocked HBV/HDV infection of HepaRG cells and PHH. In contrast, no effect on HBV/HDV infection was found when uncharged P2XR antagonists or agonists were applied. In summary, HDV infection, comparable to HBV infection, requires binding to the carbohydrate side chains of hepatocyte-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycans as attachment receptors, while P2XR are not actively involved.

  5. P2X7 receptor cross-talk regulates ATP-induced pannexin 1 internalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Andrew K J; Swayne, Leigh Anne

    2017-06-13

    In the nervous system, extracellular ATP levels transiently increase in physiological and pathophysiological circumstances, effecting key signalling pathways in plasticity and inflammation through purinergic receptors. Pannexin 1 (Panx1) forms ion- and metabolite-permeable channels that mediate ATP release and are particularly enriched in the nervous system. Our recent study demonstrated that elevation of extracellular ATP triggers Panx1 internalization in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Notably, this effect was sensitive to inhibition of ionotropic P2X7 purinergic receptors (P2X7Rs). Here, we report our novel findings from the detailed investigation of the mechanism underlying P2X7R-Panx1 cross-talk in ATP-stimulated internalization. We demonstrate that extracellular ATP triggers and is required for the clustering of P2X7Rs and Panx1 on Neuro2a cells through an extracellular physical interaction with the Panx1 first extracellular loop (EL1). Importantly, disruption of P2X7R-Panx1 clustering by mutation of tryptophan 74 within the Panx1 EL1 inhibits Panx1 internalization. Notably, P2X7R-Panx1 clustering and internalization are independent of P2X7R-associated intracellular signalling pathways (Ca 2+ influx and Src activation). Further analysis revealed that cholesterol is required for ATP-stimulated P2X7R-Panx1 clustering at the cell periphery. Taken together, our data suggest that extracellular ATP induces and is required for Panx1 EL1-mediated, cholesterol-dependent P2X7R-Panx1 clustering and endocytosis. These findings have important implications for understanding the role of Panx1 in the nervous system and provide important new insights into Panx1-P2X7R cross-talk. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. P2X receptors in the cardiovascular system and their potential as therapeutic targets in disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralevic, Vera

    2015-01-01

    This review considers the expression and roles of P2X receptors in the cardiovascular system in health and disease and their potential as therapeutic targets. P2X receptors are ligand gated ion channels which are activated by the endogenous ligand ATP. They are formed from the assembly of three P2X subunit proteins from the complement of seven (P2X1-7), which can associate to form homomeric or heteromeric P2X receptors. The P2X1 receptor is widely expressed in the cardiovascular system, being located in the heart, in the smooth muscle of the majority of blood vessels and in platelets. P2X1 receptors expressed in blood vessels can be activated by ATP coreleased with noradrenaline as a sympathetic neurotransmitter, leading to smooth muscle depolarisation and contraction. There is evidence that the purinergic component of sympathetic neurotransmission is increased in hypertension, identifying P2X1 receptors as a possible therapeutic target in this disorder. P2X3 and P2X2/3 receptors are expressed on cardiac sympathetic neurones and may, through positive feedback of neuronal ATP at this prejunctional site, amplify sympathetic neurotransmission. Activation of P2X receptors expressed in the heart increases cardiac myocyte contractility, and an important role of the P2X4 receptor in this has been identified. Deletion of P2X4 receptors in the heart depresses contractile performance in models of heart failure, while overexpression of P2X4 receptors has been shown to be cardioprotective, thus P2X4 receptors may be therapeutic targets in the treatment of heart disease. P2X receptors have been identified on endothelial cells. Although immunoreactivity for all P2X1-7 receptor proteins has been shown on the endothelium, relatively little is known about their function, with the exception of the endothelial P2X4 receptor, which has been shown to mediate endothelium-dependent vasodilatation to ATP released during shear stress. The potential of P2X receptors as therapeutic targets

  7. Role of P2X7 Receptor in Pancreatic Cancer Progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giannuzzo, Andrea

    in the extracellular compartment. Among all the purinergic receptors, P2X7 receptor (P2X7R), with its peculiar double-faced role in both cell death and cell proliferation, has been shown to be involved in the progression of some types of cancer. Thus, the aim of our study was to investigate the possible role of P2X7R...... in PDAC behaviour in vitro and in vivo. We detected a higher P2X7R protein level in several human PDAC cells compared to a “normal” human pancreatic duct epithelial cell line, which localized mostly on the plasma membrane. From the functional point of view, we observed that a sustained activation of the P......2X7 receptor using ATP and BzATP (a more potent agonist) resulted in a cytotoxic effect, mainly ascribed to necrosis. The allosteric inhibition of the receptor led to a drastic reduction in cell proliferation in all PDAC cell lines. Moreover, P2X7R showed a crucial role in PDAC cell migration...

  8. Physical basis of apparent pore dilation of ATP-activated P2X receptor channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mufeng; Toombes, Gilman E S; Silberberg, Shai D; Swartz, Kenton J

    2015-11-01

    The selectivity of ion channels is fundamental for their roles in electrical and chemical signaling and in ion homeostasis. Although most ion channels exhibit stable ion selectivity, the prevailing view of purinergic P2X receptor channels, transient receptor potential V1 (TRPV1) channels and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) is that their ion conduction pores dilate upon prolonged activation. We investigated this mechanism in P2X receptors and found that the hallmark shift in equilibrium potential observed with prolonged channel activation does not result from pore dilation, but from time-dependent alterations in the concentration of intracellular ions. We derived a physical model to calculate ion concentration changes during patch-clamp recordings, which validated our experimental findings and provides a quantitative guideline for effectively controlling ion concentration. Our results have fundamental implications for understanding ion permeation and gating in P2X receptor channels, as well as more broadly for using patch-clamp techniques to study ion channels and neuronal excitability.

  9. Circadian ATP Release in Organotypic Cultures of the Rat Suprachiasmatic Nucleus Is Dependent on P2X7 and P2Y Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Svobodova

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The circadian rhythms in physiological and behavioral functions are driven by a pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN. The rhythms continue in constant darkness and depend on cell-cell communication between neurons and glia. The SCN astrocytes generate also a circadian rhythm in extracellular adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP accumulation, but molecular mechanisms that regulate ATP release are poorly understood. Here, we tested the hypothesis that ATP is released via the plasma membrane purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs and P2Y receptors (P2YRs which have been previously shown to be expressed in the SCN tissue at transcriptional level. We have investigated this hypothesis using SCN organotypic cultures, primary cultures of SCN astrocytes, ATP bioluminescent assays, immunohistochemistry, patch-clamping, and calcium imaging. We found that extracellular ATP accumulation in organotypic cultures followed a circadian rhythm, with a peak between 24:00 and 04:00 h, and the trough at ~12:00 h. ATP rhythm was inhibited by application of AZ10606120, A438079, and BBG, specific blockers of P2X7R, and potentiated by GW791343, a positive allosteric modulator of this receptor. Double-immunohistochemical staining revealed high expression of the P2X7R protein in astrocytes of SCN slices. PPADS, a non-specific P2 antagonist, and MRS2179, specific P2Y1R antagonist, also abolished ATP rhythm, whereas the specific P2X4R blocker 5-BDBD was not effective. The pannexin-1 hemichannel blocker carbenoxolone displayed a partial inhibitory effect. The P2Y1R agonist MRS2365, and the P2Y2R agonist MRS2768 potentiated ATP release in organotypic cultures and increase intracellular Ca2+ level in cultured astrocytes. Thus, SCN utilizes multiple purinergic receptor systems and pannexin-1 hemichannels to release ATP.

  10. Dynamic micro-organization of P2X7 receptors revealed by PALM based single particle tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amulya Nidhi Shrivastava

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine triphosphate (ATP-gated P2X7 receptors (P2X7Rs are members of the purinergic receptor family that are expressed in several cell types including neurons. A high concentration of ATP is required for the channel opening of P2X7Rs compared to other members of this receptor family. Recent work suggests that ATP binding to members of the P2X receptor family determines the diffusion and localization of these receptors on the plasma membrane of neurons. Here, we employed single particle tracking photoactivated localization microscopy (sptPALM to study the diffusion and ATP-dependence of rat P2X7Rs. Dendra2-tagged P2X7Rs were transfected in hippocampal neurons and imaged on proximal dendrites. Our results suggest the presence of two populations of P2X7Rs within the extra-synaptic membrane: a population composed of rapidly diffusing receptors and one stabilized within nanoclusters (~100 nm diameter. P2X7R trajectories were rarely observed at synaptic sites. P2X7R mutations in the ATP-binding site (K64A or the conserved phosphorylation site (K17A resulted in faster- and slower-diffusing receptors, respectively. Furthermore, ATP differentially accelerated wild type and K17A-mutant receptors but not K64A-mutant receptors. Our results indicate that receptor conformation plays a critical role in regulating ATP-mediated changes in P2X7R diffusion and micro-organization.

  11. Menthol evokes Ca2+ signals and induces oxidative stress independently of the presence of TRPM8 (menthol receptor in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Nazıroğlu

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Menthol is a naturally occurring monoterpene alcohol possessing remarkable biological properties including antipruritic, analgesic, antiseptic, anti-inflammatory and cooling effects. Here, we examined the menthol-evoked Ca2+ signals in breast and prostate cancer cell lines. The effect of menthol (50–500 µM was predicted to be mediated by the transient receptor potential ion channel melastatin subtype 8 (TRPM8. However, the intensity of menthol-evoked Ca2+ signals did not correlate with the expression levels of TRPM8 in breast and prostate cancer cells indicating a TRPM8-independent signaling pathway. Menthol-evoked Ca2+ signals were analyzed in detail in Du 145 prostate cancer cells, as well as in CRISPR/Cas9 TRPM8-knockout Du 145 cells. Menthol (500 µM induced Ca2+ oscillations in both cell lines, thus independent of TRPM8, which were however dependent on the production of inositol trisphosphate. Results based on pharmacological tools point to an involvement of the purinergic pathway in menthol-evoked Ca2+ responses. Finally, menthol (50–500 µM decreased cell viability and induced oxidative stress independently of the presence of TRPM8 channels, despite that temperature-evoked TRPM8-mediated inward currents were significantly decreased in TRPM8-knockout Du 145 cells compared to wild type Du 145 cells. Keywords: Ca2+ oscillations, TRPM8, Menthol, Oxidative stress, Purinergic signaling

  12. Uncaria tomentosa extract alters the catabolism of adenine nucleotides and expression of ecto-5'-nucleotidase/CD73 and P2X7 and A1 receptors in the MDA-MB-231 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Karen Freitas; Gutierres, Jessié Martins; Pillat, Micheli Mainardi; Rissi, Vitor Braga; Santos Araújo, Maria do Carmo Dos; Bertol, Gustavo; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard Dias; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina; Morsch, Vera Maria

    2016-12-24

    Uncaria tomentosa (Willd.) DC. (Rubiaceae) (Ut), also known as cat's claw, is a woody liana widely spread throughout the Amazon rainforest of Central and South America, containing many chemical constituents such as oxindole alkaloids, which are responsible for various biological activities. Since ancient times, the indigenous people of Peru have used it as a bark infusion for the treatment of a wide range of health problems gastric ulcers, arthritis and rheumatism. Recently, Ut is distributed worldwide and used as an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory herbal remedy. Additionally, U. tomentosa also has antitumural activity. However, little is known about the action of U. tomentosa on the purinergic system mechanisms, which is involved in tumor progression. Considering the pharmacological properties of U. tomentosa, we sought to evaluate the hydroalcoholic extract U tomentosa is able to influence the purinergic system in breast cancer cells, MDA-MB-231. Through the activity and expression of ectonucleotidases (NTPDase - CD39; Ecto-5'-nucleotidase - CD73) and purinergic repceptores (P2X7 and A1). A hydroalcoholic extract was prepared in two concentrations, 250 and 500μg/mL. (Ut250; Ut500). The effect of these concentrations on the activity and expression of ectonucleotidases, as well as on the density of purinergic receptors were investigated in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Cells were treated with the hydroalcoholic extract of Uncaria tomentosa and/or doxorubicin (Doxo 1μM; Ut250+Doxo; Ut500+Doxo) for 24h. Although the results were not significant for the hydrolysis of the ATP, they presented an increase in the ADP hydrolysis in the Ut500+Doxo group when compared to the control group. Additionally, the activity of 5'-nucleotidase was inhibited in all groups when compared with the untreated group of cells. Inhibition of the enzyme was more evident in groups with U. tomentosa per se. The expression of CD39 was increased in the Ut250 and Ut250+Doxo groups when

  13. Enhancement of the response to purinergic agonists in P2Y1 transfected 1321N1 cells by antagonists suramin and PPADS

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Colin A; Charlton, Steven J; Boarder, Michael R

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that both suramin and pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′, 4′ disulphonic acid (PPADS) act as antagonists at transfected P2Y1 receptors. Here we show that under certain experimental conditions these two P2 antagonists can enhance the response to agonists acting at these receptors.The expression of either P2Y1 or P2Y2 receptors in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells results, on a change of medium, in an elevation of basal (no added agonist) accumulation of [3H]-inositol(poly...

  14. The antipsychotic trifluoperazine reduces marble-burying behavior in mice via D2 and 5-HT2A receptors: Implications for obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egashira, Nobuaki; Kubota, Naoki; Goto, Yu; Watanabe, Takuya; Kubota, Kaori; Katsurabayashi, Shutaro; Iwasaki, Katsunori

    2018-02-01

    Trifluoperazine, a typical antipsychotic drug, not only antagonizes dopamine D 2 receptors but also enhances serotonin 5-HT 2 receptor-mediated behavior. Moreover, trifluoperazine suppresses human purinergic receptor P2X7 responses and calmodulin. However, the effect of trifluoperazine on marble-burying behavior, which has been considered an animal model of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), has not been studied. Here, we examined the effect of trifluoperazine on marble-burying behavior in mice. Oral administration of paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor, significantly reduced marble-burying behavior without affecting total locomotor activity. Similar results were obtained for trifluoperazine (3mg/kg). The D 2 receptor agonist, quinpirole (0.03mg/kg, intraperitoneal [i.p.]), and 5-HT 2A receptor antagonist, ketanserin (0.3mg/kg, i.p.), significantly counteracted this reduction of marble-burying behavior by trifluoperazine. These results show that trifluoperazine reduces marble-burying behavior via D 2 and 5-HT 2A receptors, and may be a useful drug for the treatment of OCD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The expression of Toll-like receptor 4, 7 and co-receptors in neurochemical sub-populations of rat trigeminal ganglion sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helley, M P; Abate, W; Jackson, S K; Bennett, J H; Thompson, S W N

    2015-12-03

    The recent discovery that mammalian nociceptors express Toll-like receptors (TLRs) has raised the possibility that these cells directly detect and respond to pathogens with implications for either direct nociceptor activation or sensitization. A range of neuronal TLRs have been identified, however a detailed description regarding the distribution of expression of these receptors within sub-populations of sensory neurons is lacking. There is also some debate as to the composition of the TLR4 receptor complex on sensory neurons. Here we use a range of techniques to quantify the expression of TLR4, TLR7 and some associated molecules within neurochemically-identified sub-populations of trigeminal (TG) and dorsal root (DRG) ganglion sensory neurons. We also detail the pattern of expression and co-expression of two isoforms of lysophosphatidylcholine acyltransferase (LPCAT), a phospholipid remodeling enzyme previously shown to be involved in the lipopolysaccharide-dependent TLR4 response in monocytes, within sensory ganglia. Immunohistochemistry shows that both TLR4 and TLR7 preferentially co-localize with transient receptor potential vallinoid 1 (TRPV1) and purinergic receptor P2X ligand-gated ion channel 3 (P2X3), markers of nociceptor populations, within both TG and DRG. A gene expression profile shows that TG sensory neurons express a range of TLR-associated molecules. LPCAT1 is expressed by a proportion of both nociceptors and non-nociceptive neurons. LPCAT2 immunostaining is absent from neuronal profiles within both TG and DRG and is confined to non-neuronal cell types under naïve conditions. Together, our results show that nociceptors express the molecular machinery required to directly respond to pathogenic challenge independently from the innate immune system. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of muscarinic and P2X receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle of the rat bladder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Ogoda

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Muscarinic and purinergic (P2X receptors play critical roles in bladder urothelium under physiological and pathological conditions. Aim of present study was to characterize these receptors in rat bladder urothelium and detrusor muscle using selective radioligands of [N-methyl-3H]scopolamine methyl chloride ([3H]NMS and αβ-methylene ATP [2,8-3H]tetrasodium salt ([3H]αβ-MeATP. Similar binding parameters for each radioligand were observed in urothelium and detrusor muscle. Pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl-4-piperidinyl diphenylacetate (4-DAMP mustard mustard revealed co-existence of M2 and M3 receptors, with the number of M2 receptors being larger in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. Intravesical administration of imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O (active metabolite of propiverine displayed significant binding of muscarinic receptors in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. The treatment with cyclophosphamide (CYP or resiniferatoxin (RTX resulted in a significant decrease in maximal number of binding sites (Bmax for [3H]NMS and/or [3H]αβ-MeATP in the urothelium and detrusor muscle. These results demonstrated that 1 pharmacological characteristics of muscarinic and P2X receptors in rat bladder urothelium were similar to those in the detrusor muscle, 2 that densities of these receptors were significantly altered by pretreatments with CYP and RTX, and 3 that these receptors may be pharmacologically affected by imidafenacin and Dpr-P-4 (N → O which are excreted in the urine.

  17. P2Y1 receptor inhibits GABA transport through a calcium signalling-dependent mechanism in rat cortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Pedro F; Vaz, Sandra H; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytes express a variety of purinergic (P2) receptors, involved in astrocytic communication through fast increases in [Ca(2+) ]i . Of these, the metabotropic ATP receptors (P2Y) regulate cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels through the PLC-PKC pathway. GABA transporters are a substrate for a number of Ca(2+) -related kinases, raising the possibility that calcium signalling in astrocytes impact the control of extracellular levels of the major inhibitory transmitter in the brain. To access this possibility we tested the influence of P2Y receptors upon GABA transport into astrocytes. Mature primary cortical astroglial-enriched cultures expressed functional P2Y receptors, as evaluated through Ca(2+) imaging, being P2Y1 the predominant P2Y receptor subtype. ATP (100 μM, for 1 min) caused an inhibition of GABA transport through either GAT-1 or GAT-3 transporters, decreasing the Vmax kinetic constant. ATP-induced inhibition of GATs activity was still evident in the presence of adenosine deaminase, precluding an adenosine-mediated effect. This, was mimicked by a specific agonist for the P2Y1,12,13 receptor (2-MeSADP). The effect of 2-MeSADP on GABA transport was blocked by the P2 (PPADS) and P2Y1 selective (MRS2179) receptor antagonists, as well as by the PLC inhibitor (U73122). 2-MeSADP failed to inhibit GABA transport in astrocytes where intracellular calcium had been chelated (BAPTA-AM) or where calcium stores were depleted (α-cyclopiazonic acid, CPA). In conclusion, P2Y1 receptors in astrocytes inhibit GABA transport through a mechanism dependent of P2Y1 -mediated calcium signalling, suggesting that astrocytic calcium signalling, which occurs as a consequence of neuronal firing, may operate a negative feedback loop to enhance extracellular levels of GABA. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Glutamate receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Anders S; Geballe, Matthew T; Snyder, James P

    2006-01-01

    Fast excitatory synaptic transmission in the CNS relies almost entirely on the neurotransmitter glutamate and its family of ion channel receptors. An appreciation of the coupling between agonist binding and channel opening has advanced rapidly during the past five years, largely as a result of ne...

  19. Human Adenosine A2A Receptor: Molecular Mechanism of Ligand Binding and Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byron Carpenter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine receptors (ARs comprise the P1 class of purinergic receptors and belong to the largest family of integral membrane proteins in the human genome, the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. ARs are classified into four subtypes, A1, A2A, A2B, and A3, which are all activated by extracellular adenosine, and play central roles in a broad range of physiological processes, including sleep regulation, angiogenesis and modulation of the immune system. ARs are potential therapeutic targets in a variety of pathophysiological conditions, including sleep disorders, cancer, and dementia, which has made them important targets for structural biology. Over a decade of research and innovation has culminated with the publication of more than 30 crystal structures of the human adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR, making it one of the best structurally characterized GPCRs at the atomic level. In this review we analyze the structural data reported for A2AR that described for the first time the binding of mode of antagonists, including newly developed drug candidates, synthetic and endogenous agonists, sodium ions and an engineered G protein. These structures have revealed the key conformational changes induced upon agonist and G protein binding that are central to signal transduction by A2AR, and have highlighted both similarities and differences in the activation mechanism of this receptor compared to other class A GPCRs. Finally, comparison of A2AR with the recently solved structures of A1R has provided the first structural insight into the molecular determinants of ligand binding specificity in different AR subtypes.

  20. Muscle afferent receptors engaged in augmented sympathetic responsiveness in peripheral artery disease

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    Jianhua eLi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The exercise pressor reflex (EPR is a neural control mechanism responsible for the cardiovascular responses to exercise. As exercise is initiated, thin fiber muscle afferent nerves are activated by mechanical and metabolic stimuli arising in the contracting muscles. This leads to reflex increases in arterial blood pressure and heart rate primarily through activation of sympathetic nerve activity (SNA. Studies of humans and animals have indicated that the EPR is exaggerated in a number of cardiovascular diseases. For the last several years, studies have specifically employed a rodent model to examine the mechanisms at receptor and cellular levels by which responses of SNA and blood pressure to static exercise are heightened in peripheral artery disease (PAD, one of the most common cardiovascular disorders. A rat model of this disease has well been established. Specifically, femoral artery occlusion is used to study intermittent claudication that is observed in human PAD. The receptors on thin fiber muscle afferents that are engaged in this disease include transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1, purinergic P2X and acid sensing ion channel (ASIC. The role played by nerve growth factor (NGF in regulating those sensory receptors in the processing of amplified EPR was also investigated. The purpose of this review is to focus on a theme namely that PAD accentuates autonomic reflex responses to exercise and further address regulatory mechanisms leading to abnormal sympathetic responsiveness. This review will present some of recent results in regard with several receptors in muscle sensory neurons in contribution to augmented autonomic reflex responses in PAD. Review of the findings from recent studies would lead to a better understanding in integrated processing of sympathetic nervous system in PAD.

  1. Deciphering the regulation of P2X4 receptor channel gating by ivermectin using Markov models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Mackay

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The P2X4 receptor (P2X4R is a member of a family of purinergic channels activated by extracellular ATP through three orthosteric binding sites and allosterically regulated by ivermectin (IVM, a broad-spectrum antiparasitic agent. Treatment with IVM increases the efficacy of ATP to activate P2X4R, slows both receptor desensitization during sustained ATP application and receptor deactivation after ATP washout, and makes the receptor pore permeable to NMDG+, a large organic cation. Previously, we developed a Markov model based on the presence of one IVM binding site, which described some effects of IVM on rat P2X4R. Here we present two novel models, both with three IVM binding sites. The simpler one-layer model can reproduce many of the observed time series of evoked currents, but does not capture well the short time scales of activation, desensitization, and deactivation. A more complex two-layer model can reproduce the transient changes in desensitization observed upon IVM application, the significant increase in ATP-induced current amplitudes at low IVM concentrations, and the modest increase in the unitary conductance. In addition, the two-layer model suggests that this receptor can exist in a deeply inactivated state, not responsive to ATP, and that its desensitization rate can be altered by each of the three IVM binding sites. In summary, this study provides a detailed analysis of P2X4R kinetics and elucidates the orthosteric and allosteric mechanisms regulating its channel gating.

  2. Ligand-dependent and -independent regulation of human hepatic sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase acid-like 3A expression by pregnane X receptor and crosstalk with liver X receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeske, Judith; Bitter, Andreas; Thasler, Wolfgang E; Weiss, Thomas S; Schwab, Matthias; Burk, Oliver

    2017-07-15

    Pregnane X receptor (PXR) mainly regulates xenobiotic metabolism and detoxification. Additionally, it exerts pleiotropic effects on liver physiology, which in large parts depend on transrepression of other liver-enriched transcription factors. Based on the hypothesis that lower expression levels of PXR may reduce the extent of this inhibition, an exploratory genome-wide transcriptomic profiling was performed using HepG2 cell clones with different expression levels of PXR. This screen and confirmatory real-time RT-PCR identified sphingomyelin phosphodiesterase acid-like (SMPDL) 3A, a novel nucleotide phosphodiesterase and phosphoramidase, as being up-regulated by PXR-deficiency. Transient siRNA-mediated knock-down of PXR in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes similarly induced mRNA up-regulation, which translated into increased intracellular and secreted extracellular protein levels. Interestingly, ligand-dependent PXR activation also induced SMPDL3A in HepG2 cells and primary human hepatocytes. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated binding of PXR to the previously identified liver X receptor (LXR)-binding DR4 motif as well as to an adjacent ER8 motif in intron 1 of SMPDL3A. Constitutive binding of the unliganded receptor to the intron 1 chromatin indicated ligand-independent repression of SMPDL3A by PXR. Transient transfection and reporter gene analysis confirmed the specific role of these motifs in PXR- and LXR-dependent activation of the SMPDL3A intronic enhancer. PXR inhibited LXR mainly by competition for binding sites. In conclusion, this study describes that a decrease in PXR expression levels and ligand-dependent activation of PXR and LXR increase hepatic SMPDL3A levels, which possibly connects these receptors to hepatic purinergic signaling and phospholipid metabolism and may result in drug-drug interactions with phosphoramidate pro-drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lipopolysaccharide Inhibits the Channel Activity of the P2X7 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Leiva-Salcedo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R plays an important role during the immune response, participating in several events such as cytokine release, apoptosis, and necrosis. The bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS is one of the strongest stimuli of the immune response, and it has been shown that P2X7R activation can modulate LPS-induced responses. Moreover, a C-terminal binding site for LPS has been proposed. In order to evaluate if LPS can directly modulate the activity of the P2X7R, we tested several signaling pathways associated with P2X7R activation in HEK293 cells that do not express the TLR-4 receptor. We found that LPS alone was unable to induce any P2X7R-related activity, suggesting that the P2X7R is not directly activated by the endotoxin. On the other hand, preapplication of LPS inhibited ATP-induced currents, intracellular calcium increase, and ethidium bromide uptake and had no effect on ERK activation in HEK293 cells. In splenocytes-derived T-regulatory cells, in which ATP-induced apoptosis is driven by the P2X7R, LPS inhibited ATP-induced apoptosis. Altogether, these results demonstrate that LPS modulates the activity of the P2X7R and suggest that this effect could be of physiological relevance.

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Inhibits the Channel Activity of the P2X7 Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiva-Salcedo, Elias; Coddou, Claudio; Rodríguez, Felipe E.; Penna, Antonello; Lopez, Ximena; Neira, Tanya; Fernández, Ricardo; Imarai, Mónica; Rios, Miguel; Escobar, Jorge; Montoya, Margarita; Huidobro-Toro, J. Pablo; Escobar, Alejandro; Acuña-Castillo, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays an important role during the immune response, participating in several events such as cytokine release, apoptosis, and necrosis. The bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the strongest stimuli of the immune response, and it has been shown that P2X7R activation can modulate LPS-induced responses. Moreover, a C-terminal binding site for LPS has been proposed. In order to evaluate if LPS can directly modulate the activity of the P2X7R, we tested several signaling pathways associated with P2X7R activation in HEK293 cells that do not express the TLR-4 receptor. We found that LPS alone was unable to induce any P2X7R-related activity, suggesting that the P2X7R is not directly activated by the endotoxin. On the other hand, preapplication of LPS inhibited ATP-induced currents, intracellular calcium increase, and ethidium bromide uptake and had no effect on ERK activation in HEK293 cells. In splenocytes-derived T-regulatory cells, in which ATP-induced apoptosis is driven by the P2X7R, LPS inhibited ATP-induced apoptosis. Altogether, these results demonstrate that LPS modulates the activity of the P2X7R and suggest that this effect could be of physiological relevance. PMID:21941410

  5. Enhancement of the response to purinergic agonists in P2Y1 transfected 1321N1 cells by antagonists suramin and PPADS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C A; Charlton, S J; Boarder, M R

    1997-03-01

    1. We have previously shown that both suramin and pyridoxal-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2',4' disulphonic acid (PPADS) act as antagonists at transfected P2Y1 receptors. Here we show that under certain experimental conditions these two P2 antagonists can enhance the response to agonists acting at these receptors. 2. The expression of either P2Y1 or P2Y2 receptors in 1321N1 human astrocytoma cells results, on a change of medium, in an elevation of basal (no added agonist) accumulation of [3H]-inositol(poly)phosphates([3H]-InsPx) compared to cells not expressing these receptors. This elevation is much greater in P2Y1 transfectants than in P2Y, transfectants. 3. Both PPADS and suramin reduced this basal level of [3H]-InsPx accumulation in the P2Y1 expressing cells. 4. When a protocol was used which required changing the culture medium, antagonists were added at a concentration which reduced the basal accumulation by about 50%, there was a significant stimulation in response to increasing concentrations of 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-triphosphate (2MeSATP), in the absence of antagonists there was no significant effect of the agonist. 5. However, when 2MeSATP was added in the absence of a change of medium and with no antagonist present, there was a several fold increase in [3H]-InsPx accumulation. These results show that a release of endogenous agonist activity (possibly ATP/ADP) from the P2Y1 expressing cells can create conditions in which a response to an agonist such as 2MeSATP can only be seen in the presence of a competitive antagonist.

  6. Anoctamin 6 mediates effects essential for innate immunity downstream of P2X7 receptors in macrophages

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    Ousingsawat, Jiraporn; Wanitchakool, Podchanart; Kmit, Arthur; Romao, Ana M.; Jantarajit, Walailak; Schreiber, Rainer; Kunzelmann, Karl

    2015-02-01

    Purinergic P2X7 receptors (P2X7R) are fundamental to innate immune response. In macrophages, transient stimulation of P2X7R activates several transport mechanisms and induces the scrambling of phospholipids with subsequent membrane blebbing and apoptosis. These processes support phagocytosis and subsequent killing of phagocytosed bacteria. Here we demonstrate that the stimulation of P2X7 receptors activates anoctamin 6 (ANO6, TMEM16F), a protein that functions as Ca2+ dependent phospholipid scramblase and Ca2+-activated Cl- channel. Inhibition or knockdown of ANO6 attenuates ATP-induced cell shrinkage, cell migration and phospholipid scrambling. In mouse macrophages, Ano6 produces large ion currents by stimulation of P2X7 receptors and contributes to ATP-induced membrane blebbing and apoptosis, which is largely reduced in macrophages from Ano6-/- mice. ANO6 supports bacterial phagocytosis and killing by mouse and human THP-1 macrophages. Our data demonstrate that anoctamin 6 is an essential component of the immune defense by macrophages.

  7. Co-Expression of Wild-Type P2X7R with Gln460Arg Variant Alters Receptor Function.

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    Fernando Aprile-Garcia

    Full Text Available The P2X7 receptor is a member of the P2X family of ligand-gated ion channels. A single-nucleotide polymorphism leading to a glutamine (Gln by arginine (Arg substitution at codon 460 of the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R has been associated with mood disorders. No change in function (loss or gain has been described for this SNP so far. Here we show that although the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant per se is not compromised in its function, co-expression of wild-type P2X7R with P2X7R-Gln460Arg impairs receptor function with respect to calcium influx, channel currents and intracellular signaling in vitro. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation and FRET studies show that the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant physically interacts with P2X7R-WT. Specific silencing of either the normal or polymorphic variant rescues the heterozygous loss of function phenotype and restores normal function. The described loss of function due to co-expression, unique for mutations in the P2RX7 gene so far, explains the mechanism by which the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant affects the normal function of the channel and may represent a mechanism of action for other mutations.

  8. Co-Expression of Wild-Type P2X7R with Gln460Arg Variant Alters Receptor Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile-Garcia, Fernando; Metzger, Michael W; Paez-Pereda, Marcelo; Stadler, Herbert; Acuña, Matías; Liberman, Ana C; Senin, Sergio A; Gerez, Juan; Hoijman, Esteban; Refojo, Damian; Mitkovski, Mišo; Panhuysen, Markus; Stühmer, Walter; Holsboer, Florian; Deussing, Jan M; Arzt, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    The P2X7 receptor is a member of the P2X family of ligand-gated ion channels. A single-nucleotide polymorphism leading to a glutamine (Gln) by arginine (Arg) substitution at codon 460 of the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has been associated with mood disorders. No change in function (loss or gain) has been described for this SNP so far. Here we show that although the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant per se is not compromised in its function, co-expression of wild-type P2X7R with P2X7R-Gln460Arg impairs receptor function with respect to calcium influx, channel currents and intracellular signaling in vitro. Moreover, co-immunoprecipitation and FRET studies show that the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant physically interacts with P2X7R-WT. Specific silencing of either the normal or polymorphic variant rescues the heterozygous loss of function phenotype and restores normal function. The described loss of function due to co-expression, unique for mutations in the P2RX7 gene so far, explains the mechanism by which the P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant affects the normal function of the channel and may represent a mechanism of action for other mutations.

  9. Presynaptic membrane receptors in acetylcholine release modulation in the neuromuscular synapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomàs, Josep; Santafé, Manel M; Garcia, Neus; Lanuza, Maria A; Tomàs, Marta; Besalduch, Núria; Obis, Teresa; Priego, Mercedes; Hurtado, Erica

    2014-05-01

    Over the past few years, we have studied, in the mammalian neuromuscular junction (NMJ), the local involvement in transmitter release of the presynaptic muscarinic ACh autoreceptors (mAChRs), purinergic adenosine autoreceptors (P1Rs), and trophic factor receptors (TFRs; for neurotrophins and trophic cytokines) during development and in the adult. At any given moment, the way in which a synapse works is largely the logical outcome of the confluence of these (and other) metabotropic signalling pathways on intracellular kinases, which phosphorylate protein targets and materialize adaptive changes. We propose an integrated interpretation of the complementary function of these receptors in the adult NMJ. The activity of a given receptor group can modulate a given combination of spontaneous, evoked, and activity-dependent release characteristics. For instance, P1Rs can conserve resources by limiting spontaneous quantal leak of ACh (an A1 R action) and protect synapse function, because stimulation with adenosine reduces the magnitude of depression during repetitive activity. The overall outcome of the mAChRs seems to contribute to upkeep of spontaneous quantal output of ACh, save synapse function by decreasing the extent of evoked release (mainly an M2 action), and reduce depression. We have also identified several links among P1Rs, mAChRs, and TFRs. We found a close dependence between mAChR and some TFRs and observed that the muscarinic group has to operate correctly if the tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (trkB) is also to operate correctly, and vice versa. Likewise, the functional integrity of mAChRs depends on P1Rs operating normally. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. The enzymatic activity of the VEGFR2 receptor for the biosynthesis of dinucleoside polyphosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Vera; Schulz, Anna; Kretschmer, Axel; Mischak, Harald; Boehringer, Falko; van der Giet, Markus; Janke, Doreen; Schuchardt, Mirjam; Herwig, Ralf; Zidek, Walter; Jankowski, Joachim

    2013-09-01

    The group of dinucleoside polyphosphates encompasses a large number of molecules consisting of two nucleosides which are connected by a phosphate chain of variable length. While the receptors activated by dinucleoside polyphosphates as well as their degradation have been studied in detail, its biosynthesis has not been elucidated so far. Since endothelial cells released the dinucleoside polyphosphate uridine adenosine tetraphosphate (Up4A), we tested cytosolic proteins of human endothelial cells obtained from dermal vessels elicited for enzymatic activity. When incubated with ADP and UDP, these cells showed increasing concentrations of Up4A. The underlying enzyme was isolated by chromatography and the mass spectrometric analysis revealed that the enzymatic activity was caused by the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2). Since VEGFR2 but neither VEGFR1 nor VEGFR3 were capable to synthesise dinucleoside polyphosphates, Tyr-1175 of VEGFR2 is most likely essential for the enzymatic activity of interest. Further, VEGFR2-containing cells like HepG2, THP-1 and RAW264.7 were capable of synthesising dinucleoside polyphosphates. VEGFR2-transfected HEK 293T/17 but not native HEK 293T/17 cells synthesised dinucleoside polyphosphates in vivo too. The simultaneous biosynthesis of dinucleoside polyphosphates could amplify the response to VEGF, since dinucleoside polyphosphates induce cellular growth via P2Y purinergic receptors. Thus the biosynthesis of dinucleoside polyphosphates by VEGFR2 may enhance the proliferative response to VEGF. Given that VEGFR2 is primarily expressed in endothelial cells, the biosynthesis of dinucleoside polyphosphates is mainly located in the vascular system. Since the vasculature is also the main site of action of dinucleoside polyphosphates, activating vascular purinoceptors, blood vessels appear as an autocrine system with respect to dinucleoside polyphosphates. We conclude that VEGFR2 receptor is capable of synthesising

  11. Presence of Cleaved Synaptosomal-Associated Protein-25 and Decrease of Purinergic Receptors P2X3 in the Bladder Urothelium Influence Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin Treatment for Overactive Bladder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsin-Tzu; Chen, Sung-Ho; Chancellor, Michael B; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injection and Lipotoxin (liposomes with 200 U of BoNT-A) instillation target different proteins, including P2X3, synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A, and SNAP-25, in the bladder mucosa, leading to different treatment outcomes. This was a retrospective study performed in a tertiary teaching hospital. We evaluated the clinical results of 27 OAB patients treated with intravesical BoNT-A injection (n = 16) or Lipotoxin instillation (n = 11). Seven controls were treated with saline. Patients were injected with 100 U of BoNT-A or Lipotoxinin a single intravesical instillation. The patients enrolled in this study all had bladder biopsies performed at baseline and one month after BoNT-A therapy. Treatment outcome was measured by the decreases in urgency and frequency episodes at 1 month. The functional protein expressions in the urothelium were measured at baseline and after 1 month. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and ordinal logistic regression were used to compare the treatment outcomes. Both BoNT-A injection and Lipotoxin instillation treatments effectively decreased the frequency of urgency episodes in OAB patients. Lipotoxin instillation did not increase post-void residual volume. BoNT-A injection effectively cleaved SNAP-25 (p < 0.01). Liposome encapsulated BoNT-A decreased urothelial P2X3 expression in the five responders (p = 0.04), while SNAP-25 was not significantly cleaved. The results of this study provide a possible mechanism for the therapeutic effects of BoNT-A for the treatment of OAB via different treatment forms. BoNT-A and Lipotoxin treatments effectively decreased the frequency of urgency episodes in patients with OAB.

  12. Presence of Cleaved Synaptosomal-Associated Protein-25 and Decrease of Purinergic Receptors P2X3 in the Bladder Urothelium Influence Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin Treatment for Overactive Bladder Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Tzu Liu

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A injection and Lipotoxin (liposomes with 200 U of BoNT-A instillation target different proteins, including P2X3, synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A, and SNAP-25, in the bladder mucosa, leading to different treatment outcomes.This was a retrospective study performed in a tertiary teaching hospital. We evaluated the clinical results of 27 OAB patients treated with intravesical BoNT-A injection (n = 16 or Lipotoxin instillation (n = 11. Seven controls were treated with saline. Patients were injected with 100 U of BoNT-A or Lipotoxinin a single intravesical instillation. The patients enrolled in this study all had bladder biopsies performed at baseline and one month after BoNT-A therapy. Treatment outcome was measured by the decreases in urgency and frequency episodes at 1 month. The functional protein expressions in the urothelium were measured at baseline and after 1 month. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and ordinal logistic regression were used to compare the treatment outcomes.Both BoNT-A injection and Lipotoxin instillation treatments effectively decreased the frequency of urgency episodes in OAB patients. Lipotoxin instillation did not increase post-void residual volume. BoNT-A injection effectively cleaved SNAP-25 (p < 0.01. Liposome encapsulated BoNT-A decreased urothelial P2X3 expression in the five responders (p = 0.04, while SNAP-25 was not significantly cleaved.The results of this study provide a possible mechanism for the therapeutic effects of BoNT-A for the treatment of OAB via different treatment forms. BoNT-A and Lipotoxin treatments effectively decreased the frequency of urgency episodes in patients with OAB.

  13. Nanoparticle-Encapsulated Curcumin Inhibits Diabetic Neuropathic Pain Involving the P2Y12 Receptor in the Dorsal Root Ganglia

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    Tianyu Jia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic peripheral neuropathy results in diabetic neuropathic pain (DNP. Satellite glial cells (SGCs enwrap the neuronal soma in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG. The purinergic 2 (P2 Y12 receptor is expressed on SGCs in the DRG. SGC activation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of DNP. Curcumin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. Because curcumin has poor metabolic stability in vivo and low bioavailability, nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin was used to improve its targeting and bioavailability. In the present study, our aim was to investigate the effects of nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin on DNP mediated by the P2Y12 receptor on SGCs in the rat DRG. Diabetic peripheral neuropathy increased the expression levels of the P2Y12 receptor on SGCs in the DRG and enhanced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with diabetes mellitus (DM. Up-regulation of the P2Y12 receptor in SGCs in the DRG increased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Up-regulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β and connexin43 (Cx43 resulted in mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with DM. The nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin decreased up-regulated IL-1β and Cx43 expression and reduced levels of phosphorylated-Akt (p-Akt in the DRG of rats with DM. The up-regulation of P2Y12 on SGCs and the up-regulation of the IL-1β and Cx43 in the DRG indicated the activation of SGCs in the DRG. The nano-curcumin treatment inhibited the activation of SGCs accompanied by its anti-inflammatory effect to decrease the up-regulated CGRP expression in the DRG neurons. Therefore, the nanoparticle-encapsulated curcumin treatment decreased the up-regulation of the P2Y12 receptor on SGCs in the DRG and decreased mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats with DM.

  14. Effect of electroacupuncture on the cervicospinal P2X7 receptor/fractalkine/CX3CR1 signaling pathway in a rat neck-incision pain model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Y H; Li, C W; Wang, J Y; Tan, L H; Duanmu, C L; Jing, X H; Chang, X R; Liu, J L

    2017-06-01

    Increasing evidence supports that acupuncture intervention is an effective approach for intraoperative and postoperative pain. Neuron-microglia crosstalk, mediated by the purinergic P2X7 receptor (R)/fractalkine/CX3CR1 cascade in the spinal cord dorsal horn, plays a pivotal role in pain processing. However, its involvement in the analgesic effect of electroacupuncture (EA) remains unclear. In this study, a rat neck-incision pain model was established by making a longitudinal incision along the midline of the neck and subsequent repeated mechanical stimulation. EA stimulation was applied to bilateral LI18, LI4-PC6, or ST36-GB34. The thermal pain threshold, cervicospinal ATP concentration, expression levels of purinergic P2XR and P2YR subunits mRNAs, and fractalkine, CX3CR1 and p38 MAPK proteins, were detected separately. The neck incision induced strong thermal hyperalgesia and upregulation of spinal ATP within 48 h. No significant change was found in thermal hyperalgesia after a single session of EA intervention. However, a single session of EA dramatically enhanced the neck incision-induced upregulation of ATP and upregulated the expression of P2X7R, which was reversed by two sessions of EA. Two sessions of EA at bilateral LI18 or LI4-PC6 attenuated hyperalgesia significantly, accompanied with downregulation of P2X7R/fractalkine/ CX3CR1 signaling after three sessions of EA. EA stimulation of LI18 or LI4-PC6 alleviates thermal hyperalgesia in neck-incision pain rats, which may be associated with its effects in regulating the neck incision-induced increase of ATP and P2X7R and subsequently suppressing fractalkine/CX3CR1 signaling in the cervical spinal cord.

  15. The role of the P2X7 receptor in murine cutaneous leishmaniasis: aspects of inflammation and parasite control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figliuolo, Vanessa Ribeiro; Chaves, Suzana Passos; Savio, Luiz Eduardo Baggio; Thorstenberg, Maria Luiza Prates; Machado Salles, Érika; Takiya, Christina Maeda; D'Império-Lima, Maria Regina; de Matos Guedes, Herbert Leonel; Rossi-Bergmann, Bartira; Coutinho-Silva, Robson

    2017-06-01

    Leishmania amazonensis is the etiological agent of diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis. The immunopathology of leishmaniasis caused by L. amazonensis infection is dependent on the pathogenic role of effector CD4 + T cells. Purinergic signalling has been implicated in resistance to infection by different intracellular parasites. In this study, we evaluated the role of the P2X7 receptor in modulating the immune response and susceptibility to infection by L. amazonensis. We found that P2X7-deficient mice are more susceptible to L. amazonensis infection than wild-type (WT) mice. P2X7 deletion resulted in increased lesion size and parasite load. Our histological analysis showed an increase in cell infiltration in infected footpads of P2X7-deficient mice. Analysis of the cytokine profile in footpad homogenates showed increased levels of IFN-γ and decreased TGF-β production in P2X7-deficient mice, suggesting an exaggerated pro-inflammatory response. In addition, we observed that CD4 + and CD8 + T cells from infected P2X7-deficient mice exhibit a higher proliferative capacity than infected WT mice. These data suggest that P2X7 receptor plays a key role in parasite control by regulating T effector cells and inflammation during L. amazonensis infection.

  16. Lack of functional P2X7 receptor aggravates brain edema development after middle cerebral artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Melanie; Penk, Anja; Franke, Heike; Krügel, Ute; Nörenberg, Wolfgang; Huster, Daniel; Schaefer, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Effective therapeutic measures against the development of brain edema, a life-threatening complication of cerebral ischemia, are necessary to improve the functional outcome for the patient. Here, we identified a beneficial role of purinergic receptor P2X7 activation in acute ischemic stroke. Involvement of P2X7 in the development of neurological deficits, infarct size, brain edema, and glial responses after ischemic cerebral infarction has been analyzed. Neurologic evaluation, magnetic resonance imaging, and immunofluorescence assays were used to characterize the receptor's effect on the disease progress during 72 h after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO). Sham-operated animals were included in all experiments for control purposes. We found P2X7-deficient mice to develop a more prominent brain edema with a trend towards more severe neurological deficits 24 h after tMCAO. Infarct sizes, T2 times, and apparent diffusion coefficients did not differ significantly between wild-type and P2X7(-/-) animals. Our results show a characteristic spatial distribution of reactive glia cells with strongly attenuated microglia activation in P2X7(-/-) mice 72 h after tMCAO. Our data indicate that P2X7 exerts a role in limiting the early edema formation, possibly by modulating glial responses, and supports later microglia activation.

  17. Lung injury during LPS-induced inflammation occurs independently of the receptor P2Y1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liverani, Elisabetta

    2017-03-01

    Disruption of the lung endothelial and epithelial barriers during acute inflammation leads to excessive neutrophil migration. It is likely that activated platelets promote pulmonary recruitment of neutrophils during inflammation, and previous studies have found that anti-platelet therapy and depletion of circulating platelets have lung-protective effects in different models of inflammation. Because ADP signaling is important for platelet activation, I investigated the role of the ADP-receptor P2Y 1 , a G protein-coupled receptor expressed on the surface of circulating platelets, during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation and lung injury in P2Y 1 -null and wild-type mice. Systemic inflammation was induced by a single intraperitoneal dose of LPS (3 mg/kg), and the mice were analyzed 24 h posttreatment. The data show that the LPS-induced inflammation levels were comparable in the P2Y 1 -null and wild-type mice. Specifically, splenomegaly, counts of circulating platelets and white blood cells (lymphocytes and neutrophils), and assessments of lung injury (tissue architecture and cell infiltration) were similar in the P2Y 1 -null and wild-type mice. Based on my results, I conclude that lung injury during LPS-induced inflammation in mice is independent of P2Y 1 signaling. I propose that if a blockade of purinergic signaling in platelets is a potential lung-protective strategy in the treatment of acute inflammation, then it is more likely to be a result of the disruption of the signaling pathway mediated by P2Y 12 , another G protein-coupled receptor that mediates platelet responses to ADP.

  18. The A1 adenosine receptor as a new player in microglia physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luongo, L; Guida, F; Imperatore, R; Napolitano, F; Gatta, L; Cristino, L; Giordano, C; Siniscalco, D; Di Marzo, V; Bellini, G; Petrelli, R; Cappellacci, L; Usiello, A; de Novellis, V; Rossi, F; Maione, S

    2014-01-01

    The purinergic system is highly involved in the regulation of microglial physiological processes. In addition to the accepted roles for the P2 X4,7 and P2 Y12 receptors activated by adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine diphosphate, respectively, recent evidence suggests a role for the adenosine A2A receptor in microglial cytoskeletal rearrangements. However, the expression and function of adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) in microglia is still unclear. Several reports have demonstrated possible expression of A1AR in microglia, but a new study has refuted such evidence. In this study, we investigated the presence and function of A1AR in microglia using biomolecular techniques, live microscopy, live calcium imaging, and in vivo electrophysiological approaches. The aim of this study was to clarify the expression of A1AR in microglia and to highlight its possible roles. We found that microglia express A1AR and that it is highly upregulated upon ATP treatment. Moreover, we observed that selective stimulation of A1AR inhibits the morphological activation of microglia, possibly by suppressing the Ca(2+) influx induced by ATP treatment. Finally, we recorded the spontaneous and evoked activity of spinal nociceptive-specific neuron before and after application of resting or ATP-treated microglia, with or without preincubation with a selective A1AR agonist. We found that the microglial cells, pretreated with the A1AR agonist, exhibit lower capability to facilitate the nociceptive neurons, as compared with the cells treated with ATP alone. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. P2Y6 Receptor Activation Promotes Inflammation and Tissue Remodeling in Pulmonary Fibrosis

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    Tobias Müller

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a disease with a poor prognosis and very few available treatment options. The involvement of the purinergic receptor subtypes P2Y2 and P2X7 in fibrotic lung disease has been demonstrated recently. In this study, we investigated the role of P2Y6 receptors in the pathogenesis of IPF in humans and in the animal model of bleomycin-induced lung injury. P2Y6R expression was upregulated in lung structural cells but not in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL cells derived from IPF patients as well as in animals following bleomycin administration. Furthermore, BAL fluid levels of the P2Y6R agonist uridine-5′-diphosphate were elevated in animals with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Inflammation and fibrosis following bleomycin administration were reduced in P2Y6R-deficient compared to wild-type animals confirming the pathophysiological relevance of P2Y6R subtypes for fibrotic lung diseases. Experiments with bone marrow chimeras revealed the importance of P2Y6R expression on lung structural cells for pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. Similar effects were obtained when animals were treated with the P2Y6R antagonist MRS2578. In vitro studies demonstrated that proliferation and secretion of the pro-inflammatory/pro-fibrotic cytokine IL-6 by lung fibroblasts are P2Y6R-mediated processes. In summary, our results clearly demonstrate the involvement of P2Y6R subtypes in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Thus, blocking pulmonary P2Y6 receptors might be a new target for the treatment of IPF.

  20. Point Mutation in the Mouse P2X7 Receptor Affects Intercellular Calcium Waves in Astrocytes

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    Sylvia O Suadicani

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic P2 receptors and gap junctions are two groups of proteins involved in the transmission of ICWs (intercellular calcium waves between astrocytes. The extent to which ICWs spread among these glial cells depends on the amount of ATP released, which can occur through membrane channels, as well as other pathways. Our previous studies have shown that the pore-forming P2X7R (P2X7 receptor contributes to the amplification of ICW spread by providing sites of ATP release through Panx1 (Pannexin1 channels. To gain insight into the signal transduction events mediating this response we compared the properties of the P2X7R–Panx1 complex in astrocytes from a mouse strain (C57Bl/6 containing a naturally occurring point mutation (P451L in the C-terminus of the P2X7R to that of non-mutated receptors (Balb/C mice. Electrophysiological, biochemical, pharmacological and fluorescence imaging techniques revealed that the P451L mutation located in the SH3 domain (a Src tyrosine kinase-binding site of the C-terminus of the P2X7R attenuates Panx1 currents, ATP release and the distance of ICW spread between astrocytes. Similar results were obtained when using the Src tyrosine inhibitor (PP2 and a membrane-permeant peptide spanning the P451L mutation of the P2X7R of the C57Bl6 astrocytes. These results support the participation of a tyrosine kinase of the Src family in the initial steps mediating the opening of Panx1 channels following P2X7R stimulation and in the transmission of calcium signals among astrocytes.

  1. P2X7R suppression promotes glioma growth through epidermal growth factor receptor signal pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jingqin; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Letian; Chen, Jinhua; Liang, Yi; Li, Xue; Xiang, Jianbo; Wang, Lili; Guo, Guangkuo; Zhang, Bo; Zhang, Weiguo

    2013-06-01

    P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has been shown to mediate an anticancer effect via apoptosis in different types of cancer. However, whether P2X7R exerts a promoting or suppressive effect on brain glioma is still a controversial issue and its underlying mechanism remains unknown. We showed here that P2X7R suppression exerted a pro-growth effect on glioma through directly promoting cells proliferation and pro-angiogenesis, which was associated with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling. The P2X7R was markedly downregulated by cells exposure to the P2X7R antagonist, brilliant blue G (BBG), moreover, the cells proliferation was enhanced in a dose-dependent manner and the expression of EGFR or p-EGFR protein was significantly upregulated. By constructing C6 cells with reduced expression of P2X7R using shRNA, we also demonstrated strong upregulation in cells proliferation and EGFR/p-EGFR expression. However, this effect of BBG was reversed in the presence of gefitinib or suramin. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography perfusion showed that the BBG or P2X7R shRNA promoted the tumor growth by about 40% and 50%, respectively, and significantly increased angiogenesis. Nissl and Ki-67 staining also confirmed that BBG or P2X7R shRNA notably increased the tumor growth. More importantly, either BBG or P2X7R shRNA could markedly upregulated the expression of EGFR, p-EGFR, HIF-1α and VEGF in glioma cells. In conclusion, P2X7R suppression exerts a promoting effect on glioma growth, which is likely to be related to upregulated EGFR, HIF-1α and VEGF expression. These findings provide important clues to the molecular basis of anticancer effect of targeting purinergic receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. AMP and adenosine are both ligands for adenosine 2B receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holien, Jessica K; Seibt, Benjamin; Roberts, Veena; Salvaris, Evelyn; Parker, Michael W; Cowan, Peter J; Dwyer, Karen M

    2018-01-15

    Adenosine is considered the canonical ligand for the adenosine 2B receptor (A 2B R). A 2B R is upregulated following kidney ischemia augmenting post ischemic blood flow and limiting tubular injury. In this context the beneficial effect of A 2B R signaling has been attributed to an increase in the pericellular concentration of adenosine. However, following renal ischemia both kidney adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and adenosine levels are substantially increased. Using computational modeling and calcium mobilization assays, we investigated whether AMP could also be a ligand for A 2B R. The computational modeling suggested that AMP interacts with more favorable energy to A 2B R compared with adenosine. Furthermore, AMPαS, a non-hydrolyzable form of AMP, increased calcium uptake by Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells expressing the human A 2B R, indicating preferential signaling via the G q pathway. Therefore, a putative AMP-A 2B R interaction is supported by the computational modeling data and the biological results suggest this interaction involves preferential G q activation. These data provide further insights into the role of purinergic signaling in the pathophysiology of renal IRI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Anticonvulsant effect of AMP by direct activation of adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzi, Mirko; Coppi, Elisabetta; Pugliese, Anna Maria; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2013-12-01

    Purinergic neurotransmission mediated by adenosine (Ado) type 1 receptors (A1Rs) plays pivotal roles in negative modulation of epileptic seizures, and Ado is thought to be a key endogenous anticonvulsant. Recent evidence, however, indicates that AMP, the metabolic precursor of Ado, also activate A1Rs. Here, we evaluated the antiepileptic effects of AMP adopting in vitro and in vivo models of epilepsy. We report that AMP reversed the increase in population spike (PS) amplitude and the decrease in PS latency induced by a Mg(2+)-free extracellular solution in CA1 neurons of mouse hippocampal slices. The AMP effects were inhibited by the A1R antagonist DPCPX, but not prevented by inhibiting conversion of AMP into Ado, indicating that AMP inhibited per se sustained hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission by directly activating A1Rs. AMP also reduced seizure severity and mortality in a model of audiogenic convulsion. Of note, the anticonvulsant effects of AMP were potentiated by preventing its conversion into Ado and inhibited by DPCPX. When tested in a model of kainate-induced seizure, AMP prolonged latency of convulsions but had no effects on seizure severity and mortality. Data provide the first evidence that AMP is an endogenous anticonvulsant acting at A1Rs. © 2013.

  4. P2X-Receptor Antagonists Inhibit the Interaction of S. aureus Hemolysin A with Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Schwiering

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The pore forming hemolysin A, Hla, is a major virulence factor of Staphylococcus aureus. Apparently, 1–2 pore(s per cell suffice(s to cause cell death. Accumulated experimental evidence points towards a major role of ATP-gated purinergic receptors (P2XR for hemolysis caused by Hla, complement and other pore forming proteins, presumably by increasing membrane permeability. Indeed, in experiments employing rabbit erythrocytes, inhibitory concentrations of frequently employed P2XR-antagonists were in a similar range as previously reported for erythrocytes of other species and other toxins. However, Hla-dependent hemolysis was not enhanced by extracellular ATP, and oxidized adenosinetriphosphate (oxATP had only a minor inhibitory effect. Unexpectedly, P2XR-inhibitors also prevented Hla-induced lysis of pure lipid membranes, demonstrating that the inhibition did not even depend on the presence of P2XR. Fluorescence microscopy and gel-electrophoresis clearly revealed that P2XR-inhibitors interfere with binding and subsequent oligomerisation of Hla with membranes. Similar results were obtained employing HaCaT-cells. Furthermore, calorimetric data and hemolysis experiments with Hla pre-treated with pyridoxal phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulfonic acid (PPADS showed that this compound directly binds to Hla. Our results call for a critical re-assessment of the appealing concept, which suggests that P2XR are general amplifiers of damage by pore-forming proteins.

  5. Lack of a Functioning P2X7 Receptor Leads to Increased Susceptibility to Toxoplasmic Ileitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine M Miller

    Full Text Available Oral infection of C57BL/6J mice with the protozoan parasite Toxoplasma gondii leads to a lethal inflammatory ileitis.Mice lacking the purinergic receptor P2X7R are acutely susceptible to toxoplasmic ileitis, losing significantly more weight than C57BL/6J mice and exhibiting much greater intestinal inflammatory pathology in response to infection with only 10 cysts of T. gondii. This susceptibility is not dependent on the ability of P2X7R-deficient mice to control the parasite, which they accomplish just as efficiently as C57BL/6J mice. Rather, susceptibility is associated with elevated ileal concentrations of pro-inflammatory cytokines, reactive nitrogen intermediates and altered regulation of elements of NFκB activation in P2X7R-deficient mice.Our data support the thesis that P2X7R, a well-documented activator of pro-inflammatory cytokine production, also plays an important role in the regulation of intestinal inflammation.

  6. The ATP-gated P2X1 receptor plays a pivotal role in activation of aspirin-treated platelets by thrombin and epinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenegård, Magnus; Vretenbrant-Oberg, Karin; Nylander, Martina; Désilets, Stéphanie; Lindström, Eva G; Larsson, Anders; Ramström, Ida; Ramström, Sofia; Lindahl, Tomas L

    2008-07-04

    Human platelets express protease-activated receptor 1 (PAR1) and PAR4 but limited data indicate for differences in signal transduction. We studied the involvement of PAR1 and PAR4 in the cross-talk between thrombin and epinephrine. The results show that epinephrine acted via alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptors to provoke aggregation, secretion, and Ca(2+) mobilization in aspirin-treated platelets pre-stimulated with subthreshold concentrations of thrombin. Incubating platelets with antibodies against PAR4 or the PAR4-specific inhibitor pepducin P4pal-i1 abolished the aggregation. Furthermore, platelets pre-exposed to the PAR4-activating peptide AYPGKF, but not to the PAR1-activating peptide SFLLRN, were aggregated by epinephrine, whereas both AYPGKF and SFLLRN synergized with epinephrine in the absence of aspirin. The roles of released ATP and ADP were elucidated by using antagonists of the purinergic receptors P2X(1), P2Y(1), and P2Y(12) (i.e. NF449, MRS2159, MRS2179, and cangrelor). Intriguingly, ATP, but not ADP, was required for the epinephrine/thrombin-induced aggregation. In Western blot analysis, a low concentration of AYPGKF, but not SFLLRN, stimulated phosphorylation of Akt on serine 473. Moreover, the phosphatidyl inositide 3-kinase inhibitor LY294002 antagonized the effect of epinephrine combined with thrombin or AYPGKF. Thus, in aspirin-treated platelets, PAR4, but not PAR1, interacts synergistically with alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptors, and the PI3-kinase/Akt pathway is involved in this cross-talk. Furthermore, in PAR4-pretreated platelets, epinephrine caused dense granule secretion, and subsequent signaling from the ATP-gated P2X(1)-receptor and the alpha(2A)-adrenergic receptor induced aggregation. These results suggest a new mechanism that has ATP as a key element and circumvents the action of aspirin on epinephrine-facilitated PAR4-mediated platelet activation.

  7. Urothelial Functional Protein and Sensory Receptors in Patients With Interstitial Cystitis/Bladder Pain Syndrome With and Without Hunner's Lesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhang, Jia-Fong; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the urothelium function and sensory receptors difference between interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (IC/BPS) patients with or without Hunner's lesion. Fourteen female IC/BPS patients with Hunner's lesion (Hunner IC) and 14 age-matched IC/BPS patients without Hunner's lesions (non-Hunner IC) were enrolled. Bladder mucosa biopsies were obtained. Bladder inflammation, eosinophil infiltration, and urothelial denudation were graded on a 4-point scale after staining with hematoxylin and eosin. Adhesive protein E-cadherin, tryptase, and zonula occuldens-1 in the bladder tissues were assessed with immunofluorescence staining. Urothelial muscarinic receptors M2, M3, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and purinergic receptor P2X3 were evaluated by Western blotting. Hunner IC patients had a significantly higher mean visual analog scale pain score and smaller cystometric bladder capacity than non-Hunner IC patients. The Hunner IC bladder specimens showed more severe or moderate eosinophilic infiltration and urothelial denudation than the non-Hunner IC bladder specimens did. The E-cadherin expression was significantly lower, and eNOS expression was significantly higher in the Hunner IC bladder samples than in the non-Hunner IC samples. The other functional proteins or sensory receptors did not differ between groups. Bladder inflammation and urothelial cell adhesion defects were more severe in the Hunner IC than that in the non-Hunner IC patients. eNOS was significantly higher in the Hunner IC than in the non-Hunner IC bladder samples, suggesting that eNOS expression difference may implicate different pathogenesis in 2 types of IC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Novel regulation of equlibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) by receptor-stimulated Ca2+-dependent calmodulin binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicket, Alex; Mehrabi, Pedram; Naydenova, Zlatina; Wong, Victoria; Donaldson, Logan; Stagljar, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Equilibrative nucleoside transporters (ENTs) facilitate the flux of nucleosides, such as adenosine, and nucleoside analog (NA) drugs across cell membranes. A correlation between adenosine flux and calcium-dependent signaling has been previously reported; however, the mechanistic basis of these observations is not known. Here we report the identification of the calcium signaling transducer calmodulin (CaM) as an ENT1-interacting protein, via a conserved classic 1-5-10 motif in ENT1. Calcium-dependent human ENT1-CaM protein interactions were confirmed in human cell lines (HEK293, RT4, U-87 MG) using biochemical assays (HEK293) and the functional assays (HEK293, RT4), which confirmed modified nucleoside uptake that occurred in the presence of pharmacological manipulations of calcium levels and CaM function. Nucleoside and NA drug uptake was significantly decreased (∼12% and ∼39%, respectively) by chelating calcium (EGTA, 50 μM; BAPTA-AM, 25 μM), whereas increasing intracellular calcium (thapsigargin, 1.5 μM) led to increased nucleoside uptake (∼26%). Activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors (in U-87 MG) by glutamate (1 mM) and glycine (100 μM) significantly increased nucleoside uptake (∼38%) except in the presence of the NMDA receptor antagonist, MK-801 (50 μM), or CaM antagonist, W7 (50 μM). These data support the existence of a previously unidentified novel receptor-dependent regulatory mechanism, whereby intracellular calcium modulates nucleoside and NA drug uptake via CaM-dependent interaction of ENT1. These findings suggest that ENT1 is regulated via receptor-dependent calcium-linked pathways resulting in an alteration of purine flux, which may modulate purinergic signaling and influence NA drug efficacy. PMID:27009875

  9. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    physiology and develop- mental biology of silkworms, and use of silk in industrial applications. The low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), one of the best characterized cell-surface receptors, mediates cholesterol ho- meostasis and other functions in mammals. The members of the LDLR superfamily are structurally related ...

  10. Lipophorin Receptor: The Insect Lipoprotein Receptor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/018/08/0748-0755. Keywords. Low-density lipoprotein receptor; lipophorin; lipophorin receptor; insects. Author Affiliations. G Ravikumar1 N B Vijayaprakash1. Seri-biotech Research Laboratory Central Silk Board Kodathi, Carmelaram Post Bangalore 560 035, India.

  11. Post-translational regulation of P2X receptor channels: modulation by phospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe eBernier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available P2X receptor channels mediate fast excitatory signaling by ATP and play major roles in sensory transduction, neuro-immune communication and inflammatory response. P2X receptors constitute a gene family of calcium-permeable ATP-gated cation channels therefore the regulation of P2X signaling is critical for both membrane potential and intracellular calcium homeostasis. Phosphoinositides (PIPn are anionic signaling phospholipids that act as functional regulators of many types of ion channels. Direct PIPn binding was demonstrated for several ligand- or voltage-gated ion channels, however no generic motif emerged to accurately predict lipid-protein binding sites. This review presents what is currently known about the modulation of the different P2X subtypes by phospholipids and about critical determinants underlying their sensitivity to PIPn levels in the plasma membrane.All functional mammalian P2X subtypes tested, with the notable exception of P2X5, have been shown to be positively modulated by PIPn, i.e. homomeric P2X1, P2X2, P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7, as well as heteromeric P2X1/5 and P2X2/3 receptors. Based on various results reported on the aforementioned subtypes including mutagenesis of the prototypical PIPn-sensitive P2X4 and PIPn-insensitive P2X5 receptor subtypes, an increasing amount of functional, biochemical and structural evidence converges on the modulatory role of a short polybasic domain located in the proximal C-terminus of P2X subunits. This linear motif, semi-conserved in the P2X family, seems necessary and sufficient for encoding direct modulation of ATP-gated channels by PIPn. Furthermore, the physiological impact of the regulation of ionotropic purinergic responses by phospholipids on pain pathways was recently revealed in the context of native crosstalks between phospholipase C-linked metabotropic receptors and P2X receptor channels in DRG sensory neurons and microglia.

  12. Experimental Cortical Spreading Depression Induces NMDA Receptor Dependent Potassium Currents in Microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Stefan; Wogram, Emile; Korvers, Laura; Kettenmann, Helmut

    2016-06-08

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a propagating event of neuronal depolarization, which is considered as the cellular correlate of the migraine aura. It is characterized by a change in the intrinsic optical signal and by a negative DC potential shift. Microglia are the resident macrophages of the CNS and act as sensors for pathological changes. In the present study, we analyzed whether microglial cells might sense CSD by recording membrane currents from microglia in acutely isolated cortical mouse brain slices during an experimentally induced CSD. Coincident with the change in the intrinsic optical signal and the negative DC potential shift we recorded an increase in potassium conductance predominantly mediated by K(+) inward rectifier (Kir)2.1, which was blocked by the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5. Application of NMDA and an increase in extracellular K(+) mimics the CSD-induced Kir activation. Application of D-AP5, but not the purinergic receptor antagonist RB2, blocks the NMDA-induced Kir activation. The K(+) channel blocker Ba(2+) blocks both the CSD- and the NMDA-triggered increase in Kir channel activity. In addition, we could confirm previous findings that microglia in the adult brain do not express functional NMDA receptors by recording from microglia cultured from adult brain. From these observations we conclude that CSD activates neuronal NMDA receptors, which lead to an increase in extracellular [K(+)] resulting in the activation of Kir channel activity in microglia. Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a wave of neuronal depolarization spreading through the cortex and is associated with the aura of migraine. Here we show that microglial cells, which are viewed as pathologic sensors of the brain, can sense this wave. The increase in the extracellular potassium concentration associated with that wave leads to the activation of an inward rectifying potassium conductance in microglia. The involvement of neuronal NMDA receptors is crucial because

  13. Acetylcholine receptor antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003576.htm Acetylcholine receptor antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acetylcholine receptor antibody is a protein found in the blood ...

  14. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.O. Brinkmann (Albert); G.G.J.M. Kuiper (George); C. Ris-Stalpers (Carolyn); H.C.J. van Rooij (Henri); G. Romalo (G.); G. Trifiro (Gianluca); E. Mulder (Eppo); L. Pinsky (L.); H.U. Schweikert (H.); J. Trapman (Jan)

    1991-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of

  15. Androgen receptor abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkmann, A. O.; Kuiper, G. G.; Ris-Stalpers, C.; van Rooij, H. C.; Romalo, G.; Trifiro, M.; Mulder, E.; Pinsky, L.; Schweikert, H. U.; Trapman, J.

    1991-01-01

    The human androgen receptor is a member of the superfamily of steroid hormone receptors. Proper functioning of this protein is a prerequisite for normal male sexual differentiation and development. The cloning of the human androgen receptor cDNA and the elucidation of the genomic organization of the

  16. Effects of IP3R2 Receptor Deletion in the Ischemic Mouse Retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Lysann; Pannicke, Thomas; Frommherz, Ina; Sauer, Katja; Chen, Ju; Grosche, Antje

    2016-04-01

    Glial cells in the diseased nervous system undergo a process known as reactive gliosis. Gliosis of retinal Müller glial cells is characterized by an upregulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein and frequently by a reduction of inward K(+) current amplitudes. Purinergic signaling is assumed to be involved in gliotic processes. As previously shown, lack of the nucleotide receptor P2Y1 leads to an altered regulation of K(+) currents in Müller cells of the ischemic retina. Here, we asked first whether this effect is mediated by the IP3 receptor subtype 2 (IP3R2) known as the major downstream signaling target of P2Y1 in Müller cells. The second question was whether lack of IP3R2 affects neuronal survival in the control and ischemic retina. Ischemia was induced in wild type and IP3R2-deficient (IP 3 R2 (-/-)) mice by transient elevation of the intraocular pressure. Immunostaining and TUNEL labelling were used to quantify neuronal cell loss. The downregulation of inward K(+) currents in Müller cells from ischemic IP 3 R2 (-/-) retinae was less strong than in wild type animals. The reduction of the number of cells in the ganglion cell layer and of calretinin- and calbindin-positive cells 7 days after ischemia was similar in wild type and IP 3 R2 (-/-) mice. However, IP3R2 deficiency led to an increased number of TUNEL-positive cells in the outer nuclear layer at 1 day and to an enhanced postischemic loss of photoreceptors 7 days after ischemia. This implies that IP3R2 is involved in some but not all aspects of signaling in Müller cells after an ischemic insult.

  17. Inosine Released from Dying or Dead Cells Stimulates Cell Proliferation via Adenosine Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jin; Chaurio, Ricardo A; Maueröder, Christian; Derer, Anja; Rauh, Manfred; Kost, Andriy; Liu, Yi; Mo, Xianming; Hueber, Axel; Bilyy, Rostyslav; Herrmann, Martin; Zhao, Yi; Muñoz, Luis E

    2017-01-01

    Many antitumor therapies induce apoptotic cell death in order to cause tumor regression. Paradoxically, apoptotic cells are also known to promote wound healing, cell proliferation, and tumor cell repopulation in multicellular organisms. We aimed to characterize the nature of the regenerative signals concentrated in the micromilieu of dead and dying cells. Cultures of viable melanoma B16F10 cells, mouse fibroblasts, and primary human fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) in the presence of dead and dying cells, their supernatants (SNs), or purified agonists and antagonists were used to evaluate the stimulation of proliferation. Viable cell quantification was performed by either flow cytometry of harvested cells or by crystal violet staining of adherent cells. High-performance liquid chromatography and liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry of cell SNs were deployed to identify the nature of growth-promoting factors. Coimplantation of living cells in the presence of SNs collected from dead and dying cells and specific agonists was used to evaluate tumor growth in vivo . The stimulation of proliferation of few surviving cells by bystander dead cells was confirmed for melanoma cells, mouse fibroblasts, and primary FLS. We found that small soluble molecules present in the protein-free fraction of SNs of dead and dying cells were responsible for the promotion of proliferation. The nucleoside inosine released by dead and dying cells acting via adenosine receptors was identified as putative inducer of proliferation of surviving tumor cells after irradiation and heat treatment. Inosine released by dead and dying cells mediates tumor cell proliferation via purinergic receptors. Therapeutic strategies surmounting this pathway may help to reduce the rate of recurrence after radio- and chemotherapy.

  18. P2Y receptor-mediated transient relaxation of rat longitudinal ileum preparations involves phospholipase C activation, intracellular Ca(2+) release and SK channel activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mader, Felix; Krause, Ludwig; Tokay, Tursonjan; Hakenberg, Oliver W; Köhling, Rüdiger; Kirschstein, Timo

    2016-05-01

    Purinergic signaling plays a major role in the enteric nervous system, where it governs gut motility through a number of P2X and P2Y receptors. The aim of this study was to investigate the P2Y receptor-mediated motility in rat longitudinal ileum preparations. Ileum smooth muscle strips were prepared from rats, and fixed in an organ bath. Isometric contraction and relaxation responses of the muscle strips were measured with force transducers. Drugs were applied by adding of stock solutions to the organ bath to yield the individual final concentrations. Application of the non-hydrolyzable P2 receptor agonists α,β-Me-ATP or 2-Me-S-ADP (10, 100 μmol/L) dose-dependently elicited a transient relaxation response followed by a sustained contraction. The relaxation response was largely blocked by SK channel blockers apamin (500 nmol/L) and UCL1684 (10 μmol/L), PLC inhibitor U73122 (100 μmol/L), IP3 receptor blocker 2-APB (100 μmol/L) or sarcoendoplasmic Ca(2+) ATPase inhibitor thapsigargin (1 μmol/L), but not affected by atropine, NO synthase blocker L-NAME or tetrodotoxin. Furthermore, α,β-Me-ATP-induced relaxation was suppressed by P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2179 (50 μmol/L) or P2Y13 receptor antagonist MRS2211 (100 μmol/L), and was abolished by co-application of the two antagonists, whereas 2-Me-S-ADP-induced relaxation was abolished by P2Y6 receptor antagonist MRS2578 (50 μmol/L). In addition, P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2500 (1 μmol/L) not only abolished α,β-Me-ATP-induced relaxation, but also suppressed 2-Me-S-ADP-induced relaxation. P2Y receptor agonist-induced transient relaxation of rat ileum smooth muscle strips is mediated predominantly by P2Y1 receptor, but also by P2Y6 and P2Y13 receptors, and involves PLC, IP3, Ca(2+) release and SK channel activation, but is independent of acetylcholine and NO release.

  19. P2X7 receptors in satellite glial cells mediate high functional expression of P2X3 receptors in immature dorsal root ganglion neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Yong

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purinergic P2X3 receptor (P2X3R expressed in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG sensory neuron and the P2X7 receptor (P2X7R expressed in the surrounding satellite glial cell (SGC are two major receptors participating in neuron-SGC communication in adult DRGs. Activation of P2X7Rs was found to tonically reduce the expression of P2X3Rs in DRGs, thus inhibiting the abnormal pain behaviors in adult rats. P2X receptors are also actively involved in sensory signaling in developing rodents. However, very little is known about the developmental change of P2X7Rs in DRGs and the interaction between P2X7Rs and P2X3Rs in those animals. We therefore examined the expression of P2X3Rs and P2X7Rs in postnatal rats and determined if P2X7R-P2X3R control exists in developing rats. Findings We immunostained DRGs of immature rats and found that P2X3Rs were expressed only in neurons and P2X7Rs were expressed only in SGCs. Western blot analyses indicated that P2X3R expression decreased while P2X7R expression increased with the age of rats. Electrophysiological studies showed that the number of DRG neurons responding to the stimulation of the P2XR agonist, α,β-meATP, was higher and the amplitudes of α,β-meATP-induced depolarizations were larger in immature DRG neurons. As a result, P2X3R-mediated flinching responses were much more pronounced in immature rats than those found in adult rats. When we reduced P2X7R expression with P2X7R-siRNA in postnatal and adult rats, P2X3R-mediated flinch responses were greatly enhanced in both rat populations. Conclusions These results show that the P2X7R expression increases as rats age. In addition, P2X7Rs in SGCs exert inhibitory control on the P2X3R expression and function in sensory neurons of immature rats, just as observed in adult rats. Regulation of P2X7R expression is likely an effective way to control P2X3R activity and manage pain relief in infants.

  20. GABA receptor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA{sub A}-receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA{sub B}-receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA{sub A}-receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA{sub A}-receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with {sup 11}C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, {sup 18}F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome {sup 11}C's short half-life. {sup 18}F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1{sup 1}C-FMZ PET instead of {sup 18}F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA{sub A} receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas.

  1. GABA receptor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jong Doo

    2007-01-01

    GABA is primary an inhibitory neurotransmitter that is localized in inhibitory interneurons. GABA is released from presynaptic terminals and functions by binding to GABA receptors. There are two types of GABA receptors, GABA A -receptor that allows chloride to pass through a ligand gated ion channel and GABA B -receptor that uses G-proteins for signaling. The GABA A -receptor has a GABA binding site as well as a benzodiazepine binding sites, which modulate GABA A -receptor function. Benzodiazepine GABAA receptor imaging can be accomplished by radiolabeling derivates that activates benzodiazepine binding sites. There has been much research on flumazenil (FMZ) labeled with 11 C-FMZ, a benzodiazepine derivate that is a selective, reversible antagonist to GABAA receptors. Recently, 18 F-fluoroflumazenil (FFMZ) has been developed to overcome 11 C's short half-life. 18 F-FFMZ shows high selective affinity and good pharmacodynamics, and is a promising PET agent with better central benzodiazepine receptor imaging capabilities. In an epileptic focus, because the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor amount is decreased, using '1 1 C-FMZ PET instead of 18 F-FDG, PET, restrict the foci better and may also help find lesions better than high resolution MR. GABA A receptors are widely distributed in the cerebral cortex, and can be used as an viable neuronal marker. Therefore it can be used as a neuronal cell viability marker in cerebral ischemia. Also, GABA-receptors decrease in areas where neuronal plasticity develops, therefore, GABA imaging can be used to evaluate plasticity. Besides these usages, GABA receptors are related with psychological diseases, especially depression and schizophrenia as well as cerebral palsy, a motor-related disorder, so further in-depth studies are needed for these areas

  2. Anti-nociceptive properties of the xanthine oxidase inhibitor allopurinol in mice: role of A1 adenosine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, AP; Böhmer, AE; Antunes, C; Schallenberger, C; Porciúncula, LO; Elisabetsky, E; Lara, DR; Souza, DO

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose Allopurinol is a potent inhibitor of the enzyme xanthine oxidase, used primarily in the treatment of hyperuricemia and gout. It is well known that purines exert multiple effects on pain transmission. We hypothesized that the inhibition of xanthine oxidase by allopurinol, thereby reducing purine degradation, could be a valid strategy to enhance purinergic activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the anti-nociceptive profile of allopurinol on chemical and thermal pain models in mice. Experimental approach Mice received an intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of vehicle (Tween 10%) or allopurinol (10–400 mg kg−1). Anti-nociceptive effects were measured with intraplantar capsaicin, intraplantar glutamate, tail-flick or hot-plate tests. Key results Allopurinol presented dose-dependent anti-nociceptive effects in all models. The opioid antagonist naloxone did not affect these anti-nociceptive effects. The non-selective adenosine-receptor antagonist caffeine and the selective A1 adenosine-receptor antagonist, DPCPX, but not the selective A2A adenosine-receptor antagonist, SCH58261, completely prevented allopurinol-induced anti-nociception. No obvious motor deficits were produced by allopurinol, at doses up to 200 mg kg−1. Allopurinol also caused an increase in cerebrospinal fluid levels of purines, including the nucleosides adenosine and guanosine, and decreased cerebrospinal fluid concentration of uric acid. Conclusions and implications Allopurinol-induced anti-nociception may be related to adenosine accumulation. Allopurinol is an old and extensively used compound and seems to be well tolerated with no obvious central nervous system toxic effects at high doses. This drug may be useful to treat pain syndromes in humans. PMID:19133997

  3. P2X7 receptor regulates osteoclast function and bone loss in a mouse model of osteoporosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Ning; Agrawal, Ankita; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye

    2018-01-01

    Post-menopausal osteoporosis is a condition that affects millions worldwide and places a huge socio-economic burden on society. Previous research has shown an association of loss of function SNPs in the gene for the purinergic receptor P2X7R with low bone mineral density, increased rates of bone...... loss and vertebral fractures in post-menopausal women. In this study we use a mouse model of oestrogen deficiency-induced bone loss and the BALB/cJ P2X7R-/- to show that absence of the P2X7R resulted in increased bone loss. Osteoclast precursors were isolated from both BALB/cJ P2X7R-/- and BALB/cJ P2X7......R+/+ mice and then cultured in vitro to form mature resorbing osteoclasts. The BALB/cJ P2X7R-/- derived precursors generated slightly more osteoclasts but with a significant reduction in the amount of resorption per osteoclast. Furthermore, when using modified culture conditions osteoclast activity...

  4. Dengue virus receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Hidari, Kazuya I.P.J.; Suzuki, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Dengue virus is an arthropod-borne virus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. Dengue virus causes fever and hemorrhagic disorders in humans and non-human primates. Direct interaction of the virus introduced by a mosquito bite with host receptor molecule(s) is crucial for virus propagation and the pathological progression of dengue diseases. Therefore, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between dengue virus and its receptor(s) in both humans and mosquitoes is essent...

  5. Therapeutic androgen receptor ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, George F.; Sui, Zhihua

    2003-01-01

    In the past several years, the concept of tissue-selective nuclear receptor ligands has emerged. This concept has come to fruition with estrogens, with the successful marketing of drugs such as raloxifene. The discovery of raloxifene and other selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) has raised the possibility of generating selective compounds for other pathways, including androgens (that is, selective androgen receptor modulators, or SARMs). PMID:16604181

  6. Evolutionary origins of the purinergic signalling system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burnstock, G.; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 195, č. 4 (2009), s. 415-447 ISSN 1748-1708 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA305/08/1384 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : adenosine * ATP * invertebrate Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.810, year: 2009

  7. Altered Expression of Genes Encoding Neurotransmitter Receptors in GnRH Neurons of Proestrous Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vastagh, Csaba; Rodolosse, Annie; Solymosi, Norbert; Liposits, Zsolt

    2016-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons play a key role in the central regulation of reproduction. In proestrous female mice, estradiol triggers the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, however, its impact on the expression of neurotransmitter receptor genes in GnRH neurons has not been explored yet. We hypothesized that proestrus is accompanied by substantial changes in the expression profile of genes coding for neurotransmitter receptors in GnRH neurons. We compared the transcriptome of GnRH neurons obtained from intact, proestrous, and metestrous female GnRH-GFP transgenic mice, respectively. About 1500 individual GnRH neurons were sampled from both groups and their transcriptome was analyzed using microarray hybridization and real-time PCR. In this study, changes in mRNA expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling were investigated. Differential gene expression was most apparent in GABA-ergic ( Gabbr1, Gabra3, Gabrb3, Gabrb2, Gabrg2 ), glutamatergic ( Gria1, Gria2, Grin1, Grin3a, Grm1, Slc17a6 ), cholinergic ( Chrnb2, Chrm4 ) and dopaminergic ( Drd3, Drd4 ), adrenergic ( Adra1b, Adra2a, Adra2c ), adenosinergic ( Adora2a, Adora2b ), glycinergic ( Glra ), purinergic ( P2rx7 ), and serotonergic ( Htr1b ) receptors. In concert with these events, expression of genes in the signaling pathways downstream to the receptors, i.e., G-proteins ( Gnai1, Gnai2, Gnas ), adenylate-cyclases ( Adcy3, Adcy5 ), protein kinase A ( Prkaca, Prkacb ) protein kinase C ( Prkca ) and certain transporters ( Slc1a4, Slc17a6, Slc6a17 ) were also changed. The marked differences found in the expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling of GnRH neurons at pro- and metestrous stages of the ovarian cycle indicate the differential contribution of these neurotransmitter systems to the induction of the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, the known prerequisite of the subsequent hormonal cascade inducing ovulation.

  8. Altered expression of genes encoding neurotransmitter receptors in GnRH neurons of proestrous mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Csaba Vastagh

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons play a key role in the central regulation of reproduction. In proestrous female mice, estradiol triggers the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, however, its impact on the expression of neurotransmitter receptor genes in GnRH neurons has not been explored yet. We hypothesized that proestrus is accompanied by substantial changes in the expression profile of genes coding for neurotransmitter receptors in GnRH neurons. We compared the transcriptome of GnRH neurons obtained from intact, proestrous and metestrous female GnRH-GFP transgenic mice, respectively. About 1500 individual GnRH neurons were sampled from both groups and their transcriptome was analyzed using microarray hybridization and real-time PCR. In this study, changes in mRNA expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling were investigated. Differential gene expression was most apparent in GABA-ergic (Gabbr1, Gabra3, Gabrb3, Gabrb2, Gabrg2, glutamatergic (Gria1, Gria2, Grin1, Grin3a, Grm1, Slc17a6, cholinergic (Chrnb2, Chrm4 and dopaminergic (Drd3, Drd4, adrenergic (Adra1b, Adra2a, Adra2c, adenosinergic (Adora2a, Adora2b, glycinergic (Glra, purinergic (P2rx7 and serotonergic (Htr1b receptors. In concert with these events, expression of genes in the signaling pathways downstream to the receptors, i.e. G-proteins (Gnai1, Gnai2, Gnas, adenylate-cyclases (Adcy3, Adcy5, protein kinase A (Prkaca, Prkacb protein kinase C (Prkca and certain transporters (Slc1a4, Slc17a6, Slc6a17 were also changed. The marked differences found in the expression of genes involved in neurotransmitter signaling of GnRH neurons at pro- and metestrous stages of the ovarian cycle indicate the differential contribution of these neurotransmitter systems to the induction of the pre-ovulatory GnRH surge, the known prerequisite of the subsequent hormonal cascade inducing ovulation.

  9. AMPA receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strømgaard, Kristian; Mellor, Ian

    2004-01-01

    Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPAR), subtype of the ionotropic glutamate receptors (IGRs), mediate fast synaptic transmission in the central nervous system (CNS), and are involved in many neurological disorders, as well as being a key player...

  10. Angiotensin type 2 receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sumners, Colin; de Kloet, Annette D; Krause, Eric G

    2015-01-01

    In most situations, the angiotensin AT2-receptor (AT2R) mediates physiological actions opposing those mediated by the AT1-receptor (AT1R), including a vasorelaxant effect. Nevertheless, experimental evidence vastly supports that systemic application of AT2R-agonists is blood pressure neutral...

  11. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate [(S)-Glu] is responsible for most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effect of (S)-Glu is mediated by both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate receptor agonists are generally a-amino acids with one or more...... stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  12. P2X receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, R Alan

    2016-08-05

    Extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) activates cell surface P2X and P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are membrane ion channels preferably permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium that open within milliseconds of the binding of ATP. In molecular architecture, they form a unique structural family. The receptor is a trimer, the binding of ATP between subunits causes them to flex together within the ectodomain and separate in the membrane-spanning region so as to open a central channel. P2X receptors have a widespread tissue distribution. On some smooth muscle cells, P2X receptors mediate the fast excitatory junction potential that leads to depolarization and contraction. In the central nervous system, activation of P2X receptors allows calcium to enter neurons and this can evoke slower neuromodulatory responses such as the trafficking of receptors for the neurotransmitter glutamate. In primary afferent nerves, P2X receptors are critical for the initiation of action potentials when they respond to ATP released from sensory cells such as taste buds, chemoreceptors or urothelium. In immune cells, activation of P2X receptors triggers the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin 1β. The development of selective blockers of different P2X receptors has led to clinical trials of their effectiveness in the management of cough, pain, inflammation and certain neurodegenerative diseases.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolution brings Ca(2+) and ATP together to control life and death'. © 2016 The Author(s).

  13. Muscarinic receptor oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsango, Sara; Ward, Richard J; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-11-14

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been classically described as monomeric entities that function by binding in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to both ligand and downstream signalling proteins. However, in recent years, a growing number of studies has supported the hypothesis that these receptors can interact to form dimers and higher order oligomers although the molecular basis for these interactions, the overall quaternary arrangements and the functional importance of GPCR oligomerization remain topics of intense speculation. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors belong to class A of the GPCR family. Each muscarinic receptor subtype has its own particular distribution throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. In the central nervous system, muscarinic receptors regulate several sensory, cognitive, and motor functions while, in the peripheral nervous system, they are involved in the regulation of heart rate, stimulation of glandular secretion and smooth muscle contraction. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors have long been used as a model for the study of GPCR structure and function and to address aspects of GPCR dimerization using a broad range of approaches. In this review, the prevailing knowledge regarding the quaternary arrangement for the various muscarinic acetylcholine receptors has been summarized by discussing work ranging from initial results obtained using more traditional biochemical approaches to those generated with more modern biophysical techniques. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Modulation of P2X7 Receptor during Inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Amadio

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is characterized by macrophage accumulation and inflammatory infiltrates into the CNS contributing to demyelination. Because purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R is known to be abundantly expressed on cells of the hematopoietic lineage and of the nervous system, we further investigated its phenotypic expression in MS and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis conditions. By quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry, we analyzed the P2X7R expression in human mononuclear cells of peripheral blood from stable and acute relapsing-remitting MS phases. Human monocytes were also challenged in vitro with pro-inflammatory stimuli such as the lipopolysaccharide, or the P2X7R preferential agonist 2′(3′-O-(4 Benzoylbenzoyladenosine 5′-triphosphate, before evaluating P2X7R protein expression. Finally, by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence confocal analysis, we investigated the P2X7R expression in frontal cortex from secondary progressive MS cases. We demonstrated that P2X7R is present and inhibited on peripheral monocytes isolated from MS donors during the acute phase of the disease, moreover it is down-regulated in human monocytes after pro-inflammatory stimulation in vitro. P2X7R is instead up-regulated on astrocytes in the parenchyma of frontal cortex from secondary progressive MS patients, concomitantly with monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 chemokine, while totally absent from microglia/macrophages or oligodendrocytes, despite the occurrence of inflammatory conditions. Our results suggest that inhibition of P2X7R on monocytes and up-regulation in astrocytes might contribute to sustain inflammatory mechanisms in MS. By acquiring further knowledge about P2X7R dynamics and identifying P2X7R as a potential marker for the disease, we expect to gain insights into the molecular pathways of MS.

  15. P2X7 receptor-dependent tuning of gut epithelial responses to infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Szu-Wei; Walker, Catherine; Pennock, Joanne; Else, Kathryn; Muller, Werner; Daniels, Michael Jd; Pellegrini, Carolina; Brough, David; Lopez-Castejon, Gloria; Cruickshank, Sheena M

    2017-02-01

    Infection and injury of the gut are associated with cell damage and release of molecules such as extracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP), which is recognised by the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R). P2X7R is widely expressed in the gut by antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and epithelial cells, but the role of the P2X7R on epithelial cells is poorly understood. We investigated P2X7R in intestinal epithelium in vitro and in vivo using two model infections, Toxoplasma gondii and Trichinella spiralis. Lipopolysaccharide and ATP treatment of intestinal epithelial cells and infection with T. gondii in vitro did not promote inflammasome-associated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) or IL-18 secretion, but promoted C-C motif chemokine ligand 5 (CCL5), tumour necrosis factor-α and IL-6 production that were significantly reduced when the P2X7R was blocked. Similarly, in vivo, infection with either T. spiralis or T. gondii induced rapid upregulation of epithelial CCL5 in wild-type (wild-type (WT)) mice that was significantly reduced in P2X7R -/- littermate controls. The effects of reduced epithelial CCL5 were assayed by investigating recruitment of dendritic cells (DCs) to the epithelium. Infection induced a rapid recruitment of CD11c + CD103 + DC subsets into the epithelial layer of WT mice but not P2X7R -/- mice. In vitro chemotaxis assays and bone marrow chimeras demonstrated the importance of epithelial P2X7R in DC recruitment. P2X7R signalling in epithelial cells mediates chemokine responses to promote initiation of host immunity to infection.

  16. Modulation of P2X7 Receptor during Inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amadio, Susanna; Parisi, Chiara; Piras, Eleonora; Fabbrizio, Paola; Apolloni, Savina; Montilli, Cinzia; Luchetti, Sabina; Ruggieri, Serena; Gasperini, Claudio; Laghi-Pasini, Franco; Battistini, Luca; Volonté, Cinzia

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by macrophage accumulation and inflammatory infiltrates into the CNS contributing to demyelination. Because purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is known to be abundantly expressed on cells of the hematopoietic lineage and of the nervous system, we further investigated its phenotypic expression in MS and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis conditions. By quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and flow cytometry, we analyzed the P2X7R expression in human mononuclear cells of peripheral blood from stable and acute relapsing-remitting MS phases. Human monocytes were also challenged in vitro with pro-inflammatory stimuli such as the lipopolysaccharide, or the P2X7R preferential agonist 2'(3')-O-(4 Benzoylbenzoyl)adenosine 5'-triphosphate, before evaluating P2X7R protein expression. Finally, by immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence confocal analysis, we investigated the P2X7R expression in frontal cortex from secondary progressive MS cases. We demonstrated that P2X7R is present and inhibited on peripheral monocytes isolated from MS donors during the acute phase of the disease, moreover it is down-regulated in human monocytes after pro-inflammatory stimulation in vitro . P2X7R is instead up-regulated on astrocytes in the parenchyma of frontal cortex from secondary progressive MS patients, concomitantly with monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 chemokine, while totally absent from microglia/macrophages or oligodendrocytes, despite the occurrence of inflammatory conditions. Our results suggest that inhibition of P2X7R on monocytes and up-regulation in astrocytes might contribute to sustain inflammatory mechanisms in MS. By acquiring further knowledge about P2X7R dynamics and identifying P2X7R as a potential marker for the disease, we expect to gain insights into the molecular pathways of MS.

  17. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  18. P2X receptors

    OpenAIRE

    North, R. Alan

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular adenosine 5′-triphosphate (ATP) activates cell surface P2X and P2Y receptors. P2X receptors are membrane ion channels preferably permeable to sodium, potassium and calcium that open within milliseconds of the binding of ATP. In molecular architecture, they form a unique structural family. The receptor is a trimer, the binding of ATP between subunits causes them to flex together within the ectodomain and separate in the membrane-spanning region so as to open a central channel. P2...

  19. Serotonin Receptors in Hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berumen, Laura Cristina; Rodríguez, Angelina; Miledi, Ricardo; García-Alcocer, Guadalupe

    2012-01-01

    Serotonin is an ancient molecular signal and a recognized neurotransmitter brainwide distributed with particular presence in hippocampus. Almost all serotonin receptor subtypes are expressed in hippocampus, which implicates an intricate modulating system, considering that they can be localized as autosynaptic, presynaptic, and postsynaptic receptors, even colocalized within the same cell and being target of homo- and heterodimerization. Neurons and glia, including immune cells, integrate a functional network that uses several serotonin receptors to regulate their roles in this particular part of the limbic system. PMID:22629209

  20. Activation of P2Y6 Receptors Facilitates Nonneuronal Adenosine Triphosphate and Acetylcholine Release from Urothelium with the Lamina Propria of Men with Bladder Outlet Obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Isabel; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Magalhães-Cardoso, Maria Teresa; Silva-Ramos, Miguel; Correia-de-Sá, Paulo

    2015-10-01

    Deregulation of purinergic bladder signaling may contribute to persistent detrusor overactivity in patients with bladder outlet obstruction. Activation of uridine diphosphate sensitive P2Y6 receptors increases voiding frequency in rats indirectly by releasing adenosine triphosphate from the urothelium. To our knowledge this mechanism has never been tested in the human bladder. We examined the role of the uridine diphosphate sensitive P2Y6 receptor on tetrodotoxin insensitive nonneuronal adenosine triphosphate and [(3)H]acetylcholine release from the human urothelium with the lamina propria of control organ donors and patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. The adenosine triphosphate-to-[(3)H]acetylcholine ratio was fivefold higher in mucosal urothelium/lamina propria strips from benign prostatic hyperplasia patients than control men. The selective P2Y6 receptor agonist PSB0474 (100 nM) augmented by a similar amount adenosine triphosphate and [(3)H]acetylcholine release from mucosal urothelium/lamina propria strips from both groups of individuals. The facilitatory effect of PSB0474 was prevented by MRS2578 (50 nM) and by carbenoxolone (10 μM), which block P2Y6 receptor and pannexin-1 hemichannels, respectively. Blockade of P2X3 (and/or P2X2/3) receptors with A317491 (100 nM) also attenuated release facilitation by PSB0474 in control men but not in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Immunolocalization studies showed that P2Y6, P2X2 and P2X3 receptors were present in choline acetyltransferase positive urothelial cells. In contrast to P2Y6 staining, choline acetyltransferase, P2X2 and P2X3 immunoreactivity decreased in the urothelium of benign prostatic hyperplasia patients. Activation of P2Y6 receptor amplifies mucosal adenosine triphosphate release underlying bladder overactivity in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia. Therefore, we propose selective P2Y6 receptor blockade as a novel therapeutic strategy to control persistent storage symptoms in

  1. Vascular surgical stretch injury leads to activation of P2X7 receptors and impaired endothelial function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmini Komalavilas

    Full Text Available A viable vascular endothelial layer prevents vasomotor dysfunction, thrombosis, inflammation, and intimal hyperplasia. Injury to the endothelium occurs during harvest and "back table" preparation of human saphenous vein prior to implantation as an arterial bypass conduit. A subfailure overstretch model of rat aorta was used to show that subfailure stretch injury of vascular tissue leads to impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. Stretch-induced impaired relaxation was mitigated by treatment with purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R inhibitors, brilliant blue FCF (FCF and A740003, or apyrase, an enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolysis of ATP. Alternatively, treatment of rat aorta with exogenous ATP or 2'(3'-O-(4-Benzoyl benzoyl-ATP (BzATP also impaired endothelial-dependent relaxation. Treatment of human saphenous vein endothelial cells (HSVEC with exogenous ATP led to reduced nitric oxide production which was associated with increased phosphorylation of the stress activated protein kinase, p38 MAPK. ATP- stimulated p38 MAPK phosphorylation of HSVEC was inhibited by FCF and SB203580. Moreover, ATP inhibition of nitric oxide production in HSVEC was prevented by FCF, SB203580, L-arginine supplementation and arginase inhibition. Finally, L-arginine supplementation and arginase inhibition restored endothelial dependent relaxation after stretch injury of rat aorta. These results suggest that vascular stretch injury leads to ATP release, activation of P2X7R and p38 MAPK resulting in endothelial dysfunction due to arginase activation. Endothelial function can be restored in both ATP treated HSVEC and intact stretch injured rat aorta by P2X7 receptor inhibition with FCF or L-arginine supplementation, implicating straightforward therapeutic options for treatment of surgical vascular injury.

  2. Somatostatin receptor skintigrafi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Karin; Nielsen, Jørn Theil; Rehling, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy (SRS) is a very valuable imaging technique for visualisation of a diversity of neuroendocrine tumours. The sensitivity for localisation of carcinoid tumours is high, but somewhat lower for other neuroendocrine tumours. The methodology, multiple clinical aspects ...

  3. Muscarinic receptor oligomerization

    OpenAIRE

    Marsango, Sara; Ward, Richard J.; Alvarez-Curto, Elisa; Milligan, Graeme

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been classically described as monomeric entities that function by binding in a 1:1 stoichiometric ratio to both ligand and downstream signalling proteins. However, in recent years, a growing number of studies has supported the hypothesis that these receptors can interact to form dimers and higher order oligomers although the molecular basis for these interactions, the overall quaternary arrangements and the functional importance of GPCR oligomerization...

  4. Adenosine receptor neurobiology: overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiang-Fan; Lee, Chien-fei; Chern, Yijuang

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine is a naturally occurring nucleoside that is distributed ubiquitously throughout the body as a metabolic intermediary. In the brain, adenosine functions as an important upstream neuromodulator of a broad spectrum of neurotransmitters, receptors, and signaling pathways. By acting through four G-protein-coupled receptors, adenosine contributes critically to homeostasis and neuromodulatory control of a variety of normal and abnormal brain functions, ranging from synaptic plasticity, to cognition, to sleep, to motor activity to neuroinflammation, and cell death. This review begun with an overview of the gene and genome structure and the expression pattern of adenosine receptors (ARs). We feature several new developments over the past decade in our understanding of AR functions in the brain, with special focus on the identification and characterization of canonical and noncanonical signaling pathways of ARs. We provide an update on functional insights from complementary genetic-knockout and pharmacological studies on the AR control of various brain functions. We also highlight several novel and recent developments of AR neurobiology, including (i) recent breakthrough in high resolution of three-dimension structure of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs) in several functional status, (ii) receptor-receptor heterodimerization, (iii) AR function in glial cells, and (iv) the druggability of AR. We concluded the review with the contention that these new developments extend and strengthen the support for A1 and A2ARs in brain as therapeutic targets for neurologic and psychiatric diseases. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetics of taste receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmanov, Alexander A; Bosak, Natalia P; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R; Nelson, Theodore M

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical "tastes" as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications.

  6. P2X7 receptors in body temperature, locomotor activity, and brain mRNA and lncRNA responses to sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Christopher J; Taishi, Ping; Honn, Kimberly A; Koberstein, John N; Krueger, James M

    2016-12-01

    The ionotropic purine type 2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is a nonspecific cation channel implicated in sleep regulation and brain cytokine release. Many endogenous rhythms covary with sleep, including locomotor activity and core body temperature. Furthermore, brain-hypothalamic cytokines and purines play a role in the regulation of these physiological parameters as well as sleep. We hypothesized that these parameters are also affected by the absence of the P2X7 receptor. Herein, we determine spontaneous expression of body temperature and locomotor activity in wild-type (WT) and P2X7R knockout (KO) mice and how they are affected by sleep deprivation (SD). We also compare hypothalamic, hippocampal, and cortical cytokine- and purine-related receptor and enzyme mRNA expressions before and after SD in WT and P2X7RKO mice. Next, in a hypothesis-generating survey of hypothalamic long noncoding (lnc) RNAs, we compare lncRNA expression levels between strains and after SD. During baseline conditions, P2X7RKO mice had attenuated temperature rhythms compared with WT mice, although locomotor activity patterns were similar in both strains. After 6 h of SD, body temperature and locomotion were enhanced to a greater extent in P2X7RKO mice than in WT mice during the initial 2-3 h after SD. Baseline mRNA levels of cortical TNF-α and P2X4R were higher in the KO mice than WT mice. In response to SD, the KO mice failed to increase hypothalamic adenosine deaminase and P2X4R mRNAs. Further, hypothalamic lncRNA expressions varied by strain, and with SD. Current data are consistent with a role for the P2X7R in thermoregulation and lncRNA involvement in purinergic signaling. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Activity-induced Ca2+ signaling in perisynaptic Schwann cells of the early postnatal mouse is mediated by P2Y1 receptors and regulates muscle fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heredia, Dante J; Feng, Cheng-Yuan; Hennig, Grant W; Renden, Robert B

    2018-01-01

    Perisynaptic glial cells respond to neural activity by increasing cytosolic calcium, but the significance of this pathway is unclear. Terminal/perisynaptic Schwann cells (TPSCs) are a perisynaptic glial cell at the neuromuscular junction that respond to nerve-derived substances such as acetylcholine and purines. Here, we provide genetic evidence that activity-induced calcium accumulation in neonatal TPSCs is mediated exclusively by one subtype of metabotropic purinergic receptor. In P2ry1 mutant mice lacking these responses, postsynaptic, rather than presynaptic, function was altered in response to nerve stimulation. This impairment was correlated with a greater susceptibility to activity-induced muscle fatigue. Interestingly, fatigue in P2ry1 mutants was more greatly exacerbated by exposure to high potassium than in control mice. High potassium itself increased cytosolic levels of calcium in TPSCs, a response which was also reduced P2ry1 mutants. These results suggest that activity-induced calcium responses in TPSCs regulate postsynaptic function and muscle fatigue by regulating perisynaptic potassium. PMID:29384476

  8. Excessive Extracellular ATP Desensitizes P2Y2 and P2X4 ATP Receptors Provoking Surfactant Impairment Ending in Ventilation-Induced Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djo Hasan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Stretching the alveolar epithelial type I (AT I cells controls the intercellular signaling for the exocytosis of surfactant by the AT II cells through the extracellular release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP (purinergic signaling. Extracellular ATP is cleared by extracellular ATPases, maintaining its homeostasis and enabling the lung to adapt the exocytosis of surfactant to the demand. Vigorous deformation of the AT I cells by high mechanical power ventilation causes a massive release of extracellular ATP beyond the clearance capacity of the extracellular ATPases. When extracellular ATP reaches levels >100 μM, the ATP receptors of the AT II cells become desensitized and surfactant impairment is initiated. The resulting alteration in viscoelastic properties and in alveolar opening and collapse time-constants leads to alveolar collapse and the redistribution of inspired air from the alveoli to the alveolar ducts, which become pathologically dilated. The collapsed alveoli connected to these dilated alveolar ducts are subject to a massive strain, exacerbating the ATP release. After reaching concentrations >300 μM extracellular ATP acts as a danger-associated molecular pattern, causing capillary leakage, alveolar space edema, and further deactivation of surfactant by serum proteins. Decreasing the tidal volume to 6 mL/kg or less at this stage cannot prevent further lung injury.

  9. Low-Level Laser Therapy Reduces Lung Inflammation in an Experimental Model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Involving P2X7 Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel da Cunha Moraes

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is a progressive disease characterized by irreversible airflow limitation, airway inflammation and remodeling, and enlargement of alveolar spaces. COPD is in the top five leading causes of deaths worldwide and presents a high economic cost. However, there are some preventive measures to lower the risk of developing COPD. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT is a new effective therapy, with very low cost and no side effects. So, our objective was to investigate if LLLT reduces pulmonary alterations in an experimental model of COPD. C57BL/6 mice were submitted to cigarette smoke for 75 days (2x/day. After 60 days to smoke exposure, the treated group was submitted to LLLT (diode laser, 660 nm, 30 mW, and 3 J/cm2 for 15 days and euthanized for morphologic and functional analysis of the lungs. Our results showed that LLLT significantly reduced the number of inflammatory cells and the proinflammatory cytokine secretion such as IL-1β, IL-6, and TNF-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF. We also observed that LLLT decreased collagen deposition as well as the expression of purinergic P2X7 receptor. On the other hand, LLLT increased the IL-10 release. Thus, LLLT can be pointed as a promising therapeutic approach for lung inflammatory diseases as COPD.

  10. Ionotropic crustacean olfactory receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Corey

    Full Text Available The nature of the olfactory receptor in crustaceans, a major group of arthropods, has remained elusive. We report that spiny lobsters, Panulirus argus, express ionotropic receptors (IRs, the insect chemosensory variants of ionotropic glutamate receptors. Unlike insects IRs, which are expressed in a specific subset of olfactory cells, two lobster IR subunits are expressed in most, if not all, lobster olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs, as confirmed by antibody labeling and in situ hybridization. Ligand-specific ORN responses visualized by calcium imaging are consistent with a restricted expression pattern found for other potential subunits, suggesting that cell-specific expression of uncommon IR subunits determines the ligand sensitivity of individual cells. IRs are the only type of olfactory receptor that we have detected in spiny lobster olfactory tissue, suggesting that they likely mediate olfactory signaling. Given long-standing evidence for G protein-mediated signaling in activation of lobster ORNs, this finding raises the interesting specter that IRs act in concert with second messenger-mediated signaling.

  11. Colchicine inhibits cationic dye uptake induced by ATP in P2X2 and P2X7 receptor-expressing cells: implications for its therapeutic action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-da-Silva, C; Chaves, MM; Castro, NG; Coutinho-Silva, R; Guimaraes, MZP

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE The two longest C-termini of the purinergic P2X receptors occur in the P2X2 and P2X7 receptors and are thought to interact with multiple cytoplasmic proteins, among which are members of the cytoskeleton, including microtubules. In this work we asked whether disrupting the microtubule cytoskeleton might affect the functions of these receptors. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Functions of heterologously expressed P2X2 and P2X7 receptors were evaluated with electrophysiology and dye uptake following ATP application. Permeabilization and secretion of pro-inflammatory agents were quantified from fresh or cultured peritoneal mouse macrophages, treated in vitro or in vivo with colchicine. KEY RESULTS Disrupting the microtubule network with colchicine did not affect currents generated by ATP in P2X2 and P2X7 receptor-expressing cells but inhibited uptake of the dye Yo-Pro-1 in Xenopus oocytes and HEK293 cells expressing these channels. Peritoneal mouse macrophages showed less ATP-induced permeabilization to ethidium bromide in the presence of colchicine, and less reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, nitric oxide (NO) and interleukin (IL)-1β release. Colchicine treatment did not affect ATP-evoked currents in macrophages. Finally, in vivo assays with mice inoculated with lipopolysaccharide and ATP showed diminished ROS, IL-1β, interferon-γ and NO production after colchicine treatment. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Colchicine has known anti-inflammatory actions and is used to treat several conditions involving innate immunity, including gout and familial Mediterranean fever. Here we propose a new mechanism of action – inhibition of pore formation induced by activation of P2X receptors – which could explain some of the anti-inflammatory effects of colchicine. LINKED ARTICLE This article is commented on by Pelegrín, pp. 908–911 of this issue. To view this commentary visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1476-5381.2011.01325.x PMID:21306580

  12. adrenergic receptor with preeclampsia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-09

    May 9, 2011 ... expenditure and lipolysis. The mechanisms underlying lipolytic resistance to catecholamines in obesity are not clear and may include desensitization of ADRB2 function. (Yamada et al., 1999). Many studies have reported on the relationship between obesity and genetic variants in β-2 adrenergic receptors ...

  13. Ginkgolides and glycine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jaracz, Stanislav; Nakanishi, Koji; Jensen, Anders A.

    2004-01-01

    Ginkgolides from the Ginkgo biloba tree are diterpenes with a cage structure consisting of six five-membered rings and a unique tBu group. They exert a variety of biological properties. In addition to being antagonists of the platelet activating factor receptor (PAFR), it has recently been shown ...

  14. Meeting report: nuclear receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tuckermann, Jan; Bourguet, William; Mandrup, Susanne

    2010-01-01

    The biannual European Molecular Biology Organization (EMBO) conference on nuclear receptors was organized by Beatrice Desvergne and Laszlo Nagy and took place in Cavtat near Dubrovnik on the Adriatic coast of Croatia September 25-29, 2009. The meeting brought together researchers from all over...

  15. Metformin and insulin receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vigneri, R.; Gullo, D.; Pezzino, V.

    1984-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effect of metformin (N,N-dimethylbiguanide), a biguanide known to be less toxic than phenformin, on insulin binding to its receptors, both in vitro and in vivo. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to cultured IM-9 human lymphocytes and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was determined after preincubation with metformin. Specific 125 I-insulin binding to circulating monocytes was also evaluated in six controls, eight obese subjects, and six obese type II diabetic patients before and after a short-term treatment with metformin. Plasma insulin levels and blood glucose were also measured on both occasions. Metformin significantly increased insulin binding in vitro to both IM-9 lymphocytes and MCF-7 cells; the maximum increment was 47.1% and 38.0%, respectively. Metformin treatment significantly increased insulin binding in vivo to monocytes of obese subjects and diabetic patients. Scatchard analysis indicated that the increased binding was mainly due to an increase in receptor capacity. Insulin binding to monocytes of normal controls was unchanged after metformin as were insulin levels in all groups; blood glucose was significantly reduced after metformin only in diabetic patients. These data indicate that metformin increases insulin binding to its receptors in vitro and in vivo. The effect in vivo is observed in obese subjects and in obese type II diabetic patients, paralleling the clinical effectiveness of this antidiabetic agent, and is not due to receptor regulation by circulating insulin, since no variation in insulin levels was recorded

  16. Angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and receptor Mas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villela, Daniel; Leonhardt, Julia; Patel, Neal

    2015-01-01

    The angiotensin type 2 receptor (AT2R) and the receptor Mas are components of the protective arms of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), i.e. they both mediate tissue protective and regenerative actions. The spectrum of actions of these two receptors and their signalling mechanisms display striking...... the phenomenon of blockade of angiotensin-(1-7) [Ang-(1-7)] actions by AT2R antagonists and vice versa. Such mechanisms may comprise dimerization of the receptors or dimerization-independent mechanisms such as lack of specificity of the receptor ligands used in the experiments or involvement of the Ang-(1...

  17. Mechanisms involved in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-induced neurotransmitter release from sympathetic nerve terminals in the mouse vas deferens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Williams

    Full Text Available Prejunctional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs amplify postganglionic sympathetic neurotransmission, and there are indications that intraterminal Ca(2+ stores might be involved. However, the mechanisms by which nAChR activation stimulates neurotransmitter release at such junctions is unknown. Rapid local delivery (picospritzing of the nAChR agonist epibatidine was combined with intracellular sharp microelectrode recording to monitor spontaneous and field-stimulation-evoked neurotransmitter release from sympathetic nerve terminals in the mouse isolated vas deferens. Locally applied epibatidine (1 µM produced 'epibatidine-induced depolarisations' (EIDs that were similar in shape to spontaneous excitatory junction potentials (SEJPs and were abolished by nonselective nAChR antagonists and the purinergic desensitizing agonist α,β-methylene ATP. The amplitude distribution of EIDs was only slightly shifted towards lower amplitudes by the selective α7 nAChR antagonists α-bungarotoxin and methyllcaconitine, the voltage-gated Na(+ channel blocker tetrodotoxin or by blocking voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels with Cd(2+. Lowering the extracellular Ca(2+ concentration reduced the frequency of EIDs by 69%, but more surprisingly, the Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release blocker ryanodine greatly decreased the amplitude (by 41% and the frequency of EIDs by 36%. Ryanodine had no effect on electrically-evoked neurotransmitter release, paired-pulse facilitation, SEJP frequency, SEJP amplitude or SEJP amplitude distribution. These results show that activation of non-α7 nAChRs on sympathetic postganglionic nerve terminals induces high-amplitude junctional potentials that are argued to represent multipacketed neurotransmitter release synchronized by intraterminal Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release, triggered by Ca(2+ influx directly through the nAChR. This nAChR-induced neurotransmitter release can be targeted pharmacologically without affecting spontaneous or electrically

  18. Role of P2X7 Receptor in an Animal Model of Mania Induced by D-Amphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubert, Carolina; Fries, Gabriel Rodrigo; Pfaffenseller, Bianca; Ferrari, Pâmela; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Morrone, Fernanda Bueno; Kapczinski, Flávio; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the association between the P2X7 purinergic receptor (P2X7R) and neuroinflammation using a preclinical model of acute bipolar mania. We analyzed the modulatory effects of P2X7R agonist (3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl-adenosine 5'-triphosphate, BzATP) and antagonists (brilliant blue, BBG and 3-[[5-(2,3 dichlorophenyl)-1H-tetrazol-1-yl]methyl]pyridine hydrochloride, A438079) on assessments related to behavior (locomotor activity), neuroinflammation (interleukin-1 beta, IL-1β; tumor necrosis factor alpha, TNF-α; and interleukin- 6, IL-6), oxidative stress (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, TBARS) and neuroplasticity (brain-derived neurotrophic factor, BDNF) markers in a pharmacological model of mania induced by acute and chronic treatment with D-amphetamine (AMPH) (2 mg/kg) in mice. An apparent lack of responsiveness to AMPH was observed in terms of the locomotor activity in animals with blocked P2X7R or with genetic deletion of P2X7R in knockout (P2X7R(-/-)) mice. Likewise, P2X7R participated in the AMPH-induced increase of the proinflammatory and excitotoxic environment, as demonstrated by the reversal of IL-1β, TNF-α, and TBARS levels caused by P2X7R blocking. Our results support the hypothesis that P2X7R plays a role in the neuroinflammation induced by AMPH in a preclinical model of mania, which could explain the altered behavior. The present data suggest that P2X7R may be a therapeutic target related to the neuroinflammation reported in bipolar disorder.

  19. P2X7 receptor regulates osteoclast function and bone loss in a mouse model of osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Agrawal, Ankita; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Gartland, Alison

    2018-02-22

    Post-menopausal osteoporosis is a condition that affects millions worldwide and places a huge socio-economic burden on society. Previous research has shown an association of loss of function SNPs in the gene for the purinergic receptor P2X7R with low bone mineral density, increased rates of bone loss and vertebral fractures in post-menopausal women. In this study we use a mouse model of oestrogen deficiency-induced bone loss and the BALB/cJ P2X7R -/- to show that absence of the P2X7R resulted in increased bone loss. Osteoclast precursors were isolated from both BALB/cJ P2X7R -/- and BALB/cJ P2X7R +/+ mice and then cultured in vitro to form mature resorbing osteoclasts. The BALB/cJ P2X7R -/- derived precursors generated slightly more osteoclasts but with a significant reduction in the amount of resorption per osteoclast. Furthermore, when using modified culture conditions osteoclast activity was additionally increased in the absence of the P2X7R suggest that P2X7R may regulate the lifespan and activity of osteoclasts. Finally using mechanical loading as an anabolic stimulus for bone formation, we demonstrated that the increased oestrogen-deficient bone loss could be rescued, even in the absence of P2X7R. This study paves the way for clinical intervention for women with post-menopausal osteoporosis and P2XR7 loss of function polymorphisms.

  20. GABA(A) Increases Calcium in Subventricular Zone Astrocyte-Like Cells Through L- and T-Type Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Young, Stephanie Z; Platel, Jean-Claude; Nielsen, Jakob V

    2010-01-01

    intracellular Ca(2+) dynamics in SVZ astrocytes. To monitor Ca(2+) activity selectively in astrocyte-like cells, we used two lines of transgenic mice expressing either GFP fused to a Gq-coupled receptor or DsRed under the human glial fibrillary acidic protein (hGFAP) promoter. GABA(A) receptor activation......In the adult neurogenic subventricular zone (SVZ), the behavior of astrocyte-like cells and some of their functions depend on changes in intracellular Ca(2+) levels and tonic GABA(A) receptor activation. However, it is unknown whether, and if so how, GABA(A) receptor activity regulates......-like cells to 75%, suggesting that the majority of SVZ astrocytes express functional VGCCs. SVZ astrocytes also displayed spontaneous Ca(2+) activity, the frequency of which was regulated by tonic GABA(A) receptor activation. These data support a role for ambient GABA in tonically regulating intracellular Ca...

  1. Extracellular ATP-induced nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transient is mediated by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors in mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zheng; Li, Zhengzheng; Peng, Gong; Chen, Xiaoli; Yin, Wenxuan [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China); Kotlikoff, Michael I. [Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Yuan, Zeng-qiang, E-mail: zqyuan@sun5.ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China); Ji, Guangju, E-mail: gj28@ibp.ac.cn [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 15 Datun Rd., Beijing 100101 (China)

    2009-05-01

    Extracellular ATP (eATP) induces an intracellular Ca{sup 2+} transient by activating phospholipase C (PLC)-associated P2X4 purinergic receptors, leading to production of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) and subsequent Ca{sup 2+} release from intracellular stores in mouse pancreatic {beta}-cells. Using laser scanning confocal microscopy, Ca{sup 2+} indicator fluo-4 AM, and the cell permeable nuclear indicator Hoechst 33342, we examined the properties of eATP-induced Ca{sup 2+} release in pancreatic {beta}-cell nuclei. eATP induced a higher nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transient in pancreatic {beta}-cell nuclei than in the cytosol. After pretreatment with thapsigargin (TG), an inhibitor of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (SERCA) pumps, the amplitude of eATP-induced Ca{sup 2+} transients in the nucleus was still much higher than those in the cytosol. This effect of eATP was not altered by inhibition of either the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase (PMCA) or the plasma membrane Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchanger (NCX) by LaCl{sub 3} or by replacement of Na{sup +} with N-Methyl-Glucosamine. eATP-induced nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transients were abolished by a cell-permeable IP3R inhibitor, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), but were not blocked by the ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonist ryanodine. Immunofluorescence studies showed that IP3Rs are expressed on the nuclear envelope of pancreatic {beta}-cells. These results indicate that eATP triggers nuclear Ca{sup 2+} transients by mobilizing a nuclear Ca{sup 2+} store via nuclear IP3Rs.

  2. Prostaglandin Receptor Signaling in Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Matsuoka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostanoids, consisting of the prostaglandins (PGs and the thromboxanes (TXs, are a group of lipid mediators formed in response to various stimuli. They include PGD2, PGE2, PGF2α, PGI2, and TXA2. They are released outside of the cells immediately after synthesis, and exert their actions by binding to a G-protein coupled rhodopsin-type receptor on the surface of target cells. There are eight types of the prostanoid receptors conserved in mammals from mouse to human. They are the PGD receptor (DP, four subtypes of the PGE receptor (EP1, EP2, EP3, and EP4, the PGF receptor (FP, PGI receptor (IP, and TXA receptor (TP. Recently, mice deficient in each of these prostanoid receptors were generated and subjected to various experimental models of disease. These studies have revealed the roles of PG receptor signaling in various pathological conditions, and suggest that selective manipulation of the prostanoid receptors may be beneficial in treatment of the pathological conditions. Here we review these recent findings of roles of prostanoid receptor signaling and their therapeutic implications.

  3. Receptors for enterovirus 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamayoshi, Seiya; Fujii, Ken; Koike, Satoshi

    2014-07-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the major causative agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD). Occasionally, EV71 infection is associated with severe neurological diseases, such as acute encephalitis, acute flaccid paralysis and cardiopulmonary failure. Several molecules act as cell surface receptors that stimulate EV71 infection, including scavenger receptor B2 (SCARB2), P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), sialylated glycan, heparan sulfate and annexin II (Anx2). SCARB2 plays critical roles in attachment, viral entry and uncoating, and it can facilitate efficient EV71 infection. The three-dimensional structures of the mature EV71 virion, procapsid and empty capsid, as well as the exofacial domain of SCARB2, have been elucidated. This structural information has greatly increased our understanding of the early steps of EV71 infection. Furthermore, SCARB2 plays essential roles in the development of EV71 neurological disease in vivo. Adult mice are not susceptible to infection by EV71, but transgenic mice that express human SCARB2 become susceptible to EV71 infection and develop similar neurological diseases to those found in humans. This mouse model facilitates the in vivo investigation of many issues related to EV71. PSGL-1, sialylated glycan, heparan sulfate and Anx2 are attachment receptors, which enhance viral infection by retaining the virus on the cell surface. These molecules also contribute to viral infection in vitro either by interacting with SCARB2 or independently of SCARB2. However, the cooperative effects of these receptors, and their contribution to EV71 pathogenicity in vivo, remain to be elucidated.

  4. The interleukin-4 receptor: signal transduction by a hematopoietin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, A D; Pierce, J H

    1994-02-01

    Over the last several years, the receptors for numerous cytokines have been molecularly characterized. Analysis of their amino acid sequences shows that some of these receptors bear certain motifs in their extracellular domains that define a family of receptors called the Hematopoietin receptor superfamily. Significant advances in characterizing the structure, function, and mechanisms of signal transduction have been made for several members of this family. The purpose of this review is to discuss the recent advances made for one of the family members, the interleukin (IL) 4 receptor. Other receptor systems have recently been reviewed elsewhere. The IL-4 receptor consists of, at the minimum, the cloned 140 kDa IL-4-binding chain with the potential for associating with other chains. The IL-4 receptor transduces its signal by activating a tyrosine kinase that phosphorylates cellular substrates, including the receptor itself, and the 170 kDa substrate called 4PS. Phosphorylated 4PS interacts with the SH2 domain of the enzyme PI-3'-kinase and increases its enzymatic activity. These early events in the IL-4 receptor initiated signaling pathway may trigger a series of signals that will ultimately lead to an IL-4 specific biologic outcome.

  5. Evolutionary analysis of functional divergence among chemokine receptors, decoy receptors and viral receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiromi eDaiyasu

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Chemokine receptors (CKRs function in the inflammatory response and in vertebrate homeostasis. Decoy and viral receptors are two types of CKR homologues with modified functions from those of the typical CKRs. The decoy receptors are able to bind ligands without signaling. On the other hand, the viral receptors show constitutive signaling without ligands. We examined the sites related to the functional difference. At first, the decoy and viral receptors were each classified into five groups, based on the molecular phylogenetic analysis. A multiple amino acid sequence alignment between each group and the CKRs was then constructed. The difference in the amino acid composition between the group and the CKRs was evaluated as the Kullback-Leibler (KL information value at each alignment site. The KL information value is considered to reflect the difference in the functional constraints at the site. The sites with the top 5% of KL information values were selected and mapped on the structure of a CKR. The comparisons with decoy receptor groups revealed that the detected sites were biased on the intracellular side. In contrast, the sites detected from the comparisons with viral receptor groups were found on both the extracellular and intracellular sides. More sites were found in the ligand-binding pocket in the analyses of the viral receptor groups, as compared to the decoy receptor groups. Some of the detected sites were located in the GPCR motifs. For example, the DRY motif of the decoy receptors was often degraded, although the motif of the viral receptors was basically conserved. The observations for the viral receptor groups suggested that the constraints in the pocket region are loose and that the sites on the intracellular side are different from those for the decoy receptors, which may be related to the constitutive signaling activity of the viral receptors.

  6. Melatonin Receptor Genes in Vertebrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dong Yin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin receptors are members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR family. Three genes for melatonin receptors have been cloned. The MT1 (or Mel1a or MTNR1A and MT2 (or Mel1b or MTNR1B receptor subtypes are present in humans and other mammals, while an additional melatonin receptor subtype, Mel1c (or MTNR1C, has been identified in fish, amphibians and birds. Another melatonin related orphan receptor, GPR50, which does not bind melatonin, is found exclusively in mammals. The hormone melatonin is secreted primarily by the pineal gland, with highest levels occurring during the dark period of a circadian cycle. This hormone acts systemically in numerous organs. In the brain, it is involved in the regulation of various neural and endocrine processes, and it readjusts the circadian pacemaker, the suprachiasmatic nucleus. This article reviews recent studies of gene organization, expression, evolution and mutations of melatonin receptor genes of vertebrates. Gene polymorphisms reveal that numerous mutations are associated with diseases and disorders. The phylogenetic analysis of receptor genes indicates that GPR50 is an outgroup to all other melatonin receptor sequences. GPR50 may have separated from a melatonin receptor ancestor before the split between MTNR1C and the MTNR1A/B ancestor.

  7. Long non‑coding RNA BC168687 small interfering RNA reduces high glucose and high free fatty acid‑induced expression of P2X7 receptors in satellite glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cheng-Long; Deng, Ze-Yu; Du, Er-Rong; Xu, Chang-Shui

    2018-04-01

    Purinergic signaling contributes to inflammatory and immune responses. The activation of the P2X purinoceptor 7 (P2X7) in satellite glial cells (SGCs) may be an essential component in the promotion of inflammation and neuropathic pain. Long non‑coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in multiple physiological and pathological processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of a small interfering RNA for the lncRNA BC168687 on SGC P2X7 expression in a high glucose and high free fatty acids (HGHF) environment. It was demonstrated that BC168687 small interfering (si)RNA downregulated the co‑expression of the P2X7 and glial fibrillary acidic protein and P2X7 mRNA expression. Additionally, HGHF may activate the mitogen‑activated protein kinase signaling pathway by increasing the release of nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in SGCs. Taken together, these results indicate that silencing BC168687 expression may downregulate the increased expression of P2X7 receptors in SGCs induced by a HGHF environment.

  8. Flavivirus Entry Receptors: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Perera-Lecoin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses enter host cells by endocytosis initiated when the virus particles interact with cell surface receptors. The current model suggests that flaviviruses use at least two different sets of molecules for infectious entry: attachment factors that concentrate and/or recruit viruses on the cell surface and primary receptor(s that bind to virions and direct them to the endocytic pathway. Here, we present the currently available knowledge regarding the flavivirus receptors described so far with specific attention to C-type lectin receptors and the phosphatidylserine receptors, T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (TIM and TYRO3, AXL and MER (TAM. Their role in flavivirus attachment and entry as well as their implication in the virus biology will be discussed in depth.

  9. Dimerization of nuclear receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germain, Pierre; Bourguet, William

    2013-01-01

    Multicellular organisms require specific intercellular communication to properly organize the complex body plan during embryogenesis and maintain its properties and functions during the entire life. While growth factors, neurotransmitters, and peptide hormones bind to membrane receptors, thereby inducing the activity of intracellular kinase cascades or the JAK-STAT signaling pathways, other small signaling compounds such as steroid hormones, certain vitamins, and metabolic intermediates enter, or are generated, within the target cells and bind to members of a large family of nuclear receptors (NRs). NRs are ligand-inducible transcription factors that control a plethora of biological phenomena, thus orchestrating complex events like development, organ homeostasis, immune function, and reproduction. NR-NR interactions are of major importance in these regulatory processes, as NRs regulate their target genes by binding to cognate DNA response elements essentially as homo- or heterodimers. A number of structural and functional studies have provided significant insights as to how combinatorial NRs rely on protein-protein contacts that discriminate geometric features of their DNA response elements, thereby allowing both binding site diversity and physiological specificity. Here, we will review our current understanding of NR-NR interactions and provide protocols for a number of experimental approaches that are useful for their study. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Receptor studies in biological psychiatry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Yutaka

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in the pharmacological treatment of endogenous psychosis have led to the development of biological studies in psychiatry. Studies on neurotransmitter receptors were reviewed in order to apply positron-emission tomograph (PET) for biological psychiatry. The dopamine (DA) hypothesis for schizophrenia was advanced on the basis of the observed effects of neuroleptics and methamphetamine, and DA(D 2 ) receptor supersensitivity measured by PET and receptor binding in the schizophrenic brain. The clinical potencies of neuroleptics for schizophrenia were correlated with their abilities to inhibit the D 2 receptor, and not other receptors. The σ receptor was expected to be a site of antipsychotic action. However, the potency of drugs action on it was not correlated with clinical efficacy. Haloperidol binds with high affinity to the σ receptor, which may mediate acute dystonia, an extrapyramidal side effect of neuroleptics. Behavioral and neurochemical changes induced by methamphetamine treatment were studied as an animal model of schizophrenia, and both a decrease of D 2 receptor density and an increase of DA release were detected. The monoamine hypothesis for manic-depressive psychosis was advanced on the basis of the effect of reserpine, monoamine oxidase inhibitor and antidepressants. 3 H-clonidine binding sites were increased in platelet membranes of depressive patients, 3 H-imipramine binding sites were decreased. The GABA A receptor is the target site for the action of anxiolytics and antiepileptics such as benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Recent developments in molecular biology techniques have revealed the structure of receptor proteins, which are classified into two receptor families, the G-protein coupled type (D 2 ) and the ion-channel type (GABA A ). (J.P.N.)

  11. Possible Relevance of Receptor-Receptor Interactions between Viral- and Host-Coded Receptors for Viral-Induced Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi F. Agnati

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that some viruses, such as the cytomegalovirus, code for G-protein coupled receptors not only to elude the immune system, but also to redirect cellular signaling in the receptor networks of the host cells. In view of the existence of receptor-receptor interactions, the hypothesis is introduced that these viral-coded receptors not only operate as constitutively active monomers, but also can affect other receptor function by interacting with receptors of the host cell. Furthermore, it is suggested that viruses could also insert not single receptors (monomers, but clusters of receptors (receptor mosaics, altering the cell metabolism in a profound way. The prevention of viral receptor-induced changes in host receptor networks may give rise to novel antiviral drugs that counteract viral-induced disease.

  12. Heterozygosity for the Mood Disorder-Associated Variant Gln460Arg Alters P2X7 Receptor Function and Sleep Quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Michael W; Walser, Sandra M; Dedic, Nina; Aprile-Garcia, Fernando; Jakubcakova, Vladimira; Adamczyk, Marek; Webb, Katharine J; Uhr, Manfred; Refojo, Damian; Schmidt, Mathias V; Friess, Elisabeth; Steiger, Axel; Kimura, Mayumi; Chen, Alon; Holsboer, Florian; Arzt, Eduardo; Wurst, Wolfgang; Deussing, Jan M

    2017-11-29

    A single nucleotide polymorphism substitution from glutamine (Gln, Q) to arginine (Arg, R) at codon 460 of the purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) has repeatedly been associated with mood disorders. The P2X7R-Gln460Arg variant per se is not compromised in its function. However, heterologous expression of P2X7R-Gln460Arg together with wild-type P2X7R has recently been demonstrated to impair receptor function. Here we show that this also applies to humanized mice coexpressing both human P2X7R variants. Primary hippocampal cells derived from heterozygous mice showed an attenuated calcium uptake upon agonist stimulation. While humanized mice were unaffected in their behavioral repertoire under basal housing conditions, mice that harbor both P2X7R variants showed alterations in their sleep quality resembling signs of a prodromal disease stage. Also healthy heterozygous human subjects showed mild changes in sleep parameters. These results indicate that heterozygosity for the wild-type P2X7R and its mood disorder-associated variant P2X7R-Gln460Arg represents a genetic risk factor, which is potentially able to convey susceptibility to mood disorders. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Depression and bipolar disorder are the most common mood disorders. The P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) regulates many cellular functions. Its polymorphic variant Gln460Arg has repeatedly been associated with mood disorders. Genetically engineered mice, with human P2X7R, revealed that heterozygous mice (i.e., they coexpress the disease-associated Gln460Arg variant together with its normal version) have impaired receptor function and showed sleep disturbances. Human participants with the heterozygote genotype also had subtle alterations in their sleep profile. Our findings suggest that altered P2X7R function in heterozygote individuals disturbs sleep and might increase the risk for developing mood disorders. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/3711688-13$15.00/0.

  13. Peptide Receptor Radionuclide Therapy & Oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Bergsma (Hendrik)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractNeuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are rare neoplasms with differences in clinical presentation, course and prognosis. Most of the NETs express the somatostatine receptor, which can be utilized for imaging and therapy. Radiolabeled somatostatin analogs can be used for peptide receptor

  14. Hydrocarbon Receptor Pathway in Dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steenbeek, F.G. van; Spee, B.; Penning, L.C.; Kummeling, A.; Gils, I.H.M.; Grinwis, G.C.M.; Leenen, D. van; Holstege, F.C.P.; Vos-Loohuis, M.; Rothuizen, J.; Leegwater, P.A.J.

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates biological responses to toxic chemicals. An unexpected role for AHR in vascularization was suggested when mice lacking AHR displayed impaired closure of the ductus venosus after birth, as did knockout mice for aryl hydrocarbon receptor interacting

  15. Coronavirus spike-receptor interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mou, H.

    2015-01-01

    Coronaviruses cause important diseases in humans and animals. Coronavirus infection starts with the virus binding with its spike proteins to molecules present on the surface of host cells that act as receptors. This spike-receptor interaction is highly specific and determines the virus’ cell, tissue

  16. Neurobeachin regulates neurotransmitter receptor trafficking to synapses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nair, R.; Lauks, J.; Jung, S; Cooke, N.E.; de Wit, H.; Brose, N.; Kilimann, M.W.; Verhage, M.; Rhee, J.

    2013-01-01

    The surface density of neurotransmitter receptors at synapses is a key determinant of synaptic efficacy. Synaptic receptor accumulation is regulated by the transport, postsynaptic anchoring, and turnover of receptors, involving multiple trafficking, sorting, motor, and scaffold proteins. We found

  17. Probing Biased Signaling in Chemokine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amarandi, Roxana Maria; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine system mediates leukocyte migration during homeostatic and inflammatory processes. Traditionally, it is described as redundant and promiscuous, with a single chemokine ligand binding to different receptors and a single receptor having several ligands. Signaling of chemokine receptor...

  18. Dopamine Receptors and Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hisahara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive extrapyramidal motor disorder. Pathologically, this disease is characterized by the selective dopaminergic (DAergic neuronal degeneration in the substantia nigra. Correcting the DA deficiency in PD with levodopa (L-dopa significantly attenuates the motor symptoms; however, its effectiveness often declines, and L-dopa-related adverse effects emerge after long-term treatment. Nowadays, DA receptor agonists are useful medication even regarded as first choice to delay the starting of L-dopa therapy. In advanced stage of PD, they are also used as adjunct therapy together with L-dopa. DA receptor agonists act by stimulation of presynaptic and postsynaptic DA receptors. Despite the usefulness, they could be causative drugs for valvulopathy and nonmotor complication such as DA dysregulation syndrome (DDS. In this paper, physiological characteristics of DA receptor familyare discussed. We also discuss the validity, benefits, and specific adverse effects of pharmaceutical DA receptor agonist.

  19. Ryanodine receptor channelopathies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betzenhauser, Matthew J.

    2010-01-01

    Ryanodine receptors (RyR) are intracellular Ca2+-permeable channels that provide the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release required for skeletal and cardiac muscle contractions. RyR1 underlies skeletal muscle contraction, and RyR2 fulfills this role in cardiac muscle. Over the past 20 years, numerous mutations in both RyR isoforms have been identified and linked to skeletal and cardiac diseases. Malignant hyperthermia, central core disease, and catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia have been genetically linked to mutations in either RyR1 or RyR2. Thus, RyR channelopathies are both of interest because they cause significant human diseases and provide model systems that can be studied to elucidate important structure–function relationships of these ion channels. PMID:20179962

  20. Molecular characterization of opioid receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howard, A.D.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this research was to purify and characterize active opioid receptors and elucidate molecular aspects of opioid receptor heterogeneity. Purification to apparent homogeneity of an opioid binding protein from bovine caudate was achieved by solubilization in the non-ionic detergent, digitonin, followed by sequential chromatography on the opiate affinity matrix, ..beta..-naltrexylethylenediamine-CH-Sepharose 4B, and on the lectine affinity matrix, wheat germ agglutinin-agarose. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) followed by autoradiography revealed that radioiodinated purified receptor gave a single band. Purified receptor preparations showed a specific activity of 12,000-15,000 fmol of opiate bound per mg of protein. Radioiodinated human beta-endorphin (/sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/) was used as a probe to investigate the ligand binding subunits of mu and delta opioid receptors. /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ was shown to bind to a variety of opioid receptor-containing tissues with high affinity and specificity with preference for mu and delta sites, and with little, if any, binding to kappa sites. Affinity crosslinking techniques were employed to covalently link /sup 125/I-beta-end/sub H/ to opioid receptors, utilizing derivatives of bis-succinimidyl esters that are bifunctional crosslinkers with specificities for amino and sulfhydryl groups. This, and competition experiments with high type-selective ligands, permitted the assignment of two labeled peptides to their receptor types, namely a peptide of M/sub r/ = 65,000 for mu receptors and one of M/sub r/ = 53,000 for delta receptors.

  1. Estrogen-related receptor β (ERRβ) - renaissance receptor or receptor renaissance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divekar, Shailaja D; Tiek, Deanna M; Fernandez, Aileen; Riggins, Rebecca B

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related receptors (ERRs) are founding members of the orphan nuclear receptor (ONR) subgroup of the nuclear receptor superfamily. Twenty-seven years of study have yet to identify cognate ligands for the ERRs, though they have firmly placed ERRα and ERRγ at the intersection of cellular metabolism and oncogenesis. The pace of discovery for novel functions of ERRβ, however, has until recently been somewhat slower than that of its family members. ERRβ has also been largely ignored in summaries and perspectives of the ONR literature. Here, we provide an overview of established and emerging knowledge of ERRβ in mouse, man, and other species, highlighting unique aspects of ERRβ biology that set it apart from the other two estrogen-related receptors, with a focus on the impact of alternative splicing on the structure and function of this receptor.

  2. Corticosteroids decrease glomerular angiotensin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas, J.G.

    1987-03-01

    Angiotensin II (ANG II) receptors of glomerular mesangial cells are regulated in vivo by changes in Na balance, effects that are presumed to be secondary to changes in circulating ANG II. However, since changes in ANG II were accompanied by parallel changes in plasma aldosterone in all models tested, it is possible that aldosterone may have also participated in the modulation of glomerular ANG II receptors. To test this hypothesis, short-term aldosterone infusions within the physiological range were employed to favor actions that would be mediated through a high-affinity mineralocorticoid receptor. The glucocorticoid, dexamethasone, was also tested to determine the mineralocorticoid specificity of the response. Two infusion rates were associated with a decrease in glomerular /sup 125/I ANG II receptor density of 33 and 45%, respectively. Serum potassium and urinary Na/K ratio were lower in the aldosterone group. Spironolactone abolished the effect of aldosterone consistent with an action mediated through a specific mineralocorticoid receptor. These studies support the hypothesis that corticosteroids modulate glomerular ANG II receptors and validate the complexity of glomerular receptor modulation. The downregulation observed would be expected to diminish the ability of ANG II to influence glomerular hemodynamics in models such as mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid-induced hypertension.

  3. Radioiodinated ligands for dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kung, H.F.

    1994-01-01

    The dopamine receptor system is important for normal brain function; it is also the apparent action site for various neuroleptic drugs for the treatment of schizophrenia and other metal disorders. In the past few years radioiodinated ligands for single photon emission tomography (SPECT) have been successfully developed and tested in humans: [ 123 I]TISCH for D1 dopamine receptors; [ 123 I]IBZM, epidepride, IBF and FIDA2, four iodobenzamide derivatives, for D2/D3 dopamine receptors. In addition, [ 123 I]β-CIT (RTI-55) and IPT, cocaine derivatives, for the dopamine reuptake site are potentially useful for diagnosis of loss of dopamine neurons. The first iodinated ligand, (R)trans-7-OH-PIPAT, for D3 dopamine receptors, was synthesized and characterized with cloned cell lines (Spodoptera frugiperda, Sf9) expressing the D2 and D3 dopamine receptors and with rat basal forebrain membrane preparations. Most of the known iodobenzamides displayed similar potency in binding to both D2 and D3 dopamine receptors expressed in the cell lines. Initial studies appear to suggest that by fine tuning the structures it may be possible to develop agents specific for D2 and D3 dopamine receptors. It is important to investigate D2/D3 selectivity for this series of potent ligands

  4. Lysophospholipid receptors in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Yasuyuki; Mizuno, Hirotaka; Chun, Jerold

    2015-05-01

    Lysophospholipids (LPs), including lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), sphingosine 1-phospate (S1P), lysophosphatidylinositol (LPI), and lysophosphatidylserine (LysoPS), are bioactive lipids that transduce signals through their specific cell-surface G protein-coupled receptors, LPA1-6, S1P1-5, LPI1, and LysoPS1-3, respectively. These LPs and their receptors have been implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological processes such as autoimmune diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, fibrosis, pain, cancer, inflammation, metabolic syndrome, bone formation, fertility, organismal development, and other effects on most organ systems. Advances in the LP receptor field have enabled the development of novel small molecules targeting LP receptors for several diseases. Most notably, fingolimod (FTY720, Gilenya, Novartis), an S1P receptor modulator, became the first FDA-approved medicine as an orally bioavailable drug for treating relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. This success is currently being followed by multiple, mechanistically related compounds targeting S1P receptor subtypes, which are in various stages of clinical development. In addition, an LPA1 antagonist, BMS-986020 (Bristol-Myers Squibb), is in Phase 2 clinical development for treating idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, as a distinct compound, SAR100842 (Sanofi) for the treatment of systemic sclerosis and related fibrotic diseases. This review summarizes the current state of drug discovery in the LP receptor field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Pulmonary infection with hypervirulent Mycobacteria reveals a crucial role for the P2X7 receptor in aggressive forms of tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo P Amaral

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R is a sensor of extracellular ATP, a damage-associated molecule that is released from necrotic cells and that induces pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cell death. To investigate whether the innate immune response to damage signals could contribute to the development of pulmonary necrotic lesions in severe forms of tuberculosis, disease progression was examined in C57BL/6 and P2X7R-/- mice that were intratracheally infected with highly virulent mycobacterial strains (Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain 1471 of the Beijing genotype family and Mycobacterium bovis strain MP287/03. The low-dose infection of C57BL/6 mice with bacteria of these strains caused the rapid development of extensive granulomatous pneumonia with necrotic areas, intense bacillus dissemination and anticipated animal death. In contrast, in P2X7R-/- mice, the lung pathology presented with moderate infiltrates of mononuclear leukocytes without visible signs of necrosis; the disease attenuation was accompanied by a delay in mortality. In vitro, the hypervirulent mycobacteria grew rapidly inside macrophages and induced death by a P2X7R-dependent mechanism that facilitated the release of bacilli. Furthermore, these bacteria were resistant to the protective mechanisms elicited in macrophages following extracellular ATP stimulation. Based on this study, we propose that the rapid intracellular growth of hypervirulent mycobacteria results in massive macrophage damage. The ATP released by damaged cells engages P2X7R and accelerates the necrotic death of infected macrophages and the release of bacilli. This vicious cycle exacerbates pneumonia and lung necrosis by promoting widespread cell destruction and bacillus dissemination. These findings suggest the use of drugs that have been designed to inhibit the P2X7R as a new therapeutic approach to treat the aggressive forms of tuberculosis.

  6. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, ecstasy) disrupts blood-brain barrier integrity through a mechanism involving P2X7 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Araiz, Ana; Perez-Hernandez, Mercedes; Urrutia, Andrés; Porcu, Francesca; Borcel, Erika; Gutierrez-Lopez, Maria Dolores; O'Shea, Esther; Colado, Maria Isabel

    2014-08-01

    The recreational drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA; 'ecstasy') produces a neuro-inflammatory response in rats characterized by an increase in microglial activation and IL-1β levels. The integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is important in preserving the homeostasis of the brain and has been shown to be affected by neuro-inflammatory processes. We aimed to study the effect of a single dose of MDMA on the activity of metalloproteinases (MMPs), expression of extracellular matrix proteins, BBB leakage and the role of the ionotropic purinergic receptor P2X7 (P2X7R) in the changes induced by the drug. Adult male Dark Agouti rats were treated with MDMA (10 mg/kg, i.p.) and killed at several time-points in order to evaluate MMP-9 and MMP-3 activity in the hippocampus and laminin and collagen-IV expression and IgG extravasation in the dentate gyrus. Microglial activation, P2X7R expression and localization were also determined in the dentate gyrus. Separate groups were treated with MDMA and the P2X7R antagonists Brilliant Blue G (BBG; 50 mg/kg, i.p.) or A-438079 (30 mg/kg, i.p.). MDMA increased MMP-3 and MMP-9 activity, reduced laminin and collagen-IV expression and increased IgG immunoreactivity. In addition, MDMA increased microglial activation and P2X7R immunoreactivity in these cells. BBG suppressed the increase in MMP-9 and MMP-3 activity, prevented basal lamina degradation and IgG extravasation into the brain parenchyma. A-438079 also prevented the MDMA-induced reduction in laminin and collagen-IV immunoreactivity. These results indicate that MDMA alters BBB permeability through an early P2X7R-mediated event, which in turn leads to enhancement of MMP-9 and MMP-3 activity and degradation of extracellular matrix.

  7. Pulmonary Infection with Hypervirulent Mycobacteria Reveals a Crucial Role for the P2X7 Receptor in Aggressive Forms of Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaral, Eduardo P.; Ribeiro, Simone C. M.; Lanes, Verônica R.; Almeida, Fabrício M.; de Andrade, Marcelle R. M.; Bomfim, Caio Cesar Barbosa; Salles, Érika M.; Bortoluci, Karina R.; Coutinho-Silva, Robson; Hirata, Mario H.; Alvarez, José M.; Lasunskaia, Elena B.; D'Império-Lima, Maria Regina

    2014-01-01

    The purinergic P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) is a sensor of extracellular ATP, a damage-associated molecule that is released from necrotic cells and that induces pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cell death. To investigate whether the innate immune response to damage signals could contribute to the development of pulmonary necrotic lesions in severe forms of tuberculosis, disease progression was examined in C57BL/6 and P2X7R−/− mice that were intratracheally infected with highly virulent mycobacterial strains (Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain 1471 of the Beijing genotype family and Mycobacterium bovis strain MP287/03). The low-dose infection of C57BL/6 mice with bacteria of these strains caused the rapid development of extensive granulomatous pneumonia with necrotic areas, intense bacillus dissemination and anticipated animal death. In contrast, in P2X7R−/− mice, the lung pathology presented with moderate infiltrates of mononuclear leukocytes without visible signs of necrosis; the disease attenuation was accompanied by a delay in mortality. In vitro, the hypervirulent mycobacteria grew rapidly inside macrophages and induced death by a P2X7R-dependent mechanism that facilitated the release of bacilli. Furthermore, these bacteria were resistant to the protective mechanisms elicited in macrophages following extracellular ATP stimulation. Based on this study, we propose that the rapid intracellular growth of hypervirulent mycobacteria results in massive macrophage damage. The ATP released by damaged cells engages P2X7R and accelerates the necrotic death of infected macrophages and the release of bacilli. This vicious cycle exacerbates pneumonia and lung necrosis by promoting widespread cell destruction and bacillus dissemination. These findings suggest the use of drugs that have been designed to inhibit the P2X7R as a new therapeutic approach to treat the aggressive forms of tuberculosis. PMID:24991816

  8. P2X7 Receptor Mediates Spinal Microglia Activation of Visceral Hyperalgesia in a Rat Model of Chronic PancreatitisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yi Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Molecular mechanisms underlying the activated spinal microglia in association with the pain in chronic pancreatitis (CP remain unknown. We tested whether P2X7R on spinal microglia mediates the pathogenesis of visceral pain using a CP rat model. Methods: The CP model was induced via intraductal injection of 2% trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid into male Sprague-Dawley rats. Hyperalgesia was assessed based on the mechanical sensitivity to Von-Frey filaments (VFFs, and nocifensive behaviors were measured in response to electrical stimulation of the pancreas. Three weeks after CP induction, spinal cord samples were harvested for immunostaining, immunoblot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses of the P2X7R. Changes in nocifensive behaviors and associated molecular effectors were assessed by blocking spinal cord P2X7R pharmacologically using the selective P2X7R antagonist brilliant blue G (BBG or genetically using short interfering RNA (siRNA. Results: CP induced a significant up-regulation of spinal P2X7R expression, which colocalized with a microglial marker (OX-42. Intrathecal administration of BBG significantly attenuated CP-related visceral hyperalgesia in response to VFF-mediated or electrical stimulation of the pancreas, which was associated with suppressed spinal expression of P2X7R and inhibited activation of spinal microglia. Intrathecal injection of siRNA to knock down P2X7R expression in the spinal cord would suppress the nociceptive behaviors in CP rats. Conclusions: Spinal microglia P2X7R mediates central sensitization of chronic visceral pain in CP. BBG may represent an effective drug for the treatment of chronic pain in CP patients. Keywords: Brilliant Blue G, Chronic Visceral Pain, Purinergic Receptors, siRNA Knockdown

  9. A transient receptor potential channel expressed in taste receptor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Cristian A; Huang, Liquan; Rong, Minqing; Kozak, J Ashot; Preuss, Axel K; Zhang, Hailin; Max, Marianna; Margolskee, Robert F

    2002-11-01

    We used differential screening of cDNAs from individual taste receptor cells to identify candidate taste transduction elements in mice. Among the differentially expressed clones, one encoded Trpm5, a member of the mammalian family of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. We found Trpm5 to be expressed in a restricted manner, with particularly high levels in taste tissue. In taste cells, Trpm5 was coexpressed with taste-signaling molecules such as alpha-gustducin, Ggamma13, phospholipase C-beta2 (PLC-beta2) and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor type III (IP3R3). Our heterologous expression studies of Trpm5 indicate that it functions as a cationic channel that is gated when internal calcium stores are depleted. Trpm5 may be responsible for capacitative calcium entry in taste receptor cells that respond to bitter and/or sweet compounds.

  10. Quantitative receptor radioautography in the study of receptor-receptor interactions in the nucleus tractus solitarii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fior-Chadi D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS in the dorsomedial medulla comprises a wide range of neuropeptides and biogenic amines. Several of them are related to mechanisms of central blood pressure control. Angiotensin II (Ang II, neuropeptide Y (NPY and noradrenaline (NA are found in the NTS cells, as well as their receptors. Based on this observation we have evaluated the modulatory effect of these peptide receptors on a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. Using quantitative receptor radioautography, we observed that NPY and Ang II receptors decreased the affinity of a2-adrenoceptors for their agonists in the NTS of the rat. Cardiovascular experiments agreed with the in vitro data. Coinjection of a threshold dose of Ang II or of the NPY agonists together with an ED50 dose of adrenergic agonists such as NA, adrenaline and clonidine counteracted the depressor effect produced by the a2-agonist in the NTS. The results provide evidence for the existence of an antagonistic interaction between Ang II at1 receptors and NPY receptor subtypes with the a2-adrenoceptors in the NTS. This receptor interaction may reduce the transduction over the a2-adrenoceptors which can be important in central cardiovascular regulation and in the development of hypertension

  11. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA...... or slightly lower potencies than (S)-AA [e.g., EC(50) = 76 microM for (2S,4S)-4-methyl-AA (5a) as compared to EC(50) = 35 microM for (S)-AA]. The position of the methyl substituent had a profound effect on the observed pharmacology, whereas the absolute stereochemistry at the methylated carbon atom had a very......) analogs, and the synthesis, stereochemistry, and enantiopharmacology of 3-methyl-AA (4a-d), 4-methyl-AA (5a-d), 5-methyl-AA (6a-d), and (E)-Delta(4)-5-methyl-AA (7a and 7b) are reported. The compounds were resolved using chiral HPLC and the configurational assignments of the enantiomers were based on X...

  12. Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Nuclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) is designed to foster the development of a comprehensive understanding of the structure, function, and role in disease...

  13. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  14. Receptor-targeted metalloradiopharmaceuticals. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    Copper (II) and platinum (II) coordination complexes were prepared and characterized. These complexes were designed to afford structural homology with steroidal and non-steroidal estrogens for possible use as receptor-targeted radiopharmaceuticals. While weak affinity for the estrogen receptor was detectable, none would appear to have sufficient receptor-affinity for estrogen-receptor-targeted imaging or therapy

  15. [The receptor theory of atherosclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likhoded, V G; Bondarenko, V M; Gintsburg, A L

    2010-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides of Gram-negative bacteria can interact with Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and induce atheroma formation. The risk of atherosclerosis is decreased in case of TLR4 mutation. Other bacterial ligands and endogenous ligands of TLRs can also be involved in induction of atherogenesis. The general concept of atherosclerosis pathogentsis is presented. According to this concept atherogenesis can be initiated by some reactions resulting from interaction of exogenous and endogenous microbial ligands with Toll-like receptors.

  16. The A2B Adenosine Receptor Modulates the Epithelial– Mesenchymal Transition through the Balance of cAMP/PKA and MAPK/ERK Pathway Activation in Human Epithelial Lung Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Giacomelli

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT is a complex process in which cell phenotype switches from the epithelial to mesenchymal one. The deregulations of this process have been related with the occurrence of different diseases such as lung cancer and fibrosis. In the last decade, several efforts have been devoted in understanding the mechanisms that trigger and sustain this transition process. Adenosine is a purinergic signaling molecule that has been involved in the onset and progression of chronic lung diseases and cancer through the A2B adenosine receptor subtype activation, too. However, the relationship between A2BAR and EMT has not been investigated, yet. Herein, the A2BAR characterization was carried out in human epithelial lung cells. Moreover, the effects of receptor activation on EMT were investigated in the absence and presence of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1, which has been known to promote the transition. The A2BAR activation alone decreased and increased the expression of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and the mesenchymal one (Vimentin, N-cadherin, respectively, nevertheless a complete EMT was not observed. Surprisingly, the receptor activation counteracted the EMT induced by TGF-β1. Several intracellular pathways regulate the EMT: high levels of cAMP and ERK1/2 phosphorylation has been demonstrated to counteract and promote the transition, respectively. The A2BAR stimulation was able to modulated these two pathways, cAMP/PKA and MAPK/ERK, shifting the fine balance toward activation or inhibition of EMT. In fact, using a selective PKA inhibitor, which blocks the cAMP pathway, the A2BAR-mediated EMT promotion were exacerbated, and conversely the selective inhibition of MAPK/ERK counteracted the receptor-induced transition. These results highlighted the A2BAR as one of the receptors involved in the modulation of EMT process. Nevertheless, its activation is not enough to trigger a complete transition, its ability to

  17. The A2B Adenosine Receptor Modulates the Epithelial– Mesenchymal Transition through the Balance of cAMP/PKA and MAPK/ERK Pathway Activation in Human Epithelial Lung Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, Chiara; Daniele, Simona; Romei, Chiara; Tavanti, Laura; Neri, Tommaso; Piano, Ilaria; Celi, Alessandro; Martini, Claudia; Trincavelli, Maria L.

    2018-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex process in which cell phenotype switches from the epithelial to mesenchymal one. The deregulations of this process have been related with the occurrence of different diseases such as lung cancer and fibrosis. In the last decade, several efforts have been devoted in understanding the mechanisms that trigger and sustain this transition process. Adenosine is a purinergic signaling molecule that has been involved in the onset and progression of chronic lung diseases and cancer through the A2B adenosine receptor subtype activation, too. However, the relationship between A2BAR and EMT has not been investigated, yet. Herein, the A2BAR characterization was carried out in human epithelial lung cells. Moreover, the effects of receptor activation on EMT were investigated in the absence and presence of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β1), which has been known to promote the transition. The A2BAR activation alone decreased and increased the expression of epithelial markers (E-cadherin) and the mesenchymal one (Vimentin, N-cadherin), respectively, nevertheless a complete EMT was not observed. Surprisingly, the receptor activation counteracted the EMT induced by TGF-β1. Several intracellular pathways regulate the EMT: high levels of cAMP and ERK1/2 phosphorylation has been demonstrated to counteract and promote the transition, respectively. The A2BAR stimulation was able to modulated these two pathways, cAMP/PKA and MAPK/ERK, shifting the fine balance toward activation or inhibition of EMT. In fact, using a selective PKA inhibitor, which blocks the cAMP pathway, the A2BAR-mediated EMT promotion were exacerbated, and conversely the selective inhibition of MAPK/ERK counteracted the receptor-induced transition. These results highlighted the A2BAR as one of the receptors involved in the modulation of EMT process. Nevertheless, its activation is not enough to trigger a complete transition, its ability to affect different

  18. Odorant Receptor Desensitization in Insects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Guo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Insects and other arthropods transmit devastating human diseases, and these vectors use chemical senses to target humans. Understanding how these animals detect, respond, and adapt to volatile odorants may lead to novel ways to disrupt host localization or mate recognition in these pests. The past decade has led to remarkable progress in understanding odorant detection in arthropods. Insects use odorant-gated ion channels, first discovered in Drosophila melanogaster , to detect volatile chemicals. In flies, 60 “tuning” receptor subunits combine with a common subunit, Orco ( o dorant r eceptor co receptor to form ligand-gated ion channels. The mechanisms underlying odorant receptor desensitization in insects are largely unknown. Recent work reveals that dephosphorylation of serine 289 on the shared Orco subunit is responsible for slow, odor-induced receptor desensitization. Dephosphorylation has no effect on the localization of the receptor protein, and activation of the olfactory neurons in the absence of odor is sufficient to induce dephosphorylation and desensitization. These findings reveal a major component of receptor modulation in this important group of disease vectors, and implicate a second messenger feedback mechanism in this process.

  19. Nuclear Receptors, RXR, and the Big Bang.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Ronald M; Mangelsdorf, David J

    2014-03-27

    Isolation of genes encoding the receptors for steroids, retinoids, vitamin D, and thyroid hormone and their structural and functional analysis revealed an evolutionarily conserved template for nuclear hormone receptors. This discovery sparked identification of numerous genes encoding related proteins, termed orphan receptors. Characterization of these orphan receptors and, in particular, of the retinoid X receptor (RXR) positioned nuclear receptors at the epicenter of the "Big Bang" of molecular endocrinology. This Review provides a personal perspective on nuclear receptors and explores their integrated and coordinated signaling networks that are essential for multicellular life, highlighting the RXR heterodimer and its associated ligands and transcriptional mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Expression of GABAergic receptors in mouse taste receptor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret R Starostik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple excitatory neurotransmitters have been identified in the mammalian taste transduction, with few studies focused on inhibitory neurotransmitters. Since the synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD for gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA is expressed in a subset of mouse taste cells, we hypothesized that other components of the GABA signaling pathway are likely expressed in this system. GABA signaling is initiated by the activation of either ionotropic receptors (GABA(A and GABA(C or metabotropic receptors (GABA(B while it is terminated by the re-uptake of GABA through transporters (GATs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using reverse transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR analysis, we investigated the expression of different GABA signaling molecules in the mouse taste system. Taste receptor cells (TRCs in the circumvallate papillae express multiple subunits of the GABA(A and GABA(B receptors as well as multiple GATs. Immunocytochemical analyses examined the distribution of the GABA machinery in the circumvallate papillae. Both GABA(A-and GABA(B- immunoreactivity were detected in the peripheral taste receptor cells. We also used transgenic mice that express green fluorescent protein (GFP in either the Type II taste cells, which can respond to bitter, sweet or umami taste stimuli, or in the Type III GAD67 expressing taste cells. Thus, we were able to identify that GABAergic receptors are expressed in some Type II and Type III taste cells. Mouse GAT4 labeling was concentrated in the cells surrounding the taste buds with a few positively labeled TRCs at the margins of the taste buds. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presence of GABAergic receptors localized on Type II and Type III taste cells suggests that GABA is likely modulating evoked taste responses in the mouse taste bud.

  1. Toll-like receptors in neonatal sepsis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hare, Fiona M

    2013-06-01

    Toll-like receptors are vital transmembrane receptors that initiate the innate immune response to many micro-organisms. The discovery of these receptors has improved our understanding of host-pathogen interactions, and these receptors play an important role in the pathogenesis of multiple neonatal conditions such as sepsis and brain injury. Toll-like receptors, especially TLRs 2 and 4, are associated with necrotizing enterocolitis, periventricular leukomalacia and sepsis.

  2. NMDA receptor signaling: death or survival?

    OpenAIRE

    LUO, Tong; WU, Wei-Hua; CHEN, Bo-Shiun

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate-induced neuronal damage is mainly caused by overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors. Conversely, normal physiological brain function and neuronal survival require adequate activation of NMDA receptors. Studies have revealed that NMDA receptor-induced neuronal death or survival is mediated through distinct subset of NMDA receptors triggering different intracellular signaling pathways. Here we discuss recent advances in the characterization of NMDA receptors in neurona...

  3. Regulation of NMDA Receptors by Phosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Bo-Shiun; Roche, Katherine W.

    2007-01-01

    N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are critical for neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. The molecular mechanisms underlying the synaptic localization and functional regulation of NMDA receptors have been the subject of extensive studies. In particular, phosphorylation has emerged as a fundamental mechanism that regulates NMDA receptor trafficking and can alter the channel properties of NMDA receptors. Here we summarize recent advances in the characterization of NMDA receptor phos...

  4. Studies on insulin receptor, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakai, Yukio

    1979-01-01

    The present study is to investigate an influence of starvation and high fat diet on insulin receptor of the plasma membrane by means of radioreceptor assay using 125 I-labelled insulin. Male guinea pigs of Hartley strain were employed for the starvation study, and 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was determined at 24, 48 and 72 hours of the fast after the last meal. Male rats of Wistar strain were employed for the high fat study where the diet containing 35% of butter was fed ad libitum for 38 or 68 days. The animals were killed at the fast of 12 hours, and 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver was determined. The results obtained are summarized as follows: 1) An increase in 125 I-insulin binding capacity on the plasma membrane of the liver and kidney was observed by the starvation for 24 to 72 hours. 2) The mechanism of the increase by starvation was considered to be different by the organs; it was due to an increase in number of insulin receptor in the liver, and due to an increase in affinity of insulin receptor in the kidney. 3) In non-obese rats fed with high fat diet, the number of insulin receptor on the liver plasma membrane showed a decrease, and this observation clearly indicated that the decrease in number of the receptor did not depend on the obesity. 4) Obese rats also fed with high fat diet presented a decrease in number of insulin receptor without an elevation of insulin levels in the circulating blood. This indicated that at least in the obese rats fed with high fat diet, the decrease in number of the receptor was not due to hyperinsulinemia. (author)

  5. Photo-antagonism of the GABAA receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Martin; Iqbal, Favaad; Pandurangan, Arun P; Hannan, Saad; Huckvale, Rosemary; Topf, Maya; Baker, James R; Smart, Trevor G

    2014-07-29

    Neurotransmitter receptor trafficking is fundamentally important for synaptic transmission and neural network activity. GABAA receptors and inhibitory synapses are vital components of brain function, yet much of our knowledge regarding receptor mobility and function at inhibitory synapses is derived indirectly from using recombinant receptors, antibody-tagged native receptors and pharmacological treatments. Here we describe the use of a set of research tools that can irreversibly bind to and affect the function of recombinant and neuronal GABAA receptors following ultraviolet photoactivation. These compounds are based on the competitive antagonist gabazine and incorporate a variety of photoactive groups. By using site-directed mutagenesis and ligand-docking studies, they reveal new areas of the GABA binding site at the interface between receptor β and α subunits. These compounds enable the selected inactivation of native GABAA receptor populations providing new insight into the function of inhibitory synapses and extrasynaptic receptors in controlling neuronal excitation.

  6. Scavenger receptors in homeostasis and immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canton, Johnathan; Neculai, Dante; Grinstein, Sergio

    2013-09-01

    Scavenger receptors were originally identified by their ability to recognize and to remove modified lipoproteins; however, it is now appreciated that they carry out a striking range of functions, including pathogen clearance, lipid transport, the transport of cargo within the cell and even functioning as taste receptors. The large repertoire of ligands recognized by scavenger receptors and their broad range of functions are not only due to the wide range of receptors that constitute this family but also to their ability to partner with various co-receptors. The ability of individual scavenger receptors to associate with different co-receptors makes their responsiveness extremely versatile. This Review highlights recent insights into the structural features that determine the function of scavenger receptors and the emerging role that these receptors have in immune responses, notably in macrophage polarization and in the pathogenesis of diseases such as atherosclerosis and Alzheimer's disease.

  7. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melcher, Karsten; Xu, Yong; Ng, Ley-Moy; Zhou, X. Edward; Soon, Fen-Fen; Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Suino-Powell, Kelly M; Kovach, Amanda; Tham, Fook S.; Cutler, Sean R.; Li, Jun; Yong, Eu-Leong; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Xu, H. Eric (NU Sinapore); (Van Andel); (UCR)

    2010-11-11

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands.

  8. Modulation of Xenobiotic Receptors by Steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delira Robbins

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear receptors (NRs are ligand-activated transcription factors that regulate the expression of their target genes. NRs play important roles in many human diseases, including metabolic diseases and cancer, and are therefore a key class of therapeutic targets. Steroids play important roles in regulating nuclear receptors; in addition to being ligands of steroid receptors, steroids (and their metabolites also regulate other NRs, such as the pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor (termed xenobiotic receptors, which participate in steroid metabolism. Xenobiotic receptors have promiscuous ligand-binding properties, and their structurally diverse ligands include steroids and their metabolites. Therefore, steroids, their metabolism and metabolites, xenobiotic receptors, steroid receptors, and the respective signaling pathways they regulate have functional interactions. This review discusses these functional interactions and their implications for activities mediated by steroid receptors and xenobiotic receptors, focusing on steroids that modulate pathways involving the pregnane X receptor and constitutive androstane receptor. The emphasis of the review is on structure-function studies of xenobiotic receptors bound to steroid ligands.

  9. 5-Hydroxytryptamine type 7 receptor neuroprotection against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity is PDGFβ receptor dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasefi, Maryam S; Kruk, Jeff S; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2013-04-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the hippocampus. Long-term (2-24 h) activation of 5-HT7 receptors regulates growth factor receptor expression, including the expression of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) β receptors. Direct activation of PDGFβ receptors in primary hippocampal and cortical neurons inhibits NMDA receptor activity and attenuates NMDA receptor-induced neurotoxicity. Our objective was to investigate whether the 5-HT7 receptor-induced increase in PDGFβ receptor expression would be similarly neuroprotective. We demonstrate that 5-HT7 receptor agonist treatment in primary hippocampal neurons also increases the expression of phospholipase C (PLC) γ, a downstream effector of PDGFβ receptors associated with the inhibition of NMDA receptor activity. To determine if the up-regulation of PDGFβ receptors is neuroprotective, primary hippocampal neurons were incubated with the 5-HT7 receptor agonist, LP 12, for 24 h. Indeed, LP 12 treatment prevented NMDA-induced neurotoxicity and this effect was dependent on PDGFβ receptor kinase activity. Treatment of primary neurons with LP 12 also differentially altered NMDA receptor subunit expression, reducing the expression of NR1 and NR2B, but not NR2A. These findings demonstrate the potential for providing growth factor receptor-dependent neuroprotective effects using small-molecule ligands of G protein-coupled receptors. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  10. Prolactin receptors in uterine leiomyomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baban, Rayah S.; Farid, Yahya Y.; Al-Zuheiri, Shatha T.

    2008-01-01

    Objective was to identify the location of prolactin receptors in patientswith uterine leiomyomas and their host myometrium as well as normalmyometrium. A case control study was conducted at the College of MedicineAl-Nahrain University, Baghdad, Iraq during the period from 2004-2006. Thesamples were collected at Obstetrics and Gynecological Departments of 4hospitals in Baghdad City (Al-Khadimiya Teaching Hospital, Al-Noor,Al-Kharch, and Al-Sadoon Hospital). Sections from large and small tumors(n=53) with their host myometriums and from normal myometriums (n=40) werestained immunohistochemically for prolactin receptors. Prolactin receptorswere positively seen in all cases examined including patient and comparisontissues, in the form of dark brown staining. Staining was heterogeneous andvaried in intensity from one case to another and sometimes from one are toanother in the same section. The increase in prolactin receptors in leiomyomais expected given that the underlying host myometrium abnormal. (author)

  11. Paracrine stimulation of P2X7 receptor by ATP activates a proliferative pathway in ovarian carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Cuevas, Francisco G; Martínez-Ramírez, Angélica S; Robles-Martínez, Leticia; Garay, Edith; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Pérez-Montiel, Delia; Castañeda-García, Carolina; Arellano, Rogelio O

    2014-11-01

    P2X7 is a purinergic receptor-channel; its activation by ATP elicits a broad set of cellular actions, from apoptosis to signals for survival. Here, P2X7 expression and function was studied in human ovarian carcinoma (OCA) cells, and biopsies from non-cancerous and cancer patients were analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Ovarian surface epithelium in healthy tissue expressed P2X7 at a high level that was maintained throughout the cancer. The cell lines SKOV-3 and CAOV-3 were used to investigate P2X7 functions in OCA. In SKOV-3 cells, selective stimulation of P2X7 by 2'(3')-O-(4-benzoylbenzoyl) adenosine-5'-triphosphate (BzATP) induced a dose-dependent increase of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) but not cell death. Instead, BzATP increased the levels of phosphorylated ERK and AKT (pERK and pAKT), with an EC(50) of 44 ± 2 and 1.27 ± 0.5 μM, respectively; 10 μM BzATP evoked a maximum effect within 15 min that lasted for 120 min. Interestingly, basal levels of pERK and pAKT were decreased in the presence of apyrase in the medium, strongly suggesting an endogenous, ATP-mediated phenomenon. Accordingly: (i) mechanically stimulated cells generated a [Ca(2+)](i) increase that was abolished by apyrase; (ii) apyrase induced a decrease in culture viability, as measured by the MTS assay for mitochondrial activity; and (iii) incubation with 10 μM AZ10606120, a specific P2X7 antagonist and transfection with the dominant negative P2X7 mutant E496A, both reduced cell viability to 70.1 ± 8.9% and to 76.5 ± 5%, respectively, of control cultures. These observations suggested that P2X7 activity was auto-induced through ATP efflux; this increased pERK and pAKT levels that generated a positive feedback on cell viability. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Variable transcriptional responsiveness of the P2X3 receptor gene during CFA-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuñez-Badinez, Paulina; Sepúlveda, Hugo; Diaz, Emilio; Greffrath, Wolfgang; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Stehberg, Jimmy; Montecino, Martin; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2018-05-01

    The purinergic receptor P2X3 (P2X3-R) plays important roles in molecular pathways of pain, and reduction of its activity or expression effectively reduces chronic inflammatory and neuropathic pain sensation. Inflammation, nerve injury, and cancer-induced pain can increase P2X3-R mRNA and/or protein levels in dorsal root ganglia (DRG). However, P2X3-R expression is unaltered or even reduced in other pain studies. The reasons for these discrepancies are unknown and might depend on the applied traumatic intervention or on intrinsic factors such as age, gender, genetic background, and/or epigenetics. In this study, we sought to get insights into the molecular mechanisms responsible for inflammatory hyperalgesia by determining P2X3-R expression in DRG neurons of juvenile male rats that received a Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA) bilateral paw injection. We demonstrate that all CFA-treated rats showed inflammatory hyperalgesia, however, only a fraction (14-20%) displayed increased P2X3-R mRNA levels, reproducible across both sides. Immunostaining assays did not reveal significant increases in the percentage of P2X3-positive neurons, indicating that increased P2X3-R at DRG somas is not critical for inducing inflammatory hyperalgesia in CFA-treated rats. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed a correlated (R 2  = 0.671) enrichment of the transcription factor Runx1 and the epigenetic active mark histone H3 acetylation (H3Ac) at the P2X3-R gene promoter in a fraction of the CFA-treated rats. These results suggest that animal-specific increases in P2X3-R mRNA levels are likely associated with the genetic/epigenetic context of the P2X3-R locus that controls P2X3-R gene transcription by recruiting Runx1 and epigenetic co-regulators that mediate histone acetylation. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Mechanism for the activation of glutamate receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists at the NIH have used a technique called cryo-electron microscopy to determine a molecular mechanism for the activation and desensitization of ionotropic glutamate receptors, a prominent class of neurotransmitter receptors in the brain and spina

  14. Genetics Home Reference: leptin receptor deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... People with leptin receptor deficiency also have hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, which is a condition caused by reduced production ... weight gain associated with this disorder. Because hypogonadotropic hypogonadism occurs in leptin receptor deficiency , researchers suggest that ...

  15. Excitatory amino acid receptor antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Ebert, B

    1997-01-01

    We have previously shown that (RS)-2-amino-2-(5-tert-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-4-yl)acetic acid (ATAA) is an antagonist at N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) and (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors. We have now resolved ATAA via diastereomeric salt formation...

  16. Pharmacological approach of the receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puech, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper explains the three main goals for clinical positron emission tomography (PET) studies: detection of receptor abnormalities in groups of patients to propose therapeutic indication of new ligands; validation of current hypothesis of drug effect; rational clinical drug development specially for dose-finding studies. (H.W.)

  17. Are olfactory receptors really olfactive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgi, Franco; Maggio, Roberto; Bruni, Luis Emilio

    2011-01-01

    Any living organism interacts with and responds specifically to environmental molecules by expressing specific olfactory receptors. This specificity will be first examined in causal terms with particular emphasis on the mechanisms controlling olfactory gene expression, cell-to-cell interactions a...

  18. Cannabinoid receptor localization in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herkenham, M.; Lynn, A.B.; Little, M.D.; Johnson, M.R.; Melvin, L.S.; de Costa, B.R.; Rice, K.C. (National Institute of Mental Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-03-01

    (3H)CP 55,940, a radiolabeled synthetic cannabinoid, which is 10-100 times more potent in vivo than delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol, was used to characterize and localize a specific cannabinoid receptor in brain sections. The potencies of a series of natural and synthetic cannabinoids as competitors of (3H)CP 55,940 binding correlated closely with their relative potencies in several biological assays, suggesting that the receptor characterized in our in vitro assay is the same receptor that mediates behavioral and pharmacological effects of cannabinoids, including human subjective experience. Autoradiography of cannabinoid receptors in brain sections from several mammalian species, including human, reveals a unique and conserved distribution; binding is most dense in outflow nuclei of the basal ganglia--the substantia nigra pars reticulata and globus pallidus--and in the hippocampus and cerebellum. Generally high densities in forebrain and cerebellum implicate roles for cannabinoids in cognition and movement. Sparse densities in lower brainstem areas controlling cardiovascular and respiratory functions may explain why high doses of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol are not lethal.

  19. Ligand-guided receptor optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katritch, Vsevolod; Rueda, Manuel; Abagyan, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    Receptor models generated by homology or even obtained by crystallography often have their binding pockets suboptimal for ligand docking and virtual screening applications due to insufficient accuracy or induced fit bias. Knowledge of previously discovered receptor ligands provides key information that can be used for improving docking and screening performance of the receptor. Here, we present a comprehensive ligand-guided receptor optimization (LiBERO) algorithm that exploits ligand information for selecting the best performing protein models from an ensemble. The energetically feasible protein conformers are generated through normal mode analysis and Monte Carlo conformational sampling. The algorithm allows iteration of the conformer generation and selection steps until convergence of a specially developed fitness function which quantifies the conformer's ability to select known ligands from decoys in a small-scale virtual screening test. Because of the requirement for a large number of computationally intensive docking calculations, the automated algorithm has been implemented to use Linux clusters allowing easy parallel scaling. Here, we will discuss the setup of LiBERO calculations, selection of parameters, and a range of possible uses of the algorithm which has already proven itself in several practical applications to binding pocket optimization and prospective virtual ligand screening.

  20. Molecular imaging of estrogen receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kruchten, Michel

    2015-01-01

    For patients with estrogen receptor (ER) positive breast cancer, endocrine therapy plays a major role in both the adjuvant and palliative setting. For adequate treatment decision-making it is crucial to obtain up-to-date information on the ER-status of the tumor(s), since ER-expression is the sole

  1. Stability of solubilized benzodiazepine receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, M.J; Ensing, K; de Zeeuw, R.A

    1997-01-01

    According to the observations of other researchers, benzodiazepine receptors solubilized with sodium deoxycholate are unstable, but stability can be improved by exchanging deoxycholate for Triton X-100. In our experiments we conclude that the choice of detergent is not the restrictive factor for the

  2. Uncompetitive antagonism of AMPA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine F; Tikhonov, Denis B; Bølcho, Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    Philanthotoxins are uncompetitive antagonists of Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors presumed to bind to the pore-forming region, but a detailed molecular mechanism for this interaction is missing. Here a small library of novel philanthotoxins was designed and synthesized using a solid-phase strategy. ...

  3. New horizons for lipoprotein receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Olav M.; Dagil, Robert; Kragelund, Birthe Brandt

    2013-01-01

    , this dogma has transformed with the observation that β-propellers of some LRs actively engage in complex formation too. Based on an in-depth decomposition of current structures and sequences, we suggest that exploitation of the β-propellers as binding targets depends on receptor subgroups. In particular, we...

  4. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  5. Physiopathological implications of P2X1 and P2X7 receptors in regulation of glomerular hemodynamics in angiotensin II-induced hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Martha; Bautista-Pérez, Rocío; Cano-Martínez, Agustina; Pacheco, Ursino; Santamaría, José; Del Valle Mondragón, Leonardo; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar; Navar, L Gabriel

    2017-07-01

    Deleterious effects of purinergic P2X 1 and P2X 7 receptors (P2XRs) in ANG II-dependent hypertension include increased renal vascular resistance, and impaired autoregulation and pressure natriuresis. However, their specific effects on the determinants of glomerular hemodynamics remain incompletely delineated. To investigate the P2XR contributions to altered glomerular hemodynamics in hypertension, the effects of acute blockade of P2X 1 R, P2X 7 R, and P2X 4 R with NF449, A438079, and PSB12054, respectively, were evaluated in ANG II-infused rats (435 ng·kg -1 ·min -1 ). P2X 1 R or P2X 7 R blockade reduced afferent (6.85 ± 1.05 vs. 2.37 ± 0.20 dyn·s -1 ·cm -5 ) and efferent (2.85 ± 0.38 vs. 0.99 ± 0.07 dyn·s -1 ·cm -5 ) arteriolar resistances, leading to increases in glomerular plasma flow (75.82 ± 5.58 vs. 206.7 ± 16.38 nl/min), ultrafiltration coefficient (0.0198 ± 0.0024 vs. 0.0512 ± 0.0046 nl·min -1 ·mmHg -1 ), and single-nephron glomerular filtration rate (22.73 ± 2.02 vs. 51.56 ± 3.87 nl/min) to near normal values. Blockade of P2X 4 R did not elicit effects in hypertensive rats. In normotensive sham-operated rats, only the P2X 1 R antagonist caused an increase plasma flow and single-nephron glomerular filtration rate, whereas the P2X 4 R antagonist induced glomerular vasoconstriction that was consistent with evidence that P2X 4 R stimulation increases release of nitric oxide from endothelial cells. Mean arterial pressure remained unchanged in both hypertensive and normotensive groups. Western blot analysis showed overexpression of P2X 1 R, P2X 7 R, and P2X 4 R proteins in hypertensive rats. Whereas it has been generally assumed that the altered glomerular vascular resistances in ANG II hypertension are due to AT 1 receptor-mediated vasoconstriction, these data indicate a predominant P2X 1 R and P2X 7 R control of glomerular hemodynamics in ANG II hypertension. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  6. The P2X7 receptor antagonist, oxidized adenosine triphosphate, ameliorates renal ischemia-reperfusion injury by expansion of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Tai Yeon; Lee, Jae-Ghi; Yan, Ji-Jing; Jang, Joon Young; Ju, Kyung Don; Han, Miyeun; Oh, Kook-Hwan; Ahn, Curie; Yang, Jaeseok

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binds to purinergic receptors and, as a danger molecule, promotes inflammatory responses. Here we tested whether periodate-oxidized ATP (oATP), a P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) antagonist can attenuate renal ischemia-reperfusion injury and clarify the related cellular mechanisms. Treatment with oATP prior to ischemia-reperfusion injury decreased blood urea nitrogen, serum creatinine, the tubular injury score, and tubular epithelial cell apoptosis after injury. The infiltration of dendritic cells, neutrophils, macrophages, CD69 + CD4 + , and CD44 + CD4 + T cells was attenuated, but renal Foxp3 + CD4 + Treg infiltration was increased by oATP. The levels of IL-6 and CCL2 were reduced in the oATP group. Additionally, oATP treatment following injury improved renal function, decreased the infiltration of innate and adaptive effector cells, and increased the renal infiltration of Foxp3 + CD4 + Tregs. Post-ischemia-reperfusion injury oATP treatment increased tubular cell proliferation and reduced renal fibrosis. oATP treatment attenuated renal functional deterioration after ischemia-reperfusion injury in RAG-1 knockout mice; however, Treg depletion using PC61 abrogated the beneficial effects of oATP in wild-type mice. Furthermore, oATP treatment after transfer of Tregs from wild-type mice improved the beneficial effects of Tregs on ischemia-reperfusion injury, but treatment after transfer of Tregs from P2X7R knockout mice did not. Renal ischemia-reperfusion injury was also attenuated in P2X7R knockout mice. Experiments using bone marrow chimeras established that P2X7R expression on hematopoietic cells rather than non-hematopoietic cells, such as tubular epithelial cells, plays a major role in ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thus, oATP attenuated acute renal damage and facilitated renal recovery in ischemia-reperfusion injury by expansion of Tregs. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  7. P2X7 receptor blockade protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice by decreasing the activities of inflammasome components, oxidative stress and caspase-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Fahuan; Cao, Xuejiao [Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, PLA, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Zhai, Zhifang [Department of Dermatology, Southwest Hospital, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400038 (China); Gang Huang [Department of Medical Genetics, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 430038 (China); Du, Xiang; Wang, Yiqin; Zhang, Jingbo; Huang, Yunjian; Zhao, Jinghong [Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, PLA, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China); Hou, Weiping, E-mail: hwp0518@aliyun.com [Department of Nephrology, Xinqiao Hospital, PLA, Third Military Medical University, Chongqing 400037 (China)

    2014-11-15

    Nephrotoxicity is a common complication of cisplatin chemotherapy and thus limits the use of cisplatin in clinic. The purinergic 2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays important roles in inflammation and apoptosis in some inflammatory diseases; however, its roles in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remain unclear. In this study, we first assessed the expression of P2X7R in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice, and then we investigated the changes of renal function, histological injury, inflammatory response, and apoptosis in renal tissues after P2X7R blockade in vivo using an antagonist A-438079. Moreover, we measured the changes of nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing proteins (NLRP3) inflammasome components, oxidative stress, and proapoptotic genes in renal tissues in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity after treatment with A-438079. We found that the expression of P2X7R was significantly upregulated in the renal tubular epithelial cells in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity compared with that of the normal control group. Furthermore, pretreatment with A-438079 markedly attenuated the cisplatin-induced renal injury while lightening the histological damage, inflammatory response and apoptosis in renal tissue, and improved the renal function. These effects were associated with the significantly reduced levels of NLRP3 inflammasome components, oxidative stress, p53 and caspase-3 in renal tissues in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. In conclusions, our studies suggest that the upregulated activity of P2X7R might play important roles in the development of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, and P2X7R blockade might become an effective therapeutic strategy for this disease. - Highlights: • The P2X7R expression was markedly upregulated in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. • P2X7R blockade significantly attenuated the cisplatin-induced renal injury. • P2X7R blockade reduced activities of NLRP3 inflammasome components in renal tissue. • P2X7R blockade

  8. P2X7 receptor blockade protects against cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in mice by decreasing the activities of inflammasome components, oxidative stress and caspase-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yuan, Fahuan; Cao, Xuejiao; Zhai, Zhifang; Gang Huang; Du, Xiang; Wang, Yiqin; Zhang, Jingbo; Huang, Yunjian; Zhao, Jinghong; Hou, Weiping

    2014-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a common complication of cisplatin chemotherapy and thus limits the use of cisplatin in clinic. The purinergic 2X7 receptor (P2X7R) plays important roles in inflammation and apoptosis in some inflammatory diseases; however, its roles in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity remain unclear. In this study, we first assessed the expression of P2X7R in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity in C57BL/6 mice, and then we investigated the changes of renal function, histological injury, inflammatory response, and apoptosis in renal tissues after P2X7R blockade in vivo using an antagonist A-438079. Moreover, we measured the changes of nod-like receptor family, pyrin domain containing proteins (NLRP3) inflammasome components, oxidative stress, and proapoptotic genes in renal tissues in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity after treatment with A-438079. We found that the expression of P2X7R was significantly upregulated in the renal tubular epithelial cells in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity compared with that of the normal control group. Furthermore, pretreatment with A-438079 markedly attenuated the cisplatin-induced renal injury while lightening the histological damage, inflammatory response and apoptosis in renal tissue, and improved the renal function. These effects were associated with the significantly reduced levels of NLRP3 inflammasome components, oxidative stress, p53 and caspase-3 in renal tissues in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. In conclusions, our studies suggest that the upregulated activity of P2X7R might play important roles in the development of cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity, and P2X7R blockade might become an effective therapeutic strategy for this disease. - Highlights: • The P2X7R expression was markedly upregulated in cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. • P2X7R blockade significantly attenuated the cisplatin-induced renal injury. • P2X7R blockade reduced activities of NLRP3 inflammasome components in renal tissue. • P2X7R blockade

  9. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, BRK; Korte, SM; Buwalda, B; la Fleur, SE; Bohus, B; Luiten, PGM

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  10. Repeated blockade of mineralocorticoid receptors, but not of glucocorticoid receptors impairs food rewarded spatial learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douma, B. R.; Korte, S. M.; Buwalda, B.; La Fleur, S. E.; Bohus, B.; Luiten, P. G.

    1998-01-01

    Corticosteroids from the adrenal cortex influence a variety of behaviours including cognition, learning and memory. These hormones act via two intracellular receptors, the mineralo-corticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These two receptor types display a high concentration and

  11. The substance P/NK-1 receptor system: NK-1 receptor antagonists ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The substance P (SP)/neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor system plays an important role in cancer. SP promotes the proliferation of tumour cells, angiogenesis and the migration of tumour cells. We review the involvement of SP, the NK-1 receptor and NK-1 receptor antagonists in cancer. Tumour cells overexpress NK-1 receptors, ...

  12. Muscarinic receptors and drugs in cardiovascular medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P. A.; Doods, H. N.

    1995-01-01

    The parasympathetic system and its associated muscarinic receptors have been the subject of a renaissance of interest for the following two main reasons: (1) the association of endothelial muscarinic receptors and the nitric oxide (NO) pathway; (2) the discovery of several muscarinic receptor

  13. A new family of insect tyramine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cazzamali, Giuseppe; Klærke, Dan Arne; Grimmelikhuijzen, Cornelis J P

    2005-01-01

    in the genomic databases from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae and the honeybee Apis mellifera. These four tyramine or tyramine-like receptors constitute a new receptor family that is phylogenetically distinct from the previously identified insect octopamine/tyramine receptors. The Drosophila tyramine...

  14. Metabotropic glutamate receptors in glial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Antoni, Simona; Berretta, Antonio; Bonaccorso, Carmela Maria; Bruno, Valeria; Aronica, Eleonora; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Catania, Maria Vincenza

    2008-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS) and exerts its actions via a number of ionotropic glutamate receptors/channels and metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. In addition to being expressed in neurons, glutamate receptors are expressed in

  15. Neurotransmitter Receptor Binding in Bovine Cerebral Microvessels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peroutka, Stephen J.; Moskowitz, Michael A.; Reinhard, John F.; Synder, Solomon H.

    1980-05-01

    Purified preparations of microvessels from bovine cerebral cortex contain substantial levels of alpha-adrenergic, beta-adrenergic, and histamine 1 receptor binding sites but only negligible serotonin, muscarinic cholinergic, opiate, and benzodiazepine receptor binding. Norepinephrine and histamine may be endogenous regulators of the cerebral microcirculation at the observed receptors.

  16. Imaging of receptors in clinical neurosciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korf, J

    This article deals with the question why should one determine receptors in the brain with positron and single photon emission tomography (PET and SPECT, respectively). Radiopharmaceuticals for a wide variety of receptors are available now. Receptors studies with PET and SPECT have thus far focused

  17. Modified Receptor Internalization upon Coexpression of 5-HT1B Receptor and 5-HT2B Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Janoshazi , Agnes; Deraet , Maud; Callebert , Jacques; Setola , Vincent; Guenther , Silke; Saubamea , Bruno; Manivet , Philippe; Launay , Jean-Marie; Maroteaux , Luc

    2007-01-01

    International audience; Serotonin 5-HT(2B) receptors are often coexpressed with 5-HT(1B) receptors, and cross-talk between the two receptors has been reported in various cell types. However, many mechanistic details underlying 5-HT(1B) and 5-HT(2B) receptor cross-talk have not been elucidated. We hypothesized that 5-HT(2B) and 5-HT(1B) receptors each affect the others' signaling by modulating the others' trafficking. We thus examined the agonist stimulated internalization kinetics of fluoresc...

  18. Purinergic signalling in the nervous system: an overview

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abbracchio, M. P.; Burnstock, G.; Verkhratsky, Alexei; Zimmermann, H.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 1 (2009), s. 19-29 ISSN 0166-2236 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : extracellular hydrolysis * behaviour Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 12.794, year: 2009

  19. Intrarenal purinergic signaling in the control of renal tubular transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prætorius, Helle; Leipziger, Jens Georg

    2010-01-01

    -reaching advances indicate that ATP is often used as a local transmitter for classical sensory transduction. This transmission apparently also applies to sensory functions in the kidney. Locally released ATP is involved in sensing of renal tubular flow or in detecting the distal tubular load of NaCl at the macula...

  20. Triheteromeric NMDA Receptors at Hippocampal Synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar, Kenneth R.; McGinley, Matthew J.; Westbrook, Gary L.

    2013-01-01

    NMDA receptors are composed of two GluN1 (N1) and two GluN2 (N2) subunits. Constituent N2 subunits control the pharmacological and kinetic characteristics of the receptor. NMDA receptors in hippocampal or cortical neurons are often thought of as diheteromeric, i.e., containing only one type of N2 subunit. However, triheteromeric receptors with more than one type of N2 subunit also have been reported and the relative contribution of di- and triheteromeric NMDA receptors at synapses has been difficult to assess. Because wild-type hippocampal principal neurons express N1, N2A and N2B, we used cultured hippocampal principal neurons from N2A and N2B-knockout mice as templates for diheteromeric synaptic receptors. Summation of N1/N2B and N1/N2A excitatory postsynaptic currents could not account for the deactivation kinetics of wild-type excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs) however. To make a quantitative estimate of NMDA receptor subtypes at wild-type synapses, we used the deactivation kinetics, as well as the effects of the competitive antagonist NVP-AAM077. Our results indicate that three types of NMDA receptors contribute to the wild-type EPSC, with at least two-thirds being triheteromeric receptors. Functional isolation of synaptic triheteromeric receptors revealed deactivation kinetics and pharmacology distinct from either diheteromeric receptor subtype. Because of differences in open probability, synaptic triheteromeric receptors outnumbered N1/N2A receptors by 5.8 to 1 and N1/N2B receptors by 3.2 to 1. Our results suggest that triheteromeric NMDA receptors must be either preferentially assembled or preferentially localized at synapses. PMID:23699525

  1. Some theoretical aspects of hormone receptor determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sluiter, W.J.

    1981-01-01

    Suitable antisera for determination of hormone receptors are not available for the majority of hormone receptors. Therefore, the determination of hormone receptors is mostly performed in terms of binding capacity for the appropriate hormone, using radioactive hormone labels. Some theoretical aspects of such a receptor determination are discussed including the length of incubation (total or unoccupied receptor concentration), single point or multiple point (Scatchard) analysis (regarding the influence of other specific binders), the correction procedure for non-specific binding and the influence of the circulating hormone level. (Auth.)

  2. Adenosine A1 receptor-mediated inhibition of in vitro prolactin secretion from the rat anterior pituitary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.L.W. Picanço-Diniz

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In previous studies, we demonstrated biphasic purinergic effects on prolactin (PRL secretion stimulated by an adenosine A2 agonist. In the present study, we investigated the role of the activation of adenosine A1 receptors by (R-N6-(2-phenylisopropyladenosine (R-PIA at the pituitary level in in vitro PRL secretion. Hemipituitaries (one per cuvette in five replicates from adult male rats were incubated. Administration of R-PIA (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1, and 10 µM induced a reduction of PRL secretion into the medium in a U-shaped dose-response curve. The maximal reduction was obtained with 0.1 µM R-PIA (mean ± SEM, 36.01 ± 5.53 ng/mg tissue weight (t.w. treatment compared to control (264.56 ± 15.46 ng/mg t.w.. R-PIA inhibition (0.01 µM = 141.97 ± 15.79 vs control = 244.77 ± 13.79 ng/mg t.w. of PRL release was blocked by 1 µM cyclopentyltheophylline, a specific A1 receptor antagonist (1 µM = 212.360 ± 26.560 ng/mg t.w., whereas cyclopentyltheophylline alone (0.01, 0.1, 1 µM had no effect. R-PIA (0.001, 0.01, 0.1, 1 µM produced inhibition of PRL secretion stimulated by both phospholipase C (0.5 IU/mL; 977.44 ± 76.17 ng/mg t.w. and dibutyryl cAMP (1 mM; 415.93 ± 37.66 ng/mg t.w. with nadir established at the dose of 0.1 µM (225.55 ± 71.42 and 201.9 ± 19.08 ng/mg t.w., respectively. Similarly, R-PIA (0.01 µM decreased (242.00 ± 24.00 ng/mg t.w. the PRL secretion stimulated by cholera toxin (0.5 mg/mL; 1050.00 ± 70.00 ng/mg t.w.. In contrast, R-PIA had no effect (468.00 ± 34.00 ng/mg t.w. on PRL secretion stimulation by pertussis toxin (0.5 mg/mL; 430.00 ± 26.00 ng/mg t.w.. These results suggest that inhibition of PRL secretion after A1 receptor activation by R-PIA is mediated by a Gi protein-dependent mechanism.

  3. Chapter 8. Activation mechanisms of chemokine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia C; Rosenkilde, Mette M

    2009-01-01

    Chemokine receptors belong to the large family of 7-transmembrane (7TM) G-protein-coupled receptors. These receptors are targeted and activated by a variety of different ligands, indicating that activation is a result of similar molecular mechanisms but not necessarily similar modes of ligand...... binding. Attempts to unravel the activation mechanism of 7TM receptors have led to the conclusion that activation involves movements of the transmembrane segments VI and VII in particular, as recently gathered in the Global Toggle Switch Model. However, to understand the activation mechanism completely......, more research has to be done in this field. Chemokine receptors are interesting tools in this matter. First, the chemokine system has a high degree of promiscuity that allows several chemokines to target one receptor in different ways, as well as a single chemokine ligand to target several receptors...

  4. DMPD: Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 15379975 Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor... Signal transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. PubmedID 15379975 Title Signa...l transduction by the lipopolysaccharide receptor, Toll-like receptor-4. Authors

  5. Further characterization of tuftsin receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bump, N.J.; Lee, J.; Najjar, V.A.

    1986-03-05

    Tuftsin receptor was purified from rabbit peritoneal granulocytes by affinity chromatography. The pentapeptide analog, Thr-Lys-Pro-Pro-Arg was covalently linked to a solid support column. Rabbit granulocyte membrane was prepared, dissolved in 8 mM CHAPS and run through the column, eluted with 20 eta M free pentapeptide and subjected to dialysis concentration. When this was run on SDS-PAGE, two bands were obtained at a migration equivalent to Mr 60 and 62 K. These were electroblotted on nitrocellulose paper which showed two corresponding (/sup 3/H)-tuftsin binding bands. After reduction, and boiling, SDS-PAGE runs showed two bands Mr 85 and 70 K. When the purified receptor was reduced, alkylated and treated with endo-..beta..-N-acetylglucosaminidase H, only one band was obtained at Mr of about 90 K.

  6. Ketamine: NMDA Receptors and Beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Zorumski, Charles F.; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Mennerick, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Human studies examining the effects of the dissociative anesthetic ketamine as a model for psychosis and as a rapidly acting antidepressant have spurred great interest in understanding ketamine's actions at molecular, cellular, and network levels. Although ketamine has unequivocal uncompetitive inhibitory effects on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and may preferentially alter the function of NMDARs on interneurons, recent work has questioned whether block of NMDARs is critical for its...

  7. Assay for the glucagon receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, F.J.; Birnbaumer, L.

    1985-01-01

    A new iodination procedure for glucagon using 1,3,4,6-tetracholoro-3α,6α-diphenylglycouril (Iodogen) as the oxidizing agent, and the subsequent separation in pure form of [ 125 I-Tyr 10 ]mono-iodoglucagon by reverse-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) over C 18 -μ Bondapak columns is described. The newly synthesized [ 125 I]mono-iodoglucagon is shown to be a suitable probe for studying structural and functional properties of glucagon receptors

  8. Keratinocyte cytokine and chemokine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüzün, Yalçin; Antonov, Meltem; Dolar, Neslihan; Wolf, Ronni

    2007-10-01

    Chemokines are a superfamily of small, secreted proteins that regulate cell traffic in homeostatic and inflammatory conditions. Keratinocytes synthesize many chemokines, including members of the CC and CXC subfamilies, such as regulated on activation of normal T-cell expressed and secreted, gamma-interferon inducible protein-10, monokine induced by gamma-interferon, and thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine. They also express some chemokine receptors that mediate the inflammatory or immune response by attracting various kinds of leukocytes.

  9. Insulin receptor in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petruzzelli, L.; Herrera, R.; Rosen, O.

    1986-01-01

    A specific, high affinity insulin receptor is present in both adult Drosophila and in Drosophila embryos. Wheat germ lectin-enriched extracts of detergent-solubilized membranes from embryos and adults bind insulin with a K/sub d/ of 15 nM. Binding is specific for insulin; micromolar concentrations of proinsulin, IGFI, and IGFII are required to displace bound 125 I-insulin. Insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase activity appears during embryogenesis. It is evident between 6 and 12 hours of development, peaks between 12 and 18 hours and falls in the adult. During 0-6 hours of embryogenesis, and in the adult, a specific protein band (Mr = 135,000) is crosslinked to 125 I-insulin. During 6-12 and 12-18 hours of embryogenesis stages in which insulin-dependent protein tyrosine kinase is high, an additional band (Mr = 100,000) becomes crosslinked to 125 I-insulin. Isolation and DNA sequence analysis of genomic clones encoding the Drosophila insulin receptor will be presented as will the characterization of insulin receptor mRNA's during development

  10. PAF receptor structure: a hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfroid, J J; Dive, G; Lamotte-Brasseur, J; Batt, J P; Heymans, F

    1991-12-01

    Different hypotheses of the structure of platelet-activating factor (PAF) receptor based on structure-activity relationships of agonists and antagonists are reviewed. For an agonistic effect, strong hydrophobic interactions and an ether function are required in position-1 of the glycerol backbone; chain length limitations and steric hindrance demand a small group in position-2. The unusual structural properties of non-PAF-like antagonists required 3-D electrostatic potential calculations. This method applied to seven potent antagonists suggests a strong "Cache-orielles" (ear-muff) effect, i.e., two strong electronegative wells (isocontour at -10 Kcal/mole) are located at 180 degrees to each other and at a relatively constant distance. Initial consideration of the "Cache-oreilles" effect implied the structure of a bipolarized cylinder of 10-12 A diameter for the receptor. However, very recent results on studies with agonists and antagonists structurally similar to PAF suggest that the receptor may in fact be a multi-polarized cylinder.

  11. NGA/Insulin receptor scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurtaran, A.; Virgolini, I.

    1994-01-01

    Tc-99m-galactosyl-neoglycoalbumin (NGA) is one of the first receptor-based radiopharmaceuticals which specifically recognizes the hepatic binding protein (HBP) located on the surface of the hepatocytes. The exclusive interactin of NGA with HBP provided the basis for a kinetic model for the evaluation hepatocellular function. During the last years we have used NGA in more than 300 patients with various liver diseases including liver cirrhosis (Stages Child A to Child C), viral hepatitis, and carcinomas. In these studies, the calculated HBP densities, after i.v.-injection of Tc-99m-NGA, significantly correlated with the clinical course of the diseases. Furthermore, similar to conventional Tc-colloid, NGA provided excellent demonstration of 'cold spots' for hepatic masses. In a further approach we used another hepatocyte receptor-seeking radioligand, I-123-Tyr-A14- insulin, and found, that its in vitro-binding to hepatocellular carcinomas is greatly enhanced over normal hepatic tissue. On this basis, we developed a double-tracer method using NGA and insulin in a single study. Thus, areas of 'cold spots' identifying hepatic masses on NGA scans, take up I-123-Tyr-A14-insulin immediately after i.v.-injection. This was true for hepatocellular hepatomas, but not for adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, NGA/insulin receptor scanning could be a novel and save method for the demonstration of hepatocellular hepatomas. (author)

  12. Lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, C.G.; Armstrong, G.D. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    1990-12-01

    We have investigated human T-lymphocyte receptors for pertussis toxin by affinity isolation and photoaffinity labeling procedures. T lymphocytes were obtained from peripheral human blood, surface iodinated, and solubilized in Triton X-100. The iodinated mixture was then passed through pertussis toxin-agarose, and the fractions were analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Autoradiography of the fixed, dried gels revealed several bands in the pertussis toxin-bound fraction that were not observed in fractions obtained from histone or fetuin-agarose. Further investigations employed a photoaffinity labeling reagent, sulfosuccinimidyl 2-(p-azido-salicylamido)-1,3'-dithiopropionate, to identify pertussis toxin receptors in freshly isolated peripheral blood monocytic cells, T lymphocytes, and Jurkat cells. In all three cell systems, the pertussis toxin affinity probe specifically labeled a single protein species with an apparent molecular weight of 70,000 that was not observed when the procedure was performed in the presence of excess unmodified pertussis toxin. A protein comparable in molecular weight to the one detected by the photoaffinity labeling technique was also observed among the species that bound to pertussis toxin-agarose. The results suggest that pertussis toxin may bind to a 70,000-Da receptor in human T lymphocytes.

  13. Nuclear receptors for thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricketts, M.H.; Groenewald, J. de W.; Wilson, B.D.

    1980-01-01

    The thyroid hormones, T 3 and T 4 , modulate a vast number of metabolic processes in mammalian tissues. High affinity, low capacity binding sites for T 3 and T 4 have been demonstrated in cell nuclei of target organs using both in vivo and in vitro labelling techniques. The displacement of [ 125 I]T 3 from nuclear binding sites by thyroid hormone analogues correlates well with the thyromimetic activities of the analogues tested. Dose-response relationships between T 3 occupancy and growth hormone secretion as a function of free T 3 concentration have been established with the GH 1 cell line. The equilibrium dissociation constant of the equation which describes how T 3 binds to the nuclei of intact cells is essentially the same as the free T 3 concentration that elicits the half-maximal biological response of the hormone. It is becoming apparent that these nuclear binding sites represent specific thyroid hormone receptors, whose function may be to regulate gene activity in target tissues. This report concerns the binding of the rat liver nuclear receptor to duplex and random coil DNA as well as to non-mammalian and synthetic DNAs. We postulate that the receptor binds in vivo to native DNA in the minor groove of the DNA helix

  14. Complex GABAB receptor complexes: how to generate multiple functionally distinct units from a single receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanjuan eXU

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The main inhibitory neurotransmitter, GABA, acts on both ligand-gated and G protein-coupled receptors, the GABAA/C and GABAB receptors, respectively. The later play important roles in modulating many synapses, both at the pre- and post-synaptic levels, and are then still considered as interesting targets to treat a number of brain diseases, including addiction. For many years, several subtypes of GABAB receptors were expected, but cloning revealed only two genes that work in concert to generate a single type of GABAB receptor composed of two subunits. Here we will show that the signaling complexity of this unit receptor type can be largely increased through various ways, including receptor stoichiometry, subunit isoforms, membrane expression and localization, crosstalk with other receptors or interacting proteins. These recent data revealed how complexity of a receptor unit can be increased, observation that certainly are not unique to the GABAB receptor.

  15. The two-state dimer receptor model: a general model for receptor dimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Rafael; Casadó, Vicent; Mallol, Josefa; Ferrada, Carla; Ferré, Sergi; Fuxe, Kjell; Cortés, Antoni; Ciruela, Francisco; Lluis, Carmen; Canela, Enric I

    2006-06-01

    Nonlinear Scatchard plots are often found for agonist binding to G-protein-coupled receptors. Because there is clear evidence of receptor dimerization, these nonlinear Scatchard plots can reflect cooperativity on agonist binding to the two binding sites in the dimer. According to this, the "two-state dimer receptor model" has been recently derived. In this article, the performance of the model has been analyzed in fitting data of agonist binding to A(1) adenosine receptors, which are an example of receptor displaying concave downward Scatchard plots. Analysis of agonist/antagonist competition data for dopamine D(1) receptors using the two-state dimer receptor model has also been performed. Although fitting to the two-state dimer receptor model was similar to the fitting to the "two-independent-site receptor model", the former is simpler, and a discrimination test selects the two-state dimer receptor model as the best. This model was also very robust in fitting data of estrogen binding to the estrogen receptor, for which Scatchard plots are concave upward. On the one hand, the model would predict the already demonstrated existence of estrogen receptor dimers. On the other hand, the model would predict that concave upward Scatchard plots reflect positive cooperativity, which can be neither predicted nor explained by assuming the existence of two different affinity states. In summary, the two-state dimer receptor model is good for fitting data of binding to dimeric receptors displaying either linear, concave upward, or concave downward Scatchard plots.

  16. Characterization of astrocytic and neuronal benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Primary cultures of astrocytes and neurons express benzodiazepine receptors. Neuronal benzodiazepine receptors were of high-affinity, K{sub D} values were 7.5-43 nM and the densities of receptors (B{sub max}) were 924-4131 fmol/mg protein. Astrocytes posses a high-affinity benzodiazepine receptor, K{sub D} values were 6.6-13 nM. The B{sub max} values were 6,033-12,000 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological profile of the neuronal benzodiazepine receptor was that of the central-type benzodiazepine receptor, where clonazepam has a high-affinity and Ro 5-4864 (4{prime}-chlorodiazepam) has a low-affinity. Whereas astrocytic benzoidazepine receptor was characteristic of the so called peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, which shows a high-affinity towards Ro 5-4863, and a low-affinity towards clonazepam. The astrocytic benzodiazepine receptors was functionally correlated with voltage dependent calcium channels, since dihydropyridines and benzodiazepines interacted with ({sup 3}H) diazepam and ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine receptors with the same rank order of potency, showing a statistically significant correlation. No such correlation was observed in neurons.

  17. Localization of mineralocorticoid receptors at mammalian synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric M Prager

    Full Text Available In the brain, membrane associated nongenomic steroid receptors can induce fast-acting responses to ion conductance and second messenger systems of neurons. Emerging data suggest that membrane associated glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors may directly regulate synaptic excitability during times of stress when adrenal hormones are elevated. As the key neuron signaling interface, the synapse is involved in learning and memory, including traumatic memories during times of stress. The lateral amygdala is a key site for synaptic plasticity underlying conditioned fear, which can both trigger and be coincident with the stress response. A large body of electrophysiological data shows rapid regulation of neuronal excitability by steroid hormone receptors. Despite the importance of these receptors, to date, only the glucocorticoid receptor has been anatomically localized to the membrane. We investigated the subcellular sites of mineralocorticoid receptors in the lateral amygdala of the Sprague-Dawley rat. Immunoblot analysis revealed the presence of mineralocorticoid receptors in the amygdala. Using electron microscopy, we found mineralocorticoid receptors expressed at both nuclear including: glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons and extra nuclear sites including: presynaptic terminals, neuronal dendrites, and dendritic spines. Importantly we also observed mineralocorticoid receptors at postsynaptic membrane densities of excitatory synapses. These data provide direct anatomical evidence supporting the concept that, at some synapses, synaptic transmission is regulated by mineralocorticoid receptors. Thus part of the stress signaling response in the brain is a direct modulation of the synapse itself by adrenal steroids.

  18. Protein Connectivity in Chemotaxis Receptor Complexes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan Eismann

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The chemotaxis sensory system allows bacteria such as Escherichia coli to swim towards nutrients and away from repellents. The underlying pathway is remarkably sensitive in detecting chemical gradients over a wide range of ambient concentrations. Interactions among receptors, which are predominantly clustered at the cell poles, are crucial to this sensitivity. Although it has been suggested that the kinase CheA and the adapter protein CheW are integral for receptor connectivity, the exact coupling mechanism remains unclear. Here, we present a statistical-mechanics approach to model the receptor linkage mechanism itself, building on nanodisc and electron cryotomography experiments. Specifically, we investigate how the sensing behavior of mixed receptor clusters is affected by variations in the expression levels of CheA and CheW at a constant receptor density in the membrane. Our model compares favorably with dose-response curves from in vivo Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET measurements, demonstrating that the receptor-methylation level has only minor effects on receptor cooperativity. Importantly, our model provides an explanation for the non-intuitive conclusion that the receptor cooperativity decreases with increasing levels of CheA, a core signaling protein associated with the receptors, whereas the receptor cooperativity increases with increasing levels of CheW, a key adapter protein. Finally, we propose an evolutionary advantage as explanation for the recently suggested CheW-only linker structures.

  19. Amphipathic benzenes are designed inhibitors of the estrogen receptor alpha/steroid receptor coactivator interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Jillian R; Moore, Terry W; Collins, Margaret L; Katzenellenbogen, John A

    2008-05-16

    We report here on the design, synthesis, and evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between a steroid receptor coactivator and estrogen receptor alpha. These inhibitors are based upon an amphipathic benzene scaffold whose hydrophobic face mimics the leucine-rich alpha-helical consensus sequence on the steroid receptor coactivators that interacts with a shallow groove on estrogen receptor alpha. Several of these molecules are among the most potent inhibitors of this interaction described to date and are active at low micromolar concentrations in both in vitro models of estrogen receptor action and in cell-based assays of estrogen receptor-mediated coactivator interaction and transcription.

  20. Activation of glucocorticoid receptors increases 5-HT2A receptor levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trajkovska, Viktorija; Kirkegaard, Lisbeth; Krey, Gesa

    2009-01-01

    of depression is unknown. In mice with altered glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression we investigated 5-HT2A receptor levels by Western blot and 3H-MDL100907 receptor binding. Serotonin fibre density was analyzed by stereological quantification of serotonin transporter immunopositive fibers. To establish...... an effect of GR activation on 5-HT2A levels, mature organotypic hippocampal cultures were exposed to corticosterone with or without GR antagonist mifepristone and mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist spironolactone. In GR under-expressing mice, hippocampal 5-HT2A receptor protein levels were decreased...... in dorsal hippocampus (77 +/- 35%, p effect of GR activation on 5-HT2A receptor...

  1. Receptor Tyrosine Kinases in Drosophila Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopko, Richelle; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation plays a significant role in a wide range of cellular processes. The Drosophila genome encodes more than 20 receptor tyrosine kinases and extensive studies in the past 20 years have illustrated their diverse roles and complex signaling mechanisms. Although some receptor tyrosine kinases have highly specific functions, others strikingly are used in rather ubiquitous manners. Receptor tyrosine kinases regulate a broad expanse of processes, ranging from cell survival and proliferation to differentiation and patterning. Remarkably, different receptor tyrosine kinases share many of the same effectors and their hierarchical organization is retained in disparate biological contexts. In this comprehensive review, we summarize what is known regarding each receptor tyrosine kinase during Drosophila development. Astonishingly, very little is known for approximately half of all Drosophila receptor tyrosine kinases. PMID:23732470

  2. Acetylcholine receptors in the human retina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutchins, J.B.; Hollyfield, J.G.

    1985-01-01

    Evidence for a population of acetylcholine (ACh) receptors in the human retina is presented. The authors have used the irreversible ligand 3 H-propylbenzilylcholine mustard ( 3 H-PrBCM) to label muscarinic receptors. 3 H- or 125 I-alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTx) was used to label putative nicotinic receptors. Muscarinic receptors are apparently present in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Autoradiographic grain densities are reduced in the presence of saturating concentrations of atropine, quinuclidinyl benzilate or scopolamine; this indicates that 3 H-PrBCM binding is specific for a population of muscarinic receptors in the human retina. Binding sites for radiolabeled alpha-BTx are found predominantly in the inner plexiform layer of the retina. Grain densities are reduced in the presence of d-tubocurarine, indicating that alpha-BTx may bind to a pharmacologically relevant nicotinic ACh receptor. This study provides evidence for cholinergic neurotransmission in the human retina

  3. Characteristic molecular vibrations of adenosine receptor ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chee, Hyun Keun; Yang, Jin-San; Joung, Je-Gun; Zhang, Byoung-Tak; Oh, S June

    2015-02-13

    Although the regulation of membrane receptor activation is known to be crucial for molecular signal transduction, the molecular mechanism underlying receptor activation is not fully elucidated. Here we study the physicochemical nature of membrane receptor behavior by investigating the characteristic molecular vibrations of receptor ligands using computational chemistry and informatics methods. By using information gain, t-tests, and support vector machines, we have identified highly informative features of adenosine receptor (AdoR) ligand and corresponding functional amino acid residues such as Asn (6.55) of AdoR that has informative significance and is indispensable for ligand recognition of AdoRs. These findings may provide new perspectives and insights into the fundamental mechanism of class A G protein-coupled receptor activation. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Subtype selective kainic acid receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bunch, Lennart; Krogsgaard-Larsen, Povl

    2009-01-01

    (S)-Glutamic acid (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, activating the plethora of glutamate receptors (GluRs). In broad lines, the GluRs are divided into two major classes: the ionotropic Glu receptors (iGluRs) and the metabotropic Glu receptors (m......GluRs). Within the iGluRs, five subtypes (KA1, KA2, iGluR5-7) show high affinity and express full agonist activity upon binding of the naturally occurring amino acid kainic acid (KA). Thus these receptors have been named the KA receptors. This review describes all-to our knowledge-published KA receptor agonists...

  5. Androgen receptor in estrogen receptor positive breast cancer: Beyond expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, Debora; Cinausero, Marika; Iacono, Donatella; Pelizzari, Giacomo; Bonotto, Marta; Vitale, Maria Grazia; Gerratana, Lorenzo; Puglisi, Fabio

    2017-12-01

    In recent years, new therapeutic approaches have reshaped the overall strategy of breast cancer (BC) treatment and have markedly improved patient survival. This is, in part, due to novel therapies for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive BC. Unfortunately, many patients present de novo resistance to these therapies or develop an acquired resistance over time. Therefore, research is now focused on discovering new molecular targets to overcome these resistances. Interestingly, preclinical and clinical studies have shown a critical role for the cross-talk between androgen receptor (AR) and ER in luminal-like BC. AR is expressed in >60% of BC and in up to 90% of ERα-positive tumors. Multiple studies suggest that AR is associated with a favorable prognosis. However, AR overexpression and, in particular, the high AR:ER ratio, seem to be involved in resistance to hormonal treatment. In this setting, a group of BCs could benefit from AR-inhibitors; nevertheless, some ER-positive BC patients do not seem to benefit from this strategy. Therefore, it is crucial to identify biomarkers that would enable the selection of patients who might benefit from combination treatment with ER and AR inhibitors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Xenobiotics and the Glucocorticoid Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Linda S M

    2017-03-15

    Glucocorticoid Receptor (GR) is present in virtually every human cell type. Representing a nuclear receptor superfamily, GR has several different isoforms essentially acting as ligand-dependent transcription factors, regulating glucocorticoid-responsive gene expression in both a positive and a negative manner. Although the natural ligand of the Glucocorticoid Receptor, glucocorticoids (GC) represent only some of the multiple ligands for GR. Xenobiotics, ubiquitous in the environment, bind to GR and are also capable of activating or repressing GR gene expression, thereby modulating GR cell and tissue-specific downstream effects in a multitude of ways that include responses to inflammatory, allergic, metabolic, neoplastic and autoimmune processes. Many xenobiotics, if inadequately metabolized by xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and not wholly eliminated, could have deleterious toxic effects with potentially lethal consequences. This review examines GR, the genomic and non-genomic actions of natural and synthetic GC and the body's handling of xenobiotic compounds, before reviewing what is presently known about GR's interactions with many of the more commonly encountered and some of the less well known GR-associated xenobiotics. GR promiscuity and crosstalk with other signaling pathways is discussed, alongside novel roles for GR that include mood disorder and addiction. A knowledge of GR interactions with xenobiotics is increasingly relevant when considering aging populations and the related prevalence of neoplastic disease, together with growing concerns around human exposure to mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Furthermore, escalating rates of obesity, Type 2 diabetes; autoimmune, allergy, addiction and mood disorder-related pathologies, require novel targeted interventions and GR appears a promising pharmacological candidate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. NUREBASE: database of nuclear hormone receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Duarte, Jorge; Perrière, Guy; Laudet, Vincent; Robinson-Rechavi, Marc

    2002-01-01

    Nuclear hormone receptors are an abundant class of ligand activated transcriptional regulators, found in varying numbers in all animals. Based on our experience of managing the official nomenclature of nuclear receptors, we have developed NUREBASE, a database containing protein and DNA sequences, reviewed protein alignments and phylogenies, taxonomy and annotations for all nuclear receptors. The reviewed NUREBASE is completed by NUREBASE_DAILY, automatically updated every 24 h. Both databases...

  8. Progesterone receptor modulators in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    WIEHLE, Ronald D.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer has been treated successfully with selective estrogen receptor antagonists (SERMs) such as tamoxifen, receptor-depleting agents such as fulvestrant, and aromatase inhibitors such as anastrozole. Selective progesterone receptor modulators (SPRMs or PRMs) have not been studied as much and are currently under investigation for inhibition of mammary carcinogenesis in animal models and breast cancer prevention trials in women. They might follow tamoxifen and aromatase inhibitors in t...

  9. Hemoglobin and heme scavenger receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Marianne Jensby; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2010-01-01

    Heme, the functional group of hemoglobin, myoglobin, and other hemoproteins, is a highly toxic substance when it appears in the extracellular milieu. To circumvent potential harmful effects of heme from hemoproteins released during physiological or pathological cell damage (such as hemolysis...... and rhabdomyolysis), specific high capacity scavenging systems have evolved in the mammalian organism. Two major systems, which essentially function in a similar way by means of a circulating latent plasma carrier protein that upon ligand binding is recognized by a receptor, are represented by a) the hemoglobin...

  10. CERAPP: Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from a large-scale modeling project called CERAPP (Collaborative Estrogen Receptor Activity Prediction Project) demonstrating using predictive computational...

  11. Human dopamine receptor and its uses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civelli, Olivier (Portland, OR); Van Tol, Hubert Henri-Marie (Toronto, CA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward the isolation, characterization and pharmacological use of the human D4 dopamine receptor. The nucleotide sequence of the gene corresponding to this receptor and alleleic variant thereof are provided by the invention. The invention also includes recombinant eukaryotic expression constructs capable of expressing the human D4 dopamine receptor in cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells. The invention provides cultures of transformed eukaryotic cells which synthesize the human D4 dopamine receptor, and methods for characterizing novel psychotropic compounds using such cultures.

  12. Characterization of the chicken muscle insulin receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamo, M.; Simon, J.; Rosebrough, R.W.; McMurtry, J.P.; Steele, N.C.; LeRoith, D.

    1987-01-01

    Insulin receptors are present in chicken skeletal muscle. Crude membrane preparations demonstrated specific 125 I-insulin binding. The nonspecific binding was high (36-55% of total binding) and slightly lower affinity receptors were found than are typically observed for crude membrane insulin binding in other chicken tissues. Affinity crosslinking of 125 I-insulin to crude membranes revealed insulin receptor alpha-subunits of Mr 128K, intermediate between those of liver (134K) and brain (124K). When solubilized and partially purified on wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) affinity columns, chicken muscle insulin receptors exhibited typical high affinity binding, with approximately 10(-10) M unlabeled insulin producing 50% inhibition of the specific 125 I-insulin binding. WGA purified chicken muscle insulin receptors also exhibited insulin-stimulated autophosphorylation of the beta-subunit, which appeared as phosphorylated bands of 92- and 81K. Both bands were immunoprecipitated by anti-receptor antiserum (B10). WGA purified membranes also demonstrated dose-dependent insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of the exogenous substrate poly(Glu,Tyr)4:1. However, unlike chicken liver, chicken muscle insulin receptor number and tyrosine kinase activity were unaltered by 48 hr of fasting or 48 hr of fasting and 24 hr of refeeding. Thus, despite the presence of insulin receptors in chicken muscle showing normal coupling to receptor tyrosine kinase activity, nutritional alterations modulate these parameters in a tissue-specific manner in chickens

  13. Evolution of Class I cytokine receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liongue, Clifford; Ward, Alister C

    2007-01-01

    Background The Class I cytokine receptors have a wide range of actions, including a major role in the development and function of immune and blood cells. However, the evolution of the genes encoding them remains poorly understood. To address this we have used bioinformatics to analyze the Class I receptor repertoire in sea squirt (Ciona intestinalis) and zebrafish (Danio rerio). Results Only two Class I receptors were identified in sea squirt, one with homology to the archetypal GP130 receptor, and the other with high conservation with the divergent orphan receptor CLF-3. In contrast, 36 Class I cytokine receptors were present in zebrafish, including representative members for each of the five structural groups found in mammals. This allowed the identification of 27 core receptors belonging to the last common ancestor of teleosts and mammals. Conclusion This study suggests that the majority of diversification of this receptor family occurred after the divergence of urochordates and vertebrates approximately 794 million years ago (MYA), but before the divergence of ray-finned from lobe-finned fishes around 476 MYA. Since then, only relatively limited lineage-specific diversification within the different Class I receptor structural groups has occurred. PMID:17640376

  14. Identification and mechanism of ABA receptor antagonism

    KAUST Repository

    Melcher, Karsten

    2010-08-22

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) functions through a family of fourteen PYR/PYL receptors, which were identified by resistance to pyrabactin, a synthetic inhibitor of seed germination. ABA activates these receptors to inhibit type 2C protein phosphatases, such as ABI1, yet it remains unclear whether these receptors can be antagonized. Here we demonstrate that pyrabactin is an agonist of PYR1 and PYL1 but is unexpectedly an antagonist of PYL2. Crystal structures of the PYL2-pyrabactin and PYL1-pyrabactin-ABI1 complexes reveal the mechanism responsible for receptor-selective activation and inhibition, which enables us to design mutations that convert PYL1 to a pyrabactin-inhibited receptor and PYL2 to a pyrabactin-activated receptor and to identify new pyrabactin-based ABA receptor agonists. Together, our results establish a new concept of ABA receptor antagonism, illustrate its underlying mechanisms and provide a rational framework for discovering novel ABA receptor ligands. © 2010 Nature America, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. ABA Receptors: Past, Present and Future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Jianjun [Harvard University; Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Chen, Jay [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is the key plant stress hormone. Consistent with the earlier studies in support of the presence of both membrane- and cytoplasm-localized ABA receptors, recent studies have identified multiple ABA receptors located in various subcellular locations. These include a chloroplast envelope-localized receptor (the H subunit of Chloroplast Mg2+-chelatase/ABA Receptor), two plasma membrane-localized receptors (G-protein Coupled Receptor 2 and GPCR-type G proteins), and one cytosol/nucleus-localized Pyrabactin Resistant (PYR)/PYR-Like (PYL)/Regulatory Component of ABA Receptor 1 (RCAR). Although the downstream molecular events for most of the identified ABA receptors are currently unknown, one of them, PYR/PYL/RACR was found to directly bind and regulate the activity of a long-known central regulator of ABA signaling, the A-group protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C). Together with the Sucrose Non-fermentation Kinase Subfamily 2 (SnRK2s) protein kinases, a central signaling complex (ABA-PYR-PP2Cs-SnRK2s) that is responsible for ABA signal perception and transduction is supported by abundant genetic, physiological, biochemical and structural evidence. The identification of multiple ABA receptors has advanced our understanding of ABA signal perception and transduction while adding an extra layer of complexity.

  16. Amphipathic Benzenes Are Designed Inhibitors of the Estrogen Receptor α/Steroid Receptor Coactivator Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Gunther, Jillian R.; Moore, Terry W.; Collins, Margaret L.; Katzenellenbogen, John A.

    2008-01-01

    We report here on the design, synthesis and evaluation of small molecule inhibitors of the interaction between a steroid receptor coactivator and estrogen receptor α. These inhibitors are based upon an amphipathic benzene scaffold whose hydrophobic face mimics the leucine-rich α-helical consensus sequence on the steroid receptor coactivators that interacts with a shallow groove on estrogen receptor α. Several of these molecules are among the most potent inhibitors of this interaction describe...

  17. Hypothyroidism Affects D2 Receptor-mediated Breathing without altering D2 Receptor Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Schlenker, Evelyn H.; Rio, Rodrigo Del; Schultz, Harold D.

    2014-01-01

    Bromocriptine depressed ventilation in air and D2 receptor expression in the nucleus tractus solitaries (NTS) in male hypothyroid hamsters. Here we postulated that in age- matched hypothyroid female hamsters, the pattern of D2 receptor modulation of breathing and D2 receptor expression would differ from those reported in hypothyroid males. In females hypothyroidism did not affect D2 receptor protein levels in the NTS, carotid bodies or striatum. Bromocriptine, but not carmoxirole (a periphera...

  18. Hierarchical Phosphorylation of δ-Opioid Receptor Regulates Agonist-induced Receptor Desensitization and Internalization*

    OpenAIRE

    Maestri-El Kouhen, Odile; Wang, Guilin; Solberg, Jonathan; Erickson, Laurie J.; Law, Ping-Yee; Loh, Horace H.

    2000-01-01

    Treatment of HEK293 cells expressing the δ-opioid receptor with agonist [d-Pen2,5]enkephalin (DPDPE) resulted in the rapid phosphorylation of the receptor. We constructed several mutants of the potential phosphorylation sites (Ser/Thr) at the carboxyl tail of the receptor in order to delineate the receptor phosphorylation sites and the agonist-induced desensitization and internalization. The Ser and Thr were substituted to alanine, and the corresponding mutants were transiently and stably exp...

  19. The repertoire of trace amine G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gloriam, David E.; Bjarnadóttir, Thóra K; Yan, Yi-Lin

    2005-01-01

    eukaryotic species for receptors similar to the mammalian trace amine (TA) receptor subfamily. We identified 18 new receptors in rodents that are orthologous to the previously known TA-receptors. Remarkably, we found 57 receptors (and 40 pseudogenes) of this type in the zebrafish (Danio rerio), while fugu...

  20. One for all: the receptor-associated kinase BAK1.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chinchilla, D.; Shan, L.; He, P.; Vries, de S.C.; Kemmerling, B.

    2009-01-01

    The plant receptor kinase BAK1/SERK3 has been identified as a partner of ligand-binding leucine-rich repeat receptor kinases, in particular the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1 and the immune receptor FLS2. BAK1 positively regulates BRI1 receptor function via physical interaction and

  1. The G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A (GPRC6A) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, C; Smajilovic, S; Wellendorph, P

    2014-01-01

    GPRC6A (G protein-coupled receptor, class C, group 6, subtype A) is a class C G protein-coupled receptor, that has been cloned from human, mouse and rat. Several groups have shown that the receptor is activated by a range of basic and small aliphatic L-α-amino acids of which L-arginine, L-lysine...

  2. The substance P/NK-1 receptor system: NK-1 receptor antagonists ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-04-27

    Apr 27, 2015 ... The substance P (SP)/neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor system plays an important role in cancer. SP promotes the ... NK-1 receptor may be a promising target in the treatment of cancer; NK-1 receptor antagonists could act as specific ...... mycin, ifosfamide, cisplatin) in MG-63 human osteosarcoma cells, but not in ...

  3. Interaction of epidermal growth factor receptors with the cytoskeleton is related to receptor clustering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Belzen, N.; Spaargaren, M.; Verkleij, A. J.; Boonstra, J.

    1990-01-01

    Recently it has been established that cytoskeleton-associated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptors are predominantly of the high-affinity class and that EGF induces a recruitment of low-affinity receptors to the cytoskeleton. The nature of this EGF-induced receptor-cytoskeleton interaction,

  4. Posttransplant chimeric antigen receptor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melody; Zakrzewski, Johannes; James, Scott; Sadelain, Michel

    2018-03-08

    Therapeutic T-cell engineering is emerging as a powerful approach to treat refractory hematological malignancies. Its most successful embodiment to date is based on the use of second-generation chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19, a cell surface molecule found in most B-cell leukemias and lymphomas. Remarkable complete remissions have been obtained with autologous T cells expressing CD19 CARs in patients with relapsed, chemo-refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Allogeneic CAR T cells may also be harnessed to treat relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, the use of donor T cells poses unique challenges owing to potential alloreactivity. We review different approaches to mitigate the risk of causing or aggravating graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), including CAR therapies based on donor leukocyte infusion, virus-specific T cells, T-cell receptor-deficient T cells, lymphoid progenitor cells, and regulatory T cells. Advances in CAR design, T-cell selection and gene editing are poised to enable the safe use of allogeneic CAR T cells without incurring GVHD. © 2018 by The American Society of Hematology.

  5. Microarray-Based Determination of Estrogen Receptor, Progesterone Receptor, and HER2 Receptor Status in Breast Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roepman, Paul; Horlings, Hugo M.; Krijgsman, Oscar; Kok, Marleen; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Jolien M.; Bender, Richard; Linn, Sabine C.; Glas, Annuska M.; van de Vijver, Marc J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The level of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and HER2 aids in the determination of prognosis and treatment of breast cancer. Immunohistochemistry is currently the predominant method for assessment, but differences in methods and interpretation can substantially affect

  6. The lactate receptor, G-protein-coupled receptor 81/hydroxycarboxylic acid receptor 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morland, Cecilie; Lauritzen, Knut Huso; Puchades, Maja

    2015-01-01

    , and schizophrenia and in the deposition of phosphorylated tau protein in Alzheimer's disease. HCAR1 could serve to ameliorate these conditions and might also act through downstream mechanisms other than cAMP. Lactate exits cells through monocarboxylate transporters in an equilibrating manner and through astrocyte...... anion channels activated by depolarization. In addition to locally produced lactate, lactate produced by exercising muscle as well as exogenous HCAR1 agonists, e.g., from fruits and berries, might activate the receptor on cerebral blood vessels and brain cells....

  7. A bioluminescence resonance energy transfer 2 (BRET2) assay for monitoring seven transmembrane receptor and insulin receptor crosstalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanni, Samra Joke; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Jorgensen, Rasmus

    2017-01-01

    The angiotensin AT1 receptor is a seven transmembrane (7TM) receptor, which mediates the regulation of blood pressure. Activation of angiotensin AT1 receptor may lead to impaired insulin signaling indicating crosstalk between angiotensin AT1 receptor and insulin receptor signaling pathways. To el...

  8. Cannabinoid 2 Receptor- and Beta Arrestin 2-Dependent Upregulation of Serotonin 2A Receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, J.M.; Vasiljevik, T.; Prisinzano, T.E.; Carrasco, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that cannabinoid receptor agonists may regulate serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptor neurotransmission in the brain, although no molecular mechanism has been identified. Here, we present experimental evidence that sustained treatment with a non-selective cannabinoid agonist (CP 55,940) or selective CB2 receptor agonists (JWH 133 or GP 1a) upregulate 5-HT2A receptors in a neuronal cell line. Furthermore, this cannabinoid receptor agonist-induced upregulation of 5-HT2A recept...

  9. Identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of retinoid X and retinoic acid receptors via quantum mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Motonori; Shudo, Koichi; Kagechika, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    Understanding and identifying the receptor subtype selectivity of a ligand is an important issue in the field of drug discovery. Using a combination of classical molecular mechanics and quantum mechanical calculations, this report assesses the receptor subtype selectivity for the human retinoid X receptor (hRXR) and retinoic acid receptor (hRAR) ligand-binding domains (LBDs) complexed with retinoid ligands. The calculated energies show good correlation with the experimentally reported binding affinities. The technique proposed here is a promising method as it reveals the origin of the receptor subtype selectivity of selective ligands.

  10. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented

  11. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented.

  12. The Relationship of Erythropoietin Receptor Expression and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... A critical role of erythropoietin receptor in neurogenesis and post‑stroke recovery. J Neurosci 2006;26:1269‑74. 4. Ribatti D, Poliani PL, Longo V, Mangieri D, Nico B,. Vacca A. Erythropoietin/erythropoietin receptor system is involved in angiogenesis in human neuroblastoma. Histopathology 2007 ...

  13. Progesterone Receptor Scaffolding Function in Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    response. PR are expressed in multiple human tissues including the uterus, mammary gland , brain, pancreas, thymus , bone, ovary, testes, and in the...ABSTRACT Progesterone receptors (PR) are critical mediators of mammary gland development and contribute to breast cancer progression. Progestin...receptors (PR) are critical for massive breast epithelial cell expansion during mammary gland development and contribute to breast cancer progression

  14. Structural Studies of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shahsavar, Azadeh; Gajhede, Michael; Kastrup, Jette

    2016-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are members of the pentameric ligand-gated ion channel superfamily that play important roles in control of neurotransmitter release in the central and peripheral nervous system. These receptors are important therapeutic targets for development of drugs...

  15. Docking to flexible nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander, Tommy; Bruun, Anne T; Balle, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Computational docking to nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and other members of the Cys-loop receptor family is complicated by the flexibility of the so-called C-loop. As observed in the large number of published crystal structures of the acetylcholine binding protein (AChBP), a structural...

  16. Structural Mapping of Adenosine Receptor Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespers, Willem; Schiedel, Anke C; Heitman, Laura H

    2018-01-01

    The four adenosine receptors (ARs), A1, A2A, A2B, and A3, constitute a subfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) with exceptional foundations for structure-based ligand design. The vast amount of mutagenesis data, accumulated in the literature since the 1990s, has been recently supplemente...

  17. Interactions of Rodent Coronaviruses with Cellular Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-08

    bluecomb disease). b. Other diseases caused by corooaviruses inc lude infectious peritonitis, r!¥lting, nephritis , pancreatitis , parotitis, and...homology with the MEV receptor, perhaps a different member of the CEA family such as the rat pregnancy specific glycoprotein could serve as a receptor

  18. Receptors, G proteins, and their interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollmann, Markus W.; Strumper, Danja; Herroeder, Susanne; Durieux, Marcel E.

    2005-01-01

    Membrane receptors coupling to intracellular G proteins (G protein-coupled receptors) form one of the major classes of membrane signaling proteins. They are of great importance to the practice of anesthesiology because they are involved in many systems of relevance to the specialty (cardiovascular

  19. Lipoprotein receptors in cultured bovine endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struempfer, A.E.M.

    1983-07-01

    In this study, receptors that may be involved in the uptake of low density lipoproteins (LDL) and low density lipoproteins which have been modified by acetylation (AcLDL), were characterized. Aortic epithelial cells were used and a cell culture system which closely resembled the in vivo monolayer was established. Endothelial cell and lipoprotein interactions were examined by incubating the cells with 125 l-labelled lipoproteins under various conditions. The receptor affinity of bovine aortic endothelial cells was higher for AcLDL than that for LDL. Competition studies demonstrated that there were two distinct receptors for LDL and AcLDL on the endothelial cells. AcLDL did not compete with LDL for the LDL receptor, and conversely LDL did not compete with AcLDL for the AcLDL receptor. The receptor activities for LDL and AcLDL were examined as a function of culture age. Whereas the LDL receptor could be regulated, the AcLDL receptor was not as susceptible to regulation. Upon exposing endothelial cells for 72 h to either LDL or AcLDL, it was found that the total amount of cellular cholesterol increased by about 50%. However, the increase of total cholesterol was largely in the form of free cholesterol. This is in contrast to macrophages, where the increase in total cholesterol upon exposure to AcLDL is largely in the form cholesteryl esters

  20. Molecular identification of the first SIFamide receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Lars M; Hauser, Frank; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    . Database searches revealed SIFamide receptor orthologues in the genomes from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae, the silkworm Bombyx mori, the red flour beetle Tribolium castaneum, and the honey bee Apis mellifera. An alignment of the five insect SIFamide or SIFamide-like receptors showed, again...

  1. Genetic features of thyroid hormone receptors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Thyroid hormone receptors (TR) are prototypes of nuclear transcription factors that regulate the expression of target genes. These receptors play an important role in many physiological processes. Moreover, a dysfunction of these proteins is often implicated in several human diseases and malignancies. Here we ...

  2. Emerging functions for neuropeptide Y5 receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bischoff, A.; Michel, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    The Y5 subtype of neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors has raised considerable interest as a mediator of NPY-stimulated food intake, but with the advent of recent data, this hypothesis has come into question. Moreover, Y5 receptor-selective drugs might not be specific for food intake because additional

  3. Receptor study of psychiatric disorders using PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhara, Tetsuya

    1992-01-01

    Recent receptor studies of psychiatric disorders using PET have been focused on the change in the number of D 2 dopamine receptors in the striatum of drug-naive schizophrenic patients. One study confirmed an increase in D 2 receptors, while another study denied it. Although there were some differences in the approaches of the two groups, the reason for the discrepancy is not clear yet. Looking to psychiatric disorders other than schizophrenia, our recent study revealed a possible role of dopamine D 1 receptors in bipolar mood disorders. However, some problems must be resolved for further receptor studies with PET. For example, our recent study shows that desipamine decreases the in vivo binding of dopramine D 1 and D 2 receptors whereas these is no effect on dopamine D 1 and D 2 receptors in vitro. Additionally significant methodological problems lie in the method of evaluation of the non-specific binding and the effect of endogenous neurotransmitters. Moreover, difficulties in the diagnosis of psychiatric disorders and ethical problems in psychiatric research are critical factors in receptor studies with PET in psychiatric disorders. (author)

  4. Thermogenic characterization of ghrelin receptor null mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic hormone that increases food intake and promotes adiposity, and these physiological functions of ghrelin are mediated through its receptor growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R). Ghrelin/GHS-R signaling plays a crucial role in energy homeostasis....

  5. Enantioselective Transport by a Steroidal Guanidinium Receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baragaña, Beatriz; Blackburn, Adrian G.; Breccia, Perla; Davis, Anthony P.; Mendoza, Javier de; Padrón-Carrillo, José M.; Prados, Pilar; Riedner, Jens; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2002-01-01

    The cationic steroidal receptors 9 and 11 have been synthesized from cholic acid 3. Receptor 9 extracts N-acetyl-α-amino acids from aqueous media into chloroform with enantioselectivities (L:D) of 7-10:1. The lipophilic variant 11 has been employed for the enantioselective transport of

  6. How calcium makes endocytic receptors attractive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian B F; Moestrup, Søren K

    2014-01-01

    'lynchpin' that stabilizes favorable positioning of ligand-attractive receptor residues. In addition to explaining how calcium depletion can cause ligand-receptor dissociation, the new data add further insight into how acidification contributes to dissociation through structural changes that affect...

  7. Immunohistochemical assessment of oestrogen and progesterone receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabau, D A; Thorpe, S M; Knoop, A

    2000-01-01

    Two different methods to determine steroid receptors were analysed with respect to their ability to estimate prognosis in primary breast cancer patients. The immunohistochemical assay (IHA) was compared with the dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) method of receptor determination. A random sample of 281...

  8. P2X receptors in epithelia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipziger, Jens Georg

    2015-01-01

    P2X receptors are ubiquitously expressed in all epithelial tissues but their functional roles are less well studied. Here we review the current state of knowledge by focusing on functional effects of P2X receptor in secretory and in absorptive tissues. In glandular tissue like the parotid gland b...

  9. Carbamate Insecticides Target Human Melatonin Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popovska-Gorevski, Marina; Dubocovich, Margarita L; Rajnarayanan, Rajendram V

    2017-02-20

    Carbaryl (1-naphthyl methylcarbamate) and carbofuran (2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyl methylcarbamate) are among the most toxic insecticides, implicated in a variety of diseases including diabetes and cancer among others. Using an integrated pharmacoinformatics based screening approach, we have identified these insecticides to be structural mimics of the neurohormone melatonin and were able to bind to the putative melatonin binding sites in MT 1 and MT 2 melatonin receptors in silico. Carbaryl and carbofuran then were tested for competition with 2-[ 125 I]-iodomelatonin (300 pM) binding to hMT 1 or hMT 2 receptors stably expressed in CHO cells. Carbaryl and carbofuran showed higher affinity for competition with 2-[ 125 I]-iodomelatonin binding to the hMT 2 compared to the hMT 1 melatonin receptor (33 and 35-fold difference, respectively) as predicted by the molecular modeling. In the presence of GTP (100 μM), which decouples the G-protein linked receptors to modulate signaling, the apparent efficacy of carbaryl and carbofuran for 2-[ 125 I]-iodomelatonin binding for the hMT 1 melatonin receptor was not affected but significantly decreased for the hMT 2 melatonin receptor compatible with receptor antagonist/inverse agonist and agonist efficacy, respectively. Altogether, our data points to a potentially new mechanism through which carbamate insecticides carbaryl and carbofuran could impact human health by altering the homeostatic balance of key regulatory processes by directly binding to melatonin receptors.

  10. NRSAS: Nuclear Receptor Structure Analysis Servers.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bettler, E.J.M.; Krause, R.; Horn, F.; Vriend, G.

    2003-01-01

    We present a coherent series of servers that can perform a large number of structure analyses on nuclear hormone receptors. These servers are part of the NucleaRDB project, which provides a powerful information system for nuclear hormone receptors. The computations performed by the servers include

  11. Progesterone receptor levels independently predict survival in endometrial adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyholm, H C; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Anette Lynge

    1995-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptor (PR) contents were determined by biochemical (dextran charcoal-coated (DCC) assay) and immunohistochemical (ICA) methods in biopsies from 145 primary endometrial adenocarcinomas and those with eligible receptor measurements were analyzed with respect...

  12. Steroid Hormone Receptor Signals as Prognosticators for Urothelial Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Ide

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a substantial amount of preclinical or clinical evidence suggesting that steroid hormone receptor-mediated signals play a critical role in urothelial tumorigenesis and tumor progression. These receptors include androgen receptor, estrogen receptors, glucocorticoid receptor, progesterone receptor, vitamin D receptor, retinoid receptors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, and others including orphan receptors. In particular, studies using urothelial cancer tissue specimens have demonstrated that elevated or reduced expression of these receptors as well as alterations of their upstream or downstream pathways correlates with patient outcomes. This review summarizes and discusses available data suggesting that steroid hormone receptors and related signals serve as biomarkers for urothelial carcinoma and are able to predict tumor recurrence or progression.

  13. Current Research on Opioid Receptor Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yuan; He, Xiaozhou; Yang, Yilin; Chao, Dongman; Lazarus, Lawrence H.; Xia, Ying

    2012-01-01

    The use of opioid analgesics has a long history in clinical settings, although the comprehensive action of opioid receptors is still less understood. Nonetheless, recent studies have generated fresh insights into opioid receptor-mediated functions and their underlying mechanisms. Three major opioid receptors (μ-opioid receptor, MOR; δ-opioid receptor, DOR; and κ-opioid receptor, KOR) have been cloned in many species. Each opioid receptor is functionally sub-classified into several pharmacological subtypes, although, specific gene corresponding each of these receptor subtypes is still unidentified as only a single gene has been isolated for each opioid receptor. In addition to pain modulation and addiction, opioid receptors are widely involved in various physiological and pathophysiological activities, including the regulation of membrane ionic homeostasis, cell proliferation, emotional response, epileptic seizures, immune function, feeding, obesity, respiratory and cardiovascular control as well as some neurodegenerative disorders. In some species, they play an essential role in hibernation. One of the most exciting findings of the past decade is the opioid-receptor, especially DOR, mediated neuroprotection and cardioprotection. The up-regulation of DOR expression and DOR activation increase the neuronal tolerance to hypoxic/ischemic stress. The DOR signal triggers (depending on stress duration and severity) different mechanisms at multiple levels to preserve neuronal survival, including the stabilization of homeostasis and increased pro-survival signaling (e.g., PKC-ERK-Bcl 2) and anti-oxidative capacity. In the heart, PKC and KATP channels are involved in the opioid receptor-mediated cardioprotection. The DOR-mediated neuroprotection and cardioprotection have the potential to significantly alter the clinical pharmacology in terms of prevention and treatment of life-threatening conditions like stroke and myocardial infarction. The main purpose of this article

  14. Computer modeling of Cannabinoid receptor type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sapundzhi Fatima

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid receptors are important class of receptors as they are involved in various physiological processes such as appetite, pain-sensation, mood, and memory. It is important to design receptor-selective ligands in order to treat a particular disorder. The aim of the present study is to model the structure of cannabinoid receptor CB1 and to perform docking between obtained models and known ligands. Two models of CBR1 were prepared with two different methods (Modeller of Chimera and MOE. They were used for docking with GOLD 5.2. It was established a high correlation between inhibitory constant Ki of CB1 cannabinoid ligands and the ChemScore scoring function of GOLD, which concerns both models. This suggests that the models of the CB1 receptors obtained could be used for docking studies and in further investigation and design of new potential, selective and active cannabinoids with the desired effects.

  15. Complex Pharmacology of Free Fatty Acid Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milligan, Graeme; Shimpukade, Bharat; Ulven, Trond

    2017-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are historically the most successful family of drug targets. In recent times it has become clear that the pharmacology of these receptors is far more complex than previously imagined. Understanding of the pharmacological regulation of GPCRs now extends beyond...... pharmacology have shaped understanding of the complex pharmacology of receptors that recognize and are activated by nonesterified or "free" fatty acids (FFAs). The FFA family of receptors is a recently deorphanized set of GPCRs, the members of which are now receiving substantial interest as novel targets...... for the treatment of metabolic and inflammatory diseases. Further understanding of the complex pharmacology of these receptors will be critical to unlocking their ultimate therapeutic potential....

  16. Molecular pharmacology of human NMDA receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedegaard, Maiken; Hansen, Kasper Bø; Andersen, Karen Toftegaard

    2012-01-01

    current knowledge of the relationship between NMDA receptor structure and function. We summarize studies on the biophysical properties of human NMDA receptors and compare these properties to those of rat orthologs. Finally, we provide a comprehensive pharmacological characterization that allows side......-by-side comparison of agonists, un-competitive antagonists, GluN2B-selective non-competitive antagonists, and GluN2C/D-selective modulators at recombinant human and rat NMDA receptors. The evaluation of biophysical properties and pharmacological probes acting at different sites on the receptor suggest...... that the binding sites and conformational changes leading to channel gating in response to agonist binding are highly conserved between human and rat NMDA receptors. In summary, the results of this study suggest that no major detectable differences exist in the pharmacological and functional properties of human...

  17. Ror receptor tyrosine kinases: orphans no more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jennifer L; Kuntz, Steven G; Sternberg, Paul W

    2008-11-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor (Ror) proteins are a conserved family of tyrosine kinase receptors that function in developmental processes including skeletal and neuronal development, cell movement and cell polarity. Although Ror proteins were originally named because the associated ligand and signaling pathway were unknown, recent studies in multiple species have now established that Ror proteins are Wnt receptors. Depending on the cellular context, Ror proteins can either activate or repress transcription of Wnt target genes and can modulate Wnt signaling by sequestering Wnt ligands. New evidence implicates Ror proteins in planar cell polarity, an alternative Wnt pathway. Here, we review the progress made in understanding these mysterious proteins and, in particular, we focus on their function as Wnt receptors.

  18. Androgen insensitivity syndrome: gonadal androgen receptor activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coulam, C.B.; Graham, M.L.; Spelsberg, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    To determine whether abnormalities of the androgen receptor previously observed in skin fibroblasts from patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome also occur in the gonads of affected individuals, androgen receptor activity in the gonads of a patient with testicular feminization syndrome was investigated. Using conditions for optimal recovery of androgen receptor from human testes established by previous studies, we detected the presence of a high-affinity (dissociation constant . 3.2 X 10(-10) mol/L), low-capacity (4.2 X 10(-12) mol/mg DNA), androgen-binding protein when tritium-labeled R1881 was incubated at 4 degrees C with nuclear extracts from the gonads of control patients or from a patient with testicular feminization syndrome but not when incubated at 37 degrees C. Thus this patient has an androgen receptor with a temperature lability similar to that of receptors from normal persons

  19. Kinetic Profile of Neuropeptide-Receptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nederpelt, Indira; Bunnik, Julia; IJzerman, Adriaan P; Heitman, Laura H

    2016-12-01

    Currently, drug discovery focusses only on quantifying pharmacological parameters, sometimes including binding kinetics, of drug candidates. For a complete understanding of a drug's desired binding kinetics, the kinetics of both the target and its endogenous ligands should be considered. This is because the release and binding kinetics of endogenous ligands in addition to receptor internalization rates are significant contributors to drug-target interactions. Here, we discuss the kinetic profile of three neuropeptides and their receptors; gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR), neuropeptide Y receptors, and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF 1 R). These three examples provide new insights into the importance of kinetic profiles which could improve the understanding of desired drug-target binding kinetics and advance drug discovery for various neurological and psychiatric illnesses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mutations in G protein-coupled receptors that impact receptor trafficking and reproductive function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulloa-Aguirre, Alfredo; Zariñán, Teresa; Dias, James A; Conn, P Michael

    2014-01-25

    G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are a large superfamily of integral cell surface plasma membrane proteins that play key roles in transducing extracellular signals, including sensory stimuli, hormones, neurotransmitters, or paracrine factors into the intracellular environment through the activation of one or more heterotrimeric G proteins. Structural alterations provoked by mutations or variations in the genes coding for GPCRs may lead to misfolding, altered plasma membrane expression of the receptor protein and frequently to disease. A number of GPCRs regulate reproductive function at different levels; these receptors include the gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR) and the gonadotropin receptors (follicle-stimulating hormone receptor and luteinizing hormone receptor), which regulate the function of the pituitary-gonadal axis. Loss-of-function mutations in these receptors may lead to hypogonadotropic or hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, which encompass a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. In this review we describe mutations that provoke misfolding and failure of these receptors to traffick from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane. We also discuss some aspects related to the therapeutic potential of some target-specific drugs that selectively bind to and rescue function of misfolded mutant GnRHR and gonadotropin receptors, and that represent potentially valuable strategies to treat diseases caused by inactivating mutations of these receptors. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Real-Time G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Imaging to Understand and Quantify Receptor Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María S. Aymerich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the trafficking of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and their regulation by agonists and antagonists is fundamental to develop more effective drugs. Optical methods using fluorescent-tagged receptors and spinning disk confocal microscopy are useful tools to investigate membrane receptor dynamics in living cells. The aim of this study was to develop a method to characterize receptor dynamics using this system which offers the advantage of very fast image acquisition with minimal cell perturbation. However, in short-term assays photobleaching was still a problem. Thus, we developed a procedure to perform a photobleaching-corrected image analysis. A study of short-term dynamics of the long isoform of the dopamine type 2 receptor revealed an agonist-induced increase in the mobile fraction of receptors with a rate of movement of 0.08 μm/s For long-term assays, the ratio between the relative fluorescence intensity at the cell surface versus that in the intracellular compartment indicated that receptor internalization only occurred in cells co-expressing G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2. These results indicate that the lateral movement of receptors and receptor internalization are not directly coupled. Thus, we believe that live imaging of GPCRs using spinning disk confocal image analysis constitutes a powerful tool to study of receptor dynamics.

  2. Receptor oligomerization in family B1 of G-protein-coupled receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roed, Sarah Norklit; Ørgaard, Anne; Jørgensen, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    , investigation of family B1 receptor oligomerization and especially its pharmacological importance is still at an early stage. Even though GPCR oligomerization is a well-established phenomenon, there is a need for more investigations providing a direct link between these interactions and receptor functionality......The superfamily of the seven transmembrane G-protein-coupled receptors (7TM/GPCRs) is the largest family of membrane-associated receptors. GPCRs are involved in the pathophysiology of numerous human diseases, and they constitute an estimated 30-40% of all drug targets. During the last two decades......, GPCR oligomerization has been extensively studied using methods like bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) and today, receptor-receptor interactions within the GPCR superfamily is a well-established phenomenon. Evidence of the impact of GPCR oligomerization on, e.g., ligand binding, receptor...

  3. Enhanced sensitivity of muscarinic cholinergic receptor associated with dopaminergic receptor subsensitivity after chronic antidepressant treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, T.; Matsushita, H.

    1981-01-01

    The chronic effects of antidepressant treatment on striatal dopaminergic (DA) and muscarinic cholinergic (mACh) receptors of the rat brain have been examined comparatively in this study using 3 H-spiroperidol ( 3 H-SPD) and 3 H-quinuclidinyl benzilate ( 3 H-QNB) as the respective radioactive ligands. Imipramine and desipramine were used as prototype antidepressants. Although a single administration of imipramine or desipramine did not affect each receptor sensitivity, chronic treatment with each drug caused a supersensitivity of mACh receptor subsequent to DA receptor subsensitivity. Furthermore, it has been suggested that anti-mACh properties of imipramine or desipramine may not necessarily be related to the manifestation of mACh receptor supersensitivity and that sustained DA receptor subsensitivity may play some role in the alterations of mACh receptor sensitivity

  4. Multiple autophosphorylation sites of the epidermal growth factor receptor are essential for receptor kinase activity and internalization. Contrasting significance of tyrosine 992 in the native and truncated receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorkin, A; Helin, K; Waters, C M

    1992-01-01

    for cells expressing kinase-negative receptor (A721). Moreover, tyrosine kinase activity of the Dc-123F receptor toward phospholipase C-gamma 1, compared to wild-type receptor, was reduced by 90%. Taken together, these results show that EGF receptor lacking five autophosphorylation sites functions similar...

  5. Emerging GLP-1 receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Asger; Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Recently, glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists have become available for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. These agents exploit the physiological effects of GLP-1, which is able to address several of the pathophysiological features of type 2 diabetes. GLP-1R agonists...... presently available are administered once or twice daily, but several once-weekly GLP-1R agonists are in late clinical development. Areas covered: The present review aims to give an overview of the clinical data on the currently available GLP-1R agonists used for treatment of type 2 diabetes, exenatide...... and liraglutide, as well as the emerging GLP-1R agonists including the long-acting compounds. Expert opinion: An emerging therapeutic trend toward initial or early combination therapy with metformin- and incretin-based therapy is anticipated for patients with type 2 diabetes. GLP-1-based therapy has so far proven...

  6. Ketamine: NMDA Receptors and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorumski, Charles F; Izumi, Yukitoshi; Mennerick, Steven

    2016-11-02

    Human studies examining the effects of the dissociative anesthetic ketamine as a model for psychosis and as a rapidly acting antidepressant have spurred great interest in understanding ketamine's actions at molecular, cellular, and network levels. Although ketamine has unequivocal uncompetitive inhibitory effects on N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) and may preferentially alter the function of NMDARs on interneurons, recent work has questioned whether block of NMDARs is critical for its mood enhancing actions. In this viewpoint, we examine the evolving literature on ketamine supporting NMDARs as important triggers for certain psychiatric effects and the possibility that the antidepressant trigger is unrelated to NMDARs. The rapidly evolving story of ketamine offers great hope for untangling and treating the biology of both depressive and psychotic illnesses. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/3611158-07$15.00/0.

  7. THE NATURE OF ACETYLCHOLINE RECEPTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E. TASHAYOD

    1983-05-01

    Full Text Available The present work with consideratlon to the autoradiographic pictures, suggests that cholinergic receptors are located at the gate of a channel originating from synaptic cleft coming to lie within the muscle fibre. AChE molecules stand at the gate of this channel,controlling the entrance of different cholinergic agents. It was report- ••• ed previously that dtc molecules s t.abD ;:.2e the AChE rnolecules and will obstruct the gate. This blocks the acess of ionic flux within the channel thus producing a non-depolarizing neuromuscular paralysis.The presented experiments imply that depolarizing agent will bring a considerable change in conformation of AChE mole cule and this causes the opening of the gate allowing ioni flux and depolarization .In case of ACh this process is repeated in a fraction of milli second, due to rapid regeneration of AChE while in case of suxamethonium and neostigmine(given in high dose, the regeneration of AChE takes much longer time thus will produce a depolarizing blockade. In this hypothepis the main responsa~ility of AChE"nis confined to identification of cholinergic agents and Cooperation in their function so,it can be accepted as Cholinergic receptor. In regard to clinic, this work suggests that only the use of minimum effective dose of neostigmine is advisable, in reversing curarisation. In contrast to general belief , the dose of neostigmine should be s elec t ed in relation to r eceptor dtc occupation and not depending on pati ent 's weight . As it was demonstrated , the early use"nof high dose o f neostigmine may a lso potent i a te curar i s a tion

  8. G-protein Receptor Kinase 5 Regulates the Cannabinoid Receptor 2-induced Up-regulation of Serotonin 2A Receptors*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Jade M.; Carrasco, Gonzalo A.

    2013-01-01

    We have recently reported that cannabinoid agonists can up-regulate and enhance the activity of serotonin 2A (5-HT2A) receptors in the prefrontal cortex (PFCx). Increased expression and activity of cortical 5-HT2A receptors has been associated with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as anxiety and schizophrenia. Here we report that repeated CP55940 exposure selectively up-regulates GRK5 proteins in rat PFCx and in a neuronal cell culture model. We sought to examine the mechanism underlying the regulation of GRK5 and to identify the role of GRK5 in the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation and enhanced activity of 5-HT2A receptors. Interestingly, we found that cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation of GRK5 involves CB2 receptors, β-arrestin 2, and ERK1/2 signaling because treatment with CB2 shRNA lentiviral particles, β-arrestin 2 shRNA lentiviral particles, or ERK1/2 inhibitor prevented the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation of GRK5. Most importantly, we found that GRK5 shRNA lentiviral particle treatment prevented the cannabinoid agonist-induced up-regulation and enhanced 5-HT2A receptor-mediated calcium release. Repeated cannabinoid exposure was also associated with enhanced phosphorylation of CB2 receptors and increased interaction between β-arrestin 2 and ERK1/2. These latter phenomena were also significantly inhibited by GRK5 shRNA lentiviral treatment. Our results suggest that sustained activation of CB2 receptors, which up-regulates 5-HT2A receptor signaling, enhances GRK5 expression; the phosphorylation of CB2 receptors; and the β-arrestin 2/ERK interactions. These data could provide a rationale for some of the adverse effects associated with repeated cannabinoid agonist exposure. PMID:23592773

  9. Renal tubular vasopressin receptors downregulated by dehydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, M.; Phillips, M.I.

    1988-01-01

    Receptors for arginine vasopressin (AVP) were characterized in tubular epithelial basolateral membranes (BL membranes) prepared from the kidneys of male Spraque-Dawley rats. Association of [ 3 H]AVP was rapid, reversible, and specific. Saturation studies revealed a single class of saturable binding sites with a maximal binding (B max ) of 184 ± 15 fmol/mg protein. The V 2 receptor antagonist was more than 3,700 times as effective in displacing [ 3 H]AVP than was the V 1 antagonist. To investigate the physiological regulation of vasopressin receptors, the effects of elevated levels of circulating AVP on receptor characteristics were studied. Seventy-two-hour water deprivation significantly elevated plasma osmolality and caused an 11.5-fold increase in plasma [AVP]. Scatchard analysis revealed a 38% decreased in the number of AVP receptors on the BL membranes from dehydrated animals. The high-affinity binding sites on the BL membranes fit the pharmacological profile for adenylate cyclase-linked vasopressin receptors (V 2 ), which mediate the antidiuretic action of the hormone. The authors conclude that physiologically elevated levels of AVP can downregulate vasopressin receptors in the kidney

  10. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von, E-mail: evonrose@medicine.umaryland.edu; Raufman, Jean-Pierre [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Division of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, 22 S. Greene Street, N3W62, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Department of Veterans Affairs, VA Maryland Health Care System, 10 North Greene Street, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States)

    2011-03-02

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  11. Action mechanisms of Liver X Receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabbi, Chiara; Warner, Margaret; Gustafsson, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • LXRα and LXRβ are ligand-activated nuclear receptors. • They share oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, RXR. • LXRs regulate lipid and glucose metabolism, CNS and immune functions, and water transport. - Abstract: The two Liver X Receptors, LXRα and LXRβ, are nuclear receptors belonging to the superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. They share more than 78% homology in amino acid sequence, a common profile of oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, Retinoid X Receptor. LXRs play crucial roles in several metabolic pathways: lipid metabolism, in particular in preventing cellular cholesterol accumulation; glucose homeostasis; inflammation; central nervous system functions and water transport. As with all nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of LXR is the result of an orchestration of numerous cellular factors including ligand bioavailability, presence of corepressors and coactivators and cellular context i.e., what other pathways are activated in the cell at the time the receptor recognizes its ligand. In this mini-review we summarize the factors regulating the transcriptional activity and the mechanisms of action of these two receptors

  12. Action mechanisms of Liver X Receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabbi, Chiara; Warner, Margaret [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, University of Houston, 3056 Cullen Blv, 77204 Houston, Texas (United States); Gustafsson, Jan-Åke, E-mail: jgustafs@central.uh.edu [Center for Nuclear Receptors and Cell Signaling, University of Houston, 3056 Cullen Blv, 77204 Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, Novum S-141 86 (Sweden)

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • LXRα and LXRβ are ligand-activated nuclear receptors. • They share oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, RXR. • LXRs regulate lipid and glucose metabolism, CNS and immune functions, and water transport. - Abstract: The two Liver X Receptors, LXRα and LXRβ, are nuclear receptors belonging to the superfamily of ligand-activated transcription factors. They share more than 78% homology in amino acid sequence, a common profile of oxysterol ligands and the same heterodimerization partner, Retinoid X Receptor. LXRs play crucial roles in several metabolic pathways: lipid metabolism, in particular in preventing cellular cholesterol accumulation; glucose homeostasis; inflammation; central nervous system functions and water transport. As with all nuclear receptors, the transcriptional activity of LXR is the result of an orchestration of numerous cellular factors including ligand bioavailability, presence of corepressors and coactivators and cellular context i.e., what other pathways are activated in the cell at the time the receptor recognizes its ligand. In this mini-review we summarize the factors regulating the transcriptional activity and the mechanisms of action of these two receptors.

  13. Tachykinins and tachykinin receptors in bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tetsuya; Tanaka, Teruo

    2002-07-15

    Tachykinins are neuropeptides that are widely distributed in the body and function as neurotransmitters and neuromodulators. Five tachykinin subtypes: substance P (SP), neurokinin A, neurokinin B, neuropeptide K, and neuropeptide gamma; and three receptor subtypes: neurokinin-1, -2, and -3 receptors, have been identified. SP was the first peptide of the tachykinin family to be identified. It is considered to be an important neuropeptide, and to function in the nervous system and intestine. However, recent advances in the analysis of SP receptors, particularly neurokinin-1 receptors (NK(1)-Rs) that have high affinity for SP, have demonstrated that NK(1)-Rs are distributed not only in neurons and immune cells, but also in other peripheral cells, including bone cells. This article reviews the current understanding of the distribution of SP and other tachykinins in bone, and the function of tachykinins, through neurokinin receptors. The distribution of tachykinin-immunoreactive axons and neurokinin receptors suggests that tachykinins may directly modulate bone metabolism through neurokinin receptors. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Pharmacological analysis of calcium antagonist receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    This work focuses on two aspects of the action of calcium antagonist drugs, namely, the interaction of drugs with receptors for verapamil-like calcium antagonists, and the interactions of drugs with voltage-sensitive calcium fluxes in rat brain synaptosomes. From binding studies I have found that the ligand of choice for labeling the verapamil receptor is (-)[ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil. This drug labels potently, reversibly and stereoselectively two receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain and rabbit skeletal muscle tissues. In equilibrium studies dihydropyridine calcium antagonists interact in a non-competitive fashion, while many non-DHPs are apparently competitive. In-depth kinetic studies in skeletal muscle membranes indicate that the two receptors are linked in a negative heterotropic fashion, and that low-affinity binding of (-) [ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil may be to the diltiazem receptor. However, these studies were not able to distinguish between the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to spatially separate, allosterically coupled receptors, and the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to a subsite of the verapamil receptor

  15. Psychopharmacology of 5-HT1A receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowen, Philip J.

    2000-01-01

    Serotonin 1A (5-HT 1A ) receptors are located on both 5-HT cell bodies where they act as inhibitory autoreceptors and at postsynaptic sites where they mediate the effects of 5-HT released from nerve terminals. The sensitivity of 5-HT 1A receptors in humans can be measured using the technique of pharmacological challenge. For example, acute administration of a selective 5-HT 1A receptor agonist, such as ipsapirone, decreases body temperature and increases plasma cortisol through activation of pre- and postsynaptic 5-HT 1A receptors, respectively. Use of this technique has demonstrated that unmedicated patients with major depression have decreased sensitivity of both pre- and postsynaptic 5-HT 1A receptors. Treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors further down-regulates 5-HT 1A receptor activity. Due to the hypotheses linking decreased sensitivity of 5-HT 1A autoreceptors with the onset of antidepressant activity, there is current interest in the therapeutic efficacy of combined treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and 5-HT 1A receptor antagonists

  16. Receptor mapping in psychiatric patients with SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, S.

    1997-01-01

    This paper summarizes some data of our studies with the single-photon-emission-computerized tomography (SPECT), focussing on the dopamine-D2- and the benzodiazepine receptor mapping. Benzodiazepine receptors: Central benzodiazepine receptors (BZr) can be visualized with iomazenil which is an analogue of the benzodiazepine antagonist flumazenil, labeled with 123-iodine. Since the involvement of the BZr system is discussed in the pathogenesis of anxiety and depression, patients with these disorders were investigated. A third study investigated the BZr-occupancy during benzodiazepine treatment (lorazepam). Results: (a) Patients with panic disorders had lower iomazenil uptake values compared to epileptic patients. (b) Depressed patients showed a positive correlation between severity of illness and frontal uptake. (c) BZr occupancy during lorazepam treatment was measurable, but not associated with lorazepam plasma levels. Dopamine-D2-receptors: With 123-I-iodobenzamide (IBZM), and iodine-labeled dopamine receptor ligand, the D2 receptor density can be measured by a semiquantitative approach (striatum/frontal cortex=ST/FC). Therefore, we investigated the D2-receptor occupancy during treatment with typical and atypical neuroleptics in relationship to dosages (normalized with different formulas of chlorpromazine equivalents), side effects, and prolactin plasma levels. Results: Dependent on the selected formula for chlorpromazine equivalents, the ST/FC ratio was correlated with dosages. Side effects and prolactin plasma levels showed a negative association with lower ST/FC ratios. (orig.) [de

  17. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenvinge, Erik C. von; Raufman, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer

  18. Muscarinic Receptor Signaling in Colon Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre Raufman

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the adenoma-carcinoma sequence, colon cancer results from accumulating somatic gene mutations; environmental growth factors accelerate and augment this process. For example, diets rich in meat and fat increase fecal bile acids and colon cancer risk. In rodent cancer models, increased fecal bile acids promote colon dysplasia. Conversely, in rodents and in persons with inflammatory bowel disease, low-dose ursodeoxycholic acid treatment alters fecal bile acid composition and attenuates colon neoplasia. In the course of elucidating the mechanism underlying these actions, we discovered that bile acids interact functionally with intestinal muscarinic receptors. The present communication reviews muscarinic receptor expression in normal and neoplastic colon epithelium, the role of autocrine signaling following synthesis and release of acetylcholine from colon cancer cells, post-muscarinic receptor signaling including the role of transactivation of epidermal growth factor receptors and activation of the ERK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways, the structural biology and metabolism of bile acids and evidence for functional interaction of bile acids with muscarinic receptors on human colon cancer cells. In murine colon cancer models, deficiency of subtype 3 muscarinic receptors attenuates intestinal neoplasia; a proof-of-concept supporting muscarinic receptor signaling as a therapeutic target for colon cancer.

  19. Andrographolide regulates epidermal growth factor receptor and transferrin receptor trafficking in epidermoid carcinoma (A-431) cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Y; Chiow, KH; Huang, D; Wong, SH

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: Andrographolide is the active component of Andrographis paniculata, a plant used in both Indian and Chinese traditional medicine, and it has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis in different cancer cell lines. However, not much is known about how it may affect the key receptors implicated in cancer. Knowledge of how andrographolide affects receptor trafficking will allow us to better understand new mechanisms by which andrographolide may cause death in cancer cells. Experimental approach: We utilized the well-characterized epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transferrin receptor (TfR) expressed in epidermoid carcinoma (A-431) cells as a model to study the effect of andrographolide on receptor trafficking. Receptor distribution, the total number of receptors and surface receptors were analysed by immunofluorescence, Western blot as well as flow-cytometry respectively. Key results: Andrographolide treatment inhibited cell growth, down-regulated EGFRs on the cell surface and affected the degradation of EGFRs and TfRs. The EGFR was internalized into the cell at an increased rate, and accumulated in a compartment that co-localizes with the lysosomal-associated membrane protein in the late endosomes. Conclusion and implications: This study sheds light on how andrographolide may affect receptor trafficking by inhibiting receptor movement from the late endosomes to lysosomes. The down-regulation of EGFR from the cell surface also indicates a new mechanism by which andrographolide may induce cancer cell death. PMID:20233216

  20. Serotonin 5-HT4 receptors and forebrain cholinergic system: receptor expression in identified cell populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas-Cazorla, Raúl; Vilaró, M Teresa

    2015-11-01

    Activation of serotonin 5-HT4 receptors has pro-cognitive effects on memory performance. The proposed underlying neurochemical mechanism is the enhancement of acetylcholine release in frontal cortex and hippocampus elicited by 5-HT4 agonists. Although 5-HT4 receptors are present in brain areas related to cognition, e.g., hippocampus and cortex, the cellular localization of the receptors that might modulate acetylcholine release is unknown at present. We have analyzed, using dual label in situ hybridization, the cellular localization of 5-HT4 receptor mRNA in identified neuronal populations of the rat basal forebrain, which is the source of the cholinergic innervation to cortex and hippocampus. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was visualized with isotopically labeled oligonucleotide probes, whereas cholinergic, glutamatergic, GABAergic and parvalbumin-synthesizing neurons were identified with digoxigenin-labeled oligonucleotide probes. 5-HT4 receptor mRNA was not detected in the basal forebrain cholinergic cell population. In contrast, basal forebrain GABAergic, parvalbumin synthesizing, and glutamatergic cells contained 5-HT4 receptor mRNA. Hippocampal and cortical glutamatergic neurons also express this receptor. These results indicate that 5-HT4 receptors are not synthesized by cholinergic cells, and thus would be absent from cholinergic terminals. In contrast, several non-cholinergic cell populations within the basal forebrain and its target hippocampal and cortical areas express these receptors and are thus likely to mediate the enhancement of acetylcholine release elicited by 5-HT4 agonists.

  1. Andrographolide regulates epidermal growth factor receptor and transferrin receptor trafficking in epidermoid carcinoma (A-431) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Y; Chiow, K H; Huang, D; Wong, S H

    2010-04-01

    Andrographolide is the active component of Andrographis paniculata, a plant used in both Indian and Chinese traditional medicine, and it has been demonstrated to induce apoptosis in different cancer cell lines. However, not much is known about how it may affect the key receptors implicated in cancer. Knowledge of how andrographolide affects receptor trafficking will allow us to better understand new mechanisms by which andrographolide may cause death in cancer cells. We utilized the well-characterized epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and transferrin receptor (TfR) expressed in epidermoid carcinoma (A-431) cells as a model to study the effect of andrographolide on receptor trafficking. Receptor distribution, the total number of receptors and surface receptors were analysed by immunofluorescence, Western blot as well as flow-cytometry respectively. Andrographolide treatment inhibited cell growth, down-regulated EGFRs on the cell surface and affected the degradation of EGFRs and TfRs. The EGFR was internalized into the cell at an increased rate, and accumulated in a compartment that co-localizes with the lysosomal-associated membrane protein in the late endosomes. This study sheds light on how andrographolide may affect receptor trafficking by inhibiting receptor movement from the late endosomes to lysosomes. The down-regulation of EGFR from the cell surface also indicates a new mechanism by which andrographolide may induce cancer cell death.

  2. Pharmacological and autoradiographic characterization of sigma receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Largent, B.L.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of three types of opioid receptors - μ, kappa, and sigma - was postulated to explain the effects of different opioids in the chronic spinal dog. Sigma receptors, named for the prototypic agonist SKF 10,047 (N-allylnormetazocine), were suggested to mediate the psychotomimetic-like effects of SKF 10,047 in the dog. 3-(3-Hydroxyphenyl)-N-(1-propyl)piperidine (3-PPP) has been proposed as a selective dopamine autoreceptor agonist. However, the drug specificity of (+)[ 3 H]3-PPP binding in brain is identical to that of sigma receptor binding sites which may mediate psychotomimetic effects of some opioids. Pharmacological and autoradiographic analyses reveal that (+)[ 3 H]SKF 10,047, the prototypic sigma agonist, labels two sites in brain. The drug specificity of the high affinity site for (+)[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 resembles that of putative sigma receptors labeled with (+)[ 3 H]3-PPP, being potently inhibited by (+)3-PPP, haloperidol, and (+/-)pentazocine, and demonstrating stereoselectivity for the (+) isomer of SKF 10,047. Autoradiographic localizations of high affinity (+)[ 3 H]SKF 10,047 binding sites closely resemble those of (+)[ 3 H]3-PPP labeled sites with high levels of binding in the hippocampal pyramidal cell layer, hypothalamus, and pontine and cranial nerve nuclei. Thus, putative sigma receptors and PCP receptors represent distinct receptor populations in brain. This proposal is supported by the presence of sigma binding sites - and absence of PCP receptors - on NCB-20 cell membranes, a hybrid neurotumor cell line that provides a model system for the physiological and biochemical study of sigma receptors

  3. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holtzman, S.G.; Mante, S.; Minneman, K.P.

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity

  4. Identification of the haemoglobin scavenger receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, M; Graversen, Jonas Heilskov; Jacobsen, C

    2001-01-01

    haptoglobin, which is depleted from plasma during elevated haemolysis. Here we report the identification of the acute phase-regulated and signal-inducing macrophage protein, CD163, as a receptor that scavenges haemoglobin by mediating endocytosis of haptoglobin-haemoglobin complexes. CD163 binds only...... haptoglobin and haemoglobin in complex, which indicates the exposure of a receptor-binding neoepitope. The receptor-ligand interaction is Ca2+-dependent and of high affinity. Complexes of haemoglobin and multimeric haptoglobin (the 2-2 phenotype) exhibit higher functional affinity for CD 163 than do complexes...

  5. Transitional cell carcinoma express vitamin D receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermann, G G; Andersen, C B

    1997-01-01

    Recently, vitamin D analogues have shown antineoplastic effect in several diseases. Vitamin D analogues exert its effect by interacting with the vitamin D receptor (VDR). Studies of VDR in transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) have not been reported. The purpose of the present study was therefore.......05). Similarly, also tumor grade appeared to be related to the number of cells expressing the receptor. Normal urothlium also expressed VDR but only with low intensity. Our study shows that TCC cells possess the VDR receptor which may make them capable to respond to stimulation with vitamin D, but functional...

  6. [Progress of pattern recognition receptors of molluscs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Qian; Zhao, Qin-ping; Ma, Xiao-xue; Dong, Hui-fen

    2015-08-01

    Molluscs have established complete innate immunity to defense against pathogens. The pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) are the sensory receptors of molluscs to resist outside invaders, as the first reactor to initiate the innate immune response. Some PRRs have been identified in several molluscs, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) , C-type lectins, galectins, lipopolysaccharide-β-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP), Clq domain-containing protein (ClqDC), and peptidoglycan recognition protein (PGRP). PRRs have various biological activities and play important roles in the defense system of molluscs. This paper reviews the research progress of PRRs in molluscs.

  7. Dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton mediates receptor cross talk: An emerging concept in tuning receptor signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Pieta K.; Batista, Facundo D.

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence implicates the actin cytoskeleton in the control of receptor signaling. This may be of particular importance in the context of immune receptors, such as the B cell receptor, where dysregulated signaling can result in autoimmunity and malignancy. Here, we discuss the role of the actin cytoskeleton in controlling receptor compartmentalization, dynamics, and clustering as a means to regulate receptor signaling through controlling the interactions with protein partners. We propose that the actin cytoskeleton is a point of integration for receptor cross talk through modulation of protein dynamics and clustering. We discuss the implication of this cross talk via the cytoskeleton for both ligand-induced and low-level constitutive (tonic) signaling necessary for immune cell survival. PMID:26833785

  8. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Julie Ladeby; Blaabjerg, Morten; Bogetofte Thomasen, Helle

    2015-01-01

    is, however, needed to realise their therapeutic potential. Glutamate and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) affect proliferation and survival of rodent NSCs both during embryonic and postnatal development. To investigate the role of group I mGluRs (mGluR1 and mGluR5) on human NSCs, we...... differentiated an immortalized, forebrain-derived stem cell line in the presence or absence of glutamate and with addition of either the group I mGluR agonist DHPG or the selective antagonists; MPEP (mGluR5) and LY367385 (mGluR1). Characterization of differentiated cells revealed that both mGluR1 and mGluR5 were...... present on the cells. Addition of glutamate to the growth medium significantly increased cell proliferation and reduced cell death, resulting in increased cell numbers. In the presence of glutamate, selective activation of group I mGluRs reduced gliogenesis, whereas selective inhibition of group I m...

  9. Endogenous Receptor Agonists: Resolving Inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Bannenberg

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Controlled resolution or the physiologic resolution of a well-orchestrated inflammatory response at the tissue level is essential to return to homeostasis. A comprehensive understanding of the cellular and molecular events that control the termination of acute inflammation is needed in molecular terms given the widely held view that aberrant inflammation underlies many common diseases. This review focuses on recent advances in the understanding of the role of arachidonic acid and ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA–derived lipid mediators in regulating the resolution of inflammation. Using a functional lipidomic approach employing LC-MS-MS–based informatics, recent studies, reviewed herein, uncovered new families of local-acting chemical mediators actively biosynthesized during the resolution phase from the essential fatty acids eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA. These new families of local chemical mediators are generated endogenously in exudates collected during the resolution phase, and were coined resolvins and protectins because specific members of these novel chemical families control both the duration and magnitude of inflammation in animal models of complex diseases. Recent advances on the biosynthesis, receptors, and actions of these novel anti-inflammatory and proresolving lipid mediators are reviewed with the aim to bring to attention the important role of specific lipid mediators as endogenous agonists in inflammation resolution.

  10. Teleost Chemokines and Their Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Bird

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines are a superfamily of cytokines that appeared about 650 million years ago, at the emergence of vertebrates, and are responsible for regulating cell migration under both inflammatory and physiological conditions. The first teleost chemokine gene was reported in rainbow trout in 1998. Since then, numerous chemokine genes have been identified in diverse fish species evidencing the great differences that exist among fish and mammalian chemokines, and within the different fish species, as a consequence of extensive intrachromosomal gene duplications and different infectious experiences. Subsequently, it has only been possible to establish clear homologies with mammalian chemokines in the case of some chemokines with well-conserved homeostatic roles, whereas the functionality of other chemokine genes will have to be independently addressed in each species. Despite this, functional studies have only been undertaken for a few of these chemokine genes. In this review, we describe the current state of knowledge of chemokine biology in teleost fish. We have mainly focused on those species for which more research efforts have been made in this subject, specially zebrafish (Danio rerio, rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss and catfish (Ictalurus punctatus, outlining which genes have been identified thus far, highlighting the most important aspects of their expression regulation and addressing any known aspects of their biological role in immunity. Finally, we summarise what is known about the chemokine receptors in teleosts and provide some analysis using recently available data to help characterise them more clearly.

  11. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anshula eSamarajeewa

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The serotonin (5-HT type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including cortical neurons. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins towards the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands.

  12. Acetylcholine Receptor: Complex of Homologous Subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, Michael A.; Hunkapiller, Michael W.; Strader, Catherine D.; Hood, Leroy E.

    1980-06-01

    The acetylcholine receptor from the electric ray Torpedo californica is composed of five subunits; two are identical and the other three are structurally related to them. Microsequence analysis of the four polypeptides demonstrates amino acid homology among the subunits. Further sequence analysis of both membrane-bound and Triton-solubilized, chromatographically purified receptor gave the stoichiometry of the four subunits (40,000:50,000:60,000:65,000 daltons) as 2:1:1:1, indicating that this protein is a pentameric complex with a molecular weight of 255,000 daltons. Genealogical analysis suggests that divergence from a common ancestral gene occurred early in the evolution of the receptor. This shared ancestry argues that each of the four subunits plays a functional role in the receptor's physiological action.

  13. Tachykinins and tachykinin receptors: a growing family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennefather, Jocelyn N; Lecci, Alessandro; Candenas, M Luz; Patak, Eva; Pinto, Francisco M; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    2004-02-06

    The peptides of the tachykinin family are widely distributed within the mammalian peripheral and central nervous systems and play a well-recognized role as excitatory neurotransmitters. Currently, the concept that tachykinins act exclusively as neuropeptides is being challenged, since the best known members of the family, substance P, neurokinin A and neurokinin B, are also present in non-neuronal cells and in non-innervated tissues. Moreover, the recently cloned mammalian tachykinins hemokinin-1 and endokinins are primarily expressed in non-neuronal cells, suggesting a widespread distribution and important role for these peptides as intercellular signaling molecules. The biological actions of tachykinins are mediated through three types of receptors denoted NK(1), NK(2) and NK(3) that belong to the family of G protein-coupled receptors. The identification of additional tachykinins has reopened the debate of whether more tachykinin receptors exist. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge of tachykinins and their receptors.

  14. Lactate Transport and Receptor Actions in Retina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, Miriam; Vosborg, Fia; Henriksen, Jens Ulrik Lütken

    2016-01-01

    In retina, like in brain, lactate equilibrates across cell membranes via monocarboxylate transporters and in the extracellular space by diffusion, forming a basis for the action of lactate as a transmitter of metabolic signals. In the present paper, we argue that the lactate receptor GPR81, also...... known as HCAR1, may contribute importantly to the control of retinal cell functions in health and disease. GPR81, a G-protein coupled receptor, is known to downregulate cAMP both in adipose and nervous tissue. The receptor also acts through other down-stream mechanisms to control functions...... reveal high GPR81 mRNA in retina and indicate GPR81 localization in Müller cells and retinal ganglion cells. Moreover, monocarboxylate transporters are expressed in retinal cells. We envision that lactate receptors and transporters could be useful future targets of novel therapeutic strategies to protect...

  15. Molecular Mechanisms of Dopamine Receptor Mediated Neuroprotection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sealfon, Stuart

    2000-01-01

    ... of the cellular changes characteristic of this process. Evidence from our laboratory and others suggest that activation of dopamine receptors can oppose the induction of apoptosis in dopamine neurons...

  16. Agonism and antagonism at the insulin receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Louise; Hansen, Bo Falck; Jensen, Pia

    2012-01-01

    Insulin can trigger metabolic as well as mitogenic effects, the latter being pharmaceutically undesirable. An understanding of the structure/function relationships between insulin receptor (IR) binding and mitogenic/metabolic signalling would greatly facilitate the preclinical development of new...... insulin analogues. The occurrence of ligand agonism and antagonism is well described for G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and other receptors but in general, with the exception of antibodies, not for receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). In the case of the IR, no natural ligand or insulin analogue has been...... shown to exhibit antagonistic properties, with the exception of a crosslinked insulin dimer (B29-B'29). However, synthetic monomeric or dimeric peptides targeting sites 1 or 2 of the IR were shown to be either agonists or antagonists. We found here that the S961 peptide, previously described to be an IR...

  17. Agonist induction, conformational selection, and mutant receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraldo, Jesús

    2004-01-02

    Current models of receptor activation are based on either of two basic mechanisms: agonist induction or conformational selection. The importance of one pathway relative to the other is controversial. In this article, the impossibility of distinguishing between the two mechanisms under a thermodynamic approach is shown. The effect of receptor mutation on the constants governing ligand-receptor equilibria is discussed. The two-state model of agonism both in its original formulation (one cycle) and including multiple active states (multiple cycles) is used. Pharmacological equations for the double (two cycles) two-state model are derived. The simulations performed suggest that the double two-state model of agonism can be a useful model for assessing quantitatively the changes in pharmacological activity following receptor mutation.

  18. Brain nuclear receptors and body weight regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neural pathways, especially those in the hypothalamus, integrate multiple nutritional, hormonal, and neural signals, resulting in the coordinated control of body weight balance and glucose homeostasis. Nuclear receptors (NRs) sense changing levels of nutrients and hormones, and therefore play essent...

  19. Ecdysteroid receptors in Drosophila melanogaster adult females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecdysteroid receptors were identified and partially characterized from total cell extracts of whole animals and dissected tissues from Drosophila melanogaster adult females. Binding studies indicated the presence of two ecdysteroid binding components having high affinity and specificity consistent w...

  20. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and calcium sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrgan, Monija; Nielsen, Sanne; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a lifelong, benign autosomal dominant disease characterized by hypercalcemia, normal to increased parathyroid hormone level, and a relatively low renal calcium excretion. Inactivation of the calcium-sensing receptor in heterozygous patients results in...