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Sample records for gps radio sources

  1. Variability of GPS Radio Sources at 5 GHz

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    GPS) radio sources at 5 GHz and find that about one-third of them show considerable Inter-Month Variability (IMV), and these IMV phenomena are likely to be caused by interstellar scintillation (ISS). Furthermore, we find that those showing IMV ...

  2. Variability of GPS Radio Sources at 5 GHz Lang Cui , Xiang Liu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-02-07

    Feb 7, 2010 ... Abstract. We carry out flux monitoring on a sample of 169 Gigahertz. Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources at 5 GHz and find that about one- third of them show considerable Inter-Month Variability (IMV), and these. IMV phenomena are likely to be caused by interstellar scintillation (ISS). Furthermore, we ...

  3. Variability in GPS sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jauncey, DL; King, EA; Bignall, HE; Lovell, JEJ; Kedziora-Chudczer, L; Tzioumis, AK; Tingay, SJ; Macquart, JP; McCulloch, PM

    2003-01-01

    Flux density monitoring data at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz is presented for a sample of 33 southern hemisphere GPS sources, drawn from the 2.7 GHz Parkes survey. This monitoring data, together with VLBI monitoring data, shows that a small fraction of these sources, similar to10%, vary. Their variability falls

  4. Convective towers detection using GPS radio occultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Neubert, Torsten; Syndergaard, S.

    an important role since they lead to deep convective activity. With this work we want to investigate if severe storms leave a significant signature in radio occultation profiles in the tropical tropopause layer. The GPS radio occultation (RO) technique is useful for studying severe weather phenomena because...... the GPS signals penetrate through clouds and allow measurements of atmospheric profiles related to temperature, pressure, and water vapour with high vertical resolution. Using tropical cyclone best track database and data from different GPS RO missions (COSMIC, GRACE, CHAMP, SACC and GPSMET), we selected...... 1194 profiles in a time window of 3 hours and a space window of 300 km from the eye of the cyclone. We show that the bending angle anomaly of a GPS RO signal is typically larger than the climatology above the tropopause. Comparisons with co-located radiosondes, climatology of tropopause altitudes...

  5. Radio spectra of Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum radio sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deVries, WH; Barthel, PD; ODea, CP

    A well defined sample of 72 Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum radio sources is compiled, having turnover frequencies in the range of 0.5 - 10 GHz. Using this sample, the canonical GPS radio spectrum is constructed, which is found to have a constant shape, independent of AGN type, redshift or radio

  6. A new sample of faint Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum radio sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellen, IAG; Schilizzi, RT; de Bruyn, AG; Miley, GK; Rengelink, RB; Rottgering, HJ

    The Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) has been used to select a sample of Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources at flux densities one to two orders of magnitude lower than bright GPS sources investigated in earlier studies. Sources with inverted spectra at frequencies above 325 MHz have

  7. Constraints on Radio Source Evolution from the Compact Steep Spectrum and GHz Peaked Spectrum Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, Christopher P.; Baum, Stefi A.

    1997-01-01

    We present the results of a study of the global properties of combined complete samples of GPS and CSS sources. The resulting sample consists of 67 objects which span a range in size of over 3 orders of magnitude. We have used this sample to examine relationships between turnover frequency, redshift, radio power, and linear size. We find that the distribution of rest-frame turnover frequency extends above 10 GHz. This reveals the presence of a previously unsuspected population of sources which peak at high frequencies. There is a strong anticorrelation between turnover frequency and projected linear size nu_m ~ LS(-0.65) . The continuity on this plane suggests that GPS and CSS sources are related either by evolution or by the mechanism for the turnover or both. We compare the the GPS and CSS sources with the LRL 3CR classical doubles in the redshift range 0.2 lae z lae 1.0. We show that the GPS and CSS sources would be members of the LRL 3CR if their spectra did not turnover. There is no trend for radio power in the GPS and CSS sources to vary with projected linear size. The number of GPS and CSS sources per bin of log projected size is constant. This contrasts with the LRL 3CR classical doubles in which the number increases with increasing size as N ~ LS(0.4) . We discuss the constraints the results place on models for the evolution of these sources. Our results suggest that the GPS and CSS sources evolve in a qualitatively different way than the large scale classical doubles. One way of describing the difference is that for a given dependence on velocity with size, the GPS and CSS sources must decline in luminosity at a faster rate than the 3CR classical doubles. The strong decline in luminosity implies that the GPS and CSS sources are not the progenitors of the LRL 3CR classical doubles and that instead they evolve into less luminous radio sources - possibly FR1 radio sources. We suggest that the strong luminosity evolution may be at least partially due to a

  8. Radio frequency ion source

    CERN Document Server

    Shen Guan Ren; Gao Fu; LiuNaiYi

    2001-01-01

    The study on Radio Frequency Ion Source is mainly introduced, which is used for CIAE 600kV ns Pulse Neutron Generator; and obtained result is also presented. The RF ion source consists of a diameter phi 25 mm, length 200 mm, coefficient of expansion =3.5 mA, beam current on target >=1.5 mA, beam spot =100 h.

  9. Evaluation of solar radio bursts' effect on GPS receiver signal tracking within International GPS Service network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiyu; Gao, Yang; Liu, Zhizhao

    2005-06-01

    The direct interference from solar radio bursts (SRB) has not usually been considered as a potential threat to global positioning system (GPS) signal tracking, since the flux densities of most bursts are below 40,000 solar flux units (sfu), a threat threshold to GPS L1 frequency proposed by Klobuchar et al. (1999). Recent analysis indicated that a much lower threshold should be adopted for codeless or semicodeless dual-frequency GPS receivers. In this investigation, severe signal corruptions were found at dayside International GPS Service GPS receiver stations during a large solar radio burst that accompanied the super flare of 28 October 2003. Almost no GPS L2 signals were tracked during the solar flux peak time for areas near the subsolar point. Correlation analysis was performed between the rate of loss of lock on GPS L2 frequency and solar radio flux density at different bands, and a correlation index as high as 0.75 is revealed in the 1415 MHz solar radiation band, which is located between the two GPS operating frequencies L2 (1227.60 MHz) and L1 (1575.42 MHz). The correlation analysis indicates that GPS signal losses of lock were primarily caused by microwave in-band interference and that the threat threshold of SRB effects on the GPS system should be re-evaluated, since the flux density of the burst at 1415 MHz was just 4,000-12,000 sfu, which is far below the previously proposed threat threshold. The signal-tracking performance of different types of GPS receivers during such a super flare event is also presented.

  10. Effect of Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) on the Precision of GPS Relative Positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Idris, A N; Suldi, A M; Hamid, J R A; Sathyamoorthy, D

    2014-01-01

    The successful of GPS observations are dependent on several factors between satellite vehicles and GPS receivers, where low GPS power levels have led to the threat of radio frequency interference (RFI) on the GPS signals. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of RFI on the precision of positions of single and dual frequency receivers through relative positioning technique by taking into consideration the radius of GPS receiver from interference source, length of baseline and response of rejection. Several tests were conducted in real environment by simulating the interference signal towards GPS receivers in the nominated GPS L1 and L2 bands. Calculations were made to indentify the distance and interference signal power between interference source and GPS receiver in order to investigate the level of effect. To be able to study this effect on the precision of GPS positions, the 3D residual positions and geometric dilution of precision (GDOP) have been used. The findings of this study have demonstrated that a sufficient time for the GPS receiver to respond in particular interference signal power level and the radius from the interference source were made as compared to previous work. It was also indicated that the residual positions and GDOPs were affected proportionally when nearly to interference source but not similar for both days due to GPS coverage and other probable errors. Therefore, a good investigation on RFI towards GPS signals should be conducted in secured environment which can control the various GPS error parameters in order to obtain a reliable result on this effect

  11. Astrometry of southern radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Graeme L.; Jauncey, David L.; Harvey, Bruce R.; Savage, Ann; Gulkis, Samuel; Preston, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    An overview is presented of a number of astrometry and astrophysics programs based on radio sources from the Parkes 2.7 GHz catalogs. The programs cover the optical identification and spectroscopy of flat-spectrum Parkes sources and the determination of their milliarcsecond radio structures and positions. Work is also in progress to tie together the radio and Hipparcos positional reference frames. A parallel program of radio and optical astrometry of southern radio stars is also under way.

  12. Central radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phinney, E.S.

    1985-01-01

    The compact radio sources in the nuclei of most active galaxies lie closer to their centers of activity than any other region accessible to observation, excepting only the broad emission line region. They provide uniquely strong evidence for bulk motion of matter at relativistic velocities, encouraging the belief that the activity originates in a gravitational potential well whose escape velocity is of the order of the speed of light. The observational facts are reviewed as well as several theoretical pictures of them. Those places where systematic observations could help to distinguish the true theoretical picture from the many competing forgeries are emphasized. 76 references

  13. Magnetogasdynamics of double radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nepveu, M.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetogasdynamical behaviour of plasmoids moving through an ambient gas is investigated numerically with a two-dimensional code, based on the SHASTA scheme. The astrophysical importance of this study lies in the observed extended extragalactic radio sources. It is assumed that plasma clouds with cylinder symmetry are ejected from the nucleus of a galaxy. Their large-scale evolution in the intergalactic medium (IGM) is followed. The gas dynamics of an ejected cloud, the magnetogasdynamics of ejected clouds, the Christiansen-Pacholczyk-Scott picture for radio galaxies and the shear layers in double radio sources are studied. (Auth.)

  14. GPS radio collar 3D performance as influenced by forest structure and topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. Scott Gamo; Mark A. Rumble; Fred Lindzey; Matt Stefanich

    2000-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) telemetry enables biologists to obtain accurate and systematic locations of animals. Vegetation can block signals from satellites to GPS radio collars. Therefore, a vegetation dependent bias to telemetry data may occur which if quantified, could be accounted for. We evaluated the performance of GPS collars in 6 structural stage...

  15. Exploring atmospheric blocking with GPS radio occultation observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Brunner

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric blocking has been closely investigated in recent years due to its impact on weather and climate, such as heat waves, droughts, and flooding. We use, for the first time, satellite-based observations from Global Positioning System (GPS radio occultation (RO and explore their ability to resolve blocking in order to potentially open up new avenues complementing models and reanalyses. RO delivers globally available and vertically highly resolved profiles of atmospheric variables such as temperature and geopotential height (GPH. Applying a standard blocking detection algorithm, we find that RO data robustly capture blocking as demonstrated for two well-known blocking events over Russia in summer 2010 and over Greenland in late winter 2013. During blocking episodes, vertically resolved GPH gradients show a distinct anomalous behavior compared to climatological conditions up to 300 hPa and sometimes even further up into the tropopause. The accompanying increase in GPH of up to 300 m in the upper troposphere yields a pronounced tropopause height increase. Corresponding temperatures rise up to 10 K in the middle and lower troposphere. These results demonstrate the feasibility and potential of RO to detect and resolve blocking and in particular to explore the vertical structure of the atmosphere during blocking episodes. This new observation-based view is available globally at the same quality so that blocking in the Southern Hemisphere can also be studied with the same reliability as in the Northern Hemisphere.

  16. Ionospheric observations using GPS radio occultation from a nanosat platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, R. L.; Redding, M.; Straus, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Compact Total Electron Content Sensor (CTECS) is a GPS radio occultation instrument designed for cubesat platforms that utilizes a COTS receiver, modified firmware, and a custom designed antenna. CTECS was placed on the Pico Satellite Solar Cell Testbed 2 (PSSC2) nanosat that was installed on the Space Shuttle Atlantis (STS-135). PSSC2 was successfully released from the shuttle on 20 July 2011 near 380 km altitude. Because of attitude control and power issues, only 13.5 hours of data was collected during its approximately 5-month mission life. Total Electron Content (TEC) observations were obtained and this presentation will present a summary of all TEC data analyzed from the mission. We will discuss the instrument challenges encountered, data issues, and future planned improvements to CTECS. Two CTECS flight units were delivered in the spring of 2012 for integration on the SMC/XR Space Environment NanoSatellite Experiment (SENSE) spacecrafts that are scheduled for launch in the second half of 2013. We will present a summary of the SENSE mission, performance of the improved CTECS sensors, and the results of ground and day-in-the-life testing.

  17. Characteristics of tropopause parameters as observed with GPS radio occultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Rieckh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of the lapse rate tropopause are analyzed globally for tropopause altitude and temperature using global positioning system (GPS radio occultation (RO data from late 2001 to the end of 2013. RO profiles feature high vertical resolution and excellent quality in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, which are key factors for tropopause determination, including multiple ones. RO data provide measurements globally and allow examination of both temporal and spatial tropopause characteristics based entirely on observational measurements. To investigate latitudinal and longitudinal tropopause characteristics, the mean annual cycle, and inter-annual variability, we use tropopauses from individual profiles as well as their statistical measures for zonal bands and 5° × 10° bins. The latitudinal structure of first tropopauses shows the well-known distribution with high (cold tropical tropopauses and low (warm extra-tropical tropopauses. In the transition zones (20 to 40° N/S, individual profiles reveal varying tropopause altitudes from less than 7 km to more than 17 km due to variability in the subtropical tropopause break. In this region, we also find multiple tropopauses throughout the year. Longitudinal variability is strongest at northern hemispheric mid latitudes and in the Asian monsoon region. The mean annual cycle features changes in amplitude and phase, depending on latitude. This is caused by different underlying physical processes (such as the Brewer–Dobson circulation – BDC and atmospheric dynamics (such as the strong polar vortex in the southern hemispheric winter. Inter-annual anomalies of tropopause parameters show signatures of El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO, the quasi–biennial oscillation (QBO, and the varying strength of the polar vortex, including sudden stratospheric warming (SSW events. These results are in good agreement with previous studies and underpin the high utility of the entire RO record

  18. Identification of southern radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, A.

    1976-01-01

    Identifications are suggested for 32 radio sources from the southern zones of the Parkes 2700 MHz survey, 18 with galaxies, one with a confirmed and 12 with possible quasistellar objects, and one with a supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The identifications were made from the ESO IIa-O quick blue survey plates, the SRC IIIa-J deep survey plates and the Palomar sky survey prints. Accurate optical positions have also been measured for 10 of the objects and for five previously suggested QSOs. (author)

  19. The radio spectral energy distribution of infrared-faint radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Seymour, N.; Spitler, L. R.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Hunstead, R.; Intema, H. T.; Marvil, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sirothia, S. K.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Callingham, J. R.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B.-Q.; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Morgan, J.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, I.; Indermuehle, B.; Popping, A.; Sault, R. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a class of radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts (z ≥ 1.7) that are characterised by their relative infrared faintness, resulting in enormous radio-to-infrared flux density ratios of up to several thousand. Aims: Because of their optical and infrared faintness, it is very challenging to study IFRS at these wavelengths. However, IFRS are relatively bright in the radio regime with 1.4 GHz flux densities of a few to a few tens of mJy. Therefore, the radio regime is the most promising wavelength regime in which to constrain their nature. We aim to test the hypothesis that IFRS are young AGN, particularly GHz peaked-spectrum (GPS) and compact steep-spectrum (CSS) sources that have a low frequency turnover. Methods: We use the rich radio data set available for the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey fields, covering the frequency range between 150 MHz and 34 GHz with up to 19 wavebands from different telescopes, and build radio spectral energy distributions (SEDs) for 34 IFRS. We then study the radio properties of this class of object with respect to turnover, spectral index, and behaviour towards higher frequencies. We also present the highest-frequency radio observations of an IFRS, observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer at 105 GHz, and model the multi-wavelength and radio-far-infrared SED of this source. Results: We find IFRS usually follow single power laws down to observed frequencies of around 150 MHz. Mostly, the radio SEDs are steep (α IFRS show statistically significantly steeper radio SEDs than the broader RL AGN population. Our analysis reveals that the fractions of GPS and CSS sources in the population of IFRS are consistent with the fractions in the broader RL AGN population. We find that at least % of IFRS contain young AGN, although the fraction might be significantly higher as suggested by the steep SEDs and the compact morphology of IFRS. The detailed multi

  20. Sources of the Radio Background Considered

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singal, J.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Stawarz, L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U. /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Lawrence, A.; /Edinburgh U., Inst. Astron. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U.; Petrosian, V.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-08-22

    We investigate possible origins of the extragalactic radio background reported by the ARCADE 2 collaboration. The surface brightness of the background is several times higher than that which would result from currently observed radio sources. We consider contributions to the background from diffuse synchrotron emission from clusters and the intergalactic medium, previously unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of radio sources, and faint point sources below the flux limit of existing surveys. By examining radio source counts available in the literature, we conclude that most of the radio background is produced by radio point sources that dominate at sub {mu}Jy fluxes. We show that a truly diffuse background produced by elections far from galaxies is ruled out because such energetic electrons would overproduce the observed X-ray/{gamma}-ray background through inverse Compton scattering of the other photon fields. Unrecognized flux from low surface brightness regions of extended radio sources, or moderate flux sources missed entirely by radio source count surveys, cannot explain the bulk of the observed background, but may contribute as much as 10%. We consider both radio supernovae and radio quiet quasars as candidate sources for the background, and show that both fail to produce it at the observed level because of insufficient number of objects and total flux, although radio quiet quasars contribute at the level of at least a few percent. We conclude that the most important population for production of the background is likely ordinary starforming galaxies above redshift 1 characterized by an evolving radio far-infrared correlation, which increases toward the radio loud with redshift.

  1. Changing-Look AGNs or Short-Lived Radio Sources?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wołowska, Aleksandra [Toruń Centre for Astronomy, Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Informatics, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Toruń (Poland); Kunert-Bajraszewska, Magdalena; Mooley, Kunal [Centre for Astrophysical Surveys, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Hallinan, Gregg, E-mail: ola@astro.umk.pl [Cahill Center for Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2017-11-17

    The evolution of extragalactic radio sources has been a fundamental problem in the study of active galactic nuclei for many years. A standard evolutionary model has been created based on observations of a wide range of radio sources. In the general scenario of the evolution, the younger and smaller Gigahertz-Peaked Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) sources become large-scale FRI and FRII objects. However, a growing number of observations of low power radio sources suggests that the model cannot explain all their properties and there are still some aspects of the evolutionary path that remain unclear. There are indications, that some sources may be short-lived objects on timescales of 10{sup 4}–10{sup 5} years. Those objects represent a new population of active galaxies. Here, we present the discovery of several radio transient sources on timescales of 5–20 yrs, largely associated with renewed AGN (Active Galactic Nucleus) activity. These changing-look AGNs possibly represent behavior typical for many active galaxies.

  2. A radio and optical study of Molonglo radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishwara-Chandra, C. H.; Saikia, D. J.; McCarthy, P. J.; van Breugel, W. J. M.

    2001-05-01

    We present multi-wavelength radio observations with the Very Large Array, and narrow- and broad-band optical observations with the 2.5-m telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory, of a well-defined sample of high-luminosity Fanaroff-Riley class II radio galaxies and quasars, selected from the Molonglo Reference Catalogue 1-Jy sample. These observations were carried out as part of a programme to investigate the effects of orientation and environment on some of the observed properties of these sources. We examine the dependence of the Liu-Pooley relationship, which shows that radio lobes with flatter radio spectra are less depolarized, on size, identification and redshift, and show that it is significantly stronger for smaller sources, with the strength of the relationship being similar for both radio galaxies and quasars. In addition to Doppler effects, there appear to be intrinsic differences between the lobes on opposite sides. We discuss the asymmetry in brightness and location of the hotspots, and present estimates of the ages and velocities from matched-resolution observations in the L and C bands. Narrow- and broad-band optical images of some of these sources were made to study their environments and correlate with the symmetry parameters. An extended emission-line region is seen in a quasar, and in four of the objects possible companion galaxies are seen close to the radio axis.

  3. The radio properties of infrared-faint radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Hales, C. A.; Seymour, N.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Huynh, M. T.; Lenc, E.; Mao, M. Y.

    2011-02-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects that have flux densities of several mJy at 1.4 GHz, but that are invisible at 3.6 μm when using sensitive Spitzer observations with μJy sensitivities. Their nature is unclear and difficult to investigate since they are only visible in the radio. Aims: High-resolution radio images and comprehensive spectral coverage can yield constraints on the emission mechanisms of IFRS and can give hints to similarities with known objects. Methods: We imaged a sample of 17 IFRS at 4.8 GHz and 8.6 GHz with the Australia Telescope Compact Array to determine the structures on arcsecond scales. We added radio data from other observing projects and from the literature to obtain broad-band radio spectra. Results: We find that the sources in our sample are either resolved out at the higher frequencies or are compact at resolutions of a few arcsec, which implies that they are smaller than a typical galaxy. The spectra of IFRS are remarkably steep, with a median spectral index of -1.4 and a prominent lack of spectral indices larger than -0.7. We also find that, given the IR non-detections, the ratio of 1.4 GHz flux density to 3.6 μm flux density is very high, and this puts them into the same regime as high-redshift radio galaxies. Conclusions: The evidence that IFRS are predominantly high-redshift sources driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) is strong, even though not all IFRS may be caused by the same phenomenon. Compared to the rare and painstakingly collected high-redshift radio galaxies, IFRS appear to be much more abundant, but less luminous, AGN-driven galaxies at similar cosmological distances.

  4. Thermal structure of intense convective clouds derived from GPS radio occultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Randel, W. J.; Ho, S. -P.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal structure associated with deep convective clouds is investigated using Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation measurements. GPS data are insensitive to the presence of clouds, and provide high vertical resolution and high accuracy measurements to identify associated temperature...... behavior. Deep convective systems are identified using International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) satellite data, and cloud tops are accurately measured using Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIPSO) lidar observations; we focus on 53 cases of near-coincident GPS...... occultations with CALIPSO profiles over deep convection. Results show a sharp spike in GPS bending angle highly correlated to the top of the clouds, corresponding to anomalously cold temperatures within the clouds. Above the clouds the temperatures return to background conditions, and there is a strong...

  5. Thermal structure of intense convective clouds derived from GPS radio occultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Randel, W. J.; Ho, S.-P.

    2011-01-01

    Thermal structure associated with deep convective clouds is investigated using Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation measurements. GPS data are insensitive to the presence of clouds, and provide high vertical resolution and high accuracy measurements to identify associated temperature...... behavior. Deep convective systems are identified using International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) satellite data, and cloud tops are accurately measured using Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIPSO) lidar observations; we focus on 53 cases of near-coincident GPS...... occultations with CALIPSO profiles over deep convection. Results show a sharp spike in GPS bending angle highly correlated to the top of the clouds, corresponding to anomalously cold temperatures within the clouds. Above the clouds the temperatures return to background conditions, and there is a strong...

  6. IMPELEMENTASI SISTEM PEMANTAUAN OBJEK BERGERAK DENGAN MEMANFAATKAN FREKUENSI RADIO MENGGUNAKAN GPS (GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budi Triandi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available GPS was developed by the United States Department of Defense as a reliable means for accurate navigation. The system provides highly accurate position and velocity information and precise time on a continuous global basis to an unlimited number of properly equipped users. By using combined GPS receiver and microcontroller together with radio system, we can design a monitoring system for our vehicles and display the result on the computer. This system consists of a master module that transmits and receives signals from computer and two slave modules to collect GPS data from vehicles. The result of experiment shows that this system is able to track the vehicle on digital map with accuracy as high as 95%.Keywords: GPS, microcontroller, monitoring, RF

  7. Development of the Plate Boundary Observatory GPS Low Latency Salton Trough Radio Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, C.; Miller, S.; Wilson, B.; Lawrence, S.; Arnitz, E.

    2008-05-01

    UNAVCO is developing a 20 GPS station low latency radio network that spans the San Andreas and San Jacinto faults in the region of highest strain in southern California and the narrowest part of the North America-Pacific plate boundary. The Salton Trough Radio Network (STRN) is instrumented with Ethernet bridge Intuicom EB6+ (900 MHz) radios to transmit a high rate low latency data stream from each permanent GPS site for the purpose of the following: 1) telemeter 15 second data (1 MB/day/station) to the Plate Boundary Observatory archive, 2) accommodate the timely download of 1 and 5 sample per second data following large earthquakes (4 MB/hour/station), and 3) test the UStream of 1Hz BINEX and RTCM data. Three of four phases have been completed. Office radio testing yielded transfer rates of 30-50 KB/s with subsecond latency while streaming 1 Hz data. Latency climbed to ~1.8 seconds while simultaneously streaming 1 Hz and downloading hourly 1 and 5 sample per second data files. Field testing demonstrated rates on the order of 30 KB/s. At present the radios are installed and have transfer rates of 10-40 KB/s between sites that span 10-32 km. The final phase will be the installation of the main telemetry relay where master radios will be connected to a high speed ISP near the town of Brawley. The high-rate low latency UStream data will be available to researchers who are developing prototype earthquake early warning systems in Southern California. A goal of the STRN is to make the data available rapidly enough for GPS-derived coseismic and dynamic displacements to be integrated into early warning system earthquake models. The improved earthquake models will better assist emergency response. UStream data will also aid surveyors who wish to use PBO GPS stations as permanent, high-quality base stations in real-time kinematic surveys.

  8. Design and implementation of the GPS subsystem for the Radio Aurora eXplorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spangelo, Sara C.; Bennett, Matthew W.; Meinzer, Daniel C.; Klesh, Andrew T.; Arlas, Jessica A.; Cutler, James W.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of the Global Positioning System (GPS) subsystem for the Radio Aurora eXplorer (RAX) CubeSat. The GPS subsystem provides accurate temporal and spatial information necessary to satisfy the science objectives of the RAX mission. There are many challenges in the successful design and implementation of a GPS subsystem for a CubeSat-based mission, including power, size, mass, and financial constraints. This paper presents an approach for selecting and testing the individual and integrated GPS subsystem components, including the receiver, antenna, low noise amplifier, and supporting circuitry. The procedures to numerically evaluate the GPS link budget and test the subsystem components at various stages of system integration are described. Performance results for simulated tests in the terrestrial and orbital environments are provided, including start-up times, carrier-to-noise ratios, and orbital position accuracy. Preliminary on-orbit GPS results from the RAX-1 and RAX-2 spacecraft are presented to validate the design process and pre-flight simulations. Overall, this paper provides a systematic approach to aid future satellite designers in implementing and verifying GPS subsystems for resource-constrained small satellites.

  9. Impact of GPS Radio Occultation Refractivity Soundings on a Simulation of Typhoon Bilis (2006 upon Landfall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mien-Tze Kueh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Typhoon Bilis which struck Taiwan in July 2006 was chosen to assess the potential impact of GPS radio occultation (RO refractivity soundings on numerical simulation using the WRF model. We found that this case elucidates the impact of the limited GPS RO soundings on typhoon prediction due to their favorable locations. In addition, on top of available precipitable water (PW and near-surface wind speed from SSM/I data, we have also explored their combined impacts on model prediction.

  10. Radio Source Morphology: 'nature or nuture'?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, Julie; Emonts, Bjorn; O'Sullivan, Shane

    2012-10-01

    Radio sources, emanating from supermassive black-holes in the centres of active galaxies, display a large variety of morphological properties. It is a long-standing debate to what extent the differences between various types of radio sources are due to intrinsic properties of the central engine (`nature') or due to the properties of the interstellar medium that surrounds the central engine and host galaxy (`nurture'). Settling this `nature vs. nurture' debate for nearby radio galaxies, which can be studied in great detail, is vital for understanding the properties and evolution of radio galaxies throughout the Universe. We propose to observe the radio galaxy NGC 612 where previous observations have detected the presence of a large-scale HI bridge between the host galaxy and a nearby galaxy NGC 619. We request a total of 13 hrs in the 750m array-configuration to determine whether or not the 100 kpc-scale radio source morphology is directly related to the intergalactic distribution of neutral hydrogen gas.

  11. Evaluation of Refractivity Profiles from CHAMP and SAC-C GPS Radio Occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Paul; Ao, Chi On; Joiner, Joanna; delaTorreJuarez, Manuel; Hoff, Raymond

    2002-01-01

    The GeoForschungsZentrum's Challenging Minisatellite Payload for Geophysical Research and Application (CHAMP, Germany-US) and the Comision Nacional de Actividades Especiales' Satelite de Aplicaciones Cientificas-C (SAC-C, Argentina-US) missions are the first missions to carry a second-generation Blackjack Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver. One of the new features of this receiver is its ability to sense the lower troposphere closer to the surface than the proof-of-concept GPS Meteorology experiment (GPS/MET). Since their launch, CHAMP and SAC-C have collected thousands of GPS radio occultations, representing a wealth of measurements available for data assimilation and Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP). In order to evaluate the refractivity data derived by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) from raw radio occultation measurements, we use Data Assimilation Office (DAO) 6-hour forecasts as an independent state of the atmosphere. We compare CHAMP and SAC-C refractivity (processed by JPL) with refractivity calculated from the DAO global fields of temperature, water vapor content and humidity. We show statistics of the differences as well as histograms of the differences.

  12. Reflection jets and collimation of radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacholczyk, A.G.

    1983-01-01

    A discussion of the hydrodynamics of jets formed by discrete portions of materials ejected from the parent galaxy through a channel, and reflected back to it as a result of an encounter with the material accumulated at the end of the channel, is the basis of the present descriptive hypothesis for a class of jets in extended radio sources. The model encompasses the view of extended radio sources as the multiple ejection of plasmoids through a channel, as well as the formation of retrojets through the interaction of a plasmon with the dense relic material at the end of a channel, and the collimation of plasmon material in channels. 14 references

  13. Simulating GPS radio signal to synchronize network--a new technique for redundant timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Qingxiao; Jun, Yang; Le Floch, Jean-Michel; Fan, Yaohui; Ivanov, Eugene N; Tobar, Michael E

    2014-07-01

    Currently, many distributed systems such as 3G mobile communications and power systems are time synchronized with a Global Positioning System (GPS) signal. If there is a GPS failure, it is difficult to realize redundant timing, and thus time-synchronized devices may fail. In this work, we develop time transfer by simulating GPS signals, which promises no extra modification to original GPS-synchronized devices. This is achieved by applying a simplified GPS simulator for synchronization purposes only. Navigation data are calculated based on a pre-assigned time at a fixed position. Pseudo-range data which describes the distance change between the space vehicle (SV) and users are calculated. Because real-time simulation requires heavy-duty computations, we use self-developed software optimized on a PC to generate data, and save the data onto memory disks while the simulator is operating. The radio signal generation is similar to the SV at an initial position, and the frequency synthesis of the simulator is locked to a pre-assigned time. A filtering group technique is used to simulate the signal transmission delay corresponding to the SV displacement. Each SV generates a digital baseband signal, where a unique identifying code is added to the signal and up-converted to generate the output radio signal at the centered frequency of 1575.42 MHz (L1 band). A prototype with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) has been built and experiments have been conducted to prove that we can realize time transfer. The prototype has been applied to the CDMA network for a three-month long experiment. Its precision has been verified and can meet the requirements of most telecommunication systems.

  14. Stratospheric gravity wave activities inferred through the GPS radio occultation technique; Ondas de gravidade na estratosfera terrestre inferida atraves da tecnica de radio ocultacao de GPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrasse, Cristiano Max [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IPeD), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Takahashi, Hisao; Fechine, Joaquim; Denardini, Clezio Marcos [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Wickert, Jens, E-mail: cmw@univap.br, E-mail: hisaotak@laser.inpe.br, E-mail: joaquim@laser.inpe.br, E-mail: denardin@dae.inpe.br, E-mail: jens.wickert@gfz-potsdam.de [GeoForschungsZentrum, Potsdam (GFZ), Department of Geodesy and Remote Sensing (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Stratospheric gravity wave activities were deduced from GPS radio occultation temperature profiles obtained by CHAMP satellite between 2001 and 2005. Potential energy profiles are used to analyze the gravity wave activity over South America. The results showed an inter-annual variation of the potential energy integrated between 24 and 34 km of altitude. The gravity wave activity is more concentrated around the equatorial region. In order to evaluate the seasonal variation of the gravity wave activity, a mean potential energy was determined over (10 deg N-10 deg S) and (100 deg W-20 deg W). The results showed a lower gravity wave activity during winter time, while during spring time the mean potential energy showed an increase in the wave activity. The results of the mean potential energy also showed that the gravity wave activity in the lower stratosphere exhibits a higher wave activity during 2002 and 2004 and a lower wave activity during 2003 and 2005. (author)

  15. The physics of radio sources and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheuer, P.A.G.

    1977-01-01

    Malcolm Longair's first notable contribution to science was to point out that the radio source counts require not only that the source population should evolve, but that powerful sources should evolve much faster than weak sources. Ever since then he has been trying to define more quantitatively how one must fill up the P - z plane, and indeed much of this symposium has been devoted to that and closely related problems. The theoretician in each of us cannot help also wondering why. There are plenty of explanations for the greater abundance of radio sources in the past; all sorts of exciting things could have happened when the world was young and galaxies first shone forth out of the primaeval turbulence. There are fewer explanations of the fact that weaker radio sources weren't nearly as overabundant (relative to the present epoch) as powerful ones. However, there is one natural and elegant explanation, which depends on the idea that old, weak, diffuse sources are extinguished because of inverse Compton losses on the microwave background. This explanation is pursued in this paper. (Auth.)

  16. 1DVAR Analysis of Temperature and Humidity using GPS Radio Occulation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna; Kursinski, Robert; Kolodner, Marc

    2000-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) enables positioning with a very small receiver. The signals transmitted by the GPS satellites are sensitive to the atmosphere and can be used to perform soundings with the radio occultation technique (e.g., Kursinski et al., 1997). The GPS signal can be converted to refractivity N via the Abel transform. The refractivity can then be related to atmospheric pressure P, temperature T, and water vapor partial pressure P (sub w) the GPS measurement, (between 0.5 and 1.5 km), its self-calibration, and it's nearly all-weather capabilities make it a good candidate for use in data assimilation systems (DAS) and numerical weather prediction (NWP). In order to demonstrate its usefulness in a DAS or NWP system, a first step is to assess its impact oil the analysis. A one-dimensional variational off-line analysis (1DVAR), meaning the data are not assimilated 'In the 3D DAS, constitutes a starting approach to which further enhancements can be made. The chosen observable to be analyzed in this study is the refractivity. One way to extract temperature (humidity) from the refractivity, is to assume a humidity (temperature) profile. One variable may then be retrieved without any a priori information. The 1DVAR approach used here resolves the ambiguity problem raised in the interpretation of these data. It enables retrieving these two atmospheric variables at a reasonable computing cost.

  17. Ionospheric scintillations at Guilin detected by GPS ground-based and radio occultation observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuhua

    2011-03-01

    The occurrence of ionospheric scintillations with S4 ⩾ 0.2 was studied using GPS measurements at Guilin, China (25.29°N, 110.33°E; geomagnetic: 15.04°N, 181.98°E), a station located near the northern crest of the equatorial anomaly. The results are presented for data collected from January 2009 to March 2010. The results show that nighttime amplitude scintillations only took place in February and March of the considered years, while daytime amplitude scintillations occurred in August and December of 2009. Nighttime amplitude scintillations, observed in the south of Guilin, always occurred with phase scintillations, TEC (Total Electron Content) depletions, and ROT (Rate Of change of TEC) fluctuations. However, TEC depletions and ROT fluctuations were weak during daytime amplitude scintillations, and daytime amplitude scintillations always took place simultaneously for most of the GPS satellites which appeared over Guilin in different azimuth directions. Ground-based GPS scintillation/TEC observations recorded at Guilin and signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) measurements obtained from GPS-COSMIC radio occultation indicate that nighttime and daytime scintillations are very likely caused by ionospheric F region irregularities and sporadic E, respectively. Moreover, strong daytime amplitude scintillations may be associated with the plasma density enhancements in ionospheric E region caused by the Perseid and Geminid meteor shower activities.

  18. GPS Radio Occultation: Results from CHAMP, GRACE and FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Wickert

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Taiwan/US FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (FORMOsa SATellite mission - 3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate satellite nstellation was successfully launched on 14 April 2006. It is expected to leverage the use of the GPS (Global Positioning System radio occultation data for atmospheric and ionospheric research to improve global weather forecasts and aid climate change related studies. FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC, together with the European MetOp, German CHAMP and US/German GRACE-A satellites, form a 9 satellite constellation for precise atmospheric sounding on a global scale. This satellite constellation is expected to provide about 3500 occultation measurements daily.

  19. Tropical cyclone cloud‐top height and vertical temperature structure detection using GPS radio occultation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Ho, Shu‐Peng; Randel, William

    2013-01-01

    The accurate determination of tropical cyclone (TC) cloud-top height and its vertical thermal structure using the GPS radio occultation (RO) technique is demonstrated in this study. Cloud-top heights are determined by using the bending angle anomaly and the temperature anomaly profiles during......-derived inversion heights and those from radiosonde temperature profiles is approximately 500 m. Results show that, while cloud-top height detected from nadir-viewing satellites can be easily biased by a few kilometers, the biases of RO-derived cloud-top height are within ~500 m....

  20. Reflection jets and collimation of radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacholczyk, A.G.

    1983-01-01

    The author proposes a description of only a certain class of jets in extended radio sources by discussing hydrodynamics of jets formed by discrete portions of material ejected from the parent galaxy through a channel and reflected back into it as a result of an encounter with the material accumulated at the end of the channel. The picture presented here combines some older ideas with recent ones. The older ideas consist of modeling of extended radio sources in terms of multiple ejection of plasmons through a channel ploughed by the first few plasmons in the ambient medium with a resupply of energy in plasmons through the conversion of bulk kinetic energy into relativistic electron energy through instability driven turbulence. The recent ideas concern the formation of retro-jets as the result of interaction of a plasmon with the dense relic material at the end of a channel and the collimation of plasmon material in channels. (Auth.)

  1. THE GENESIS OF MORPHOLOGIES IN EXTENDED RADIO SOURCES: X-SHAPES, OFF-AXIS DISTORTIONS, AND GIANT RADIO SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saripalli, Lakshmi; Subrahmanyan, Ravi

    2009-01-01

    We examine relationships between the morphology in double radio sources and the radio-optical position angle offset-the relative orientation of the radio axis with respect to the major axis of the host galaxy. The study was done for a representative sample of radio sources, the nearby (redshift z < 0.5) 3CRR sources, and separately for samples of giant radio sources and X-shaped radio sources. We find that radio morphological features have a dependence on the radio-optical position angle offset and on whether the source is a major- or minor-axis source. The evidence indicates an anisotropic gas environment, related to the ellipticity of the host galaxy, that causes the source linear size evolution, strength of backflow in the radio lobes, off-axis lobe distortions and the formation of wings, and X-shaped radio sources to depend on the radio-optical position angle offset. We identify a class of X-shaped radio sources, which are either edge-darkened or lacking hotspots, and appear to have inner doubles suggesting a restarting of activity. We suggest a common formation mechanism, requiring backflows, for these apparently FR-I X-shaped radio sources as well as the edge-brightened X-shaped sources.

  2. Are the infrared-faint radio sources pulsars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, A. D.; Keith, M.; Hobbs, G.; Norris, R. P.; Mao, M. Y.; Middelberg, E.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are objects which are strong at radio wavelengths but undetected in sensitive Spitzer observations at infrared wavelengths. Their nature is uncertain and most have not yet been associated with any known astrophysical object. One possibility is that they are radio pulsars. To test this hypothesis we undertook observations of 16 of these sources with the Parkes Radio Telescope. Our results limit the radio emission to a pulsed flux density of less than 0.21 mJy (assuming a 50 per cent duty cycle). This is well below the flux density of the IFRS. We therefore conclude that these IFRS are not radio pulsars.

  3. GPS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    spamer

    Directorate: Antarctica and Islands and Branch: Marine & Coastal Management of the Department of. Environmental Affairs and Tourism. Prof. C. L. Merry,. Department of Geodetics, University of Cape Town, provided helpful information about GPS accuracy, and commented on a draft. LITERATURE CITED. BUCKLEY, P. A. ...

  4. Ultra-wideband technology radio frequency interference effects to GPS and interference scenario development : first interim report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-09-12

    In October, 1999, at the request of the Department of Transportation (DoT), the RTCA undertook an effort to investigate the radio frequency interference (RFI) environment in the vicinity of the new Global Positioning System (GPS) L5 frequency (1176.4...

  5. Assessment of NOAA NUCAPS upper air temperature profiles using COSMIC GPS radio occultation and ARM radiosondes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feltz, M. L.; Borg, L.; Knuteson, R. O.; Tobin, D.; Revercomb, H.; Gambacorta, A.

    2017-09-01

    The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recently began operational processing to derive vertical temperature profiles from two new sensors, Cross-Track Infrared Sounder and Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder, which were developed for the next generation of U.S. weather satellites. The NOAA-Unique Combined Atmospheric Processing System (NUCAPS) has been developed by NOAA to routinely process data from future Joint Polar Satellite System operational satellites and the preparatory Suomi-NPP satellite. This paper assesses the NUCAPS vertical temperature profile product from the upper troposphere into the middle stratosphere using radiosonde and GPS radio occultation (RO) data. Radiosonde data from the Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program are=] compared to both the NUCAPS and GPS RO temperature products to evaluate bias and RMS errors. At all three fixed ARM sites for time periods investigated the NUCAPS temperature in the 100-40 hPa range is found to have an average bias to the radiosondes of less than 0.45 K and an RMS error of less than 1 K when temperature averaging kernels are applied. At a 95% confidence level, the radiosondes and RO were found to agree within 0.4 K at the North Slope of Alaska site and within 0.83 K at Southern Great Plains and Tropical Western Pacific. The GPS RO-derived dry temperatures, obtained from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) mission, are used as a common reference for the intercomparison of NUCAPS temperature products to similar products produced by NASA from Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) and by European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites from MetOp-B Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI). For seasonal and zonal scales, the NUCAPS agreement with AIRS and IASI is less than 0.5 K after application of averaging kernels.

  6. Atmospheric anomalies over Mt.Etna using GPS signal delays and tomography of radio wave velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Puglisi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the prominent topography of Mt. Etna, the use of satellite geodetic techniques may significantly suffer from atmospheric heterogeneities. This problem mainly affects the DInSAR technique. To overcome these drawbacks the present study attempts to make headway in measuring and interpreting atmospheric anomalies. We used the GAMIT software to obtain the ZTD (Zenith Total Delay values for the GPS sessions performed on 1996-97, during ERS-2 passes at Mt. Etna. GAMIT software also allows to characterize the statistical behaviour of the tropospheric effects, by using residuals for each station-satellite pair, and to locate the atmospheric anomalies, present mostly at low altitudes. The attempt at using these results to produce a tomography of radio waves velocity of the troposphere suggests that the number of GPS stations used to investigate atmosphere is a critical point in such a study. The three stations are too few to invert anomalies eventually existing in the lower atmosphere. This result is a good starting point for better direct future study to verify the applicability of this tomographic technique to a geodetic network with a higher number of stations, with the aim of characterizing the lower atmosphere of Mt. Etna for a more accurate monitoring of ground deformations.

  7. The radio spectral energy distribution of infrared-faint radio sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Seymour, N.; Spitler, L. R.; Emonts, B. H. C.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Hunstead, R.; Intema, H. T.; Marvil, J.; Parker, Q. A.; Sirothia, S. K.; Hurley-Walker, N.; Bell, M.; Bernardi, G.; Bowman, J. D.; Briggs, F.; Cappallo, R. J.; Callingham, J. R.; Deshpande, A. A.; Dwarakanath, K. S.; For, B. -Q; Greenhill, L. J.; Hancock, P.; Hazelton, B. J.; Hindson, L.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Kapińska, A. D.; Kaplan, D. L.; Lenc, E.; Lonsdale, C. J.; McKinley, B.; McWhirter, S. R.; Mitchell, D. A.; Morales, M. F.; Morgan, E.; Morgan, J.; Oberoi, D.; Offringa, A.; Ord, S. M.; Prabu, T.; Procopio, P.; Udaya Shankar, N.; Srivani, K. S.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Tingay, S. J.; Wayth, R. B.; Webster, R. L.; Williams, A.; Williams, C. L.; Wu, C.; Zheng, Q.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, I.; Indermuehle, B.; Popping, A.; Sault, R. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a class of radio-loud (RL) active galactic nuclei (AGN) at high redshifts (z ≥ 1.7) that are characterised by their relative infrared faintness, resulting in enormous radio-to-infrared flux density ratios of up to several thousand. Aims: Because of

  8. Hubble Space Telescope imaging of compact steep spectrum radio sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deVries, WH; ODea, CP; Baum, SA; Sparks, WB; Biretta, J; deKoff, S; Golombek, D; Lehnert, MD; Macchetto, F; McCarthy, P; Miley, GK

    We present Hubble Space Telescope WFPC2 images taken through a broad red filter (F702W) of 30 Third Cambridge Catalog compact steep spectrum (CSS) radio sources. We have overlaid radio maps taken from the literature on the optical images to determine the radio-optical alignment and to study detailed

  9. Long-Term Global Distributions of Mesoscale Variations in Atmospheric Radio Refraction Obtained from the GPS Champ Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilov, N. M.; Manuilova, R. O.

    2016-12-01

    We obtain average global distributions of the variances of the mesoscale variations in the atmospheric radio-refraction index (refractive index) at altitudes of 5-35 km from the data of the radio-occultation experiments performed during operation of the low-orbit GPS CHAMP satellite in the period 2001-2009. The filtering of the vertical profiles of the radio-refraction index allows one to determine the variances of the variations with vertical scales below 8 km. The latitudinal-temporal distributions of the zonal-mean variances of the index demonstrate significant interannual variations at various altitudes. Seasonal variations in the variances of radio refraction are studied. Quasi-biennial oscillations at low latitudes are revealed. Acoustic-gravity waves and turbulent and convective motions in the atmosphere can cause a spread of the radio-refraction index.

  10. Asymmetries in four powerful radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonsdale, C.J.; Morison, I.

    1983-01-01

    The extragalactic radio sources 3C 153, 196, 249.1 and 268.4 have been observed at frequencies of 408 and 1666 MHz with the new MERLIN array operated by Jodrell Bank, giving resolutions of approx. 0.9 and 0.25 arcsec respectively. The sources show marked asymmetries about the central object in spectral index, flux and morphology, which we believe are most naturally accounted for by the effects of a time-dependent asymmetry in the central powerhouse. In the case of 3C 249.1 the observations suggest that energy is being supplied alternately to the two sides of the source. The 1666-MHz observations also show that each of the other three sources contains one extremely compact hotspot. The minimum internal energy densities in these hotspots are such that confinement by ram pressure of motion through the intergalactic medium may not be possible, indicating that such features are transient phenomena in free expansion, or that some other confinement mechanism is operating. (author)

  11. Variability of GPS Radio Sources at 5 GHz

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Since January 2016, the Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy has moved to Continuous Article Publishing (CAP) mode. This means that each accepted article is being published immediately online with DOI and article citation ID with starting page number 1. Articles are also visible in Web of Science immediately.

  12. Quality aspects of the Wegener Center multi-satellite GPS radio occultation record OPSv5.6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angerer, Barbara; Ladstädter, Florian; Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Schwärz, Marc; Steiner, Andrea K.; Foelsche, Ulrich; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2017-12-01

    The demand for high-quality atmospheric data records, which are applicable in climate studies, is undisputed. Using such records requires knowledge of the quality and the specific characteristics of all contained data sources. The latest version of the Wegener Center (WEGC) multi-satellite Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) record, OPSv5.6, provides globally distributed upper-air satellite data of high quality, usable for climate and other high-accuracy applications. The GPS RO technique has been deployed in several satellite missions since 2001. Consistency among data from these missions is essential to create a homogeneous long-term multi-satellite climate record. In order to enable a qualified usage of the WEGC OPSv5.6 data set we performed a detailed analysis of satellite-dependent quality aspects from 2001 to 2017. We present the impact of the OPSv5.6 quality control on the processed data and reveal time-dependent and satellite-specific quality characteristics. The highest quality data are found for MetOp (Meteorological Operational satellite) and GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment). Data from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (Formosa Satellite mission-3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) are also of high quality. However, comparatively large day-to-day variations and satellite-dependent irregularities need to be taken into account when using these data. We validate the consistency among the various satellite missions by calculating monthly mean temperature deviations from the multi-satellite mean, including a correction for the different sampling characteristics. The results are highly consistent in the altitude range from 8 to 25 km, with mean temperature deviations less than 0.1 K. At higher altitudes the OPSv5.6 RO temperature record is increasingly influenced by the characteristics of the bending angle initialization, with the amount of impact depending on the receiver quality.

  13. A global perspective on atmospheric blocking using GPS radio occultation – one decade of observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Brunner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric blocking represents a weather pattern where a stationary high-pressure system weakens or reverses the climatological westerly flow at mid-latitudes for up to several weeks. It is closely connected to strong anomalies in key atmospheric variables such as geopotential height, temperature, and humidity. Here we provide, for the first time, a comprehensive, global perspective on atmospheric blocking and related impacts by using an observation-based data set from Global Positioning System (GPS radio occultation (RO from 2006 to 2016. The main blocking regions in both hemispheres and seasonal variations are found to be represented well in RO data. The effect of blocking on vertically resolved temperature and humidity anomalies in the troposphere and lower stratosphere is investigated for blocking regions in the Northern and Southern hemispheres, respectively. We find a statistically significant correlation of blocking with positive temperature anomalies, exceeding 3 K in the troposphere, and a reversal above the tropopause with negative temperature anomalies below −3 K in the lower stratosphere. Specific humidity is positively correlated with temperature throughout the troposphere with larger anomalies revealed in the Southern Hemisphere. At the eastern and equatorward side of the investigated blocking regions, a band of tropospheric cold anomalies reveals advection of cold air by anticyclonic motion around blocking highs, which is less distinct in the Southern Hemisphere due to stronger zonal flow. We find GPS RO to be a promising new data set for blocking research that gives insight into the vertical atmospheric structure, especially in light of the expected increase in data coverage that future missions will provide.

  14. Characteristics of layers, waves and turbulence in the atmosphere and ionosphere as estimated by GPS space radio-holography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavelyev, Alexander; Gubenko, Vladimir; Matyugov, Stanislav; Pavelyev, Alexey

    The spatial, seasonal and geographical distrubutions of the intensity of layers, turbulence and internal waves at different altitudes in the atmosphere and ionosphere of the Earth are presented. The results have been obtained on the base of locality principle using a new phase acceleration-intensity method for analysis of the GPS radio occultation signals. This methodology has been applied to mesearements of the inclination and altitude of ionospheric layers. Obtained information has been used for estimation of the front orientation, internal frequency and phase speed of the internal waves in the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere. A new index of the ionospheric activity as measured from the phase of radio waves passed through the ionosphere is introduced and its high correlation with S4 scintillation index is established. This correlation indicates the significant influence of ionospheric layers on variations of characteristics of radio waves in transionospheric communication links. Specially for the troposphere the geographical distribution of the weak total absorption (about of 1-2 db) of the radio waves at GPS frequencies in the Earth atmosphere corresponding to influence of the oxygen and water vapor in the troposphere is measured with accuracy better than 0.1 db. Obtained results expanded the applicable domain of the GPS space radio-holography for global investigation of the natural processes in the atmosphere and ionosphere as function of solar activity and space weather effects. The new phase acceleration-intensity method is also a basic tool which can be applied for data analysis of future planetary radio occultation missions

  15. Blind source separation problem in GPS time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualandi, A.; Serpelloni, E.; Belardinelli, M. E.

    2016-04-01

    A critical point in the analysis of ground displacement time series, as those recorded by space geodetic techniques, is the development of data-driven methods that allow the different sources of deformation to be discerned and characterized in the space and time domains. Multivariate statistic includes several approaches that can be considered as a part of data-driven methods. A widely used technique is the principal component analysis (PCA), which allows us to reduce the dimensionality of the data space while maintaining most of the variance of the dataset explained. However, PCA does not perform well in finding the solution to the so-called blind source separation (BSS) problem, i.e., in recovering and separating the original sources that generate the observed data. This is mainly due to the fact that PCA minimizes the misfit calculated using an L2 norm (χ 2), looking for a new Euclidean space where the projected data are uncorrelated. The independent component analysis (ICA) is a popular technique adopted to approach the BSS problem. However, the independence condition is not easy to impose, and it is often necessary to introduce some approximations. To work around this problem, we test the use of a modified variational Bayesian ICA (vbICA) method to recover the multiple sources of ground deformation even in the presence of missing data. The vbICA method models the probability density function (pdf) of each source signal using a mix of Gaussian distributions, allowing for more flexibility in the description of the pdf of the sources with respect to standard ICA, and giving a more reliable estimate of them. Here we present its application to synthetic global positioning system (GPS) position time series, generated by simulating deformation near an active fault, including inter-seismic, co-seismic, and post-seismic signals, plus seasonal signals and noise, and an additional time-dependent volcanic source. We evaluate the ability of the PCA and ICA decomposition

  16. Optical and radio properties of extragalactic radio sources with recurrent jet activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuźmicz, A.; Jamrozy, M.; Kozieł-Wierzbowska, D.; Weżgowiec, M.

    2017-11-01

    We present a sample of 74 radio sources with recurrent jet activity. The sample consists of 67 galaxies, 2 quasars and 5 unidentified sources, selected from the published data or are newly recognized. The sample's redshift range is 0.002 young stars can be observed as well. Based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric observations, we also analyse the morphology of the host galaxies and obtained significantly smaller concentration indices for the restarting radio sources when compared to the classical FRII hosts. This effect can be interpreted as a result of frequent merger events in the history of host galaxies of restarting radio sources.

  17. Characterizing GPS radio occultation loss of lock due to ionospheric weather

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Xinan; Schreiner, William S.; Pedatella, Nicholas M.; Kuo, Ying-Hwa

    2016-04-01

    Transient loss of lock is one of the key space weather effects on the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). Based on the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) observations during 2007-2011, we have analyzed the signal cycle slip (CS) occurrence comprehensively and its correlation to the ionospheric weather phenomena such as sporadic E (Es), equatorial F region irregularity (EFI), and the ionospheric equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA). The high vertical resolution of RO observations enables us to distinguish the CS resulting from different ionospheric layers clearly on a global scale. In the E layer, the CS is dominated by the Es occurrence, while in the F layer, the CS is mainly related to the EIA and EFI at low and equatorial latitudes. In the polar region, the CS is primarily related to polar cap electron density gradients. The overall average CS (>6 cycles) occurrence is ~23% per occultation, with the E (50-150 km) and F (150-600 km) layers contributing ~8.3% and ~14.7%, respectively. Awareness of the effect of the ionospheric weather on the CS of the low Earth orbit (LEO)-based GNSS signal could be beneficial to a variety of applications, including the LEO-based GNSS data processing and the corresponding hardware/firmware design.

  18. Observational constraints on the cosmological evolution of extragalactic radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perryman, M.A.C.

    1979-11-01

    The thesis discusses statistical studies of the remote radio sources, taking into account the various parameters for such sources, based on data from the various Cambridge Catalogues. Some of the sources have optical counterparts which yield distances from their redshifts. Combining optical and radio observations, an attempt is made to investigate whether large-scale evolution of galaxies occurs as one looks backwards in time to early epochs. Special attention is paid to ensuring that the optical identifications of the selected radio sources are sound and that the selection procedures do not distort the inferences obtained. (U.K.)

  19. Plasma and radio waves from Neptune: Source mechamisms and propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menietti, J. Douglas

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the radio wave emission observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument on board Voyager 2 as it flew by Neptune. The study has included data analysis, theoretical and numerical calculations, and ray tracing to determine the possible source mechanisms and locations of the radiation, including the narrowband bursty and smooth components of the Neptune radio emission.

  20. Planck early results. XIV. ERCSC validation and extreme radio sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, A.; Lavonen, N.; León-Tavares, J.

    2011-01-01

    Source Catalog (ERCSC) with quasi-simultaneous ground-based observations as well as archival data at frequencies below or overlapping Planck frequency bands, to validate the astrometry and photometry of the ERCSC radio sources and study the spectral features shown in this new frequency window opened......Planck's all-sky surveys at 30-857 GHz provide an unprecedented opportunity to follow the radio spectra of a large sample of extragalactic sources to frequencies 2-20 times higher than allowed by past, large-area, ground-based surveys. We combine the results of the Planck Early Release Compact...... by Planck. The ERCSC source positions and flux density scales are found to be consistent with the ground-based observations. We present and discuss the spectral energy distributions of a sample of "extreme" radio sources, to illustrate the richness of the ERCSC for the study of extragalactic radio sources...

  1. H- radio frequency source development at the Spallation Neutron Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welton, R F; Dudnikov, V G; Gawne, K R; Han, B X; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Roseberry, R T; Santana, M; Stockli, M P; Turvey, M W

    2012-02-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) now routinely operates nearly 1 MW of beam power on target with a highly persistent ∼38 mA peak current in the linac and an availability of ∼90%. H(-) beam pulses (∼1 ms, 60 Hz) are produced by a Cs-enhanced, multicusp ion source closely coupled with an electrostatic low energy beam transport (LEBT), which focuses the 65 kV beam into a radio frequency quadrupole accelerator. The source plasma is generated by RF excitation (2 MHz, ∼60 kW) of a copper antenna that has been encased with a thickness of ∼0.7 mm of porcelain enamel and immersed into the plasma chamber. The ion source and LEBT normally have a combined availability of ∼99%. Recent increases in duty-factor and RF power have made antenna failures a leading cause of downtime. This report first identifies the physical mechanism of antenna failure from a statistical inspection of ∼75 antennas which ran at the SNS, scanning electron microscopy studies of antenna surface, and cross sectional cuts and analysis of calorimetric heating measurements. Failure mitigation efforts are then described which include modifying the antenna geometry and our acceptance∕installation criteria. Progress and status of the development of the SNS external antenna source, a long-term solution to the internal antenna problem, are then discussed. Currently, this source is capable of delivering comparable beam currents to the baseline source to the SNS and, an earlier version, has briefly demonstrated unanalyzed currents up to ∼100 mA (1 ms, 60 Hz) on the test stand. In particular, this paper discusses plasma ignition (dc and RF plasma guns), antenna reliability, magnet overheating, and insufficient beam persistence.

  2. Observations of compact radio nuclei in Cygnus A, Centaurus A, and other extended radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellermann, K.I.; Clark, B.G.; Niell, A.E.; Shaffer, D.B.

    1975-01-01

    Observations of Cygnus A show a compact radio core 2 milli-arcsec in extent oriented in the same direction as the extended components. Other large double- or multiple-component sources, including Centaurus A, have also been found to contain compact radio nuclei with angular sizes in the range 1--10 milli-arcsec

  3. Survey of Potential Radio Frequency Interference Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-05-13

    Article 5 of the International Telecomunications Union (ITU) Radio Regulations, 1968 Edition, as revised by the World Administrative Radio Conferences (WARC...392AA In Brazil , Canada and the United States of America, the band 6 625-7 125 MHz is also allocated on a secondary basis to the fixed-satellite...Republic (34) Arab Jamnahiriya) (4) Brazil (Federative Republic of) (29) Liechtenstein (Principality of) (28) (--3) Canada (19) Luxembourg (32) Chile

  4. Characteristics of tropical cyclones and overshooting from GPS radio occultation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Rieckh, Therese; Steiner, Andrea; Kirchengast, Gottfried

    2014-05-01

    Tropical cyclones (TCs) are extreme weather events causing every year huge damages and several deaths. In some countries they are the natural catastrophes accounting for the major economic damages. The thermal structure of TCs gives important information on the cloud top height allowing for a better understanding of the troposphere-stratosphere transport, which is still poorly understood. The measurement of atmospheric parameters (such as temperature, pressure and humidity) with high vertical resolution and accuracy in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) is difficult especially during severe weather events (e.g TCs). Satellite remote sensing has improved the TC forecast and monitoring accuracy. In the last decade the Global Positioning Systems (GPS) Radio Occultation (RO) technique contributed to improve our knowledge especially at high troposphere altitudes and in remote regions of the globe thanks to the high vertical resolution, avoiding temperature smoothing issues (given by microwave and infrared instruments) in the UTLS and improving the poor temporal resolution and global coverage given by lidars and radars. We selected more than twenty-thousand GPS RO profiles co-located with TC best tracks for the period 2001 to 2012 and computed temperature anomaly profiles relative to a RO background climatology in order to detect TC cloud tops. We characterized the thermal structure for different ocean basins and for different TC intensities, distinguishing between tropical and extra-tropical cases. The analysis shows that all investigated storms have a common feature: they warm the troposphere and cool the UTLS near the cloud top. This behavior is amplified in the extra-tropical areas. Results reveal that the storms' cloud tops in the southern hemisphere basins reach higher altitudes and lower temperatures than in the northern hemisphere basins. We furthermore compared the cloud top height of each profile with the mean tropopause altitude (from the RO

  5. A CLUSTER OF COMPACT RADIO SOURCES IN W40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RodrIguez, Luis F.; Rodney, Steven A.; Reipurth, Bo

    2010-01-01

    We present deep 3.6 cm radio continuum observations of the H II region W40 obtained using the Very Large Array (VLA) in its A and B configurations. We detect a total of 20 compact radio sources in a region of 4' x 4', with 11 of them concentrated in a band with 30'' of extent. We also present JHK photometry of the W40 cluster taken with the QUIRC instrument on the University of Hawaii 2.2 m telescope. These data reveal that 15 of the 20 VLA sources have infrared counterparts, and 10 show radio variability with periods less than 20 days. Based on these combined radio and IR data, we propose that eight of the radio sources are candidate ultracompact H II regions, seven are likely to be young stellar objects, and two may be shocked interstellar gas.

  6. UTLS temperature validation of MPI-ESM decadal hindcast experiments with GPS radio occultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Schmidt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Global Positioning System (GPS radio occultation (RO temperature data are used to validate MPI-ESM (Max Planck Institute – Earth System Model decadal hindcast experiments in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS region between 300 hPa and 10 hPa (8 km and 32 km for the time period between 2002 and 2011. The GPSRO dataset is unique since it is very precise, calibration independent and covers the globe better than the usual radiosonde dataset. In addition it is vertically finer resolved than any of the existing satellite temperature measurements available for the UTLS and provides now a unique one decade long temperature validation dataset. The initialization of the MPI-ESM decadal hindcast runs mostly increases the skill of the atmospheric temperatures when compared to uninitialized climate projections with very high skill scores for lead-year one, and gradually decreases for the later lead-years. A comparison between two different initialization sets (b0, b1 of the low-resolution (LR MPI-ESM shows increased skills in b1-LR in most parts of the UTLS in particular in the tropics. The medium resolution (MR MPI-ESM initializations are characterized by reduced temperature biases in the uninitialized runs as compared to observations and a better capturing of the high latitude northern hemisphere interannual polar vortex variability as compared to the LR model version. Negative skills are found for the b1-MR hindcasts however in the regions around the mid-latitude tropospheric jets on both hemispheres and in the vicinity of the tropical tropopause in comparison to the b1-LR variant. It is interesting to highlight that none of the model experiments can reproduce the observed positive temperature trend in the tropical tropopause region since 2001 as seen by GPSRO data.

  7. X-ray Counterparts of Infrared Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schartel, Norbert

    2011-10-01

    Infrared Faint Radio Sources (IFRS) are radio sources with extremely faint or even absent infrared emission in deep Spitzer Surveys. Models of their spectral energy distributions, the ratios of radio to infrared flux densities and their steep radio spectra strongly suggest that IFRS are AGN at high redshifts (2IFRS, but if confirmed, the increased AGN numbers at these redshifts will account for the unresolved part of the X-ray background. The identification of X-ray counterparts of IFRS is considered to be the smoking gun for this hypothesis. We propose to observe 8 IFRS using 30ks pointed observations. X-ray detections of IFRS with different ratios of radio-to-infrared fluxes, will constrain the class-specific SED.

  8. All Source Adaptive Fusion for Aided Navigation in Non-GPS Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klausutis, Timothy J; Wehling, Ric; Lames, Matthew; Aboutalib, Omar; Awalt, Bruce; Fund, Alex; Thai, Bea; Leibs, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    An innovative approach for navigation in non-GPS environment is presented based on all source adaptive fusion of any available information encompassing passive imaging data, digital elevation terrain...

  9. Polarimetry of the Fast Radio Burst Source FRB121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michilli, Daniele; Seymour, Andrew; Hessels, Jason W. T.; Spitler, Laura; Gajjar, Vishal; Archibald, Anne; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Chatterjee, Shami; Cordes, Jim; Gourdji, Kelly; Heald, George; Kaspi, Victoria; Law, Casey; Sobey, Charlotte

    2018-01-01

    Fast radio bursts (FRBs) are millisecond-duration radio flashes of presumably extragalactic origin. FRB121102 is the only FRB known to repeat and the only one with a precise localization. It is co-located with a persistent radio source inside a star-forming region in a dwarf galaxy at z=0.2. While the persistent source is compatible with either a low-luminosity accreting black hole or a very energetic nebula and supernova remnant, the source of the bursts is still a mystery. We present new bursts from FRB121102 detected at relatively high radio frequencies of ~5GHz. These observations allow us to investigate the polarization properties of the bursts, placing new constraints on the environment of FRB121102.

  10. Scintillation-Hardened GPS Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Donald R.

    2015-01-01

    CommLargo, Inc., has developed a scintillation-hardened Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver that improves reliability for low-orbit missions and complies with NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standards. A software-defined radio (SDR) implementation allows a single hardware element to function as either a conventional radio or as a GPS receiver, providing backup and redundancy for platforms such as the International Space Station (ISS) and high-value remote sensing platforms. The innovation's flexible SDR implementation reduces cost, weight, and power requirements. Scintillation hardening improves mission reliability and variability. In Phase I, CommLargo refactored an open-source GPS software package with Kalman filter-based tracking loops to improve performance during scintillation and also demonstrated improved navigation during a geomagnetic storm. In Phase II, the company generated a new field-programmable gate array (FPGA)-based GPS waveform to demonstrate on NASA's Space Communication and Navigation (SCaN) test bed.

  11. Assessment of Radiometer Calibration with GPS Radio Occultation for the MiRaTA CubeSat Mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinan, Anne D; Cahoy, Kerri L; Bishop, Rebecca L; Lui, Susan S; Bardeen, James R; Mulligan, Tamitha; Blackwell, William J; Leslie, R Vincent; Osaretin, Idahosa; Shields, Michael

    2016-12-01

    The Microwave Radiometer Technology Acceleration (MiRaTA) is a 3U CubeSat mission sponsored by the NASA Earth Science Technology Office (ESTO). The science payload on MiRaTA consists of a tri-band microwave radiometer and Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (GPSRO) sensor. The microwave radiometer takes measurements of all-weather temperature (V-band, 50-57 GHz), water vapor (G-band, 175-191 GHz), and cloud ice (G-band, 205 GHz) to provide observations used to improve weather forecasting. The Aerospace Corporation's GPSRO experiment, called the Compact TEC (Total Electron Content) and Atmospheric GPS Sensor (CTAGS), measures profiles of temperature and pressure in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (∼20 km) and electron density in the ionosphere (over 100 km). The MiRaTA mission will validate new technologies in both passive microwave radiometry and GPS radio occultation: (1) new ultra-compact and low-power technology for multi-channel and multi-band passive microwave radiometers, (2) the application of a commercial off the shelf (COTS) GPS receiver and custom patch antenna array technology to obtain neutral atmospheric GPSRO retrieval from a nanosatellite, and (3) a new approach to spaceborne microwave radiometer calibration using adjacent GPSRO measurements. In this paper, we focus on objective (3), developing operational models to meet a mission goal of 100 concurrent radiometer and GPSRO measurements, and estimating the temperature measurement precision for the CTAGS instrument based on thermal noise. Based on an analysis of thermal noise of the CTAGS instrument, the expected temperature retrieval precision is between 0.17 K and 1.4 K, which supports the improvement of radiometric calibration to 0.25 K.

  12. Planck intermediate results: XLV. Radio spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Aller, H. D.

    2016-01-01

    ground-based radio observations between 1.1 and 37 GHz. The single-survey Planck data confirm that the flattest high-frequency radio spectral indices are close to zero, indicating that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum is much harder than commonly thought, with power-law index around 1......Continuum spectra covering centimetre to submillimetre wavelengths are presented for a northern sample of 104 extragalactic radio sources, mainly active galactic nuclei, based on four-epoch Planck data. The nine Planck frequencies, from 30 to 857 GHz, are complemented by a set of simultaneous.......5 instead of the canonical 2.5. The radio spectra peak at high frequencies and exhibit a variety of shapes. For a small set of low-z sources, we find a spectral upturn at high frequencies, indicating the presence of intrinsic cold dust. Variability can generally be approximated by achromatic variations...

  13. Measurements of the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere during tropical cyclones using the GPS radio occultation technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Neubert, Torsten; Syndergaard, Stig

    2011-01-01

    and Climate (COSMIC) were analyzed, focusing on two particular tropical cyclones with completely different characteristics, the hurricane Bertha, which formed in the Atlantic Basin during July 2008 and reached a maximum intensity of Category 3, and the typhoon Hondo, which formed in the south Indian Ocean...... during 2008 reaching a maximum intensity of Category 4. The result is positive, suggesting that the bending angle of a GPS radio occultation signal contains interesting information on the atmosphere around the tropopause, but not any information regarding the water vapour. The maximum percentage anomaly...

  14. Evolution of Extragalactic Radio Sources and Quasar/Galaxy Unification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onah, C. I.; Ubachukwu, A. A.; Odo, F. C.; Onuchukwu, C. C.

    2018-04-01

    We use a large sample of radio sources to investigate the effects of evolution, luminosity selection and radio source orientation in explaining the apparent deviation of observed angular size - redshift (θ - z) relation of extragalactic radio sources (EGRSs) from the standard model. We have fitted the observed θ - z data with standard cosmological models based on a flat universe (Ω0 = 1). The size evolution of EGRSs has been described as luminosity, temporal and orientation-dependent in the form DP,z,Φ ≍ P±q(1 + z)-m sinΦ, with q=0.3, Φ=59°, m=-0.26 for radio galaxies and q=-0.5, Φ=33°, m=3.1 for radio quasars respectively. Critical points of luminosity, logPcrit=26.33 WHz-1 and logDc=2.51 kpc (316.23 kpc) of the present sample of radio sources were also observed. All the results were found to be consistent with the popular quasar/galaxy unification scheme.

  15. Radio-tracking large wilderness mammals: integration of GPS and Argos technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Charles C.; Arthur, Steve M.

    1999-01-01

    We tested 30 prototype global positioning system (GPS) radiocollars on brown bears (Ursus arctos) over a 3-year period on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. Collars were of 2 design types: GPS units with an Argos (Argos Data collection and Location System) satellite uplink (n = 19) and GPS units where the data were stored on board (n = 10) for retrieval at a later date. All units also contained a conventional VHF (very high frequency) transmitter and weighed 1.7 kg. GPS-Argos units obtained 10-82% of expected GPS fixes, and fix rate declined significantly (P Argos uplink success (proportion of successful transmissions of stored data) was linearly related to GPS fix rate (r = 0.91, P Argos units (t = -4.009, P < 0.001). Fix success rate for deployed store-on-board collars ranged from 13-96%; because of the increased number of attempted fixes per day, these collars obtained fixes on 97% of days deployed. Accuracy of the GPS units was less than predicted by the NAVSTAR GPS technology using the course acquisition code. Reduced accuracy was likely a result of the proportion of 2-dimensional versus 3-dimensional fixes obtained, although we could not determine this statistic from recorded data. Increased overstory closure was the only variable measured that partially explained the reduced likelihood of a successful fix. Stem density, stem diameter, and overstory height measured within 3 m of the collar did not affect fix success. GPS fix success rates for collars attached to bears varied more and were lower than fix rates for stationary collars placed in various vegetation types, suggesting that the bear, terrain, and movement all influence both fix and uplink success rate. Application of this new technology to grizzly and brown bear research and comparisons to studies with moose (Alces alces) are discussed.

  16. Radio variability in complete samples of extragalactic radio sources at 1.4 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, S.; Machalski, J.

    1990-09-01

    Complete samples of extragalactic radio sources obtained in 1970-1975 and the sky survey of Condon and Broderick (1983) were used to select sources variable at 1.4 GHz, and to investigate the characteristics of variability in the whole population of sources at this frequency. The radio structures, radio spectral types, and optical identifications of the selected variables are discussed. Only compact flat-spectrum sources vary at 1.4 GHz, and all but four are identified with QSOs, BL Lacs, or other (unconfirmed spectroscopically) stellar objects. No correlation of degree of variability at 1.4 GHz with Galactic latitude or variability at 408 MHz has been found, suggesting that most of the 1.4-GHz variability is intrinsic and not caused by refractive scintillations. Numerical models of the variability have been computed.

  17. Evidence for Infrared-faint Radio Sources as z > 1 Radio-loud Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh T.; Norris, Ray P.; Siana, Brian; Middelberg, Enno

    2010-02-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey which have no observable mid-infrared counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic (SWIRE) survey. The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6-70 μm) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the spectral energy distribution of these objects shows that they are consistent with high-redshift (z >~ 1) active galactic nuclei.

  18. Plasma and radio waves from Neptune: Source mechanisms and propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H. K.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes results obtained through the support of NASA Grant NAGW-2412. The objective of this project is to conduct a comprehensive investigation of the radio wave emission observed by the planetary radio astronomy (PRA) instrument on board Voyager 2 as if flew by Neptune. This study has included data analysis, theoretical and numerical calculations, ray tracing, and modeling to determine the possible source mechanism(s) and locations of the Neptune radio emissions. We have completed four papers, which are included in the appendix. The paper 'Modeling of Whistler Ray Paths in the Magnetosphere of Neptune' investigated the propagation and dispersion of lighting-generated whistler in the magnetosphere of Neptune by using three dimensional ray tracing. The two papers 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Radio Emissions from Planetary Magnetospheres' and 'Numerical Simulations of Bursty Planetary Radio Emissions' employed numerical simulations to investigate an alternate source mechanism of bursty radio emissions in addition to the cyclotron maser instability. We have also studied the possible generation of Z and whistler mode waves by the temperature anisotropic beam instability and the result was published in 'Electron Cyclotron Wave Generation by Relativistic Electrons.' Besides the aforementioned studies, we have also collaborated with members of the PRA team to investigate various aspects of the radio wave data. Two papers have been submitted for publication and the abstracts of these papers are also listed in the appendix.

  19. Compact continuum radio sources in the Orion Nebula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garay, G.; Moran, J.M.; Reid, M.J.; European Southern Observatory, Garching, West Germany)

    1987-01-01

    The Orion Nebula was observed with the VLA in order to search for radio emission from compact H II regions indicative of embedded OB stars or from winds associated with pre-main sequence, low-mass stars. Fourteen of the 21 detected radio sources are within 30 arcsec of Omega 1 Orionis C; 13 of these objects are probably neutral condensations surrounded by ionized envelopes that are excited by the star. If the temperature of the ionized envelopes is 10,000 K and their electron densities decrease as the square of the distance from the core center, then a typical neutral condensation has a radius of 10 to the 15th cm and a peak electron density of 400,000/cu cm. Seven sources are in or near the Orion molecular cloud. Four of the sources have optical counterparts. Two are highly variable radio sources associated with X-ray sources, and two have radio spectra indicative of thermal emission. Two of the three optically invisible sources have radio emission likely to arise in a dense ionized envelope surrounding and excited by an early B-type star. 46 references

  20. Optical Followup of Extragalactic Radio Sources CH Ishwara-Chandra

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Distance measurement is a must to characterize any source in the sky. In the radio band, it is rarely possible to get distance or redshift measurements. The optical band is the most used band to get distance esti- mate of sources, even for those originally discovered in other bands of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  1. Radio-tracking large wilderness mammals: integration of GPS and Argos technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Charles C.; Arthur, Steve M.

    1999-01-01

    We tested 30 prototype global positioning system (GPS) radiocollars on brown bears (Ursus arctos) over a 3-year period on the Kenai Peninsula, Alaska. Collars were of 2 design types: GPS units with an Argos (Argos Data collection and Location System) satellite uplink (n = 19) and GPS units where the data were stored on board (n = 10) for retrieval at a later date. All units also contained a conventional VHF (very high frequency) transmitter and weighed 1.7 kg. GPS-Argos units obtained 10-82% of expected GPS fixes, and fix rate declined significantly (P technology using the course acquisition code. Reduced accuracy was likely a result of the proportion of 2-dimensional versus 3-dimensional fixes obtained, although we could not determine this statistic from recorded data. Increased overstory closure was the only variable measured that partially explained the reduced likelihood of a successful fix. Stem density, stem diameter, and overstory height measured within 3 m of the collar did not affect fix success. GPS fix success rates for collars attached to bears varied more and were lower than fix rates for stationary collars placed in various vegetation types, suggesting that the bear, terrain, and movement all influence both fix and uplink success rate. Application of this new technology to grizzly and brown bear research and comparisons to studies with moose (Alces alces) are discussed.

  2. Centaurus A galaxy, type EO peculiar elliptical, also radio source

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Centaurus A galaxy, type EO peculiar elliptical, also radio source. CTIO 4-meter telescope, 1975. NGC 5128, a Type EO peculiar elliptical galaxy in the constellation Centaurus. This galaxy is one of the most luminous and massive galaxies known and is a strong source of both radio and X-ray radiation. Current theories suggest that the nucleus is experiencing giant explosions involving millions of stars and that the dark band across the galactic disk is material being ejected outward. Cerro Toloto 4-meter telescope photo. Photo credit: National Optical Astronomy Observatories

  3. Upper Troposphere Lower Stratosphere structure during convective systems using GPS radio occultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo

    to the analysis of tropical storms for the future mission ACES will also be evaluated. Using data from the past and ongoing GPS RO missions we have defined an algorithm to detect the clouds top of the convective systems and their thermal structure. Other satellite and in-situ measurements co-located with GPS ROs......, were used to validate the results. The outcomes are very promising. The GPS signal can be used to characterize the thermal structure of the convective systems, and to detect the storm cloud top. The RO signal contains interesting information in connection to the troposphere–stratosphere transport...... of soundings in the tropical area is requested to exploit all the capabilities of thistechnique....

  4. Inversion of GPS-measured coseismic displacements for source parameters of Taiwan earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, J. T.; Chang, W. L.; Hung, H. K.; Yu, W. C.

    2016-12-01

    We performed a method of determining earthquake location, focal mechanism, and centroid moment tensor by coseismic surface displacements from daily and high-rate GPS measurements. Unlike commonly used dislocation model where fault geometry is calculated nonlinearly, our method makes a point source approach to evaluate these parameters in a solid and efficient way without a priori fault information and can thus provide constrains to subsequent finite source modeling of fault slip. In this study, we focus on the resolving ability of GPS data for moderate (Mw=6.0 7.0) earthquakes in Taiwan, and four earthquakes were investigated in detail: the March 27 2013 Nantou (Mw=6.0), the June 2 2013 Nantou (Mw=6.3) , the October 31 2013 Ruisui (Mw=6.3), and the March 31 2002 Hualien (ML=6.8) earthquakes. All these events were recorded by the Taiwan continuous GPS network with data sampling rates of 30-second and 1 Hz, where the Mw6.3 Ruisui earthquake was additionally recorded by another local GPS network with a sampling rate of 20 Hz. Our inverted focal mechanisms of all these earthquakes are consistent with the results of GCMT and USGS that evaluates source parameters by dynamic information from seismic waves. We also successfully resolved source parameters of the Mw6.3 Ruisui earthquake within only 10 seconds following the earthquake occurrence, demonstrating the potential of high-rate GPS data on earthquake early warning and real-time determination of earthquake source parameters.

  5. Performance Evaluation of Block Acquisition and Tracking Algorithms Using an Open Source GPS Receiver Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Ganesh K.; Akopian, David; Heckler, Gregory W.; Winternitz, Luke B.

    2011-01-01

    Location technologies have many applications in wireless communications, military and space missions, etc. US Global Positioning System (GPS) and other existing and emerging Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) are expected to provide accurate location information to enable such applications. While GNSS systems perform very well in strong signal conditions, their operation in many urban, indoor, and space applications is not robust or even impossible due to weak signals and strong distortions. The search for less costly, faster and more sensitive receivers is still in progress. As the research community addresses more and more complicated phenomena there exists a demand on flexible multimode reference receivers, associated SDKs, and development platforms which may accelerate and facilitate the research. One of such concepts is the software GPS/GNSS receiver (GPS SDR) which permits a facilitated access to algorithmic libraries and a possibility to integrate more advanced algorithms without hardware and essential software updates. The GNU-SDR and GPS-SDR open source receiver platforms are such popular examples. This paper evaluates the performance of recently proposed block-corelator techniques for acquisition and tracking of GPS signals using open source GPS-SDR platform.

  6. The psisub(IPS)-LAS relation for extragalactic radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banhatti, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    Metre-wavelength interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations give the overall angular sizes psi of scintillating compact structures in radio sources. From 326.5-MHz IPS data for a sample of faint (Ooty) radio sources, log psi versus log (largest angular size) is seen, on average, to have a slope 0.2, significantly less than one. A similar trend is seen from 81.5-MHz IPS data for a sample of strong, powerful (3CR) double sources, although the slope is 0.4 and the mean psi about four times larger. The difference in slopes is due mainly to the large spread in the redshifts of the 3CR sources compared to the expected narrow range for the Ooty sources, while the difference in mean psi values is due to the different methods of determining psi for the two samples, the different frequencies used for the IPS observations and the different mean LAS values. (author)

  7. Autonomous robotic platforms for locating radio sources buried under rubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasu, A. S.; Anchidin, L.; Tamas, R.; Paun, M.; Danisor, A.; Petrescu, T.

    2016-12-01

    This paper deals with the use of autonomous robotic platforms able to locate radio signal sources such as mobile phones, buried under collapsed buildings as a result of earthquakes, natural disasters, terrorism, war, etc. This technique relies on averaging position data resulting from a propagation model implemented on the platform and the data acquired by robotic platforms at the disaster site. That allows us to calculate the approximate position of radio sources buried under the rubble. Based on measurements, a radio map of the disaster site is made, very useful for locating victims and for guiding specific rubble lifting machinery, by assuming that there is a victim next to a mobile device detected by the robotic platform; by knowing the approximate position, the lifting machinery does not risk to further hurt the victims. Moreover, by knowing the positions of the victims, the reaction time is decreased, and the chances of survival for the victims buried under the rubble, are obviously increased.

  8. Radio flux flicker of extragalactic sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeschen, D.S.

    1982-01-01

    The author describes observations which indicate that compact sources (compactness evidenced by flat/complex spectra) display a ''flicker'' in their intrinsic centimeter wavelength radiation, with an amplitude of about 2% and a characteristic time scale of a few days. (Auth.)

  9. GPS radio occultation technique for measurement of the atmosphere above tropical cyclones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Neubert, Torsten; Syndergaard, Stig

    2009-01-01

    /lower stratosphere (UT/LS). The result is positive, suggesting that the bending angle of a GPS signal contains interesting information on the atmosphere around the tropopause. The presentation is focused on one particular Tropical Cyclone (TC), the hurricane Bertha, which formed in the Atlantic Basin during July...

  10. Chandra Observations of Dying Radio Sources in Galaxy Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgia, M.; Markevitch, M.; Govoni, F.; Parma, P.; Fanti, R.; de Ruiter, H. R.; Mack, K.-H.

    2012-01-01

    Context. The dying radio sources represent a very interesting and largely unexplored stage of the active galactic nucleus (AGN) evolution. They are considered to be very rare, and almost all of the few known ones were found in galaxy clusters. However, considering the small number detected so far, it has not been possible to draw any firm conclusions about their X-ray environment. Aims. We present X-ray observations performed with the Chandra satellite of the three galaxy clusters Abell 2276, ZwCl 1829.3+6912, and RX J1852.1+5711, which harbor at their center a dying radio source with an ultra-steep spectrum that we recently discovered. Methods. We analyzed the physical properties of the X-ray emitting gas surrounding these elusive radio sources. We determined the global X-ray properties of the clusters, derived the azimuthally averaged profiles of metal abundance, gas temperature, density, and pressure. Furthermore, we estimated the total mass profiles. Results. The large-scale X-ray emission is regular and spherical, suggesting a relaxed state for these systems. Indeed, we found that the three clusters are also characterized by significant enhancements in the metal abundance and declining temperature profiles toward the central region. For all these reasons, we classified RX J1852.1+5711, Abell 2276, and ZwCl 1829.3+6912 as cool-core galaxy clusters. Conclusions. We calculated the non-thermal pressure of the radio lobes assuming that the radio sources are in the minimum energy condition. For all dying sources we found that this is on average about one to two orders of magnitude lower than that of the external gas, as found for many other radio sources at the center of galaxy groups and clusters. We found marginal evidence for the presence of X-ray surface brightness depressions coincident with the fossil radio lobes of the dying sources in A2276 and ZwCl 1829.3+691. We estimated the outburst age and energy output for these two dying sources. The energy power from

  11. BROADBAND RADIO POLARIMETRY AND FARADAY ROTATION OF 563 EXTRAGALACTIC RADIO SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J.; Franzen, T. M. O.

    2015-01-01

    We present a broadband spectropolarimetric survey of 563 discrete, mostly unresolved radio sources between 1.3 and 2.0 GHz using data taken with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. We have used rotation-measure synthesis to identify Faraday-complex polarized sources, those objects whose frequency-dependent polarization behavior indicates the presence of material possessing complicated magnetoionic structure along the line of sight (LOS). For sources classified as Faraday-complex, we have analyzed a number of their radio and multiwavelength properties to determine whether they differ from Faraday-simple polarized sources (sources for which LOS magnetoionic structures are comparatively simple) in these properties. We use this information to constrain the physical nature of the magnetoionic structures responsible for generating the observed complexity. We detect Faraday complexity in 12% of polarized sources at ∼1′ resolution, but we demonstrate that underlying signal-to-noise limitations mean the true percentage is likely to be significantly higher in the polarized radio source population. We find that the properties of Faraday-complex objects are diverse, but that complexity is most often associated with depolarization of extended radio sources possessing a relatively steep total intensity spectrum. We find an association between Faraday complexity and LOS structure in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and claim that a significant proportion of the Faraday complexity we observe may be generated at interfaces of the ISM associated with ionization fronts near neutral hydrogen structures. Galaxy cluster environments and internally generated Faraday complexity provide possible alternative explanations in some cases

  12. NIR Flare of radio source GB60713+5738

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, L.; Porras, A.; Recillas, E.; Chavushyan, V.

    2018-02-01

    In ATel#11331, we reported the NIR detection of the radio source GB60713+5738 and the suggestion of it being in flaring state. However, we found a previous observation in our archive that fully confirms a recent giant flare of this object.

  13. Probing Statistical Isotropy of Cosmological Radio Sources using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Astrophysics and Astronomy; Volume 37; Issue 4. Probing Statistical Isotropy of Cosmological Radio Sources using Square Kilometre Array. Shamik Ghosh Pankaj Jain Gopal Kashyap Rahul Kothari Sharvari Nadkarni-Ghosh Prabhakar Tiwari. Review Volume 37 Issue 4 December 2016 Article ...

  14. Flicker of extragalactic radio sources and refractive interstellar scintillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blandford, R.; Narayan, R.; Romani, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Recent work has identified variability of flat-spectrum extragalactic radio sources at lambdaroughly-equal10 cm with rms amplitude of approx.2%--3% and time scale of days. We show that this ''flicker'' is consistent with intensity fluctuations caused by refractive scintillation in an extended interstellar medium in our Galaxy. Further observation of flicker may allow the structure of suitable sources to be partially resolved on angular scales smaller than those probed by VLBI

  15. Data Assimilation of Ground-Based GPS and Radio Occultation Total Electron Content for Global Ionospheric Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C. Y.; Matsuo, T.; Liu, J. Y.; Lin, C. H.; Huba, J. D.; Tsai, H. F.; Chen, C. Y.

    2017-10-01

    This study presents an approach based on the Gauss-Markov Kalman filter to assimilate the total electron content observed from ground-based GPS receivers and space-based radio occultation instrumentations (such as FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) and FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 (F7/C2)) into the International Reference Ionosphere. Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) show that the data assimilation procedure consisting of the forecast and the measurement update steps can better improve the accuracy of the data assimilation analysis than the assimilation procedure using the measurement update alone. Compared with F3/C, the denser F7/C2 occultation observations can improve the analysis accuracy significantly as suggested by OSSEs. The real data assimilation results are further validated with global ionosphere maps, the global ground-based GPS measurements, and the ionospheric F2 peak height and electron density sounded by ionosondes. Both the OSSEs and validation results confirm that a number of improvements to the data assimilation procedure presented in this paper can indeed be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional ionospheric electron density adequately.

  16. Study of sporadic E layers based on GPS radio occultation measurements and digisonde data over the Brazilian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resende, Laysa C. A.; Arras, Christina; Batista, Inez S.; Denardini, Clezio M.; Bertollotto, Thainá O.; Moro, Juliano

    2018-04-01

    This work presents new results about sporadic E-layers (Es layers) using GPS (global positioning system) radio occultation (RO) measurements obtained from the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC satellites and digisonde data. The RO profiles are used to study the Es layer occurrence as well as its intensity of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the 50 Hz GPS L1 signal. The methodology was applied to identify the Es layer on RO measurements over Cachoeira Paulista, a low-latitude station in the Brazilian region, in which the Es layer development is not driven tidal winds only as it is at middle latitudes. The coincident events were analyzed using the RO technique and ionosonde observations during the year 2014 to 2016. We used the electron density obtained using the blanketing frequency parameter (fbEs) and the Es layer height (h'Es) acquired from the ionograms to validate the satellite measurements. The comparative results show that the Es layer characteristics extracted from the RO measurements are in good agreement with the Es layer parameters from the digisonde.

  17. Global Three-Dimensional Ionospheric Data Assimilation Model Using Ground-based GPS and Radio Occultation Total Electron Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jann-Yenq Liu, Tiger; Lin, Chi-Yen; Matsuo, Tomoko; Lin, Charles C. H.; Tsai, Ho-Fang; Chen, Chao-Yen

    2017-04-01

    An ionospheric data assimilation approach presented here is based on the Gauss-Markov Kalman filter with International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) as the background model and designed to assimilate the total electron content (TEC) observed from ground-based GPS receivers and space-based radio occultation (RO) of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) or FORMOSAT-7/COSMIC-2 (F7/C2). The Kalman filter consists of the forecast step according to Gauss-Markov process and measurement update step. Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) show that the Gauss-Markov Kalman filter procedure can increase the accuracy of the data assimilation analysis over the procedure consisting of the measurement update step alone. Moreover, in comparing to F3/C, the dense F7/C2 RO observation can further increase the model accuracy significantly. Validating the data assimilation results with the vertical TEC in Global Ionosphere Maps and that derived from ground-based GPS measurements, as well as the ionospheric F2-peak height and electron density sounded by ionosondes is also carried out. Both the OSSE results and the observation validations confirm that the developed data assimilation model can be used to reconstruct the three-dimensional electron density in the ionosphere satisfactorily.

  18. Improving MWA/HERA Calibration Using Extended Radio Source Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Devin; Tasker, Nicholas; University of Washington EoR Imaging Team

    2018-01-01

    The formation of the first stars and galaxies in the universe is among the greatest mysteries in astrophysics. Using special purpose radio interferometers, it is possible to detect the faint 21 cm radio line emitted by neutral hydrogen in order to characterize the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and the formation of the first stars and galaxies. We create better models of extended radio sources by reducing component number of deconvolved Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) data by up to 90%, while preserving real structure and flux information. This real structure is confirmed by comparisons to observations of the same extended radio sources from the TIFR GMRT Sky Survey (TGSS) and NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS), which detect at a similar frequency range as the MWA. These sophisticated data reduction techniques not only offer improvements to the calibration of the MWA, but also hold applications for the future sky-based calibration of the Hydrogen Epoch of Reionization Array (HERA). This has the potential to reduce noise in the power spectra from these instruments, and consequently provide a deeper view into the window of EoR.

  19. VLBI observations of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, Enno; Phillips, Chris; Norris, Ray; Tingay, Steven

    2006-10-01

    We propose to observe a small sample of radio sources from the ATLAS project (ATLAS = Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) with the LBA, to determine their compactness and map their structures. The sample consists of three radio sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubbed Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations: we will map their structure to test whether they resemble core-jet or double-lobed morphologies, and we will measure the flux densities on long baselines, to determine their compactness. Previous snapshot-style LBA observations of two other IFRS yielded no detections, hence we propose to use disk-based recording with 512 Mbps where possible, for highest sensitivity. With the observations proposed here, we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from two to five, soon allowing us to draw general conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  20. Optical counterpart positions of extragalactic radio sources and connecting optical and radio reference frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslan, Z.; Gumerov, R.; Jin, W.; Khamitov, I.; Maigurova, N.; Pinigin, G.; Tang, Z.; Wang, S.

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the results of an investigation of astrometric positions of extragalactic radio sources from a list for the International Celestial Reference Frame. About 300 fields around extragalactic radio sources were observed during the years 2000-2003. The observations were performed mainly using two telescopes equipped with CCD cameras at TUG, Turkey (Russian-Turkish Telescope - RTT150) and at YAO (1 m telescope), (Kunming, China). The mean accuracies of the measured positions are 38 mas in right ascension and 35 mas in declination. A comparison between the measured optical positions determined using the UCAC2 catalog and the radio positions from the current ICRF shows that the overall optical-minus- radio offsets are -4 and +15 mas for right ascension and declination, respectively. The formal internal errors of these mean offsets are 4 mas. The results of optical positions with respect to the reference catalogue 2MASS are also given. A search for a relation between optical and radio reference frames indicates that the orientation angles are near zero within their accuracy of about 5 mas. The link accuracy becomes 3 mas when our observations are combined with other studies. Tables 2 and 3 giving the positions are only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/510/A10Present address: İstanbul Kültür University, Ataköy Yerleşkesi, 34156 Istanbul, Turkey

  1. Morphology and astrometry of Infrared-Faint Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Randall, Kate; Mao, Minnie; Hales, Christopher

    2008-10-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS, are an unexpected class of object discovered in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey, ATLAS. They are compact 1.4GHz radio sources with no visible counterparts in co-located (relatively shallow) Spitzer infrared and optical images. We have detected two of these objects with VLBI, indicating the presence of an AGN. These observations and our ATLAS data indicate that IFRS are extended on scales of arcseconds, and we wish to image their morphologies to obtain clues about their nature. These observations will also help us to select optical counterparts from very deep, and hence crowded, optical images which we have proposed. With these data in hand, we will be able to compare IFRS to known object types and to apply for spectroscopy to obtain their redshifts.

  2. PySE: Software for extracting sources from radio images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, D.; Garsden, H.; Spreeuw, H.; Swinbank, J. D.; van der Horst, A. J.; Rowlinson, A.; Broderick, J. W.; Rol, E.; Law, C.; Molenaar, G.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.

    2018-04-01

    PySE is a Python software package for finding and measuring sources in radio telescope images. The software was designed to detect sources in the LOFAR telescope images, but can be used with images from other radio telescopes as well. We introduce the LOFAR Telescope, the context within which PySE was developed, the design of PySE, and describe how it is used. Detailed experiments on the validation and testing of PySE are then presented, along with results of performance testing. We discuss some of the current issues with the algorithms implemented in PySE and their interaction with LOFAR images, concluding with the current status of PySE and its future development.

  3. Do the enigmatic ``Infrared-Faint Radio Sources'' include pulsars?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, George; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Keith, Michael; Mao, Minnie; Champion, David

    2009-04-01

    The Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) team have surveyed seven square degrees of sky at 1.4GHz. During processing some unexpected infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS sources) were discovered. The nature of these sources is not understood, but it is possible that some of these sources may be pulsars within our own galaxy. We propose to observe the IFRS sources with steep spectral indices using standard search techniques to determine whether or not they are pulsars. A pulsar detection would 1) remove a subset of the IFRS sources from the ATLAS sample so they would not need to be observed with large optical/IR telescopes to find their hosts and 2) be intrinsically interesting as the pulsar would be a millisecond pulsar and/or have an extreme spatial velocity.

  4. Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS observations of the host galaxies of powerful radio sources : Does size matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, WH; O'Dea, CP; Barthel, PD; Fanti, C; Fanti, R; Lehnert, MD

    2000-01-01

    We present near-infrared J- and K-band imaging of a sample of powerful radio source host galaxies with the Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS2 camera. These sources have been selected on their double-lobed radio structure and include a wide range of projected radio source sizes. The largest projected

  5. SCORPIO - II. Spectral indices of weak Galactic radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallaro, F.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Norris, R. P.; Leto, P.; Ingallinera, A.; Buemi, C. S.; Marvil, J.; Agliozzo, C.; Bufano, F.; Cerrigone, L.; Riggi, S.

    2018-01-01

    In the next few years the classification of radio sources observed by the large surveys will be a challenging problem and spectral index is a powerful tool for addressing it. Here we present an algorithm to estimate the spectral index of sources from multiwavelength radio images. We have applied our algorithm to SCORPIO, a Galactic plane survey centred around 2.1 GHz carried out with Australian Telescope Compact Array and found we can measure reliable spectral indices only for sources stronger than 40 times the rms noise. Above a threshold of 1 mJy, the source density in SCORPIO is 20 per cent greater than in a typical extragalactic field, like Australia Telescope Large Area Survey because of the presence of Galactic sources. Among this excess population, 16 sources per square degree have a spectral index of about zero suggesting optically thin thermal emission such as H II regions and planetary nebulae, while 12 per square degree present a rising spectrum, suggesting optically thick thermal emission such as stars and UCH II regions.

  6. Radio Galaxy Zoo: Compact and extended radio source classification with deep learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukic, V.; Brüggen, M.; Banfield, J. K.; Wong, O. I.; Rudnick, L.; Norris, R. P.; Simmons, B.

    2018-01-01

    Machine learning techniques have been increasingly useful in astronomical applications over the last few years, for example in the morphological classification of galaxies. Convolutional neural networks have proven to be highly effective in classifying objects in image data. The current work aims to establish when multiple components are present, in the astronomical context of synthesis imaging observations of radio sources. To this effect, we design a convolutional neural network to differentiate between different morphology classes using sources from the Radio Galaxy Zoo (RGZ) citizen science project. In this first step, we focus on exploring the factors that affect the performance of such neural networks, such as the amount of training data, number and nature of layers and the hyperparameters. We begin with a simple experiment in which we only differentiate between two extreme morphologies, using compact and multiple component extended sources. We found that a three convolutional layer architecture yielded very good results, achieving a classification accuracy of 97.4% on a test data set. The same architecture was then tested on a four-class problem where we let the network classify sources into compact and three classes of extended sources, achieving a test accuracy of 93.5%. The best-performing convolutional neural network setup has been verified against RGZ Data Release 1 where a final test accuracy of 94.8% was obtained, using both original and augmented images. The use of sigma clipping does not offer a significant benefit overall, except in cases with a small number of training images.

  7. Radio source orientation and the angular diameter-redshift relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuora, L. I.

    1991-08-01

    The effect of a nonrandom source orientation on the angular diameter-redshift relation was considered for the 3CR sample of Laing et al., based on the 'unified' scheme of Barthel. For an inhomogeneous sample of objects displaying milliarcsecond scale structure, it was found that there was no evidence for a systematic variation for orientation angle with redshift. However, if it was assumed that quasars are closer to the line of sight than powerful extended radio galaxies, then the observed angular size-redshift relation could be interpreted in terms of source orientation, rather than linear size evolution.

  8. Sub-seasonal temperature variability in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere observed with GPS radio occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherllin-Pirscher, Barbara; Randel, William J.; Kim, Joowan

    2017-04-01

    We investigate sub-seasonal temperature variability in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS) region using daily gridded fields of GPS radio occultation measurements. The unprecedented vertical resolution (from about 100 m in the troposphere to about 1.5 km in the stratosphere) and high accuracy and precision (0.7 K to 1 K between 8 km and 25 km) make these data ideal for characterizing temperature oscillations with short vertical wavelengths. Long-term behavior of sub-seasonal temperature variability is investigated using the entire RO record from January 2002 to December 2014 (13 years of data). Transient sub-seasonal waves including eastward-propagating Kelvin waves (isolated with space-time spectral analysis) dominate large-scale zonal temperature variability in the tropical tropopause region and in the lower stratosphere. Above 20 km, Kelvin waves are strongly modulated by the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO). Enhanced wave activity can be found during the westerly shear phase of the QBO. In the tropical tropopause region, however, sub-seasonal waves are highly transient in time. Several peaks of Kelvin-wave activity coincide with short-term fluctuations in tropospheric deep convection, but other episodes are not evidently related. Also, there are no obvious relationships with zonal winds or stability fields near the tropical tropopause. Further investigations of convective forcing and atmospheric background conditions along the waves' trajectories are needed to better understand sub-seasonal temperature variability near the tropopause. For more details, see Scherllin-Pirscher, B., Randel, W. J., and Kim, J.: Tropical temperature variability and Kelvin-wave activity in the UTLS from GPS RO measurements, Atmos. Chem. Phys., 17, 793-806, doi:10.5194/acp-17-793-2017, 2017. http://www.atmos-chem-phys.net/17/793/2017/acp-17-793-2017.html

  9. Turblence-related morphology in extragalactic radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benford, G.; Ferrari, A.; Trussoni, E.

    1980-01-01

    As particle beams propagate through the intergalactic medium, unavoidable instabilities from shear flows produce turbulent magnetic waves. Rather than disrupting beams, this wave energy may enhance luminosity and alter morphology. For reasonable parameters the dominant nonlinear process is an energy cascade from long wavelengths ( 21 cm) to short wavelengths ( 14 cm), where particles are reaccelerated in quasi-linear fachion. We construct a phenomenological turbulence theory to describe this. In an ambient magnetic field, wave-particle scatterings which cause reacceleration can also lead to spatial cross-field diffusion, broadening the beam. Thus beams can flare rapidly as they propagate. This relates luminosity to morphology in a new way. The broadening is wholly intrinsic, unrelated to the beam environment. A variety of radio source types may be related to his effect. Protons do not scatter strongly, remaining collimated and depositing most of the beam energy in hot spots, which are generally weak in the radio but strong in the X-ray

  10. Compact radio sources as a plasma turbulent reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atoyan, A.M.; Nagapetyan, A.

    1987-01-01

    The electromagnetic raiation spectra of a homogeneous cosmic radio source (CRS) wherein the relativistic electron acceleration on the langmuir waves leads to the formation of Maxwell-like spectra with characteristic value of the Lorentz-factor γ 0 ∼ 10 3 are considered. It has been shown that due to synchrotron radiation of relativistic electrons, usually observed from CRSs flat radiosepctra, gradually steepening at submillimeter wavelengths are naturally formed in the optically thin range of frequencies. The electromagnetic radiation at the scattering of the electron on the turbulence produces significant nonthermal infrared radiation. Inverse compton scattering of the relativistic electrons on the radio-infrared photons leads the production of X-rays. The characteristic of the electromagnetic radiation spectra obtained in the model are compared with the observational ones

  11. RESOLUTION OF THE COMPACT RADIO CONTINUUM SOURCES IN Arp220

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batejat, Fabien; Conway, John E.; Hurley, Rossa; Parra, Rodrigo; Diamond, Philip J.; Lonsdale, Colin J.; Lonsdale, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    We present 2 cm and 3.6 cm wavelength very long baseline interferometry images of the compact radio continuum sources in the nearby ultra-luminous infrared galaxy Arp220. Based on their radio spectra and variability properties, we confirm these sources to be a mixture of supernovae (SNe) and supernova remnants (SNRs). Of the 17 detected sources we resolve 7 at both wavelengths. The SNe generally only have upper size limits. In contrast all the SNRs are resolved with diameters ≥0.27 pc. This size limit is consistent with them having just entered their Sedov phase while embedded in an interstellar medium (ISM) of density 10 4 cm -3 . These objects lie on the diameter-luminosity correlation for SNRs (and so also on the diameter-surface brightness relation) and extend these correlations to very small sources. The data are consistent with the relation L∝D -9/4 . Revised equipartition arguments adjusted to a magnetic field to a relativistic particle energy density ratio of 1% combined with a reasonable synchrotron-emitting volume filling factor of 10% give estimated magnetic field strengths in the SNR shells of ∼15-50 mG. The SNR shell magnetic fields are unlikely to come from compression of ambient ISM fields and must instead be internally generated. We set an upper limit of 7 mG for the ISM magnetic field. The estimated energy in relativistic particles, 2%-20% of the explosion kinetic energy, is consistent with estimates from models that fit the IR-radio correlation in compact starburst galaxies.

  12. Analysis of the GPS Observations of the Site Survey at Sheshan 25-m Radio Telescope in August 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Cheng, Z. Y.; Li, J. L.

    2010-01-01

    The processing of the GPS observations of the site survey at Sheshan 25-m radio telescope in August 2008 is reported. Because each session in this survey is only about six hours, not allowing the subdaily high frequency variations in the station coordinates to be reasonably smoothed, and because there are serious cycle slips in the observations and a large volume of data would be rejected during the software automatic adjustment of slips, the ordinary solution settings of GAMIT needed to be adjusted by loosening the constraints in the a priori coordinates to 10 m, adopting the "quick" mode in the solution iteration, and combining Cview manual operation with GAMIT automatic fixing of cycle slips. The resulting coordinates of the local control polygon in ITRF2005 are then compared with conventional geodetic results. Due to large rotations and translations in the two sets of coordinates (geocentric versus quasi-topocentric), the seven transformation parameters cannot be solved for directly. With various trial solutions it is shown that with a partial pre-removal of the large parameters, high precision transformation parameters can be obtained with post-fit residuals at the millimeter level. This analysis is necessary to prepare the follow-on site and transformation survey of the VLBI and SLR telescopes at Sheshan

  13. Impact of land convection on temperature diurnal variation in the tropical lower stratosphere inferred from COSMIC GPS radio occultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Khaykin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Following recent studies evidencing the influence of deep convection on the chemical composition and thermal structure of the tropical lower stratosphere, we explore its impact on the temperature diurnal variation in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere using the high-resolution COSMIC GPS radio-occultation temperature measurements spanning from 2006 through 2011. The temperature in the lowermost stratosphere over land during summer displays a marked diurnal cycle characterized by an afternoon cooling. This diurnal cycle is shown collocated with most intense land convective areas observed by the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM precipitation radar and in phase with the maximum overshooting occurrence frequency in late afternoon. Two processes potentially responsible for that are identified: (i non-migrating tides, whose physical nature is internal gravity waves, and (ii local cross-tropopause mass transport of adiabatically cooled air by overshooting turrets. Although both processes can contribute, only the lofting of adiabatically cooled air is well captured by models, making it difficult to characterize the contribution of non-migrating tides. The impact of deep convection on the temperature diurnal cycle is found larger in the southern tropics, suggesting more vigorous convection over clean rain forest continents than desert areas and polluted continents in the northern tropics.

  14. Impact of CHAMP Radio Occultation Observations on Global Analysis and Forecasts in the Absence of AMSU Radiance Data (3.Application of GPS Data to Atmospheric Science)

    OpenAIRE

    X., ZOU; H., LIU; R.A., ANTHES; H., SHAO; J.C., CHANG; Y.-J., ZHU; Florida State University; Florida State University; University Corporation for Atmospheric Research; Florida State University; Chinese Culture University; National Centers for Environmental Prediction, Camp Springs

    2004-01-01

    Challenging Minisatellite Payload (CHAMP) radio occultation (RO) observations during a two-week period are assimilated into global analyses using the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) three-dimensional variational (3D-Var) system with a recently improved observation operator for assimilating GPS bending angle data. The NCEP 3D-Var system used in this research is suboptimal since Advanced Microwave Unit (AMSU) radiances are not included in our experiments. Analyses with and w...

  15. Radio News Source Preference by Residents of UYO Urban, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHARLES OBOT

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to broadcast news by audience members is part of human information processing.  Radio is believed to be a major source of news on many local and national issues for many people in many countries. But it was uncertain whether the assumption was tenable in Nigeria. Selectivity plays significant role in audience members’ exposure to broadcast news.  The study set out to investigate which radio station(s residents of Uyo residents tune to for news on important local and national issues. It also studied what factors influence their choice of radio station for news on socio-political crises in Nigeria. The findings showed that majority of the respondents prefer foreign radio stations – Voice of America (VOA and British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC for news on socio-political crises in Nigeria. The survey also revealed that media credibility exerted great influence on audience exposure to broadcast news and choice of broadcast medium for news. It is the submission of this work that the continuous presentation of one-sided point of view, whether in government-controlled media or privately-owned ones not only makes the audience hold their news content suspect but also makes such mass medium to rank low in terms of perceived credibility. One of the implications of that situation is that mass mobilization through such media would be difficult to achieve.  Consequently, it is the submission of this research that if broadcast media in Nigeria are to be reckoned trustworthy and reliable, diverse and balanced views on all issues in the news should always be presented.

  16. Interstellar scattering of the compact radio source 2005 + 403

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutel, R.L.; Lestrade, J.

    1990-01-01

    Analysis of Mk III VLBI visibility amplitudes of the compact radio source 2005 + 403 shows an excess at baselines greater than a few diffractive scale lengths compared with that expected from formulas using ensemble-averaged quantities and power-law turbulence with quasi-Kolmogorov spectral indices. The data are in good agreement with the 1989 analysis of Goodman and Narayan, who find that measured visibility amplitudes correspond to the average visibility regime, which differs significantly from the ensemble-averaged results for baselines much longer than one diffractive scale length. 20 refs

  17. Searching for Compact Radio Sources Associated with UCH ii Regions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masqué, Josep M.; Trinidad, Miguel A.; Rodríguez-Rico, Carlos A. [Departamento de Astronomía, Universidad de Guanajuato, Apdo. Postal 144, 36000 Guanajuato, México (Mexico); Rodríguez, Luis F.; Kurtz, Stan; Loinard, Laurent [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Morelia 58089, México (Mexico); Dzib, Sergio A. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)

    2017-02-10

    Ultra-compact (UC)H ii regions represent a very early stage of massive star formation. The structure and evolution of these regions are not yet fully understood. Interferometric observations showed in recent years that compact sources of uncertain nature are associated with some UCH ii regions. To examine this, we carried out VLA 1.3 cm observations in the A configuration of selected UCH ii regions in order to report additional cases of compact sources embedded in UCH ii regions. With these observations, we find 13 compact sources that are associated with 9 UCH ii regions. Although we cannot establish an unambiguous nature for the newly detected sources, we assess some of their observational properties. According to the results, we can distinguish between two types of compact sources. One type corresponds to sources that are probably deeply embedded in the dense ionized gas of the UCH ii region. These sources are photoevaporated by the exciting star of the region and will last for 10{sup 4}–10{sup 5} years. They may play a crucial role in the evolution of the UCH ii region as the photoevaporated material could replenish the expanding plasma and might provide a solution to the so-called lifetime problem of these regions. The second type of compact sources is not associated with the densest ionized gas of the region. A few of these sources appear resolved and may be photoevaporating objects such as those of the first type, but with significantly lower mass depletion rates. The remaining sources of this second type appear unresolved, and their properties are varied. We speculate on the similarity between the sources of the second type and those of the Orion population of radio sources.

  18. The 11 Year Solar Cycle Response of the Equatorial Ionization Anomaly Observed by GPS Radio Occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, King-Fai; Lin, Li-Ching; Bui, Xuan-Hien; Liang, Mao-Chang

    2018-01-01

    We have retrieved the latitudinal and vertical structures of the 11 year solar cycle modulation on ionospheric electron density using 14 years of satellite-based radio occultation measurements utilizing the Global Positioning System. The densities at the crests of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) in the subtropics near 300 km in 2003 and 2014 (high solar activity with solar 10.7 cm flux, F10.7 ≈ 140 solar flux unit (sfu)) were 3 times higher than that in 2009 (low solar activity F10.7 ≈ 70 sfu). The higher density is attributed to the elevated solar extreme ultraviolet and geomagnetic activity during high solar activity periods. The location of the EIA crests moved 50 km upward and 10° poleward, because of the enhanced E × B force. The EIA in the northern hemisphere was more pronounced than that in the southern hemisphere. This interhemispheric asymmetry is consistent with the effect of enhanced transequatorial neutral wind. The above observations were reproduced qualitatively by the two benchmark runs of the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Electrodynamics General Circulation Model. In addition, we have studied the impact of the 11 year solar cycle on the 27 day solar cycle response of the ionospheric electron density. Beside the expected modulation on the amplitude of the 27 day solar variation due to the 11 year solar cycle, we find that the altitude of the maximal 27 day solar response is unexpectedly 50 km higher than that of the 11 year solar response. This is the first time that a vertical dependence of the solar responses on different time scales is reported.

  19. Analysis of GPS radio occultation data from the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC and Metop/GRAS missions at CDAAC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Schreiner

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the noise level and mission-to-mission stability of Global Positioning System (GPS radio occultation (RO neutral atmospheric bending angle data at the UCAR COSMIC Data Analysis and Archive Center (CDAAC. Data are used from two independently developed RO instruments currently flying in orbit on the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3C and Metop/GRAS (GNSS Receiver for Atmospheric Sounding missions. The F3C 50 Hz RO data are post-processed with a single-difference excess atmospheric phase algorithm, and the Metop/GRAS 50 Hz closed loop and raw sampling (down-sampled from 1000 Hz to 50 Hz data are processed with a zero-difference algorithm. The standard deviations of the F3C and Metop/GRAS bending angles from climatology between 60 and 80 km altitude from June–December 2009 are approximately 1.78 and 1.13 μrad, respectively. The F3C standard deviation reduces significantly to 1.44 μrad when single-difference processing uses GPS satellites on the same side of the spacecraft. The higher noise level for F3C bending angles can be explained by additional noise from the reference link phase data that are required with single-difference processing. The F3C and Metop/GRAS mean bending angles differences relative to climatology during the same six month period are statistically significant and have values of −0.05 and −0.02 μrad, respectively. A comparison of ~13 500 collocated F3C and Metop/GRAS bending angle profiles over this six month period shows a similar mean difference of ~0.02 ± 0.02 μrad between 30 and 60 km impact heights that is marginally significant. The observed mean difference between the F3C and Metop/GRAS bending angles of ~0.02–0.03 μrad is quite small and illustrates the high degree of re-produceability and mission independence of the GPS RO data at high altitudes. Collocated bending angles between two F3C satellites from early in the mission differ on average by up to 0.5% near the surface due to systematically

  20. Comparisons of the tropospheric specific humidity from GPS radio occultations with ERA-Interim, NASA MERRA, and AIRS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergados, Panagiotis; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Ao, Chi O.; Verkhoglyadova, Olga; Iijima, Byron

    2018-03-01

    We construct a 9-year data record (2007-2015) of the tropospheric specific humidity using Global Positioning System radio occultation (GPS RO) observations from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC) mission. This record covers the ±40° latitude belt and includes estimates of the zonally averaged monthly mean specific humidity from 700 up to 400 hPa. It includes three major climate zones: (a) the deep tropics (±15°), (b) the trade winds belts (±15-30°), and (c) the subtropics (±30-40°). We find that the RO observations agree very well with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Re-Analysis Interim (ERA-Interim), the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA), and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) by capturing similar magnitudes and patterns of variability in the monthly zonal mean specific humidity and interannual anomaly over annual and interannual timescales. The JPL and UCAR specific humidity climatologies differ by less than 15 % (depending on location and pressure level), primarily due to differences in the retrieved refractivity. In the middle-to-upper troposphere, in all climate zones, JPL is the wettest of all data sets, AIRS is the driest of all data sets, and UCAR, ERA-Interim, and MERRA are in very good agreement, lying between the JPL and AIRS climatologies. In the lower-to-middle troposphere, we present a complex behavior of discrepancies, and we speculate that this might be due to convection and entrainment. Conclusively, the RO observations could potentially be used as a climate variable, but more thorough analysis is required to assess the structural uncertainty between centers and its origin.

  1. Comparisons of the tropospheric specific humidity from GPS radio occultations with ERA-Interim, NASA MERRA, and AIRS data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Vergados

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We construct a 9-year data record (2007–2015 of the tropospheric specific humidity using Global Positioning System radio occultation (GPS RO observations from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC mission. This record covers the ±40° latitude belt and includes estimates of the zonally averaged monthly mean specific humidity from 700 up to 400 hPa. It includes three major climate zones: (a the deep tropics (±15°, (b the trade winds belts (±15–30°, and (c the subtropics (±30–40°. We find that the RO observations agree very well with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts Re-Analysis Interim (ERA-Interim, the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA, and the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS by capturing similar magnitudes and patterns of variability in the monthly zonal mean specific humidity and interannual anomaly over annual and interannual timescales. The JPL and UCAR specific humidity climatologies differ by less than 15 % (depending on location and pressure level, primarily due to differences in the retrieved refractivity. In the middle-to-upper troposphere, in all climate zones, JPL is the wettest of all data sets, AIRS is the driest of all data sets, and UCAR, ERA-Interim, and MERRA are in very good agreement, lying between the JPL and AIRS climatologies. In the lower-to-middle troposphere, we present a complex behavior of discrepancies, and we speculate that this might be due to convection and entrainment. Conclusively, the RO observations could potentially be used as a climate variable, but more thorough analysis is required to assess the structural uncertainty between centers and its origin.

  2. Design and Implementation of Real-Time Software Radio for Anti-Interference GPS/WAAS Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per Enge

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive antenna array processing is widely known to provide significant anti-interference capabilities within a Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS receiver. A main challenge in the quest for such receiver architecture has always been the computational/processing requirements. Even more demanding would be to try and incorporate the flexibility of the Software-Defined Radio (SDR design philosophy in such an implementation. This paper documents a feasible approach to a real-time SDR implementation of a beam-steered GNSS receiver and validates its performance. This research implements a real-time software receiver on a widely-available x86-based multi-core microprocessor to process four-element antenna array data streams sampled with 16-bit resolution. The software receiver is capable of 12 channels all-in-view Controlled Reception Pattern Antenna (CRPA array processing capable of rejecting multiple interferers. Single Instruction Multiple Data (SIMD instructions assembly coding and multithreaded programming, the key to such an implementation to reduce computational complexity, are fully documented within the paper. In conventional antenna array systems, receivers use the geometry of antennas and cable lengths known in advance. The documented CRPA implementation is architected to operate without extensive set-up and pre-calibration and leverages Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP to provide adaptation in both the frequency and space domains. The validation component of the paper demonstrates that the developed software receiver operates in real time with live Global Positioning System (GPS and Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS L1 C/A code signal. Further, interference rejection capabilities of the implementation are also demonstrated using multiple synthetic interferers which are added to the live data stream.

  3. Do Unification Models Explain the X-ray Properties of Radio Sources?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilkes, Belinda J.; Kuraszkiewicz, J.; Haas, M.; Barthel, P.; Willner, S. P.; Leipski, C.; Worrall, D.; Birkinshaw, M.; Antonucci, R. R.; Ashby, M.; Chini, R.; Fazio, G. G.; Lawrence, C. R.; Ogle, P. M.; Schulz, B.

    Chandra observations of a complete, flux-limited sample of 38 high-redshift (1 radio selected (and so relatively unbiased in orientation), 3CRR radio sources (21 quasars, 17 narrow line radio galaxies, NLRGs) support Unification models and lead to estimates of the covering

  4. Infrared-faint radio sources in the SERVS deep fields. Pinpointing AGNs at high redshift

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maini, A.; Prandoni, I.; Norris, R. P.; Spitler, L. R.; Mignano, A.; Lacy, M.; Morganti, R.

    2016-01-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) represent an unexpected class of objects which are relatively bright at radio wavelength, but unusually faint at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. A recent and extensive campaign on the radio-brightest IFRSs (S1.4 GHz≳ 10 mJy) has provided evidence

  5. FR-type radio sources in COSMOS: relation of radio structure to size, accretion modes and large-scale environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardoulaki, Eleni; Faustino Jimenez Andrade, Eric; Delvecchio, Ivan; Karim, Alexander; Smolčić, Vernesa; Magnelli, Benjamin; Bertoldi, Frank; Schinnener, Eva; Sargent, Mark; Finoguenov, Alexis; VLA COSMOS Team

    2018-01-01

    The radio sources associated with active galactic nuclei (AGN) can exhibit a variety of radio structures, from simple to more complex, giving rise to a variety of classification schemes. The question which still remains open, given deeper surveys revealing new populations of radio sources, is whether this plethora of radio structures can be attributed to the physical properties of the host or to the environment. Here we present an analysis on the radio structure of radio-selected AGN from the VLA-COSMOS Large Project at 3 GHz (JVLA-COSMOS; Smolčić et al.) in relation to: 1) their linear projected size, 2) the Eddington ratio, and 3) the environment their hosts lie within. We classify these as FRI (jet-like) and FRII (lobe-like) based on the FR-type classification scheme, and compare them to a sample of jet-less radio AGN in JVLA-COSMOS. We measure their linear projected sizes using a semi-automatic machine learning technique. Their Eddington ratios are calculated from X-ray data available for COSMOS. As environmental probes we take the X-ray groups (hundreds kpc) and the density fields (~Mpc-scale) in COSMOS. We find that FRII radio sources are on average larger than FRIs, which agrees with literature. But contrary to past studies, we find no dichotomy in FR objects in JVLA-COSMOS given their Eddington ratios, as on average they exhibit similar values. Furthermore our results show that the large-scale environment does not explain the observed dichotomy in lobe- and jet-like FR-type objects as both types are found on similar environments, but it does affect the shape of the radio structure introducing bents for objects closer to the centre of an X-ray group.

  6. A compiled catalog of rotation measures of radio point sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jun; Han Jin-Lin

    2014-01-01

    We compiled a catalog of Faraday rotation measures (RMs) for 4553 extragalactic radio point sources published in literature. These RMs were derived from multi-frequency polarization observations. The RM data are compared to those in the NRAO VLA Sky Survey (NVSS) RM catalog. We reveal a systematic uncertainty of about 10.0 ± 1.5 rad m −2 in the NVSS RM catalog. The Galactic foreground RM is calculated through a weighted averaging method by using the compiled RM catalog together with the NVSS RM catalog, with careful consideration of uncertainties in the RM data. The data from the catalog and the interface for the Galactic foreground RM calculations are publicly available on the webpage: http://zmtt.bao.ac.cn/RM/. (research papers)

  7. Jets and beams in powerful extragalatic radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelletier, G.; Roland, J.; Asseo, E.

    1989-01-01

    The simplest, but the most constraining assumption for jet modeling powerfull extragalatic radio sources is to consider a single relativistic plasma with relativistic motion from short distances (few pc) to large distances (few 100 kpc) from the nucleus. We argue that it is worth introducing more ingredients in the model. Besides the interest in developing plasma physics motivated by these objects, there are two reasons for enriching the physics. First, the interpretation of hot spots as resulting from shocks with diffusive acceleration in a thermal classical plasma with a tenuous relativistic component is consistent with data and constrain the parameters. Second, the interpretation of relativistic motions on parsec scales as resulting from a core beam relaxing in a collimated wind is consistent with data and avoid several difficulties. (author). 14 refs

  8. Global distribution of vertical wavenumber spectra in the lower stratosphere observed using high-vertical-resolution temperature profiles from COSMIC GPS radio occultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noersomadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We retrieved temperature (T profiles with a high vertical resolution using the full spectrum inversion (FSI method from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO data from January 2007 to December 2009. We studied the characteristics of temperature perturbations in the stratosphere at 20–27 km altitude. This height range does not include a sharp jump in the background Brunt–Väisälä frequency squared (N2 near the tropopause, and it was reasonably stable regardless of season and latitude. We analyzed the vertical wavenumber spectra of gravity waves (GWs with vertical wavelengths ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 km, and we integrated the (total potential energy EpT. Another integration of the spectra from 0.5 to 1.75 km was defined as EpS for short vertical wavelength GWs, which was not studied with the conventional geometrical optics (GO retrievals. We also estimated the logarithmic spectral slope (p for the saturated portion of spectra with a linear regression fitting from 0.5 to 1.75 km.Latitude and time variations in the spectral parameters were investigated in two longitudinal regions: (a 90–150° E, where the topography was more complicated, and (b 170–230° E, which is dominated by oceans. We compared EpT, EpS, and p, with the mean zonal winds (U and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR. We also show a ratio of EpS to EpT and discuss the generation source of EpS. EpT and p clearly showed an annual cycle, with their maximum values in winter at 30–50° N in region (a, and 50–70° N in region (b, which was related to the topography. At 30–50° N in region (b, EpT and p exhibited some irregular variations in addition to an annual cycle. In the Southern Hemisphere, we also found an annual oscillation in EpT and p, but it showed a time lag of about 2 months relative to U. Characteristics of EpTand p in the tropical region seem to be related to

  9. Global distribution of vertical wavenumber spectra in the lower stratosphere observed using high-vertical-resolution temperature profiles from COSMIC GPS radio occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noersomadi; Tsuda, T.

    2016-02-01

    We retrieved temperature (T) profiles with a high vertical resolution using the full spectrum inversion (FSI) method from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO) data from January 2007 to December 2009. We studied the characteristics of temperature perturbations in the stratosphere at 20-27 km altitude. This height range does not include a sharp jump in the background Brunt-Väisälä frequency squared (N2) near the tropopause, and it was reasonably stable regardless of season and latitude. We analyzed the vertical wavenumber spectra of gravity waves (GWs) with vertical wavelengths ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 km, and we integrated the (total) potential energy EpT. Another integration of the spectra from 0.5 to 1.75 km was defined as EpS for short vertical wavelength GWs, which was not studied with the conventional geometrical optics (GO) retrievals. We also estimated the logarithmic spectral slope (p) for the saturated portion of spectra with a linear regression fitting from 0.5 to 1.75 km.Latitude and time variations in the spectral parameters were investigated in two longitudinal regions: (a) 90-150° E, where the topography was more complicated, and (b) 170-230° E, which is dominated by oceans. We compared EpT, EpS, and p, with the mean zonal winds (U) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). We also show a ratio of EpS to EpT and discuss the generation source of EpS. EpT and p clearly showed an annual cycle, with their maximum values in winter at 30-50° N in region (a), and 50-70° N in region (b), which was related to the topography. At 30-50° N in region (b), EpT and p exhibited some irregular variations in addition to an annual cycle. In the Southern Hemisphere, we also found an annual oscillation in EpT and p, but it showed a time lag of about 2 months relative to U. Characteristics of EpTand p in the tropical region seem to be related to convective activity. The ratio of EpT to the

  10. Fast radio burst source properties and curvature radiation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pawan; Lu, Wenbin; Bhattacharya, Mukul

    2017-07-01

    We use the observed properties of fast radio bursts (FRBs) and a number of general physical considerations to provide a broad-brush model for the physical properties of FRB sources and the radiation mechanism. We show that the magnetic field in the source region should be at least 1014 G. This strong field is required to ensure that the electrons have sufficiently high ground state Landau energy so that particle collisions, instabilities and strong electromagnetic fields associated with the FRB radiation do not perturb electrons' motion in the direction transverse to the magnetic field and destroy their coherent motion; coherence is required by the high observed brightness temperature of FRB radiation. The electric field in the source region required to sustain particle motion for a wave period is estimated to be of the order of 1011 esu. These requirements suggest that FRBs are produced near the surface of magnetars perhaps via forced reconnection of magnetic fields to produce episodic, repeated, outbursts. The beaming-corrected energy release in these bursts is estimated to be about 1036 erg, whereas the total energy in the magnetic field is at least ˜1045 erg. We provide a number of predictions for this model which can be tested by future observations. One of which is that short duration FRB-like bursts should exist at much higher frequencies, possibly up to optical.

  11. Determination of locational error associated with global positioning system (GPS) radio collars in relation to vegetation and topography in north-central New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, K.; Biggs, J.; Fresquez, P.R.

    1997-02-01

    In 1996, a study was initiated to assess seasonal habitat use and movement patterns of Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) using global positioning system (GPS) radio collars. As part of this study, the authors attempted to assess the accuracies of GPS (non-differentially corrected) positions under various vegetation canopies and terrain conditions with the use of a GPS ``test`` collar. The test collar was activated every twenty minutes to obtain a position location and continuously uplinked to Argos satellites to transfer position data files. They used a Telonics, Inc. uplink receiver to intercept the transmission and view the results of the collar in real time. They placed the collar on a stand equivalent to the neck height of an adult elk and then placed the stand within three different treatment categories: (1) topographical influence (canyon and mesa tops), (2) canopy influence (open and closed canopy), and (3) vegetation type influence (ponderosa pine and pinion pine-juniper). The collar was kept at each location for one hour (usually obtaining three fixes). In addition, the authors used a hand-held GPS to obtain a position of the test collar at the same time and location.

  12. Rapid Open Source GPS software development for modern embedded systems:using the GPSTk with the Gumstix

    OpenAIRE

    Salazar Hernández, Dagoberto José; Hernández Pajares, Manuel; Juan Zornoza, José Miguel; Sanz Subirana, Jaume

    2006-01-01

    This work shows how the combination of GPS Open Source Software (GOSS) and advanced full function miniature computers (FFMC) allows rapid development, implementation and testing of advanced embedded GNSS data processing applications in a flexible way. In this regard, our tools of choice are the “GPS Toolkit” (GPSTk), and a modern, high power embedded platform such as the “Gumstix” computer boards. Peer Reviewed

  13. New 20-cm radio-continuum study of the Small Magellanic Cloud, part II: Point sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong G.F.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a new catalogue of radio-continuum sources in the field of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC. This catalogue contains sources previously not found in 2370 MHz (λ=13 cm with sources found at 1400 MHz (λ=20 cm and 843 MHz (λ=36 cm. 45 sources have been detected at 13 cm, with 1560 sources at 20 cm created from new high sensitivity and resolution radio-continuum images of the SMC at 20 cm from paper I. We also created a 36 cm catalogue to which we listed 1689 radio-continuum sources.

  14. The peculiar radio source M17 JVLA 35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, L. F.; Carrasco-González, C. [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica UNAM, Apartado Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Montes, G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Tapia, M. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apdo. Postal 877, Ensenada, BC, CP 22830 (Mexico)

    2014-07-01

    M17 JVLA 35 is a radio source detected in projection against the M17 H II region. In recent observations, its spectrum between 4.96 and 8.46 GHz was found to be positive and very steep, with α ≥ 2.9 ± 0.6 (S {sub ν}∝ν{sup α}). Here we present Very Large Array observations made in the 18.5 to 36.5 GHz region that indicate a spectral turnover at ∼13 GHz and a negative spectral index (α ≅ –2.0) at higher frequencies. The spectrum is consistent with that of an extragalactic high frequency peaker (HFP). However, M17 JVLA 35 has an angular size of ∼0.''5 at 8.46 GHz, while HFPs have extremely compact, milliarcsecond dimensions. We discuss other possible models for the spectrum of the source and do not find them feasible. Finally, we propose that M17 JVLA 35 is indeed an HFP but that its angular size becomes broadened by plasma scattering as its radiation travels across M17. If our interpretation is correct, accurate measurements of the angular size of M17 JVLA 35 across the centimeter range should reveal the expected ν{sup –2} dependence.

  15. Climate intercomparison of GPS radio occultation, RS90/92 radiosondes and GRUAN from 2002 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ladstädter

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Observations from the GPS radio occultation (GPSRO satellite technique and from the newly established GCOS Reference Upper Air Network (GRUAN are both candidates to serve as reference observations in the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS. Such reference observations are key to decrease existing uncertainties in upper-air climate research. There are now more than 12 years of data available from GPSRO, with the recognized properties high accuracy, global coverage, high vertical resolution, and long-term stability. These properties make GPSRO a suitable choice for comparison studies with other upper-air observational systems. The GRUAN network consists of reference radiosonde ground stations (16 at present, which adhere to the GCOS climate monitoring principles. In this study, we intercompare GPSRO temperature and humidity profiles and Vaisala RS90/92 data from the "standard" global radiosonde network over the whole 2002 to 2013 time frame. Additionally, we include the first years of GRUAN data (using Vaisala RS92, available since 2009. GPSRO profiles which occur within 3 h and 300 km of radiosonde launches are used. Overall very good agreement is found between all three data sets with temperature differences usually less than 0.2 K. In the stratosphere above 30 hPa, temperature differences are larger but still within 0.5 K. Day/night comparisons with GRUAN data reveal small deviations likely related to a warm bias of the radiosonde data at high altitudes, but also residual errors from the GPSRO retrieval process might play a role. Vaisala RS90/92 specific humidity exhibits a dry bias of up to 40% in the upper troposphere, with a smaller bias at lower altitudes within 15%. GRUAN shows a marked improvement in the bias characteristics, with less than 5% difference to GPSRO, up to 300 hPa. GPSRO dry temperature and physical temperature are validated using radiosonde data as reference. We find that GPSRO provides valuable long-term stable reference

  16. On Asymmetries in Powerful Radio Sources and the Quasar/Galaxy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we quantitatively re-examine the implications of relativistic beaming and source orientation on the structural asymmetries of a heterogeneous sample of non-symmetric radio sources, consisting of radio galaxies and quasars, based on observed correlations between the fractional separation difference (x) and.

  17. The use of GPS radio-collars to track elephants (Loxodonta africana in the Tarangire National Park (Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Galanti

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The GPS (Global Positioning System telemetry was used in Tarangire National Park (Tanzania to study migration routes and the use of space by elephants (Loxodonta africana. Five female elephants were captured in November 1997 in five different areas of Tarangire National Park and fitted with GPS collars. The collar consists of a 6 channel Global Positioning System (GPS receiver, a radio-modem for data communication, a non volatile memory, and an independent VHF transmitter. The operator can «communicate» with the collar through a command unit connected to a PC. The GPS collar receives signals from different satellites which permits automatic calculation of its position, with an accuracy of 25 m. The data collected in the period November 1997 - April 1998 show that three female elephants mainly used the northern sector of the park, moving sometimes outside the protected area about 10 to 20 km NE of the park boundary. Also the two female elephants captured in the southern sector of the park moved outside, travelling about 80 km SE of the park boundary. Home range size varied between 159 and 660 km² for the northern elephants (n=3, and between 2104 and 3314 km² for the southern elephants (n=2. The elephants whose ranges extended outside the park exhibited their highest movement rate from 4 p.m. to 12 p.m., while those animals within the park had the highest movement rates during daylight hours (from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.. We discuss the advantages and shortcomings of GPS-telemetry as a means of gathering useful information on space use and movements of elephants for the development of long-term conservation strategies for large herbivores in the whole Tarangire area.

  18. Infrared point sources aligned with the SgrA(asterisk) non-thermal radio source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, W. A.; Forrest, W. J.

    1986-01-01

    Assembled 0.7-5.0 micron observational data for two point sources approximately aligned with the compact nonthermal radio source SgrA(asterisk) in the Galactic center, thus far interpreted as being from the same object on the basis of their position and spectral continuity, are presently given alternative interpretations. While the object must be a hot star surrounded by a circumstellar dust cloud if it is a foreground star, a Galactic center position calls for an unorthodox extinction curve which suggests that the IR emission may be the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of a hot star or star cluster, or perhaps a thermal accretion disk.

  19. NIR photometry of the Radio Source GB6 J0713+5738

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, L.; Lopez, A.; Recillas, E.; Porras, A.; Chavushyan, V.

    2018-02-01

    We report on NIR photometry of the radio source GB6J0713+5738, tentatively identified with the Gamma-ray source Fermi J0713+5739 (ATels #10149, #11056). On January 22nd, 2018, we observed a source coincident with the radio source coordinates, finding that on MJD2458140.8592, its fluxes corresponded to J = 16.448 +/- 0.07, H = 15.865 +/- 0.02 and Ks = 14.931 +/- 0.05.

  20. JVLA observations of IC 348 SW: Compact radio sources and their nature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Luis F.; Zapata, Luis A.; Palau, Aina, E-mail: l.rodriguez@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: l.zapata@crya.unam.mx, E-mail: a.palau@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico)

    2014-07-20

    We present sensitive 2.1 and 3.3 cm Jansky Very Large Array radio continuum observations of the region IC 348 SW. We detect a total of 10 compact radio sources in the region, 7 of which are first reported here. One of the sources is associated with the remarkable periodic time-variable infrared source LRLL 54361, opening the possibility of monitoring this object at radio wavelengths. Four of the sources appear to be powering outflows in the region, including HH 211 and HH 797. In the case of the rotating outflow HH 797, we detect a double radio source at its center, separated by ∼3''. Two of the sources are associated with infrared stars that possibly have gyrosynchrotron emission produced in active magnetospheres. Finally, three of the sources are interpreted as background objects.

  1. On the height estimation using various sources of the ground antenna GPS phase centre correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araszkiewicz, Andrzej; Podkowa, Anna

    2017-04-01

    In this study we compared two sources of PCCs of 25 antennas of the same type (LEIAR25.R3 LEIT) mounted at the stations belonging to EUREF Permanent Network. One PCCs came directly from individual calibration prepared by Geo++ GmbH company, second one is the IGS type mean model (igs08_1840.atx). The mean RMS of differences between these two phase centre corrections (dPCCs) is below 1 mm for both GPS frequencies. However, for some antenna models dPCCs exhibit an elevation-dependent or azimuthal asymmetrical patterns, which affect the final estimates. This carries a number of consequences, such as disagreement in position (mostly height) or even changes in values of positions discontinuities (shifts or steps) related to antenna replacements.

  2. Observations of a radio source in the nucleus of M81 with dimensions less than 1300 astronomical units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kellermann, K.I.; Shaffer, D.B.; Pauliny-Toth, I.I.K.; Preuss, E.; Witzel, A.

    1976-01-01

    Very long baseline interferometer observations of the nucleus of M81 show an unresolved radio source with linear dimensions < or approximately 1300 AU. This is the smallest extragalactic radio source whose size has been directly measured. Its luminosity is intermediate between that of the compact radio source at the galactic center and the luminosity of compact sources found in the centers of extended radio galaxies and quasars

  3. RADIO MONITORING OF THE PERIODICALLY VARIABLE IR SOURCE LRLL 54361: NO DIRECT CORRELATION BETWEEN THE RADIO AND IR EMISSIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forbrich, Jan, E-mail: jan.forbrich@univie.ac.at [University of Vienna, Department of Astrophysics, Türkenschanzstraße 17, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Rodríguez, Luis F.; Palau, Aina; Zapata, Luis A. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Muzerolle, James [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gutermuth, Robert A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    LRLL 54361 is an infrared source located in the star-forming region IC 348 SW. Remarkably, its infrared luminosity increases by a factor of 10 over roughly one week every 25.34 days. To understand the origin of these remarkable periodic variations, we obtained sensitive 3.3 cm JVLA radio continuum observations of LRLL 54361 and its surroundings in six different epochs: three of them during the IR-on state and three during the IR-off state. The radio source associated with LRLL 54361 remained steady and did not show a correlation with the IR variations. We suggest that the IR is tracing the results of fast (with a timescale of days) pulsed accretion from an unseen binary companion, while the radio traces an ionized outflow with an extent of ∼100 AU that smooths out the variability over a period of the order of a year. The average flux density measured in these 2014 observations, 27 ± 5 μJy, is about a factor of two less than that measured about 1.5 years before, 53 ± 11 μJy, suggesting that variability in the radio is present, but over larger timescales than in the IR. We discuss other sources in the field, in particular two infrared/X-ray stars that show rapidly varying gyrosynchrotron emission.

  4. Infrared-faint radio sources in the SERVS deep fields. Pinpointing AGNs at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, A.; Prandoni, I.; Norris, R. P.; Spitler, L. R.; Mignano, A.; Lacy, M.; Morganti, R.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) represent an unexpected class of objects which are relatively bright at radio wavelength, but unusually faint at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. A recent and extensive campaign on the radio-brightest IFRSs (S1.4 GHz≳ 10 mJy) has provided evidence that most of them (if not all) contain an active galactic nuclei (AGN). Still uncertain is the nature of the radio-faintest IFRSs (S1.4 GHz≲ 1 mJy). Aims: The scope of this paper is to assess the nature of the radio-faintest IFRSs, testing their classification and improving the knowledge of their IR properties by making use of the most sensitive IR survey available so far: the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). We also explore how the criteria of IFRSs can be fine-tuned to pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at very high redshift (z > 4). Methods: We analysed a number of IFRS samples identified in SERVS fields, including a new sample (21 sources) extracted from the Lockman Hole. 3.6 and 4.5 μm IR counterparts of the 64 sources located in the SERVS fields were searched for and, when detected, their IR properties were studied. Results: We compared the radio/IR properties of the IR-detected IFRSs with those expected for a number of known classes of objects. We found that IR-detected IFRSs are mostly consistent with a mixture of high-redshift (z ≳ 3) radio-loud AGNs. The faintest ones (S1.4 GHz 100 μJy), however, could be also associated with nearer (z 2) dust-enshrouded star-burst galaxies. We also argue that, while IFRSs with radio-to-IR ratios >500 can very efficiently pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at redshift 2 < z < 4, lower radio-to-IR ratios ( 100-200) are expected for higher redshift radio-loud AGNs.

  5. Planck early results. XV. Spectral energy distributions and radio continuum spectra of northern extragalactic radio sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aatrokoski, J.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lavonen, N.

    2011-01-01

    of development, shape the radio spectra as they move in the relativistic jet. The SEDs presented in this paper were fitted with second and third degree polynomials to estimate the frequencies of the synchrotron and inverse Compton (IC) peaks, and the spectral indices of low and high frequency radio data......, including the Planck ERCSC data, were calculated. SED modelling methods are discussed, with an emphasis on proper, physical modelling of the synchrotron bump using multiple components. Planck ERCSC data also suggest that the original accelerated electron energy spectrum could be much harder than commonly...

  6. Relativistic jets and the most powerful radio sources in the universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bridle, A.

    1987-01-01

    Relativistic jets, which are beams of particles and magnetic fields emitting synchrotron radiation that emanate from black holes at the centers of galaxies and quasars, have been one of the most exciting discoveries made at the Very Large Array (VLA) operated by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). The VLA is an array of 27 antennas, each 25 meters in diameter, distributed in a Y-formation with two branches 21 kilometers long and one branch 19 kilometers long. Astronomers can use it to study relativistic jets that generate intense natural radio sources (or transmitters). These sources, associated with regions hundreds of thousands of light years across, are the most powerful in the universe in energy output. In his lecture, Bridle describes how consecutive advances in imaging techniques for radio astronomy have uncovered the properties of the powerful radio sources, culminating in the discovery at the VLA that many of these sources contain radio emitting jets. He then describes some of the NRAO's research on these jets, and discusses the jets' physical properties. He concludes with an outlook for the future: the NRAO's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) is to be completed in the early 1990's. The VLBA is an array of ten radio telescopes distributed from Hawaii to St. Croix, from the Canadian border to Texas. With the VLBA, astronomers plan to look more deeply into these radio sources. 15 figs

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: HI in nearby radio sources (Maccagni+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Gereb, K.; Maddox, N.

    2017-10-01

    We expand the sample of radio sources presented in Gereb et al. (2014A&A...569A..35G, hereafter G14) and Gereb et al. (2015, Cat. J/A+A/575/A44, hereafter G15) to lower radio fluxes and radio powers. As in those studies, we selected the sources by cross-correlating the seventh data release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey catalogue (SDSS DR7; York et al. 2000AJ....120.1579Y) with the Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty-cm catalogue (FIRST; Becker et al. 1995ApJ...450..559B, See Cat. VIII/92). The sources lie above declination DE>10° and between 07h51m00s and 17h22m25s in right ascension. The sources are restricted to the redshift range 0.02file).

  8. EGRET Unidentified Source Radio Observations and Performance of Receiver Gain Calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niinuma, Kotaro; Asuma, Kuniyuki; Kuniyoshi, Masaya; Matsumura, Nobuo; Takefuji, Kazuhiro; Kida, Sumiko; Takeuchi, Akihiko; Ichikawa, Hajime; Sawano, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Naoya; Suzuki, Shigehiro; Nakamura, Ryosuke; Nakayama, Yu; Daishido, Tsuneaki

    2006-01-01

    Last year, we have developed the receiver gain calibration system by using Johnson-Nyquist noise, for accuracy flux measurement, because we have been starting radio identification program of transient radio sources, blazars and radio counterpart of The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) unidentified γ-ray sources in Waseda Nasu Pulsar Observatory. It is shown that there are a few low correlation data between receiver gain and ambient temperature around receiver for anything troubles of receiver, because we can detect gain and ambient temperature through a day by developed system. Estimated fluctuations of daily data of steady sources decrease by removing low correlation data before analysing. As the result of our analysis by using above system, radio counterpart of EGRET identified source showed fading light-curve for a week

  9. A statistical study of faint radio sources at 81.5 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffett-Smith, P.J.; Purvis, A.; Hewish, A.

    1980-01-01

    The method of interplanetary scintillations (IPS) together with the technique of background deflection analysis (P(D)) have been used to determine the mean angular size and the sky density of scintillating radio sources in the range 2 to 3 Jy at 81.5 MHz. It is found that the radio power from a high proportion of the sources in this range comes from one or two components of angular diameter about 0.7 arcsec. (author)

  10. (WAT) Radio Source Associated with the Galaxy PGC 1519010 NG

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-03-13

    Mar 13, 2009 ... 1984; Leahy 1984; O'Dea & Owen 1985; O'Donoghue et al. 1990). Since neither the bending of the radio plumes occurs universally, nor is the bending of jet essential for its flaring and plume formation, jet bending is currently regarded as a phenomenon independent from jet flaring (Hardcastle & Sakelliou ...

  11. Determination of plasma parameters in solar zebra radio sources

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karlický, Marian; Yasnov, L. V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 581, September (2015), A115/1-A115/6 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP209/12/0103 Grant - others:EC(XE) 606862 Program:FP7 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun * flares * radio radiation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.378, year: 2014

  12. (WAT) Radio Source Associated with the Galaxy PGC 1519010 NG ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-03-13

    Mar 13, 2009 ... The bending of the jet before and after its disruption forming the radio plume, are found to be correlated in this WAT, as seen from the contrasting morphological patterns on the two sides of the core. Probable constraints imposed by this on the models of WAT formation are pointed out. We also briefly report ...

  13. Characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the MU (Middle and Upper atmosphere) radar and GPS (Global Positioning System) radio occultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Toshitaka

    2014-01-01

    The wind velocity and temperature profiles observed in the middle atmosphere (altitude: 10-100 km) show perturbations resulting from superposition of various atmospheric waves, including atmospheric gravity waves. Atmospheric gravity waves are known to play an important role in determining the general circulation in the middle atmosphere by dynamical stresses caused by gravity wave breaking. In this paper, we summarize the characteristics of atmospheric gravity waves observed using the middle and upper atmosphere (MU) radar in Japan, as well as novel satellite data obtained from global positioning system radio occultation (GPS RO) measurements. In particular, we focus on the behavior of gravity waves in the mesosphere (50-90 km), where considerable gravity wave attenuation occurs. We also report on the global distribution of gravity wave activity in the stratosphere (10-50 km), highlighting various excitation mechanisms such as orographic effects, convection in the tropics, meteorological disturbances, the subtropical jet and the polar night jet.

  14. Superconducting cosmic string loops as sources for fast radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiao-Feng; Yu, Yun-Wei

    2018-01-01

    The cusp burst radiation of superconducting cosmic string (SCS) loops is thought to be a possible origin of observed fast radio bursts with the model-predicted radiation spectrum and the redshift- and energy-dependent event rate, we fit the observational redshift and energy distributions of 21 Parkes fast radio bursts and constrain the model parameters. It is found that the model can basically be consistent with the observations, if the current on the SCS loops has a present value of ˜1016μ179 /10 esu s-1 and evolves with redshift as an empirical power law ˜(1 +z )-1.3 , where μ17=μ /1017 g cm-1 is the string tension. This current evolution may provide a clue to probe the evolution of the cosmic magnetic fields and the gathering of the SCS loops to galaxy clusters.

  15. The faint radio source population at 15.7 GHz - II. Multi-wavelength properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittam, I. H.; Riley, J. M.; Green, D. A.; Jarvis, M. J.; Vaccari, M.

    2015-11-01

    A complete, flux density limited sample of 96 faint (>0.5 mJy) radio sources is selected from the 10C survey at 15.7 GHz in the Lockman Hole. We have matched this sample to a range of multi-wavelength catalogues, including Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey, Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic survey, United Kingdom Infrared Telescope Infrared Deep Sky Survey and optical data; multi-wavelength counterparts are found for 80 of the 96 sources and spectroscopic redshifts are available for 24 sources. Photometric redshifts are estimated for the sources with multi-wavelength data available; the median redshift of the sample is 0.91 with an interquartile range of 0.84. Radio-to-optical ratios show that at least 94 per cent of the sample are radio loud, indicating that the 10C sample is dominated by radio galaxies. This is in contrast to samples selected at lower frequencies, where radio-quiet AGN and star-forming galaxies are present in significant numbers at these flux density levels. All six radio-quiet sources have rising radio spectra, suggesting that they are dominated by AGN emission. These results confirm the conclusions of Paper I that the faint, flat-spectrum sources which are found to dominate the 10C sample below ˜1 mJy are the cores of radio galaxies. The properties of the 10C sample are compared to the Square Kilometre Array Design Studies Simulated Skies; a population of low-redshift star-forming galaxies predicted by the simulation is not found in the observed sample.

  16. Variability of GPS Radio Sources at 5 GHz Lang Cui , Xiang Liu ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-02-07

    Feb 7, 2010 ... The monthly flux monitoring on the sample was carried out since September 2008 and ended in November 2009, a total eleven epochs. The modulation index M, which is defined by M = σ/ ¯S × 100, where σ and ¯S are the standard deviation and mean flux density of the observation sequence, respectively, ...

  17. Using publicly available GPS solutions for fast estimations of first-order source details from coseismic deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Piersanti

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We here explore the potential use of publicly available GPS solutions to obtain first-order constraints on a source model immediately following an earthquake, within the limits of GPS solution timeliness and near-field coverage. We use GPS solutions from the Scripps Orbit and Permanent Array Center to carry out simple inversions of the coseismic displacement field induced by the 2010 Maule earthquake (Chile, by inferring the seismic moment and the rake angle of a fixed-geometry seismic source. The rake angle obtained from the inversion (m = 117.8˚ is consistent with seismological estimates. The seismic moment, which corresponds to a moment magnitude MW = 8.9, is about 1.6 times greater than seismological estimates. This suggests that as in other recent megathrust events, a consistent fraction of the energy was released aseismically. In this respect, the additional information obtained from GPS can help to provide a better estimate of the weight of the aseismic contribution to the energy release.

  18. Superconducting cosmic strings as sources of cosmological fast radio bursts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Jiani [University of Science and Technology of China, CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, Hefei, Anhui (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Shanghai (China); Stony Brook University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook, NY (United States); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Wang, Kai; Cai, Yi-Fu [University of Science and Technology of China, CAS Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, Hefei, Anhui (China); University of Science and Technology of China, School of Astronomy and Space Science, Hefei, Anhui (China)

    2017-11-15

    In this paper we calculate the radio burst signals from three kinds of structures of superconducting cosmic strings. By taking into account the observational factors including scattering and relativistic effects, we derive the event rate of radio bursts as a function of redshift with the theoretical parameters Gμ and I of superconducting strings. Our analyses show that cusps and kinks may have noticeable contributions to the event rate and in most cases cusps would dominate the contribution, while the kink-kink collisions tend to have secondary effects. By fitting theoretical predictions with the normalized data of fast radio bursts, we for the first time constrain the parameter space of superconducting strings and report that the parameter space of Gμ ∝ [10{sup -14}, 10{sup -12}] and I ∝ [10{sup -1}, 10{sup 2}] GeV fit the observation well although the statistic significance is low due to the lack of observational data. Moreover, we derive two types of best fittings, with one being dominated by cusps with a redshift z = 1.3, and the other dominated by kinks at the range of the maximal event rate. (orig.)

  19. Richness of compact radio sources in NGC 6334D to F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, S.-N. X.; Dzib, S. A.; Tapia, M.; Rodríguez, L. F.; Loinard, L.

    2018-02-01

    Context. The presence and properties of compact radio sources embedded in massive star forming regions can reveal important physical properties about these regions and the processes occurring within them. The NGC 6334 complex, a massive star forming region, has been studied extensively. Nevertheless, none of these studies has focused in its content in compact radio sources. Aims: Our goal here is to report on a systematic census of the compact radio sources toward NGC 6334, and their characteristics. This will be used to attempt to define their very nature. Methods: We used the VLA C band (4-8 GHz) archive data with 0.̋36 (500 AU) of spatial resolution and noise level of 50 μJy bm‑1 to carry out a systematic search for compact radio sources within NGC 6334. We also searched for infrared counterparts to provide some constraints on the nature of the detected radio sources. Results: A total of 83 compact sources and three slightly resolved sources were detected. Most of them are here reported for the first time. We found that 29 of these 86 sources have infrared counterparts and three are highly variable. Region D contains 18 of these sources. The compact source toward the center, in projection, of region E is also detected. Conclusions: From statistical analyses, we suggest that the 83 reported compact sources are real and most of them are related to NGC 6334 itself. A stellar nature for 27 of them is confirmed by their IR emission. Compared with Orion, region D suffers a deficit of compact radio sources. The infrared nebulosities around two of the slightly resolved sources are suggested to be warm dust, and we argue that the associated radio sources trace free-free emission from ionized material. We confirm the thermal radio emission of the compact source in region E. However, its detection at infrared wavelengths implies that it is located in the foreground of the molecular cloud. Finally, three strongly variable sources are suggested to be magnetically active

  20. OPEN-SOURCE DIGITAL ELEVATION MODEL (DEMs EVALUATION WITH GPS AND LiDAR DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. F. Khalid

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer-Global Digital Elevation Model (ASTER GDEM, Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM, and Global Multi-resolution Terrain Elevation Data 2010 (GMTED2010 are freely available Digital Elevation Model (DEM datasets for environmental modeling and studies. The quality of spatial resolution and vertical accuracy of the DEM data source has a great influence particularly on the accuracy specifically for inundation mapping. Most of the coastal inundation risk studies used the publicly available DEM to estimated the coastal inundation and associated damaged especially to human population based on the increment of sea level. In this study, the comparison between ground truth data from Global Positioning System (GPS observation and DEM is done to evaluate the accuracy of each DEM. The vertical accuracy of SRTM shows better result against ASTER and GMTED10 with an RMSE of 6.054 m. On top of the accuracy, the correlation of DEM is identified with the high determination of coefficient of 0.912 for SRTM. For coastal zone area, DEMs based on airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR dataset was used as ground truth data relating to terrain height. In this case, the LiDAR DEM is compared against the new SRTM DEM after applying the scale factor. From the findings, the accuracy of the new DEM model from SRTM can be improved by applying scale factor. The result clearly shows that the value of RMSE exhibit slightly different when it reached 0.503 m. Hence, this new model is the most suitable and meets the accuracy requirement for coastal inundation risk assessment using open source data. The suitability of these datasets for further analysis on coastal management studies is vital to assess the potentially vulnerable areas caused by coastal inundation.

  1. First `Winged' and `X'-shaped Radio Source Candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C.C.

    2007-01-22

    A small number of double-lobed radio galaxies (17 from our own census of the literature) show an additional pair of low surface brightness ''wings'', thus forming an overall ''X''-shaped appearance. The origin of the wings in these radio sources is unclear. They may be the result of back-flowing plasma from the currently active radio lobes into an asymmetric medium surrounding the active nucleus, which would make these ideal systems in which to study thermal/non-thermal plasma interactions in extragalactic radio sources. Another possibility is that the wings are the aging radio lobes left over after a (rapid) realignment of the central supermassive black-hole/accretion disk system due perhaps to a merger. Generally, these models are not well tested; with the small number of known examples, previous works focused on detailed case studies of selected sources with little attempt at a systematic study of a large sample. Using the VLA-FIRST survey database, we are compiling a large sample of winged and X-shaped radio sources for such studies. As a first step toward this goal, an initial sample of 100 new candidate objects of this type are presented in this paper. The search process is described, optical identifications from available literature data, and basic radio data are presented. From the limited resolution FIRST images ({approx} 5''), we can already confidently classify a sufficient number of these objects as having the characteristic wing lengths >80% of the active lobes to more than double the number of known X-shaped radio sources. We have also included as candidates, radio sources with shorter wings (<80% wing to lobe length ratios), or simply ''winged'' sources, as it is probable that projection effects are important. Finally, among the candidates are four quasars (z=0.37 to 0.84), and several have morphologies suggestive of Fanaroff-Riley type-I (low-power) radio galaxies. While followup

  2. Infrared Faint Radio Sources in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh T.

    2009-01-01

    Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRSs) are a class of radio objects found in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) which have no observable counterpart in the Spitzer Wide-area Infrared Extragalactic Survey (SWIRE). The extended Chandra Deep Field South now has even deeper Spitzer imaging (3.6 to 70 micron) from a number of Legacy surveys. We report the detections of two IFRS sources in IRAC images. The non-detection of two other IFRSs allows us to constrain the source type. Detailed modeling of the SED of these objects shows that they are consistent with high redshift AGN (z > 2).

  3. The Catalog of Positions of Optically Bright Extragalactic Radio Sources OBRS-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, L.

    2011-01-01

    It is expected that the European Space Agency mission Gaia will make it possible to determine coordinates in the optical domain of more than 500,000 quasars. In 2006, a radio astrometry project was launched with the overall goal of making comparisons between coordinate systems derived from future space-born astrometry instruments and the coordinate system constructed from analysis of global very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) more robust. Investigation of the rotation, zonal errors, and non-alignment of the radio and optical positions caused by both radio and optical structures is needed to validate both techniques. In order to support these studies, the densification of the list of compact extragalactic objects that are bright in both radio and optical ranges is desirable. A set of 105 objects from the list of 398 compact extragalactic radio sources with decl. > -10deg was observed with the Very Long Baseline Array and European VLBI Network (EVN) with the primary goal of producing images with milliarcsecond resolution. These sources are brighter than 18 mag in the V band, and they were previously detected by the EVN. In this paper, coordinates of observed sources have been derived with milliarcsecond accuracies from analysis of these VLBI observations using an absolute astrometry method. The catalog of positions for 105 target sources is presented. The accuracies of source coordinates are in the range of 0.3.7 mas, with a median of 1.1 mas.

  4. X-ray Properties and the Environment of Compact Radio Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemiginowska, Aneta; Sobolewska, Malgorzata; Guainazzi, Matteo; Hardcastle, Martin; Migliori, Giulia; Ostorero, Luisa; Stawarz, Lukasz

    2018-01-01

    Compact extragalactic radio sources provide important insights into the initial stages of radio source evolution and probe states of a black hole activity at the time of the formation of the relativistic outflow. Such outflows propagate out to hundreds kpc distances from the origin and impact environment on many scales, and thus influence evolution of structures in the universe. These compact sources show radio features typically observed in large-scale radio galaxies (jets, lobes, hot spots), but contained within the central 1 kpc region of the host galaxy. Compact Symmetric Objects (CSOs, a subclass of GigaHertz Peaked spectrum radio sources) are symmetric and not affected by beaming. Their linear radio size can be translated into a source age if one measures the expansion velocity of the radio structures. Such ages has been measured for a small sample of CSOs. Using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and XMM-Newton we observed a pilot samples of 16 CSOs in X-rays (6 for the first time). Our results show heterogeneous nature of the CSOs X-ray emission indicating a range of AGN luminosities and a complex environment. In particular, we identified four Compton Thick sources with a dense medium (equivalent column > 1e24 cm^-2) capable of disturbing/slowing down the jet and confining the jet to a small region. Thus for the first time we gain the observational evidence in X-ray domain in favor of the hypothesis that in a sub-population of CSOs the radio jets may be confined by the dense X-ray obscuring medium. As a consequence, the kinematic ages of these CSOs may be underestimated.. We discuss the implications of our results on the emission models of CSOs, the earliest stages of the radio source evolution, jet interactions with the ISM, diversity of the environments in which the jets expand, and jet-galaxy co-evolution.Partial support for this work was provided by the NASA grants GO1-12145X, GO4-15099X, NNX10AO60G, NNX17AC23G and XMM AO15 project 78461. This work supported

  5. OPTICAL SPECTRA OF CANDIDATE INTERNATIONAL CELESTIAL REFERENCE FRAME (ICRF) FLAT-SPECTRUM RADIO SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Titov, O.; Stanford, Laura M. [Geoscience Australia, P.O. Box 378, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia); Johnston, Helen M.; Hunstead, Richard W. [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Pursimo, T. [Nordic Optical Telescope, Nordic Optical Telescope Apartado 474E-38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma, Santa Cruz de Tenerife (Spain); Jauncey, David L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science, ATNF and Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Maslennikov, K. [Central Astronomical Observatory at Pulkovo, Pulkovskoye Shosse, 65/1, 196140, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Boldycheva, A., E-mail: oleg.titov@ga.gov.au [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, 26 Polytekhnicheskaya, St. Petersburg, 194021 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01

    Continuing our program of spectroscopic observations of International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) sources, we present redshifts for 120 quasars and radio galaxies. Data were obtained with five telescopes: the 3.58 m European Southern Observatory New Technology Telescope, the two 8.2 m Gemini telescopes, the 2.5 m Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT), and the 6.0 m Big Azimuthal Telescope of the Special Astrophysical Observatory in Russia. The targets were selected from the International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry candidate International Celestial Reference Catalog which forms part of an observational very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) program to strengthen the celestial reference frame. We obtained spectra of the potential optical counterparts of more than 150 compact flat-spectrum radio sources, and measured redshifts of 120 emission-line objects, together with 19 BL Lac objects. These identifications add significantly to the precise radio-optical frame tie to be undertaken by Gaia, due to be launched in 2013, and to the existing data available for analyzing source proper motions over the celestial sphere. We show that the distribution of redshifts for ICRF sources is consistent with the much larger sample drawn from Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty cm (FIRST) and Sloan Digital Sky Survey, implying that the ultra-compact VLBI sources are not distinguished from the overall radio-loud quasar population. In addition, we obtained NOT spectra for five radio sources from the FIRST and NRAO VLA Sky Survey catalogs, selected on the basis of their red colors, which yielded three quasars with z > 4.

  6. Flicker of extragalactic radio sources at two epochs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonetti, J.H.; Cordes, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The flicker of compact extragalactic sources on day-like time scales is investigated. At 1410 MHz the flat-spectrum sources show larger intensity variations than do the steep-spectrum sources. At 820 MHz measurement noise dominates the source variations, so that observations yield an upper limit to the flicker amplitude at this frequency. The flicker amplitude appears to be weakly dependent upon observing wavelength, possibly increasing with increasing wavelength. No dependence of the intensity or time scale of flicker on galactic coordinates is apparent in this data set, but the number of flat spectrum sources observed may be too small to show any such effects. Evidence is presented that flicker is approximately stable in its characteristics over time scales at least as large as 2 yr. 12 refs

  7. Automated detection of extended sources in radio maps: progress from the SCORPIO survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggi, S.; Ingallinera, A.; Leto, P.; Cavallaro, F.; Bufano, F.; Schillirò, F.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Buemi, C. S.; Norris, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    Automated source extraction and parametrization represents a crucial challenge for the next-generation radio interferometer surveys, such as those performed with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its precursors. In this paper, we present a new algorithm, called CAESAR (Compact And Extended Source Automated Recognition), to detect and parametrize extended sources in radio interferometric maps. It is based on a pre-filtering stage, allowing image denoising, compact source suppression and enhancement of diffuse emission, followed by an adaptive superpixel clustering stage for final source segmentation. A parametrization stage provides source flux information and a wide range of morphology estimators for post-processing analysis. We developed CAESAR in a modular software library, also including different methods for local background estimation and image filtering, along with alternative algorithms for both compact and diffuse source extraction. The method was applied to real radio continuum data collected at the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) within the SCORPIO project, a pathfinder of the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) survey at the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). The source reconstruction capabilities were studied over different test fields in the presence of compact sources, imaging artefacts and diffuse emission from the Galactic plane and compared with existing algorithms. When compared to a human-driven analysis, the designed algorithm was found capable of detecting known target sources and regions of diffuse emission, outperforming alternative approaches over the considered fields.

  8. A VLA SURVEY FOR FAINT COMPACT RADIO SOURCES IN THE ORION NEBULA CLUSTER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehan, Patrick D.; Eisner, Josh A. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N. Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Mann, Rita K. [National Research Council Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Williams, Jonathan P., E-mail: psheehan@email.arizona.edu [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2016-11-10

    We present Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array 1.3, 3.6, and 6 cm continuum maps of compact radio sources in the Orion Nebular Cluster (ONC). We mosaicked 34 arcmin{sup 2} at 1.3 cm, 70 arcmin{sup 2} at 3.6 cm and 109 arcmin{sup 2} at 6 cm, containing 778 near-infrared detected young stellar objects and 190 Hubble Space Telescope -identified proplyds (with significant overlap between those characterizations). We detected radio emission from 175 compact radio sources in the ONC, including 26 sources that were detected for the first time at these wavelengths. For each detected source, we fitted a simple free–free and dust emission model to characterize the radio emission. We extrapolate the free–free emission spectrum model for each source to ALMA bands to illustrate how these measurements could be used to correctly measure protoplanetary disk dust masses from submillimeter flux measurements. Finally, we compare the fluxes measured in this survey with previously measured fluxes for our targets, as well as four separate epochs of 1.3 cm data, to search for and quantify the variability of our sources.

  9. The asymmetries in radio-source structures. 1: A comparison of two classical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rys, S.

    1994-01-01

    A method is suggested for the mathematical description of the asymmetry occurring in the radio-source structures. The method is based on the transformation of the radio structure into 'itself' and may be used for all morphological types of structures. Two models of generation of the source asymmetry are investigated, namely Doppler effects and the flip-flop mechanism, with an assumption that the luminosity of the plasma volume depends on time as a power law S approximately tmu. The model with Doppler effects turns out to be more suitable than that with flip-flop mechanism.

  10. Millimeter-wave spectra and variability of bright, compact radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelson, R. A.

    1987-01-01

    Observations at 2.7 mm and at 1.5 cm were used to study the millimeter spectra and variability of 176 bright, compact radio sources. More than 20 percent of the flat-spectrum sources, but none of the steep-spectrum sources, were seen to vary at 1.5 cm by at least 30 percent over ten months. This is consistent with the hypothesis that flat-spectrum sources are compact and possibly beamed, while steep-spectrum sources are not. These data can also be used to choose sources for VLBI observations and for calibration of millimeter-wave observations.

  11. Toward Understanding the Fanaroff-Riley Dichotomy in Radio Source Morphology and Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Stefi A.; Zirbel, Esther L.; O'Dea, Christopher P.

    1995-09-01

    In Paper I we presented the results of a study of the interrelationships between host galaxy magnitude, optical line luminosity, and radio luminosity in a large sample of Fanaroff-Riley classes 1 and 2 (FR 1 and FR 2) radio galaxies. We report several important differences between the FR 1 and FR 2 radio galaxies. At the same host galaxy magnitude or radio luminosity, the FR 2's produce substantially more optical line emission (by roughly an order of magnitude or more) than do FR 1's. Similarly, FR 2 sources produce orders of magnitude more line luminosity than do radio-quiet galaxies of the same optical magnitude, while FR 1 sources and radio-quiet galaxies of the same optical magnitude produce similar line luminosities. Combining these results with previous results from the literature, we conclude that while the emission-line gas in the FR 2's is indeed photoionized by a nuclear UV continuum source from the AGN, the emission-line gas in the FR 1's may be energized predominantly by processes associated with the host galaxy itself. The apparent lack of a strong UV continuum source from the central engine in FR 1 sources can be understood in two different ways. In the first scenario, FR l's are much more efficient at covering jet bulk kinetic energy into radio luminosity than FR 2's, such that an FR 1 has a much lower bolometric AGN luminosity (hence nuclear UV continuum source) than does an FR 2 of the same radio luminosity. We discuss the pros and cons of this model and conclude that the efficiency differences needed between FR 2 and FR 1 radio galaxies are quite large and may lead to difficulties with the interpretation since it would suggest that FR 2 radio source deposit very large amounts of kinetic energy into the ISM Intracluster Medium. However, this interpretation remains viable. Alternatively, it may be that the AGNs in FR 1 sources simply produce far less radiant UV energy than do those in FR 2 sources. That is, FR 1 sources may funnel a higher fraction

  12. Astronomers Detect Powerful Bursting Radio Source Discovery Points to New Class of Astronomical Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    Astronomers at Sweet Briar College and the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) have detected a powerful new bursting radio source whose unique properties suggest the discovery of a new class of astronomical objects. The researchers have monitored the center of the Milky Way Galaxy for several years and reveal their findings in the March 3, 2005 edition of the journal, “Nature”. This radio image of the central region of the Milky Way Galaxy holds a new radio source, GCRT J1745-3009. The arrow points to an expanding ring of debris expelled by a supernova. CREDIT: N.E. Kassim et al., Naval Research Laboratory, NRAO/AUI/NSF Principal investigator, Dr. Scott Hyman, professor of physics at Sweet Briar College, said the discovery came after analyzing some additional observations from 2002 provided by researchers at Northwestern University. “"We hit the jackpot!” Hyman said referring to the observations. “An image of the Galactic center, made by collecting radio waves of about 1-meter in wavelength, revealed multiple bursts from the source during a seven-hour period from Sept. 30 to Oct. 1, 2002 — five bursts in fact, and repeating at remarkably constant intervals.” Hyman, four Sweet Briar students, and his NRL collaborators, Drs. Namir Kassim and Joseph Lazio, happened upon transient emission from two radio sources while studying the Galactic center in 1998. This prompted the team to propose an ongoing monitoring program using the National Science Foundation’s Very Large Array (VLA) radio telescope in New Mexico. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory, which operates the VLA, approved the program. The data collected, laid the groundwork for the detection of the new radio source. “Amazingly, even though the sky is known to be full of transient objects emitting at X- and gamma-ray wavelengths,” NRL astronomer Dr. Joseph Lazio pointed out, “very little has been done to look for radio bursts, which are often easier for astronomical objects to produce

  13. Faint Radio Sources in the NOAO Bootes Field. VLBA Imaging And Optical Identifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wrobel, J.M.; /NRAO, Socorro; Taylor, Greg B.; /NRAO, Socorro /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Rector, T.A.; /NRAO, Socorro /Alaska U.; Myers, S.T.; /NRAO, Socorro; Fassnacht, C.D.; /UC,

    2005-06-13

    As a step toward investigating the parsec-scale properties of faint extragalactic radio sources, the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) was used at 5.0 GHz to obtain phase-referenced images of 76 sources in the NOAO Booetes field. These 76 sources were selected from the FIRST catalog to have peak flux densities above 10 mJy at 5'' resolution and deconvolved major diameters of less than 3'' at 1.4 GHz. Fifty-five of these faint radio sources were identified with accretion-powered radio galaxies and quasars brighter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band. On VLA scales at 1.4 GHz, a measure of the compactness of the faint sources (the ratio of the peak flux density from FIRST to the integrated flux density from the NVSS catalog) spans the full range of possibilities arising from source-resolution effects. Thirty of the faint radio sources, or 39{sub -7}{sup +9}%, were detected with the VLBA at 5.0 GHz with peak flux densities above 6 {sigma} {approx} 2 mJy at 2 mas resolution. The VLBA detections occur through the full range of compactness ratios. The stronger VLBA detections can themselves serve as phase-reference calibrators, boding well for opening up much of the radio sky to VLBA imaging. For the adopted cosmology, the VLBA resolution corresponds to 17 pc or finer. Most VLBA detections are unresolved or slightly resolved but one is diffuse and five show either double or core-jet structures; the properties of these latter six are discussed in detail. Eight VLBA detections are unidentified and fainter than 25.5 mag in the optical I band; their properties are highlighted because they likely mark optically-obscured active nuclei at high redshift.

  14. Case study of inclined sporadic E layers in the Earth's ionosphere observed by CHAMP/GPS radio occultations: Coupling between the tilted plasma layers and internal waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubenko, Vladimir N.; Pavelyev, A. G.; Kirillovich, I. A.; Liou, Y.-A.

    2018-04-01

    We have used the radio occultation (RO) satellite data CHAMP/GPS (Challenging Minisatellite Payload/Global Positioning System) for studying the ionosphere of the Earth. A method for deriving the parameters of ionospheric structures is based upon an analysis of the RO signal variations in the phase path and intensity. This method allows one to estimate the spatial displacement of a plasma layer with respect to the ray perigee, and to determine the layer inclination and height correction values. In this paper, we focus on the case study of inclined sporadic E (Es) layers in the high-latitude ionosphere based on available CHAMP RO data. Assuming that the internal gravity waves (IGWs) with the phase-fronts parallel to the ionization layer surfaces are responsible for the tilt angles of sporadic plasma layers, we have developed a new technique for determining the parameters of IGWs linked with the inclined Es structures. A small-scale internal wave may be modulating initially horizontal Es layer in height and causing a direction of the plasma density gradient to be rotated and aligned with that of the wave propagation vector k. The results of determination of the intrinsic wave frequency and period, vertical and horizontal wavelengths, intrinsic vertical and horizontal phase speeds, and other characteristics of IGWs under study are presented and discussed.

  15. Kinematics and physical conditions of H I in nearby radio sources. The last survey of the old Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Geréb, K.; Maddox, N.

    2017-08-01

    We present an analysis of the properties of neutral hydrogen (H I) in 248 nearby (0.02 30 mJy and for which optical spectroscopy is available. The observations were carried out with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope as the last large project before the upgrade of the telescope with phased array feed receivers (Apertif). The sample covers almost four orders of magnitude in radio power from log P1.4 GHz = 22.5 W Hz-1 and 26.2 W Hz-1. We detect H I in absorption in 27% ± 5.5% of the objects. The detections are found over the full range of radio power. However, the distribution and kinematics of the absorbing H I gas appear to depend on radio power, the properties of the radio continuum emission, and the dust content of the sources. Among the sources where H I is detected, gas with kinematics deviating from regular rotation is more likely found as the radio power increases. In the great majority of these cases, the H I profile is asymmetric with a significant blue-shifted component. This is particularly common for sources with log P1.4 GHz > 24 W Hz-1, where the radio emission is small, possibly because these radio sources are young. The same is found for sources that are bright in the mid-infrared, I.e. sources rich in heated dust. In these sources, the H I is outflowing likely under the effect of the interaction with the radio emission. Conversely, in dust-poor galaxies, and in sources with extended radio emission, at all radio powers we only detect H I distributed in a rotating disk. Stacking experiments show that in sources for which we do not detect H I in absorption directly, the H I has a column density that is lower than 3.5 × 1017 (Tspin/cf) cm-2. We use our results to predict the number and type of H I absorption lines that will be detected by the upcoming surveys of the Square Kilometre Array precursors and pathfinders (Apertif, MeerKAT, and ASKAP).

  16. FIRST "WINGED" AND X-SHAPED RADIO SOURCE CANDIDATES. II. NEW REDSHIFTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cheung, C. C.; Healey, Stephen E.; Landt, Hermine; Kleijn, Gijs Verdoes; Jordan, Andres

    We report optical spectroscopic observations of X-shaped radio sources with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope and Multiple-Mirror Telescope, focused on the sample of candidates from the FIRST survey presented in a previous paper. A total of 27 redshifts were successfully obtained, 21 of which are new,

  17. RADIO-SOURCES IN A FIELD CENTERED ON BG 2107 + 49

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HIGGS, LA; VANDERWERF, PP

    In an effort to determine the nature of the peculiar radio source BG 2107 + 49, a field centered on this object (l = 91.1-degrees, b = 1.6-degrees) has been observed with the DRAO synthesis telescope at 408 MHz and 1420 MHz. The discussion of BG 2107 + 49 has been reported elsewhere; in this paper,

  18. An open source and flexible ACARS receiver based on software defined radio

    OpenAIRE

    Chamaillard, Baptiste; Lastera, Maxime; Roque, Damien

    2017-01-01

    In this demo, an aeronautical datalink is studied in the scope of a student project. Firstly, a theoretical model of the VHF ACARS transmission system is developed. Secondly, a software defined radio implementation of the former system is realized with GNURadio. Finally, a functional and flexible receiver is distributed to the open source community.

  19. The use of radio and television as sources of agricultural information ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study examined the use of radio and television as sources of agricultural information among poultry farmers in Egbeda Local Government area of Oyo State. Sixty farmers from 4 villages namely: Egbeda, Erunmu, Olode and Owobale were selected for this study. Primary data were collected from the respondents by ...

  20. Characterization of polarimetric and total intensity behaviour of a complete sample of PACO radio sources in the radio bands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzi, V.; Massardi, M.; Bonaldi, A.; Casasola, V.; Gregorini, L.; Trombetti, T.; Burigana, C.; Bonato, M.; De Zotti, G.; Ricci, R.; Stevens, J.; Ekers, R. D.; Bonavera, L.; di Serego Alighieri, S.; Liuzzo, E.; López-Caniego, M.; Paladino, R.; Toffolatti, L.; Tucci, M.; Callingham, J. R.

    2018-03-01

    We present high sensitivity (σP ≃ 0.6 mJy) polarimetric observations in seven bands, from 2.1 to 38 GHz, of a complete sample of 104 compact extragalactic radio sources brighter than 200 mJy at 20 GHz. Polarization measurements in six bands, in the range 5.5-38 GHz, for 53 of these objects were reported by Galluzzi et al. We have added new measurements in the same six bands for another 51 sources and measurements at 2.1 GHz for the full sample of 104 sources. Also, the previous measurements at 18, 24, 33, and 38 GHz were re-calibrated using the updated model for the flux density absolute calibrator, PKS1934-638, not available for the earlier analysis. The observations, carried out with the Australia Telescope Compact Array, achieved a 90 per cent detection rate (at 5σ) in polarization. 89 of our sources have a counterpart in the 72-231 MHz GLEAM (GaLactic and Extragalactic All-sky Murchison Widefield Array) survey, providing an unparalleled spectral coverage of 2.7 decades of frequency for these sources. While the total intensity data from 5.5 to 38 GHz could be interpreted in terms of single component emission, a joint analysis of more extended total intensity spectra presented here, and of the polarization spectra, reveals that over 90 per cent of our sources show clear indications of at least two emission components. We interpret this as an evidence of recurrent activity. Our high sensitivity polarimetry has allowed a 5σ detection of the weak circular polarization for ˜ 38 per cent of the data set, and a deeper estimate of 20 GHz polarization source counts than has been possible so far.

  1. The Discovery of a Hyperluminal Source in the Radio Afterglow of GRB 030329

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, Alvaro; Dado, Shlomo; Dar, Arnon

    2004-01-01

    Taylor, Frail, Berger and Kulkarni have made precise VLBI measurements of the size and position of the source of the radio afterglow of GRB 030329. They report a size evolution compatible with standard fireball models, proper motion limits inconsistent with the cannonball model, and a double source, i.e. "an additional compact component" on day 51 after the GRB, totally unexpected in the standard models. We outline a consistent interpretation of the ensemble of the data in the realm of the cannonball model. The observed double source is a radio image of the two cannonballs required in this model to explain the gamma-ray and optical light curves of this GRB; their separation agrees with the expectation. Thus interpreted, the observation of the two sources --separated by a "hyperluminal" distance-- is a major discovery in astrophysics: it pins down the origin of GRBs.

  2. FAINT RADIO-SOURCES WITH PEAKED SPECTRA .1. VLA OBSERVATIONS OF A NEW SAMPLE WITH INTERMEDIATE FLUX-DENSITIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SNELLEN, IAG; ZHANG, M; SCHILIZZI, RT; ROTTGERING, HJA; DEBRUYN, AG; MILEY, GK

    We present 2 and 20 cm observations with the VLA of 25 candidate peaked spectrum radio sources. These data combined with those from earlier surveys have allowed us to construct radio spectra spanning a range of frequency from 0.3 to 15 GHz. Ten of the 25 sources are found to be variable with no

  3. A radio optical reference frame. I. Precise radio source positions determined by Mark III VLBI - Observations from 1979 to 1988 and a tie to the FK5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, C.; Shaffer, D.B.; De Vegt, C.; Johnston, K.J.; Russell, J.L.

    1990-01-01

    Observations from 600 Mark III VLBI experiments from 1979 to 1988, resulting in 237,681 acceptable pairs of group delay and phase delay rate observations, have been used to derive positions of 182 extragalactic radio sources with typical formal standard errors less than 1 mas. The sources are distributed fairly evenly above delta = -30 deg, and 70 sources have delta greater than 0 deg. Analysis with different troposphere models, as well as internal and external comparisons, indicates that a coordinate frame defined by this set of radio sources should be reliable at the 1 mas level. The right ascension zero point of this reference frame has been aligned with the FK5 by using the optical positions of 28 extragalactic radio sources whose positions are on the FK5 system. Because of known defects in the knowledge of astronomical constants, daily nutation offsets in longitude and obliquity were determined relative to an arbitrary reference day in the set of experiments. 30 refs

  4. A radio/optical reference frame. 5: Additional source positions in the mid-latitude southern hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, J. L.; Reynolds, J. E.; Jauncey, D. L.; de Vegt, C.; Zacharias, N.; Ma, C.; Fey, A. L.; Johnston, K. J.; Hindsley, R.; Hughes, J. A.; Malin, D. F.; White, G. L.; Kawaguchi, N.; Takahashi, Y.

    1994-01-01

    We report new accurate radio position measurements for 30 sources, preliminary positions for two sources, improved radio postions for nine additional sources which had limited previous observations, and optical positions and optical-radio differences for six of the radio sources. The Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations are part of the continuing effort to establish a global radio reference frame of about 400 compact, flat spectrum sources, which are evenly distributed across the sky. The observations were made using Mark III data format in four separate sessions in 1988-89 with radio telescopes at Tidbinbilla, Australia, Kauai, USA, and Kashima, Japan. We observed a total of 54 sources, including ten calibrators and three which were undetected. The 32 new source positions bring the total number in the radio reference frame catalog to 319 (172 northern and 147 southern) and fill in the zone -25 deg greater than delta greater than -45 deg which, prior to this list, had the lowest source density. The VLBI positions have an average formal precision of less than 1 mas, although unknown radio structure effects of about 1-2 mas may be present. The six new optical postion measurements are part of the program to obtain positions of the optical counterparts of the radio reference frame source and to map accurately the optical on to the radio reference frames. The optical measurements were obtained from United States Naval Observatory (USNO) Black Birch astrograph plates and source plates from the AAT, and Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) 4 m, and the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Schmidt. The optical positions have an average precision of 0.07 sec, mostly due to the zero point error when adjusted to the FK5 optical frame using the IRS catalog. To date we have measured optical positions for 46 sources.

  5. Radio- Isotopic Neutron Sources for Industrial Applications and Basic Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, G.Y.; Hassan, M.F.; Ali, M.A.; Abd-EI-Wahab, M.

    2009-01-01

    A new irradiation facility has been designed, constructed and located at the Experimental Nuclear Physics Department, NRC, AEA, Cairo. The facility is based on an Am-Be Ca, n) source with activity of about 175 GBq results in a neutron yield of about 2.5* 106 nls. The geometrical arrangements of the facility consider the safety aspects and protection rules. This new irradiation facility uses fast and epi-thermal neutrons that can be used in basic research and industrial applications. The aim of the present work is to develop methods able to use fast and epi-thermal neutron activation analysis to estimate the hydrogen content in bulk samples through neutron reflection and transmission processes

  6. Optical spectroscopy of faint gigahertz peaked-spectrum sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellen, IAG; Schilizzi, RT; Miley, GK; de Bruyn, AG; Rottgering, HJA

    1999-01-01

    We present spectroscopic observations of a sample of faint gigahertz peaked-spectrum (GPS) radio sources drawn from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS), Redshifts have been determined for 19 (40 per cent) of the objects. The optical spectra of the GPS sources identified with low-redshift

  7. Sources of the Multi-Lane Type II Solar Radio Burst on 5 November 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, M. S.; Chen, Y.; Li, C. Y.; Zimovets, I.; Du, G. H.; Wang, B.; Feng, S. W.; Ma, S. L.

    2017-12-01

    We report the well-observed event of a multi-lane type II solar radio burst with a combined analysis of radio dynamic spectra and radio and extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) imaging data. The burst is associated with an EUV wave driven by a coronal mass ejection (CME) that is accompanied by a GOES X-ray M7.9 flare on 5 November 2014. This type of event is rarely observed with such a complete data set. The type II burst presents three episodes (referred to as A, B, and C), characterized by a sudden change in spectral drift, and contains more than ten branches, including both harmonic-fundamental (H-F) pairs and split bands. The sources of the three episodes present a general outward propagating trend. There exists a significant morphology change from single source (Episode A) to double source (Episode B). Episode C maintains the double-source morphology at 150 MHz (no imaging data are available at a lower frequency). The double-source centroids are separated by ˜300 ^'' to 500^''. The southeastern (SE) source is likely the continuation of the source of Episode A since both are at the same section of the shock ( i.e. the EUV wave) and close to each other. The northwestern (NW) source is coincident with (thus, possibly originates from) the interaction of the shock with a nearby mini-streamer-like structure. Comparing the simultaneously observed sources of the F and H branches of Episode A, we find that their centroids are separated by less than 200^' '. The centroids of the split bands of Episode B are cospatial within the observational uncertainties. This study shows the source evolution of a multi-lane type II burst and the source locations of different lanes relative to each other and to the EUV wave generated by a CME. The study indicates the intrinsic complexity underlying a type II dynamic spectrum.

  8. An extreme magneto-ionic environment associated with the fast radio burst source FRB 121102

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michilli, D.; Seymour, A.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Spitler, L. G.; Gajjar, V.; Archibald, A. M.; Bower, G. C.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.; Gourdji, K.; Heald, G. H.; Kaspi, V. M.; Law, C. J.; Sobey, C.; Adams, E. A. K.; Bassa, C. G.; Bogdanov, S.; Brinkman, C.; Demorest, P.; Fernandez, F.; Hellbourg, G.; Lazio, T. J. W.; Lynch, R. S.; Maddox, N.; Marcote, B.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Paragi, Z.; Ransom, S. M.; Scholz, P.; Siemion, A. P. V.; Tendulkar, S. P.; van Rooy, P.; Wharton, R. S.; Whitlow, D.

    2018-01-01

    Fast radio bursts are millisecond-duration, extragalactic radio flashes of unknown physical origin. The only known repeating fast radio burst source—FRB 121102—has been localized to a star-forming region in a dwarf galaxy at redshift 0.193 and is spatially coincident with a compact, persistent radio source. The origin of the bursts, the nature of the persistent source and the properties of the local environment are still unclear. Here we report observations of FRB 121102 that show almost 100 per cent linearly polarized emission at a very high and variable Faraday rotation measure in the source frame (varying from +1.46 × 105 radians per square metre to +1.33 × 105 radians per square metre at epochs separated by seven months) and narrow (below 30 microseconds) temporal structure. The large and variable rotation measure demonstrates that FRB 121102 is in an extreme and dynamic magneto-ionic environment, and the short durations of the bursts suggest a neutron star origin. Such large rotation measures have hitherto been observed only in the vicinities of massive black holes (larger than about 10,000 solar masses). Indeed, the properties of the persistent radio source are compatible with those of a low-luminosity, accreting massive black hole. The bursts may therefore come from a neutron star in such an environment or could be explained by other models, such as a highly magnetized wind nebula or supernova remnant surrounding a young neutron star.

  9. Planck early results. XIII. Statistical properties of extragalactic radio sources in the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, A.; Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.

    2011-01-01

    The data reported in Planck's Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) are exploited to measure the number counts (dN/dS) of extragalactic radio sources at 30, 44, 70, 100, 143 and 217 GHz. Due to the full-sky nature of the catalogue, this measurement extends to the rarest and brightest...... and ACT surveys over small fractions of the sky. An analysis of source spectra, exploiting Planck's uniquely broad spectral coverage, finds clear evidence of a steepening of the mean spectral index above about 70 GHz. This implies that, at these frequencies, the contamination of the CMB power spectrum...

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Infrared-faint radio sources catalog (Collier+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, J. D.; Banfield, J. K.; Norris, R. P.; Schnitzeler, D. H. F. M.; Kimball, A. E.; Filipovic, M. D.; Jarrett, T. H.; Lonsdale, C. J.; Tothill, N. F. H.

    2014-11-01

    The 20cm radio data come from the Unified Radio Catalog (URC) compiled by Kimball & Ivezic (2008AJ....136..684K). This radio catalogue combines data from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) VLA Sky Survey (NVSS; Condon et al., 1998, Cat. VIII/65), Faint Images of the Radio Sky at Twenty Centimeters (FIRST; Becker, White & Helfand, 1995, cat. VIII/92), Green Bank 6cm survey (GB6; Gregory et al., 1996, Cat. VIII/40), the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS; Rengelink et al. 1997; de Bruyn et al. 2000, Cat. VIII/62) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 6 (SDSS DR6; Adelman-McCarthy et al., 2008, Cat. II/282). We use updated NVSS and FIRST data from the URC version 2.0 (Kimball & Ivezic, in preparation), which includes a number of new sources as well as updated positions and flux densities. The IR data come from WISE (Wright et al. (WISE Team) 2009, Cat. II/311), which is an all-sky survey centred at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22um (referred to as bands W1, W2, W3 and W4), with respective angular resolutions of 6.1, 6.4, 6.5 and 12.0-arcsec (full width at half-maximum, FWHM), and typical 5σ sensitivity levels of 0.08, 0.11, 1 and 6mJy, with sensitivity increasing towards the ecliptic poles. (1 data file).

  11. INVESTIGATING PARTICLE ACCELERATION IN PROTOSTELLAR JETS: THE TRIPLE RADIO CONTINUUM SOURCE IN SERPENS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez-Kamenetzky, Adriana; Valotto, Carlos [Instituto de Astronomía Teórica y Experimental, (IATE-UNC), X5000BGR Córdoba (Argentina); Carrasco-González, Carlos; Rodríguez, Luis F. [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica (IRyA-UNAM), 58089 Morelia, México (Mexico); Araudo, Anabella [University of Oxford, Astrophysics, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Torrelles, José M. [Institut de Ciències de l’Espai (CSIC-IEEC) and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos (UB-IEEC), Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain); Anglada, Guillem [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, CSIC, Camino Bajo de Huétor 50, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Martí, Josep [Dept. de Física, EPS de Jaén, Universidad de Jaén, Campus Las Lagunillas s/n, A3-402, E-23071 Jaén (Spain)

    2016-02-10

    While most protostellar jets present free–free emission at radio wavelengths, synchrotron emission has also been proposed to be present in a handful of these objects. The presence of nonthermal emission has been inferred by negative spectral indices at centimeter wavelengths. In one case (the HH 80-81 jet arising from a massive protostar), its synchrotron nature was confirmed by the detection of linearly polarized radio emission. One of the main consequences of these results is that synchrotron emission implies the presence of relativistic particles among the nonrelativistic material of these jets. Therefore, an acceleration mechanism should be taking place. The most probable scenario is that particles are accelerated when the jets strongly impact against the dense envelope surrounding the protostar. Here we present an analysis of radio observations obtained with the Very Large Array of the triple radio source in the Serpens star-forming region. This object is known to be a radio jet arising from an intermediate-mass protostar. It is also one of the first protostellar jets where the presence of nonthermal emission was proposed. We analyze the dynamics of the jet and the nature of the emission and discuss these issues in the context of the physical parameters of the jet and the particle acceleration phenomenon.

  12. New 6 and 3-cm radio-continuum maps of the Small Magellanic Cloud - part II: Point source catalogue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong G.F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present two new catalogues of radio-continuum sources in the field of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC. These catalogues contain sources found at 4800 MHz (λ=6cm and 8640 MHz (λ=3cm. Some 457 sources have been detected at 3cm with 601 sources at 6cm created from new high-sensitivity and resolution radio-continuum images of the SMC from Crawford et al. (2011.

  13. Distorted structure in the small high-redshift radio source 4C 29.50

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lonsdale, C.J.; Barthel, P.D.; Leiden Rijksuniversiteit, Sterrewacht, Netherlands)

    1986-01-01

    The powerful radio source 4C 29.50, which is identified with a quasar at redshift 1.927, has been mapped with a variety of instruments, frequencies, and resolutions. The highest resolution is 30 mas, corresponding to about 150 pc at this redshift. The projected overall dimensions of the radio source are subgalactic, and the structure is very distorted. There are apparent sudden deflections of a jet emerging from the quasar core, and it is proposed that these are due to interaction with a dense, clumpy interstellar eenvironment. The great power of the source and the small scales on which the deflections occur yield constraints on the properties of this environment. 31 references

  14. Evolution in linear sizes and the Faraday effects in radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anene, G.; Ugwoke, A.C.

    2001-05-01

    It is still a matter of conjecture whether the observed depolarization in radio sources originate from an external Faraday screen lying in our line of sight, or is largely due to internal processes occurring within these sources. This paper argues for an external origin. By applying recent evidences from the evolution of linear sizes while allowing for selection effects, it is shown that the density parameters within radio sources do not depend on redshift, implying that the observed depolarizations is epoch independent and may therefore, be largely external in origin. We also show that the observed low correlation between λ 1/2 and linear size(D) cannot be improved much even when allowance is made for evolution in D. (author)

  15. An intercomparison of stratospheric gravity wave potential energy densities from METOP GPS radio occultation measurements and ECMWF model data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, Markus; Dörnbrack, Andreas; Kaifler, Bernd

    2018-02-01

    Temperature profiles based on radio occultation (RO) measurements with the operational European METOP satellites are used to derive monthly mean global distributions of stratospheric (20-40 km) gravity wave (GW) potential energy densities (EP) for the period July 2014-December 2016. In order to test whether the sampling and data quality of this data set is sufficient for scientific analysis, we investigate to what degree the METOP observations agree quantitatively with ECMWF operational analysis (IFS data) and reanalysis (ERA-Interim) data. A systematic comparison between corresponding monthly mean temperature fields determined for a latitude-longitude-altitude grid of 5° by 10° by 1 km is carried out. This yields very low systematic differences between RO and model data below 30 km (i.e., median temperature differences is between -0.2 and +0.3 K), which increases with height to yield median differences of +1.0 K at 34 km and +2.2 K at 40 km. Comparing EP values for three selected locations at which also ground-based lidar measurements are available yields excellent agreement between RO and IFS data below 35 km. ERA-Interim underestimates EP under conditions of strong local mountain wave forcing over northern Scandinavia which is apparently not resolved by the model. Above 35 km, RO values are consistently much larger than model values, which is likely caused by the model sponge layer, which damps small-scale fluctuations above ˜ 32 km altitude. Another reason is the well-known significant increase of noise in RO measurements above 35 km. The comparison between RO and lidar data reveals very good qualitative agreement in terms of the seasonal variation of EP, but RO values are consistently smaller than lidar values by about a factor of 2. This discrepancy is likely caused by the very different sampling characteristics of RO and lidar observations. Direct comparison of the global data set of RO and model EP fields shows large correlation coefficients (0

  16. The REX survey a search for Radio Emitting X-ray sources

    CERN Document Server

    Caccianiga, A; Wolter, A; Ceca, R D; Gioia, I M

    1999-01-01

    We present the scientific goals, the strategy and the first results of the REX project, an effort aimed at creating a sizable and statistically complete sample of Radio Emitting X-ray sources (REX) using the available data from a VLA survey and the ROSAT PSPC archive. Through a positional cross-correlation of the two data sets we have derived a sample of about 1600 REX. Among the 393 REX identified so far a high fraction is represented by AGNs, typically radio loud QSOs and BL Lacs. The remaining sources are galaxies, typically radio galaxies isolated or in cluster. Thanks to the low flux limits in the radio and in the X-ray band and the large area of sky covered by the survey, we intend to derive a new complete and unbiased sample of BL Lacs which will contain both ``RBL'' and ``XBL'' type objects. In this way, the apparent dichotomy resulting from the current samples of BL Lacs will be directly analyzed in a unique sample. Moreover, the high number of BL Lacs expected in the REX sample (about 200) will allo...

  17. Building Models for Extended Radio Sources: Implications for Epoch of Reionisation Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trott, Cathryn M.; Wayth, Randall B.

    2017-11-01

    We test the hypothesis that limitations in the sky model used to calibrate an interferometric radio telescope, where the model contains extended radio sources, will generate bias in the Epoch of Reionisation power spectrum. The information contained in a calibration model about the spatial and spectral structure of an extended source is incomplete because a radio telescope cannot sample all Fourier components. Application of an incomplete sky model to calibration of Epoch of Reionisation data will imprint residual error in the data, which propagates forward to the Epoch of Reionisation power spectrum. This limited information is studied in the context of current and future planned instruments and surveys at Epoch of Reionisation frequencies, such as the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA), Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA1-Low). For the MWA Epoch of Reionisation experiment, we find that both the additional short baseline uv-coverage of the compact Epoch of Reionisation array, and the additional long baselines provided by TGSS and planned MWA expansions, are required to obtain sufficient information on all relevant scales. For SKA1-Low, arrays with maximum baselines of 49 km and 65 km yield comparable performance at 50 MHz and 150 MHz, while 39 km, 14 km, and 4 km arrays yield degraded performance.

  18. SOURCE REGIONS OF THE TYPE II RADIO BURST OBSERVED DURING A CME–CME INTERACTION ON 2013 MAY 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mäkelä, P.; Reiner, M. J.; Akiyama, S.; Gopalswamy, N.; Krupar, V.

    2016-01-01

    We report on our study of radio source regions during the type II radio burst on 2013 May 22 based on direction-finding analysis of the Wind /WAVES and STEREO /WAVES (SWAVES) radio observations at decameter–hectometric wavelengths. The type II emission showed an enhancement that coincided with the interaction of two coronal mass ejections (CMEs) launched in sequence along closely spaced trajectories. The triangulation of the SWAVES source directions posited the ecliptic projections of the radio sources near the line connecting the Sun and the STEREO-A spacecraft. The WAVES and SWAVES source directions revealed shifts in the latitude of the radio source, indicating that the spatial location of the dominant source of the type II emission varies during the CME–CME interaction. The WAVES source directions close to 1 MHz frequencies matched the location of the leading edge of the primary CME seen in the images of the LASCO/C3 coronagraph. This correspondence of spatial locations at both wavelengths confirms that the CME–CME interaction region is the source of the type II enhancement. Comparison of radio and white-light observations also showed that at lower frequencies scattering significantly affects radio wave propagation.

  19. An analysis of interplanetary scintillation as a method of measuring the angular sizes of radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajivassiliou, C.A.; Duffett-Smith, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation has been widely used at metre wavelengths for estimating the angular sizes of radio sources in the range 0.1-2.0 arcsec. The estimates are based on observations of either the width of the temporal power spectrum or the shape of the scintillation index-elongation curve. We present a mathematical model of the latter procedure which reveals the biases introduced into an IPS survey as a result of the estimation process. (author)

  20. X-ray study of the environmental impact on the initial stages of a radio source evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewska, M.; Siemiginowska, A.; Migliori, G.; Guainazzi, M.; Hardcastle, M.; Ostorero, L.; Stawarz, L.

    2017-10-01

    Compact Symmetric Objects (CSOs) are thought to be among the progenitors of large-scale radio galaxies. They show radio features typically observed in large-scale radio galaxies (jets, lobes, hot spots), but contained within the central 1 kpc region of the host galaxy. Because the CSOs are symmetric and not affected by beaming, their linear radio size can be translated into the source age if one measures the expansion velocity of the radio source. However, if the jet expansion is disturbed, e.g. by a dense interstellar medium (ISM), the ages derived this way may be biased. Until now we did not have means to discriminate between confined and non-confined radio sources. We present our X-ray studies of CSOs performed with XMM-Newton and Chandra. For the first time, the data reveal the evidence in favor of the hypothesis that in a sub-population of CSOs the medium is Compton Thick and the radio jets may be confined. Thus their kinematic ages may be underestimated. We discuss the implications of our results on the high energy emission models of CSOs, the earliest stages of the radio source evolution, jet interactions with the ISM, diversity of the environments in which the jets expand, and jet-galaxy co-evolution.

  1. Another Shock for the Bullet Cluster, and the Source of Seed Electrons for Radio Relics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimwell, Timothy W,; Markevitch, Maxim; Brown, Shea; Feretti, Luigina; Gaensler, B. M.; Johnston-Hollitt, M.; Lage, Craig; Srinivasan, Raghav

    2015-01-01

    With Australia Telescope Compact Array observations, we detect a highly elongated Mpc-scale diffuse radio source on the eastern periphery of the Bullet cluster 1E 0657-55.8, which we argue has the positional, spectral and polarimetric characteristics of a radio relic. This powerful relic (2:30:11025 WHz(exp -1) consists of a bright northern bulb and a faint linear tail. The bulb emits 94% of the observed radio flux and has the highest surface brightness of any known relic. Exactly coincident with the linear tail we find a sharp X-ray surface brightness edge in the deep Chandra image of the cluster - a signature of a shock front in the hot intracluster medium (ICM), located on the opposite side of the cluster to the famous bow shock. This new example of an X-ray shock coincident with a relic further supports the hypothesis that shocks in the outer regions of clusters can form relics via diffusive shock (re- )acceleration. Intriguingly, our new relic suggests that seed electrons for reacceleration are coming from a local remnant of a radio galaxy, which we are lucky to catch before its complete disruption. If this scenario, in which a relic forms when a shock crosses a well-defined region of the ICM polluted with aged relativistic plasma - as opposed to the usual assumption that seeds are uniformly mixed in the ICM - is also the case for other relics, this may explain a number of peculiar properties of peripheral relics.

  2. Radiative efficiency and content of extragalactic radio sources: Toward a universal scaling relation between jet power and radio power

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bîrzan, L.; McNamara, B.R.; Nulsen, P.E.J.; Carilli, C.L.; Wise, M.W.

    2008-01-01

    We present an analysis of the energetics and particle content of the lobes of 24 radio galaxies at the cores of cooling clusters. The radio lobes in these systems have created visible cavities in the surrounding hot, X-ray-emitting gas, which allow direct measurement of the mechanical jet power of

  3. Two-Component Structure of the Radio Source 0014+813 from VLBI Observations within the CONT14 Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, O. A.; Lopez, Yu. R.

    2018-03-01

    We consider a method of reconstructing the structure delay of extended radio sources without constructing their radio images. The residuals derived after the adjustment of geodetic VLBI observations are used for this purpose. We show that the simplest model of a radio source consisting of two point components can be represented by four parameters (the angular separation of the components, the mutual orientation relative to the poleward direction, the flux-density ratio, and the spectral index difference) that are determined for each baseline of a multi-baseline VLBI network. The efficiency of this approach is demonstrated by estimating the coordinates of the radio source 0014+813 observed during the two-week CONT14 program organized by the International VLBI Service (IVS) in May 2014. Large systematic deviations have been detected in the residuals of the observations for the radio source 0014+813. The averaged characteristics of the radio structure of 0014+813 at a frequency of 8.4 GHz can be calculated from these deviations. Our modeling using four parameters has confirmed that the source consists of two components at an angular separation of 0.5 mas in the north-south direction. Using the structure delay when adjusting the CONT14 observations leads to a correction of the average declination estimate for the radio source 0014+813 by 0.070 mas.

  4. Infrared-faint radio sources are at high redshifts. Spectroscopic redshift determination of infrared-faint radio sources using the Very Large Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Sharp, R.; Spitler, L. R.; Parker, Q. A.

    2014-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are characterised by relatively high radio flux densities and associated faint or even absent infrared and optical counterparts. The resulting extremely high radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousands were previously known only for high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs), suggesting a link between the two classes of object. However, the optical and infrared faintness of IFRS makes their study difficult. Prior to this work, no redshift was known for any IFRS in the Australia Telescope Large Area Survey (ATLAS) fields which would help to put IFRS in the context of other classes of object, especially of HzRGs. Aims: This work aims at measuring the first redshifts of IFRS in the ATLAS fields. Furthermore, we test the hypothesis that IFRS are similar to HzRGs, that they are higher-redshift or dust-obscured versions of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of IFRS was spectroscopically observed using the Focal Reducer and Low Dispersion Spectrograph 2 (FORS2) at the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The data were calibrated based on the Image Reduction and Analysis Facility (IRAF) and redshifts extracted from the final spectra, where possible. This information was then used to calculate rest-frame luminosities, and to perform the first spectral energy distribution modelling of IFRS based on redshifts. Results: We found redshifts of 1.84, 2.13, and 2.76, for three IFRS, confirming the suggested high-redshift character of this class of object. These redshifts and the resulting luminosities show IFRS to be similar to HzRGs, supporting our hypothesis. We found further evidence that fainter IFRS are at even higher redshifts. Conclusions: Considering the similarities between IFRS and HzRGs substantiated in this work, the detection of IFRS, which have a significantly higher sky density than HzRGs, increases the number of active galactic nuclei in the early universe and adds to the problems of explaining the formation of

  5. Analysis the Source model of the 2009 Mw 7.6 Padang Earthquake in Sumatra Region using continuous GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amertha Sanjiwani, I. D. M.; En, C. K.; Anjasmara, I. M.

    2017-12-01

    A seismic gap on the interface along the Sunda subduction zone has been proposed among the 2000, 2004, 2005 and 2007 great earthquakes. This seismic gap therefore plays an important role in the earthquake risk on the Sunda trench. The Mw 7.6 Padang earthquake, an intraslab event, was occurred on September 30, 2009 located at ± 250 km east of the Sunda trench, close to the seismic gap on the interface. To understand the interaction between the seismic gap and the Padang earthquake, twelves continuous GPS data from SUGAR are adopted in this study to estimate the source model of this event. The daily GPS coordinates one month before and after the earthquake were calculated by the GAMIT software. The coseismic displacements were evaluated based on the analysis of coordinate time series in Padang region. This geodetic network provides a rather good spatial coverage for examining the seismic source along the Padang region in detail. The general pattern of coseismic horizontal displacements is moving toward epicenter and also the trench. The coseismic vertical displacement pattern is uplift. The highest coseismic displacement derived from the MSAI station are 35.0 mm for horizontal component toward S32.1°W and 21.7 mm for vertical component. The second largest one derived from the LNNG station are 26.6 mm for horizontal component toward N68.6°W and 3.4 mm for vertical component. Next, we will use uniform stress drop inversion to invert the coseismic displacement field for estimating the source model. Then the relationship between the seismic gap on the interface and the intraslab Padang earthquake will be discussed in the next step. Keyword: seismic gap, Padang earthquake, coseismic displacement.

  6. THE PROPER MOTIONS OF THE DOUBLE RADIO SOURCE n IN THE ORION BN/KL REGION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Luis F.; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis; Lizano, Susana [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, UNAM, Apdo. Postal 3-72 (Xangari), 58089 Morelia, Michoacán, México (Mexico); Dzib, Sergio A.; Menten, Karl M. [Max Planck Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Gómez, Laura, E-mail: l.rodriguez@crya.unam.mx [Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Córdoba 3107, Vitacura, Santiago (Chile)

    2017-01-10

    We have extended the time baseline for observations of the proper motions of radio sources in the Orion BN/KL region from 14.7 to 22.5 years. We present improved determinations for the sources BN and I. In addition, we address the proper motions of the double radio source n, that have been questioned in the literature. We confirm that all three sources are moving away at transverse velocities of tens of kilometers per second from a region in-between them, where they were located about 500 years ago. Source n exhibits a new component that we interpret as due to a one-sided ejection of free–free emitting plasma that took place after 2006.36. We used the highly accurate relative proper motions between sources BN and I to determine that their closest separation took place in the year 1475 ± 6, when they were within ∼100 au or less from each other in the plane of the sky.

  7. THE PROPER MOTIONS OF THE DOUBLE RADIO SOURCE n IN THE ORION BN/KL REGION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez, Luis F.; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis; Lizano, Susana; Dzib, Sergio A.; Menten, Karl M.; Gómez, Laura

    2017-01-01

    We have extended the time baseline for observations of the proper motions of radio sources in the Orion BN/KL region from 14.7 to 22.5 years. We present improved determinations for the sources BN and I. In addition, we address the proper motions of the double radio source n, that have been questioned in the literature. We confirm that all three sources are moving away at transverse velocities of tens of kilometers per second from a region in-between them, where they were located about 500 years ago. Source n exhibits a new component that we interpret as due to a one-sided ejection of free–free emitting plasma that took place after 2006.36. We used the highly accurate relative proper motions between sources BN and I to determine that their closest separation took place in the year 1475 ± 6, when they were within ∼100 au or less from each other in the plane of the sky.

  8. The first VLBI image of an infrared-faint radio source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Tingay, S.; Mao, M. Y.; Phillips, C. J.; Hotan, A. W.

    2008-11-01

    Context: We investigate the joint evolution of active galactic nuclei and star formation in the Universe. Aims: In the 1.4 GHz survey with the Australia Telescope Compact Array of the Chandra Deep Field South and the European Large Area ISO Survey - S1 we have identified a class of objects which are strong in the radio but have no detectable infrared and optical counterparts. This class has been called Infrared-Faint Radio Sources, or IFRS. 53 sources out of 2002 have been classified as IFRS. It is not known what these objects are. Methods: To address the many possible explanations as to what the nature of these objects is we have observed four sources with the Australian Long Baseline Array. Results: We have detected and imaged one of the four sources observed. Assuming that the source is at a high redshift, we find its properties in agreement with properties of Compact Steep Spectrum sources. However, due to the lack of optical and infrared data the constraints are not particularly strong.

  9. Cross Matching as Strategy to Find Radio Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christian, Tiffany; Kimball, Amy

    2018-01-01

    Using cross-matching between the FIRST (20cm) and GPS1 (optical) catalogs, we identified possible radio star candidates. This is an extension of earlier work by Kimball et al. (2009), who sought to identify radiostar candidates by cross-matching the FIRST (radio)and SDSS (optical) catalogs, but did not include the consideration of stellar proper motions. We used proper motions from GPS1 to match with FIRST radio sources; the region of sky where they overlap contains ~900,000 FIRST sources and several million GPS1 sources. We used WISE near-infrared and PanSTARRS optical information to identify matches that have stellar colors. Our selection constraints identified 6 stars (spectroscopically confirmed) as radio star candidates. They are faint in the radio (<1 mJy) indicating we may be searching at the limits of the radio survey. Other candidates had no spectral confirmation or object type identification in SIMBAD, which would make them ideal for follow up radio observations. However, random analysis indicated that many other possible candidates were random associations, which may also be true for these 6 stars.

  10. Note: A versatile radio-frequency source for cold atom experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Na; Wu, Yu-Ping; Min, Hao; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Xiao, E-mail: jiangx@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at Microscale and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); CAS Center for Excellence and Synergetic Innovation Center in Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2016-08-15

    A radio-frequency (RF) source designed for cold atom experiments is presented. The source uses AD9858, a direct digital synthesizer, to generate the sine wave directly, up to 400 MHz, with sub-Hz resolution. An amplitude control circuit consisting of wideband variable gain amplifier and high speed digital to analog converter is integrated into the source, capable of 70 dB off isolation and 4 ns on-off keying. A field programmable gate array is used to implement a versatile frequency and amplitude co-sweep logic. Owing to modular design, the RF sources have been used on many cold atom experiments to generate various complicated RF sequences, enriching the operation schemes of cold atoms, which cannot be done by standard RF source instruments.

  11. Large proper motions in the remarkable triple radio source in Serpens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, L.F.; Curiel, S.; Moran, J.M.; Mirabel, I.F.; Roth, M. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA) Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan (Mexico) Universidad de Puerto Rico, San Juan (Puerto Rico) Observatorio Interamericano de Cerro Tololo, La Serena (Chile))

    1989-11-01

    The triple radio source in the Serpens star formation region consists of a central object and two lobes with spectral indices characteristic of nonthermal emission. Measurements made at the Arecibo Observatory and the VLA indicate that this triple source is probably associated with the Serpens star-forming region. A weak, circularly polarized 1667 MHz OH maser detected at Arecibo has been observed with the VLA and found to coincide in position to within 1 arcsec with the central source. The position of this central source also falls within the position error ellipsoid of IRAS 18273+0113. VLA observations at 6 cm clearly show that the outer components are moving away from the central source. The angular motion of each component with respect to the central one is 1.3 + or - 0.2 arcsec, implying velocities of 300 + or - 100 km/s at a distance of 500 + or - 200 pc. 36 refs.

  12. Stabilized operation of the Spallation Neutron Source radio-frequency quadrupole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-ho Kim

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ had resonance control instabilities at duty factors higher than approximately 4%. Systematic investigations have been carried out to understand the cause of the instability and to ensure the operational stability of the RFQ. The most critical source of the instability is revealed to be an interaction between hydrogen released by beam bombardments and the RFQ rf field resulting in a discharge, which consumes additional rf power and could cause the RFQ to operate in an unstable region. This paper reports improvement of the SNS RFQ operational stability based on the findings during the SNS operation.

  13. Source parameter inversion for earthquakes in the Bardarbunga caldera (August 2014-February 2015) based on high-rate GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Cardozo, Félix; Hjörleifsdóttir, Vala; Jónsdóttir, Kristín; Geirsson, Halldor; Iglesias, Arturo

    2017-04-01

    In August 2014 a sequence of earthquakes took place in the Bardarbunga caldera (7x11 km) and a laterally propagating dike that connected the caldera with the Holuhraun lava field. The caldera earthquakes were coincident in time with the caldera subsidence ( 70 m) and the propagation of a dike, which ended in a fissural eruption in Holuhraun (Guðmundsson et al., 2016). The volcanic seismic sources represented by the moment tensor, commonly have a large non-double couple component, which implies that the source can not be described as a slip on a planar fault. However, encountering an apropiate physical mechanism that explain the non double couple component is a challenging task since there are several phenomena that could explain it, such as intrusive processes like dikes or sills (Kanamori et al 1993, Riel et al 2014) as well as geometric effects due slip on a curved fault (Nettles & Ekström, 1998). The earthquakes in the Bardarbunga caldera are quite interesting not only due to the magnitudes (around seventy events between 5.0radar (InSAR) also (Guðmundsson et al., 2016). Taking into account that the Bardarbunga caldera is covered by glacier (which makes difficult detecting changes in the surface using InSAR) and detecting waveforms in GPS stations is common only for large tectonics earthquakes (above Mw.7); observing a volcanic earthquakes simultaneously by InSAR and GPS is a rare and outstanding opportunity for constrain the volcanic seismic source . Likewise, if we assume that all the subsidence earthquakes in Bardarbunga have a common seismic source, we can use the same fault plane costrained for the 18th september earthquake, for inverting the seismic source of all the events in the caldera, only variying some parameters such as half duration and time shift. In this work, we obtained a source parameter for the 18th september earthquake and used it as an inicial solution for looking for a model of several point sources, that depict all the earthquakes

  14. Occultations of Astrophysical Radio Sources as Probes of Planetary Environments: A Case Study of Jupiter and Possible Applications to Exoplanets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Withers, Paul [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States); Vogt, Marissa F. [Center for Space Physics, Boston University, 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

    2017-02-10

    Properties of planetary atmospheres, ionospheres, and magnetospheres are difficult to measure from Earth. Radio occultations are a common method for measuring these properties, but they traditionally rely on radio transmissions from a spacecraft near the planet. Here, we explore whether occultations of radio emissions from a distant astrophysical radio source can be used to measure magnetic field strength, plasma density, and neutral density around planets. In a theoretical case study of Jupiter, we find that significant changes in polarization angle due to Faraday rotation occur for radio signals that pass within 10 Jupiter radii of the planet and that significant changes in frequency and power occur from radio signals that pass through the neutral atmosphere. There are sufficient candidate radio sources, such as pulsars, active galactic nuclei, and masers, that occultations are likely to occur at least once per year. For pulsars, time delays in the arrival of their emitted pulses can be used to measure plasma density. Exoplanets, whose physical properties are very challenging to observe, may also occult distant astrophysical radio sources, such as their parent stars.

  15. A search for AGN activity in Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenc, Emil; Middelberg, Enno; Norris, Ray; Mao, Minnie

    2010-04-01

    We propose to observe a large sample of radio sources from the ATLAS (Australia Telescope Large Area Survey) source catalogue with the LBA, to determine their compactness. The sample consists of 36 sources with no counterpart in the co-located SWIRE survey (3.6 um to 160 um), carried out with the Spitzer Space Telescope. This rare class of sources, dubber Infrared-Faint Radio Sources (IFRS), is inconsistent with current galaxy evolution models. VLBI observations are an essential way to obtain further clues on what these objects are and why they are hidden from infrared observations. We will measure the flux densities on long baselines to determine their compactness. Only five IFRS have been previously targeted with VLBI observations (resulting in two detections). We propose using single baseline (Parkes-ATCA) eVLBI observations with the LBA at 1 Gbps to maximise sensitivity. With the observations proposed here we will increase the number of VLBI-observed IFRS from 5 to 36, allowing us to draw statistical conclusions about this intriguing new class of objects.

  16. THE WISE BLAZAR-LIKE RADIO-LOUD SOURCES: AN ALL-SKY CATALOG OF CANDIDATE γ-RAY BLAZARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A.; Smith, H. A.; Massaro, F.; Masetti, N.; Landoni, M.; Tosti, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a catalog of radio-loud candidate γ-ray emitting blazars with WISE mid-infrared colors similar to the colors of confirmed γ-ray blazars. The catalog is assembled from WISE sources detected in all four WISE filters, with colors compatible with the three-dimensional locus of the WISE γ-ray emitting blazars, and which can be spatially cross-matched with radio sources from one of the three radio surveys: NVSS, FIRST, and/or SUMSS. Our initial WISE selection uses a slightly modified version of previously successful algorithms. We then select only the radio-loud sources using a measure of the radio-to-IR flux, the q 22 parameter, which is analogous to the q 24 parameter known in the literature but which instead uses the WISE band-four flux at 22 μm. Our final catalog contains 7855 sources classified as BL Lacs, FSRQs, or mixed candidate blazars; 1295 of these sources can be spatially re-associated as confirmed blazars. We describe the properties of the final catalog of WISE blazar-like radio-loud sources and consider possible contaminants. Finally, we discuss why this large catalog of candidate γ-ray emitting blazars represents a new and useful resource to address the problem of finding low-energy counterparts to currently unidentified high-energy sources

  17. Diffusive shock acceleration in the lobes of the Serpens triple radio source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crusius-Watzel, A.R. (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Recent observations of the triple radio source in the Serpens star formation region have shown large proper motions of the lobes. Their radio spectral index is characteristic of nonthermal emission. The possibility that this is synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons is investigated. Particle acceleration can occur at the bow shock (bullet and jet model) or at the jet termination shock. The rates for ion-neutral damping and for the self-excitation of magnetic field fluctuations are compared. High levels of MHD turbulence and/or high Alfvenic Mach numbers are required to produce a power-law energy spectrum of electrons up to Lorentz factors of 1000. Diffusive shock acceleration of particles is then very efficient. 26 refs.

  18. Opacity in compact extragalactic radio sources and the core shift effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalev, Y Y; Lobanov, A P; Pushkarev, A B; Zensus, J A

    2008-01-01

    The apparent position of the 'core' in a parsec-scale radio jet (a compact, bright emitting region at the narrow end of the jet) depends on the observing frequency, owing to synchrotron self-absorption and external absorption. This dependency both provides a tool to probe physical conditions in the vicinity of the core and poses problems for astrometric studies using compact radio sources. We investigate the frequency-dependent shift of the positions of the cores (core shift) observed with very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) in parsec-scale jets. We present results for 29 selected active galactic nuclei (AGN). In these AGN, the magnitude of the measured core shift between 2.3 and 8.6 GHz reaches 1.4 mas, with a median value for the sample of 0.44 mas. We discuss related physics as well as astrometry applications and plans for further studies.

  19. Global VLBI Observations of Weak Extragalactic Radio Sources: Imaging Candidates to Align the VLBI and Gaia Frames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourda, Geraldine; Collioud, Arnaud; Charlot, Patrick; Porcas, Richard; Garrington, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The space astrometry mission Gaia will construct a dense optical QSO-based celestial reference frame. For consistency between optical and radio positions, it will be important to align the Gaia and VLBI frames (International Celestial Reference Frame) with the highest accuracy. In this respect, it is found that only 10% of the ICRF sources are suitable to establish this link (70 sources), either because most of the ICRF sources are not bright enough at optical wavelengths or because they show extended radio emission which precludes reaching the highest astrometric accuracy. In order to improve the situation, we initiated a multi-step VLBI observational project, dedicated to finding additional suitable radio sources for aligning the two frames. The sample consists of about 450 optically-bright radio sources, typically 20 times weaker than the ICRF sources, which have been selected by cross-correlating optical and radio catalogs. The initial observations, aimed at checking whether these sources are detectable with VLBI, and conducted with the European VLBI Network (EVN) in 2007, showed an excellent 90% detection rate. This paper reports on global VLBI observations carried out in March 2008 to image 105 from the 398 previously detected sources. All sources were successfully imaged, revealing compact VLBI structure for about half of them, which is very promising for the future.

  20. A 31 GHz Survey of Low-Frequency Selected Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, B. S.; Weintraub, L.; Sievers, J.; Bond, J. R.; Myers, S. T.; Pearson, T. J.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Shepherd, M. C.

    2009-10-01

    The 100 m Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope and the 40 m Owens Valley Radio Observatory telescope have been used to conduct a 31 GHz survey of 3165 known extragalactic radio sources over 143 deg2 of the sky. Target sources were selected from the NRAO VLA Sky Survey in fields observed by the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI); most are extragalactic active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with 1.4 GHz flux densities of 3-10 mJy. The resulting 31 GHz catalogs are presented in full online. Using a maximum-likelihood analysis to obtain an unbiased estimate of the distribution of the 1.4-31 GHz spectral indices of these sources, we find a mean 31-1.4 GHz flux ratio of 0.110 ± 0.003 corresponding to a spectral index of α = -0.71 ± 0.01 (S ν vprop να) 9.0% ± 0.8% of sources have α > - 0.5 and 1.2% ± 0.2% have α > 0. By combining this spectral-index distribution with 1.4 GHz source counts, we predict 31 GHz source counts in the range 1 mJy S 31) = (16.7 ± 1.7) deg-2(S 31/1 mJy)-0.80±0.07. We also assess the contribution of mJy-level (S 1.4 GHz < 3.4 mJy) radio sources to the 31 GHz cosmic microwave background power spectrum, finding a mean power of ell(ell + 1)C src ell/(2π) = 44 ± 14 μK2 and a 95% upper limit of 80 μK2 at ell = 2500. Including an estimated contribution of 12 μK2 from the population of sources responsible for the turn-up in counts below S 1.4 GHz = 1 mJy, this amounts to 21% ± 7% of what is needed to explain the CBI high-ell excess signal, 275 ± 63 μK2. These results are consistent with other measurements of the 31 GHz point-source foreground.

  1. Rupture Process of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki Earthquake Based upon Joint Source Inversion of Teleseismic and GPS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiann-Jong Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated 18 broadband teleseismic records and 451 near field GPS coseismic deformation data to determine the spatial and temporal slip distribution of the 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (M 9.0. The results show a large triangular shaped slip zone with several asperities. The largest asperity centered above the hypocenter at about 5 - 30 km depth. A secondary large asperity was found in the deeper subduction zone beneath the hypocenter. The average slip on the fault is ~15 m and the maximum displacement on the biggest asperity is > 30 m. The temporal rupture process shows that the slip nucleated near the hypocenter at the beginning, and then ruptured to the shallow fault plane forming the largest asperity. The slip developed in the deeper subduction zone in the second stage. Finally, the rupture propagated toward the north and south of the fault along the Japan Trench. The source time function shows three segments of energy releases with two large peaks related to the development of the asperities. The overall rupture process is ~180 seconds. This source model coincides well with the aftershock distribution and provides a first-order information on the source complexity of the earthquake which is crucial for further studies.

  2. Radio Weak Lensing Shear Measurement in the Visibility Domain - II. Source Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivi, M.; Miller, L.

    2018-02-01

    This paper extends the method introduced in Rivi et al. (2016b) to measure galaxy ellipticities in the visibility domain for radio weak lensing surveys. In that paper we focused on the development and testing of the method for the simple case of individual galaxies located at the phase centre, and proposed to extend it to the realistic case of many sources in the field of view by isolating visibilities of each source with a faceting technique. In this second paper we present a detailed algorithm for source extraction in the visibility domain and show its effectiveness as a function of the source number density by running simulations of SKA1-MID observations in the band 950-1150 MHz and comparing original and measured values of galaxies' ellipticities. Shear measurements from a realistic population of 104 galaxies randomly located in a field of view of 1 \\deg ^2 (i.e. the source density expected for the current radio weak lensing survey proposal with SKA1) are also performed. At SNR ≥ 10, the multiplicative bias is only a factor 1.5 worse than what found when analysing individual sources, and is still comparable to the bias values reported for similar measurement methods at optical wavelengths. The additive bias is unchanged from the case of individual sources, but it is significantly larger than typically found in optical surveys. This bias depends on the shape of the uv coverage and we suggest that a uv-plane weighting scheme to produce a more isotropic shape could reduce and control additive bias.

  3. Radio weak lensing shear measurement in the visibility domain - II. Source extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivi, M.; Miller, L.

    2018-05-01

    This paper extends the method introduced in Rivi et al. (2016b) to measure galaxy ellipticities in the visibility domain for radio weak lensing surveys. In that paper, we focused on the development and testing of the method for the simple case of individual galaxies located at the phase centre, and proposed to extend it to the realistic case of many sources in the field of view by isolating visibilities of each source with a faceting technique. In this second paper, we present a detailed algorithm for source extraction in the visibility domain and show its effectiveness as a function of the source number density by running simulations of SKA1-MID observations in the band 950-1150 MHz and comparing original and measured values of galaxies' ellipticities. Shear measurements from a realistic population of 104 galaxies randomly located in a field of view of 1 \\deg ^2 (i.e. the source density expected for the current radio weak lensing survey proposal with SKA1) are also performed. At SNR ≥ 10, the multiplicative bias is only a factor 1.5 worse than what found when analysing individual sources, and is still comparable to the bias values reported for similar measurement methods at optical wavelengths. The additive bias is unchanged from the case of individual sources, but it is significantly larger than typically found in optical surveys. This bias depends on the shape of the uv coverage and we suggest that a uv-plane weighting scheme to produce a more isotropic shape could reduce and control additive bias.

  4. Radio Astronomy Demonstrator: Assessment of the Appropriate Sites through a GIS Open Source Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Duarte

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of Portuguese radio astronomical capacitation towards participation in the Square Kilometer Array (SKA project, a site was selected for radio astronomical testing purposes and the development of a radio astronomical infrastructure. The site is within Herdade da Contenda (HC, a large national forest perimeter, located in Alentejo (Portugal. In order to minimize the impacts in the ecosystem and landscape, an application based on the Geographic Information System (GIS open source environment was created, the HC Environmental Integrated Management System. This application combines several functionalities and menus with different characterization methods allowing the creation of multiple maps regarding the HC characteristics, such as Digital Elevation Model (DEM, Land Use Land Cover (LULC, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, groundwater vulnerability, erosion risk, flood risk and forest fire risk. Other geographical information can be added if necessary (human heritage visualization and fauna and flora. A decision making support tool was also developed. It incorporates an algorithm running through a series of assigned weights and eliminatory factors to find the locations best suited for the infrastructure with minimal impact to the local ecosystem. In order to test the application and the decision making tool, several maps were used as input in order to decide which sites are more adequate. The application developed can be adopted for other protected or natural areas.

  5. Hacking GPS

    CERN Document Server

    Kingsley-Hughes, Kathie

    2005-01-01

    * This is the "user manual" that didn't come with any of the 30 million GPS receivers currently in use, showing readers how to modify, tweak, and hack their GPS to take it to new levels!* Crazy-cool modifications include exploiting secret keycodes, revealing hidden features, building power cords and cables, hacking the battery and antenna, protecting a GPS from impact and falls, making a screen protector, and solar-powering a GPS* Potential power users will take the function and performance of their GPS to a whole new level by hacking into the firmware and hacking into a PC connection with a GPS* Fear not! Any potentially dangerous mod (to the device) is clearly labeled, with precautions listed that should be taken* Game time! Readers can check out GPS games, check into hacking geocaching, and even use a GPS as a metal detector

  6. The mechanics of unrest at Long Valley caldera, California: 1. Modeling the geometry of the source using GPS, leveling and two-color EDM data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Segall, P.; Murray, J.; Cervelli, Peter; Langbein, J.

    2003-01-01

    We surveyed 44 existing leveling monuments in Long Valley caldera in July 1999, using dual frequency global positioning system (GPS) receivers. We have been able to tie GPS and leveling to a common reference frame in the Long Valley area and computed the vertical deformation by differencing GPS-based and leveled orthometric heights. The resurgent dome uplifted 74??7 cm from 1975 to 1999. To define the inflation source, we invert two-color EDM and uplift data from the 1985-1999 unrest period using spherical or ellipsoidal sources. We find that the ellipsoidal source satisfies both the vertical and horizontal deformation data, whereas the spherical point source cannot. According to our analysis of the 1985-1999 data, the main source of deformation is a prolate ellipsoid located beneath the resurgent dome at a depth of 5.9 km (95% bounds of 4.9-7.5 km). This body is vertically elongated, has an aspect ratio of 0.475 (95% bounds are 0.25-0.65) and a volume change of 0.086 km3 (95% bounds are 0.06-0.13 km3). Failure to account for the ellipsoidal nature of the source biases the estimated source depth by 2.1 km (35%), and the source volume by 0.038 km3 (44%). ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The origin of the optical emission lines associated with extragalactic radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viegas, S. M.; De Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.

    1992-01-01

    The observed extended emission line regions (EELRs) associated with radio sources are investigated with the objective of determining the characteristics of the ionization mechanisms and the possible effect of star formation. The sources included in the sample are 3C 227, 3C 277.3, 3C 305, Cen A (NGC 5128), NGC 7385, PKS 0349-27, PKS 2152-69, and Minkowski's Object. It is shown that the emission-line ratios of the EELRs considered can be explained by models which account for the coupled effect of photoionization and shock acting at different degrees. It is also shown that the EELR ionization is not due to young stars. The main energy sources of the EELR are identified.

  8. Metre-wavelength fine structure in 30 extragalactic radio sources with sizes of a few arcsec

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banhatti, D.G.; Ananthakrishnan, S.; Pramesh Rao, A.

    1983-01-01

    Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations at 327 MHz of an unbiased sample of 30 extragalactic radio sources having overall sizes between 1 and 4 arcsec, and flux densities greater than 1 Jy at 327 MHz are reported. From VLBI observations, these sources have been reported to contain compact components of sizes < approx.= to 0.02 arcsec contributing on an average about 25 per cent of the total emission at 5 HGz. The IPS observations show that about 45 per cent of the total emission at 327 MHz arises from structures of sizes between 0.05 and 0.5 arcsec (corresponding typically to 0.5 to 5 kpc). A comparison of the VLBI and IPS results indicates that the VLBI and IPS components probably refer to the same physical features in these sources. (author)

  9. The width of jets in powerful edge-brightened extragalactic double radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banhatti, D.G.

    1987-01-01

    The widths of primary and secondary jets are derived from a sample of 14 double hotspots in powerful extended extragalactic double radio sources. In the model employed, the primary jet extends from the core to the more compact primary hotspot and the secondary jet emerges from the primary hotspot and dissipates to form the diffuse secondary hotspot. Mean values of hotspot size/jet extent imply that the primary and secondary jets, if free, must be 2 0 and > 27 0 wide, respectively. (author)

  10. The impacts of source structure on geodetic parameters demonstrated by the radio source 3C371

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ming H.; Heinkelmann, Robert; Anderson, James M.; Mora-Diaz, Julian; Karbon, Maria; Schuh, Harald; Wang, Guang L.

    2017-07-01

    Closure quantities measured by very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations are independent of instrumental and propagation instabilities and antenna gain factors, but are sensitive to source structure. A new method is proposed to calculate a structure index based on the median values of closure quantities rather than the brightness distribution of a source. The results are comparable to structure indices based on imaging observations at other epochs and demonstrate the flexibility of deriving structure indices from exactly the same observations as used for geodetic analysis and without imaging analysis. A three-component model for the structure of source 3C371 is developed by model-fitting closure phases. It provides a real case of tracing how the structure effect identified by closure phases in the same observations as the delay observables affects the geodetic analysis, and investigating which geodetic parameters are corrupted to what extent by the structure effect. Using the resulting structure correction based on the three-component model of source 3C371, two solutions, with and without correcting the structure effect, are made. With corrections, the overall rms of this source is reduced by 1 ps, and the impacts of the structure effect introduced by this single source are up to 1.4 mm on station positions and up to 4.4 microarcseconds on Earth orientation parameters. This study is considered as a starting point for handling the source structure effect on geodetic VLBI from geodetic sessions themselves.

  11. Compact radio sources in the starburst galaxy M82 and the Sigma-D relation for supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z. P.; Thuan, T. X.; Chevalier, R. A.; Condon, J. J.; Yin, Q. F.

    1994-01-01

    We have obtained an 8.4 GHz Very Large Array (VLA) A-array map of the starburst galaxy M82 with a resolution Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM) approximately 0.182 sec. About 50 compact radio sources in the central region of M82 were detected with a peak surface brightness approximately greater than 10(exp -17) W/Hz/sq m/sr. Comparison with previous observations shows that most sources are declining in flux. Three previously visible sources have faded into the background of our map (approximately less than 0.2 mJy/beam), while a few sources, including the second and third brightest radio sources in M82, may have increased slightly in flux over the last decade. No new radio supernova was found. The birth rate of the compact radio sources is estimated to be 0.11 + or - 0.05/yr. We attribute the population of such bright, small supernova remnants (SNRs) in M82 to the high pressure in the central region that can truncate the mass loss during a red supergiant phase or allow dense ionized clouds to be present. The compact radio sources obey a Sigma(radio surface brightness) - D(diameter) relation which is remarkably similar to that followed by supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Magellanic Clouds and by two of the strongest known extragalactic radio supernovae: SN 1986J and SN 1979C. A least-squares fit to the SNR data gives: Sigma(sub 8.4 GHz) (W/Hz/sq m/sr) = 4.4 x 10(exp -16) D(sub pc)(exp -3.5 +/- 0.1) covering seven orders of magnitude in Sigma. Possible selection effects are discussed and a theoretical discussion of the correlation is presented.

  12. Jet emission in young radio sources: A Fermi large area telescope gamma-ray view

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Migliori, G.; Siemiginowska, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kelly, B. C. [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93107 (United States); Stawarz, Ł. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Celotti, A. [Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati (SISSA), via Bonomea, 265-34136 Trieste (Italy); Begelman, M. C., E-mail: migliori@cfa.harvard.edu [JILA, University of Colorado and National Institute of Standards and Technology, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0440 (United States)

    2014-01-10

    We investigate the contribution of the beamed jet component to the high-energy emission in young and compact extragalactic radio sources, focusing for the first time on the γ-ray band. We derive predictions on the γ-ray luminosities associated with the relativistic jet assuming a leptonic radiative model. The high-energy emission is produced via Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in a spherical region at the considered scales (≲10 kpc). Simulations show a wide range of γ-ray luminosities, with intensities up to ∼10{sup 46}-10{sup 48} erg s{sup –1} depending on the assumed jet parameters. We find a highly linear relation between the simulated X-ray and γ-ray luminosities that can be used to select candidates for γ-ray detection. We compare the simulated luminosity distributions in the radio, X-ray, and γ-ray regimes with observations for the largest sample of X-ray-detected young radio quasars. Our analysis of ∼4-yr Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data does not yield any statistically significant detections. However, the majority of the model-predicted γ-ray fluxes for the sample are near or below the current Fermi-LAT flux threshold and compatible with the derived upper limits. Our study gives constraints on the minimum jet power (L {sub jet,} {sub kin}/L {sub disk} > 0.01) of a potential jet contribution to the X-ray emission in the most compact sources (≲ 1 kpc) and on the particle-to-magnetic field energy density ratio that are in broad agreement with equipartition assumptions.

  13. Jet Emission in Young Radio Sources: A Fermi Large Area Telescope Gamma-Ray View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliori, G.; Siemiginowska, A.; Kelly, B. C.; Stawarz, Ł.; Celotti, A.; Begelman, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the contribution of the beamed jet component to the high-energy emission in young and compact extragalactic radio sources, focusing for the first time on the γ-ray band. We derive predictions on the γ-ray luminosities associated with the relativistic jet assuming a leptonic radiative model. The high-energy emission is produced via Compton scattering by the relativistic electrons in a spherical region at the considered scales (lsim10 kpc). Simulations show a wide range of γ-ray luminosities, with intensities up to ~1046-1048 erg s-1 depending on the assumed jet parameters. We find a highly linear relation between the simulated X-ray and γ-ray luminosities that can be used to select candidates for γ-ray detection. We compare the simulated luminosity distributions in the radio, X-ray, and γ-ray regimes with observations for the largest sample of X-ray-detected young radio quasars. Our analysis of ~4-yr Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) data does not yield any statistically significant detections. However, the majority of the model-predicted γ-ray fluxes for the sample are near or below the current Fermi-LAT flux threshold and compatible with the derived upper limits. Our study gives constraints on the minimum jet power (L jet, kin/L disk > 0.01) of a potential jet contribution to the X-ray emission in the most compact sources (lsim 1 kpc) and on the particle-to-magnetic field energy density ratio that are in broad agreement with equipartition assumptions.

  14. Estimation of the Characterized Tsunami Source Model considering the Complicated Shape of Tsunami Source by Using the observed waveforms of GPS Buoys in the Nankai Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, S.; Takahashi, T.

    2017-12-01

    In the 2011 Tohoku earthquake tsunami disaster, the delay of understanding damage situation increased the human damage. To solve this problem, it is important to search the severe damaged areas. The tsunami numerical modeling is useful to estimate damages and the accuracy of simulation depends on the tsunami source. Seto and Takahashi (2017) proposed a method to estimate the characterized tsunami source model by using the limited observed data of GPS buoys. The model consists of Large slip zone (LSZ), Super large slip zone (SLSZ) and background rupture zone (BZ) as the Cabinet Office, Government of Japan (below COGJ) reported after the Tohoku tsunami. At the beginning of this method, the rectangular fault model is assumed based on the seismic magnitude and hypocenter reported right after an earthquake. By using the fault model, tsunami propagation is simulated numerically, and the fault model is improved after comparing the computed data with the observed data repeatedly. In the comparison, correlation coefficient and regression coefficient are used as indexes. They are calculated with the observed and the computed tsunami wave profiles. This repetition is conducted to get the two coefficients close to 1.0, which makes the precise of the fault model higher. However, it was indicated as the improvement that the model did not examine a complicated shape of tsunami source. In this study, we proposed an improved model to examine the complicated shape. COGJ(2012) assumed that possible tsunami source region in the Nankai trough consisted of the several thousands small faults. And, we use these small faults to estimate the targeted tsunami source in this model. Therefore, we can estimate the complicated tsunami source by using these small faults. The estimation of BZ is carried out as a first step, and LSZ and SLSZ are estimated next as same as the previous model. The proposed model by using GPS buoy was applied for a tsunami scenario in the Nankai Trough. As a result

  15. On the population of remnant Fanaroff-Riley type II radio galaxies and implications for radio source dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, L. E. H.; Morganti, R.; Brienza, M.

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this work is two-fold: (1) to quantify the occurrence of ultrasteep spectrum remnant Fanaroff-Riley type II (FRII) radio galaxies in a 74 MHz flux-limited sample, and (2) perform Monte Carlo simulations of the population of active and remnant FRII radio galaxies to confront models of remnant lobe evolution, and to provide guidance for further investigation of remnant radio galaxies. We find that fewer than 2 per cent of FRII radio galaxies with S74 MHz > 1.5 Jy are candidate ultrasteep spectrum remnants, where we define ultrasteep spectrum as α _74 MHz^1400 MHz > 1.2. Our Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that models involving Sedov-like expansion in the remnant phase, resulting in rapid adiabatic energy losses, are consistent with this upper limit, and predict the existence of nearly twice as many remnants with normal (not ultrasteep) spectra in the observed frequency range as there are ultrasteep spectrum remnants. This model also predicts an ultrasteep remnant fraction approaching 10 per cent at redshifts z age distribution of remnants is a steeply decreasing function of age. In other words, young remnants are expected to be much more common than old remnants in flux-limited samples. For this reason, incorporating higher frequency data ≳5 GHz will be of great benefit to future studies of the remnant population.

  16. Double radio sources and the new approach to cosmical plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alfven, H.

    1978-01-01

    The methodology of cosmic plasma physics is discussed. It is hazardous to try to describe plasma phenomena by theories which have not been carefully tested experimentally. One present approach is to rely on laboratory measurements and in situ measurements in the magnetosphere and heliosphere, and to approach galactic phenomena by scaling up the wellknown phenomena to galactic dimensions. A summary is given of laboratory investigations of electric double layers, a phenomenon which is known to be very important in laboratory discharges. A summary is also given of the in situ measurements in the magnetosphere by which the importance of electric double layers in the Earth's surrounding is established. The scaling laws between laboratory and magnetospheric double layers are studied. The successful scaling between laboratory and magnetospheric phenomena encourages an extrapolation to heliospheric phenomena. A further extrapolation to galactic phenomena leads to a theory of double radio sources. In analogy with the Sun which, acting as a homopolar inductor, energizes the heliospheric current system, a rotating magnetized galaxy should produce a similar current system. From analogy with laboratory and magnetospheric current systems it is argued that the galactic current might produce double layers where a large energy dissipation takes place. This leads to a theory of the double radio sources which, within the necessary wide limits of uncertainty, is quantitatively reconcilable with observations. (Auth.)

  17. Separation of radio-frequency sources and localization of partial discharges in noisy environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Guillermo; Fresno, José Manuel; Martínez-Tarifa, Juan Manuel

    2015-04-27

    The detection of partial discharges (PD) can help in early-warning detection systems to protect critical assets in power systems. The radio-frequency emission of these events can be measured with antennas even when the equipment is in service which reduces dramatically the maintenance costs and favours the implementation of condition-based monitoring systems. The drawback of these type of measurements is the difficulty of having a reference signal to study the events in a classical phase-resolved partial discharge pattern (PRPD). Therefore, in open-air substations and overhead lines where interferences from radio and TV broadcasting and mobile communications are important sources of noise and other pulsed interferences from rectifiers or inverters can be present, it is difficult to identify whether there is partial discharges activity or not. This paper proposes a robust method to separate the events captured with the antennas, identify which of them are partial discharges and localize the piece of equipment that is having problems. The separation is done with power ratio (PR) maps based on the spectral characteristics of the signal and the identification of the type of event is done localizing the source with an array of four antennas. Several classical methods to calculate the time differences of arrival (TDOA) of the emission to the antennas have been tested, and the localization is done using particle swarm optimization (PSO) to minimize a distance function.

  18. Separation of Radio-Frequency Sources and Localization of Partial Discharges in Noisy Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Robles

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The detection of partial discharges (PD can help in early-warning detection systems to protect critical assets in power systems. The radio-frequency emission of these events can be measured with antennas even when the equipment is in service which reduces dramatically the maintenance costs and favours the implementation of condition-based monitoring systems. The drawback of these type of measurements is the difficulty of having a reference signal to study the events in a classical phase-resolved partial discharge pattern (PRPD. Therefore, in open-air substations and overhead lines where interferences from radio and TV broadcasting and mobile communications are important sources of noise and other pulsed interferences from rectifiers or inverters can be present, it is difficult to identify whether there is partial discharges activity or not. This paper proposes a robust method to separate the events captured with the antennas, identify which of them are partial discharges and localize the piece of equipment that is having problems. The separation is done with power ratio (PR maps based on the spectral characteristics of the signal and the identification of the type of event is done localizing the source with an array of four antennas. Several classical methods to calculate the time differences of arrival (TDOA of the emission to the antennas have been tested, and the localization is done using particle swarm optimization (PSO to minimize a distance function.

  19. Variable Correlation Digital Noise Source on FPGA — A Versatile Tool for Debugging Radio Telescope Backends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buch, Kaushal D.; Gupta, Yashwant; Ajith Kumar, B.

    Contemporary wideband radio telescope backends are generally developed on Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) or hybrid (FPGA+GPU) platforms. One of the challenges faced while developing such instruments is the functional verification of the signal processing backend at various stages of development. In the case of an interferometer or pulsar backend, the typical requirement is for one independent noise source per input, with provision for a common, correlated signal component across all the inputs, with controllable level of correlation. This paper describes the design of a FPGA-based variable correlation Digital Noise Source (DNS), and its applications to built-in testing and debugging of correlators and beamformers. This DNS uses the Central Limit Theorem-based approach for generation of Gaussian noise, and the architecture is optimized for resource requirements and ease of integration with existing signal processing blocks on FPGA.

  20. Metal negative ion production by a planar magnetron sputter type radio frequency ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, K.; Kanda, S.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2017-08-01

    A planar magnetron sputter type ion source has been operated to investigate metal negative ion production. Radio frequency power at 13.56 MHz was directly supplied to the planar target made of 2 mm thick Cu disk to maintain plasma discharge and induce DC self-bias to the target for sputtering. Beam profile was obtained and the peak of negative ion beam profile was shifted to 6 mm as the beam traversed the 32 mT magnetic field in the region of the plasma grid. Extraction of Cu- beam was performed and the Cu- beam current was found consisted of two components: Cu-(surface) and Cu-(volume). Negative ion spectra were observed to measure the ratio of the surface component to the volume component. The surface component of Cu- occupied 67% of the total beam at the maximum, while it decreased the fraction down to about 50% as the source pressure was increased.

  1. The Spiral Host Galaxy of the Double Radio Source 0313-192

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, William C.; White, Raymond E., III; Owen, Frazer N.; Ledlow, Michael J.

    2006-12-01

    We present new Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Gemini South, and Chandra observations of the radio galaxy 0313-192, which hosts a 350 kpc double source and jets, even though previous data have suggested that it is a spiral galaxy. We measure the bulge scale and the luminosity, radial, and vertical profiles of disk starlight and consider the distributions of H II regions and absorbing dust. In each case the HST data confirm its classification as an edge-on spiral galaxy, the only such system known to produce such an extended radio source of this kind. The Gemini near-IR images and Chandra spectral fit reveal a strongly obscured central active galactic nucleus (AGN), seen through the entire interstellar medium path length of the disk and showing X-ray evidence of additional absorption from warm or dense material close to the central object. We consider several possible mechanisms for producing such a rare combination of AGN and host properties, some combination of which may be at work. These include an unusually luminous bulge (suggesting a black hole of mass ~8×108 Msolar), the orientation of the jets near the pole of the gas-rich disk, and some evidence of a weak gravitational interaction that has warped the disk and could have enhanced fueling of the central engine. We detect an X-ray counterpart of the kiloparsec-scale radio jet emerging to the south; jet/counterjet limits on both radio and X-ray regimes allow them to be symmetric if seen more than 15° from the plane of the sky, still consistent with the jet axes being within ~30° of the poles of the gas-rich galaxy disk. A linear or disklike emission-line structure is seen around the nucleus, inclined by ~20° to the stellar disk but nearly perpendicular to the jets; this may represent the aftermath of a galaxy encounter, in which gas is photoionized by a direct view of the nuclear continuum. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute

  2. What Are “X-shaped” Radio Sources Telling Us? II. Properties of a Sample of 87

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saripalli, Lakshmi; Roberts, David H.

    2018-01-01

    In an earlier paper, we presented Jansky Very Large Array multi-frequency, multi-array continuum imaging of a unique sample of low-axial ratio radio galaxies. In this paper, the second in the series, we examine the images to learn the phenomenology of how the off-axis emission relates to the main radio source. Inversion-symmetric offset emission appears to be bimodal and to originate from one of two strategic locations: outer ends of radio lobes (outer-deviation) or from inner ends (inner-deviation). The latter sources are almost always associated with edge-brightened sources. With S- and Z-shaped sources being a subset of outer-deviation sources, this class lends itself naturally to explanations involving black hole axis precession. Our data allow us to present a plausible model for the more enigmatic inner-deviation sources with impressive wings; as for outer-deviation sources these too require black hole axis shifts, although they also require plasma backflows into relic channels. Evolution in morphology over time relates the variety in structures in inner-deviation sources including XRGs. With features such as non-collinearities, central inner-S “spine,” corresponding lobe emission peaks, double and protruding hotspots not uncommon, black hole axis precession, drifts, or flips could be active in a significant fraction of radio sources with prominent off-axis emission. At least 4% of radio galaxies appear to undergo black hole axis rotation. Quasars offer a key signature for recognizing rotating axes. With a rich haul of sources that have likely undergone axis rotation, our work shows the usefulness of low-axial ratio sources in pursuing searches for binary supermassive black holes.

  3. goGPS: open source software for enhancing the accuracy of low-cost receivers by single-frequency relative kinematic positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Realini, Eugenio; Reguzzoni, Mirko

    2013-01-01

    goGPS is a free and open source satellite positioning software package aiming to provide a collaborative platform for research and teaching purposes. It was first published in 2009 and since then several related projects are on-going. Its objective is the investigation of strategies for enhancing the accuracy of low-cost single-frequency GPS receivers, mainly by relative positioning with respect to a base station and by a tailored extended Kalman filter working directly on code and phase observations. In this paper, the positioning algorithms implemented in goGPS are presented, emphasizing the modularity of the software design; two specific strategies to support the navigation with low-cost receivers are also proposed and discussed, namely an empirical observation weighting function calibrated on the receiver signal-to-noise ratio and the inclusion of height information from a digital terrain model as an additional observation in the Kalman filter. The former is crucial when working with high-sensitivity receivers, while the latter can significantly improve the positioning in the vertical direction. The overall goGPS positioning accuracy is assessed by comparison with a dual-frequency receiver and with the positioning computed by a standard low-cost receiver. The benefits of the calibrated weighting function and the digital terrain model are investigated by an experiment in a dense urban environment. It comes out that the use of goGPS and low-cost receivers leads to results comparable with those obtained by higher level receivers; goGPS has good performances also in a dense urban environment, where its additional features play an important role. (paper)

  4. High frequency ion sound waves associated with Langmuir waves in type III radio burst source regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thejappa

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Short wavelength ion sound waves (2-4kHz are detected in association with the Langmuir waves (~15-30kHz in the source regions of several local type III radio bursts. They are most probably not due to any resonant wave-wave interactions such as the electrostatic decay instability because their wavelengths are much shorter than those of Langmuir waves. The Langmuir waves occur as coherent field structures with peak intensities exceeding the Langmuir collapse thresholds. Their scale sizes are of the order of the wavelength of an ion sound wave. These Langmuir wave field characteristics indicate that the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are most probably generated during the thermalization of the burnt-out cavitons left behind by the Langmuir collapse. Moreover, the peak intensities of the observed short wavelength ion sound waves are comparable to the expected intensities of those ion sound waves radiated by the burnt-out cavitons. However, the speeds of the electron beams derived from the frequency drift of type III radio bursts are too slow to satisfy the needed adiabatic ion approximation. Therefore, some non-linear process such as the induced scattering on thermal ions most probably pumps the beam excited Langmuir waves towards the lower wavenumbers, where the adiabatic ion approximation is justified.

  5. Power efficiency improvements with the radio frequency H{sup −} ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalvas, T., E-mail: taneli.kalvas@jyu.fi; Tarvainen, O.; Komppula, J.; Koivisto, H.; Tuunanen, J. [Department of Physics, University of Jyväskylä, P.O. Box 35 (YFL), FI-40014 Jyväskylä (Finland); Potkins, D.; Stewart, T.; Dehnel, M. [D-Pace, Inc., P.O. Box 201, Nelson, British Columbia V1L 5P9 (Canada)

    2016-02-15

    CW 13.56 MHz radio frequency-driven H{sup −} ion source is under development at the University of Jyväskylä for replacing an existing filament-driven ion source at the MCC30/15 cyclotron. Previously, production of 1 mA H{sup −} beam, which is the target intensity of the ion source, has been reported at 3 kW of RF power. The original ion source front plate with an adjustable electromagnet based filter field has been replaced with a new front plate with permanent magnet filter field. The new structure is more open and enables a higher flux of ro-vibrationally excited molecules towards the plasma electrode and provides a better control of the potential near the extraction due to a stronger separation of the main plasma from the plasma electrode. While the original system provided better control over the e{sup −}/H{sup −} ratio, the new configuration has led to a higher production efficiency of 1 mA H{sup −} at 1.75 kW RF power. The latest results and upgrade plans are presented.

  6. MULTI-MESSENGER ASTRONOMY OF GRAVITATIONAL-WAVE SOURCES WITH FLEXIBLE WIDE-AREA RADIO TRANSIENT SURVEYS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yancey, Cregg C.; Shawhan, Peter [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bear, Brandon E.; Akukwe, Bernadine; Simonetti, John H.; Tsai, Jr-Wei [Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Chen, Kevin [Department of Physics, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ 08628 (United States); Dowell, Jayce; Obenberger, Kenneth; Taylor, Gregory B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque NM, 87131 (United States); Gough, Jonathan D. [Department of Chemistry, Lehman College, Bronx, NY 10468 (United States); Kanner, Jonah [LIGO-California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California CA 91125 (United States); Kavic, Michael [Department of Physics, Long Island University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States)

    2015-10-20

    We explore opportunities for multi-messenger astronomy using gravitational waves (GWs) and prompt, transient low-frequency radio emission to study highly energetic astrophysical events. We review the literature on possible sources of correlated emission of GWs and radio transients, highlighting proposed mechanisms that lead to a short-duration, high-flux radio pulse originating from the merger of two neutron stars or from a superconducting cosmic string cusp. We discuss the detection prospects for each of these mechanisms by low-frequency dipole array instruments such as LWA1, the Low Frequency Array and the Murchison Widefield Array. We find that a broad range of models may be tested by searching for radio pulses that, when de-dispersed, are temporally and spatially coincident with a LIGO/Virgo GW trigger within a ∼30 s time window and ∼200–500 deg{sup 2} sky region. We consider various possible observing strategies and discuss their advantages and disadvantages. Uniquely, for low-frequency radio arrays, dispersion can delay the radio pulse until after low-latency GW data analysis has identified and reported an event candidate, enabling a prompt radio signal to be captured by a deliberately targeted beam. If neutron star mergers do have detectable prompt radio emissions, a coincident search with the GW detector network and low-frequency radio arrays could increase the LIGO/Virgo effective search volume by up to a factor of ∼2. For some models, we also map the parameter space that may be constrained by non-detections.

  7. High power water load for microwave and millimeter-wave radio frequency sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, R. Lawrence; Mizuhara, Yosuke M.; Schumacher, Richard V.; Pendleton, Rand P.

    1999-01-01

    A high power water load for microwave and millimeter wave radio frequency sources has a front wall including an input port for the application of RF power, a cylindrical dissipation cavity lined with a dissipating material having a thickness which varies with depth, and a rear wall including a rotating reflector for the reflection of wave energy inside the cylindrical cavity. The dissipation cavity includes a water jacket for removal of heat generated by the absorptive material coating the dissipation cavity, and this absorptive material has a thickness which is greater near the front wall than near the rear wall. Waves entering the cavity reflect from the rotating reflector, impinging and reflecting multiple times on the absorptive coating of the dissipation cavity, dissipating equal amounts of power on each internal reflection.

  8. Engine-driven electrization of aircraft as a radio interference source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varfolomeev, A. A.; Gushchin, M. E.; Korobkov, S. V.; Kostrov, A. V.; Palochkin, Yu. P.; Priver, S. E.; Odzerikho, D. A.; Strikovskii, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Field measurements of the quasi-static electrical fields emerging due to the in-flight electrization of low-speed low-altitude aircraft (helicopters) were performed for the first time. It was found that the electrization of helicopters with gas turbine power plants is of a engine-driven nature: the accumulation of static positive charge at the fuselage is induced by a unipolar negatively charged exhaust stream. A static positive fuselage potential that reaches +30 or even +35 kV for certain helicopter models was determined. If dielectric and composite materials are used in the construction of helicopters and specific parts of the aircraft are isolated electrically from the fuselage, differential electrization occurs. In view of the high absolute value of the fuselage potential, this electrization results in the generation of high-voltage discharges that serve as a source of intense radio interference within a frequency band of from several megahertz to several hundred megahertz.

  9. An Electron Bunch Compression Scheme for a Superconducting Radio Frequency Linear Accelerator Driven Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. Tennant, S.V. Benson, D. Douglas, P. Evtushenko, R.A. Legg

    2011-09-01

    We describe an electron bunch compression scheme suitable for use in a light source driven by a superconducting radio frequency (SRF) linac. The key feature is the use of a recirculating linac to perform the initial bunch compression. Phasing of the second pass beam through the linac is chosen to de-chirp the electron bunch prior to acceleration to the final energy in an SRF linac ('afterburner'). The final bunch compression is then done at maximum energy. This scheme has the potential to circumvent some of the most technically challenging aspects of current longitudinal matches; namely transporting a fully compressed, high peak current electron bunch through an extended SRF environment, the need for a RF harmonic linearizer and the need for a laser heater. Additional benefits include a substantial savings in capital and operational costs by efficiently using the available SRF gradient.

  10. A complete sample of double-lobed radio quasars for VLBI tests of source models - Definition and statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, D. H.; Readhead, A. C. S.

    1989-01-01

    A complete, flux-density-limited sample of double-lobed radio quasars is defined, with nuclei bright enough to be mapped with the Mark III VLBI system. It is shown that the statistics of linear size, nuclear strength, and curvature are consistent with the assumption of random source orientations and simple relativistic beaming in the nuclei. However, these statistics are also consistent with the effects of interaction between the beams and the surrounding medium. The distribution of jet velocities in the nuclei, as measured with VLBI, will provide a powerful test of physical theories of extragalactic radio sources.

  11. GMRT Detection of a New Wide-Angle Tail (WAT) Radio Source ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/joaa/030/01/0037-0051. Keywords. Radio galaxies; cluster of galaxies; ram pressure; intracluster medium. Abstract. We report the serendipitous detection of a Wide-Angle Tail (WAT) radio galaxy at 240 and 610 MHz, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope (GMRT).

  12. On an Allan variance approach to classify VLBI radio-sources on the basis of their astrometric stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gattano, C.; Lambert, S.; Bizouard, C.

    2017-12-01

    In the context of selecting sources defining the celestial reference frame, we compute astrometric time series of all VLBI radio-sources from observations in the International VLBI Service database. The time series are then analyzed with Allan variance in order to estimate the astrometric stability. From results, we establish a new classification that takes into account the whole multi-time scales information. The algorithm is flexible on the definition of ``stable source" through an adjustable threshold.

  13. Lightning Radio Source Retrieval Using Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William J.; Blakeslee, Richard J.; Bailey, J. C.

    1998-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from an Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing and arrival time of lightning radio emissions. Solutions for the plane (i.e., no Earth curvature) are provided that implement all of tile measurements mentioned above. Tests of the retrieval method are provided using computer-simulated data sets. We also introduce a quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in source location. Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. In the absence of measurement errors, quadratic root degeneracy (no source location ambiguity) is shown to exist exactly on the outer sensor baselines for arbitrary non-collinear network geometries. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer generated data sets. The results are generally better than those obtained from the three station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 deg. We also note some of the advantages and disadvantages of these methods over the nonlinear method of chi(sup 2) minimization employed by the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) and discussed in Cummins et al.(1993, 1995, 1998).

  14. Free-form analysis of the cosmological evolution of radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.G.

    1980-01-01

    This paper extends an iterative scheme for calculation of free-form evolution functions able to reconcile observed radio source counts with the standard General Relativistic cosmological models. It is assumed that the luminosity dependence of the evolution consists of a gradual turn-on of evolution above a certain luminosity. No particular functional form is assumed for the redshift dependence of the evolution (i.e. it is free-form). The extension concerns the use of the luminosity distribution to supply an effective luminosity function, thus overcoming a problem of consistency at the high-luminosity end of the luminosity function, where the evolution function has to be known. This method also guarantees that the correct average redshifts will be predicted where they are known observationally at high flux densities. The new iterative scheme has been applied to the source counts at 408 MHz from the Molonglo Cross telescope, using the Einstein-de Sitter cosmology and a recent determination of the luminosity distribution for sources of S 408 > 10 Jy. (author)

  15. On the nature of emission of the star-gas-dust complex of the W1 radio source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udal'tsov, V.A.; Kovalenko, A.V.

    1982-01-01

    The brightness distribution of the radio source W 1 at 102 MHz has been investigated with the 187x384 m radio telescope in Pushchino. It is shown that W 1 is genetically connected with the stellar association Ceph IV as well as with the extended emission nebula GS 285 which consists of numerous nebulae, including two bright ones, Sharpless (S) 171 and NGC 7822. The radio emission of the nebula S 171 is shown to be thermal, and there is no Supernova remnant in it, in contrast with the other authors' suggestion. By two independent methods, the distance to S 171 has been evaluated to be 840 pc. The emission of NGC 7822 is mainly thermal. The extended nebula GS 285 is a thermal source, not a remnant of a Supernova that had exploded in a dense gas - dust medium, as was believed by other authors. Attention is drawn to the wrong identification by many authors of the radio source in the S 171 region with the nebula NGC 7822. It is shown that when measuring the difference of spectral indices of two sources, the calibration error may be eliminated if their calibration at given frequency is made by means of the same source [ru

  16. Further evidence for the strong steepening of the median radio spectrum with decreasing intensity of sources selected at 5 GHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machalski, J.; Rys, S.

    1981-06-01

    Results are presented of a comparison of the spectral indices of radio sources selected at 5 GHz with their 5-GHz intensities which provides further evidence for the strong steepening of the radio spectrum with decreasing flux density. Distributions of spectral index between 5000 and 1400 MHz are compared for radio sources of 5-GHz intensity greater than or equal to 800 mJy of Witzel et al. (1979), sources selected from the S5 installment of the NRAO-Bonn survey with intensity between 250 and 800 mJy, and sources selected from the 4755-MHz survey of Ledden et al. (1980) with intensity between 40 and 250 mJy. As 5-GHz flux density decreases, it is observed that (1) the secondary peak of the spectral index distribution decreases; (2) the main peak of the distribution is shifted to steeper values; and (3) the dispersion systematically decreases. It is pointed out that further optical identifications of faint radio sources at 5 GHz are required to determine whether the observed steepening is due to a decline of quasars, or a variation in quasar spectral properties with increasing distance.

  17. Interplanetary scintillation studies with the Murchison Widefield Array - II. Properties of sub-arcsecond compact sources at low radio frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhetri, R.; Morgan, J.; Ekers, R. D.; Macquart, J.-P.; Sadler, E. M.; Giroletti, M.; Callingham, J. R.; Tingay, S. J.

    2018-03-01

    We report the first astrophysical application of the technique of wide-field interplanetary scintillation (IPS) with the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA). This powerful technique allows us to identify and measure sub-arcsecond compact components in low-frequency radio sources across large areas of sky without the need for long-baseline interferometry or ionospheric calibration. We present the results of a 5-min observation of a 30 × 30 deg2 MWA field at 162 MHz with 0.5 s time resolution. Of the 2550 continuum sources detected in this field, 302 (12 per cent) show rapid fluctuations caused by IPS. We find that at least 32 per cent of bright low-frequency radio sources contain a sub-arcsecond compact component that contributes over 40 per cent of the total flux density. Perhaps surprisingly, peaked-spectrum radio sources are the dominant population among the strongly scintillating, low-frequency sources in our sample. While gamma-ray active galactic nuclei are generally compact, flat-spectrum radio sources at higher frequencies (162 MHz), the properties of many of the Fermi blazars in our field are consistent with a compact component embedded within more extended low-frequency emission. The detection of a known pulsar in our field shows that the wide-field IPS technique is at the threshold of sensitivity needed to detect new pulsars using image plane analysis, and scaling the current MWA sensitivity to that expected for SKA-low implies that large IPS-based pulsar searches will be feasible with SKA. Calibration strategies for the SKA require a better knowledge of the space density of compact sources at low radio frequencies, which IPS observations can now provide.

  18. Three-color photographic photometry of active quasi-stellar radio sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackney, K.R.H.

    1973-01-01

    Statistically significant optical variations were detected at Rosemary Hill Observatory in studies of the quasars and quasar-like objects PKS 0048-09, PSK 0336-01, PKS 0420-01, PKS 0518+16, PKS 0735+17, PKS 2111-25, PKS 2209+08, PKS 2354-11, OB 338, OI 318, OK 290, and OL 318. These sources comprised about 40 percent of the sample of 28 objects for which numerous photographic plates were measured with an iris photometer. The detection of variability in the objects PKS 2111-25, PKS 2209+08, PKS 2354-11, OB 338, and OL 318 supports the previously suggested optical identifications that were based only on color and proximity to the radio source positions. The large-amplitude variability of PKS 0735+17 is especially noteworthy in connection with its featureless optical spectrum and its consequent similarity to the active peculiar sources BL Lac and OJ 287. Detailed observation revealed that the quasar PKS 0906+01 continues to exhibit one-magnitude monthly flares that erupt apparently at random from a slowly varying base component. Observation of the quasar 3C 345 disclosed the second apparition of a one-magnitude plateau of about one-year duration, following by about 1200 days its initial appearance in the light curve. Substantial interday variation of BL Lac and 3C 120 and possible intraday variation in OJ 287 were revealed in Rosemary Hill observations of these sources made in cooperation with other observatories. The amplitudes of the variations of BL Lac and OJ 287 were found to be greater for shorter wavelengths in the present UBV observations. The B--V color index of BL Lac increased by 0.18 magnitude on the average for a one-magnitude decrease in V over the 1971 and 1972 observing seasons. This result is interpreted simply in terms of a two-component synchrotron source model

  19. Ham radio for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Silver, H Ward

    2013-01-01

    An ideal first step for learning about ham radio Beyond operating wirelessly, today's ham radio operators can transmit data and pictures; use the Internet, laser, and microwave transmitters; and travel to places high and low to make contact. This hands-on beginner guide reflects the operational and technical changes to amateur radio over the past decade and provides you with updated licensing requirements and information, changes in digital communication (such as the Internet, social media, and GPS), and how to use e-mail via radio. Addresses the critical use of ham radio for replacing downe

  20. Studies of an inductively coupled negative hydrogen ion radio frequency source through simulations and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2004-01-01

    In the frame work of a development project for ITER neutral beam injection system a radio frequency (RF) driven negative hydrogen (H-/D-) ion source, (BATMAN ion source) is developed which is designed to produce several 10s of ampere of H-/D- beam current. This PhD work has been carried out to understand and optimize BATMAN ion source. The study has been done with the help of computer simulations, modeling and experiments. The complete three dimensional Monte-Carlo computer simulation codes have been developed under the scope of this PhD work. A comprehensive description about the volume production and the surface production of H- ions is presented in the thesis along with the study results obtained from the simulations, modeling and the experiments. One of the simulations is based on the volume production of H- ions, where it calculates the density profile of the vibrationally excited H2 molecules, the density profile of H- ions and the transport probability of those H- ions along the source axis towards the grid. The other simulation studies the transport of those H- ions which are produced on the surface of the plasma grid. It is expected that if there is a plasma flow in the source, the transport of plasma components (molecules and ions) would be influenced. Experimentally it is observed that there is a convective plasma flow exists in the ion source. A transverse magnetic filter field which is present near the grid inside the ion source reduces the flow velocity. Negative ions and electrons have the same sign of charge; therefore the electrons are co-extracted with the negative ions through the grid system, which is not desirable. It is observed that a magnetic field near the grid, magnetized the electrons and therefore reduce the co-extracted electron current. It is also observed experimentally that if the plasma grid is biased positively with respect to the source body, the electron density near the plasma grid is reduced and therefore the co

  1. Studies of an inductively coupled negative hydrogen ion radio frequency source through simulations and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bandyopadhyay, M.

    2004-08-24

    In the frame work of a development project for ITER neutral beam injection system a radio frequency (RF) driven negative hydrogen (H-/D-) ion source, (BATMAN ion source) is developed which is designed to produce several 10s of ampere of H-/D- beam current. This PhD work has been carried out to understand and optimize BATMAN ion source. The study has been done with the help of computer simulations, modeling and experiments. The complete three dimensional Monte-Carlo computer simulation codes have been developed under the scope of this PhD work. A comprehensive description about the volume production and the surface production of H- ions is presented in the thesis along with the study results obtained from the simulations, modeling and the experiments. One of the simulations is based on the volume production of H- ions, where it calculates the density profile of the vibrationally excited H2 molecules, the density profile of H- ions and the transport probability of those H- ions along the source axis towards the grid. The other simulation studies the transport of those H- ions which are produced on the surface of the plasma grid. It is expected that if there is a plasma flow in the source, the transport of plasma components (molecules and ions) would be influenced. Experimentally it is observed that there is a convective plasma flow exists in the ion source. A transverse magnetic filter field which is present near the grid inside the ion source reduces the flow velocity. Negative ions and electrons have the same sign of charge; therefore the electrons are co-extracted with the negative ions through the grid system, which is not desirable. It is observed that a magnetic field near the grid, magnetized the electrons and therefore reduce the co-extracted electron current. It is also observed experimentally that if the plasma grid is biased positively with respect to the source body, the electron density near the plasma grid is reduced and therefore the co

  2. J1649+2635: A Grand-Design Spiral with a Large Double-Lobed Radio Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Minnie Y.; Owen, Frazer; Duffin, Ryan; Keel, Bill; Lacy, Mark; Momjian, Emmanuel; Morrison, Glenn; Mroczkowski, Tony; Neff, Susan; Norris, Ray P.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We report the discovery of a grand-design spiral galaxy associated with a double-lobed radio source. J1649+2635 (z = 0.0545) is a red spiral galaxy with a prominent bulge that it is associated with a L(1.4GHz) is approximately 10(exp24) W Hz(exp-1) double-lobed radio source that spans almost 100 kpc. J1649+2635 has a black hole mass of M(BH) is approximately 3-7 × 10(exp8) Solar mass and SFR is approximately 0.26 - 2.6 solar mass year(exp-1). The galaxy hosts a approximately 96 kpc diffuse optical halo, which is unprecedented for spiral galaxies. We find that J1649+2635 resides in an overdense environment with a mass of M(dyn) = 7.7(+7.9/-4.3) × 10(exp13) Solar mass, likely a galaxy group below the detection threshold of the ROSAT All-Sky Survey. We suggest one possible scenario for the association of double-lobed radio emission from J1649+2635 is that the source may be similar to a Seyfert galaxy, located in a denser-than-normal environment. The study of spiral galaxies that host large-scale radio emission is important because although rare in the local Universe, these sources may be more common at high-redshifts.

  3. Boundary Layer Remote Sensing with Combined Active and Passive Techniques: GPS Radio Occultation and High-Resolution Stereo Imaging (WindCam) Small Satellite Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannucci, A.J.; Wu, D.L.; Teixeira, J.; Ao, C.O.; Xie, F.; Diner, D.J.; Wood, R.; Turk, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Objective: significant progress in understanding low-cloud boundary layer processes. This is the Single largest uncertainty in climate projections. Radio occultation has unique features suited to boundary layer remote sensing (1) Cloud penetrating (2) Very high vertical resolution (approximately 50m-100m) (3) Sensitivity to thermodynamic variables

  4. GPS & Roadpricing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zabic, Martina

    2005-01-01

    I denne artikel præsenteres analysemetoderne og resultaterne fra et eksamensprojekt omhandlende en analyse af GPS kvaliteten i forhold til roadpricing i København. Denne undersøgelse af GPS kvaliteten i forbindelse med roadpricing, er foretaget i tilknytning til det danske AKTA forsøg (www.......akta-kbh.dk), hvor GPS data er indsamlet for 500 biler over en 2-årig periode (2001-2003). Artiklen præsenterer således en analyse af GPS nøjagtigheden med henblik på at undersøge om kvalitet og pålidelighed er tilstrækkelig, til et GPS-baseret roadpricingssystem i København. Ved GPS-baseret roadpricing, udstyres...... med henblik på enhedsomkostningerne skulle være økonomisk realisable til brug i et så omfattende roadpricingssystem. Endvidere vanskeliggøres positionerings forholdene, idet bilen der ønskes positionsbestemt er i bevægelse. Når både satellitterne og GPS modtageren er i bevægelse, reduceres...

  5. Classical radio source propagating into outer HI disc in NGC 3801

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emonts, B. H. C.; Burnett, C.; Morganti, R.; Struve, C.

    We present observations of a large-scale disc of neutral hydrogen (H I) in the nearby Fanaroff-Riley type I (FR I) radio galaxy NGC 3801 with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The HI disc (34 kpc in diameter and with M-HI = 1.3 x 10(9)M(circle dot)) is aligned with the radio jet axis. This

  6. ON THE SOURCE OF FARADAY ROTATION IN THE JET OF THE RADIO GALAXY 3C 120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Jose L.; Roca-Sogorb, Mar; Agudo, Ivan; Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.

    2011-01-01

    The source of Faraday rotation in the jet of the radio galaxy 3C 120 is analyzed through Very Long Baseline Array observations carried out between 1999 and 2007 at 86, 43, 22, 15, 12, 8, 5, 2, and 1.7 GHz. Comparison of observations from 1999 to 2001 reveals uncorrelated changes in the linear polarization of the underlying jet emission and the Faraday rotation screen: while the rotation measure (RM) remains constant between approximately 2 and 5 mas from the core, the RM-corrected electric vector position angles (EVPAs) of two superluminal components are rotated by almost 90 0 when compared to other components moving through similar jet locations. On the other hand, the innermost 2 mas experiences a significant change in RM-including a sign reversal-but without variations in the RM-corrected EVPAs. Similarly, observations in 2007 reveal a double sign reversal in RM along the jet, while the RM-corrected EVPAs remain perpendicular to the jet axis. Although the observed coherent structure and gradient of the RM along the jet support the idea that the Faraday rotation is produced by a sheath of thermal electrons that surrounds the emitting jet, the uncorrelated changes in the RM and RM-corrected EVPAs indicate that the emitting jet and the source of Faraday rotation are not closely connected physically and have different configurations for the magnetic field and/or kinematical properties. Furthermore, the existence of a region of enhanced RM whose properties remain constant over three years requires a localized source of Faraday rotation, favoring a model in which a significant fraction of the RM originates in foreground clouds.

  7. On Asymmetries in Powerful Radio Sources and the Quasar/Galaxy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    show a high degree of asymmetry in observed radio structures due to relativistic beaming, with foreshortened projected linear sizes. A simple consequence of this is the x−D anti-correlation. Results show a tight cor- relation (r > 0.8) between the total and core radio luminosities and a clear x − D anti-correlation (r ∼ −0.5).

  8. Remote sensing of a NTC radio source from a Cluster tilted spacecraft pair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. E. Décréau

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Cluster mission operated a "tilt campaign" during the month of May 2008. Two of the four identical Cluster spacecraft were placed at a close distance (~50 km from each other and the spin axis of one of the spacecraft pair was tilted by an angle of ~46°. This gave the opportunity, for the first time in space, to measure global characteristics of AC electric field, at the sensitivity available with long boom (88 m antennas, simultaneously from the specific configuration of the tilted pair of satellites and from the available base of three satellites placed at a large characteristic separation (~1 RE. This paper describes how global characteristics of radio waves, in this case the configuration of the electric field polarization ellipse in 3-D-space, are identified from in situ measurements of spin modulation features by the tilted pair, validating a novel experimental concept. In the event selected for analysis, non-thermal continuum (NTC waves in the 15–25 kHz frequency range are observed from the Cluster constellation placed above the polar cap. The observed intensity variations with spin angle are those of plane waves, with an electric field polarization close to circular, at an ellipticity ratio e = 0.87. We derive the source position in 3-D by two different methods. The first one uses ray path orientation (measured by the tilted pair combined with spectral signature of magnetic field magnitude at source. The second one is obtained via triangulation from the three spacecraft baseline, using estimation of directivity angles under assumption of circular polarization. The two results are not compatible, placing sources widely apart. We present a general study of the level of systematic errors due to the assumption of circular polarization, linked to the second approach, and show how this approach can lead to poor triangulation and wrong source positioning. The estimation derived from the first method places the NTC source region in the

  9. Trusted information sources used during and after Superstorm Sandy: TV and radio were used more often than social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Joanna; Gochfeld, Michael; Jeitner, Christian; Pittfield, Taryn; Donio, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Health and safety professionals and the public are interested in the best methods of providing timely information about disasters. The objective of this study was to examine information sources used for Superstorm Sandy with respect to the storm, evacuation routes, shelters, safety, and health issues. Respondents in central New Jersey and Jersey shore communities were differentially impacted by the storm. Jersey shore respondents had higher evacuation rates (47% vs. 13%), higher flood waters in homes, longer power outages (average 23 vs. 6 d), and longer periods without Internet (29 vs. 6 d). Electricity outages disrupted both sources and receivers of communication. Both groups obtained most of their information regarding safety from television, radio, friends, and Web/e-mail. Information sources on health varied by location, with central Jersey respondents using mainly TV and the Web, and Jersey shore respondents obtaining health information from the radio and TV (before the storm). For information on evacuation routes, Jersey shore respondents obtained information from many sources, while central Jersey respondents obtained it from TV. Information on mold was largely obtained from friends and the Web, since mold issues were dealt with several weeks after Sandy. The reliance on traditional sources of information (TV, radio, friends) found in this study suggests that the extreme power outages rendered Web, cell phones, and social media on cell phones less usable, and suggests the need for an integrated communication strategy with redundancies that takes into account prolonged power outages over large geographical areas.

  10. Development of a novel radio-frequency negative hydrogen ion source in conically converging configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, B K; Dang, J J; An, Y H; Chung, K J; Hwang, Y S

    2014-02-01

    Volume-produced negative ion source still requires enhancement of current density with lower input RF (radio-frequency) power in lower operating pressure for various applications. To confirm recent observation of efficient negative ion production with a short cylindrical chamber with smaller effective plasma size, the RF-driven transformer-coupled plasma H(-) ion source at Seoul National University is modified by adopting a newly designed quartz RF window to reduce the chamber length. Experiments with the reduced chamber length show a few times enhancement of H(-) ion beam current compared to that extracted from the previous chamber design, which is consistent with the measured H(-) ion population. Nevertheless, decrease in H(-) ion beam current observed in low pressure regime below ∼5 mTorr owing to insufficient filtering of high energy electrons in the extraction region needs to be resolved to address the usefulness of electron temperature control by the change of geometrical configuration of the discharge chamber. A new discharge chamber with conically converging configuration has been developed, in which the chamber diameter decreases as approaching to the extraction region away from the planar RF antenna such that stronger filter magnetic field can be utilized to prohibit high energy electrons from transporting to the extraction region. First experimental results for the H(-) ion beam extraction with this configuration show that higher magnetic filter field makes peak negative beam currents happen in lower operating pressure. However, overall decrease in H(-) ion beam current due to the change of chamber geometry still requires further study of geometrical effect on particle transport and optimization of magnetic field in this novel configuration.

  11. THE COMPACT, TIME-VARIABLE RADIO SOURCE PROJECTED INSIDE W3(OH): EVIDENCE FOR A PHOTOEVAPORATED DISK?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzib, Sergio A.; Rodriguez-Garza, Carolina B.; Rodriguez, Luis F.; Kurtz, Stan E.; Loinard, Laurent; Zapata, Luis A.; Lizano, Susana, E-mail: s.dzib@crya.unam.mx [Centro de Radiostronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Morelia 58089 (Mexico)

    2013-08-01

    We present new Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) observations of the compact ({approx}0.''05), time-variable radio source projected near the center of the ultracompact H II region W3(OH). The analysis of our new data as well as of VLA archival observations confirms the variability of the source on timescales of years and for a given epoch indicates a spectral index of {alpha} = 1.3 {+-} 0.3 (S{sub {nu}}{proportional_to}{nu}{sup {alpha}}). This spectral index and the brightness temperature of the source ({approx}6500 K) suggest that we are most likely detecting partially optically thick free-free radiation. The radio source is probably associated with the ionizing star of W3(OH), but an interpretation in terms of an ionized stellar wind fails because the detected flux densities are orders of magnitude larger than expected. We discuss several scenarios and tentatively propose that the radio emission could arise in a static ionized atmosphere around a fossil photoevaporated disk.

  12. GPS Composite Clock Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Wright, James R.

    2008-01-01

    The GPS composite clock defines GPS time, the timescale used today in GPS operations. GPS time is illuminated by examination of its role in the complete estimation and control problem relative to UTC/TAI. The phase of each GPS clock is unobservable from GPS pseudorange measurements, and the mean phase of the GPS clock ensemble (GPS time) is unobservable. A new and useful observability definition is presented, together with new observability theorems, to demonstrate explicitly that GPS time is...

  13. On Asymmetries in Powerful Radio Sources and the Quasar/Galaxy ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    sight are expected to show a high degree of asymmetry in observed radio ... Department of Physics, Federal University of Technology, Owerri, Nigeria; Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Nigeria, Nsukka, Nigeria ...

  14. Motion of the sources for type II and type IV radio bursts and flare-associated interplanetary disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, K.; Chao, J. K.

    1974-01-01

    Shock waves are indirectly observed as the source of type II radio bursts, whereas magnetic bottles are identified as the source of moving metric type IV radio bursts. The difference between the expansion speeds of these waves and bottles is examined during their generation and propagation near the flare regions. It is shown that, although generated in the explosive phase of flares, the bottles behave quite differently from the waves and that the bottles are generally much slower than the waves. It has been suggested that the waves are related to flare-associated interplanetary disturbances which produce SSC geomagnetic storms. These disturbances may, therefore, be identified as interplanetary shock waves. The relationship among magnetic bottles, shock waves near the sun, and flare-associated disturbances in interplanetary space is briefly discussed.

  15. Motion of the sources for type 2 and type 4 radio bursts and flare-associated interplanetary disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, K.; Chao, J. K.

    1973-01-01

    Shock waves are indirectly observed as the source of type 2 radio brusts, whereas magnetic bottles are identified as the source of moving metric type 4 radio bursts. The difference between the expansion speeds of these waves bottles is examined during their generation and propagation near the flare regions. It is shown that, although generated in the explosive phase of flares, the behavior of the bottles is quite different from that of the waves and that the speed of the former is generally much lower. It is shown that the transit times of disturbances between the sun and the earth give information about the deceleration of shock waves to their local speeds observed near the earth's orbit. A brief discussion is given on the relationship among magnetic bottles, shock waves near the sun, and flare-associated disturbances in interplanetary space.

  16. Inversion of GPS meteorology data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Hocke

    Full Text Available The GPS meteorology (GPS/MET experiment, led by the Universities Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR, consists of a GPS receiver aboard a low earth orbit (LEO satellite which was launched on 3 April 1995. During a radio occultation the LEO satellite rises or sets relative to one of the 24 GPS satellites at the Earth's horizon. Thereby the atmospheric layers are successively sounded by radio waves which propagate from the GPS satellite to the LEO satellite. From the observed phase path increases, which are due to refraction of the radio waves by the ionosphere and the neutral atmosphere, the atmospheric parameter refractivity, density, pressure and temperature are calculated with high accuracy and resolution (0.5–1.5 km. In the present study, practical aspects of the GPS/MET data analysis are discussed. The retrieval is based on the Abelian integral inversion of the atmospheric bending angle profile into the refractivity index profile. The problem of the upper boundary condition of the Abelian integral is described by examples. The statistical optimization approach which is applied to the data above 40 km and the use of topside bending angle profiles from model atmospheres stabilize the inversion. The retrieved temperature profiles are compared with corresponding profiles which have already been calculated by scientists of UCAR and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL, using Abelian integral inversion too. The comparison shows that in some cases large differences occur (5 K and more. This is probably due to different treatment of the upper boundary condition, data runaways and noise. Several temperature profiles with wavelike structures at tropospheric and stratospheric heights are shown. While the periodic structures at upper stratospheric heights could be caused by residual errors of the ionospheric correction method, the periodic temperature fluctuations at heights below 30 km are most likely caused by atmospheric waves (vertically

  17. Retrieving Precipitable Water Vapor Data Using GPS Zenith Delays and Global Reanalysis Data in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Jiang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available GPS has become a very effective tool to remotely sense precipitable water vapor (PWV information, which is important for weather forecasting and nowcasting. The number of geodetic GNSS stations set up in China has substantially increased over the last few decades. However, GPS PWV derivation requires surface pressure to calculate the precise zenith hydrostatic delay and weighted mean temperature to map the zenith wet delay to precipitable water vapor. GPS stations without collocated meteorological sensors can retrieve water vapor using standard atmosphere parameters, which lead to a decrease in accuracy. In this paper, a method of interpolating NWP reanalysis data to site locations for generating corresponding meteorological elements is explored over China. The NCEP FNL dataset provided by the NCEP (National Centers for Environmental Prediction and over 600 observed stations from different sources was selected to assess the quality of the results. A one-year experiment was performed in our study. The types of stations selected include meteorological sites, GPS stations, radio sounding stations, and a sun photometer station. Compared with real surface measurements, the accuracy of the interpolated surface pressure and air temperature both meet the requirements of GPS PWV derivation in most areas; however, the interpolated surface air temperature exhibits lower precision than the interpolated surface pressure. At more than 96% of selected stations, PWV differences caused by the differences between the interpolation results and real measurements were less than 1.0 mm. Our study also indicates that relief amplitude exerts great influence on the accuracy of the interpolation approach. Unsatisfactory interpolation results always occurred in areas of strong relief. GPS PWV data generated from interpolated meteorological parameters are consistent with other PWV products (radio soundings, the NWP reanalysis dataset, and sun photometer PWV data. The

  18. The mystery of the "Kite" radio source in Abell 2626: Insights from new Chandra observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignesti, A.; Gitti, M.; Brunetti, G.; O'Sullivan, E.; Sarazin, C.; Wong, K.

    2018-03-01

    Context. We present the results of a new Chandra study of the galaxy cluster Abell 2626. The radio emission of the cluster shows a complex system of four symmetric arcs without known correlations with the thermal X-ray emission. The mirror symmetry of the radio arcs toward the center and the presence of two optical cores in the central galaxy suggested that they may be created by pairs of precessing radio jets powered by dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) inside the core dominant galaxy. However, previous observations failed to observe the second jetted AGN and the spectral trend due to radiative age along the radio arcs, thus challenging this interpretation. Aim. The new Chandra observation had several scientific objectives, including the search for the second AGN that would support the jet precession model. We focus here on the detailed study of the local properties of the thermal and non-thermal emission in the proximity of the radio arcs, in order to obtain further insights into their origin. Methods: We performed a standard data reduction of the Chandra dataset deriving the radial profiles of temperature, density, pressure and cooling time of the intra-cluster medium. We further analyzed the two-dimensional (2D) distribution of the gas temperature, discovering that the south-western junction of the radio arcs surrounds the cool core of the cluster. Results: We studied the X-ray surface brightness and spectral profiles across the junction, finding a cold front spatially coincident with the radio arcs. This may suggest a connection between the sloshing of the thermal gas and the nature of the radio filaments, raising new scenarios for their origin. A tantalizing possibility is that the radio arcs trace the projection of a complex surface connecting the sites where electrons are most efficiently reaccelerated by the turbulence that is generated by the gas sloshing. In this case, diffuse emission embedded by the arcs and with extremely steep spectrum should be

  19. The puzzling case of the radio-loud QSO 3C 186: a gravitational wave recoiling black hole in a young radio source?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiaberge, M.; Ely, J. C.; Meyer, E. T.; Georganopoulos, M.; Marinucci, A.; Bianchi, S.; Tremblay, G. R.; Hilbert, B.; Kotyla, J. P.; Capetti, A.; Baum, S. A.; Macchetto, F. D.; Miley, G.; O'Dea, C. P.; Perlman, E. S.; Sparks, W. B.; Norman, C.

    2017-04-01

    Context. Radio-loud active galactic nuclei with powerful relativistic jets are thought to be associated with rapidly spinning black holes (BHs). BH spin-up may result from a number of processes, including accretion of matter onto the BH itself, and catastrophic events such as BH-BH mergers. Aims: We study the intriguing properties of the powerful (Lbol 1047 erg s-1) radio-loud quasar 3C 186. This object shows peculiar features both in the images and in the spectra. Methods: We utilize near-IR Hubble Space Telescope (HST) images to study the properties of the host galaxy, and HST UV and Sloan Digital Sky Survey optical spectra to study the kinematics of the source. Chandra X-ray data are also used to better constrain the physical interpretation. Results: HST imaging shows that the active nucleus is offset by 1.3 ± 0.1 arcsec (I.e. 11 kpc) with respect to the center of the host galaxy. Spectroscopic data show that the broad emission lines are offset by -2140 ± 390 km s-1 with respect to the narrow lines. Velocity shifts are often seen in QSO spectra, in particular in high-ionization broad emission lines. The host galaxy of the quasar displays a distorted morphology with possible tidal features that are typical of the late stages of a galaxy merger. Conclusions: A number of scenarios can be envisaged to account for the observed features. While the presence of a peculiar outflow cannot be completely ruled out, all of the observed features are consistent with those expected if the QSO is associated with a gravitational wave (GW) recoiling BH. Future detailed studies of this object will allow us to confirm this type of scenario and will enable a better understanding of both the physics of BH-BH mergers and the phenomena associated with the emission of GW from astrophysical sources.

  20. A multiwavelength view of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 and its peculiar diffuse radio source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girardi, M.; Boschin, W.; Gastaldello, F.; Giovannini, G.; Govoni, F.; Murgia, M.; Barrena, R.; Ettori, S.; Trasatti, M.; Vacca, V.

    2016-03-01

    We study the structure of the galaxy cluster Abell 523 (A523) at z = 0.104 using new spectroscopic data for 132 galaxies acquired at the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo, new photometric data from the Isaac Newton Telescope, and X-ray and radio data from the Chandra and Very Large Array archives. We estimate the velocity dispersion of the galaxy population, σ _V=949_{-60}^{+80} km s-1, and the X-ray temperature of the hot intracluster medium, kT = 5.3 ± 0.3 keV. We infer that A523 is a massive system: M200 ˜ 7-9 × 1014 M⊙. The analysis of the optical data confirms the presence of two subclusters, 0.75 Mpc apart, tracing the SSW-NNE direction and dominated by the two brightest cluster galaxies (BCG1 and BCG2). The X-ray surface brightness is strongly elongated towards the NNE direction, and its peak is clearly offset from both the brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). We confirm the presence of a 1.3 Mpc large radio halo, elongated in the ESE-WNW direction and perpendicular to the optical/X-ray elongation. We detect a significant radio/X-ray offset and radio polarization, two features which might be the result of a magnetic field energy spread on large spatial scales. A523 is found consistent with most scaling relations followed by clusters hosting radio haloes, but quite peculiar in the Pradio-LX relation: it is underluminous in the X-rays or overluminous in radio. A523 can be described as a binary head-on merger caught after a collision along the SSW-NNE direction. However, minor optical and radio features suggest a more complex cluster structure, with A523 forming at the crossing of two filaments along the SSW-NNE and ESE-WNW directions.

  1. Infrared-faint radio sources remain undetected at far-infrared wavelengths. Deep photometric observations using the Herschel Space Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Norris, R. P.; Middelberg, E.; Spitler, L. R.; Leipski, C.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-08-01

    Context. Showing 1.4 GHz flux densities in the range of a few to a few tens of mJy, infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are a type of galaxy characterised by faint or absent near-infrared counterparts and consequently extreme radio-to-infrared flux density ratios up to several thousand. Recent studies showed that IFRS are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at redshifts ≳2, potentially linked to high-redshift radio galaxies (HzRGs). Aims: This work explores the far-infrared emission of IFRS, providing crucial information on the star forming and AGN activity of IFRS. Furthermore, the data enable examining the putative relationship between IFRS and HzRGs and testing whether IFRS are more distant or fainter siblings of these massive galaxies. Methods: A sample of six IFRS was observed with the Herschel Space Observatory between 100 μm and 500 μm. Using these results, we constrained the nature of IFRS by modelling their broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED). Furthermore, we set an upper limit on their infrared SED and decomposed their emission into contributions from an AGN and from star forming activity. Results: All six observed IFRS were undetected in all five Herschel far-infrared channels (stacking limits: σ = 0.74 mJy at 100 μm, σ = 3.45 mJy at 500 μm). Based on our SED modelling, we ruled out the following objects to explain the photometric characteristics of IFRS: (a) known radio-loud quasars and compact steep-spectrum sources at any redshift; (b) starburst galaxies with and without an AGN and Seyfert galaxies at any redshift, even if the templates were modified; and (c) known HzRGs at z ≲ 10.5. We find that the IFRS analysed in this work can only be explained by objects that fulfil the selection criteria of HzRGs. More precisely, IFRS could be (a) known HzRGs at very high redshifts (z ≳ 10.5); (b) low-luminosity siblings of HzRGs with additional dust obscuration at lower redshifts; (c) scaled or unscaled versions of Cygnus A at any

  2. Interplanetary scintillation observations of an unbiased sample of 90 Ooty occultation radio sources at 326.5 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banhatti, D.G.; Ananthakrishnan, S.

    1989-01-01

    We present 327-MHz interplanetary scintillation (IPS) observations of an unbiased sample of 90 extragalactic radio sources selected from the ninth Ooty lunar occultation list. The sources are brighter than 0.75 Jy at 327 MHz and lie outside the galactic plane. We derive values, the fraction of scintillating flux density, and the equivalent Gaussian diameter for the scintillating structure. Various correlations are found between the observed parameters. In particular, the scintillating component weakens and broadens with increasing largest angular size, and stronger scintillators have more compact scintillating components. (author)

  3. Pre-eruptive and co-eruptive deformation of Kirishima volcano, Japan with deep and shallow sources modeling constrained from InSAR and GPS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Amelug, F.; Albino, F.; Aoki, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Kirishima volcano group is located on the southern part of Kyushu, Japan. Prior to its 2011 magmatic eruption, several phreatic eruptions occurred on August 2008 and March, April, May, June and July 2010. Using time series InSAR from 2007-2011 ALOS PALSAR data, we found a small deflating area around Shinmoe-dake volcano summit and a relatively large inflating area on the northwest of Shinmoe-dake volcano, before 2011 Kirishima, Shinmoe-dake eruption. Modeling constrained from both InSAR and dense regional GPS network data revealed deep and shallow deformation sources for Kirishima volcano. This double sources system would help us better understand the complex process of volcanic deformation.

  4. Hydrogen production in a radio-frequency plasma source operating on water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Son-Ca Viet Thi

    The global energy and climate challenges have motivated development of innovative techniques to satisfy energy demand while minimizing emissions. To this end, hydrogen as an alternative energy carrier in the transportation sector is an attractive option. In addition, there is already a great need for hydrogen gas in several industrial processes such as hydro-cracking of crude oil to produce gasoline and production of ammonia and methanol. The current dominant methods of hydrogen production from fossil fuels are well-developed and have reached relatively high energy efficiencies (up to 85%), but these methods rely on non-renewable natural resources and produce carbon dioxide emissions. This work investigates the feasibility of hydrogen production by dissociating water molecules in a radio-frequency (RF) plasma discharge. In addition to the widespread usage of hydrogen gas, applications of water plasma have permeated in many areas of research, and information on basic behaviors of a water plasma discharge will provide fruitful insights for other researchers. An RF plasma source equipped with a double-helix antenna (m = 1 mode) and an applied axial magnetic field is designed to operate on water vapor. It is shown that water molecules are being dissociated in the discharge. Experimental results show that the rate of hydrogen production increases linearly with RF power in the absence of the applied axial magnetic field. With the magnetic field, the rate of hydrogen production increases from 250 to 500 W, and begins to saturate with RF power. Despite this saturation, it is shown that hydrogen increases with magnetic field strength at a fixed RF power. Further, the rate of hydrogen production increases with water input flow rate up to 100 sccm for a fixed RF power level, and begins to decrease at 125 sccm. This dissertation characterizes the rate of hydrogen production and plasma properties as a function of RF power, applied B-field strength, and water input flow rate. A

  5. Evidential recovery from GPS devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Cusack

    Full Text Available Global Positioning Systems (GPS have become more affordable, are now widely used in motor vehicles and in other frequently used applications. As a consequence GPS are increasingly becoming an important source of evidential data for digital forensic investigations. This paper acknowledges there are only disparate documents for the guidance of an investigator when extracting evidence form such systems. The focus of this paper is to provide the technical details of recovering artifacts from four GPS currently available to the New Zealand market. Navman brand GPS are used, following a forensically robust process. The steps of the process are described, results analysed and the associated risks are discussed. In addition, the paper discusses techniques related to the visual presentation of evidence suitable for Google Maps. Automation attempts to speed up the analysis to visualization steps are also included. The outcome is a road map that may assist digital forensic investigators develop GPS examination strategies for implementation in their own organizations.

  6. Pressure Source Model for Ground Inflation during the Periods of High Explosivity at Sakurajima Volcano in Japan - Combination Analysis of GPS, Tilt, and Strain Data -

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, K.; Iguchi, M.; Ohkura, T.; Yamamoto, K.

    2014-12-01

    During frequent vulcanian activity at the Minami-dake crater at Sakurajima during the period of 1974 - 1992, ground subsidence was observed and its pattern was modeled by two deflation sources: located in Aira caldera at a depth of about 10 km, about 6 km north from Minami-dake, and beneath Minami-dake at a depth of about 3 km [Eto, 1989]. Eruptive activities at Showa crater, about 500 m east of Minami-dake, since 2006 increased, accompanying ground inflation in October 2009 - May 2010 (2009 event) in contrast to the Minami-dake period. Similar inflation occurred in October 2011 - March 2012 (2011 event). In this study, we analyzed GPS, tilt and strain data synthetically to obtain pressure sources around Sakurajima during the periods of high explosivity with ground inflation. We applied 3-pressure-source model to the deformation of 2009 and 2011 events. Main inflation source is located beneath Aira caldera at a depth of 9.6 km, similar to previous study. In Sakurajima, inflation pressure source is located beneath Kita-dake 1 km north of Minami-dake at a depth of 3.3 km (K-source), and deflation source is located beneath Minami-dake at a depth of 0.7 km (M-source). We estimated temporal change of volume of K- and M-sources fixing inflation rate of Aira source for 2011 event. Inflation rate of K-source increased in November 2011 and kept at a constant rate until January 2012. Deflation rate of M-source increased at the same time as inflation rate of K-source increased, and kept at a constant rate until March 2012. Amount of volume increase of K-source is nearly 20 times larger than that of volume decrease of M-source. Magma was thought to migrate from Aira source to K-source in November 2011 and continued until January 2012. Due to higher eruptive volume from Showa crater than migration of magma from K-source, M-source deflated slightly from late November 2011 to March 2012.

  7. Using Near-IR Imaging to Probe Accretion-Disk Physics in Powerful Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koekemoer, Anton; O'Dea, Chris; Baum, Stefi

    1999-08-01

    An intriguing question in the study of powerful radio galaxies concerns the reason for their wide diversity of properties: is this related predominantly to external environmental effects, or to intrinsic differences in their central engines and accretion processes? We propose to address this question by using the 2.1m + ONIS to obtain J, H and K imaging of two samples of FR I and FR II radio galaxies, to measure the luminosity and colors of warm circumnuclear dust and determine the near- IR structure and environment of the surrounding host galaxies. The dust absorbs radiation from the AGN and re-radiates it in the near-IR, which can thus be used as a diagnostic of the AGN radiant energy output. This will be compared with the AGN kinetic energy output in the form of radio jets. Our two samples are statistically well-matched in both radio power and redshift space, allowing us to carry out statistical comparisons between AGN properties such as the radiant / kinetic energy conversion, as well as large-scale host galaxy properties. This will indicate whether differences between these classes of active galaxies are related primarily to the central engine, or instead dominated by the large-scale properties of the host galaxy and its environment.

  8. The Golden Age of Radio and Television Programming: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Eleanor S.

    1993-01-01

    Describes reference works that are devoted to the content, background, criticism, history, and scheduling of U.S. television and radio programs from the beginnings of broadcasting through 1960. Works are divided into six categories: general encyclopedias, specific genres, chronology, catalogs and archives, criticism, and "TV Guide." (42…

  9. HST and Spitzer point source and dust lane detection in powerful narrow-line radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, E. A.; Tadhunter, C. N.; Dicken, D.; Rose, M.; Axon, D. J.; Sparks, W.

    2014-10-01

    We present the analysis of infrared HST and Spitzer data for a sample of 13 FRII powerful radio galaxies at 0.03 scale toroidal structure when this is viewed edge-on (Barthel 1989, Antonucci 1993). Our high resolution infrared observations provide new information about the optical extinction, orientation, and direct AGN detection of the inner kpc-scale region of the AGN.

  10. Characterizing Open Source Routing Radio-to-Router Information in an Airborne Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    different combination of heterogeneous radio systems (see Figures 3 and 4) to bridge network connectivity ’" E’-<:lfcnk St.. rOod B.um Rod!o sr.’ .... (ES8...actual RF and signal coding techniques ; 2) The link layer which describes the characteristics of a I-hop link; 3) The network layer that uses

  11. TELEVISION AND RADIO IN ADULT EDUCATION, NUMBER 1. CURRENT INFORMATION SOURCES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syracuse Univ., NY. ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult Education.

    AN ANNOTATED BIBLIOGRAPHY CONTAINS 32 INDEXED ITEMS, MOSTLY WITH ABSTRACTS, ON ASPECTS OF EDUCATIONAL AND INSTRUCTIONAL RADIO AND TELEVISION, PARTICULARLY VIEWING HABITS, MOTIVATION, PUBLIC TELEVISION, MEDIA TECHNOLOGY (INCLUDING COMMUNICATION SATELLITES), INFORMATION DISSEMINATION AND PATTERNS OF INFORMATION SEEKING, THE USE OF CORRESPONDENCE…

  12. Planck intermediate results: VII. Statistical properties of infrared and radio extragalactic sources from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue at frequencies between 100 and 857 GHz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J.-F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.

    2013-01-01

    We make use of the Planck all-sky survey to derive number counts and spectral indices of extragalactic sources-infrared and radio sources-from the Planck Early Release Compact Source Catalogue (ERCSC) at 100 to 857 GHz (3 mm to 350 μm). Three zones (deep, medium and shallow) of approximately...... at 857 GHz over about 12 800 to 16 550 deg2 (31 to 40% of the sky). After the 80% completeness cut, between 122 and 452 and sources remain, with flux densities above 0.3 and 1.9 Jy at 100 and 857 GHz. The sample so defined can be used for statistical analysis. Using the multi-frequency coverage...... of the Planck High Frequency Instrument, all the sources have been classified as either dust-dominated (infrared galaxies) or synchrotron-dominated (radio galaxies) on the basis of their spectral energy distributions (SED). Our sample is thus complete, flux-limited and color-selected to differentiate between...

  13. On the occurrence of F region irregularities over Haikou retrieved from COSMIC GPS radio occultation and ground-based ionospheric scintillation monitor observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao; Yue, Xinan; Zhen, Weimin; Xu, Jisheng; Liu, Dun; Guo, Shan

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the amplitude scintillation index (s4) derived from COSMIC (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate) radio occultation (RO) technique and ground-based Ionospheric Scintillation Monitor (ISM) at Haikou station (geographic latitude: 20.0°N, geographic longitude: 110.3°E, and geomagnetic latitude: 10.02°N) is used to investigate the morphology of F region irregularities in the low latitudes of China. The RO events of tangent point within the range of 10-30°N latitude, 70-160°E longitude, and 150-500 km altitude are adopted to analyze the ionospheric scintillation characteristics. The percentage of ionospheric scintillation occurrence is computed to obtain its diurnal variations, seasonal trends, and the dependence on solar and geomagnetic activities. Based on a statistical analysis of a long-term period data set (years 2007 to 2013), we found that the ionospheric scintillation occurrence from both techniques show similar variations. After sunset (18 LT), the scintillation occurrence increases rapidly and reaches the maximum 3 h later. Then it decreases rapidly till 04 LT and remains low level during the daytime. The ionospheric scintillation tends to occur more frequently during vernal and autumnal equinoxes, especially in March-April and September-October. The equinoctial asymmetry could be seen clearly from the ground-based ISM observations. The peak ionospheric scintillation occurrence time varies with seasons. It is reached latest in summer, while in spring it is very close to that in autumn. The nighttime ionospheric scintillation occurrence tends to increase with increasing solar activities. The increasing tendency is more prominent in vernal and autumnal equinoxes than that in summer and winter. In general, the control of geomagnetic activities is apt to inhibit ionospheric scintillation at equinox nighttime. In summer and winter, the geomagnetic activities could either trigger or inhibit the generation of

  14. MINIFILAMENT ERUPTION AS THE SOURCE OF A BLOWOUT JET, C-CLASS FLARE, AND TYPE-III RADIO BURST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Junchao; Jiang, Yunchun; Yang, Jiayan; Li, Haidong; Xu, Zhe, E-mail: hjcsolar@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 396 Yangfangwang, Guandu District, Kunming, 650216 (China); Center for Astronomical Mega-Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 20A Datun Road, Chaoyang District, Beijing, 100012 (China)

    2017-01-20

    We report a strong minifilament eruption associated with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite C1.6 flare and WIND type-III radio burst. The minifilament, which lies at the periphery of active region 12259, is detected by H α images from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope. The minifilament undergoes a partial and then a full eruption. Simultaneously, two co-spatial jets are successively observed in extreme ultraviolet images from the Solar Dynamic Observatory . The first jet exhibits a typical fan-spine geometry, suggesting that the co-spatial minifilament is possibly embedded in magnetic fields with a fan-spine structure. However, the second jet displays blowout morphology when the entire minifilament erupts upward, leaving behind a hard X-ray emission source in the base. Differential emission measure analyses show that the eruptive region is heated up to about 4 MK during the fan-spine jet, while up to about 7 MK during the blowout jet. In particular, the blowout jet is accompanied by an interplanetary type-III radio burst observed by WIND /WAVES in the frequency range from above 10 to 0.1 MHz. Hence, the minifilament eruption is correlated with the interplanetary type-III radio burst for the first time. These results not only suggest that coronal jets can result from magnetic reconnection initiated by erupting minifilaments with open fields, but also shed light on the potential influence of minifilament eruption on interplanetary space.

  15. Medicina array demonstrator: calibration and radiation pattern characterization using a UAV-mounted radio-frequency source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pupillo, G.; Naldi, G.; Bianchi, G.; Mattana, A.; Monari, J.; Perini, F.; Poloni, M.; Schiaffino, M.; Bolli, P.; Lingua, A.; Aicardi, I.; Bendea, H.; Maschio, P.; Piras, M.; Virone, G.; Paonessa, F.; Farooqui, Z.; Tibaldi, A.; Addamo, G.; Peverini, O. A.; Tascone, R.; Wijnholds, S. J.

    2015-06-01

    One of the most challenging aspects of the new-generation Low-Frequency Aperture Array (LFAA) radio telescopes is instrument calibration. The operational LOw-Frequency ARray (LOFAR) instrument and the future LFAA element of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) require advanced calibration techniques to reach the expected outstanding performance. In this framework, a small array, called Medicina Array Demonstrator (MAD), has been designed and installed in Italy to provide a test bench for antenna characterization and calibration techniques based on a flying artificial test source. A radio-frequency tone is transmitted through a dipole antenna mounted on a micro Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) (hexacopter) and received by each element of the array. A modern digital FPGA-based back-end is responsible for both data-acquisition and data-reduction. A simple amplitude and phase equalization algorithm is exploited for array calibration owing to the high stability and accuracy of the developed artificial test source. Both the measured embedded element patterns and calibrated array patterns are found to be in good agreement with the simulated data. The successful measurement campaign has demonstrated that a UAV-mounted test source provides a means to accurately validate and calibrate the full-polarized response of an antenna/array in operating conditions, including consequently effects like mutual coupling between the array elements and contribution of the environment to the antenna patterns. A similar system can therefore find a future application in the SKA-LFAA context.

  16. Millimeter wave technology IV and radio frequency power sources; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 21, 22, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiltse, J.C.; Coleman, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    The present conference on mm-wave technology and radio-frequency power sources discusses topics in the fields of vacuum devices, mm-wave antennas and transmission lines, mm-wave systems and subsystems, and mm-wave techniques and components. Attention is given to recent experiments with planar orotrons, a high peak power X-band gyroklystron for linear supercolliders, cathode-driven crossed-field amplifiers, multi-MW quasi-optical gyrotrons, the radiation coupling of interinjection-locked oscillators, air-to-air mm-wave communications, mm-wave active and passive sensors for terrain mapping, and mm-wave components for electronically controllable antennas

  17. Kinematics and physical conditions of H I in nearby radio sources. The last survey of the old Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Geréb, K.; Maddox, N.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analysis of the properties of neutral hydrogen (H I) in 248 nearby (0.02 radio galaxies with S1.4 GHz > 30 mJy and for which optical spectroscopy is available. The observations were carried out with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope as the last large project before the

  18. Development of a Simulink Library for the Design, Testing and Simulation of Software Defined GPS Radios. With Application to the Development of Parallel Correlator Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    a cosmetic tool to create the C/A code of a single PRN given any value of the sampling frequency. This block is ideally used for generation of the...the L1 signal these parameters must be initialized to 1. 3. The Output mask source indicates how the output is determined for the shift register, as...a Dialog parameter for constant configuration or as input port for modifiable operation during execution. 4. The ’Output mask vector’ is a binary

  19. Evaluation of power transfer efficiency for a high power inductively coupled radio-frequency hydrogen ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, P.; Recchia, M.; Cavenago, M.; Fantz, U.; Gaio, E.; Kraus, W.; Maistrello, A.; Veltri, P.

    2018-04-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) for plasma heating and current drive is necessary for International Thermonuclear Experimental reactor (ITER) tokamak. Due to its various advantages, a radio frequency (RF) driven plasma source type was selected as a reference ion source for the ITER heating NBI. The ITER relevant RF negative ion sources are inductively coupled (IC) devices whose operational working frequency has been chosen to be 1 MHz and are characterized by high RF power density (˜9.4 W cm-3) and low operational pressure (around 0.3 Pa). The RF field is produced by a coil in a cylindrical chamber leading to a plasma generation followed by its expansion inside the chamber. This paper recalls different concepts based on which a methodology is developed to evaluate the efficiency of the RF power transfer to hydrogen plasma. This efficiency is then analyzed as a function of the working frequency and in dependence of other operating source and plasma parameters. The study is applied to a high power IC RF hydrogen ion source which is similar to one simplified driver of the ELISE source (half the size of the ITER NBI source).

  20. GPS for land surveyors

    CERN Document Server

    Van Sickle, Jan

    2008-01-01

    The GPS SignalGlobal Positioning System (GPS) Signal StructureTwo ObservablesPseudorangingCarrier Phase RangingBiases and SolutionsThe Error BudgetDifferencingThe FrameworkTechnological ForerunnersVery Long Baseline InterferometryTransitNavstar GPSGPS Segment OrganizationGPS ConstellationThe Control SegmentReceivers and MethodsCommon Features of GPS ReceiversChoosing a GPS ReceiverSome GPS Surveying MethodsCoordinatesA Few Pertinent Ideas About Geodetic Datums for GPSState Plane CoordinatesHeightsGPS Surveying TechniquesStatic GPS SurveyingReal-Time Kinematic (RTK) and Differential GPS (DGPS)T

  1. UNVEILING THE NATURE OF THE UNIDENTIFIED GAMMA-RAY SOURCES. III. GAMMA-RAY BLAZAR-LIKE COUNTERPARTS AT LOW RADIO FREQUENCIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massaro, F.; Funk, S. [SLAC National Laboratory and Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); D' Abrusco, R.; Paggi, A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Giroletti, M. [INAF Istituto di Radioastronomia, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Masetti, N. [INAF-Istituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Bologna, via Gobetti 101, I-40129 Bologna (Italy); Tosti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Perugia, I-06123 Perugia (Italy); Nori, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Bologna, viale Berti Pichat 6/2, I-40127 Bologna (Italy)

    2013-07-01

    About one-third of the {gamma}-ray sources listed in the second Fermi Large Area Telescope catalog (2FGL) have no firmly established counterpart at lower energies and so are classified as unidentified gamma-ray sources (UGSs). Here, we propose a new approach to find candidate counterparts for the UGSs based on the 325 MHz radio survey performed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope in the northern hemisphere. First, we investigate the low-frequency radio properties of blazars, the largest known population of {gamma}-ray sources; then we search for sources with similar radio properties combining the information derived from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) with those of the NRAO Very Large Array Sky Survey. We present a list of candidate counterparts for 32 UGSs with at least one counterpart in the WENSS. We also performed an extensive research in the literature to look for infrared and optical counterparts of the {gamma}-ray blazar candidates selected using the low-frequency radio observations to confirm their nature. On the basis of our multifrequency research, we identify 23 new {gamma}-ray blazar candidates out of the 32 UGSs investigated. Comparison with previous results on the UGSs is also presented. Finally, we speculate on the advantages of using low-frequency radio observations to associate UGSs and to search for {gamma}-ray pulsar candidates.

  2. The VLT/MUSE view of the central galaxy in Abell 2052. Ionized gas swept by the expanding radio source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balmaverde, Barbara; Capetti, Alessandro; Marconi, Alessandro; Venturi, Giacomo

    2018-04-01

    We report observations of the radio galaxy 3C 317 (at z = 0.0345) located at the center of the Abell cluster A2052, obtained with the VLT/MUSE integral field spectrograph. The Chandra images of this cluster show cavities in the X-ray emitting gas, which were produced by the expansion of the radio lobes inflated by the active galactic nucleus (AGN). Our exquisite MUSE data show with unprecedented detail the complex network of line emitting filaments enshrouding the northern X-ray cavity. We do not detect any emission lines from the southern cavity, with a luminosity asymmetry between the two regions higher than 75. The emission lines produced by the warm phase of the interstellar medium (WIM) enable us to obtain unique information on the properties of the emitting gas. We find dense gas (up to 270 cm-3) that makes up part of a global quasi spherical outflow that is driven by the radio source, and obtain a direct estimate of the expansion velocity of the cavities (265 km s-1). The emission lines diagnostic rules out ionization from the AGN or from star-forming regions, suggesting instead ionization from slow shocks or from cosmic rays. The striking asymmetric line emission observed between the two cavities contrasts with the less pronounced differences between the north and south sides in the hot gas; this represents a significant new ingredient for our understanding of the process of the exchange of energy between the relativistic plasma and the external medium. We conclude that the expanding radio lobes displace the hot tenuous phase of the interstellar medium (ISM), but also impact the colder and denser ISM phases. These results show the effects of the AGN on its host and the importance of radio mode feedback. The reduced datacube is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/612/A19

  3. Brightness Temperature of Radio Zebras and Wave Energy Densities in Their Sources

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yasnov, L. V.; Benáček, J.; Karlický, Marian

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 292, č. 11 (2017), 163/1-163/12 ISSN 0038-0938 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-13277S; GA ČR(CZ) GA17-16447S Grant - others:GA MŠk,CERIT-SC(CZ) LM2015085; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2015042 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Sun corona * Su flares * radio radiation Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics OBOR OECD: Astronomy (including astrophysics,space science) Impact factor: 2.682, year: 2016

  4. Location of acoustic radiators and inversion for energy density using radio-frequency sources and thunder recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J.; Johnson, J. B.; Arechiga, R. O.; Edens, H. E.; Thomas, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    We use radio frequency (VHF) pulse locations mapped with the New Mexico Tech Lightning Mapping Array (LMA) to study the distribution of thunder sources in lightning channels. A least squares inversion is used to fit channel acoustic energy radiation with broadband (0.01 to 500 Hz) acoustic recordings using microphones deployed local (lightning. We model the thunder (acoustic) source as a superposition of line segments connecting the LMA VHF pulses. An optimum branching algorithm is used to reconstruct conductive channels delineated by VHF sources, which we discretize as a superposition of finely-spaced (0.25 m) acoustic point sources. We consider total radiated thunder as a weighted superposition of acoustic waves from individual channels, each with a constant current along its length that is presumed to be proportional to acoustic energy density radiated per unit length. Merged channels are considered as a linear sum of current-carrying branches and radiate proportionally greater acoustic energy. Synthetic energy time series for a given microphone location are calculated for each independent channel. We then use a non-negative least squares inversion to solve for channel energy densities to match the energy time series determined from broadband acoustic recordings across a 4-station microphone network. Events analyzed by this method have so far included 300-1000 VHF sources, and correlations as high as 0.5 between synthetic and recorded thunder energy were obtained, despite the presence of wind noise and 10-30 m uncertainty in VHF source locations.

  5. Numerical simulation of atmospheric-pressure helium discharge driven by combined radio frequency and trapezoidal pulse sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qi; Sun Jizhong; Zhang Jianhong; Ding Zhenfeng; Wang Dezhen

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric-pressure capacitive discharges driven by combined radio frequency (rf) and trapezoidal pulse sources are investigated using a one-dimensional self-consistent fluid model. The results show that the plasma intensity in the rf discharge can be enhanced drastically when a low duty ratio short pulse source is additionally applied. The mechanism for the increase in the plasma density can be attributed to a strong localized electric field induced by the applied short pulse; the strong electric field generates a great number of high energy electrons and chemically active particles, which subsequently generate more electrons and ions. The rf capacitive discharges with the aid of externally applied short pulses can achieve a high plasma density with better power efficiency.

  6. Radio Jove: Jupiter Radio Astronomy for Citizens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Charles; Thieman, J. R.; Flagg, R.; Reyes, F. J.; Sky, J.; Greenman, W.; Brown, J.; Typinski, D.; Ashcraft, T.; Mount, A.

    2014-01-01

    Radio JOVE is a hands-on educational activity that brings the radio sounds of the Sun, Jupiter, the Milky Way Galaxy, and terrestrial radio noise to students, teachers, and the general public. Participants may build a simple radio telescope kit, make scientific observations, and interact with professional radio observatories in real-time over the Internet. Our website (http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov) includes science information, construction manuals, observing guides, and education resources for teachers and students. Radio Jove is continually expanding its participants with over 1800 kits sold to more than 70 countries worldwide. Recently some of our most dedicated observers have upgraded their Radio Jove antennas to semi-professional observatories. We have spectrographs and wide band antennas, some with 8 MHz bandwidth and some with dual polarization capabilities. In an effort to add to the science literature, these observers are coordinating their efforts to pursue some basic questions about Jupiter’s radio emissions (radio source locations, spectral structure, long term changes, etc.). We can compare signal and ionosphere variations using the many Radio Jove observers at different locations. Observers are also working with members of the Long Wavelength Array Station 1 (LWA1) radio telescope to coordinate observations of Jupiter; Radio Jove is planning to make coordinated observations while the Juno Mission is active beginning in 2015. The Radio Jove program is overviewed, its hardware and software are highlighted, recent sample observations are shown, and we demonstrate that we are capable of real citizen science.

  7. The use of civilian-type GPS receivers by the military and their vulnerability to jamming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig Combrinck

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We considered the impact of external influences on a GPS receiver and how these influences affect the capabilities of civilian-type GPS receivers. A standard commercial radio frequency signal generator and passive GPS antenna were used to test the sensitivity of GPS to intentional jamming; the possible effects of the terrain on the propagation of the jamming signal were also tested. It was found that the high sensitivity of GPS receivers and the low strength level of GPS satellite signals combine to make GPS receivers very vulnerable to intentional jamming or unintentional radio frequency interference. Terrain undulation was used to shield GPS antennas from the direct line-of-sight of the jamming antenna and this indicated that terrain characteristics can be used to mitigate the effects of jamming. These results illuminate the vulnerability of civilian-type GPS receivers to the possibility and the ease of disablement and establish the foundation for future work.

  8. The 100 strongest radio point sources in the field of the Large Magellanic Cloud at 1.4 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne J.L.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the 100 strongest 1.4 GHz point sources from a new mosaic image in the direction of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC. The observations making up the mosaic were made using Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA over a ten year period and were combined with Parkes single dish data at 1.4 GHz to complete the image for short spacing. An initial list of co-identifications within 1000 at 0.843, 4.8 and 8.6 GHz consisted of 2682 sources. Elimination of extended objects and artifact noise allowed the creation of a refined list containing 1988 point sources. Most of these are presumed to be background objects seen through the LMC; a small portion may represent compact H ii regions, young SNRs and radio planetary nebulae. For the 1988 point sources we find a preliminary average spectral index (α of -0.53 and present a 1.4 GHz image showing source location in the direction of the LMC.

  9. The 100 Strongest Radio Point Sources in the Field of the Large Magellanic Cloud at 1.4 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payne, J. L.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We present the 100 strongest 1.4~GHz point sources from a new mosaicimage in the direction of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC. The observationsmaking up the mosaic were made using Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCAover a ten year period and were combined with Parkes single dish data at 1.4 GHz to complete the image for short spacing. An initial list of co-identifications within 10arcsec at 0.843, 4.8 and 8.6 GHz consisted of 2682 sources. Elimination of extended objects and artifact noise allowed the creation of a refined list containing 1988 point sources. Most of these are presumed to be background objects seen through the LMC; a small portion may represent compact HII regions, young SNRs and radio planetary nebulae. For the 1988 point sources we find a preliminary average spectral index ($alpha$ of -0.53 and present a 1.4 GHz image showing source locationin the direction of the LMC.

  10. Infrared-faint radio sources: a cosmological view. AGN number counts, the cosmic X-ray background and SMBH formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinn, P.-C.; Middelberg, E.; Ibar, E.

    2011-07-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) are extragalactic emitters clearly detected at radio wavelengths but barely detected or undetected at optical and infrared wavelengths, with 5σ sensitivities as low as 1 μJy. Aims: Spectral energy distribution (hereafter SED) modelling and analyses of their radio properties indicate that IFRS are consistent with a population of (potentially extremely obscured) high-redshift AGN at 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. We demonstrate some astrophysical implications of this population and compare them to predictions from models of galaxy evolution and structure formation. Methods: We compiled a list of IFRS from four deep extragalactic surveys and extrapolated the IFRS number density to a survey-independent value of (30.8 ± 15.0) deg-2. We computed the IFRS contribution to the total number of AGN in the Universe to account for the cosmic X-ray background. By estimating the black hole mass contained in IFRS, we present conclusions for the SMBH mass density in the early universe and compare it to relevant simulations of structure formation after the Big Bang. Results: The number density of AGN derived from the IFRS density was found to be ~310 deg-2, which is equivalent to a SMBH mass density of the order of 103 M⊙ Mpc-3 in the redshift range 3 ≤ z ≤ 6. This produces an X-ray flux of 9 × 10-16 W m-2 deg-2 in the 0.5-2.0 keV band and 3 × 10-15 W m-2 deg-2 in the 2.0-10 keV band, in agreement with the missing unresolved components of the Cosmic X-ray Background. To address SMBH formation after the Big Bang we invoke a scenario involving both halo gas accretion and major mergers.

  11. Simplified radio-over-fiber transport systems with a low-cost multiband light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Hung; Peng, Peng-Chun; Lu, Hai-Han; Shih, Chine-Liang; Chen, Hwan-Wen

    2010-12-01

    In this Letter, low-cost radio-over-fiber (ROF) transport systems are proposed and experimentally demonstrated. By utilizing a laser diode (LD) and a local oscillator (LO) to generate coherent multiband optical carriers, as well as a self-composed wavelength selector to separate every two carriers for different ROF transport systems, no any other dedicated LD or electrical frequency upconverting circuit/process is needed in the central station (CS). Compared with current ROF systems, the required numbers of LDs, LOs, and mixers in a CS are significantly reduced. Reducing the number of components not only can simplify the network structure but can also reduce the volume and complexity of the relative logistics. To demonstrate the practice of the proposed ROF transport systems, clear eye diagrams and error-free transmission performance are experimentally presented.

  12. The changing source of X-ray reflection in the radio-intermediate Seyfert 1 galaxy III Zw 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, A. G.; Waddell, S. G. H.; Gallo, L. C.

    2018-03-01

    We report on X-ray observations of the radio-intermediate, X-ray bright Seyfert 1 galaxy, III Zw 2, obtained with XMM-Newton, Suzaku, and Swift over the past 17 yr. The source brightness varies significantly over yearly time-scales, but more modestly over periods of days. Pointed observations with XMM-Newton in 2000 and Suzaku in 2011 show spectral differences despite comparable X-ray fluxes. The Suzaku spectra are consistent with a power-law continuum and a narrow Gaussian emission feature at ˜6.4 keV, whereas the earlier XMM-Newton spectrum requires a broader Gaussian profile and soft-excess below ˜2 keV. A potential interpretation is that the primary power-law emission, perhaps from a jet base, preferentially illuminates the inner accretion disc in 2000, but the distant torus in 2011. The interpretation could be consistent with the hypothesized precessing radio jet in III Zw 2 that may have originated from disc instabilities due to an ongoing merging event.

  13. Ground deformation source model at Kuchinoerabu-jima volcano during 2006-2014 as revealed by campaign GPS observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotta, Kohei; Iguchi, Masato

    2017-12-01

    We analyzed campaign Global Positioning System observation data in Kuchinoerabu-jima during 2006-2014. Most benchmarks located around Shin-dake crater showed crater-centered radial horizontal displacements. Horizontal displacements at western rim of the Shin-dake crater were tended to be larger compared to those at eastern rim. In addition, benchmark KUC14 which locates near the cliff at Furu-dake showed westward horizontal displacement rather than crater-centered radial (southward) one. Meanwhile, small displacements were detected at the benchmarks located at the foot of Kuchinoerabu-jima. We modeled the observed displacements applying a finite element method. We set entire FE domain as 100 × 100 × 50 km3. We set top of the domain as a free surface, and sides and bottom to be fixed boundaries. Topography was introduced in the area within Kuchinoerabu-jima using digital elevation model data provided by Kagoshima prefecture and elevation information from Google earth, and elevation of the outside area was assumed to be sea level. We assumed a stratified structure based on a one-dimensional P-wave velocity structure. We applied a vertical spheroid source model and searched optimal values of horizontal location, depth, equatorial and polar radiuses, and internal pressure change of the source using the forward modeling method. A spherical source with a radius of 50 m was obtained beneath the Shin-dake crater at a depth of 400 m above sea level. The internal pressure increase of 361 MPa yields its volume increase of 31,700 m3. Taking effects of topography and heterogeneity of ground into account allowed reproduction of overall deformation in Kuchinoerabu-jima. The location of deformation source coincides with hypocenters of shallow volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes and the aquifer estimated from a two-dimensional resistivity model by audio-frequency magnetotellurics method. The obtained deformation source may be corresponding to the pressurized aquifer, and shallow VT

  14. GPS PPP-derived precipitable water vapor retrieval based on Tm/Ps from multiple sources of meteorological data sets in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongxing; Yuan, Yunbin; Li, Wei; Ou, Jikun; Li, Ying; Zhang, Baocheng

    2017-04-01

    Weighted mean temperature (Tm) and pressure (Ps) are two parameters of great relevance to precipitable water vapor (PWV) retrieval from global positioning system (GPS) data. However, information about the Tm and Ps cannot be available for those GPS stations that are not colocated with meteorological sensors. To investigate the optimal GPS-PWV retrieval method for China, two enhanced Tm models, GM-Tm (temperature dependent) and GH-Tm (temperature independent), are developed. Additionally, the potentials of the Ps data from the two reanalysis data sets, the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP)-Department of Energy (DOE) Reanalysis II (NCEP II) and ERA-Interim, and from the empirical model GPT2w for GPS-PWV retrieval are investigated over China. To evaluate the performances of multisources Tm and Ps data for GPS-PWV retrieval, GPS data (2011-2013) collected from 22 stations of the Crustal Movement Observation Network of China (CMONOC) were processed by using the precise point positioning (PPP) technique, estimating the zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) so as to be subsequently converted to GPS-PWV. The retrieved GPS-PWVs are compared with their counterparts derived from NCEP II and radiosonde data over China. The results show that (1) the GM-Tm model consistently shows the highest accuracy (with root mean square error of 2.3 K), and the GH-Tm model should be selected when temperature observations are not available, and that (2) the performances of Ps from NCEP II and ERA-Interim differ marginally for GPS-PWV retrieval, and significant seasonal variations are found in the agreement between the GPS-PWVs and the PWVs derived from NCEP II and radiosonde data over China.

  15. The development of the radio frequency driven negative ion source for neutral beam injectors (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, W; Fantz, U; Franzen, P; Fröschle, M; Heinemann, B; Riedl, R; Wünderlich, D

    2012-02-01

    Large and powerful negative hydrogen ion sources are required for the neutral beam injection (NBI) systems of future fusion devices. Simplicity and maintenance-free operation favors RF sources, which are developed intensively at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) since many years. The negative hydrogen ions are generated by caesium-enhanced surface conversion of atoms and positive ions on the plasma grid surface. With a small scale prototype the required high ion current density and the low fraction of co-extracted electrons at low pressure as well as stable pulses up to 1 h could be demonstrated. The modular design allows extension to large source dimensions. This has led to the decision to choose RF sources for the NBI of the international fusion reactor, ITER. As an intermediate step towards the full size ITER source at IPP, the development will be continued with a half-size source on the new ELISE testbed. This will enable to gain experience for the first time with negative hydrogen ion beams from RF sources of these dimensions.

  16. RADIO SOURCES FROM A 31 GHz SKY SURVEY WITH THE SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH ARRAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muchovej, Stephen; Hawkins, David; Lamb, James; Woody, David; Leitch, Erik; Carlstrom, John E.; Culverhouse, Thomas; Greer, Chris; Hennessy, Ryan; Loh, Michael; Marrone, Daniel P.; Pryke, Clem; Sharp, Matthew; Joy, Marshall; Miller, Amber; Mroczkowski, Tony

    2010-01-01

    We present the first sample of 31 GHz selected sources to flux levels of 1 mJy. From late 2005 to mid-2007, the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Array observed 7.7 deg 2 of the sky at 31 GHz to a median rms of 0.18 mJy beam -1 . We identify 209 sources at greater than 5σ significance in the 31 GHz maps, ranging in flux from 0.7 mJy to ∼200 mJy. Archival NVSS data at 1.4 GHz and observations at 5 GHz with the Very Large Array are used to characterize the sources. We determine the maximum-likelihood integrated source count to be N(>S) = (27.2 ± 2.5)deg -2 x (S mJy ) -1.18±0.12 over the flux range 0.7-15 mJy. This result is significantly higher than predictions based on 1.4 GHz selected samples, a discrepancy which can be explained by a small shift in the spectral index distribution for faint 1.4 GHz sources. From comparison with previous measurements of sources within the central arcminute of massive clusters, we derive an overdensity of 6.8 ± 4.4, relative to field sources.

  17. Near-source high-rate GPS, strong motion and InSAR observations to image the 2015 Lefkada (Greece) Earthquake rupture history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avallone, Antonio; Cirella, Antonella; Cheloni, Daniele; Tolomei, Cristiano; Theodoulidis, Nikos; Piatanesi, Alessio; Briole, Pierre; Ganas, Athanassios

    2017-09-04

    The 2015/11/17 Lefkada (Greece) earthquake ruptured a segment of the Cephalonia Transform Fault (CTF) where probably the penultimate major event was in 1948. Using near-source strong motion and high sampling rate GPS data and Sentinel-1A SAR images on two tracks, we performed the inversion for the geometry, slip distribution and rupture history of the causative fault with a three-step self-consistent procedure, in which every step provided input parameters for the next one. Our preferred model results in a ~70° ESE-dipping and ~13° N-striking fault plane, with a strike-slip mechanism (rake ~169°) in agreement with the CTF tectonic regime. This model shows a bilateral propagation spanning ~9 s with the activation of three main slip patches, characterized by rise time and peak slip velocity in the ranges 2.5-3.5 s and 1.4-2.4 m/s, respectively, corresponding to 1.2-1.8 m of slip which is mainly concentrated in the shallower ( 6) earthquakes to the northern and to the southern boundaries of the 2015 causative fault cannot be excluded.

  18. 20 cm VLA radio-continuum study of M31-images and point source catalogues DR2: Extraction of a supernova remnant sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvin T.J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present Data Release 2 of the Point Source Catalogue created from a series of previously constructed radio-continuum images of M31 at λ=20 cm (v=1.4 GHz from archived VLA observations. In total, we identify a collection of 916 unique discrete radio sources across the field of M31. Comparing these detected sources to those listed by Gelfand et al. (2004 at λ=92 cm, the spectral index of 98 sources has been derived. The majority (73% of these sources exhibit a spectral index of α<-0.6, indicating that their emission is predominantly non-thermal in nature, which is typical for background objects and Supernova Remnants (SNRs. Additionally, we investigate the presence of radio counterparts for some 156 SNRs and SNR candidates, finding a total of only 13 of these objects in our images within a 500 search area. Auxiliary optical, radio and X-ray catalogues were cross referenced highlighting a small population of SNRs and SNR candidates common to multi frequency domains.

  19. Characteristics and diagnosis of a new type radio frequency driven in vacuum arc ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakhary, S.G.

    2001-01-01

    The discharge mechanism of this source is based on the use of mixed discharge formed by the use of both RF-driven (15 MHz-300W) and vacuum arc to create discharge plasma of higher intensity. The basic construction of the source is in the form of a cylindrical anode which is immersed in non homogeneous axial magnetic field of 500Gauss measured at the source center. The anode is terminated from its both ends with two cathodes, thus allowing the electrons to be oscillate between the two cathodes. An internal antenna is used to couple the RF power to the plasma through a matching circuit formed from an inductor connected in parallel with capacitor, in order to insure maximum power transfer to the plasma. The oscillating electrons thus absorb energy from both RF and DC fields in the gaps between the cathodes and the anode due to the arc discharge. In order to investigate and optimize the source characteristics, the influence of the discharge pressure, magnetic field, discharge voltage and RF power on the source characteristics have been studied. The source is considered self extracted ion current and could deliver ion currents of ∼10A for thin beam (diameter ∼4mm.) and ∼20 mA for broad beam (diameter ∼6cm.) at ∼200V extraction voltage. The plasma is diagnosed using double Langumier probes. The plasma intensity could reach ∼8x10 11 elec./cm 3 and the plasma temperature ∼14 eV. Lower ignition voltage (50 up to 200V) and higher plasma intensity feature the characteristics of this source. The beam diagnostics (for thin beam) of this source are measured, which include: the beam profiles, beam emittance, energy spread and distribution of the ion species in the ion beam. The increase of the anode voltage affects decrease of the beam emittance, while the energy spread increases with the decrease of the discharge pressure. The beam emittance is found to be around 200 up to 400 mm.m.rad. and the energy spread of the ions in the ion beam is around 40 up to 80 eV. The

  20. Production of vibrationally cold ions using a radio frequency storage ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, A.

    1985-01-01

    A storage ion source has been built for the production of vibrationally cold H 2 + and H 3 + ions. Using a gas mixture of H 2 and rare gases (Ne and He) in the source at high pressure, higher vibrational states of these ions have been effectively depleted by ion-molecule reactions and collisional deactivation. The internal energy of the cold ions were determined by the threshold measurement of collision-induced dissociation. With a mixture of H 2 and Ne (ratio 1:5) in the source operated at 80 mtorr, H 2 + ions were found to be in v = 0 and 1 states only and the H 3 + ions were in the ground vibrational state. 24 refs., 4 figs

  1. Star Scheduling Mode—A New Observing Strategy for Monitoring Weak Southern Radio Sources with the AuScope VLBI Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallum, Lucia; Mayer, David; Le Bail, Karine; Schartner, Matthias; McCallum, Jamie; Lovell, Jim; Titov, Oleg; Shu, Fengchun; Gulyaev, Sergei

    2017-11-01

    The International Celestial Reference Frame suffers from significantly less observations in the southern hemisphere compared to the northern one. One reason for this is the historically low number of very long baseline interferometry radio telescopes in the south. The AuScope very long baseline interferometry array with three new telescopes on the Australian continent and an identical antenna in New Zealand were built to address this issue. While the overall number of observations in the south has greatly improved since then, a closer look reveals that this improvement is only true for strong radio sources (source flux densities >0.6 Jy). The new array of small very long baseline interferometry antennas has a relatively low baseline sensitivity so that only strong sources can be observed within a short integration time. A new observing strategy, the star scheduling mode, was developed to enable efficient observations of weak sources during geodetic sessions, through the addition of a single more sensitive antenna to the network. This scheduling mode was implemented in the Vienna very long baseline interferometry Software and applied in four 24-h sessions in 2016. These observations provide updated positions and source flux densities for 42 weak southern radio sources and significantly reduce the formal uncertainties for these sources. The star scheduling mode now allows the AuScope very long baseline interferometry array to undertake greater responsibility in monitoring sources in the southern sky, without significantly weakening the session for geodetic purposes.

  2. Obscured flat spectrum radio active galactic nuclei as sources of high-energy neutrinos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maggi, G.; Buitink, S.; Correa, P.; de Vries, K. D.; Gentile, G.; Tavares, J. León; Scholten, O.; van Eijndhoven, N.; Vereecken, M.; Winchen, T.

    2016-01-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) are believed to be one of the main source candidates for the high-energy (TeV-PeV) cosmic neutrino flux recently discovered by the IceCube neutrino observatory. Nevertheless, several correlation studies between AGN and the cosmic neutrinos detected by IceCube show no

  3. VLBI observations of the radio quasar J2228+0110 at z=5.95 and other field sources in multiple-phase-centre mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cao, H.M.; Frey, S.; Gurvits, L.; Yang, J.; Hong, X.Y.; Paragi, Z.; Deller, A.T.; Ivezic, Z.

    2014-01-01

    A patch of sky in the SDSS Stripe 82 was observed at 1.6 GHz with Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) using the European VLBI Network (EVN). The data were correlated at the EVN software correlator at JIVE (SFXC). There are fifteen known mJy/sub-mJy radio sources in the target field defined by

  4. Radio-isotopic neutron sources for industrial applications and basic research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, G.Y.; Hassan, M.F.; Ali, M.A.; Abd-El-Wahab, M.; Aziz, M.

    2010-01-01

    CNIF 2 is an irradiation facility based on an Am-Be (b, n) source with present activity of about 175 GBq results in a neutron yield of about 1.04*107 n/s. The facility provides fast and epi-thermal neutrons as well. The aim of the present work is to develop methods able to use neutron activation analysis to estimate the hydrogen content in bulk samples through neutron reflection and transmission processes.

  5. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-03-28

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  6. Dynamics of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type III solar radio sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Willes, A. J.; Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The study traces the evolution of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type III sources, incorporating linear growth, linear damping, and nonlinear electrostatic decay. Improved estimates are obtained for the wavenumber range of growing waves and the nonlinear coupling coefficient for the decay process. It is shown that the conditions in the solar wind do not allow a steady state to be attained; instead, bursty linear and nonlinear interactions take place, consistent with the highly inhomogeneous and impulsive waves actually observed. Nonlinear growth is found to be rapid enough to saturate the growth of the parent Langmuir waves in the available interaction time. The competing processes of nonlinear wave collapse and quasi-linear relaxation are discussed, and it is concluded that neither is responsible for the saturation of Langmuir growth.

  7. Penerapan Teknologi GPS Tracker Untuk Identifikasi Kondisi Traffik Jalan Raya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IM. O. Widyantara

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Real time tracking system technology has been made possible by integrating three technologies, namely global positioning system (GPS, database technologies such as geographic information system (GIS and mobile telecommunications technologies such as general packet radio service (GPRS. This paper has proposed a vehicle tracking mechanism based on GPS tracker to build a real-time traffic information system. A GPS server is built to process data of position and speed of the vehicle for further processed into vehicle traffic information. The Server and GPS tracker is designed to communicate using GPRS services in real time. Furthermore, the server processes the data from the GPS tracker into traffic information such as traffic jam, dense, medium and smoothly. Test results showed that the GPS server is able to visualize the real position of the vehicle and is able to decide the category of traffic information in real time.

  8. Precise Orbit Determination of GPS Satellites Using Phase Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Kook Jee

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The accuracy of user position by GPS is heavily dependent upon the accuracy of satellite position which is usually transmitted to GPS users in radio signals. The real-time satellite position information directly obtained from broadcast ephimerides has the accuracy of 3 x 10 meters which is very unsatisfactory to measure 100km baseline to the accuracy of less than a few mili-meters. There are globally at present seven orbit analysis centers capable of generating precise GPS ephimerides and their orbit quality is of the order of about 10cm. Therefore, precise orbit model and phase processing technique were reviewed and consequently precise GPS ephimerides were produced after processing the phase observables of 28 global GPS stations for 1 day. Initial 6 orbit parameters and 2 solar radiation coefficients were estimated using batch least square algorithm and the final results were compared with the orbit of IGS, the International GPS Service for Geodynamics.

  9. XMM-Newton and Chandra Observations of the Remarkable Dynamics of the Intracluster Medium and Radio Sources in the Clusters Abell 2061 and 3667

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarazin, C.; Hogge, T.; Chatzikos, M.; Wik, D.; Giacintucci, S.; Clarke, T.; Wong, K.; Gitti, M.; Finoguenov, A.

    2014-07-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of remarkable dynamic structures in the X-ray gas and connected radio sources in three clusters are presented. Abell 2061 is a highly irregular, merging cluster in the Corona Borealis supercluster. X-ray observations show that there is a plume of very cool gas (˜1 keV) to the NE of the cluster, and a hot (7.6 keV) shock region just NE of the center. There is a very bright radio relic to the far SW of the cluster, and a central radio halo/relic with an extension to the NE. Comparison to SLAM simulations show that this is an offset merger of a ˜5 × 10^{13} M⊙ subcluster with a ˜2.5 × 10^{14} M⊙ cluster seen after first core passage. The plume is the cool-core gas from the subcluster, which has been ``slingshot'' to the NE of the cluster. The plume gas is now falling back into the cluster center, and shocks when it hits the central gas. The model predicts a strong shock to the SW at the location of the bright radio relic, and another shock at the NE radio extension. Time permitting, the observations of Abell 2626 and Abell 3667 will also be presented.

  10. Statistical survey of type III radio bursts at long wavelengths observed by the Solar TErrestrial RElations Observatory (STEREO)/Waves instruments: goniopolarimetric properties and radio source locations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krupař, Vratislav; Maksimovic, M.; Santolík, Ondřej; Cecconi, B.; Krupařová, Oksana

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 289, č. 12 (2014), s. 4633-4652 ISSN 0038-0938 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP13-37174P; GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2394 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : plasma radiation * solar radio emissions Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.039, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11207-014-0601-z

  11. The electron-cyclotron maser instability as a source of plasma radiation. [Solar radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The generation of continuum bursts from the sun at dm and m wavelengths (in particular, type IV bursts) via the electron-cyclotron-maser instability is examined. The maser instability can be driven by an electron distribution with either a loss-cone anisotropy or a peak at large pitch angles. For omega(p)/Omega(e) much greater than 1, the maser emission is produced by electrons interacting through a harmonic (cyclotron) resonance and is electrostatic, being in the upper hybrid mode at frequencies approximately equal to omega(p). Coalescence processes are required to convert the electrostatic waves into transverse radiation which can escape from the source region. Whether the resultant spectrum is nearly a smooth continuum or has a zebra-stripe pattern (both of which occur in type IV bursts) depends on the form of the electron distribution, inhomogeneities in the density and magnetic field, and whether the maser reaches saturation. For at least the case of some type IV dm bursts with fine structure, comparison with observations seems to indicate that the electrons producing the emission are more likely to have a loss-cone distribution, and that the maser instability is not at saturation.

  12. GPS Satellite Simulation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The GPS satellite simulation facility consists of a GPS satellite simulator controlled by either a Silicon Graphics Origin 2000 or PC depending upon unit under test...

  13. Geomagnetic storm effects on GPS based navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. V. S. Rama Rao

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The energetic events on the sun, solar wind and subsequent effects on the Earth's geomagnetic field and upper atmosphere (ionosphere comprise space weather. Modern navigation systems that use radio-wave signals, reflecting from or propagating through the ionosphere as a means of determining range or distance, are vulnerable to a variety of effects that can degrade the performance of the navigational systems. In particular, the Global Positioning System (GPS that uses a constellation of earth orbiting satellites are affected due to the space weather phenomena.

    Studies made during two successive geomagnetic storms that occurred during the period from 8 to 12 November 2004, have clearly revealed the adverse affects on the GPS range delay as inferred from the Total Electron Content (TEC measurements made from a chain of seven dual frequency GPS receivers installed in the Indian sector. Significant increases in TEC at the Equatorial Ionization anomaly crest region are observed, resulting in increased range delay during the periods of the storm activity. Further, the storm time rapid changes occurring in TEC resulted in a number of phase slips in the GPS signal compared to those on quiet days. These phase slips often result in the loss of lock of the GPS receivers, similar to those that occur during strong(>10 dB L-band scintillation events, adversely affecting the GPS based navigation.

  14. Dynamic of Langmuir and Ion-Sound Waves in Type 3 Solar Radio Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, P. A.; Willes, A. J.; Cairns, I. H.

    1993-01-01

    The evolution of Langmuir and ion-sound waves in type 3 sources is investigated, incorporating linear growth, linear damping, and nonlinear electrostatic decay. Improved estimates are obtained for the wavenumber range of growing waves and the nonlinear coupling coefficient for the decay process. The resulting prediction for the electrostatic decay threshold is consistent with the observed high-field cutoff in the Langmuir field distribution. It is shown that the conditions in the solar wind do not allow a steady state to be attained; rather, bursty linear and nonlinear interactions take place, consistent with the highly inhomogeneous and impulsive waves actually observed. Nonlinear growth is found to be fast enough to saturate the growth of the parent Langmuir waves in the available interaction time. The resulting levels of product Langmuir and ion-sound waves are estimated theoretically and shown to be consistent with in situ ISEE 3 observations of type 3 events at 1 AU. Nonlinear interactions slave the growth and decay of product sound waves to that of the product Langmuir waves. The resulting probability distribution of ion-sound field strengths is predicted to have a flat tail extending to a high-field cutoff. This prediction is consistent with statistics derived here from ISEE 3 observations. Agreement is also found between the frequencies of the observed waves and predictions for the product S waves. The competing processes of nonlinear wave collapse and quasilinear relaxation are discussed, and it is concluded that neither is responsible for the saturation of Langmuir growth. When wave and beam inhomogeneities are accounted for, arguments from quasi-linear relaxation yield an upper bound on the Langmuir fields that is too high to be relevant. Nor are the criteria for direct wave collapse of the beam-driven waves met, consistent with earlier simulation results that imply that this process is not responsible for saturation of the beam instability. Indeed, even

  15. En Billig GPS Data Analyse Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Christiansen, Nick; Larsen, Niels T.

    2011-01-01

    Denne artikel præsenterer en komplet software platform til analyse af GPS data. Platformen er bygget udelukkende vha. open-source komponenter. De enkelte komponenter i platformen beskrives i detaljer. Fordele og ulemper ved at bruge open-source diskuteres herunder hvilke IT politiske tiltage, der...... organisationer med et digitalt vejkort og GPS data begynde at lave trafikanalyser på disse data. Det er et krav, at der er passende IT kompetencer tilstede i organisationen....

  16. Optical and near-infrared imaging of faint Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellen, IAG; Schilizzi, RT; de Bruyn, AG; Miley, GK; Rottgering, HJA; McMahon, RG; Fournon, IP

    1998-01-01

    A sample of 47 faint Gigahertz Peaked Spectrum (GPS) radio sources selected from the Westerbork Northern Sky Survey (WENSS) has been imaged in the optical and near-infrared, resulting in an identification fraction of 87 per cent. The R - I and R - K colours of the faint optical counterparts are as

  17. Characterization and Application of a Planar Radio - Inductively-Coupled Plasma Source for the Production of Barrier Coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Leonard Joseph

    A planar radio-frequency (rf) inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) source is used to produce fluorocarbon discharges (CF_4/Ar) to fluorinate the surface of high-density polyethylene (HDPE). Using this system, concurrent studies of discharge characteristics, permeation properties of treated polymers and polymer surface characteristics are conducted to advance the use of plasma-fluorinated polymer surfaces as a barrier layer for automotive applications. Langmuir probes are used to determine spatial distribution of charged-particle and space-potential characteristics in Ar and CF_4/Ar discharges and to show the influence of the spatial distribution of the heating regions and the reactor boundaries on the discharge uniformity. Langmuir probes are also used to identify rf anisotropic drift motion of electrons in the heating regions of the source and transient high-energy electron features in pulsed discharges. These latter features allow pulsed ICP sources to be operated at low time-averaged powers that are necessary to treat thermally sensitive polymers. Fourier Transform Infrared (FITR) spectroscopy is used to measure the dissociation of fluorocarbon gases and to explore differences between pulsed- and continuous -power operation. Dissociation levels of CF_4 (50-85%) using pulsed-power operation are as high as that for continuous operation, even though the net time -averaged power is far less with pulsed operation. The result suggests that pulsed fluorocarbon discharges possess high concentrations of chemically-active species needed for rapid surface fluorination. A gravimetric permeation cup method is used to measure the permeation rate of test fuels through HDPE membranes, and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) studies are performed to determine the stoichiometry and thickness of the barrier layer. From these studies we find that a 50-70 A thick, polar, fluoro-hydrocarbon over layer reduces the permeation of isooctane/toluene/methanol mixtures by a

  18. GPS TEC, scintillation and cycle slips observed at high latitudes during solar minimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Prikryl

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available High-latitude irregularities can impair the operation of GPS-based devices by causing fluctuations of GPS signal amplitude and phase, also known as scintillation. Severe scintillation events lead to losses of phase lock, which result in cycle slips. We have used data from the Canadian High Arctic Ionospheric Network (CHAIN to measure amplitude and phase scintillation from L1 GPS signals and total electron content (TEC from L1 and L2 GPS signals to study the relative role that various high-latitude irregularity generation mechanisms have in producing scintillation. In the first year of operation during the current solar minimum the amplitude scintillation has remained very low but events of strong phase scintillation have been observed. We have found, as expected, that auroral arc and substorm intensifications as well as cusp region dynamics are strong sources of phase scintillation and potential cycle slips. In addition, we have found clear seasonal and universal time dependencies of TEC and phase scintillation over the polar cap region. A comparison with radio instruments from the Canadian GeoSpace Monitoring (CGSM network strongly suggests that the polar cap scintillation and TEC variations are associated with polar cap patches which we therefore infer to be main contributors to scintillation-causing irregularities in the polar cap.

  19. Active galactic nuclei cores in infrared-faint radio sources. Very long baseline interferometry observations using the Very Long Baseline Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, A.; Middelberg, E.; Norris, R. P.; Spitler, L. R.; Deller, A. T.; Collier, J. D.; Parker, Q. A.

    2015-06-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) form a new class of galaxies characterised by radio flux densities between tenths and tens of mJy and faint or absent infrared counterparts. It has been suggested that these objects are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs) at significant redshifts (z ≳ 2). Aims: Whereas the high redshifts of IFRS have been recently confirmed based on spectroscopic data, the evidence for the presence of AGNs in IFRS is mainly indirect. So far, only two AGNs have been unquestionably confirmed in IFRS based on very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) observations. In this work, we test the hypothesis that IFRS contain AGNs in a large sample of sources using VLBI. Methods: We observed 57 IFRS with the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) down to a detection sensitivity in the sub-mJy regime and detected compact cores in 35 sources. Results: Our VLBA detections increase the number of VLBI-detected IFRS from 2 to 37 and provide strong evidence that most - if not all - IFRS contain AGNs. We find that IFRS have a marginally higher VLBI detection fraction than randomly selected sources with mJy flux densities at arcsec-scales. Moreover, our data provide a positive correlation between compactness - defined as the ratio of milliarcsec- to arcsec-scale flux density - and redshift for IFRS, but suggest a decreasing mean compactness with increasing arcsec-scale radio flux density. Based on these findings, we suggest that IFRS tend to contain young AGNs whose jets have not formed yet or have not expanded, equivalent to very compact objects. We found two IFRS that are resolved into two components. The two components are spatially separated by a few hundred milliarcseconds in both cases. They might be components of one AGN, a binary black hole, or the result of gravitational lensing.

  20. InSAR and GPS time series analysis: Crustal deformation in the Yucca Mountain, Nevada region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z.; Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Kreemer, C. W.; Plag, H.

    2010-12-01

    Several previous studies have successfully demonstrated that long time series (e.g. >5 years) of GPS measurements can be employed to detect tectonic signals with a vertical rate greater than 0.3 mm/yr (e.g. Hill and Blewitt, 2006; Bennett et al. 2009). However, GPS stations are often sparse, with spacing from a few kilometres to a few hundred kilometres. Interferometric SAR (InSAR) can complement GPS by providing high horizontal spatial resolution (e.g. meters to tens-of metres) over large regions (e.g. 100 km × 100 km). A major source of error for repeat-pass InSAR is the phase delay in radio signal propagation through the atmosphere. The portion of this attributable to tropospheric water vapour causes errors as large as 10-20 cm in deformation retrievals. InSAR Time Series analysis with Atmospheric Estimation Models (InSAR TS + AEM), developed at the University of Glasgow, is a robust time series analysis approach, which mainly uses interferograms with small geometric baselines to minimise the effects of decorrelation and inaccuracies in topographic data. In addition, InSAR TS + AEM can be used to separate deformation signals from atmospheric water vapour effects in order to map surface deformation as it evolves in time. The principal purposes of this study are to assess: (1) how consistent InSAR-derived deformation time series are with GPS; and (2) how precise InSAR-derived atmospheric path delays can be. The Yucca Mountain, Nevada region is chosen as the study site because of its excellent GPS network and extensive radar archives (>10 years of dense and high-quality GPS stations, and >17 years of ERS and ENVISAT radar acquisitions), and because of its arid environment. The latter results in coherence that is generally high, even for long periods that span the existing C-band radar archives of ERS and ENVISAT. Preliminary results show that our InSAR LOS deformation map agrees with GPS measurements to within 0.35 mm/yr RMS misfit at the stations which is the

  1. Using GPS to determine vehicle attitude - USS Yorktown test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruczynski, Leonard R.; Li, Pui C.; Evans, Alan G.; Hermann, Bruce R.

    Prototype GPS orientation equipment was tested aboard the USS Yorktown, a U.S. Navy guided missile cruiser, to demonstrate that GPS could be used to determine orientation on a moving vessel. Initialization, integer maintenance, and accuracy in a real-time dynamic environment were addressed. The tests confirmed GPS-based real-time orientation determination, provided real-world data to exercise enhanced orientation algorithms, and identified equipment improvements that will make GPS a viable source of vehicle attitude in addition to GPS's superior positioning capabilities.

  2. X-ray study of a sample of FR0 radio galaxies: unveiling the nature of the central engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torresi, E.; Grandi, P.; Capetti, A.; Baldi, R. D.; Giovannini, G.

    2018-03-01

    FR0s are compact radio sources that represent the bulk of the Radio-Loud (RL) AGN population, but they are still poorly understood. Pilot studies on these sources have been already performed at radio and optical wavelengths: here we present the first X-ray study of a sample of 19 FR0 radio galaxies selected from the SDSS/NVSS/FIRST sample of Best & Heckman (2012), with redshift ≤ 0.15, radio size ≤ 10 kpc and optically classified as low-excitation galaxies (LEG). The X-ray spectra are modeled with a power-law component absorbed by Galactic column density with, in some cases, a contribution from thermal extended gas. The X-ray photons are likely produced by the jet as attested by the observed correlation between X-ray (2-10 keV) and radio (5 GHz) luminosities, similar to FRIs. The estimated Eddington-scaled luminosities indicate a low accretion rate. Overall, we find that the X-ray properties of FR0s are indistinguishable from those of FRIs, thus adding another similarity between AGN associated with compact and extended radio sources. A comparison between FR0s and low luminosity BL Lacs, rules out important beaming effects in the X-ray emission of the compact radio galaxies. FR0s have different X-ray properties with respect to young radio sources (e.g. GPS/CSS sources), generally characterized by higher X-ray luminosities and more complex spectra. In conclusion, the paucity of extended radio emission in FR0s is probably related to the intrinsic properties of their jets that prevent the formation of extended structures, and/or to intermittent activity of their engines.

  3. GPS=A Good Candidate for Data Assimilation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, P.; Joiner, J.; Kursinski, R.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) enables positioning anywhere about our planet. The microwave signals sent by the 24 transmitters are sensitive to the atmosphere. Using the radio occultation technique, it is possible to perform soundings, with a Low Earth Orbiter (700 km) GPS receiver. The insensitiveness to clouds and aerosols, the relatively high vertical resolution (1.5 km), the self-calibration and stability of the GPS make it a priori a potentially good observing system candidate for data assimilation. A low-computing cost simple method to retrieve both temperature and humidity will be presented. Comparisons with radiosonde show the capability of the GPS to resolve the tropopause. Options for using GPS for data assimilation and remaining issues will be discussed.

  4. Physical applications of GPS geodesy: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Yehuda; Melgar, Diego

    2016-10-01

    Geodesy, the oldest science, has become an important discipline in the geosciences, in large part by enhancing Global Positioning System (GPS) capabilities over the last 35 years well beyond the satellite constellation's original design. The ability of GPS geodesy to estimate 3D positions with millimeter-level precision with respect to a global terrestrial reference frame has contributed to significant advances in geophysics, seismology, atmospheric science, hydrology, and natural hazard science. Monitoring the changes in the positions or trajectories of GPS instruments on the Earth's land and water surfaces, in the atmosphere, or in space, is important for both theory and applications, from an improved understanding of tectonic and magmatic processes to developing systems for mitigating the impact of natural hazards on society and the environment. Besides accurate positioning, all disturbances in the propagation of the transmitted GPS radio signals from satellite to receiver are mined for information, from troposphere and ionosphere delays for weather, climate, and natural hazard applications, to disturbances in the signals due to multipath reflections from the solid ground, water, and ice for environmental applications. We review the relevant concepts of geodetic theory, data analysis, and physical modeling for a myriad of processes at multiple spatial and temporal scales, and discuss the extensive global infrastructure that has been built to support GPS geodesy consisting of thousands of continuously operating stations. We also discuss the integration of heterogeneous and complementary data sets from geodesy, seismology, and geology, focusing on crustal deformation applications and early warning systems for natural hazards.

  5. Countering GPS jamming and EW threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Carlos M.; Rastegar, J.; McLain, Clifford E.; Alanson, T.; McMullan, Charles; Nguyen, H.-L.

    2007-09-01

    Efforts at the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) at Picatinny, New Jersey are focused on developing methods to counter GPS jamming and electronic warfare (EW) threat by eliminating GPS dependency entirely. In addition, the need for munitions cost reduction requires alternatives to expensive high-grade inertia components. Efforts at ARDEC include investigations of novel methods for onboard measurement of munitions full position and angular orientation independent of GPS signals or high-grade inertia components. Currently, two types of direct angular measurement sensors are being investigated. A first sensor, Radio Frequency Polarized Sensor (RFPS), uses an electromagnetic field as a reference. A second sensor is based on magnetometers, using the Earth magnetic field for orientation measurement. Magnetometers, however, can only provide two independent orientation measurements. The RFPS may also be used to make full object position and angular orientation measurement relative to a reference coordinate system, which may be moving or stationary. The potential applications of novel RFPS sensors is in providing highly effective inexpensive replacement for GPS, which could be used in a "Layered Navigation" scheme employing alternate referencing methods and reduce the current dependency on GPS as a primary reference for guided gun-fired munitions. Other potential applications of RFPSs is in UAVs, UGVs, and robotic platforms.

  6. 75 FR 10439 - Cognitive Radio Technologies and Software Defined Radios

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ..., such as keys, passwords or biometric data. 11. Finally, as software defined radio and security... concerning the use of open source software to implement security features in software defined radios (SDRs... radios; and (2) its policy on the confidentiality of software that controls security measures in software...

  7. GPS Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Global Positioning System (GPS) Test Facility Instrumentation Suite (GPSIS) provides great flexibility in testing receivers by providing operational control of...

  8. Thermal radio emission : The brightness temperature and the spectral index of radio emission

    OpenAIRE

    Prigara, F. V.

    2001-01-01

    The condition of radio emission is proposed, on the base of which the theory of themal radio emission for gaseous disk is developed. This theory explains the radio emission spectra of known types of extended radio sources, located beyond the Solar planetary system. Besides, the thermal radio emission spectra of Venus and Jupiter are explained.

  9. PiVoT GPS Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wennersten, Miriam Dvorak; Banes, Anthony Vince; Boegner, Gregory J.; Dougherty, Lamar; Edwards, Bernard L.; Roman, Joseph; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has built an open architecture, 24 channel space flight GPS receiver. The CompactPCI PiVoT GPS receiver card is based on the Mitel/GEC Plessey Builder-2 board. PiVoT uses two Plessey 2021 correlators to allow tracking of up to 24 separate GPS SV's on unique channels. Its four front ends can support four independent antennas, making it a useful card for hosting GPS attitude determination algorithms. It has been built using space quality, radiation tolerant parts. The PiVoT card will track a weaker signal than the original Builder 2 board. It also hosts an improved clock oscillator. The PiVoT software is based on the original Plessey Builder 2 software ported to the Linux operating system. The software is POSIX complaint and can easily be converted to other POSIX operating systems. The software is open source to anyone with a licensing agreement with Plessey. Additional tasks can be added to the software to support GPS science experiments or attitude determination algorithms. The next generation PiVoT receiver will be a single radiation hardened CompactPCI card containing the microprocessor and the GPS receiver optimized for use above the GPS constellation. PiVoT was flown successfully on a balloon in July, 2001, for its first non-simulated flight.

  10. Is popular radio a source of exposure to alcohol references in mid to later life? A content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haighton, C; Halligan, J; Scott, S

    2017-04-20

    There is concern around alcohol consumption in mid to later life yet little understanding about what influences this behaviour. No previous research has explored the extent to which adults in mid to later life may be exposed to alcohol references in the media. This project aimed to determine the frequency of alcohol references on radio stations with a high proportion of listeners in mid to later life. Content analysis of alcohol references on four popular UK music-based radio stations with a high proportion of listeners aged 55-64 years over three time points. Alcohol references occur frequently, but vary by time of year and type of radio station. When alcohol is mentioned its consumption is portrayed as the norm, without negative consequences. On three commercial stations, the majority of mentions came from advertising, whereas on BBC Radio 2 nearly all references were talk-based. All adverts for direct promotion of alcohol were by supermarkets. Alcohol was frequently associated with celebrations, socializing or something to consume for its own sake. Adults in the age group 55-64 may be exposed to references to alcohol that could serve to reinforce norms of consumption of alcohol and promote purchases of cheap alcohol. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  11. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, G.; Becker, R.; Hamm, R. W.; Baskaran, R.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.

    2014-02-01

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged 238U40+ (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  12. The direct injection of intense ion beams from a high field electron cyclotron resonance ion source into a radio frequency quadrupole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, G; Becker, R; Hamm, R W; Baskaran, R; Kanjilal, D; Roy, A

    2014-02-01

    The ion current achievable from high intensity ECR sources for highly charged ions is limited by the high space charge. This makes classical extraction systems for the transport and subsequent matching to a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) accelerator less efficient. The direct plasma injection (DPI) method developed originally for the laser ion source avoids these problems and uses the combined focusing of the gap between the ion source and the RFQ vanes (or rods) and the focusing of the rf fields from the RFQ penetrating into this gap. For high performance ECR sources that use superconducting solenoids, the stray magnetic field of the source in addition to the DPI scheme provides focusing against the space charge blow-up of the beam. A combined extraction/matching system has been designed for a high performance ECR ion source injecting into an RFQ, allowing a total beam current of 10 mA from the ion source for the production of highly charged (238)U(40+) (1.33 mA) to be injected at an ion source voltage of 60 kV. In this design, the features of IGUN have been used to take into account the rf-focusing of an RFQ channel (without modulation), the electrostatic field between ion source extraction and the RFQ vanes, the magnetic stray field of the ECR superconducting solenoid, and the defocusing space charge of an ion beam. The stray magnetic field is shown to be critical in the case of a matched beam.

  13. Radio Wavelength Studies of the Galactic Center Source N3, Spectroscopic Instrumentation For Robotic Telescope Systems, and Developing Active Learning Activities for Astronomy Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludovici, Dominic Alesio

    2017-08-01

    The mysterious radio source N3 appears to be located within the vicinity of the Radio Arc region of the Galactic Center. To investigate the nature of this source, we have conducted radio observations with the VLA and the VLBA. Continuum observations between 2 and 50 GHz reveal that N3 is an extremely compact and bright source with a non-thermal spectrum. Molecular line observations with the VLA reveal a compact molecular cloud adjacent to N3 in projection. The properties of this cloud are consistent with other galactic center clouds. We are able to rule out several hypotheses for the nature of N3, though a micro-blazar origin cannot be ruled out. Robotic Telescope systems are now seeing widespread deployment as both teaching and research instruments. While these systems have traditionally been able to produce high quality images, these systems have lacked the capability to conduct spectroscopic observations. To enable spectroscopic observations on the Iowa Robotic Observatory, we have developed a low cost (˜ 500), low resolution (R ˜ 300) spectrometer which mounts inside a modified filter wheel and a moderate cost (˜ 5000), medium resolution (R ˜ 8000) fiber-fed spectrometer. Software has been developed to operate both instruments robotically and calibration pipelines are being developed to automate calibration of the data. The University of Iowa offers several introductory astronomy laboratory courses taken by many hundreds of students each semester. To improve student learning in these laboratory courses, we have worked to integrate active learning into laboratory activities. We present the pedagogical approaches used to develop and update the laboratory activities and present an inventory of the current laboratory exercises. Using the inventory, we make observations of the strengths and weaknesses of the current exercises and provide suggestions for future refinement of the astronomy laboratory curriculum.

  14. Initial Beam Dynamics Simulations of a High-Average-Current Field-Emission Electron Source in a Superconducting RadioFrequency Gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohsen, O. [Northern Illinois U.; Gonin, I. [Fermilab; Kephart, R. [Fermilab; Khabiboulline, T. [Fermilab; Piot, P. [Northern Illinois U.; Solyak, N. [Fermilab; Thangaraj, J. C. [Fermilab; Yakovlev, V. [Fermilab

    2018-01-05

    High-power electron beams are sought-after tools in support to a wide array of societal applications. This paper investigates the production of high-power electron beams by combining a high-current field-emission electron source to a superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) cavity. We especially carry out beam-dynamics simulations that demonstrate the viability of the scheme to form $\\sim$ 300 kW average-power electron beam using a 1+1/2-cell SRF gun.

  15. An Advanced Data Warehouse for Integrating Large Sets of GPS Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Krogh, Benjamin Bjerre; Thomsen, Christian

    2014-01-01

    GPS data recorded from driving vehicles is available from many sources and is a very good data foundation for answering traffic related queries. However, most approaches so far have not considered combining GPS data from many sources into a single data warehouse. Further, the integration of GPS d...

  16. An Interdisciplinary Approach at Studying the Earth-Sun System with GPS/GNSS and GPS-like Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuffada, Cinzia; Hajj, George; Mannucci, Anthony J.; Chao, Yi; Ao, Chi; Zumberge, James

    2005-01-01

    The value of Global Positioning Satellites (GPS) measurements to atmospheric science, space physics, and ocean science, is now emerging or showing a potential to play a major role in the evolving programs of NASA, NSF and NOAA. The objective of this communication is to identify and articulate the key scientific questions that are optimally, or perhaps uniquely, addressed by GPS or GPS-like observations, and discuss their relevance to existing or planned national Earth-science research programs. The GPS-based ocean reflection experiments performed to date have demonstrated the precision and spatial resolution suitable to altimetric applications that require higher spatial resolution and more frequent repeat than the current radar altimeter satellites. GPS radio occultation is promising as a climate monitoring tool because of its benchmark properties: its raw observable is based on extremely accurate timing measurements. GPS-derived temperature profiles can provide meaningful climate trend information over decadal time scales without the need for overlapping missions or mission-to-mission calibrations. By acquiring data as GPS satellites occult behind the Earth's limb, GPS also provides high vertical resolution information on the vertical structure of electron density with global coverage. New experimental techniques will create more comprehensive TEC maps by using signals reflected from the oceans and received in orbit. This communication will discuss a potential future GNSS Earth Observing System project which would deploy a constellation of satellites using GPS and GPS-like measurements, to obtain a) topography measurements based on GPS reflections with an accuracy and horizontal resolution suitable for eddy monitoring, and h) climate-records quality atmospheric temperature profiles. The constellation would also provide for measurements of ionospheric elec tron density. This is a good example of an interdisciplinary mission concept, with broad science objectives

  17. Searching for giga-Jansky fast radio bursts from the Milky Way with a global array of low-cost radio receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoz, Dan; Loeb, Abraham

    2017-06-01

    If fast radio bursts (FRBs) originate from galaxies at cosmological distances, then their all-sky rate implies that the Milky Way may host an FRB every 30-1500 yr, on average. If many FRBs persistently repeat for decades or more, a local giant FRB could be active now, with 1 GHz radio pulses of flux ˜3 × 1010 Jy, comparable with the fluxes and frequencies detectable by cellular communication devices (cell phones, Wi-Fi and GPS). We propose searching for Galactic FRBs using a global array of low-cost radio receivers. One possibility is the ˜1 GHz communication channel in cellular phones, through a Citizens-Science downloadable application. Participating phones would continuously listen for and record candidate FRBs and would periodically upload information to a central data-processing website which will identify the signature of a real, globe-encompassing, FRB from an astronomical distance. Triangulation of the GPS-based pulse arrival times reported from different Earth locations will provide the FRB sky position, potentially to arcsecond accuracy. Pulse arrival times versus frequency, from reports from phones operating at diverse frequencies, or from fast signal de-dispersion by the application, will yield the dispersion measure (DM). Compared to a Galactic DM model, it will indicate the source distance within the Galaxy. A variant approach uses the built-in ˜100 MHz FM-radio receivers present in cell phones for an FRB search at lower frequencies. Alternatively, numerous 'software-defined radio' devices, costing ˜$10 US each, could be deployed and plugged into USB ports of personal computers (particularly in radio-quiet locations) to establish the global network of receivers.

  18. Radio Mariackie

    OpenAIRE

    Tytko, Marek Mariusz

    1993-01-01

    Tekst dotyczy początków katolickiego Radia Mariackiego w Krakowie w 1993 r. The text concerns the begining of the Mariackie Radio [The Mariackie Broadcasting, the Maria's Radio Station, the Maria's Broadcasting, the Maria's Radio) in Cracow 1993.

  19. Source regions of the type II radio burst observed during a CME–CME interaction on 2013 May 22

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mäkelä, P.; Gopalswamy, N.; Reiner, M. J.; Akiyama, S.; Krupař, Vratislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 827, č. 2 (2016), 141/1-141/7 ISSN 0004-637X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/12/2394 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1401 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : coronal mass ejections (CMEs) * radio radiation Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 5.533, year: 2016 http://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.3847/0004-637X/827/2/141

  20. The apparent source size of type III radio bursts: Preliminary results by the STEREO/WAVES instruments

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krupař, Vratislav; Maksimovic, M.; Santolík, Ondřej; Cecconi, B.; Nguyen, Q. N.; Hoang, S.; Goetz, K.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 1216, č. 1 (2010), s. 284-287 ISSN 0094-243X. [International Solar Wind Conference /12./. Saint-Milo, 21.06.2009-26.06.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/2279; GA AV ČR IAA301120601; GA MŠk ME09107 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : WAVES Instrument * Solar Radio Emissions * Singular Value Decomposition technique Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  1. GPS system simulation methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    The following topics are presented: background; Global Positioning System (GPS) methodology overview; the graphical user interface (GUI); current models; application to space nuclear power/propulsion; and interfacing requirements. The discussion is presented in vugraph form.

  2. The Statistics of GPS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Matsakis, Demetrios

    2007-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) is an extremely effective satellite-based system that broadcasts sufficient information for a user to determine time and position from any location on or near the Earth...

  3. Langmuir probes for SPIDER (source for the production of ions of deuterium extracted from radio frequency plasma) experiment: Tests in BATMAN (Bavarian test machine for negative ions)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brombin, M., E-mail: matteo.brombin@igi.cnr.it; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Pomaro, N.; Taliercio, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); Schiesko, L. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    A prototype system of the Langmuir probes for SPIDER (Source for the production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) was manufactured and experimentally qualified. The diagnostic was operated in RF (Radio Frequency) plasmas with cesium evaporation on the BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) test facility, which can provide plasma conditions as expected in the SPIDER source. A RF passive compensation circuit was realised to operate the Langmuir probes in RF plasmas. The sensors’ holder, designed to better simulate the bias plate conditions in SPIDER, was exposed to a severe experimental campaign in BATMAN with cesium evaporation. No detrimental effect on the diagnostic due to cesium evaporation was found during the exposure to the BATMAN plasma and in particular the insulation of the electrodes was preserved. The paper presents the system prototype, the RF compensation circuit, the acquisition system (as foreseen in SPIDER), and the results obtained during the experimental campaigns.

  4. Langmuir probes for SPIDER (source for the production of ions of deuterium extracted from radio frequency plasma) experiment: Tests in BATMAN (Bavarian test machine for negative ions)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brombin, M.; Spolaore, M.; Serianni, G.; Pomaro, N.; Taliercio, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Pasqualotto, R.; Schiesko, L.

    2014-11-01

    A prototype system of the Langmuir probes for SPIDER (Source for the production of Ions of Deuterium Extracted from RF plasma) was manufactured and experimentally qualified. The diagnostic was operated in RF (Radio Frequency) plasmas with cesium evaporation on the BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) test facility, which can provide plasma conditions as expected in the SPIDER source. A RF passive compensation circuit was realised to operate the Langmuir probes in RF plasmas. The sensors' holder, designed to better simulate the bias plate conditions in SPIDER, was exposed to a severe experimental campaign in BATMAN with cesium evaporation. No detrimental effect on the diagnostic due to cesium evaporation was found during the exposure to the BATMAN plasma and in particular the insulation of the electrodes was preserved. The paper presents the system prototype, the RF compensation circuit, the acquisition system (as foreseen in SPIDER), and the results obtained during the experimental campaigns.

  5. A Real-Time Capable Software-Defined Receiver Using GPU for Adaptive Anti-Jam GPS Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jiwon; Chen, Yu-Hsuan; De Lorenzo, David S.; Lo, Sherman; Enge, Per; Akos, Dennis; Lee, Jiyun

    2011-01-01

    Due to their weak received signal power, Global Positioning System (GPS) signals are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. Adaptive beam and null steering of the gain pattern of a GPS antenna array can significantly increase the resistance of GPS sensors to signal interference and jamming. Since adaptive array processing requires intensive computational power, beamsteering GPS receivers were usually implemented using hardware such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). However, a software implementation using general-purpose processors is much more desirable because of its flexibility and cost effectiveness. This paper presents a GPS software-defined radio (SDR) with adaptive beamsteering capability for anti-jam applications. The GPS SDR design is based on an optimized desktop parallel processing architecture using a quad-core Central Processing Unit (CPU) coupled with a new generation Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) having massively parallel processors. This GPS SDR demonstrates sufficient computational capability to support a four-element antenna array and future GPS L5 signal processing in real time. After providing the details of our design and optimization schemes for future GPU-based GPS SDR developments, the jamming resistance of our GPS SDR under synthetic wideband jamming is presented. Since the GPS SDR uses commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and processors, it can be easily adopted in civil GPS applications requiring anti-jam capabilities. PMID:22164116

  6. A Real-Time Capable Software-Defined Receiver Using GPU for Adaptive Anti-Jam GPS Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis Akos

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Due to their weak received signal power, Global Positioning System (GPS signals are vulnerable to radio frequency interference. Adaptive beam and null steering of the gain pattern of a GPS antenna array can significantly increase the resistance of GPS sensors to signal interference and jamming. Since adaptive array processing requires intensive computational power, beamsteering GPS receivers were usually implemented using hardware such as field-programmable gate arrays (FPGAs. However, a software implementation using general-purpose processors is much more desirable because of its flexibility and cost effectiveness. This paper presents a GPS software-defined radio (SDR with adaptive beamsteering capability for anti-jam applications. The GPS SDR design is based on an optimized desktop parallel processing architecture using a quad-core Central Processing Unit (CPU coupled with a new generation Graphics Processing Unit (GPU having massively parallel processors. This GPS SDR demonstrates sufficient computational capability to support a four-element antenna array and future GPS L5 signal processing in real time. After providing the details of our design and optimization schemes for future GPU-based GPS SDR developments, the jamming resistance of our GPS SDR under synthetic wideband jamming is presented. Since the GPS SDR uses commercial-off-the-shelf hardware and processors, it can be easily adopted in civil GPS applications requiring anti-jam capabilities.

  7. Using Transponders on the Moon to Increase Accuracy of GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Chui, Talso

    2008-01-01

    It has been proposed to place laser or radio transponders at suitably chosen locations on the Moon to increase the accuracy achievable using the Global Positioning System (GPS) or other satellite-based positioning system. The accuracy of GPS position measurements depends on the accuracy of determination of the ephemerides of the GPS satellites. These ephemerides are determined by means of ranging to and from Earth-based stations and consistency checks among the satellites. Unfortunately, ranging to and from Earth is subject to errors caused by atmospheric effects, notably including unpredictable variations in refraction. The proposal is based on exploitation of the fact that ranging between a GPS satellite and another object outside the atmosphere is not subject to error-inducing atmospheric effects. The Moon is such an object and is a convenient place for a ranging station. The ephemeris of the Moon is well known and, unlike a GPS satellite, the Moon is massive enough that its orbit is not measurably affected by the solar wind and solar radiation. According to the proposal, each GPS satellite would repeatedly send a short laser or radio pulse toward the Moon and the transponder(s) would respond by sending back a pulse and delay information. The GPS satellite could then compute its distance from the known position(s) of the transponder(s) on the Moon. Because the same hemisphere of the Moon faces the Earth continuously, any transponders placed there would remain continuously or nearly continuously accessible to GPS satellites, and so only a relatively small number of transponders would be needed to provide continuous coverage. Assuming that the transponders would depend on solar power, it would be desirable to use at least two transponders, placed at diametrically opposite points on the edges of the Moon disk as seen from Earth, so that all or most of the time, at least one of them would be in sunlight.

  8. Radio-Optical Imaging of ATLBS Survey

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... The primary aim of the ATLBS survey is to image low-power radio sources which form the bulk of the radio source population to moderately high red-shifts ( ∼ 1.0). The accompanying multiband optical and near infra-red observations provide information about the hosts and environments of the radio ...

  9. Farmer participation in radio campaigns for technology adoption:

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Peter Berglez

    =Control. Community; PRC=Participatory Radio Campaign. Source: Farm Radio International, 2011. The above impact data suggest that the more farmers listened to radio campaign programmes, the more they learned or gained new ...

  10. RADIO CINEMA

    OpenAIRE

    JØRGENSEN, MARIA; HALADYN, DENNIS; DIENER, BIRK; REESE, LIV LINDTNER

    2016-01-01

    First article: Radio Cinema has become more and more popular in Copenhagen - escalating since the first Radio Cinema event was held in 2013. Now, it is monthly taking place in Gloria Biograf. The audience meets in the darkened cinema auditory and listens to a curated program of podcasts. In this article we investigate how the experience of participating in a Radio Cinema event feels through the theory of Sarah Pink’s Doing Sensory Ethnography (2009). In the first par...

  11. FCC press release and consumer/retailer enforcement advisories regarding cell jammers, GPS jammers, and other jamming devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-09

    FCC ENFORCEMENT BUREAU STEPS UP EDUCATION AND ENFORCEMENT EFFORTS AGAINST CELLPHONE AND GPS JAMMING. CONSUMERS BEWARE: It is Unlawful to Use Cell Jammers and Other Equipment : that Blocks, Jams, or Interferes with Authorized Radio Communication...

  12. The importance of Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ) for radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2013-05-01

    Most of radio observatories are located in isolated areas. Since radio sources from the universe is very weak, astronomer need to avoid radio frequency interference (RFI) from active spectrum users and radio noise produced by human made (telecommunication, mobile phone, microwave user and many more. There are many observatories around the world are surrounded by a Radio Quiet Zone (RQZ), which is it was set up using public or state laws. A Radio Quiet Zone normally consists of two areas: an exclusive area in which totally radio emissions are forbidden, with restrictions for residents and business developments, and a larger (radius up to 100 km above) coordination area where the power of radio transmission limits to threshold levels. Geographical Information System (GIS) can be used as a powerful tool in mapping large areas with varying RQZ profiles. In this paper, we report the initial testing of the usage of this system in order to identify the areas were suitable for Radio Quiet Zone. Among the important parameters used to develop the database for our GIS are population density, information on TV and telecommunication (mobile phones) transmitters, road networks (highway), and contour shielding. We will also use other information gathered from on-site RFI level measurements on selected 'best' areas generated by the GIS. The intention is to find the best site for the purpose of establishing first radio quiet zones for radio telescope in Malaysia.

  13. How and Why to Do VLBI on GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, J. M.

    2010-01-01

    In order to establish the position of the center of mass of the Earth in the International Celestial Reference Frame, observations of the Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) constellation using the IVS network are important. With a good frame-tie between the coordinates of the IVS telescopes and nearby GPS receivers, plus a common local oscillator reference signal, it should be possible to observe and record simultaneously signals from the astrometric calibration sources and the GPS satellites. The standard IVS solution would give the atmospheric delay and clock offsets to use in analysis of the GPS data. Correlation of the GPS signals would then give accurate orbital parameters of the satellites in the ICRF reference frame, i.e., relative to the positions of the astrometric sources. This is particularly needed to determine motion of the center of mass of the earth along the rotation axis.

  14. Radio galaxies with a 'double-double morphology' : I. Analysis of the radio properties and evidence for interrupted activity in active galactic nuclei

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenmakers, AP; de Bruyn, AG; Rottgering, HJA; van der Laan, H; Kaiser, CR

    2000-01-01

    We present four Mpc-sized radio galaxies which consist of a pair of double-lobed radio sources, aligned along the same axis, and with a coinciding radio core. We call these peculiar radio sources 'double-double' radio galaxies (DDRGs) and propose a general definition of such sources: a

  15. A reliable extraction method for source and drain series resistances in silicon nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFETs) based on radio-frequency analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwa, Jae Hwa; Yoon, Young Jun; Lee, Hwan Gi; Yoo, Gwan Min; Cho, Eou-Sik; Cho, Seongjae; Lee, Jung-Hee; Kang, In Man

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a new extraction method for source and drain (S/D) series resistances of silicon nanowire (SNW) metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) based on small-signal radio-frequency (RF) analysis. The proposed method can be applied to the extraction of S/D series resistances for SNW MOSFETs with finite off-state channel resistance as well as gate bias-dependent on-state resistive components realized by 3-dimensional (3-D) device simulation. The series resistances as a function of frequency and gate voltage are presented and compared with the results obtained by an existing method with infinite off-state channel resistance model. The accuracy of the newly proposed parameter extraction method has been successfully verified by Z22- and Y-parameters up to 100 GHz operation frequency.

  16. Relativistic jet feedback - II. Relationship to gigahertz peak spectrum and compact steep spectrum radio galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicknell, Geoffrey V.; Mukherjee, Dipanjan; Wagner, Alexander Y.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Nesvadba, Nicole P. H.

    2018-04-01

    We propose that Gigahertz Peak Spectrum (GPS) and Compact Steep Spectrum (CSS) radio sources are the signposts of relativistic jet feedback in evolving galaxies. Our simulations of relativistic jets interacting with a warm, inhomogeneous medium, utilizing cloud densities and velocity dispersions in the range derived from optical observations, show that free-free absorption can account for the ˜ GHz peak frequencies and low-frequency power laws inferred from the radio observations. These new computational models replace a power-law model for the free-free optical depth a more fundamental model involving disrupted log-normal distributions of warm gas. One feature of our new models is that at early stages, the low-frequency spectrum is steep but progressively flattens as a result of a broader distribution of optical depths, suggesting that the steep low-frequency spectra discovered by Callingham et al. may possibly be attributed to young sources. We also investigate the inverse correlation between peak frequency and size and find that the initial location on this correlation is determined by the average density of the warm ISM. The simulated sources track this correlation initially but eventually fall below it, indicating the need for a more extended ISM than presently modelled. GPS and CSS sources can potentially provide new insights into the phenomenon of AGN feedback since their peak frequencies and spectra are indicative of the density, turbulent structure, and distribution of gas in the host galaxy.

  17. The development of the radio frequency driven negative ion source for neutral beam injectors (invited)a)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, W.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D.

    2012-02-01

    Large and powerful negative hydrogen ion sources are required for the neutral beam injection (NBI) systems of future fusion devices. Simplicity and maintenance-free operation favors RF sources, which are developed intensively at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) since many years. The negative hydrogen ions are generated by caesium-enhanced surface conversion of atoms and positive ions on the plasma grid surface. With a small scale prototype the required high ion current density and the low fraction of co-extracted electrons at low pressure as well as stable pulses up to 1 h could be demonstrated. The modular design allows extension to large source dimensions. This has led to the decision to choose RF sources for the NBI of the international fusion reactor, ITER. As an intermediate step towards the full size ITER source at IPP, the development will be continued with a half-size source on the new ELISE testbed. This will enable to gain experience for the first time with negative hydrogen ion beams from RF sources of these dimensions.

  18. Mechanical Design of the Radio-Isotope Source Driver Module for an Initial Prototype of Medium Dose Rate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ari Satmoko; Tri Harjanto; Hendra Prasetia

    2012-01-01

    High dose rate brachytherapy equipment for therapy against cervical cancer is developed by empowering local products. An Iridium-192 with 5 Curies of energy is used. The source is wrapped in a capsule and combined with a wire diameter of 1 mm and length 1800 mm. The therapy is carried out by inserting the radiation source into the patient's body through an applicator. The system for loading-unloading the isotope source is divided into three modules: the source driver module, the source container modules, and channel distributor module. In this paper, the discussion is focused on engineering activities of the first module that serves to drive forward and backward position of the Iridium-192 isotope sources. The activity begins with the development of preliminary design sketches that produces drawings of mechanical components required. Furthermore, the calculations are carried out in order to establish the main component specifications. From this stage, a stepper motor type M66-A50K-G10 as a mechanical driver is chosen. The next stage is developing the detailed design and producing detailed drawings for all components. The fabrication of each component refers to the detailed design drawings. All components are assembled completely into the source driver module. Test also shows that the module works manually well. By rotating the manual handle in both directions, the tip of the wire moves alternately in forward and backward directions. (author)

  19. GPS satellite surveying

    CERN Document Server

    Leick, Alfred; Tatarnikov, Dmitry

    2015-01-01

    THE MOST COMPREHENSIVE, UP-TO-DATE GUIDE ON GPS TECHNOLOGY FOR SURVEYING Three previous editions have established GPS Satellite Surveying as the definitive industry reference. Now fully updated and expanded to reflect the newest developments in the field, this Fourth Edition features cutting-edge information on GNSS antennas, precise point positioning, real-time relative positioning, lattice reduction, and much more. Expert authors examine additional tools and applications, offering complete coverage of geodetic surveying using satellite technologies. The past decade has seen a major evolut

  20. Tracking log displacement during floods in the Tagliamento River using RFID and GPS tracker devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravazzolo, D.; Mao, L.; Picco, L.; Lenzi, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Large pieces of in-channel wood can exert an important role on the ecological and morphological properties of gravel-bed rivers. On the other side, when transported during flood events, large wood can become a source of risk for sensitive structures such as bridges. However, wood displacement and velocity in river systems are still poorly understood, especially in large gravel-bed rivers. This study focuses on log transport in a valley reach of Tagliamento River (Italy). Log displacement during flood events of different magnitudes recorded from June 2010 to October 2011 has been analysed thanks to the installation of 113 radio frequency identification (RFID) tags and 42 GPS tracker devices in logs of different dimensions. Recovery rates of logs equipped with RFID and GPS trackers were about 43% and 42%, respectively. The GPS devices allowed us to analyse in details the log displacement and transport overtime, indicating a higher log entrainment during rising limb of hydrographs. The threshold for the entrainment of logs from low bars is around 40% of bankfull water stage. No clear relationship was found between the peak of flood and log displacement length and velocity. However, log displacement length and velocity appear significantly correlated to the ratio between the peak of flow and the water stage exceeding the flow duration curve for 25% of time (i.e. the ratio hmax/h25 ratio). Log deposition was observed to occur at the peak flow, and logs transported during ordinary events are preferably deposited on low bars. This study reveals the potentials of GPS tracker devices to monitor the entrainment and movements of logs in large gravel-bed rivers during floods. These observations could be useful for better planning of river management practices and strategies involving the use of large wood pieces and could help for calibrating wood budgets at the reach scale.

  1. Exposure Perception as a Key Indicator of Risk Perception and Acceptance of Sources of Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, Peter M.; Brown, Tim W. C.

    2015-01-01

    The presented survey was conducted in six European countries as an online study. A total of 2454 subjects participated. Two main research questions were investigated: firstly, how does the cognitive, moral, and affective framing of radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF EMF) exposure perception influence RF EMF risk perception? Secondly, can the deployment of mobile phone base stations have greater acceptance with RF EMF exposure reduction? The findings with respect to the first question clearly indicated that the cognitive framed exposure perception is the main determinant of RF EMF risk perception. The concomitant sensitivity to exposure strength offers an opportunity to improve the acceptance of base stations by exposure reduction. A linear regression analysis supported this assumption: in a fictional test situation, exposure reduction improved the acceptance of base stations, operationalized as the requested distance of the base station from one's own home. Furthermore, subjects with high RF EMF risk perception were most sensitive to exposure reduction. On average, a 70% exposure reduction reduced the requested distance from about 2000 meters to 1000 meters. The consequences for risk communication are discussed. PMID:26229540

  2. Exposure Perception as a Key Indicator of Risk Perception and Acceptance of Sources of Radio Frequency Electromagnetic Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Freudenstein

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The presented survey was conducted in six European countries as an online study. A total of 2454 subjects participated. Two main research questions were investigated: firstly, how does the cognitive, moral, and affective framing of radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF EMF exposure perception influence RF EMF risk perception? Secondly, can the deployment of mobile phone base stations have greater acceptance with RF EMF exposure reduction? The findings with respect to the first question clearly indicated that the cognitive framed exposure perception is the main determinant of RF EMF risk perception. The concomitant sensitivity to exposure strength offers an opportunity to improve the acceptance of base stations by exposure reduction. A linear regression analysis supported this assumption: in a fictional test situation, exposure reduction improved the acceptance of base stations, operationalized as the requested distance of the base station from one’s own home. Furthermore, subjects with high RF EMF risk perception were most sensitive to exposure reduction. On average, a 70% exposure reduction reduced the requested distance from about 2000 meters to 1000 meters. The consequences for risk communication are discussed.

  3. A STUDY OF BROADBAND FARADAY ROTATION AND POLARIZATION BEHAVIOR OVER 1.3–10 GHz IN 36 DISCRETE RADIO SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C. S.; Gaensler, B. M.; Feain, I. J.

    2016-01-01

    We present a broadband polarization analysis of 36 discrete polarized radio sources over a very broad, densely sampled frequency band. Our sample was selected on the basis of polarization behavior apparent in narrowband archival data at 1.4 GHz: half the sample shows complicated frequency-dependent polarization behavior (i.e., Faraday complexity) at these frequencies, while half shows comparatively simple behavior (i.e., they appear Faraday simple ). We re-observed the sample using the Australia Telescope Compact Array in full polarization, with 6 GHz of densely sampled frequency coverage spanning 1.3–10 GHz. We have devised a general polarization modeling technique that allows us to identify multiple polarized emission components in a source, and to characterize their properties. We detect Faraday complex behavior in almost every source in our sample. Several sources exhibit particularly remarkable polarization behavior. By comparing our new and archival data, we have identified temporal variability in the broadband integrated polarization spectra of some sources. In a number of cases, the characteristics of the polarized emission components, including the range of Faraday depths over which they emit, their temporal variability, spectral index, and the linear extent of the source, allow us to argue that the spectropolarimetric data encode information about the magneto-ionic environment of active galactic nuclei themselves. Furthermore, the data place direct constraints on the geometry and magneto-ionic structure of this material. We discuss the consequences of restricted frequency bands on the detection and interpretation of polarization structures, and the implications for upcoming spectropolarimetric surveys.

  4. Spatial relationship with the grazing pressure and alpine grassland degradation base on the GPS tracing experiment: a case study in the source region of Yellow River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-12-01

    It is hard to distinguish the affects from the human activities and climate change on the grassland degradation, especially to quantification the human activities. Grazing is the main kind of human activities on the alpine grassland. To investigate the relationship of the grazing activities and grassland degradation will help the understanding of the effects of human impacts. A GPS tracing experiment was designed to tracing the activities of the Yaks. The spatial distribution of the grazing pressure was simulated under Geographic Information System. The biomass distribution and grazing pressure was compared to judge the distribution of overgrazing. The main research results are: (1) The tracing experiment could record the track of the Yaks very well, and it could be a good tool for the quantification research of grazing pressure. (2) The grazing activities have good relationship with vegetation, residents and landform. The worse vegetation is, the grazing time is longer and the radius is bigger. The closer to the residents, the grazing intensive is higher. The grazing route is influenced by the landform. Usually the herds would like to choose the least cost way. And the grazing intensive is higher in sunny slope. (3) The grazing probability is higher while the elevation is lower and the vegetation is better. The numbers of livestock of different villages determine the spatial distribution of the grazing pressure but it has very big heterogeneity in the same village. It seems the forage is enough in the research area since the available biomass is about 1190058t and the total demand is only 603700t. But because of the heterogeneity of the grazing pressure, there are still overgrazing in some villages. The area of overgrazing is 6 percent in the winter rangeland and 11 percent in summer rangeland. It is important to take care of the spatial heterogeneity of the grazing pressure and grass production in the management of the grassland ecosystem. It should improve the

  5. Recent Advances of Structures Monitoring and Evaluation Using GPS-Time Series Monitoring Systems: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mosbeh R. Kaloop

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the recent development in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM applications for monitoring the dynamic behavior of structures using the Global Positioning Systems (GPS technique. GPS monitoring systems for real-time kinematic (RTK, precise point positioning (PPP and the sampling frequency development of GPS measurements are summarized for time series analysis. Recent proposed time series GPS monitoring systems, errors sources and mitigation, as well as system analysis and identification, are presented and discussed.

  6. Satellite Radio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Satellites have been a highly effective platform for multi- form broadcasts. This has led to a revival of the radio era. The satellite radio is a natural choice to bridge the digital gap. It has several novel features like selective addressing and error control. The value-added services from such systems are of particular interest.

  7. Volcano deformation and subdaily GPS products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grapenthin, Ronni

    Volcanic unrest is often accompanied by hours to months of deformation of the ground that is measurable with high-precision GPS. Although GPS receivers are capable of near continuous operation, positions are generally estimated for daily intervals, which I use to infer characteristics of a volcano’s plumbing system. However, GPS based volcano geodesy will not be useful in early warning scenarios unless positions are estimated at high rates and in real time. Visualization and analysis of dynamic and static deformation during the 2011 Tohokuoki earthquake in Japan motivates the application of high-rate GPS from a GPS seismology perspective. I give examples of dynamic seismic signals and their evolution to the final static offset in 30 s and 1 s intervals, which demonstrates the enhancement of subtle rupture dynamics through increased temporal resolution. This stresses the importance of processing data at recording intervals to minimize signal loss. Deformation during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, suggested net deflation by 0.05 km³ in three distinct phases. Mid-crustal aseismic precursory inflation began in May 2008 and was detected by a single continuous GPS station about 28 km NE of Redoubt. Deflation during the explosive and effusive phases was sourced from a vertical ellipsoidal reservoir at about 7-11.5 km. From this I infer a model for the temporal evolution of a complex plumbing system of at least 2 sources during the eruption. Using subdaily GPS positioning solutions I demonstrate that plumes can be detected and localized by utilizing information on phase residuals. The GPS network at Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka, records network wide subsidence at rapid rates between 8 and 12 mm/yr from 2005-2010. I hypothesize this to be caused by continuous deflation of a ˜30 km deep sill under Kluchevskoy Volcano. Interestingly, 1-2 explosive events per year cause little to no deformation at any site other than the summit site closest to the vent. I

  8. GPS Ephemeris Message Broadcast Simulation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Browne, Nathan J; Light, James J

    2005-01-01

    The warfighter constantly needs increased accuracy from GPS and a means to increasing this accuracy to the decimeter level is a broadcast ephemeris message containing GPS satellite orbit and clock corrections...

  9. Efficient GPS Position Determination Algorithms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nguyen, Thao Q

    2007-01-01

    ... differential GPS algorithm for a network of users. The stand-alone user GPS algorithm is a direct, closed-form, and efficient new position determination algorithm that exploits the closed-form solution of the GPS trilateration equations and works...

  10. Simulations of cm-wavelength Sunyaev-Zel'dovich galaxy cluster and point source blind sky surveys and predictions for the RT32/OCRA-f and the Hevelius 100-m radio telescope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lew, Bartosz; Kus, Andrzej [Toruń Centre for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus University, ul. Gagarina 11, 87-100 Toruń (Poland); Birkinshaw, Mark [HH Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Wilkinson, Peter, E-mail: blew@astro.uni.torun.pl, E-mail: Mark.Birkinshaw@bristol.ac.uk, E-mail: peter.wilkinson@manchester.ac.uk, E-mail: ajk@astro.uni.torun.pl [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, The University of Manchester, Alan Turing Building, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the effectiveness of blind surveys for radio sources and galaxy cluster thermal Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects (TSZEs) using the four-pair, beam-switched OCRA-f radiometer on the 32-m radio telescope in Poland. The predictions are based on mock maps that include the cosmic microwave background, TSZEs from hydrodynamical simulations of large scale structure formation, and unresolved radio sources. We validate the mock maps against observational data, and examine the limitations imposed by simplified physics. We estimate the effects of source clustering towards galaxy clusters from NVSS source counts around Planck-selected cluster candidates, and include appropriate correlations in our mock maps. The study allows us to quantify the effects of halo line-of-sight alignments, source confusion, and telescope angular resolution on the detections of TSZEs. We perform a similar analysis for the planned 100-m Hevelius radio telescope (RTH) equipped with a 49-beam radio camera and operating at frequencies up to 22 GHz.We find that RT32/OCRA-f will be suitable for small-field blind radio source surveys, and will detect 33{sup +17}{sub −11} new radio sources brighter than 0.87 mJy at 30 GHz in a 1 deg{sup 2} field at > 5σ CL during a one-year, non-continuous, observing campaign, taking account of Polish weather conditions. It is unlikely that any galaxy cluster will be detected at 3σ CL in such a survey. A 60-deg{sup 2} survey, with field coverage of 2{sup 2} beams per pixel, at 15 GHz with the RTH, would find <1.5 galaxy clusters per year brighter than 60 μJy (at 3σ CL), and would detect about 3.4 × 10{sup 4} point sources brighter than 1 mJy at 5σ CL, with confusion causing flux density errors ∼< 2% (20%) in 68% (95%) of the detected sources.A primary goal of the planned RTH will be a wide-area (π sr) radio source survey at 15 GHz. This survey will detect nearly 3 × 10{sup 5} radio sources at 5σ CL down to 1.3 mJy, and tens of galaxy

  11. Radio structure in quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, P.D.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis, observational attention is given to the extended extragalactic radio sources associated with quasars. The isolated compact radio sources, often identified with quasars, are only included in the discussions. Three aspects of the radio structure in quasars and their cosmic evolution are considered: a study of the parsec scale morphology in quasar cores, in relation to the extended morphologies; an investigation of possible epoch dependent hotspot properties as well as a more detailed investigation of this fine scale structure; a VLA project was carried out to obtain morphological information on scales of 0.5 arcsec on high redshift quasars and to investigate possible epoch dependent morphological properties. MERLIN observations at 0.1 arcsec resolution to supplement the VLA data were initiated. (Auth.)

  12. TLALOCNet continuous GPS-Met Array in Mexico supporting the 2017 NAM GPS Hydrometeorological Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-Cano, E.; Salazar-Tlaczani, L.; Adams, D. K.; Vivoni, E. R.; Grutter, M.; Serra, Y. L.; DeMets, C.; Galetzka, J.; Feaux, K.; Mattioli, G. S.; Miller, M. M.

    2017-12-01

    TLALOCNet is a network of continuous GPS and meteorology stations in Mexico to study atmospheric and solid earth processes. This recently completed network spans most of Mexico with a strong coverage emphasis on southern and western Mexico. This network, funded by NSF, CONACyT and UNAM, recently built 40 cGPS-Met sites to EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory standards and upgraded 25 additional GPS stations. TLALOCNet provides open and freely available raw GPS data, and high frequency surface meteorology measurements, and time series of daily positions. This is accomplished through the development of the TLALOCNet data center (http://tlalocnet.udg.mx) that serves as a collection and distribution point. This data center is based on UNAVCO's Dataworks-GSAC software and also works as part of UNAVCO's seamless archive for discovery, sharing, and access to GPS data. The TLALOCNet data center also contains contributed data from several regional GPS networks in Mexico for a total of 100+ stations. By using the same protocols and structure as the UNAVCO and other COCONet regional data centers, the scientific community has the capability of accessing data from the largest Mexican GPS network. This archive provides a fully queryable and scriptable GPS and Meteorological data retrieval point. In addition, real-time 1Hz streams from selected TLALOCNet stations are available in BINEX, RTCM 2.3 and RTCM 3.1 formats via the Networked Transport of RTCM via Internet Protocol (NTRIP) for real-time seismic and weather forecasting applications. TLALOCNet served as a GPS-Met backbone for the binational Mexico-US North American Monsoon GPS Hydrometeorological Network 2017 campaign experiment. This innovative experiment attempts to address water vapor source regions and land-surface water vapor flux contributions to precipitation (i.e., moisture recycling) during the 2017 North American Monsoon in Baja California, Sonora, Chihuahua, and Arizona. Models suggest that moisture recycling is

  13. Classics in radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Woodruff Turner

    1982-01-01

    Radio techniques were the nrst to lead astronomy away from the quiescent and limited Universe revealed by traditional observations at optical wave­ lengths. In the earliest days of radio astronomy, a handful of radio physicists and engineers made one startling discovery after another as they opened up the radio sky. With this collection of classic papers and the extensive intro­ ductory material, the reader can experience these exciting discoveries, as well as understand the developing techniques and follow the motivations which prompted the various lines of inquiry. For instance he or she will follow in detail the several attempts to detect radio waves from the sun at the turn of the century; the unravelling by Jansky of a "steady hiss type static"; the incredible story of Reber who built a 9 meter dish in his backyard in 1937 and then mapped the Milky Way; the vital discoveries by Hey and colleagues of radio bursts from the Sun and of a discrete source in the constellation of Cygnus; the development of re...

  14. High-resolution observations of the compact radio sources CL4, Cygnus X-3, and the Galactic Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geldzahler, B.J.; Kellermann, K.I.; Shaffer, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    Very long-baseline interferometer observations at lambda=3.6 cm of the Galactic object Cygnus X-3, the compact source at the Galactic Center, and CL4 are reported. Both Cygnus X-3, in the quiescent state, and CL4 have brightness temperatures of approx.10 9 --10 10 K and an angular size of about 1 milliarcsec. We find no evidence for a change in size of the Galactic Center over a temporal baseline of 3 yr

  15. Indoor Positioning Using GPS Revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Blunck, Henrik; Godsk, Torben

    2010-01-01

    It has been considered a fact that GPS performs too poorly inside buildings to provide usable indoor positioning. We analyze results of a measurement campaign to improve on the understanding of indoor GPS reception characteristics. The results show that using state-of-the-art receivers GPS...... low signal-to-noise ratios, multipath phenomena or bad satellite constellation geometry. We have also measured the indoor performance of embedded GPS receivers in mobile phones which provided lower availability and accuracy than state-of-the-art ones. Finally, we consider how the GPS performance...

  16. Measurements of Interferometer Parameters at Reception of GLONASS and GPS Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nechaeva M.

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with the calibration method of interferometers with antennas having a small effective area, on the quasinoise signals of GLONASS and GPS navigation satellites. Algorithms for calculation of antenna coordinates and instrumental delay from the analysis of correlation interferometer response to signals of satellites in the near field of the instrument were reviewed. The method was tested in VLBI experiments on interferometers with medium and large baselines that included radio telescopes of NIRFI and VIRAC. The values of the antenna coordinates and instrumental delay with an error within the limits of one discrete were obtained. The sources of measurement errors and ways to improve the accuracy of results were analysed.

  17. Software Defined GPS Receiver for International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Courtney B.; Robison, David E.; Koelewyn, Cynthia Lee

    2011-01-01

    JPL is providing a software defined radio (SDR) that will fly on the International Space Station (ISS) as part of the CoNNeCT project under NASA's SCaN program. The SDR consists of several modules including a Baseband Processor Module (BPM) and a GPS Module (GPSM). The BPM executes applications (waveforms) consisting of software components for the embedded SPARC processor and logic for two Virtex II Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) that operate on data received from the GPSM. GPS waveforms on the SDR are enabled by an L-Band antenna, low noise amplifier (LNA), and the GPSM that performs quadrature downconversion at L1, L2, and L5. The GPS waveform for the JPL SDR will acquire and track L1 C/A, L2C, and L5 GPS signals from a CoNNeCT platform on ISS, providing the best GPS-based positioning of ISS achieved to date, the first use of multiple frequency GPS on ISS, and potentially the first L5 signal tracking from space. The system will also enable various radiometric investigations on ISS such as local multipath or ISS dynamic behavior characterization. In following the software-defined model, this work will create a highly portable GPS software and firmware package that can be adapted to another platform with the necessary processor and FPGA capability. This paper also describes ISS applications for the JPL CoNNeCT SDR GPS waveform, possibilities for future global navigation satellite system (GNSS) tracking development, and the applicability of the waveform components to other space navigation applications.

  18. Relationships between GPS-signal propagation errors and EISCAT observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jakowski

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available When travelling through the ionosphere the signals of space-based radio navigation systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS are subject to modifications in amplitude, phase and polarization. In particular, phase changes due to refraction lead to propagation errors of up to 50 m for single-frequency GPS users. If both the L1 and the L2 frequencies transmitted by the GPS satellites are measured, first-order range error contributions of the ionosphere can be determined and removed by difference methods. The ionospheric contribution is proportional to the total electron content (TEC along the ray path between satellite and receiver. Using about ten European GPS receiving stations of the International GPS Service for Geodynamics (IGS, the TEC over Europe is estimated within the geographic ranges -20°≤ λ ≤40°E and 32.5°≤ Φ ≤70°N in longitude and latitude, respectively. The derived TEC maps over Europe contribute to the study of horizontal coupling and transport proces- ses during significant ionospheric events. Due to their comprehensive information about the high-latitude ionosphere, EISCAT observations may help to study the influence of ionospheric phenomena upon propagation errors in GPS navigation systems. Since there are still some accuracy limiting problems to be solved in TEC determination using GPS, data comparison of TEC with vertical electron density profiles derived from EISCAT observations is valuable to enhance the accuracy of propagation-error estimations. This is evident both for absolute TEC calibration as well as for the conversion of ray-path-related observations to vertical TEC. The combination of EISCAT data and GPS-derived TEC data enables a better understanding of large-scale ionospheric processes.

  19. Relationships between GPS-signal propagation errors and EISCAT observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Jakowski

    Full Text Available When travelling through the ionosphere the signals of space-based radio navigation systems such as the Global Positioning System (GPS are subject to modifications in amplitude, phase and polarization. In particular, phase changes due to refraction lead to propagation errors of up to 50 m for single-frequency GPS users. If both the L1 and the L2 frequencies transmitted by the GPS satellites are measured, first-order range error contributions of the ionosphere can be determined and removed by difference methods. The ionospheric contribution is proportional to the total electron content (TEC along the ray path between satellite and receiver. Using about ten European GPS receiving stations of the International GPS Service for Geodynamics (IGS, the TEC over Europe is estimated within the geographic ranges -20°≤ λ ≤40°E and 32.5°≤ Φ ≤70°N in longitude and latitude, respectively. The derived TEC maps over Europe contribute to the study of horizontal coupling and transport proces- ses during significant ionospheric events. Due to their comprehensive information about the high-latitude ionosphere, EISCAT observations may help to study the influence of ionospheric phenomena upon propagation errors in GPS navigation systems. Since there are still some accuracy limiting problems to be solved in TEC determination using GPS, data comparison of TEC with vertical electron density profiles derived from EISCAT observations is valuable to enhance the accuracy of propagation-error estimations. This is evident both for absolute TEC calibration as well as for the conversion of ray-path-related observations to vertical TEC. The combination of EISCAT data and GPS-derived TEC data enables a better understanding of large-scale ionospheric processes.

  20. Radio emission from Supernovae and High Precision Astrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Torres, M. A.

    1999-11-01

    The present thesis work makes contributions in two scientific fronts: differential astrometry over the largest angular scales ever attempted (approx. 15 arcdegrees) and numerical simulations of radio emission from very young supernovae. In the first part, we describe the results of the use of very-long-baseline interferometry (VLBI) in one experiment designed to measure with very high precision the angular distance between the radio sources 1150+812 (QSO) and 1803+784 (BL Lac). We observed the radio sources on 19 November 1993 using an intercontinental array of radio telescopes, which simultaneously recorded at 2.3 and 8.4 GHz. VLBI differential astrometry is capable, Nature allowing, of yielding source positions with precisions well below the milliarcsecond level. To achieve this precision, we first had to accurately model the rotation of the interferometric fringes via the most precise models of Earth Orientation Parameters (EOP; precession, polar motion and UT1, nutation). With this model, we successfully connected our phase delay data at both frequencies and, using difference astrometric techniques, determined the coordinates of 1803+784 relative to those of 1150+812-within the IERS reference frame--with an standard error of about 0.6 mas in each coordinate. We then corrected for several effects including propagation medium (mainly the atmosphere and ionosphere), and opacity and source-structure effects within the radio sources. We stress that our dual-frequency measurements allowed us to accurately subtract the ionosphere contribution from our data. We also used GPS-based TEC measurements to independently find the ionosphere contribution, and showed that these contributions agree with our dual-frequency measurements within about 2 standard deviations in the less favorables cases (the longest baselines), but are usually well within one standard deviation. Our estimates of the relative positions, whether using dual-frequency-based or GPS-based ionosphere

  1. Solar Radio

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Scientists monitor the structure of the solar corona, the outer most regions of the Sun's atmosphere, using radio waves (100?s of MHz to 10?s of GHz). Variations in...

  2. Assimilation Experiments of One-Dimensional Variational Analyses with GPS/MET Refractivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Paul; Joiner, Joanna; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The GPS/MET 1995 experiment demonstrated the feasibility of remote soundings of the Earth's atmosphere using the GPS radio occultation technique. Subsequent studies assessed the information content of such measurements. Several groups have attempted to assimilate the GPS radio occultation measurements into a global Data Assimilation System (DAS). These attempts followed in general the methodology proposed by Eyre, and range from die act four-dimensional variational assimilation of bending angles to assimilation of inverted profiles of temperature and/or humidity. We present here an hybrid approach. We attempted to take advantage of the accuracy of current, weather models to constrain one-dimensional variational analyses using GPS refractivity. Retrieved profiles of atmospheric parameters were then assimilated like other types of observations in a global DAS for issuing the next forecast period.

  3. Field-Aligned GPS Scintillation: Multisensor Data Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrak, Sebastijan; Semeter, Joshua; Hirsch, Michael; Starr, Gregory; Hampton, Don; Varney, Roger H.; Reimer, Ashton S.; Swoboda, John; Erickson, Philip J.; Lind, Frank; Coster, Anthea J.; Pankratius, Victor

    2018-01-01

    The Mahali Global Positioning System (GPS) array (9 receivers, 15-30 km baseline distance) in central Alaska has probed auroral structures in a field-aligned direction during a geomagnetic substorm on 7 October 2015. We present results from a collaborative study of GPS phase scintillation, optical emission brightness, and ionospheric density perturbations, by virtue of data fusion procedure from the Mahali GPS array, all-sky imager (ASI), and the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR). First, we present observations in a traditional way using colocated GPS-ASI sensors, giving us a principal pattern of the phase scintillation with respect to auroral brightness, free of any mapping ambiguities. Next, we use an assumption that the plasma irregularities are located at an altitude of 120 km, we map the optical data to this altitude, and we extend the GPS-ASI study over the entire field of view of the GPS receiver array. We obtain a repeatable and persuasive pattern, revealing that GPS phase scintillation is clustered at the auroral edges. Moreover, investigation of the colinear ISR observations supports the altitude assumption of scintillation producing irregularities, and PFISR-derived electric field estimates suggest that the source for irregularities is gradient drift instability. The phase scintillation was observed on all GPS receivers, phase scintillation exceeded once cycle during several electrojet intensifications, and several events lasted for more than a minute. Finally, phase scintillation was observed during all surge events, independent of the particular auroral morphology.

  4. Radio astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parijskij, Y.N.; Gossachinskij, I.V.; Zuckerman, B.; Khersonsky, V.K.; Pustilnik, S.; Robinson, B.J.

    1976-01-01

    A critical review of major developments and discoveries in the field of radioastronomy during the period 1973-1975 is presented. The report is presented under the following headings:(1) Continuum radiation from the Galaxy; (2) Neutral hydrogen, 21 cm (galactic and extragalactic) and recombination lines; (3) Radioastronomy investigations of interstellar molecules; (4) Extragalactic radio astronomy and (6) Development in radio astronomy instruments. (B.R.H.)

  5. GPS antenna designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Samuel J. P.

    1987-05-01

    Application of the current GPS NAVSTAR system to civilian service requires that a right hand, circularly polarized, -160 dBW spread spectrum signal be received from an orbiting satellite, where the antenna environment is also moving. This presents a design challenge when inexpensive antennas are desired. The intent of this survey is to provide information on the antennas mentioned and to construct and test prototypes to determine whether the choice made by the industry, the quadrifilar helix, is the best. The helix antenna is currently the low cost standard for GPS. Prototype versions were constructed using 12 gauge wire and subminiature coaxial hardline. The constructed antennas were tested using a signal generator and a reference turnstile. A spectrum analyzer was used to measure the level of the received signal.

  6. Open-source implementation of an ad-hoc IEEE802.11a/g/p software-defined radio on low-power and low-cost general purpose processors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ciccia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This work proposes a low-cost and low-power software-defined radio open-source platform with IEEE 802.11 a/g/p wireless communication capability. A state-of-the-art version of the IEEE 802.11 a/g/p software for GNU Radio (a free and open-source software development framework is available online, but we show here that its computational complexity prevents operations in low-power general purpose processors, even at throughputs below the standard. We therefore propose an evolution of this software that achieves a faster and lighter IEEE 802.11 a/g/p transmitter and receiver, suitable for low-power general purpose processors, for which GNU Radio provides very limited support; we discuss and describe the software radio processing structuring that is necessary to achieve the goal, providing a review of signal processing techniques. In particular, we emphasize the advanced reduced-instruction set (RISC machine (ARM study case, for which we also optimize some of the processing libraries. The presented software will remain open-source.

  7. Assessment of ultrasound equipment as a possible source of nosocomial infection in Lagos state hospitals and radio-diagnostic centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akpochafor, M.O.; Eze, C.U.; Adeneye, S.O.; Ajekigbe, A.T.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the role of ultrasound equipment as a possible source of nosocomial infection in Lagos metropolis, Nigeria. Methods: Microbiological cultures were carried out on samples obtained from ultrasound probes, gel and couch before and after scanning period. Cultures were incubated in a culture plate (Chocolate and MacConkey agar) for 48 h at a temperature of 37 ° in order to grow microorganism, after which the culture plate was examined microscopically against a bright light in order to identify the isolated organisms based on their colonial characteristics. Results: Transabdominal ultrasound probes, transvaginal probe, ultrasound couch and ultrasound gel all were contaminated with microorganisms. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent and most common organisms found (33.8%). Other organisms such as Staphylococcus epidermidis (15.4%), Candida albicans (6.2%), aerobic spore formers (26.2%), Klebsiella pneumonia (6.2%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3.1%), among others were also identified. Conclusion: The ultrasound equipment posed a significant risk for infection transmission. Patients who underwent ultrasonography within the period of the study had significant chances of being infected with Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and Aerobic spore formers. - Highlights: • Ultrasound equipment has been shown to be a possible source of nosocomial infection for patient undergoing ultrasonography. • The study showed that Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated organism. • Transabdominal probe was the most commonly contaminated ultrasound equipment in the finding. • The ultrasound gel was also contaminated with organisms like S. aureus, etc. • There was a statistical significant difference between site of collection of sample and growth density of microorganisms (p = 0.03)

  8. High-frequency variability of extragalactic radio sources. II: A statistical multi-frequency model of variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdziarz, P.; Machalski, J.

    1993-08-01

    The numerical model of extragalactic variability, proposed by Rys & Machalski (1990), is extended for multi-epoch and multi-frequency sampling of an imaginary population of variable sources. Variability observations gathered in Paper I of this series (cf. Introduction) are used to constrain free parameters of the model. The fits to the observations are satisfactory if the distributions of burst amplitude, duration, and recurrence time between consecutive bursts of radiation are frequency-dependent. The model shows how the characteristics of variability depends on the time-filter applied in observations. In particular we found that (1) the intrinsic amplitude A of the flux- density fluctuations varies with frequency as ν^0.41+/-0.14^, (2) the mean timescale of variability , characterizing the total population of variables, varies as ν^0.9+/-0.1^, and should increase from about 10-15 yr at 10.8 GHz to about 80-120 yr at 1.4 GHz. This behavior is explained by a loss of identity and dissolution of the burst in slowly decaying previous bursts, (3) the "intrinsic" fraction of variables (i.e. a fraction independent on the time filter applied) should increase (e.g. for sources with apparent fluctuation > 0.3, about five times) with increasing frequency from 1.4 to 10.8 GHz, (4) (i) the mean timescale observed in a sample of variables, ω^bar^, is shorter than that in the total population, and (ii) the observed fraction of variables is lower than the intrinsic one, if the time base of observations is shorter than (0.4-1.0) (depending on a number of sampling epochs).

  9. Radio frequency source of a weakly expanding wedge-shaped xenon ion beam for contactless removal of large-sized space debris objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balashov, Victor; Cherkasova, Maria; Kruglov, Kirill; Kudriavtsev, Arseny; Masherov, Pavel; Mogulkin, Andrey; Obukhov, Vladimir; Riaby, Valentin; Svotina, Victoria

    2017-08-01

    A theoretical-experimental research has been carried out to determine the characteristics of a radio frequency (RF) ion source for the generation of a weakly expanding wedge-shaped xenon ion beam. Such ion beam geometry is of interest as a prototype of an on-board ion injector for contactless "ion shepherding" by service spacecraft to remove large space debris objects from geostationary orbits. The wedge shape of the ion beam increases its range. The device described herein comprises an inductive gas discharge chamber and a slit-type three-electrode ion extraction grid (IEG) unit. Calculations of accelerating cell geometries and ion trajectories determined the dependence of beam expansion half-angle on normalized perveance based on the measurements of the spatial distributions of the xenon plasma parameters at the IEG entrance for a xenon flow rate q ≈ 0.2 mg/s and an incident RF power Pin ≤ 250 W at a driving frequency f = 2 MHz. Experimental studies showed that the ion beam, circular at the IEG exit, accepted the elliptical form at the distance of 580 mm with half-angle of beam expansion across IEG slits about 2°-3° and close to 0° along them. Thus, the obtained result proved the possibility of creating a new-generation on-board ion injector that could be used in spacecrafts for removal of debris.

  10. Plasma Diagnostics of the Interstellar Medium with Radio Astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Haverkorn, Marijke; Spangler, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the degree to which radio propagation measurements diagnose conditions in the ionized gas of the interstellar medium (ISM). The "signal generators" of the radio waves of interest are extragalactic radio sources (quasars and radio galaxies), as well as Galactic sources, primarily pulsars. The polarized synchrotron radiation of the Galactic non-thermal radiation also serves to probe the ISM, including space between the emitting regions and the solar system. Radio propagation measurem...

  11. Standardization of GPS data processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Pil Ho

    2001-06-01

    A nationwide GPS network has been constructed with about 60 permanent GPS stations after late 1990s in Korea. For using the GPS in variety of application area like crustal deformation, positioning, or monitoring upper atmosphere, it is necessary to have ability to process the data precisely. Now Korea Astronomy Observatory has the precise GPS data processing technique in Korea because it is difficult to understand characteristics of the parameters we want to estimate, resolve the integer ambiguity, and analyze many errors. There are three reliable GPS data processing software in the world ; Bernese(University of Berne), GIPSY-OASIS(JPL), GAMIT(MIT). These software allow us to achieve millimeter accuracy in the horizontal position and about 1 cm accuracy vertically even for regional networks with a diameter of several thousand kilometers. But we established the standard of GPS data processing using Bernese as main tool and GIPSY O ASIS as side

  12. Radio Observations of the Ionosphere From an Imaging Array and a CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isham, B.; Gustavsson, B.; Bullett, T. W.; Bergman, J. E. S.; Rincón-Charris, A.; Bruhn, F.; Funk, P.

    2017-12-01

    The ionosphere is a source of many radio emissions in the various low-frequency, medium-frequency, and high-frequency bands (0 to 30 MHz). In addition to natural radio emissions, artificial emissions can be stimulated using high-power radiowave ionospheric modification facilities. Two complementary projects are underway for the purpose of improving our knowledge of the processes of radio emissions from the ionosphere. One project is the Aguadilla radio array, located in northwestern Puerto Rico. The Aguadilla array is intended to produce 2 to 25 MHz radio images of the ionosphere, as well as to perform bistatic radar imaging of the ionosphere over Puerto Rico. The array will consist of multiple antenna elements, each of which is a single active (electromagnetically short) crossed electric dipole. The elements are arranged within a roughly 200 by 300-meter core array, in a semi-random pattern providing an optimal distribution of baseline vectors, with 6-meter minimum spacing to eliminate spacial aliasing. In addition, several elements are arranged in a partial ring around the central core, providing a roughly four times expanded region in u-v space for improved image resolution and quality. Phase is maintained via cabled connections to a central location. A remote array is also being developed, in which phase is maintained between elements by through the use of GPS-disciplined rubidium clocks. The other project involves the GimmeRF radio instrument, designed for 0.3 to 30 MHz vector observation of the radio electric field, and planned for launch in 2020 on a CubeSat. The data rate that can be sustained by GimmeRF far exceeds any available communication strategy. By exploiting fast on-board computing and efficient artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms for analysis and data selection, the usage of the telemetry link can be optimized and value added to the mission. Radio images recorded by the radio array from below the ionosphere can be directly compared with the

  13. Robust GPS carrier tracking under ionospheric scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, M.; Andreotti, M.; Aquino, M. H.; Dodson, A.

    2013-12-01

    Small scale irregularities present in the ionosphere can induce fast and unpredictable fluctuations of Radio Frequency (RF) signal phase and amplitude. This phenomenon, known as scintillation, can degrade the performance of a GPS receiver leading to cycle slips, increasing the tracking error and also producing a complete loss of lock. In the most severe scenarios, if the tracking of multiple satellites links is prevented, outages in the GPS service can also occur. In order to render a GPS receiver more robust under scintillation, particular attention should be dedicated to the design of the carrier tracking stage, that is the receiver's part most sensitive to these types of phenomenon. This paper exploits the reconfigurability and flexibility of a GPS software receiver to develop a tracking algorithm that is more robust under ionospheric scintillation. For this purpose, first of all, the scintillation level is monitored in real time. Indeed the carrier phase and the post correlation terms obtained by the PLL (Phase Locked Loop) are used to estimate phi60 and S4 [1], the scintillation indices traditionally used to quantify the level of phase and amplitude scintillations, as well as p and T, the spectral parameters of the fluctuations PSD. The effectiveness of the scintillation parameter computation is confirmed by comparing the values obtained by the software receiver and the ones provided by a commercial scintillation monitoring, i.e. the Septentrio PolarxS receiver [2]. Then the above scintillation parameters and the signal carrier to noise density are exploited to tune the carrier tracking algorithm. In case of very weak signals the FLL (Frequency Locked Loop) scheme is selected in order to maintain the signal lock. Otherwise an adaptive bandwidth Phase Locked Loop (PLL) scheme is adopted. The optimum bandwidth for the specific scintillation scenario is evaluated in real time by exploiting the Conker formula [1] for the tracking jitter estimation. The performance

  14. Radio astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Alder, Berni

    1975-01-01

    Methods in Computational Physics, Volume 14: Radio Astronomy is devoted to the role of the digital computer both as a control device and as a calculator in addressing problems related to galactic radio noise. This volume contains four chapters and begins with a technical description of the hardware and the special data-handling problems of using radioheliography, with an emphasis on a selection of observational results obtained with the Culgoora radioheliograph and their significance to solar physics and to astrophysics in general. The subsequent chapter examines interstellar dispersion, i

  15. Comparison of Atmospheric Parameters From Vlbi, GPS and Wvr In The Kanto District, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa, R.; 14 Co-Authors

    Radio signal delay associated with the neutral atmosphere is one of the major er- ror sources for space-based geodetic techniques such as the Global Positioning Sys- tem (GPS) and Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI). The comparison of atmo- spheric parameters (equivalent zenith wet delay and linear horizontal delay gradients) derived from VLBI, GPS, and WVR has been carried out to reveal the limitation of the anisotropic mapping functions under the intense mesoscale phenomena. For the four stations of the Key Stone Project(KSP) geodetic VLBI network (Kashima, Ko- ganei, Miura and Tateyama) atmospheric parameters from all these techniques have been analyzed for the summer and autumn season experiments of the year 2000 and 2001. We are also evaluating those parameters by comparing with the ray-traced slant path delay through the two days data sets of the non-hydrostatic numerical weather prediction model with 5 km horizontal resolution. We find estimated weighted RMS differences below the 10-millimeter level and correlation coefficients more than 0.8 for the zenith wet delays derived from GPS and WVR. However, RMS differences between the zenith wet delays derived from VLBI and those from WVR are more than 50 millimeters. In addition, the agreement for the estimated horizontal delay gradients from these three techniques is less clear. The discrepancy between the VLBI results and other techniques is caused by the difficulty to estimate the vertical position, the clock offset and tropospheric parameters independently since the baseline lengths of the KSP VLBI network are relatively short (less than 150km).

  16. TAGGING, TRACKING AND LOCATING WITHOUT GPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordaro, J.; Coleman, T.; Shull, D.

    2012-07-08

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to lead a Law Enforcement Working Group that was formed to collaborate on common operational needs. All agencies represented on the working group ranked their need to tag, track, and locate a witting or unwitting target as their highest priority. Specifically, they were looking for technologies more robust than Global Positioning Satellite (GPS), could communicate back to the owner, and worked where normal cell phone communications did not work or were unreliable. SRNL brought together multiple technologies in a demonstration that was held in in various Alaska venues, including metropolitan, wilderness, and at-sea that met the working group's requirements. Using prototypical technologies from Boeing, On Ramp, and Fortress, SRNL was able to demonstrate the ability to track personnel and material in all scenarios including indoors, in heavily wooden areas, canyons, and in parking garages. In all cases GPS signals were too weak to measure. Bi-directional communication was achieved in areas that Wi-Fi, cell towers, or traditional radios would not perform. The results of the exercise will be presented. These technologies are considered ideal for tracking high value material such has nuclear material with a platform that allows seamless tracking anywhere in the world, indoors or outdoors.

  17. Satellite Radio

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    communications as well as for point-to-multipoint broadcasting. GENERAL I ARTICLE. Radio is perceived to be an individual's possession because of its portability. It can be ... (See Box 1.) Gsa satellites are used for point-to-point communications as ... digital modulations one uses perceptual coding using auditory masking.

  18. Activities of voluntary public squads in Dnipropetrovsk region in the field of crime prevention during in the late 50’s – mid 60’s of XX century (according the sources connected with Dnipropetrovsk radio factory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malyga, N. M.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the article considered the activities of voluntary public squads in Dnipropetrovsk region in the field of crime prevention during in the late 50’s – mid 60’s of XX century according the sources connected with Dnipropetrovsk radio factory. This enterprise clearly shows peculiarities of social activity of citizens under the leadership of the Communist Party, which considered labor collective as a main link of communist self government. In Ukrainian and foreign historiography this problem is almost unconsidered. Source base is represented by the fund of State archive of Dnipropetrovsk region, acts of the CC KPSU (Central Committee of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, and puplications of local press. In the article made an attempt to show the process of functioning of voluntary public squads on the example of Dnipropetrovsk radio factory and show the results in field of crime prevention.

  19. Radio Astronomy Explorer /RAE/. I - Observations of terrestrial radio noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, J. R.; Caruso, J. A.; Stone, R. G.

    1973-01-01

    Radio Astronomy Explorer (RAE) I data are analyzed to establish characteristics of HF terrestrial radio noise at an altitude of about 6000 km. Time and frequency variations in amplitude of the observed noise well above cosmic noise background are explained on the basis of temporal and spatial variations in ionospheric critical frequency coupled with those in noise source distributions. It is shown that terrestrial radio noise regularly breaks through the ionosphere and reaches RAE with magnitudes 15 dB and more above cosmic noise background, on frequencies above the F-layer critical frequency.

  20. The GPS odograph user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    The GPS-based Odograph Prototype (GOP or GPS Odograph) was developed in an effort sponsored by The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA). The purpose of this effort was to develop a means of using inexpensive commercial off-the-self laptop (or notebo...

  1. High Gain Advanced GPS Receiver

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brown, Alison; Zhang, Gengsheng

    2006-01-01

    NAVSYS High Gain Advanced GPS Receiver (HAGR) uses a digital beam-steering antenna array to enable up to eight GPS satellites to be tracked, each with up to 10 dBi of additional antenna gain over a conventional receiver solution...

  2. GENERALIZED PROCESSOR SHARING (GPS) TECHNIQUES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olumide

    popular technique, Generalized Processor Sharing (GPS), provided an effective and efficient utilization of the available resources at the face of stringent and varied QoS requirements. This paper, therefore, presents the comparison of two GPS techniques –. PGPS and CDGPS – based on performance with limited resources ...

  3. GPS Position Time Series @ JPL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Susan; Moore, Angelyn; Kedar, Sharon; Liu, Zhen; Webb, Frank; Heflin, Mike; Desai, Shailen

    2013-01-01

    Different flavors of GPS time series analysis at JPL - Use same GPS Precise Point Positioning Analysis raw time series - Variations in time series analysis/post-processing driven by different users. center dot JPL Global Time Series/Velocities - researchers studying reference frame, combining with VLBI/SLR/DORIS center dot JPL/SOPAC Combined Time Series/Velocities - crustal deformation for tectonic, volcanic, ground water studies center dot ARIA Time Series/Coseismic Data Products - Hazard monitoring and response focused center dot ARIA data system designed to integrate GPS and InSAR - GPS tropospheric delay used for correcting InSAR - Caltech's GIANT time series analysis uses GPS to correct orbital errors in InSAR - Zhen Liu's talking tomorrow on InSAR Time Series analysis

  4. On the origin of radio core emission in radio-quiet quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Blundell, Katherine; Kuncic, Zdenka

    2007-01-01

    We present a model for the radio emission from radio-quiet quasar nuclei. We show that a thermal origin for the high brightness temperature, flat spectrum point sources (known as radio ``cores'') is possible provided the emitting region is hot and optically-thin. We hence demonstrate that optically-thin bremsstrahlung from a slow, dense disk wind can make a significant contribution to the observed levels of radio core emission. This is a much more satisfactory explanation, particularly for so...

  5. Driving without a GPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Karen M.

    in the best way possible; and that the differences in their knowledge systems is acknowledged and used as an asset in these international programmes. With these factors in place, on the other hand, programmes with international faculty and diverse student audiences in which this diversity is exploited...... as students as well as the lecturers themselves represent a diverse range of first languages, cultures and knowledge systems; at the same time, the teaching and learning must reach at least the same high quality standards as in more traditional mono-lingual and mono-cultural settings. For a lecturer...... in an appropriate way, may have a considerable added value that positively impacts on the knowledge, skills and competences developed by their graduates. However, lecturers often feel at a loss because they are not sure how to do this and teaching becomes like driving in unknown territory without a GPS. Based...

  6. Retrieval Assimilation and Modeling of Atmospheric Water Vapor from Ground- and Space-Based GPS Networks: Investigation of the Global and Regional Hydrological Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Jean O.

    1999-01-01

    Uncertainty over the response of the atmospheric hydrological cycle (particularly the distribution of water vapor and cloudiness) to anthropogenic forcing is a primary source of doubt in current estimates of global climate sensitivity, which raises severe difficulties in evaluating its likely societal impact. Fortunately, a variety of advanced techniques and sensors are beginning to shed new light on the atmospheric hydrological cycle. One of the most promising makes use of the sensitivity of the Global Positioning System (GPS) to the thermodynamic state, and in particular the water vapor content, of the atmosphere through which the radio signals propagate. Our strategy to derive the maximum benefit for hydrological studies from the rapidly increasing GPS data stream will proceed in three stages: (1) systematically analyze and archive quality-controlled retrievals using state-of-the-art techniques; (2) employ both currently available and innovative assimilation procedures to incorporate these determinations into advanced regional and global atmospheric models and assess their effects; and (3) apply the results to investigate selected scientific issues of relevance to regional and global hydrological studies. An archive of GPS-based estimation of total zenith delay (TZD) data and water vapor where applicable has been established with expanded automated quality control. The accuracy of the GPS estimates is being monitored; the investigation of systematic errors is ongoing using comparisons with water vapor radiometers. Meteorological packages have been implemented. The accuracy and utilization of the TZD estimates has been improved by implementing a troposphere gradient model. GPS-based gradients have been validated as real atmospheric moisture gradients, establishing a link between the estimated gradients and the passage of weather fronts. We have developed a generalized ray tracing inversion scheme that can be used to analyze occultation data acquired from space

  7. Analysis of meteorological variables in the Australasian region using ground- and space-based GPS techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleshov, Yuriy; Choy, Suelynn; Fu, Erjiang Frank; Chane-Ming, Fabrice; Liou, Yuei-An; Pavelyev, Alexander G.

    2016-07-01

    Results of analysis of meteorological variables (temperature and moisture) in the Australasian region using the global positioning system (GPS) radio occultation (RO) and GPS ground-based observations verified with in situ radiosonde (RS) data are presented. The potential of using ground-based GPS observations for retrieving column integrated precipitable water vapour (PWV) over the Australian continent has been demonstrated using the Australian ground-based GPS reference stations network. Using data from the 15 ground-based GPS stations, the state of the atmosphere over Victoria during a significant weather event, the March 2010 Melbourne storm, has been investigated, and it has been shown that the GPS observations has potential for monitoring the movement of a weather front that has sharp moisture contrast. Temperature and moisture variability in the atmosphere over various climatic regions (the Indian and the Pacific Oceans, the Antarctic and Australia) has been examined using satellite-based GPS RO and in situ RS observations. Investigating recent atmospheric temperature trends over Antarctica, the time series of the collocated GPS RO and RS data were examined, and strong cooling in the lower stratosphere and warming through the troposphere over Antarctica has been identified, in agreement with outputs of climate models. With further expansion of the Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) system, it is expected that GNSS satellite- and ground-based measurements would be able to provide an order of magnitude larger amount of data which in turn could significantly advance weather forecasting services, climate monitoring and analysis in the Australasian region.

  8. Application of GPS Measurements for Ionospheric and Tropospheric Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendra Prasad, P.; Abdu, M. A.; Furlan, Benedito. M. P.; Koiti Kuga, Hélio

    military navigation. The DOD's primary purposes were to use the system in precision weapon delivery and providing a capability that would help reverse the proliferation of navigation systems in military. Subsequently, it was very quickly realized that civil use and scientific utility would far outstrip military use. A variety of scientific applications are uniquely suited to precise positioning capabilities. The relatively high precision, low cost, mobility and convenience of GPS receivers make positioning attractive. The other applications being precise time measurement, surveying and geodesy purposes apart from orbit and attitude determination along with many user services. The system operates by transmitting radio waves from satellites to receivers on the ground, aircraft, or other satellites. These signals are used to calculate location very accurately. Standard Positioning Services (SPS) which restricts access to Coarse/Access (C/A) code and carrier signals on the L1 frequency only. The accuracy thus provided by SPS fall short of most of the accuracy requirements of users. The upper atmosphere is ionized by the ultra violet radiation from the sun. The significant errors in positioning can result when the signals are refracted and slowed by ionospheric conditions, the parameter of the ionosphere that produces most effects on GPS signals is the total number of electrons in the ionospheric propagation path. This integrated number of electrons, called Total Electron Content (TEC) varies, not only from day to night, time of the year and solar flux cycle, but also with geomagnetic latitude and longitude. Being plasma the ionosphere affects the radio waves propagating through it. Effects of scintillation on GPS satellite navigation systems operating at L1 (1.5754 GHz), L2 (1.2276 GHz) frequencies have not been estimated accurately. It is generally recognized that GPS navigation systems are vulnerable in the polar and especially in the equatorial region during the

  9. The Effect of high temperature plasma on GPS satellite signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghanajafi, C.; Alizadeh, M.M.

    2002-01-01

    Ionospheric disturbances caused by pulses of electromagnetic radiation are observed in the propagation of radio signals. Specific events affecting particular aspects of radio propagation are sudden phase anomaly; sudden frequency deviation, sudden cosmic noise and short wave fade out. Global positioning System (GPS) is a space-based navigation system, developed by the United States, to satisfy the requirements for the military forces and the civilians to determine their position, velocity and time in a common reference system anywhere on or near the earth. The purpose of this paper is to calculate the effect of ionosphere on GPS satellite signals. In order to find this effects, calculation of the total column electron content is needed. The lack of data necessary to generate real Electron Density Profile versus altitude, latitude, time, season and solar activity; causes the introduction of a new method to reproduce the topside and bottom side component of the peak electron density. Electron density profiles computed in this method are compared with GPS derived profiles, which use observations of dual frequency receivers. Ionospheric range corrections, for signal point positioning, using two methods have also been discussed

  10. CURIE: Cubesat Radio Interferometry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundkvist, D. J.; Saint-Hilaire, P.; Bain, H. M.; Bale, S. D.; Bonnell, J. W.; Hurford, G. J.; Maruca, B.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.; Pulupa, M.

    2016-12-01

    The CUbesat Radio Interferometry Experiment (CURIE) is a proposed two-element radio interferometer, based on proven and developed digital radio receivers and designed to fit within a Cubesat platform. CURIE will launch as a 6U Cubesat and then separate into two 3U Cubesats once in orbit. CURIE measures radio waves from 0.1-19MHz, which must be measured from space, as those frequencies fall below the cutoff imposed by Earth's ionosphere. The principal science objective for CURIE is to use radio interferometry to study radio burst emissions from solar eruptive events such as flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs) in the inner heliosphere, providing observations important for our understanding of the heliospheric space weather environment. The influence of space weather can be felt at Earth and other planets, as radiation levels increase and lead to auroral activity and geomagnetic effects. CURIE will be able to determine the location and size of radio burst source regions and then to track their movement outward from the Sun. In addition to the primary objective CURIE will measure the gradients of the local ionospheric density and electron temperature on the spatial scale of a few kilometers, as well as create an improved map of the radio sky at these unexplored frequencies. A space based radio interferometry observatory has long been envisioned, in orbit around the Earth or the Moon, or on the far side of the Moon. Beyond its important science objectives, CURIE will prove that the concept of a dedicated space-based interferometer can be realized by using relatively cheap Cubesats. CURIE will therefore not only provide new important science results but also serve as a pathfinder in the development of new space-based radio observation techniques for helio- and astro-physics.

  11. Space Telecommunications Radio System STRS Cognitive Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones, Janette C.; Handler, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    Radios today are evolving from awareness toward cognition. A software defined radio (SDR) provides the most capability for integrating autonomic decision making ability and allows the incremental evolution toward a cognitive radio. This cognitive radio technology will impact NASA space communications in areas such as spectrum utilization, interoperability, network operations, and radio resource management over a wide range of operating conditions. NASAs cognitive radio will build upon the infrastructure being developed by Space Telecommunication Radio System (STRS) SDR technology. This paper explores the feasibility of inserting cognitive capabilities in the NASA STRS architecture and the interfaces between the cognitive engine and the STRS radio. The STRS architecture defines methods that can inform the cognitive engine about the radio environment so that the cognitive engine can learn autonomously from experience, and take appropriate actions to adapt the radio operating characteristics and optimize performance.

  12. GFZ HR/LL GPS Ground station networks and their use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reigber, C.; Galas, R.; Koehler, W.; Forberg, M.; Ramatschi, M.

    2003-12-01

    The contribution presents GFZ's global and local High-Rate and Low-Latency GPS networks. The global HR/LL network was established, in collaboration with JPL, to support the CHAMP and GRACE POD activities and the radio occultation experiment on both missions. The GFZ sub-network is composed of 13 continuously tracking stations, generating 15-min 1 Hz GPS data files and transmitting them to GFZ every 15 minutes. Eight stations contribute to the Galileo mission preparations. Since early 2003 eight HR sites are streaming GPS data in real time. Three of them take part in the IGS Real-Time Prototype Network. GPS HR/LL network for deformation monitoring is an example of local HR/LL GPS array. This 1 Hz network was installed on Popocapetel volcano end of 1999. For the calibration of satellite altimetry, an autonomous 10 Hz GPS-Buoy was developed by GFZ and is operating in the North Sea. The presentation describes shortly the three systems and discusses issues such as: data performance, real-time data aspects and quality monitoring. Application results from ultra-rapid CHAMP/GRACE orbit processing, radio-occultation routine processing, buoy monitoring and volcano monitoring in geodesy, geophysics and meteorology will be presented.

  13. Hastighedskort for Danmark vha. GPS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ove; Lahrmann, Harry; Torp, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Hastighed på vejnettet er en central metrik indenfor trafikplanlægning og trafikoptimering. I denne artikel beskrives, hvorledes et hastighedskort for hele Danmark er skabt udelukkende vha. GPS data. To tilgangsvinkler til at beregne hastigheder vha. GPS data er præsenteret. Dette er hhv. en....... Opsummeret anses den turbaseret for at beregne det mest akkurate estimat, men metoden er meget datakrævende. Det er derfor nødvendigt at have den punktbaserede at falde tilbage på. Generelt mangler metoder til beregning af hastigheder vha. GPS data at blive valideret. Hvordan en sådan validering kan...

  14. GPS Navigation and Tracking Device

    OpenAIRE

    Yahya Salameh Khraisat; Mohammad Al-Khateeb; Yahya Abu-Alreesh; Anas Ayyash; Osama Lahlouh

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of GPS Navigation systems in the marketplace, consumers and businesses have been coming up with innovative ways to use the technology in their everyday life. GPS Navigation and Tracking systems keep us from getting lost when we are in strange locations, they monitor children when they are away from home, keep track of business vehicles and can even let us know where a philandering partner is at all times. Because of this we attend to build a GPS tracking device to solve...

  15. Contrast source inversion (CSI) method to cross-hole radio-imaging (RIM) data - Part 2: A complex synthetic example and a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongxing; Smith, Richard S.

    2018-03-01

    We present two examples of using the contrast source inversion (CSI) method to invert synthetic radio-imaging (RIM) data and field data. The synthetic model has two isolated conductors (one perfect conductor and one moderate conductor) embedded in a layered background. After inversion, we can identify the two conductors on the inverted image. The shape of the perfect conductor is better resolved than the shape of the moderate conductor. The inverted conductivity values of the two conductors are approximately the same, which demonstrates that the conductivity values cannot be correctly interpreted from the CSI results. The boundaries and the tilts of the upper and the lower conductive layers on the background can also be inferred from the results, but the centre parts of conductive layers in the inversion results are more conductive than the parts close to the boreholes. We used the straight-ray tomographic imaging method and the CSI method to invert the RIM field data collected using the FARA system between two boreholes in a mining area in Sudbury, Canada. The RIM data include the amplitude and the phase data collected using three frequencies: 312.5 kHz, 625 kHz and 1250 kHz. The data close to the ground surface have high amplitude values and complicated phase fluctuations, which are inferred to be contaminated by the reflected or refracted electromagnetic (EM) fields from the ground surface, and are removed for all frequencies. Higher-frequency EM waves attenuate more quickly in the subsurface environment, and the locations where the measurements are dominated by noise are also removed. When the data are interpreted with the straight-ray method, the images differ substantially for different frequencies. In addition, there are some unexpected features in the images, which are difficult to interpret. Compared with the straight-ray imaging results, the inversion results with the CSI method are more consistent for different frequencies. On the basis of what we learnt

  16. Radio Frequency Power Load and Associated Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, V. Karthik (Inventor); Freestone, Todd M. (Inventor); Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A radio frequency power load and associated method. A radio frequency power load apparatus may include a container with an ionized fluid therein. The apparatus may include one conductor immersed in a fluid and another conductor electrically connected to the container. A radio frequency transmission system may include a radio frequency transmitter, a radio frequency amplifier connected to the transmitter and a radio frequency power load apparatus connected to the amplifier. The apparatus may include a fluid having an ion source therein, one conductor immersed in a fluid, and another conductor electrically connected to the container. A method of dissipating power generated by a radio frequency transmission system may include constructing a waveguide with ionized fluid in a container and connecting the waveguide to an amplifier of the transmission system.

  17. A galactic microquasar mimicking winged radio galaxies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Josep; Luque-Escamilla, Pedro L; Bosch-Ramon, Valentí; Paredes, Josep M

    2017-11-24

    A subclass of extragalactic radio sources known as winged radio galaxies has puzzled astronomers for many years. The wing features are detected at radio wavelengths as low-surface-brightness radio lobes that are clearly misaligned with respect to the main lobe axis. Different models compete to account for these peculiar structures. Here, we report observational evidence that the parsec-scale radio jets in the Galactic microquasar GRS 1758-258 give rise to a Z-shaped radio emission strongly reminiscent of the X and Z-shaped morphologies found in winged radio galaxies. This is the first time that such extended emission features are observed in a microquasar, providing a new analogy for its extragalactic relatives. From our observations, we can clearly favour the hydrodynamic backflow interpretation against other possible wing formation scenarios. Assuming that physical processes are similar, we can extrapolate this conclusion and suggest that this mechanism could also be at work in many extragalactic cases.

  18. 75 FR 8928 - Announcement of IS-GPS-200, IS-GPS-705, IS-GPS-800 Interface Control Working Group (ICWG...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Announcement of IS-GPS-200, IS-GPS-705, IS-GPS... document/s IS-GPS-200E (NAVSTAR GPS Space Segment/Navigation User Interfaces), IS-GPS-705A (NAVSTAR GPS Space Segment/User Segment L5 Interfaces), and IS-GPS-800A (NAVSTAR GPS Space Segment/User Segment L1C...

  19. Sensing and Classifying Impairments of GPS Reception on Mobile Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blunck, Henrik; Kjærgaard, Mikkel Baun; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg

    2011-01-01

    degradation on modern smart phones for different hand grip styles and body placements can cause signal strength drops as high as 10-16 dB and double the positioning error. Furthermore, existing phone applications designed to help users identify sources of GPS performance impairment are restricted to show raw...... that the proposed autonomous method can identify and differentiate such sources, and thus also user environments and phone postures, with reasonable accuracy, while relying solely on GPS receiver data as it is available on most modern smart phones....

  20. Evaluating elk habitat interactions with GPS collars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark A. Rumble; Lakhdar Benkobi; Fredrick Lindzey; R. Scott Gamo

    2001-01-01

    Global positioning systems (GPS) are likely to revolutionize animal telemetry studies. GPS collars allow biologists to collect systematically scheduled data when VHF telemetry data is difficult or impossible to collect. Past studies have shown that the success of GPS telemetry is greater when animals are standing, or in open habitats. To make effective use of GPS...

  1. GPS Navigation and Tracking Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Salameh Khraisat

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of GPS Navigation systems in the marketplace, consumers and businesses have been coming up with innovative ways to use the technology in their everyday life. GPS Navigation and Tracking systems keep us from getting lost when we are in strange locations, they monitor children when they are away from home, keep track of business vehicles and can even let us know where a philandering partner is at all times. Because of this we attend to build a GPS tracking device to solve the mentioned problems. Our work consists of the GPS module that collects data from satellites and calculates the position information before transmitting them to the user’s PC (of Navigation system or observers (of Tracking System using wireless technology (GSM.

  2. LADOTD GPS technology management plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    Over many years, Global Positioning System (GPS) technology has been adopted by different sections within the Louisiana : Department of Transportation and Development (DOTD), with no uniform standards for accuracy, operation, hardware, or : software....

  3. Continuous professional development for GPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, N K; Steenstrup, A P; Pedersen, L B

    2014-01-01

    randomly chosen Danish GPs. RESULTS: Focus groups: CPD activities are chosen based on personal needs analysis, and in order to be professionally updated, to meet engaged colleagues and to prevent burnout. GPs also attend CPD to assess their own pre-existing level of competence. CPD activities need...... by topics strengthening their professional capacity and preventing burnout. There would seem to be no need for a mandatory system....

  4. CORRELATION OF CHANDRA PHOTONS WITH THE RADIO GIANT PULSES FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilous, A. V. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Kondratiev, V. I. [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Ransom, S. M., E-mail: avb3k@virginia.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2012-04-10

    No apparent correlation was found between giant pulses (GPs) and X-ray photons from the Crab pulsar during 5.4 hr of simultaneous observations with the Green Bank Telescope at 1.5 GHz and Chandra X-Ray Observatory primarily in the energy range of 1.5-4.5 keV. During the Crab pulsar periods with GPs, the X-ray flux in radio emission phase windows does not change more than by {+-}10% for main pulse (MP) GPs and {+-}30% for interpulse (IP) GPs. During GPs themselves, the X-ray flux does not change by more than two times for MP GPs and five times for IP GPs. All limits quoted are compatible with 2{sigma} fluctuations of the X-ray flux around the sets of false GPs with random arrival times. The results speak in favor of changes in plasma coherence as the origin of GPs. However, the results do not rule out variations in the rate of particle creation if the particles that emit coherent radio emission are mostly at the lowest Landau level.

  5. CORRELATION OF CHANDRA PHOTONS WITH THE RADIO GIANT PULSES FROM THE CRAB PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilous, A. V.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Ransom, S. M.

    2012-01-01

    No apparent correlation was found between giant pulses (GPs) and X-ray photons from the Crab pulsar during 5.4 hr of simultaneous observations with the Green Bank Telescope at 1.5 GHz and Chandra X-Ray Observatory primarily in the energy range of 1.5-4.5 keV. During the Crab pulsar periods with GPs, the X-ray flux in radio emission phase windows does not change more than by ±10% for main pulse (MP) GPs and ±30% for interpulse (IP) GPs. During GPs themselves, the X-ray flux does not change by more than two times for MP GPs and five times for IP GPs. All limits quoted are compatible with 2σ fluctuations of the X-ray flux around the sets of false GPs with random arrival times. The results speak in favor of changes in plasma coherence as the origin of GPs. However, the results do not rule out variations in the rate of particle creation if the particles that emit coherent radio emission are mostly at the lowest Landau level.

  6. The Quasi-Biennial Vertical Oscillations at Global GPS Stations: Identification by Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanjin Pan

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modeling nonlinear vertical components of a GPS time series is critical to separating sources contributing to mass displacements. Improved vertical precision in GPS positioning at stations for velocity fields is key to resolving the mechanism of certain geophysical phenomena. In this paper, we use ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD to analyze the daily GPS time series at 89 continuous GPS stations, spanning from 2002 to 2013. EEMD decomposes a GPS time series into different intrinsic mode functions (IMFs, which are used to identify different kinds of signals and secular terms. Our study suggests that the GPS records contain not only the well-known signals (such as semi-annual and annual signals but also the seldom-noted quasi-biennial oscillations (QBS. The quasi-biennial signals are explained by modeled loadings of atmosphere, non-tidal and hydrology that deform the surface around the GPS stations. In addition, the loadings derived from GRACE gravity changes are also consistent with the quasi-biennial deformations derived from the GPS observations. By removing the modeled components, the weighted root-mean-square (WRMS variation of the GPS time series is reduced by 7.1% to 42.3%, and especially, after removing the seasonal and QBO signals, the average improvement percentages for seasonal and QBO signals are 25.6% and 7.5%, respectively, suggesting that it is significant to consider the QBS signals in the GPS records to improve the observed vertical deformations.

  7. Flattening and radio emission among elliptical galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, M.J.; Sparks, W.B.; Wall, J.V.

    1984-01-01

    In a sample of 132 bright elliptical galaxies it is shown that there is a strong correlation between radio activity and flattening in the sense that radio ellipticals are both apparently and inherently rounder than the average elliptical. Both extended and compact sources are subject to the same correlation. No galaxies with axial ratios below 0.65 are found to be radio emitters. (author)

  8. Estimation of interfrequency receiver biases in Korean Peninsula using GPS measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Byung Kyu; Cho, Jung-Ho

    Interfrequency bias of the GPS (Global Positioning System) receiver and satellite has an effect to estimate the ionosphere TEC (Total Electron Contents). For more precise estimates of GPS-TEC, satellite and receiver instrumental biases should be calculated from GPS observables. The method for estimation the local TEC has been used the geometry-free linear combination derived from dual-frequency GPS observations. We estimated the receiver biases (also known as differential code biases) of 50 GPS reference stations in Korean Peninsula for improving an accuracy of ionosphere TEC. In this study, we found out that the GPS receivers in local area have a very large instrumental bias over 10 nano-seconds and also presented that this effect is a significant error source in the local ionosphere model.

  9. Astronomers Win Protection for Key Part of Radio Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-06-01

    International Telecommunication Union meet to painstakingly parcel out the radio frequency spectrum between radio-based applications such as personal communications, satellite broadcasting, GPS and amateur radio, and the sciences of radio astronomy, earth exploration and deep space research. The WRC also coordinates sharing between services in the same radio bands. WRC decisions are incorporated into the Radio Regulations that govern radio services worldwide. The new spectrum allocations for radio astronomy are the first since 1979. Millimeter-wave astronomy was then in its infancy and many of its needs were not yet known. As astronomers began to explore this region of the spectrum they found spectral lines from many interesting molecules in space. Many of those lines had not fallen into the areas originally set aside for astronomy, but most will be under the new allocations. "It's a win for millimeter-wave science," said Dr. John Whiteoak of the Australia Telescope National Facility, Australian delegate to WRC-00. "This secures its future." The protection is a significant step for both existing millimeter-wave telescopes and new ones such as the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) now being planned by a U.S.-European consortium. Even at its isolated site in Chile's Atacama desert, ALMA would be vulnerable to interference from satellite emissions. Sensitive radio astronomy receivers are blinded by these emissions, just as an optical telescope would be by a searchlight. "There is more energy at millimeter and sub-millimeter wavelengths washing through the Universe than there is of light or any other kind of radiation," said ALMA Project Scientist, Dr. Al Wootten of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory. "Imaging the sources of this energy can tell us a great deal about the formation of stars and galaxies, and even planets." "But the Earth's atmosphere isn't very kind to us - it has only a few windows at these frequencies, and not very transparent ones at that. They are

  10. GPS measurements in Satakunta area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poutanen, M.; Nyberg, S.; Ahola, J.

    2010-10-01

    The Finnish Geodetic Institute, the Geological Survey of Finland, Posiva Ltd and municipalities in the district of Satakunta launched the GeoSatakunta research program in 2002 to carry out interdisciplinary studies on regional bedrock stress field and to apply the results e.g. in land use planning in the Satakunta area. The area was chosen for many reasons. Its geological diversity, extensive multi-disciplinary data coverage, and various interests of participants made the area suitable for the project. The purpose of the GPS observations is to get detailed information on recent crustal deformations in the area. The Finnish Geodetic Institute maintains e.g. national GPS network, FinnRef, and since 1995 a local research network in the Olkiluoto area. The Satakunta network differs from these, and this is the first time to obtain such detailed information of a regional network in Finland. The Satakunta GPS network consists of 13 concrete pillars for episodic GPS campaigns and the Olkiluoto permanent GPS station in the FinnRef network. The distances between the concrete pillars are 10-15 km, and the sites were chosen in a co-operation with the Geological Survey of Finland taking into account the geological structures in the area. The City of Pori made the final reconnaissance in the field and constructed eight pillars in 2003. The original network was expanded in 2005-2006 in Eurajoki and Rauma, and at the City of Rauma joined the co-operation. The five new pillars join the previous Olkiluoto network into the Satakunta network. There have been three annual GPS campaigns in 2003-2008. Time series of the Satakunta network are shorter than in the Olkiluoto network, and also the distances are longer. Therefore, the same accuracy than in Olkiluoto has not yet achieved. However, mm-sized movements can be excluded. Estimated velocities were small (0.2 mm/a) and mostly statistically insignificant because of relatively short time series. In this publication we describe the

  11. HIGH-RESOLUTION RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF INTERMEDIATE REDSHIFT QUASARS AND RADIO GALAXIES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOGERS, WJ; HES, R; BARTHEL, PD; ZENSUS, JA

    We present radio maps of a collection of intermediate redshift quasars and radio galaxies mostly taken from the 3C and 4C catalogues. The sources were observed with the Very Large Array (VLA) at one or more of the following frequencies: 15 GHz, 8.4 GHz or 1.4 GHz. Several basic source parameters axe

  12. Radio Occultation Bending Angle Anomalies During Tropical Cyclones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Neubert, Torsten; Syndergaard, Stig

    signature in radio occultation profiles in the tropical tropopause layer. Using tropical cyclone best track database and data from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC), we show that the bending angle anomaly of a GPS radio occultation signal is typically larger......The tropical deep convection affects the radiation balance of the atmosphere changing the water vapor mixing ratio and the temperature of the upper troposphere lower stratosphere. The aim of this work is to better understand these processes and to investigate if severe storms leave a significant...... than the annual mean of the atmosphere around the tropopause. Comparisons with co-located CALIPSO products and GOES analyses will also be shown. The results are discussed in connection to the GPS radio occultation receiver which will be part of the Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space (ACES) payload...

  13. Radio occultation bending angle anomalies during tropical cyclones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biondi, Riccardo; Neubert, Torsten; Syndergaard, S.

    2011-01-01

    The tropical deep convection affects the radiation balance of the atmosphere changing the water vapor mixing ratio and the temperature of the upper troposphere lower stratosphere. The aim of this work is to better understand these processes and to investigate if severe storms leave a significant...... signature in radio occultation profiles in the tropical tropopause layer. Using tropical cyclone best track database and data from different GPS radio occultation missions (COSMIC, GRACE, CHAMP, SACC and GPSMET), we selected 1194 profiles in a time window of 3 h and a space window of 300 km from the eye...... of the cyclone. We show that the bending angle anomaly of a GPS radio occultation signal is typically larger than the climatology in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere and that a double tropopause during deep convection can easily be detected using this technique. Comparisons with co...

  14. RELATIVISTIC PLASMA AS THE DOMINANT SOURCE OF THE OPTICAL CONTINUUM EMISSION IN THE BROAD-LINE RADIO GALAXY 3C 120

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon-Tavares, J.; Lobanov, A. P.; Arshakian, T. G.; Chavushyan, V. H.; Doroshenko, V. T.; Sergeev, S. G.; Efimov, Y. S.; Nazarov, S. V.

    2010-01-01

    We report a relation between radio emission in the inner jet of the Seyfert galaxy 3C 120 and optical continuum emission in this galaxy. Combining the optical variability data with multi-epoch high-resolution very long baseline interferometry observations reveals that an optical flare rises when a superluminal component emerges into the jet, and its maxima is related to the passage of such component through the location of a stationary feature at a distance of ∼1.3 pc from the jet origin. This indicates that a significant fraction of the optical continuum produced in 3C 120 is non-thermal, and it can ionize material in a sub-relativistic wind or outflow. We discuss implications of this finding for the ionization and structure of the broad emission line region, as well as for the use of broad emission lines for determining black hole masses in radio-loud active galactic nucleus.

  15. GPS/INS Sensor Fusion Using GPS Wind up Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Walton R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A method of stabilizing an inertial navigation system (INS), includes the steps of: receiving data from an inertial navigation system; and receiving a finite number of carrier phase observables using at least one GPS receiver from a plurality of GPS satellites; calculating a phase wind up correction; correcting at least one of the finite number of carrier phase observables using the phase wind up correction; and calculating a corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position using the corrected at least one of the finite number of carrier phase observables; and performing a step selected from the steps consisting of recording, reporting, or providing the corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position to another process that uses the corrected IMU attitude or velocity or position. A GPS stabilized inertial navigation system apparatus is also described.

  16. Gamma-ray burster counterparts - Radio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, B.E.; Cline, T.L.; Desai, U.D.

    1989-01-01

    Many observers and theorists have suggested that gamma-ray bursters (GRBs) are related to highly magnetized rotating, neutron stars, in which case an analogy with pulsars implies that GRBs would be prodigious emitters of polarized radio emission during quiescence. The paper reports on a survey conducted with the Very Large Array radio telescope of 10 small GRB error regions for quiescent radio emission at wavelengths of 2, 6, and 20 cm. The sensitivity of the survey varied from 0.1 to 0.8 mJy. The observations did indeed reveal four radio sources inside the GRB error regions. 27 refs

  17. GPS test range mission planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Iris P.; Hancock, Thomas P.

    The principal features of the Test Range User Mission Planner (TRUMP), a PC-resident tool designed to aid in deploying and utilizing GPS-based test range assets, are reviewed. TRUMP features time history plots of time-space-position information (TSPI); performance based on a dynamic GPS/inertial system simulation; time history plots of TSPI data link connectivity; digital terrain elevation data maps with user-defined cultural features; and two-dimensional coverage plots of ground-based test range assets. Some functions to be added during the next development phase are discussed.

  18. Equatorial Kelvin Waves Observed with GPS Occultation Measurements : CHAMP and SAC-C (2.Space-Borne GPS Meteorology and Related Techniques)

    OpenAIRE

    Ho-Fang, TSAI; Toshitaka, TSUDA; George A., HAJJ; Jens, WICKERT; Yuichi, AOYAMA; Radio Science Center for Space and Atmosphere (RASC), Kyoto University :National Space Program Office(NSPO); Radio Science Center for Space and Atmosphere (RASC), Kyoto University; Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology; GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam (GFZ), Department 1:Geodesy and Remote Sensing; RASC, Kyoto University

    2004-01-01

    Structure and propagation of equatorial Kelvin waves during May 2001 and December 2002 are observed from the temperature profiles in the upper troposphere and the lower stratosphere using CHAMP and SAC-C GPS radio occultation data. Kelvin waves derived from temperature fluctuations characterize eastward phase propagation in time-longitude section and eastward phase tilts with height in altitude-longitude section between 10 and 30 km. The phase progression spans the range indicating the contin...

  19. Reduction Vehicle Speed Using GPS Android Smart Phone Programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Sami Hassan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Today the new generation of smart phone such as Samsung galaxy, Sony, Motorola, HTC is used to build smart applications that made the human life more comfortable and safe. The Android open source operating system with java programming language can be used to develop such applications. In this paper a new software application has been developed using Samsung, galaxy note smart phone to control the speed of vehicle using GPS and Android programming for such smart phone. By collecting the speed and location information from Global Position System (GPS receiver and using the global map application programming interface to determine the location nearby university, school and hospital in Baghdad city. The application will be check the speed of vehicle in zone of school, hospital and university using GPS information. If the speed over the limit the application produce sound alarm to reduce the speed to set up limit.

  20. Preliminary GPS orbit determination results for the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Kenn; Bertiger, Willy; Wu, Sien; Yunck, Tom

    1993-01-01

    A single-frequency Motorola Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver was launched with the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer mission in June 1992. The receiver utilizes dual GPS antennas placed on opposite sides of the satellite to obtain full GPS coverage as it rotates during its primary scanning mission. A data set from this GPS experiment has been processed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory with the GIPSY-OASIS 2 software package. The single-frequency, dual antenna approach and the low altitude (approximately 500 km) orbit of the satellite create special problems for the GPS orbit determination analysis. The low orbit implies that the dynamics of the spacecraft will be difficult to model, and that atmospheric drag will be an important error source. A reduced-dynamic solution technique was investigated in which ad hoc accelerations were estimated at each time step to absorb dynamic model error. In addition, a single-frequency ionospheric correction was investigated, and a cycle-slip detector was written. Orbit accuracy is currently better than 5 m. Further optimization should improve this to about 1 m.

  1. Free space optical alignment system using GPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Wee-Leong; Refai, Hazem H.; Sluss, James J., Jr.

    2005-04-01

    This paper presents results from an ongoing effort at the University of Oklahoma to develop a real-time active alignment system for free-space optical communication system. An initial prototype of a FSO active alignment system using Global Positioning System (GPS) sensors, two gimbals, and point-to-point spread spectrum RF communication is described. The positions of both FSO transceivers are exchanged over the radio frequency (RF) communication link. A controller uses the exchanged information to calculate azimuth and elevation bearings to achieve initial alignment between the transceivers. The gimbals are used to steer the beams. The paper also presents a binary scan algorithm developed to expedite the initial alignment process. The algorithm incorporates power measurements as feed back to the original transceiver for comparison. In minimizing convergence time, simulation results confirm that the algorithm performs better than raster scan, spiral scan, and raster spiral scan algorithms, all of which are used in laser satellite communications. The results also show that the initial design is not able to achieve real-time alignment. For real-time alignment, different augmenting technologies (for example, steering mirrors) should be considered.

  2. A study of GPS ionospheric scintillations observed at Guilin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuhua; Wang, Dongli

    2009-12-01

    The occurrence of strong ionospheric scintillations with S4>=0.2 was studied using global positioning system (GPS) measurements at Guilin (25.29°N, 110.33°E; geomagnetic: 15.04°N, 181.98°E), a station located near the northern crest of equatorial anomaly in China. The results are presented for data collected from January 2007 to December 2008. The results show that amplitude scintillations occurred only during the first five months of the considered years. Nighttime amplitude scintillations, observed mainly in the south of Guilin, always occurred with phase scintillations, total electron content (TEC) depletions, and Rate Of change of TEC (ROT) fluctuations. However, TEC depletions and ROT fluctuations were weak during daytime amplitude scintillations, and daytime amplitude scintillations usually occurred in most of the azimuth directions. GPS scintillation/TEC observations recorded at Guilin and signal-to-noise-ratio measurements obtained from GPS-COSMIC radio occultation indicate that nighttime and daytime scintillations are very likely caused by ionospheric F region irregularities and sporadic E, respectively.

  3. GPS operations at Olkiluoto in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koivula, H.; Kallio, U.; Nyberg, S.; Jokela, J.; Poutanen, M.

    2012-06-01

    The Finnish Geodetic Institute has studied crustal deformations at Olkiluoto, Kivetty and Romuvaara in co-operation with Posiva Oy since 1995. At Olkiluoto a total of 32 GPS campaigns have been carried out at inner network since 1995 and 17 campaigns at outer network since 2003. Kivetty and Romuvaara were not measured in 2011. In the Olkiluoto inner network 80 percent of the estimated change rates are smaller than 0.10 mm/a. One third of the change rates are statistically significant. They are mainly related to the Olkiluoto permanent station (GPS1) and to the pillars GPS6 and GPS13. The change rates related to GPS6 are not realistic due to the site-specific changes affecting the time series. The maximum change rate (-0.20 mm/a ± 0.05 mm/a) is related to GPS13. The time series of GPS13 is half the length of other pillars and therefore, the change rates are more uncertain. In the Olkiluoto outer network the maximum and statistically significant change rate is between GPS1-GPS11 (0.39 mm/a ± 0.06 mm/a). Pillar GPS12 was not observed this year. The change rates of baselines GPS1-GPS14 and GPS1-GPS15 are first time statistically significant. The change rates indicate a small movement of the GPS1 pillar. The baseline GPS1-GPS11 crosses an old fracture zone locating in the direction of the Eurajoensalmi, which might be a reason for the deformation. On the other hand, the Onkalo excavations in the vicinity of the Olkiluoto permanent station (GPS1) may cause some movement. Electronic distance measurements have been performed at Olkiluoto at the baseline GPS7-GPS8 using the Mekometer since 2002. The measurements have been carried out simultaneously with GPS campaigns. Based on 19 measurements in 10 years, the trends of the two time series seems to be similar. Due to unmodelled or dismodelled geometrical offsets and the scale difference between GPS measurements and EDM there is about 0.3 mm difference between distances GPS7-GPS8 derived from GPS measurements and EDM. It is

  4. Implementing GPS into Pave-IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    To further enhance the capabilities of the Pave-IR thermal segregation detection system developed at the Texas Transportation Institute, researchers incorporated global positioning system (GPS) data collection into the thermal profiles. This GPS capa...

  5. Location - Global Positioning System (GPS) Photos

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — Digital photos tagged with GPS location information. The St. Paul District maintains a digital library of over 10,000 GPS photos. Photos are often associated with...

  6. CLPX-Airborne: Airborne GPS Bistatic Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set consists of measurements of GPS signals reflected from the Earth's surface and collected on an airborne platform. A modified GPS Delay Mapping Receiver...

  7. GPS operations at Olkiluoto in 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koivula, H.; Kallio, U.; Nyberg, S.; Jokela, J.; Poutanen, M. [Finnish Geodetic Institute, Masala (Finland)

    2012-06-15

    The Finnish Geodetic Institute has studied crustal deformations at Olkiluoto, Kivetty and Romuvaara in co-operation with Posiva Oy since 1995. At Olkiluoto a total of 32 GPS campaigns have been carried out at inner network since 1995 and 17 campaigns at outer network since 2003. Kivetty and Romuvaara were not measured in 2011. In the Olkiluoto inner network 80 percent of the estimated change rates are smaller than 0.10 mm/a. One third of the change rates are statistically significant. They are mainly related to the Olkiluoto permanent station (GPS1) and to the pillars GPS6 and GPS13. The change rates related to GPS6 are not realistic due to the site-specific changes affecting the time series. The maximum change rate (-0.20 mm/a {+-} 0.05 mm/a) is related to GPS13. The time series of GPS13 is half the length of other pillars and therefore, the change rates are more uncertain. In the Olkiluoto outer network the maximum and statistically significant change rate is between GPS1-GPS11 (0.39 mm/a {+-} 0.06 mm/a). Pillar GPS12 was not observed this year. The change rates of baselines GPS1-GPS14 and GPS1-GPS15 are first time statistically significant. The change rates indicate a small movement of the GPS1 pillar. The baseline GPS1-GPS11 crosses an old fracture zone locating in the direction of the Eurajoensalmi, which might be a reason for the deformation. On the other hand, the Onkalo excavations in the vicinity of the Olkiluoto permanent station (GPS1) may cause some movement. Electronic distance measurements have been performed at Olkiluoto at the baseline GPS7-GPS8 using the Mekometer since 2002. The measurements have been carried out simultaneously with GPS campaigns. Based on 19 measurements in 10 years, the trends of the two time series seems to be similar. Due to unmodelled or dismodelled geometrical offsets and the scale difference between GPS measurements and EDM there is about 0.3 mm difference between distances GPS7-GPS8 derived from GPS measurements and EDM

  8. Plate Boundary Observatory GPS Network Status in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walls, C. P.; Austin, K. E.; Dittman, T.; Mann, D.; Basset, A.; Turner, R.; Lawrence, S.; Woolace, A. C.; Kasmer, D.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Feaux, K.; Mattioli, G. S.

    2015-12-01

    The EarthScope PBO GPS network, funded by the NSF and operated by UNAVCO, is comprised of 599 permanent GPS stations spanning three principal tectonic regimes and is administered by separate management regions (Subduction - Pacific Northwest [91 sites], Extension - East [41 sites], Transform - Southwest [467 sites]). Since the close of construction in September 2008 various enhancements have been implemented through additional funding by the NSF, NOAA, and NASA and in collaboration with stakeholders such as Caltrans, Scripps, and the USGS. Initially, the majority of stations used first generation IP based cellular modems and radios capable of ~10KB/s data rates. The bandwidth limitation was a challenge for regional high-rate data downloads for GPS-seismology and airborne LiDAR surveys, and real-time data flow. Today, only 13 of the original cell modems remain with 297 upgraded cell modems providing 3G/4G/LTE data communications with transfer rates ranging from 80-400 KB/s. Ongoing radio network expansion and upgrades continue to harden communications. 32 VSAT and one manual download site remain. In CA, the network capabilities for 1Hz and 5Hz downloads or real-time streaming are ~95%, ~80% and ~65%, respectively. During the past year, uptime ranged from 94-99% with data return for 15 s data exceeding 99%. Real-time (1 Hz) data from 204 sites are distributed in BINEX and RTCM 2.3/3.1 formats with an average latency of 0.5 s and completion of 86%. A variety of geophysical sensors are co-located with the GPS stations and include: 21 MEMS accelerometers, 31 strong motion and broadband seismometers, 9 borehole strainmeters and 1 long baseline strainmeter. Vaisala meteorological instruments are located at 60 sites of which 38 stream GPS/Met data. In an effort to modernize the network, Trimble NetRS receivers are gradually being replaced with GNSS-capable/enabled receivers and antennas. Today, 11 stations are GLONASS enabled and 84 are GNSS capable.

  9. Near real-time PPP-based monitoring of the ionosphere using dual-frequency GPS/BDS/Galileo data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhinmin; Li, Yangyang; Li, Fei; Guo, Jinyun

    2018-03-01

    Ionosphere delay is very important to GNSS observations, since it is one of the main error sources which have to be mitigated even eliminated in order to determine reliable and precise positions. The ionosphere is a dispersive medium to radio signal, so the value of the group delay or phase advance of GNSS radio signal depends on the signal frequency. Ground-based GNSS stations have been used for ionosphere monitoring and modeling for a long time. In this paper we will introduce a novel approach suitable for single-receiver operation based on the precise point positioning (PPP) technique. One of the main characteristic is that only carrier-phase observations are used to avoid particular effects of pseudorange observations. The technique consists of introducing ionosphere ambiguity parameters obtained from PPP filter into the geometry-free combination of observations to estimate ionospheric delays. Observational data from stations that are capable of tracking the GPS/BDS/GALILEO from the International GNSS Service (IGS) Multi-GNSS Experiments (MGEX) network are processed. For the purpose of performance validation, ionospheric delays series derived from the novel approach are compared with the global ionospheric map (GIM) from Ionospheric Associate Analysis Centers (IAACs). The results are encouraging and offer potential solutions to the near real-time ionosphere monitoring.

  10. Contents of GPS Data Files

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, John P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carver, Matthew Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Norman, Benjamin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-09

    There are no very detailed descriptions of most of these instruments in the literature – we will attempt to fix that problem in the future. The BDD instruments are described in [1]. One of the dosimeter instruments on CXD boxes is described in [2]. These documents (or web links to them) and a few others are in this directory tree. The cross calibration of the CXD electron data with RBSP is described in [3]. Each row in the data file contains the data from one time bin from a CXD or BDD instrument along with a variety of parameters derived from the data. Time steps are commandable but 4 minutes is a typical setting. These instruments are on many (but not all) GPS satellites which are currently in operation. The data come from either BDD instruments on GPS Block IIR satellites (SVN41 and 48), or else CXD-IIR instruments on GPS Block IIR and IIR-M satellites (SVN53-61) or CXD-IIF instruments on GPS block IIF satellites (SVN62-73). The CXD-IIR instruments on block IIR and IIR(M) satellites use the same design.

  11. Radio Frequency Interference Site Survey for Thai Radio Telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaroenjittichai, P.; Punyawarin, S.; Singwong, D.; Somboonpon, P.; Prasert, N.; Bandudej, K.; Kempet, P.; Leckngam, A.; Poshyachinda, S.; Soonthornthum, B.; Kramer, B.

    2017-09-01

    Radio astronomical observations have increasingly been threaten by the march of today telecommunication and wireless technology. Performance of radio telescopes lies within the fact that astronomical sources are extremely weak. National Astronomy Research Institute of Thailand (NARIT) has initiated a 5-year project, known as the Radio Astronomy Network and Geodesy for Development (RANGD), which includes the establishment of 40-meter and 13-meter radio telescopes. Possible locations have been narrowed down to three candidates, situated in the Northern part of Thailand, where the atmosphere is sufficiently dry and suitable for 22 and 43 GHz observations. The Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) measurements were carried out with a DC spectrum analyzer and directional antennas at 1.5 meter above ground, from 20 MHz to 6 GHz with full azimuth coverage. The data from a 3-minute pointing were recorded for both horizontal and vertical polarizations, in maxhold and average modes. The results, for which we used to make preliminary site selection, show signals from typical broadcast and telecommunication services and aeronautics applications. The signal intensity varies accordingly to the presence of nearby population and topography of the region.

  12. GPS-Based Navigation And Orbit Determination for the AMSAT AO-40 Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, George; Moreau, Michael; Carpenter, Russell; Bauer, Frank

    2002-01-01

    The AMSAT OSCAR-40 (AO-40) spacecraft occupies a highly elliptical orbit (HEO) to support amateur radio experiments. An interesting aspect of the mission is the attempted use of GPS for navigation and attitude determination in HEO. Previous experiences with GPS tracking in such orbits have demonstrated the ability to acquire GPS signals, but very little data were produced for navigation and orbit determination studies. The AO-40 spacecraft, flying two Trimble Advanced Navigation Sensor (TANS) Vector GPS receivers for signal reception at apogee and at perigee, is the first to demonstrate autonomous tracking of GPS signals from within a HEO with no interaction from ground controllers. Moreover, over 11 weeks of total operations as of June 2002, the receiver has returned a continuous stream of code phase, Doppler, and carrier phase measurements useful for studying GPS signal characteristics and performing post-processed orbit determination studies in HEO. This paper presents the initial efforts to generate AO-40 navigation solutions from pseudorange data reconstructed from the TANS Vector code phase, as well as to generate a precise orbit solution for the AO-40 spacecraft using a batch filter.

  13. The SMS-GPS-Trip-Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinau, Kristian Hegner; Harder, Henrik; Weber, Michael

    2015-01-01

    This article presents a new method for collecting travel behavior data, based on a combination of GPS tracking and SMS technology, coined the SMS–GPS-Trip method. The state-of-the-art method for collecting data for activity based traffic models is a combination of travel diaries and GPS tracking...

  14. Case: The Global Positioning System (GPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    supporting four dedicated GPS Ground Antennas at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida, the Kwajalein Atoll, the Ascension Islands , and Diego Garcia...study earthquakes using GPS receivers placed along fault lines; and ... GPS also plays a major role in military combat, guiding missiles and bombs to

  15. Diagnosing dementia with confidence by GPs.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hout, H.P.J. van; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Stalman, W.A.B.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Earlier reports suggest limited clinical reasoning and substantial uncertainty of GPs in assessing patients suspected of dementia. OBJECTIVE: To explore the predictors of GPs to decide on the presence and absence of dementia as well as the predictors of diagnostic confidence of GPs.

  16. Sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duffy, L.P.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the sources of radiation in the narrow perspective of radioactivity and the even narrow perspective of those sources that concern environmental management and restoration activities at DOE facilities, as well as a few related sources. Sources of irritation, Sources of inflammatory jingoism, and Sources of information. First, the sources of irritation fall into three categories: No reliable scientific ombudsman to speak without bias and prejudice for the public good, Technical jargon with unclear definitions exists within the radioactive nomenclature, and Scientific community keeps a low-profile with regard to public information. The next area of personal concern are the sources of inflammation. This include such things as: Plutonium being described as the most dangerous substance known to man, The amount of plutonium required to make a bomb, Talk of transuranic waste containing plutonium and its health affects, TMI-2 and Chernobyl being described as Siamese twins, Inadequate information on low-level disposal sites and current regulatory requirements under 10 CFR 61, Enhanced engineered waste disposal not being presented to the public accurately. Numerous sources of disinformation regarding low level radiation high-level radiation, Elusive nature of the scientific community, The Federal and State Health Agencies resources to address comparative risk, and Regulatory agencies speaking out without the support of the scientific community

  17. The polarization of radio galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaegers, W.J.

    1986-01-01

    In this thesis radio observations at 0.6 GHz together with matched (convolved) observations at 1.4 GHz of 30 radiosources are described and interpreted. Sources of great interest which are individually discussed are the complex nearby source 3C66B, the source 4C73.48, the narrow edge-darkened double source 3C130 (together with two newly observed narrow-edge-darkened doubles), the galaxies 3C129 and 3C390.3 and the giant quasar 4C34.47. (Auth.)

  18. Radio frequency detection assembly and method for detecting radio frequencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cown, Steven H.; Derr, Kurt Warren

    2010-03-16

    A radio frequency detection assembly is described and which includes a radio frequency detector which detects a radio frequency emission produced by a radio frequency emitter from a given location which is remote relative to the radio frequency detector; a location assembly electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and which is operable to estimate the location of the radio frequency emitter from the radio frequency emission which has been received; and a radio frequency transmitter electrically coupled with the radio frequency detector and the location assembly, and which transmits a radio frequency signal which reports the presence of the radio frequency emitter.

  19. Testing of the transionospheric radiochannel using data from the global GPS network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Karachenschev

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Using the international ground-based network of two-frequency receivers of the GPS navigation system provides a means of carrying out a global, continuous and fully-computerized monitoring of phase fluctuations of signals from satellite-borne radio engineering systems caused by the Earth's inhomogeneous and nonstationary ionosphere. We found that during major geomagnetic storms, the errors of determination of the range, frequency Doppler shift and angles of arrival of transionospheric radio signals exceeds that for magnetically quiet days by one order of magnitude as a minimum. This can be the cause of performance degradation of current satellite radio engineering navigation, communication and radar systems as well as superlong-baseline radio interferometry systems.

  20. Imaging spectroscopy of solar radio burst fine structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, E P; Yu, S; Kuznetsov, A A; Emslie, A G; Alcock, B; Jeffrey, N L S; Melnik, V N; Bian, N H; Subramanian, P

    2017-11-15

    Solar radio observations provide a unique diagnostic of the outer solar atmosphere. However, the inhomogeneous turbulent corona strongly affects the propagation of the emitted radio waves, so decoupling the intrinsic properties of the emitting source from the effects of radio wave propagation has long been a major challenge in solar physics. Here we report quantitative spatial and frequency characterization of solar radio burst fine structures observed with the Low Frequency Array, an instrument with high-time resolution that also permits imaging at scales much shorter than those corresponding to radio wave propagation in the corona. The observations demonstrate that radio wave propagation effects, and not the properties of the intrinsic emission source, dominate the observed spatial characteristics of radio burst images. These results permit more accurate estimates of source brightness temperatures, and open opportunities for quantitative study of the mechanisms that create the turbulent coronal medium through which the emitted radiation propagates.

  1. Industrial interference and radio astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessner, A.

    2013-07-01

    The interferer - victim scenario is described for the case of industrial interference affecting radio astronomical observatories. The sensitivity of radio astronomical receivers and their interference limits are outlined. EMC above 30 MHz is a serious problem for Radio Astronomy. Interferer (CISPR) and victim (ITU-R RA 769) standards are not harmonised. The emissions from the interferer and their spectral characteristics are not defined sufficiently well by CISPR standards. The required minimum coupling losses (MCL) between an industrial device and radio astronomical antenna depends on device properties but is shown to exceed 140 dB in most cases. Spatial separation of a few km is insufficient on its own, the terrain must shield > 30-40 dB, additional mitigations such as extra shielding or suppression of high frequency emissions may be necessary. A case by case compatibility analysis and tailored EMC measures are required for individual installations. Aggregation of many weak rfi emitters can become serious problem. If deployment densities are high enough, the emission constraints can even exceed those for a single interferer at a short distance from the radio observatory. Compatibility studies must account not only for the single interferer but also for many widely distributed interference sources.

  2. Intelligent Cognitive Radio Models for Enhancing Future Radio Astronomy Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayodele Abiola Periola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio astronomy organisations desire to optimise the terrestrial radio astronomy observations by mitigating against interference and enhancing angular resolution. Ground telescopes (GTs experience interference from intersatellite links (ISLs. Astronomy source radio signals received by GTs are analysed at the high performance computing (HPC infrastructure. Furthermore, observation limitation conditions prevent GTs from conducting radio astronomy observations all the time, thereby causing low HPC utilisation. This paper proposes mechanisms that protect GTs from ISL interference without permanent prevention of ISL data transmission and enhance angular resolution. The ISL transmits data by taking advantage of similarities in the sequence of observed astronomy sources to increase ISL connection duration. In addition, the paper proposes a mechanism that enhances angular resolution by using reconfigurable earth stations. Furthermore, the paper presents the opportunistic computing scheme (OCS to enhance HPC utilisation. OCS enables the underutilised HPC to be used to train learning algorithms of a cognitive base station. The performances of the three mechanisms are evaluated. Simulations show that the proposed mechanisms protect GTs from ISL interference, enhance angular resolution, and improve HPC utilisation.

  3. Utilization of GPS Tropospheric Delays for Climate Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suparta, Wayan

    2017-01-01

    The tropospheric delay is one of the main error sources in Global Positioning Systems (GPS) and its impact plays a crucial role in near real-time weather forecasting. Accessibility and accurate estimation of this parameter are essential for weather and climate research. Advances in GPS application has allowed the measurements of zenith tropospheric delay (ZTD) in all weather conditions and on a global scale with fine temporal and spatial resolution. In addition to the rapid advancement of GPS technology and informatics and the development of research in the field of Earth and Planetary Sciences, the GPS data has been available free of charge. Now only required sophisticated processing techniques but user friendly. On the other hand, the ZTD parameter obtained from the models or measurements needs to be converted into precipitable water vapor (PWV) to make it more useful as a component of weather forecasting and analysis atmospheric hazards such as tropical storms, flash floods, landslide, pollution, and earthquake as well as for climate change studies. This paper addresses the determination of ZTD as a signal error or delay source during the propagation from the satellite to a receiver on the ground and is a key driving force behind the atmospheric events. Some results in terms of ZTD and PWV will be highlighted in this paper. (paper)

  4. GPS in Travel and Activity Surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Alexander Sick; Hovgesen, Henrik Harder

    2004-01-01

    The use of GPS-positioning as a monitoring tool in travel and activity surveys opens up a range of possibilities. Using a personal GPS device, the locations and movements of respondents can be followed over a longer period of time. It will then be possible to analyse how the use of urban spaces...... area. The paper presents the possibilities in travel and activity surveys with GPS and electronic questionnaires. Demonstrative mapping of test data from passive GPS registration of Copenhagen respondents is presented. The different survey possibilities given a combination of GPS and PDA based...

  5. "We're certainly not in our comfort zone": a qualitative study of GPs' dementia-care educational needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Tony; Boyle, Siobhán; Jennings, Aisling; Smithson, W Henry

    2017-05-22

    Rising dementia prevalence rates rise combined with the policy objective of enabling people with dementia to remain living at home, means that there will be a growing demand for dementia care in the community setting. However, GPs are challenged by dementia care and have identified it as an area in which further training is needed. Previous studies of GPs dementia care educational needs have explored the views of GPs alone, without taking the perspectives of people with dementia and family carers into account. The aim of the study was to explore GPs' dementia care educational needs, as viewed from multiple perspectives, in order to inform the design and delivery of an educational programme for GPs. A qualitative study of GPs, people with dementia and family carers in a community setting was undertaken. Face-to-face interviews were performed with GPs, people with dementia and with family carers. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Thirty-one people were interviewed, consisting of fourteen GPs, twelve family carers and five people with dementia. GPs expressed a wish for further education, preferentially through small group workshops. Five distinct educational needs emerged from the interviews, namely, diagnosis, disclosure, signposting of local services, counselling and the management of behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD). While GPs focused on diagnosis, disclosure and BPSD in particular, people with dementia and family carers emphasised the need for GPs to engage in counselling and signposting of local services. The triangulation of data from multiple relevant sources revealed a broader range of GPs' educational needs, incorporating both medical and social aspects of dementia care. The findings of this study will inform the content and delivery of a dementia educational programme for GPs that is practice-relevant, by ensuring that the curriculum meets the needs of GPs, patients and their families.

  6. sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Yin Chiang

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the simplified models of the ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode multiplexer network with Bernoulli random traffic sources. Based on the model, the performance measures are analyzed by the different output service schemes.

  7. Estimation of precipitable water vapour from GPS measurements in Argentina: Validation and qualitative analysis of results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, L. I.; Salio, P.; Natali, M. P.; Meza, A. M.

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents PWV estimates from GPS data computed at four continuously operated GPS stations in Argentina established at Buenos Aires, Córdoba, Rosario and Salta over a 1 year period (2006-2007). The objective is to analyze the behaviour of the GPS PWV estimation using mean tropospheric temperature ( Tm) values from the Bevis model, Sapucci model and obtained by a numerical integration of variables provided by the operational analysis of the National Centre of Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The results are validated using PWV values from nearest radio soundings. Moreover, a comparison between PWV values determined from microwave sensors deployed on the NOAA-18 satellite and PWV from GPS observations is also presented. From the analysis we can see that the computation of GPS PWV using the Tm from the Bevis model, originally deduced for the northern hemisphere, shows similar behaviour to the respective computation using a Sapucci model inside 0.5 mm. The differences between the Tm values computed from the Sapucci model and the numerical integration of NCEP variables are of the order of 15 K, although it does not represent a significant error in PWV. Nevertheless, differences in bias are imperceptible during the dry period and they are as big as 3 mm during the moist or high precipitation period. This behaviour could not represent an improvement when comparing radio soundings with respect to the GPS PWV values using different estimations of Tm. Thus, we conclude that the usage of Tm estimated from the Bevis model is the best choice for regional studies, considering the simplicity and dissemination of the method, unless some more studies taking into account the geographical and climatological characteristic of the region are performed. As expected, GPS PWV values show very good agreement with radio sounding determinations, small differences can be observed especially during extreme precipitation periods. In general the NOAA PWV values denote an over

  8. Radio astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, R.D.; Gulkis, S.

    1982-07-01

    Use of the Tidbinbilla Interferometer to refine the source positions in the Parkes 2.7 GHz survey of the southern sky is described. A result of the first phase of this work was the identification of a quasi-stellar object which appears to be the most remote object yet observed. This object has a red shift of 3.78 (PKS 2000-330, and a velocity of recession equal to 91% of that light. Based on Hubble's law, PKS 2000-330 appears to be 12 billion light years away

  9. The Cubesat Radio Experiment (CURE) and Beyond: Cubesat-based Low Frequency Radio Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saint-Hilaire, P.; Sundkvist, D. J.; Martinez Oliveros, J. C.; Sample, J. G.; Pulupa, M.; Maruca, B.; Bale, S. D.; Bonnell, J. W.; Mozer, F.; Hurford, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    We have proposed a 3U cubesat, to carry a low-frequency radio receiver into low-Earth orbit to study solar radio bursts induced by solar flares and Coronal Mass Ejections. Because of the reflective properties of the Earth's ionosphere, observations of radio waves around and below 10 MHz must be made from space. The measurements will allow continuous tracking of radio bursts and associated CMEs through the inner heliosphere. These observations are important since such events are the main cause for space weather disturbances. Data products from the mission will primarily be spectra and waveforms of solar radio type II and III bursts, and the direction to the radio source as it propagates through the inner heliosphere. These data products will be available to the community through an automated pipeline nominally within a few hours of downlink. Additional science data products will be sizes of radio sources obtained via lunar occultations, and local ionospheric plasma density and electron temperature. As a first cubesat with a scientific radio instrument at these frequencies, this project is also intended as a path-finder: the instrument and sub-systems can immediately be duplicated in other cubesats, with the goal of providing the first radio interferometric measurements below the ionospheric cutoff.

  10. Impact of cognitive radio on radio astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Marinus Jan; Boonstra, A.J.; Baan, W.A.

    2010-01-01

    The introduction of new communication techniques requires an increase in the efficiency of spectrum usage. Cognitive radio is one of the new techniques that fosters spectrum efficiency by using unoccupied frequency spectrum for communications. However, cognitive radio will increase the transmission

  11. The crisis of the radio producing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Raúl Garcés

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available In a media world highly influenced by new technologies revolution and the increasing impact of television, speeches on radio are frequently polarized: in one side, some scholars argue radio belongs to the past and it is no longer able of attracting younger audiences. In the other, lay those who predict long life to radio as a source of alternative and communitarian communication experiences. The author reviews the arguments that sustain both perspectives and emphasizes the need of renovating radio producing with audacious and creative formulas. At the same time, he discusses some of the challenges Cuban radio has ahead to attract new audiences, when television and printed press are recovering from the economic crack the Island suffered after Eastern European socialism disappeared.

  12. From 1000 AU to 1000 pc: high proper-motion stars in the solar neighbourhood, radio sources in the sigma Orionis cluster, and new X-ray stars surrounding Alnilam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J. A.

    2009-07-01

    The Virtual Observatory is useful. I summarise some of my works where I extensively use the Aladin sky atlas. Topics cover from the search and common proper motion confirmation of very low-mass stars and brown dwarfs in wide (ρ > 1000 AU) binaries and multiple systems, to the identification and characterisation of stellar and substellar populations in young open clusters and OB associations at heliocentric distances of up to 1000 pc. I present three practical examples of what one can do with Aladin in one morning: a fruitful proper-motion search of objects with available ugrizJHKs photometry, an analysis of the 21 cm radio sources towards the young σ Orionis cluster, and a novel study of X-ray young stars surrounding Alnilam in the Orion Belt.

  13. An improvement of the GPS buoy system for detecting tsunami at far offshore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, T.; Terada, Y.; Nagai, T.; Kawaguchi, K.; Koshimura, S.; Matsushita, Y.

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a GPS buoy system for detecting a tsunami before its arrival at coasts and thereby mitigating tsunami disaster. The system was first deployed in 1997 for a short period in the Sagami bay, south of Tokyo, for basic experiments, and then deployed off Ofunato city, northeastern part of Japan, for the period 2001-2004. The system was then established at about 13km south of Cape Muroto, southwestern part of Japan, since 2004. Five tsunamis of about 10cm have been observed in these systems, including 2001 Peru earthquake (Mw8.3), 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (Mw8.3), 2004 Off Kii Peninsula earthquake (Mw7.4), 2010 Chile earthquake (Mw8.8), and 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake (Mw9.0). These experiments clearly showed that GPS buoy is capable of detecting tsunami with a few centimeter accuracy and can be monitored in near real time by applying an appropriate filter, real-time data transmission using radio and dissemination of obtained records of sea surface height changes through internet. Considering that the system is a powerful tool to monitor sea surface variations due to wind as well as tsunami, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure, Transport and Tourism implemented the system in a part of the Nationwide Ocean Wave information network for Ports and HArbourS (NOWPHAS) system and deployed the system at 15 sites along the coasts around the Japanese Islands. The system detected the tsunami due to the 11th March 2011 Tohoku-Oki earthquake with higher than 6m of tsunami height at the site Off South Iwate (Kamaishi). The Japan Meteorological Agency that was monitoring the record updated the level of the tsunami warning to the greatest value due to the result. Currently, the GPS buoy system uses a RTK-GPS which requires a land base for obtaining precise location of the buoy by a baseline analysis. This algorithm limits the distance of the buoy to, at most, 20km from the coast as the accuracy of positioning gets much worse as the baseline distance becomes longer

  14. MARS PATHFINDER RADIO TRACKING

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Mars Pathfinder (MPF) Radio Science (RS) data archive contains both raw radio tracking data collected during the surface lifetime of the MPF Lander and results...

  15. reduced-to-sea-level value of microwave radio refractivity over three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJPAP

    to estimate the performance of terrestrial radio links, the refractive index of the troposphere is equally a very .... Suite (ISS), a solar panel (with an alternative battery source) and the wireless console. The ISS (Fig. 2) is a ..... “Performance Analysis of Microwace Radio Refractivity on Radio Field Strength and Radio Horizon ...

  16. The Importance of Site Selection for Radio Astronomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umar, Roslan; Abidin, Zamri Zainal; Ibrahim, Zainol Abidin

    2014-01-01

    Radio sources are very weak since this object travel very far from outer space. Radio astronomy studies are limited due to radio frequency interference (RFI) that is made by man. If the harassment is not stopped, it will provide critical problems in their radio astronomy scientists research. The purpose of this study is to provide RFI map Peninsular Malaysia with a minimum mapping techniques RFI interference. RFI mapping technique using GIS is proposed as a tool in mapping techniques. Decision-making process for the selection requires gathering information from a variety of parameters. These factors affecting the selection process are also taken account. In this study, various factors or parameters involved such as availability of telecommunications transmission (including radio and television), rainfall, water line and human activity. This study will benefit radio astronomy research especially in the RFI profile in Malaysia. Keywords: Radio Astronomy, Radio Frequency Interference (RFI), RFI mapping technique : GIS

  17. Operation of the Radio Occultation Mission in KOMPSAT-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoo Choi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Korea multi-purpose satellite-5 (KOMPSAT-5 is a low earth orbit (LEO satellite scheduled to be launched in 2010. To satisfy the precision orbit determination (POD requirement for a high resolution synthetic aperture radar image of KOMPSAT-5, KOMPSAT-5 has atmosphere occultation POD (AOPOD system which consists of a space-borne dual frequency global positioning system (GPS receiver and a laser retro reflector array. A space-borne dual frequency GPS receiver on a LEO satellite provides position data for the POD and radio occultation data for scientific applications. This paper describes an overview of AOPOD system and operation concepts of the radio occultation mission in KOMPSAT-5. We showed AOPOD system satisfies the requirements of KOMPSAT-5 in performance and stability.

  18. Passive radio frequency peak power multiplier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkas, Zoltan D.; Wilson, Perry B.

    1977-01-01

    Peak power multiplication of a radio frequency source by simultaneous charging of two high-Q resonant microwave cavities by applying the source output through a directional coupler to the cavities and then reversing the phase of the source power to the coupler, thereby permitting the power in the cavities to simultaneously discharge through the coupler to the load in combination with power from the source to apply a peak power to the load that is a multiplication of the source peak power.

  19. Use of bremsstrahlung radiation to identify hidden weak β‑ sources: feasibility and possible use in radio-guided surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlotti, D.; Collamati, F.; Faccini, R.; Fresch, P.; Iacoangeli, F.; Mancini-Terracciano, C.; Marafini, M.; Mirabelli, R.; Recchia, L.; Russomando, A.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Toppi, M.; Traini, G.; Bocci, V.

    2017-11-01

    The recent interest in β^‑ radionuclides for radio-guided surgery derives from the feature of the β radiation to release energy in few millimeters of tissue. Such feature can be used to locate residual tumors with a probe located in its immediate vicinity, determining the resection margins with an accuracy of millimeters. The drawback of this technique is that it does not allow to identify tumors hidden in more than few mm of tissue. Conversely, the bremsstrahlung X-rays emitted by the interaction of the β‑ radiation with the nuclei of the tissue are relatively penetrating. To complement the β‑ probes, we have therefore developed a detector based on cadmium telluride, an X-ray detector with a high quantum efficiency working at room temperature. We measured the secondary emission of bremsstrahlung photons in a target of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) with a density similar to living tissue. The results show that this device allows to detect a 1 ml residual or lymph-node with an activity of 1 kBq hidden under a layer of 10 mm of PMMA with a 3:1 signal to noise, i.e. with a five sigma discrimination in less than 5 s.

  20. La radio digital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Eduardo Cortés S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available La radio digital es un producto de la llamada convergencia digital. Las nuevas tecnologías interconectadas permiten la aparición de nuevos modos de audiencia y la implementación de herramientas versátiles. Habla del problema de los estándares, de la radio satelital, la radio digital terrestre, las radios internacionales, la interactividad.