WorldWideScience

Sample records for gore-mbeki binational commission

  1. Gore-Mbeki Binational Commission integrated housing program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    This report documents the work done under Grant DE-FG36-97GO10209, Innovative Renewable Energy Technology Transfer Program. PEER Consultants, PC, and its subcontractor, PEER Africa (Pty.) Ltd., received an $88,000.00 grant to plan and build two energy efficient homes in the black township of Gugulethu in Cape Town, South Africa. These demonstration homes were given to the people of South Africa as a gesture of goodwill by the US government as part of the Gore-Mbeki Binational Commission (BNC) agreements and cooperation. The BNC is the term used to describe the agreement to work together by the US and the South African governments for economic development of South Africa in the areas of energy, commerce, agriculture, housing, and transportation. The BNC was formed in 1995. This project under the auspices of the BNC started in September 1996. The DOE-funded portion was performed between January 11, 1997 and February 28, 1997.

  2. 76 FR 45311 - International Joint Commission Public Hearings on Binational Management of Lake of the Woods and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 7537] International Joint Commission Public Hearings on Binational Management of Lake of the Woods and Rainy River Watershed The International Joint Commission (IJC) will hold public hearings on the final report of its International Lake of the Woods and Rainy River...

  3. San Pedro River Aquifer Binational Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callegary, James B.; Minjárez Sosa, Ismael; Tapia Villaseñor, Elia María; dos Santos, Placido; Monreal Saavedra, Rogelio; Grijalva Noriega, Franciso Javier; Huth, A. K.; Gray, Floyd; Scott, C. A.; Megdal, Sharon; Oroz Ramos, L. A.; Rangel Medina, Miguel; Leenhouts, James M.

    2016-01-01

    The United States and Mexico share waters in a number of hydrological basins and aquifers that cross the international boundary. Both countries recognize that, in a region of scarce water resources and expanding populations, a greater scientific understanding of these aquifer systems would be beneficial. In light of this, the Mexican and U.S. Principal Engineers of the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC) signed the “Joint Report of the Principal Engineers Regarding the Joint Cooperative Process United States-Mexico for the Transboundary Aquifer Assessment Program" on August 19, 2009 (IBWC-CILA, 2009). This IBWC “Joint Report” serves as the framework for U.S.-Mexico coordination and dialogue to implement transboundary aquifer studies. The document clarifies several details about the program such as background, roles, responsibilities, funding, relevance of the international water treaties, and the use of information collected or compiled as part of the program. In the document, it was agreed by the parties involved, which included the IBWC, the Mexican National Water Commission (CONAGUA), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the Universities of Arizona and Sonora, to study two priority binational aquifers, one in the San Pedro River basin and the other in the Santa Cruz River basin. This report focuses on the Binational San Pedro Basin (BSPB). Reasons for the focus on and interest in this aquifer include the fact that it is shared by the two countries, that the San Pedro River has an elevated ecological value because of the riparian ecosystem that it sustains, and that water resources are needed to sustain the river, existing communities, and continued development. This study describes the aquifer’s characteristics in its binational context; however, most of the scientific work has been undertaken for many years by each country without full knowledge of the conditions on the other side of the border. The general objective of this study is to

  4. Validation of Neutron Calculation Codes and Models by means of benchmark cases in the frame of the Binational Commission of Nuclear Energy. Probabilistic Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, Adimir; Siqueira, Paulo de Tarso D.; Andrade e Silva, Graciete Simões; Grant, Carlos; Tarazaga, Ariel E.; Barberis, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    In year 2008 the Atomic Energy National Commission (CNEA) of Argentina, and the Brazilian Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research (IPEN), under the frame of Nuclear Energy Argentine Brazilian Agreement (COBEN), among many others, included the project “Validation and Verification of Calculation Methods used for Research and Experimental Reactors . At this time, it was established that the validation was to be performed with models implemented in the deterministic codes HUEMUL and PUMA (cell and reactor codes) developed by CNEA and those ones implemented in MCNP by CNEA and IPEN. The necessary data for these validations would correspond to theoretical-experimental reference cases in the research reactor IPEN/MB-01 located in São Paulo, Brazil. The staff of the group Reactor and Nuclear Power Studies (SERC) of CNEA, from the argentine side, performed calculations with deterministic models (HUEMUL-PUMA) and probabilistic methods (MCNP) modeling a great number of physical situations of de reactor, which previously have been studied and modeled by members of the Center of Nuclear Engineering of the IPEN, whose results were extensively provided to CNEA. In this paper results of comparison of calculated and experimental results for critical configurations, temperature coefficients, kinetic parameters and fission rates evaluated with probabilistic models spatial distributions are shown. (author)

  5. Validation of Neutron Calculation Codes and Models by means of benchmark cases in the frame of the Binational Commission of Nuclear Energy. Criticality Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, Adimir; Siqueira, Paulo de Tarso D.; Andrade e Silva, Graciete Simões; Grant, Carlos; Tarazaga, Ariel E.; Barberis, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    In year 2008 the Atomic Energy National Commission (CNEA) of Argentina, and the Brazilian Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research (IPEN), under the frame of Nuclear Energy Argentine Brazilian Agreement (COBEN), among many others, included the project “Validation and Verification of Calculation Methods used for Research and Experimental Reactors . At this time, it was established that the validation was to be performed with models implemented in the deterministic codes HUEMUL and PUMA (cell and reactor codes) developed by CNEA and those ones implemented in MCNP by CNEA and IPEN. The necessary data for these validations would correspond to theoretical-experimental reference cases in the research reactor IPEN/MB-01 located in São Paulo, Brazil. The staff of the group Reactor and Nuclear Power Studies (SERC) of CNEA, from the argentine side, performed calculations with deterministic models (HUEMUL-PUMA) and probabilistic methods (MCNP) modeling a great number of physical situations of de reactor, which previously have been studied and modeled by members of the Center of Nuclear Engineering of the IPEN, whose results were extensively provided to CNEA. In this paper results for critical configurations are shown. (author)

  6. Binational Learning Communities: A Work in Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Joan

    2015-01-01

    The author, having directed, taught and evaluated five study-abroad programmes in three different countries, created her own programme based on the pros and cons she had observed. In December 2013, she completed a pilot run of a binational learning community focused on food, culture and social justice in Ecuador and Oregon, and here she shares…

  7. Validation of Neutron Calculation Codes and Models by means of benchmark cases in the frame of the Binational Commission of Nuclear Energy. Kinetic Parameters, Temperature Coefficients and Power Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dos Santos, Adimir; Siqueira, Paulo de Tarso D.; Andrade e Silva, Graciete Simões; Grant, Carlos; Tarazaga, Ariel E.; Barberis, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    In year 2008 the Atomic Energy National Commission (CNEA) of Argentina, and the Brazilian Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research (IPEN), under the frame of Nuclear Energy Argentine Brazilian Agreement (COBEN), among many others, included the project “Validation and Verification of Calculation Methods used for Research and Experimental Reactors . At this time, it was established that the validation was to be performed with models implemented in the deterministic codes HUEMUL and PUMA (cell and reactor codes) developed by CNEA and those ones implemented in MCNP by CNEA and IPEN. The necessary data for these validations would correspond to theoretical-experimental reference cases in the research reactor IPEN/MB-01 located in São Paulo, Brazil. The staff of the group Reactor and Nuclear Power Studies (SERC) of CNEA, from the argentine side, performed calculations with deterministic models (HUEMUL-PUMA) and probabilistic methods (MCNP) modeling a great number of physical situations of de reactor, which previously have been studied and modeled by members of the Center of Nuclear Engineering of the IPEN, whose results were extensively provided to CNEA. In this paper results of comparison of calculated and experimental results for temperature coefficients, kinetic parameters and fission rates spatial distributions are shown. (author)

  8. Binational Americans: In their own words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Anne; Wade, Priscilla

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study explores the ethnic identity formation of binational adults, defined as adults with parents who are each of different nationalities. In this sample, all participants were US citizens between the ages of 20 and 34 and most also identified as having biracial backgrounds. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, allowing participants to freely express their life experiences, personal revelations and feelings about their identity and place in the world around them. Results were recorded, transcribed and coded. Personal narratives described how life experiences enabled participants to develop cultural sensitivity, and increased their ability to identify commonalities and differences in concepts of race, ethnicity and culture in and outside the USA.

  9. Development of a Surveillance Definition for United States-Mexico Binational Cases of Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodruff, Rachel S Yelk; Miner, Mark C; Miramontes, Roque

    Consistently collected binational surveillance data are important in advocating for resources to manage and treat binational cases of tuberculosis (TB). The objective of this study was to develop a surveillance definition for binational (United States-Mexico) cases of TB to assess the burden on US TB program resources. We collaborated with state and local TB program staff members in the United States to identify characteristics associated with binational cases of TB. We collected data on all cases of TB from 9 pilot sites in 5 states (Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas) during January 1-June 30, 2014, that had at least 1 binational characteristic (eg, "crossed border while on TB treatment" and "received treatment in another country, coordinated by an established, US-funded, binational TB program"). A workgroup of US state, local, and federal partners reviewed results and used them to develop a practical surveillance definition. The pilot sites reported 87 cases of TB with at least 1 binational characteristic during the project period. The workgroup drafted a proposed surveillance definition to include 2 binational characteristics: "crossed border while on TB treatment" (34 of 87 cases, 39%) and "received treatment in another country, coordinated by an established, US-funded, binational TB program" (26 of 87 cases, 30%). Applying the new proposed definition, 39 of 87 pilot cases of TB (45%) met the definition of binational. Input from partners who were responsible for the care and treatment of patients who cross the United States-Mexico border was crucial in defining a binational case of TB.

  10. 77 FR 65864 - North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ... (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... law of the country that made the determination. Under Article 1904 of the Agreement, which came into... Government of Mexico established Rules of Procedure for Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews (``Rules...

  11. 77 FR 74174 - North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... duty law of the country that made the determination. Under Article 1904 of the Agreement, which came... Government of Mexico established Rules of Procedure for Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews (``Rules...

  12. 78 FR 51708 - North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... determination. Under Article 1904 of the Agreement, which came into force on January 1, 1994, the Government of... Procedure for Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews (``Rules''). These Rules were published in the Federal...

  13. 75 FR 74686 - North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    ... (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... determination. Under Article 1904 of the Agreement, which came into force on January 1, 1994, the Government of... Procedure for Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews (``Rules''). These Rules were published in the Federal...

  14. 76 FR 4633 - North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... duty law of the country that made the determination. Under Article 1904 of the Agreement, which came... Government of Mexico established Rules of Procedure for Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews (``Rules...

  15. 76 FR 14917 - North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... that made the determination. Under Article 1904 of the Agreement, which came into force on January 1... established Rules of Procedure for Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews (``Rules''). These Rules were...

  16. 76 FR 56404 - North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    ... (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... law of the country that made the determination. Under Article 1904 of the Agreement, which came into... Government of Mexico established Rules of Procedure for Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews (``Rules...

  17. 77 FR 29965 - North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-21

    ... (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... determination. Under Article 1904 of the Agreement, which came into force on January 1, 1994, the Government of... Procedure for Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews (``Rules''). These Rules were published in the Federal...

  18. 78 FR 57838 - North American Free Trade Agreement Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration [Secretariat File No. USA-MEX-2011- 1904-02] North American Free Trade Agreement Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United... Decision and Order of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Binational Panel dated August 6, 2013...

  19. 'You're not in charge here' : Negotiations of control and connection in a binational stepfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolstrup, Kirsten L.

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the interactional processes of a binational stepfamily in Denmark. Following Bourdieu (1977), it is argued that in stepfamily interaction, negotiations of legitimacy precede, overlap and become intertwined with negotiations of control and connection. In previous studies

  20. Binational collaboration to study Gulf of Mexico's harmful algae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Inia; Hu, Chuanmin; Steidinger, Karen; Muller-Karger, Frank; Cannizzaro, Jennifer; Wolny, Jennifer; Cerdeira-Estrada, Sergio; Santamaria-del-Angel, Eduardo; Tafoya-del-Angel, Fausto; Alvarez-Torres, Porfirio; Herrera Silveira, Jorge; Allen, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    Blooms of the toxic marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis cause massive fish kills and other public health and economic problems in coastal waters throughout the Gulf of Mexico [Steidinger, 2009]. These harmful algal blooms (HABs) are a gulf-wide problem that require a synoptic observing system for better serving decision-making needs. The major nutrient sources that initiate and maintain these HABs and the possible connectivity of blooms in different locations are important questions being addressed through new collaborations between Mexican and U.S. researchers and government institutions. These efforts were originally organized under the U.S./Mexico binational partnership for the HABs Observing System (HABSOS), led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Gulf of Mexico Program (EPAGMP) and several agencies in Veracruz, Mexico, since 2006. In 2010 these efforts were expanded to include other Mexican states and institutions with the integrated assessment and management of the Gulf of Mexico Large Marine Ecosystem (GoMLME) program sponsored by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), the Secretaría de Medio Ambiente y Recursos Naturales (SEMARNAT), and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  1. 75 FR 20567 - North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... Article 1904 of the Agreement, which came into force on January 1, 1994, the Government of the United States, the Government of Canada and the Government of Mexico established Rules of Procedure for Article...

  2. 76 FR 56156 - North American Free-Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-12

    ... (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... Article 1904 of the Agreement, which came into force on January 1, 1994, the Government of the United States, the Government of Canada and the Government of Mexico established Rules of Procedure for Article...

  3. 77 FR 74174 - North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section.... Therefore, on the basis of the Panel Order and Rule 80 of the Article 1904 Panel Rules, the Panel Review was...

  4. 78 FR 5778 - North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... the Panel Order and Rule 80 of the Article 1904 Panel Rules, the Panel Review was completed and the...

  5. 78 FR 17639 - North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... Order and Rule 80 of the Article 1904 Panel Rules, the Panel Review was completed and the panelists were...

  6. 78 FR 10600 - North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... Order and Rule 80 of the Article 1904 Panel Rules, the Panel Review was completed and the panelists were...

  7. 78 FR 11627 - North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... Order and Rule 80 of the Article 1904 Panel Rules, the Panel Review was completed and the panelists were...

  8. 77 FR 72325 - North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews AGENCY: NAFTA Secretariat, United States Section... Order and Rule 80 of the Article 1904 Panel Rules, the Panel Review was completed and the panelists were...

  9. Commissioning MMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Paul; Gramling, Cheryl; Stone, John; Smith, Patrick; Reiter, Jenifer

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses commissioning of NASAs Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission. The mission includes four identical spacecraft with a large, complex set of instrumentation. The planning for and execution of commissioning for this mission is described. The paper concludes by discussing lessons learned.

  10. A Comprehensive Approach to Bi-National Regional Energy Planning in the Pacific Northwest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matt Morrison

    2007-12-31

    The Pacific NorthWest Economic Region, a statutory organization chartered by the Northwest states of Alaska, Washington, Idaho, Montana, and Oregon, and the western Canadian provinces of British Columbia, Alberta, and the Yukon through its Energy Working Group launched a bi-national energy planning initiative designed to create a Pacific Northwest energy planning council of regional public/private stakeholders from both Canada and the US. There is an urgent need to deal with the comprehensive energy picture now before our hoped for economic recovery results in energy price spikes which are likely to happen because the current supply will not meet predicted demand. Also recent events of August 14th have shown that our bi-national energy grid system is intricately interdependent, and additional planning for future capacity is desperately needed.

  11. Meeting a Binational Research Challenge: Substance Abuse Among Transnational Mexican Farmworkers in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Victor

    2011-01-01

    To help in understanding the manner in which community, individual, and other factors in the United States and Mexico contribute to drug use among transnational migrants, this paper introduces a binational social ecology model of substance abuse in this population. We draw on our 2 NIH-funded ethnographic studies—1 on problem drinking and the other on drug abuse—among transnational Mexican workers in the mushroom industry of southeastern Pennsylvania. Our model demonstrates that major reasons for substance abuse among transnational migrants include nontraditional living arrangements in labor camps and overcrowded apartments, the absence of kin and community deterrents to drug use, social isolation, the presence of drug use and binge drinking subcultures, the availability of drugs, family history of drugs, previous drug use or witnessing of drug use in Mexico, and drug use norms and drug availability in Mexico. It suggests the need for US and Mexican researchers to collaborate in binational teams and address factors on both sides of the border. Our binational social ecology model, together with our research recommendations, will assist alcohol and drug researchers to discover how community and individual factors in both the United States and abroad fit and interact beyond mere association and provide a more comprehensive research approach to substance abuse research among transnational migrants. PMID:18237326

  12. Commission 1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    state" to provide the Commission with information on the measures that they have ...... policies and identify the gaps in ensuring the full realisation of socio- economic .... Boulle L, Harris Band Hoexter C Constitutional and Administrative Law.

  13. Joint Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the latest publication of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety (JQPS). . How We Work Process improvement program breeds quality culture, empowers staff An article in Quality Progress, June ...

  14. A moving paradox: a binational view of obesity and residential mobility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Jennifer E; Yabiku, Scott T

    2015-04-01

    This paper takes a unique approach to the study of immigrant and native health differentials by addressing the role of internal as well as international mobility and considering the binational context in which such moves occur. The analyses take advantage of a unique dataset of urban residents in Mexico and the United States to compare Mexican origin immigrants and US-born Spanish-speaking residents in one urban setting in the United States and residents in a similar urban setting in Mexico. The binational approach allows for the test of standard indicators used to proxy acculturation (duration of residence in the United States, household language use) and measures of residential mobility among Mexican-Americans, Mexican immigrants and residents in Mexico. The results confirm a lower prevalence of obesity among Mexicans in Mexico and recent immigrants to the United States when compared to longer residents in the United States. However, for Mexican urban residents, more residential moves are associated with less obesity, while more residential mobility is associated with higher obesity in the urban sample in the United States.

  15. The Binational Civic and Political Engagement of Mexican Migrant Hometown Associations and Federations in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xóchitl Bada

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This article focuses on the history and current situation of Mexican hometown associations (HTAs in the United States with a special emphasis on Chicago-based Mexican hometown associations and federations. It presents empirical evidence of new forms of binational engagement among Mexican migrant communities in the United States leading to the creation of a Mexican migrant civil society.

  16. Uneven exchange and urban binational complexes in Dominican Republic’s border with Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroldo Dilla Alfonso

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dominican/Haitian border is signed by profound asymmetries and the predominance of a relation of uneven exchange in benefit of Dominican Republic. Transborder relations summary this contradictory relation, but at the same time constitute the only form of survival for more than half million of Haitians that inhabit the region. This article discusses the history of this relation and its present tendencies, including the formation of economic regions and urban binational systems. The weakness of regulatory public policies and the aggressive action of the market generate a very contradictory setting that could lead to conflicts by the use of shared natural resources, the exploitation of the Haitian labour force, and the agitation of nationalist positions.

  17. A bi-national appellation of origin: Pisco in Chile and Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Lacoste

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Pisco is a brandy made from selected grapes, restricted as Appellation of Origin (AO in 1931 in Chile by executive order number 181 of May 15, and also legally protected by Peru in 1991 by executive resolution of December 12 and executive order 001-91-ICTI/IND of January 16. This AO has given rise to a commercial controversy between producers of both countries, who claim it as their own. This article proposes a new thesis: The AO of pisco is actually bi-national, belonging to Chile as well as to Peru. The reason is that the producers of the two countries contributed to the origin and consolidation of this product. Pisco would not exist without the participation of both of them. Therefore, the two countries have co-ownership rights since they are co-founders.

  18. Factors Associated with Overweight and Obesity among Children of Mexican Descent: Results of a Binational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas, Lisa G.; Guendelman, Sylvia; Harley, Kim; Fernald, Lia C. H.; Neufeld, Lynnette; Mejia, Fabiola

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of childhood obesity is high among young children of Mexican origin in the United States, however, the determinants are poorly understood. We conducted a binational study with a sample from California (CA) and Mexico (MX), to identify and compare the most important factors associated with overweight and obesity among children of Mexican descent. Significantly more children were classified as overweight or obese in CA compared to MX (53.3 vs. 14.9%, P obese mother was significantly associated with being overweight or obese. In MX, male gender, high socioeconomic status and very low food insecurity were associated with being overweight or obese. These data offer hypotheses for how migration may influence the high prevalence of overweight among the Mexican children in California. PMID:20217234

  19. Risk Factors Associated With Circumferential Resection Margin Positivity in Rectal Cancer: A Binational Registry Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warrier, Satish K; Kong, Joseph Cherng; Guerra, Glen R; Chittleborough, Timothy J; Naik, Arun; Ramsay, Robert G; Lynch, A Craig; Heriot, Alexander G

    2018-04-01

    Rectal cancer outcomes have improved with the adoption of a multidisciplinary model of care. However, there is a spectrum of quality when viewed from a national perspective, as highlighted by the Consortium for Optimizing the Treatment of Rectal Cancer data on rectal cancer care in the United States. The aim of this study was to assess and identify predictors of circumferential resection margin involvement for rectal cancer across Australasia. A retrospective study from a prospectively maintained binational colorectal cancer database was interrogated. This study is based on a binational colorectal cancer audit database. Clinical information on all consecutive resected rectal cancer cases recorded in the registry from 2007 to 2016 was retrieved, collated, and analyzed. The primary outcome measure was positive circumferential resection margin, measured as a resection margin ≤1 mm. A total of 3367 patients were included, with 261 (7.5%) having a positive circumferential resection margin. After adjusting for hospital and surgeon volume, hierarchical logistic regression analysis identified a 6-variable model encompassing the independent predictors, including urgent operation, abdominoperineal resection, open technique, low rectal cancer, T3 to T4, and N1 to N2. The accuracy of the model was 92.3%, with an receiver operating characteristic of 0.783 (p risk associated with circumferential resection margin positivity ranged from risk factors) to 43% (6 risk factors). This study was limited by the lack of recorded long-term outcomes associated with circumferential resection margin positivity. The rate of circumferential resection margin involvement in patients undergoing rectal cancer resection in Australasia is low and is influenced by a number of factors. Risk stratification of outcome is important with the increasing demand for publicly accessible quality data. See Video Abstract at http://links.lww.com/DCR/A512.

  20. Binational climate change vulnerability assessment of migratory birds in the Great Lakes Basins: Tools and impediments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert S Rempel

    Full Text Available Climate change is a global concern, requiring international strategies to reduce emissions, however, climate change vulnerability assessments are often local in scope with assessment areas restricted to jurisdictional boundaries. In our study we explored tools and impediments to understanding and responding to the effects of climate change on vulnerability of migratory birds from a binational perspective. We apply and assess the utility of a Climate Change Vulnerability Index on 3 focal species using distribution or niche modeling frameworks. We use the distributional forecasts to explore possible changes to jurisdictional conservation responsibilities resulting from shifting distributions for: eastern meadowlark (Sturnella magna, wood thrush (Hylocichla mustelina, and hooded warbler (Setophaga citrina. We found the Climate Change Vulnerability Index to be a well-organized approach to integrating numerous lines of evidence concerning effects of climate change, and provided transparency to the final assessment of vulnerability. Under this framework, we identified that eastern meadowlark and wood thrush are highly vulnerable to climate change, but hooded warbler is less vulnerable. Our study revealed impediments to assessing and modeling vulnerability to climate change from a binational perspective, including gaps in data or modeling for climate exposure parameters. We recommend increased cross-border collaboration to enhance the availability and resources needed to improve vulnerability assessments and development of conservation strategies. We did not find evidence to suggest major shifts in jurisdictional responsibility for the 3 focal species, but results do indicate increasing responsibility for these birds in the Canadian Provinces. These Provinces should consider conservation planning to help ensure a future supply of necessary habitat for these species.

  1. Impacting Binational Health through Leadership Development: A Program Evaluation of the Leaders across Borders Program, 2010–2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar A. Contreras

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWorkforce and leadership development is imperative for the advancement of public health along the U.S./Mexico border. The Leaders across borders (LaB program aims to train the public health and health-care workforce of the border region. The LaB is a 6-month intensive leadership development program, which offers training in various areas of public health. Program curriculum topics include: leadership, border health epidemiology, health diplomacy, border public policies, and conflict resolution.MethodsThis article describes the LaB program evaluation outcomes across four LaB cohort graduates between 2010 and 2014. LaB graduates received an invitation to participate via email in an online questionnaire. Eighty-five percent (n = 34 of evaluation participants indicated an improvement in the level of binationality since participating in the LaB program. Identified themes in the evaluation results included increased binational collaborations and partnerships across multidisciplinary organizations that work towards improving the health status of border communities. Approximately 93% (n = 37 of the LaB samples were interested in participating in future binational projects while 80% (n = 32 indicated interest in the proposal of other binational initiatives. Participants expressed feelings of gratitude from employers who supported their participation and successful completion of LaB.DiscussionPrograms such as LaB are important in providing professional development and education to a health-care workforce along the U.S./Mexico border that is dedicated to positively impacting the health outcomes of vulnerable populations residing in this region.

  2. Cooperation on Climate Services in the Binational Rio Grande/Bravo Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfin, G. M.; Shafer, M. A.; Brown, D. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Rio Grande/Bravo River Basin (RGB) of the United States and México is exposed to tornadoes, severe storms, hurricanes, winter storms, wildfire, and drought. The combination of these weather and climate-related hazards has resulted in impacts, such as wildfire, crop loss, water supply reduction, and flooding, with exceedingly high economic costs ($13 billion in 2011). In order to contribute to increased binational information flow and knowledge exchange in the region, we have developed a prototype quarterly bilingual RGB Climate Outlook, in PDF, supplemented by Twitter messages and Facebook posts. The goal of the project is to improve coordination between institutions in the U.S. and Mexico, increase awareness about climate variations, their impacts and costs to society, and build capacity for enhanced hazard preparedness. The RGB Outlook features a synthesis of climate products, impact data and analysis, is expressed in user-friendly language, and relies substantially on visual communication in contrast to text. The RGB Outlook is co-produced with colleagues in the U.S. and Mexico, in conjunction with the North American Climate Services Partnership (NACSP) and NOAA's regional climate services program. NACSP is a tri-national initiative to develop and deliver drought-based climate services in order to assist water resource managers, agricultural interests, and other constituents as they prepare for future drought events and build capacity to respond to other climate extremes. The RGB Climate Outlook builds on lessons learned from the Climate Assessment for the Southwest (CLIMAS) Southwest Climate Outlook (PDF, html), La Niña Drought Tracker (PDF, html), the Southern Climate Impacts Policy Program (SCIPP) Managing Drought in the Southern Plains webinar series, the Border Climate Summary (PDF), and Transborder Climate newsletter (PDF) and webinar series. The latter two have been the only regularly occurring bilingual climate information products in the U

  3. Diabetes among Latinos in the Southwestern United States: border health and binational cooperation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan P. Casey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This analysis reviews cooperation between the four border states of the United States of America (Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas and international partners in Mexico with regard to type 2 diabetes among Latinos. Binational cooperation, academic collaboration, preventative health initiatives, and efforts to improve health care access for the border population are highlighted. This meta-analysis of the literature points out causative factors of the increased type 2 diabetes prevalence among Latinos in the United States; an inverse correlation between diabetes and education and socioeconomic level; contributing factors, including barriers with language, health care payment, transportation, and underestimating diabetes implications; and a lack of social and environmental support for disease management. Medical and indirect costs in socioeconomic terms are also included. Cooperation between the United States and Mexico may be beneficial to promoting further collaborative efforts between these nations, and serve as a template for greater cooperative efforts to mitigate the substantial public health and socioeconomic implications of type 2 diabetes globally.

  4. The integrated North American electricity market : a bi-national model for securing a reliable supply of electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egan, T.

    2004-03-01

    The 50 million people who experienced the power blackout on August 14, 2003 in southern Ontario and the U.S. Midwest and Northeast understood how vital electricity is in our day-to-day lives, but they also saw the resiliency of the North American electricity system. More than 65 per cent of the power generation was restored to service within 12 hours and no damage was caused to the generation or transmission facilities. Although the interconnected North American electricity system is among the most reliable in the world, it is threatened by an aging infrastructure, lack of new generation and transmission to meet demand, and growing regulatory pressures. This report suggests that any measures that respond to the threat of ongoing reliability should be bi-national in scope due to the interconnected nature of the system. Currently, the market, regulatory and administrative systems are different in each country. The full engagement and cooperation of both Canada and the United States is important to ensure future cross-border trade and power reliability. The Canadian Electricity Association proposes the following 7 measures: (1) support an open debate on all the supply options available to meet growing power demands, (2) promote bi-national cooperation in the construction of new transmission capacity to ensure a reliable continental electricity system, (3) examine opportunities for bi-national cooperation for investment in advanced transmission technologies and transmission research and development, (4) promote new generation technology and demand-side measures to relieve existing transmission constraints and reduce the need for new transmission facilities, (5) endorse a self-governing international organization for developing and enforcing mandatory reliability standards for the electricity industry, (6) coordinate measures to promote critical infrastructure protection, and (7) harmonize U.S. and Canadian efforts to streamline or clarify regulation of electricity

  5. Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey: Methodology and Estimated Arsenic Intake from Drinking Water and Urinary Arsenic Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin B. Harris

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The Binational Arsenic Exposure Survey (BAsES was designed to evaluate probable arsenic exposures in selected areas of southern Arizona and northern Mexico, two regions with known elevated levels of arsenic in groundwater reserves. This paper describes the methodology of BAsES and the relationship between estimated arsenic intake from beverages and arsenic output in urine. Households from eight communities were selected for their varying groundwater arsenic concentrations in Arizona, USA and Sonora, Mexico. Adults responded to questionnaires and provided dietary information. A first morning urine void and water from all household drinking sources were collected. Associations between urinary arsenic concentration (total, organic, inorganic and estimated level of arsenic consumed from water and other beverages were evaluated through crude associations and by random effects models. Median estimated total arsenic intake from beverages among participants from Arizona communities ranged from 1.7 to 14.1 µg/day compared to 0.6 to 3.4 µg/day among those from Mexico communities. In contrast, median urinary inorganic arsenic concentrations were greatest among participants from Hermosillo, Mexico (6.2 µg/L whereas a high of 2.0 µg/L was found among participants from Ajo, Arizona. Estimated arsenic intake from drinking water was associated with urinary total arsenic concentration (p < 0.001, urinary inorganic arsenic concentration (p < 0.001, and urinary sum of species (p < 0.001. Urinary arsenic concentrations increased between 7% and 12% for each one percent increase in arsenic consumed from drinking water. Variability in arsenic intake from beverages and urinary arsenic output yielded counter intuitive results. Estimated intake of arsenic from all beverages was greatest among Arizonans yet participants in Mexico had higher urinary total and inorganic arsenic concentrations. Other contributors to urinary arsenic concentrations should be evaluated.

  6. Changes in health selection of obesity among Mexican immigrants: a binational examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, Annie; Fleischer, Nancy

    2014-12-01

    Health selection is often measured by comparing the health of more recent immigrants to the native born of their new host country. However, this comparison fails to take into account two important factors: (1) that changes in the health profile of sending countries may impact the health of immigrants over time, and (2) that the best comparison group for health selection would be people who remain in the country of origin. Obesity represents an important health outcome that may be best understood by taking into account these two factors. Using nationally-representative datasets from Mexico and the US, we examined differences in obesity-related health selection, by gender, in 2000 and 2012. We calculated prevalence ratios from log-binomial models to compare the risk of obesity among recent immigrants to the US to Mexican nationals with varying likelihood of migration, in order to determine changes in health selection over time. Among men in 2000, we found little difference in obesity status between recent immigrants to the US and Mexican non-migrants. However, in 2012, Mexican men who were the least likely to migrate had higher obesity prevalence than recent immigrants, which may reflect emerging health selection. The trends for women, however, indicated differences in obesity status between recent Mexican immigrants and non-migrants at both time points. In both 2000 and 2012, Mexican national women had significantly higher obesity prevalence than recent immigrant women, with the biggest difference between recent immigrants and Mexican women who were least likely to migrate. There was also indication that selection increased with time for women, as the differences between Mexican nationals and recent immigrants to the US grew from 2000 to 2012. Our study is among the first to use a binational dataset to examine the impact of health selectivity, over time, on obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Tuberculosis Treatment Completion in a United States/Mexico Binational Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celina I. Valencia

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTuberculosis (TB remains a salient public health issue along the U.S./Mexico border. This study seeks to identify the social and structural factors, which are associated with TB disease burden in the binational geographic region. Identification of barriers of treatment completion provides the necessary framework for developing evidence-based interventions that are culturally relevant and context specific for the U.S./Mexico border region.MethodsRetrospective study of data extracted from medical charts (n = 439 from Yuma County Health Department (YCHD (n = 160 and Centro de Salud San Luis Río Colorado (n = 279. Patients currently accessing TB treatment at either facility were excluded from the study. Chi-square, unadjusted odds ratios, and logistic regression were utilized to identify characteristics associated with successful TB treatment in this population.FindingsThe study population was predominantly male (n = 327. Females were more likely to complete TB treatment (OR = 3.71. The absence of drug use and/or the absence of an HIV positive diagnosis were found to be predictors of TB treatment completion across both clinical sites. Forty-four percent (43.59% (n = 85 TB patients treated at CDS San Luis did not complete treatment versus 40.35% (n = 49 of TB patients who did not complete treatment at YCHD. Moving from the area or being deported was the highest category (20.78% for incomplete TB treatment in the population (n = 64 across both clinical sites.

  8. Bi-national cross-validation of an evidence-based conduct problem prevention model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, Carolyn M; Bloomquist, Michael L; Garcia-Huidobro, Diego; Gutiérrez, Rafael; Vega, Leticia; Balch, Rosita; Yu, Xiaohui; Cooper, Daniel K

    2018-04-01

    To (a) explore the preferences of Mexican parents and Spanish-speaking professionals working with migrant Latino families in Minnesota regarding the Mexican-adapted brief model versus the original conduct problems intervention and (b) identifying the potential challenges, and preferred solutions, to implementation of a conduct problems preventive intervention. The core practice elements of a conduct problems prevention program originating in the United States were adapted for prevention efforts in Mexico. Three focus groups were conducted in the United States, with Latino parents (n = 24; 2 focus groups) and professionals serving Latino families (n = 9; 1 focus group), to compare and discuss the Mexican-adapted model and the original conduct problems prevention program. Thematic analysis was conducted on the verbatim focus group transcripts in the original language spoken. Participants preferred the Mexican-adapted model. The following key areas were identified for cultural adaptation when delivering a conduct problems prevention program with Latino families: recruitment/enrollment strategies, program delivery format, and program content (i.e., child skills training, parent skills training, child-parent activities, and child-parent support). For both models, strengths, concerns, barriers, and strategies for overcoming concerns and barriers were identified. We summarize recommendations offered by participants to strengthen the effective implementation of a conduct problems prevention model with Latino families in the United States. This project demonstrates the strength in binational collaboration to critically examine cultural adaptations of evidence-based prevention programs that could be useful to diverse communities, families, and youth in other settings. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  9. The SWENOTECA group: A good example of continuous binational and multidisciplinary collaboration for patients with testicular cancer in Sweden and Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandstad, Torgrim; Ståhl, Olof; Håkansson, Ulf; Wahlqvist, Rolf; Klepp, Olbjørn; Cavallin-Ståhl, Eva; Cohn-Cedermark, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to present the Swedish and Norwegian Testicular Cancer Group (SWENOTECA), with an emphasis on the history of SWENOTECA, organization, results and current status. SWENOTECA was founded in 1981 as a binational organization open to hospitals in Sweden and Norway treating testicular cancer. It has since published treatment protocols for testicular cancer and prospectively registered patients with testicular cancer. Today, all hospitals in Norway and Sweden involved in the care of testicular cancer participate in SWENOTECA, and all patients with testicular cancer are prospectively registered in a population-based database. Nine protocols with standardized guidelines on the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of testicular cancer have been published. In addition to the guidelines, several studies have been performed or initiated within the scope of SWENOTECA. The details are presented in this article. SWENOTECA has been a very fruitful binational collaboration and has thoughtfully evolved over time. The group's continuous work and dedication have provided an example for other national and international cancer networks. The binational implementation of standardized guidelines has resulted in excellent patient outcomes, regardless of place of residence. Although testicular cancer is a relatively rare disease, the population-based binational organization of SWENOTECA has made it possible to publish some of the largest studies in the field of testicular cancer.

  10. [Population in the northern border area. Urban dynamism and binational interrelation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ham Chande, R

    1988-01-01

    The 3300 km border between Mexico and the US constitutes the geopolitical separation between an underdeveloped country on the 1 hand and 1 of the most technologically and economically powerful countries in the world on the other. The border region is characterized by the contrasts on either side of the border and by the strong interrelation between both sides. Vast streams of persons, merchandise, money, services, communications, and cultural influences flow from 1 side to the other. The border region as a seat of population has a recent history. The border was defined in near current form only in the mid-19th century, when the expansionist tendencies of the US encountered a vast area of very sparse population. In 1900, the principal localities of the border zone had only about 39,000 inhabitants, of whom fewer than 5000 lived west of Ciudad Juarez. Between 1910-20, the population of the border region increased from 53,000 to 96,000 as a result of migrants fleeing the ravages of the revolution. The population of the border region was estimated at 3.826 million in 1988, resulting from rates of growth above Mexico's national average. Settlement in the area has depended on events and conditions in Mexico and on such US occurrences as Prohibition, the Great Depression, the 2nd World War, the Bracero program, and the Program of Border Industrialization. 82% of the border population lives in urban zones, partly because of lack of water. 80% of the urban population is concentrated in 6 cities, Juarez, Tijuana, Mexicali, Nuevo Laredo, Reynosa, and Matamoros. Much of the population of the 6 cities is composed of persons born elsewhere. The border area also has a large floating population of undocumented migrants in transit to or from the US. The high rates of urbanization and of binational interaction are reflected in demographic dynamics. In 1979, 71% of women in union in the border area vs 54% in the rest of Mexico had used contraception, and the infant mortality rate was

  11. Cervical Cancer Screening in the US–Mexico Border Region: A Binational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiefelbein, Emily L.; Smith, Ruben; Rojas, Rosalba; Mirchandani, Gita G.; McDonald, Jill A.

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer mortality is high along the US–Mexico border. We describe the prevalence of a recent Papanicolaou screening test (Pap) among US and Mexican border women. We analyzed 2006 cross-sectional data from Mexico’s National Survey of Health and Nutrition and the US Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Women aged 20–77 years in 44 US border counties (n = 1,724) and 80 Mexican border municipios (n = 1,454) were studied. We computed weighted proportions for a Pap within the past year by age, education, employment, marital status, health insurance, health status, risk behaviors, and ethnicity and adjusted prevalence ratios (APR) for the US, Mexico, and the region overall. Sixty-five percent (95 %CI 60.3–68.6) of US women and 32 % (95 %CI 28.7–35.2) of Mexican women had a recent Pap. US residence (APR = 2.01, 95 %CI 1.74–2.33), marriage (APR = 1.31, 95 %CI 1.17–1.47) and insurance (APR = 1.38, 95 %CI 1.22–1.56) were positively associated with a Pap test. Among US women, insurance and marriage were associated (APR = 1.21, 95 %CI 1.05–1.38 and 1.33, 95 %CI 1.10–1.61, respectively), and women aged 20–34 years were about 25 % more likely to have received a test than older women. Insurance and marriage were also positively associated with Pap testing among Mexican women (APR = 1.39, 95 %CI 1.17–1.64 and 1.50; 95 %CI 1.23–1.82, respectively), as were lower levels of education (≤8th grade or 9th–12th grade versus some college) (APR = 1.74; 95 %CI 1.21–2.52 and 1.60; 95 %CI 1.03–2.49, respectively). Marriage and insurance were associated with a recent Pap test on both sides of the border. Binational insurance coverage increases and/or cost reductions might bolster testing among unmarried and uninsured women, leading to earlier cervical cancer diagnosis and potentially lower mortality. PMID:22965734

  12. 76 FR 23286 - North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), Article 1904 Binational Panel Reviews: Notice of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration North American Free Trade Agreement... Secretariat, United States Section, International Trade Administration, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice... International Trade Commission, in the matter of Light-Walled Rectangular Pipe and Tube from Mexico, Secretariat...

  13. Safe LHC beam commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uythoven, J.; Schmidt, R.

    2007-01-01

    Due to the large amount of energy stored in magnets and beams, safety operation of the LHC is essential. The commissioning of the LHC machine protection system will be an integral part of the general LHC commissioning program. A brief overview of the LHC Machine Protection System will be given, identifying the main components: the Beam Interlock System, the Beam Dumping System, the Collimation System, the Beam Loss Monitoring System and the Quench Protection System. An outline is given of the commissioning strategy of these systems during the different commissioning phases of the LHC: without beam, injection and the different phases with stored beam depending on beam intensity and energy. (author)

  14. Regulatory Commission of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Map Help Regulatory Commission of Alaska Login Forgot Password Arrow Image Forgot password? View Cart login Procedures for Requesting Login For Consumers General Information Telephone Electric Natural Gas

  15. Guidelines for residential commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-01-31

    Currently, houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict, largely because they are field assembled and there is no consistent process to identify problems or to correct them. Residential commissioning is a solution to this problem. This guide is the culmination of a 30-month project that began in September 1999. The ultimate objective of the project is to increase the number of houses that undergo commissioning, which will improve the quality, comfort, and safety of homes for California citizens. The project goal is to lay the groundwork for a residential commissioning industry in California focused on end-use energy and non-energy issues. As such, we intend this guide to be a beginning and not an end. Our intent is that the guide will lead to the programmatic integration of commissioning with other building industry processes, which in turn will provide more value to a single site visit for people such as home energy auditors and raters, home inspectors, and building performance contractors. Project work to support the development of this guide includes: a literature review and annotated bibliography, which facilitates access to 469 documents related to residential commissioning published over the past 20 years (Wray et al. 2000), an analysis of the potential benefits one can realistically expect from commissioning new and existing California houses (Matson et al. 2002), and an assessment of 107 diagnostic tools for evaluating residential commissioning metrics (Wray et al. 2002). In this guide, we describe the issues that non-experts should consider in developing a commissioning program to achieve the benefits we have identified. We do this by providing specific recommendations about: how to structure the commissioning process, which diagnostics to use, and how to use them to commission new and existing houses. Using examples, we also demonstrate the potential benefits of applying the recommended whole-house commissioning approach to

  16. Unravelling long-term vegetation change patterns in a binational watershed using multitemporal land cover data and historical photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Miguel L.; Norman, Laura M.; Webb, Robert H.; Boyer, Diane E.; Turner, Raymond M.

    2011-01-01

    A significant amount of research conducted in the Sonoran Desert of North America has documented, both anecdotally and empirically, major vegetation changes over the past century due to human land use activities. However, many studies lack coincidental landscape-scale data characterizing the spatial and temporal manifestation of these changes. Vegetation changes in a binational (USA and Mexico) watershed were documented using a series of four land cover maps (1979-2009) derived from multispectral satellite imagery. Cover changes are compared to georeferenced, repeat oblique photographs dating from the late 19th century to present. Results indicate the expansion of grassland over the past 20 years following nearly a century of decline. Historical repeat photography documents early-mid 20th century mesquite invasions, but recent land cover data and rephotography demonstrate declines in xeroriparian/riparian mesquite communities in recent decades. These vegetation changes are variable over the landscape and influenced by topography and land management.

  17. Establishing a binational student-run free-clinic in Tijuana, Mexico: a model for US-Mexico border states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeda, Victoria D; Eppstein, Amy; Lozada, Remedios; Vargas-Ojeda, Adriana C; Strathdee, Steffanie A; Goodman, David; Burgos, Jose L

    2014-06-01

    In 2011, a bi-national student-run free clinic for the underserved, known as "Health Frontiers in Tijuana" (HFiT), was created in Tijuana, Mexico. Students and faculty from one Mexican and one US medical school staff the clinic and attend patients on Saturdays. Students from both medical schools enroll in a didactic course during the quarter/semester that they attend the free clinic. The course addresses clinical, ethical, cultural, population-specific issues and the structure, financing and delivery of medical care in Mexico. The clinic implements an electronic medical record and is developing telemedicine for consulting on complex cases. Despite challenges related to sustaining adequate funding, this program may be replicated in other border communities.

  18. The US/Mexico Border: A Binational Approach to Framing Challenges and Constructing Solutions for Improving Farmworkers’ Lives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Aranda

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mexican migrant and seasonal farmworkers in the US-Mexico border region face health hazards and occupational risks and are becoming commonly known in the public health literature. According to several studies, farmworkers have high levels of chronic diseases such as diabetes and respiratory problems, are at risk for infectious diseases, and experience among the highest incidences of work-related injuries of any profession. The findings from two studies are considered and presented with the objective of contributing to an overall understanding of migrant farmworkers as a workforce moving across national boundaries and affected by the work environments and health stressors both shared and unique to each context. We propose a binational approach to comprehensively address the health problems and socioeconomic challenges faced by migrant and seasonal farmworkers. In this paper we present the results of two distinct but complementary studies of farmworker health on the Arizona-Sonora border.

  19. Assessing potential impacts of climate change and variability on the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin: A binational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quinn, F.H.; Mortsch, L.D.

    1997-01-01

    The potential impacts of climate change and variability on the Great Lakes environment are serious and complex. The Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Basin is home to 42.5 million US and Canadian citizens and is the industrial and commercial heartland of both nations. The region is rich in human and natural resources, with diverse economic activities and substantial infrastructure which would be affected by major shifts in climate. For example, water level changes could affect wetland distribution and functioning; reductions in streamflow would alter assimilative capacities while warmer water temperatures would influence spring and fall turnover and incidence of anoxia. A binational program has been initiated to conduct interdisciplinary, integrated impact assessments for the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence River Basin. The goal of this program is to undertake interdisciplinary, integrated studies to improve the understanding of the complex interactions between climate, the environment, and socioeconomic systems in order to develop informed regional adaptation responses

  20. Commission on Legal Matters

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    What is a commission within the Staff Association (SA)? A commission is a working group of the CERN Staff Council, led by a staff representative. The commission is composed mainly of staff representatives, but interested members of the SA can apply to participate in the work of a commission. What is the commission on legal matters? The commission on legal matters works on texts governing the employment conditions of staff (Employed Members of Personnel and Associated Members of Personnel). This covers legal documents such as the Staff Rules and Regulations, administrative and operational circulars, as well as any other document relating to employment conditions. How is the work organised in this commission? The revision process of the text is generally done along following lines: The HR department, and its legal experts, proposes new texts or modifications to existing texts. A schedule for the study of these texts is established each year and this calendar by the commission to plan its work. The new or modi...

  1. The Lhc beam commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redarelli, S.; Bailey, R.

    2008-01-01

    The plans for the Lhc proton beam commissioning are presented. A staged commissioning approach is proposed to satisfy the request of the Lhc experiments while minimizing the machine complexity in early commissioning phases. Machine protection and collimation aspects will be tackled progressively as the performance will be pushed to higher beam intensities. The key parameters are the number of bunches, k b , the proton intensity pe bunch, N, and the β in the various interaction points. All together these parameters determine the total beam power and the complexity of the machine. We will present the proposed trade off between the evolution of these parameters and the Lhc luminosity performance.

  2. The Danish Welfare Commission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerding, Allan Næs

    2006-01-01

    on public services, and install economic incentives for the behaviour of private households. The paper then digs into the proposals of the commission that are broadly grouped into five policy target areas con-cerning (1) the ageing of the population, (2) the incentives for labour market participation, (3......The paper deals with the main report of the Danish Welfare Commission and the one-hundred-and-nine proposals on the structure of the future Danish welfare state that the com-mission has put forward. Following upon a brief review of the discussion on the work of the Danish Welfare Commission......) competitiveness in the global economy, (4) behavioural regulation of the use of public bene-fits and services, and (5) management within tight budgets of an increasing demand on health and care. Finally, the concluding section sums up the discussion and elaborates on the debate on the Welfare Commission’s work...

  3. Commissioning for Humidified Buildings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Deal, Brian

    1998-01-01

    .... Although proper commissioning procedures have been noted to reduce the potential for approximately 70 percent of these claims, no standards exist for the control of moisture migration in building...

  4. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM).

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors; Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  7. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-09-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  8. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  10. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-10-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  11. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM).

  12. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLl), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  13. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Director's Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  14. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (AU), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  15. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  16. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  17. Innovative Power of Health Care Organisations Affects IT Adoption: A bi-National Health IT Benchmark Comparing Austria and Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüsers, Jens; Hübner, Ursula; Esdar, Moritz; Ammenwerth, Elske; Hackl, Werner O; Naumann, Laura; Liebe, Jan David

    2017-02-01

    Multinational health IT benchmarks foster cross-country learning and have been employed at various levels, e.g. OECD and Nordic countries. A bi-national benchmark study conducted in 2007 revealed a significantly higher adoption of health IT in Austria compared to Germany, two countries with comparable healthcare systems. We now investigated whether these differences still persisted. We further studied whether these differences were associated with hospital intrinsic factors, i.e. the innovative power of the organisation and hospital demographics. We thus performed a survey to measure the "perceived IT availability" and the "innovative power of the hospital" of 464 German and 70 Austrian hospitals. The survey was based on a questionnaire with 52 items and was given to the directors of nursing in 2013/2014. Our findings confirmed a significantly greater IT availability in Austria than in Germany. This was visible in the aggregated IT adoption composite score "IT function" as well as in the IT adoption for the individual functions "nursing documentation" (OR = 5.98), "intensive care unit (ICU) documentation" (OR = 2.49), "medication administration documentation" (OR = 2.48), "electronic archive" (OR = 2.27) and "medication" (OR = 2.16). "Innovative power" was the strongest factor to explain the variance of the composite score "IT function". It was effective in hospitals of both countries but significantly more effective in Austria than in Germany. "Hospital size" and "hospital system affiliation" were also significantly associated with the composite score "IT function", but they did not differ between the countries. These findings can be partly associated with the national characteristics. Indicators point to a more favourable financial situation in Austrian hospitals; we thus argue that Austrian hospitals may possess a larger degree of financial freedom to be innovative and to act accordingly. This study is the first to empirically demonstrate the

  18. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This is the thirty-sixth volume of issuances (1-396) of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and its Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, Administrative Law Judges, and Office Directors. It covers the period from July 1, 1992-December 31, 1992. Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards are authorized by Section 191 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. These Boards, comprised of three members conduct adjudicatory hearings on applications to construct and operate nuclear power plants and related facilities and issue initial decisions which, subject to internal review and appellate procedures, become the final Commission action with respect to those applications. Boards are drawn from the Atomic Safety and Licensing Board Panel, comprised of lawyers, nuclear physicists and engineers, environmentalists, chemists, and economists. The Atomic Energy Commission first established Licensing Boards in 1962 and the Panel in 1967

  19. Commissioning of ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, J

    2008-01-01

    The status of the commissioning of the ATLAS experiment as of May 2008 is presented. The subdetector integration in recent milestone weeks is described, especially the cosmic commissioning in milestone week M6, focussing on combined running and track analysis of the muon detector and inner detector. The liquid argon and tile calorimeters have achieved near-full operation, and are integrated with the calorimeter trigger. The High-Level-Trigger infrastructure is installed and algorithms tested in technical runs. Problems with the inner detector cooling compressors are being fixed.

  20. ATF2 Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seryi, A.; /SLAC; Christian, G.; /KLTE-ATOMKI; Parker, B.; /BNL; Schulte, D.; Delahaye, J.-P.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN; Wolski, A.; Elsen, E.; /Cockcroft Inst. /DESY; Sanuki, T.; /Tohoku U.; Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Ross, M.; Wendt, M.; /Fermilab; Takahashi, T.; /Hiroshima U.; Bai, S.; Gao, J.; /Beijing, Inst. High Energy Phys.; Bolzon, B.; Geffroy, N.; Jeremie, A.; /Annecy, LAPP; Apsimon, R.; Burrows, P.; /Oxford U., JAI /Kyoto U., Inst. Chem. Res. /Kyungpook Natl. U. /Orsay, LAL /Phang Accelerator Lab /Royal Holloway, U. of London /SLAC /Daresbury /University Coll. London /Manchester U. /Univ. of Tokyo U.

    2009-10-30

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line that aims to focus the low-emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a beam size of about 37 nm, and at the same time to demonstrate nm beam stability, using numerous advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools. The construction has been finished at the end of 2008 and the beam commissioning of ATF2 has started in December of 2008. ATF2 is constructed and commissioned by ATF international collaborations with strong US, Asian and European participation.

  1. ATF2 COMMISSIONING

    CERN Document Server

    Seryi, A; Parker, B; Schulte, D; Delahaye, J P; Tomas, R; Zimmermann, F; Wolski, A; Elsen, E; Sanuki, T; Gianfelice-Wendt, E; Ross, M; Wendt, M; Takahashi, T; Bai, S; Gao, J; Bolzon, B; Geffroy, N; Jeremie, A; Apsimon, R; Burrows, P; Constance, B; Perry, C; Resta-Lopez, J; Swinson, C; Araki, S; Aryshev, A; Hayano, H; Honda, Y; Kubo, K; Kume, T; Kuroda, S; Masuzawa, M; Naito, T; Okugi, T; Sugahara, R; Tauchi, T; Terunuma, N; Urakawa, J; Yokoya, K; Iwashita, Y; Sugimoto, T; Heo, A Y; Kim, E S; Kim, H S; Bambade, P; Renier, Y; Rimbault, C; Huang, J Y; Kim, S H; Park, Y J; Hwang, W H; Blair, G; Boogert, S; Karataev, P; Molloy, S; Amann, J; Bellomo, P; Lam, B; McCormick, D; Nelson, J; Paterson, E; Pivi, M; Raubenheimer, T; Spencer, C; Wang, M H; White, G; Wittmer, W; Woodley, M; Yan, Y; Zhou, F; Angal-Kalinin, D; Jones, J; Lyapin, A; Scarfe, A; Kamiya, Y; Komamiya, S; Oroku, M; Suehara, T; Yamanaka, T

    2010-01-01

    ATF2 is a final-focus test beam line that aims to focus the low-emittance beam from the ATF damping ring to a beam size of about 37 nm, and at the same time to demonstrate nm beam stability, using numerous advanced beam diagnostics and feedback tools. The construction has been finished at the end of 2008 and the beam commissioning of ATF2 has started in December of 2008. ATF2 is constructed and commissioned by ATF international collaborations with strong US, Asian and European participation.

  2. 78 FR 32295 - Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on... business meeting are contained in the Supplementary Information section of this notice. DATES: June 20...

  3. 77 FR 10599 - Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ... SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on... business meeting are contained in the Supplementary Information section of this notice. DATES: March 15...

  4. 78 FR 12412 - Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on... business meeting are contained in the Supplementary Information section of this notice. DATES: March 21...

  5. 77 FR 28420 - Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-14

    ... SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on... meeting are contained in the Supplementary Information section of this notice. DATES: June 7, 2012, at 9...

  6. 78 FR 52601 - Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-23

    ... SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on... meeting are contained in the Supplementary Information section of this notice. DATES: September 19, 2013...

  7. 77 FR 70204 - Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on... meeting are contained in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section of this notice. DATES: December 14, 2012...

  8. 78 FR 69517 - Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-19

    ... SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on... meeting are contained in the Supplementary Information section of this notice. DATES: December 12, 2013...

  9. 77 FR 52106 - Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-28

    ... SUSQUEHANNA RIVER BASIN COMMISSION Commission Meeting AGENCY: Susquehanna River Basin Commission. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Susquehanna River Basin Commission will hold its regular business meeting on... business meeting are contained in the Supplementary Information section of this notice. DATES: September 20...

  10. Nuclear regulatory commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  11. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking

  12. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-07-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  13. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance

  14. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance

  15. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  16. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-11-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Danials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  17. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  18. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  19. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-02-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  20. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Director's Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  2. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking

  3. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  4. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  6. Nuclear regulatory commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-07-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  7. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance

  8. DESY: HERA commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    The commissioning of the world's first electron-proton collider - the 6.3 kilometre HERA ring at the DESY Laboratory in Hamburg - last year was the result of more than a decade of careful planning, design and construction

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  10. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-03-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  11. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report includes the issuance received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  12. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance.

  13. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  14. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  15. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  16. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  17. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  18. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  19. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-02-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  20. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety And Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  2. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  3. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  4. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  6. Framing scenarios of binational water policy with a tool to visualize, quantify and valuate changes in ecosystem services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Laura M.; Villarreal, Miguel L.; Niraula, Rewati; Meixner, Thomas; Frisvold, George; Labiosa, William

    2013-01-01

    In the Santa Cruz Watershed, located on the Arizona-Sonora portion of the U.S.-Mexico border, an international wastewater treatment plant treats wastewater from cities on both sides of the border, before discharging it into the river in Arizona. These artificial flows often subsidize important perennial surface water ecosystems in the region. An explicit understanding of the benefits of maintaining instream flow for present and future generations requires the ability to assess and understand the important trade-offs implicit in water-resource management decisions. In this paper, we outline an approach for modeling and visualizing impacts of management decisions in terms of rare terrestrial and aquatic wildlife, vegetation, surface water, groundwater recharge, real-estate values and socio-environmental vulnerable communities. We identify and quantify ecosystem services and model the potential reduction in effluent discharge to the U.S. that is under scrutiny by binational water policy makers and of concern to stakeholders. Results of service provisioning are presented, and implications for policy makers and resource managers are discussed. This paper presents a robust ecosystem services assessment of multiple scenarios of watershed management as a means to discern eco-hydrological responses and consider their potential values for future generations living in the borderlands.

  7. Commissioning of the LHC

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The LHC construction is now approaching the end and it is now time to prepare for commissioning with beam. The behavior of a proton storage ring is much different to that of LEP, which profited from strong radiation damping to keep the beam stable. Our last experience with a hadron collider at CERN goes back more than 15 years when the proton-antiproton collider last operated. Ppbar taught us a lot about the machine physics of bunched beam proton storage rings and was essential input for the design of the LHC. After a short presentation of where we stand today with machine installation and hardware commissioning, I will discuss the main machine physics issues that will have to be dealt with in the LHC.

  8. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-03-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions For Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or to have any independent legal significance

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-08-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety nd Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or have any independent legal significance

  10. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the April 1996 reporting period from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, the Administrative Law Judges, the Directors' Decisions, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking. Included are issuances pertaining to: (1) Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (2) Georgia Tech Research Reactor, (3) River Bend Station, (4) Millstone Unit 1, (5) Thermo-Lag fire barrier material, and (6) Louisiana Energy Services

  11. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the April 1996 reporting period from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, the Administrative Law Judges, the Directors` Decisions, and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking. Included are issuances pertaining to: (1) Yankee Nuclear Power Station, (2) Georgia Tech Research Reactor, (3) River Bend Station, (4) Millstone Unit 1, (5) Thermo-Lag fire barrier material, and (6) Louisiana Energy Services.

  12. BROOKHAVEN: Booster commissioned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleser, Ed

    1992-03-15

    The construction and first commissioning phase of the Booster synchrotron to inject into Brookhaven's veteran Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) were completed last year. Scheduled to come into operation this year, the new Booster will extend the research capabilities AGS, and with its ability to accelerate partially stripped heavy ions will play an essential role in the chain of accelerators serving the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)

  13. Commission on Social Security

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2010-01-01

    A commission studying past, present, and future social stakes ! For many years we have been hearing about the problems of funding of health insurance benefits in our different Member States. At CERN we are not totally immune from this problem.  To start with, let us recall that we have a mutual-benefit scheme which covers everyone for the consequences of the uncertainties in life (illness and accidents). The rules of our scheme are established by CERN in the framework of a sub-group of the Standing Concertation Committee, the CERN Health Insurance Scheme Board (CHISB), which is also in charge of managing the scheme.  The work of the “ProtSoc” (Protection Sociale – Social Security) commission, as we like to call it at the Staff Association, is to help your representatives on the CHISB, by preparing together with them the subjects and positions to be put forward and defended. This commission, which groups together the staff delegates who wish to invest their ...

  14. Development of a high-resolution binational vegetation map of the Santa Cruz River riparian corridor and surrounding watershed, southern Arizona and northern Sonora, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Cynthia S.A.; Villarreal, Miguel L.; Norman, Laura M.

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes the development of a binational vegetation map developed for the Santa Cruz Watershed, which straddles the southern border of Arizona and the northern border of Sonora, Mexico. The map was created as an environmental input to the Santa Cruz Watershed Ecosystem Portfolio Model (SCWEPM) that is being created by the U.S. Geological Survey for the watershed. The SCWEPM is a map-based multicriteria evaluation tool that allows stakeholders to explore tradeoffs between valued ecosystem services at multiple scales within a participatory decision-making process. Maps related to vegetation type and are needed for use in modeling wildlife habitat and other ecosystem services. Although detailed vegetation maps existed for the U.S. side of the border, there was a lack of consistent data for the Santa Cruz Watershed in Mexico. We produced a binational vegetation classification of the Santa Cruz River riparian habitat and watershed vegetation based on NatureServe Terrestrial Ecological Systems (TES) units using Classification And Regression Tree (CART) modeling. Environmental layers used as predictor data were derived from a seasonal set of Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) images (spring, summer, and fall) and from a 30-meter digital-elevation-model (DEM) grid. Because both sources of environmental data are seamless across the international border, they are particularly suited to this binational modeling effort. Training data were compiled from existing field data for the riparian corridor and data collected by the NM-GAP (New Mexico Gap Analysis Project) team for the original Southwest Regional Gap Analysis Project (SWReGAP) modeling effort. Additional training data were collected from core areas of the SWReGAP classification itself, allowing the extrapolation of the SWReGAP mapping into the Mexican portion of the watershed without collecting additional training data.

  15. Length of Storage of Red Blood Cells and Patient Survival After Blood Transfusion: A Binational Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmin, Märit; Rostgaard, Klaus; Lee, Brian K; Wikman, Agneta; Norda, Rut; Nielsen, Kaspar René; Pedersen, Ole B; Holmqvist, Jacob; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Edgren, Gustaf

    2017-02-21

    Possible negative effects, including increased mortality, among persons who receive stored red blood cells (RBCs) have recently garnered considerable attention. Despite many studies, including 4 randomized trials, no consensus exists. To study the association between the length of RBC storage and mortality in a large population-based cohort of patients who received transfusions, allowing detection of small yet clinically significant effects. Binational cohort study. All transfusion recipients in Sweden and Denmark. 854 862 adult patients who received transfusions from 2003 to 2012. Patients were followed from first blood transfusion. Relative and absolute risks for death in 30 days or 1 year in relation to length of RBC storage were assessed by using 3 independent analytic approaches. All analyses were conducted by using Cox proportional hazards regression. Regardless of the analytic approach, no association was found between the length of RBC storage and mortality. The difference in 30-day cumulative mortality between patients receiving blood stored for 30 to 42 days and those receiving blood stored for 10 to 19 days was -0.2% (95% CI, -0.5% to 0.1%). Even among patients who received more than 6 units of RBCs stored for 30 days or longer, the hazard ratio of death was 1.00 (CI, 0.96 to 1.05) compared with those who received no such units. Observational study; risk of confounding by indication. Consistent with previous randomized trials, this study found no association between the length of storage of transfused RBCs and patient mortality. Results were homogeneous, with differences in absolute mortality consistently less than 1% among the most extreme exposure categories. These findings suggest that the current practice of storing RBCs for up to 42 days does not need to be changed. The Swedish Research Council, Swedish Heart-Lung Foundation, Swedish Society for Medical Research, Strategic Research Program in Epidemiology at Karolinska Institutet, and Danish

  16. Health-related quality of life in a binational population with diabetes at the Texas-Mexico border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mier, Nelda; Bocanegra-Alonso, Anabel; Zhan, Dongling; Zuniga, Miguel A; Acosta, Rosa I

    2008-03-01

    To examine physical and mental health domains of health-related quality of life (HRQL) in a binational adult population with type 2 diabetes at the Texas-Mexico border, and to explore individual and social correlates to physical and mental health status. Adults 18 years and older with type 2 diabetes residing in the South Texas Lower Rio Grande Valley and in Reynosa, Tamaulipas, Mexico, were recruited using a convenience sampling technique and interviewed face-to-face with a structured survey. HRQL was measured using physical and mental health summary components of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form. HRQL correlates included demographic characteristics, health factors, access to healthcare, and family support. Samples characteristics were compared using the Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U test. Associations between dependent and independent variables were examined using unadjusted and adjusted (multiple variable) logistic regression models. There were no significant differences between Valley and Reynosa respondents in physical or mental health status scores. Valley participants with lower socioeconomic status and those perceiving their supportive relative's level of diabetes-related knowledge as "low" were more likely to report worse physical health than those lacking those characteristics. In the Reynosa group, lower physical health status was associated with duration of diabetes and insulin use. Both sample populations with clinical depressive symptoms were more likely to have worse physical and mental health than those without such symptoms. HRQL is an important outcome in monitoring health status. Understanding the levels and influences of HRQL in U.S.-Mexico border residents with diabetes may help improve diabetes management programs.

  17. Nutrient delivery to Lake Winnipeg from the Red-Assiniboine River Basin – A binational application of the SPARROW model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoy, Glenn A; Jenkinson, R. Wayne; Robertson, Dale M.; Saad, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Excessive phosphorus (TP) and nitrogen (TN) inputs from the Red–Assiniboine River Basin (RARB) have been linked to eutrophication of Lake Winnipeg; therefore, it is important for the management of water resources to understand where and from what sources these nutrients originate. The RARB straddles the Canada–United States border and includes portions of two provinces and three states. This study represents the first binationally focused application of SPAtially Referenced Regressions on Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models to estimate loads and sources of TP and TN by jurisdiction and basin at multiple spatial scales. Major hurdles overcome to develop these models included: (1) harmonization of geospatial data sets, particularly construction of a contiguous stream network; and (2) use of novel calibration steps to accommodate limitations in spatial variability across the model extent and in the number of calibration sites. Using nutrient inputs for a 2002 base year, a RARB TP SPARROW model was calibrated that included inputs from agriculture, forests and wetlands, wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) and stream channels, and a TN model was calibrated that included inputs from agriculture, WWTPs and atmospheric deposition. At the RARB outlet, downstream from Winnipeg, Manitoba, the majority of the delivered TP and TN came from the Red River Basin (90%), followed by the Upper Assiniboine River and Souris River basins. Agriculture was the single most important TP and TN source for each major basin, province and state. In general, stream channels (historically deposited nutrients and from bank erosion) were the second most important source of TP. Performance metrics for the RARB SPARROW model are similarly robust compared to other, larger US SPARROW models making it a potentially useful tool to address questions of where nutrients originate and their relative contributions to loads delivered to Lake Winnipeg.

  18. Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission information digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the commission. This is an annual publication for the general use of the NRC Staff and is available to the public. The digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide

  19. A Guide to Building Commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Michael C.

    2011-09-01

    Commissioning is the process of verifying that a building's heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) and lighting systems perform correctly and efficiently. Without commissioning, system and equipment problems can result in higher than necessary utility bills and unexpected and costly equipment repairs. This report reviews the benefits of commissioning, why it is a requirement for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) certification, and why building codes are gradually adopting commissioning activities into code.

  20. Discussion: European Commission policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coldwell, R.

    1993-01-01

    This paper documents the debate which arose following two papers presented to a seminar run by the Centre for the Study of Regulated Industries, on 11th November 1992, on European Commission (EC) energy policies. The issues raised cover how an internal market for electricity and natural gas will be implemented under a proposed EC directive, bearing in mind the level of opposition from a number of Member States. How this Directive will apply to vertically integrated structures, such as Scottish Electricity Industry, is also considered. (UK)

  1. Commissioning of the SCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, Helen

    2010-01-01

    In September 2008, the large hadron collider (LHC) at CERN was switched on with successful tests of circulating beam in both directions of the ring. The ATLAS semiconductor tracker (SCT) has been installed in the ATLAS cavern since summer 2007 and then integrated with the rest of the ATLAS subdetectors, in preparation for this event. After the SCT was assembled on the surface, the process of being commissioned using cosmic ray events began, and continued after the SCT was installed in the cavern with the rest of the ATLAS detector. Performance results will be given for the recent cosmic runs.

  2. Atomic Energy Commission Act, 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    Promulgated in 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission Act (204) established and vested in the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission the sole responsibility for all matters relating to the peaceful uses of atomic energy in the country. Embodied in the Act are provisions relating to the powers, duties, rights and liabilities of the Commission. (EAA)

  3. Commission 4: Ephemerides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, George H.; Hohenkerk, Catherine Y.; Fukushima, Toshio; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Bangert, John A.; Bell, Steven A.; Folkner, William M.; Lara, Martin; Pitjeva, Elena V.; Urban, Sean E.; Vondrák, Jan

    2012-04-01

    The Commission 4 Organizing Committee began its work for the 2009-2012 triennium by revising the commission's terms of reference, which serve as our ``mission statement.'' The new terms of reference are:(a)Maintain cooperation and collaboration between the national offices providing ephemerides, prediction of phenomena, astronomical reference data, and navigational almanacs.(b)Encourage agreement on the bases (reference systems, time scales, models, and constants) of astronomical ephemerides and reference data in the various countries. Promote improvements to the usability and accuracy of astronomical ephemerides, and provide information comparing computational methods, models, and results to ensure the accuracy of data provided.(c)Maintain databases, available on the Internet to the national ephemeris offices and qualified researchers, containing observations of all types on which the ephemerides are based. Promote the continued importance of observations needed to improve the ephemerides, and encourage prompt availability of these observations, especially those from space missions, to the science community.(d)Encourage the development of software and web sites that provide astronomical ephemerides, prediction of phenomena, and astronomical reference data to the scientific community and public.Promote the development of explanatory material that fosters better understanding of the use and bases of ephemerides and related data.

  4. The Cross Surfzone/Inner-shelf Dye Exchange (CSIDE) Experiment Overview: Binational Dye Tracer Releases to Study Pollution Transport and Dilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feddersen, F.; Giddings, S. N.; Kumar, N.; Grimes, D. J.; Pawlak, G. R.; Rivas, D.; Diaz, M.

    2016-02-01

    Per square km, the surfzone and inner-shelf are by far the most economically and ecologically important ocean regions, vital for recreation, food, and ecosystem services. Despite the importance of clean coastal waters to our economy and well-being, declining water quality threatens coastal ecosystem and human health worldwide. Healthy coasts are a significant priority to federal agencies, local government, and NGOs. In particular the San Diego US and Tijuana Mexico border region have unique and persistent water quality issues due to a range of pollution sources. Cross-shore exchange of tracers (e.g., pathogens, anthropogenic nutrients, harmful algal blooms - HABs, larvae) between the well-mixed surfzone and stratified inner-shelf is poorly understood. The surfzone, inner- and mid-shelf span drastically different dynamical regimes, with varying cross-shelf exchange mechanisms due to wave, wind, buoyancy, and tidal processes and intrinsic variability. The NSF funded CSIDE (Cross Surfzone/Inner-shelf Dye Exchange) experiment (Sept & Oct 2015) aims to increase our understanding of cross-shelf material exchange by performing 3 shoreline dye release experiments that are tracked for up to 20 km alongshore and over 48+ hrs. One dye release will be performed in Mexico and the dye transport tracked across the border. The dye will be tracked via a broad range of binational instrumentation. In this presentation, we present an overview of the CSIDE experiment, in particular the binational aspects of the study,

  5. Proceedings of the Binational Conference on Libraries in California and Baja California (1st, Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico, January 13-14, 1984) = Memorias de la Primera Conferencia Binacional de Bibliotecas de las Californias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Marta Stiefel, Ed.; And Others

    This document includes the text of presentations given at the First Binational Conference on Libraries in California and Baja California, as well as minutes from four roundtables held at the conference. Following a prologue and a brief background on the conference, the following presentations are included: (1) "State Support for Public…

  6. Commissioning the GTA accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Bowling, S.; Brown, S.; Cole, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Garnett, R.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Johnson, K.F.; Kerstiens, D.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Lysenko, W.P.; Mottershead, C.T.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Rusthoi, D.P.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Connolly, R.; Weiss, R.; Saadatmand, K.

    1992-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) is being used to resolve the physics and engineering issues related to accelerating, focusing, and steering a high-brightness, high-current H - beam and then neutralizing it. The goal is to produce a 24 MeV, 50 mA device with a 2% duty factor. Specific features of the GTA -- injector, beam optics, rf linac structures, diagnostics, control and rf power systems are described. The first four steps in commissioning have been completed. The RFQ predicted and measured performances are in good agreement; however, the transmission is lower than specifications. Input emittance is larger than design specifications and increases the effects of image charge and multipoles. Displacement of steering magnets in either the horizontal or vertical plane caused beam displacements in both planes. It is suspected that quadrupole rotation is the cause of the coupled motion. 9 figs., 5 tabs., 11 refs

  7. Safety Commission databases support

    CERN Document Server

    Petit, S; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2005-01-01

    A collaboration project between the Safety Commission (SC) and the Controls, Safety and Engineering databases group (TS/CSE) started last year. The aim of this collaboration is to transfer several SC applications from their local environments onto the D7i-MTF EDMS framework, for which the TS/CSE group is responsible. Different domains of activity and projects have been defined in the areas of equipment management, safety inspections, accidents and risks management. Priorities have been established in collaboration with SC. This paper presents the new Safety Inspections Management system (SIM) which will be put in production before the summer 2005 and reviews the constraints of both the users and the development and operational framework that needed to be taken into account. The technical solutions adopted to assure a successful production start-up and operation of the SIM system are described. Progress on other on-going projects and plans for the next year are also reported.

  8. GP commissioning in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Rodger

    2013-02-01

    The NHS, yet again, is in transition with an emphasis on groups of general practitioners (GPs) (clinical commissioning groups) making decisions on which specialist services should be chosen for patients requiring referral from primary care. It is an area of new terminology with a new language and further change for all working in the NHS and the all-important interface between primary and secondary care, and its impact on teamwork. There are many drivers including choice, efficiency, franchising of services, coordination and leadership in an enormous organisation, but not least reducing costs and keeping to a budget. There are many logistical issues and ethical anxieties, and only time will inform patients, practitioners, stakeholders and politicians as to its success.

  9. SSCL Commissioning and Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The SSC, with an energy of 20 TeV/Beam, requires a sequence of individual accelerators of increasing energy in the injector chain. These are the Linac, Low Energy Booster, Medium Energy Booster, and High Energy Booster. Each accelerator system must be completed in sequence in order to provide beam to the next higher energy accelerator. The collider itself is comprised of ten sectors, each of which in terms of superconducting magnet bending strength, is equivalent to two HEB injectors. The completion of all injectors and collider sectors is required before stored beams can circulate in preparation for colliding beam operation. Four experimental halls are planned for the detector systems. Each major detector will be assembled in one of the halls by a world-wide collaboration of scientists. In addition, above ground facilities provide shops and test facilities for accelerator technical systems, superconducting magnet and materials research and development, and for detector assembly and operations. The purpose of this report is to present a plan for the sequential commissioning and operation of these individual accelerators and other technical facilities of the SSC. A central objective of this plan is to describe the activities at the SSCL that are not included as part of the construction project TPC, even though they occur during the overall project construction time-frame. Examples of such activities include the operation of general laboratory facilities and services not specifically related to construction, the operating costs for the individual accelerators in the injector chain once these facilities have been commissioned, and the costs of SSCL physics research groups. The Department of Energy has provided the following decision with regard to these operations categories for the SSCL

  10. Water First Aid Is Beneficial In Humans Post-Burn: Evidence from a Bi-National Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Fiona M; Phillips, Michael; Jovic, Tom; Cassidy, John T; Cameron, Peter; Edgar, Dale W

    2016-01-01

    Reported first aid application, frequency and practices around the world vary greatly. Based primarily on animal and observational studies, first aid after a burn injury is considered to be integral in reducing scar and infection, and the need for surgery. The current recommendation for optimum first aid after burn is water cooling for 20 minutes within three hours. However, compliance with this guideline is reported as poor to moderate at best and evidence exists to suggest that overcooling can be detrimental. This prospective cohort study of a bi-national burn patient registry examined data collected between 2009 and 2012. The aim of the study was to quantify the magnitude of effects of water cooling first aid after burn on indicators of burn severity in a large human cohort. The data for the analysis was provided by the Burn Registry of Australia and New Zealand (BRANZ). The application of first aid cooling prior to admission to a dedicated burn service, was analysed for its influence on four outcomes related to injury severity. The patient related outcomes were whether graft surgery occurred, and death while the health system (cost) outcomes included total hospital length of stay and admission to ICU. Robust regression analysis using bootstrapped estimation adjusted using a propensity score was used to control for confounding and to estimate the strength of association with first aid. Dose-response relationships were examined to determine associations with duration of first aid. The influence of covariates on the impact of first aid was assessed. Cooling was provided before Burn Centre admission for 68% of patients, with at least twenty minutes duration for 46%. The results indicated a reduction in burn injury severity associated with first aid. Patients probability for graft surgery fell by 0.070 from 0.537 (13% reduction) (p = 0.014). The probability for ICU admission fell by 0.084 from 0.175 (48% reduction) (pfirst aid. The size of burn and age interacted

  11. Water First Aid Is Beneficial In Humans Post-Burn: Evidence from a Bi-National Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona M Wood

    Full Text Available Reported first aid application, frequency and practices around the world vary greatly. Based primarily on animal and observational studies, first aid after a burn injury is considered to be integral in reducing scar and infection, and the need for surgery. The current recommendation for optimum first aid after burn is water cooling for 20 minutes within three hours. However, compliance with this guideline is reported as poor to moderate at best and evidence exists to suggest that overcooling can be detrimental. This prospective cohort study of a bi-national burn patient registry examined data collected between 2009 and 2012. The aim of the study was to quantify the magnitude of effects of water cooling first aid after burn on indicators of burn severity in a large human cohort.The data for the analysis was provided by the Burn Registry of Australia and New Zealand (BRANZ. The application of first aid cooling prior to admission to a dedicated burn service, was analysed for its influence on four outcomes related to injury severity. The patient related outcomes were whether graft surgery occurred, and death while the health system (cost outcomes included total hospital length of stay and admission to ICU. Robust regression analysis using bootstrapped estimation adjusted using a propensity score was used to control for confounding and to estimate the strength of association with first aid. Dose-response relationships were examined to determine associations with duration of first aid. The influence of covariates on the impact of first aid was assessed.Cooling was provided before Burn Centre admission for 68% of patients, with at least twenty minutes duration for 46%. The results indicated a reduction in burn injury severity associated with first aid. Patients probability for graft surgery fell by 0.070 from 0.537 (13% reduction (p = 0.014. The probability for ICU admission fell by 0.084 from 0.175 (48% reduction (p<0.001 and hospital length of stay

  12. A Virtual Commissioning Learning Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Steffen; Madsen, Ole

    2018-01-01

    The introduction of reconfigurable manufacturing systems (RMS), Industry 4.0 and the associated technologies requires the establishment of new competencies. Towards that goal, Aalborg University (AAU) has developed an Industry 4.0 learning factory, the AAU Smart Production Lab. The AAU Smart...... Production Lab integrates a number of Industry 4.0 technologies for learning and research purposes. One of the many techniques is virtual commissioning. Virtual commissioning uses a virtual plant model and real controllers (PLCs) enabling a full emulation of the manufacturing system for verification. Virtual...... commissioning can lower the commissioning time up to 63%, allowing faster time to market. However, virtual commission is still missing industrial impact one of the reasons being lack of competencies and integration experiences. The paper presents the setup of the virtual commissioning learning platform...

  13. Model Commissioning Plan and Guide Specifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of Model Commissioning Plan and Guide Specifications are to ensure that the design team applies commissioning concepts to the design and prepares commissioning specifications and a commission plan for inclusion in the bid construction documents.

  14. Liberalism, authority, and bioethics commissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, D Robert

    2013-12-01

    Bioethicists working on national ethics commissions frequently think of themselves as advisors to the government, but distance themselves from any claims to actual authority. Governments however may find it beneficial to appear to defer to the authority of these commissions when designing laws and policies, and might appoint such commissions for exactly this reason. Where does the authority for setting laws and policies come from? This question is best answered from within a normative political philosophy. This paper explains the locus of moral authority as understood within one family of normative political theories--liberal political theories--and argues that most major "liberal" commentators have understood both the source and scope of ethics commissions' authority in a manner at odds with liberalism, rightly interpreted. The author argues that reexamining the implications of liberalism for bioethics commissions would mean changing what are considered valid criticisms of such commissions and also changing the content of national bioethics commission mandates. The author concludes that bioethicists who participate in such commissions ought to carefully examine their own views about the normative limits of governmental authority because such limits have important implications for the contribution that bioethicists can legitimately make to government commissions.

  15. Commissioning of NSLS-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willeke, F.

    2015-05-03

    NSLS-II, the new 3rd generation light source at BNL was designed for a brightness of 1022 photons s-1mm-2mrad-2 (0.1%BW)-1. It was constructed between 2009 and 2014. The storage ring was commissioned in April 2014 which was followed by insertion device and beamline commissioning in the fall of 2014. All ambitious design parameters of the facility have already been achieved except for commissioning the full beam intensity of 500mA which requires more RF installation. This paper reports on the results of commissioning.

  16. National Knowledge Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitroda, Sam

    2007-04-01

    India's National Knowledge Commission (NKC) established by the prime minister is focused on building institutions and infrastructure in Education, Science and Technology, Innovation etc. to meet the challenges of the knowledge economy in the 21st century and increase India's competitive advantage in the global market. India today stands poised to reap the benefits of a rapidly growing economy and a major demographic advantage, with 550 million young people below the age of 25 years, the largest in the world. The NKC is focused on five critical areas of knowledge related to access, concepts, creation, applications and services. This includes a variety of subject areas such as language, translations, libraries, networks, portals, affirmative action, distance learning, intellectual property, Entrepreneurship, application in Agriculture, health, small and medium scale industries, e-governance etc. One of the keys to this effort is to build a national broadband gigabit of networks of 500 nodes to connect universities, Libraries, Laboratories, Hospitals, Agriculture institutions etc. to share resources and collaborate on multidisciplinary activities. This presentation will introduce the NKC, discuss methodology, subject areas, specific recommendation and outline a plan to build knowledge networks and specifics on network architecture, applications, and utilities.

  17. Commissioning the SNO+ Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caden, E.; Coulter, I.; SNO+ Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    SNO+ is a multipurpose liquid scintillator neutrino experiment based at SNOLAB in Sudbury, Ontario, Canada. The experiment’s main physics goal is a search for neutrinoless double beta decay in Tellurium-130, but SNO+ will also study low energy solar neutrinos, geo- and reactor-antineutrinos, among other topics. We are reusing much of the hardware from the original SNO experiment, but significant work has taken place to transform the heavy water detector into a liquid scintillator detector. We present upgrades and improvements to the read-out electronics and trigger system to handle the higher data rates expected by a scintillator experiment. We show the successful installation and testing of a hold-down rope net for the acrylic vessel to counter-act the buoyancy of organic liquid scintillator. We also describe the new scintillator process plant and cover gas systems that have been constructed to achieve the purification necessary to meet our physics goals. We are currently commissioning the experiment with ultra-pure water in preparation for filling with scintillator in early 2017 and present the current status of this work.

  18. Post commissioning noise study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heraud, P.

    2008-01-01

    This presentation described a wind farm post-commissioning study conducted at a wind farm owned by Helimax Energy Inc. The farm was located in a partly-forested, partly cultivated region in Quebec that featured gently rolling hills. Over 600 dwellings were located within 2 km of the wind farm, and 44 dwellings were within the wind farm's boundaries. The noise impact assessments were conducted at various points near the wind farm. The wind farm was designed using an International Standards Organization (ISO) noise propagation model and a 40 dBA to provide adequate setbacks. The study was conducted using 10 days of continuous measurements at selected points of a wind farm. Points of reception included points from 650 m to 800 m. Noise over 2 km was not thought to be contributed by the wind turbine. The nearest dwelling was 512 m from one of the farm's wind turbines. The study also considered ground factor, temperature, relative humidity, and the height of the receptors. Quebec noise level limits are 40 dBA at night, and 45 dBA during the day. Noise level limits are independent of wind speed. Measured noise contributions over 40 dBA were not observed during the measurement program. The wind turbines were only audible for 1 night out of the 30 night study period. It was concluded that the ISO noise propagation model is a reliable tool for conducting noise impact assessments. tabs., figs

  19. LEIR commissioning successfully completed

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    An important milestone has been passed in the preparation of the injector complex to supply ions to the LHC experiments. The LEIR lead-ion beam, seen on one of the control screens just before the PS injection region. The Low-Energy Ion Ring - LEIR for short - has passed its first tests with flying colours. On 12 May, the ring that will accumulate lead ions for the LHC was shut down after seven months of tests (see Bulletin 44/2005). 'The commissioning phase was a resounding success,' enthuses a satisfied Michel Chanel, head of the LEIR construction project. After several months of fine-tuning, the LEIR team has achieved its aim of producing the kind of beam required for first lead-ion collisions in the LHC in 2008. This involved creating bunches containing 230 million ions, in line with the specifications for those first beams. This success can be put down to the machine's outstanding design and components. 'It's a great achivement by all the teams involved in the machine's construction,' underlines Christian...

  20. ROS Installation and Commissioning

    CERN Multimedia

    Gorini, B

    The ATLAS Readout group (a sub-group of TDAQ) has now completed the installation and commissioning of all of the Readout System (ROS) units. Event data from ATLAS is initially handled by detector specific hardware and software, but following a Level 1 Accept the data passes from the detector specific Readout Drivers (RODs) to the ROS, the first stage of the central ATLAS DAQ. Within the final ATLAS TDAQ system the ROS stores the data and on request makes it available to the Level 2 Trigger (L2) processors and to the Event Builder (EB) as required. The ROS is implemented as a large number of PCs housing custom built cards (ROBINs) and running custom multi-threaded software. Each ROBIN card (shown below) contains buffer memories to store the data, plus a field programmable gate array ( FPGA ) and an embedded PowerPC processor for management of the memories and data requests, and is implemented as a 64-bit 66 MHz PCI card. Both the software and the ROBIN cards have been designed and developed by the Readout g...

  1. Binational school-based monitoring of traffic-related air pollutants in El Paso, Texas (USA) and Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua (Mexico)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raysoni, Amit U.; Sarnat, Jeremy A.; Sarnat, Stefanie Ebelt; Garcia, Jose Humberto; Holguin, Fernando; Flores Luevano, Silvia; Li, Wen-Whai

    2011-01-01

    Paired indoor and outdoor concentrations of fine and coarse particulate matter (PM), PM2.5 reflectance [black carbon(BC)], and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2 ) were determined for sixteen weeks in 2008 at four elementary schools (two in high and two in low traffic density zones) in a U.S.-Mexico border community to aid a binational health effects study. Strong spatial heterogeneity was observed for all outdoor pollutant concentrations. Concentrations of all pollutants, except coarse PM, were higher in high traffic zones than in the respective low traffic zones. Black carbon and NO 2 appear to be better traffic indicators than fine PM. Indoor air pollution was found to be well associated with outdoor air pollution, although differences existed due to uncontrollable factors involving student activities and building/ventilation configurations. Results of this study indicate substantial spatial variability of pollutants in the region, suggesting that children's exposures to these pollutants vary based on the location of their school. - Highlights: → First binational investigation characterizing traffic air pollutants at four schools in El Paso, USA and Cd. Juarez, Mexico. → Paired in-outdoor sampling of PM 2.5 , PM 10-2.5 , reflectance [black carbon(BC)], and NO 2 for 16 weeks in 2008 at each school. → Two schools (one in each city) were located in high traffic density areas and the other two in areas of low traffic density. → Usage of spatially resolved environmental indictors of traffic pollutants in a range of exposure settings. → Substantial intra-urban spatial variability in pollutant concentrations observed between and within the two cities. - Spatial variability in traffic-mediated pollutant concentrations can exist at the intra-urban level and ambient monitoring sites may not accurately represent these concentration gradients.

  2. Commission 31: Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsakis, Demetrios; Defraigne, Pascale; Hosokawa, M.; Leschiutta, S.; Petit, G.; Zhai, Z.-C.

    2007-03-01

    The most intensely discussed and controversial issue in time keeping has been the proposal before the International Telecommunications Union (ITU) to redefine Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) so as to replace leap seconds by leap hours. Should this proposal be adopted, the practice of inserting leap seconds would cease after a specific date. Should the Earth's rotation continue to de-accelerate at its historical rate, the next discontinuity in UTC would be an hour inserted several centuries from now. Advocates of this proposal cite the need to synchronize satellite and other systems, such as GPS, Galileo, and GLONASS, which did not exist and were not envisioned when the current system was adopted. They note that leap second insertions can be and have been incorrectly implemented or accounted for. Such errors have to date had localized impact, but they could cause serious mishaps involving loss of life. For example, some GPS receivers have been known to fail simply because there was no leap second after a long enough interval, other GPS receivers failed because the leap second information was broadcast more than three months in advance, and some commercial software used for internet time-transfer Network Time Protocol (NTP) could either discard all data received after a leap second or interpret it as a frequency change. The ambiguity associated with the extra second could also disrupt financial accounting and certain forms of encryption. Those opposed to the proposal question the need for a change, and also point out the costs of adjusting to the proposed change and its inconvenience to amateur astronomers and others who rely upon astronomical calculations published in advance. Reports have been circulated that the cost of checking and correcting software to accommodate the new definition of UTC would be many millions of dollars for some systems. In October 2005 American Astronomical Society asked the ITU for a year's time to study the issue. This commission has

  3. Commissioning plans for SSC linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurd, J.W.; Aprile, R.L.; Chang, C.R.; Crist, C.E.; Cutler, R.I.; Funk, L.W.; Guy, F.W.; Leifeste, G.T.; Raparia, D.; Saadatmand, K.; Sethi, R.C.; Swenson, D.A.; Tooker, J.; Yao, C.G.

    1992-01-01

    Presented are the general description of the SSC linac and the plans for commissioning. Sections of the linac are installed, tested, and beam commissioned in a serial approach. A specialized set of diagnostics is used to characterize the beam through each section. In addition to the standard diagnostic set, plans call for the use of a bunch shape monitor and x-ray spectrometer. Streak camera and digital imaging diagnostics will be developed. The commissioning plan is folded into the general linac project schedule to show the relation between delivery, staging, installation, conditioning, and actual commissioning with beam. These plans form the basis for coordination between the various organizations responsible for different elements of the linac including the technical components, infrastructure, and temporary staging and operation facilities. (Author) 2 figs., 17 refs

  4. National Capital Planning Commission Meeting Transcripts

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Capital Planning Commission — Transcripts of the monthly (with the exception of August) National Capital Planning Commission meeting transcripts are provided for research to confirm actions taken...

  5. 75 FR 11166 - Joint Meeting of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-10

    ... the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission; Notice of Joint Meeting of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission March 2, 2010. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) will hold...

  6. Commission Conditions d'emploi

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2017-01-01

    Au CERN, nous avons la formidable possibilité d’imaginer nos CONDITIONS D’EMPLOIS. Rendez-vous compte ! Nous avons le pouvoir de proposer des idées et de les défendre pour avoir des conditions d’emplois qui soient les plus attractives possibles pour le personnel en place et à venir. ---------------- L’Association du personnel du CERN, tout le monde connait ou en a entendu parler. Ce qui est moins connu, ce sont les diverses commissions internes qui traitent des sujets propres à défendre les intérêts du personnel. Les publications dans notre journal, l’Echo, sont un des moyens à notre disposition pour vous faire découvrir chacune des commissions internes de l’Association du personnel (voir Echo n°242 sur la commission juridique, et Echo n°255 sur la commission des cas particuliers). Commission Conditions d&...

  7. National Bioethics Commissions as Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lisa M

    2017-05-01

    As has become tradition, executive directors of United States' presidential bioethics committees offer reflections about their experience shortly after the orderly shutdown of the commission staff. After the records are filed according to government records regulations; after all the staff members, who are hired into temporary positions that must be renewed every two years, have secured permanent employment; after preparations are made to ensure that the next commission staff (should there be one) has a budget and standard operating procedures in order to begin its work in a timely manner; after the lights are turned out for the last time, the executive director makes the final climb up the stairs into the sunlight and reflects on the whirlwind. There is much about my work with the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues that deserves comment, but one aspect of the commission that has been especially valuable to me is its work to educate the nation on bioethical issues. This is, moreover, a contribution in which the commission staff was central, and it is one that, as an ethics educator myself, I will cherish deeply. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  8. Commissioning of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2069446

    2008-01-01

    The status of the commissioning of the ATLAS experiment as of May 2008 is presented. The subdetector integration in recent milestone weeks is described, especially the cosmic commissioning in milestone week M6, focusing on simultaneous running and combined track analysis of the muon detector and inner detector. The liquid argon and tile calorimeters have achieved near-full operation, and are integrated with the calorimeter trigger. The High-Level-Trigger infrastructure is installed and algorithms tested in technical runs. Problems with the inner detector cooling compressors are being fixed.

  9. Surrogacy commissioning fathers and HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Jordaan, D W

    2014-01-01

    Surrogacy is not regulated by a single legal instrument only, nor is confirmation of a surrogacy agreement by the High Court an unqualified green light for the surrogacy process to proceed. In the context of the HIV status of the commissioning father, whose gametes are to be used for the conception of the child in pursuance of a surrogacy agreement, the intended in vitro fertilisation of the surrogate mother may only take place on condition that the commissioning father, and his semen, have b...

  10. 47 CFR 1.1528 - Commission review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commission review. 1.1528 Section 1.1528... Commission review. Either the applicant or Bureau counsel may seek Commission review of the initial decision on the application, or the Commission may decide to review the decision on its own initiative, in...

  11. LHC Commissioning and First Operation

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, S

    2010-01-01

    A description is given of the repair of the LHC after the accident of September 2008. The LHC hardware and beam commissioning and initial operation are reviewed both in terms of beam and hardware performance. The implemented machine protection measures and their impact on LHC operation are presented.

  12. Commissioning Leibstadt nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, A.; Degen, R.; Nedelko, U.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the experience and benefits obtained from the use of temporary oil fired boilers of sufficient capacity to allow commissioning and no-load tests to be carried out on the turbine-generator months ahead of steam being available from the NSSS. The successful result at Leibstadt may be a model for other plants

  13. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    The commissioning effort is presently addressing two main areas: the commissioning of the hardware components at the pit and the coordination of the activities of the newly constituted Detector Performance groups (DPGs). At point 5, a plan regarding the service cavern and the commissioning of the connections of the off-detector electronics (for the data collection line and trigger primitive generation) to the central DAQ and the central Trigger has been defined. This activity was started early February and will continue until May. It began with Tracker electronics followed so far by HCAL and CSC. The goal is to have by May every detector commission, as much as possible, their data transfer paths from FED to Central DAQ as well as their trigger setups between TPGs and Global Level 1 trigger. The next focus is on connections of front-ends to the service cavern. This depends strongly on the installations of services. Presently the only detector which has its link fibers connected to the off-detector electr...

  14. LHC: Construction and Commissioning Status

    CERN Document Server

    Evans, Lyndon R

    2007-01-01

    The installation of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN is now approaching completion. All magnets are installed with the exception of a few inner triplet quadrupoles. The first of the eight machine sectors is cold and power tests are proceeding. Two other sectors are ready for cool down and interconnect work is proceeding at a satisfactory pace in the other five sectors. In view of a number of accumulated delays, the original plan for partial commissioning of the machine and a low energy pilot run at the end of 2007 will now have to be abandoned. Instead, the full commissioning of the machine to top energy in a single step will start once the injector chain becomes available in spring 2008.

  15. Guidance on future art commissioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    Delegates at Building Better Healthcare's recent "National Patient Environment and the Arts Conference 2009" in London heard how national public arts think tank ixia has appointed Bristol-based arts and wellbeing development agency Willis Newson to write "concise and convincing guidance" on commissioning art for new healthcare facilities. A key message, during a joint presentation, was that integrating artwork into hospitals and other healthcare premises requires the earliest possible consideration to reap the maximum rewards.

  16. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS

    CERN Document Server

    T. Camporesi

    The major progress made during the last months has been in the consolidation of services for the +endcaps and three barrel wheels (YB+2, YB+1 and YB0): all subdetectors have now final power connections (including Detector Safety protection), the gas systems have been commissioned for all gas detectors (the recirculation is not yet activated for the RPC though) and detector cooling has also been commissioned. Their integration with final services is the necessary condition for being able to operate larger fractions the detector. Recent weeks have seen full HCAL, more than 50% of EB and full wheels of DTs and CSC being operated using final services. This has not yet translated into major progress of global integration due to major interruptions of central services, which have not allowed the necessary debugging and commissioning time to all the subdetec¬tors and central activities like DAQ and trigger. Moreover the running in of the final central services has introduced instabilities related to the co...

  17. Report of the disarmament commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    At its forty-fifth session, the General Assembly adopted resolution 45/62 B of 4 December 1990, entitled ''Report of the Disarmament Commission'', by which the Assembly, inter alia: notes that no consensus could be reached on specific recommendations for the item regarding various aspects of the arms race, particularly the nuclear-arms race and nuclear disarmament, as well as a general approach to negotiations on nuclear and conventional disarmament; Working Group II on agenda item 5 of the United Nations Disarmament Commission, entitled ''Process of nuclear disarmament in the framework of international peace and security, with the objective of the elimination of nuclear weapons'', held 11 meetings during the 1991 substantive session of the Disarmament Commission which were preceded by a number of rounds of informal consultations conducted by the Chairman. A structure of work which would serve as a guideline for the work of the Group, while at the same time maintaining the general nature of the desired approach was agreed to by the Group; it included the following four items: 1. The relationship between the process of nuclear disarmament and international peace and security; 2. Review of the steps taken in the process of nuclear disarmament; 3. Strengthening the process of nuclear disarmament, necessary conditions, and mechanisms required for it; 4. The role of the United Nations system in the process of nuclear disarmament with the objective of the elimination of nuclear weapons

  18. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS

    CERN Document Server

    T. Camporesi

    P5 Commissioning activities The commissioning effort at the pit has made major progress since the last CMS week concerning the installation and operation of the off-detector electronics in USC. The progress has been much slower in the experi¬mental cavern due to the delay in the deployment of the infrastructure which should eventually allow safe powering-up of the front ends. Nevertheless, temporary power connections have allowed operation of slices of subdetectors at any given time. HF, HE, ECAL, DTs, RPCs and CSCs have carried out local commissioning tests with these temporary services. The status of hardware deployment in USC and on the towers/balconies is represented in the detailed table below.   Table 1: Status of installation of off-detector electronics. FEDs are detector dependent hardware modules which perform the first ‘colla¬tion’ of front-end data and send it to Central-data for event building. Tracker, ECAL, HCAL have their front end electronics mo...

  19. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    The global commissioning campaign begins this year with a series of weekly two-day global runs of limited participation until mid-March. The aim of these runs varies week-to-week, but includes the commissioning the calorimeter triggers, the muon track-finder triggers in the DT/CSC overlap, the PLL locking ranges, and generally accumulating data either for HCAL noise characterization or detector studies with cosmic muons. In mid-March a full Global Run is scheduled with all components participating, followed in April by a Cosmic Run with the aim of collecting statistics over a couple weeks with the installed Tracker and other subsystems. The ultimate milestone is the Cosmic Run At Four Tesla (CRAFT), with a completed CMS closed and the solenoid energized for data-taking during June. The Detector Performance Groups start the year with the focus to prepare for LHC collisions, and the associated challenges (CSA08) and global commissioning exercises (CRAFT) along the way. New this year is the addition of the Tri...

  20. Unit Commissioning of “Belene” NPP (Bulgaria)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This presentations gives detailed information about the following topics about commissioning: principles of NPP commissioning; phases of NPP commissioning; organization of commissioning activities; duties and responsibilities of the parties for carrying out unit commissioning activities; responsibility and obligations of the sides during commissioning of power unit; documentation required for power unit commissioning; quality assurance for commissioning activities

  1. Alaska Public Offices Commission, Department of Administration, State of

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visiting Alaska State Employees State of Alaska Department of Administration Alaska Public Offices Commission Alaska Department of Administration, Alaska Public Offices Commission APOC Home Commission Filer ; AO's Contact Us Administration > Alaska Public Offices Commission Alaska Public Offices Commission

  2. National Capital Planning Commission Library contents

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Capital Planning Commission — The National Capital Planning Commission library catalog is a compilation of titles, authors, years of publication and topics of books, reports and NCPC publications.

  3. Powers and Duties of Corporate Affairs Commission

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mofasony

    POWERS AND DUTIES OF THE CORPORATE AFFAIRS. COMMISSION ... The Registrar-General is the Chief Executive of the Commission and is saddled .... Federal Board of Inland Revenue Department of the Ministry of Finance v). Register ...

  4. Goodenough Spring, Texas, USA: Discharge and water chemistry of a large spring deeply submerged under the binational Amistad Reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamps, Ray H.; Tatum, Gregg S.; Gault, Mike; Groeger, Alan W.

    2009-06-01

    Goodenough Spring (Texas, USA) is a large spring near the border of the American state of Texas and the Mexican state of Coahuila, discharging into the international Amistad Reservoir on the river Rio Grande (Rio Bravo). Discharge was routinely measured from 1928 until 1968 to partition the flow of the river between the two countries in accordance with water-use treaties. Samples were analyzed for water-quality parameters in 1967-1968 prior to inundation under 45 m of Amistad Reservoir in 1968. Subsequently, discharge has been estimated indirectly by the International Boundary and Water Commission (IBWC). For the first direct measurements of the spring in 37 years, velocity and cross-sectional measurements were made and water samples collected in the summer of 2005 using advanced self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) techniques. Spring discharge was calculated at 2.03 m3 s-1, approximately one-half of the historical mean of 3.94 m3 s-1. In situ and laboratory analyses of samples for temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, alkalinity, nitrate-nitrogen, dissolved solids, chloride, sulfate, fluoride, phosphorus, calcium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, and iron showed the water quality to be very good for human consumption and crop irrigation. Measurement values are relatively unchanged from those reported 37 years prior.

  5. Atomic Energy Commission Act, 2000 (Act 588)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Act 588 of the Republic of Ghana entitled, Atomic Energy Commission Act, 2000, amends and consolidates the Atomic Energy Commission Act, 204 of 1963 relating to the establishment of the Atomic Energy Commission. Act 588 makes provision for the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission to establish more institutes for the purpose of research in furtherance of its functions and also promote the commercialization of its research and development results. (E.A.A.)

  6. Bioethics commission to review gene patenting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothenburg, L.

    1995-12-01

    In October, in an unexpected development, U.S. President Bill Clinton created a national ethics advisory board, the National Bioethics Advisory Commission (NBAC, Washington, DC), to study both research ethics and the management and use of genetic information. Of particular interest to biotechnology companies and researchers is the fact that the commission`s brief encompasses issues about human gene patenting, a subject not contained in earlier proposals for the commission.

  7. The Industry Commission inquiry into charitable organisations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, K

    1996-01-01

    The Industry Commission has carried out Australia's largest inquiry into charities. It was, from the point of view of charities, an unsatisfactory operation, all the more so since it was not clear why the task had been given to the commission. This article examines the commission's work in three ways: the overall relationship between government and charities; the commission's proposed major reforms; and the minor reforms.

  8. Atomic Energy Commission (Amendment) Law, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    The Atomic Energy Commission (Amendment) Law, 1993 (P.N.D.C.L. 308) seeks to amend the Atomic Energy Commission Act of 1963 (Act 204) so as to provide for the establishment of a Radiation Protection Board and other institutes under the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. The Law further repeats the Atomic Energy Commission (Amendment) Law of 1982 (P.N.D.C.L. 37). (EAA)

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission 1989 Information Digest provides summary information regarding the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, its regulatory responsibilities, and areas licensed by the Commission. This is the first of an annual publication for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. The Digest is divided into two parts: the first presents an overview of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the second provides data on NRC commercial nuclear reactor licensees and commercial nuclear power reactors worldwide

  10. Commissioning Instrument for the GTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuevas, S.; Sánchez, B.; Bringas, V.; Espejo, C.; Flores, R.; Chapa, O.; Lara, G.; Chavolla, A.; Anguiano, G.; Arciniega, S.; Dorantes, A.; González, J. L.; Montoya, J. M.; Toral, R.; Hernández, H.; Nava, R.; Devaney, N.; Castro, J.; Cavaller-Marqués, L.

    2005-12-01

    During the GTC integration phase, the Commissioning Instrument (CI) will be a diagnostic tool for performance verification. The CI features four operation modes: imaging, pupil imaging, Curvature WFS, and high resolution Shack-Hartmann WFS. This instrument was built by the Instituto de Astronomía UNAM and the Centro de Ingeniería y Desarrollo Industrial (CIDESI) under GRANTECAN contract after a public bid. In this paper we made a general instrument overview and we show some of the performance final results obtained when the Factory Acceptance tests previous to its transport to La Palma.

  11. 17 CFR 201.57 - Commission review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Commission review. 201.57... Regulations Pertaining to the Equal Access to Justice Act § 201.57 Commission review. In accordance with the... Division of the Commission may seek review of the initial decision on the fee application, or the...

  12. Commissioning of the CEBAF cryomodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drury, M.; Lee, T.; Marshall, J.; Preble, J.; Saulter, Q.; Schneider, W.; Spata, M.; Wiseman, M.

    1993-01-01

    When complete, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility will house a 4 GeV recirculating linear accelerator containing 42 1/4 cryomodules arrayed in two antiparallel linacs and an injector. Currently, over half of the cryomodules have been installed. Each cryomodule contains eight superconducting niobium 5-cell rf cavities that operate at 1.497 GHz. A cryomodule must provide an energy gain of 20 MeV to the 200 μA beam. The resultant dynamic heat load must be less than 45 W. The cavity parameters that are measured during the commissioning process include the external Q's of the cavity ports, the unloaded Q (Q 0 ) of the cavity as a function of accelerating gradient, and the maximum operating gradient of the cavity. The sensitivity of the resonant frequency to changes in pressure and gradient is also measured. Finally, the mechanical tuners are cycled and characterized. In all cases, the performance of CEBAF cryomodules has exceeded the design requirements. A portable test stand allows local control of the rf system and provides automated data acquisition. This paper describes the cryomodule commissioning hardware, software, and measurements

  13. Molr - A delegation framework for accelerator commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Valliappan, Nachiappan

    2017-01-01

    Accelerator commissioning is the process of preparing an accelerator for beam operations. A typical commissioning period at CERN involves running thousands of tests on many complex systems and machinery to ensure smooth beam operations and correct functioning of the machine protection systems. AccTesting is a software framework which helps orchestrate the commissioning of CERN’s accelerators and it’s equipment systems. This involves running and managing tests provided by various commissioning tools and analyzing their outcomes. Currently, AccTesting only supports a specific set of commissioning tools. In this project, we aim to widen the spectrum of commissioning tools supported by AccTesting by developing a generic and programmable integration framework called Molr, which would enable the integration of more commissioning tools with AccTesting. In this report, we summarize the work done during the summer student project and lay out a brief overview of the current status and next steps for Molr.

  14. SERPUKHOV: UNK transfer beamline commissioned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    At the end of the 1000 hour February-March run of the 70 GeV proton synchrotron at the Institute for High Energy Physics (IHEP), Serpukhov, near Moscow, the new 2.7-kilometre UNK Beam Transfer Line (BTL) was commissioned with proton beam. BTL will eventually transfer beam from the existing U70 proton accelerator to the first stage of the UNK (UNK-1, now under construction) where it will be accelerated in the 21- kilometre ring up to 600 GeV. BTL was designed for proton energies between 60 and 70 GeV, momentum spread ± 2 x 10 -3 and beam emittance 2 mm.mrad, with systems for fast ejection, beam transfer and injection into UNK-1

  15. Commissioning and operation of DRAGON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engel, Sabine

    2003-01-01

    The new DRAGON (Detector of Recoils And Gammas Of Nuclear reactions) facility, located at the TRIUMF-ISAC radioactive beams laboratory in Vancouver, Canada, has initiated its experimental program. Recently DRAGON was used for initial studies of the 21 Na(p,γ) 22 Mg reaction. This facility was designed to measure absolutely the rates of radiative proton and alpha capture reactions of astrophysical interest to a precision of ±20%, using inverse kinematics. To fully understand the optics and operational parameters of the facility along with the transmission particularly of the reaction recoils, systematic studies of various configurations are in progress using stable beams along with measurements of well-known resonance reactions. The status of these commissioning studies is presented

  16. Commissioning and operation of DRAGON

    CERN Document Server

    Engel, S

    2003-01-01

    The new DRAGON (Detector of Recoils And Gammas Of Nuclear reactions) facility, located at the TRIUMF-ISAC radioactive beams laboratory in Vancouver, Canada, has initiated its experimental program. Recently DRAGON was used for initial studies of the sup 2 sup 1 Na(p,gamma) sup 2 sup 2 Mg reaction. This facility was designed to measure absolutely the rates of radiative proton and alpha capture reactions of astrophysical interest to a precision of +-20%, using inverse kinematics. To fully understand the optics and operational parameters of the facility along with the transmission particularly of the reaction recoils, systematic studies of various configurations are in progress using stable beams along with measurements of well-known resonance reactions. The status of these commissioning studies is presented.

  17. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS

    CERN Multimedia

    T. Camporesi

    The central commissioning activities have concentrated mostly in the Service cavern. Since early February the central DAQ has been ready to accept connections from FEDs from the various partitions. This has triggered a campaign from all subdetectors to install their readout crates in USC55. Systematic tests of the connections between FEDs and Central DAQ have been scheduled and to date more than 70% of all FED connections have been successfully tested from almost all subdetectors. In March the Level 1 trigger team started deployment of their hardware followed by a campaign of testing the connections between Trigger primitive generators and the corresponding LV1 hardware (Regional Calorimeter Trigger and Global Muon Trigger). The functionality tests are continuing to date by pattern tests of increasing complexity. In April the central DAQ was ready to start FED system tests, which amounts to testing the data reading and trans¬fer-ability from the FEDs to the Filter Units (with or without an actual ...

  18. Division A Commission 31: Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosokawa, Mizuhiko; Arias, Elisa Felicitas; Manchester, Richard; Tuckey, Philip; Matsakis, Demetrios; Zhang, Shougang; Zharov, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Time is an essential element of fundamental astronomy. In recent years there have been many time-related issues, in scientific and technological aspects as well as in conventions and definitions. At the Commission 31 (Time) business meeting at the XXIX General Assembly, recent progress and many topics, including Pulsar Time Scales WG and Future UTC WG activities, were reviewed and discussed. In this report, we will review the progress of these topics in the past three years. There are many remarkable topics, such as Time scales, Atomic clock development, Time transfer, Future UTC and future redefinition of the second. Among them, scientific highlights are the progress of pulsar time scales and the optical frequency standards. On the other hand, as the social convention, change in the definition of UTC and the second is important.

  19. The Commissioning of the LHC Technical Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Saban, R; Baggiolini, V; Ballarino, A; Barbero-Soto, E; Bellesia, B; Bordry, Frederick; Bozzini, D; Casas-Lino, M-P; Chareyre, V; Claudet, S; Coelingh, G-J; Dahlerup-Petersen, K; Denz, R; Fehér, S; Flora, R; Gruwé, M; Kain, V; Kirby, G; Koratzinos, M; Lauckner, R; Le Naour, S; Mess, K-H; Millet, F; Montabonnet, V; Nisbet, D; Perea-Solano, B; Pojer, M; Principe, R; Rabehl, R; Rijllart, A; Redaelli, S; Rodríguez-Mateos, F; Schmidt, R; Serio, L; Siemko, A; Solfaroli-Camillocci, M; Thiesen, H; Venturini, W; Vergara-Fernandez, A; Verweij, A; Zerlauth, M

    2007-01-01

    The LHC is an accelerator with unprecedented complexity where the energy stored in magnets and the beams exceeds other accelerators by one-to-two orders of magnitude. To ensure a safe and efficient machine start-up without being plagued by technical problems, a phase of "hardware commissioning" was introduced: a thorough commissioning of technical systems without beam. This activity started in June 2005 with the commissioning of individual systems, followed by operating a full sector, one eighth of the machine; the commissioning is expected to last until spring 2008 when commissioning with beam will start. The LHC architecture allows the commissioning of each of the eight sectors independently from the others, before the installation of other sectors is complete. An important effort went into the definition of the programme and the organization of the coordination in the field, as well as in the preparation of the tools to record and analyze test results. This paper discusses the experience with this approach...

  20. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, October 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This document contains a Commission issuance in which the Commission denies the petitioners' motion to quash or modify a subpoena issued by the NRC staff in the course of an investigation to determine if the petitioners' have violated NRC regulations and to determine if safety-related problems exist at NRC-licensed facilities. The pertinent regulations and the Commission's Memorandum and Order are included

  1. Large Hadron Collider commissioning and first operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, S

    2012-02-28

    A history of the commissioning and the very successful early operation of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is described. The accident that interrupted the first commissioning, its repair and the enhanced protection system put in place are fully described. The LHC beam commissioning and operational performance are reviewed for the period from 2010 to mid-2011. Preliminary plans for operation and future upgrades for the LHC are given for the short and medium term.

  2. A Staged Approach to LHC Commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Lamont, M; Brüning, Oliver Sim; Collier, P; Lauckner, R; Schmidt, R

    2006-01-01

    Effective commissioning of the LHC with beam will demand very good preparation; all concerned subsystems will need to be well-prepared and thoroughly tested before first beam. To clarify the demands on the systems involved the objectives of the commissioning phases are presented, along with a breakdown of the phases and the essential prerequisites for each. The nature of the interdependencies between the various systems is highlighted; in particular the need for a well-planned commissioning of the machine protection system.

  3. Startup and commissioning of pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albert, L.J.; Gilbert, C.F.

    1983-05-01

    A critical phase of plant development is the test, startup, and commissioning period. The effort expended prior to commissioning has a definite effect on the reliability and continuing availability of the plant during its life. This paper describes a test, startup, and commissioning program for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant. This program commences with the completion of construction and continues through the turnover of equipment/systems to the owner's startup/ commissioning group. The paper addresses the organization of the test/startup group, planning and scheduling, test procedures and initial testing, staffing and certification of the test group, training of operators, and turnover to the owner

  4. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Regions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Regions. FERC is an independent agency that regulates the interstate transmission of electricity, natural gas, and oil....

  5. Commissioning of the nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtado, P.M.; Rolf, F.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear Power Plant Angra 2, located at Itaorna Beach-Angra dos Reis is the first plant of the Brazilian-German Agreement to be commissioned. The Nuclear Power Plant is a pressurized water reactor rated at 3765 Mw thermal/1325 Mw electrical. For commissioning purpose the plant is divided into 110 systems. Plant commissioning objective is to demonstrate the safe and correct operation of each plan component, system and of the whole plant in agreement with design conditions, licensing requirements and contractual obligations. This work gives a description of plant commissioning objectives, activities their time sequence, and documentation. (Author) [pt

  6. Real Estate Agent Commission Disputes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anida Duarte

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship among Procuring Cause Law, real estate agent years of experience, and real estate commission disputes. A pilot survey was conducted in the southwestern United States among real estate agents, realtor(s, and brokers. After testing the hypothesis, the decision was made to fail to reject the hypothesis and conclude that real estate agent experience and not Procuring Cause Law produced favorable outcomes in disputes. As a result, the following recommendations were made: (a Agency seller and buyer’s agreements should be used in each transaction to avoid disputes, (b proper expectations and guidelines should be reviewed prior to starting any real estate transaction, (c a checklist may assist in the assurance that all valuable information is reviewed, (d agents could benefit from fully understanding Procuring Cause Law and sharing this information with their clients, (e state and national regulatory requirements of the law could be modified for easier understanding and use, and (f consumers who willfully violate the law could be subject to monetary penalties.

  7. Canada's Response to the Recommendations in the Tenth Biennial Report on Great Lakes Water Quality of the International Joint Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The Government of Canada and Ontario are currently renegotiating the Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem (COA). They are committed to restoring and maintaining the basin's chemical, physical and biological integrity and ensuring that it has a healthy, sustainable future. The COA has established a strategic framework for coordinated federal-provincial responsibilities regarding the Great Lakes basin ecosystem. This document presents responses to the recommendations of the International Joint Commission's (IJC) Tenth Biennial Report on how to improve the performance and effectiveness of government programs such as the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. According to the IJC, there are many challenges ahead, including: cleanup of Canadian Areas of Concern; controlling and preventing the further introduction of exotic species; mitigating the impact of rapid urban growth on environmental conditions throughout the basin; and reducing contaminants transported in the atmosphere over long distances to the Great Lakes. This document presented the government's responses to each of the following IJC recommendations regarding remedial action plans, threats to human health with respect to consumption of fish, contaminated sediment, airborne toxic substances, Great Lakes binational toxics strategy, land use, alien invasive species, and information and data management. IJC also recommended that indicators should be reported regarding whether the Great Lakes surface waters are suitable for drinking, swimming and whether fish are edible.

  8. 77 FR 67637 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... notice also describes the functions of the Commission. Notice of this meeting is required by section 10(a.... ADDRESSES: The Commission will meet in Washington, DC at the National Museum of the American Indian at... Lounge of the museum on November 27 and in the museum's fourth-floor conference room on November 28. FOR...

  9. Commissioning quality assurance at Pickering NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wieckowski, J.T.

    1983-05-01

    Ontario Hydro decided in 1978 to implement a formal quality assurance program applicable to commissioning and operation of nuclear generating stations. Pickering NGS is the first station to have the commissioning quality assurance (CQA) program applied to it. This paper outlines the scope, implementation, and evaluation of the CQA program as applied to Pickering Unit 5

  10. 76 FR 4369 - Special Law Enforcement Commissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-25

    ...This notice announces the online publication of the Interim Special Law Enforcement Commission Policy, Rules and Procedures, the Interim Special Law Enforcement Commission Protocols and the Interim Domestic Violence Waiver that will be used by the Office of Justice Services following passage of the Tribal Law and Order Act of 2010. The documents are published on the Indian Affairs Web site.

  11. Ghana Atomic Energy Commission: Annual Report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This report covers the activities and research progams of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2001. The research programs and associated publications have been grouped under the three main institutes of the Commission namely National Nuclear Research Institute, Radiation Protection Institute and Biotechnology and Nuclear Agricultre Research Institute.

  12. The Lancet Commission on Syria | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The journal has adopted a series of global commissions that convene groups of experts for a limited time to produce thematic work aimed at improving human lives through scientific review and inquiry, and to encourage accountability for the problem under study. The Commission on Syria marks the first time a Southern ...

  13. Ghana Atomic Energy Commission: Annual Report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This report covers the activities and research progams of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2001. The research programs and associated publications have been grouped under the three main institutes of the Commission namely National Nuclear Research Institute, Radiation Protection Institute and Biotechnology and Nuclear Agricultre Research Institute

  14. Niger Delta Development Commission and Sustainable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Niger Delta Development Commission and Sustainable Development of Niger Delta Region of Nigeria: The Case of Rivers State. Goddey Wilson. Abstract. The study is on Niger Delta Development Commission and sustainable development of Niger Delta region of Nigeria, the case of Rivers State. The main objective of the ...

  15. Commissioning MMS: Challenges and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Paul; Gramling, Cheryl; Reiter, Jennifer; Smith, Patrick; Stone, John

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses commissioning of NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) Mission. The mission includes four identical spacecraft with a large, complex set of instrumentation. The planning for and execution of commissioning for this mission is described. The paper concludes by discussing lessons learned.

  16. A Practical Guide for Commissioning Existing Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haasl, T.

    1999-05-11

    Although this guide focuses on the retrocommissioning process and its advantages, all three types of commissioning--retrocommissioning, commissioning, and recommissioning--play an equally important role in ensuring that buildings perform efficiently and provide comfortable, safe, and productive work environments for owners and occupants. For new construction and retrofit projects, commissioning should be incorporated early, during design, and last throughout the length of the project. For buildings that were never commissioned, the retrocommissioning process can yield a wealth of cost-saving opportunities while enhancing a building's environment. Finally, once a building is commissioned or retrocommissioned, incorporating recommissioning into the organization's O and M program (by periodically reapplying the original diagnostic testing and checklist procedures) helps ensure that cost savings and other benefits gained from the original process persist over time.

  17. A Practical Guide for Commissioning Existing Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haasl, T.; Sharp, T.

    1999-04-01

    Although this guide focuses on the retrocommissioning process and its advantages, all three types of commissioning--retrocommissioning, commissioning, and recommissioning--play an equally important role in ensuring that buildings perform efficiently and provide comfortable, safe, and productive work environments for owners and occupants. For new construction and retrofit projects, commissioning should be incorporated early, during design, and last throughout the length of the project. For buildings that were never commissioned, the retrocommissioning process can yield a wealth of cost-saving opportunities while enhancing a building's environment. Finally, once a building is commissioned or retrocommissioned, incorporating recommissioning into the organization's O and M program (by periodically reapplying the original diagnostic testing and checklist procedures) helps ensure that cost savings and other benefits gained from the original process persist over time.

  18. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Multimedia

    Tiziano Camporesi

    Pit commissioning activities The last 4 months have seen various major achievements in hardware commissioning, global data taking, readiness of the DPGs to deal with LHC data flows and alignment and calibration workflows. Since February, the global commissioning has been characterized on the one side by more and more of the final CMS detector becoming available for global readout and triggering and on the other side by consolidation of many of the central software infrastructure and of most of the services infrastructure. The reliability of services like cooling, power, gas has markedly improved with respect to what we observed in the second half of 2007.   Of particular note are the delivery of all low voltage power supplies, the commissioning of the final power distribution, the progressive commissioning ( still ongoing)  of the Detector Safety System and of the associated DCS early warning and alarm system. On the detector side, while already we are used to seeing all of HCAL being exe...

  19. Instrumented home energy rating and commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-05-01

    Currently, houses do not perform optimally or even as many codes and forecasts predict, largely because they are field assembled and there is no consistent process to identify deficiencies or to correct them. Solving this problem requires field performance evaluations using appropriate and agreed upon procedures in the form of a new process called residential commissioning. The purpose of this project is to develop and document these procedures and to demonstrate the value that applying them could provide in both new and existing California houses. This project has four specific objectives: to develop metrics and diagnostics for assessing house performance, to provide information on the potential benefits of commissioning using a whole-house approach, to develop programmatic guidelines for commissioning, and to conduct outreach efforts to transfer project results to industry stakeholders. The primary outcomes from this project are the development of residential commissioning guidelines and the analytical confirmation that there are significant potential benefits associated with commissioning California houses, particularly existing ones. In addition, we have made substantial advances in understanding the accuracy and usability of diagnostics for commissioning houses. In some cases, we have been able to work with equipment manufacturers to improve these aspects of their diagnostic tools. These outcomes provide a solid foundation on which to build a residential commissioning program in California. We expect that a concerted effort will be necessary to integrate such a program with existing building industry efforts and to demonstrate its use in the field.

  20. The Kemeny commission report. Comments by UKAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The report of the President's Commission - the Kemeny Report - on the accident at Three Mile island has been considered by the UKAEA and the implications of the Commission's findings and recommendations for the United Kingdom examined. The contents of the report have been studied not only generally but also for each site and especially with respect to plant instrumentation, operator training, emergency arrangements and communications. The Authority believes that there are no major deficiencies but is fully aware of the crucial importance of continuing to exercise all possible care and ensuring that each detailed point arising from the Kemeny Commission's Report is given careful thought. (U.K.)

  1. Commissioning quality assurance for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1986-09-01

    This standard contains the requirements for the quality assurance program applicable to the commissioning phase of a nuclear power plant. This standard embodies the relevant quality assurance requirements of CSA Standard CAN3-N286.0, and is the governing Standard for commissioning quality assurance activities in the event of any conflicting requirements. This Standard applies to the commissioning of safety-related equipment, systems, and structures as identified by the owner. It may be applied to other equipment, systems, and structures at the discretion of the owner. 1 fig.

  2. Commissioning quality assurance for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-09-01

    This standard contains the requirements for the quality assurance program applicable to the commissioning phase of a nuclear power plant. This standard embodies the relevant quality assurance requirements of CSA Standard CAN3-N286.0, and is the governing Standard for commissioning quality assurance activities in the event of any conflicting requirements. This Standard applies to the commissioning of safety-related equipment, systems, and structures as identified by the owner. It may be applied to other equipment, systems, and structures at the discretion of the owner. 1 fig

  3. Official communication of the Safety Commission

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    The Prevention and Training section of the Safety Commission, would like to inform you that the new Safety Awareness course for newcomers will replace the welcome video in building 55 as of 2 April. The 3 levels (‘Safety at CERN’, ‘General Risks’ and ‘Specific Risks’) followed by 3 tests will determine access to CERN. Thanks to the SIR (Safety Information Registration, http://sir.cern.ch) application, it will be possible for you to follow the awareness course from your computer. For more information, go to the Safety Commission web site: http://safety-commission.web.cern.ch

  4. Official communication of the Safety Commission

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    We, the Prevention and Training section of the Safety Commission, would like to inform you that the new Safety Awareness course for newcomers will replace the welcome video in building 55 as of the 2nd April. The 3 levels (‘Safety at CERN’, ‘General Risks’ and ‘Specific Risks’) followed by 3 tests will determine access to CERN. Thanks to the SIR (Safety Information Registration, http://sir.cern.ch) application, it will be possible for you to follow the awareness course from your computer. For more information, go to the Safety Commission web site: http://safety-commission.web.cern.ch

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission: more aggressive leadership needed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staats, E.B.

    1980-01-01

    The Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 which established the Nuclear Regulatory Commission required GAO to evaluate the Commission's performance by January 18, 1980. This report responds to that requirement. GAO concluded that, although improvements have been made, the Commission's nuclear regulatory performance can be characterized best as slow, indecisive, cautious - in a word, complacent. This has largely resulted from a lack of aggressive leadership as evidenced by the Commissioners' failure to establish regulatory goals, control policymaking, and most importantly, clearly define their roles in nuclear regulation

  6. Permanent Commission for Health and Safety

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    The mandate of the Staff Association's permanent commission for Health and Safety is to examine all aspects of health and safety related to the working environment at CERN. In no way does it wish to be a substitute for the official bodies that are responsible for these matters. The Commission's aim is to formulate remarks on and make proposals about these questions to the relevant bodies and the CERN Management. Its main focus is the safety of the CERN staff but it is also concerned with the safety of the installations and of the CERN environment. The Commission reports to the Staff Council and the Executive Committee of the Staff Association.

  7. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, January 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Defense (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  8. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, May 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  9. Impact of National Universities Commission (NUC) Accreditation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    (NUC) accreditation exercise on university administrative structure of four selected Nigerian ... The Commission's recommendations led to the setting up by Government the National ... For instance, the goals of tertiary education as spelt out in ...

  10. Commissioning (Phases 4, 4A, 4B)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schofield, Andrew

    1997-01-01

    Phase 4 marked the completion of ANS&A's commitments under the BAA, as the new large centrifuge at the Waterways Experiment Station was commissioned and a series of research experiments were undertaken to demonstrate the breadth of new...

  11. Compressor Load Stand: Commissioning and Control Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Causey, Andrew

    1998-01-01

    .... The purpose of this research project was to commission this load stand, which includes setting up the hardware, setting up a control system, a data acquisition system, and an automatic test sequence system...

  12. The commissioning of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-09-01

    The objectives and requirements to be met in commissioning nuclear power plants are presented. The objective of commissioning is to ensure that each component, subsystem, system, or structure in a plant will be capable of fulfilling its design requirements throughout its design life. The requirements for commissioning are: the preparation of a detailed, comprehensive, documented program to demonstrate that all components, systems and structures relevant to safety meet design intent; documented evidence that safety systems are fully operable and can meet design requirements; and, appropriate documentation of the actual state or behaviour of all components, systems and structures relevant to safety. All systems must be included in the commissioning program. Whenever possible, full safety system test should be performed. If a full system in situ test is not possible, alternative means are suggested. (8 refs.)

  13. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, July 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  14. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, June 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-06-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  15. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, April 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  16. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances, November 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    Contents: Issuances of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Issuances of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards; Issuances of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards; and Issuances of the Directors Denial

  17. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, December 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  18. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, December 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  19. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, December 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  20. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, September 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, February 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLl), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Director's Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  2. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, March 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  3. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, July 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  4. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, August 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  5. arXiv Medical Physics Commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Meer, David

    The medical commissioning is an important step to bring a particle gantry into clinical operation for tumour treatments. This involves the parametrization and characterization of all relevant systems including the beam delivery, the patient table, the imaging systems and the connection to all required software components. This article is limited to necessary tasks for the beam delivery system of a pencil beam scanning system. Usually the commissioning starts with the characterization of the unscanned beam and the calibration of the beam energy. The following steps are the parametrization of the scanning system, the commissioning of the beam position monitoring system and characterization of the spot size, all requiring precisions better than 1 mm. The commissioning effort for these tasks depends also on the gantry topology. Finally, the calibration of the dose measurement system ensures that any dose distribution can be delivered with an absolute precision better than 1%.

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, May 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, the Administrative Law Judge, the Directors' Decision, and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking

  7. Commissioning the Linac Coherent Light Source injector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Akre

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The Linac Coherent Light Source is a SASE x-ray free-electron laser (FEL project presently under construction at SLAC [J. Arthur et al., SLAC-R-593, 2002.]. The injector section, from drive laser and rf photocathode gun through first bunch compressor chicane, was installed in the fall of 2006. The initial system commissioning with an electron beam was completed in August of 2007, with the goal of a 1.2-micron emittance in a 1-nC bunch demonstrated. The second phase of commissioning, including second bunch compressor and full linac, is planned for 2008, with FEL commissioning in 2009. We report experimental results and experience gained in the first phase of commissioning, including the photocathode drive laser, rf gun, photocathode, S-band and X-band rf systems, first bunch compressor, and the various beam diagnostics.

  8. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances, December 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    Contents: Issuances of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Issuances of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards; Issuances of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards; and Issuances of the Directors Denial

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, August 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  10. Alaska State Commission for Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harassment Poster Filing a Complaint with the Commission Public Hearing Cases Accusations Decisions Public . vs. Anchorage Plumbing and Heating Vilma Anderson vs. Anchorage School District Robin Block vs. Pulse

  11. LHC injection optics measurements at commissioning (2015)

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Tabares Valdivieso, Ana; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Garcia-Bonilla, Alba-Carolina; Langner, Andy Sven; Maclean, Ewen Hamish; Malina, Lukas; Mcateer, Meghan Jill; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Skowronski, Piotr Krzysztof; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the measurement and correction process followed during the 2015 LHC injection optics commissioning which extended into Machine Developments (MDs). Results have been analyzed and compared to the 2012 measurements.

  12. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, February 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-02-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  13. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, November 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  14. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, April 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  15. Online Learning of Commission Avoidant Portfolio Ensembles

    OpenAIRE

    Uziel, Guy; El-Yaniv, Ran

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel online ensemble learning strategy for portfolio selection. The new strategy controls and exploits any set of commission-oblivious portfolio selection algorithms. The strategy handles transaction costs using a novel commission avoidance mechanism. We prove a logarithmic regret bound for our strategy with respect to optimal mixtures of the base algorithms. Numerical examples validate the viability of our method and show significant improvement over the state-of-the-art.

  16. The LHC from commissioning to operation

    CERN Document Server

    Lamont, M

    2011-01-01

    In 2011 the LHC moved from commissioning into the physics production phase with the aim of accumulating 1 fb-1 by the end of the year. The progress from commissioning to operation is described. Emphasis is put on the beam performance, but also on the performance of the different hardware systems. The role of collimation and machine protection is discussed, in view of the very high stored beam and magnet energy.

  17. Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission annual report, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-05-01

    The Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission has the responsibility of selling the Crown's royalty share of Alberta's crude and synthetic oil production; similar services are provided for natural gas. The Commission also markets crude oil on behalf of producers to North American and offshore consumers. The Commission's position as the largest crude oil marketer in Canada enables it to provide analyses of industry pricing and marketing trends to the Alberta government. 1993 marked the last full year of the Commission operating as Alberta's representative in the energy regulatory arena in Canada and the USA; due to restructuring, these functions will be transferred to the Ministry of Energy in early 1994. A brief overview is presented of crude oil markets in Canada and the USA. The Commission's receipts of light and medium royalty oil totalled 40.2 million bbl, down 11% from 1992, and receipts of heavy crude were 3.7 million bbl, down 42% from 1992. Revenue from crude oil sales was $800 million, down 25% from 1992. The Commission's natural gas activities in 1993 included price determination and information collection. 4 figs., 3 tabs

  18. Audit of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s Office of Chief Accountant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-07

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (Commission) mission is to oversee America`s natural gas and oil pipeline transportation, electric utility, and hydroelectric power industries to ensure that consumers receive adequate energy supplies at just and reasonable rates. To carry out this mission, the Commission issues regulations covering the accounting, reporting, and rate-making requirements of the regulated utility companies. The Commission`s Office of Chief Accountant performs financial related audits at companies to ensure compliance with these regulations. The purpose of this audit was to evaluate the office of Chief Accountant`s audit performance. Specifically, the objectives were to determine if the most appropriate audit approach was used and if a quality assurance process was in place to ensure reports were accurate and supported by the working papers.

  19. 75 FR 81244 - Military Leadership Diversity Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Military Leadership Diversity Commission Meeting... will take place: 1. Name of Committee: Military Leadership Diversity Commission (MLDC). 2. Date... Military Leadership Diversity Commission to continue their efforts to address congressional concerns as...

  20. 75 FR 2114 - Military Leadership Diversity Commission (MLDC); Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Office of the Secretary Military Leadership Diversity Commission (MLDC....150, the Department of Defense announces that the Military Leadership Diversity Commission (MLDC) will... commissioners of the Military Leadership Diversity Commission to continue their efforts to address congressional...

  1. Commissioning of the LHC Cryogenic System Subsystems Cold Commissioning in Preparation of Full Sector Tests

    CERN Document Server

    Serio, L; Ferlin, G; Gilbert, N; Gruehagen, Henning; Knoops, S; Parente, C; Sanmartí, M

    2006-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the Large Hadron Collider accelerator is presently in its final phase of installation and commissioning at nominal operating temperatures. The refrigeration capacity for the LHC will be produced using eight large cryogenic plants installed on five technical sites and distributed around the 26.7-km circumference ring located in a deep underground tunnel. The status of the cryogenic system commissioning is presented together with the experience gained in operating and commissioning it.

  2. Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission annual report, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    The Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission has the responsibility of selling the Crown's royalty share of Alberta's crude and synthetic oil production; similar services are provided for natural gas. The Commission also markets crude oil on behalf of producers to North American and offshore consumers. The Commission's position as the largest crude oil marketeer in Canada enables it to provide analyses of industry pricing and marketing trends to the Alberta government. 1992 marked the end of chronically depressed natural gas prices and a significant reduction in natural gas surpluses. A brief overview is presented of crude oil markets in Canada and the USA. The Commission's receipts of light and medium royalty oil totalled 45.3 million bbl, unchanged from 1991, and receipts of heavy crude were 6.3 million bbl, up 4% from 1991. Revenue from crude oil sales was $1.1 billion, down from $1.64 billion in 1991. The Commission's natural gas activities in 1992 included price determination and information collection. 9 figs., 1 tab

  3. Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission annual report, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    The Alberta Petroleum Marketing Commission has the responsibility of selling the Crown's royalty share of Alberta's crude and synthetic oil production; similar services are provided for natural gas. The Commission also markets crude oil on behalf of producers to North American and offshore consumers. The Commission's position as the largest crude oil marketeer in Canada enables it to provide analyses of industry pricing and marketing trends to the Alberta government. In 1991, the middle east crisis caused prices to spike at the commencement of the Gulf war, but these quickly stabilized. The Commission's receipts of light and medium royalty oil totalled 45.3 million bbl, down 1.5% from 1990, and receipts of heavy crude were 6.1 million bbl, up 5% from 1990. Revenue from crude oil sales was $1,642,244,000, down from $2,078,197,000 in 1990. Loss of the Montreal market through pipeline closure led to increased pressure on prices, particularly on heavy crudes. The Commission's natural gas activities in 1991 included price determination and information collection. 9 figs., 1 tab

  4. The NRU blowdown test facility commissioning program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsworth, J A; Zanatta, R J; Yamazaki, A R; Semeniuk, D D; Wong, W; Dickson, L W; Ferris, C E; Burton, D H [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

    1990-12-31

    A major experimental program has been established at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRL) that will provide essential data on the thermal and mechanical behaviour of nuclear fuel under abnormal reactor operating conditions and on the transient release, transport and deposition of fission product activity from severely degraded fuel. A number of severe fuel damage (SFD) experiments will be conducted within the Blowdown Test Facility (BTF) at CRL. A series of experiments are being conducted to commission this new facility prior to the SFD program. This paper describes the features and the commissioning program for the BTF. A development and testing program is described for critical components used on the reactor test section. In-reactor commissioning with a fuel assembly simulator commenced in 1989 June and preliminary results are given. The paper also outlines plans for future all-effects, in-reactor tests of CANDU-designed fuel. (author). 11 refs., 3 tabs., 7 figs.

  5. VINCI: the VLT Interferometer commissioning instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kervella, Pierre; Coudé du Foresto, Vincent; Glindemann, Andreas; Hofmann, Reiner

    2000-07-01

    The Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) is a complex system, made of a large number of separated elements. To prepare an early successful operation, it will require a period of extensive testing and verification to ensure that the many devices involved work properly together, and can produce meaningful data. This paper describes the concept chosen for the VLTI commissioning instrument, LEONARDO da VINCI, and details its functionalities. It is a fiber based two-way beam combiner, associated with an artificial star and an alignment verification unit. The technical commissioning of the VLTI is foreseen as a stepwise process: fringes will first be obtained with the commissioning instrument in an autonomous mode (no other parts of the VLTI involved); then the VLTI telescopes and optical trains will be tested in autocollimation; finally fringes will be observed on the sky.

  6. Commissioning of the Ground Test Accelerator RFQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Brown, S.; Connolly, R.; Garnett, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Little, C.; Lohson, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Saadatmand, K.; Sandoval, D.P.; Stevens, R.R.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Weiss, R.; Yuan, V.

    1992-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H - beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on-line. The commissioning stages are the 35 key H - injector, the 2.5 MeV Radio Frequency Quadrupole (RFQ), the Intertank Matching Section (IMS), the 3.2 MeV first 2βγ Drift Tube Linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7 MeV 2βγ DTL (modules 1--5), and the 24 MeV GTA; all 10 DTL modules. Commissioning results from the RFQ beam experiments will be presented along with comparisons to simulations

  7. Commissioning of the ground test accelerator RFQ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, K.F.; Sander, O.R.; Atkins, W.H.; Bolme, G.O.; Brown, S.; Garnott, R.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Guy, F.W.; Ingalls, W.B.; Little, C.; Lohsen, R.A.; Lloyd, S.; Neuschaefer, G.; Power, J.; Sandoval, D.P.; Saadatmand, K.; Stevens, R.R.Jr.; Vaughn, G.; Wadlinger, E.A.; Yuan, V.; Connolly, R.; Weiss, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) has the objective of verifying much of the technology (physics and engineering) required for producing high-brightness, high-current H - beams. GTA commissioning is staged to verify the beam dynamics design of each major accelerator component as it is brought on line. The commissioning stages are the 35-keV H - injector, the 2.5-MeV radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ), the intertank matching section (IMS), the 3.2-MeV first 2-βλ drift tube linac (DTL-1) module, the 8.7-MeV 2-βλDTL (modules 1-5), and the 24-MeV GTA (all 10 DTL modules). Commissioning results from the RFQ beam experiments are presented along with comparisons with simulations. (Author) 8 refs., 9 figs

  8. Yale and the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowers, J.Z.

    1983-01-01

    This is a description, based largely on personal discussions, of the contributions of men from the Yale University School of Medicine to the saga of the immediate and long-term studies on the medical effects of the atomic bombs at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They played key roles in the immediate studies of bomb effects, in the creation of long-term studies of delayed effects, and in elevating the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission after 1955 to a position of excellence in its studies and relations with the Japanese. The accumulation of the information presented in this paper derives from research for the preparation of the history of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission. In 1975, the commission was passed to Japanese leadership as the Radiation Effects Research Foundation

  9. Law of the Energy Regulatory Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This Decree-Law consist of three chapters each on divided in articles and subsections and came into force in November 1 st., 1995. Chapter I, with the heading 'Nature and Powers', defines the Energy Regulatory Commission as a decentralized organ of the Energy Secretariat with technical and operative autonomy in terms of the law, and establish the conditions for the sell, generation, exportation and importation of electricity with destination to particular and public services. The sell transport, storage and distribution of natural gas, as well as the gas liquefied from petroleum are also considered. Chapter II with the heading 'Organization and duties' establish that the Commission is integrated by five Committee, the President included. The Committee members will deliberate in collegiate manner and the decisions are by majority, having the President a vote of quality. Chapter III for 'General provisions' is related to the lawsuits arises between the Commission and the users of services. (Author)

  10. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s fiscal year 1996 financial statement audit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-02-14

    This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission`s (FERC) financial statements as of September 30, 1996. The auditors have expressed an unqualified opinion on the 1996 statement of financial position and the related statements of operations and changes in net position.

  11. European commission research activities on iodine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loggia, E. della

    1996-01-01

    The research on iodine, as on other important fission products which would be released during a severe accident, carried out directly or organized by the European Commission stems from the Euratom Treaty, namely from Chapter III of the treaty which deals with the protection of the health of the population against radiations and from Chapter I which deals with research. In this paper we do not consider the Commission radiological protection programme: we limit ourselves to the presentation of the research carried out on Iodine as part of the most recent source term studies within the framework Programmes as are called the research programme of the European Commission, usually valid for a 4 year periods. The research activities are carried out by the European Commission either directly through the Joint Research Centres (JRC) or indirectly through collaboration with research organizations of Member States. Concerning the iodine research carried out as Direct Action in the Joint Research Centres, are mentioned here the most relevant activities carried out in this field at the JRC of Ispra and Karlsruhe (TUI). As Indirect Action, we present here the results of some studies allocated by the European Commission to experts of research organizations of Member Countries, followed by a short description of the main results achieved by the Reinforced Concerted Action, within the III Framework Programme (1992-1995). At the end of the paper are described the research on iodine being carried out or proposed within the IV Framework Programme (1995-1998). Mention is also done of the Commission participation, relevant in terms of financial and human efforts, to the PHEBUS FP Project. (author) refs

  12. European commission research activities on iodine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loggia, E della [European Commission, Brussels (Belgium)

    1996-12-01

    The research on iodine, as on other important fission products which would be released during a severe accident, carried out directly or organized by the European Commission stems from the Euratom Treaty, namely from Chapter III of the treaty which deals with the protection of the health of the population against radiations and from Chapter I which deals with research. In this paper we do not consider the Commission radiological protection programme: we limit ourselves to the presentation of the research carried out on Iodine as part of the most recent source term studies within the framework Programmes as are called the research programme of the European Commission, usually valid for a 4 year periods. The research activities are carried out by the European Commission either directly through the Joint Research Centres (JRC) or indirectly through collaboration with research organizations of Member States. Concerning the iodine research carried out as Direct Action in the Joint Research Centres, are mentioned here the most relevant activities carried out in this field at the JRC of Ispra and Karlsruhe (TUI). As Indirect Action, we present here the results of some studies allocated by the European Commission to experts of research organizations of Member Countries, followed by a short description of the main results achieved by the Reinforced Concerted Action, within the III Framework Programme (1992-1995). At the end of the paper are described the research on iodine being carried out or proposed within the IV Framework Programme (1995-1998). Mention is also done of the Commission participation, relevant in terms of financial and human efforts, to the PHEBUS FP Project. (author) refs.

  13. Commissioning of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, M; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Since the first modules of the ATLAS LAr calorimeters were read out in situ in 2006, commissioning studies have been performed. These studies include the testing of the electronics calibration system, surveys for dead or problematic channels, investigations of the quality of the physics pulse shape prediction , and tests of energy and time reconstruction with cosmic or single beam induced signals. The results of these commissioning studies indicate the LAr calorimeters are prepared for LHC collisions and positioned to meet the physics objectives of the ATLAS experiment.

  14. 1992 Nuclear Regulatory Commission Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This is the 18th annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), covering events and activities occurring in fiscal year 1992 (the year ending September 30, 1992), with some treatment of events from the last quarter of calendar year 1992. The NRC was created by enactment in the Congress of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974. It is an independent agency of the Federal Government. The five NRC Commissioners are nominated by the President and confirmed by the United States Senate. The Chairman of the Commission is appointed by the President from among the Commissioners confirmed

  15. Jacques Delors - President de la Commission Europeenne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacian Graţian GAL

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available This article refers to the President of the European Commission between 1985- 1995, Jacques Delors. He was the single person who exercised the presidency of the European Commission during 10 years and this period was one of the most important for the European construction: the achievement of the Single Market, the development of the Single Currency Unit project, of the new common politics, the enlargement of the European Union from 12 members to 15 members etc. Due the contribution of his presidency to the European construction, Jacques Delors is one of the parents of the European construction and one of the most important political men of the XX century.  

  16. Evaluating the impact of Mexico's drug policy reforms on people who inject drugs in Tijuana, B.C., Mexico, and San Diego, CA, United States: a binational mixed methods research agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Angela M; Garfein, Richard S; Wagner, Karla D; Mehta, Sanjay R; Magis-Rodriguez, Carlos; Cuevas-Mota, Jazmine; Moreno-Zuniga, Patricia Gonzalez; Strathdee, Steffanie A

    2014-02-12

    Policymakers and researchers seek answers to how liberalized drug policies affect people who inject drugs (PWID). In response to concerns about the failing "war on drugs," Mexico recently implemented drug policy reforms that partially decriminalized possession of small amounts of drugs for personal use while promoting drug treatment. Recognizing important epidemiologic, policy, and socioeconomic differences between the United States-where possession of any psychoactive drugs without a prescription remains illegal-and Mexico-where possession of small quantities for personal use was partially decriminalized, we sought to assess changes over time in knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, and infectious disease profiles among PWID in the adjacent border cities of San Diego, CA, USA, and Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico. Based on extensive binational experience and collaboration, from 2012-2014 we initiated two parallel, prospective, mixed methods studies: Proyecto El Cuete IV in Tijuana (n = 785) and the STAHR II Study in San Diego (n = 575). Methods for sampling, recruitment, and data collection were designed to be compatible in both studies. All participants completed quantitative behavioral and geographic assessments and serological testing (HIV in both studies; hepatitis C virus and tuberculosis in STAHR II) at baseline and four semi-annual follow-up visits. Between follow-up assessment visits, subsets of participants completed qualitative interviews to explore contextual factors relating to study aims and other emergent phenomena. Planned analyses include descriptive and inferential statistics for quantitative data, content analysis and other mixed-methods approaches for qualitative data, and phylogenetic analysis of HIV-positive samples to understand cross-border transmission dynamics. Investigators and research staff shared preliminary findings across studies to provide feedback on instruments and insights regarding local phenomena. As a result, recruitment and data

  17. 45 CFR 702.12 - Contempt of the Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contempt of the Commission. 702.12 Section 702.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) COMMISSION ON CIVIL RIGHTS RULES ON HEARINGS, REPORTS, AND MEETINGS OF THE COMMISSION Hearings and Reports § 702.12 Contempt of the Commission...

  18. 29 CFR 2200.92 - Review by the Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION RULES OF PROCEDURE Posthearing Procedures § 2200.92 Review by the Commission. (a) Jurisdiction of the Commission; issues on... Commission to review the entire case. The issues to be decided on review are within the discretion of the...

  19. 19 CFR 213.5 - Access to Commission resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Access to Commission resources. 213.5 Section 213.5 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE TRADE REMEDY ASSISTANCE § 213.5 Access to Commission resources. Commission resources, in...

  20. 78 FR 44165 - Nuclear Regulatory Commission Enforcement Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-23

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2013-0159] Nuclear Regulatory Commission Enforcement Policy AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Enforcement policy; request for comment. SUMMARY: The U.S... Policy. In SRM-SECY-12-0047, ``Revisions to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission Enforcement Policy,'' dated...

  1. 76 FR 31307 - Commission of Fine Arts; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-31

    ... COMMISSION OF FINE ARTS Commission of Fine Arts; Notice of Meeting The next meeting of the U.S. Commission of Fine Arts is scheduled for June 16, 2011, at 10 a.m. in the Commission offices at the National Building Museum,Suite 312, Judiciary Square, 401 F Street, NW., Washington, DC, 20001-2728. Items of...

  2. 18 CFR 388.104 - Informal advice from Commission staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Commission staff. 388.104 Section 388.104 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY... Commission staff. (a) The Commission staff provides informal advice and assistance to the general public and... expressed by the staff do not represent the official views of the Commission, but are designed to aid the...

  3. 17 CFR 171.28 - Participation by Commission staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... staff. 171.28 Section 171.28 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION..., Membership Denial and Registration Actions § 171.28 Participation by Commission staff. The Division of.... The Commission shall by order establish a supplementary briefing schedule for the Commission staff and...

  4. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, April 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, July 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-07-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, March 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  7. Danish Atomic Energy Commission 1974/75

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    Activities of the Danish Atomic Energy Commission and the Risoe eesearch Establishment for the period April1, 1974 to March 31, 1975 are summarized. The operations of the various facilities at the Research Establishment are revised. Operating staff levels and financial data are tabulated, a selected list of staff publications is given, and the design data on research facilities are presented. (B.P.)

  8. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, August 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  9. The European Commission as Network Broker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borrás, Susana

    2007-01-01

    after the year 2000. Developing a conceptual framework about brokerage roles in EU policy, the article uses a combination of quantitative and qualitative data in an empirical analysis of two very different cases where the Commission has been embattled the past years. The article argues that previous...

  10. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, December 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  11. Ten years after the Jali Commission

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ten years have lapsed since the Jali Commission's final report became publicly available, and it is therefore an .... as the 'core business' of the department. This was seen as .... the 2009/10–2013/14 DCS Strategic Plan did the department ...

  12. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, May 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  13. 76 FR 55424 - CFC-50 Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-07

    ... conclude its work in approximately six months. 11. Termination. March 31, 2012. 12. Membership and... administrators of the campaign, participating charities and watchdog groups. These members will consist of both... Agency's approval, are responsible for directing the work of the Commission, including the creation of...

  14. Philippine Atomic Energy Commission: Annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This publication gives the highlights of the research and development projects of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission in agriculture and food, nuclear fuels and power system technology, medicine, public health and nutrition, environmental surveillance, supportive basic research, social response to nuclear technology, nuclear licensing and safeguards, supportive technology and international and local linkages including manpower development. (ELC)

  15. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, September 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  16. Bundled Discounts and the Antitrust Modernization Commission

    OpenAIRE

    Aaron Panner

    2007-01-01

    The Report of the Antitrust Modernization Commission devotes relatively little space to antitrust common law – the judge-made doctrine that governs unreasonable restraints of trade under Section 1 and monopolization under Section 2 of the Sherman Act.

  17. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, May 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  18. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, May 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  19. Division B Commission 40: Radio Astronomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, Jessica M.; Giovaninni, Gabriele; Taylor, Russell; Carilli, Christopher; Hills, Richard; Hirabayashi, Hisashi; Jonas, Justin L.; Lazio, Joseph; Morganti, Raffaella; Nan, Rendong; Rubio, Monica; Shastri, Prjaval; Kellermann, Ken; Ekers, Ronald; Ohishi, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    IAU Commission 40 for Radio Astronomy (hereafter C40) brought together scientists and engineers who carry out observational and theoretical research in radio astronomy and who develop and operate the ground and space-based radio astronomy facilities and instrumentation. As of June 2015, the

  20. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, July 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-08-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances, October 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  2. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, February 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLl), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  3. Commissioning of the ATLAS Liquid Argon Calorimeters

    CERN Document Server

    Cooke, Mark S

    2009-01-01

    A selection of ATLAS liquid argon (LAr) calorimeter commissioning studies are presented. These include a coherent noise study, a measurement of the quality of the physics pulse shape prediction, and energy and time reconstruction analyses with cosmic and single beam signals.

  4. Agency transformation and state public utility commissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, Douglas N.

    2006-01-01

    The demise of public utility commissions has been periodically predicted (sometimes hoped for). In their long history they have been attacked by critics as ineffective, inefficient, expensive, or unnecessary. Further, the demonstrated survivability of the commission concept has often been uncharitably attributed to powerful political constituencies, self-preservation manoeuvrings by commissioners themselves, and inertia. The implications of this article point another way. Commission regulation of public utilities has survived mainly because of continued need for social oversight of these critical industry sectors and the capacity of PUCs strategically to adapt to fundamental changes in their surroundings. Two transformational upheavals are treated here - a challenge of flexibility and responsiveness by the dramatic run-up in costs and prices in the 1970s and challenge to relevance by the policy shift to greater reliance on market competition in the 1990s - and regulation's successful accommodation to them. Viewed this way commission regulation is more in a position of 'second wind' than 'last breath'. (author)

  5. Survey commission of the Manche center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The subjects discussed during the Survey commission of the storage center of the Manche CSCM, held in october 2001, are presented in this document. They deal with the site survey, the maintenance facilities realized on this installations, the tritium survey in the water and the CSCM operating. (A.L.B.)

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-06-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decision (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  7. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, October 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  8. Commissioning for the European XFEL facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nölle, D.

    2017-06-01

    The European XFEL is a 4th generation light source based on the Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) FreeElectron-Laser concept. It is currently being commissioned in North- Germany. The core installation is a 17.5 GeV superconducting accelerator driving 3 SASE lines with photon energies from 1 to beyond 20 keV range with a maximum of 27.000 pulses per second. The international facility is organized as a limited liability company with shareholders from the contributing countries. DESY has taken over the leadership of the accelerator construction consortium, and will be in charge of the operation of the accelerator complex. The facility was set up with contributions from the 11 shareholder countries, either being hardware systems and/or staff or cash contributions. The construction is almost complete, and the commissioning phase has started by the end of 2015. This contribution will report the status of the accelerator complex with emphasis on the commissioning of the accelerator and an outlook to the commissioning of the SASE 1 FEL line.

  9. Commissioning of the RFQ1 injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arbique, G.M.; Sheikh, J.Y.; Taylor, T.; Birney, L.F.; Davidson, A.D.; Wills, J.S.C.

    1987-01-01

    The RFQ1 accelerator is being developed at Chalk River to test the limits of the cw RFQ technology. A 50 kV injector has been built and is now being commissioned as the first phase of the program. This paper describes some of the innovative features of the RFQ1 injector and reports on initial operating experience

  10. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, December 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  11. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, April 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period (April 1991) from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  12. Nuclear Regualtory Commission Issuances, October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors Denial (DD), and the Denial of Petitions for Rulemaking

  13. Status and commissioning of the CMS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulz, C.-E.

    2008-05-01

    The construction status of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider and strategies for commissioning the subdetectors, the magnet, the trigger and the data acquisition are described. The first operations of CMS as a unified system, using either cosmic rays or test data, and the planned activities until the startup of the LHC are presented.

  14. Status and Commissioning of the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The construction status of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider and strategies for commissioning the subdetectors, the magnet, the trigger and the data acquisition are described. The first operations of CMS as a unified system, using either cosmic rays or test data, and the planned activities until the startup of the LHC are presented.

  15. Status and commissioning of the CMS experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulz, C-E

    2008-01-01

    The construction status of the CMS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider and strategies for commissioning the subdetectors, the magnet, the trigger and the data acquisition are described. The first operations of CMS as a unified system, using either cosmic rays or test data, and the planned activities until the startup of the LHC are presented

  16. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, April 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  17. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances, August 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-08-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  18. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, November 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  19. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances, March 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    The report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  20. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, November 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, June 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-06-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  2. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Acosta

    Point 5 commissioning activities Since the last CMS week there has been little global commissioning activities: the first mid week global run aiming to assess the status of the hardware and DAQ software after the winter maintenance and developments has taken place two weeks ago involving all subdetectors but tracker and pixel whose hardware is still being actively worked on. The local commissioning restarted once the cooling became available again the third week of January. Below are detailed the main activities which have taken place so far. DAQ The activity of the central DAQ group during pause of global runs was focused on various items. The commissioning of the 900 new PCs which will be used to run the HLT processes has been almost completed. It is planned to use these PCs in the first global run at the start of March. In addition the location of various server PCs which host essential functionalities to get the private ".cms" network going, has been re-organized to allow to implemen...

  3. 76 FR 63325 - National Indian Gaming Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... General Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). Many comments stated that if this definition was amended... result in an enforcement action and closure order. 25 CFR 573.6(a)(7). II. Definitions--Net Revenues--management fee The NOI asked whether the Commission should consider whether the definition of net revenues...

  4. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, February 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  5. 76 FR 27034 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    .... The Commission will also make recommendations for restructuring school finance systems to achieve... educational opportunities that give rise to the achievement gap, with a focus on systems of finance, and recommend appropriate ways in which Federal policies could address such disparities. The agenda for the...

  6. 75 FR 48661 - Equity and Excellence Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    .... The Commission will also make recommendations for restructuring school finance systems to achieve... educational opportunities that give rise to the achievement gap, with a focus on systems of finance, and recommend appropriate ways in which Federal policies could address such disparities. In order to achieve...

  7. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, November 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  8. Securities and Exchange Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-20

    ... Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes Agency Contact: Alicia Goldin, Division of Trading and Markets, Securities...: Alicia Goldin, Division of Trading and Markets, Securities and Exchange Commission, 100 F Street NE... Flexibility Analysis Required: Yes Agency Contact: Alicia Goldin, Division of Trading and Markets, Securities...

  9. Appalachian Regional Commission: 1982 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appalachian Regional Commission, Washington, DC.

    Fiscal year 1982 was transitional for the Appalachian Regional Commission (ARC), as it was the last year of the broad economic development program and a year of reduced funding and new limits on programs. In 1981, Congress had requested that ARC prepare a plan for completion of the Appalachian highway system and for a 3 to 5 year ARC finish-up…

  10. Appalachian Regional Commission: 1979 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appalachian Regional Commission, Washington, DC.

    Narrative text, tables, maps, and photographs present an overview of the Appalachian Regional Commission's (ARC) activities in fiscal year 1979, past achievements, and future goals. Major accomplishments of 1979 include: utilization of the $233 million appropriation for highway construction; approval of over $143 million in ARC funds for 985…

  11. Curriculum for Commissioning Energy Efficient Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, Lia [Portland Energy Conservation, Inc., OR (United States)

    2012-12-27

    In July 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) awarded funding to PECI to develop training curriculum in commercial energy auditing and building commissioning. This program was created in response to the high demand for auditing and commissioning services in the U.S. commercial buildings market and to bridge gaps and barriers in existing training programs. Obstacles addressed included: lack of focus on entry level candidates; prohibitive cost and time required for training; lack of hands-on training; trainings that focus on certifications & process overviews; and lack of comprehensive training. PECI organized several other industry players to create a co-funded project sponsored by DOE, PECI, New York State Energy and Research Development Authority (NYSERDA), California Energy Commission (CEC), Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance (NEEA) and California Commissioning Collaborative (CCC). After awarded, PECI teamed with another DOE awardee, New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT), to work collaboratively to create one comprehensive program featuring two training tracks. NJIT’s Center for Building Knowledge is a research and training institute affiliated with the College of Architecture and Design, and provided e-learning and video enhancements. This project designed and developed two training programs with a comprehensive, energy-focused curriculum to prepare new entrants to become energy auditors or commissioning authorities (CxAs). The following are the key elements of the developed trainings, which is depicted graphically in Figure 1: • Online classes are self-paced, and can be completed anywhere, any time • Commissioning Authority track includes 3 online modules made up of 24 courses delivered in 104 individual lessons, followed by a 40 hour hands-on lab. Total time required is between 75 and 100 hours, depending on the pace of the independent learner. • Energy Auditor track includes 3 online modules made up of 18 courses delivered in 72 individual

  12. Optimization of the commissioning period of nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Ganglian; Li Chunyue

    2014-01-01

    Due to current equipment manufacture capacity, construction experience and other factors, commissioning of nuclear power projects was used to be postponed, which could lead to delay of the whole project. Based on the actual situation, optimization of commissioning period and its logic could be an effective way to improve this situation to some extent. Based on previous practice and experience in the schedule management for the commissioning nuclear power projects, this paper analyzes and discusses the characteristics of make commissioning plan and the difficulties of program implementation and strategies of commissioning plan optimization, discusses and presents ways of dynamic plan adjustment and optimization at the vision of entire project, synthesizes the methods of time management through commissioning itself, interface and management, expounds measures for the timing and optimization of commissioning schedule and commissioning period, and sums up the ways of optimization of commissioning period, improving management capabilities and control of optimization principles. (authors)

  13. Commissioning of long subsea pipelines - environmental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falck, C.; Kleppe, T.; Maribu, J.

    1997-01-01

    Discharges to air and sea are inevitable during precommissioning and commissioning of long subsea pipelines. Large quantities of water is pumped through the pipeline during these operations. This water is normally treated with corrosion inhibiting chemicals to minimise internal corrosion of the pipeline. Chemicals like methanol or glycol may be used to prevent hydrate formation, and will normally be discharged to sea during commissioning. In order to minimise the environmental impact of these operations, while maintaining corrosion protection, the Norwegian Statoil has been working for several years along three main routes such as to develop concepts and methods that minimise the discharged volumes, the use of the most environmentally friendly chemicals available, and to monitor and identify the effects of discharges to various marine species. 3 refs., 4 figs

  14. Programme of the Commission for 1978. [Booklet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-01-01

    Mr. Jenkins, President of the Commission, first examines the problem of the economy and the level of its unemployment in the Community, resulting in a lack of growth. He than presents the two-fold aim of the Commission--to instigate emergency action to sustain industries that are no longer fully competitive and to promote economic growth to provide employment and prosperity. He then examins the energy and agriculture sectors. Two obligations cited for the Community are: (1) to defend Community interests in the energy field in relation to Third World Countries, and (2) to make clear the connections between energy policy and the general economic strategy. Negotiations are underway for enlargement of the community with applications being considered for Greece, Portugal, and Spain. A memorandum annexed to the address contains additional material on building an integrated economic unit, the European citizen and his environment, Europe in the world, and enlargement of the community. (MCW)

  15. A History of the Atomic Energy Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Alice L.

    1983-07-01

    This pamphlet traces the history of the US Atomic Energy Commission's twenty-eight year stewardship of the Nation's nuclear energy program, from the signing of the Atomic Energy Act on August 1, 1946 to the signing of the Energy Reorganization Act on October 11, 1974. The Commission's early concentration on the military atom produced sophisticated nuclear weapons for the Nation's defense and made possible the creation of a fleet of nuclear submarines and surface ships. Extensive research in the nuclear sciences resulted in the widespread application of nuclear technology for scientific, medical and industrial purposes, while the passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 made possible the development of a nuclear industry, and enabled the United States to share the new technology with other nations.

  16. LHC Damper Beam commissioning in 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Höfle, W; Schokker, M; Valuch, D

    2011-01-01

    The LHC transverse dampers were commissioned in 2010 with beam and their use at injection energy of 450 GeV, during the ramp and in collisions at 3.5 TeV for Physics has become part of the standard operations pro- cedure. The system proved important to limit emittance blow-up at injection and to maintain smaller than nominal emittances throughout the accelerating cycle. We describe the commissioning of the system step-by-step as done in 2010 and summarize its performance as achieved for pro- ton as well as ion beams in 2010. Although its principle function is to keep transverse oscillations under control, the system has also been used as an exciter for abort gap clean- ing and tune measurement. The dedicated beam position measurement system with its low noise properties provides additional possibilities for diagnostics.

  17. Activity report 2015 Commission Perspectives du Reseau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricour, Olivia

    2016-01-01

    This document contains the activity report for 2015 of the Commission Perspectives du Reseau which has been set up by RTE to be the main body for organising a dialogue with all the actors of the energy sector and civil society about challenges and stakes of the electric power system on the medium and on the long term. It describes how this body aims at sharing knowledge and expertise of all stakeholders (publications, European platform for data transparency), at being a place for debating and enriching the understanding of tomorrow's important stakes for the power system (discussion of the issue of greenhouse gas emissions with an analysis of the impact of the CO 2 price signal on emissions by the European electricity system and results of the e-Highway 2050 European project). The road-map of the Commission works for 2016 is provided, as well as a list of members

  18. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, May 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    This report contains the issuances received during the specified period (May 1993) from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not deemed a part of these opinions or have any independent legal significance. Contents of this document include an Issuance of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the Sacramento Municipal Utility District and Issuances of Directors' Decisions concerning the Interstate Nuclear Service Corporation; Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation; and Texas Utilities Electric Company, et al. and All Nuclear Power Plants with Thermo-Lag Fire Barriers

  19. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest 1992 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, K.

    1992-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, the activities NRC licenses, and general information on domestic and worldwide nuclear energy. This digest is a compilation of nuclear- and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1991, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating US commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the licensee. This information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed

  20. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ryd and T. Camporesi

    2010-01-01

    Commissioning and Run Coordination activities After the successful conclusion of the LHC pilot run commissioning in 2009 activities at the experiment restarted only late in January due to the cooling and detector maintenance. As usual we got going with weekly exercises used to deploy, debug, and validate improvements in firmware and software. A debriefing workshop aimed at analyzing the operational aspects of the 2009 pilot run was held on Jan. 15, 2009, to define a list of improvements (and relative priorities) to be planned. In the last month, most of the objectives set in the debriefing workshop have been attained. The major achievements/improvements obtained are the following: - Consolidation of the firmware for both readout and trigger for ECAL - Software implementation of procedures for raising the bias voltage of the silicon tracker and pixel driven by LHC mode changes with automatic propagation of the state changes from the DCS to the DAQ. The improvements in the software and firmware allow suppress...

  1. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's intern program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmour, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Intern Program was introduced at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Canada's Nuclear Regulator in response to the current competitive market for engineers and scientists and the CNSC's aging workforce. It is an entry level staff development program designed to recruit and train new engineering and science graduates to eventually regulate Canada's nuclear industry. The program provides meaningful work experience and exposes the interns to the general work activities of the Commission. It also provides them with a broad awareness of the regulatory issues in which the CNSC is involved. The intern program is a two-year program focusing on the operational areas and, more specifically, on the generalist functions of project officers. (author)

  2. Commissioning of the TRIUMF ISAC RF system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fong, K.; Fang, S.; Laverty, M.; Lu, J.; Poirier, R.L.

    2001-09-01

    The ISAC RF system at present consists of a Radio Frequency Quadrupole accelerator, five Drift Tube Linear Accelerators, six bunchers, two choppers and a bunch rotator. The RFQ operates at the fundamental frequency of 35.36 MHz, while the DTLs operate at the third harmonic frequency of 106.08 MHz. The operating power ranges from 45 W to 120 W for the choppers, 1 kW to 20 kW for the DTLs and bunchers, and 80 kW for the RFQ. These cavities have been commissioned to operate synchronously with both closed-loop amplitude and phase regulation, as well as automatic tuning of the cavities. This paper gives a brief summary of the commissioning experience. (author)

  3. History of the Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, A.L.

    1983-07-01

    This pamphlet traces the history of the US Atomic Energy Commission's twenty-eight year stewardship of the Nation's nuclear energy program, from the signing of the Atomic Energy Act on August 1, 1946 to the signing of the Energy Reorganization Act on October 11, 1974. The Commission's early concentration on the military atom produced sophisticated nuclear weapons for the Nation's defense and made possible the creation of a fleet of nuclear submarines and surface ships. Extensive research in the nuclear sciences resulted in the widespread application of nuclear technology for scientific, medical and industrial purposes, while the passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 made possible the development of a nuclear industry, and enabled the United States to share the new technology with other nations

  4. Status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuillier, T., E-mail: thuillier@lpsc.in2p3.fr; Angot, J.; Jacob, J.; Lamy, T.; Sole, P. [LPSC, Université Grenoble Alpes, CNRS/IN2P3, 53 rue des Martyrs, 38026 Grenoble Cedex (France); Barué, C.; Bertrand, P.; Canet, C.; Ferdinand, R.; Flambard, J.-L.; Jardin, P.; Lemagnen, F.; Maunoury, L.; Osmond, B. [GANIL, CNRS/IN2P3, Bvd Henri Becquerel, BP 55027, 14076 Caen Cedex 5 (France); Biarrotte, J. L. [IPN Orsay, Université Paris Sud, CNRS/IN2P3, 15 rue Georges Clémenceau, 91406 Orsay Cedex (France); Denis, J.-F.; Roger, A.; Touzery, R.; Tuske, O.; Uriot, D. [Irfu, CEA Saclay, DSM/Irfu/SACM, 91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); and others

    2016-02-15

    The SPIRAL2 injector, installed in its tunnel, is currently under commissioning at GANIL, Caen, France. The injector is composed of two low energy beam transport lines: one is dedicated to the light ion beam production, the other to the heavy ions. The first light ion beam, created by a 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source, has been successfully produced in December 2014. The first beam of the PHOENIX V2 18 GHz heavy ion source was analyzed on 10 July 2015. A status of the SPIRAL2 injector commissioning is given. An upgrade of the heavy ion source, named PHOENIX V3 aimed to replace the V2, is presented. The new version features a doubled plasma chamber volume and the high charge state beam intensity is expected to increase by a factor of 1.5 to 2 up to the mass ∼50. A status of its assembly is proposed.

  5. History of the Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buck, A.L.

    1982-08-01

    This pamphlet traces the history of the Atomic Energy Commission's twenty-eight year stewardship of the Nation's nuclear energy program, from the signing of the Atomic Energy Act on August 1, 1946, to the signing of the Energy Reorganization Act on October 11, 1974. The Commission's early concentration on the military atom produced sophisticated nuclear weapons for the Nation's defense and made possible the creation of a fleet of nuclear submarines and surface ships. Extensive research in the nuclear sciences resulted in the widespread application of nuclear technology for scientific, medical and industrial purposes, while the passage of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 made possible the development of a nuclear industry, and enabled the United States to share the new technology with other nations

  6. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest, 1991 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, K.L.

    1991-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest provides a summary of information about the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, and the areas NRC licenses. This digest is a compilation of NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1990, with exceptions noted. For operating US commercial nuclear power reactors, information on generating capacity and average capacity factor is obtained from Monthly Operating Reports submitted to the NRC directly by the licensee. This information is reviewed for consistency only. No independent validation and/or verification is performed by the NRC. For detailed and complete information about tables and figures, refer to the source publications. This digest is published annually for the general use of the NRC staff and is available to the public. 30 figs., 12 tabs

  7. Division V: Commission 42: Close Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribas, Ignasi; Richards, Mercedes T.; Rucinski, Slavek; Bradstreet, David H.; Harmanec, Petr; Kaluzny, Janusz; Mikolajewska, Joanna; Munari, Ulisse; Niarchos, Panagiotis; Olah, Katalin; Pribulla, Theodor; Scarfe, Colin D.; Torres, Guillermo

    2015-08-01

    Commission 42 (C42) co-organized, together with Commission 27 (C27) and Division V (Div V) as a whole, a full day of science and business sessions that were held on 24 August 2012. The program included time slots for discussion of business matters related to Div V, C27 and C42, and two sessions of 2 hours each devoted to science talks of interest to both C42 and C27. In addition, we had a joint session between Div IV and Div V motivated by the proposal to reformulate the division structure of the IAU and the possible merger of the two divisions into a new Div G. The current report gives an account of the matters discussed during the business session of C42.

  8. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, September 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-09-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards (ALAB), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judge (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM). The summaries and headnotes preceding the opinions reported herein are not to be deemed a part of those opinions or to have any independent legal significance

  9. Securities and Exchange Commission Semiannual Regulatory Agenda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-26

    ...: 3235-AK58 420. REVISIONS TO REGULATION D Legal Authority: 15 USC 77b(a)(15); 15 USC 77b(b); 15 USC 77d; 15 USC 77r; 15 USC 77s; 15 USC 77s(a); 15 USC 77z-3 Abstract: The Division is considering... SOLICITATION ENHANCEMENTS Legal Authority: 15 USC 78n Abstract: The Commission proposed amendments to its proxy...

  10. Viet Nam National Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    Vietnam National Atomic Energy Commission (VINATOM) is a governmental body in charge of organizing and coordinating activities related to use of nuclear energy for peaceful purpose. VINATOM in structure consists of the Nuclear Research Institute (Dalat), the Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (Hanoi), the Institute for Technology of Radioactive and Rare Elements (Hanoi), and the Centre for Nuclear Technique Application (Ho Chi Minh City). This catalogue introduces profiles of nuclear R and D activities under management by VINATOM. (N.H.A)

  11. Indexes to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Digests and indexes for issuances of the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and licensing Board Panel (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ) the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM) are presented in this document. These digests and indexes are intended to serve as a guide to the issuances. Information elements are displayed in one or more of five separate formats arranged as follows: Case Name Index; Headers and Digests; Legal Citations Index; Subject Index; and Facility Index

  12. European commission report on market opening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2005-01-01

    Governments must step up their effort to implement measures relating to market opening within the framework of the directives on gas and electricity. Only greater integration of national markets will produce the improvements required from a competitive point of view on the domestic energy market. These are the main conclusions of the annual report on domestic electricity and gas market operation adopted by the European Commission at the beginning of January 2005. (author)

  13. Indexes to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Digests and indexes for issuances of the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and licensing Board Panel (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ) the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM) are presented in this document. These digests and indexes are intended to serve as a guide to the issuances. Information elements are displayed in one or more of five separate formats arranged as follows: Case Name Index; Headers and Digests; Legal Citations Index; Subject Index; and Facility Index.

  14. COMMISSIONING CNI PROTON POLARIMETERS IN RHIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUANG, H.; BRAVAR, A.; LI, Z.; MACKAY, W.W.; MAKDISI, Y.; RESCIA, S.; ROSER, T.; SURROW, B.; BUNCE, G.; DESHPANDE, A.; GOTO, Y.; ET AL

    2002-01-01

    Two polarimeters based on proton carbon elastic scattering in the Coulomb Nuclear Interference (CNI) region have been installed and commissioned in the Blue and Yellow rings of RHIC during the first RHIC polarized proton collider run. Each polarimeter consists of ultra-thin carbon targets and six silicon detectors. With newly developed wave form digitizers, they provide fast and reliable polarization information for both rings

  15. Philippine Atomic Energy Commission: Annual report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-02-01

    This publication enumerates the research and development activities of the Philippine Atomic Energy Commission with priorities geared towards achieving the economic and social upliftment of the Filipinos in the field of agriculture, energy, industry, health and environment. Highlights are summaries of investigations and studies of great importance in crop improvement, animal production, nuclear fuels, nutrition research, not to mention its supportive technology, technical services, nuclear information and public acceptance, and nuclear manpower development. (RTD)

  16. Commissioning an Engineering Scale Coal Gasifier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Douglas J.; Bearden, Mark D.; Cabe, James E.

    2010-07-01

    This report explains the development, commissioning, and testing of an engineering scale slagging coal gasifier at PNNL. The initial objective of this project was to commission the gasifier with zero safety incidents. The commissioning work was primarily an empirical study that required an engineering design approach. After bringing the gasifier on-line, tests were conducted to assess the impact of various operating parameters on the synthesis gas (syngas) product composition. The long-term intent of this project is to produce syngas product for use by internal Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) researchers in catalyst, materials, and instrumentation development. Future work on the project will focus on improving the reliability and performance of the gasifier, with a goal of continuous operation for greater than 4 hours using coal feedstock. In addition, alternate designs that allow for increased flexibility regarding the fuel sources that can be used for syngas production is desired. Continued modifications to the fuel feed system will be pursued to address these goals. Alternative feed mechanisms such as a coal/methanol slurry are being considered.

  17. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest: 1993 edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission Information Digest (digest) provides a summary of information about the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), NRC's regulatory responsibilities, the activities NRC licenses, and general information on domestic and worldwide nuclear energy. The digest, published annually, is a compilation of nuclear- and NRC-related data and is designed to provide a quick reference to major facts about the agency and the industry it regulates. In general, the data cover 1975 through 1992, with exceptions noted. Information on generating capacity and average capacity factor for operating U.S. commercial nuclear power reactors is obtained from monthly operating reports that are submitted directly to the NRC by the licensee. This information is reviewed by the NRC for consistency only and no independent validation and/or verification is performed. Comments and/or suggestions on the data presented are welcomed and should be directed to Karen Olive, United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of the Controller, Division of Budget and Analysis, Washington, D.C. 20555. For detailed and complete information about tables and figures, refer to the source publications

  18. NSLS-II commissioning and operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, G., E-mail: gwang@bnl.gov; Shaftan, T.; Bassi, G.; Bengtsson, J.; Blednykh, A.; Blum, E.; Cheng, W.; Choi, J.; Davidsaver, M.; Doom, L.; Fliller, R.; Ganetis, G.; Guo, W.; Hidaka, Y.; Kramer, S.; Li, Y.; Podobedov, B.; Qian, K.; Rose, J.; Seletskiy, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); and others

    2016-07-27

    The National Synchrotron Light Source II at Brookhaven National Lab is a third-generation synchrotron radiation facility that has been commissioned in 2014. The facility is based on a 3 GeV electron storage ring, which will circulate 500 mA of beam current at 1 nm rad horizontal emittance. The storage ring is 792 meters in circumference and will accommodate more than 60 beamlines in the final built-out. The beamline sources range from insertion-devices located in straight sections, bending magnets or three-pole-wigglers configured in multiple branches. The NSLS-II storage ring commissioning was successfully completed in July 2014 and the facility delivered the first user light on October 23, 2014. Currently the storage ring reached 300 mA beam current and achieved 1 nm rad of horizontal emittance with 3 sets of Damping Wigglers. At this point six NSLS-II project beamlines are routinely taking photons with beam current at 150 mA. This paper reviews the NSLS-II accelerator design and commissioning experience.

  19. CEBAF Cryomodule Commissioning in the South Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M. Drury; H. Lankford; T. Lee; J. Marshall; J. Preble; Q. Saulter; W. Schneider; Michael Spata; Mark Wiseman

    1993-01-01

    When complete, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility will house a 4 GeV recirculating linear accelerator containing 42 1/4 cryomodules arrayed in two antiparallel linacs and an injector. Currently, 38 1/4 cryomodules have been installed. Each cryomodule contains eight superconducting niobium 5-cell rf cavities that operate at 1.497 GHz[1]. A cryomodule must provide an energy gain of 20 MeV to the 200 mu-A beam[2]. The resultant dynamic heat load must be less than 45 W. The cavity parameters that are measured during the commissioning process include the external Q's (Q(sub ext)) of the cavity ports, the unloaded Q (Q(sub 0)) of the cavity as a function of accelerating gradient, and the maximum operating gradient of the cavity[3]. Finally, the mechanical tuners are cycled and characterized. A portable test stand allows local control of the rf system and provides automated data acquisition. During the period from April 1993 through September 1993, 16 of the 20 cryomodules installed in the South Linac were commissioned. All cryomodules tested in the South Linac meet or exceed the CEBAF specifications. This paper describes the results of the commissioning of the first 10 cryomodules in the South Linac

  20. 17 CFR 146.9 - Appeals to the Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Commission or any Commission employee has failed or refused to comply with provisions of the Privacy Act or... disagreement has been filed shall clearly note the portion which is disputed, and include a copy of the...

  1. Commissioning of Nuclear Power Plants. The AREVA approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mateo, G.

    2014-01-01

    Georges Mateo, Fellow Expert at AREVA, closed the last day of conferences by detailing deeply the different phases of NPPs commissioning. He insisted on the skills required to be a Commissioning engineer and on the carrier opportunities that it offers

  2. Decommissioning and radioactive waste management. The European Commission overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, M

    2010-01-01

    In this lecture author deals with the European Commission overview on the decommissioning and radioactive waste management. Financial support of European Commission of decommissioning of the Ignalina NPP, Bohunice V1 NPP and Kozloduy Units 1 and 2 is presented.

  3. International Commission on Radiological Protection. History, policies, procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, Bo; Dunster, H.J.; Valentin, Jack; )

    2000-01-01

    This report briefly reviews the history, mode of operation, concepts, and current policies of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). It touches upon the objectives of the Commission's recommendations, the quantities used, the biological basis of the Commission's policy, the quantitative basis for its risk estimates, the structure of the system of protection, some problems of interpretation and application in that system, and the need for stability, consistency, and clarity in the Commission's recommendations. (author)

  4. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission fiscal year 1997 annual financial statements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-24

    This report presents the results of the independent certified public accountants` audit of the Federal Energy Regulatory commission`s statements of financial position, and the related statements of operations and changes in net position. The auditors` work was conducted in accordance with generally accepted government auditing standards. An independent public accounting firm conducted the audit. The auditors` reports on the Commission`s internal control structure and compliance with laws and regulations disclosed no reportable conditions or instances of noncompliance.

  5. Stepwise commissioning of a steam boiler with stability guarantees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Simon Vestergaard; Kallesøe, Carsten Skovmose; Bendtsen, Jan Dimon

    2016-01-01

    This paper aims to make the commissioning of an industrial MIMO controller more straightforward by gradually commissioning it from a set of SISO controllers, after the system has been started. For this purpose a stepwise commissioning strategy based on the Youla-Kucera parametrization has been de...... been commissioned from a SISO controller using the developed method on a real steam boiler and measurements show a clear performance improvement after transition....

  6. C46 `ASTRONOMY Education and Development': a Peculiar Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Greve, Jean-Pierre; García, Beatriz; Gerbaldi, Michèle; Ferlet, Roger; Guinan, Edward; Hearnshaw, John; Jones, Barrie; Marschall, Laurence; Miley, George; Pasachoff, Jay; Ros, Rosa; Stavinschi, Magda; Torres-Peimbert, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    C46 was a Commission of the Executive Committee of the IAU under Division XII (Union-Wide Activities), then after 2012 under Division C (Education, Outreach, and Heritage). It was the only commission dealing exclusively with astronomy education; a previous Commission 38 (Exchange of Astronomers), which allocated travel grants to astronomers who needed them, and a Working Group on the Worldwide Development of Astronomy, have been absorbed by Commission 46.

  7. Point Lepreau G.S. commissioning management experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikhan, S.; Walker, W.J.

    1983-05-01

    This paper shares the experience gained by New Brunswick Power in commissioning its first nuclear plant, with particular emphasis on the management techniques that were developed. Some of the areas discussed include: organization of Nuclear Operations Group responsible for commissioning and its interface with construction; outline and scope of documentation required to define, execute and report commissioning to satisfy the licensing requirements, management techniques developed to implement commissioning; and a summary of lessons learned and recommendations for the future

  8. Commissioning of the ATLAS pixel detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golling, Tobias

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS pixel detector is a high precision silicon tracking device located closest to the LHC interaction point. It belongs to the first generation of its kind in a hadron collider experiment. It will provide crucial pattern recognition information and will largely determine the ability of ATLAS to precisely track particle trajectories and find secondary vertices. It was the last detector to be installed in ATLAS in June 2007, has been fully connected and tested in-situ during spring and summer 2008, and is ready for the imminent LHC turn-on. The highlights of the past and future commissioning activities of the ATLAS pixel system are presented

  9. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, March 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-04-01

    Reactor licensing actions taken by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board and the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards for March 1975 are presented. Action was included for the following reactors: Big Rock Point Nuclear Plant; West Valley Reprocessing Plant; Limerick Generating Station, Units 1 and 2; Midland Plants, Units 1 and 2; Wolf Creek Generating Station, Unit 1; Monticello Nuclear Generating Plant, Unit 1; Douglas Point Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1 and 2; Seabrook Station, Units 1 and 2; Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station; and WPPSS Hanford Units 1 and 4. (U.S.)

  10. The ATLAS Trigger System Commissioning and Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Hamilton, A

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS trigger has been used very successfully to collect collision data during 2009 and 2010 LHC running at centre of mass energies of 900 GeV, 2.36 TeV, and 7 TeV. This paper presents the ongoing work to commission the ATLAS trigger with proton collisions, including an overview of the performance of the trigger based on extensive online running. We describe how the trigger has evolved with increasing LHC luminosity and give a brief overview of plans for forthcoming LHC running.

  11. Commission of energy regulation. 2004 activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The commission of energy regulation (CRE) is an independent administrative authority in charge of the control of the operation of gas and electricity markets. This document is the fifth activity report of CRE and covers the July 1, 2003 - June 30, 2004 period, which corresponds to the era of opening of energy markets as a consequence of the enforcement of the June 26, 2003 European directive. In the framework of the stakes made by energy markets liberalization, this document presents the situation of the gas and electricity markets during this period (European framework, regulation of both markets, public utility mission..) and describes CRE's means for the monitoring of these markets. (J.S.)

  12. Nuclear Regulatory Commission: 1981 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This seventh annual report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission covers major actions, events and planning that occurred during fiscal year 1981, with some coverage of later events, where appropriate. Chapters of the report address the agency's various functions or areas of activity: regulating nuclear power plants; evaluating reactor operating experience; licensing nuclear materials and their transportation; safeguarding nuclear plants and materials; managing nuclear wastes; inspection and enforcement; cooperation with state governments; international activities; research and standards development; hearings; decisions and litigation; and administrative and public communications matters. Each chapter presents a detailed review of program accomplishments during the report period, fiscal year 1981

  13. Gentilly 2: design, construction and commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amyot, Paul; Michel, Benoit.

    1982-06-01

    Construction of the Gentilly 2 power station is essentially complete, and commissioning is proceeding. The main activities during the 1981-82 period have been the completion of the construction and overall testing of the major systems. One cause of delay in the project in 1981 was the discovery of damage to the tubesheet of a steam generator. An internal manhole cover support in the steam generator head had become loose and had caused damage to the tube-to-tubesheet welds. Repairs to the welds were completed in Feb. 1982 after an extensive development program to qualify the welding procedure. Overall project life will be slightly more than 9 years

  14. Commissioning dosimetry at SINAGAMA irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriah Mod Ali; Hasan Sham; Taiman Kadni

    2000-01-01

    Dose mapping is one of the important factors in the commissioning of the irradiation plant. Comparison of the dose distribution obtained through the dose mapping exercise carried out since 1991 for Sinagama plant are described in this paper. It is aimed to confirmed the need for a thorough dose-mapping before the plant can be proceed with routine irradiation. The dose measurement was performed using a routine ceric-cerous dosimeter, supplied by the High Dose Dosimetry Laboratory, SSDL. The quality assurance of these service was maintain and verify through regular participation in dose intercomparison organised by the IAEA

  15. Commission 22: Meters, Meteorites and Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Junichi; Jenniskens, Peter; Spurný, Pavel; Borovička, Jiří; Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Consolmagno, Guy; Jopek, Tadeusz; Vaubaillon, Jeremie; Williams, Iwan P.; Zhu, Jin

    2010-05-01

    The business meeting of commission 22 was held at the room 5 in the SulAmerica Convention Center in Rio de Janeiro(14:00-15:30). Fifteen people attended at this meeting:J.Borovička, E.Bowell, G.Consolmagno, D.Green, P. Jenniskens, A. Pellinen-Wannberg, R. Rudawska, J. Watanabe, J. Zhu, P. H. A. Hasselmann, F. Ostroviski, D. A. Oszkiewicz, W. Thuillot, P. Mahajani, and A. Sule. This meeting was managed by Junichi Watanabe, the current C22 Vice-President. The summary of the meeting is described.

  16. Cognitive Enhancement and Beyond: Recommendations from the Bioethics Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Anita L; Strand, Nicolle K

    2015-10-01

    Media outlets are reporting that cognitive enhancement is reaching epidemic levels, but evidence is lacking and ethical questions remain. The US Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has examined the issue, and we lay out the commission's findings and their relevance for the scientific community. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  17. 77 FR 8095 - Technical Corrections to Commission Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 18 CFR Part 2 [Docket No. RM11-30-000; Order No. 756] Technical Corrections to Commission Regulations Issued February 8, 2012. AGENCY: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, DOE. ACTION: Final rule: correcting amendment. SUMMARY: This document adds...

  18. 75 FR 73083 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Open Commission Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting; Open Commission Meeting November 30, 2010. The Federal Communications Commission will hold an Open Meeting on the subjects listed below on... demonstrate accessibility technologies. The meeting site is fully accessible to people using wheelchairs or...

  19. Commission administration. National Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This report is one in a series of commission option documents prepared for the US Department of Energy, designed to assist regional low-level waste compact commissions in their organization, administration and efforts to effectively manage waste within their regions. In particular, this report addresses topics related to commission administrative procedures, personnel, procurement and finance

  20. 47 CFR 0.420 - Other Commission publications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other Commission publications. 0.420 Section 0... Information Printed Publications § 0.420 Other Commission publications. The following additional Commission publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents: (a) Statistics of Communications Common...

  1. NASA Construction of Facilities Validation Processes - Total Building Commissioning (TBCx)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoover, Jay C.

    2004-01-01

    Key Atributes include: Total Quality Management (TQM) System that looks at all phases of a project. A team process that spans boundaries. A Commissioning Authority to lead the process. Commissioning requirements in contracts. Independent design review to verify compliance with Facility Project Requirements (FPR). Formal written Commissioning Plan with Documented Results. Functional performance testing (FPT) against the requirements document.

  2. 76 FR 71449 - Reporting Line for the Commission's Ethics Counsel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    ... Ethics Counsel AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Securities... of the Ethics Counsel is now a stand-alone Office of the Commission and that the head of the Office, the Ethics Counsel, reports directly to the Chairman of the Commission. DATES: Effective Date...

  3. Educational Change by Commission: Attempting "Trickle Down" Reform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Rick; Wimpelberg, Robert K.

    1987-01-01

    The processes and procedures of national commissions on education are discussed. Elements of commonality are presented with a review of competing explanations of the popularity of such commissions. A sociopolitical thesis of educational reform through commissions is advanced, based on the "trickle down" theory of economics. (SLD)

  4. 17 CFR 9.26 - Participation of Commission staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Participation of Commission staff. 9.26 Section 9.26 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION RULES... Respect to Appeals § 9.26 Participation of Commission staff. Within twenty days after receipt of the...

  5. 76 FR 24383 - Commission's Rules of Practice, Procedure, and Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Parts 0 and 1 [GC Docket No. 10-44; FCC 11-16] Commission... docket management measures, such as broadening the use of docketed proceedings; expanding the requirement... effective date for FCC rules in the event the Commission does not specify an effective date in a rulemaking...

  6. 77 FR 58941 - Appeal Proceedings Before the Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-25

    ... forth more specific rules for the different types of appeals. Rules for appeals of ordinance..., 582, 583, 584, and 585 RIN 3141-AA47 Appeal Proceedings Before the Commission AGENCY: National Indian... Commission) promulgates this final rule to enhance and clarify appeal proceedings before the Commission. This...

  7. Report of the Nevada Commission on Nuclear Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    This summary represents the major conclusions reached by the Commission on Nuclear Projects. They reflect the Commission's experience with the high-level nuclear waste disposal program since 1985 and are the result of the Commission's scrutiny of both State and federal repository-related activities

  8. 78 FR 78352 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. NJ14-4-000] Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on December 18, 2013, Orlando Utilities Commission submitted its tariff filing per 35.28(e): Order No. 1000 Further Regional Compliance Filing to be effective...

  9. 76 FR 25685 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. NJ11-12-000] Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on April 15, 2011, Orlando Utilities Commission submitted its tariff filing per 35.25(e): Order 890 compliance to be effective 4/15/2011. Any person...

  10. 76 FR 35209 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. NJ11-12-001] Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on May 26, 2011, Orlando Utilities Commission submitted its tariff filing per 35.17(b): Amendment to Compliance Filing to be effective 4/15/2011. Any...

  11. 75 FR 37789 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. NJ10-2-000] Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing June 23, 2010. Take notice that on June 11, 2010, the Orlando Utilities Commission filed, pro forma revised tariff sheets for inclusion in its open access transmission...

  12. 76 FR 49469 - Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission [Docket No. NJ11-15-000] Orlando Utilities Commission; Notice of Filing Take notice that on July 29, 2011, Orlando Utilities Commission (OUC), pursuant to section 205 of the Federal Power Act (FPA) \\1\\ and Part 35 of the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  13. Leadership of healthcare commissioning networks in England: a mixed-methods study on clinical commissioning groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariadis, Markos; Oborn, Eivor; Barrett, Michael; Zollinger-Read, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objective To explore the relational challenges for general practitioner (GP) leaders setting up new network-centric commissioning organisations in the recent health policy reform in England, we use innovation network theory to identify key network leadership practices that facilitate healthcare innovation. Design Mixed-method, multisite and case study research. Setting Six clinical commissioning groups and local clusters in the East of England area, covering in total 208 GPs and 1 662 000 population. Methods Semistructured interviews with 56 lead GPs, practice managers and staff from the local health authorities (primary care trusts, PCT) as well as various healthcare professionals; 21 observations of clinical commissioning group (CCG) board and executive meetings; electronic survey of 58 CCG board members (these included GPs, practice managers, PCT employees, nurses and patient representatives) and subsequent social network analysis. Main outcome measures Collaborative relationships between CCG board members and stakeholders from their healthcare network; clarifying the role of GPs as network leaders; strengths and areas for development of CCGs. Results Drawing upon innovation network theory provides unique insights of the CCG leaders’ activities in establishing best practices and introducing new clinical pathways. In this context we identified three network leadership roles: managing knowledge flows, managing network coherence and managing network stability. Knowledge sharing and effective collaboration among GPs enable network stability and the alignment of CCG objectives with those of the wider health system (network coherence). Even though activities varied between commissioning groups, collaborative initiatives were common. However, there was significant variation among CCGs around the level of engagement with providers, patients and local authorities. Locality (sub) groups played an important role because they linked commissioning decisions with

  14. Role of the team of scientific and technical commissioning support (TSTCS) during Mochovce NPP unit 3 and 4 commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansky, J.; Prachar, M.; Sedlacek, M.; Petenyi, V.

    2011-01-01

    The Team of Scientific and Technical Commissioning Support (TSTCS) shall provide an independent support for the Mochovce NPP 3 and 4 Commissioning Department during Mochovce Units 3 and 4 commissioning. This independent support will be in line with the Mochovce NPP 3 and 4 Directive 'Non-active tests and commissioning' and it will be carried out in form of professional and expert works focusing on supervision of fulfilment of requirements for nuclear safety observance. The TSTCS duty to provide for such services during NPP commissioning is specified by Slovak Regulatory Body legislation. The independent TSTCS will supervise; - fulfilment of requirements for nuclear safety during preparation and implementation of commissioning tests; -scientific and technical level of commissioning programmes, and reflection on nuclear safety requirements in commissioning programmes,- commissioning process and test results. Main standpoints of the Team activities for individual unit commissioning stages will be; - assesment of the selected programs of functional tests in installations having an impact on nuclear safety and evaluation of the results of these tests; - assesment of the programs of physics and power commissioning, - assesment of the unit preparedness before fuel loading start; - assesment of the unit preparedness for performing initial criticality and low power commissioning and power commissioning stages; - evaluation of the results of physics and power commissioning stages and sub-stages; - final evaluation of the results from implementing the physics and power commissioning stages. The paper also presents a short description of the Team scope activities, the Team organisation, and a procedure for issuing of standpoints to individual unit commissioning stages. (Authors)

  15. Translating landscape: the Colombian Chorographic Commission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Uribe Hanabergh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1850 the Colombian government developed a project to survey the young country´s landscape. Scientists, writers, and artists were invited to make part of the project led by the Italian military, geographer and cartographer, Agustin Codazzi. After nine years and three different artists, the Commission had many watercolor drawings that portrayed a landscape, not only in its physical traits, but also in its social, economic and agricultural development. Through the lens of these artists, the drawings that concluded the survey showed a landscape that was truly original but that was also seen through the lens of a certain romantic eye inherited by a firm European legacy. As a result, these watercolors show the different regions, people, and means of transportation, crops and trades. The Colombian Chorographic Commission was an important project in the construction of the Colombian modern nation, a country that was constantly divided by federalist and centralist politics, liberal and conservative parties. An interesting union between science, politics and art, these drawings represent the process of the modernization of nineteenth-century Colombia.

  16. Acceptance, commissioning and quality control in radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toreti, Dalila Luzia

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic Radiosurgery is a treatment technique that uses narrow beams of radiation focused with great accuracy in a small lesion. The introduction of micro multi leaf collimators (mMLC) allows this technique to reach a higher degree of dose conformation of the target lesion allowing a smaller irradiation of critical structures and normal tissues. This paper presents the results of the acceptance tests and commissioning of a Varian 6EX linear accelerator dedicated to radiosurgery associated with the BrainLab micro multi leaf collimator installed in the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da USP (HC-FMUSP) and establish feasible quality assurance program for the services that employ this special technique. The results of the acceptance tests were satisfactory and are willing with the specifications provided by the manufacturer and the commissioning tests were within the international recommendations. The tests and measures that are part of quality control process should be specific to each treatment unit, and the need, frequency and levels of tolerance

  17. Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission dosimetric information system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero Vallejos, Patricia Andrea

    1997-01-01

    This thesis discusses the nuclear radiation that people who work with radioactive material is exposed to and its control by the Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission. A full analysis of the System is presented with information about the Commission and the Department of Nuclear and Radiological Safety which runs the System. Ana analysis of the System is presented in order to obtain requirements. Management flow diagrams, the processes involved and current problems experienced by the users are described. A design logic is modeled producing Data Flow Diagrams (DFD). based on this physical design, or, Model of Physical Data, is prepared including tables, attributes, types of data, primary and foreign keys. A description is presented of how the System is implemented, the tools that are used and how the testing phase is carried out. The Dosimetry System meets the criteria for a Software Engineering project, where the basic cycle was used as a working methodology. The System developed supports the dosimetric control of people exposed to radioactive material. (author)

  18. Commissioning of research reactors. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this Safety Guide is to provide recommendations on meeting the requirements for the commissioning of research reactors on the basis of international best practices. Specifically, it provides recommendations on fulfilling the requirements established in paras 6.44 and 7.42-7.50 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety of Research Reactors, IAEA Safety Standards Series No. NS-R-4, IAEA, Vienna (2005) and guidance and specific and consequential recommendations relating to the recommendations presented in paras 615-621 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety in the Utilization and Modification of Research Reactors, Safety Series No. 35-G2, IAEA, Vienna (1994) and paras 228-229 of International Atomic Energy Agency, Safety Assessment of Research Reactors and Preparation of the Safety Analysis Report, Safety Series No. 35-G1, IAEA, Vienna (1994). This Safety Guide is intended for use by all organizations involved in commissioning for a research reactor, including the operating organization, the regulatory body and other organizations involved in the research reactor project

  19. Surrogacy: The experience of Greek commissioning women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaligoura, Zaira; Papadatou, Danai; Bellali, Thalia

    2015-12-01

    Available studies on surrogacy are extremely limited. Findings suggest that surrogacy is experienced as problem free, with a significant number of commissioning mothers maintaining contact with the surrogates over time. To explore the experiences of Greek commissioning women regarding the surrogacy arrangement and birth of a child through surrogacy. The data of this study were collected from 7 intended mothers who had either a long history of infertility or serious health problems. Interviews were tape-recorded, transcribed and analysed employing content analysis. The analysis of the women's accounts revealed three themes: (a) a shared journey, (b) the birth of a long-awaited child, and (c) the surrogacy disclosure. The surrogacy process became the women's affairs, with their partners offering backstage support. A very close bond was developed with the surrogates, characterised by daily contacts and care-giving behaviours. While this bond was abruptly discontinued after the child's birth, it was interiorised with all participants being grateful to their surrogate. The timing and content of the surrogacy disclosure to family and child(ren) were carefully chosen by participants, who avoided providing information when egg donation was involved. Findings are reassuring for women who want to parent a child through a surrogate arrangement, and suggest that the availability of counselling services may help intended mothers to cope with disclosure issues. Copyright © 2015 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Multimedia

    L. Malgeri

    2011-01-01

    As the technical interventions were finishing up and services restored at P5 we started central operations again in 2011. We started operations with a reduced shift crew, Shift leader and DCS shifter, on 24th January. We had a first mid-week global run on 2nd and 3rd February followed by cosmic data-taking between 10th and 20th February. Due to delays with cooling for the strip tracker the useful cosmic data-taking with the strip tracker was reduced to about four days. On 20th February, the LHC started beam commissioning, and cosmic data-taking with the full CMS detector was stopped. The machine availability has been much higher during the 2011 beam commissioning than during the comparable time period in 2010. This has given us few opportunities to turn on the tracker for further cosmic data-taking. Many changes and upgrades were performed during the winter shutdown. Among them was an upgrade to running the central DAQ on 64 bit. All of these upgrades have now b...

  1. President's Commission and the normal accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrow, C.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter incorporates the major points of an analysis of the accident at Three Mile Island that I prepared in September 1979. In contrast to the findings of the President's Commission (1979), I did not view the accident as the result of operator error, an inept utility, or a negligent Nuclear Regulatory Commission but as a consequence of the complexity and interdependence that characterize the system itself. I argued that the accident was inevitable-that is, that it could not have been prevented, foreseen, or quickly terminated, because it was incomprehensible. It resembled other accidents in nuclear plants and in other high risk, complex and highly interdependent operator-machine systems; none of the accidents were caused by management or operator ineptness or by poor government regulation, though these characteristics existed and should have been expected. I maintained that the accident was normal, because in complex systems there are bound to be multiple faults that cannot be avoided by planning and that operators cannot immediately comprehend

  2. Linac4 chopper line commissioning strategy

    CERN Document Server

    Bellodi, G; Lombardi, A M; Posocco, P A; Sargsyan, E

    2010-01-01

    The report outlines the strategy for beam-based commissioning of the Linac4 3 MeV chopper line as currently scheduled to start in the second half of 2011 in the Test Stand Area. A dedicated temporary diagnostics test bench will complement the measurement devices foreseen for permanent installation in the chopper line. A commissioning procedure is set out as a series of consecutive phases, each one supposed to meet a well- defined milestone in the path to fully characterise the beam-line. Specific set-ups for each stage are defined in terms of beam characteristics, machine settings and diagnostics used. Operational guidelines are given and expected results at the relative points of measurements are shown for simulated scenarios (on the basis of multi-particle tracking studies carried out with the codes PATH and TRACEWin). These are then interpreted in the light of the resolution limits of the available diagnostics instruments to assess the precision reach on individual measurements and the feasibility of techn...

  3. PLEIADES-HR IMAGE QUALITY COMMISSIONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Lebègue

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available PLEIADES is the highest resolution civilian earth observing system ever developed in Europe. This imagery program is conducted by the French National Space Agency, CNES. It operates since 2012 a first satellite PLEIADES-HR launched on 2011 December 17th, a second one should be launched by the end of the year. Each satellite is designed to provide optical 70 cm resolution coloured images to civilian and defence users. The Image Quality requirements were defined from users studies from the different spatial imaging applications, taking into account the trade-off between on-board technological complexity and ground processing capacity. The assessment of the image quality and the calibration operation have been performed by CNES Image Quality team during the 6 month commissioning phase that followed the satellite launch. These activities cover many topics gathered in two families : radiometric and geometric image quality. The new capabilities offered by PLEIADES-HR agility allowed to imagine new methods of image calibration and performance assessment. Starting from an overview of the satellite characteristics, this paper presents all the calibration operations that were conducted during the commissioning phase and also gives the main results for every image quality performance.

  4. Validation Tools for ATLAS Muon Spectrometer Commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benekos, N.Chr.; Dedes, G.; Laporte, J.F.; Nicolaidou, R.; Ouraou, A.

    2008-01-01

    The ATLAS Muon Spectrometer (MS), currently being installed at CERN, is designed to measure final state muons of 14 TeV proton-proton interactions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) with a good momentum resolution of 2-3% at 10-100 GeV/c and 10% at 1 TeV, taking into account the high level background enviroment, the inhomogeneous magnetic field, and the large size of the apparatus (24 m diameter by 44 m length). The MS layout of the ATLAS detector is made of a large toroidal magnet, arrays of high-pressure drift tubes for precise tracking and dedicated fast detectors for the first-level trigger, and is organized in eight Large and eight Small sectors. All the detectors of the barrel toroid have been installed and the commissioning has started with cosmic rays. In order to validate the MS performance using cosmic events, a Muon Commissioning Validation package has been developed and its results are presented in this paper. Integration with the rest of the ATLAS sub-detectors is now being done in the ATLAS cavern

  5. Alien invasive species and biological pollution of the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem[Great Lakes Water Quality Board : Report to the International Joint Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-05-01

    all levels (federal, provincial, state) in the Great Lakes Basin. The recommendations made represent the opinions of the binational effort and not necessarily the views of the Commission. 6 refs. figs.

  6. Report of the State of Nevada Commission on Nuclear Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-12-01

    This third biennial Report of the Nevada Commission on Nuclear Projects has been prepared in fulfillment of the requirements of NRS 459.0092, which stipulates that the Commission shall report to the Governor and Legislature on any matter relating to radioactive waste disposal the Commission deems appropriate and advise and make recommendations on the policy of the State concerning nuclear waste disposal projects. Chapter One of the Report presents a brief overview of the Commission's functions and statutory charges. It also contains a summary of developments which have affected the overall nuclear waste disposl issue since the last Commission Report was published in November, 1988. Chapter Two contains a synthesis of Commission activities and reports on the findings of the Commission relative to the geotechnical, environmental, socioeconomic, transportation, intergovernmental and legal aspects of federal and State nuclear waste program efforts

  7. Members of the Science and Technology Commission, Spanish Senate

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2002-01-01

    Photo 01: (left to right) Mr Francisco Xabier Albistur, Senator; Mrs Mercedes Senen, Lawyer of the Commission; Mr Ramon Antonio Socias, Second Vice-President of the Commission; Prof. Luciano Maiani, CERN Director-General, Mr Alonso Arroyo, President of the Commission, signing the VIP visitors' book; and Mr Adolfo Abejon, Senator. Photo 02: Mr Alonso Arroyo, President of the Commission, signing the VIP visitors' book. Photos 03, 04: Mr Ramon Antonio Socias, Second Vice-President of the Commission, signing the VIP visitors' book; and Mr Adolfo Abejon, Senator. Photo 05: Mr Francisco Xabier Albistur, Senator, signing the VIP visitors' book. Photo 06: Mrs Mercedes Senen, Lawyer of the Commission, signing the VIP visitors' book. Photo 07: (left to right) Mr Francisco Xabier Albistur, Senator; Prof. Juan Antonio Rubio, Education and Technology Transfer Division Leader; Prof. Luciano Maiani, CERN Director-General; Mr Ramon Antonio Socias, Second Vice-President of the Commission; Mr Alonso Arroyo, President of the C...

  8. Truth Commissions, Education, and Positive Peace: An Analysis of Truth Commission Final Reports (1980-2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, Julia; Bellino, Michelle J.

    2017-01-01

    Transitional justice and education both occupy increasingly prominent space on the international peacebuilding agenda, though less is known about the ways they might reinforce one another to contribute towards peace. This paper presents a cross-national analysis of truth commission (TC) reports spanning 1980-2015, exploring the range of…

  9. Israel Atomic Energy Commission 1996 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Selecting the research efforts to be highlighted in the Israel Atomic Energy Commission`s Annual Report from the large body and broad spectrum of ongoing work is not an easy task. The extensive bibliography of published results attached to the report attests to the scope of this difficulty. Of the many worthwhile projects, four were chosen to represent best the current trends in the continuing R and D program at the research centers of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission. One of these trends is the growing cooperation with private industry, in an attempt to gear our R and D programs to respond to market demands. Another feature, noted already several years ago, is the extensive collaboration of our scientists and engineers with colleagues at other institutions, in Israel and abroad. some of the work reported is part of evolving international industrial cooperation projects, illustrating both these trends. Following a trend common to many nuclear research centers around the world, a substantial part of our research effort is non-nuclear in nature. This is illustrated in the first article, which deals with advances in the application of non-linear optics in diverse fields of science and technology. These include state-of-the-art solid-state lasers, rapid modulation of light signals, development and generation of tunable sources of coherent light, optical data storage and the microscopic probing of biological and inorganic samples. The present work reports on a range of R and D, from the fundamentals of non-linear optical materials to proof-of-principle demonstrations of non-linear subwavelength resolution microscopy, to fabrication of prototype commercial tunable laser systems The second report considers the microstrain characteristics in some alloys using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The research utilizes XRD line broadening effects to study the characteristics of alloys from especially prepared surfaces. These characteristics include the homogeneity of alloying

  10. Division B Commission 6: Astronomical Telegrams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaoka, H.; Green, D. W. E.; Samus, N. N.; Aksnes, K.; Gilmore, A. C.; Nakano, S.; Sphar, T.; Tichá, J.; Williams, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    IAU Commission 6 ``Astronomical Telegrams'' had a single business meeting during Honolulu General Assembly of the IAU. It took place on Tuesday, 11 August 2015. The meeting was attended by Hitoshi Yamaoka (President), Daniel Green (Director of the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams, CBAT, via Skype), Steven Chesley (JPL), Paul Chodas (JPL), Alan Gilmore (Canterbury University), Shinjiro Kouzuma (Chukyo University), Paolo Mazzali (Co-Chair of the Supernova Working Group), Elena Pian (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa), Marion Schmitz (chair IAU Working Group Designations + NED), David Tholen (University of Hawaii), Jana Ticha (Klet Observatory), Milos Tichy (Klet Observatory), Giovanni Valsecchi (INAF\\slash Italy), Gareth Williams (Minor Planet Center). Apologies: Nikolai Samus (General Catalogue of Variable Stars, GCVS).

  11. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Document Server

    D. Acosta

    Run coordination and DPG The activities of the DPGs in the last six months have included the completion of publications (and many internal notes) on the data collected during CRAFT08 exercise, continuation of these studies with CRAFT09 data, and finally the first workflows and prompt feedback on 2009 LHC beam data. The level of readiness of the DPG prompt feedback groups is quite high, as first results from the early November “beam splash” data were shown to CMS within 24 hours of the first LHC beam. Moreover, results from the first collisions at 900 GeV were presented publicly three days afterward on November 26th. The CRAFT09 cosmic data taking period provided an opportunity to commission the calibration and alignment workflows on large data samples using the same software release series intended for the first LHC data, and to demonstrate routine operation of alignment and calibration workflows under production conditions. Significantly, the "prompt calibration loop" wa...

  12. QPS Upgrade and Re-commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Denz, R

    2009-01-01

    Prior to the re-start of the Large Hadron Collider LHC in 2009 the protection system for superconducting devices QPS will be submitted to a substantial upgrade. The foreseen modifications will enhance the capability of the system in detecting problems related to the electrical interconnections between superconducting magnets as well as the detection of so-called aperture symmetric quenches in the LHC main magnets. The presentation will describe the design and implementation of the new protection layers and report on recent tests with prototype devices. It will address as well the planned steps for commissioning of the new system, possible limitations and the additional tools and procedures required to make use of its full capability. Finally the recent progress with respect to procurement, production, test and installation will be presented.

  13. Open Letter to the European Commission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savin, Andrej; Schwemer, Sebastian Felix

    2016-01-01

    to the information society. A key component of this acquis is the prohibition of general monitoring obligations to the benefit of providers of intermediary services. It is a means to achieve at least two central objectives: the encouragement of innovation as well as the protection of fundamental rights of all...... Internet users, namely the rights protected by Articles 8 and 11 of the European Convention of Human Rights. Yet, the proposed Copyright Directive, in particular, seems to negatively affect both the domain and effect of Article 15 of the E-commerce Directive. The signatories of this open letter therefore...... urge the European Commission to take into account the human rights dimension of Article 15 of the E-commerce Directive, as made explicit by the Court of the Justice of the European Union, and to make sure its implications are carefully examined across sectors. Authors: Sophie Stalla-Bourdillon Eleonora...

  14. ARIEL e-LINAC: Commissioning and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Zvyagintsev, V.

    2016-09-01

    A superconducting electron Linac (e-Linac) will be a part of the ARIEL facility for the production of radioactive ion beams (RIB) at TRIUMF. The e-Linac will consist of five 1.3GHz 9-cell cavities in three cryomodules delivering a 50MeV 10mA beam. The baseline operation will be single pass but a re-circulating ring is planned to allow either energy boost or energy recovery operation. The first stage of the accelerator which consists of two cryomodules has been successfully commissioned in 2014. The paper will discuss the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) challenges of the accelerator. Cavities, crymodules and RF system design, preparation, and performance will be presented.

  15. Commissioning the CMS alignment and calibration framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Futyan, David

    2010-01-01

    The CMS experiment has developed a powerful framework to ensure the precise and prompt alignment and calibration of its components, which is a major prerequisite to achieve the optimal performance for physics analysis. The prompt alignment and calibration strategy harnesses computing resources both at the Tier-0 site and the CERN Analysis Facility (CAF) to ensure fast turnaround for updating the corresponding database payloads. An essential element is the creation of dedicated data streams concentrating the specific event information required by the various alignment and calibration workflows. The resulting low latency is required for feeding the resulting constants into the prompt reconstruction process, which is essential for achieving swift physics analysis of the LHC data. This report discusses the implementation and the computational aspects of the alignment and calibration framework. Recent commissioning campaigns with cosmic muons, beam halo and simulated data have been used to gain detailed experience with this framework, and results of this validation are reported.

  16. Commissioning the CMS Alignment and Calibration Framework

    CERN Document Server

    Futyan, David

    2009-01-01

    The CMS experiment has developed a powerful framework to ensure the precise and prompt alignment and calibration of its components, which is a major prerequisite to achieve the optimal performance for physics analysis. The prompt alignment and calibration strategy harnesses computing resources both at the Tier-0 site and the CERN Analysis Facility (CAF) to ensure fast turnaround for updating the corresponding database payloads. An essential element is the creation of dedicated data streams concentrating the specific event information required by the various alignment and calibration workflows. The resulting low latency is required for feeding the resulting constants into the prompt reconstruction process, which is essential for achieving swift physics analysis of the LHC data. This report discusses the implementation and the computational aspects of the alignment and calibration framework. Recent commissioning campaigns with cosmic muons, beam halo and simulated data have been used to gain detailed experience...

  17. The commissioning of the BRISOL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, B., E-mail: tangb364@126.com; Cui, B.; Chen, L.; Huang, Q.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y.; Ma, X.; Zhang, T.; Jiang, W.

    2016-06-01

    The Beijing Radioactive ion beam facility Isotope Separator On-Line (BRISOL) is a radioactive ion beam facility based on a 100 MeV cyclotron providing 100 μA proton beam bombarding a thick target to produce radioactive nuclei, which are transferred into an ion source to produce a singly-charged ion beam. The construction and installation of BRISOL was completed in March 2014. The commissioning of the BRISOL facility with stable beams has been carried out in the last year. The ion source, the separator and the beam-line were tested with a {sup 39}K{sup +} stable beam. The tests and the current status of the BRISOL facility will be presented in this paper.

  18. ARIEL e-LINAC: Commissioning and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laxdal, R.E.; Zvyagintsev, V.

    2016-01-01

    A superconducting electron Linac (e-Linac) will be a part of the ARIEL facility for the production of radioactive ion beams (RIB) at TRIUMF. The e-Linac will consist of five 1.3GHz 9-cell cavities in three cryomodules delivering a 50MeV 10mA beam. The baseline operation will be single pass but a re-circulating ring is planned to allow either energy boost or energy recovery operation. The first stage of the accelerator which consists of two cryomodules has been successfully commissioned in 2014. The paper will discuss the superconducting radio-frequency (SRF) challenges of the accelerator. Cavities, crymodules and RF system design, preparation, and performance will be presented. (paper)

  19. Commissioning results of the HZB quadrupole resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Kleindienst, Raphael; Knobloch, Jens; Kugeler, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    Recent cavity results with niobium have demonstrated the necessity of a good understanding of both the BCS and residual resistance. For a complete picture and comparison with theory, it is essential that one can measure the RF properties as a function of field, temperature, frequency and ambient magnetic field. Standard cavity measurements are limited in their ability to change all parameters freely and in a controlled manner. On the other hand, most sample measurement setups operate at fairly high frequency, where the surface resistance is always BCS dominated. The quadrupole resonator, originally developed at CERN, is ideally suited for characterization of samples at typical cavity RF frequencies. We report on a modified version of the QPR with improved RF figures of merit for high-field operation. Experimental challenges in the commissioning run and alternate designs for simpler sample changes are shown alongside measurement results of a large grain niobium sample.

  20. Advanced photoinjector experiment photogun commissioning results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sannibale

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Advanced Photoinjector Experiment (APEX at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is dedicated to the development of a high-brightness high-repetition rate (MHz-class electron injector for x-ray free-electron laser (FEL and other applications where high repetition rates and high brightness are simultaneously required. The injector is based on a new concept rf gun utilizing a normal-conducting (NC cavity resonating in the VHF band at 186 MHz, and operating in continuous wave (cw mode in conjunction with high quantum efficiency photocathodes capable of delivering the required charge at MHz repetition rates with available laser technology. The APEX activities are staged in three phases. In phase 0, the NC cw gun is built and tested to demonstrate the major milestones to validate the gun design and performance. Also, starting in phase 0 and continuing in phase I, different photocathodes are tested at the gun energy and at full repetition rate for validating candidate materials to operate in a high-repetition rate FEL. In phase II, a room-temperature pulsed linac is added for accelerating the beam at several tens of MeV to reduce space charge effects and allow the measurement of the brightness of the beam from the gun when integrated in an injector scheme. The installation of the phase 0 beam line and the commissioning of the VHF gun are completed, phase I components are under fabrication, and initial design and specification of components and layout for phase II are under way. This paper presents the phase 0 commissioning results with emphasis on the experimental milestones that have successfully demonstrated the APEX gun capability of operating at the required performance.

  1. Phase C commissioning-Cernavoda Unit 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Phase C commissioning program includes over 500 individual tests and checks which are carefully planned and scheduled at the correct power level. Some of the major tests are the following: - heat transport thermosyphoning test at 3% Full Power (FP); - dual computer failure test at 15% FP; - turbine overspeed test and generator first synchronization; - load rejection tests at 25, 50, 75 and 100% FP; - loss of Class IV Power test at 25% FP; - shutdown system (SDS nr. 1 and SDS nr. 2) tests at >60% FP; - condensate extraction and boiler feedwater pump trip tests at 100% FP; - power cycling through reactor setback from 100 to 10 and back to 100% FP; - condenser steam discharge valve tests with reactor at 100% FP and turbine at 60% output; - low pressure and high pressure heater box-up tests at 100% FP. Progress through the Phase C program is controlled at six specific Commissioning Control Points (CCPs) which meet the Romanian Regulatory Authority (CNCAN) and Management requirements. These CCPs are the following: PI - Approval for Power increase to 5% FP; PP1 - Approval for Power increase to 25% FP; PP2 - Approval for Power increase to 50% FP; PP3 - Approval for Power increase to 75% FP; PP4 - Approval for Power increase to 100% FP. Prior to releasing each of these CCPs both Management and CNCAN complete an assessment of the 'Readiness' to proceed to the next power plateau. The readiness includes a review of the plant material condition, results of previous tests, documentation status, and operability maintainability issues. (author)

  2. British Columbia Utilities Commission 2001 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    The main responsibility of the British Columbia Utilities Commission is to regulate energy utilities under its jurisdiction to ensure that energy rates are fair and that utility operators in the province provide safe, adequate and secure service to their customers. The Commission also approves the construction of new facilities planned by utilities. It also participates in the review of utility and energy projects under the Environmental Assessment Act. Several successes were achieved in 2001 as the utility implemented its first performance plan. Oral public hearings were held for applications by Pacific Northern Gas and by Pembina Pipelines, owners of the common carrier oil pipeline from Taylor to Kamloops. A review of BC Gas' rate design to apportion utility revenue requirements fairly to different classes of customers was successfully achieved by a negotiated settlement process. In 2001, there was also a high level of proposed mergers, acquisitions and divestitures. Duke Energy Corporation's share acquisition of Westcoast Energy's two affiliated gas utilities was approved. BC Gas' application to divest its customer care activities to a joint venture company with Enbridge was also reviewed, and an oral hearing was held to review a West Kootenay Power application to sell its Kootenay River hydroelectric generation assets to Columbia Basin Trust and the Columbia Power Corp. In this case, the decision rendered was that the sale terms had to be changed so that customers could share the proceeds. The utility therefore, decided not to proceed with the sale under these conditions. The BC Hydro legislated rate freeze, which was due to expire on September 30, 2001, was extended for an additional 18 months to allow the new provincial government time to implement a new energy policy. The new energy policy is expected to give the province an energy advantage by facilitating growth and diversification in energy production while providing competition and more choice for

  3. Qinshan CANDU commissioning - a successful partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikhan, S.; Thomson, J.; Jun, G.; Guoyuan, J.

    2004-01-01

    The Qinshan CANDU Nuclear Power Plant consists of 2 x 728 MWe CANDU 6 units, built in Zhejiang Province, China, by the Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Company (TQNPC) as the owner and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) as the main contractor. The Contract between China National Nuclear Corporation (CNNC) and AECL was signed in November 1996 and became effective on February 12, 1997 with scheduled completion dates of February 12, 2003 for Unit 1 and November 12, 2003 for Unit 2. Unit 1 was declared in-service on December 31, 2002, 43 days ahead of schedule and Unit 2 was declared in service on July 20, 2003, 115 days ahead of schedule. The successful partnership between AECL, Bechtel, Hitachi and TQNPC working as a team is the key to this success. Total commissioning period from first energization of the system service transformer to in-service for both units was 20.7 months, which is significantly better than the experience at other comparable CANDU 6 units. It has clearly demonstrated the benefits of building two units together, about 6 months apart, to achieve optimum utilization of resources already mobilized for the first unit; the second unit is commissioned with less than 40% of the effort required for the first unit. Since in-service to the end of March 2004, Unit 1 has operated at a gross capacity factor of 93% and Unit 2 at 82.5%, including loss of production for one month in August 2003 to repair the failure of turbine LP blades tie-wire. (author)

  4. Advanced photoinjector experiment photogun commissioning results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sannibale, F.; Filippetto, D.; Papadopoulos, C. F.; Staples, J.; Wells, R.; Bailey, B.; Baptiste, K.; Corlett, J.; Cork, C.; De Santis, S.; Dimaggio, S.; Doolittle, L.; Doyle, J.; Feng, J.; Garcia Quintas, D.; Huang, G.; Huang, H.; Kramasz, T.; Kwiatkowski, S.; Lellinger, R.; Moroz, V.; Norum, W. E.; Padmore, H.; Pappas, C.; Portmann, G.; Vecchione, T.; Vinco, M.; Zolotorev, M.; Zucca, F.

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Photoinjector Experiment (APEX) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is dedicated to the development of a high-brightness high-repetition rate (MHz-class) electron injector for x-ray free-electron laser (FEL) and other applications where high repetition rates and high brightness are simultaneously required. The injector is based on a new concept rf gun utilizing a normal-conducting (NC) cavity resonating in the VHF band at 186 MHz, and operating in continuous wave (cw) mode in conjunction with high quantum efficiency photocathodes capable of delivering the required charge at MHz repetition rates with available laser technology. The APEX activities are staged in three phases. In phase 0, the NC cw gun is built and tested to demonstrate the major milestones to validate the gun design and performance. Also, starting in phase 0 and continuing in phase I, different photocathodes are tested at the gun energy and at full repetition rate for validating candidate materials to operate in a high-repetition rate FEL. In phase II, a room-temperature pulsed linac is added for accelerating the beam at several tens of MeV to reduce space charge effects and allow the measurement of the brightness of the beam from the gun when integrated in an injector scheme. The installation of the phase 0 beam line and the commissioning of the VHF gun are completed, phase I components are under fabrication, and initial design and specification of components and layout for phase II are under way. This paper presents the phase 0 commissioning results with emphasis on the experimental milestones that have successfully demonstrated the APEX gun capability of operating at the required performance.

  5. Preparation of physics commissioning of Mochovce units 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlacek, M.; Chrapciak, V.

    2010-01-01

    The Project 'Mochovce Units 3 and 4 Completion' started in 2009 and it will be finished in 2013. VUJE, Inc. is one of the five main Project contractors for the Nuclear Island and it is responsible, inter alia, for Mochovce Units 3 and 4 commissioning. The commissioning of Units 3 and 4 includes the stages of Physics Commissioning and Power Commissioning. This paper deals with the preparation of Mochovce Units 3 and 4 Physics Commissioning. In the paper there is presented a preparation of some commissioning documents, e.g. 'Quality Assurance Programme', 'Commissioning Programme', 'Stage Programme for Physics Commissioning', 'Test working programmes', 'Neutron-physics characteristics for Physics and Power Commissioning', etc. The scope of Physics Commissioning is presented by list of tests. For assessment of tests results so-called three-level acceptance criteria will be applied: realization, design and safety criteria. In the paper there are also presented computer codes, which will be used for neutron-physics characteristics calculation and the fuel loading scheme for the reactor core of Mochovce Unit 3. (Authors)

  6. Commissioning and Operational Experience in Power Reactor Fuel Reprocessing Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pradhan, S., E-mail: spradhan@barctara.gov.in [Tarapur Based Reprocessing Plant, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Tarapur (India)

    2014-10-15

    After completing design, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance experience of the reprocessing plants at Tarapur, Mumbai and Kalpakkam a new reprocessing plant is commissioned and put into operation at BARC, Tarapur since 2011. Subsequent to construction clearance, commissioning of the plant is taken in many steps with simultaneous review by design and safety committees. In spite of vast experience, all the staff was retrained in various aspects of process and utility operations and in operation of innovative changes incorporated in the design. Operating personnel are licensed through an elaborate procedure consisting of various check lists followed by personnel interview. Commissioning systems were divided in sub-systems. Sub-systems were commissioned independently and later integrated testing was carried out. For commissioning, extreme operating conditions were identified in consultation with designers and detailed commissioning procedures were made accordingly. Commissioning was done in different conditions to ensure safety, smooth operation and maintainability. Few modifications were carried out based on commissioning experience. Technical specifications for operation of the plant are made in consultation with designers and reviewed by safety committees. Operation of the plant was carried out after successful commissioning trials with Deep Depleted Uranium (DDU). Emergency operating procedures for each design basis accident were made. Performance of various systems, subsystems are quite satisfactory and the plant has given very good capacity factor. (author)

  7. Horizontal mergers and weak and strong competition commissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić Bojan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we analyse the horizontal merger of companies in an already concentrated industry. The participants in mergers are obliged to submit notification to the Competition Commission but they also have the option of rejecting the merger. At the time of the notification submission the participants do not know whether the Commission is strong or weak, and they can complain to the Court if the Commission prohibits the merger. We model the strategic interaction between Participants and Commission in a dynamic game of incomplete information and determine weak perfect Bayesian equilibria. The main finding of our paper is that Participants will base their decision to submit notification on their belief in a weak Commission decision and will almost completely ignore the possibility of a strong Commission decision. We also provide a detailed examination of one case from Serbian regulatory practice, which coincides with the results of our game theoretical model.

  8. Survey on the virtual commissioning of manufacturing systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi G. Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews and identifies issues in the application of virtual commissioning technology for automated manufacturing systems. While the real commissioning of a manufacturing system involves a real plant system and a real controller, the virtual commissioning deals with a virtual plant model and a real controller. The expected benefits of virtual commissioning are the reduction of debugging and correction efforts during the subsequent real commissioning stage. However, it requires a virtual plant model and hence still requires significant amount time and efforts. Two main issues are identified, the physical model construction of a virtual device, and the logical model construction of a virtual device. This paper reviews the current literature related to the two issues and proposes future research directions to achieve the full utilization of virtual commissioning technology.

  9. Israel Atomic Energy Commission 1996 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Selecting the research efforts to be highlighted in the Israel Atomic Energy Commission's Annual Report from the large body and broad spectrum of ongoing work is not an easy task. The extensive bibliography of published results attached to the report attests to the scope of this difficulty. Of the many worthwhile projects, four were chosen to represent best the current trends in the continuing R and D program at the research centers of the Israel Atomic Energy Commission. One of these trends is the growing cooperation with private industry, in an attempt to gear our R and D programs to respond to market demands. Another feature, noted already several years ago, is the extensive collaboration of our scientists and engineers with colleagues at other institutions, in Israel and abroad. some of the work reported is part of evolving international industrial cooperation projects, illustrating both these trends. Following a trend common to many nuclear research centers around the world, a substantial part of our research effort is non-nuclear in nature. This is illustrated in the first article, which deals with advances in the application of non-linear optics in diverse fields of science and technology. These include state-of-the-art solid-state lasers, rapid modulation of light signals, development and generation of tunable sources of coherent light, optical data storage and the microscopic probing of biological and inorganic samples. The present work reports on a range of R and D, from the fundamentals of non-linear optical materials to proof-of-principle demonstrations of non-linear subwavelength resolution microscopy, to fabrication of prototype commercial tunable laser systems The second report considers the microstrain characteristics in some alloys using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The research utilizes XRD line broadening effects to study the characteristics of alloys from especially prepared surfaces. These characteristics include the homogeneity of alloying

  10. 1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection adopted by the Commission in November 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This publication represents a completely new set of basic recommendations, outdating ICRP Publication 26. They aim to: a) take account of new biological information and of trends in setting safety standards; b) improve the presentation of the recommendations: c) maintain as much stability in the recommendations as is consistent with the new information. The recommendations cover quantities, biological aspects, the conceptual framework of radiological protection, proposed and continuing practices (occupational, medical and public exposure) and implementation of the Commission's Recommendations. (UK)

  11. Report by the Nuclear Liability Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Nuclear Liability Commission set up by the Ministry of Trade and Industry was to find out whether the basic principles of Finland's current nuclear liability system are appropriate and well functioning and what changes should be made to the present system, taking into account Finland's position in the European convention system (Paris and Brussels Conventions). No proposal in the form of a bill was expected of the Commission. The Finnish nuclear liability system would be further developed as part of the international convention system so that the negotiated amendments to the conventions would be enforced in Finland as soon as possible after the final adoption of the convention texts. The Nuclear Liability Act would be amended so that the principle of unlimited liability of the nuclear installation operator would be adopted instead of the principle of limited liability. The unlimited liability should be covered by an insurance limited in amount so that the installation operator must take out an insurance of at least euro 700 million to cover the injured parties. The liability of the host State would be extended to cover damages exceeding the amount subject to the liability to take out an insurance referred to above by euro 500 million. The international compensation community would cover damages exceeding euro 1.2 billion by no more than euro 300 million. In this case a total of euro 1.5 billion should be compensated from the liability insurance of the installation operator and on the basis of the liability obligation of the host State and compensation community. Later, within the limits of the insurance capacity available, the liability to take out an insurance could be increased to euro 1.2 billion by gradually raising the limit so as to finally also cover fully the share of euro 500 million of the host State referred to above. As for appeal times, the Nuclear Liability Act would be amended so that the appeal time of personal damages would be prolonged. The

  12. Israel Atomic Energy Commission 1997 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The 1997 Annual Report is published in a special year for Israel, marking the 50th anniversary of its independece and statehood. From its inception, and the election of a distinguished scientist as its first president, Israel has regarded science and technology as a central pillar for future AEC development and a lever for improved quality of life of its people. The Israel Atomic Energy Commission, which will be celebrating its own anniversary in a few years, has made a modest but significant contribution to the establishment and growth of the technological infrastructure of the country. The first article in this Annual Report focuses attention on yet another aspect of our continuing investigation of the basic properties of technologically interesting and important materials, presented in our 1994 and 1996 Annual Reports. The current entry describes an application of the nuclear Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation technique to the study of the structure and properties of metal-hydrogen compounds, of potential interest within the framework of future, environmentally attractive hydrogen-burning energy systems, and in fusion power reactors. The second article also relates to some basic aspects of nuclear fusion. A theoretical study of the behavior and properties of laser-generated hot plasmas resulted in the proposal of a new confinement scheme, in which a plasma generated by circularly polarized laser light is confined in a miniature magnetic bottle created by magnetic fields induced in the plasma by the same light. The paper discusses the conditions under which such confinement and ensuing energy gain may be achieved. Measurements of actual axial magnetic fields generated in plasma by intense circularly polarized laser light are also reported. The third report describes one of our ongoing efforts to improve and streamline the techniques and procedures used in medical applications of radioisotopes. Replacement of the customary )311 solutions for

  13. Israel Atomic Energy Commission 1997 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The 1997 Annual Report is published in a special year for Israel, marking the 50th anniversary of its independece and statehood. From its inception, and the election of a distinguished scientist as its first president, Israel has regarded science and technology as a central pillar for future AEC development and a lever for improved quality of life of its people. The Israel Atomic Energy Commission, which will be celebrating its own anniversary in a few years, has made a modest but significant contribution to the establishment and growth of the technological infrastructure of the country. The first article in this Annual Report focuses attention on yet another aspect of our continuing investigation of the basic properties of technologically interesting and important materials, presented in our 1994 and 1996 Annual Reports. The current entry describes an application of the nuclear Time Differential Perturbed Angular Correlation technique to the study of the structure and properties of metal-hydrogen compounds, of potential interest within the framework of future, environmentally attractive hydrogen-burning energy systems, and in fusion power reactors. The second article also relates to some basic aspects of nuclear fusion. A theoretical study of the behavior and properties of laser-generated hot plasmas resulted in the proposal of a new confinement scheme, in which a plasma generated by circularly polarized laser light is confined in a miniature magnetic bottle created by magnetic fields induced in the plasma by the same light. The paper discusses the conditions under which such confinement and ensuing energy gain may be achieved. Measurements of actual axial magnetic fields generated in plasma by intense circularly polarized laser light are also reported. The third report describes one of our ongoing efforts to improve and streamline the techniques and procedures used in medical applications of radioisotopes. Replacement of the customary 311 solutions for

  14. Nine centuries waiting: The experiences of Iranians surrogacy commissioning mothers

    OpenAIRE

    Zandi, Mitra; Vanaki, Zohreh; Shiva, Marziyeh; Mohammadi, Eesa

    2014-01-01

    Background: There are a few studies about commissioning mothers’ understanding from the surrogacy during 9 months of waiting for delivery in Iran and other countries. This study was conducted with an aim to explore and explain the nature of concerns (experiences) of commissioning mothers. Materials and Methods: A qualitative design with a conventional content analysis approach was used to gather and analyze the experiences of commissioning mothers. They were selected from Royan Research Centr...

  15. Radiological emergency preparedness arrangements in the European Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, V.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the different procedures established within the European Commission, which are relevant to radiological emergency planning and response. Although emergency preparedness is a national responsibility within the European Union, the Commission has clearly defined operational tasks in terms of emergency information exchange and community foodstuff regulations. In addition the Commission promotes research programmes and training courses in the field

  16. Should diabetes be commissioned through multidisciplinary networks, rather than Practice Based Commissioning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, David; English, Patrick; Robins, Peter; Craig, Andrew; Addicott, Rachael

    2011-04-01

    Diabetes is recognized as a complex, long term, largely asymptomatic condition requiring self management skills, a range of health care professionals and articulated health services. Diabetes Networks have been introduced to provide guidance from people with diabetes and local health professionals with different skills to ensure that diabetes care is well organized, sustainable and delivers quality care. We have considered the role of Diabetes Networks in the English setting. Drawing on studies of health service organization and health policy, we describe the context in which diabetes commissioning is currently occurring in England, the role of Diabetes Networks and key components for an effective Diabetes Network. We have identified that Diabetes Networks are not currently mandatory and discovered policy approaches that are likely to work against safe, timely, integrated approaches to diabetes services with potentially harmful impacts on people with diabetes in the future. Practice Based Commissioning, where it sidelines Diabetes Networks, is a particular concern. We have identified key components of Diabetes Networks including explicit frameworks for leadership, membership, funding, decision making, communication and action. Diabetes is a condition requiring collaboration between all involved. Diabetes Networks include patients and all relevant health professionals and should dictate what and how diabetes care should be commissioned within the local health economy. Copyright © 2010 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Kennedy Report: Commission Evaluates High School Journalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, Ann

    1974-01-01

    Presents excerpts from the report of the Kennedy Commission of Inquiry into High School Journalism, concentrating on censorship, minority participation, journalism education, established media, and censorship issues.

  18. The ATLAS Inner Detector commissioning and calibration

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, G.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A.A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, D.L.; Addy, T.N.; Adelman, J.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Adye, T.; Aefsky, S.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J.A.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S.P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahsan, M.; Aielli, G.; Akdogan, T.; Akesson, T.P.A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A.V.; Aktas, A.; Alam, M.S.; Alam, M.A.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I.N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexandre, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Aliev, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alison, J.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P.P.; Allwood-Spiers, S.E.; Almond, J.; Aloisio, A.; Alon, R.; Alonso, A.; Alviggi, M.G.; Amako, K.; Amelung, C.; Amorim, A.; Amoros, G.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C.F.; Anderson, K.J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Anduaga, X.S.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Antos, J.; Antunovic, B.; Anulli, F.; Aoun, S.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A.T.H.; Archambault, J.P.; Arfaoui, S.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, T.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A.J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Arutinov, D.; Asai, M.; Asai, S.; Asfandiyarov, R.; Ask, S.; Asman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Atoian, G.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, D.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Azuma, Y.; Baak, M.A.; Bach, A.M.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J.T.; Baker, O.K.; Baker, M.D.; Baker, S.; Baltasar Dos, F.Santos Pedrosa; Banas, E.; Banerjee, P.; Banerjee, S.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S.P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barber, T.; Barberio, E.L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Bardin, D.Y.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnett, B.M.; Barnett, R.M.; Baroncelli, A.; Barr, A.J.; Barreiro, F.; Guimara, J.Barreiro; Barrillon, P.; Bartoldus, R.; Bartsch, D.; Bates, R.L.; Batkova, L.; Batley, J.R.; Battaglia, A.; Battistin, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H.S.; Bazalova, M.; Beare, B.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P.H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, G.A.; Beck, H.P.; Beckingham, M.; Becks, K.H.; Beddall, A.J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V.A.; Bee, C.; Begel, M.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Behera, P.K.; Beimforde, M.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, P.J.; Bell, W.H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, M.; Belloni, A.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Ben Ami, S.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B.H.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G.P.; Benjamin, D.P.; Benoit, M.; Bensinger, J.R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, E.; Beringer, J.; Bernat, P.; Bernhard, R.; Bernius, C.; Berry, T.; Bertin, A.; Besana, M.I.; Besson, N.; Bethke, S.; Bianchi, R.M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biesiada, J.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bitenc, U.; Black, K.M.; Blair, R.E.; Blanchard, J-B.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G.J.; Bocci, A.; Boehler, M.; Boek, J.; Boelaert, N.; Boser, S.; Bogaerts, J.A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V.G.; Bondioli, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Bordoni, S.; Borer, C.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borjanovic, I.; Borroni, S.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boterenbrood, H.; Bouchami, J.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E.V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I.R.; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G.W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J.E.; Braun, H.M.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Britton, D.; Brochu, F.M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodet, E.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, W.K.; Brown, G.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P.A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Brunet, S.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bucci, F.; Buchanan, J.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A.G.; Budagov, I.A.; Budick, B.; Buscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Bulekov, O.; Bunse, M.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgess, T.; Burke, S.; Busato, E.; Bussey, P.; Buszello, C.P.; Butin, F.; Butler, B.; Butler, J.M.; Buttar, C.M.; Butterworth, J.M.; Byatt, T.; Caballero, J.; Urban, S.Cabrera; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Calkins, R.; Caloba, L.P.; Calvet, D.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Canale, V.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Cantero, J.; Capasso, L.; Capeans Garrido, M.D.M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Caramarcu, C.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carrillo Montoya, G.D.; Carron Montero, S.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M.P.; Cascella, M.; Castaneda Hernadez, A.M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.F.; Cataldi, G.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J.R.; Cattai, A.; Cattani, G.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerqueira, A.S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cetin, S.A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K.; Chapman, J.D.; Chapman, J.W.; Chareyre, E.; Charlton, D.G.; Chavda, V.; Cheatham, S.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S.V.; Chelkov, G.A.; Chen, H.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V.F.; Cherkaoui El, R.Moursli; Tcherniatine, V.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Cheung, S.L.; Chevalier, L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Childers, J.T.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chizhov, V.; Choudalakis, G.; Chouridou, S.; Christidi, I.A.; Christov, A.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M.L.; Chudoba, J.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A.K.; Ciftci, R.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M.D.; Ciocca, C.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, P.J.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J.C.; Clement, B.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coggeshall, J.; Cogneras, E.; Colijn, A.P.; Collard, C.; Collins, N.J.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Colon, G.; Muino, P.Conde; Coniavitis, E.; Conidi, M.C.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B.D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A.M.; Cooper-Smith, N.J.; Copic, K.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M.J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Cote, D.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Cowan, G.; Cowden, C.; Cox, B.E.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Crupi, R.; Crepe-Renaudin, S.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C.J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; D'Orazio, A.; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Danielsson, H.O.; Dannheim, D.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darlea, G.L.; Davey, W.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Davies, M.; Davison, A.R.; Dawson, I.; Daya, R.K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Castro, P.E.Faria Salgado; De Cecco, S.; de Graat, J.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De Mora, L.; De Oliveira, M.Branco; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J.B.; De Zorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedovich, D.V.; Degenhardt, J.; Dehchar, M.; Del Papa, C.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Dell'Asta, L.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P.A.; Deluca, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demirkoz, B.; Deng, J.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S.P.; Derkaoui, J.E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deviveiros, P.O.; Dewhurst, A.; DeWilde, B.; Dhaliwal, S.; Dhullipudi, R.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Diaz, M.A.; Diblen, F.; Diehl, E.B.; Dietrich, J.; Dietzsch, T.A.; Diglio, S.; Dindar Yagci, K.; Dingfelder, D.J.; Dionisi, C.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; Vale, M.A.B.do; Do Valle, A.Wemans; Doan, T.K.O.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Doglioni, C.; Doherty, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B.A.; Dohmae, T.; Donega, M.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M.T.; Doxiadis, A.; Doyle, A.T.; Drasal, Z.; Dris, M.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dudziak, F.; Duhrssen, M.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M-A.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Dushkin, A.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Duren, M.; Ebenstein, W.L.; Ebke, J.; Eckweiler, S.; Edmonds, K.; Edwards, C.A.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Ehrich, T.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Ellis, K.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engl, A.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A.I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Fabbri, L.; Fabre, C.; Facius, K.; Fakhrutdinov, R.M.; Falciano, S.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farley, J.; Farooque, T.; Farrington, S.M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fatholahzadeh, B.; Fayard, L.; Fayette, F.; Febbraro, R.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O.L.; Fedorko, W.; Feligioni, L.; Felzmann, C.U.; Feng, C.; Feng, E.J.; Fenyuk, A.B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferland, J.; Fernandes, B.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrara, V.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M.L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipcic, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Fiolhais, M.C.N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, G.; Fisher, M.J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleckner, J.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Flick, T.; Flores Castillo, L.R.; Flowerdew, M.J.; Fonseca Martin, T.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fortin, D.; Fournier, D.; Fowler, A.J.; Fowler, K.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Franchino, S.; Francis, D.; Franklin, M.; Franz, S.; Fraternali, M.; Fratina, S.; Freestone, J.; French, S.T.; Froeschl, R.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J.A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gadfort, T.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Gallas, E.J.; Gallo, V.; Gallop, B.J.; Gallus, P.; Galyaev, E.; Gan, K.K.; Gao, Y.S.; Gaponenko, A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garcia, C.; Navarro, J.E.Garcia; Gardner, R.W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I.L.; Gay, C.; Gaycken, G.; Gazis, E.N.; Ge, P.; Gee, C.N.P.; Geich-Gimbel, Ch.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M.H.; Gentile, S.; Georgatos, F.; George, S.; Gershon, A.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, S.M.; Gilbert, L.M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gilewsky, V.; Gingrich, D.M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.P.; Giordano, R.; Giorgi, F.M.; Giovannini, P.; Giraud, P.F.; Girtler, P.; Giugni, D.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B.K.; Gladilin, L.K.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K.W.; Glonti, G.L.; Godfrey, J.; Godlewski, J.; Goebel, M.; Gopfert, T.; Goeringer, C.; Gossling, C.; Gottfert, T.; Goggi, V.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Golling, T.; Gomes, A.; Gomez Fajardo, L.S.; Goncalo, R.; Gonella, L.; Gong, C.; Gonzalez de la Hoz, S.; Gonzalez Silva, M.L.; Gonzalez-Sevilla, S.; Goodson, J.J.; Goossens, L.; Gordon, H.A.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorisek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gosdzik, B.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M.I.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Gouighri, M.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M.P.; Goussiou, A.G.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grafstrom, P.; Grahn, K-J.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassi, V.; Gratchev, V.; Grau, N.; Gray, H.M.; Gray, J.A.; Graziani, E.; Green, B.; Greenshaw, T.; Greenwood, Z.D.; Gregor, I.M.; Grenier, P.; Griesmayer, E.; Griffiths, J.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grillo, A.A.; Grimm, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grishkevich, Y.V.; Groh, M.; Groll, M.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Groth-Jensen, J.; Grybel, K.; Guicheney, C.; Guida, A.; Guillemin, T.; Guler, H.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Gusakov, Y.; Gutierrez, A.; Gutierrez, P.; Guttman, N.; Gutzwiller, O.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C.B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Hadavand, H.K.; Hadley, D.R.; Haefner, P.; Hartel, R.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakobyan, H.; Haller, J.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, A.; Hamilton, S.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hance, M.; Handel, C.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, J.R.; Hansen, J.B.; Hansen, J.D.; Hansen, P.H.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Hare, G.A.; Harenberg, T.; Harrington, R.D.; Harris, O.M.; Harrison, K.; Hartert, J.; Hartjes, F.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, S.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hashemi, K.; Hassani, S.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Havranek, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.J.; Hayakawa, T.; Hayward, H.S.; Haywood, S.J.; Head, S.J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heim, S.; Heinemann, B.; Heisterkamp, S.; Helary, L.; Heller, M.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Hemperek, T.; Henderson, R.C.W.; Henke, M.; Henrichs, A.; Henriques Correia, A.M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hensel, C.; Henss, T.; Hernandez Jimenez, Y.; Hershenhorn, A.D.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hessey, N.P.; Higon-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, J.C.; Hiller, K.H.; Hillert, S.; Hillier, S.J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hines, E.; Hirose, M.; Hirsch, F.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hobbs, J.; Hod, N.; Hodgkinson, M.C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M.R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holy, T.; Holzbauer, J.L.; Homma, Y.; Horazdovsky, T.; Hori, T.; Horn, C.; Horner, S.; Horvat, S.; Hostachy, J-Y.; Hou, S.; Hoummada, A.; Howe, T.; Hrivnac, J.; Hryn'ova, T.; Hsu, P.J.; Hsu, S.C.; Huang, G.S.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, T.B.; Hughes, E.W.; Hughes, G.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Iakovidis, G.; Ibragimov, I.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Iengo, P.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Iliadis, D.; Ince, T.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Irles Quiles, A.; Ishikawa, A.; Ishino, M.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Isobe, T.; Issever, C.; Istin, S.; Itoh, Y.; Ivashin, A.V.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J.M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, B.; Jackson, J.N.; Jackson, P.; Jaekel, M.R.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakobsen, S.; Jakubek, J.; Jana, D.; Jankowski, E.; Jansen, E.; Jantsch, A.; Janus, M.; Jared, R.C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jeanty, L.; Plante, I.Jen-La; Jenni, P.; Jez, P.; Jezequel, S.; Ji, W.; Jia, J.; Jiang, Y.; Jimenez Belenguer, M.; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K.E.; Johansson, P.; Johnert, S.; Johns, K.A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, G.; Jones, R.W.L.; Jones, T.J.; Jorge, P.M.; Joseph, J.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Kabachenko, V.V.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagan, M.; Kaiser, S.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kalinin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L.V.; Kama, S.; Kanaya, N.; Kaneda, M.; Kantserov, V.A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Kar, D.; Karagounis, M.; Karagoz Unel, M.; Karnevskiy, M.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A.N.; Kashif, L.; Kasmi, A.; Kass, R.D.; Kastanas, A.; Kastoryano, M.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katzy, J.; Kaushik, V.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Kawamura, G.; Kayl, M.S.; Kayumov, F.; Kazanin, V.A.; Kazarinov, M.Y.; Keates, J.R.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P.T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Kelly, M.; Kenyon, M.; Kepka, O.; Kerschen, N.; Kersevan, B.P.; Kersten, S.; Kessoku, K.; Khakzad, M.; Khalil-zada, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Khomich, A.; Khoriauli, G.; Khovanskiy, N.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kim, H.; Kim, M.S.; Kim, P.C.; Kim, S.H.; Kind, O.; Kind, P.; King, B.T.; Kirk, J.; Kirsch, G.P.; Kirsch, L.E.; Kiryunin, A.E.; Kisielewska, D.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiyamura, H.; Kladiva, E.; Klein, M.; Klein, U.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klemetti, M.; Klier, A.; Klimentov, A.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E.B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P.F.; Klous, S.; Kluge, E.E.; Kluge, T.; Kluit, P.; Klute, M.; Kluth, S.; Knecht, N.S.; Kneringer, E.; Ko, B.R.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Koblitz, B.; Kocian, M.; Kocnar, A.; Kodys, P.; Koneke, K.; Konig, A.C.; Koenig, S.; Kopke, L.; Koetsveld, F.; Koevesarki, P.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kohn, F.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolesnikov, V.; Koletsou, I.; Koll, J.; Kollar, D.; Kolos, S.; Kolya, S.D.; Komar, A.A.; Komaragiri, J.R.; Kondo, T.; Kono, T.; Konoplich, R.; Konovalov, S.P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Koperny, S.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Korn, A.; Korolkov, I.; Korolkova, E.V.; Korotkov, V.A.; Kortner, O.; Kostka, P.; Kostyukhin, V.V.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V.M.; Kotov, K.Y.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Koutsman, A.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, H.; Kowalski, T.Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A.S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V.A.; Kramberger, G.; Krasny, M.W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Kraus, J.; Kreisel, A.; Krejci, F.; Kretzschmar, J.; Krieger, N.; Krieger, P.; Kroeninger, K.; Kroha, H.; Kroll, J.; Kroseberg, J.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Kruger, H.; Krumshteyn, Z.V.; Kubota, T.; Kuehn, S.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kuhn, D.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kuleshov, S.; Kummer, C.; Kuna, M.; Kunkle, J.; Kupco, A.; Kurashige, H.; Kurata, M.; Kurchaninov, L.L.; Kurochkin, Y.A.; Kus, V.; Kwee, R.; La Rosa, A.; La Rotonda, L.; Labbe, J.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V.R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lamanna, M.; Lampen, C.L.; Lampl, W.; Lancon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M.P.J.; Lane, J.L.; Lankford, A.J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Laplace, S.; Lapoire, C.; Laporte, J.F.; Lari, T.; Larner, A.; Lassnig, M.; Laurelli, P.; Lavrijsen, W.; Laycock, P.; Lazarev, A.B.; Lazzaro, A.; Le Dortz, O.; Le Guirriec, E.; Le Menedeu, E.; Le Vine, M.; Lebedev, A.; Lebel, C.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, H.; Lee, J.S.H.; Lee, S.C.; Lefebvre, M.; Legendre, M.; LeGeyt, B.C.; Legger, F.; Leggett, C.; Lehmacher, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lei, X.; Leitner, R.; Lellouch, D.; Lellouch, J.; Lendermann, V.; Leney, K.J.C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzen, G.; Lenzi, B.; Leonhardt, K.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, J-R.; Lester, C.G.; Leung Fook, A.Cheong; Leveque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L.J.; Leyton, M.; Li, H.; Li, X.; Liang, Z.; Liang, Z.; Liberti, B.; Lichard, P.; Lichtnecker, M.; Lie, K.; Liebig, W.; Lilley, J.N.; Limosani, A.; Limper, M.; Lin, S.C.; Linnemann, J.T.; Lipeles, E.; Lipinsky, L.; Lipniacka, A.; Liss, T.M.; Lissauer, D.; Lister, A.; Litke, A.M.; Liu, C.; Liu, D.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.B.; Liu, M.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Lloyd, S.L.; Lobodzinska, E.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W.S.; Lockwitz, S.; Loddenkoetter, T.; Loebinger, F.K.; Loginov, A.; Loh, C.W.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Long, R.E.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Losada, M.; Loscutoff, P.; Lou, X.; Lounis, A.; Loureiro, K.F.; Lovas, L.; Love, J.; Love, P.A.; Lowe, A.J.; Lu, F.; Lubatti, H.J.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, D.; Ludwig, I.; Luehring, F.; Luisa, L.; Lumb, D.; Luminari, L.; Lund, E.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Lundberg, J.; Lundquist, J.; Lynn, D.; Lys, J.; Lytken, E.; Ma, H.; Ma, L.L.; Macana Goia, J.A.; Maccarrone, G.; Macchiolo, A.; Macek, B.; Machado Miguens, J.; Mackeprang, R.; Madaras, R.J.; Mader, W.F.; Maenner, R.; Maeno, T.; Mattig, P.; Mattig, S.; Magalhaes Martins, P.J.; Magradze, E.; Mahalalel, Y.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahmood, A.; Maiani, C.; Maidantchik, C.; Maio, A.; Majewski, S.; Makida, Y.; Makouski, M.; Makovec, N.; Malecki, Pa.; Malecki, P.; Maleev, V.P.; Malek, F.; Mallik, U.; Malon, D.; Maltezos, S.; Malyshev, V.; Malyukov, S.; Mambelli, M.; Mameghani, R.; Mamuzic, J.; Mandelli, L.; Mandic, I.; Mandrysch, R.; Maneira, J.; Mangeard, P.S.; Manjavidze, I.D.; Manning, P.M.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Mapelli, A.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchand, J.F.; Marchese, F.; Marchiori, G.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marino, C.P.; Marroquim, F.; Marshall, Z.; Marti-Garcia, S.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, A.J.; Martin, B.; Martin, B.; Martin, F.F.; Martin, J.P.; Martin, T.A.; Dit Latour, B.Martin; Martinez, M.; Martinez Outschoorn, V.; Martini, A.; Martyniuk, A.C.; Marzano, F.; Marzin, A.; Masetti, L.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A.L.; Massa, I.; Massol, N.; Mastroberardino, A.; Masubuchi, T.; Matsunaga, H.; Matsushita, T.; Mattravers, C.; Maxfield, S.J.; Mayne, A.; Mazini, R.; Mazur, M.; Mazzanti, M.; Mc Donald, J.; Mc Kee, S.P.; McCarn, A.; McCarthy, R.L.; McCubbin, N.A.; McFarlane, K.W.; McGlone, H.; Mchedlidze, G.; McMahon, S.J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meade, A.; Mechnich, J.; Mechtel, M.; Medinnis, M.; Meera-Lebbai, R.; Meguro, T.M.; Mehlhase, S.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meirose, B.; Melachrinos, C.; Mellado Garcia, B.R.; Mendoza Navas, L.; Meng, Z.; Menke, S.; Meoni, E.; Mermod, P.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F.S.; Messina, A.M.; Metcalfe, J.; Mete, A.S.; Meyer, J-P.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, J.; Meyer, T.C.; Meyer, W.T.; Miao, J.; Michal, S.; Micu, L.; Middleton, R.P.; Migas, S.; Mijovic, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikuz, M.; Miller, D.W.; Mills, W.J.; Mills, C.M.; Milov, A.; Milstead, D.A.; Milstein, D.; Minaenko, A.A.; Minano, M.; Minashvili, I.A.; Mincer, A.I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Ming, Y.; Mir, L.M.; Mirabelli, G.; Misawa, S.; Miscetti, S.; Misiejuk, A.; Mitrevski, J.; Mitsou, V.A.; Miyagawa, P.S.; Mjornmark, J.U.; Mladenov, D.; Moa, T.; Moed, S.; Moeller, V.; Monig, K.; Moser, N.; Mohr, W.; Mohrdieck-Mock, S.; Moles-Valls, R.; Molina-Perez, J.; Monk, J.; Monnier, E.; Montesano, S.; Monticelli, F.; Moore, R.W.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Morais, A.; Morel, J.; Morello, G.; Moreno, D.; Llacer, M.Moreno; Morettini, P.; Morii, M.; Morley, A.K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morozov, S.V.; Morris, J.D.; Moser, H.G.; Mosidze, M.; Moss, J.; Mount, R.; Mountricha, E.; Mouraviev, S.V.; Moyse, E.J.W.; Mudrinic, M.; Mueller, F.; Mueller, J.; Mueller, K.; Muller, T.A.; Muenstermann, D.; Muir, A.; Munwes, Y.; Murillo Garcia, R.; Murray, W.J.; Mussche, I.; Musto, E.; Myagkov, A.G.; Myska, M.; Nadal, J.; Nagai, K.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nairz, A.M.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Nakatsuka, H.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Nash, M.; Nation, N.R.; Nattermann, T.; Naumann, T.; Navarro, G.; Nderitu, S.K.; Neal, H.A.; Nebot, E.; Nechaeva, P.; Negri, A.; Negri, G.; Nelson, A.; Nelson, T.K.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A.A.; Nessi, M.; Neubauer, M.S.; Neusiedl, A.; Neves, R.N.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F.M.; Nickerson, R.B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicolas, L.; Nicoletti, G.; Nicquevert, B.; Niedercorn, F.; Nielsen, J.; Nikiforov, A.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, H.; Nilsson, P.; Nisati, A.; Nishiyama, T.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L.; Nomachi, M.; Nomidis, I.; Nordberg, M.; Nordkvist, B.; Notz, D.; Novakova, J.; Nozaki, M.; Nozicka, M.; Nugent, I.M.; Nuncio-Quiroz, A.E.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nurse, E.; O'Neil, D.C.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F.G.; Oberlack, H.; Ochi, A.; Oda, S.; Odaka, S.; Odier, J.; Ogren, H.; Oh, A.; Oh, S.H.; Ohm, C.C.; Ohshima, T.; Ohshita, H.; Ohsugi, T.; Okada, S.; Okawa, H.; Okumura, Y.; Okuyama, T.; Olchevski, A.G.; Oliveira, M.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver, J.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olivito, D.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P.U.E.; Oram, C.J.; Oreglia, M.J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R.S.; Ortega, E.O.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Osuna, C.; Ottersbach, J.P.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Owen, M.; Owen, S.; Oyarzun, A.; Ozcan, V.E.; Ozone, K.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pajchel, K.; Palestini, S.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Palmer, J.D.; Pan, Y.B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Panes, B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Papadopoulou, Th.D.; Park, S.J.; Park, W.; Parker, M.A.; Parker, S.I.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J.A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passeri, A.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pasztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Pater, J.R.; Patricelli, S.; Patwa, A.; Pauly, T.; Peak, L.S.; Pecsy, M.; Pedraza Morales, M.I.; Peleganchuk, S.V.; Peng, H.; Penson, A.; Penwell, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perez, K.; Perez Codina, E.; Perez Garcia-Estan, M.T.; Perez Reale, V.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrino, R.; Persembe, S.; Perus, P.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Petersen, B.A.; Petersen, T.C.; Petit, E.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petschull, D.; Petteni, M.; Pezoa, R.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A.W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccinini, M.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pilkington, A.D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J.L.; Pinto, B.; Pizio, C.; Placakyte, R.; Plamondon, M.; Pleier, M.A.; Poblaguev, A.; Poddar, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poffenberger, P.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polci, F.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Poll, J.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomeroy, D.; Pommes, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B.G.; Popovic, D.S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Porter, R.; Pospelov, G.E.; Pospisil, S.; Potekhin, M.; Potrap, I.N.; Potter, C.J.; Potter, C.T.; Potter, K.P.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Pravahan, R.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L.E.; Prichard, P.M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Prudent, X.; Przysiezniak, H.; Psoroulas, S.; Ptacek, E.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qin, Z.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D.R.; Quayle, W.B.; Quinonez, F.; Raas, M.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radics, B.; Rador, T.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rahimi, A.M.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rammes, M.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Read, A.L.; Rebuzzi, D.M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reinsch, A.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z.L.; Renkel, P.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richards, A.; Richards, R.A.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Rios, R.R.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Roa Romero, D.A.; Robertson, S.H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J.E.M.; Robinson, M.; Robson, A.; Rocha de Lima, J.G.; Roda, C.; Roda Dos, D.Santos; Rodriguez, D.; Rodriguez Garcia, Y.; Roe, S.; Rohne, O.; Rojo, V.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V.M.; Romeo, G.; Romero Maltrana, D.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, G.A.; Rosselet, L.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, L.P.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C.R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Ruckert, B.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rud, V.I.; Rudolph, G.; Ruhr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rumyantsev, L.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N.A.; Rutherfoord, J.P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ruzicka, P.; Ryabov, Y.F.; Ryan, P.; Rybkin, G.; Rzaeva, S.; Saavedra, A.F.; Sadrozinski, H.F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.S.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvachua Ferrando, B.M.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B.H.; Sanchis Lozano, M.A.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H.G.; Sanders, M.P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandhu, P.; Sandstroem, R.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D.P.C.; Sanny, B.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Saraiva, J.G.; Sarangi, T.; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A.Y.; Savinov, V.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, D.H.; Says, L.P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D.A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schafer, U.; Schaetzel, S.; Schaffer, A.C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R.D.; Schamov, A.G.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V.A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M.I.; Schiavi, C.; Schieck, J.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitz, M.; Schonig, A.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schram, M.; Schreiner, A.; Schroeder, C.; Schroer, N.; Schroers, M.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.C.; Schumacher, J.W.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B.A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W.G.; Searcy, J.; Sedykh, E.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S.C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J.M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D.M.; Sellden, B.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M.E.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L.Y.; Shank, J.T.; Shao, Q.T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P.B.; Shaw, K.; Sherman, D.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shmeleva, A.; Shochet, M.J.; Shupe, M.A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silbert, O.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, D.; Silverstein, S.B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N.B.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A.N.; Sivoklokov, S.Yu.; Sjoelin, J.; Sjursen, T.B.; Skovpen, K.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloper, J.; Sluka, T.; Smakhtin, V.; Smirnov, S.Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, B.C.; Smith, D.; Smith, K.M.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A.A.; Snow, S.W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C.A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A.A.; Solovyanov, O.V.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sosebee, M.; Soukharev, A.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiwoks, R.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Spurlock, B.; Denis, R.D.St.; Stahl, T.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S.N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R.W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E.A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Stastny, J.; Stavina, P.; Steele, G.; Steinbach, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H.J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stevenson, K.; Stewart, G.; Stockton, M.C.; Stoerig, K.; Stoicea, G.; Stonjek, S.; Strachota, P.; Stradling, A.R.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Strohmer, R.; Strom, D.M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strube, J.; Stugu, B.; Sturm, P.; Soh, D.A.; Su, D.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V.V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, X.H.; Sundermann, J.E.; Suruliz, K.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M.R.; Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Szymocha, T.; Sanchez, J.; Ta, D.; Tackmann, K.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takahashi, Y.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M.C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tardif, D.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G.F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tassi, E.; Tatarkhanov, M.; Taylor, C.; Taylor, F.E.; Taylor, G.N.; Taylor, R.P.; Taylor, W.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P.K.; Tennenbaum-Katan, Y.D.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R.J.; Therhaag, J.; Thioye, M.; Thoma, S.; Thomas, J.P.; Thompson, E.N.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, P.D.; Thompson, R.J.; Thompson, A.S.; Thomson, E.; Thun, R.P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V.O.; Tikhonov, Y.A.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires, F.J.Viegas; Tisserant, S.; Toczek, B.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Toggerson, B.; Tojo, J.; Tokar, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N.D.; Torchiani, I.; Torrence, E.; Pastor, E.Torro; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D.R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I.M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Trinh, T.N.; Tripiana, M.F.; Triplett, N.; Trischuk, W.; Trivedi, A.; Trocme, B.; Troncon, C.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J.C-L.; Tsiakiris, M.; Tsiareshka, P.V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E.G.; Tsukerman, I.I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsung, J.W.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuggle, J.M.; Turecek, D.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P.M.; Twomey, M.S.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Uchida, K.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urbaniec, D.; Urkovsky, E.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Uslenghi, M.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valente, P.; Valentinetti, S.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J.A.; Van Berg, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; van der Poel, E.; van der Ster, D.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Vandelli, W.; Vaniachine, A.; Vankov, P.; Vannucci, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E.W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K.E.; Vasilyeva, L.; Vassilakopoulos, V.I.; Vazeille, F.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J.C.; Vetterli, M.C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G.H.A.; Villa, M.; Villani, E.G.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M.G.; Vinek, E.; Vinogradov, V.B.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vitells, O.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vlasak, M.; Vlasov, N.; Vogel, A.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Loeben, J.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorwerk, V.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Voss, T.T.; Vossebeld, J.H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vu Anh, T.; Vudragovic, D.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Wagner, P.; Walbersloh, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wang, C.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.M.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C.P.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, M.F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, A.T.; Waugh, B.M.; Weber, M.D.; Weber, M.; Weber, M.S.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A.R.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wells, P.S.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Werth, M.; Werthenbach, U.; Wessels, M.; Whalen, K.; White, A.; White, M.J.; White, S.; Whitehead, S.R.; Whiteson, D.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F.J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik, L.A.M.; Wildauer, A.; Wildt, M.A.; Wilkens, H.G.; Williams, E.; Williams, H.H.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J.A.; Wilson, M.G.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Wittgen, M.; Wolter, M.W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M.J.; Wraight, K.; Wright, C.; Wright, D.; Wrona, B.; Wu, S.L.; Wu, X.; Wulf, E.; Wynne, B.M.; Xaplanteris, L.; Xella, S.; Xie, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, N.; Yamada, M.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamamura, T.; Yamaoka, J.; Yamazaki, T.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, U.K.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W-M.; Yao, Y.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S.P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Zajacova, Z.; Zambrano, V.; Zanello, L.; Zaytsev, A.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zemla, A.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, O.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; della Porta, G.Zevi; Zhan, Z.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C.G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zimmermann, R.; Zimmermann, S.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zivkovic, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Inner Detector is a composite tracking system consisting of silicon pixels, silicon strips and straw tubes in a 2 T magnetic field. Its installation was completed in August 2008 and the detector took part in data- taking with single LHC beams and cosmic rays. The initial detector operation, hardware commissioning and in-situ calibrations are described. Tracking performance has been measured with 7.6 million cosmic-ray events, collected using a tracking trigger and reconstructed with modular pattern-recognition and fitting software. The intrinsic hit efficiency and tracking trigger efficiencies are close to 100%. Lorentz angle measurements for both electrons and holes, specific energy-loss calibration and transition radiation turn-on measurements have been performed. Different alignment techniques have been used to reconstruct the detector geometry. After the initial alignment, a transverse impact parameter resolution of 22.1+/-0.9 {\\mu}m and a relative momentum resolution {\\sigma}p/p = (4.83+/-0.16)...

  19. Commission for energy regulation - 2012 Activity Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    After a presentation of the organisation, role and missions of the French Commission for Energy Regulation (CRE), and of its relationship with other institutional actors, this report describes and comments the action of the CRE in the fields of dialogue and transparency. It presents and comments key figures regarding the electricity and gas retail markets. It reports and comments the European reaction to the cold peak of February 2012 (historical peak for consumption and prices, inquiry on the causes of these price peaks, need of a European market). The next part addresses the relationship between electricity grids and territories (solidarity between electricity grids as the basis of the Europe of energy, evolution of French grids to face new needs and to take regional and local dimensions into account). Another part addresses gas infrastructures which are considered as the cornerstone of a good operation for the French market and for the integration of the European energy market (gas world market in 2012, definition of a target model for the gas market by European regulators, evolution of the French market in compliance with the European target model, new tariffs for the use of natural gas transport networks). The report then addresses the development of renewable energies: actions of CRE (bidding, opinion of tariffs), influence of renewable energy development on electricity prices on gross markets, needed evolution of electricity grids. A last part addresses the issues of energy cost, demand management, and struggle against energy poverty

  20. HYTEST Phase I Facility Commissioning and Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee P. Shunn; Richard D. Boardman; Shane J. Cherry; Craig G. Rieger

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this document is to report the first year accomplishments of two coordinated Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) projects that utilize a hybrid energy testing laboratory that couples various reactors to investigate system reactance behavior. This work is the first phase of a series of hybrid energy research and testing stations - referred to hereafter as HYTEST facilities – that are planned for construction and operation at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A HYTEST Phase I facility was set up and commissioned in Bay 9 of the Bonneville County Technology Center (BCTC). The purpose of this facility is to utilize the hydrogen and oxygen that is produced by the High Temperature Steam Electrolysis test reactors operating in Bay 9 to support the investigation of kinetic phenomena and transient response of integrated reactor components. This facility provides a convenient scale for conducting scoping tests of new reaction concepts, materials performance, new instruments, and real-time data collection and manipulation for advance process controls. An enclosed reactor module was assembled and connected to a new ventilation system equipped with a variable-speed exhaust blower to mitigate hazardous gas exposures, as well as contract with hot surfaces. The module was equipped with a hydrogen gas pump and receiver tank to supply high quality hydrogen to chemical reactors located in the hood.

  1. ATLAS TDAQ System Integration and Commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Negri, A

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS detector will be exposed to proton proton collisions at a center of mass energy of 14 TeV with the bunch crossing rate of 40 MHz. A three-level trigger system has been designed to reduce this rate down to the level at which only interesting events are fully reconstructed. The level 1 trigger reduces the rate down to 75 kHz via custom-built electronics. The Region of Interest Builder delivers the Region of Interest records to the second level trigger which runs the selection algorithms with the commodity processors and brings the rate further down to ~ 3.5 kHz. Finally the Event Filter reduces the rate down to ~ 200 Hz for permanent storage. We review the trigger and data acquisition architecture and its in situ commissioning using almost full detectors. Results on system functionality and performance based on the cosmic data, early experience on LHC beam in 2008 and preselected simulated events are presented.

  2. Innovative ultrasonics for power plant commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, R.V.; Alikhan, S.

    1983-05-01

    During the commissioning of a nuclear power plant, the usual role of ultrasonics is associated with nondestructive testing of welds. There is, however, a variety of undesirable conditions associated with the fluids carried through the various reactor systems which may be just as important to station operation. A variety of unusual ultrasonic techniques has been developed for testing fluid systems at the Point Lepreau Generating Station. This paper uses the experience gained at the Point Lepreau reactor to illustrate the valuable information which can be gained from these measurements, such as: fluid level in pipes and headers; fluid level in pressure vessels; detection, and sizing of debris in pipes; in situ measurement and verification of orifice condition; detection and location of cavitation, water hammer, valve leakage; quantitative measurement of gate movement within the body of an inservice valve; determination of valve position; detection and imaging of flow separation; detection and location of leaks in concrete containment structures; verification of design flows; balancing of loop flows; and detection of low flow. The application of these techniques at other reactor sites is also discussed

  3. COMMISSIONING AND DETECTOR PERFORMANCE GROUPS (DPG)

    CERN Multimedia

    Darin Acosta

    Since the last CMS week we have continued the regular mid week global runs and conducted the first CRUZET this year at the beginning of June. The fact that the tracker was not available yet due to the cooling plant refurbishing has limited the scope of these global runs. The focus has been on verifying the robustness of the various subsystem data acquisition chains under realistic LHC-like trigger conditions. In the last few weeks we have been able to take runs of many hours at a Level-1 trigger rate of 90 kHz with less than 10% deadtime. As usual a lot of issues have been found and dealt with, and the firmware of the various subsystems have all been upgraded/fixed. Worth reporting is the fact that now both endcaps are read-out completely (including the RPC on the negative side) and the local commissioning of the preshower detector has been steadily progressing, with the last firmware fixes in hand to be able to join the global run campaign. The Pixel system has been part of 3 global runs already and has pr...

  4. AEgIS experiment commissioning at CERN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnicky, D. [University of Genoa, Dept of Physics, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Genova, Via Dodecaneso 33, 16146 Genova (Italy); Aghion, S. [Politecnico di Milano, LNESS and Dept of Physics, Via Anzani 42, 22100 Como, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Milano, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Russian Federation); Amsler, C.; Ariga, A.; Ariga, T.; Ereditato, A.; Kawada, J.; Kimura, M.; Pistillo, C.; Scampoli, P.; Storey, J. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, University of Bern, 3012 Bern (Switzerland); Belov, A. S.; Gninenko, S. N. [Institute for Nuclear Research of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 117312 (Russian Federation); Bonomi, G.; Subieta Vasquez, M. A. [University of Brescia, Dept of Mech. and Indust. Engineering, Via Branze 38, 25133 Brescia, Italy and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sez. di Pavia, Via Agostino Bassi 6, 27100 Pavia (Italy); Braeunig, P.; Oberthaler, M. K. [University of Heidelberg, Kirchhoff Institute for Physics, Im Neuenheimer Feld 227, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Brusa, R. S.; Di Noto, L.; Mariazzi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Trento and INFN, Gruppo collegato di Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo, Trento (Italy); and others

    2013-03-19

    The AEgIS Experiment is an international collaboration based at CERN whose aim is to perform the first direct measurement of the gravitational acceleration g of antihydrogen in the gravitational field of the Earth. Cold antihydrogen will be produced with a pulsed charge exchange reaction in a cylindrical Penning trap where antiprotons will be cooled to 100mK. The cold antihydrogen will be produced in an excited Rydberg state and subsequently formed into a beam. The deflection of the antihydrogen beam will be measured by using Moire deflectometer gratings. After being approved in late 2008, AEgIS started taking data in a commissioning phase early 2012. This report presents an overview of the AEgIS experiment, describes its current status and shows the first measurements on antiproton catching and cooling in the 5 T Penning catching trap. We will also present details on the techniques needed for the 100mK antihydrogen production, such as pulsed positronium production and its excitation with lasers.

  5. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances, August 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Contents include: Issuances of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission--Metropolitan Edison Company (Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit No. 1), Metropolitan Edison Company, et al. (Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1), Westinghouse Electric Corp. (Export of LEU to the Philippines); Issuances of Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards--Duke Power Company (Amendment to Materials License SNM-1773--Transportation of Spent Fuel from Oconee Nuclear Station for Storage at McGuire Nuclear Station); Issuances of the Atomic Safety Licensing Boards--Commonwealth Edison Company (Byron Station, Units 1 and 2), Dairyland Power Cooperative (La Crosse Boiling Water Reactor, Operating License and Show Cause), Florida Power and Light Company (St. Lucie Plant, Unit No. 2), Florida Power and Light Company (Turkey Point Nuclear Generating, Units 3 and 4), Metropolitan Edison Company (Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1) Pacific Gas and Electric Company (Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2), The Regents of the University of California (UCLA Research Reactor), The Toledo Edison Company, et al. (Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station, Units 2 and 3: Terminiation of Proceedings); Issuances of the Directors Denial--Florida Power and Light Company

  6. The International Whaling Commission – Beyond Whaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew John Wright

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Since its establishment in 1946 as the international body intended to manage whaling, the International Whaling Commission (IWC has expanded its areas of interest to ensure the wider conservation of whales. Several key conservation topics have been taken forward under its auspices including climate change, chemical and noise pollution, marine debris and whale watching. Work on each of these topics at the IWC has grown substantially since the 1990s and remains ongoing. Important developments were the establishment of the Standing Working Group on Environmental Concerns in 1996 and the IWC’s Conservation Committee in 2003. Trying to address this diverse set of issues is obviously a challenge but will be necessary if the long term conservation of cetaceans is to be achieved. Through research, workshops, resolutions and collaboration with other organisations, the IWC has advanced both the understanding of the various issues and the means to manage them with increasing effectiveness. The IWC is likely to remain on the forefront of continuing efforts to address these, and other, conservation concerns and ensure the continued viability of cetacean populations around the globe.

  7. Pickering dry storage - commissioning and initial operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jonjev, S.

    1996-01-01

    Having commissioned all individual conventional and nuclear systems, the first Dry Storage Container (DSC) was loaded with four modules of 17 year cooled irradiated fuel (366 bundles) in the Auxiliary Irradiated Fuel Bay (AIFB) on November 29, 1995. After decontamination of the outer surface, and draining of water, the DSC was transported to the Used Fuel Dry Storage Facility (UFDSF) workshop, where it was vacuum dried, and then the lid was welded on. Following successful radiography test of the lid weld, the DSC was vacuum dried again and backfilled with Helium to a pressure of 930 mbar(a). The Helium leak test showed zero leakage (allowable leak rate is 1x10 -5 cc/sec). Finally, after loose contamination checks were performed and permanent safeguards seals were applied, the DSC was placed in the UFDSF storage area on January 23, 1996. Radiation fields at contact with the DSC surface were < 0.6 mrem/hr, and at the exterior surface of the storage building wall only 33 micro-rem/hr (far below the target of 250 micro-rem/hr). Therefore, the actual dose rates to general public (at the exclusion zone boundary) will be well below the design target of 1 % of the regulatory limit. (author). 3 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs

  8. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances, September 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    Contents include: Issuances of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission--Commonwealth Edison Company (Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1), Consolidated Edison Company of New York (Indian Point, Unit 2), Metropolitan Edison Company, et al. (Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit 1), Pacific Gas and Electric Company (Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2), Pacific Gas and Electric Company (Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2), Power Authority of the State of New York (Indian Point, Unit 3), Texas Utilities Generating Company, et al. (Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2); Issuances of Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards--Pacific Gas and Electric Company (Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2), Philadelphia Electric Company, et al. (Peach Bottom Atomic Power Statin, Units 2 and 3), Metropolitan Edison Company, et al. (Three Mile Island Nuclear Statin, Unit No. 2), Public Service Electric and Gas Company (Hope Creek Generating Station, Units 1 and 2), The Toledo Edison Company, et al. (Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station, Units 2 and 3); Issuances of the Atomic Safety Licensing Boards--Cleveland Electric Illuminating Company, et al. (Perry Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2), Commonwealth Edison Company (Dresden Station, Units 2 and 3), Houston Lighting and Power Company (Allens Creek Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1), Southern California Edison Company, et al. (San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Units 2 and 3), Texas Utilities Generating Company, et al. (Comanche Peak Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2), Texas Utilities Generating Company, et al

  9. Measurement and evaluation systems for NPP commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elko, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Standard core monitoring and information systems are designed with an emphasis on normal operation of nuclear power plant. Their purpose is to provide necessary support for reactor operators and other operating personnel during the fuel cycle. After each fuel reloading, and to the larger extent during the plant commissioning, a variety of start-up tests need to be carried out and evaluated. Sampling periods, accuracy and communication delays of standard systems are not always suitable for test performance and evaluation. For technical and safety reasons, the access to standard monitoring and information systems is very limited. Non-Standard Measurement and Evaluation Systems are highly specialized devices designed with an emphasis on start-up tests performance and evaluation. They are capable of high frequency sampling, processing and communication of hundreds of technological signals with required accuracy and low communication delay. All technological signals needed for the test performance and evaluation are collected from various systems, concentrated in one system and fully accessible to a test leader, a reactor physicist or other users. In addition, Non-Standard Measurement and Evaluation Systems can perform other tasks like data storing and presentation, data distribution to other systems or external computers via network, reactivity calculations, etc. Structure of such systems can vary, but generally it is a mixture of two basic concepts: a mobile system and a stationary system. A basic description of hardware structure and software equipment of Non-Standard Measurement and Evaluation Systems is given in the paper (Authors)

  10. Pickering dry storage - commissioning and initial operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonjev, S [Ontario Hydro, Pickering, ON (Canada). Pickering Generating Station

    1997-12-31

    Having commissioned all individual conventional and nuclear systems, the first Dry Storage Container (DSC) was loaded with four modules of 17 year cooled irradiated fuel (366 bundles) in the Auxiliary Irradiated Fuel Bay (AIFB) on November 29, 1995. After decontamination of the outer surface, and draining of water, the DSC was transported to the Used Fuel Dry Storage Facility (UFDSF) workshop, where it was vacuum dried, and then the lid was welded on. Following successful radiography test of the lid weld, the DSC was vacuum dried again and backfilled with Helium to a pressure of 930 mbar(a). The Helium leak test showed zero leakage (allowable leak rate is 1x10{sup -5} cc/sec). Finally, after loose contamination checks were performed and permanent safeguards seals were applied, the DSC was placed in the UFDSF storage area on January 23, 1996. Radiation fields at contact with the DSC surface were < 0.6 mrem/hr, and at the exterior surface of the storage building wall only 33 micro-rem/hr (far below the target of 250 micro-rem/hr). Therefore, the actual dose rates to general public (at the exclusion zone boundary) will be well below the design target of 1 % of the regulatory limit. (author). 3 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  11. Commissioning of the JAERI free electron laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minehara, E.J.; Nagai, R.; Sawamura, M.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed, and constructed a prototype for a quasi-cw, and high-average power free electron laser driven by a 15MeV superconducting rf linac at Tokai, JAERI. In designing a high power FEL, there are many available design options to generate the required power output. By applying the superconducting rf linac driver, some of the options relating to the FEL itself may be relaxed by transferring design difficulties to the driver. Because wall losses become minimal in the superconducting accelerator cavity, very long pulse or quasi-cw, and resultant high average power may be readily attained at the JAERI superconducting rf linac FEL. In 1992 Japanese fiscal year, we have successfully demonstrated better cryogenic (stand-by loss<3.5W at 4.5K) and accelerating fields' performances (Eacc=7-9.4MV/m and Q=1-2x10+9) of four JAERI superconducting accelerator modules, and installed them in the FEL accelerator vault. In 1993, Optical resonators and beam transport systems, which have been already assembled, are now under commissioning. A description and the latest results of the JAERI super-conducting rf linac FEL will be discussed in comparison with a normal-conducting one, and reported in the symposium. (author)

  12. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances, May 81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-05-01

    Contents: Issuances of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission--Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. (Indian Point, Unit No. 2), Power Authority of the State of New York (Indian Point, No. 3 Nuclear Power Plant), Pacific Gas and Electric Company (Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2), Statement of Policy on Conduct of Licensing Proceedings, Uranium Mill Licensing Requirements; Issuances of Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Boards--Houston Lighting and Power Company, et al. (South Texas Project, Units 1 and 2), Metropolitan Edison Company, et al. (Three Mile Island Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2), Pennsylvania Power and Light Company and Allegheny Electric Cooperative, Inc. (Susquehanna Steam Electric Station, Units 1 and 2), Philadelphia Electric Company et al. (Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and 3), Public Service Electric and Gas Company (Hope Creek Generating Station, Units 1 and 2); Issuances of the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards--Duke Power Company (William B. McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2), Florida Light and Power Company (Turkey Point Nuclear Generating, Units 3 and 4), Illinois Power Company, et al. (Clinton Power Station, Units 1 and 2), Sacramento Municipal Utility District (Rancho Seco Nuclear Generating Station); Issuances of the Directors Denial--Commonwealth Edison Company (Byron Station, Units 1 and 2), Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc. (Indian Point Unit No. 2), Gulf States Utilities Company (River Bend Station Units 1 and 2), Petition to Suspend All Operating Licenses for Pressurized Water Reactors (River Bend Station Units 1 and 2), Portland General Electric Company (Trojan Nuclear

  13. Commission des Nations Unies sur les produits indispensables aux ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    United Nations Commission on Commodities for Women's and Children's Health. Too often, cost effective, high impact medicines - those that could address critical health problems such as pneumonia, diarrhea, and post-partum hemorrhage - don't reach the women and... View moreUnited Nations Commission on ...

  14. Commission in charge of a reflexion on the gas tariffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brochard, B.; Durieux, B.; Chevalier, J.M.

    2006-03-01

    The presentation covered the recommendations and the major conclusions of the commission. The commission proposes a new method of tariffs fixing, asks a better answer to consumers expectations by the implementing of commercial offers, proposes more stable and open tariffs fixing rules and recommends an increase of the prices of 5,8%. (A.L.B.)

  15. News from the Biological Stain Commission No. 11

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyon, H O; Horobin, R W

    2012-01-01

    The 11th issue of News from the Biological Stain Commission (BSC) provides our first impressions of the REACH and ECHA programs. We intend to give a more thorough account of what these important programs actually mean in later editions of News from the Biological Stain Commission. Under the heading...

  16. 47 CFR 1.14 - Citation of Commission documents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Citation of Commission documents. 1.14 Section... Rules of Practice and Procedure General § 1.14 Citation of Commission documents. The appropriate reference to the FCC Record shall be included as part of the citation to any document that has been printed...

  17. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This document is the US NRC organizational structure and chart as of July 1, 1996. It contains the org charts for the Commission, ACRS, ASLAB, Commission staff offices, Executive Director for Operations, Office of the Inspector General, Program offices, and regional offices

  18. 19 CFR 210.49 - Implementation of Commission action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Implementation of Commission action. 210.49 Section 210.49 Customs Duties UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION INVESTIGATIONS OF UNFAIR PRACTICES IN IMPORT TRADE ADJUDICATION AND ENFORCEMENT Determinations and Actions Taken § 210.49...

  19. 46 CFR 504.9 - Information required by the Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... a complaint, protest, petition or agreement requesting Commission action shall submit, no later than... operator, or any officer, agent or employee thereof, as well as all parties to proceedings before the Commission, to submit, within ten (10) days of such request, all material information necessary to comply...

  20. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission organization charts and functional statements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    This document is the US NRC organizational structure and chart as of July 1, 1996. It contains the org charts for the Commission, ACRS, ASLAB, Commission staff offices, Executive Director for Operations, Office of the Inspector General, Program offices, and regional offices.

  1. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances: August 1994. Volume 40, Number 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report contains the collected issuances of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for the month of August, 1994. The report includes issuances of the Commission, the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards, and the Directors' Decisions. Some of the entities involved include Gulf States Utility company, Sequoyah Fuels Corporation and General Atomics, Georgia Power Company, and Arizona Public Service Company

  2. Powers and Duties of the Corporate Affairs Commission as a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Corporate Affairs Commission was established by section 1 of the Companies and Allied Matters Act, Cap C.20, Laws of the Federation of Nigeria, 2004 (CAMA). The Corporate Affairs Commission is a regulatory body, established to regulate the incorporation, running and winding up of companies, business names and ...

  3. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This document contains procedures for review by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for reviewing and deciding on matters pertaining to nuclear power plant licensing. Also, contained within the document are decisions the Commission has made between July 1972 to September 1989. (F.S.D.)

  4. Knight Commission to Fight High Salaries and Recruiting Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, Brad; Lipka, Sara

    2007-01-01

    Last week, commissioners of the Knight Foundation Commission on Intercollegiate Athletics organized a meeting to tackle recruiting problems and gender inequalities in college sports, but another topic--the high pay of football and men's basketball coaches--came up repeatedly. This article reports on what the commission intends to do in order to…

  5. 78 FR 70959 - Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of the Secretary [DR.5A311.IA000514] Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Renewal of the Commission... administration system to support a reasoned and factually based set of options for potential management...

  6. 78 FR 4366 - Appeal Proceedings Before the Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... significant adverse effect on competition, employment, investment, productivity, innovation, or the ability of... assessment is not required. Civil Justice Reform In accordance with Executive Order 12988, the Commission has...(a) and 3(b)(2) of the Order. National Environmental Policy Act The Commission has determined that...

  7. Commissioning of the LEIR electron cooler with Pb$^{+54}$ ions

    CERN Document Server

    Tranquille, G; Carly, Ch; Prieto, V; Sautier, R; Bubley, A; Parkhomchuk, V; Reva, V; Brizgunov, M; Vedenev, M; Panasyuk, V

    2006-01-01

    The new LEIR cooler with a variable profile of the electron beam and electrostatic bending was commissioned in 2005-2006. In this paper we present our experience with the commissioning of the new device as well as the first results of the ion beam Pb +54 cooling with a high-intensity variable-density electron beam.

  8. Truth commissions and gender: A South African case study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    groups and activists led the Commission to take up gender in ad hoc ways, such ... evaluating the Commission, it is possible to see how its ad hoc approach to gender ... on 'hearing the experiences of victims of gross violations from the people.

  9. 28 CFR 2.56 - Disclosure of Parole Commission file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Chairman's decision on appeal. (i) Expedited processing of Requests. (1) The Commission will provide... permissible under the Freedom of Information Act or the Privacy Act of 1974. (b) Scope of disclosure. Disclosure under this section shall extend to Commission documents concerning the prisoner or parolee making...

  10. 16 CFR 5.66 - Commission decision and reconsideration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Commission decision and reconsideration. 5.66 Section 5.66 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION ORGANIZATION, PROCEDURES AND RULES OF... (b) references therein to “court of appeals” shall be deemed for purposes of proceedings under this...

  11. 28 CFR 2.207 - Supervision reports to Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Supervision reports to Commission. 2.207 Section 2.207 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS District of Columbia Supervised Releasees § 2.207 Supervision reports to Commission. A...

  12. Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs 1982 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, Phoenix.

    Designed to provide insight into the proceedings, transactions, and findings of the Arizona Commission of Indian Affairs, this 1981-82 annual report reflects the Commission's efforts to improve communications, understanding and working relationships between tribes and state government to provide tribes with technical assistance. The report…

  13. 77 FR 4891 - Technical Corrections to Commission Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    ... 20426. 12. From the Commission's homepage on the Internet, this information is available in the Commission's document management system, eLibrary. The full text of this document is available on eLibrary in...Library, type the docket number excluding the last three digits of this document in the docket number...

  14. Page THE ROLE OF SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fr. Ikenga

    Exchange Commission requires that important information concerning the issuer and the securities ... role of the Securities and Exchange Commission in regulating investments and securities ... relatively long periods for use by economic units with deficit funds. ..... (including bank account) of any person whose assets were.

  15. 17 CFR 200.80 - Commission records and information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... intelligence investigation, information furnished by a confidential source; (v) Would disclose techniques or... Commission publishes weekly the SEC Docket, which prints the full text of every Commission release. (iii) The... obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington, DC 20402. (iv...

  16. D’une problématique locale-frontalière à un enjeu binational : le cas de la contrebande transfrontalière de carburants entre la Colombie et le Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Andrade Benitez

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cet article propose d’appréhender le processus d’inscription de la question de la contrebande transfrontalière de carburants dans l’agenda d’intégration binational entre la Colombie et le Venezuela. Peu de travaux s’intéressent à ce sujet qui est habituellement abordé dans une perspective de politique intérieure et non pas extérieure. Notre étude s’inscrit dans le cadre théorique de la « mise en agenda » traitée par Cobb et Elders (1983 et des travaux de Jones et Baumgartner (2005 sur l’évolution de l’agenda politique après l’introduction de nouveaux enjeux. Elle vise à comprendre la manière dont la contrebande de carburants trouve une place dans l’agenda d’intégration énergétique bilatéral et devient un enjeu de coopération entre les deux pays. Les effets économiques de la contrebande ainsi que ses conséquences sur la sécurité de la frontière ont été des facteurs déterminants dans la signature d’un accord entre les deux pays. Les agences énergétiques de Colombie et du Venezuela ont été les acteurs privilégiés du processus d’inscription du problème dans l’agenda d’intégration entre les deux pays.This article analyzes the gradual inclusion of the illegal oil trade in the binational integration agenda between Venezuela and Colombia. Few scholars have focused on this question, which is generally examined through the prism of domestic –not foreign– policy. This study borrows from Cobb and Elders’ (1983 agenda setting theory and its development by Jones and Baumgartner (2005 on the evolution of political agendas following the incorporation of new issues. The purpose is to understand the ways in which illegal oil trade found its place in the bilateral energy integration agenda and became the subject of cooperation between Venezuela and Colombia. The economic effects of this illegal traffic along with its consequences on border security were crucial factors in the signing of a

  17. Report of the State of Nevada Commission on Nuclear Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    Chapter One of the report presents a brief overview of the commission's functions and statutory charges. It also contains a summary of developments which have affected the overall nuclear waste disposal issue since the last Commission report was published. This chapter summarizes the Nuclear Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1987 (NWPAA), which significantly modified federal waste disposal policy and identified Nevada's Yucca Mountain as the only site to be evaluated for suitability as a nuclear waste repository. Chapter Two contains a synthesis of Commission activities and reports on the findings of the Commission relative to the geotechnical, environmental, socioeconomic, transportation, intergovernmental and legal aspects of federal and state nuclear waste program efforts. Chapter Three of the report presents recommendations which the Commission is making to the 1989 Nevada Legislature, the governor, and others concerned with matters surrounding the proposed high-level nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain and with repository-related activities, such as the transportation of radioactive materials

  18. State Electricity Commission of Victoria. Annual report 1984-1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    The State Electricity Commission of Victoria is a body corporate first constituted under the Electricity Commissioner's Act 1918. It now operates under the State Electricity Commission Act 1958. It generates, transmits and distributes electricity throughout Victoria's 228,000 square kilometres and supplies directly to 1.424 million customers. In addition 277,800 customers are supplied by eleven municipal authorities which purchase electricity in bulk from the Commission. The Commission also has a regulatory responsibility to ensure the safe use of electricity. It employs 22,518 people. The installed capacity of generators in the Commission's system, plus Victoria's share of Snowy and Hume generation, totalled 6603 MW at 30 June 1985 and the main transmission system comprises 500 kV, 300 kV and 220 kV lines. Corporate objectives have been developed in seven broad areas: customers,employee, finance, ntural resources, environment, conservationand community. These areas of activity are detailed in this report.

  19. Managing vital records in the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osei, Mary Mavis

    2004-05-01

    Several vital records can be found within the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission. Some of these records include confidential files on staff and general purpose files on staff, specialised subject files on IAEA, FAO, UN agencies etc, records on agreements from memorandum of understanding between the commission and other organisations, legislative instruments establishing the commission and its institutes and research publications. The study critically examined how these vital records at the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission were managed with the view of identifying problems and to propose actions for improvement. The specific objectives of the study was to examine methods of storage, security measures put in place to manage vital records, committment of management and staff to these measures, quality of records staff and vital records policy. Recommendations have been provided to help in the efficient and effective management of records in the commission. (A.B.)

  20. THE STAFF ASSOCIATION'S INTERNAL COMMISSIONS A source of innovative ideas

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    In the heart of the Staff Association, internal commissions carry out preparatory work which is indispensable for productive discussions in Staff Council and Executive Committee meetings. These working groups, composed of staff delegates and interested staff members, are think tanks for all subjects in the area assigned to them. Five commissions are active in 2010 : The “In-Form-Action” Commission develops a communication strategy (Information), organizes staff mobilization and action (Action) and promotes delegate training (Formation [training]), in order to enhance, support and professionalize the activities of the Staff Association. The Commission for “Employment Conditions” deals with remuneration, the advancement system, working hours, recruitment, and retention, among other things. It gives its opinion on proposals by the Management or elaborates its own proposals. The Commission for “Health and Safety” examines all aspec...

  1. Report of nuclear utility industry responses to Kemeny Commission recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a report of nuclear utility industry progress in responding to the recommendations of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (The Kemeny Commission). On April 11, 1979, in response to TMI, President Carter established a Commission to conduct '.... a comprehensive study and investigation of the recent accident involving the nuclear power facility on Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania'. The Commission was chaired by Dr. John G. Kemeny, then President of Dartmouth College. (A list of all members of The Kemeny Commission is provided in Attachment to the Appendix ). The report of the commission's findings and recommendations was transmitted to the President in October 1979. During this same period, the nuclear utility industry responded to TMI by creating the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) with a mission to promote the highest levels of safety and reliability - to promote excellence - in the operation of nuclear electric generating plants. In addition, the Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) was established at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI to evaluate the accident and assist in determining the best industry response. In a White House paper (and press release) of December 7 1979, the President announced that he agreed fully with the spirit and intent of al the Kemeny Commission recommendations and requested that the industry and The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) comply with the recommendations. The President also recognized the industry initiative in establishing INPO and called for several actions involving the Institute; the President directed the Department of Energy and other government agencies to provide assistance to INPO and the industry. An overall status of the nuclear utility industry responses to Kemeny Commission recommendations in the key areas directly related to nuclear plant operations is provided below. A more detailed status of industry responses to the

  2. Report of nuclear utility industry responses to Kemeny Commission recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-02-15

    The purpose of this paper is to provide a report of nuclear utility industry progress in responding to the recommendations of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island (The Kemeny Commission). On April 11, 1979, in response to TMI, President Carter established a Commission to conduct '.... a comprehensive study and investigation of the recent accident involving the nuclear power facility on Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania'. The Commission was chaired by Dr. John G. Kemeny, then President of Dartmouth College. (A list of all members of The Kemeny Commission is provided in Attachment to the Appendix ). The report of the commission's findings and recommendations was transmitted to the President in October 1979. During this same period, the nuclear utility industry responded to TMI by creating the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) with a mission to promote the highest levels of safety and reliability - to promote excellence - in the operation of nuclear electric generating plants. In addition, the Nuclear Safety Analysis Center (NSAC) was established at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI to evaluate the accident and assist in determining the best industry response. In a White House paper (and press release) of December 7 1979, the President announced that he agreed fully with the spirit and intent of al the Kemeny Commission recommendations and requested that the industry and The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) comply with the recommendations. The President also recognized the industry initiative in establishing INPO and called for several actions involving the Institute; the President directed the Department of Energy and other government agencies to provide assistance to INPO and the industry. An overall status of the nuclear utility industry responses to Kemeny Commission recommendations in the key areas directly related to nuclear plant operations is provided below. A more detailed status of industry responses to the

  3. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Staff practice and procedure digest. Commission, Appeal Board and Licensing Board Decision, July 1972 - June 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    This is the seventh edition of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff Practice and Procedure Digest. It contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to June 1995 interpreting the NRC rules of practice in 10 CFR part 2

  4. Status of the Commissioning of SOLEIL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filhol, J. M.; Couprie, M. E.; Level, M. P.; Besson, J. C.; Brunelle, P.; Denard, J. C.; Godefroy, J. M.; Herbeaux, C.; Lebasque, P.; Le Roux, V.; Lestrade, A.; Loulergue, A.; Marchand, P.; Nadji, A.; Nadolski, L.; Nagaoka, R.; Pottin, B.; Tordeux, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    SOLEIL is a third generation Synchrotron radiation Source, under construction in France at St Aubin, near Paris. The Storage Ring consists in a 357 m circumference ring, with 16 cells and 24 straight sections (4x12m, 12x7m, 8x3.6m), out of which up to 21 will house insertion devices. The optics, with distributed dispersion, features a low 3.7 nm.rad emittance at the 2.75 GeV operating energy, so as to provide high brilliance, from the VUV up to the hard X ray domain. In order to provide a long lifetime, and beam position stabilities in the micron range, significant attention was paid at each design stage (optics, magnets, beam position monitors, vacuum and RF systems,..), including the design of the building and infrastructure, the construction of which is now complete. This resulted in some unprecedented approaches such as the intensive use of NEG coating Aluminium vessels, or the development of a dedicated superconducting RF cavity and of 190 kW solid state RF amplifiers. The construction, started in 2002, is now completed. The injector system (100 MeV Linac) and the 3 Hz full energy Booster synchrotron have reached nominal operating conditions by fall 2005. The installation of the Storage Ring was just completed and its commissioning started in May 2006. First 9 turns in the ring were achieved on May the 14th, and visible synchrotron radiation was also observed on a CCD camera. Innovative insertion devices were designed and built so as to provide the best possible performances in an energy range as large as 5 eV to 20 keV. These are helical electromagnetic devices with 640 mm and 256 mm periods, APPLE II type undulators with 80 mm period, and in-vacuum hybrid undulators with 20 mm period. Two infra-red beamlines providing both edge and constant dipole field emission are also under construction and a superconducting wiggler is currently being designed in order to provide high flux in the 10 to 50 keV range. A first set of 10 beamlines (out of 24 included in the

  5. European Commission - 7th Framework Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, G.L.; Vasile, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Core safety optimisation through a set of reactivity feedback coefficients allowing to cope with accidental transients. → Reactor optimisation by exploring innovative options for intermediate circuits and steam generators. → Reactor behaviour under accidental conditions including severe accidents to improve the robustness. → Waste management options having both characteristics of efficiency and economics viability. → Promoting European young human resources skills on sodium fast reactors by means of dedicated workshops and doctoral dissertations. - Abstract: Fast Reactors have a unique capability as sustainable energy source; the closed fuel cycle allows significantly improving the usage of natural resources and the minimisation of volume and heat load of high-level waste. Among the fast reactor systems, the sodium-cooled fast reactor has the most comprehensive technological basis, thanks to the experience gained internationally from operating experimental, prototype and commercial size reactors. The paper summarizes the key characteristics of the four years large Collaborative Project on European Sodium Fast Reactor (CP ESFR - 2009-2012); the CP ESFR follows the 6th FP project named 'Roadmap for a European Innovative SOdium cooled FAst Reactor - EISOFAR' further identifying, organizing and implementing a significant part of the needed R and D effort. The CP ESFR merges the contribution of 25 European partners; it is performed under the aegis of the 7th FP under the Area - Advanced Nuclear Systems with a refund from the European Commission of 5.8 M Euro (11.55 M Euro total budget). It is a key component of the European Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNE TP) and its Strategic Research Agenda (SRA). The inputs for the project are the key research goals for fourth generation of European sodium cooled fast reactors which can be summarized as follows: an improved safety with in particular the achievement of a robust architecture

  6. The international law commission and international environmental law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramcharan, B.G.

    1975-01-01

    If the oceans are destroyed through pollution there will be nothing left to manage. Protection against pollution is thus a fundamental aspect of ocean management. What legal principles are available for the protection of the oceans. This paper brings together the relevant practice of the foremost international body responsible for the codification and development of international law: the International Law Commission. It describes the work of the Commission concerning: 1) pollution of the high seas; 2) pollution of international watercourses; and 3) international responsibility for environmental hazards. It concludes by expressing the hope that the Commission will further study, codify and develop international environmental law

  7. The work of the international commission on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    ICRP was established in 1928 as the International X-ray and Radium Protection Committee. In 1950 the name was changed to reflect the wider scope of radiological protection. The present membership of the Main Commission and its four committees was established in July 1993 for the period 1993-1997. Their programmes of work are now nearing completion with the Committees having met four times and their progress is summarised. The Main Commission meets in November 1996, when one of the main topics will be the election of the new Commission and members of the four Committees for the period 1997-2001

  8. The pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, Naoki; Kodama, Takashi; Hatano, K.

    2013-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows higher radiation dose to be focused to the target volumes while minimizing the dose to OAR. To start of clinical treatment in IMRTvwe must perform commissioning strictly than 3D-conformal radiotherapy (CRT). In this report, pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy were reviewed. Multileaf collimator (MLC) offsets and MLC transmissions are important parameters in commissioning of RTPS for IMRT. Correction of depth scaling and fluence scaling is necessary for dose measurement using solid phantom. (author)

  9. Comparison of Brokerage and Commission in Iranian Commercial Law

    OpenAIRE

    Manochehr Ghadami; Ali Radan Jebelli

    2017-01-01

    Terms such as commission and brokerage are similar in the concept of agency and in some cases they are different. In the legal system of Iran, commission section is derived from French law and it drives out the commission from the realm of agency and justifies it as an entity equal to the contract of the mandate. On the other hand, the brokerage has not been discussed in Iran’s jurisprudential sources and civil law as a legal body establishment; therefore, we can take it as new found phenomen...

  10. 32 CFR 700.873 - Inspection incident to commissioning of ships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inspection incident to commissioning of ships... Inspection incident to commissioning of ships. When a ship is to be commissioned, the authority designated to place such ship in commission shall, just prior to commissioning, cause an inspection to be made to...

  11. 36 CFR 401.6 - Approval by National Commission of Fine Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Commission of Fine Arts. 401.6 Section 401.6 Parks, Forests, and Public Property AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION MONUMENTS AND MEMORIALS § 401.6 Approval by National Commission of Fine Arts. A design for a... Commission of Fine Arts before the Commission can accept it. ...

  12. PROMOTER COMMISSION LEGISLATIVE AND EXTERNAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE UNION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nely Militaru

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Commission was established by the Treaty establishing the Economic Community of Coal and Osel – signed in Paris in 1951, entered into force next year –as the High Authority supranational institution with discretionary decisionmaking powers in optics of this treaty. Also known as “guardian of the treaties” Commission by its member, who exercise their functions in complete independence, is an institution that promotes the general interest of the Union (art. 17 par.TEU. Commission oversees therefore application of Union law. In this capacity, especially in terms of the competence of the legislative proposal, the Commission by calling upon specialists and experts from EU Member States harmonize with the national interest.

  13. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, March 1995. Volume 41, No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  14. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, May 1995. Volume 41, No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (AU), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  15. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances. Volume 42, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (AU), the Directors' Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM)

  16. The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Commission marked a turning point in that it became a model for future commis- sions. .... Committee on Reparation and Rehabilitation (SA Act 34/1995: sections ...... have covered persons who were already serving prison terms . Amnesty ...

  17. Regulatory view on licensing and commissioning of Temelin NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.; Boehm, K.; Brandejs, P.; Tipek, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The competencies delegated to the Czech State Office for Nuclear Safety by Czech legislation are highlighted and the history of construction and commissioning of the Temelin nuclear power plant in relation to the licensing process is described. (P.A.)

  18. Commission : Paksas violated oath of office / Steven Paulikas

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Paulikas, Steven

    2003-01-01

    Leedu presidendi ümber puhkenud skandaali uuriv Seimi erikomisjon leidis, et president Rolandas Paksas oli ja on oma sidemete tõttu haavatav ning see kujutab ohtu riigi julgeolekule. Lisa: Commission conclusions

  19. Nuclear Regulatory Commission issuances, April 1994. Volume 39, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    This report includes the issuances received during the specified period from the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and Licensing Boards (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ), the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Denials of Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM).

  20. The Spanish energy regulatory body: the national energy commission (CNE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merono, P. M.

    2002-01-01

    The National Energy Commission (CNE) is the Spanish Energy Regulatory body. This paper presents its scope and purpose, organisation, resources and financing, financial and performance control, functions, and legal provisions. (author)