WorldWideScience

Sample records for gold nanoparticles electrostatically

  1. "Cloud" assemblies: quantum dots form electrostatically bound dynamic nebulae around large gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilly, G Daniel; Lee, Jaebeom; Kotov, Nicholas A

    2010-10-14

    Dynamic self-assembled structures of nanoparticles can be produced using predominantly electrostatic interactions. Such assemblies were made from large, positively charged Au metal nanoparticles surrounded by an electrostatically bound cloud of smaller, negatively charged CdSe/ZnS or CdTe quantum dots. At low concentrations they are topologically similar to double electric layers of ions and corona-like assemblies linked by polymer chains. They can also be compared to the topological arrangement of some planetary systems in space. The great advantages of the cloud assemblies are (1) their highly dynamic nature compared to more rigid covalently bound assemblies, (2) simplicity of preparation, and (3) exceptional versatility in components and resulting optical properties. Photoluminescence intensity enhancement originating from quantum resonance between excitons and plasmons was observed for CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, although CdTe dots displayed emission quenching. To evaluate more attentively their dynamic behavior, emission data were collected for the cloud-assemblies with different ratios of the components and ionic strengths of the media. The emission of the system passes through a maximum for 80 QDs ∶ 1 Au NP as determined by the structure of the assemblies and light absorption conditions. Ionic strength dependence of luminescence intensity contradicts the predictions based on the Gouy-Chapman theory and osmotic pressure at high ionic strengths due to formation of larger chaotic colloidally stable assemblies. "Cloud" assemblies made from different nanoscale components can be used both for elucidation of most fundamental aspects of nanoparticle interactions, as well as for practical purposes in sensing and biology.

  2. Spherical aggregates composed of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C-C; Kuo, P-L; Cheng, Y-C

    2009-01-01

    Alkylated triethylenetetramine (C12E3) was synthesized and used as both a reductant in the preparation of gold nanoparticles by the reduction of HAuCl 4 and a stabilizer in the subsequent self-assembly of the gold nanoparticles. In acidic aqueous solution, spherical aggregates (with a diameter of about 202 ± 22 nm) of gold nanoparticles (with the mean diameter of ∼18.7 nm) were formed. The anion-induced ammonium adsorption of the alkylated amines on the gold nanoparticles was considered to provide the electrostatic repulsion and steric hindrance between the gold nanoparticles, which constituted the barrier that prevented the individual particles from coagulating. However, as the amino groups became deprotonated with increasing pH, the ammonium adsorption was weakened, and the amino groups were desorbed from the gold surface, resulting in discrete gold particles. The results indicate that the morphology of the reduced gold nanoparticles is controllable through pH-'tunable' aggregation under the mediation of the amino groups of alkylated amine to create spherical microstructures.

  3. Gold Nanoparticle Microwave Synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krantz, Kelsie E.; Christian, Jonathan H.; Coopersmith, Kaitlin; Washington II, Aaron L.; Murph, Simona H.

    2016-01-01

    At the nanometer scale, numerous compounds display different properties than those found in bulk material that can prove useful in areas such as medicinal chemistry. Gold nanoparticles, for example, display promise in newly developed hyperthermia therapies for cancer treatment. Currently, gold nanoparticle synthesis is performed via the hot injection technique which has large variability in final particle size and a longer reaction time. One underdeveloped area by which these particles could be produced is through microwave synthesis. To initiate heating, microwaves agitate polar molecules creating a vibration that gives off the heat energy needed. Previous studies have used microwaves for gold nanoparticle synthesis; however, polar solvents were used that partially absorbed incident microwaves, leading to partial thermal heating of the sample rather than taking full advantage of the microwave to solely heat the gold nanoparticle precursors in a non-polar solution. Through this project, microwaves were utilized as the sole heat source, and non-polar solvents were used to explore the effects of microwave heating only as pertains to the precursor material. Our findings show that the use of non-polar solvents allows for more rapid heating as compared to polar solvents, and a reduction in reaction time from 10 minutes to 1 minute; this maximizes the efficiency of the reaction, and allows for reproducibility in the size/shape of the fabricated nanoparticles.

  4. Gold Nanoparticle Microwave Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krantz, Kelsie E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Christian, Jonathan H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Coopersmith, Kaitlin [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Washington, II, Aaron L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Murph, Simona H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-07-27

    At the nanometer scale, numerous compounds display different properties than those found in bulk material that can prove useful in areas such as medicinal chemistry. Gold nanoparticles, for example, display promise in newly developed hyperthermia therapies for cancer treatment. Currently, gold nanoparticle synthesis is performed via the hot injection technique which has large variability in final particle size and a longer reaction time. One underdeveloped area by which these particles could be produced is through microwave synthesis. To initiate heating, microwaves agitate polar molecules creating a vibration that gives off the heat energy needed. Previous studies have used microwaves for gold nanoparticle synthesis; however, polar solvents were used that partially absorbed incident microwaves, leading to partial thermal heating of the sample rather than taking full advantage of the microwave to solely heat the gold nanoparticle precursors in a non-polar solution. Through this project, microwaves were utilized as the sole heat source, and non-polar solvents were used to explore the effects of microwave heating only as pertains to the precursor material. Our findings show that the use of non-polar solvents allows for more rapid heating as compared to polar solvents, and a reduction in reaction time from 10 minutes to 1 minute; this maximizes the efficiency of the reaction, and allows for reproducibility in the size/shape of the fabricated nanoparticles.

  5. Gold Nanoparticles Cytotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mironava, Tatsiana

    Over the last two decades gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used for many scientific applications and have attracted attention due to the specific chemical, electronic and optical size dependent properties that make them very promising agents in many fields such as medicine, imagine techniques and electronics. More specifically, biocompatible gold nanoparticles have a huge potential for use as the contrast augmentation agent in X-ray Computed Tomography and Photo Acoustic Tomography for early tumor diagnostic as well these nanoparticles are extensively researched for enhancing the targeted cancer treatment effectiveness such as photo-thermal and radiotherapy. In most biomedical applications biocompatible gold nanoparticles are labeled with specific tumor or other pathology targeting antibodies and used for site specific drug delivery. However, even though gold nanoparticles poses very high level of anti cancer properties, the question of their cytotoxicity ones they are released in normal tissue has to be researched. Moreover, the huge amount of industrially produced gold nanoparticles raises the question of these particles being a health hazard, since the penetration is fairly easy for the "nano" size substances. This study focuses on the effect of AuNPs on a human skin tissue, since it is fall in both categories -- the side effects for biomedical applications and industrial workers and users' exposure during production and handling. Therefore, in the present project, gold nanoparticles stabilized with the biocompatible agent citric acid were generated and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxic effect of AuNPs release to healthy skin tissue was modeled on 3 different cell types: human keratinocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, and human adipose derived stromal (ADS) cells. The AuNPs localization inside the cell was found to be cell type dependent. Overall cytotoxicity was found to be dependent

  6. Preparation and characterization of graphene oxide encapsulated gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yong Ju; Song, Ki-Bong

    2013-11-01

    We present a simple approach for the fabrication of graphene oxide-encapsulated gold nanoparticles using graphene oxide sheet-wrapping via electrostatic self-assembly. By mixing bovine serum albumin molecule-functionalized gold nanoparticles with graphene oxide dispersion, positively charged bovine serum albumin/gold nanoparticles easily assembled with negatively charged graphene oxide sheets through electrostatic interaction. Transmittance electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used to confirm the encapsulation of graphene oxide on gold nanoparticles. Interestingly, graphene oxide sheets wrapping mainly occurs along the main body of single or a few gold nanoparticles. Additionally, by measuring the ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy spectrum, we found that the surface plasmon resonances band of the graphene oxide-encapsulated gold nanoparticles was found to become red-shifted compared to that of pristine gold nanoparticles, whereas similar to that of bovine serum albumin-coated gold nanoparticles. These results indicating that most of graphene oxide-encapsulated gold nanoparticles have good monodispersity and spherical shape. These resulting materials may potentially serve as a platform for plasmon resonance electron transfer spectroscopy or a probe for low level biosensing.

  7. Immunological properties of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykman, Lev A; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G

    2017-03-01

    In the past decade, gold nanoparticles have attracted strong interest from the nanobiotechnological community owing to the significant progress made in robust and easy-to-make synthesis technologies, in surface functionalization, and in promising biomedical applications. These include bioimaging, gene diagnostics, analytical sensing, photothermal treatment of tumors, and targeted delivery of various biomolecular and chemical cargos. For the last-named application, gold nanoparticles should be properly fabricated to deliver the cargo into the targeted cells through effective endocytosis. In this review, we discuss recent progress in understanding the selective penetration of gold nanoparticles into immune cells. The interaction of gold nanoparticles with immune cell receptors is discussed. As distinct from other published reviews, we present a summary of the immunological properties of gold nanoparticles. This review also summarizes what is known about the application of gold nanoparticles as an antigen carrier and adjuvant in immunization for the preparation of antibodies in vivo . For each of the above topics, the basic principles, recent advances, and current challenges are discussed. Thus, this review presents a detailed analysis of data on interaction of gold nanoparticles with immune cells. Emphasis is placed on the systematization of data over production of antibodies by using gold nanoparticles and adjuvant properties of gold nanoparticles. Specifically, we start our discussion with current data on interaction of various gold nanoparticles with immune cells. The next section describes existing technologies to improve production of antibodies in vivo by using gold nanoparticles conjugated with specific ligands. Finally, we describe what is known about adjuvant properties of bare gold or functionalized nanoparticles. In the Conclusion section, we present a short summary of reported data and some challenges and perspectives.

  8. Shape evolution of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y. Q.; Liang, W. S.; Geng, C. Y.

    2010-01-01

    The tetraoctylammonium bromide-stabilized gold nanoparticles have been successfully fabricated. The shape evolution of these nanoparticles under different annealing temperatures has been investigated using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. After an annealing at 100 o C for 30 min, the average diameters of the gold nanoparticles change a little. However, the shapes of gold nanoparticles change drastically, and facets appear in most nanoparticles. After an annealing at 200 o C for 30 min, not only the size but also the shape changes a lot. After an annealing at 300 o C for 30 min, two or more gold nanoparticles coalesce into bigger ones. In addition, because of the presence of Cu grid during the annealing, some gold particles become the nucleation sites of Cu 2 O nanocubes, which possess a microstructure of gold-particle core/Cu 2 O shell. These Au/Cu 2 O heterostructure nanocubes can only be formed at a relatively high temperature (≥300 o C). The results can provide some insights on controlling the shapes of gold nanoparticles.

  9. Human serum albumin mediated self-assembly of gold nanoparticles into hollow spheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nayak, Nimai C; Shin, Kwanwoo

    2008-01-01

    The assembly of nanoparticles in topologically predefined superstructures is an important area in nanoscale architecture. In this paper, we report an unusual aggregation phenomenon involving L-lysine capped gold nanoparticles and human serum albumin into hollow nanospheres. The electrostatic interaction between positively charged L-lysine capped gold nanoparticles and negatively charged human serum albumin at physiological pH led to the assembly of the gold nanoparticles into hollow spheres. The phenomenon can be explained by the dry hole opening mechanism

  10. Directed Assembly of Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westerlund, Axel Rune Fredrik; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    As a complement to common "top-down" lithography techniques, "bottom-up" assembly techniques are emerging as promising tools to build nanoscale structures in a predictable way. Gold nanoparticles that are stable and relatively easy to synthesize are important building blocks in many such structures...... due to their useful optical and electronic properties. Programmed assembly of gold nanoparticles in one, two, and three dimensions is therefore of large interest. This review focuses on the progress from the last three years in the field of directed gold nanoparticle and nanorod assembly using...

  11. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with Pfu DNA polymerase and effect on polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L-P; Wang, S; Zhang, Z-W; Ma, Y-Y; Lai, Y-Q; Weng, J; Zhang, Q-Q

    2011-03-01

    The interaction of gold nanoparticles with Pfu DNA polymerase has been investigated by a number of biological, optical and electronic spectroscopic techniques. Polymerase chain reaction was performed to show gold nanoparticles' biological effect. Ultraviolet-visible and circular dichroism spectra analysis were applied to character the structure of Pfu DNA polymerase after conjugation with gold nanoparticles. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to investigate the bond properties of the polymerase-gold nanoparticles complex. The authors demonstrate that gold nanoparticles do not affect the amplification efficiency of polymerase chain reaction using Pfu DNA polymerase, and Pfu DNA polymerase displays no significant changes of the secondary structure upon interaction with gold nanoparticles. The adsorption of Pfu DNA polymerase to gold nanoparticles is mainly through Au-NH(2) bond and electrostatic interaction. These findings may have important implications regarding the safety issue as gold nanoparticles are widely used in biomedical applications.

  12. Immunological properties of gold nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Dykman, Lev A.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2016-01-01

    In the past decade, gold nanoparticles have attracted strong interest from the nanobiotechnological community owing to the significant progress made in robust and easy-to-make synthesis technologies, in surface functionalization, and in promising biomedical applications. These include bioimaging, gene diagnostics, analytical sensing, photothermal treatment of tumors, and targeted delivery of various biomolecular and chemical cargos. For the last-named application, gold nanoparticles should be...

  13. Singular electrostatic energy of nanoparticle clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Jian; Krapf, Nathan W.; Witten, Thomas A.

    2016-02-01

    The binding of clusters of metal nanoparticles is partly electrostatic. We address difficulties in calculating the electrostatic energy when high charging energies limit the total charge to a single quantum, entailing unequal potentials on the particles. We show that the energy at small separation h has a singular logarithmic dependence on h . We derive a general form for this energy in terms of the singular capacitance of two spheres in near contact c (h ) , together with nonsingular geometric features of the cluster. Using this form, we determine the energies of various clusters, finding that more compact clusters are more stable. These energies are proposed to be significant for metal-semiconductor binary nanoparticle lattices found experimentally. We sketch how these effects should dictate the relative abundances of metal nanoparticle clusters in nonpolar solvents.

  14. Controlling gold nanoparticle seeded growth in thermophilic ferritin protein templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulsipher, Katherine W; Honig, Stephanie; Deng, Sunbin; Dmochowski, Ivan J

    2017-09-01

    Ferritin protein cages provide templates for inorganic nanoparticle synthesis in more environmentally-friendly conditions. Thermophilic ferritin from Archaeoglobus fulgidus (AfFtn) has been shown to encapsulate pre-formed 6-nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and template their further growth within its 8-nm cavity. In this study, we explore whether using a gold complex with electrostatic complementarity to the anionic ferritin cavity can promote efficient seeded nanoparticle growth. We also compare wt AfFtn and a closed pore mutant AfFtn to explore whether the ferritin pores influence final AuNP size. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Gold Nanoparticles Assembly on Silicon and Gold Surfaces: Mechanism, Stability and Efficiency in Diclofenac Biosensing

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Haddada , Maroua; Hübner , Maria; Casale , Sandra; Knopp , Dietmar; Niessner , Reinhard; Salmain , Michele; Boujday , Souhir

    2016-01-01

    International audience; We investigated the assembly of Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on Gold and Silicon sensors with two final objectives: (i) understanding the factors governing the interaction and (ii) building up a nanostructured piezoelectric immunosensor for diclofenac, a small-sized pharmaceutical pollutant. Different surface chemistries were devised to achieve AuNPs assembly on planar substrates. These surface chemistries included amines to immobilize AuNPs via electrostatic interaction...

  16. Gold nanoparticles stabilized by chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraldes, Adriana N.; Oliveira, Maria Jose A.; Silva, Andressa A. da; Leal, Jessica; Batista, Jorge G.S.; Lugao, Ademar B.

    2015-01-01

    In our laboratory has been growing the interest in studying gold nanoparticles and for this reason, the aim of this work is report the first results of the effect of chitosan as stabilizer in gold nanoparticle formulation. AuNPs were synthesized by reducing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl 4 ) using NaBH 4 or gamma irradiation (25kGy) as reduction agent. The chitosan (3 mol L -1 ) was added at 0.5; 1.0 and 1.5 mL. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Their physical stability was determined using a UV-Vis spectrophotometer over one week during storage at room temperature. Absorption measurements indicated that the plasmon resonance wavelength appears at a wavelength around 530 nm. Has been observed that Chitosan in such quantities were not effective in stabilizing the AuNPs. (author)

  17. Surface vertical deposition for gold nanoparticle film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diao, J J; Qiu, F S; Chen, G D; Reeves, M E

    2003-01-01

    In this rapid communication, we present the surface vertical deposition (SVD) method to synthesize the gold nanoparticle films. Under conditions where the surface of the gold nanoparticle suspension descends slowly by evaporation, the gold nanoparticles in the solid-liquid-gas junction of the suspension aggregate together on the substrate by the force of solid and liquid interface. When the surface properties of the substrate and colloidal nanoparticle suspension define for the SVD, the density of gold nanoparticles in the thin film made by SVD only depends on the descending velocity of the suspension surface and on the concentration of the gold nanoparticle suspension. (rapid communication)

  18. Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Phototherapy for Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, C.; Zhang, L.; Wang, J.; He, Y.; Xin, J.; Wang, S.; Xu, H.; Zhang, Z.

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles exhibit very unique physiochemical and optical properties, which now are extensively studied in range of medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In particular, gold nanoparticles show promise in the advancement of cancer treatments. This review will provide insights into the four different cancer treatments such as photothermal therapy, gold nanoparticle-aided photodynamic therapy, gold nanoparticle-aided radiation therapy, and their use as drug carrier. We also discuss the mechanism of every method and the adverse effects and its limitations

  19. A Novel Strategy for Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticle Self Assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verma, Jyoti; Lal, Sumit; van Veen, Henk A.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle self assemblies are one-dimensional structures of gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticle self assemblies exhibit unique physical properties and find applications in the development of biosensors. Methodologies currently available for lab-scale and commercial synthesis of gold

  20. Multifunctional gold nanoparticles for photodynamic therapy of cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaing Oo, Maung Kyaw

    As an important and growing branch of photomedicine, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is being increasingly employed in clinical applications particularly for the treatment of skin cancer. This dissertation focuses on the synthesis, characterization and deployment of gold nanoparticles for enhanced PDT of fibrosarcoma cancer cells. We have developed robust strategies and methods in fabrication of gold nanoparticles with positively- and negatively-tethered surface charges by photo-reduction of gold chloride salt using branched polyethyleneimine and sodium citrate respectively. An optimal concentration window of gold salt has been established to yield the most stable and monodispersed gold nanoparticles. 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), a photosensitizing precursor, has been successfully conjugated on to positively charged gold nanoparticles through electrostatic interactions. The 5-ALA/gold nanoparticle conjugates are biocompatible and have shown to be preferably taken up by cancer cells. Subsequent light irradiation results in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer cells, leading to their destruction without adverse effects on normal fibroblasts. We have demonstrated for the first time that gold nanoparticles can enhance PDT efficacy by 50% compared to the treatment with 5-ALA alone. Collected evidence has strongly suggested that this enhancement stems from the elevated formation of ROS via the strongly localized electric field of gold nanoparticles. Through single cell imaging using surface-enhanced Raman scattering enabled by the very same gold nanoparticles, we have shown that multifunctionality of gold nanoparticles can be harvested concurrently for biomedical applications in general and for PDT in specific. In other words, gold nanoparticles can be used not only for targeted drug delivery and field-enhanced ROS formation, but also for monitoring cell destructions during PDT. Finally, our COMSOL Multiphysics simulation of the size-dependent electric

  1. Amoxicillin functionalized gold nanoparticles reverts MRSA resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalita, Sanjeeb; Kandimalla, Raghuram; Sharma, Kaustav Kalyan; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Deka, Manab; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we have described the biosynthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles (GNPs) from aqueous extract of the aerial parts of a pteridophyte, “Adiantum philippense” by microwave irradiation and its surface functionalization with broad spectrum beta lactam antibiotic, amoxicillin (Amox). The functionalization of amoxicillin on GNPs (GNP-Amox) was carried out via electrostatic interaction of protonated amino group and thioether moiety mediated attractive forces. The synthesized GNPs and GNP-Amox were physicochemically characterized. UV–Vis spectroscopy, Zeta potential, XRD, FTIR and SERS (surface enhanced raman spectra) results confirmed the loading of Amox into GNPs. Loading of Amox to GNPs reduce amoxicillin cytotoxicity, whereas GNPs were found to be nontoxic to mouse fibroblast cell line (L929) as evident from MTT and acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EtBr) live/dead cell assays. The GNP-Amox conjugates demonstrated enhanced broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, in-vitro and in-vivo assays of GNP-Amox revealed potent anti-MRSA activity and improved the survival rate. This indicates the subversion of antibiotic resistance mechanism by overcoming the effect of high levels of β-lactamase produced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Taken together, this study demonstrates the positive attributes from GNP-Amox conjugates as a promising antibacterial therapeutic agent against MRSA as well as other pathogens. - Highlights: • Aqueous extract of A. phillippens was used as a reducing and capping agent for synthesis of microwave irradiated gold nanoparticles. • GNPs were loaded with amoxicillin for restoration in antibacterial activity of amoxicillin against MRSA strains. • Gold nanoparticles and GNP-Amox were found biocompitable as tested on L929 cell line. • The nanoparticle antibiotic conjugates exhibited restoration of amoxicillin activity against MRSA in

  2. Amoxicillin functionalized gold nanoparticles reverts MRSA resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalita, Sanjeeb; Kandimalla, Raghuram; Sharma, Kaustav Kalyan [Drug Discovery Lab, Life Science Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology (IASST), Paschim Boragaon, Garchuk, Guwahati 781035, Assam (India); Kataki, Amal Chandra [Dr. B. Borooah Cancer Institute, Guwahati, Assam (India); Department of Applied Sciences, Gopinath Bordoloi Nagar, Jalukbari, Gauhati University, Guwahati 781014, Assam (India); Deka, Manab [Department of Applied Sciences, Gopinath Bordoloi Nagar, Jalukbari, Gauhati University, Guwahati 781014, Assam (India); Kotoky, Jibon, E-mail: jkotoky@gmail.com [Drug Discovery Lab, Life Science Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology (IASST), Paschim Boragaon, Garchuk, Guwahati 781035, Assam (India)

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we have described the biosynthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles (GNPs) from aqueous extract of the aerial parts of a pteridophyte, “Adiantum philippense” by microwave irradiation and its surface functionalization with broad spectrum beta lactam antibiotic, amoxicillin (Amox). The functionalization of amoxicillin on GNPs (GNP-Amox) was carried out via electrostatic interaction of protonated amino group and thioether moiety mediated attractive forces. The synthesized GNPs and GNP-Amox were physicochemically characterized. UV–Vis spectroscopy, Zeta potential, XRD, FTIR and SERS (surface enhanced raman spectra) results confirmed the loading of Amox into GNPs. Loading of Amox to GNPs reduce amoxicillin cytotoxicity, whereas GNPs were found to be nontoxic to mouse fibroblast cell line (L929) as evident from MTT and acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EtBr) live/dead cell assays. The GNP-Amox conjugates demonstrated enhanced broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, in-vitro and in-vivo assays of GNP-Amox revealed potent anti-MRSA activity and improved the survival rate. This indicates the subversion of antibiotic resistance mechanism by overcoming the effect of high levels of β-lactamase produced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Taken together, this study demonstrates the positive attributes from GNP-Amox conjugates as a promising antibacterial therapeutic agent against MRSA as well as other pathogens. - Highlights: • Aqueous extract of A. phillippens was used as a reducing and capping agent for synthesis of microwave irradiated gold nanoparticles. • GNPs were loaded with amoxicillin for restoration in antibacterial activity of amoxicillin against MRSA strains. • Gold nanoparticles and GNP-Amox were found biocompitable as tested on L929 cell line. • The nanoparticle antibiotic conjugates exhibited restoration of amoxicillin activity against MRSA in

  3. Glyco-gold nanoparticles: synthesis and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica Compostella

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Glyco-gold nanoparticles combine in a single entity the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles with the biological activity of carbohydrates. The result is an exciting nanosystem, able to mimic the natural multivalent presentation of saccharide moieties and to exploit the peculiar optical properties of the metallic core. In this review, we present recent advances on glyco-gold nanoparticle applications in different biological fields, highlighting the key parameters which inspire the glyco nanoparticle design.

  4. Competing effects of silanol surface concentration and solvent dielectric constant on electrostatic layer-by-layer assembly of silica nanoparticles on gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruidong; Wang, Feng; Blunk, Richard H; Angelopoulos, Anastasios P

    2010-09-01

    Two types of silica nanoparticles having differing concentrations of ionizable surface groups are used to investigate the interplay between nanoparticle surface charge and solvent dielectric constant in nanostructure development during layer-by-layer assembly with a cationic polyacrylamide. Zeta (zeta) potential measurements are used to determine the extent of silanol dissociation with pH. For 19-nm-diameter X-Tec 3408 silica nanoparticles from Nano-X GmbH (NanoX), complete dissociation yields a zeta-potential value of about -44mV and occurs between pH 5 and 6 in 50% ethanol-in-water mixture by volume. By contrast, 65-nm-diameter polishing silica from Electron Microscopy Supply (EMS) has a zeta potential that does not equilibrate even up to pH 7 with a value of -59mV under otherwise similar solution conditions. The more negative zeta potential at a given pH is found to substantially reduce nanoparticle adsorption. This behavior is opposite that observed when the dielectric constant of the suspension is decreased, independent of particle size. Nanoparticle surface chemical heterogeneity is discussed as a plausible explanation for such seriously discrepant behavior and the effects on multilayer electrical contact resistance for proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel-cell coating applications are presented. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Trapping and release of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reyes, Darwin R., E-mail: darwin.reyes@nist.gov [Semiconductor Electronics Division, Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Mijares, Geraldine I.; Nablo, Brian [Semiconductor Electronics Division, Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Briggman, Kimberly A. [Optical Technology Division, Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Gaitan, Michael [Semiconductor Electronics Division, Physical Measurement Laboratory, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    An electrical method to trap and release charged gold nanoparticles onto and from the surface of gold electrodes modified by an alkanethiol self-assembled monolayer (SAM) is presented. To form electrodes coated with gold nanoparticles (GNPs), amine-terminated SAMs on gold electrodes were immersed in a solution of negatively charged citrate-capped GNPs. Accumulation of GNPs on the electrode surface was monitored by a decrease in the impedance of the SAM-modified electrode and by an increase in the electrochemical activity at the electrode as shown through cyclic voltammetry (CV). Electrostatic interactions between the GNPs and the amine-terminated SAM trap the GNPs on the electrode surface. Application of a subsequent negative bias to the electrode initiated a partial release of the GNPs from the electrode surface. Impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were used to monitor and confirm the attraction of GNPs to and release from the aminealkanethiolated gold electrodes. This work describes a method of trapping and release for citrate-capped GNPs that could be used for on-demand nanoparticle delivery applications such as in assessing and modeling nanoparticle toxicology, as well as for monitoring the functionalization of gold nanoparticles.

  6. Application of Gold Nanoparticles to Paint Colorants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishibashi, Hideo

    Metal nanoparticles possess unique properties that they do not exhibit in their bulk states. One of these properties is the color due to surface plasmon resonance. Gold nanoparticles appear red. This color has been utilized in glass for a long long time. In recent years, highly concentrated pastes of gold and silver nanoparticles have been successfully produced by using a special type of protective polymer and a mild reductant. The paste of gold nanoparticles can be used for paint and other materials as red colorants. In this article,application examples of gold nanoparticles as colorant are introduced. Recently, methods for producing bimetal nanoparticles such as gold/silver and gold/copper have been developed. These nanoparticles allow colors from yellow to green to be created. These methods and colors they produce are also described in this article.

  7. Lamellar multilayer hexadecylaniline-modified gold nanoparticle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organization of hexadecylaniline (HDA)-modified colloidal gold particles at the air-water interface and the formation thereafter of lamellar, multilayer films of gold nanoparticles by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique is described in this paper. Formation of HDA-capped gold nanoparticles is accomplished by a simple biphasic ...

  8. Lamellar multilayer hexadecylaniline-modified gold nanoparticle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Organization of hexadecylaniline (HDA)-modified colloidal gold particles at the air-water interface and the formation thereafter of lamellar, multilayer films of gold nanoparticles by the Langmuir-Blodgett technique is described in this paper. Formation of HDA-capped gold nanoparticles is accomplished by a simple biphasic ...

  9. Quantification of the electrostatic forces involved in the directed assembly of colloidal nanoparticles by AFM nanoxerography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palleau, E; Sangeetha, N M; Ressier, L

    2011-08-12

    Directed assembly of 10 nm dodecanethiol stabilized silver nanoparticles in hexane and 14 nm citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles in ethanol was performed by AFM nanoxerography onto charge patterns of both polarities written into poly(methylmethacrylate) thin films. The quasi-neutral silver nanoparticles were grafted on both positive and negative charge patterns while the negatively charged gold nanoparticles were selectively deposited on positive charge patterns only. Numerical simulations were conducted to quantify the magnitude, direction and spatial range of the electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic forces exerted by the charge patterns on these two types of nanoparticles in suspension taken as models. The simulations indicate that the directed assembly of silver nanoparticles on both charge patterns is due to the predominant dielectrophoretic forces, while the selective assembly of gold nanoparticles only on positive charge patterns is due to the predominant electrophoretic forces. The study also suggests that the minimum surface potential of charge patterns required for obtaining effective nanoparticle assembly depends strongly on the charge and polarizability of the nanoparticles and also on the nature of the dispersing solvent. Attractive electrostatic forces of about 2 × 10( - 2) pN in magnitude just above the charged surface appear to be sufficient to trap silver nanoparticles in hexane onto charge patterns and the value is about 2 pN for gold nanoparticles in ethanol, under the present experimental conditions. The numerical simulations used in this work to quantify the electrostatic forces operating in the directed assembly of nanoparticles from suspensions onto charge patterns can easily be extended to any kind of colloid and serve as an effective tool for a better comprehension and prediction of liquid-phase nanoxerography processes.

  10. Quantification of the electrostatic forces involved in the directed assembly of colloidal nanoparticles by AFM nanoxerography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palleau, E; Sangeetha, N M; Ressier, L

    2011-01-01

    Directed assembly of 10 nm dodecanethiol stabilized silver nanoparticles in hexane and 14 nm citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles in ethanol was performed by AFM nanoxerography onto charge patterns of both polarities written into poly(methylmethacrylate) thin films. The quasi-neutral silver nanoparticles were grafted on both positive and negative charge patterns while the negatively charged gold nanoparticles were selectively deposited on positive charge patterns only. Numerical simulations were conducted to quantify the magnitude, direction and spatial range of the electrophoretic and dielectrophoretic forces exerted by the charge patterns on these two types of nanoparticles in suspension taken as models. The simulations indicate that the directed assembly of silver nanoparticles on both charge patterns is due to the predominant dielectrophoretic forces, while the selective assembly of gold nanoparticles only on positive charge patterns is due to the predominant electrophoretic forces. The study also suggests that the minimum surface potential of charge patterns required for obtaining effective nanoparticle assembly depends strongly on the charge and polarizability of the nanoparticles and also on the nature of the dispersing solvent. Attractive electrostatic forces of about 2 x 10 -2 pN in magnitude just above the charged surface appear to be sufficient to trap silver nanoparticles in hexane onto charge patterns and the value is about 2 pN for gold nanoparticles in ethanol, under the present experimental conditions. The numerical simulations used in this work to quantify the electrostatic forces operating in the directed assembly of nanoparticles from suspensions onto charge patterns can easily be extended to any kind of colloid and serve as an effective tool for a better comprehension and prediction of liquid-phase nanoxerography processes.

  11. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using diatoms-silica-gold and EPS-gold bionanocomposite formation

    OpenAIRE

    Schröfel, Adam; Kratošová, Gabriela; Bohunická, Markéta; Dobročka, Edmund; Vávra, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Novel synthesis of gold nanoparticles, EPS-gold, and silica-gold bionanocomposites by biologically driven processes employing two diatom strains (Navicula atomus, Diadesmis gallica) is described. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron diffraction analysis (SAED) revealed a presence of gold nanoparticles in the experimental solutions of the diatom culture mixed with tetrachloroaureate. Nature of the gold nanoparticles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction studies. Scanning electron m...

  12. Glyco-gold nanoparticles: synthesis and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Compostella, Federica; Pitirollo, Olimpia; Silvestri, Alessandro; Polito, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Glyco-gold nanoparticles combine in a single entity the peculiar properties of gold nanoparticles with the biological activity of carbohydrates. The result is an exciting nanosystem, able to mimic the natural multivalent presentation of saccharide moieties and to exploit the peculiar optical properties of the metallic core. In this review, we present recent advances on glyco-gold nanoparticle applications in different biological fields, highlighting the key parameters which inspire the glyco ...

  13. Gold nanoparticles: generation and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G.R.

    2013-07-01

    In this presentation we report the reduction of Au 3+ through chemical and free radical (e solv - ) reactions both in non-aqueous and aqueous media. In chemical reduction, the spectral nature in ascorbic acid (AA) and citric acid (CA) systems was different. The band intensity of gold nanoparticles was lower in AA system. While in free radical reaction, the yield of nanoparticles was pure i.e. free from excess reactants. Under the study 60-200 nm size nanoparticles were generated, which are inert to oxygen. Using pulse radiolysis technique, the initial rate for e solv - reaction with Au 3+ was determined to be 7.6 x 10 9 M -1 s -1 . (author)

  14. Chemistry of Oligonucleotibe-Gold Nanoparticle Conjugates

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Letsinger, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Conjugates prepared by immobilizing thiol-terminated oligonucleotides onto gold nanoparticles from stable colloidal solutions in aqueous media The oligo nucleotides can serve as linkers to organize...

  15. Fabrication of Gold Nanoparticles Doped DVB Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Yu; Luo Xuan; Fan Yongheng; Zhang Qingjun; Ren Hongbo; Xiao Lei

    2009-01-01

    The fabrication of gold nanoparticles doped low density DVB foams was researched, which can be used as ICF target materials. By high internal phase emulsion (HIPE) method, gold nanoparticles doped low density DVB foams were prepared, with gold nanoparticles dissolved in inner phase. The results show that the content of Au in the gold nanoparticles doped DVB foam is 3. 19%, the axial direction density of the foam is uniform which indicates none evident settlement of gold nanoparticles. SEM tests show that the gold doped DVB polymer foams have open-celled structure and very uniform aperture, and the average pore size is about 1 μm, which is much smaller than that of pure DVB foams. EDX test shows that Au disperses uniformly in the foams. (authors)

  16. Lamellar multilayer hexadecylaniline-modified gold nanoparticle ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Materials Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune 411 008,. India e-mail: ... to the Brust method for the synthesis of hydrophobized gold nanoparticles.33 This process essentially consists of .... due to rearrangement of the gold nanoparticles within domains (and reorganization of the domains themselves) on ...

  17. [Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Azospirillum brasilense].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupriashina, M A; Vetchinkina, E P; Burov, A M; Ponomareva, E G; Nikitina, V E

    2014-01-01

    Plant-associated nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria Azospirillum brasilense were shown to reduce the gold of chloroauric acid to elemental gold, resulting in formation of gold nanoparicles. Extracellular phenoloxidizing enzymes (laccases and Mn peroxidases) were shown to participate in reduction of Au+3 (HAuCl4) to Au(0). Transmission electron microscopy revealed accumulation of colloidal gold nanoparticles of diverse shape in the culture liquid of A. brasilense strains Sp245 and Sp7. The size of the electron-dense nanospheres was 5 to 50 nm, and the size of nanoprisms varied from 5 to 300 nm. The tentative mechanism responsible for formation of gold nanoparticles is discussed.

  18. Shape-Controlled Gold Nanoparticle Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Shankar, S. S.; Bhargava, S.; Sastry, M. Synthesis of Gold Nanospheres and Nanotriangles by the Turkevich Approach. Journal of Nanoscience and...Accounts of Chemical Research 2008, 41, 1587–1595. 22. Sun, Y.; Xia, Y. Shape-Controlled Synthesis of Gold And Silver Nanoparticles. Science...N.; Griep, M. H.; and Karna, S. P. Chemical vs. Sonochemical Synthesis and Characterization of Silver , Gold, and Hybrid Nanoparticles; ARL-TR-5764

  19. Grafting of Gold Nanoparticles on Glass Using Sputtered Gold Interlayers

    OpenAIRE

    Kvítek, Ondřej; Hendrych, Robin; Kolská, Zdeňka; Švorčík, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Three-step preparation of nanostructured Au layer on glass substrate is described. The procedure starts with sputtered gold interlayer, followed by grafting with dithiols and final coverage with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Successful binding of dithiols on the sputtered Au film was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement. AuNPs bound to the surface were observed using atomic force microscopy. Both single nanoparticles and their aggregates were observed. UV-Vis spectra show b...

  20. Encapsulation of gold nanoparticles into self-assembling protein nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Yongkun; Burkhard Peter

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Gold nanoparticles are useful tools for biological applications due to their attractive physical and chemical properties. Their applications can be further expanded when they are functionalized with biological molecules. The biological molecules not only provide the interfaces for interactions between nanoparticles and biological environment, but also contribute their biological functions to the nanoparticles. Therefore, we used self-assembling protein nanoparticles (SAPNs...

  1. Gold nanoparticles produced in a microalga

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luangpipat, Tiyaporn; Beattie, Isabel R.; Chisti, Yusuf; Haverkamp, Richard G.

    2011-01-01

    An efficient biological route to production of gold nanoparticles which allows the nanoparticles to be easily recovered remains elusive. Live cells of the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris were incubated with a solution of gold chloride and harvested by centrifugation. Nanoparticles inside intact cells were identified by transmission electron microscopy and confirmed to be metallic gold by synchrotron based X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. These intracellular gold nanoparticles were 40–60 nm in diameter. At a concentration of 1.4% Au in the alga, a better than 97% recovery of the gold from solution was achieved. A maximum of 4.2% Au in the alga was obtained. Exposure of C. vulgaris to solutions containing dissolved salts of palladium, ruthenium, and rhodium also resulted in the production of the corresponding nanoparticles within the cells. These were surmised to be also metallic, but were produced at a much lower intracellular concentration than achieved with gold. Iridium was apparently toxic to the alga. No nanoparticles were observed using platinum solutions. C. vulgaris provides a possible route to large scale production of gold nanoparticles.

  2. CO oxidation on gold nanoparticles: Theoretical studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remediakis, Ioannis; Lopez, Nuria; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2005-01-01

    We present a summary of our theoretical results regarding CO oxidation on both oxide-supported and isolated gold nanoparticles. Using Density Functional Theory we have studied the adsorption of molecules and the oxidation reaction of CO on gold clusters. Low-coordinated sites on the gold...... nanoparticles can adsorb small inorganic molecules such as O2 and CO, and the presence of these sites is the key factor for the catalytic properties of supported gold nanoclusters. Other contributions, induced by the presence of the support, can provide parallel channels for the reaction and modulate the final...

  3. Nanotoxicity of gold and iron nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Souvik

    2011-02-01

    The extensive use of potentially hazardous nanoparticles in industrial applications suggest that their biological effects need to be evaluated following clinical testing practices as applicable for any new pharmaceutical. It was rationalized that a non hypothesis-driven approach is best suited for discovering the biological effects of nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles (approximately 18 nm), showed no drastic effect on gene expression in cells but iron nanoparticles showed perturbations in the expression of a set of functional genes.

  4. Gold Nanoparticle Labels Amplify Ellipsometric Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatasubbarao, Srivatsa

    2008-01-01

    The ellipsometric method reported in the immediately preceding article was developed in conjunction with a method of using gold nanoparticles as labels on biomolecules that one seeks to detect. The purpose of the labeling is to exploit the optical properties of the gold nanoparticles in order to amplify the measurable ellipsometric effects and thereby to enable ultrasensitive detection of the labeled biomolecules without need to develop more-complex ellipsometric instrumentation. The colorimetric, polarization, light-scattering, and other optical properties of nanoparticles depend on their sizes and shapes. In the present method, these size-and-shape-dependent properties are used to magnify the polarization of scattered light and the diattenuation and retardance of signals derived from ellipsometry. The size-and-shape-dependent optical properties of the nanoparticles make it possible to interrogate the nanoparticles by use of light of various wavelengths, as appropriate, to optimally detect particles of a specific type at high sensitivity. Hence, by incorporating gold nanoparticles bound to biomolecules as primary or secondary labels, the performance of ellipsometry as a means of detecting the biomolecules can be improved. The use of gold nanoparticles as labels in ellipsometry has been found to afford sensitivity that equals or exceeds the sensitivity achieved by use of fluorescence-based methods. Potential applications for ellipsometric detection of gold nanoparticle-labeled biomolecules include monitoring molecules of interest in biological samples, in-vitro diagnostics, process monitoring, general environmental monitoring, and detection of biohazards.

  5. Amoxicillin functionalized gold nanoparticles reverts MRSA resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalita, Sanjeeb; Kandimalla, Raghuram; Sharma, Kaustav Kalyan; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Deka, Manab; Kotoky, Jibon

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we have described the biosynthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles (GNPs) from aqueous extract of the aerial parts of a pteridophyte, "Adiantum philippense" by microwave irradiation and its surface functionalization with broad spectrum beta lactam antibiotic, amoxicillin (Amox). The functionalization of amoxicillin on GNPs (GNP-Amox) was carried out via electrostatic interaction of protonated amino group and thioether moiety mediated attractive forces. The synthesized GNPs and GNP-Amox were physicochemically characterized. UV-Vis spectroscopy, Zeta potential, XRD, FTIR and SERS (surface enhanced raman spectra) results confirmed the loading of Amox into GNPs. Loading of Amox to GNPs reduce amoxicillin cytotoxicity, whereas GNPs were found to be nontoxic to mouse fibroblast cell line (L929) as evident from MTT and acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EtBr) live/dead cell assays. The GNP-Amox conjugates demonstrated enhanced broad-spectrum bactericidal activity against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Furthermore, in-vitro and in-vivo assays of GNP-Amox revealed potent anti-MRSA activity and improved the survival rate. This indicates the subversion of antibiotic resistance mechanism by overcoming the effect of high levels of β-lactamase produced by methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Taken together, this study demonstrates the positive attributes from GNP-Amox conjugates as a promising antibacterial therapeutic agent against MRSA as well as other pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Metal enhanced fluorescence with gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattingly, Shaina LaRissa Strating

    A novel hybrid nanocomposite of Au nanoparticle-modified silicon nanowire was developed for surface enhanced fluorescence applications. The designed nanocomposite contained a silicon nanowire, gold nanoparticles and a silica layer doped with dye molecules. The hybrid nanomaterial was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), fluorescence measurements, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the gold nanoparticles were uniformly adhered on the silicon nanowires and covered by a thin silica layer. The nanostructure exhibited strong capacity for surface enhanced fluorescence. Different enhancement factors were obtained by changing synthetic conditions. The second goal of the project was to determine if the shape of gold nanoparticles affects the extent of its fluorescence enhancement under constant external factors. Two shapes of gold nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by SEM, STEM, zeta potential and absorbance measurements. Then they were coated with fluorescent dye-doped silica and the fluorescence intensity was measured and compared to the pure fluorescent dye. Gold nanorods enhanced fluorescence more than gold nanostars and that the fluorescent dye Alexafluor 700 showed a greater fluorescence intensity change in the presence of nanoparticles than methylene blue.

  7. Photochemical synthesis of polygonal gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, W.-C.; Chen, Y.-C.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a method to generate gold nanoparticles capable of absorbing near infrared light (NIR) radiation through a photochemical reaction. This approach does not require the use of either surfactants or polymers, reducing the difficulties that may arise in further chemical modifications for the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles with either triangular or hexagonal shapes were generated using the photo-reduction method, mixing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate with sodium oxalate, a reducing agent, in aqueous solution under illumination of a mercury lamp (λ max = 306 nm) for more than 10 min. The size of the gold nanoparticles varies from 25 to 200 nm, which mainly depends on the duration of light illumination and the concentration of sodium oxalate. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the presence of the gold nanoparticles in aqueous solutions can effectively elevate the temperature of the solutions under irradiation of NIR light (808 nm) within a few minutes. The gold nanoparticles can be potentially used as suitable photothermal agents for hyperthermia

  8. Nonlinear optical studies of single gold nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Meindert Alexander van

    2007-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are spherical clusters of gold atoms, with diameters typically between 1 and 100 nanometers. The applications of these particles are rather diverse, from optical labels for biological experiments to data carrier for optical data storage. The goal of my project was to develop new

  9. Radiofrequency Heating Pathways for Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, C. B.; McCoy, R. S.; Ackerson, B. J.; Collins, G. J.

    2015-01-01

    This feature article reviews the thermal dissipation of nanoscopic gold under radiofrequency (RF) irradiation. It also presents previously unpublished data addressing obscure aspects of this phenomenon. While applications in biology motivated initial investigation of RF heating of gold nanoparticles, recent controversy concerning whether thermal effects can be attributed to nanoscopic gold highlight the need to understand the involved mechanism or mechanisms of heating. Both the nature of the particle and the nature of the RF field influence heating. Aspects of nanoparticle chemistry and physics, including the hydrodynamic diameter of the particle, the oxidation state and related magnetism of the core, and the chemical nature of the ligand shell may all strongly influence to what extent a nanoparticle heats in an RF field. Aspects of RF include: power, frequency and antenna designs that emphasize relative strength of magnetic or electric fields, and also influence the extent to which a gold nanoparticle heats in RF. These nanoparticle and RF properties are analysed in the context of three heating mechanisms proposed to explain gold nanoparticle heating in an RF field. This article also makes a critical analysis of the existing literature in the context of the nanoparticle preparations, RF structure, and suggested mechanisms in previously reported experiments. PMID:24962620

  10. Synthesis of radioactive gold nanoparticle in surfactant medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swadesh Mandal

    2014-01-01

    The present study describes the synthesis of radioactive gold nanoparticle in surfactant medium. Proton irradiated stable 197 Au and radioactive 198 Au were simultaneously used for production of radioactive gold nanoparticle. Face centered cubic gold nanoparticles with size of 4-50 nm were found in proton irradiated gold foil. However, the size of nanoparticle varies with pH using both stable and radioactive gold. (author)

  11. Functionalization of Biosynthesized Gold Nanoparticle from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    nanoparticles and formulated nanodrug were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometry, Zetasizer, Scanning and transmission Electron Microscopy .... UV–Vis Spectrophotometer (UV-1800 Shimadzu) was used to measure the wavelength .... plasma resonance at 545.5nm for biosynthesized gold nanoparticle using ...

  12. Gold nanoparticles extraction from dielectric scattering background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xin; Wang, Jingxin

    2014-11-01

    The unique advantages such as brightness, non-photobleaching, good bio-compatibility make gold nanoparticles desirable labels and play important roles in biotech and related research and applications. Distinguishing gold nanoparticles from other dielectric scattering particles is of more importance, especially in bio-tracing and imaging. The enhancement image results from the localized surface plasmon resonance associated with gold nanopartilces makes themselves distinguishable from other dielectric particles, based on which, we propose a dual-wavelength detection method by employing a high sensitive cross-polarization microscopy.

  13. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Pseudomonas Aeruginosa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd El-Aziz, M.; Badr, Y.; Mahmoud, M. A.

    2007-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa were used for extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). Consequently, Au NPs were formed due to reduction of gold ion by bacterial cell supernatant of P. aeruginos ATCC 90271, P. aeruginos (2) and P. aeruginos (1). The UV-Vis. and fluorescence spectra of the bacterial as well as chemical prepared Au NPs were recorded. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) micrograph showed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles in the range of 15-30 nm. The process of reduction being extracellular and may lead to the development of an easy bioprocess for synthesis of Au NPs

  14. Effective electrostatic interactions in colloid-nanoparticle mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Alan R.

    2017-12-01

    Interparticle interactions and bulk properties of colloidal suspensions can be substantially modified by the addition of nanoparticles. Extreme asymmetries in size and charge between colloidal particles and nanoparticles present severe computational challenges to molecular-scale modeling of such complex systems. We present a statistical mechanical theory of effective electrostatic interactions that can greatly ease large-scale modeling of charged colloid-nanoparticle mixtures. By applying a sequential coarse-graining procedure, we show that a multicomponent mixture of charged colloids, nanoparticles, counterions, and coions can be mapped first onto a binary mixture of colloids and nanoparticles and then onto a one-component model of colloids alone. In a linear-response approximation, the one-component model is governed by a single effective pair potential and a one-body volume energy, whose parameters depend nontrivially on nanoparticle size, charge, and concentration. To test the theory, we perform molecular dynamics simulations of the two-component and one-component models and compute structural properties. For moderate electrostatic couplings, colloid-colloid radial distribution functions and static structure factors agree closely between the two models, validating the sequential coarse-graining approach. Nanoparticles of sufficient charge and concentration enhance screening of electrostatic interactions, weakening correlations between charged colloids and destabilizing suspensions, consistent with experiments.

  15. Engineered Gold Nanoparticles and Plant Adaptation Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqi, Khwaja Salahuddin; Husen, Azamal

    2016-09-01

    Use of metal nanoparticles in biological system has recently been recognised although little is known about their possible effects on plant growth and development. Nanoparticles accumulation, translocation, growth response and stress modulation in plant system is not well understood. Plants exposed to gold and gold nanoparticles have been demonstrated to exhibit both positive and negative effects. Their growth and yield vary from species to species. Cytoxicity of engineered gold nanoparticles depends on the concentration, particle size and shape. They exhibit increase in vegetative growth and yield of fruit/seed at lower concentration and decrease them at higher concentration. Studies have shown that the gold nanoparticles exposure has improved free radical scavenging potential and antioxidant enzymatic activities and alter micro RNAs expression that regulate different morphological, physiological and metabolic processes in plants. These modulations lead to improved plant growth and yields. Prior to the use of gold nanoparticles, it has been suggested that its cost may be calculated to see if it is economically feasible.

  16. Growth of gold nanoparticles at gelatin-silica bio-interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaid, Imen; Masse, Sylvie; Selmane, Mohamed; Fessi, Shemseddine; Coradin, Thibaud

    2016-01-01

    The growth of gold nanoparticles via chemical reduction of HAuCl4 dispersed in gelatin-silicate mixtures was studied. Gelatin leads to densely packed nanoparticles whereas open colloidal aggregates with tight boundaries are formed within silica. Within the bio-hybrid systems, gold species are located within the gelatin-silicate particles and/or within the gelatin phase, depending on the preparation conditions. These various localizations and their impact on the final nanoparticle structure are discussed considering attractive and repulsive electrostatic interactions existing between the three components. These data suggest that bio-hybrid systems are interesting and versatile interfaces to study crystallization processes in confined environments.

  17. Subchronic inhalation toxicity of gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung Yong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gold nanoparticles are widely used in consumer products, including cosmetics, food packaging, beverages, toothpaste, automobiles, and lubricants. With this increase in consumer products containing gold nanoparticles, the potential for worker exposure to gold nanoparticles will also increase. Only a few studies have produced data on the in vivo toxicology of gold nanoparticles, meaning that the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME of gold nanoparticles remain unclear. Results The toxicity of gold nanoparticles was studied in Sprague Dawley rats by inhalation. Seven-week-old rats, weighing approximately 200 g (males and 145 g (females, were divided into 4 groups (10 rats in each group: fresh-air control, low-dose (2.36 × 104 particle/cm3, 0.04 μg/m3, middle-dose (2.36 × 105 particle/cm3, 0.38 μg/m3, and high-dose (1.85 × 106 particle/cm3, 20.02 μg/m3. The animals were exposed to gold nanoparticles (average diameter 4-5 nm for 6 hours/day, 5 days/week, for 90-days in a whole-body inhalation chamber. In addition to mortality and clinical observations, body weight, food consumption, and lung function were recorded weekly. At the end of the study, the rats were subjected to a full necropsy, blood samples were collected for hematology and clinical chemistry tests, and organ weights were measured. Cellular differential counts and cytotoxicity measurements, such as albumin, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH, and total protein were also monitored in a cellular bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL fluid. Among lung function test measurements, tidal volume and minute volume showed a tendency to decrease comparing control and dose groups during the 90-days of exposure. Although no statistically significant differences were found in cellular differential counts, histopathologic examination showed minimal alveoli, an inflammatory infiltrate with a mixed cell type, and increased macrophages in the high-dose rats. Tissue

  18. A low cost microwave synthesis method for preparation of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo Vo Ke Thanh; Lam Quang Vinh; Nguyen Dang Giang; Huynh Thanh Dat

    2014-01-01

    The gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in 15-20 nm size range have attention for fabrication of smart sensing devices in biomedical sciences as diagnostic tools. Citrate capped GNPs are negatively charged, which can be exploited for electrostatic interactions with some positively charged biomolecules like antibody. In this study, we are developing a low-cost technique by using a common microwave system with medium power for synthesizing gold nanoparticles with using sodium citrate (Na 3 Ct) reduction in chloroauric acid (HAuCl 4 .3H 2 O). It was found that the comparing with normal thermal method, the reaction by the microwave irradiation was much faster. Besides, the effects the sodium citrate concentration and optical properties of gold nanoparticles were studied. The optical properties of gold nanoparticles suspension were characterized by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis). Maximum absorbance wavelengths (λ max ) for gold nanoparticles are ∼ 518-524 nm with the size of 12-25 nm. The size of gold nanoparticles decreases with increasing concentration of sodium citrate. Besides, the morphology of gold nanoparticles have a spherical shape with face-centered-cubic (fcc) crystalline structure. (author)

  19. Gold nano-particles fixed on glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worsch, Christian; Wisniewski, Wolfgang; Kracker, Michael; Rüssel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We produced wear resistant gold–ruby coatings on amorphous substrates. ► Thin sputtered gold layers were covered by or embedded in silica coatings. ► Annealing above T g of the substrate glass led to the formation of gold nano particles. ► A 1 1 1-texture of the gold particles is observed via XRD and EBSD. ► EBSD-patterns can be acquired from crystals covered by a thin layer of glass. - Abstract: A simple process for producing wear resistant gold nano-particle coatings on transparent substrates is proposed. Soda-lime-silica glasses were sputtered with gold and subsequently coated with SiO 2 using a combustion chemical vapor deposition technique. Some samples were first coated with silica, sputtered with gold and then coated with a second layer of silica. The samples were annealed for 20 min at either 550 or 600 °C. This resulted in the formation of round, well separated gold nano-particles with sizes from 15 to 200 nm. The color of the coated glass was equivalent to that of gold–ruby glasses. Silica/gold/silica coatings annealed at 600 °C for 20 min were strongly adherent and scratch resistant. X-ray diffraction and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) were used to describe the crystal orientations of the embedded particles. The gold particles are preferably oriented with their (1 1 1) planes perpendicular to the surface.

  20. Grafting of Gold Nanoparticles on Glass Using Sputtered Gold Interlayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ondřej Kvítek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-step preparation of nanostructured Au layer on glass substrate is described. The procedure starts with sputtered gold interlayer, followed by grafting with dithiols and final coverage with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs. Successful binding of dithiols on the sputtered Au film was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurement. AuNPs bound to the surface were observed using atomic force microscopy. Both single nanoparticles and their aggregates were observed. UV-Vis spectra show broadening of surface plasmon resonance peak after AuNPs binding caused by aggregation of AuNPs on the sample surface. Zeta potential measurements suggest that a large part of the dithiol molecules are preferentially bound to the gold interlayer via both –SH groups.

  1. Electrostatic model of semiconductor nanoparticles trapped

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple electrostatic model is applied to study the solvation energy and localization energy to inorganic semiconductor nanocrystallites trapped in polymer and ion conducting polymer electrolytes. The effective mass approximation has been applied to the system. In the single charge configuration, the dielectric constant of ...

  2. Electrostatic model of semiconductor nanoparticles trapped in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple electrostatic model is applied to study the solvation energy and localization energy to inorganic semiconductor nanocrystallites trapped in polymer and ion conducting polymer electrolytes. The effective mass approximation has been applied to the system. In the single charge configuration, the dielectric constant of ...

  3. Gold nanoparticle-based electrochemical biosensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pingarron, Jose M.; Yanez-Sedeno, Paloma; Gonzalez-Cortes, Araceli

    2008-01-01

    The unique properties of gold nanoparticles to provide a suitable microenvironment for biomolecules immobilization retaining their biological activity, and to facilitate electron transfer between the immobilized proteins and electrode surfaces, have led to an intensive use of this nanomaterial for the construction of electrochemical biosensors with enhanced analytical performance with respect to other biosensor designs. Recent advances in this field are reviewed in this article. The advantageous operational characteristics of the biosensing devices designed making use of gold nanoparticles are highlighted with respect to non-nanostructured biosensors and some illustrative examples are commented. Electrochemical enzyme biosensors including those using hybrid materials with carbon nanotubes and polymers, sol-gel matrices, and layer-by-layer architectures are considered. Moreover, electrochemical immunosensors in which gold nanoparticles play a crucial role in the electrode transduction enhancement of the affinity reaction as well as in the efficiency of immunoreagents immobilization in a stable mode are reviewed. Similarly, recent advances in the development of DNA biosensors using gold nanoparticles to improve DNA immobilization on electrode surfaces and as suitable labels to improve detection of hybridization events are considered. Finally, other biosensors designed with gold nanoparticles oriented to electrically contact redox enzymes to electrodes by a reconstitution process and to the study of direct electron transfer between redox proteins and electrode surfaces have also been treated

  4. Gold nanoparticle assemblies through Hydrogen-bonded supramolecular mediators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kinge, S.S.; Crego Calama, Mercedes; Reinhoudt, David

    2007-01-01

    The synthesis of spherical gold nanoparticle assemblies with multicomponent double rosette molecular boxes as mediators is presented. These nine-component hydrogen-bonded supramolecular structures held together by 36 hydrogen bonds induce gold nanoparticle assembly. The morphologies of the

  5. Increased cellular uptake of peptide-modified PEGylated gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bo; Yang, Dan; Qin, Mengmeng; Zhang, Yuan; He, Bing; Dai, Wenbing; Wang, Xueqing; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Hua; Yin, Changcheng

    2017-12-09

    Gold nanoparticles are promising drug delivery vehicles for nucleic acids, small molecules, and proteins, allowing various modifications on the particle surface. However, the instability and low bioavailability of gold nanoparticles compromise their clinical application. Here, we functionalized gold nanoparticles with CPP fragments (CALNNPFVYLI, CALRRRRRRRR) through sulfhydryl PEG to increase their stability and bioavailability. The resulting gold nanoparticles were characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), UV-visible spectrometry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and the stability in biological solutions was evaluated. Comparing to PEGylated gold nanoparticles, CPP (CALNNPFVYLI, CALRRRRRRRR)-modified gold nanoparticles showed 46 folds increase in cellular uptake in A549 and B16 cell lines, as evidenced by the inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES). The interactions between gold nanoparticles and liposomes indicated CPP-modified gold nanoparticles bind to cell membrane more effectively than PEGylated gold nanoparticles. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was used to measure interactions between nanoparticles and the membrane. TEM and uptake inhibitor experiments indicated that the cellular entry of gold nanoparticles was mediated by clathrin and macropinocytosis. Other energy independent endocytosis pathways were also identified. Our work revealed a new strategy to modify gold nanoparticles with CPP and illustrated the cellular uptake pathway of CPP-modified gold nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Formation of gold nanoparticles by glycolipids of Lactobacillus casei

    OpenAIRE

    Kikuchi, Fumiya; Kato, Yugo; Furihata, Kazuo; Kogure, Toshihiro; Imura, Yuki; Yoshimura, Etsuro; Suzuki, Michio

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have particular properties distinct from those of bulk gold crystals, and such nanoparticles are used in various applications in optics, catalysis, and drug delivery. Many reports on microbial synthesis of gold nanoparticles have appeared. However, the molecular details (reduction and dispersion) of such synthesis remain unclear. In the present study, we studied gold nanoparticle synthesis by Lactobacillus casei. A comparison of L. casei components before and after addition...

  7. Gold Nanoparticle Quantitation by Whole Cell Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Aric W; Jeerage, Kavita M; Schwartz, Cindi L; Curtin, Alexandra E; Chiaramonti, Ann N

    2015-12-22

    Many proposed biomedical applications for engineered gold nanoparticles require their incorporation by mammalian cells in specific numbers and locations. Here, the number of gold nanoparticles inside of individual mammalian stem cells was characterized using fast focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy based tomography. Enhanced optical microscopy was used to provide a multiscale map of the in vitro sample, which allows cells of interest to be identified within their local environment. Cells were then serially sectioned using a gallium ion beam and imaged using a scanning electron beam. To confirm the accuracy of single cross sections, nanoparticles in similar cross sections were imaged using transmission electron microscopy and scanning helium ion microscopy. Complete tomographic series were then used to count the nanoparticles inside of each cell and measure their spatial distribution. We investigated the influence of slice thickness on counting single particles and clusters as well as nanoparticle packing within clusters. For 60 nm citrate stabilized particles, the nanoparticle cluster packing volume is 2.15 ± 0.20 times the volume of the bare gold nanoparticles.

  8. Gold-coated nanoparticles for use in biotechnology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berning, Douglas E [Los Alamos, NM; Kraus, Jr., Robert H.; Atcher, Robert W [Los Alamos, NM; Schmidt, Jurgen G [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-07-07

    A process of preparing gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles is disclosed and includes forming a suspension of magnetic nanoparticles within a suitable liquid, adding an amount of a reducible gold compound and a reducing agent to the suspension, and, maintaining the suspension for time sufficient to form gold-coated magnetic nanoparticles.

  9. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles with graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenshuo; He, Dawei; Zhang, Xiqing; Duan, Jiahua; Wu, Hongpeng; Xu, Haiteng; Wang, Yongsheng

    2014-05-01

    Single sheets of functionalized graphene oxide are derived through chemical exfoliation of natural flake graphite. We present an effective synthetic method of graphene-gold nanoparticles hybrid nanocomposites. AFM (Atomic Force Microscope) was used to measure the thickness of the individual GO nanosheet. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy was used to verify the attachment of oxygen functionalities on the surface of graphene oxide. TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) data revealed the average diameters of the gold colloids and characterized the composite particles situation. Absorption spectroscopy showed that before and after synthesis the gold particle size did not change. Our studies indicate that the hybrid is potential substrates for catalysts and biosensors.

  10. Synthesis and Bioconjugation of Gold Nanoparticles as Potential Molecular Probes for Light-Based Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Gopal Rayavarapu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We have synthesized and characterized gold nanoparticles (spheres and rods with optical extinction bands within the “optical imaging window.” The intense plasmon resonant driven absorption and scattering peaks of these nanoparticles make them suitable as contrast agents for optical imaging techniques. Further, we have conjugated these gold nanoparticles to a mouse monoclonal antibody specific to HER2 overexpressing SKBR3 breast carcinoma cells. The bioconjugation protocol uses noncovalent modes of binding based on a combination of electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions of the antibody and the gold surface. We discuss various aspects of the synthesis and bioconjugation protocols and the characterization results of the functionalized nanoparticles. Some proposed applications of these potential molecular probes in the field of biomedical imaging are also discussed.

  11. Applications of gold nanoparticles in cancer nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibo Cai

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Weibo Cai1,2, Ting Gao3, Hao Hong1, Jiangtao Sun11Departments of Radiology and Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin – Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; 2University of Wisconsin Paul P. Carbone Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin, USA; 3Tyco Electronics Corporation, 306 Constitution Drive, Menlo Park, California, USAAbstract: It has been almost 4 decades since the “war on cancer” was declared. It is now generally believed that personalized medicine is the future for cancer patient management. Possessing unprecedented potential for early detection, accurate diagnosis, and personalized treatment of cancer, nanoparticles have been extensively studied over the last decade. In this review, we will summarize the current state-of-the-art of gold nanoparticles in biomedical applications targeting cancer. Gold nanospheres, nanorods, nanoshells, nanocages, and surface enhanced Raman scattering nanoparticles will be discussed in detail regarding their uses in in vitro assays, ex vivo and in vivo imaging, cancer therapy, and drug delivery. Multifunctionality is the key feature of nanoparticle-based agents. Targeting ligands, imaging labels, therapeutic drugs, and other functionalities can all be integrated to allow for targeted molecular imaging and molecular therapy of cancer. Big strides have been made and many proof-of-principle studies have been successfully performed. The future looks brighter than ever yet many hurdles remain to be conquered. A multifunctional platform based on gold nanoparticles, with multiple receptor targeting, multimodality imaging, and multiple therapeutic entities, holds the promise for a “magic gold bullet” against cancer.Keywords: gold nanoparticles, cancer, nanotechnology, optical imaging, nanomedicine, molecular therapy

  12. Protracted elimination of gold nanoparticles from mouse liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadauskas, Evaldas; Wallin, Håkan; Stoltenberg, Meredin

    2009-01-01

    The present study aims at revealing the fate of 40-nm gold nanoparticles after intravenous injections. The gold nanoparticles were traced histochemically with light and transmission electron microscopy using autometallographic (AMG) staining, and the gold content in the liver was determined......% fall in the gold content over the observed 6 months, the AMG finding of a significant reduction in the stained area of the liver sections and number of macrophages loaded with gold nanoparticles reveals that over time an increasing part of the total amount of gold nanoparticles in the liver...

  13. Synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles incorporated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles incorporated bentonite clay for electrocatalytic sensing of arsenic(III). Pankaj Kumar Rastogi Dharmendra Kumar Yadav Shruti Pandey Vellaichamy Ganesan Piyush Kumar Sonkar Rupali Gupta. Regular Articles Volume 128 Issue 3 March 2016 pp 349-356 ...

  14. Surface interactions between gold nanoparticles and biochar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineered nanomaterials are directly applied to agricultural soils as a part of pesticide/fertilize formulations and sludge/manure amendments. Yet, no prior reports are available on the extent and reversibility of gold nanoparticles (nAu) retention by soil components including charcoal black carbo...

  15. Plasmonic biocompatible silver-gold alloyed nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotiriou, Georgios A; Etterlin, Gion Diego; Spyrogianni, Anastasia; Krumeich, Frank; Leroux, Jean-Christophe; Pratsinis, Sotiris E

    2014-11-14

    The addition of Au during scalable synthesis of nanosilver drastically minimizes its surface oxidation and leaching of toxic Ag(+) ions. These biocompatible and inexpensive silver-gold nanoalloyed particles exhibit superior plasmonic performance than commonly used pure Au nanoparticles, and as such these nanoalloys have great potential in theranostic applications.

  16. Reversible multi polyelectrolyte layers on gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoumessi Lekeufack, Diane; Brioude, Arnaud; Lalatonne, Yoann; Motte, Laurence; Coleman, Anthony W.; Miele, Philippe

    2012-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles surface can be easily modified by different molecules such as polyelectrolytes. In a typical multilayer system made of polyethyleneimine and poly(styrene sulfonate)sodium alternated layers around gold nanoparticles, we have evaluated the interactions between the different layers and the relative strength of interfacial properties. By means of UV-Visible and FTIR spectroscopies, we have shown that due to its amine functionalities, the bonding of polyethyleneimine to gold particles is stronger than the one implied with the sulfonate anion in the PSS inducing a clean removal of this latter after the last polyethyleneimine deposition. Considering that polyethyleneimine is cytotoxic and that only weak covalent bonds are concerned in polyelectrolyte multilayer, this last point is of main importance since external degradation thus exposing polyethyleneimine sub-layer of multilayer films to in vivo tissue cells can occur by many ways.

  17. Molecular dynamics simulations on the melting of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Zhiwei; Feng, Haijun; Zhou, Jian

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics is employed to study the melting of bulk gold and gold nanoparticles. PCFF, Sutton-Chen and COMPASS force fields are adopted to study the melting point of bulk gold and we find out that the Sutton-Chen force field is the most accurate model in predicting the melting point of bulk gold. Consequently, the Sutton-Chen force field is applied to study the melting points of spherical gold nanoparticles with different diameters. Variations of diffusion coefficient, potential energy and translational order parameter with temperature are analyzed. The simulated melting points of gold nanoparticles are between 615∼1115 K, which are much lower than that of bulk gold (1336 K). As the diameter of gold nanoparticle drops, the melting point also descends. The melting mechanism is also analyzed for gold nanoparticles.

  18. Antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles prepared by solvothermal method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Tokeer, E-mail: tahmad3@jmi.ac.in [Nanochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Wani, Irshad A.; Lone, Irfan H.; Ganguly, Aparna [Nanochemistry Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Manzoor, Nikhat; Ahmad, Aijaz [Department of Biosciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi 110025 (India); Ahmed, Jahangeer [Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Al-Shihri, Ayed S. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, King Khalid University, Abha 61413, P.O. Box 9004 (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-01-15

    Graphical abstract: Gold nanoparticles (7 and 15 nm) of very high surface area (329 and 269 m{sup 2}/g) have been successfully synthesized through solvothermal method by using tin chloride and sodium borohydride as reducing agents. As-prepared gold nanoparticles shows very excellent antifungal activity against Candida isolates and activity increases with decrease in the particle size. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Effect of reducing agents on the morphology of gold nanoparticles. ► Highly uniform and monodisperse gold nanoparticles (7 nm). ► Highest surface area of gold nanoparticles (329 m{sup 2/}g). ► Excellent antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles against Candida strains. -- Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by solvothermal method using SnCl{sub 2} and NaBH{sub 4} as reducing agents. X-ray diffraction studies show highly crystalline and monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles with face centred cubic structure. The transmission electron microscopic studies show the formation of nearly spherical gold nanoparticles of average size of 15 nm using SnCl{sub 2}, however, NaBH{sub 4} produced highly uniform, monodispersed and spherical gold nanoparticles of average grain size of 7 nm. A high surface area of 329 m{sup 2}/g for 7 nm and 269 m{sup 2}/g for 15 nm gold nanoparticles was observed. UV–vis studies assert the excitations over the visible region due to transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon modes. The gold nanoparticles exhibit excellent size dependant antifungal activity and greater biocidal action against Candida isolates for 7 nm sized gold nanoparticles restricting the transmembrane H{sup +} efflux of the Candida species than 15 nm sized gold nanoparticles.

  19. Antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles prepared by solvothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, Tokeer; Wani, Irshad A.; Lone, Irfan H.; Ganguly, Aparna; Manzoor, Nikhat; Ahmad, Aijaz; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Al-Shihri, Ayed S.

    2013-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Gold nanoparticles (7 and 15 nm) of very high surface area (329 and 269 m 2 /g) have been successfully synthesized through solvothermal method by using tin chloride and sodium borohydride as reducing agents. As-prepared gold nanoparticles shows very excellent antifungal activity against Candida isolates and activity increases with decrease in the particle size. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Effect of reducing agents on the morphology of gold nanoparticles. ► Highly uniform and monodisperse gold nanoparticles (7 nm). ► Highest surface area of gold nanoparticles (329 m 2/ g). ► Excellent antifungal activity of gold nanoparticles against Candida strains. -- Abstract: Gold nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by solvothermal method using SnCl 2 and NaBH 4 as reducing agents. X-ray diffraction studies show highly crystalline and monophasic nature of the gold nanoparticles with face centred cubic structure. The transmission electron microscopic studies show the formation of nearly spherical gold nanoparticles of average size of 15 nm using SnCl 2 , however, NaBH 4 produced highly uniform, monodispersed and spherical gold nanoparticles of average grain size of 7 nm. A high surface area of 329 m 2 /g for 7 nm and 269 m 2 /g for 15 nm gold nanoparticles was observed. UV–vis studies assert the excitations over the visible region due to transverse and longitudinal surface plasmon modes. The gold nanoparticles exhibit excellent size dependant antifungal activity and greater biocidal action against Candida isolates for 7 nm sized gold nanoparticles restricting the transmembrane H + efflux of the Candida species than 15 nm sized gold nanoparticles.

  20. Beyond superquenching: Hyper-efficient energy transfer from conjugated polymers to gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Chunhai; Wang, Shu; Hong, Janice W.; Bazan, Guillermo C.; Plaxco, Kevin W.; Heeger, Alan J.

    2003-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles quench the fluorescence of cationic polyfluorene with Stern–Volmer constants (KSV) approaching 1011 M—1, several orders of magnitude larger than any previously reported conjugated polymer–quencher pair and 9–10 orders of magnitude larger than small molecule dye–quencher pairs. The dependence of KSV on ionic strength, charge and conjugation length of the polymer, and the dimensions (and thus optical properties) of the nanoparticles suggests that three factors account for this extraordinary efficiency: (i) amplification of the quenching via rapid internal energy or electron transfer, (ii) electrostatic interactions between the cationic polymer and anionic nanoparticles, and (iii) the ability of gold nanoparticles to quench via efficient energy transfer. As a result of this extraordinarily high KSV, quenching can be observed even at subpicomolar concentrations of nanoparticles, suggesting that the combination of conjugated polymers with these nanomaterials can potentially lead to improved sensitivity in optical biosensors. PMID:12750470

  1. Gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) and gold nanopore (AuNPore) catalysts in organic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takale, Balaram S; Bao, Ming; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

    2014-04-07

    Organic synthesis using gold has gained tremendous attention in last few years, especially heterogeneous gold catalysis based on gold nanoparticles has made its place in almost all organic reactions, because of the robust and green nature of gold catalysts. In this context, gold nanopore (AuNPore) with a 3D metal framework is giving a new dimension to heterogeneous gold catalysts. Interestingly, AuNPore chemistry is proving better than gold nanoparticles based chemistry. In this review, along with recent advances, major discoveries in heterogeneous gold catalysis are discussed.

  2. Absorption Spectra of Gold Nanoparticle Suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anan'eva, M. V.; Nurmukhametov, D. R.; Zverev, A. S.; Nelyubina, N. V.; Zvekov, A. A.; Russakov, D. M.; Kalenskii, A. V.; Eremenko, A. N.

    2018-02-01

    Three gold nanoparticle suspensions are obtained, and mean radii in distributions - (6.1 ± 0.2), (11.9 ± 0.3), and (17.3 ± 0.7) nm - are determined by the transmission electron microscopy method. The optical absorption spectra of suspensions are obtained and studied. Calculation of spectral dependences of the absorption index of suspensions at values of the gold complex refractive index taken from the literature showed a significant deviation of experimental and calculated data in the region of 450-800 nm. Spectral dependences of the absorption of suspensions are simulated within the framework of the Mie-Drude theory taking into account the interband absorption in the form of an additional term in the imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity of the Gaussian type. It is shown that to quantify the spectral dependences in the region of the plasmon absorption band of nanoparticles, correction of the parameters of the interband absorption is necessary in addition to the increase of the relaxation parameter of the Drude theory. Spectral dependences of the dielectric permittivity of gold in nanodimensional state are refined from the solution of the inverse problem. The results of the present work are important for predicting the special features of operation of photonic devices and optical detonators based on gold nanoparticles.

  3. The golden age: gold nanoparticles for biomedicine†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreaden, Erik C.; Alkilany, Alaaldin M.; Huang, Xiaohua; Murphy, Catherine J.; El-Sayed, Mostafa A.

    2018-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been used in biomedical applications since their first colloidal syntheses more than three centuries ago. However, over the past two decades, their beautiful colors and unique electronic properties have also attracted tremendous attention due to their historical applications in art and ancient medicine and current applications in enhanced optoelectronics and photovoltaics. In spite of their modest alchemical beginnings, gold nanoparticles exhibit physical properties that are truly different from both small molecules and bulk materials, as well as from other nanoscale particles. Their unique combination of properties is just beginning to be fully realized in range of medical diagnostic and therapeutic applications. This critical review will provide insights into the design, synthesis, functionalization, and applications of these artificial molecules in biomedicine and discuss their tailored interactions with biological systems to achieve improved patient health. Further, we provide a survey of the rapidly expanding body of literature on this topic and argue that gold nanotechnology-enabled biomedicine is not simply an act of ‘gilding the (nanomedicinal) lily’, but that a new ‘Golden Age’ of biomedical nanotechnology is truly upon us. Moving forward, the most challenging nanoscience ahead of us will be to find new chemical and physical methods of functionalizing gold nanoparticles with compounds that can promote efficient binding, clearance, and biocompatibility and to assess their safety to other biological systems and their long-term term effects on human health and reproduction (472 references). PMID:22109657

  4. Monofunctional gold nanoparticles: synthesis and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Qun; Worden, James G.

    2007-01-01

    The ability to control the assembly of nanoparticle building blocks is critically important for the development of new materials and devices. The properties and functions of nanomaterials are not only dependent on the size and properties of individual particles, but also the interparticle distance and interactions. In order to control the structures of nanoassemblies, it is important to first achieve a precise control on the chemical functionality of nanoparticle building blocks. This review discusses three methods that have been reported recently for the preparation of monofunctional gold nanoparticles, i.e., nanoparticles with a single chemical functional group attached to each particle. The advantages and disadvantages of the three methods are discussed and compared. With a single functional group attached to the surface, one can treat such nanoparticles as molecular building blocks to react with other molecules or nanoparticles. In other words, by using appropriate chemical reactions, nanoparticles can be linked together into nanoassemblies and materials by covalent bonds, similar to the total chemical synthesis of complicated organic compounds from smaller molecular units. An example of using this approach for the synthesis of nanoparticle/polymer hybrid materials with optical limiting properties is presented. Other potential applications and advantages of covalent bond-based nanoarchitectures vs. non-covalent interaction-based supramolecular self-assemblies are also discussed briefly in this review

  5. A simple gold nanoparticle-mediated immobilization method to fabricate highly homogeneous DNA microarrays having higher capacities than those prepared by using conventional techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Cheulhee; Mun, Hyo Young; Li, Taihua; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2009-01-01

    A simple, highly efficient immobilization method to fabricate DNA microarrays, that utilizes gold nanoparticles as the mediator, has been developed. The fabrication method begins with electrostatic attachment of amine-modified DNA to gold nanoparticles. The resulting gold-DNA complexes are immobilized on conventional amine or aldehyde functionalized glass slides. By employing gold nanoparticles as the immobilization mediator, implementation of this procedure yields highly homogeneous microarrays that have higher binding capacities than those produced by conventional methods. This outcome is due to the increased three-dimensional immobilization surface provided by the gold nanoparticles as well as the intrinsic effects of gold on emission properties. This novel immobilization strategy gives microarrays that produce more intense hybridization signals for the complementary DNA. Furthermore, the silver enhancement technique, made possible only in the case of immobilized gold nanoparticles on the microarrays, enables simple monitoring of the integrity of the immobilized DNA probe.

  6. Gold nanoparticles: preparation, functionalisation and applications in biochemistry and immunochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dykman, Lev A; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A

    2007-01-01

    The review summarises data on the synthesis and functionalisation of gold nanoparticles and their applications in biological investigations. Particular attention is given to applications of colloidal gold in solid-phase assays, immunoassay and studies of biologically active compounds by vibrational spectroscopy. A special section deals with the use of gold nanoparticles as antigen carriers in immunisation.

  7. Controlled synthesis and optical properties of pure gold nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Singh, A.K.; Rai, A.K.; Bicanic, D.D.

    2009-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by laser ablation of a gold metallic disc at wavelengths of 532 nm and 355 nm with 7 ns pulse duration in the pure water. The colloidal gold nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and

  8. Assembly of functional gold nanoparticle on silica microsphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hsuan-Lan; Lee, Fu-Cheng; Tang, Tse-Yu; Zhou, Chenguang; Tsai, De-Hao

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a controlled synthesis of silica microsphere with the surface-decorated functional gold nanoparticles. Surface of silica microsphere was modified by 3-aminopropypltriethoxysilane and 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane to generate a positive electric field, by which the gold nanoparticles with the negative charges (unconjugated, thiolated polyethylene glycol functionalized with the traceable packing density and conformation) were able to be attracted to the silica microsphere. Results show that both the molecular conjugation on gold nanoparticle and the uniformity in the amino-silanization of silica microsphere influenced the loading and the homogeneity of gold nanoparticles on silica microsphere. The 3-aminopropyldimethylethoxysilane-functionalized silica microsphere provided an uniform field to attract gold nanoparticles. Increasing the ethanol content in aminosilane solution significantly improved the homogeneity and the loading of gold nanoparticles on the surface of silica microsphere. For the gold nanoparticle, increasing the molecular mass of polyethylene glycol yielded a greater homogeneity but a lower loading on silica microsphere. Bovine serum albumin induced the desorption of gold nanoparticles from silica microsphere, where the extent of desorption was suppressed by the presence of high-molecular mass polyethylene glycol on gold nanoparticles. This work provides the fundamental understanding for the synthesis of gold nanoparticle-silica microsphere constructs useful to the applications in chemo-radioactive therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Preparation of gold nanoparticles by microwave heating and application of spectroscopy to study conjugate of gold nanoparticles with antibody E. coli O157:H7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ngo, Vo Ke Thanh; Nguyen, Hoang Phuong Uyen; Huynh, Trong Phat; Tran, Nguyen Nguyen Pham; Lam, Quang Vinh; Huynh, Thanh Dat

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of 15–20 nm size range have attracted attention for producing smart sensing devices as diagnostic tools in biomedical sciences. Citrate capped AuNPs are negatively charged, which can be exploited for electrostatic interactions with some positively charged biomolecules like antibodies. In this paper we describe a method for the low cost synthesis of gold nanoparticles using sodium citrate (Na 3 Ct) reduction in chloroauric acid (HAuCl 4 .3H 2 O) by microwave heating (diameter about 13–15 nm). Gold nanoparticles were functionalized with surface activation by 3-mercaptopropionic acid for attaching antibody. These nanoparticles were then reacted with anti-E. coli O157:H7, using N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) and carbondimide hydrochloride (EDC) coupling chemistry. The product was characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and zeta potential. In addition, the binding of antibody-gold nanoparticles conjugates to E. coli O157:H7 was demonstrated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). (paper)

  10. Preparation of gold nanoparticles by microwave heating and application of spectroscopy to study conjugate of gold nanoparticles with antibody E. coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanh Ngo, Vo Ke; Phuong Uyen Nguyen, Hoang; Phat Huynh, Trong; Nguyen Pham Tran, Nguyen; Lam, Quang Vinh; Dat Huynh, Thanh

    2015-09-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of 15-20 nm size range have attracted attention for producing smart sensing devices as diagnostic tools in biomedical sciences. Citrate capped AuNPs are negatively charged, which can be exploited for electrostatic interactions with some positively charged biomolecules like antibodies. In this paper we describe a method for the low cost synthesis of gold nanoparticles using sodium citrate (Na3Ct) reduction in chloroauric acid (HAuCl4.3H2O) by microwave heating (diameter about 13-15 nm). Gold nanoparticles were functionalized with surface activation by 3-mercaptopropionic acid for attaching antibody. These nanoparticles were then reacted with anti-E. coli O157:H7, using N-hydroxy succinimide (NHS) and carbondimide hydrochloride (EDC) coupling chemistry. The product was characterized with UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and zeta potential. In addition, the binding of antibody-gold nanoparticles conjugates to E. coli O157:H7 was demonstrated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  11. Gold Nanoparticles: Synthesis and Applications in Drug Delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This review is focused essentially on the synthesis and applications of gold nanoparticles in the field of medicine and targeted drug delivery. Nanotechnology has become one of the most interesting and advanced areas of research in this field. Among nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles demonstrate special advantages in ...

  12. Immobilization of gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces for safe and enhanced gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalies, Stefan; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Gentemann, Lara; Meyer, Heiko; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. In comparison to standard transfection methods, gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection has proven to be a versatile alternative. This is based on its minor influence on cell viability and its high efficiency, especially for the delivery of small molecules like small interfering RNA. However, in order to transfer it to routine usage, a safety aspect is of major concern: The avoidance of nanoparticle uptake by the cells is desired. The immobilization of the gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces can address this issue. In this study, we achieved this by silanization of the appropriate surfaces and the binding of gold nanoparticles to them. Comparable perforation efficiencies to the previous approaches of gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection with free gold nanoparticles are demonstrated. The uptake of the immobilized particles by the cells is unlikely. Consequently, these investigations offer the possibility of bringing gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection closer to routine usage. PMID:25069006

  13. Immobilization of gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces for safe and enhanced gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalies, Stefan; Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Gentemann, Lara; Meyer, Heiko; Ripken, Tammo

    2014-01-01

    In comparison to standard transfection methods, gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection has proven to be a versatile alternative. This is based on its minor influence on cell viability and its high efficiency, especially for the delivery of small molecules like small interfering RNA. However, in order to transfer it to routine usage, a safety aspect is of major concern: The avoidance of nanoparticle uptake by the cells is desired. The immobilization of the gold nanoparticles on cell culture surfaces can address this issue. In this study, we achieved this by silanization of the appropriate surfaces and the binding of gold nanoparticles to them. Comparable perforation efficiencies to the previous approaches of gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection with free gold nanoparticles are demonstrated. The uptake of the immobilized particles by the cells is unlikely. Consequently, these investigations offer the possibility of bringing gold nanoparticle-mediated laser transfection closer to routine usage.

  14. Gold nanoparticle assisted assembly of a heme protein for enhancement of long-range interfacial electron transfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Chi, Qijin; Grumsen, Flemming Bjerg

    2007-01-01

    and characterization of water-soluble gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with core diameter 3-4 nm and their application for the enhancement of long-range interfacial ET of a heme protein. Gold nanoparticles were electrostatically conjugated with cyt c to form nanoparticle-protein hybrid ET systems with well......-defined stoichiometry. The systems were investigated in homogeneous solution and at liquid/solid interface. Conjugation of cyt c results in a small but consistent broadening of the nanoparticle plasmon band. This phenomenon can be explained in terms of long-range electronic interactions between the gold nanoparticle...... of bioelectronics. A key challenge in molecular bioelectronics is to improve the efficiency of long-range charge transfer. The present work shows that this can be achieved by nanoparticle (NP) assisted assembly of cytochrome c (cyt c) on macroscopic single-crystalline electrode surfaces. We present the synthesis...

  15. Application of gold nanoparticles in separation sciences

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sýkora, D.; Kašička, Václav; Mikšík, Ivan; Řezanka, P.; Záruba, K.; Matějka, P.; Král, V.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 3 (2010), s. 372-387 ISSN 1615-9306 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/09/0675; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/08/1428; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0510 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : gold nanoparticles * electrophoresis * chromatography Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.631, year: 2010

  16. Preparation of gold nanoparticles by arc discharge in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, Jen-Kuang; Huang, Jen-Chuen; Tien, Der-Chi; Liao, Chih-Yu; Tseng, Kuo-Hsiung; Tsung, Tsing-Tshin; Kao, Wen-Shiow; Tsai, Teh-Hua; Jwo, Ching-Song; Lin, Hong-Ming; Stobinski, Leszek

    2007-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been attracting attention due to their extensive application in chemistry, physics, material science, electronics, catalysis and bionanotechnology. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles often involves toxic and expensive physical-chemistry methods. Preparation of gold nanoparticles by arc discharge in water is proposed for the first time. Fabrication of gold nanostructures in deionized water has been successfully established. The evidence of gold particles' light absorbance reveals a unique surface plasmon resonance for Au nanoparticles suspended in deionized water. Gold nanostructures uniformly dispersed in water, their UV-Vis absorption and crystalline size are shown. Our experimental results demonstrate that fabrication of gold nanoparticles by arc discharge in water is an alternative, cheap, effective and environmentally friendly method

  17. Photochemical Synthesis of the Bioconjugate Folic Acid-Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    León, John Jairo Castillo; Bertel, Linda; Páez-Mozo, Edgar

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a rapid and simple onepot method to obtain gold nanoparticles functionalized with folic acid using a photochemistry method. The bioconjugate folic acid-gold nanoparticle was generated in one step using a photo-reduction method, mixing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate with folic...... at 4°C prolongs the stability of folic acid-gold nanoparticle suspensions to up to 26 days. Ultraviolet visible and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy showed a surface plasmon band of around 534nm and fluorescence spectroscopy exhibited a quenching effect on gold nanoparticles in the fluorescence...... emission of folic acid and thus confirmed the conjugation of folic acid to the surface of gold nanoparticles. In this study we demonstrate the use of a photochemistry method to obtain folic acid-gold nanoparticles in a simple and rapid way without the use of surfactants and long reaction times...

  18. Formation and Aggregation of Gold (Electrum Nanoparticles in Epithermal Ores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Saunders

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Here, we review the concept that nanoparticles and colloids may have played a significant role in forming some types of hydrothermal ores deposits, particularly epithermal. This concept was first proposed almost a century ago but the development of new analytical technologies, lab experiments, and the discovery of new epithermal deposits where nanoparticles are evident have added credence to the “gold colloid theory”. Nanoparticles are defined to have at least one dimension <10−7 m, and may have different chemical and physical properties than the bulk solids. Colloids are typically <10−6 m in diameter and have the added characteristic that they are dispersed in another medium. In epithermal ore-forming solutions, gold or electrum nanoparticles nucleate from supersaturated hydrothermal solutions, and thus this is a “far-from-equilibrium” process. In some cases, gold nanoparticles may simply play a transitory role of aggregating to form much coarser-grained crystals, where all of the evidence of nanoparticles precursor phases is not preserved. However, in some epithermal ores, silica nanoparticles also formed, and their co-deposition with gold (electrum nanoparticles preserved the gold aggregation features as self-organized “fractal” dendrites. Here, we review existing the data on gold and electrum nanoparticles in epithermal ores, present images of electrum nanoparticles and their aggregates, and discuss the significance of gold nanoparticles formation and aggregation in helping to produce some of the highest-grade gold ores in the world.

  19. Quantum Electrostatic Model for Optical Properties of Nanoscale Gold Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Haoliang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties of thin gold films with thickness varying from 2.5 nm to 30 nm are investigated. Due to the quantum size effect, the optical constants of the thin gold film deviate from the Drude model for bulk material as film thickness decreases, especially around 2.5 nm, where the electron energy level becomes discrete. A theory based on the self-consistent solution of the Schrödinger equation and the Poisson equation is proposed and its predictions agree well with experimental results.

  20. Polymer-stabilized gold nanoparticles with high grafting densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbierre, Muriel K; Cameron, Neil S; Lennox, R Bruce

    2004-03-30

    A series of polymer-coated Au nanoparticles have been prepared using the "grafting-to" approach. Thiol-terminated polystyrene and poly(ethylene oxide) ligands are found to form dense brushes on the faceted gold nanoparticle surfaces. Depending on the polymer, the ligand grafting densities on the gold nanoparticles are 1.2- to 23.5-fold greater than those available via self-assembled monolayer formation of the corresponding two-dimensional gold surfaces.

  1. Different interaction modes of biomolecules with citrate-capped gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shiyun; Moustafa, Yasmine; Huo, Qun

    2014-12-10

    In this study, we investigated the interaction between five biorelevant molecules and citrate-capped gold nanoparticles using dynamic light scattering, ζ-potential analysis, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The five biomolecules are bovine serum albumin (BSA), two immunoglobulin G (IgG) proteins, immunoglobulin M (IgM), and a polysaccharide molecule, hyaluronan. BSA, IgG, and IgM are high abundance proteins in blood. Hyaluronan is a major component of the extracellular matrix. An abnormal level of hyaluronan in blood is associated with a number of medical conditions including rheumatoid arthritis and malignancy. Five different interaction modes were observed from these molecules. While BSA and IgM interact with the gold nanoparticles by forming electrostatic interactions with the citrate ligands, IgG and hyaluronan adsorb to the nanoparticle metal core by displacing the citrate ligands. BSA, rabbit IgG, and hyaluronan formed a stable monolayer on the nanoparticle surface. Human IgG and IgM caused nanoparticle cluster formation upon interacting with the gold nanoparticles. For the first time, we discovered that hyaluronan, a highly negatively charged polyglycosaminoglycan, exhibits an exceptionally strong affinity toward the citrate-gold nanoparticles. It can effectively compete with IgG to adsorb to the gold nanoparticles. This finding has exciting implications for future research: the molecular composition of a protein corona formed on a nanoparticle surface upon mixing the nanoparticle with blood or other biological fluids may vary according to the pathological conditions of individuals, and the analysis of these compositions could potentially lead to new biomarker discovery with diagnostic applications.

  2. The effect of cysteine on electrodeposition of gold nanoparticle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolati, A.; Imanieh, I.; Salehi, F.; Farahani, M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Cysteine was found as an appropriate additive for electrodeposition of gold nanoparticles. → The deposition mechanism of gold nanoparticle was determined as instantaneous nucleation. → Oxygen reduction on the gold nanoparticle surface was eight times greater than that on the conventional gold deposits. - Abstract: The most applications of gold nanoparticles are in the photo-electronical accessories and bio-chemical sensors. Chloride solution with cysteine additive was used as electrolyte in gold nanoparticles electrodeposition. The nucleation and growing mechanism were studied by electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, in order to obtain a suitable nano structure. The deposition mechanism was determined as instantaneous nucleation and the dimension of particles was controlled in nanometric particle size range. Atomic Force Microscope was used to evaluate the effect of cysteine on the morphology and topography of gold nanoparticles. Finally the catalytic property of gold nanoparticle electrodeposited was studied in KOH solution, where oxygen reduction on the gold nanoparticle surface was eight times greater than that on the conventional gold deposits.

  3. Methanobactin-Mediated One-Step Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Wang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of gold nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution has enormous importance in nanotechnology. Methanobactin (Mb is a copper-binding small peptide that appears to function as an agent for copper sequestration and uptake in methanotrophs. Mb can also bind and catalytically reduce Au (III to Au (0. In this study, we demonstrate a facile Mb-mediated one-step synthetic route to prepare monodispersed gold nanoparticles. Continuous reduction of Au (III by Mb can be achieved by using hydroquinone as the reducing agent. The gold nanoparticles have been characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy. The formation and the surface plasmon resonance properties of the gold nanoparticles are highly dependent on the ratio of Au (III to Mb in solution. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, fluorescence spectra and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR spectra suggest that Mb molecules catalytically reduce Au (III to Au (0 with the concomitant production of gold nanoparticles, and then, Mb statically adsorbed onto the surface of gold nanoparticles to form an Mb-gold nanoparticles assembly. This avoids secondary nucleation. The formed gold nanoparticles have been demonstrated to be monodispersed and uniform by transmission electron microscopy (TEM images. Analysis of these particles shows an average size of 14.9 nm with a standard deviation of 1.1 nm. The gold nanoparticles are extremely stable and can resist aggregation, even after several months.

  4. X-Ray Spectroscopy of Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahar, Sultana N.; Montenegro, M.; Pradhan, A. K.; Pitzer, R.

    2009-06-01

    Inner shell transitions, such as 1s-2p, in heavy elements can absorb or produce hard X-rays, and hence are widely used in nanoparticles. Bio-medical research for cancer treatment has been using heavy element nanoparticles, embeded in malignant tumor, for efficient absorption of irradiated X-rays and leading emission of hard X-rays and energetic electrons to kill the surrounding cells. Ejection of a 1s electron during ionization of the element by absorption of a X-ray photon initiates the Auger cascades of emission of photons and electrons. We have investigated gold nanoparticles for the optimal energy range, below the K-edge (1s) ionization threshold, that corresponds to resonant absorption of X-rays with large attenuation coefficients, orders of magnitude higher over the background as well as to that at K-edge threshold. We applied these attenuation coefficients in Monte Carlo simulation to study the intensities of emission of photons and electrons by Auger cascades. The numerical experiments were carried out in a phantom of water cube with a thin layer, 0.1mm/g, of gold nanoparticles 10 cm inside from the surface using the well-known code Geant4. We will present results on photon and electron emission spectra from passing monochromatic X-ray beams at 67 keV, which is the resonant energy for resonant K_{α} lines, at 82 keV, the K-shell ionization threshold, and at 2 MeV where the resonant effect is non-existent. Our findings show a high peak in the gold nanoparticle absorption curve indicating complete absorption of radiation within the gold layer. The photon and electron emission spectra show resonant features. Acknowledgement: Partially supported by a Large Interdisciplinary Grant award of the Ohio State University and NASA APRA program (SNN). The computational work was carried out on the Cray X1 and Itanium 4 cluster at the Ohio Supercomputer Center, Columbus Ohio. "Resonant X-ray Irradiation of High-Z Nanoparticles For Cancer Theranostics" (refereed

  5. Microbial biosynthesis of nontoxic gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Swarup, E-mail: swaruproy@klyuniv.ac.in [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India); Das, Tapan Kumar [Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India); Maiti, Guru Prasad [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India); Department of Anesthesiology, Texas Tech University Health science Center, 3601 4th Street, Lubbock, TX 79430 (United States); Basu, Utpal [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, University of Kalyani, Kalyani 741235, West Bengal (India)

    2016-01-15

    Graphical abstract: The manuscript deals with the fungus mediated optimized biologically synthesized GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus and characterization of biosynthesized GNPs using various physico-chemical methods. The fairly stable synthesized nanoparticles have size in the range of 10–40 nm. Cytotoxicity study of biosynthesized GNPs on Human lung cancer cell line A549 showed no significant toxicity of GNPs. - Highlights: • A novel biosynthesis process of GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus. • Biosynthesized GNPs are in the range of 10–40 nm as observed from TEM. • This process of synthesis is an optimized biosynthesis process of GNPs. • Biosynthesized GNPs are noncytotoxic against A549 cell line. - Abstract: We study the extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using the fungal species Aspergillus foetidus. The formation of GNPs were initially monitored by visual observation and then characterized with the help of various characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results revealed distinctive formation of face centered cubic crystalline GNPs. From field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) the morphology of the nanoparticles were found to be roughly spherical and within the size range of 30–50 nm. The spherical and polydispersed GNPs in the range of 10–40 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. It was established that alkaline pH, 1 mM gold salt concentration and 75 °C temperature were the respective optimum parameter for biosynthesis of GNPs. Cell cytotoxicity of GNP was compared with that of normal gold salt solution on A549 cell. The A549 cell growth in presence of GNPs was found to be comparatively less toxic than the gold ion.

  6. Microbial biosynthesis of nontoxic gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Swarup; Das, Tapan Kumar; Maiti, Guru Prasad; Basu, Utpal

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The manuscript deals with the fungus mediated optimized biologically synthesized GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus and characterization of biosynthesized GNPs using various physico-chemical methods. The fairly stable synthesized nanoparticles have size in the range of 10–40 nm. Cytotoxicity study of biosynthesized GNPs on Human lung cancer cell line A549 showed no significant toxicity of GNPs. - Highlights: • A novel biosynthesis process of GNPs using Aspergillus foetidus. • Biosynthesized GNPs are in the range of 10–40 nm as observed from TEM. • This process of synthesis is an optimized biosynthesis process of GNPs. • Biosynthesized GNPs are noncytotoxic against A549 cell line. - Abstract: We study the extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) using the fungal species Aspergillus foetidus. The formation of GNPs were initially monitored by visual observation and then characterized with the help of various characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results revealed distinctive formation of face centered cubic crystalline GNPs. From field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) the morphology of the nanoparticles were found to be roughly spherical and within the size range of 30–50 nm. The spherical and polydispersed GNPs in the range of 10–40 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. It was established that alkaline pH, 1 mM gold salt concentration and 75 °C temperature were the respective optimum parameter for biosynthesis of GNPs. Cell cytotoxicity of GNP was compared with that of normal gold salt solution on A549 cell. The A549 cell growth in presence of GNPs was found to be comparatively less toxic than the gold ion.

  7. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A series of bile acid-derived facially amphiphilic thiols have been used to cap sliver and gold nanoparticles. The self-assembling properties of these steroid-capped nanoparticles have been investigated and reported in this article.

  8. Merely Measuring the UV-Visible Spectrum of Gold Nanoparticles Can Change Their Charge State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete, Jose; Siefe, Chris; Alcantar, Samuel; Belt, Michael; Stucky, Galen D; Moskovits, Martin

    2018-02-14

    Metallic nanostructures exhibit a strong plasmon resonance at a wavelength whose value is sensitive to the charge density in the nanostructure, its size, shape, interparticle coupling, and the dielectric properties of its surrounding medium. Here we use UV-visible transmission and reflectance spectroscopy to track the shifts of the plasmon resonance in an array of gold nanoparticles buried under metal-oxide layers of varying thickness produced using atomic layer deposition (ALD) and then coated with bulk layers of one of three metals: aluminum, silver, or gold. A significant shift in the plasmon resonance was observed and a precise value of ω p , the plasmon frequency of the gold comprising the nanoparticles, was determined by modeling the composite of gold nanoparticles and metal-oxide layer as an optically homogeneous film of core-shell particles bounded by two substrates: one of quartz and the other being one of the aforementioned metals, then using a Maxwell-Garnett effective medium expression to extract ω p for the gold nanoparticles before and after coating with the bulk metals. Under illumination, the change in the charge density of the gold nanoparticles per particle determined from the change in the values of ω p is found to be some 50-fold greater than what traditional electrostatic contact electrification models compute based on the work function difference of the two conductive materials. Moreover, when using bulk gold as the capping layer, which should have resulted in a negligible charge exchange between the gold nanoparticles and the bulk gold, a significant charge transfer from the bulk gold layer to the nanoparticles was observed as with the other metals. We explain these observations in terms of the "plasmoelectric effect", recently described by Atwater and co-workers, in which the gold nanoparticles modify their charge density to allow their resonant wavelength to match that of the incident light, thereby achieving, a lower value of the

  9. Silver, gold, and alloyed silver–gold nanoparticles: characterization and comparative cell-biologic action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahl, Dirk; Diendorf, Jörg; Ristig, Simon; Greulich, Christina; Li Zian; Farle, Michael; Köller, Manfred; Epple, Matthias

    2012-01-01

    Silver, gold, and silver–gold-alloy nanoparticles were prepared by citrate reduction modified by the addition of tannin during the synthesis, leading to a reduction in particle size by a factor of three. Nanoparticles can be prepared by this easy water-based synthesis and subsequently functionalized by the addition of either tris(3-sulfonatophenyl)phosphine or poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone). The resulting nanoparticles of silver (diameter 15–25 nm), gold (5–6 nm), and silver–gold (50:50; 10–12 nm) were easily dispersable in water and also in cell culture media (RPMI + 10 % fetal calf serum), as shown by nanoparticle tracking analysis and differential centrifugal sedimentation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed a polycrystalline nature of all nanoparticles. EDX on single silver–gold nanoparticles indicated that the concentration of gold is higher inside a nanoparticle. The biologic action of the nanoparticles toward human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) was different: Silver nanoparticles showed a significant concentration-dependent influence on the viability of hMSC. Gold nanoparticles showed only a small effect on the viability of hMSC after 7 days. Surprisingly, silver–gold nanoparticles had no significant influence on the viability of hMSC despite the silver content. Silver nanoparticles and silver–gold nanoparticles in the concentration range of 5–20 μg mL −1 induced the activation of hMSC as indicated by the release of IL-8. In contrast, gold nanoparticles led to a reduction of the release of IL-6 and IL-8.

  10. Silver, gold, and alloyed silver-gold nanoparticles: characterization and comparative cell-biologic action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahl, Dirk; Diendorf, Joerg; Ristig, Simon [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany); Greulich, Christina [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Bergmannsheil University Hospital/Surgical Research (Germany); Li Zian; Farle, Michael [University of Duisburg-Essen, Faculty of Physics, Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany); Koeller, Manfred [Ruhr-University of Bochum, Bergmannsheil University Hospital/Surgical Research (Germany); Epple, Matthias, E-mail: matthias.epple@uni-due.de [University of Duisburg-Essen, Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CeNIDE) (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Silver, gold, and silver-gold-alloy nanoparticles were prepared by citrate reduction modified by the addition of tannin during the synthesis, leading to a reduction in particle size by a factor of three. Nanoparticles can be prepared by this easy water-based synthesis and subsequently functionalized by the addition of either tris(3-sulfonatophenyl)phosphine or poly(N-vinylpyrrolidone). The resulting nanoparticles of silver (diameter 15-25 nm), gold (5-6 nm), and silver-gold (50:50; 10-12 nm) were easily dispersable in water and also in cell culture media (RPMI + 10 % fetal calf serum), as shown by nanoparticle tracking analysis and differential centrifugal sedimentation. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed a polycrystalline nature of all nanoparticles. EDX on single silver-gold nanoparticles indicated that the concentration of gold is higher inside a nanoparticle. The biologic action of the nanoparticles toward human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) was different: Silver nanoparticles showed a significant concentration-dependent influence on the viability of hMSC. Gold nanoparticles showed only a small effect on the viability of hMSC after 7 days. Surprisingly, silver-gold nanoparticles had no significant influence on the viability of hMSC despite the silver content. Silver nanoparticles and silver-gold nanoparticles in the concentration range of 5-20 {mu}g mL{sup -1} induced the activation of hMSC as indicated by the release of IL-8. In contrast, gold nanoparticles led to a reduction of the release of IL-6 and IL-8.

  11. Biosynthesis and Application of Silver and Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Sadowski, Zygmunt

    2010-01-01

    A green chemistry synthetic route has been used for both silver and gold nanoparticles synthesis. The reaction occurred at ambient temperature. Among the nanoparticles biological organism, some microorganisms such as bacteria, fungi, and yeast have been exploited for nanoparticles synthesis. Several plant biomass or plant extracts have been successfully used for extracellular biosynthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles. Analytical techniques, such as ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis...

  12. Phonon assisted thermophoretic motion of gold nanoparticles inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoen, Philipp A.E.; Walther, Jens Honore; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigate the thermally driven mass transport of gold nanoparticles confined inside carbon nanotubes using molecular dynamics simulations. The observed thermophoretic motion of the gold nanoparticles correlates with the phonon dispersion exhibited by a standard carbon nanotube and......, in particular, with the breathing mode of the tube. Additionally, the results show an increased static friction for gold nanoparticles confines inside a zig-zag carbon nanotube when increasing the size length of the nanoparticles. However, an unexpected, opposite trend is observed for the same nanoparticles...

  13. Gold and gold-copper nanoparticles in 2-propanol: A radiation chemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, G.R.

    2011-01-01

    The studies on the reduction of Au 3+ to gold nanoparticles in presence and absence of Cu 2+ under deoxygenated conditions in 2-propanol by radiolytic method have been carried out. On γ-radiolysis, preliminary yellow colored solution of Au 3+ changed to purple color owing to gold nanoparticles formation, which exhibits an absorption peak at around 540 nm. In the presence of Cu 2+ , absorption of gold-copper nanoparticles, which was also produced during γ-radiolysis, was red shifted in contrast to the system containing no Cu 2+ . Under DLS studies the sizes of gold nanoparticles in the absence and the presence of Cu 2+ were found to be larger (>400 nm). However, in presence of polyethylene glycol, a stabilizer the nanoparticle sizes became smaller, sizes measured for gold and gold-copper nanoparticles are 40 and 140 nm, respectively. Moreover, the change in UV-vis spectra in the Cu 2+ and Au 3+ mixed system highlights the formation of gold-copper nanoparticles in core-shell type arrangement. - Highlights: → Present radiation chemical study highlights high reactivity of Au ·2+ with Cu 2+ . → Absorption of gold-copper nanoparticles is blue shifted as compared to copper nanoparticles. → Change in UV-vis spectra with dose emphasizes core-shell type arrangement of Au-Cu nanoparticles.

  14. Aggregation effect on absorbance spectrum of laser ablated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isnaeni; Irmaniar; Herbani, Y.

    2017-04-01

    Plasmon of gold nanoparticles is one of the hot topics nowadays due to various possible applications. The application is determined by plasmon peak in absorbance spectrum. We have fabricated gold nanoparticles using laser ablation technique and studied the influence of CTAB (Cetyl trimethylammonium bromide) effect on the optical characterization of fabricated gold nanoparticles. We ablated a gold plate using NdYAG pulsed laser at 1064 nm wavelength, 10 Hz pulse frequency at low energy density. We found there are two distinctive plasmon peaks, i.e., primary and secondary peaks, where the secondary peak is the main interests of this work. Our simulation results have revealed that the secondary plasmon peak is affected by random aggregation of gold nanoparticles. Our research leads to good techniques on fabrication of colloidal gold nanoparticles in aqueous solution using laser ablation technique.

  15. Biodistribution of gold nanoparticles following intratracheal instillation in mouse lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadauskas, Evaldas; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Danscher, Gorm

    2009-01-01

    Background The fate of gold nanoparticles, 2, 40 and 100 nm, administered intratracheally to adult female mice was examined. The nanoparticles were traced by autometallography (AMG) at both ultrastructural and light microscopic levels. Also, the gold content was quantified by inductively coupled...... plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and neutron activation analysis (NAA). The liver is the major site of deposition of circulating gold nanoparticles. Therefore the degree of translocation was determined by the hepatic deposition of gold. Mice were instilled with 5 intratracheal doses of gold...... repeatedly during 3 weeks, the load was substantial. Ultrastructurally, AMG silver enhanced gold nanoparticles were found in lysosome-/endosome-like organelles of the macrophages and analysis with AMG, ICP-MS and NAA of the liver revealed an almost total lack of translocation of nanoparticles. In mice given...

  16. Mapping the electrostatic potential of Au nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsoy-Keskinbora, Cigdem; Boothroyd, Chris B; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; van Aken, Peter A; Koch, Christoph T

    2016-06-01

    Electron holography is a powerful technique for characterizing electrostatic potentials, charge distributions, electric and magnetic fields, strain distributions and semiconductor dopant distributions with sub-nm spatial resolution. Mapping internal electrostatic and magnetic fields within nanoparticles and other low-dimensional materials by TEM requires both high spatial resolution and high phase sensitivity. Carrying out such an analysis fully quantitatively is even more challenging, since artefacts such as dynamical electron scattering may strongly affect the measurement. In-line electron holography, one of the variants of electron holography, features high phase sensitivity at high spatial frequencies, but suffers from inefficient phase recovery at low spatial frequencies. Off-axis electron holography, in contrast, can recover low spatial frequency phase information much more reliably, but is less effective in retrieving phase information at high spatial frequencies when compared to in-line holography. We investigate gold nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography at both atomic-resolution and intermediate magnification. Hybrid electron holography is a novel technique that synergistically combines off-axis and in-line electron holography, allowing the measurement of the complex wave function describing the scattered electrons with excellent signal-to-noise properties at both high and low spatial frequencies. The effect of dynamical electron scattering is minimized by beam tilt averaging. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Grafting single molecule magnets on gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetti, Mauro; Pineider, Francesco; Poggini, Lorenzo; Otero, Edwige; Mannini, Matteo; Sorace, Lorenzo; Sangregorio, Claudio; Cornia, Andrea; Sessoli, Roberta

    2014-01-29

    The chemical synthesis and characterization of the first hybrid material composed by gold nanoparticles and single molecule magnets (SMMs) are described. Gold nanoparticles are functionalized via ligand exchange using a tetrairon(III) SMM containing two 1,2-dithiolane end groups. The grafting is evidenced by the shift of the plasmon resonance peak recorded with a UV-vis spectrometer, by the suppression of nuclear magnetic resonance signals, by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy peaks, and by transmission electron microscopy images. The latter evidence the formation of aggregates of nanoparticles as a consequence of the cross-linking ability of Fe4 through the two 1,2-dithiolane rings located on opposite sides of the metal core. The presence of intact Fe4 molecules is directly proven by synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy, while a detailed magnetic characterization, obtained using electron paramagnetic resonance and alternating-current susceptibility, confirms the persistence of SMM behavior in this new hybrid nanostructure. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Surface modification of silica particles with gold nanoparticles as an augmentation of gold nanoparticle mediated laser perforation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalies, Stefan; Gentemann, Lara; Schomaker, Markus; Heinemann, Dag; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle mediated (GNOME) laser transfection/perforation fulfills the demands of a reliable transfection technique. It provides efficient delivery and has a negligible impact on cell viability. Furthermore, it reaches high-throughput applicability. However, currently only large gold particles (> 80 nm) allow successful GNOME laser perforation, probably due to insufficient sedimentation of smaller gold nanoparticles. The objective of this study is to determine whether this aspect can be addressed by a modification of silica particles with gold nanoparticles. Throughout the analysis, we show that after the attachment of gold nanoparticles to silica particles, comparable or better efficiencies to GNOME laser perforation are reached. In combination with 1 µm silica particles, we report laser perforation with gold nanoparticles with sizes down to 4 nm. Therefore, our investigations have great importance for the future research in and the fields of laser transfection combined with plasmonics. PMID:25136494

  19. Gold nanoparticles grafting on glass surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvítek, Ondřej; Bot, Marek; Švorčík, Václav

    2012-09-01

    New method of grafting of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to glass surface was developed and investigated. The method based on glass activation by plasma discharge use dithiols for AuNP binding as an alternative to silane chemistry currently used for binding AuNPs onto glass surface. XPS measurements confirmed the presence of sulfur and gold on the modified glass surface. The presence of AuNPs on modified glass surface was then directly proven with AFM method. UV-vis spectra of samples with grafted AuNPs show a peak of SPR absorbance. With increasing modification time, more AuNPs are bound to the glass surface, which can aggregate.

  20. Nanomanufacturing of gold nanoparticle superstructures from the "bottom-up"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Tingling

    Gold nanoparticles that can generate surface plasmons under appropriate conditions have attracted significant interest for their potential in optics, photonics, data storage and biological sensors. Developing high fidelity fabrication methods that yield gold nanoparticles with well-defined size, shape, composition and self-assembly allows manipulation of surface plasmonic properties for novel applications as well as revealing new aspects of the underlying science. This dissertation demonstrates multiple techniques that describe cost-effective bottom-up" fabrication methods that yield gold nano-superstructures. In my initial work, I outline the solution conditions for fabricating Janus nanoparticles composed of one gold nanoparticle per micelle. Poly(ethylene oxide)-b-polystyrene (PEO-b-PS) was synthesized and processed into spherical micelles, which served as the template to induce gold nanoparticles growth within the PEO corona in situ. Organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticle formation was controlled kinetically by manipulating the concentration of both the micelle and reducing agent (HEPES). We also found that under certain condition, PEO-b-PS yielded micelles with pearl-like morphology, which possessed concentrated PEO domains at the interface between two adjacent PS cores. Careful manipulation of reaction conditions afforded gold nanoparticles that grew from the core-shell interface to form 1-dimensional (1-D) periodical gold nanoparticle chains. Based on similar principles, gold-gold dimers were synthesized by growing a second gold nanoparticle from a gold nanoparticle template surface-functionalized with PEO ligands. Gold dimers fabricated with this method exhibited strong enhancement properties via surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Instead of kinetic control, the number of newly grown gold nanoparticles on each particle template heavily relied on the PEO density on the nanoparticle template. As the size of the particle template increased from 10 nm to

  1. Functional gold nanoparticles for optical affinity biosensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špringer, Tomáš; Chadtová Song, Xue; Ermini, Maria Laura; Lamačová, Josefína; Homola, Jiří

    Roč. 409, č. 16 ( 2017 ), s. 4087-4097 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP205/12/G118 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1101 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Gold nanoparticles * Cancer marker carcinoembryonic antigen * Surface plasmon resonance Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment OBOR OECD: Medical laboratory technology (including laboratory samples analysis Impact factor: 3.431, year: 2016

  2. Functional gold nanoparticles for optical affinity biosensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špringer, Tomáš; Chadtová Song, Xue; Ermini, Maria Laura; Lamačová, Josefína; Homola, Jiří

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 409, č. 16 (2017), s. 4087-4097 ISSN 1618-2642 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP205/12/G118 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) AP1101 Program:Akademická prémie - Praemium Academiae Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Gold nanoparticles * Cancer marker carcinoembryonic antigen * Surface plasmon resonance Subject RIV: FS - Medical Facilities ; Equipment OBOR OECD: Medical laboratory technology (including laboratory samples analysis Impact factor: 3.431, year: 2016

  3. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with nanosecond laser pulses: Nanoparticle heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedyalkov, N.N., E-mail: nnn_1900@yahoo.com [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Imamova, S.E.; Atanasov, P.A. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tzarigradsko shousse 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Toshkova, R.A.; Gardeva, E.G.; Yossifova, L.S.; Alexandrov, M.T. [Institute of Experimental Pathology and Parasitology, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, G. Bonchev Street, bl. 25, Sofia 1113 (Bulgaria); Obara, M. [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Technology, Keio University, 3-14-1 Hiyoshi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8522 (Japan)

    2011-04-01

    Theoretical and experimental results on the heating process of gold nanoparticles irradiated by nanosecond laser pulses are presented. The efficiency of particle heating is demonstrated by in-vitro photothermal therapy of human tumor cells. Gold nanoparticles with diameters of 40 and 100 nm are added as colloid in the cell culture and the samples are irradiated by nanosecond pulses at wavelength of 532 nm delivered by Nd:YAG laser system. The results indicate clear cytotoxic effect of application of nanoparticle as more efficient is the case of using particles with diameter of 100 nm. The theoretical analysis of the heating process of nanoparticle interacting with laser radiation is based on the Mie scattering theory, which is used for calculation of the particle absorption coefficient, and two-dimensional heat diffusion model, which describes the particle and the surrounding medium temperature evolution. Using this model the dependence of the achieved maximal temperature in the particles on the applied laser fluence and time evolution of the particle temperature is obtained.

  4. Green Chemistry Techniques for Gold Nanoparticles Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavino, Sarah A.; King, Christy A.; Ferrara, Davon W.

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are often utilized in many technological and research applications ranging from the detection of tumors, molecular and biological sensors, and as nanoantennas to probe physical processes. As these applications move from the research laboratory to industrial settings, there is a need to develop efficient and sustainable synthesis techniques. Recent research has shown that several food products and beverages containing polyphenols, a common antioxidant, can be used as reducing agents in the synthesis of AuNPs in solution. In this study, we explore a variety of products to determine which allow for the most reproducible solution of nanoparticles based on the size and shapes of particles present. We analyzed the AuNPs solutions using extinction spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. We also develop a laboratory activity to introduce introductory chemistry and physics students to AuNP synthesis techniques and analysis.

  5. Colorimetric gold nanoparticles-based aptasensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezavn Yazdian-Robati

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recognition of different agents including chemical and biological plays important role in forensic, biomedical and environmentalfield.In recent decades, nanotechnology and nano materials had a high impact on development of sensors. Using  nanomaterials in construction of biosensors can effectively improve the Sensitivity and other features of biosensors. Different type of nanostructures including nanotubes, nanodiamonds, thin films ,nanorods, nanoparticles(NP, nanofibers andvarious clusters have been explored and applied in construction of biosensors. Among nanomaterials mentioned above, gold nanoparticle (GNPas a new class of unique fluorescence quenchers, is receiving significant attention in developing of optical biosensors because of their unique physical, chemical and biological properties. In this mini review, we discussed the use of GNPs in construction of colorimetric aptasensorsas a class of optical sensors for detection of antibiotics, toxins and infection diseases.

  6. Multifunctional gold nanoparticles for diagnosis and therapy of disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Fayad, Zahi A.; Cormode, David P.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have a number of physical properties that make them appealing for medical applications. For example, the attenuation of X-rays by gold nanoparticles has led to their use in computed tomography imaging and as adjuvants for radiotherapy. AuNPs have numerous other

  7. Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment Modules for Probing Gold Nanoparticle Interfacial Phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunanayake, Akila G.; Gunatilake, Sameera R.; Ameer, Fathima S.; Gadogbe, Manuel; Smith, Laura; Mlsna, Deb; Zhang, Dongmao

    2015-01-01

    Three gold-nanoparticle (AuNP) undergraduate experiment modules that are focused on nanoparticles interfacial phenomena have been developed. Modules 1 and 2 explore the synthesis and characterization of AuNPs of different sizes but with the same total gold mass. These experiments enable students to determine how particle size affects the AuNP…

  8. The bioaccumulation and toxicity induced by gold nanoparticles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed Anwar PC

    2012-05-15

    May 15, 2012 ... It is essential to characterize the bioaccumulation and toxicity of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in blood prior to using ... Key words: Gold nanoparticles, size, ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible), blood, rats, spectroscopy, toxicity, histology, liver. .... wavelengths indicate the stretching of iron and nitrogen bonds in the ...

  9. Silver and gold nanoparticles for sensor and antibacterial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindhu, M. R.; Umadevi, M.

    2014-07-01

    Green biogenic method for the synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using Solanum lycopersicums extract as reducing agent was studied. The biomolecules present in the extract was responsible for reduction of Au3+ and Ag+ ions from HAuCl4 and AgNO3 respectively. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy (UV-vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) technique to identify the size, shape of nanoparticles and biomolecules act as reducing agents. UV-visible spectra show the surface plasmon resonance peak at 546 nm and 445 nm corresponding to gold and silver nanoparticles respectively. Crystalline nature of the nanoparticles was evident from TEM images and XRD analysis. TEM images showed average size of 14 nm and 12 nm for prepared gold and silver nanoparticles respectively. FTIR analysis provides the presence of biomolecules responsible for the reduction and stability of the prepared silver and gold nanoparticles. XRD analysis of the silver and gold nanoparticles confirmed the formation of metallic silver and gold. The prepared gold and silver nanoparticles show good sensing and antimicrobial activity.

  10. Controlled synthesis of gold nanoparticles by fluorescent light irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jun-Hyun; Lavin, Brian W; Burnett, Roarke D; Boote, Brett W

    2011-01-01

    A novel photochemical synthesis of size-controlled gold nanoparticles was reliably accomplished via both a direct reduction and a seeded-growth method at room temperature under the irradiation of fluorescent light. These methods utilized the intensity of fluorescent light that closely resembles daily sunlight (∼100 mW cm -2 ). This effectively allowed for the formation of gold nanoparticles with tunable sizes simply by controlling the concentration of trisodium citrate and gold chloride. The broad band fluorescent light was found to be an efficient source for inducing the formation of gold nanoparticles at ambient conditions. The size distribution and absorption property of the resulting nanoparticles were thoroughly characterized by scanning/transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, UV-visible spectroscopy and powder x-ray diffraction. This photochemical synthesis demonstrates, for the first time, the reliable preparation of gold nanoparticles at room temperature upon irradiation with fluorescent light.

  11. Electrocatalytic glucose oxidation at gold and gold-carbon nanoparticulate film prepared from oppositely charged nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karczmarczyk, Aleksandra; Celebanska, Anna; Nogala, Wojciech; Sashuk, Volodymyr; Chernyaeva, Olga; Opallo, Marcin

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Gold nanoparticulate film electrodes were prepared by layer-by-layer method from oppositely charged nanoparticles. • Positively charged nanoparticles play dominant role in glucose oxidation in alkaline solution. • Gold and gold-carbon nanoparticulate film electrodes exhibit similar glucose oxidation current and onset potential. - Abstract: Electrocatalytic oxidation of glucose was studied at nanoparticulate gold and gold-carbon film electrodes. These electrodes were prepared by a layer-by-layer method without application of any linker molecules. Gold nanoparticles were stabilized by undecane thiols functionalized by trimethyl ammonium or carboxylate groups, whereas the carbon nanoparticles were covered by phenylsulfonate functionalities. The gold nanoparticulate electrodes were characterized by UV-vis and XPS spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy and voltammetry, before and after heat-treatment. Heat-treatment facilitates the aggregation of the nanoparticles and affects the structure of the film. The comparison of the results obtained with film electrodes prepared from gold nanoparticles with the same charge and with gold-carbon nanoparticulate electrodes, proved that positively charged nanoparticles are responsible for the high electrocatalytic activity, whereas negatively charged ones act rather as a linker of the film

  12. Reversible transformations of gold nanoparticle morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeva, Savka I; Zaikovski, Vladimir; Prasad, B L V; Stoimenov, Peter K; Sorensen, Christopher M; Klabunde, Kenneth J

    2005-11-08

    Herein is reported a metamorphosis taking place in a gold nanosized system. The observed phenomenon of shape and size transformations was found to be completely reversible. Unlike most procedures in the literature where shape and size control occur in the synthetic step by adding growth- and shape-controlling agents such as surfactants or polymers, in this system postsynthetic changes in shape and size can be carried out simply by changing the ratio of reactive, competing reagents, more specifically, alkylthiols versus tetralkylammonium salts. Interestingly, the transfer of gold metal occurs (large prismatic particles to small particles and vice versa) under the influence of reagents that do not cause such interactions with bulk gold. All intermediate steps of the morphology change were observed using HRTEM and electron diffraction. The processes of breaking down and "welding back" solid metal nanoparticles occur under mild conditions and are remarkable examples of the unique chemical properties of nanomaterials. The described process is expected to be relevant to other nanoscale systems where similar structural circumstances could occur.

  13. Phase Transition of DNA-Linked Gold Nanoparticle

    OpenAIRE

    Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2001-01-01

    Melting and hybridization of DNA-capped gold nanoparticle networks are investigated with optical absorption spectroscopy. Single-stranded, 12-base DNA-capped gold nanoparticles are linked with complementary, single-stranded, 24-base linker DNA to form particle networks. Compared to free DNA, a sharp melting transition is seen in these networked DNA-nanoparticle systems. The sharpness is explained by percolation transition phenomena.

  14. Mapping the electrostatic potential of Au nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozsoy-Keskinbora, Cigdem; Boothroyd, Chris B.; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.; Aken, Peter A. van; Koch, Christoph T.

    2016-01-01

    Electron holography is a powerful technique for characterizing electrostatic potentials, charge distributions, electric and magnetic fields, strain distributions and semiconductor dopant distributions with sub-nm spatial resolution. Mapping internal electrostatic and magnetic fields within nanoparticles and other low-dimensional materials by TEM requires both high spatial resolution and high phase sensitivity. Carrying out such an analysis fully quantitatively is even more challenging, since artefacts such as dynamical electron scattering may strongly affect the measurement. In-line electron holography, one of the variants of electron holography, features high phase sensitivity at high spatial frequencies, but suffers from inefficient phase recovery at low spatial frequencies. Off-axis electron holography, in contrast, can recover low spatial frequency phase information much more reliably, but is less effective in retrieving phase information at high spatial frequencies when compared to in-line holography. We investigate gold nanoparticles using hybrid electron holography at both atomic-resolution and intermediate magnification. Hybrid electron holography is a novel technique that synergistically combines off-axis and in-line electron holography, allowing the measurement of the complex wave function describing the scattered electrons with excellent signal-to-noise properties at both high and low spatial frequencies. The effect of dynamical electron scattering is minimized by beam tilt averaging. - Highlights: • Hybrid electron holography approach applied to Au nanoparticles. • Proof of principle of atomic resolution hybrid electron holography experiment demonstrated. • Dynamical scattering artifacts decrease by varying the illumination direction. • The effect of the number of iterations and noise on the low spatial frequencies in the phase are discussed.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of biocompatible gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Rebolledo, Anayive; Costa, Pryscila Rodrigues da; Janeti, Milena Murucci; Ferreira, Andrea Vidal; Santos, Raquel Gouvia dos

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is a broad and interdisciplinary area of research that has been an important increase in recent years. Among the various types of nanomaterials studied stand out in particular the gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) which can be applied in several fields such as biotechnology and biomedicine. The interest in development of AuNPs is due to its extraordinary physical and chemical properties resulting from the nanoscale. In this work it was developed a new process to obtain biocompatible AuNPs, whose surface was modified to allow its subsequent association to drugs with antitumor activity. Were obtained AuNPs modified with thiols, which allowed conjugation of the polymer polyethylene glycol (PEG). The results indicate the formation of AuNPs stabilized by citrate ion, with sizes ranging 5-10 nm and strong absorption at 520 nm. Nanoparticles modified with thiol and PEG showed sizes of 62 nm and 644 nm, respectively, and had easy redispersion in water. The concentration of nanoparticles in each solution was determined by neutron activation analysis. author)

  16. Phytofabricated gold nanoparticles and their biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Bashir; Hafeez, Nabia; Bashir, Shumaila; Rauf, Abdur; Mujeeb-Ur-Rehman

    2017-05-01

    In a couple of decades, nanotechnology has become a trending technology owing to its integrated science collection that incorporates variety of fields such as chemistry, physics, medicine, catalytic processes, food processing industries, electronics and energy sectors. One of the emerging fields of nanotechnology that has gained momentous admiration is nano-biotechnology. Nano-biotechnology is an integrated combination of biology with nanotechnology that encompasses the tailoring, and synthesis of small particles that are less than 100nm in size and subsequent exploitation of these particles for their biological applications. Though the variety of physical techniques and chemical procedures are known for the nanoparticles synthesis, biological approach is considered to be the preferred one. Environmental hazards and concerns associated with the physical and chemical approaches of nanoparticles synthesis has added impetus and zenith to the biological approach involving the use of plants and microorganisms. The current review article is focused on the synthesis of plant-derived (phytochemical) gold nanoparticles alongside their scope in biomedical applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Temperature driven transport of gold nanoparticles physisorbed inside carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoen, P.A.E.; Poulikakos, D.; Walther, Jens Honore

    2006-01-01

    We use molecular dynamics simulations to demonstrate the temperature driven mass transport of solid gold nanoparticles, physisorbed inside carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Our results indicate that the nanoparticle experiences a guided motion, in the direction opposite to the direction of the temperature...... affects the nanoparticle motion along the carbon lattice....

  18. Versatile Methodology to Encapsulate Gold Nanoparticles in PLGA Nanoparticles Obtained by Nano-Emulsion Templating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaguera, Cristina; Feiner-Gracia, Natàlia; Dols-Perez, Aurora; García-Celma, Maria José; Solans, Conxita

    2017-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been proved useful for many biomedical applications, specifically, for their use as advanced imaging systems. However, they usually present problems related with stability and toxicity. In the present work, gold-nanoparticles have been encapsulated in polymeric nanoparticles using a novel methodology based on nano-emulsion templating. Firstly, gold nanoparticles have been transferred from water to ethyl acetate, a solvent classified as class III by the NIH guidelines (low toxic potential). Next, the formation of nano-emulsions loaded with gold nanoparticles has been performed using a low-energy, the phase inversion composition (PIC) emulsification method, followed by solvent evaporation giving rise to polymeric nanoparticles. Using this methodology, high concentrations of gold nanoparticles (>100 pM) have been encapsulated. Increasing gold nanoparticle concentration, nano-emulsion and nanoparticle sizes increase, resulting in a decrease on the stability. It is noteworthy that the designed nanoparticles did not produce cytotoxicity neither hemolysis at the required concentration. Therefore, it can be concluded that a novel and very versatile methodology has been developed for the production of polymeric nanoparticles loaded with gold nanoparticles. Graphical Abstract Schematic representation of AuNP-loaded polymeric nanoparticles preparation from nano-emulsion templating.

  19. Pseudo-template synthesis of gold nanoparticles based on polyhydrosilanes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacarescu, Liviu; Simionescu, Mihaela; Sacarescu, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    Highly stable colloidal gold nanoparticles are obtained in a pseudo-template system using a specific polyhydrosilane copolymeric structure. This process takes place in situ by microwaves activation of the polymer solution in a non-polar solvent followed by stirring with solid HAuCl 4 in natural light. The experimental procedure is very simple and the resulted colloidal gold solution is indefinitely stable. The specific surface plasmon resonance absorption band of the gold nanoparticles is strongly red shifted and is strictly related to their size. AFM correlated with DLS analysis showed flattened round shaped colloidal polymer-gold nanoparticles with large diameters. SEM-EDX combined analysis reveals that the polysilane-gold nanoparticles show a natural tendency to auto-assemble in close packed structures which form large areas over the polymer film surface.

  20. Phospholipid-assisted synthesis of size-controlled gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Peng; Zhu Xinyuan

    2007-01-01

    Morphology and size control of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by phospholipids (PLs) has been reported. It was found that gold entities could form nanostructures with different sizes controlled by PLs in an aqueous solution. During the preparation of 1.5 nm gold seeds, AuNPs were obtained from the reduction of gold complex by sodium borohydride and capped by citrate for stabilization. With the different ratios between seed solution and growth solution, which was composed by gold complex and PLs, gold seeds grew into larger nanoparticles step by step until enough large size up to 30 nm. The main discovery of this work is that common biomolecules, such as PLs can be used to control nanoparticle size. This conclusion has been confirmed by transmission electron micrographs, particle size analysis, and UV-vis spectra

  1. GOLD NANOPARTICLES: A REVIVAL IN PRECIOUS METAL ADMINISTRATION TO PATIENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakor, AS; Jokerst, J; Zaveleta, C; Massoud, TF; Gambhir, SS

    2011-01-01

    Gold has been used as a therapeutic agent to treat a wide variety of rheumatic diseases including psoriatic arthritis, juvenile arthritis and discoid lupus erythematosus. Although the use of gold has been largely superseded by newer drugs, gold nanoparticles are being used effectively in laboratory based clinical diagnostic methods whilst concurrently showing great promise in vivo either as a diagnostic imaging agent or a therapeutic agent. For these reasons, gold nanoparticles are therefore well placed to enter mainstream clinical practice in the near future. Hence, the present review summarizes the chemistry, pharmacokinetics, bio-distribution, metabolism and toxicity of bulk gold in humans based on decades of clinical observation and experiments in which gold was used to treat patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The beneficial attributes of gold nanoparticles, such as their ease of synthesis, functionalization and shape control are also highlighted demonstrating why gold nanoparticles are an attractive target for further development and optimization. The importance of controlling the size and shape of gold nanoparticles to minimize any potential toxic side effects is also discussed. PMID:21846107

  2. Multifunctional gold nanoparticles for diagnosis and therapy of disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieszawska, Aneta J.; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have a number of physical properties that make them appealing for medical applications. For example, the attenuation of X-rays by gold nanoparticles has led to their use in computed tomography imaging and as adjuvants for radiotherapy. AuNPs have numerous other applications in imaging, therapy and diagnostic systems. The advanced state of synthetic chemistry of gold nanoparticles offers precise control over physicochemical and optical properties. Furthermore gold cores are inert and are considered to be biocompatible and non-toxic. The surface of gold nanoparticles can easily be modified for a specific application and ligands for targeting, drugs or biocompatible coatings can be introduced. AuNPs can be incorporated into larger structures such as polymeric nanoparticles or liposomes that deliver large payloads for enhanced diagnostic applications, efficiently encapsulate drugs for concurrent therapy or add additional imaging labels. This array of features has led to the afore-mentioned applications in biomedical fields, but more recently in approaches where multifunctional gold nanoparticles are used for multiple methods, such as concurrent diagnosis and therapy, so called theranostics. The following review covers basic principles and recent findings in gold nanoparticle applications for imaging, therapy and diagnostics, with a focus on reports of multifunctional AuNPs. PMID:23360440

  3. The use of gold nanoparticles to enhance radiotherapy in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainfeld, James F; Slatkin, Daniel N; Smilowitz, Henry M

    2004-01-01

    Mice bearing subcutaneous EMT-6 mammary carcinomas received a single intravenous injection of 1.9 nm diameter gold particles (up to 2.7 g Au/kg body weight), which elevated concentrations of gold to 7 mg Au/g in tumours. Tumour-to-normal-tissue gold concentration ratios remained ∼8:1 during several minutes of 250 kVp x-ray therapy. One-year survival was 86% versus 20% with x-rays alone and 0% with gold alone. The increase in tumours safely ablated was dependent on the amount of gold injected. The gold nanoparticles were apparently non-toxic to mice and were largely cleared from the body through the kidneys. This novel use of small gold nanoparticles permitted achievement of the high metal content in tumours necessary for significant high-Z radioenhancement. (note)

  4. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles with different atomistic structural characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esparza, R.; Rosas, G.; Lopez Fuentes, M.; Sanchez Ramirez, J.F.; Pal, U.; Ascencio, J.A.; Perez, R.

    2007-01-01

    A chemical reduction method was used to produce nanometric gold particles. Depending on the concentration of the main reactant compound different nanometric sizes and consequently different atomic structural configurations of the particles are obtained. Insights on the structural nature of the gold nanoparticles are obtained through a comparison between digitally-processed experimental high-resolution electron microscopy images and theoretically-simulated images obtained with a multislice approach of the dynamical theory of electron diffraction. Quantum molecular mechanical calculations, based on density functional theory, are carried out to explain the relationships between the stability of the gold nanoparticles, the atomic structural configurations and the size of nanoparticles

  5. Radiation induced synthesis of gold/iron-oxide composite nanoparticles using high-energy electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Satoshi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Nakagawa, Takashi; Kojima, Takao; Taniguci, Ryoichi; Okuda, Shuichi; Yamamoto, Takao A.

    2008-01-01

    Composite nanoparticles consisting of gold and iron oxide were synthesized in aqueous solution systems by using a high-energy electron beam. The electron irradiation induces radiation-chemical reaction to form metallic gold nanoparticles. These gold nanoparticles were firmly immobilized on the surface of the support iron oxide nanoparticles. Surface of the support iron oxide nanoparticles are almost fully coated with fine gold nanoparticles. The size of these gold nanoparticles depended on the concentrations of gold ions, polymers and iron oxide nanoparticles in the solutions before the irradiation.

  6. Infrared light-absorbing gold/gold sulfide nanoparticles induce cell death in esophageal adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Gobin, Andre M; Dryden, Gerald W; Kang, Xinqin; Xiao, Deyi; Li, Su Ping; Zhang, Guandong; Martin, Robert CG

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles and near infrared-absorbing light are each innocuous to tissue but when combined can destroy malignant tissue while leaving healthy tissue unharmed. This study investigated the feasibility of photothermal ablation therapy for esophageal adenocarcinoma using chitosan-coated gold/gold sulfide (CS-GGS) nanoparticles. A rat esophagoduodenal anastomosis model was used for the in vivo ablation study, and three human esophageal cell lines were used to study the response of cancer cells and benign cells to near infrared light after treatment with CS-GGS. The results indicate that both cancerous tissue and cancer cells took up more gold nanoparticles and were completely ablated after exposure to near infrared light. The benign tissue and noncancerous cells showed less uptake of these nanoparticles, and remained viable after exposure to near infrared light. CS-GGS nanoparticles could provide an optimal endoluminal therapeutic option for near infrared light ablation of esophageal cancer. PMID:23818775

  7. Functionalization and Characterization of Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techane, Sirnegeda D.

    2011-12-01

    Surface characterization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is necessary to obtain a thorough understanding of the AuNP properties and ultimately realize their full potential in applications. The work described in this dissertation strives to the structure and composition of AuNPs using highly surface sensitive techniques such as X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) in addition to the more widely used characterization techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and UV-VIS spectroscopy. Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiols were used to modify AuNPs surfaces to create positively and negatively charged surfaces. Functionalization with carboxylic acid terminated alkanethiol SAMs (COON-SAMs) was first optimized to produce clean and stable negatively charged AuNPs. Using 14nm and 40nm diameter AuNPs in combination with C11 and C16 chain length COOH-SAMs, it was found that addition of NH4OH during functionalization coupled with dialysis purification produced AuNPs that did not aggregate and did not have unbound thiols. Effects of AuNP size and COOH-SAM chain lengths were studied using 14, 25 and 40nm average diameter AuNPs functionalized with C6, C8, C11 and C16 COOH-SAMs. Flat Au surfaces were also functionalized with the COOH-SAMs for comparison. It was shown that the 14nm AuNPs with C16 COOH-SAMs were the most stable and had crystalline-like, well-ordered SAM structures. The SAMs on the 40nm AuNPs had similar surface chemistry as the SAMs on the flat Au surfaces. The effective photoelectron take-off angle of the C16 COOH-SAM decreased when the size of the AuNP increased. It was also shown that when using Kratos AxisUltra DLD XPS instrument in the hybrid mode, it was important to consider effects of both the hybrid mode and the AuNPs curvature when calculating overlayer thickness of the SAMs on AuNPs. Using the Kratos in the electrostatic

  8. Gold Nanoparticle Conjugation Enhances the Antiacanthamoebic Effects of Chlorhexidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Anwar, Ayaz; Shah, Muhammad Raza; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2015-12-14

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a serious infection with blinding consequences and often associated with contact lens wear. Early diagnosis, followed by aggressive topical application of drugs, is a prerequisite in successful treatment, but even then prognosis remains poor. Several drugs have shown promise, including chlorhexidine gluconate; however, host cell toxicity at physiologically relevant concentrations remains a challenge. Nanoparticles, subcolloidal structures ranging in size from 10 to 100 nm, are effective drug carriers for enhancing drug potency. The overall aim of the present study was to determine whether conjugation with gold nanoparticles enhances the antiacanthamoebic potential of chlorhexidine. Gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles were synthesized. Briefly, gold solution was mixed with chlorhexidine and reduced by adding sodium borohydride, resulting in an intense deep red color, indicative of colloidal gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. The synthesis was confirmed using UV-visible spectrophotometry that shows a plasmon resonance peak of 500 to 550 nm, indicative of gold nanoparticles. Further characterization using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry showed a gold-conjugated chlorhexidine complex at m/z 699 ranging in size from 20 to 100 nm, as determined using atomic force microscopy. To determine the amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects, amoebae were incubated with gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. For controls, amoebae also were incubated with gold and silver nanoparticles alone, chlorhexidine alone, neomycin-conjugated nanoparticles, and neomycin alone. The findings showed that gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles exhibited significant amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects at 5 μM. Amoebicidal effects were observed by parasite viability testing using a Trypan blue exclusion assay and flow-cytometric analysis using propidium iodide, while amoebistatic effects were observed using growth

  9. Gold Nanoparticle Conjugation Enhances the Antiacanthamoebic Effects of Chlorhexidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeel, Yousuf; Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Anwar, Ayaz; Shah, Muhammad Raza

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba keratitis is a serious infection with blinding consequences and often associated with contact lens wear. Early diagnosis, followed by aggressive topical application of drugs, is a prerequisite in successful treatment, but even then prognosis remains poor. Several drugs have shown promise, including chlorhexidine gluconate; however, host cell toxicity at physiologically relevant concentrations remains a challenge. Nanoparticles, subcolloidal structures ranging in size from 10 to 100 nm, are effective drug carriers for enhancing drug potency. The overall aim of the present study was to determine whether conjugation with gold nanoparticles enhances the antiacanthamoebic potential of chlorhexidine. Gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles were synthesized. Briefly, gold solution was mixed with chlorhexidine and reduced by adding sodium borohydride, resulting in an intense deep red color, indicative of colloidal gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. The synthesis was confirmed using UV-visible spectrophotometry that shows a plasmon resonance peak of 500 to 550 nm, indicative of gold nanoparticles. Further characterization using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry showed a gold-conjugated chlorhexidine complex at m/z 699 ranging in size from 20 to 100 nm, as determined using atomic force microscopy. To determine the amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects, amoebae were incubated with gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles. For controls, amoebae also were incubated with gold and silver nanoparticles alone, chlorhexidine alone, neomycin-conjugated nanoparticles, and neomycin alone. The findings showed that gold-conjugated chlorhexidine nanoparticles exhibited significant amoebicidal and amoebistatic effects at 5 μM. Amoebicidal effects were observed by parasite viability testing using a Trypan blue exclusion assay and flow-cytometric analysis using propidium iodide, while amoebistatic effects were observed using growth

  10. Optical Properties of Linoleic Acid Protected Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratan Das

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Linoleic acid-protected gold nanoparticles have been synthesized through the chemical reduction of tetrachloroaurate ions by ethanol in presence of sodium linoleate. The structure of these nanoparticles is investigated using transmission electron microscopy, which shows that the Au nanoparticles are spherical in shape with a narrow size distribution which ranges from 8 to 15 nm. Colloidal dispersion of gold nanoparticles in cyclohexane exhibits absorption bands in the ultraviolet-visible range due to surface plasmon resonance, with absorption maximum at 530 nm. Fluorescence spectra of gold nanoparticles also show an emission peak at 610 nm when illuminated at 450 nm. UV-Vis spectroscopy reveals that these nanoparticles remain stable for 10 days.

  11. Assembly of Conjugated Polymers- Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osti, Naresh; Etampawala, Thusitha; Ratnaweera, Dilru; Bunz, Uwe; Rotello, Vincent; Perahia, Dvora

    2010-03-01

    The formation of hydrophilic modified disubstituted para-polyphenyleneethylene (PPE) nanoparticles (NP) complexes in aqueous media and their assemblies have been investigated. Both PPEs and gold NPs are electro-optically active. Controlling their association would allow formation of electro-optical tunable responsive materials. Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) in conjunction with Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) has been used to characterize the structures of the complexes formed. SANS studies have shown that spherical core shell NP-P complexes are formed in dilute solutions, with the gold NPs surrounded by almost fully stretched out PPE chains. With increasing the concentration of the NP-PPE complex in solution chains which consist of the basic core-shell aggregated are observed. These NP-PPE complexes were allowed to assemble at a solid surface. While the basic building block, observed by AFM, remains spherical, they assemble in different ways from random 2-d arrays to cable like structures, depending on the interaction of the NP with the PPEs and the nature of the PPE side chains.

  12. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by Scanning Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; van Es, Peter; Petersen, Wilhelmina; van Leeuwen, Ton; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  13. Quantitative detection of gold nanoparticles on individual, unstained cancer cells by scanning electron microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, L.; van Es, P.; Petersen, W.; van Leeuwen, T. G.; Terstappen, L. W. M. M.; Otto, C.

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are rapidly emerging for use in biomedical applications. Characterization of the interaction and delivery of nanoparticles to cells through microscopy is important. Scanning electron microscopes have the intrinsic resolution to visualize gold nanoparticles on cells. A novel sample

  14. Fabrication of gold nanoparticle arrays by block copolymer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiao Ling

    2011-02-01

    Gold nanoparticle is one of the widely research objects in various fields including catalysis and biotechnology. Precise control of gold nanoparticles placement and their integration is essential to take full advantage of these unique properties for applications. An approach to self-assembling of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from reconstructed block copolymer was introduced. Highly ordered polystyrene-block-poly(2-vinylpyridine)(PS-b-P2VP) micellar arrays were obtained by solvent annealing. Subsequent immersion of the films in a preferential solvent for P2VP caused a reorganization of the film to generate a porous structure upon drying. PEG-coated AuNPs were spin-coated onto this reconstruction PS-b-P2VP template. When such films were exposed to toluene vapor-which is non-selective solvent for PEO and P2VP, AuNPs were drawn into those porous to form ordered arrays. Gold nanospheres with size 12±1.8 nm were synthesized by reducing HAuCl 4 via sodium citrate. Gold nanorods (aspect ratio about 6) were prepared from seed-mediated surfactant capping wet chemical method and the aspect ratio is tunable by changing surfactant amount. PEG ligand is used to modify gold nanoparticle surface by removing the original surfactant (sodium citrate -gold nanospheres: CTAB-gold nanorods), which have affinity with certain block copolymer component. Once gold nanoparticle is modified with PEG thiol, they were spin coated onto PS-b-P2VP template, which was prepared by solvent annealing and surface reconstruction process. So gold nanoparticle array was fabricated by this self-assembling process. The same idea can be applied on other nanoparticles

  15. Template free synthesis of silver-gold alloy nanoparticles and cellular uptake of gold nanoparticles in Chinese Hamster Ovary cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, Angshuman; Shah, Sunil; Kulkarni, Vijay; Murthy, R.S.R.; Devi, Surekha

    2009-01-01

    Gold-silver alloy nanoparticles were synthesized by simultaneous reduction of varying mole fractions of HAuCl 4 and AgNO 3 by sodium citrate in aqueous solution without using stabilizing agents such as surfactant or polymer. Appearance of single absorption peak in visible spectrum indicated formation of homogeneous gold-silver alloy nanoparticles. Transmission electron micrographs also support formation of alloy nanoparticles rather than core-shell particles. The plasmon absorption bands for Au-Ag nanoparticles show linear bathochromic shift with increasing Au content. No significant change in surface plasmon band was observed on storage of samples at 25 ± 2 deg. C for 6 months, indicating stability of the particles. Particle size distribution, zeta-potential and conduction of these colloidal suspensions were measured by dynamic light scattering along with Zetasizer. Gold and Au-Ag alloy nanoparticles exhibited fluorescence at 600 nm and in between 600 and 486 nm respectively depending on alloy composition. Gold nanoparticles were used for cell line study using liposome as a carrier. This liposome entrapped gold nanoparticles showed enhanced uptake by Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells compared to gold nanoparticles

  16. Extracellular mycosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopinath, K.; Arumugam, A.

    2014-08-01

    The development of eco-friendly methods for the synthesis of nanomaterial shape and size is an important area of research in the field of nanotechnology. The present investigation deals with the extracellular rapid biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Fusarium solani culture filtrate. The UV-vis spectra of the fungal culture filtrate medium containing gold ion showed peak at 527 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of gold nanoparticles. FTIR spectra provide an evidence for the presence of heterocyclic compound in the culture filtrate, which increases the stability of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. The X-ray analysis respects the Bragg's law and confirmed the crystalline nature of the gold nanoparticles. AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (41 nm). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that the gold nanoparticles are spherical in shape with the size range from 20 to 50 nm. The use of F. solani will offer several advantages since it is considered as a non-human pathogenic organism. The fungus F. solani has a fast growth rate, rapid capacity of metallic ions reduction, NPs stabilization and facile and economical biomass handling. Extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles could be highly advantageous from the point of view of synthesis in large quantities, time consumption, eco-friendly, non-toxic and easy downstream processing.

  17. Preparation and bactericide activity of gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Alvarez, S. A. [UASLP, Doctorado Institucional en Ingenieria y Ciencia de Materiales (Mexico); Martinez-Castanon, G. A., E-mail: mtzcastanon@fciencias.uaslp.m [UASLP, Maestria en Ciencias Odontologicas, Facultad de Estomatologia (Mexico); Nino-Martinez, N. [UASLP, Facultad de Ciencias (Mexico); Reyes-Macias, J. F.; Patino-Marin, N.; Loyola-Rodriguez, J. P. [UASLP, Maestria en Ciencias Odontologicas, Facultad de Estomatologia (Mexico); Ruiz, Facundo [UASLP, Facultad de Ciencias (Mexico)

    2010-10-15

    In this work, gold nanoparticles with three different sizes (13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm) were prepared using a simple aqueous method with gallic acid as the reducing and stabilizing agent, the different sizes were obtained varying some experimental parameters as the pH of the reaction and the amount of the gallic acid. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Samples were identified as elemental gold and present spherical morphology, a narrow size distribution and good stabilization according to TEM and DLS results. The antibacterial activity of this gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles against S. mutans (the etiologic agent of dental caries) was assessed using a microdilution method obtaining a minimum inhibitory concentration of 12.31, 12.31, and 49.25 {mu}g/mL for 13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm gold nanoparticles, respectively. The antibacterial assay showed that gold nanoparticles prepared in this work present a bactericide activity by a synergistic action with gallic acid. The MIC found for this nanoparticles are much lower than those reported for mixtures of gold nanoparticles and antibiotics.

  18. Gold nanoparticle incorporation in the cancer cells : imaging and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Jung, Sung Yong; Seo, Eun Seok; Ryu, Jeongeun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2011-11-01

    Surface modified gold nanoparticles (~ 20 nm) are selectively incorporated in the various cancer cells. Depending on the attached molecules on the gold nanoparticle surface, incorporation efficiency of the gold nanoparticles in the cancer cells are differentiated. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and second ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) are utilized to quantify the gold nanoparticles incorporated in the cancer cells. Static images of the cancer cell are obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and zone-plate X-ray nanoscopy. On the other hand, dynamic flow images are captured by dynamic X-ray imaging. To enhance the selective incorporation into the cancer cells, specially designed aptamer is introduced on the gold nanoparticles, which changes the mechanisms of gold nanoparticle incorporation through the cancer cell membrane. Anti-cancer drugs are also incorporated, by which sustained drug delivery mechanisms are investigated. This study would contribute to the basic understanding on the nanoparticle- mediated disease treatment and advanced imaging technology.

  19. Preparation and bactericide activity of gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Alvarez, S. A.; Martinez-Castanon, G. A.; Nino-Martinez, N.; Reyes-Macias, J. F.; Patino-Marin, N.; Loyola-Rodriguez, J. P.; Ruiz, Facundo

    2010-01-01

    In this work, gold nanoparticles with three different sizes (13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm) were prepared using a simple aqueous method with gallic acid as the reducing and stabilizing agent, the different sizes were obtained varying some experimental parameters as the pH of the reaction and the amount of the gallic acid. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Samples were identified as elemental gold and present spherical morphology, a narrow size distribution and good stabilization according to TEM and DLS results. The antibacterial activity of this gallic acid stabilized gold nanoparticles against S. mutans (the etiologic agent of dental caries) was assessed using a microdilution method obtaining a minimum inhibitory concentration of 12.31, 12.31, and 49.25 μg/mL for 13.7, 39.4, and 76.7 nm gold nanoparticles, respectively. The antibacterial assay showed that gold nanoparticles prepared in this work present a bactericide activity by a synergistic action with gallic acid. The MIC found for this nanoparticles are much lower than those reported for mixtures of gold nanoparticles and antibiotics.

  20. Bayesian object classification of gold nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Konomi, Bledar A.

    2013-06-01

    The properties of materials synthesized with nanoparticles (NPs) are highly correlated to the sizes and shapes of the nanoparticles. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging technique can be used to measure the morphological characteristics of NPs, which can be simple circles or more complex irregular polygons with varying degrees of scales and sizes. A major difficulty in analyzing the TEM images is the overlapping of objects, having different morphological properties with no specific information about the number of objects present. Furthermore, the objects lying along the boundary render automated image analysis much more difficult. To overcome these challenges, we propose a Bayesian method based on the marked-point process representation of the objects. We derive models, both for the marks which parameterize the morphological aspects and the points which determine the location of the objects. The proposed model is an automatic image segmentation and classification procedure, which simultaneously detects the boundaries and classifies the NPs into one of the predetermined shape families. We execute the inference by sampling the posterior distribution using Markov chainMonte Carlo (MCMC) since the posterior is doubly intractable. We apply our novel method to several TEM imaging samples of gold NPs, producing the needed statistical characterization of their morphology. © Institute of Mathematical Statistics, 2013.

  1. Exploitation of marine bacteria for production of gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Nishat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have found wide range of applications in electronics, biomedical engineering, and chemistry owing to their exceptional opto-electrical properties. Biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles by using plant extracts and microbes have received profound interest in recent times owing to their potential to produce nanoparticles with varied shape, size and morphology. Marine microorganisms are unique to tolerate high salt concentration and can evade toxicity of different metal ions. However, these marine microbes are not sufficiently explored for their capability of metal nanoparticle synthesis. Although, marine water is one of the richest sources of gold in the nature, however, there is no significant publication regarding utilization of marine micro-organisms to produce gold nanoparticles. Therefore, there might be a possibility of exploring marine bacteria as nanofactories for AuNP biosynthesis. Results In the present study, marine bacteria are exploited towards their capability of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs production. Stable, monodisperse AuNP formation with around 10 nm dimension occur upon exposure of HAuCl4 solution to whole cells of a novel strain of Marinobacter pelagius, as characterized by polyphasic taxonomy. Nanoparticles synthesized are characterized by Transmission electron microscopy, Dynamic light scattering and UV-visible spectroscopy. Conclusion The potential of marine organisms in biosynthesis of AuNPs are still relatively unexplored. Although, there are few reports of gold nanoparticles production using marine sponges and sea weeds however, there is no report on the production of gold nanoparticles using marine bacteria. The present work highlighted the possibility of using the marine bacterial strain of Marinobacter pelagius to achieve a fast rate of nanoparticles synthesis which may be of high interest for future process development of AuNPs. This is the first report of Au

  2. Formation of gold nanoparticles in polymethylmethacrylate by UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abyaneh, Majid Kazemian; Paramanik, D; Varma, S; Gosavi, S W; Kulkarni, S K

    2007-01-01

    Gold-polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) nanocomposites were fabricated with a photoreduction method using UV irradiation. The irradiated samples are compared with unirradiated ones to investigate the mechanism of gold nanoparticle formation and the effect of UV irradiation and polymer matrix on the morphology of the particles. The triangular gold nanoparticles were formed in polymer medium at a specific concentration of gold salt and UV exposure. The particle size decreased when the gold salt to polymer ratio was increased. The samples were analysed using UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, atomic force microscopy, x-ray diffraction, small angle x-ray scattering and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The interfacial interaction of Au nanoparticles and PMMA polymer has been discussed

  3. Cells adhesion and growth on gold nanoparticle grafted glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotna, Zdenka, E-mail: zdenka1.novotna@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Reznickova, Alena; Kvitek, Ondrej; Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Kolska, Zdenka [Faculty of Science, J. E. Purkyně University, Ústí nad Labem (Czech Republic); Svorcik, Vaclav [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-07-01

    The surface of glass substrate was plasma treated, coated by gold nano-structures and subsequently grafted with nanoparticles. The samples were plasma treated, sputtered with Au nanostructures which was followed by grafting with biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol (BPD) and then gold nanoparticles. The wettability, optical and chemical properties and surface morphology were studied. The adhesion and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) on the samples were investigated in-vitro as well. Grafting of gold nanoparticles with the dithiol increases the UV–vis absorbance, the surface becomes more hydrophobic, rougher and more rugged compared to pristine, sputtered and only dithiol treated surface. Gold nano-particles bound over dithiol and Au nanostructures cause better cell proliferation than purely BPD treated or pristine glass.

  4. Quinone-Enriched Gold Nanoparticles in Bioelectrochemistry and Charge Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michal; Qvortrup, Katrine; Tanner, David Ackland

    groups ranging from thiophenes to thiols) were chosen as model compounds for linking together bulk quantities of gold nanoparticles and providing desired functionality. Anthraquinone thiophene and thiol derivatives were synthetized via Sonogashira coupling-type reactions. The synthetic pathways...

  5. Gold nanoparticle trapping and delivery for therapeutic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, MS; Suwanpayak, Nathaporn; Jalil, Muhammad Arif; Jomtarak, R; Saktioto, T; Ali, Jalil; Yupapin, PP

    2012-01-01

    A new optical trapping design to transport gold nanoparticles using a PANDA ring resonator system is proposed. Intense optical fields in the form of dark solitons controlled by Gaussian pulses are used to trap and transport nanoscopic volumes of matter to the desired destination via an optical waveguide. Theoretically, the gradient and scattering forces are responsible for this trapping phenomenon, where in practice such systems can be fabricated and a thin-film device formed on the specific artificial medical materials, for instance, an artificial bone. The dynamic behavior of the tweezers can be tuned by controlling the optical pulse input power and parameters of the ring resonator system. Different trap sizes can be generated to trap different gold nanoparticles sizes, which is useful for gold nanoparticle therapy. In this paper, we have shown the utility of gold nanoparticle trapping and delivery for therapy, which may be useful for cosmetic therapy and related applications. PMID:22275818

  6. Direct Electrochemistry of Methanobactin Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles on Au Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Jiaying; Dou, Boxin; Wang, Zhenxing; Wang, Yan; Xia, Chungu; Liu, Zhongfan

    2018-07-01

    Mathanobatins (Mb, Mbtins) were immobilized successfully on nanometer-sized gold colloid particles associated with β-mercaptoethylamine. The structures of Mb functionalized gold nanoparticles were characterized and confirmed by UV-vis spectroscopy (UV-vis), FTIR spectra and electrochemical analyses. Direct electron transfer between Mb or copper-loading Mbtins and the modified electrode was investigated without the aid of any electron mediator. The copper-loading Mbtins act as a better electrocatalyst for the reduction of H2O2 than Mb. The copper-loading Mb, with which gold nanoparticles were functionalized, as a model enzyme, was immobilized on gold electrode to construct a novel H2O2 biosensor. In pH 6.4 phosphate buffer solution, the reduction and oxidation peak potentials of Mb functionalized gold nanoparticles modified Au electrode (copper-loading Mbtins) were 0.115 and 0.222 V. On the surface, capacitance per unite area (Cd) of Mb functionalized gold nanoparticles modified electrode were 38 μF cm-2. The immobilized Mb displayed the features of a peroxidase and gave an excellent electrocatalytic response to the reduction of H2O2. The detection limit of Mb functionalized gold nanoparticles (copper-loading) were 09 × 10-5 mA/M (S/N = 3). The Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) was 0.787 mM. Good stability and sensitivity were assessed for the biosensor.

  7. Presenting Precision Glycomacromolecules on Gold Nanoparticles for Increased Lectin Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Boden

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Glyco-functionalized gold nanoparticles have great potential as biosensors and as inhibitors due to their increased binding to carbohydrate-recognizing receptors such as the lectins. Here we apply previously developed solid phase polymer synthesis to obtain a series of precision glycomacromolecules that allows for straightforward variation of their chemical structure as well as functionalization of gold nanoparticles by ligand exchange. A novel building block is introduced allowing for the change of spacer building blocks within the macromolecular scaffold going from an ethylene glycol unit to an aliphatic spacer. Furthermore, the valency and overall length of the glycomacromolecule is varied. All glyco-functionalized gold nanoparticles show high degree of functionalization along with high stability in buffer solution. Therefore, a series of measurements applying UV-Vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS and surface plasmon resonance (SPR were performed studying the aggregation behavior of the glyco-functionalized gold nanoparticles in presence of model lectin Concanavalin A. While the multivalent presentation of glycomacromolecules on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs showed a strong increase in binding compared to the free ligands, we also observed an influence of the chemical structure of the ligand such as its valency or hydrophobicity on the resulting lectin interactions. The straightforward variation of the chemical structure of the precision glycomacromolecule thus gives access to tailor-made glyco-gold nanoparticles (glyco-AuNPs and fine-tuning of their lectin binding properties.

  8. Grafting of gold nanoparticles on polyethyleneterephthalate using dithiol interlayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reznickova, A.; Kolska, Z.; Zaruba, K.; Svorcik, V.

    2014-01-01

    Two different procedures of grafting of polyethyleneterephthalate (PET), modified by plasma treatment, with gold nanoparticles (nanospheres) are studied. In the first procedure the PET foil was grafted with biphenyl-4,4′-dithiol and subsequently with gold nanoparticles. In the second one the PET foil was grafted with gold nanoparticles previously coated by the same dithiol. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and electrokinetic analysis were used for characterization of the polymer surface at different modification steps. Gold nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy. The first procedure was found to be more effective. It was proved that the dithiol was chemically bonded to the surface of the plasma activated PET and it mediates subsequent grafting of the gold nanoparticles. - Highlights: • Two different techniques were used for coating of PET with gold nanoparticles. • Grafted GNPs were characterized by XPS, FTIR, UV–vis, zeta potential, AFM. • More effective coating is achieved by deposition of GNPs earlier grafted with thiol. • The studied structures may have potential application in electronics or biomedicine

  9. Size control synthesis of starch capped-gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajammul Hussain, S.; Iqbal, M.; Mazhar, M.

    2009-01-01

    Metallic gold nanoparticles have been synthesized by the reduction of chloroaurate anions [AuCl 4 ] - solution with hydrazine in the aqueous starch and ethylene glycol solution at room temperature and at atmospheric pressure. The characterization of synthesized gold nanoparticles by UV-vis spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), electron diffraction analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-rays photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicate that average size of pure gold nanoparticles is 3.5 nm, they are spherical in shape and are pure metallic gold. The concentration effects of [AuCl 4 ] - anions, starch, ethylene glycol, and hydrazine, on particle size, were investigated, and the stabilization mechanism of Au nanoparticles by starch polymer molecules was also studied by FT-IR and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). FT-IR and TGA analysis shows that hydroxyl groups of starch are responsible of capping and stabilizing gold nanoparticles. The UV-vis spectrum of these samples shows that there is blue shift in surface plasmon resonance peak with decrease in particle size due to the quantum confinement effect, a supporting evidence of formation of gold nanoparticles and this shift remains stable even after 3 months.

  10. Synthesis of hexagonal gold nanoparticles using a microfluidic reaction system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weng, Chen-Hsun; Lee, Gwo-Bin; Huang, Chih-Chia; Yeh, Chen-Sheng; Lei, Huan-Yao

    2008-01-01

    A new microfluidic reaction system capable of mixing, transporting and reacting is developed for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. It allows for a rapid and a cost-effective approach to accelerate the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The microfluidic reaction chip is made from micro-electro-mechanical-system technologies which integrate a micro-mixer, micro-pumps, a micro-valve, micro-heaters and a micro temperature sensor on a single chip. Successful synthesis of dispersed gold nanoparticles has been demonstrated within a shorter period of time, as compared to traditional methods. It is experimentally found that precise control of the mixing/heating time for gold salts and reducing agents plays an essential role in the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. The growth process of hexagonal gold nanoparticles by a thermal aqueous approach is also systematically studied by using the same microfluidic reaction system. The development of the microfluidic reaction system could be promising for the synthesis of functional nanoparticles for future biomedical applications

  11. Toward efficient modification of large gold nanoparticles with DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gill, R.; Göeken, Kristian L; Subramaniam, V.

    2014-01-01

    DNA-coated gold nanoparticles are one of the most researched nano-bio hybrid systems. Traditionally their synthesis has been a long and tedious process, involving slow salt addition and long incubation steps. This stems from the fact that both DNA and gold particles are negatively charged, therefore

  12. Applications of Gold Nanoparticles in Nanomedicine: Recent Advances in Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carabineiro, Sónia Alexandra Correia

    2017-05-22

    Nowadays, gold is used in (nano-)medicine, usually in the form of nanoparticles, due to the solid proofs given of its therapeutic effects on several diseases. Gold also plays an important role in the vaccine field as an adjuvant and a carrier, reducing toxicity, enhancing immunogenic activity, and providing stability in storage. An even brighter golden future is expected for gold applications in this area.

  13. SN38 conjugated hyaluronic acid gold nanoparticles as a novel system against metastatic colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Hosniyeh; Atyabi, Fatemeh; Varnamkhasti, Behrang Shiri; Hosseinzadeh, Reza; Ostad, Seyed Nasser; Ghahremani, Mohammad Hossein; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2017-06-30

    Combination of chemotherapy and photothermal therapy has been proposed for better treatment of metastatic colon cancer. In this study SN38, a highly potent cytotoxic agent, was conjugated to negatively charged hyaluronic acid (HA), which was deposited on the surface of the positively charged gold nanoparticles via electrostatic interaction. The drug conjugation and its interaction with gold nanoparticles were verified by 1 H NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies, respectively. The prepared SN38-HA gold NPs are negatively charged spherical nanoparticles with an average size of 75±10nm. In vitro release study revealed that drug release in acidic conditions (pH 5.2) was faster than that in physiological pH. Red light emitting diode (LED, 630nm, 30mW) was used as a light source for photothermal experiments. The drug release in acidic conditions was increased up to 30% using red LED illumination (6min) in comparison with experiment carried out indark. The cytotoxicity study on MUC1 positive HT29, SW480 colon cancer cells and MUC1 negative CHO cells, showed higher toxicity of the nanoparticles on HT29 and SW480 cell lines compared to CHO cells. Confocal microscopy images along with flow cytometry analysis confirm the cytotoxicity results. The incubation time for reaching IC50 decreases from 48h to 24h by LED illumination after nanoparticle treatment. Migratory potential of the HT29 and SW480 cell lines was reduced by co-application of SN38-HA gold NPs and LED radiation. Also anti-proliferative study indicates that LED radiation has increased the cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles and this effect is remained up to 8days. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Generation of polypeptide-templated gold nanoparticles using ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Candace Rae; Pushpavanam, Karthik; Nair, Divya Geetha; Potta, Thrimoorthy; Sutiyoso, Caesario; Kodibagkar, Vikram D; Sapareto, Stephen; Chang, John; Rege, Kaushal

    2013-08-13

    Ionizing radiation, including γ rays and X-rays, are high-energy electromagnetic radiation with diverse applications in nuclear energy, astrophysics, and medicine. In this work, we describe the use of ionizing radiation and cysteine-containing elastin-like polypeptides (C(n)ELPs, where n = 2 or 12 cysteines in the polypeptide sequence) for the generation of gold nanoparticles. In the presence of C(n)ELPs, ionizing radiation doses higher than 175 Gy resulted in the formation of maroon-colored gold nanoparticle dispersions, with maximal absorbance at 520 nm, from colorless metal salts. Visible color changes were not observed in any of the control systems, indicating that ionizing radiation, gold salt solution, and C(n)ELPs were all required for nanoparticle formation. The hydrodynamic diameters of nanoparticles, determined using dynamic light scattering, were in the range of 80-150 nm, while TEM imaging indicated the formation of gold cores 10-20 nm in diameter. Interestingly, C2ELPs formed 1-2 nm diameter gold nanoparticles in the absence of radiation. Our results describe a facile method of nanoparticle formation in which nanoparticle size can be tailored based on radiation dose and C(n)ELP type. Further improvements in these polypeptide-based systems can lead to colorimetric detection of ionizing radiation in a variety of applications.

  15. Gold nanoparticles decorated liposomes and their SERS performance in tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, D.; Wang, Z. Y.; Zong, S. F.; Chen, H.; Chen, P.; Li, M. Y.; Wu, L.; Cui, Y. P.

    2015-05-01

    Due to their unique properties, liposomes have been widely used as drug nanocarriers. Herein a liposome-Au nanohybrid has been demonstrated as a SERS active intracellular drug nanocarrier. In this study, cationic Raman reporter tagged gold nanoparticles (Au@4MBA@PAH) were anchored onto the surfaces of anionic liposomes via electrostatic interactions. Using SKBR3 cells as model cells, we revealed that the hybrid formulation can be effectively taken up by tumor cells and tracked by the SERS signals. Collectively, the liposome-Au nanohybrids hold great promise in biomedical applications.

  16. Gold Nanoparticles Obtained by Bio-precipitation from Gold(III) Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Tiemann, K.J.; Gamez, G.; Dokken, K.; Tehuacanero, S.; Jose-Yacaman, M.

    1999-01-01

    The use of metal nanoparticles has shown to be very important in recent industrial applications. Currently gold nanoparticles are being produced by physical methods such as evaporation. Biological processes may be an alternative to physical methods for the production of gold nanoparticles. Alfalfa biomass has shown to be effective at passively binding and reducing gold from solutions containing gold(III) ions and resulting in the formation of gold(0) nanoparticles. High resolution microscopy has shown that five different types of gold particles are present after reaction with gold(III) ions with alfalfa biomass. These particles include: fcc tetrahedral, hexagonal platelet, icosahedral multiple twinned, decahedral multiple twinned, and irregular shaped particles. Further analysis on the frequency of distribution has shown that icosahedral and irregular particles are more frequently formed. In addition, the larger particles observed may be formed through the coalescence of smaller particles. Through modification of the chemical parameters, more uniform particle size distribution may be obtained by the alfalfa bio-reduction of gold(III) from solution

  17. A halogen-free synthesis of gold nanoparticles using gold(III) oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sashuk, Volodymyr, E-mail: vsashuk@ichf.edu.pl; Rogaczewski, Konrad [Polish Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physical Chemistry (Poland)

    2016-09-15

    Gold nanoparticles are one of the most used nanomaterials. They are usually synthesized by the reduction of gold(III) chloride. However, the presence of halide ions in the reaction mixture is not always welcome. In some cases, these ions have detrimental influence on the morphology and structure of resulting nanoparticles. Here, we present a simple and halogen-free procedure to prepare gold nanoparticles by reduction of gold(III) oxide in neat oleylamine. The method provides the particles with an average size below 10 nm and dispersity of tens of percent. The process of nanoparticle formation was monitored using UV–Vis spectroscopy. The structure and chemical composition of the nanoparticles was determined by SEM, XPS and EDX. We also proposed the mechanism of reduction of gold(III) oxide based on MS, IR and NMR data. Importantly, the synthetic protocol is general and applicable for the preparation of other coinage metal nanoparticles from the corresponding metal oxides. For instance, we demonstrated that the absence of halogen enables efficient alloying of metals when preparing gold–silver bimetallic nanoparticles.

  18. A halogen-free synthesis of gold nanoparticles using gold(III) oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sashuk, Volodymyr; Rogaczewski, Konrad

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are one of the most used nanomaterials. They are usually synthesized by the reduction of gold(III) chloride. However, the presence of halide ions in the reaction mixture is not always welcome. In some cases, these ions have detrimental influence on the morphology and structure of resulting nanoparticles. Here, we present a simple and halogen-free procedure to prepare gold nanoparticles by reduction of gold(III) oxide in neat oleylamine. The method provides the particles with an average size below 10 nm and dispersity of tens of percent. The process of nanoparticle formation was monitored using UV–Vis spectroscopy. The structure and chemical composition of the nanoparticles was determined by SEM, XPS and EDX. We also proposed the mechanism of reduction of gold(III) oxide based on MS, IR and NMR data. Importantly, the synthetic protocol is general and applicable for the preparation of other coinage metal nanoparticles from the corresponding metal oxides. For instance, we demonstrated that the absence of halogen enables efficient alloying of metals when preparing gold–silver bimetallic nanoparticles.

  19. Reversible, reagentless solubility changes in phosphatidylcholine-stabilized gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackiewicz, Marilyn R; Ayres, Benjamin R; Reed, Scott M

    2008-01-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is a versatile ligand for synthesizing gold nanoparticles that are soluble in either organic or aqueous media. Here we report a novel route to organic-soluble, PC-stabilized gold nanoparticles that can be re-suspended in water after removal of the organic solvent. Similarly, we show that PC-stabilized gold nanoparticles synthesized in water can be re-suspended in organic solvents after complete removal of water. Without complete removal of the solvent, the nanoparticles retain their original solubility and do not phase transfer. This change in solvent preference from organic to aqueous and vice versa without the use of an additional phase transfer reagent is novel, visually striking, and of utility for synthetic modification of nanoparticles. This approach allows chemical reactions to be performed on nanoparticles in organic solvents followed by conversion of the products to water-soluble materials. A narrow distribution of PC-stabilized gold nanoparticles was obtained after phase transfer to water as characterized by UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), demonstrating that the narrow distribution obtained from the organic synthesis is retained after transfer to water. This method produces water-soluble nanoparticles with a narrower dispersity than is possible with direct aqueous synthesis

  20. Uptake and depuration of gold nanoparticles in Daphnia magna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, Lars Michael; Kern, Kristina; Hjorth, Rune

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a series of short-term studies (total duration 48 h) of uptake and depuration of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) in neonate Daphnia magna. Gold nanoparticles (Au NP) were used to study the influence of size, stabilizing agent and feeding on uptake and depuration kinetics...

  1. Electroless deposition of Gold-Platinum Core@Shell Nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    @platinum nanoparticles. (Au@PtNPs) with core@shell structure fabricated on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by electroless deposition method. Initially, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were deposited on GCE by reducing HAuCl4 in the presence ...

  2. Thermo-Optical Properties of Colloids Enhanced by Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleali, Hoda; Sarkhosh, Leila; Eslamifar, Mina; Karimzadeh, Rouhollah; Mansour, Nastaran

    2010-08-01

    This work presents a study on the thermo-optical properties of colloidal gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) under a low power laser irradiation at 532 nm. Samples of various gold volume fractions, ranging from 2.5×10-4 to 19.5×10-4%, are synthesized by nanosecond pulsed laser ablation of a pure gold plate in the distilled water. The formation of the AuNPs has been evidenced by optical absorption spectra and transmission electron microscopy. We investigate the effect of the gold nanoparticle concentration on thermo-optical properties of the colloids using the Z-scan technique. The nonlinear optical measurements exhibit a very large nonlinear refraction close to the surface plasmon resonance frequency of the nanoparticles. Our results reveal that the heat diffusion in the colloids is due to nonlocal thermal process. As the gold concentration increases, the temperature change within and around gold nanoparticles greatly enlarges the thermo-optic and thermal nonlinear refractive index coefficients of the samples. This work suggests that thermal nonlinear refraction will play an important role in development of photonic applications involving metal nanoparticles colloids.

  3. Phase Transition and Optical Properties of DNA-Gold Nanoparticle Assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Young; Harris, Nolan C.; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2007-01-01

    We review recent work on DNA-linked gold nanoparticle assemblies. The synthesis, properties, and phase behavior of such DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies are described. These nanoparticle assemblies have strong optical extinction in the ultraviolet and visible light regions; hence, the technique is used to study the kinetics and phase transitions of DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies. The melting transition of DNA-gold nanoparticle assemblies shows unusual trends compared to those of free DNA. T...

  4. Salt-Mediated Self Assembly of Thioctic Acid on Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkert, Anna A.; Subramaniam, Varuni; Ivanov, Michael R.; Goodman, Amanda M.; Haes, Amanda J.

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) modification is a widely used method to improve the functionality and stability of bulk and nanoscale materials. For instance, the chemical compatibility and utility of solution-phase nanoparticles are often improved using covalently bound SAMs. Herein, solution-phase gold nanoparticles are modified with thioctic acid SAMs in the presence and absence of salt. Molecular packing density on the nanoparticle surfaces is estimated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and increases by ~20% when molecular self-assembly occurs in the presence vs. the absence of salt. We hypothesize that as the ionic strength of the solution increases, pinhole and collapsed-site defects in the SAM are more easily accessible as the electrostatic interaction energy between adjacent molecules decreases thereby facilitating the subsequent assembly of additional thioctic acid molecules. Significantly, increased SAM packing densities increase the stability of functionalized gold nanoparticles by a factor of two relative to nanoparticles functionalized in the absence of salt. These results are expected to improve the reproducible functionalization of solution-phase nanomaterials for various applications. PMID:21524135

  5. Green synthesis of size controllable gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Kumar, Kesarla; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Kiran Kumar, Hoskote A; Maddinedi, Sireesh Babu

    2013-12-01

    A facile rapid green eco-friendly method to synthesize gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) of tunable size using aqueous Terminalia arjuna fruit extracts has been demonstrated herein. Formation of Au NPs was confirmed by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) study at 528 nm using UV-visible spectrophotometer. The time of reduction, size and morphological variations of Au NPs were studied with varying quantities of T. arjuna fruit aqueous extracts. Synthesized Au NPs were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). Polyphenols responsible for reduction of Au(3+) to Au(0) were identified using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) as ascorbic acid, gallic acid and pyrogallol. The oxidized forms of polyphenols formed coordination with surface of Au NPs which protected their further growth and aggregation. We also propose a plausible mechanism how to tune size and shape of Au NPs by varying the quantity of extracts. Thus obtained Au NPs were stable for more than four months. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Green synthesis of size controllable gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan Kumar, Kesarla; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Kiran Kumar, Hoskote A.; Maddinedi, Sireesh Babu

    2013-12-01

    A facile rapid green eco-friendly method to synthesize gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) of tunable size using aqueous Terminalia arjuna fruit extracts has been demonstrated herein. Formation of Au NPs was confirmed by Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) study at 528 nm using UV-visible spectrophotometer. The time of reduction, size and morphological variations of Au NPs were studied with varying quantities of T. arjuna fruit aqueous extracts. Synthesized Au NPs were characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX). Polyphenols responsible for reduction of Au3+ to Au0 were identified using High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) as ascorbic acid, gallic acid and pyrogallol. The oxidized forms of polyphenols formed coordination with surface of Au NPs which protected their further growth and aggregation. We also propose a plausible mechanism how to tune size and shape of Au NPs by varying the quantity of extracts. Thus obtained Au NPs were stable for more than four months.

  7. Oxidation of Bioethanol using Zeolite-Encapsulated Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the ongoing developments in biomass conversion, the oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde may become a favorable and green alternative to the preparation from ethylene. Here, a simple and effective method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles in zeolite silicalite-1 is reported and their high...... zeolite crystals comprise a broad range of mesopores and contain up to several hundred gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2-3nm that are distributed inside the zeolites rather than on the outer surface. The encapsulated nanoparticles have good stability and result in 50% conversion of ethanol with 98...

  8. Oxidation of Bioethanol using Zeolite-Encapsulated Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar; Wang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the ongoing developments in biomass conversion, the oxidation of bioethanol to acetaldehyde may become a favorable and green alternative to the preparation from ethylene. Here, a simple and effective method to encapsulate gold nanoparticles in zeolite silicalite‐1 is reported and their high...... zeolite crystals comprise a broad range of mesopores and contain up to several hundred gold nanoparticles with a diameter of 2–3 nm that are distributed inside the zeolites rather than on the outer surface. The encapsulated nanoparticles have good stability and result in 50 % conversion of ethanol with 98...

  9. Protein coated gold nanoparticles as template for the directed synthesis of highly fluorescent gold nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lingyan; Han, Fei

    2018-04-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) modified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was selected as template for the synthesis of AuNPs@gold nanoclusters (AuNCs) core/shell nanoparticles, in which BSA not only acted as dual functions agent for both anchoring and reducing Au3+ ions, but also was employed as a bridge between the AuNPs and AuNCs. Optical properties of AuNPs@AuNCs core/shell nanoparticles were studied using UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopy. The prepared AuNPs@AuNCs core/shell nanoparticles exhibited sphere size uniformity with improved monodispersity, excellent fluorescence and fluorescent stability. Compared with AuNCs, AuNPs@AuNCs core/shell nanoparticles possessed large size and strong fluorescence intensity due to the effect of AuNPs as core. Moreover, the mechanism of the AuNPs induced fluorescence changes of the core/shell nanoparticles was first explored.

  10. Microwave absorption properties of gold nanoparticle doped polymers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Chenhui; Ouattara, Lassana; Ingrosso, Chiara

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a method for characterizing microwave absorption properties of gold nanoparticle doped polymers. The method is based on on-wafer measurements at the frequencies from 0.5GHz to 20GHz. The on-wafer measurement method makes it possible to characterize electromagnetic (EM) property...... of small volume samples. The epoxy based SU8 polymer and SU8 doped with gold nanoparticles are chosen as the samples under test. Two types of microwave test devices are designed for exciting the samples through electrical coupling and magnetic coupling, respectively. Measurement results demonstrate...... that the nanocomposites absorb a certain amount of microwave energy due to gold nanoparticles. Higher nanoparticle concentration results in more significant absorption effect....

  11. Functionalization of lamellar molybdenum disulphide nanocomposite with gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavayen, V.; O'Dwyer, C.; Ana, M.A. Santa; Mirabal, N.; Benavente, E.; Cardenas, G.; Gonzalez, G.; Torres, C.M. Sotomayor

    2007-01-01

    This work explores the functionalization of an organic-inorganic MoS 2 lamellar compound, prepared by a chemical liquid deposition method (CLD), that has an interlamellar distance of ∼5.2 nm, using clusters of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles have a mean diameter of 1.2 nm, a stability of ∼85 days, and a zeta potential measured to be ζ -6.8 mV (solid). The nanoparticles are localized in the hydrophilic zones, defined by the presence of amine groups of the surfactant between the lamella of MoS 2 . SEM, TEM, EDAX and electron diffraction provide conclusive evidence of the interlamellar insertion of the gold nanoparticles in the MoS 2

  12. Comparison of amino acids interaction with gold nanoparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Fatemeh; Amanlou, Massoud; Rafii-Tabar, Hashem

    2014-04-01

    The study of nanomaterial/biomolecule interface is an important emerging field in bionanoscience, and additionally in many biological processes such as hard-tissue growth and cell-surface adhesion. To have a deeper understanding of the amino acids/gold nanoparticle assemblies, the adsorption of these amino acids on the gold nanoparticles (GNPs) has been investigated via molecular dynamics simulation. In these simulations, all the constituent atoms of the nanoparticles were considered to be dynamic. The geometries of amino acids, when adsorbed on the nanoparticle, were studied and their flexibilities were compared with one another. The interaction of each of 20 amino acids was considered with 3 and 8 nm gold GNPs.

  13. Dynamic light scattering on bioconjugated laser generated gold nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Zimbone

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs conjugated to DNA are widely used for biomedical targeting and sensing applications. DNA functionalization is easily reached on laser generated gold nanoparticles because of their unique surface chemistry, not reproducible by other methods. In this context, we present an extensive investigation concerning the attachment of DNA to the surface of laser generated nanoparticles using Dynamic Light Scattering and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The DNA conjugation is highlighted by the increase of the hydrodynamic radius and by the UV-Vis spectra behavior. Our investigation indicates that Dynamic Light Scattering is a suitable analytical tool to evidence, directly and qualitatively, the binding between a DNA molecule and a gold nanoparticle, therefore it is ideal to monitor changes in the conjugation process when experimental conditions are varied.

  14. Gold Nanoparticles for Imaging and Drug Transport to the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Male, D; Gromnicova, R; McQuaid, C

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles with a core size of 2nm covalently coated with glycans to maintain solubility, targeting molecules for brain endothelium, and cargo molecules hold great potential for delivery of therapies into the CNS. They have low toxicity, pass through brain endothelium in vitro and in vivo, and move rapidly through the brain parenchyma. Within minutes of infusion the nanoparticles can be detected in neurons and glia. These nanoparticles are relatively easy to synthesize in association with their surface ligands. They can be detected by electron microscopy, ICP-mass spectrometry, and spectroscopy. However, modification of the basic gold nanoparticle is required for in vivo imaging by MR or radioactive methods. Depending on their surface coat, the nanoparticles cross the brain endothelium by the plasma membrane/cytosolic route (passive transport) or by vesicular transcytosis (active transport). A primary aim of current research is to improve the biodistribution of the nanoparticles for CNS drug delivery. Smaller gold nanoparticles are removed rapidly via the kidney, while larger nanoparticles are taken up by mononuclear phagocytes in various tissues. Receptors selectively located on brain endothelium can act as targets for the nanoparticles, to increase their delivery to the brain. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Layer-by-layer assembled multilayers using catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sungwoo; Park, Jeongju; Cho, Jinhan

    2010-01-01

    We introduce a novel and versatile approach for the preparation of multilayers, based on catalase-encapsulated gold nanoparticles (CAT-Au NP ), allowing electrostatic charge reversal and structural transformation through pH adjustment. CAT-Au NP , which are synthesized directly from CAT stabilizer, can be electrostatically assembled with anionic and cationic PEs as a result of the charge reversal of the catalase stabilizers through pH control. In particular, at pH 5.2, near the pI of catalase, dispersed CAT-Au NP are structurally transformed into colloidal or network CAT-Au NP nanocomposites. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the layer-by-layer assembled multilayers composed of PEs and CAT-Au NP induce an effective electron transfer between CAT and the electrode as well as a high loading of CAT and Au NP , and resultantly exhibit a highly catalytic activity toward H 2 O 2 .

  16. Zirconia coating for enhanced thermal stability of gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastre, A.; Cristini-Robbe, O.; Bois, L.; Chassagneux, F.; Branzea, D.; Boé, A.; Kinowski, C.; Raulin, K.; Rolland, N.; Bernard, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a rapid, simple and one-step method for the preparation of 2-4 nm diameter zirconia-coated gold nanoparticles at room temperature. These nanoparticles were synthesized by two simultaneous processes: the chemical reduction of tetrachloroauric acid with sodium borohydride and the formation of zirconia sol-gel matrices. All the gold nanoparticle sols were characterized by UV-visible absorption and transmission electron microscopy to determine the nanoparticle size and shape. The synthesis method is a combination of a polymeric structure of the amorphous zirconia and the use of a strong reducing agent, and it yields to very small quasi-spherical gold nanoparticles at room temperature. The thermal stability up to 1200 °C of the coated nanoparticles was studied by x-ray diffraction. The metastable tetragonal phase of the zirconia coating was obtained at 400 °C, and a progressive transformation from tetragonal to monoclinic phases of the zirconia coating was observed up to 1100 °C. After the heat treatment at 400 °C, the crystallite size of the gold nanoparticles was about 29 nm, and it remained unchanged from 400 °C to 1200 °C. These results are promising for the development of such materials as doping elements for optical fiber applications.

  17. Dendritic functionalization of monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutler, Erin C.; Lundin, Erik; Garabato, B. Davis; Choi, Daeock; Shon, Young-Seok

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the facile synthesis of nanoparticle-cored dendrimers (NCDs) and nanoparticle megamers from monolayer-protected gold clusters using either single or multi-step reactions. First, 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid/hexanethiolate-protected gold clusters were synthesized using the Schiffrin reaction followed by the ligand place-exchange reaction. A convergent approach for the synthesis of nanoparticle-cored dendrimers uses a single step reaction that is an ester coupling reaction of hydroxy-functionalized dendrons with carboxylic acid-functionalized gold clusters. A divergent approach, which is based on multi-step reactions, employs the repetition of an amide coupling reaction and a Michael addition reaction to build polyamidoamine dendritic architectures around a nanoparticle core. Nanoparticle megamers, which are large dendrimer-induced nanoparticle aggregates with an average diameter of more than 300 nm, were prepared by the amide coupling reaction between polyamiodoamine [G-2] dendrimers and carboxylic acid-functionalized gold clusters. 1 H NMR spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used for the characterization of these hybrid nanoparticles

  18. Electrostatic complexation of polyelectrolyte and magnetic nanoparticles: from wild clustering to controllable magnetic wires

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Minhao; Qu, Li; Fan, Jiangxia; Ren, Yong

    2014-01-01

    We present the electrostatic complexation between polyelectrolytes and charged nanoparticles. The nanoparticles in solution are γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite) spheres with 8.3 nm diameter and anionic surface charges. The complexation was monitored using three different formulation pathways such as direct mixing, dilution, and dialysis. In the first process, the hybrids were obtained by mixing stock solutions of polymers and nanoparticles. A ‘destabilization state’ with sharp and intense maximum aggregat...

  19. Versatile Electrostatic Assembly of Nanoparticles & Polyelectrolytes: Coating, Clustering and Layer-by-Layer Processes

    OpenAIRE

    Chapel, J. -P.; Berret, J. -F.

    2011-01-01

    Engineered nanoparticles made from noble metals, rare-earth oxides or semiconductors are emerging as the central constituents of future nanotech developments. In this review, a survey of the complexing strategies between nanoparticles and oppositely charged polyelectrolytes developed during the last three years and based on electrostatic interactions is presented. These strategies include the one-step synthesis of stable and functionalized nanoparticles, the one- and multilayer coating of ind...

  20. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles (Green-gold Using Leaf Extract of Terminalia Catappa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaprasad Ankamwar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of eco-friendly nanoparticles is evergreen branch of nanoscience for biomedical application. Low cost of synthesis and non toxicity are main features make it more attractive potential option for biomedical field and elsewhere. Here, we report the synthesis of gold nanoparticles in aqueous medium using Terminalia catappa (Almond leaf extract as the reducing and stabilizing agent. On treating chloroauric acid solutions with Terminalia catappa (TC leaf extract rapid reduction of chloroaurate ions is observed leading to the formation of highly stable gold nanoparticles in solution. TEM analysis of the gold nanoparticles indicated that they ranged in size from 10 to 35 nm with average size of 21.9 nm.

  1. Gold nanoparticle trapping and delivery for therapeutic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz MS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available MS Aziz1, Nathaporn Suwanpayak3,4, Muhammad Arif Jalil2, R Jomtarak4, T Saktioto2, Jalil Ali1, PP Yupapin41Institute of Advanced Photonics Science, 2Ibnu Sina Institute of Fundamental Science Studies, Nanotechnology Research Alliance, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, Johor Bahru, Malaysia; 3King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Chump on Campus, Chumphon, 4Nanoscale Science and Engineering Research Alliance (N'SERA, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut's Institute of Technology Ladkrabang, Bangkok, ThailandAbstract: A new optical trapping design to transport gold nanoparticles using a PANDA ring resonator system is proposed. Intense optical fields in the form of dark solitons controlled by Gaussian pulses are used to trap and transport nanoscopic volumes of matter to the desired destination via an optical waveguide. Theoretically, the gradient and scattering forces are responsible for this trapping phenomenon, where in practice such systems can be fabricated and a thin-film device formed on the specific artificial medical materials, for instance, an artificial bone. The dynamic behavior of the tweezers can be tuned by controlling the optical pulse input power and parameters of the ring resonator system. Different trap sizes can be generated to trap different gold nanoparticles sizes, which is useful for gold nanoparticle therapy. In this paper, we have shown the utility of gold nanoparticle trapping and delivery for therapy, which may be useful for cosmetic therapy and related applications.Keywords: gold nanoparticle trapping, particle trapping, therapy, transport

  2. Hydrophobically modified chitosan/gold nanoparticles for DNA delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhattarai, Shanta Raj; Remant Bahadur, K.C.; Aryal, Santosh; Bhattarai, Narayan; Kim, Sun Young; Yi, Ho Keun; Hwang, Pyoung Han; Kim, Hak Yong

    2008-01-01

    Present study dealt an application of modified chitosan gold nanoparticles (Nac-6-Au) for the immobilization of necked plasmid DNA. Gold nanoparticles stabilized with N-acylated chitosan were prepared by graft-onto approach. The stabilized gold nanoparticles were characterized by different physico-chemical techniques such as UV-vis, TEM, ELS and DLS. MTT assay was used for in vitro cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles into three different cell lines (NIH 3T3, CT-26 and MCF-7). The formulation of plasmid DNA with the nanoparticles corresponds to the complex forming capacity and in-vitro/in-vivo transfection efficiency was studied via gel electrophoresis and transfection methods, respectively. Results showed the modified chitosan gold nanoparticles were well-dispersed and spherical in shape with average size around 10∼12 nm in triple distilled water at pH 7.4, and showed relatively no cytotoxicity at low concentration. Addition of plasmid DNA on the aqueous solution of the nanoparticles markedly reduced surface potential (50.0∼66.6%) as well as resulted in a 13.33% increase in hydrodynamic diameters of the formulated nanoparticles. Transfection efficiency of Nac-6-Au/DNA was dependent on cell type, and higher β-galactosidase activity was observed on MCF-7 breast cancer cell. Typically, this activity was 5 times higher in 4.5 mg/ml nanoparticles concentration than that achieved by the nanoparticles of other concentrations (and/or control). However, this activity was lower in in-vitro and dramatically higher in in-vivo than that of commercially available transfection kit (Lipofectin (registered) ) and DNA. From these results, it can be expected to develop alternative new vectors for gene delivery

  3. Hydrophobically modified chitosan/gold nanoparticles for DNA delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattarai, Shanta Raj; Remant Bahadur, K.C.; Aryal, Santosh [Chonbuk National University, Department of Bionanosystem Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Bhattarai, Narayan [University of Washington, Department of Materials Science and Engineering (United States); Kim, Sun Young [Chonbuk National University, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Ho Keun [Chonbuk National University, Department of Biochemistry, School of Dentisty (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Pyoung Han [Chonbuk National University, Department of Pediatrics, School of Medicine (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Yong [Chonbuk National University, Department of Textile Engineering (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: khy@moak.chonbuk.ac.kr

    2008-01-15

    Present study dealt an application of modified chitosan gold nanoparticles (Nac-6-Au) for the immobilization of necked plasmid DNA. Gold nanoparticles stabilized with N-acylated chitosan were prepared by graft-onto approach. The stabilized gold nanoparticles were characterized by different physico-chemical techniques such as UV-vis, TEM, ELS and DLS. MTT assay was used for in vitro cytotoxicity of the nanoparticles into three different cell lines (NIH 3T3, CT-26 and MCF-7). The formulation of plasmid DNA with the nanoparticles corresponds to the complex forming capacity and in-vitro/in-vivo transfection efficiency was studied via gel electrophoresis and transfection methods, respectively. Results showed the modified chitosan gold nanoparticles were well-dispersed and spherical in shape with average size around 10{approx}12 nm in triple distilled water at pH 7.4, and showed relatively no cytotoxicity at low concentration. Addition of plasmid DNA on the aqueous solution of the nanoparticles markedly reduced surface potential (50.0{approx}66.6%) as well as resulted in a 13.33% increase in hydrodynamic diameters of the formulated nanoparticles. Transfection efficiency of Nac-6-Au/DNA was dependent on cell type, and higher {beta}-galactosidase activity was observed on MCF-7 breast cancer cell. Typically, this activity was 5 times higher in 4.5 mg/ml nanoparticles concentration than that achieved by the nanoparticles of other concentrations (and/or control). However, this activity was lower in in-vitro and dramatically higher in in-vivo than that of commercially available transfection kit (Lipofectin (registered) ) and DNA. From these results, it can be expected to develop alternative new vectors for gene delivery.

  4. Microbial mediated preparation, characterization and optimization of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabadi, Hamed; Honary, Soheila; Ebrahimi, Pouneh; Mohammadi, Milad Ali; Alizadeh, Ahad; Naghibi, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    The need for eco-friendly and cost effective methods for nanoparticles synthesis is developing interest in biological approaches which are free from the use of toxic chemicals as byproducts. This study aimed to biosynthesize and optimize the size of gold nanoparticles which produced by biotechnological method using Penicillium crustosum isolated from soil. Initially, Penicillium crustosum was grown in fluid czapek dox broth on shaker at 28 °C and 200 rpm for ten days and then the supernatant was separated from the mycelia to convert AuCl₄ solution into gold nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles in the optimum conditions were formed with fairly well-defined dimensions and good monodispersity. The characterizations were done by using different methods (UV-Visible Spectroscopy, Fluorescence, FT-IR, AFM (Atomic Force Microscopy) and DLS (Dynamic Light Scattering). The bioconversion was optimized by Box-Behnken experimental design. The results show that the effective factors in this process were concentration of AuCl₄, pH of medium and temperature of shaker incubator. The R(2) value was calculated to be 0.9999 indicating the accuracy and ability of the polynomial model. It can be concluded that the use of multivariate analysis facilitated to find out the optimum conditions for the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles induced by Penicillium crustosum in a time and cost effective process. The current approach suggested that rapid synthesis of gold nanoparticles would be suitable for developing a biological process for mass scale production of formulations.

  5. Green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using gallic acid: catalytic activity and conversion yield toward the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jisu [Inje University, College of Pharmacy (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Song-Hyun; Cho, Seonho [Seoul National University, Department of Naval Architecture and Ocean Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Park, Youmie, E-mail: youmiep@inje.ac.kr [Inje University, College of Pharmacy (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    In the present report, gallic acid was used as both a reducing and stabilizing agent to synthesize gold and silver nanoparticles. The synthesized gold and silver nanoparticles exhibited characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands at 536 and 392 nm, respectively. Nanoparticles that were approximately spherical in shape were observed in high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy images. The hydrodynamic radius was determined to be 54.4 nm for gold nanoparticles and 33.7 nm for silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium. X-ray diffraction analyses confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles possessed a face-centered cubic structure. FT-IR spectra demonstrated that the carboxylic acid functional groups of gallic acid contributed to the electrostatic binding onto the surface of the nanoparticles. Zeta potential values of −41.98 mV for the gold nanoparticles and −53.47 mV for the silver nanoparticles indicated that the synthesized nanoparticles possess excellent stability. On-the-shelf stability for 4 weeks also confirmed that the synthesized nanoparticles were quite stable without significant changes in their UV–visible spectra. The synthesized nanoparticles exhibited catalytic activity toward the reduction reaction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of sodium borohydride. The rate constant of the silver nanoparticles was higher than that of the gold nanoparticles in the catalytic reaction. Furthermore, the conversion yield (%) of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol was determined using reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography with UV detection at 254 nm. The silver nanoparticles exhibited an excellent conversion yield (96.7–99.9 %), suggesting that the synthesized silver nanoparticles are highly efficient catalysts for the 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction.

  6. Laser-induced agglomeration of gold nanoparticles dispersed in a liquid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkov, A.A.; Shcherbina, M.E. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, P.G., E-mail: qzzzma@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kirichenko, N.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov Street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    Highlights: • Pulsed laser irradiation of dense gold nanoparticles colloidal solution can result in their agglomeration. • Gas bubbles in-phase pulsation induced by laser radiation accounts for nanoparticles agglomeration. • Time evolution of the size distribution function proceeds in activation mode. • The electrostatic-like model of nanoparticles agglomeration is in good correspondence with the experimental data. - Abstract: Dynamics of gold nanoparticles (NPs) ensemble in dense aqueous solution under exposure to picosecond laser radiation is studied both experimentally and theoretically. Properties of NPs are examined by means of transmission electron microscopy, optical spectroscopy, and size-measuring disk centrifuge. Theoretical investigation of NPs ensemble behavior is based on the analytical model taking into account collisions and agglomeration of particles. It is shown that in case of dense NPs colloidal solutions (above 10{sup 14} particles per milliliter) the process of laser fragmentation typical for nanosecond laser exposure turns into laser-induced agglomeration which leads to formation of the particles with larger sizes. It is shown that there is a critical concentration of NPs: at higher concentrations agglomeration rate increases tremendously. The results of mathematical simulation are in compliance with experimental data.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide sensing using ultrathin platinum-coated gold nanoparticles with core@shell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongxin; Lu, Qiufang; Wu, Shengnan; Wang, Lun; Shi, Xianming

    2013-03-15

    Ultrathin platinum-coated gold (Pt@Au) nanoparticles with core@shell structure have been developed by under-potential deposition (UPD) redox replacement technique. A single UPD Cu replacement with Pt(2+) produced a uniform Pt monolayer on the surface of gold nanoparticles, which are immobilized on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface based on electrostatic interaction. The ultrathin Pt@Au nanoparticles were confirmed by cyclic voltammetry and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Voltammetry and amperometric methodologies were used to evaluate the electrocatalytic activity of the Pt@Au nanoparticles modified electrode towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide under the physiological condition. The present results show that ultrathin Pt coating greatly enhances the electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide, which can be utilized to fabricate the hydrogen peroxide sensor. Chronoamperometric experiments showed that at an applied potential of 0.08 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), the current reduction of hydrogen peroxide was linear to its concentration in the range of 1-450 μΜ, and the detection limit was found to be 0.18 μM (signal-to-noise ratio, S/N=3). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Femtosecond laser generated gold nanoparticles and their plasmonic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Rupali; Navas, M. P.; Soni, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    The pulsed laser ablation in liquid medium is now commonly used to generate stable colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) in absence of any chemical additives or stabilizer with diverse applications. In this paper, we report generation of gold NPs (Au NPs) by ultra-short laser pulses. Femtosecond (fs) laser radiation (λ = 800 nm) has been used to ablate a gold target in pure de-ionized water to produce gold colloids with smallsize distribution. The average size of the particles can be further controlled by subjecting to laser-induced post-irradiation providing a versatile physical method of size-selected gold nanoparticles. The optical extinction and morphological dimensions were investigated with UV-Vis spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy measurements, respectively. Finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is employed to calculate localized surface plasmon (LSPR) wavelength and the near-field generated by Au NPs and their hybrids.

  9. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Dispersed in Palm Oil Using Laser Ablation Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Sadrolhosseini

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles have more applications in biology, medicine, and industry. In this study, gold nanoparticles were synthesized in pure palm oil using laser ablation technique. Gold nanoparticles were fabricated in different temperature, and the effect of the temperature on the particle size was investigated. Consequently, the tail of the carbonyl band of fatty acids was capped gold nanoparticles, and spherically shaped gold nanoparticles with size range of 8.92 to 19.73 nm were formed in palm oil. The temperature caused the agglomeration of nanoparticles while the particle size increased with an increase in the temperature.

  10. Morphology of gold nanoparticles synthesized by filamentous cyanobacteria from gold(I)-thiosulfate and gold(III)--chloride complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lengke, Maggy F; Fleet, Michael E; Southam, Gordon

    2006-03-14

    Plectonema boryanum UTEX 485, a filamentous cyanobacterium, has been reacted with aqueous Au(S(2)O(3))(2)(3)(-) and AuCl(4)(-) solutions ( approximately 400-550 mg/L Au) at 25-100 degrees C for up to 1 month and at 200 degrees C for 1 day. The interaction of cyanobacteria with aqueous Au(S(2)O(3))(2)(3)(-) promoted the precipitation of cubic (100) gold nanoparticles (gold sulfide within cells and encrusted on the cyanobacteria, whereas reaction with AuCl(4)(-) resulted in the precipitation of octahedral (111) gold platelets ( approximately 1-10 microm) in solutions and nanoparticles of gold (SIMS on (111) faces of the octahedral platelets were predominantly Cl and CN, with smaller amounts of C(2)H and CNO.

  11. Nanoscale sensor design via in situ labeling of gold nanoparticles onto protein scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afrasiabi, Zahra; Shukla, Ravi; Chanda, Nripen; Bhaskaran, Sharanya; Upendran, Anandhi; Zambre, Ajit; Katti, Kattesh V; Kannan, Raghuraman

    2010-02-01

    A one-step method for synthesis of bioconjugated gold nanoparticles is reported. A non-toxic and biocompatible phosphorus based reducing agent was used for reduction of gold (III) and formation of nanoparticles. Physicochemical properties of protein-A stabilized gold nanoparticls were investigated. Result of immunoassay experiments confirmed the potential of the synthesized anti-protein-A conjugated gold nanoparticles for use as a simple and inexpensive test for quantitative screening of protein-A samples.

  12. Biochemical synthesis of gold and zinc nanoparticles in reverse micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorova, E. M.

    2010-04-01

    Gold and zinc nanoparticles were obtained in AOT reverse micelles in isooctane by reduction of the corresponding metal ions by the natural pigment quercetin (the biochemical synthesis technique). Gold and zinc ions were introduced into the micellar solution of quercetin in the form of aqueous solutions, HAuCl4 and [Zn(NH3)4]SO4, to the water to AOT molar ratios 1-3 and 3-4, respectively. The process of nanoparticle formation was investigated by spectrophotometry. Nanoparticle size and shape were determined by transmission electron microscopy. The data obtained allow to conclude that there are two steps in metal ion-quercetin interaction: (1) complex formation, and (2) complex dissociation with subsequent formation of nanoparticles and a second product, presumably oxidized quercetin. Gold nanoparticles were found to be of various shapes (spheres, hexahedrons, triangles, and cylinders) and sizes, mainly in the 10-20 nm range; zinc nanoparticles are chiefly spherical and ˜5 nm in size. In both cases, the nanoparticles are stable in the air in micellar solution over long periods of time (from a several months to a several years).

  13. Formation of gold nanoparticles via a thiol functionalized polyoxometalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hegde, Shweta; Joshi, Satyawati [Department of Chemistry, Pune University, Pune 411 007 (India); Mukherjee, Tulsi [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kapoor, Sudhir, E-mail: sudhirk@barc.gov.in [Radiation and Photochemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2013-05-01

    A useful method for the synthesis of Au nanoparticles is presented. The synthesis of Au nanoparticles with various morphologies was carried out at room temperature using gamma radiolysis and NaBH{sub 4} reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} in N,N′-dimethylformamide:water solutions containing polyoxometalate (POM). The results demonstrated that by controlling the rate of reduction and ratio of DMF and water, metal particle size and shape can be further tailored. It is shown that gold nanoparticles with controllable size can be synthesized. In principle, the general finding of this work can be extended to other transition/noble metal nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: TEM image of [POM(SH{sub 2})]{sup 4−} capped gold nanoparticles in 1:1 ratio of DMF/water. Highlights: ► Synthesis of gold nanoparticles using radiolytic method ► Changes in the shapes of Au nanoparticles by changing the composition of the solvent ► The role of reductant in the formation of different shapes.

  14. Gold nanoparticles for tumour detection and treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Petersen, W.; Petersen, Wilhelmina; Jose, J.; Jose, J.; van Es, P.; van Es, Peter; Lenferink, Aufrid T.M.; Poot, Andreas A.; Terstappen, Leonardus Wendelinus Mathias Marie; van Leeuwen, Ton; Manohar, Srirang; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    The use of nanoparticles in biomedical applications is emerging rapidly. Recent developments have led to numerous studies of noble metal nanoparticles, down to the level of single molecule detection in living cells. The application of noble metal nanoparticles in diagnostics and treatment of early

  15. Radiation-induced synthesis of gold, iron-oxide composite nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seino, Satoshi; Yamamoto, Takao; Nakagawa, Takashi; Kinoshita, Takuya; Kojima, Takao; Taniguchi, Ryoichi; Okuda, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    Composite nanoparticles consisting of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles were synthesized using gamma-rays or electron beam. Ionizing irradiation induces the generation of reducing species inside the aqueous solution, and gold ions are reduced to form metallic Au nanoparticles. The size of Au nanoparticles depended on the dose rate and the concentration of support iron oxide. The gold nanoparticles on iron oxide nanoparticles selectively adsorb biomolecules via Au-S bonding. By using magnetic property of the support iron oxide nanoparticles, the composite nanoparticles are expected as a new type of magnetic nanocarrier for biomedical applications. (author)

  16. Flower-shaped gold nanoparticles: Preparation, characterization, and electro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islam M. Al-Akraa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The modification of a glassy carbon electrode with gold nanoparticles was pursued, characterized, and examined for electrocatalytic applications. The fabrication process of this electrode involved assembling the gold nanoparticles atop of amino group grafted glassy carbon electrode. The scanning electron microscopy indicated the deposition of gold nanoparticles in flower-shaped nanostructures with an average particle size of ca. 150 nm. Interestingly, the electrode exhibited outstanding enhancement in the electrocatalytic activity toward the oxygen evolution reaction, which reflected from the large negative shift (ca. 0.8 V in its onset potential, in comparison with that observed at the bulk unmodified glassy carbon and gold electrodes. Alternatively, the Tafel plot of the modified electrode revealed a significant increase (∼one order of magnitude in the apparent exchange current density of the oxygen evolution reaction upon the modification, which infers a faster charge transfer. Kinetically, gold nanoparticles are believed to facilitate a favorable adsorption of OH− (fundamental step in oxygen evolution reaction, which allows the charge transfer at reasonably lower anodic polarizations.

  17. Preparation of 2 nm gold nanoparticles for in vitro and in vivo applications

    OpenAIRE

    Moyano, Daniel F.; Duncan, Bradley; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been a versatile tool in recent years for the exploration of biological systems. However, challenges with purification and adequate surface coverage limit the biocompatibility of gold nanoparticles. Here, we describe a detailed procedure for the synthesis, purification, and functionalization of biologically compatible gold nanoparticles for in vitro and in vivo studies.

  18. Photoinduced energy and charge transfer in layered porphyrin-gold nanoparticle thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotiaho, Anne; Lahtinen, Riikka; Lehtivuori, Heli; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Lemmetyinen, Helge

    2008-01-01

    In thin films of porphyrin (H2P) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), photoexcitation of porphyrins leads to energy and charge transfer to the gold nanoparticles. Alternating layers of porphyrins and octanethiol protected gold nanoparticles (dcore ∼3 nm) were deposited on solid substrates via the

  19. Properties of TiO2 films with gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliev, S A; Nikolaev, N E; Trofimov, N S; Chekhlova, T K

    2016-01-01

    The physicochemical and optical properties of titanium dioxide films, made by gel technology and doped with gold nanoparticles, were investigated. The structures of the titanium dioxide films synthesized by different techniques have been compared. Using methods of high-resolution microscopy and the results of X-ray diffraction analysis it was shown, that the developed gel technology allows getting almost 100% nanostructured anatase phase. Titanium dioxide was modified by nanoparticles of gold with different concentration and transmittance spectra of the samples were studied. (paper)

  20. Gold nanoparticles in breast cancer treatment: Promise and potential pitfalls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jihyoun; Chatterjee, Dev Kumar; Lee, Min Hyuk; Krishnan, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Despite remarkable achievements in the treatment of breast cancer, some obstacles still remain. Gold nanoparticles may prove valuable in addressing these problems owing to their unique characteristics, including their enhanced permeability and retention in tumor tissue, their light absorbance and surface plasmon resonance in near-infrared light, their interaction with radiation to generate secondary electrons, and their ability to be conjugated with drugs or other agents. Herein, we discuss some basic concepts of gold nanoparticles, and early results from studies regarding their use in breast cancer, including toxicity and side effects. We also discuss these particles’ potential clinical applications. PMID:24556077

  1. Gold nanoparticle-based microfluidic sensor for mercury detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2011-01-01

    The contamination of natural resources by human activity can have severe socio-economical impacts. Conventional methods of environmental analysis can be significantly improved by the development of portable microscale technologies for remote/field sensing. A gold nanoparticle-based lab-on-a-chip ......-on-a-chip device was developed for the rapid, in-field detection and quantification of mercury in aquatic environments. Rhodamine 6G functionalized gold nanoparticles allowed the on-chip fluorescence detection of mercury in aqueous samples with a limit of detection of 7 nM....

  2. Authentication of gold nanoparticle encoded pharmaceutical tablets using polarimetric signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnicer, Artur; Arteaga, Oriol; Suñé-Negre, Josep M; Javidi, Bahram

    2016-10-01

    The counterfeiting of pharmaceutical products represents concerns for both industry and the safety of the general public. Falsification produces losses to companies and poses health risks for patients. In order to detect fake pharmaceutical tablets, we propose producing film-coated tablets with gold nanoparticle encoding. These coated tablets contain unique polarimetric signatures. We present experiments to show that ellipsometric optical techniques, in combination with machine learning algorithms, can be used to distinguish genuine and fake samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report using gold nanoparticles encoded with optical polarimetric classifiers to prevent the counterfeiting of pharmaceutical products.

  3. Toxicological risk assessment of elemental gold following oral exposure to sheets and nanoparticles – A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadrup, Niels; Sharma, Anoop Kumar; Poulsen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    . In addition, gold released from dental restorations has been reported to increase the risk of developing gold hypersensitivity. Regarding genotoxicity, in vitro studies indicate that gold nanoparticles induce DNA damage in mammalian cells. In vivo, gold nanoparticles induce genotoxic effects in Drosophila...

  4. Recent progress in theranostic applications of hybrid gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharatape, Alireza; Salehi, Roya

    2017-09-29

    A significant area of research is theranostic applications of nanoparticles, which involves efforts to improve delivery and reduce side effects. Accordingly, the introduction of a safe, effective, and, most importantly, renewable strategy to target, deliver and image disease cells is important. This state-of-the-art review focuses on studies done from 2013 to 2016 regarding the development of hybrid gold nanoparticles as theranostic agents in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer and infectious disease. Several syntheses (chemical and green) methods of gold nanoparticles and their applications in imaging, targeting, and delivery are reviewed; their photothermal efficiency is discussed as is the toxicity of gold nanoparticles. Owing to the unique characterizations of hybrid gold nanoparticles and their potential to be developed as multifunctional, we predict they will present an undeniable role in clinical studies and provide treatment platforms for various diseases. Thus, their clearance and interactions with extra- and intra-cellular molecules need to be considered in future projects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. GOLD NANOPARTICLES ENCAPSULATED IN A POLYMERIC MATRIX OF SODIUM ALGINATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Lelia POP

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Plasmonic nanoparticles can be used as building blocks for the design of multifunctional systems based on polymeric capsules. The use of functionalised particles in therapeutics and imaging and understanding their effect on the cell functions are among the current challenges in nanobiotechnology and nanomedicine. The aim of the study was to manufacture and characterize polymeric microstructures by encapsulating plasmonic gold nanoparticles in biocompatible matrix of sodium alginate. The gold nanoparticles were obtained by reduction of tetracluoroauric acid with sodium citrate. To characterize the microcapsules, UV-Vis and FTIR spectroscopy, optical and confocal microscopy experiments were performed. In vitro cytotoxicity tests on HFL-1 cells were also performed. The capsules have spherical shape and 120 μm diameter. The presence of encapsulated gold nanoparticles is also shown by confocal microscopy. In vitro tests show that the microcapsules are not cytotoxic upon 24 h of cells exposure to microcapsules concentrations ranging from 2.5 to 25 capsules per cell. The obtained microcapsules of sodium alginate loaded with plasmonic gold nanoparticles could potentially be considered as release systems for biologically relevant molecules.

  6. Carbon nanotubes/laser ablation gold nanoparticles composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lascialfari, Luisa; Marsili, Paolo; Caporali, Stefano; Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio; Margheri, Giancarlo; Serafini, Andrea; Brandi, Alberto; Giorgetti, Emilia; Cicchi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The production of nanohybrids formed by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanoparticles, produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids process, is described. The use of linkers, obtained by transformation of pyrene-1-butanol, is mandatory to generate an efficient and stable interaction between the two components. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed the obtainment of the efficient coverage of the MWCNTs by nanoparticles composed by metal gold and, partially, by oxides. - Highlights: • Laser ablation is a used for the production of gold nanoparticle colloids • An efficient decoration of carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles is obtained through the use of a linker • This method allows an efficient and tunable preparation of carbon nanotube hybrids

  7. Carbon nanotubes/laser ablation gold nanoparticles composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lascialfari, Luisa [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Marsili, Paolo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Caporali, Stefano [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy); Muniz-Miranda, Maurizio [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Margheri, Giancarlo [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Serafini, Andrea; Brandi, Alberto [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Giorgetti, Emilia, E-mail: emilia.giorgetti@fi.isc.cnr.it [Istituto dei Sistemi Complessi, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, via Madonna del Piano 10, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Cicchi, Stefano, E-mail: stefano.cicchi@unifi.it [Department of Chemistry, Università di Firenze, Via della Lastruccia 3-13, Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze 50019 (Italy); Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM), Via Giusti 9, Firenze 50123 (Italy)

    2014-10-31

    The production of nanohybrids formed by oxidized multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and nanoparticles, produced by pulsed laser ablation in liquids process, is described. The use of linkers, obtained by transformation of pyrene-1-butanol, is mandatory to generate an efficient and stable interaction between the two components. Transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis showed the obtainment of the efficient coverage of the MWCNTs by nanoparticles composed by metal gold and, partially, by oxides. - Highlights: • Laser ablation is a used for the production of gold nanoparticle colloids • An efficient decoration of carbon nanotubes with nanoparticles is obtained through the use of a linker • This method allows an efficient and tunable preparation of carbon nanotube hybrids.

  8. Diazonium-derived aryl films on gold nanoparticles: evidence for a carbon-gold covalent bond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurentius, Lars; Stoyanov, Stanislav R; Gusarov, Sergey; Kovalenko, Andriy; Du, Rongbing; Lopinski, Gregory P; McDermott, Mark T

    2011-05-24

    Tailoring the surface chemistry of metallic nanoparticles is generally a key step for their use in a wide range of applications. There are few examples of organic films covalently bound to metal nanoparticles. We demonstrate here that aryl films are formed on gold nanoparticles from the spontaneous reduction of diazonium salts. The structure and the bonding of the film is probed with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Extinction spectroscopy and SERS show that a nitrobenzene film forms on gold nanoparticles from the corresponding diazonium salt. Comparison of the SERS spectrum with spectra computed from density functional theory models reveals a band characteristic of a Au-C stretch. The observation of this stretch is direct evidence of a covalent bond. A similar band is observed in high-resolution electron energy loss spectra of nitrobenzene layers on planar gold. The bonding of these types of films through a covalent interaction on gold is consistent with their enhanced stability observed in other studies. These findings provide motivation for the use of diazonium-derived films on gold and other metals in applications where high stability and/or strong adsorbate-substrate coupling are required.

  9. Encapsulation of Gold Nanoparticles in a DNA Origami Cage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhao; Jacovetty, Erica L.; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2011-01-21

    A critical challenge in nanoparticle (NP) surface functionalization is to label the NP surface with a single copy of a functional group or to display multiple, unique molecules on the NP surface with control of the orientation and intermolecular distance. This challenge was addressed with the construction of a spatially addressable, self-assembling DNA origami nanocage that encapsulates gold nanoparticles and interrupts its surface symmetry

  10. Photoluminescence enhancement of dye-doped nanoparticles by surface plasmon resonance effects of gold colloidal nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Viet Ha; Nghiem, Thi Ha Lien; Tran, Hong Nhung; Fort, Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    Due to the energy transfer from surface plasmons, the fluorescence of fluorophores near metallic nanostructures can be enhanced. This effect has been intensively studied recently for biosensor applications. This work reports on the luminescence enhancement of 100 nm Cy3 dye-doped polystyrene nanoparticles by energy transfer from surface plasmons of gold colloidal nanoparticles with sizes of 20 and 100 nm. Optimal luminescence enhancement of the fluorophores has been observed in the mixture with 20 nm gold nanoparticles. This can be attributed to the resonance energy transfer from gold nanoparticles to the fluorophore beads. The interaction between the fluorophores and gold particles is attributed to far-field interaction

  11. Peptide-functionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticle for gold mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Wei-Zheng; Cetinel, Sibel; Sharma, Kumakshi; Borujeny, Elham Rafie; Montemagno, Carlo, E-mail: montemag@ualberta.ca [Ingenuity Lab, 1-070C (Canada)

    2017-02-15

    Here, we present our work on preparing a novel nanomaterial composed of inorganic binding peptides and magnetic nanoparticles for inorganic mining. Two previously selected and well-characterized gold-binding peptides from cell surface display, AuBP1 and AuBP2, were exploited. This nanomaterial (AuBP-MNP) was designed to fulfill the following two significant functions: the surface conjugated gold-binding peptide will recognize and selectively bind to gold, while the magnetic nano-sized core will respond and migrate according to the applied external magnetic field. This will allow the smart nanomaterial to mine an individual material (gold) from a pool of mixture, without excessive solvent extraction, filtration, and concentration steps. The working efficiency of AuBP-MNP was determined by showing a dramatic reduction of gold nanoparticle colloid concentration, monitored by spectroscopy. The binding kinetics of AuBP-MNP onto the gold surface was determined using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) spectroscopy, which exhibits around 100 times higher binding kinetics than peptides alone. The binding capacity of AuBP-MNP was demonstrated by a bench-top mining test with gold microparticles.

  12. Biosynthesis of Gold Nanoparticles (Green-gold) Using Leaf Extract of Terminalia Catappa

    OpenAIRE

    Ankamwar, Balaprasad

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of eco-friendly nanoparticles is evergreen branch of nanoscience for biomedical application. Low cost of synthesis and non toxicity are main features make it more attractive potential option for biomedical field and elsewhere. Here, we report the synthesis of gold nanoparticles in aqueous medium using Terminalia catappa (Almond) leaf extract as the reducing and stabilizing agent. On treating chloroauric acid solutions with Terminalia catappa (TC) leaf extract rapid reduction of ...

  13. Reversible Clustering of Gold Nanoparticles under Confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Claes, Nathalie; Solís, Diego M; Taboada, Jose M; Bals, Sara; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Grzelczak, Marek

    2018-03-12

    A limiting factor of solvent-induced nanoparticle self-assembly is the need for constant sample dilution in assembly/disassembly cycles. Changes in the nanoparticle concentration alter the kinetics of the subsequent assembly process, limiting optical signal recovery. Herein, we show that upon confining hydrophobic nanoparticles in permeable silica nanocapsules, the number of nanoparticles participating in cyclic aggregation remains constant despite bulk changes in solution, leading to highly reproducible plasmon band shifts at different solvent compositions. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles with controllable size using seed enlargement by γCo-60-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Quoc Hien; Dang Van Phu; Bui Duy Du

    2013-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles with the size in the range 8-20 nm were synthesized by γ-irradiation of Au 3+ solution containing polyvinyl pyrrolidone as stabilizer. The size of gold nanoparticles was increasingly further regulated from 20 up to about 60 nm using seed enlargement method. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The colloidal gold nanoparticles with the size from 8 to 60 nm have a plasmon absorption band with maximum wavelength in the range 517.5-543.0 nm. The colloidal gold nanoparticles solutions stored at room temperature were stable for months. (author)

  15. Fungus-mediated synthesis of gold nanoparticles: a novel biological approach to nanoparticle synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honary, Soheyla; Gharaei-Fathabad, Eshrat; Barabadi, Hamed; Naghibi, Farzaneh

    2013-02-01

    The biological effects of nanoparticles and their uses as molecular probes are research areas of growing interest. The present study demonstrates an eco-friendly biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The pure colonies of penicillium aurantiogriseum, penicillium citrinum, and penicillium waksmanii were cultured in fluid czapek dox broth. Then, their supernatants were examined for the ability to produce gold nanoparticles. In this step, 1 mM solution of AuCl added to the reaction matrixes separately. The reactions were performed in a dark environment at 28 degrees C. After 24 hours, it was observed that the color of the solutions turned to dark purple from light yellow. Synthesized gold nanoparticles were characterized by using UV-Visible Spectroscopy, Nano Zeta Sizer, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy. The results showed that the gold nanoparticles were formed fairly uniform with spherical shape with the Z-average diameter of 153.3 nm, 172 nm and 160.1 nm for penicillium aurantiogriseum, penicillium citrinum, and penicillium waksmanii, respectively. The Fourier transformed infrared spectra revealed the presence of different functional groups to gold nanoparticles which were present in the fungal extract. The current approach suggests that the rapid synthesis of nanoparticles would be proper for developing a biological process for mass scale production.

  16. Comparative study of synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    due to its distinctive properties like good conductivity, chem- ical stability and catalytic and antibacterial activities ... The cytotoxic and antioxidant activity exhibited by the leaves and the anti-hyperglycemic and antilipidemic ..... ver and gold nanoparticles using Morinda tinctoria fruit and. Couroupita guianensis flower extract, ...

  17. The bioaccumulation and toxicity induced by gold nanoparticles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mohamed Anwar PC

    2012-05-15

    May 15, 2012 ... tissues, suggesting toxic effects may be induced by smaller GNPs. These conclusions are further supported by histological observations that suggest toxic effects are induced by smaller GNPs deposited in tissue. Key words: Gold nanoparticles, size, ultraviolet-visible (UV-visible), blood, rats, spectroscopy, ...

  18. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research,. Bangalore 560 064. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles. †. SHREEDHAR BHAT a and UDAY MAITRA*. Department of Organic Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 a. Current address: ISM, University of Bordeaux, ...

  19. Monomer adsorption of indocyanine green to gold nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerrini, Luca; Hartsuiker, Liesbeth; Manohar, Srirang; Otto, Cornelis

    2011-01-01

    NIR-dye encoded gold nanoparticles (GNP) are rapidly emerging as contrast agents in many bio-imaging/sensing applications. The coding process is usually carried out without control or a clear understanding of the metal–liquid interface properties which, in contrast, are critical in determining the

  20. Reaction parameters for controlled sonosynthesis of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez M, A. L. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Quimica, Paseo Colon esq. Paseo Tollocan s/n, 50120 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Cabrera L, L. I. [UNAM-UAEM, Centro Conjunto de Investigacion en Quimica Sustentable, Km 14.5 Carretera Toluca-Atlacomulco, 50200 San Cayetano-Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles by sonochemical technique has been previously performed with excellent results. The synthesis has been carried out in the presence of citric acid, a strong reducing agent, which allows the nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles, at the same time that controls particle size. In this work we report the use of sodium tartrate as a mild reducing agent that allows a better understanding of the effect of the reaction parameters during gold nanoparticle synthesis. A conventional sonication bath (37 k Hz) was used for the sonochemical synthesis. This work focuses on the reaction temperature effect and the effect of sodium tartrate concentration. It was confirmed that particle size, and particle morphology is dependent of these two reaction parameters. Equally, colloidal stabilization was related to reaction temperature and sodium tartrate concentration. It was also determined that Ostwald ripening takes place during sonochemical reaction under our conditions, allowing to understand the mechanism that takes place during synthesis. Gold nanoparticles with main particle size of 17 nm were achieved by this method. Characterization techniques used: Fourier transform infrared spectra (Ftir), X-ray diffraction and Atomic Force Microscope was used in order to determine particle size of the synthetic product of reaction M10c by tapping mode. (Author)

  1. Reaction parameters for controlled sonosynthesis of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez M, A. L.; Cabrera L, L. I.

    2015-01-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles by sonochemical technique has been previously performed with excellent results. The synthesis has been carried out in the presence of citric acid, a strong reducing agent, which allows the nucleation and growth of gold nanoparticles, at the same time that controls particle size. In this work we report the use of sodium tartrate as a mild reducing agent that allows a better understanding of the effect of the reaction parameters during gold nanoparticle synthesis. A conventional sonication bath (37 k Hz) was used for the sonochemical synthesis. This work focuses on the reaction temperature effect and the effect of sodium tartrate concentration. It was confirmed that particle size, and particle morphology is dependent of these two reaction parameters. Equally, colloidal stabilization was related to reaction temperature and sodium tartrate concentration. It was also determined that Ostwald ripening takes place during sonochemical reaction under our conditions, allowing to understand the mechanism that takes place during synthesis. Gold nanoparticles with main particle size of 17 nm were achieved by this method. Characterization techniques used: Fourier transform infrared spectra (Ftir), X-ray diffraction and Atomic Force Microscope was used in order to determine particle size of the synthetic product of reaction M10c by tapping mode. (Author)

  2. Electrospun fibre colorimetric probe based on gold nanoparticles for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1Department of Chemistry, Rhodes University, PO Box 94, Grahamstown 6140, South Africa. ABSTRACT. An on-site colorimetric probe, based on gold nanoparticles incorporated into electrospun polystyrene nanofibres, for the detection of oestrogenic compounds, as represented by 17β-estradiol, in dairy effluents is ...

  3. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    *For correspondence. Also at the Chemical Biology Unit,. Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research,. Bangalore 560 064. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles. †. SHREEDHAR BHAT a and UDAY MAITRA*. Department of Organic Chemistry, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore ...

  4. Oligothia dendrimers for the formation of gold nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    d'Aleo, A.; Williams, R.M.; Osswald, F.; Edamana, P.; Hahn, U.; van Heyst, J.; Tichelaar, F.D.; Voegtle, F.; De Cola, L.

    2004-01-01

    The synthesis and characterization of oligothia dendrimers and their use for the formation of gold nanoparticles is described. The role played by these dendrimers in controlling the stability and size of the particles is discussed. It is shown that the generation of the dendrimers, as well as the

  5. The effects of gold nanoparticles size and concentration on viscosity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to investigate viscosity in relation with the temperature, flow activation energy and dielectric properties for 10, 20 and 50 nm gold nanoparticles size (GNPs) in addition to absorption and fluorescence spectra at different concentrations (0.2 × 10-3 to 1 × 10-2%) in an attempt to cover and understand ...

  6. The bioaccumulation and toxicity induced by gold nanoparticles in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is essential to characterize the bioaccumulation and toxicity of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in blood prior to using them in drug delivery, diagnostics, and treatment. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the blood absorbance spectra after intraperitoneal administration of 50 μl of 10, 20, and 50 nm GNPs in rat for ...

  7. Gold nanoparticle-based microfluidic sensor for mercury detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    2011-01-01

    The contamination of natural resources by human activity can have severe socio-economical impacts. Conventional methods of environmental analysis can be significantly improved by the development of portable microscale technologies for remote/field sensing. A gold nanoparticle-based lab-on-a-chip ...

  8. Electroless deposition of Gold-Platinum Core@ Shell Nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    platinum nanoparticlesz (Au@PtNPs) with core@shell structure fabricated on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) by electroless depositionmethod. Initially, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were deposited on GCE by reducing HAuCl4 in the presence of ...

  9. Comparative study of synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in vitro anticancer efficacy of synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles using leaves extract of Bauhinia tomen- tosa Linn. ... AuNPs and aqueous extract of leaves confirmed by MTT assay exhibited IC50 concentrations of 28.125, 46.875 and. 50 μg ml ... applications such as the treatment of cancer, gene therapy and drug ...

  10. A Novel Biological Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticle by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To demonstrate eco-friendly biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Enterobacteriaceae. Methods: Pure colonies of nine different bacteria from the Enterobacteriaceae family were separated from water and cultured in Luria Bertani broth medium. Their respective supernatants were examined for ability to produce ...

  11. Comparative study of synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nanotechnology is an emerging field in science and technology, which can be applied to synthesize new materials at the nanoscale level. The present investigation aimed at comparing the synthesis, characterization andin vitro anticancer efficacy of synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles using leaves extract of Bauhinia ...

  12. Ligand adsorption and exchange on pegylated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previous researchers proposed that thiolated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG-SH) adopts a “mushroom-like” conformation on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in water. However, information regarding the size and permeability of the PEG-SH mushroom caps and surface area passivated by the PEG-SH mushroom stems are ...

  13. Synthesis of multifunctional gold nanoparticles for image guided therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurent, Gautier

    2014-01-01

    The original properties of nanoparticles make them extremely attractive in the field of oncology. In fast, gold nanoparticles coated by macrocyclic ligands allow imaging and therapy with only one object. Therefore, multifunctional platforms are very promising for image-guided therapy, winch constitutes an important step towards personalization of treatment. This consists of stimulating the therapeutic activity of the nanoparticles when their accumulation is high within the tumor zone and low in healthy tissues. A higher selectivity of the treatment is therefore expected. Biodistribution study by SPECT/CT has shown free circulation, renal elimination and a moderate retention by the liver of the nanoparticles. However, this retention is not due to the opsonisation processes. The MRI study of rats' brain carrying a gliosarcoma has shown an accumulation of nanoparticles Au-at-FADOTAGA-Gd in the tumor. Moreover, the co-labeling of these nanoparticles by Ge and 64Cts2+ was successfully performed. As a result, PET/MRI images, a much researched combination but rarely achieved, were acquired on the same animal alter intravenous injection of the co-labeled nanoparticles. The radiosensitizing character of nanoparticles Au-at-TADOTAGA was confirmed by the follow up of tumor growth alter a treatment by MRT (microbeam irradiation) 15 minutes after intratumoral injection of nanoparticles. The therapeutic gain of this treatment has been validated by MRT 24 hours after intravenous injection of nanoparticles to rats carrying gliosarcoma (radioresistant tumor in radiosensitive organ). (author)

  14. Preparation of DPPE-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dungey, Keenan E.; Muller, David P.; Gunter, Tammy

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is presented that introduces students to nanotechnology through the preparation of nanoparticles and their visualization using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The experiment familiarizes the students with nonaqueous solvents, biphasic reactions, phase-transfer agents, ligands to stabilize growing nanoparticles, and bidentate…

  15. Enhancing charge-storage capacity of non-volatile memory devices using template-directed assembly of gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Raju Kumar; Krishnamoorthy, Sivashankar; Kusuma, Damar Yoga; Lee, Pooi See; Srinivasan, M P

    2012-04-07

    We demonstrate the controlled fabrication of aggregates of gold nanoparticles as a means of enhancing the charge-storage capacity of metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices by up to 300% at a low biasing voltage of ±4 V. Aggregates of citrate stabilized gold nanoparticles were obtained by directed electrostatic self-assembly onto an underlying nanopattern of positively charged centers. The underlying nanopatterns consist of amine functionalized gold nanoparticle arrays formed using amphiphilic diblock copolymer reverse micelles as templates. The hierarchical self-organization leads to a twelve-fold increase in the number density of the gold nanoparticles and therefore significantly increases the charge storage centers for the MIS device. The MIS structure showed counterclockwise C-V hysteresis curves indicating a good memory effect. A memory window of 1 V was obtained at a low biasing voltage of ±4 V. Furthermore, C-t measurements conducted after applying a charging bias of 4 V showed that the charge was retained beyond 20,000 s. The proposed strategy can be readily adapted for fabricating next generation solution processible non-volatile memory devices. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2012

  16. A simple gel electrophoresis method for separating polyhedral gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhee; Lee, Hye Jin

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, a simple approach to separate differently shaped and sized polyhedral gold nanoparticles (NPs) within colloidal solutions via gel electrophoresis is described. Gel running parameters for separating efficiently gold NPs including gel composition, added surfactant types and applied voltage were investigated. The plasmonic properties and physical structure of the separated NPs extracted from the gel matrix were then investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and UV-vis spectrophotometry respectively. Data analysis revealed that gel electrophoresis conditions of a 1.5 % agarose gel with 0.1 % sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactant under an applied voltage of 100 V resulted in the selective isolation of ~ 50 nm polyhedral shaped gold nanoparticles. Further efforts are underway to apply the method to purify biomolecule-conjugated polyhedral Au NPs that can be readily used for NP-enhanced biosensing platforms.

  17. Tea-bag-like polymer nanoreactors filled with gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitschang, Fabian; Schmalz, Holger; Agarwal, Seema; Greiner, Andreas

    2014-05-05

    Gold-containing polymer nanotubes, which showed both catalytic activity and resistance to leaching, were prepared by the "tubes by fiber templates" (TUFT) process. For this purpose, electrospun polymer nonwovens with incorporated poly(L-lactide)-stabilized gold nanoparticles were coated with poly(p-xylylene) by the chemical vapor deposition process, and then the inner fiber templates were removed. The resulting polymer tubes carried encapsulated gold nanoparticles which were shown to be immobilized and featured pronounced catalytic activity towards the hydrolytic oxidation of dimethylphenylsilane and the alcoholysis of dimethylphenylsilane with n-butanol. The macroscopic nonwovens could be used as tea-bag-like catalyst systems and showed excellent reusability. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Hybrid gold nanoparticles in molecular imaging and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katti, K.V.; Kannan, R.; Katti, K.; Kattumuri, V.; Pandrapragada, R.; Rahing, V.; Cutler, C.; Boote, E.; Casteel, S.W.; Smith, C.J.; Robertson, J.D.; Jurrison, S.

    2006-01-01

    Metallic nanoparticles, because of their size, chemical and physical properties, are particularly attractive as therapeutic probes in treating cancer. Central to any clinical advances in nanoparticulate based therapy will be to produce hybrid nanoparticles that can be targeted to vascular, extracellular or cell surface receptors. Development of hybrid nanoparticles that specifically target cancer vasculature has received considerable attention. Most cancers have leaky vasculature and the defective vascular architecture, created due to the rapid vascularisation necessary to serve fast growing cancers, in combination with poor lymphatic drainage allows increased permeation and retention effects. The leaky vasculature, because of higher porosity and permeability, serve as natural high affinity targets to metallic nanoparticles. Another attractive approach toward the application of nanotechnology to nanomedicine is the utility of nanoparticles that display inherent therapeutic properties. For example radioactive gold nanoparticles present attractive prospects in therapy of cancer. The radioactive properties of Au-198 (β(max) = 0.96 MeV; t(1/2) = 2.7 d) and Au-199 (β(max) 0.46 MeV; t(1/2) = 3.14 d) make them ideal candidates for use in radiotherapeutic applications. In addition, they both have imageable gamma emissions for dosimetry and pharmacokinetic studies and Au-199 can be made carrier-free by indirect methods. Gold nanoparticles are of interest for treatment of disease as they can deliver agents directly into cells and cellular components with a higher concentration of radioactivity, e.g. higher dose of radioactivity, to cancerous tumor cells

  19. Guided assembly of nanoparticles on electrostatically charged nanocrystalline diamond thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verveniotis Elisseos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We apply atomic force microscope for local electrostatic charging of oxygen-terminated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD thin films deposited on silicon, to induce electrostatically driven self-assembly of colloidal alumina nanoparticles into micro-patterns. Considering possible capacitive, sp2 phase and spatial uniformity factors to charging, we employ films with sub-100 nm thickness and about 60% relative sp2 phase content, probe the spatial material uniformity by Raman and electron microscopy, and repeat experiments at various positions. We demonstrate that electrostatic potential contrast on the NCD films varies between 0.1 and 1.2 V and that the contrast of more than ±1 V (as detected by Kelvin force microscopy is able to induce self-assembly of the nanoparticles via coulombic and polarization forces. This opens prospects for applications of diamond and its unique set of properties in self-assembly of nano-devices and nano-systems.

  20. Synthesis, Structure, Stability and Redispersion of Gold-based Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruvalam, Ram Chandra

    Nanoscale gold has been shown to possess an intriguing combination of unexpected optical, photochemical and catalytic properties. The ability to control the size, shape, morphology, composition and dispersion of gold-based nanostructures is key to optimizing their performance for nanotechnology applications. The advanced electron microscopy studies described in this thesis analyze three important aspects of gold and gold-palladium alloy nanoparticles: namely, (i) the ability to synthesize gold nanoparticles of controlled size and shape in an aqueous medium; (ii) the colloidal preparation of designer gold-palladium alloys for selective oxidation catalysis; and (iii) the ability to disperse gold as finely and homogeneously as possible on a metal oxide or carbon support. The ability to exploit the nanoscale properties of gold for various engineering applications often depends on our ability to control size and shape of the nanoscale entity by careful manipulation of the synthesis parameters. We have explored an aqueous based synthesis route, using oleylamine as both a reductant and surfactant, for preparing gold nanostructures. By systematically varying synthesis parameters such as oleylamine concentration, reaction temperature, and aging time it is possible to identify processing regimens that generate Au nanostructures having either pseudo-spherical, faceted polyhedral, nanostar or wire shaped morphologies. Furthermore, by quenching the reaction partway through it is possible to create a class of metastable Au-containing structures such as nanocubes, nanoboxes and nanowires. Possible formation mechanisms for these gold based nano-objects are discussed. There is a growing interest in using supported bimetallic AuPd alloy nanoparticles for selective oxidation reactions. In this study, a systematic series of size controlled AuPd bimetallic particles have been prepared by colloidal synthesis methods. Particles having random alloy structures, as well as `designer

  1. Tuning of electrostatic vs. depletion interaction in deciding the phase behavior of nanoparticle-polymer system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticle-polymer system interestingly show a re-entrant phase behavior where charge stabilized silica nanoparticles (phase I) undergo particle clustering (phase II) and then back to individual particles (phase I) as a function of polymer concentration. Such phase behavior arises as a result of dominance of various interactions (i) nanoparticle-nanoparticle electrostatic repulsion (ii) polymer induced attractive depletion between nanoparticles and (iii) polymer-polymer repulsion, at different concentration regimes. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the evolution of interaction during this re-entrant phase behavior of nanoparticles by contrast-marching the polymer. The SANS data have been modeled using a two-Yukawa potential accounting for both attractive and repulsive parts of the interaction between nanoparticles. The degree of both of these parts has been separately tuned by varying the polymer concentration and ionic strength of the solution. Both of these parts are found to have long-range nature. At low polymer concentrations, the electrostatic repulsion dominates over the depletion attraction. The magnitude and the range of the depletion interaction increase with the polymer concentration leading to nanoparticle clustering. At higher polymer concentrations, the increased polymer-polymer repulsion reduces the strength of depletion leading to re-entrant phase behavior. The clusters formed under depletion attraction are found to have surface fractal morphology

  2. Tuning of electrostatic vs. depletion interaction in deciding the phase behavior of nanoparticle-polymer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sugam; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticle-polymer system interestingly show a re-entrant phase behavior where charge stabilized silica nanoparticles (phase I) undergo particle clustering (phase II) and then back to individual particles (phase I) as a function of polymer concentration. Such phase behavior arises as a result of dominance of various interactions (i) nanoparticle-nanoparticle electrostatic repulsion (ii) polymer induced attractive depletion between nanoparticles and (iii) polymer-polymer repulsion, at different concentration regimes. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the evolution of interaction during this re-entrant phase behavior of nanoparticles by contrast-marching the polymer. The SANS data have been modeled using a two-Yukawa potential accounting for both attractive and repulsive parts of the interaction between nanoparticles. The degree of both of these parts has been separately tuned by varying the polymer concentration and ionic strength of the solution. Both of these parts are found to have long-range nature. At low polymer concentrations, the electrostatic repulsion dominates over the depletion attraction. The magnitude and the range of the depletion interaction increase with the polymer concentration leading to nanoparticle clustering. At higher polymer concentrations, the increased polymer-polymer repulsion reduces the strength of depletion leading to re-entrant phase behavior. The clusters formed under depletion attraction are found to have surface fractal morphology.

  3. Tuning of electrostatic vs. depletion interaction in deciding the phase behavior of nanoparticle-polymer system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Sugam, E-mail: sugam@barc.gov.in; Aswal, V. K. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Kohlbrecher, J. [Laboratory for Neutron Scattering, Paul Scherrer Institut, H-5232 PSI Villigen (Switzerland)

    2015-06-24

    Nanoparticle-polymer system interestingly show a re-entrant phase behavior where charge stabilized silica nanoparticles (phase I) undergo particle clustering (phase II) and then back to individual particles (phase I) as a function of polymer concentration. Such phase behavior arises as a result of dominance of various interactions (i) nanoparticle-nanoparticle electrostatic repulsion (ii) polymer induced attractive depletion between nanoparticles and (iii) polymer-polymer repulsion, at different concentration regimes. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) has been used to study the evolution of interaction during this re-entrant phase behavior of nanoparticles by contrast-marching the polymer. The SANS data have been modeled using a two-Yukawa potential accounting for both attractive and repulsive parts of the interaction between nanoparticles. The degree of both of these parts has been separately tuned by varying the polymer concentration and ionic strength of the solution. Both of these parts are found to have long-range nature. At low polymer concentrations, the electrostatic repulsion dominates over the depletion attraction. The magnitude and the range of the depletion interaction increase with the polymer concentration leading to nanoparticle clustering. At higher polymer concentrations, the increased polymer-polymer repulsion reduces the strength of depletion leading to re-entrant phase behavior. The clusters formed under depletion attraction are found to have surface fractal morphology.

  4. Optical absorption of carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaolong; Quan, Xiaojun; Zhang, Zhuomin; Cheng, Ping

    2018-01-01

    In order to enhance the solar thermal energy conversion efficiency, we propose to use carbon-gold core-shell nanoparticles dispersed in liquid water. This work demonstrates theoretically that an absorbing carbon (C) core enclosed in a plasmonic gold (Au) nanoshell can enhance the absorption peak while broadening the absorption band; giving rise to a much higher solar absorption than most previously studied core-shell combinations. The exact Mie solution is used to evaluate the absorption efficiency factor of spherical nanoparticles in the wavelength region from 300 nm to 1100 nm as well as the electric field and power dissipation profiles inside the nanoparticles at specified wavelengths (mostly at the localized surface plasmon resonance wavelength). The field enhancement by the localized plasmons at the gold surfaces boosts the absorption of the carbon particle, resulting in a redshift of the absorption peak with increased peak height and bandwidth. In addition to spherical nanoparticles, we use the finite-difference time-domain method to calculate the absorption of cubic core-shell nanoparticles. Even stronger enhancement can be achieved with cubic C-Au core-shell structures due to the localized plasmonic resonances at the sharp edges of the Au shell. The solar absorption efficiency factor can exceed 1.5 in the spherical case and reach 2.3 in the cubic case with a shell thickness of 10 nm. Such broadband absorption enhancement is in great demand for solar thermal applications including steam generation.

  5. Fabrication and investigation of magnetite nanoparticles with gold shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semenova, Ekaterina M.; Vorobyova, Svetlana A.; Lesnikovich, Anatoly I.; Fedotova, Julia A.; Bayev, Vadim G.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Core–shell nanoparticles were prepared by an interphase synthesis. ► The size of Fe 3 O 4 /Au nanoparticles is 12.8 nm with 1.2 nm gold shell. ► Fe 3 O 4 /Au nanoparticles are formed in a mixture with particles of gold and magnetite. - Abstract: A simple room temperature technique of Fe 3 O 4 /Au nanocrystals preparation in two-phase system was reported. The organic phase contains the mixture of the octane-based magnetic fluid and chloroauric acid complex with quaternary ammonium compound. AuCl 4 − was transferred from aqueous solution to octane using N-(2-(didecylamino) ethyl)-N,N-tridecyldecan-1-ammonium iodide as the phase-transfer reagent. The aqueous phase contains the sodium borohydride that was used as a reducing agent. The synthesized core–shell nanoparticles have a particle size of 12.8 nm with a gold shell thickness of approximately 1.2 nm. The principles of interphase synthesis and properties of prepared nanoparticles were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) and Mössbauer spectroscopies.

  6. Structure and nanotribology of thermally deposited gold nanoparticles on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cihan, Ebru; Özoğul, Alper; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Structure and tribology of thermally deposited AuNPs on HOPG have been studied. • Well-faceted, hexagonal AuNPs are formed on HOPG upon post-deposition annealing. • The crystalline character of the AuNPs is confirmed via TEM measurements. • AFM measurements reveal a “2/3” power law dependence of friction on load on AuNPs. • Friction forces at AuNP edges evolve linearly with increasing height and load. - Abstract: We present experiments involving the structural and frictional characterization of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) thermally deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG). The effect of thermal deposition amount, as well as post-deposition annealing on the morphology and distribution of gold on HOPG is studied via scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements, while transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is utilized to confirm the crystalline character of the nanoparticles. Lateral force measurements conducted via atomic force microscopy (AFM) under ambient conditions are employed to investigate the nanotribological properties of the gold nanoparticles as a function of normal load. Finally, the increase in lateral force experienced at the edges of the nanoparticles is studied as a function of normal load, as well as nanoparticle height. As a whole, our results constitute a comprehensive structural and frictional characterization of the AuNP/HOPG material system, forming the basis for nanotribology experiments involving the lateral manipulation of thermally deposited AuNPs on HOPG via AFM under ambient conditions.

  7. Aggregation behaviour of gold nanoparticles in presence of chitosan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collado-González, Mar; Fernández Espín, Vanesa [University of Murcia, Department of Physical Chemistry (Spain); Montalbán, Mercedes G. [University of Murcia, Department of Chemical Engineering (Spain); Pamies, Ramón [Technical University of Cartagena, Department of Material Engineering and Manufacturing (Spain); Hernández Cifre, José Ginés; Díaz Baños, F. Guillermo, E-mail: fgb@um.es [University of Murcia, Department of Physical Chemistry (Spain); Víllora, Gloria [University of Murcia, Department of Chemical Engineering (Spain); García de la Torre, José [University of Murcia, Department of Physical Chemistry (Spain)

    2015-06-15

    Chitosan (CS) is a biocompatible polysaccharide with positive charge that is widely used as a coating agent for negatively charged nanoparticles. However, the types of structures that emerge by combining CS and nanoparticles as well as their behaviour are still poorly understood. In this work, we characterize the nanocomposites formed by gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and CS and study the influence of CS in the expected aggregation process that should experience those nanoparticles under the favourable conditions of low pH and high ionic strength. Thus, at the working CS concentration, we observe the existence of CS structures that quickly trap the AuNPs and avoid the formation of nanoparticle aggregates in environmental conditions that, otherwise, would lead to such an aggregation.

  8. Gold and gold-silver core-shell nanoparticle constructs with defined size based on DNA hybridization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbrueck, Andrea; Csaki, Andrea; Ritter, Kathrin; Leich, Martin; Koehler, J. Michael; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Nanoparticles represent versatile building blocks in material science and nanotechnology. Thereby, the defined assembly of nanostructures (13 and 56 nm in diameter, respectively) is of significant importance. Short DNA sequences can be bound to the nanoparticle surface thus enabling highly specific DNA hybridization-driven events that direct the formation of nanoparticle constructs.In this paper, examples for the defined formation of gold nanoparticle constructs are demonstrated. In addition, gold-silver core-shell nanoparticles are introduced as further building blocks for the hybridization-controlled formation of nanoparticle constructs.

  9. Controlled release of a sparingly water-soluble anticancer drug through pH-responsive functionalized gold-nanoparticle-decorated liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Chandan; Das, Anupam; Chakraborty, Anjan

    2015-03-16

    The binding and detachment of carboxyl-modified gold nanoparticles from liposomes is used for controlled drug delivery. This study reveals that the binding and detachment of nanoparticles from liposomes depends on the degree of hydration of the liposomes. Liposomes with a lower hydration level undergo stronger electrostatic interactions with negatively charged gold nanoparticles, thus leading to a slower detachment of the carboxyl-modified gold nanoparticles under gastric conditions. Therefore, under gastric conditions, gold-nanoparticle-decorated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes exhibit an at least ten-times-slower drug release compared to gold-nanoparticle-decorated 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) liposomes, although both liposomes in the bare state fail to pursue controlled release. Our study also reveals that one can modulate the drug-release rate by simply varying the concentration of nanoparticles. This study highlights a novel strategy for the controlled release of drug molecules from liposomes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Variable temperature investigation of the atomic structure of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, N P; Kirkland, A I; Huis, M A van; Zandbergen, H W; Xu, H

    2010-01-01

    The characterisation of nanoparticle structures is the first step towards understanding and optimising their utility in important technological applications such as catalysis. Using newly developed in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) specimen holders, the temperature dependent atomic structure of gold nanoparticles in the size range 5-12 nm has been investigated. In this size interval, the decahedral morphology has been identified as the most favourable structure at or above room temperature, while particle surface roughening becomes evident above 600 0 C. An icosahedral transition has also been identified at low temperature in particles under 9 nm in diameter. These experimental results are consistent with recently published temperature dependent equilibrium phase maps for gold nanoparticles.

  11. Modified gold electrodes based on thiocytosine/guanine-gold nanoparticles for uric and ascorbic acid determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vulcu, Adriana; Grosan, Camelia; Muresan, Liana Maria; Pruneanu, Stela; Olenic, Liliana

    2013-01-01

    The present paper describes the preparation of new modified surfaces for electrodes based on guanine/thiocytosine and gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were analyzed by UV–vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and it was found that they have diameters between 30 and 40 nm. The layers were characterized by specular reflectance infrared spectroscopy (FTIR-RAS) and by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The thickness of layers was found to be approximately 30 nm for TC layers and 300 nm for GU layers. Every layer was characterized as electrochemical sensor (by cyclic voltammetry) both for uric acid and ascorbic acid determinations, separately and in their mixture. The modified sensors have good calibration functions with good sensitivity (between 1.145 and 1.406 mA cm −2 /decade), reproducibility ( t hiocytosine (Au T C) and gold g uanine (Au G U) layers

  12. Functionalization of biosynthesized gold nanoparticle from aqueous ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The biosynthesized nanoparticles and formulated nanodrug were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometry, Zetasizer, Scanning and transmission Electron Microscopy (SEM; TEM), Energy Dispersive spectrophotometry (EDAX) and Fourier Transform Infra-red Spectroscopy. Polyethylene glycol and Lincomycin were ...

  13. Protein Viability on Au Nanoparticles during an Electrospray and Electrostatic-Force-Directed Assembly Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun Mao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the protein viability on Au nanoparticles during an electrospray and electrostatic-force-directed assembly process, through which Au nanoparticle-antibody conjugates are assembled onto the surface of carbon nanotubes (CNTs to fabricate carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET biosensors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA and field-effect transistor (FET measurements have been used to investigate the antibody activity after the nanoparticle assembly. Upon the introduction of matching antigens, the colored reaction from the ELISA and the change in the electrical characteristic of the CNTFET device confirm that the antibody activity is preserved during the assembly process.

  14. Aggregation and adhesion of gold nanoparticles in phosphate buffered saline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shangfeng; Kendall, Kevin; Toloueinia, Panteha; Mehrabadi, Yasamin; Gupta, Gaurav; Newton, Jill

    2012-03-01

    In applications in medicine and more specifically drug delivery, the dispersion stability of nanoparticles plays a significant role on their final performances. In this study, with the use of two laser technologies, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), we report a simple method to estimate the stability of nanoparticles dispersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Stability has two features: (1) self-aggregation as the particles tend to stick to each other; (2) disappearance of particles as they adhere to surrounding substrate surfaces such as glass, metal, or polymer. By investigating the effects of sonication treatment and surface modification by five types of surfactants, including nonylphenol ethoxylate (NP9), polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), human serum albumin (HSA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and citrate ions on the dispersion stability, the varying self-aggregation and adhesion of gold nanoparticles dispersed in PBS are demonstrated. The results showed that PVP effectively prevented aggregation, while HSA exhibited the best performance in avoiding the adhesion of gold nanoparticle in PBS onto glass and metal. The simple principle of this method makes it a high potential to be applied to other nanoparticles, including virus particles, used in dispersing and processing.

  15. Aggregation and adhesion of gold nanoparticles in phosphate buffered saline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Shangfeng, E-mail: s.du@bham.ac.uk; Kendall, Kevin; Toloueinia, Panteha; Mehrabadi, Yasamin; Gupta, Gaurav; Newton, Jill [University of Birmingham, School of Chemical Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2012-03-15

    In applications in medicine and more specifically drug delivery, the dispersion stability of nanoparticles plays a significant role on their final performances. In this study, with the use of two laser technologies, dynamic light scattering (DLS) and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), we report a simple method to estimate the stability of nanoparticles dispersed in phosphate buffered saline (PBS). Stability has two features: (1) self-aggregation as the particles tend to stick to each other; (2) disappearance of particles as they adhere to surrounding substrate surfaces such as glass, metal, or polymer. By investigating the effects of sonication treatment and surface modification by five types of surfactants, including nonylphenol ethoxylate (NP9), polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), human serum albumin (HSA), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and citrate ions on the dispersion stability, the varying self-aggregation and adhesion of gold nanoparticles dispersed in PBS are demonstrated. The results showed that PVP effectively prevented aggregation, while HSA exhibited the best performance in avoiding the adhesion of gold nanoparticle in PBS onto glass and metal. The simple principle of this method makes it a high potential to be applied to other nanoparticles, including virus particles, used in dispersing and processing.

  16. Pair distribution function analysis applied to decahedral gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakotte, H; Silkwood, C; Kiefer, B; Karpov, D; Fohtung, E; Page, K; Wang, H-W; Olds, D; Manna, S; Fullerton, E E

    2017-01-01

    The five-fold symmetry of face-centered cubic (fcc) derived nanoparticles is inconsistent with the translational symmetry of a Bravais lattice and generally explained by multiple twinning of a tetrahedral subunit about a (joint) symmetry axis, with or without structural modification to the fcc motif. Unlike in bulk materials, five-fold twinning in cubic nanoparticles is common and strongly affects their structural, chemical, and electronic properties. To test and verify theoretical approaches, it is therefore pertinent that the local structural features of such materials can be fully characterized. The small size of nanoparticles severely limits the application of traditional analysis techniques, such as Bragg diffraction. A complete description of the atomic arrangement in nanoparticles therefore requires a departure from the concept of translational symmetry, and prevents fully evaluating all the structural features experimentally. We describe how recent advances in instrumentation, together with the increasing power of computing, are shaping the development of alternative analysis methods of scattering data for nanostructures. We present the application of Debye scattering and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis towards modeling of the total scattering data for the example of decahedral gold nanoparticles. PDF measurements provide a statistical description of the pair correlations of atoms within a material, allowing one to evaluate the probability of finding two atoms within a given distance. We explored the sensitivity of existing synchrotron x-ray PDF instruments for distinguishing four different simple models for our gold nanoparticles: a multiply twinned fcc decahedron with either a single gap or multiple distributed gaps, a relaxed body-centered orthorhombic (bco) decahedron, and a hybrid decahedron. The data simulations of the models were then compared with experimental data from synchrotron x-ray total scattering. We present our experimentally

  17. Pair distribution function analysis applied to decahedral gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakotte, H.; Silkwood, C.; Page, K.; Wang, H.-W.; Olds, D.; Kiefer, B.; Manna, S.; Karpov, D.; Fohtung, E.; Fullerton, E. E.

    2017-11-01

    The five-fold symmetry of face-centered cubic (fcc) derived nanoparticles is inconsistent with the translational symmetry of a Bravais lattice and generally explained by multiple twinning of a tetrahedral subunit about a (joint) symmetry axis, with or without structural modification to the fcc motif. Unlike in bulk materials, five-fold twinning in cubic nanoparticles is common and strongly affects their structural, chemical, and electronic properties. To test and verify theoretical approaches, it is therefore pertinent that the local structural features of such materials can be fully characterized. The small size of nanoparticles severely limits the application of traditional analysis techniques, such as Bragg diffraction. A complete description of the atomic arrangement in nanoparticles therefore requires a departure from the concept of translational symmetry, and prevents fully evaluating all the structural features experimentally. We describe how recent advances in instrumentation, together with the increasing power of computing, are shaping the development of alternative analysis methods of scattering data for nanostructures. We present the application of Debye scattering and pair distribution function (PDF) analysis towards modeling of the total scattering data for the example of decahedral gold nanoparticles. PDF measurements provide a statistical description of the pair correlations of atoms within a material, allowing one to evaluate the probability of finding two atoms within a given distance. We explored the sensitivity of existing synchrotron x-ray PDF instruments for distinguishing four different simple models for our gold nanoparticles: a multiply twinned fcc decahedron with either a single gap or multiple distributed gaps, a relaxed body-centered orthorhombic (bco) decahedron, and a hybrid decahedron. The data simulations of the models were then compared with experimental data from synchrotron x-ray total scattering. We present our experimentally

  18. Engineered gold nanoparticles for identification of novel ovarian biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Karuna

    Ovarian cancer is a leading cause of cancer related death among women in the US and worldwide. The disease has a high mortality rate due to limited tools available that can diagnose ovarian cancer at an early stage and the lack of effective treatments for disease free survival at late stages. Identification of proteins specifically expressed/overexpressed in ovarian cancer could lead to identification of novel diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets that improve patient outcomes. In this regard, mass spectrometry is a powerful tool to probe the proteome of a cancer cell. It can aid discovery of proteins important for the pathophysiology of ovarian cancer. These proteins in turn could serve as diagnostic and treatment biomarkers of the disease. However, a limitation of mass spectrometry based proteomic analyses is that the technique lacks sensitivity and is biased against detection of low abundance proteins. With current approaches to biomarker discovery, we may therefore be overlooking candidate proteins that are important for ovarian cancer. This study presents a new approach to enrich low abundance proteins and subsequently detect them with mass spectrometry. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and functionalization of their surfaces provide an excellent opportunity to capture and enrich low abundance proteins. First, the study focused on conducting an extensive investigation of the time evolution of nanoparticle-protein interaction and understanding drivers of protein attachment on nanoparticle surface. The adsorption of proteins to AuNPs was found to be highly dynamic with multiple attachment and detachment events which decreased over time. Initially, electrostatic forces played an important role in protein binding and structurally flexible proteins such as those involved in RNA processing were more likely to bind to AuNPs. More importantly, the feasibility and success of protein enrichment by AuNPs was evaluated. The AuNPs based approach was able to detect

  19. Hybridization thermodynamics of DNA bound to gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC) was used to study the thermodynamics of hybridization on DNA-functionalized colloidal gold nanoparticles. When compared to the thermodynamics of hybridization of DNA that is free in solution, the differences in the values of the Gibbs free energy of reaction, Δ r G o , the enthalpy, Δ r H o , and entropy, Δ r S o , were small. The change in Δ r G o between the free and bound states was always positive but with statistical significance outside the 95% confidence interval, implying the free DNA is slightly more stable than when in the bound state. Additionally, ITC was also able to reveal information about the binding stoichiometry of the hybridization reactions on the DNA-functionalized gold nanoparticles, and indicates that there is a significant fraction of the DNA on gold nanoparticle surface that is unavailable for DNA hybridization. Furthermore, the fraction of available DNA is dependent on the spacer group on the DNA that is used to span the gold surface from that to the probe DNA.

  20. Synthesis and agglomeration of gold nanoparticles in reverse micelles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Adriana P.; Resto, Oscar; Briano, Julio G.; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2005-07-01

    Reverse micelles prepared in the system water, sodium bis-(2-ethylhexyl) sulfoccinate (AOT), and isooctane were investigated as a templating system for the production of gold nanoparticles from Au(III) and the reducing agent sulfite. A core-shell Mie model was used to describe the optical properties of gold nanoparticles in the reverse micelles. Dynamic light scattering of gold colloids in aqueous media and in reverse micelle solution indicated agglomeration of micelles containing particles. This was verified theoretically with an analysis of the total interaction energy between pairs of particles as a function of particle size. The analysis indicated that particles larger than about 8 nm in diameter should reversibly flocculate. Transmission electron microscopy measurements of gold nanoparticles produced in our reverse micelles showed diameters of 8-10 nm. Evidence of cluster formation was also observed. Time-correlated UV-vis absorption measurements showed a red shift for the peak wavelength. This was interpreted as the result of multiple scattering and plasmon interaction between particles due to agglomeration of micelles with particles larger than 8 nm.

  1. Charge reversible gold nanoparticles for high efficient absorption and desorption of DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Can; Zhuang Jiaqi; Jiang Shan; Li Jun; Yang Wensheng

    2012-01-01

    Mercaptoundecylamine and mercaptoundecanoic acid co-modified Au nanoparticles were prepared by two-step ligand exchange of 6-mercaptohexanoic acid modified gold nanoparticles. Such particles terminated by appropriate ratios of the amine and carboxyl groups (R N/C ) were identified to show reversible charge on their surface, which were switchable by pH of the solution. The isoelectric point (IEP) of the particles is tunable by changing the ratios of the amine and carboxyl groups on the particle surfaces. The particles can absorb DNA effectively at pH lower than the IEP driven by the direct electrostatic interactions between DNA and the particle surface. When pH of the solutions was elevated to be higher than the IEP, the absorbed DNA can be released almost completely due to the electrostatic repulsion between the particle surface and DNA. With appropriate R N/C ratios of 0.8, the absorption and desorption efficiencies of DNA were 97 and 98%, respectively, corresponding an extraction efficiency of 95 %. Such particles with reversible surface charges allow the high efficient extraction of DNA by simply changing pH instead of by changing salt concentration in the conventional salt bridge method.Graphical Abstract

  2. Covalent assembly of gold nanoparticles for nonvolatile memory applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Raju Kumar; Kusuma, Damar Yoga; Lee, P S; Srinivasan, M P

    2011-12-01

    This work reports a versatile approach for enhancing the stability of nonvolatile memory devices through covalent assembly of functionalized gold nanoparticles. 11-mercapto-1-undecanol functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with a narrow size distribution and particle size of about 5 nm were synthesized. Then, the AuNPs were immobilized on a SiO(2) substrate using a functionalized polymer as a surface modifier. Microscopic and spectroscopic techniques were used to characterize the AuNPs and their morphology before and after immobilization. Finally, a metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) type memory device with such covalently anchored AuNPs as a charge trapping layer was fabricated. The MIS structure showed well-defined counterclockwise C-V hysteresis curves indicating a good memory effect. The flat band voltage shift was 1.64 V at a swapping voltage between ±7 V. Furthermore, the MIS structure showed a good retention characteristic up to 20,000 s. The present synthetic route to covalently immobilize gold nanoparticles system will be a step towards realization for the nanoparticle-based electronic devices and related applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. Rotational dynamics of gold nanoparticle chains in water solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zimbone, M.; Musumeci, P.; Baeri, P. [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia (Italy); Messina, E. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche (Italy); Boninelli, S. [MATIS IMM CNR (Italy); Compagnini, G. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche (Italy); Calcagno, L., E-mail: lucia.calcagno@ct.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    In this work we report a study on the determination of the shape of aggregated gold colloids, obtained by adding pyridine to a solution of pure gold nanoparticles prepared by laser ablation in water studying their dynamic behavior. We have simultaneously measured the translational and rotational diffusion coefficients of dilute solutions of the as-prepared and aggregated gold nanoparticles by polarized and depolarized dynamic light scattering. An increase of the hydrodynamic radius from 26 to 135 nm and a decrease of the rotational diffusion coefficient of two order of magnitude are measured with increasing the pyridine concentration, both correlated to the aggregate formation. The dynamic properties of nanoaggregates have been interpreted by applying a model which allows a direct evaluation of translation and rotational diffusion coefficients of a chain of spherical particles by changing the number and the relative position of each nanoparticle in the aggregate. The comparison between experimental and calculated values indicates that an aggregation of less than ten isolated nanoparticles produces mainly rod-like chains, while aggregate morphology approaches the fractal-like configuration with increasing aggregation number.

  4. Electron transport in gold colloidal nanoparticle-based strain gauges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Helena; Grisolia, Jérémie; Sangeetha, Neralagatta M.; Decorde, Nicolas; Farcau, Cosmin; Viallet, Benoit; Chen, Ke; Viau, Guillaume; Ressier, Laurence

    2013-03-01

    A systematic approach for understanding the electron transport mechanisms in resistive strain gauges based on assemblies of gold colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) protected by organic ligands is described. The strain gauges were fabricated from parallel micrometer wide wires made of 14 nm gold (Au) colloidal NPs on polyethylene terephthalate substrates, elaborated by convective self-assembly. Electron transport in such devices occurs by inter-particle electron tunneling through the tunnel barrier imposed by the organic ligands protecting the NPs. This tunnel barrier was varied by changing the nature of organic ligands coating the nanoparticles: citrate (CIT), phosphines (BSPP, TDSP) and thiols (MPA, MUDA). Electro-mechanical tests indicate that only the gold NPs protected by phosphine and thiol ligands yield high gauge sensitivity. Temperature-dependent resistance measurements are explained using the ‘regular island array model’ that extracts transport parameters, i.e., the tunneling decay constant β and the Coulomb charging energy EC. This reveals that the Au@CIT nanoparticle assemblies exhibit a behavior characteristic of a strong-coupling regime, whereas those of Au@BSPP, Au@TDSP, Au@MPA and Au@MUDA nanoparticles manifest a weak-coupling regime. A comparison of the parameters extracted from the two methods indicates that the most sensitive gauges in the weak-coupling regime feature the highest β. Moreover, the EC values of these 14 nm NPs cannot be neglected in determining the β values.

  5. Electron transport in gold colloidal nanoparticle-based strain gauges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Helena; Grisolia, Jérémie; Sangeetha, Neralagatta M; Decorde, Nicolas; Farcau, Cosmin; Viallet, Benoit; Chen Ke; Viau, Guillaume; Ressier, Laurence

    2013-01-01

    A systematic approach for understanding the electron transport mechanisms in resistive strain gauges based on assemblies of gold colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) protected by organic ligands is described. The strain gauges were fabricated from parallel micrometer wide wires made of 14 nm gold (Au) colloidal NPs on polyethylene terephthalate substrates, elaborated by convective self-assembly. Electron transport in such devices occurs by inter-particle electron tunneling through the tunnel barrier imposed by the organic ligands protecting the NPs. This tunnel barrier was varied by changing the nature of organic ligands coating the nanoparticles: citrate (CIT), phosphines (BSPP, TDSP) and thiols (MPA, MUDA). Electro-mechanical tests indicate that only the gold NPs protected by phosphine and thiol ligands yield high gauge sensitivity. Temperature-dependent resistance measurements are explained using the ‘regular island array model’ that extracts transport parameters, i.e., the tunneling decay constant β and the Coulomb charging energy E C . This reveals that the Au-CIT nanoparticle assemblies exhibit a behavior characteristic of a strong-coupling regime, whereas those of Au-BSPP, Au-TDSP, Au-MPA and Au-MUDA nanoparticles manifest a weak-coupling regime. A comparison of the parameters extracted from the two methods indicates that the most sensitive gauges in the weak-coupling regime feature the highest β. Moreover, the E C values of these 14 nm NPs cannot be neglected in determining the β values. (paper)

  6. Silver and Gold Nanoparticles Alter Cathepsin Activity In vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speshock, Janice L.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Szymanski, Eric R.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2011-12-01

    Nanomaterials are being incorporated into many biological applications for use as therapeutics, sensors, or labels. Silver nanomaterials are being utilized for biological implants and wound dressings as an antiviral material, whereas gold nanomaterials are being used as biological labels or sensors due to their surface properties and biocompatibility. Cytotoxicity data of these materials are becoming more prevalent; however, little research has been performed to understand how the introduction of these materials into cells affects cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the impact that silver and gold nanoparticles have on cathepsin activity in vitro. Cathepsins are important cellular proteases that are imperative for proper immune system function. We have selected to examine gold and silver nanoparticles due to the increased use of these materials in biological applications. This manuscript depicts how both of these types of nanomaterials affect cathepsin activity, which could impact the host's immune system and its ability to respond to pathogens. Cathepsin B activity decreases in a dose-dependent manner with all nanoparticles tested. Alternatively, the impact of nanoparticles on cathepsin L activity depends greatly on the type and size of the material.

  7. Living fungal hyphae-templated porous gold microwires using nanoparticles as building blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, Asma; Majeed, Muhammad Irfan; Ihsan, Ayesha; Hussain, Syed Zajif; Saif-ur-Rehman; Ghauri, Muhammad Afzal; Khalid, Zafar M.; Hussain, Irshad

    2011-01-01

    A simple and environmentally benign green method is reported to decorate growing fungal hyphae with high loading of gold nanoparticles, which were initially produced using aqueous tea extract as a sole reducing/stabilizing agent. Inoculation of fungal spores in aqueous suspension of nanoparticles led to the growth of intensely red-coloured fungal hyphae due to the accumulation of gold nanoparticles. Heat treatment of these hybrid materials led to the formation of porous gold microwires. This report is thus an interesting example of using green and sustainable approach to produce nanostructured materials which have potential applications in catalysis, sensing and electronics.Graphical AbstractPorous gold microwires are formed by the heat treatment of fungal hyphae–gold nanoparticle composites. These nanoparticle-loaded composites were formed by growing Aspergillus niger in gold nanoparticles suspension produced using tea extract as the sole chemical source in addition to the gold salt.

  8. Gold nanoparticles prepared using cape aloe active components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krpetić, Zeljka; Scarì, Giorgio; Caneva, Enrico; Speranza, Giovanna; Porta, Francesca

    2009-07-07

    A novel use of two components of Cape aloe, aloin A and aloesin, acting as stabilizers in the preparation of gold and silver nanoparticles, is reported. Stable water-soluble particles of different size and shape are prepared by varying the reaction conditions, temperature, reaction time, and reducing agents. Characterization of the obtained particles is performed using UV-visible, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR), and 1H NMR spectroscopies and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The efficient cellular uptake of 50 nm sized aloin A and aloesin stabilized gold particles into macrophages and HeLa cells was investigated, proposing these particles as nanovehicles.

  9. Quantitative electrical detection of immobilized protein using gold nanoparticles and gold enhancement on a biochip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Kin Fong

    2011-01-01

    Electrical detection of the concentration of protein immobilized on a biochip is demonstrated. The concentration of the direct immobilized protein can be determined by the resistance values measured by an ohm-meter directly. Indium tin oxide interdigitated electrodes were utilized as the detection sites on the biochip. Protein, i.e. antibody, of certain concentration was first immobilized on the detection site. Gold nanoparticles were then applied to indicate the immobilized protein. Since the gold nanoparticles were tiny, a detectable electrical signal could not be generated. Hence, a gold enhancement process was performed for signal amplification. Gold nanoparticles were enlarged physically, such that a conductive metal layer was formed on the detection site. The presence and concentration of protein can be determined by the resistance value across the electrode measured by an ohm-meter. An immobilized protein concentration ranging from 50 to 1000 ng ml −1 can be detected quantitatively by the resistance values from 4300 to 1700 Ω. The proposed technique is potentially extended for the detection of immunoassay on the biochip. Since the protocol of the electrical detection does not involve sophisticated equipment, it can therefore be used for the development of a portable immunoassay device

  10. Field effect on digestive ripening of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Meng-Lin; Peng, J. S.; Lee, Sanboh; Yang, Fuqian

    2014-01-01

    We studied the digestive ripening of thiol-capped gold nanoparticles under simultaneous action of electric field and reflux heating in a silicone oil bath at 130 °C, using transmission electron microscopy. Observation revealed that a polydispersed gold nanoparticle system reached the state of nearly monodispersity under the action of an electric field and the thiol-capped gold nanoparticles carried negative charges. The electric field caused the increase of the particle size for the nearly monodispersed gold nanoparticle system. The self-assembly of the nearly monodisperse gold nanoparticles under the action of an electric field of a high field intensity was observed. The gold nanoparticles tended to form self-assembled nanostructures of six-fold symmetry. This study provides a new route for system engineering to control the particle size of metallic nanoparticles by electric field and digestive ripening

  11. Synthesis of netlike gold nanoparticles using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Y.Z.; Zhou, J.F.; Song, Y.; Cheng, Z.P.; Xu, J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Electrochemical deposition of netlike gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on the surface of glassy carbon electrode and preparation of netlike GNPs in aqueous solution using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent were proposed. The catalytic properties of netlike gold nanoparticles on the glassy carbon electrode for dopamine were demonstrated. The results indicate that the netlike gold nanoparticle modified electrode has an excellent repeatability and reproducibility. Display Omitted Highlights: ► Synthesis of netlike gold nanoparticles using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent. ► Excellent repeatability and reproducibility of netlike gold nanoparticle modified glassy carbon electrode. ► The catalytic properties of netlike gold nanoparticle for dopamine. -- Abstract: Electrochemical deposition of netlike gold nanoparticles on the surface of glassy carbon electrode and preparation of netlike GNPs in aqueous solution using ampicillin as a stabilizing reagent were proposed. The netlike gold nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, infrared spectrometer, UV spectrophotometer, powder X-ray diffractometer and electrochemical analyzer. The catalysis of the netlike gold nanoparticles on the glassy carbon electrode for dopamine was demonstrated. The results indicate that the gold nanoparticle modified electrode has an excellent repeatability and reproducibility.

  12. Catalase coupled gold nanoparticles: Comparison between carbodiimide and biotin-streptavidin methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirra, Hariharasudhan D.; Sexton, Travis; Biswal, Dipti; Hersh, Louis B.; Hilt, J. Zach

    2011-01-01

    The use of proteins for therapeutic applications requires the protein to maintain sufficient activity for the period of in vivo treatment. Many proteins exhibit a short half-life in vivo and, thus, require delivery systems for them to be applied as therapeutics. The relative biocompatibility and the ability to form functionalized bioconjugates via simple chemistry make gold nanoparticles excellent candidates as protein delivery systems. Herein, two protocols for coupling proteins to gold nanoparticles were compared. In the first, the strong biomolecular binding between biotin and streptavidin was used to couple catalase to the surface of gold nanoparticles. In the second protocol, the formation of an amide bond between carboxylic acid coated gold nanoparticles and free surface amines of catalase using carbodiimide chemistry was performed. The stability and kinetics of the different steps involved in these protocols were studied using UV-Visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopy. The addition of mercaptoundecanoic acid in conjugation with (N-(6-(biotinamido)hexyl)-3′-(2′-pyridyldithio)-propionamide increased the stability of biotinylated gold nanoparticles. Although the carbodiimide chemistry based bioconjugation approach exhibited a decrease in catalase activity, the carbodiimide chemistry based bioconjugation approach resulted in more active catalase per gold nanoparticle compared to that of mercaptoundecanoic acid stabilized biotinylated gold nanoparticles. Both coupling protocols resulted in gold nanoparticles loaded with active catalase. Thus, these gold nanoparticle systems and coupling protocols represent promising methods for the application of gold nanoparticles for protein delivery. PMID:21232642

  13. Sensing Applications of Silver and Gold Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Jao, Chih-Yu

    2012-01-01

    Nanoscale materials have great applications in many areas. One of these applications is for manufacturing ultra-compact and efficient sensors for chemical and biological molecule detection. Noble metals, such as gold (Au) and silver (Ag), because of their distinguished optical property"localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) that exhibit low loss, are ideal materials to fabricate these nanoscale plasmonic particles or structures. This work addresses the synthesis, characterization, and s...

  14. In vivo integrity of polymer-coated gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Abdelmonem, Abuelmagd M.; Ali, Zulqurnain; Alves, Frauke; Geiser, Marianne; Haberl, Nadine; Hartmann, Raimo; Hirn, Stephanie; de Aberasturi, Dorleta Jimenez; Kantner, Karsten; Khadem-Saba, Gülnaz; Montenegro, Jose-Maria; Rejman, Joanna; Rojo, Teofilo; de Larramendi, Idoia Ruiz; Ufartes, Roser; Wenk, Alexander; Parak, Wolfgang J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic nanoparticles are frequently engineered with an organic surface coating to improve their physicochemical properties, and it is well known that their colloidal properties may change upon internalization by cells. While the stability of such nanoparticles is typically assayed in simple in vitro tests, their stability in a mammalian organism remains unknown. Here, we show that firmly grafted polymer shells around gold nanoparticles may degrade when injected into rats. We synthesized monodisperse radioactively labelled gold nanoparticles (198Au) and engineered an 111In-labelled polymer shell around them. Upon intravenous injection into rats, quantitative biodistribution analyses performed independently for 198Au and 111In showed partial removal of the polymer shell in vivo. While 198Au accumulates mostly in the liver, part of the 111In shows a non-particulate biodistribution similar to intravenous injection of chelated 111In. Further in vitro studies suggest that degradation of the polymer shell is caused by proteolytic enzymes in the liver. Our results show that even nanoparticles with high colloidal stability can change their physicochemical properties in vivo.

  15. Dielectrophoresis of gold nanoparticles conjugated to DNA origami structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Henning-Knechtel

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA nanostructures are promising construction materials to bridge the gap between self-assembly of functional molecules and conventional top-down fabrication methods in nanotechnology. Their positioning onto specific locations of a microstructured substrate is an important task towards this aim. Here we study manipulation and positioning of pristine and of gold nanoparticle-conjugated tubular DNA origami structures using ac dielectrophoresis. The dielectrophoretic behavior was investigated employing fluorescence microscopy. For the pristine origami, a significant dielectrophoretic response was found to take place in the megahertz range, whereas, due to the higher polarizability of the metallic nanoparticles, the nanoparticle/DNA hybrid structures required a lower electrical field strength and frequency for a comparable trapping at the edges of the electrode structure. The nanoparticle conjugation additionally resulted in a remarkable alteration of the DNA structure arrangement. The growth of linear, chain-like structures in between electrodes at applied frequencies in the megahertz range was observed. The long-range chain formation is caused by a local, gold nanoparticle-induced field concentration along the DNA nanostructures, which in turn, creates dielectrophoretic forces that enable the observed self-alignment of the hybrid structures.

  16. PREPARATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF CHITOSAN–GOLD NANOCOMPOSITES FOR DRUG DELIVERY APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    SEUNG-CHUL LEE; SANG-WHA LEE; IK-JOONG KANG

    2010-01-01

    Chitosan–gold nanocomposites were fabricated via a seed-mediated goldshell growth over chitosan–gold nanocomplex and examined as a potential biomedical agent for drug delivery. Chitosan–gold nanocomplex was formed by the electrostatic interaction between of cationic chitosan nanoparticles (ca. 50 nm) and anionic gold colloids (ca. 1–3 nm) and the subsequent reduction of gold salts was conducted to form the gold clusters over the chitosan nanoparticles in the presence of reducing ascorbic acid...

  17. Aptamer biosensor for dopamine based on a gold electrode modified with carbon nanoparticles and thionine labeled gold nanoparticles as probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Yaqiong; Hun, Xu; Liu, Fang; Wen, Xiaolong; Luo, Xiliang

    2015-01-01

    We describe a biosensor for dopamine that is based on the use of a gold electrode modified with carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) coupled to thionine labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) acting as signal amplifiers. The biosensor was constructed by first modifying the CNPs on the gold electrode and adsorbing the thionine on the surface of the AuNPs, and then linking the complementary strand of the dopamine aptamer to the AuNPs via gold-thiol chemistry. Next, dopamine aptamer is added and the duplex is formed on the surface. On addition of a sample containing dopamine, it will interact with aptamer and cause the release of the electrochemical probe which then will be adsorbed on the surface of the CNP-modified gold electrode and detected by differential pulse voltammetry. The current is linearly related to the concentration of dopamine in the 30 nM to 6.0 μM ranges. The detection limit is as low as 10 nM, and the RSD is 3.1 % at a 0.3 μM level (for n = 11). The protocol was successfully applied to the determination of dopamine in spiked human urine samples. We perceive that this method holds promise as a widely applicable platform for aptamer-based electrochemical detection of small molecules. (author)

  18. Role of Gold Nanoparticles in Early Detection of Oral Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Sanjay Reddy

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the science of the small; the very small. It is the use and manipulation of matter at a tiny scale. At this size, atoms and molecules work differently and provide a variety of surprising and interesting uses. These nanoparticles can be used to detect/mondor cancer (by utilizing or adding optical, magnetic, and fluorescent properties. This novel imaging tool can lead to significant improvements in cancer therapy due to earlier detection, accurate staging and microtumor identification. In this review, we will summarize the current state of the art of gold nanoparticles in early detection of oral cancer.

  19. Antibacterial nanocarriers of resveratrol with gold and silver nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sohyun [College of Pharmacy, Inje University, 197 Inje-ro Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Song-Hyun [National Creative Research Initiatives (NCRI) Center for Isogeometric Optimal Design, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Inyoung [School of Civil, Environmental and Architecture Engineering, Korea University, 145 Anam-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Soomin [National Creative Research Initiatives (NCRI) Center for Isogeometric Optimal Design, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Yohan [College of Pharmacy, Inje University, 197 Inje-ro Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seonho [National Creative Research Initiatives (NCRI) Center for Isogeometric Optimal Design, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Youmie, E-mail: youmiep@inje.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Inje University, 197 Inje-ro Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); National Creative Research Initiatives (NCRI) Center for Isogeometric Optimal Design, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the preparation of resveratrol nanocarrier systems and the evaluation of their in vitro antibacterial activities. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for resveratrol nanocarrier systems were synthesized using green synthetic routes. During the synthesis steps, resveratrol was utilized as a reducing agent to chemically reduce gold and silver ions to AuNPs and AgNPs. This system provides green and eco-friendly synthesis routes that do not involve additional chemical reducing agents. Resveratrol nanocarriers with AuNPs (Res-AuNPs) and AgNPs (Res-AgNPs) were observed to be spherical and to exhibit characteristic surface plasmon resonance at 547 nm and at 412–417 nm, respectively. The mean size of the nanoparticles ranged from 8.32 to 21.84 nm, as determined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The face-centered cubic structure of the Res-AuNPs was confirmed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Fourier-transform infrared spectra indicated that the hydroxyl groups and C=C in the aromatic ring of resveratrol were involved in the reduction reaction. Res-AuNPs retained excellent colloidal stability during ultracentrifugation and re-dispersion, suggesting that resveratrol also played a role as a capping agent. Zeta potentials of Res-AuNPs and Res-AgNPs were in the range of − 20.58 to − 48.54 mV. Generally, against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, the Res-AuNPs and Res-AgNPs exhibited greater antibacterial activity compared to that of resveratrol alone. Among the tested strains, the highest antibacterial activity of the Res-AuNPs was observed against Streptococcus pneumoniae. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate during the synthesis of Res-AgNPs slightly increased their antibacterial activity. These results suggest that the newly developed resveratrol nanocarrier systems with metallic nanoparticles show potential for application as nano-antibacterial agents with enhanced activities. - Highlights

  20. Naked eye detection of infertility based on sperm protamine-induced aggregation of heparin gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidya, Raj; Saji, Alex

    2018-05-01

    The development of an easy to use, one-pot, environmentally friendly, non-invasive and label-free colorimetric probe for the determination of semen protamines, the biochemical marker of male fertility, using heparin gold nanoparticles (HAuNPs) is presented. The affinity of HAuNPs for protamines was due to the electrostatic interactions between polycationic protamine and polyanionic heparin. The binding of HAuNPs to protamine was characterized by variation in the plasmon absorption spectra followed by a visibly observable colour change of the solution from red to blue. We observed a red shift in the plasmon peak and the method exhibited linearity in the range of 10-70 ng/mL with a detection limit of 5 ng/mL, which is much lower than that reported for colorimetric sensors of protamine. The colour change and the variation in the absorbance of HAuNPs were highly specific for protamines in the presence of different interfering compounds and the method was successfully applied for determining protamine in real samples of semen and serum. Rather than a quantitative estimation, it seems that the method provides a quick screening between a large array of positive and negative samples and, moreover, it maintains the privacy of the user. The method appears to be simple and would be very useful in third-world countries where high-tech diagnostic aids are inaccessible to the majority of the population. Graphical Abstract Heparin gold nanoparticles aided visual detection of infertility.

  1. Gold nanoparticles modified with coordination compounds of metals: synthesis and application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beloglazkina, Elena K; Majouga, Alexander G; Romashkina, Renata B; Zyk, Nikolai V; Zefirov, Nikolai S

    2012-01-01

    The data on the preparation methods and applications of gold nanoparticles with coordinated metal ions on the surfaces are generalized. The currently available data on the interaction of metal ions with gold nanoparticles modified with organic (particularly, sulfur-containing) ligands comprising terminal chelating groups are considered in detail as well as the applications of such modified nanoparticles. The bibliography includes 141 references.

  2. Poly-thiosemicarbazide Membrane for Gold Adsorption and In-situ Growth of Gold Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Parra, Luis F.

    2012-12-01

    In this work the synergy between a polymer containing chelate sites and gold ions was explored by the fabrication of a polymeric membrane with embedded gold nanoparticles inside its matrix and by developing a process to recover gold from acidic solutions. After realizing that the thiosemicarbazide groups present in the monomeric unit of poly-thiosemicarbazide (PTSC) formed strong complexes with Au ions, membrane technology was used to exploit this property to its maximum. The incorporation of metal nanoparticles into polymeric matrices with current technologies involves either expensive and complicated procedures or leads to poor results in terms of agglomeration, loading, dispersion, stability or efficient use of raw materials. The fabrication procedure described in this thesis solves these problems by fabricating a PTSC membrane containing 33.5 wt% in the form of 2.9 nm gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) by a three step simple and scalable procedure. It showed outstanding results in all of the areas mentioned above and demonstrated catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-Nitrophenol (4−NP) to 4-Aminophenol (4−AP). The current exponential demand of gold for electronics has encouraged the development of efficient processes to recycle it. Several adsorbents used to recover gold from acidic solutions can be found in the literature with outstanding maximum uptakes,yet, poor kinetics leading to an overall inefficient process. The method developed in this dissertation consisted in permeating the gold-containing solution through a PTSC membrane that will capture all the Au ions by forming a metal complex with them. Forcing the ions through the pores of the membrane eliminates the diffusion limitations and the adsorption will only depended on the fast complexation kinetics, resulting in a very efficient process. A flux as high as 1868 L/h m2 was enough to capture >90% of the precious metal present in a solution of 100 ppm Au. The maximum uptake achieved without sacrificing

  3. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Bucharskaya

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT/photodynamic (PDT therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells.

  4. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharskaya, Alla; Maslyakova, Galina; Terentyuk, Georgy; Yakunin, Alexander; Avetisyan, Yuri; Bibikova, Olga; Tuchina, Elena; Khlebtsov, Boris; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-08-09

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT)/photodynamic (PDT) therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells.

  5. Friction fluctuations of gold nanoparticles in the superlubric regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzel, Dirk; de Wijn, Astrid S.; Vorholzer, Matthias; Schirmeisen, Andre

    2018-04-01

    Superlubricity, or alternatively termed structural (super)lubrictiy, is a concept where ultra-low friction is expected at the interface between sliding surfaces if these surfaces are incommensurate and thus unable to interlock. In this work, we now report on sudden, reversible, friction changes that have been observed during AFM-based nanomanipulation experiments of gold nanoparticles sliding on highly oriented pyrolythic graphite. These effects can be explained by rotations of the gold nanoparticles within the concept of structural superlubricity, where the occurrence of ultra-low friction can depend extremely sensitively on the relative orientation between the slider and the substrate. From our theoretical simulations it will become apparent how even miniscule magnitudes of rotation are compatible to the observed effects and how size and shape of the particles can influence the dependence between friction and relative orientation.

  6. Paper-based tuberculosis diagnostic devices with colorimetric gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Tsung-Ting; Shen, Shu-Wei; Chen, Chien-Fu; Cheng, Chao-Min

    2013-01-01

    A colorimetric sensing strategy employing gold nanoparticles and a paper assay platform has been developed for tuberculosis diagnosis. Unmodified gold nanoparticles and single-stranded detection oligonucleotides are used to achieve rapid diagnosis without complicated and time-consuming thiolated or other surface-modified probe preparation processes. To eliminate the use of sophisticated equipment for data analysis, the color variance for multiple detection results was simultaneously collected and concentrated on cellulose paper with the data readout transmitted for cloud computing via a smartphone. The results show that the 2.6 nM tuberculosis mycobacterium target sequences extracted from patients can easily be detected, and the turnaround time after the human DNA is extracted from clinical samples was approximately 1 h. (paper)

  7. Towards Effective Photothermal/Photodynamic Treatment Using Plasmonic Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucharskaya, Alla; Maslyakova, Galina; Terentyuk, Georgy; Yakunin, Alexander; Avetisyan, Yuri; Bibikova, Olga; Tuchina, Elena; Khlebtsov, Boris; Khlebtsov, Nikolai; Tuchin, Valery

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of different size and shape are widely used as photosensitizers for cancer diagnostics and plasmonic photothermal (PPT)/photodynamic (PDT) therapy, as nanocarriers for drug delivery and laser-mediated pathogen killing, even the underlying mechanisms of treatment effects remain poorly understood. There is a need in analyzing and improving the ways to increase accumulation of AuNP in tumors and other crucial steps in interaction of AuNPs with laser light and tissues. In this review, we summarize our recent theoretical, experimental, and pre-clinical results on light activated interaction of AuNPs with tissues and cells. Specifically, we discuss a combined PPT/PDT treatment of tumors and killing of pathogen bacteria with gold-based nanocomposites and atomic clusters, cell optoporation, and theoretical simulations of nanoparticle-mediated laser heating of tissues and cells. PMID:27517913

  8. Detection of Biomarkers Using LSPR Substrate with Gold Nanoparticle Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Min Bae

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the biosensing platform, label-free detection technique provides advantages such as the short analysis time and the cost-effectiveness. In this study, we showed the feasibility of the LSPR substrate with gold nanoparticle array for detecting low density lipoprotein (LDL and high density lipoprotein (HDL without labeling. The LSPR substrate was fabricated through the lift-off process with the anodized alumina mask, and its LSPR phenomenon was observed by measuring the optical transmission of substrate. The antibodies were immobilized on the gold nanoparticle array via the chemical binding, in which the 11-MUA was used as the linker to bind the antibodies. The binding of antibodies was confirmed by observing the shift of LSPR peak of the substrate. Finally, with the LSPR substrates with the antibodies immobilized, the detection of LDL and HDL was investigated. As a result, LDL and HDL could be detected in the clinically available concentration range, respectively.

  9. Gold and magnetic oxide/gold core/shell nanoparticles as bio-functional nanoprobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, I-Im S; Njoki, Peter N; Wang, Lingyan; Mott, Derrick; Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Park, Hye-Young; Wang Xin

    2008-01-01

    The ability to create bio-functional nanoprobes for the detection of biological reactivity is important for developing bioassay and diagnostic methods. This paper describes the findings of an investigation of the surface functionalization of gold (Au) and magnetic nanoparticles coated with gold shells (M/Au) by proteins and spectroscopic labels for the creation of nanoprobes for use in surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) assays. Highly monodispersed Au nanoparticles and M/Au nanoparticles with two types of magnetic nanoparticle cores (Fe 2 O 3 and MnZn ferrite) were studied as model systems for the bio-functionalization and Raman labeling. Comparison of the SERS intensities obtained with different particle sizes (30-100 nm) and samples in solution versus on solid substrates have revealed important information about the manipulation of the SERS signals. In contrast to the salt-induced uncontrollable and irreversible aggregation of nanoparticles, the ability to use a centrifugation method to control the formation of stable small clustering sizes of nanoparticles was shown to enhance SERS intensities for samples in solution as compared with samples on solid substrates. A simple method for labeling protein-capped Au nanoparticles with Raman-active molecules was also described. The functionalized Au and M/Au nanoparticles are shown to exhibit the desired functional properties for the detection of SERS signals in the magnetically separated reaction products. These results are discussed in terms of the interparticle distance dependence of 'hot-spot' SERS sites and the delineation of the parameters for controlling the core-shell reactivity of the magnetic functional nanocomposite materials in bio-separation and spectroscopic probing

  10. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gotman, Irena; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.

    2016-01-01

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  11. Gold nanoparticles on MoS2 layered crystal flakes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Wei; Pankratov, Vladimir; Huttula, Marko; Shi, Xinying; Saukko, Sami; Huang, Zhongjia; Zhang, Meng

    2015-01-01

    Inorganic layered crystal MoS 2 is considered as one of the most promising and efficient semiconductor materials for future transistors, photoelectronics, and electrocatalysis. To boost MoS 2 -based material applications, one direction is to grow physically and chemically reactive nanoparticles onto MoS 2 . Here we report on a simple route to synthesis crystalized MoS 2 –Au complexes. The gold nanoparticles were grown on MoS 2 flakes through a wet method in the oxygen free environment at room temperature. Nanoparticles with diameters varying from 9 nm to 429 nm were controlled by the molar ratios of MoS 2 and HAuCl 4 precursors. MoS 2 host flakes keep intrinsic honeycomb layered structures and the Au nanoparticles cubic-center crystal microstructures. From product chemical states analysis, the synthesis was found driven by redox reactions between the sulphide and the chloroauric acid. Photoluminescence measurement showed that introducing Au nanoparticles onto MoS 2 stacks substantially prompted excitonic transitions of stacks, as an analogy for doping Si wafers with dopants. Such composites may have potential applications in wide ranges similar as the doped Si. - Highlights: • The Au nanoparticles were decorated on MoS 2 in oxygen free ambiences via a wet method. • The Au nanoparticles are size-controllable and crystalized. • Chemical reaction scheme was clarified. • The MoS 2 –Au complexes have strong photoluminescent properties

  12. Vascular Targeting of a Gold Nanoparticle to Breast Cancer Metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peiris, Pubudu M; Deb, Partha; Doolittle, Elizabeth; Doron, Gilad; Goldberg, Amy; Govender, Priya; Shah, Shruti; Rao, Swetha; Carbone, Sarah; Cotey, Thomas; Sylvestre, Meilyn; Singh, Sohaj; Schiemann, William P; Lee, Zhenghong; Karathanasis, Efstathios

    2015-08-01

    The vast majority of breast cancer deaths are due to metastatic disease. Although deep tissue targeting of nanoparticles is suitable for some primary tumors, vascular targeting may be a more attractive strategy for micrometastasis. This study combined a vascular targeting strategy with the enhanced targeting capabilities of a nanoparticle to evaluate the ability of a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) to specifically target the early spread of metastatic disease. As a ligand for the vascular targeting strategy, we utilized a peptide targeting alpha(v) beta(3) integrin, which is functionally linked to the development of micrometastases at a distal site. By employing a straightforward radiolabeling method to incorporate Technetium-99m into the AuNPs, we used the high sensitivity of radionuclide imaging to monitor the longitudinal accumulation of the nanoparticles in metastatic sites. Animal and histological studies showed that vascular targeting of the nanoparticle facilitated highly accurate targeting of micrometastasis in the 4T1 mouse model of breast cancer metastasis using radionuclide imaging and a low dose of the nanoparticle. Because of the efficient targeting scheme, 14% of the injected AuNP deposited at metastatic sites in the lungs within 60 min after injection, indicating that the vascular bed of metastasis is a viable target site for nanoparticles. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  13. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotman, Irena; Psakhie, Sergey G.; Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.; Gutmanas, Elazar Y.

    2016-08-01

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  14. Iron oxide and gold nanoparticles in cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotman, Irena, E-mail: gotman@technion.ac.il; Gutmanas, Elazar Y., E-mail: gutmanas@technion.ac.il [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 Israel (Israel); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Psakhie, Sergey G. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of Strength Physics and Materials Science SB RAS, Tomsk, 634055 (Russian Federation); Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S. [Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-08-02

    Continuous research activities in the field of nanomedicine in the past decade have, to a great extent, been focused on nanoparticle technologies for cancer therapy. Gold and iron oxide nanoparticles (NP) are two of the most studied inorganic nanomaterials due to their unique optical and magnetic properties. Both types of NPs are emerging as promising systems for anti-tumor drug delivery and for nanoparticle-mediated thermal therapy of cancer. In thermal therapy, localized heating inside tumors or in proximity of tumor cells can be induced, for example, with Au NPs by radiofrequency ablation heating or conversion of photon energy (photothermal therapy) and in iron oxide magnetic NPs by heat generation through relaxation in an alternating magnetic field (magnetic hyperthermia). Furthermore, the superparamagnetic properties of iron oxide nanoparticles have led to their use as potent MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) contrast agents. Surface modification/coating can produce NPs with tailored and desired properties, such as enhanced blood circulation time, stability, biocompatibility and water solubility. To target nanoparticles to specific tumor cells, NPs should be conjugated with targeting moieties on the surface which bind to receptors or other molecular structures on the cell surface. The article presents several approaches to enhancing the specificity of Au and iron oxide nanoparticles for tumor tissue by appropriate surface modification/functionalization, as well as the effect of these treatments on the saturation magnetization value of iron oxide NPs. The use of other nanoparticles and nanostructures in cancer treatment is also briefly reviewed.

  15. The reactivity of phenylethanethiolated gold nanoparticles with acetic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Nan; Gan, Zibao; Liao, Lingwen; Zhuang, Shengli; Wu, Zhikun

    2017-10-24

    We report the size-dependent reactivity of phenylethanethiolated gold nanoparticles with acetic acid. Employing this reactivity, we synthesize a novel nanocluster Au 38 (PET) 26 (PET: phenylethanethiolate), which is otherwise difficult to obtain and exhibits remarkably different photoluminescence and electrochemical properties compared with the well-known Au 38 (PET) 24 nanoclusters. And the reaction process between Au 38 (PET) 26 and acetic acid was probed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry.

  16. Uptake of gold nanoparticles in primary human endothelial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingberg, Henrik; Oddershede, Lene B.; Löschner, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are relevant in nanomedicine for drug delivery in the vascular system, where endothelial cells are the first point of contact. We investigated the uptake of 80 nm AuNPs in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by flow cytometry, 3D confocal microscopy....... Uptake of AuNPs in HUVECs occurred mainly by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and trafficking to membrane enclosures in the form of single particles and agglomerates of 2–3 particles....

  17. One-step synthesis of gold bimetallic nanoparticles with various metal-compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratescu, Maria Antoaneta; Takai, Osamu; Saito, Nagahiro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles in an aqueous solution discharge. ► Alloying gold with divalent sp metals, trivalent sp metals, 3d or 4d metals. ► Formation mechanism of bimetallic nanoparticles by metal reduction and gold erosion. ► Blue and red shift of surface plasmon resonance. -- Abstract: A rapid, one-step process for the synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles by simultaneous metal reduction and gold erosion in an aqueous solution discharge was investigated. Gold bimetallic nanoparticles were obtained by alloying gold with various types of metals belonging to one of the following categories: divalent sp metals, trivalent sp metals, 3d or 4d metals. The composition of the various gold bimetallic nanoparticles obtained depends on electrochemical factors, charge transfer between gold and other metal, and initial concentration of metal in solution. Transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy show that the gold bimetallic nanoparticles were of mixed pattern, with sizes of between 5 and 20 nm. A red-shift of the surface plasmon resonance band in the case of the bimetallic nanoparticles Au–Fe, Au–Ga, and Au–In, and a blue-shift of the plasmon band of the Au–Ag nanoparticles was observed. In addition, the interaction of gold bimetallic nanoparticles with unpaired electrons, provided by a stable free radical molecule, was highest for those NPs obtained by alloying gold with a 3d metal

  18. Complexity of gold nanoparticle formation disclosed by dynamics study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelbrekt, Christian; Jensen, Palle Skovhus; Sørensen, Karsten

    2013-01-01

    Although chemically synthesized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from gold salt (HAuCl4) are among the most studied nanomaterials, understanding the formation mechanisms is a challenge mainly due to limited dynamics information. A range of in situ methods with down to millisecond (ms) time resolution...... have been employed in the present report to monitor time-dependent physical and chemical properties in aqueous solution during the chemical synthesis. Chemical synthesis of AuNPs is a reduction process accompanied by release of ions and protons, and formation of solid particles. Dynamic information...... from redox potential, pH, conductivity, and turbidity of the solution enables distinct observation of reduction and nucleation/growth of AuNPs phases. The dynamics of the electrochemical potential shows that reduction of gold salt (HAuCl 4 and its hydrolyzed forms) occurs via intermediate [AuCl 2...

  19. Colorimetric detection of cholesterol based on enzyme modified gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirala, Narsingh R.; Saxena, Preeti S.; Srivastava, Anchal

    2018-02-01

    We develop a simple colorimetric method for determination of free cholesterol in aqueous solution based on functionalized gold nanoparticles with cholesterol oxidase. Functionalized gold nanoparticles interact with free cholesterol to produce H2O2 in proportion to the level of cholesterol visually is being detected. The quenching in optical properties and agglomeration of functionalized gold nanoparticles play a key role in cholesterol sensing due to the electron accepting property of H2O2. While the lower ranges of cholesterol (lower detection limit i.e. 0.2 mg/dL) can be effectively detected using fluorescence study, the absorption study attests evident visual color change which becomes effective for detection of higher ranges of cholesterol (lower detection limit i.e. 19 mg/dL). The shades of red gradually change to blue/purple as the level of cholesterol detected (as evident at 100 mg/dL) using unaided eye without the use of expensive instruments. The potential of the proposed method to be applied in the field is shown by the proposed cholesterol measuring color wheel.

  20. Gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric ELISA for quantification of ractopamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Shuaijuan; Zhou, Tianjiao; Yin, Bingjie; He, Pingli

    2018-03-07

    The work describes a gold nanoparticle-based colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for ractopamine. The ELISA is based on an indirect competitive approach. In the presence of ractopamine, gold(III) ions are oxidized by H 2 O 2 to form red AuNPs. On the other hand, the AuNP in solution are purple-blue due to aggregation if the sample does not contain ractopamine. The absorption, best measured at 560 nm, increases linearly in the 2 to 512 ng·mL -1 ractopamine concentration range, and the detection limit is as low as 0.35 ng·mL -1 in urine. Ractopamine can also be detected visually, even in the presence of other β-agonists and antibiotics. The results obtained by this method are consistent with those obtained by LC-MS/MS as demonstrated by analysis of sheep urine. The ELISA method described here is inexpensive, easy-to-use, and suitable for rapid screening of ractopamine in animal samples. Graphical abstract Schematic presentation of a colorimetric indirect competitive immunoassay for ractopamine. It is based on the use of catalase labeled IgG and the measurement of the absorption of red gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) that are generated by the reaction of gold ions with H 2 O 2 . In the absence of ractopamine, the solution becomes blue.

  1. Synthesis of Nanometer-Sized Poly (methyl methacrylate) Polymer Network by Gold Nanoparticle Template

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fu-Ken; Hsieh, Shang-Yu; Ko, Fu-Hsiang; Chu, Tieh-Chi; Dai, Bau-Tong

    2003-06-01

    Gold nanoparticle/polymer composites have been produced using a one-system polymer synthesis. The linear polymer, poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA, MW = 15,000 g/mol) is applied for the stabilization of gold nanoparticles. The Fourier transfer infrared (FT-IR) analysis data and transition electron microscopy (TEM) image reveal that the core shell structure of gold/PMMA nanocomposite has been synthesized. The ratio of the concentration of the capping polymer material to the concentration of the gold precursor could control the sizes of gold nanoparticles. With specific concentration of the reductant, the core-shell nanostructure could be fluctuated in order. After heating treatment, the network structure of PMMA capped gold nanoparticles could be synthesized as confirmed by the TEM image. The result indicates that PMMA not only acts as the stabilizer, but also as the bridge of the neighboring gold nanoparticles.

  2. Manganese oxides supported on gold nanoparticles: new findings and current controversies for the role of gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Hosseini, Seyedeh Maedeh; Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Tomo, Tatsuya; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2015-12-01

    We synthesized manganese oxides supported on gold nanoparticles (diameter oxide is deposited on the gold nanoparticles. The compounds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive spectrometry, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and atomic absorption spectroscopy. In the next step, the water-oxidizing activities of these compounds in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate as a non-oxo transfer oxidant were studied. The results show that these compounds are good catalysts toward water oxidation with a turnover frequency of 1.0 ± 0.1 (mmol O2/(mol Mn·s)). A comparison with other previously reported Mn oxides and important factors influencing the water-oxidizing activities of Mn oxides is also discussed.

  3. T cells enhance gold nanoparticle delivery to tumors in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bear Adham

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gold nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy (PTT has shown great potential for the treatment of cancer in mouse studies and is now being evaluated in clinical trials. For this therapy, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs are injected intravenously and are allowed to accumulate within the tumor via the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR effect. The tumor is then irradiated with a near infrared laser, whose energy is absorbed by the AuNPs and translated into heat. While reliance on the EPR effect for tumor targeting has proven adequate for vascularized tumors in small animal models, the efficiency and specificity of tumor delivery in vivo, particularly in tumors with poor blood supply, has proven challenging. In this study, we examine whether human T cells can be used as cellular delivery vehicles for AuNP transport into tumors. We first demonstrate that T cells can be efficiently loaded with 45 nm gold colloid nanoparticles without affecting viability or function (e.g. migration and cytokine production. Using a human tumor xenograft mouse model, we next demonstrate that AuNP-loaded T cells retain their capacity to migrate to tumor sites in vivo. In addition, the efficiency of AuNP delivery to tumors in vivo is increased by more than four-fold compared to injection of free PEGylated AuNPs and the use of the T cell delivery system also dramatically alters the overall nanoparticle biodistribution. Thus, the use of T cell chaperones for AuNP delivery could enhance the efficacy of nanoparticle-based therapies and imaging applications by increasing AuNP tumor accumulation.

  4. Peptide synthesis of gold nanoparticles: the early steps of gold reduction investigated by density functional theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toroz, Dimitrios; Corni, Stefano

    2011-03-09

    Gold nanoparticles can be synthesized by reducing chloroaurate(III) ions in the presence of peptides. Here, such reduction for serine and tyrosine is studied by density functional theory including solvent effects. We find that the formation of chloroaurate complexes of these amino acids is thermodynamically viable and facilitates the reduction of Au(III), to a greater degree for tyrosine as found in experiments. Our results also suggest a rationale for the behavior of tyrosine-intercalated peptides.

  5. Molecular recognition by gold, silver and copper nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauran, Yannick; Brioude, Arnaud; Coleman, Anthony W; Rhimi, Moez; Kim, Beonjoom

    2013-01-01

    The intrinsic physical properties of the noble metal nanoparticles, which are highly sensitive to the nature of their local molecular environment, make such systems ideal for the detection of molecular recognition events. The current review describes the state of the art concerning molecular recognition of Noble metal nanoparticles. In the first part the preparation of such nanoparticles is discussed along with methods of capping and stabilization. A brief discussion of the three common methods of functionalization: Electrostatic adsorption; Chemisorption; Affinity-based coordination is given. In the second section a discussion of the optical and electrical properties of nanoparticles is given to aid the reader in understanding the use of such properties in molecular recognition. In the main section the various types of capping agents for molecular recognition; nucleic acid coatings, protein coatings and molecules from the family of supramolecular chemistry are described along with their numerous applications. Emphasis for the nucleic acids is on complementary oligonucleotide and aptamer recognition. For the proteins the recognition properties of antibodies form the core of the section. With respect to the supramolecular systems the cyclodextrins, calix[n]arenes, dendrimers, crown ethers and the cucurbitales are treated in depth. Finally a short section deals with the possible toxicity of the nanoparticles, a concern in public health. PMID:23977421

  6. Curcumin coated gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, cytotoxicity, antioxidant activity and its comparison with citrate coated gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elnaz Shaabani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Biological applications of gold nanoparticles have limitations because of the toxic chemicals used in their synthesis. Curcumin can be used as reducing as well as capping agent in synthesis of GNPs to eliminate the cytotoxicity. Conjugation of curcumin to gold also helps in increasing its solubility and bioavailability. Materials and Methods: Here we report synthesis of gold nanoparticles coated with citrate and curcumin and of two different sizes via chemical routes. UV-Vis absorbance spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering and Transmission Electron Microscopy were applied to study the average particle size, size stability of the samples and zeta potential. Fourier transform infrared, Raman Spectroscopy and Fluorescence Spectroscopy were applied for detection of curcumin on the surface of GNPs. The antioxidant activity was evaluated using DPPH assay and Cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay.Results: Particles were synthesized of 6 and 16 nm size. The average particle size was found to be 21.7 ± 5.7 by TEM. The zeta potential on the surface of Cur-GNPs was negative and larger than 25 mV which is a sign of their high stability. The stability of these particles (with different coatings but with similar sizes at different time intervals (up to 3 months and also in different media like cell culture medium, different buffers, glucose and at different pH conditions have been investigated thoroughly. Appearance of functional groups assigned to curcumin in FTIR and SERS spectra are sign of presence of curcumin in the sample. The quenching of the fluorescence in the presence of GNPs reveals the clear indication of the capping and binding of curcumin with GNPs. Cur-GNP1 (16 nm were found to exhibit highest antioxidant activity than other gold nanoparticles. Cytotoxicity evaluation using MTT assay on L929 cell line proved curcumin coated gold nanoparticles were non-toxic up to 40 ppm.Conclusion: The results revealed that larger curcumin

  7. Controlling electrostatic co-assembly using ion-containing copolymers : from surfactants to nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Berret, J. -F.

    2011-01-01

    In this review, we address the issue of the electrostatic complexation between charged-neutral diblock copolymers and oppositely charged nanocolloids. We show that nanocolloids such as surfactant micelles and iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles share similar properties when mixed with charged-neutral diblocks. Above a critical charge ratio, core-shell hierarchical structures form spontaneously under direct mixing conditions. The core-shell structures are identified by a combination of small-ang...

  8. Gold and silver nanoparticles conjugated with heparin derivative possess anti-angiogenesis properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, Melissa M; Linhardt, Robert J; Kumar, Ashavani; Ajayan, Pulickel; Mousa, Shaymaa; Dyskin, Evgeny; Yalcin, Murat; Mousa, Shaker A

    2009-01-01

    Silver and gold nanoparticles display unique physical and biological properties that have been extensively studied for biological and medical applications. Typically, gold and silver nanoparticles are prepared by chemical reductants that utilize excess toxic reactants, which need to be removed for biological purposes. We utilized a clean method involving a single synthetic step to prepare metal nanoparticles for evaluating potential effects on angiogenesis modulation. These nanoparticles were prepared by reducing silver nitrate and gold chloride with diaminopyridinyl (DAP)-derivatized heparin (HP) polysaccharides. Both gold and silver nanoparticles reduced with DAPHP exhibited effective inhibition of basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2)-induced angiogenesis, with an enhanced anti-angiogenesis efficacy with the conjugation to DAPHP (P<0.01) as compared to glucose conjugation. These results suggest that DAPHP-reduced silver nanoparticles and gold nanoparticles have potential in pathological angiogenesis accelerated disorders such as cancer and inflammatory diseases.

  9. Interactions of gold nanoparticles with the interior of hollow graphitized carbon nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Torre, Alessandro; Fay, Michael W; Rance, Graham A; Del Carmen Gimenez-Lopez, Maria; Solomonsz, William A; Brown, Paul D; Khlobystov, Andrei N

    2012-04-23

    Interactions of free-standing gold nanoparticles and hollow graphitized nanofibers in colloidal suspension are investigated, revealing the first example of the controlled arrangement of nanoparticles inside nano-containers, as directed by their internal structure. The ordering is highly effective for small gold nanoparticles whose sizes are commensurate with the height of graphitic step-edges in the graphitized carbon nanofibers and is less effective for larger gold nanoparticles. Studies aimed at understanding the role of the organic-solvent surface tension, employed for the filling experiments, demonstrate that gold nanoparticles become preferentially anchored into the hollow graphitized carbon nanofibers under a mixture of pentane/CO(2) in supercritical conditions. It is shown that a three-step cleaning procedure enables effective removal of gold nanoparticles adsorbed on the exterior surface of graphitized carbon nanofibers, while ordered arrays of encapsulated nanoparticles are retained. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Coalescence and Collisions of Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Pérez-Tijerina

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the assembling of small gold clusters subject to collisions and close contact coalescence by using molecular dynamics simulations to simulate events that occur typically in the sputtering process of synthesis. Our results support the notion that the kinetics of coalescence processes strongly determine the geometry and structure of the final particle. While impact velocities, relative orientations, and the initial shape of the interacting particles are unlikely to strictly determine the structural details of the newly formed particle, we found that high initial temperatures and/or impact velocities increase the probability of appearance of icosahedral-like structures, Wulff polyhedra are likely to be formed as a product of the interactions between nanospheres, while the appearance of fcc particles of approximately cuboctahedral shape is mainly due to the interaction between icosahedra.

  11. Gold Nanoparticles with Stably Embedded Cu-64 and Their Use in Nanoparticle Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, A.I.; Frellsen, Anders Floor; Hansen, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    64Cu is a popular radionuclide for PET imaging and when 64Cu2+ is mixed with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) it adheres to the gold surface. Taking advantage of this, we developed methods to trap the 64Cu within the AuNPs by embedding under additional layers of gold. This resulted in radiolabeling...... to yield a very stable radiolabel that can accurately trace AuNPs in vivo. Such chelator-free radiolabeling removes traditional concerns over the use of chelators for 64Cu, notably instabilities of chelators, such as DOTA, and their ability to alter the surface and thus the biodistribution of the compounds...

  12. Synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles using Ficus religiosa extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirtee Wani

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We report a cost effective and eco-friendly biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (F-AuNPs using aqueous extract of Ficus religiosa as the reducing and stabilizing agent. These nanoparticles were characterized by various techniques such as UV-Vis, XRD, TEM and FTIR. The characteristic surface plasmon peak was observed at 540 nm while XRD analysis suggested it to be a face-centered cubic (fcc structure with peaks at 38.06, 44.46, 64.75 and 77.56. FTIR studies indicated the capping of the nanoparticles with polyphenols, amines and carboxylates present in the extract of Ficus religiosa whereas TEM analysis showed spherical morphology with other shapes such as triangles and hexagons. The F-AuNPs were found to be non-toxic to HEK 293 cells, thereby suggesting their potential application in the field of nanobiotechnology.

  13. Poly(amino acid) functionalized maghemite and gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perego, Davide; Manuel Domínguez-Vera, José; Gálvez, Natividad; Masciocchi, Norberto; Guagliardi, Antonietta

    2013-01-01

    Bimodal MRI/OI imaging probes are of great interest in nanomedicine. Although many organic polymers have been studied thoroughly for in vivo applications, reports on the use of poly(amino acid)s as coating polymers are scarce. In this paper, poly-(d-glutamic acid, d-lysine) (PGL) has been used for coating maghemite and gold nanoparticles. An advantage of this flexible and biocompatible polymer is that, once anchored to the nanoparticle surface, dangling lysine amino groups are available for the incorporation of new functionalities. As an example, Alexa Fluor derivatives have been attached to PGL-coated maghemite nanoparticles to obtain magnetic/fluorescent materials. These dual-property materials could be used as bimodal MRI/OI probes for in vivo imaging. (paper)

  14. Electrostatic assembly of Cu2O nanoparticles on DNA templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Wei Gang; Qi Bin; Zhou Hualan; Liu Zhiguo; Song Yonghai; Yang Xiurong; Li Zhuang

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a method for highly ordered assembly of cuprous oxide (Cu 2 O) nanoparticles (NPs) by DNA templates was reported. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-capped Cu 2 O NPs were adsorbed onto well-aligned λ-DNA chains to form necklace-like one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures. UV-vis, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the nanostructure. The Cu 2 O nanostructures fabricated with the method are both highly ordered and quite straight

  15. High-Yield Synthesis and Applications of Anisotropic Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigderman, Leonid

    This work will describe research directed towards the synthesis of anisotropic gold nanoparticles as well as their functionalization and biological applications. The thesis will begin by describing a new technique for the high-yield synthesis of gold nanorods using hydroquinone as a reducing agent. This addresses important limitations of the traditional nanorod synthesis including low yield of gold ions conversion to metallic form and inability to produce rods with longitudinal surface plasmon peak above 850 nm. The use of hydroquinone was also found to improve the synthesis of gold nanowires via the nanorod-seed mediated procedure developed in our lab. The thesis will next present the synthesis of novel starfruitshaped nanorods, mesorods, and nanowires using a modified nanorod-seed mediated procedure. The starfruit particles displayed increased activity as surfaceenhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) substrates as compared to smooth structures. Next, a method for the functionalization of gold nanorods using a cationic thiol, 16-mercaptohexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (MTAB), will be described. By using this thiol, we were able to demonstrate the complete removal of toxic surfactant from the nanorods and were also able to precisely quantify the grafting density of thiol molecules on the nanorod surface through a combination of several analytical techniques. Finally, this thesis will show that MTABfunctionalized nanorods are nontoxic and can be taken up in extremely high numbers into cancer cells. The thesis will conclude by describing the surprising uptake of larger mesorods and nanowires functionalized with MTAB into cells in high quantities.

  16. Photo-controlled aptamers delivery by dual surface gold-magnetic nanoparticles for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Tu, Keyao; Liu, Yanlei; Qin, Yulei; Wang, Xiwei; Qi, Lifeng; Shi, Donglu

    2017-11-01

    Dual surfaced dumbbell-like gold magnetic nanoparticles (Au-Fe 3 O 4 ) were synthesized for targeted aptamers delivery. Their unique biological properties were characterized as a smart photo-controlled drug carrier. DNA aptamers targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were assembled onto the surface of Au-Fe 3 O 4 by electrostatic absorption. The binding capacity of the nanoparticles with VEGF aptamers was confirmed by gel electrophoresis. The targeted recognization of ovarian cancer cells by the aptamers-functionalized Au-Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles (Apt-Au-Fe 3 O 4 NPs) was observed by confocal microscopy. Apt-Au-Fe 3 O 4 was found to bind with SKOV-3 ovarian cancer cells specifically, leading to marked intracellular release of aptamers upon plasmon-resonant light (605nm) radiation, and to enhance the in vitro inhibition against tumor cell proliferation. The results show high potential of Apt-Au-Fe 3 O 4 as a targeted cancer hyperthermia carrier by remote control with high spatial/temporal resolution. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Effects of temperature on structure and mechanical properties of alkanethiol coated gold nanoparticle membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salerno, K. Michael; Grest, Gary

    2015-03-01

    Single-nanoparticle-thick membranes have a variety of potential uses due to unique mechanical properties. While these membranes have been studied experimentally and computationally at 300K, the effects of thermal annealing on structure and properties have not been investigated. We present atomistic molecular dynamics simulations that study the effects of temperature on nanoparticle membrane properties. Nanoparticles are made of a gold core coated with organic oligomer ligands. At high grafting density, ligands with CH3 end groups exhibit local crystallinity at 300K while those with COOH end groups orient to form dimers due to electrostatics. Both features influence membrane mechanical properties. As temperature increases ligand crystallinity and COOH affinity are disrupted, and mechanical strength is reduced. Immediately after cooling back to 300K, membranes are weaker and measures of ligand interdigitation and COOH affinity are reduced. Over time, interdigitation and end-group interactions rejuvenate and samples that undergo high-temperature annealing have mechanical properties comparable to the original membranes. The structure/property temperature dependence points to ways that membranes could be tailored for temperature-dependent/resistant properties. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's NNSA under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  18. Model lipid bilayers mimic non-specific interactions of gold nanoparticles with macrophage plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montis, Costanza; Generini, Viola; Boccalini, Giulia; Bergese, Paolo; Bani, Daniele; Berti, Debora

    2018-04-15

    Understanding the interaction between nanomaterials and biological interfaces is a key unmet goal that still hampers clinical translation of nanomedicine. Here we investigate and compare non-specific interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with synthetic lipid and wild type macrophage membranes. A comprehensive data set was generated by systematically varying the structural and physicochemical properties of the AuNPs (size, shape, charge, surface functionalization) and of the synthetic membranes (composition, fluidity, bending properties and surface charge), which allowed to unveil the matching conditions for the interaction of the AuNPs with macrophage plasma membranes in vitro. This effort directly proved for the first time that synthetic bilayers can be set to mimic and predict with high fidelity key aspects of nanoparticle interaction with macrophage eukaryotic plasma membranes. It then allowed to model the experimental observations according to classical interface thermodynamics and in turn determine the paramount role played by non-specific contributions, primarily electrostatic, Van der Waals and bending energy, in driving nanoparticle-plasma membrane interactions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Electron beam patterning for writing of positively charged gold colloidal nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafri, Hadar; Azougi, Jonathan; Girshevitz, Olga; Zalevsky, Zeev; Zitoun, David

    2018-02-01

    Synthesis at the nanoscale has progressed at a very fast pace during the last decades. The main challenge today lies in precise localization to achieve efficient nanofabrication of devices. In the present work, we report on a novel method for the patterning of gold metallic nanoparticles into nanostructures on a silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafer. The fabrication makes use of relatively accessible equipment, a scanning electron microscope (SEM), and wet chemical synthesis. The electron beam implants electrons into the insulating material, which further anchors the positively charged Au nanoparticles by electrostatic attraction. The novel fabrication method was applied to several substrates useful in microelectronics to add plasmonic particles. The resolution and surface density of the deposition were tuned, respectively, by the electron energy (acceleration voltage) and the dose of electronic irradiation. We easily achieved the smallest written feature of 68 ± 18 nm on SOI, and the technique can be extended to any positively charged nanoparticles, while the resolution is in principle limited by the particle size distribution and the scattering of the electrons in the substrate. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. Quantification of Heteroaggregation between Citrate-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles and Hematite Colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian M; Pike, Daniel J; Kelly, Michael O; Nason, Jeffrey A

    2015-11-03

    Collisions with and attachment to natural colloids (heteroaggregation) is likely to influence significantly the fate, transport, and toxicity of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs). This study investigated heteroaggregation between hematite (α-Fe2O3) colloids and citrate-capped gold nanoparticles (Cit-AuNPs) using a novel approach involving time-resolved dynamic light scattering and parallel experiments designed to quantify nanoparticle attachment and heteroaggregate surface charge. Experiments were performed in low ionic strength synthetic water at environmentally relevant pH in the presence and absence of Suwannee River Natural Organic Matter (SRNOM). In the absence of SRNOM at pH values where Cit-AuNPs and hematite are oppositely charged, attachment efficiencies are high and Cit-AuNPs are capable of destabilizing hematite following an "electrostatic patch" mechanism. Furthermore, maximum observed surface coverages were far below those predicted by geometry alone, a fact predicted by the random sequential adsorption (RSA) model that has significant implications for the estimation of heteroaggregate attachment efficiencies. At pH values where both particles are negative or in the presence of small amounts of SRNOM, attachment was minimal. Calculated attachment efficiencies using the measured surface coverages corroborate these findings. The calculation of attachment efficiencies and the identification of mechanisms governing heteroaggregation represents an important step toward predicting the transport, fate, and toxicity of ENPs in the environment.

  1. pH induced protein-scaffold biosynthesis of tunable shape gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaorong; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Ren, Fang; Qin, Zhihe

    2011-09-01

    In this paper, a pH-inductive protein-scaffold biosynthesis of shape-tunable crystalline gold nanoparticles at room temperature has been developed. By simple manipulation of the reaction solution's pH, anisotropic gold nanoparticles including spheres, triangles and cubes could be produced by incubating an aqueous solution of sodium tetrachloroaurate with Dolichomitriopsis diversiformis biomasses after immersion in ultrapure Millipore water overnight. A moss protein with molecular weight of about 71 kDa and pI of 4.9 was the primary biomolecule involved in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The secondary configuration of the proteins by CD spectrum implied that the moss protein could display different secondary configurations including random coil, α-helix and intermediate conformations between random coil and α-helix for the experimental pH solution. The growth process of gold nanoparticles further showed that the moss protein with different configurations provided the template scaffold for the shape-controlled biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The constrained shape of the gold nanoparticles, however, disappeared in boiled moss extract. The gold nanoparticles with designed morphology were successfully reconstructed using the moss protein purified from the gold nanoparticles. Structural characterizations by SEM, TEM and SAED showed that the triangular and cubic gold nanoparticles were single crystalline.

  2. pH induced protein-scaffold biosynthesis of tunable shape gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Xiaorong; He Xiaoxiao; Wang Kemin; Ren Fang; Qin Zhihe

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a pH-inductive protein-scaffold biosynthesis of shape-tunable crystalline gold nanoparticles at room temperature has been developed. By simple manipulation of the reaction solution's pH, anisotropic gold nanoparticles including spheres, triangles and cubes could be produced by incubating an aqueous solution of sodium tetrachloroaurate with Dolichomitriopsis diversiformis biomasses after immersion in ultrapure Millipore water overnight. A moss protein with molecular weight of about 71 kDa and pI of 4.9 was the primary biomolecule involved in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The secondary configuration of the proteins by CD spectrum implied that the moss protein could display different secondary configurations including random coil, α-helix and intermediate conformations between random coil and α-helix for the experimental pH solution. The growth process of gold nanoparticles further showed that the moss protein with different configurations provided the template scaffold for the shape-controlled biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles. The constrained shape of the gold nanoparticles, however, disappeared in boiled moss extract. The gold nanoparticles with designed morphology were successfully reconstructed using the moss protein purified from the gold nanoparticles. Structural characterizations by SEM, TEM and SAED showed that the triangular and cubic gold nanoparticles were single crystalline.

  3. The Applications of Gold Nanoparticle-Initialed Chemiluminescence in Biomedical Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zezhong; Zhao, Furong; Gao, Shandian; Shao, Junjun; Chang, Huiyun

    2016-10-01

    Chemiluminescence technique as a novel detection method has gained much attention in recent years owning to the merits of high sensitivity, wider linear ranges, and low background signal. Similarly, nanotechnology especially for gold nanoparticles has emerged as detection tools due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Recently, it has become increasingly popular to couple gold nanoparticles with chemiluminescence technique in biological agents' detection. In this review, we describe the superiority of both chemiluminescence and gold nanoparticles and conclude the different applications of gold nanoparticle-initialed chemiluminescence in biomedical detection.

  4. Sub-10 ohm resistance gold films prepared by removal of ligands from thiol-stabilized 6 nm gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugden, Mark W; Richardson, Tim H; Leggett, Graham

    2010-03-16

    The optical and electrical properties of dodecanethiol-stabilized nanoparticles (6 nm diameter gold core) have been investigated over a range of film thicknesses and temperatures. The surface plasmon resonance absorbance is found to be dependent on temperature. Heating of the nanoparticle film causes desorption of the thiol from the surface of the gold nanoparticle, resulting in irreversible changes to the absorption spectra of the nanoparticle film. Atomic force microscopy images of the samples before and after heating for different film thicknesses reveal structural changes and increased domain connectivity for thicker films leading to sub-10 ohm resistances measured for the 15-layer film.

  5. Cell type-dependent uptake, localization, and cytotoxicity of 1.9 nm gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulter, Jonathan A; Jain, Suneil; Butterworth, Karl T; Taggart, Laura E; Dickson, Glenn R; McMahon, Stephen J; Hyland, Wendy B; Muir, Mark F; Trainor, Coleman; Hounsell, Alan R; O’Sullivan, Joe M; Schettino, Giuseppe; Currell, Fred J; Hirst, David G; Prise, Kevin M

    2012-01-01

    Background This follow-up study aims to determine the physical parameters which govern the differential radiosensitization capacity of two tumor cell lines and one immortalized normal cell line to 1.9 nm gold nanoparticles. In addition to comparing the uptake potential, localization, and cytotoxicity of 1.9 nm gold nanoparticles, the current study also draws on comparisons between nanoparticle size and total nanoparticle uptake based on previously published data. Methods We quantified gold nanoparticle uptake using atomic emission spectroscopy and imaged intracellular localization by transmission electron microscopy. Cell growth delay and clonogenic assays were used to determine cytotoxicity and radiosensitization potential, respectively. Mechanistic data were obtained by Western blot, flow cytometry, and assays for reactive oxygen species. Results Gold nanoparticle uptake was preferentially observed in tumor cells, resulting in an increased expression of cleaved caspase proteins and an accumulation of cells in sub G1 phase. Despite this, gold nanoparticle cytotoxicity remained low, with immortalized normal cells exhibiting an LD50 concentration approximately 14 times higher than tumor cells. The surviving fraction for gold nanoparticle-treated cells at 3 Gy compared with that of untreated control cells indicated a strong dependence on cell type in respect to radiosensitization potential. Conclusion Gold nanoparticles were most avidly endocytosed and localized within cytoplasmic vesicles during the first 6 hours of exposure. The lack of significant cytotoxicity in the absence of radiation, and the generation of gold nanoparticle-induced reactive oxygen species provide a potential mechanism for previously reported radiosensitization at megavoltage energies. PMID:22701316

  6. Synthesis and bioconjugation of gold nanoparticles as potential molecular probes for light-based imaging techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rayavarapu, Raja Gopal; Petersen, Wilma; Ungureanu, Constantin; Post, Janine N.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Manohar, Srirang

    2007-01-01

    We have synthesized and characterized gold nanoparticles (spheres and rods) with optical extinction bands within the "optical imaging window." The intense plasmon resonant driven absorption and scattering peaks of these nanoparticles make them suitable as contrast agents for optical imaging

  7. Heat Profiling of Three-Dimensionally Optically Trapped Gold Nanoparticles using Vesicle Cargo Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kyrsting, Anders; Bendix, Pól Martin; Stamou, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    Irradiated metallic nanoparticles hold great promise as heat transducers in photothermal applications such as drug delivery assays or photothermal therapy. We quantify the temperature increase of individual gold nanoparticles trapped in three dimensions near lipid vesicles exhibiting temperature...

  8. Interferometric detection of single gold nanoparticles calibrated against TEM size distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lixue; Christensen, Sune; Bendix, Pól Martin

    2015-01-01

    Single nanoparticle analysis: An interferometric optical approach calibrates sizes of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from the interference intensities by calibrating their interferometric signals against the corresponding transmission electron microscopy measurements. This method is used to investigate...

  9. Bioaccumulation and effects of sediment-associated gold- and graphene oxide nanoparticles on Tubifex tubifex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Panhong; Selck, Henriette; Tangaa, Stine Rosendal

    2017-01-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, gold (Au) and graphene oxide (GO) nanoparticles have been widely used in various fields, resulting in an increased release of these particles into the environment. The released nanoparticles may eventually accumulate in sediment, causing possible...

  10. Investigating the toxicity, uptake, nanoparticle formation and genetic response of plants to gold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F Taylor

    Full Text Available We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake.

  11. Investigating the toxicity, uptake, nanoparticle formation and genetic response of plants to gold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew F; Rylott, Elizabeth L; Anderson, Christopher W N; Bruce, Neil C

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis) to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold) were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake.

  12. Investigating the Toxicity, Uptake, Nanoparticle Formation and Genetic Response of Plants to Gold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew F.; Rylott, Elizabeth L.; Anderson, Christopher W. N.; Bruce, Neil C.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the physiological and genetic responses of Arabidopsis thaliana L. (Arabidopsis) to gold. The root lengths of Arabidopsis seedlings grown on nutrient agar plates containing 100 mg/L gold were reduced by 75%. Oxidized gold was subsequently found in roots and shoots of these plants, but gold nanoparticles (reduced gold) were only observed in the root tissues. We used a microarray-based study to monitor the expression of candidate genes involved in metal uptake and transport in Arabidopsis upon gold exposure. There was up-regulation of genes involved in plant stress response such as glutathione transferases, cytochromes P450, glucosyl transferases and peroxidases. In parallel, our data show the significant down-regulation of a discreet number of genes encoding proteins involved in the transport of copper, cadmium, iron and nickel ions, along with aquaporins, which bind to gold. We used Medicago sativa L. (alfalfa) to study nanoparticle uptake from hydroponic culture using ionic gold as a non-nanoparticle control and concluded that nanoparticles between 5 and 100 nm in diameter are not directly accumulated by plants. Gold nanoparticles were only observed in plants exposed to ionic gold in solution. Together, we believe our results imply that gold is taken up by the plant predominantly as an ionic form, and that plants respond to gold exposure by up-regulating genes for plant stress and down-regulating specific metal transporters to reduce gold uptake. PMID:24736522

  13. Facile method for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles using an ion coater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Han; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Kim, Tae Cheol; Kim, Chang Hee; Shin, Chang Hwan; Yoon, Tae-Sik; Hong, A.-Ra; Jang, Ho Seong; Kim, Dong Hun

    2018-03-01

    Herein we report a metal nanoparticle synthesis method based on a physical vapor deposition process instead of the conventional wet process of chemical reactions in liquids. A narrow size distribution of synthesized gold nanoparticles was obtained using an ion coater on glycerin at low vapor pressure. The nanoparticle size could be modulated by controlling the sputtering conditions especially the discharge current. Due to the formation of gold nanoparticles, a surface plasmon resonance peak appeared at

  14. Anticancer activity of eco-friendly gold nanoparticles against lung and liver cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    S. Rajeshkumar

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have many applications in biomedical field. Improving delivery of anticancer agents to tumors using nanoparticles is one of the most promising research arenas in the field of nanotechnology. Eco-friendly gold nanoparticles synthesis was studied using marine bacteria Enterococcus sp. The nanoparticle synthesis started at 2 h of incubation time was identified by the formation of ruby red in the reaction mixture and SPR band centered at 545 nm. XRD shows that the strong four i...

  15. An in-vitro studies on green synthesis of gold nanoparticles against pathogens and cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Nanotechnology is a most promising field for generating new applications in medicine. It is imperative to integrate nanoscience and medicine. The present investigation is highly warranted to through more light upon the gold nanoparticles reduced from gold salt through the active principle of medicinal plant. The special emphasis of investigation is the active principle along with gold nanoparticles against for cancer cells. The 70 - 90 nm sized particles were synthesized by using Diospyros ferrea and this confirmed by SEM. These gold nanoparticles showed a characteristic absorption peak at 540 nm in UV spectra. The possibility of protein as a stabilizing material in gold nanoparticles is revealed by FTIR analysis. Remarkably, as a result of wide screening on the application of newly synthesized gold nanoparticles their anticancer potential has been discovered using MTT assay. The antimicrobial activity of AuNPs showed effective against bacteria than the fungal strains.

  16. Clustering of carboxylated magnetite nanoparticles through polyethylenimine: Covalent versus electrostatic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tóth, Ildikó Y., E-mail: Ildiko.Toth@chem.u-szeged.hu [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Szeged, Aradi vt. square 1, Szeged (Hungary); Nesztor, Dániel [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Szeged, Aradi vt. square 1, Szeged (Hungary); Novák, Levente [Department of Colloid and Environmental Chemistry, University of Debrecen, Egyetem square 1, Debrecen (Hungary); Illés, Erzsébet; Szekeres, Márta; Szabó, Tamás [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Szeged, Aradi vt. square 1, Szeged (Hungary); Tombácz, Etelka, E-mail: tombacz@chem.u-szeged.hu [Department of Physical Chemistry and Materials Science, University of Szeged, Aradi vt. square 1, Szeged (Hungary)

    2017-04-01

    Carboxylated magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) are frequently used to develop materials with enhanced properties for MRI and hyperthermia. The controlled clustering of MNPs via covalent or electrostatic approaches provides opportunity to prepare high quality materials. MNPs were prepared by co-precipitation and coated by poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid) (PAM@MNP). The clusters were synthesized from purified PAM@MNPs and polyethylenimine (PEI) solution via electrostatic interaction and covalent bond formation (ES-cluster and CB-cluster, respectively). The electrostatic adhesion (–NH{sub 3}{sup +} and –COO{sup –}) and the formed amide bond were confirmed by ATR-FTIR. The averaged area of CB-clusters was about twice as large as that of ES-cluster, based on TEM. The SAXS results showed that the surface of MNPs was smooth and the nanoparticles were close packed in both clusters. The pH-dependent aggregation state and zeta potential of clusters were characterized by DLS and electrophoresis measurements, the clusters were colloidally stable at pH>5. In hyperthermia experiments, the values of SAR were about two times larger for the chemically bonded cluster. The MRI studies showed exceptionally high transversion relaxivities, the r{sub 2} values are 457 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1} and 691 mM{sup −1} s{sup −1} for ES-cluster and CB-cluster, respectively. Based on these results, the chemically clustered product shows greater potential for feasible biomedical applications. - Highlights: • Chemically bonded clusters (CB-cluster) were prepared from PEI and PAM-coated MNPs. • The electrostatically clustered units (ES-cluster) are smaller and more compact. • The electrostatic adhesion and the amide bond formation were confirmed by ATR-FTIR. • CB-cluster dispersions are colloidally stable under physiological conditions. • CB-cluster shows great potential for application in MRI and hyperthermia.

  17. Gold-Speckled Multimodal Nanoparticles for Noninvasive Bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In this report the synthesis, characterization, and functional evaluation of a multimodal nanoparticulate contrast agent for noninvasive imaging through both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is presented. The nanoparticles described herein enable high resolution and highly sensitive three-dimensional diagnostic imaging through the synergistic coupling of MRI and PAT capabilities. Gadolinium (Gd)-doped gold-speckled silica (GSS) nanoparticles, ranging from 50 to 200 nm, have been prepared in a simple one-pot synthesis using nonionic microemulsions. The photoacoustic signal is generated from a nonuniform, discontinuous gold nanodomains speckled across the silica surface, whereas the MR contrast is provided through Gd incorporated in the silica matrix. The presence of a discontinuous speckled surface, as opposed to a continuous gold shell, allows sufficient bulk water exchange with the Gd ions to generate a strong MR contrast. The dual imaging capabilities of the particles have been demonstrated through in silicio and in vitro methods. The described particles also have the capacity for therapeutic applications including the thermal ablation of tumors through the absorption of irradiated light. PMID:19466201

  18. Structure Tuning of Electrostatically Self-Assembled Nanoparticles through pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariani, Giacomo; Schweins, Ralf; Gröhn, Franziska

    2016-02-25

    pH can be used to tune the self-assembly of cationic polyelectrolyte dendrimers and oppositely charged dyes and to produce particles with a desired shape and size in aqueous solution. We present fundamental insight into the effect of pH on electrostatic self-assembly of poly(amidoamine) dendrimers of generation 4 and di- and trivalent anionic organic dyes. The solution pH is used as a key to turn on the interaction and to control the association by regulating the macroion charge. Stable and well-defined nanoparticles are formed in solution, being more stable at low pH where the dendrimer protonation is complete. Nanoparticle stability was correlated with ζ-potential measurements. We prove that the assemblies are electrostatically stabilized and elucidate the importance of the surface charge density. pH was also used as a key to nanoparticle dimension and shape. For example, smaller particles form at a lower pH. The nanostructures have been characterized using dynamic light scattering and small-angle neutron scattering. A "phase diagram" has been developed for each dye, showing the assembly size, shape, and instability regions dependent on the pH. Overall, a pH-responsive nanoparticle shape is a key step toward the design of novel smart therapeutic carrier systems.

  19. Facile green synthesis of variable metallic gold nanoparticle using Padina gymnospora, a brown marine macroalga

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.; Kalaivani, R.; Manikandan, S.; Sangeetha, N.; Kumaraguru, A. K.

    2013-04-01

    The process of development of reliable and eco-friendly metallic nanoparticles is an important step in the field of nanotechnology. To achieve this, use of natural sources like biological systems becomes essential. In the present work, extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using Padina gymnospora has been attempted and achieved rapid formation of gold nanoparticles in a short duration. The UV-vis spectrum of the aqueous medium containing gold ion showed peak at 527 nm corresponding to the plasmon absorbance of gold nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscopy showed the formation of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles. FTIR spectra of brown alga confirmed that hydroxyl groups present in the algal polysaccharides were involved in the gold bioreduction. AFM analysis showed the results of particle sizes (53-67 nm) and average height of the particle roughness (60.0 nm). X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectrum of the gold nanoparticles exhibited Bragg reflections corresponding to gold nanoparticles. This environment-friendly method of biological gold nanoparticle synthesis can be applied potentially in various products that directly come in contact with the human body, such as cosmetics, and foods and consumer goods, besides medical applications.

  20. Biosynthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles using extracts of tamarindus indica L leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, S N; Naranjo, A M; Herrera, A P

    2016-01-01

    This study reports the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using an extract of Tamarindus indica L. leaves. Phenols, ketones and carboxyls were present in the leaves of T. indica. These organic compounds that allowed the synthesis of nanoparticles were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and High Pressure Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC). Synthesis of gold nanoparticles was performed with the extract of T. indica leaves and an Au +3 aqueous solutions (HAuCl 4 ) at room temperature with one hour of reaction time. Characterization of gold nanoparticles was performed by UV visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX. The results indicated the formation of gold nanoparticles with a wavelength of 576nm and an average size of 52±5nm. The EDX technique confirmed the presence of gold nanoparticles with 12.88% in solution. (paper)

  1. Biosynthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles using extracts of tamarindus indica L leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, S. N.; Naranjo, A. M.; Herrera, A. P.

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles using an extract of Tamarindus indica L. leaves. Phenols, ketones and carboxyls were present in the leaves of T. indica. These organic compounds that allowed the synthesis of nanoparticles were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and High Pressure Liquid Chromatographic (HPLC). Synthesis of gold nanoparticles was performed with the extract of T. indica leaves and an Au+3 aqueous solutions (HAuCl4) at room temperature with one hour of reaction time. Characterization of gold nanoparticles was performed by UV visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDX. The results indicated the formation of gold nanoparticles with a wavelength of 576nm and an average size of 52±5nm. The EDX technique confirmed the presence of gold nanoparticles with 12.88% in solution.

  2. Green synthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles using Fagopyrum esculentum leaf extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Punuri Jayasekhar; Sharma, Pragya; Kalita, Mohan Chandra; Bora, Utpal

    2011-12-01

    This report describes the use of ethnolic extract of Fagopyrum esculentum leaves for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles. UV-visible spectroscopy analysis indicated the successful formation of gold nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM (HRTEM) and were found to be spherical, hexagonal and triangular in shape with an average size of 8.3 nm. The crystalline nature of the gold nanoparticles was confirmed from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and selected-area electron diffraction (SAED) patterns. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX) suggested the presence of organic biomolecules on the surface of the gold nanoparticles. Cytotoxicity tests against human HeLa, MCF-7 and IMR-32 cancer cell lines revealed that the gold nanoparticles were non-toxic and thus have potential for use in various biomedical applications.

  3. Microbial deposition of gold nanoparticles by the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konishi, Y.; Tsukiyama, T.; Tachimi, T.; Saitoh, N.; Nomura, T.; Nagamine, S.

    2007-01-01

    Microbial reduction and deposition of gold nanoparticles was achieved at 25 deg. C over the pH range 2.0-7.0 using the mesophilic bacterium Shewanella algae in the presence of H 2 as the electron donor. The reductive deposition of gold by the resting cells of S. algae was a fast process: 1 mM AuCl 4 - ions were completely reduced to elemental gold within 30 min. At a solution pH of 7, gold nanoparticles 10-20 nm in size were deposited in the periplasmic space of S. algae cells. At pH 2.8, gold nanoparticles 15-200 nm in size were deposited on the bacterial cells, and the biogenic nanoparticles exhibited a variety of shapes that included nanotriangles: in particular, single crystalline gold nanotriangles 100-200 nm in size were microbially deposited. At a solution pH of 2.0, gold nanoparticles about 20 nm in size were deposited intracellularly, and larger gold particles approximately 350 nm in size were deposited extracellularly. The solution pH was an important factor in controlling the morphology of the biogenic gold particles and the location of gold deposition. Microbial deposition of gold nanoparticles is potentially attractive as an environmentally friendly alternative to conventional methods

  4. Surface science of DNA adsorption onto citrate-capped gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Servos, Mark R; Liu, Juewen

    2012-02-28

    Single-stranded DNA can be adsorbed by citrate capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), resulting in increased AuNP stability, which forms the basis of a number of biochemical and analytical applications, but the fundamental interaction of this adsorption reaction remains unclear. In this study, we measured DNA adsorption kinetics, capacity, and isotherms, demonstrating that the adsorption process is governed by electrostatic forces. The charge repulsion among DNA strands and between DNA and AuNPs can be reduced by adding salt, reducing pH or by using noncharged peptide nucleic acid (PNA). Langmuir adsorption isotherms are obtained, indicating the presence of both adsorption and desorption of DNA from AuNPs. While increasing salt concentration facilitates DNA adsorption, the desorption rate is also enhanced in higher salt due to DNA compaction. DNA adsorption capacity is determined by DNA oligomer length, DNA concentration, and salt. Previous studies indicated faster adsorption of short DNA oligomers by AuNPs, we find that once adsorbed, longer DNAs are much more effective in protecting AuNPs from aggregation. DNA adsorption is also facilitated by using low pH buffers and high alcohol concentrations. A model based on electrostatic repulsion on AuNPs is proposed to rationalize the DNA adsorption/desorption behavior. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  5. Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using Whole Cells of Geotrichum candidum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Mittal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of nanoparticles with desired size and shape is an important area of research in nanotechnology. Use of biological system is an alternative approach to chemical and physical procedures for the synthesis of metal nanoparticles. An efficient environment-friendly approach for the biosynthesis of rapid and stable Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs using whole cells of Geotrichum candidum is discussed in this paper. The enzymes/proteins present in the microorganism might be responsible for the reduction of metal salts to nanoparticles. Various reaction parameters such as culture age, temperature, pH, metal salt, and cell mass concentrations were optimized. The AuNPs were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS, energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Nanoparticles were isolated by sonicating the whole cells after treatment with Tween 80. The whole cell mediated process showed the simplistic, feasible, easy to scale up, and low-cost approach for the synthesis of AuNPs.

  6. Enhancement of antibiotic effect via gold:silver-alloy nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Margarida Moreira; Queiroz, Margarida João; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2012-05-01

    A strategy for the development of novel antimicrobials is to combine the stability and pleiotropic effects of inorganic compounds with the specificity and efficiency of organic compounds, such as antibiotics. Here we report on the use of gold:silver-alloy (Au:Ag-alloy) nanoparticles, obtained via a single-step citrate co-reduction method, combined to conventional antibiotics to enhance their antimicrobial effect on bacteria. Addition of the alloy nanoparticles considerably decreased the dose of antibiotic necessary to show antimicrobial effect, both for bacterial cells growing in rich medium in suspension and for bacterial cells resting in a physiological buffer on a humid cellulose surface. The observed effect was more pronounced than the sum of the individual effects of the nanoparticles and antibiotic. We demonstrate the enhancement effect of Au:Ag-alloy nanoparticles with a size distribution of 32.5 ± 7.5 nm mean diameter on the antimicrobial effect of (i) kanamycin on Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacterium), and (ii) a β-lactam antibiotic on both a sensitive and resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium). Together, these results may pave the way for the combined use of nanoparticle-antibiotic conjugates towards decreasing antibiotic resistance currently observed for certain bacteria and conventional antibiotics.

  7. Oxidative stress and toxicity of gold nanoparticles in Mytilus edulis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tedesco, Sara [Environmental Research Institute of University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Doyle, Hugh [Tyndall National Institute, Cork (Ireland); Blasco, Julian [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC), Marine Science Institute of Andalusia, Cadiz (Spain); Redmond, Gareth [Tyndall National Institute, Cork (Ireland); Sheehan, David, E-mail: d.sheehan@ucc.ie [Environmental Research Institute of University College Cork, Cork (Ireland)

    2010-10-15

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) have potential applications in drug delivery, cancer diagnosis and therapy, food industry and environment remediation. However, little is known about their potential toxicity or fate in the environment. Mytilus edulis was exposed in tanks to750 ppb AuNP (average diameter 5.3 {+-} 1 nm) for 24 h to study in vivo biological effects of nanoparticles. Traditional biomarkers and an affinity procedure selective for thiol-containing proteins followed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) separations were used to study toxicity and oxidative stress responses. Results were compared to those obtained for treatment with cadmium chloride, a well known pro-oxidant. M. edulis mainly accumulated AuNP in digestive gland which also showed higher lipid peroxidation. One-dimensional SDS/PAGE (1DE) and 2DE analysis of digestive gland samples revealed decreased thiol-containing proteins for AuNP. Lysosomal membrane stability measured in haemolymph gave lower values for neutral red retention time (NRRT) in both treatments but was greater in AuNP. Oxidative stress occurred within 24 h of AuNP exposure in M. edulis. Previously we showed that larger diameter AuNP caused modest effects, indicating that nanoparticle size is a key factor in biological responses to nanoparticles. This study suggests that M. edulis is a suitable model animal for environmental toxicology studies of nanoparticles.

  8. Enhancement of antibiotic effect via gold:silver-alloy nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira dos Santos, Margarida, E-mail: margarida.santos@fct.unl.pt; Queiroz, Margarida Joao; Baptista, Pedro V. [Universidade Nova de Lisboa, CIGMH, Departamento Ciencias da Vida, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia (Portugal)

    2012-05-15

    A strategy for the development of novel antimicrobials is to combine the stability and pleiotropic effects of inorganic compounds with the specificity and efficiency of organic compounds, such as antibiotics. Here we report on the use of gold:silver-alloy (Au:Ag-alloy) nanoparticles, obtained via a single-step citrate co-reduction method, combined to conventional antibiotics to enhance their antimicrobial effect on bacteria. Addition of the alloy nanoparticles considerably decreased the dose of antibiotic necessary to show antimicrobial effect, both for bacterial cells growing in rich medium in suspension and for bacterial cells resting in a physiological buffer on a humid cellulose surface. The observed effect was more pronounced than the sum of the individual effects of the nanoparticles and antibiotic. We demonstrate the enhancement effect of Au:Ag-alloy nanoparticles with a size distribution of 32.5 {+-} 7.5 nm mean diameter on the antimicrobial effect of (i) kanamycin on Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacterium), and (ii) a {beta}-lactam antibiotic on both a sensitive and resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium). Together, these results may pave the way for the combined use of nanoparticle-antibiotic conjugates towards decreasing antibiotic resistance currently observed for certain bacteria and conventional antibiotics.

  9. A Comparative XAFS Study of Gold-thiolate Nanoparticles and Nanoclusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevrier, D M; Chatt, A; Zhang, P; Sham, T K

    2013-01-01

    Tiopronin-capped gold nanoparticles and gold nanoclusters of sizes 3.0 and 1.5 nm, respectively, were investigated with XAFS at the gold L 3 -edge. The specific EXAFS fitting procedure is discussed for obtaining reliable fit parameters for each system. The difficulties and challenges faced when analysing EXAFS data for gold nanoparticles and nanoclusters are also mentioned. Fitting results for gold nanoparticles reveal a small amount of surface Au-thiolate interactions with a large Au-Au metal core. For gold nanoclusters, only a one-shell fit was obtainable. Instead of Au-Au metal core, long-range interactions are expected for gold nanoclusters. Tiopronin-capped gold nanoclusters are proposed to be polymeric in nature, which helps explain the observed red luminescence.

  10. Gold nanoparticles with patterned surface monolayers for nanomedicine: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pengo, Paolo; Şologan, Maria; Pasquato, Lucia; Guida, Filomena; Pacor, Sabrina; Tossi, Alessandro; Stellacci, Francesco; Marson, Domenico; Boccardo, Silvia; Pricl, Sabrina; Posocco, Paola

    2017-12-01

    Molecular self-assembly is a topic attracting intense scientific interest. Various strategies have been developed for construction of molecular aggregates with rationally designed properties, geometries, and dimensions that promise to provide solutions to both theoretical and practical problems in areas such as drug delivery, medical diagnostics, and biosensors, to name but a few. In this respect, gold nanoparticles covered with self-assembled monolayers presenting nanoscale surface patterns-typically patched, striped or Janus-like domains-represent an emerging field. These systems are particularly intriguing for use in bio-nanotechnology applications, as presence of such monolayers with three-dimensional (3D) morphology provides nanoparticles with surface-dependent properties that, in turn, affect their biological behavior. Comprehensive understanding of the physicochemical interactions occurring at the interface between these versatile nanomaterials and biological systems is therefore crucial to fully exploit their potential. This review aims to explore the current state of development of such patterned, self-assembled monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles, through step-by-step analysis of their conceptual design, synthetic procedures, predicted and determined surface characteristics, interactions with and performance in biological environments, and experimental and computational methods currently employed for their investigation.

  11. Barium titanate core--gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FarrokhTakin, Elmira; Ciofani, Gianni; Puleo, Gian Luigi; de Vito, Giuseppe; Filippeschi, Carlo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-01-01

    The development of new tools and devices to aid in treating cancer is a hot topic in biomedical research. The practice of using heat (hyperthermia) to treat cancerous lesions has a long history dating back to ancient Greece. With deeper knowledge of the factors that cause cancer and the transmissive window of cells and tissues in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, hyperthermia applications have been able to incorporate the use of lasers. Photothermal therapy has been introduced as a selective and noninvasive treatment for cancer, in which exogenous photothermal agents are exploited to achieve the selective destruction of cancer cells. In this manuscript, we propose applications of barium titanate core-gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatment against cancer cells. We explored the effect of increasing concentrations of these nanoshells (0-100 μg/mL) on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, testing the internalization and intrinsic toxicity and validating the hyperthermic functionality of the particles through near infrared (NIR) laser-induced thermoablation experiments. No significant changes were observed in cell viability up to nanoparticle concentrations of 50 μg/mL. Experiments upon stimulation with an NIR laser revealed the ability of the nanoshells to destroy human neuroblastoma cells. On the basis of these findings, barium titanate core-gold shell nanoparticles resulted in being suitable for hyperthermia treatment, and our results represent a promising first step for subsequent investigations on their applicability in clinical practice.

  12. Barium titanate core – gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    FarrokhTakin, Elmira; Ciofani, Gianni; Puleo, Gian Luigi; de Vito, Giuseppe; Filippeschi, Carlo; Mazzolai, Barbara; Piazza, Vincenzo; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2013-01-01

    The development of new tools and devices to aid in treating cancer is a hot topic in biomedical research. The practice of using heat (hyperthermia) to treat cancerous lesions has a long history dating back to ancient Greece. With deeper knowledge of the factors that cause cancer and the transmissive window of cells and tissues in the near-infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum, hyperthermia applications have been able to incorporate the use of lasers. Photothermal therapy has been introduced as a selective and noninvasive treatment for cancer, in which exogenous photothermal agents are exploited to achieve the selective destruction of cancer cells. In this manuscript, we propose applications of barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles for hyperthermia treatment against cancer cells. We explored the effect of increasing concentrations of these nanoshells (0–100 μg/mL) on human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells, testing the internalization and intrinsic toxicity and validating the hyperthermic functionality of the particles through near infrared (NIR) laser-induced thermoablation experiments. No significant changes were observed in cell viability up to nanoparticle concentrations of 50 μg/mL. Experiments upon stimulation with an NIR laser revealed the ability of the nanoshells to destroy human neuroblastoma cells. On the basis of these findings, barium titanate core–gold shell nanoparticles resulted in being suitable for hyperthermia treatment, and our results represent a promising first step for subsequent investigations on their applicability in clinical practice. PMID:23847415

  13. A Humidity Sensor Based on Silver Nanoparticles Thin Film Prepared by Electrostatic Spray Deposition Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thutiyaporn Thiwawong

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, thin film of silver nanoparticles for humidity sensor application was deposited by electrostatic spray deposition technique. The influence of the deposition times on properties of films was studied. The crystal structures of sample films, their surface morphology, and optical properties have been investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM, and UV-VIS spectrophotometer, respectively. The crystalline structure of silver nanoparticles thin film was found in the orientation of (100 and (200 planes of cubic structure at diffraction angles 2θ  =  38.2° and 44.3°, respectively. Moreover, the silver nanoparticles thin films humidity sensor was fabricated onto the interdigitated electrodes. The sensor exhibited the humidity adsorption and desorption properties. The sensing mechanisms of the device were also elucidated by complex impedance analysis.

  14. Memecylon edule leaf extract mediated green synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elavazhagan T

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Tamizhamudu Elavazhagan, Kantha D ArunachalamCentre for Interdisciplinary Research, Directorate of Research, SRM University, Kattankulathur-603203, Tamilnadu, IndiaAbstract: We used an aqueous leaf extract of Memecylon edule (Melastomataceae to synthesize silver and gold nanoparticles. To our knowledge, this is the first report where M. edule leaf broth was found to be a suitable plant source for the green synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles. On treatment of aqueous solutions of silver nitrate and chloroauric acid with M. edule leaf extract, stable silver and gold nanoparticles were rapidly formed. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR. The kinetics of reduction of aqueous silver and gold ions during reaction with the M. edule leaf broth were easily analyzed by UV-visible spectroscopy. SEM analysis showed that aqueous gold ions, when exposed to M. edule leaf broth, were reduced and resulted in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in the size range 20–50 nm. TEM analysis of gold nanoparticles showed formation of triangular, circular, and hexagonal shapes in the size range 10–45 nm. The resulting silver nanoparticles were predominantly square with uniform size range 50–90 nm. EDAX results confirmed the presence of triangular nanoparticles in the adsorption peak of 2.30 keV. Further FTIR analysis was also done to identify the functional groups in silver and gold nanoparticles. The characterized nanoparticles of M. edule have potential for various medical and industrial applications. Saponin presence in aqueous extract of M. edule is responsible for the mass production of silver and gold nanoparticles.Keywords: Memecylon edule, nanoparticles, bioreduction, electron microscopy, FTIR

  15. Fluctuation-driven anisotropy in effective pair interactions between nanoparticles: Thiolated gold nanoparticles in ethane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabes, B. Shadrack; Yadav, Hari O. S.; Kumar, Sanat K.; Chakravarty, Charusita

    2014-10-01

    Fluctuations within the ligand shell of a nanoparticle give rise to a significant degree of anisotropy in effective pair interactions for low grafting densities [B. Bozorgui, D. Meng, S. K. Kumar, C. Chakravarty, and A. Cacciuto, Nano Lett. 13, 2732 (2013)]. Here, we examine the corresponding fluctuation-driven anisotropy for gold nanocrystals densely passivated with short ligands. In particular, we consider gold nanocrystals capped by alkylthiols, both in vacuum and in ethane solvent at high density. As in the preceding study, we show that the anisotropy in the nanoparticle pair potential can be quantified by an angle-dependent correction term to the isotropic potential of mean force (PMF). We find that the anisotropy of the ligand shells is distance dependent, and strongly influenced by ligand interdigitation effects as well as expulsion of ligand chains from the interparticle region at short distances. Such fluctuation-driven anisotropy can be significant for alkylthiol-coated gold nanoparticles, specially for longer chain lengths, under good solvent conditions. The consequences of such anisotropy for self-assembly, specially as a function of grafting density, solvent quality and at interfaces, should provide some interesting insights in future work. Our results clearly show that an isotropic two-body PMF cannot adequately describe the thermodynamics and assembly behavior of nanoparticles in this dense grafting regime and inclusion of anisotropic effects, as well as possibly many-body interactions, is necessary. Extensions of this approach to other passivated nanoparticle systems and implications for self-assembly are considered.

  16. Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles by Pseudomonas veronii AS41G inhabiting Annona squamosa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Syed; Satish, Sreedharamurthy

    2015-11-05

    Biogenic principles to nanotechnology have generated tremendous attention in recent past owing eco friendly benign process for synthesis of nanoparticles. Present investigation reports extracellular synthesis of gold nanoparticles using cell free supernatant of Pseudomonas veronii AS 41G, a novel endophyte isolated from Annona squamosa L. Gold nanoparticles formation was confirmed with UV-Visible spectrophotometer. FTIR analysis predicted various functional groups responsible for reduction of metal salts and stabilization of gold nanoparticles. Nanoparticles were crystalline in nature as shown in XRD pattern. TEM analysis revealed morphological characteristics of nanoparticles with different size. Thus the present study attributes for facile process for synthesis of gold nanoparticles as an alternative for conventional methods. The study also highlights the new role of novel bacterium Pseudomonas veronii AS41G which will be very valuable as a record for the researchers working on it. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Antibody immobilized cysteamine functionalized-gold nanoparticles for aflatoxin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Aditya; Matharu, Zimple; Sumana, G.; Solanki, Pratima R. [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, Biomedical Instrumentation Section, Materials Physics and Engineering Division, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Kim, C.G. [Centre for NanoBioEngineering and Spintronics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of); Malhotra, B.D., E-mail: bansi.malhotra@gmail.co [Department of Science and Technology Centre on Biomolecular Electronics, Biomedical Instrumentation Section, Materials Physics and Engineering Division, National Physical Laboratory (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Centre for NanoBioEngineering and Spintronics, Chungnam National University, Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-30

    Aflatoxin B{sub 1} antibody (aAFB{sub 1}) covalently attached to cysteamine functionalized-gold nanoparticles (C-AuNP) has been immobilized onto 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) based self assembled monolayer (SAM) on gold electrode (MBA/Au), for the fabrication of BSA/aAFB{sub 1}-C-AuNP/MBA/Au immunoelectrode. This immunoelectrode has been characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical characterization techniques. The electrochemical response studies reveal that the BSA/aAFB{sub 1}-C-AuNP/MBA/Au immunoelectrode can be used to detect AFB{sub 1} in the range of 10-100 ng dL{sup -1} and has sensitivity as 0.45 {mu}A ng{sup -1} dL, limit of detection as 17.90 ng dL{sup -1} and a response time of 60 s.

  18. Controlling electrostatic co-assembly using ion-containing copolymers: from surfactants to nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berret, J-F

    2011-09-14

    In this review, we address the issue of the electrostatic complexation between charged-neutral diblock copolymers and oppositely charged nanocolloids. We show that nanocolloids such as surfactant micelles and iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles share similar properties when mixed with charged-neutral diblocks. Above a critical charge ratio, core-shell hierarchical structures form spontaneously under direct mixing conditions. The core-shell structures are identified by a combination of small-angle scattering techniques and transmission electron microscopy. The formation of multi-level objects is driven by the electrostatic attraction between opposite charges and by the release of the condensed counterions. Alternative mixing processes inspired from molecular biology are also described. The protocols applied here consist in screening the electrostatic interactions of the mixed dispersions, and then removing the salt progressively as an example by dialysis. With these techniques, the oppositely charged species are intimately mixed before they can interact, and their association is monitored by the desalting kinetics. As a result, sphere- and wire-like aggregates with remarkable superparamagnetic and stability properties are obtained. These findings are discussed in the light of a new paradigm which deals with the possibility to use inorganic nanoparticles as building blocks for the design and fabrication of supracolloidal assemblies with enhanced functionalities. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Clustering of carboxylated magnetite nanoparticles through polyethylenimine: Covalent versus electrostatic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Ildikó Y.; Nesztor, Dániel; Novák, Levente; Illés, Erzsébet; Szekeres, Márta; Szabó, Tamás; Tombácz, Etelka

    2017-04-01

    Carboxylated magnetite nanoparticles (MNPs) are frequently used to develop materials with enhanced properties for MRI and hyperthermia. The controlled clustering of MNPs via covalent or electrostatic approaches provides opportunity to prepare high quality materials. MNPs were prepared by co-precipitation and coated by poly(acrylic acid-co-maleic acid) (PAM@MNP). The clusters were synthesized from purified PAM@MNPs and polyethylenimine (PEI) solution via electrostatic interaction and covalent bond formation (ES-cluster and CB-cluster, respectively). The electrostatic adhesion (-NH3+ and -COO-) and the formed amide bond were confirmed by ATR-FTIR. The averaged area of CB-clusters was about twice as large as that of ES-cluster, based on TEM. The SAXS results showed that the surface of MNPs was smooth and the nanoparticles were close packed in both clusters. The pH-dependent aggregation state and zeta potential of clusters were characterized by DLS and electrophoresis measurements, the clusters were colloidally stable at pH>5. In hyperthermia experiments, the values of SAR were about two times larger for the chemically bonded cluster. The MRI studies showed exceptionally high transversion relaxivities, the r2 values are 457 mM-1 s-1 and 691 mM-1 s-1 for ES-cluster and CB-cluster, respectively. Based on these results, the chemically clustered product shows greater potential for feasible biomedical applications.

  20. Gold Nanoparticles and Their Alternatives for Radiation Therapy Enhancement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R. Cooper

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy is one of the most commonly used treatments for cancer. The dose of delivered ionizing radiation can be amplified by the presence of high-Z materials via an enhancement of the photoelectric effect; the most widely studied material is gold (atomic number 79. However, a large amount is needed to obtain a significant dose enhancement, presenting a challenge for delivery. In order to make this technique of broader applicability, the gold must be targeted, or alternative formulations developed that do not rely solely on the photoelectric effect. One possible approach is to excite scintillating nanoparticles with ionizing radiation, and then exploit energy transfer between these particles and attached dyes in a manner analogous to photodynamic therapy. Doped rare-earth halides and semiconductor quantum dots have been investigated for this purpose. However, although the spectrum of emitted light after radiation excitation is usually similar to that seen with light excitation, the yield is not. Measurement of scintillation yields is challenging, and in many cases has been done only for bulk materials, with little understanding of how the principles translate to the nanoscale. Another alternative is to use local heating using gold or iron, followed by application of ionizing radiation. Hyperthermia pre-sensitizes the tumors, leading to an improved response. Another approach is to use chemotherapeutic drugs that can radiosensitize tumors. Drugs may be attached to high-Z nanoparticles or encapsulated. This article discusses each of these techniques, giving an overview of the current state of nanoparticle-assisted radiation therapy and future directions.

  1. Investigation of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticle sensors for gas analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Jared S.

    Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air and exhaled breath by sensor array is a very useful testing technique. It can provide non-invasive, fast, inexpensive testing for many diseases. Breath analysis has been very successful in identifying cancer and other diseases by using a chemiresistor sensor or array with gold nanoparticles to detect biomarkers. Acetone is a biomarker for diabetes and having a portable testing device could help to monitor diabetic and therapeutic progress. An advantage to this testing method is it is conducted at room temperature instead of 200 degrees Celsius. 3. The objective of this research is to determine the effect of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles based on sensor(s) detection of VOCs. The VOCs to be tested are acetone, ethanol, and a mixture of acetone and ethanol. Each chip is tested under all three VOCs and three concentration levels (0.1, 1, and 5.0 ppm). VOC samples are used to test the sensors' ability to detect and differentiate VOCs. Sensors (also referred to as a chip) are prepared using several types of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles. The factors are: thiol compound and molar volume loading of the thiol in synthesis. The average resistance results are used to determine the VOC selectivity of the sensors tested. The results show a trend of increasing resistance as VOC concentration is increased relative to dry air; which is used as baseline for VOCs. Several sensors show a high selectivity to one or more VOCs. Overall the 57 micromoles of 4-methoxy-toluenethiol sensor shows the strongest selectivity for VOCs tested. 3. Gerfen, Kurt. 2012. Detection of Acetone in Air Using Silver Ion Exchanged ZSM-5 and Zinc Oxide Sensing Films. Master of Science thesis, University of Louisville.

  2. Multiscale simulations of ligand adsorption and exchange on gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui-Min; Liu, Hong; Qian, Hu-Jun; Jiao, Gui-Sheng; Lu, Zhong-Yuan

    2018-01-17

    We have developed a multiscale model that combines first-principles methods with atomistic and mesoscopic simulations to explore the molecular structures and packing density of the ligands present on the gold nanoparticle (AuNP) surface, as well as the adsorption/exchange reaction kinetics of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)/PEG-SH ligands on different facets of gold, namely, Au(111), Au(100), and Au(110). Our model predicts that on clean gold surfaces, CTAB adsorption is diffusion limited. Specifically, CTAB has the preferentially higher adsorption rate and coverage density on Au(100) and Au(110) surfaces, forming a more compact layer with respect to that on the Au(111) surface, which could result in greater growth of gold nanoparticles along the (111) direction. As opposed to CTAB adsorption, the exchange reaction between PEG-SH with CTAB shows no selectivity to different crystal faces, and the reaction process follows Langmuir diffusion kinetics. Kinetic analysis reveals that, in water, the exchange reaction is zeroth order with respect to the concentration of an incoming PEG-SH, indicative of a dissociative exchange mechanism. The observed rate constant decreases exponentially with the PEG-SH chain length, consistent with a diffusion process for the free PEG-SH in water. In particular, we show that the exchange efficiency increases as the chain rigidness and size of the incoming ligand and/or steric bulk of the initial protecting ligand shell are decreased. Our objectives are to provide a model to assess the kinetics and thermodynamics of the adsorption/exchange reaction process, and we expect that these findings will have important implications for routine surface characterization of AuNPs.

  3. Microwave-induced synthesis of highly dispersed gold nanoparticles within the pore channels of mesoporous silica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Jinlou; Fan Wei; Shimojima, Atsushi; Okubo, Tatsuya

    2008-01-01

    Highly dispersed gold nanoparticles have been incorporated into the pore channels of SBA-15 mesoporous silica through a newly developed strategy assisted by microwave radiation (MR). The sizes of gold are effectively controlled attributed to the rapid and homogeneous nucleation, simultaneous propagation and termination of gold precursor by MR. Diol moieties with high dielectric and dielectric loss constants, and hence a high microwave activation, were firstly introduced to the pore channels of SBA-15 by a simple addition reaction between amino group and glycidiol and subsequently served as the reduction centers for gold nanoparticles. Extraction of the entrapped gold from the nanocomposite resulted in milligram quantities of gold nanoparticles with low dispersity. The successful assembly process of diol groups and formation of gold nanoparticles were monitored and tracked by solid-state NMR and UV-vis measurements. Characterization by small angle X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) indicated that the incorporation of gold nanoparticles would not breakup the structural integrity and long-range periodicity of SBA-15. The gold nanoparticles had a narrow size distribution with diameters in the size range of 5-10 nm through TEM observation. The average particles size is 7.9 nm via calculation by the Scherrer formula and TEM measurements. Nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms gave further evidence that the employed method was efficient and gold nanoparticles were successfully incorporated into the pore channels of SBA-15. - Graphical abstract: A facile and novel strategy has been developed to incorporate gold nanoparticles into the pore channels of mesoporous SBA-15 assisted by microwave radiation (MR) with mild reaction condition and rapid reaction speed. Due to the rapid and homogeneous nucleation, simultaneous propagation and termination by MR, the size of gold nanoparticles are effectively controlled

  4. Analytical performance of molecular beacons on surface immobilized gold nanoparticles of varying size and density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddayasankar, Uvaraj; Krull, Ulrich J

    2013-11-25

    The high quenching efficiency of metal nanoparticles has facilitated its use as quenchers in molecular beacons. To optimize this system, a good understanding of the many factors that influence molecular beacon performance is required. In this study, molecular beacon performance was evaluated as a function of gold nanoparticle size and its immobilization characteristics. Gold nanoparticles of 4 nm, 15 nm and 87 nm diameter, were immobilized onto glass slides. Each size regime offered distinctive optical properties for fluorescence quenching of molecular dyes that were conjugated to oligonucleotides that were immobilized to the gold nanoparticles. Rigid double stranded DNA was used as a model to place fluorophores at different distances from the gold nanoparticles. The effect of particle size and also the immobilization density of nanoparticles was evaluated. The 4 nm and 87 nm gold nanoparticles offered the highest sensitivity in terms of the change in fluorescence intensity as a function of distance (3-fold improvement for Cy5). The optical properties of the molecular fluorophore was of significance, with Cy5 offering higher contrast ratios than Cy3 due to the red-shifted emission spectrum relative to the plasmon peak. A high density of gold nanoparticles reduced contrast ratios, indicating preference for a monolayer of immobilized nanoparticles when considering analytical performance. Molecular beacon probes were then used in place of the double stranded oligonucleotides. There was a strong dependence of molecular beacon performance on the length of a linker used for attachment to the nanoparticle surface. The optimal optical performance was obtained with 4 nm gold nanoparticles that were immobilized as monolayers of low density (5.7×10(11)particles cm(-2)) on glass surfaces. These nanoparticle surfaces offered a 2-fold improvement in analytical performance of the molecular beacons when compared to other nanoparticle sizes investigated. The principles developed

  5. Gold nanostars as thermoplasmonic nanoparticles for optical heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Oliveros, R; Sánchez-Gil, José A

    2012-01-02

    Gold nanostars are theoretically studied as efficient thermal heaters at their corresponding localized surface-plasmon resonances (LSPRs). Numerical calculations are performed through the 3D Green's Theorem method to obtain the absorption and scattering cross sections for Au nanoparticles with star-like shape of varying symmetry and tip number. Their unique thermoplasmonic properties, with regard to their (red-shifted) LSPR wavelentgh, (∼ 30-fold increase) steady-state temperature, and scattering/absorption cross section ratios, make them specially suitable for optical heating and in turn for cancer thermal therapy.

  6. Design and Fabrication of Microfiber Containing Gold Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mette Marie; Wang, Guanghui; Hu, Dora Juan Juan

    2010-01-01

    We present a simple fabrication method for embedding gold nanoparticles (GNPs) in a microfiber with two main advantages. The GNPs are positioned within the microfiber securing maximum enhancement of the electrical field and protection of the GNPs from the surroundings; moreover incoupling losses...... to the microfiber are reduced significantly by integrating a single mode fiber in the device. The average enhancement factor of the electric field within one unit cell of the microfiber due to the GNPs is estimated to 17.4. This enhancement leads to an enhanced Kerr effect near the plasmon resonance frequency....... The fabrication method is demonstrated without GNPs....

  7. Gold-manganese nanoparticles for targeted diagnostic and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, Simona Hunyadi [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-11-10

    Imagine the possibility of non-invasive, non-radiation based Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in combating cardiac disease. Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are developing a process that would use nanotechnology in a novel, targeted approach that would allow MRIs to be more descriptive and brighter, and to target specific organs. Researchers at SRNL have discovered a way to use multifunctional metallic gold-manganese nanoparticles to create a unique, targeted positive contrast agent. SRNL Senior Scientist Dr. Simona Hunyadi Murph says she first thought of using the nanoparticles for cardiac disease applications after learning that people who survive an infarct exhibit up to 15 times higher rate of developing chronic heart failure, arrhythmias and/or sudden death compared to the general population. Without question, nanotechnology will revolutionize the future of technology. The development of functional nanomaterials with multi-detection modalities opens up new avenues for creating multi-purpose technologies for biomedical applications.

  8. Finely tunable fabrication and catalytic activity of gold multipod nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soon; Moon, Youngseo; Yoo, Hyojong

    2016-05-01

    Gold multipod nanoparticles (Au Multipod NPs) containing multi-branches with sharp edges and tips were synthesized in high yield through a facile seed-mediated method using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), Brij35, Au seed nanoparticles, Ag(+) ions, ascorbic acid, and sodium salicylate. The branch lengths of Au Multipod NPs were finely controlled by adjusting the molar ratio of mixed surfactants, and in particular by changing the amount of sodium salicylate. A formation mechanism for the star-shaped topologies was proposed and experimentally proved. The catalytic activity of the synthesized Au Multipod NPs was evaluated in ethanol electrooxidation reaction. The dependence of the catalytic performances on the nanostructural morphology was investigated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Gold Nanoparticles and Microwave Irradiation Inhibit Beta-Amyloid Amyloidogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastus Neus

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Peptide-Gold nanoparticles selectively attached to β-amyloid protein (Aβ amyloidogenic aggregates were irradiated with microwave. This treatment produces dramatic effects on the Aβ aggregates, inhibiting both the amyloidogenesis and the restoration of the amyloidogenic potential. This novel approach offers a new strategy to inhibit, locally and remotely, the amyloidogenic process, which could have application in Alzheimer’s disease therapy. We have studied the irradiation effect on the amyloidogenic process in the presence of conjugates peptide-nanoparticle by transmission electronic microscopy observations and by Thioflavine T assays to quantify the amount of fibrils in suspension. The amyloidogenic aggregates rather than the amyloid fibrils seem to be better targets for the treatment of the disease. Our results could contribute to the development of a new therapeutic strategy to inhibit the amyloidogenic process in Alzheimer’s disease.

  10. Memecylon edule leaf extract mediated green synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elavazhagan, Tamizhamudu; Arunachalam, Kantha D

    2011-01-01

    We used an aqueous leaf extract of Memecylon edule (Melastomataceae) to synthesize silver and gold nanoparticles. To our knowledge, this is the first report where M. edule leaf broth was found to be a suitable plant source for the green synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles. On treatment of aqueous solutions of silver nitrate and chloroauric acid with M. edule leaf extract, stable silver and gold nanoparticles were rapidly formed. The gold nanoparticles were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). The kinetics of reduction of aqueous silver and gold ions during reaction with the M. edule leaf broth were easily analyzed by UV-visible spectroscopy. SEM analysis showed that aqueous gold ions, when exposed to M. edule leaf broth, were reduced and resulted in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in the size range 20–50 nm. TEM analysis of gold nanoparticles showed formation of triangular, circular, and hexagonal shapes in the size range 10–45 nm. The resulting silver nanoparticles were predominantly square with uniform size range 50–90 nm. EDAX results confirmed the presence of triangular nanoparticles in the adsorption peak of 2.30 keV. Further FTIR analysis was also done to identify the functional groups in silver and gold nanoparticles. The characterized nanoparticles of M. edule have potential for various medical and industrial applications. Saponin presence in aqueous extract of M. edule is responsible for the mass production of silver and gold nanoparticles. PMID:21753878

  11. Gold nanoparticle-based fluorescent sensor for the analysis of dithiocarbamate pesticides in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Senkbeil, Silja; Lafleur, Josiane P.; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam

    2012-01-01

    and environmental health. This paper demonstrates the potential of a gold nanoparticle-based microfluidic sensor for in field detection of dithiocarbamate pesticides at remote locations. Combining the attractive optical properties of gold nanoparticles with on chip mixing and detection, using a simple digital...

  12. Photoinduced charge and energy transfer in phthalocyanine-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kotiaho, Anne; Lahtinen, Riikka; Efimov, Alexander; Metsberg, Hanna Kaisa; Sariola, Essi; Lehtivuori, Heli; Tkachenko, Nikolai V.; Lemmetyinen, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Photoinduced processes in phthalocyanine-functionalized gold nanoparticles (Pc-AuNPs) have been investigated by spectroscopic measurements. The metal-free phthalocyanines used have two linkers with thioacetate groups for bonding to the gold nanoparticle surface, and the attachment was achieved using

  13. Particle size-dependent organ distribution of gold nanoparticles after intravenous administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Jong, Wim H.; Hagens, Werner I.; Krystek, Petra; Burger, Marina C.; Sips, Adriënne J A M; Geertsma, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    A kinetic study was performed to determine the influence of particle size on the in vivo tissue distribution of spherical-shaped gold nanoparticles in the rat. Gold nanoparticles were chosen as model substances as they are used in several medical applications. In addition, the detection of the

  14. Side Effect of Good’s Buffers on Optical Properties of Gold Nanoparticle Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Michal; Engelbrekt, Christian; Undall-Behrend Christiansen, Mikkel

    In the search of fluorescent nanoclusters for bioimaging, several synthetic methods have been attempted. Particularly, the formation of gold nanoclusters during synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using Good’s buffers has been achieved. Here 2-(N-morpholino) ethanesulfonic acid (MES), 3-(N...... a need for deeper evaluation of fluorescence signals based on metal nanoparticles or nanoclusters....

  15. Assessment of the In Vivo Toxicity of Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liau Ian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The environmental impact of nanoparticles is evident; however, their toxicity due to their nanosize is rarely discussed. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs may serve as a promising model to address the size-dependent biological response to nanoparticles because they show good biocompatibility and their size can be controlled with great precision during their chemical synthesis. Naked GNPs ranging from 3 to 100 nm were injected intraperitoneally into BALB/C mice at a dose of 8 mg/kg/week. GNPs of 3, 5, 50, and 100 nm did not show harmful effects; however, GNPs ranging from 8 to 37 nm induced severe sickness in mice. Mice injected with GNPs in this range showed fatigue, loss of appetite, change of fur color, and weight loss. Starting from day 14, mice in this group exhibited a camel-like back and crooked spine. The majority of mice in these groups died within 21 days. Injection of 5 and 3 nm GNPs, however, did not induce sickness or lethality in mice. Pathological examination of the major organs of the mice in the diseased groups indicated an increase of Kupffer cells in the liver, loss of structural integrity in the lungs, and diffusion of white pulp in the spleen. The pathological abnormality was associated with the presence of gold particles at the diseased sites, which were verified by ex vivo Coherent anti-Stoke Raman scattering microscopy. Modifying the surface of the GNPs by incorporating immunogenic peptides ameliorated their toxicity. This reduction in the toxicity is associated with an increase in the ability to induce antibody response. The toxicity of GNPs may be a fundamental determinant of the environmental toxicity of nanoparticles.

  16. Gold and silver nanoparticles based superquenching of fluorescence: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Debanjana; Chattopadhyay, Nitin, E-mail: nitin.chattopadhyay@yahoo.com

    2015-04-15

    The short review highlights the recent advances on the gold and silver nanoparticles induced efficient quenching of fluorescence from various fluorophores looking at their promising use as optical rulers and chemo-/bio- sensors. The fluorescence quenching often leads to the increase in the Stern–Volmer constant (K{sub SV}~10{sup 7}–10{sup 10} mol{sup −1} dm{sup 3}) several orders of magnitude higher than the values observed for the normal photochemical quenching processes (~10{sup 2} mol{sup −1} dm{sup 3}). This amplified quenching has been termed as “super-quenching” or “hyper-quenching”. Energy transfer (ET) is established from the donor to the metal nanoparticles rationalizing these fast quenching processes. Considering the distance dependence of the ET process, Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) and nanometal surface energy transfer (NSET) are ascribed to take place. These sensitive distance dependent phenomena serve as the spectroscopic ruler to measure the intra- or intermolecular distances between the interacting partners. In this account focus has been laid on the size dependent energy transfer and super- and hyper- quenching of the fluorescence of the donor moieties by the nanometals and their probable applications in sensing. Rationalization has been made for the nanoparticle induced huge enhancement in the quenching efficiency. The impact of this review lies in the possible application of these amplified quenching processes in designing high sensitive chemical and biological sensors. - Highlights: • Super efficient quenching of fluorescence of probes by gold and silver nanoparticles is highlighted. • The amplified fluorescence quenching of dyes and polymers is rationalized. • Energy transfer is assigned to be responsible for the efficient quenching process. • Amplified quenching has its potential use in designing sensitive chemical/biological sensors.

  17. Assembly of citrate gold nanoparticles on hydrophilic monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vikholm-Lundin, Inger, E-mail: inger.vikholm-lundin@uta.fi [University of Tampere, BioMediTech, Tampere (Finland); Fimlab Laboratories Ltd., Tampere (Finland); Rosqvist, Emil; Ihalainen, Petri [Abo Akademi University, Center for Functional Materials, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry (Finland); Munter, Tony [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Process Chemistry end Environmental Engineering, Tampere (Finland); Honkimaa, Anni [University of Tampere, Department of Virology, School of Medicine, Tampere (Finland); Marjomäki, Varpu [University of Jyväskylä, Department of Biological and Environmental Science, Nanoscience Center, Jyväskylä (Finland); Albers, Willem M. [BioNavis Oy Ltd., Ylöjärvi, Tampere (Finland); Peltonen, Jouko [Abo Akademi University, Center for Functional Materials, Laboratory of Physical Chemistry (Finland)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • The self-assembled layers were all hydrophilic with Lipa-pTHMMAA exhibiting close to full wetting. • The polyacrylamide layers smoothen the gold surface to a higher extent than the polyethylene glycol and lipoic acid terminated with an amino group. • SPR resonance curves shift to higher angles and become increasingly damped when large nanoparticles assembled on the surface. • Topographical images confirmed that the highest number of particles were assembled on the polyethylene glycol monolayer. • By increasing the interaction time more particles could be assembled on the surface. - Abstract: Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) as model surfaces were linked onto planar gold films thorough lipoic acid or disulfide groups. The molecules used were polyethylene glycol (EG-S-S), N-[tris-(hydroxymethyl)methyl]acrylamide polymers with and without lipoic acid (Lipa-pTHMMAA and pTHMMAA) and a lipoic acid triazine derivative (Lipa-MF). All the layers, but Lipa-MF with a primary amino group were hydroxyl terminated. The layers were characterized by contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy, AFM. Citrate stabilized nanoparticles, AuNPs in water and phosphate buffer were allowed to assemble on the layers for 10 min and the binding was followed in real-time with surface plasmon resonance, SPR. The SPR resonance curves were observed to shift to higher angles and become increasingly damped, while also the peaks strongly broaden when large nanoparticles assembled on the surface. Both the angular shift and the damping of the curve was largest for nanoparticles assembling on the EG-S-S monolayer. High amounts of particles were also assembled on the pTHMMAA layer without the lipoic acid group, but the damping of the curve was considerably lower with a more even distribution of the particles. Topographical images confirmed that the highest number of particles were assembled on the polyethylene glycol monolayer. By increasing the interaction time more

  18. Enhancement of antibiotic effect via gold:silver-alloy nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira dos Santos, Margarida; Queiroz, Margarida João; Baptista, Pedro V.

    2012-01-01

    A strategy for the development of novel antimicrobials is to combine the stability and pleiotropic effects of inorganic compounds with the specificity and efficiency of organic compounds, such as antibiotics. Here we report on the use of gold:silver-alloy (Au:Ag-alloy) nanoparticles, obtained via a single-step citrate co-reduction method, combined to conventional antibiotics to enhance their antimicrobial effect on bacteria. Addition of the alloy nanoparticles considerably decreased the dose of antibiotic necessary to show antimicrobial effect, both for bacterial cells growing in rich medium in suspension and for bacterial cells resting in a physiological buffer on a humid cellulose surface. The observed effect was more pronounced than the sum of the individual effects of the nanoparticles and antibiotic. We demonstrate the enhancement effect of Au:Ag-alloy nanoparticles with a size distribution of 32.5 ± 7.5 nm mean diameter on the antimicrobial effect of (i) kanamycin on Escherichia coli (Gram-negative bacterium), and (ii) a β-lactam antibiotic on both a sensitive and resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus (Gram-positive bacterium). Together, these results may pave the way for the combined use of nanoparticle–antibiotic conjugates towards decreasing antibiotic resistance currently observed for certain bacteria and conventional antibiotics.

  19. Uptake of pH-Sensitive Gold Nanoparticles in Strong Polyelectrolyte Brushes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dikran Kesal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The impact of electrostatic attraction on the uptake of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs into positively charged strong poly-[2-(Methacryloyloxy ethyl] trimethylammonium chloride (PMETAC polyelectrolyte brushes was investigated. In this work, PMETAC brushes were synthesized via surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization (Si-ATRP. PMETAC/AuNP composite materials were prepared by incubation of the polymer brush coated samples into 3-mercaptopropionic acid-capped AuNP (5 nm in diameter suspension. The electrostatic interactions were tuned by changing the surface charge of the AuNPs through variations in pH value, while the charge of the PMETAC brush was not affected. Atomic-force microscopy (AFM, ellipsometry, UV/Vis spectroscopy, gravimetric analysis and transmission electron microscopy (TEM were employed to study the loading and penetration into the polymer brush. The results show that the number density of attached AuNPs depends on the pH value and increases with increasing pH value. There is also strong evidence that the particle assembly is dependent on the pH value of the AuNP suspension. Incubation of PMETAC brushes in AuNP suspension at pH 4 led to the formation of a surface layer on top of the brush (2D assembly due to sterical hindrance of the clustered AuNPs, while incubation in AuNP suspension at pH 8 led to deeper particle penetration into the brush (3D assembly. The straightforward control of particle uptake and assembly by tuning the charge density of the nanoparticle surface is a valuable tool for the development of materials for colorimetric sensor applications.

  20. Preparation of gold nanoparticles-agarose gel composite and its application in SERS detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiaoyuan; Xia, Yu; Ni, Lili; Song, Liangjing; Wang, Zhouping

    2014-01-01

    Agarose gel/gold nanoparticles hybrid was prepared by adding gold nanoparticles to preformed agarose gel. Nanocomposite structures and properties were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy. Based on the swelling-contraction characteristics of agarose gel and the adjustable localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the gold nanoparticles, the nanocomposites were used as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to detect the Raman signal molecules (NBA, MBA, 1NAT). Results revealed that the porous structure of the agarose gel provided a good carrier for the enrichment of the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles dynamic hot-spot effect arising from the agarose gel contraction loss of water in the air greatly enhanced the Raman signal. Furthermore, the gel could be cleaned with washing solution and recycling could be achieved for Raman detection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Simulation studies on structural and thermal properties of alkane thiol capped gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, J Meena

    2017-06-01

    The structural and thermal properties of the passivated gold nanoparticles were explored employing molecular dynamics simulation for the different surface coverage densities of the self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of alkane thiol. The structural properties of the monolayer protected gold nanoparticles such us overall shape, organization and conformation of the capping alkane thiol chains were found to be influenced by the capping density. The structural order of the thiol capped gold nanoparticles enhances with the increase in the surface coverage density. The specific heat capacity of the alkane thiol capped gold nanoparticles was found to increase linearly with the thiol coverage density. This may be attributed to the enhancement in the lattice vibrational energy. The present simulation results suggest, that the structural and thermal properties of the alkane thiol capped gold nanoparticles may be modified by the suitable selection of the SAM coverage density. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Detection of Volatile Organic Compound Gas Using Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance of Gold Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sri Nengsih; Akrajas Ali Umar; Muhamad Mat Salleh; Muhammad Yahaya

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on the detection of several organic vapors using the unique characteristic of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles on quartz substrate were prepared using seed mediated growth method. In a typical process, gold nanoparticles with average size ca. 36 nm were obtained to densely grown on the substrate. Detection of gas was based on the change in the LSPR of the gold nanoparticles film upon the exposure to the gas sample. It was found that gold nanoparticles were sensitive to the presence of volatile organic compound (VOC) gas from the change in the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) intensity. The mechanism for the detection of VOCs gas will be discussed. (author)

  3. Electrostatic Adsorption of Platinum onto Carbon Nanotubes and Nanofibers for Nanoparticle Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritubarna Banerjee

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Strong Electrostatic Adsorption (SEA has been demonstrated as a simple, scientific method to prepare well dispersed Pt nanoparticles over typical forms of carbon: activated, black, and graphitic carbons. Many varieties of specialty carbons have been invented in the last few decades including multi-walled nanotubes, nanofibers, graphene nanoplatelets, etc. In this work, we explore whether SEA can be applied to these specialty carbons for the synthesis of Pt nanoparticles. Over a number of oxidized and unoxidized multiwalled nanotubes and nanofibers, the point of zero charge (PZC was measured and the uptake of anionic Pt complexes (Pt hexachloride, [PtCl6]2−, and cationic Pt complexes (platinum tetraammine, [Pt(NH34]2+ as functions of final pH were surveyed. Pt nanoparticles on the various supports were synthesized at the optimal pH and were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM. The specialty carbons displayed volcano-shaped uptake curves typical of electrostatic adsorption for both Pt anions at low pH and Pt cations at high pH. However, the regimes of uptake often did not correspond to the measured PZC, probably due to surface impurities from the carbon manufacturing process. This renders the measured PZC of these specialty carbons unreliable for predicting anion and cation uptake. On the other hand, the anion and cation uptake curves provide an “effective” PZC and do indicate the optimal pH for the synthesis of ultrasmall nanoparticle synthesis. High resolution STEM imaging also showed that with SEA it is possible to disperse nanoparticles on the surface as well as the inner walls of the specialty carbons.

  4. Not all that glitters is gold - Electron microscopy study on uptake of gold nanoparticles in Daphnia magna and related artefacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Louise Helene Søgaard; Skjolding, Lars Michael; Thit, Amalie

    2017-01-01

    techniques are used to investigate internalization of 10 nm gold nanoparticles in Daphnia magna gut lumen and gut epithelial cells upon 24h exposure and outline potential artefacts, i.e. high contract precipitates from sample preparation related to these techniques. Light sheet microscopy confirmed......, permitting only single particles through. Structures resembling nanoparticles were also observed inside gut cells. As elemental analysis could not verify these to be gold they were likely artifacts from the preparation, such as osmium and iron. Importantly, gold nanoparticles were in fact found inside...... holocrine cells with disrupted membranes. Thus, false positive observations of nanoparticle internalization may result from either preparation artefacts or by mistaking disrupted cells for intact. These findings emphasize the importance of cell integrity and combining elemental analysis...

  5. Grafting of gold onto spin-crossover nanoparticles: SCO@Au.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulet, Lucie; Daro, Nathalie; Mornet, Stéphane; Vilar-Vidal, Noelia; Chastanet, Guillaume; Guionneau, Philippe

    2016-11-03

    Nanoparticles of gold were successfully grafted onto nanoparticles of a 1D polymeric spin-crossover material leading to singular SCO@Au hybrid particles. The result is equally obtained using a large range of gold-particle sizes, from 4 to 45 nm, which first allows definition of the best experimental conditions, notably in terms of gold-particle concentration, and then demonstrates the robustness and the efficiency of the method.

  6. Laccase-Assisted Rapid Synthesis of Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles for the Catalytic Reduction of 4-Nitrophenol

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Fang; Li, Zheng; Zeng, Chang; Hu, Yonggang

    2017-01-01

    A green method for the rapid preparation of uniform-sized colloidal gold nanoparticles under ambient conditions was presented and validated using laccase as a reduction agent in alkaline medium. UV-Vis spectrophotometry, field-emission high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, selected area electron diffraction, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, zetasizer, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy were used to characterize the gold nanoparticles. The gold nanopart...

  7. Enhanced photothermal effect of plasmonic nanoparticles coated with reduced graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Dong-Kwon; Barhoumi, Aoune; Wylie, Ryan G; Reznor, Gally; Langer, Robert S; Kohane, Daniel S

    2013-09-11

    We report plasmonic gold nanoshells and nanorods coated with reduced graphene oxide that produce an enhanced photothermal effect when stimulated by near-infrared (NIR) light. Electrostatic interactions between nanosized graphene oxide and gold nanoparticles followed by in situ chemical reduction generated reduced graphene oxide-coated nanoparticles; the coating was demonstrated using Raman and HR-TEM. Reduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles showed enhanced photothermal effect compared to noncoated or nonreduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles. Reduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles killed cells more rapidly than did noncoated or nonreduced graphene oxide-coated gold nanoparticles.

  8. Surface Plasmons and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectra of Aggregated and Alloyed Gold-Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fleger

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Effects of size, morphology, and composition of gold and silver nanoparticles on surface plasmon resonance (SPR and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS are studied with the purpose of optimizing SERS substrates. Various gold and silver films made by evaporation and subsequent annealing give different morphologies and compositions of nanoparticles and thus different position of the SPR peak. SERS measurements of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid obtained from these films reveal that the proximity of the SPR peak to the exciting laser wavelength is not the only factor leading to the highest Raman enhancement. Silver nanoparticles evaporated on top of larger gold nanoparticles show higher SERS than gold-silver alloyed nanoparticles, in spite of the fact that the SPR peak of alloyed nanoparticles is narrower and closer to the excitation wavelength. The highest Raman enhancement was obtained for substrates with a two-peak particle size distribution for excitation wavelengths close to the SPR.

  9. Sensitization of ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin by gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Sounik; Robertson, David J.; McMeekin, Scott; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2014-01-01

    Recently we reported that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) inhibit ovarian tumor growth and metastasis in mice by reversing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Since EMT is known to confer drug resistance to cancer cells, we wanted to investigate whether anti-EMT property of AuNP could be utilized to sensitize ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin. Herein, we report that AuNPs prevent cisplatin-induced acquired chemoresistance and stemness in ovarian cancer cells and sensitize them to cisplatin. AuNPs inhibit cisplatin induced EMT, decrease the side population cells and key stem cell markers such as ALDH1, CD44, CD133, Sox2, MDR1 and ABCG2 in ovarian cancer cells. Mechanistically, AuNPs prevent cisplatin-induced activation of Akt and NF-κB signaling axis in ovarian cancer cells that are critical for EMT, stem cell maintenance and drug resistance. In vivo, AuNPs sensitize orthotopically implanted ovarian tumor to a low dose of cisplatin and significantly inhibit tumor growth via facilitated delivery of both AuNP and cisplatin. These findings suggest that by depleting stem cell pools and inhibiting key molecular pathways gold nanoparticles sensitize ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin and may be used in combination to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis in ovarian cancer. PMID:25071019

  10. Gold nanoparticles in plastic columnar discotic liquid crystalline material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Mukesh, E-mail: mukeshphysics927@gmail.com [Center of Material Sciences, Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India); Kumar, Sandeep [Raman Research Institute, C.V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Dhar, Ravindra, E-mail: dr.ravindra.dhar@gmail.com [Center of Material Sciences, Institute of Interdisciplinary Studies, University of Allahabad, Allahabad 211002 (India)

    2016-05-10

    Highlights: • Dispersion of Gold nanoparticles in a discotic liquid crystal has been studied. • σ{sub i} increases by seven orders of magnitude in the case of 1.2 wt% GNPs composites. • X-ray scattering results revel that a decrement in the core–core separation. • Study suggests that dispersion at low concentrations is uniform. • Band gap has decreased due to dispersion of GNPs in HAT4. - Abstract: We have studied the effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on the thermodynamical, optical and dielectrical parameters of a discotic liquid crystal (DLC) namely hexabutyloxytriphenylene (HAT4). It has been observed that with the increase of GNPs concentration in DLC, composites shows two different regions. In the first regions i.e. low concentrations (<1 wt%), columnar hexagonal-isotropic (Col{sub hp}-I{sub L}) transition temperature and enthalpy (ΔH) decrease rapidly while in the second region i.e. higher concentrations (>1 wt%) Col{sub hp}-I{sub L} transition temperature and ΔH are approximately constant. It has been observed that, in the case of composites having 0.2 and 0.6 wt% of GNPs, conductivity has enhanced but it is poor as compared to the composite having 1.2 wt% of GNPs. For 1.2 wt% of GNPs, conductivity has increased by seven orders of magnitude as compared to the DLC. Optical study suggests that band gap of nanocomposites has decreased due to dispersion of GNPs.

  11. Gold nanoparticles enlighten the future of cancer theranostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo J

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Jianfeng Guo,1 Kamil Rahme,2–4 Yan He,1 Lin-Lin Li,5 Justin D Holmes,3,4 Caitriona M O’Driscoll6 1School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, China; 2Department of Sciences, Faculty of Natural and Applied Science, Notre Dame University (Louaize, Zouk Mosbeh, Lebanon; 3Department of Chemistry, Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Cork, 4AMBER@CRANN, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland; 5The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun, China; 6Pharmacodelivery Group, School of Pharmacy, University College Cork, Cork, Ireland Abstract: Development of multifunctional nanomaterials, one of the most interesting and advanced research areas in the field of nanotechnology, is anticipated to revolutionize cancer diagnosis and treatment. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs are now being widely utilized in bioimaging and phototherapy due to their tunable and highly sensitive optical and electronic properties (the surface plasmon resonance. As a new concept, termed “theranostics,” multifunctional AuNPs may contain diagnostic and therapeutic functions that can be integrated into one system, thereby simultaneously facilitating diagnosis and therapy and monitoring therapeutic responses. In this review, the important properties of AuNPs relevant to diagnostic and phototherapeutic applications such as structure, shape, optics, and surface chemistry are described. Barriers for translational development of theranostic AuNPs and recent advances in the application of AuNPs for cancer diagnosis, photothermal, and photodynamic therapy are discussed. Keywords: multifunctional gold nanoparticles, cancer bioimaging, cancer photothermal and photodynamic therapy

  12. Piper betle-mediated green synthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punuri, Jayasekhar Babu; Sharma, Pragya; Sibyala, Saranya; Tamuli, Ranjan; Bora, Utpal

    2012-08-01

    Here, we report the novel use of the ethonolic leaf extract of Piper betle for gold nanoparticle (AuNP) synthesis. The successful formation of AuNPs was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy, and different parameters such as leaf extract concentration (2%), gold salt concentration (0.5 mM), and time (18 s) were optimized. The synthesized AuNPs were characterized with different biophysical techniques such as transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). TEM experiments showed that nanoparticles were of various shapes and sizes ranging from 10 to 35 nm. FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that AuNPs were functionalized with biomolecules that have primary amine group -NH2, carbonyl group, -OH groups, and other stabilizing functional groups. EDX showed the presence of the elements on the surface of the AuNPs. FT-IR and EDX together confirmed the presence of biomolecules bounded on the AuNPs. Cytotoxicity of the AuNPs was tested on HeLa and MCF-7 cancer cell lines, and they were found to be nontoxic, indicating their biocompatibility. Thus, synthesized AuNPs have potential for use in various biomedical applications.

  13. Room-temperature synthesis of gold nanoparticles and nanoplates using Shewanella algae cell extract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogi, Takashi; Saitoh, Norizoh; Nomura, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Yasuhiro, E-mail: yasuhiro@chemeng.osakafu-u.ac.j [Osaka Prefecture University, Department of Chemical Engineering (Japan)

    2010-09-15

    Biosynthesis of spherical gold nanoparticles and gold nanoplates was achieved at room temperature and pH 2.8 when cell extract from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae was used as both a reducing and shape-controlling agent. Cell extract, prepared by sonicating a suspension of S. algae cells, was capable of reducing 1 mol/m{sup 3} aqueous AuCl{sub 4}{sup -} ions into elemental gold within 10 min when H{sub 2} gas was provided as an electron donor. The time interval lapsed since the beginning of the bioreductive reaction was found to be an important factor in controlling the morphology of biogenic gold nanoparticles. After 1 h, there was a large population of well-dispersed, spherical gold nanoparticles with a mean size of 9.6 nm. Gold nanoplates with an edge length of 100 nm appeared after 6 h, and 60% of the total nanoparticle population was due to gold nanoplates with an edge length of 100-200 nm after 24 h. The yield of gold nanoplates prepared with S. algae extract was four times higher than that prepared with resting cells of S. algae. The resulting biogenic gold nanoparticle suspensions showed a large variation in color, ranging from pale pink to purple due to changes in nanoparticle morphology.

  14. Room-temperature synthesis of gold nanoparticles and nanoplates using Shewanella algae cell extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogi, Takashi; Saitoh, Norizoh; Nomura, Toshiyuki; Konishi, Yasuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Biosynthesis of spherical gold nanoparticles and gold nanoplates was achieved at room temperature and pH 2.8 when cell extract from the metal-reducing bacterium Shewanella algae was used as both a reducing and shape-controlling agent. Cell extract, prepared by sonicating a suspension of S. algae cells, was capable of reducing 1 mol/m 3 aqueous AuCl 4 - ions into elemental gold within 10 min when H 2 gas was provided as an electron donor. The time interval lapsed since the beginning of the bioreductive reaction was found to be an important factor in controlling the morphology of biogenic gold nanoparticles. After 1 h, there was a large population of well-dispersed, spherical gold nanoparticles with a mean size of 9.6 nm. Gold nanoplates with an edge length of 100 nm appeared after 6 h, and 60% of the total nanoparticle population was due to gold nanoplates with an edge length of 100-200 nm after 24 h. The yield of gold nanoplates prepared with S. algae extract was four times higher than that prepared with resting cells of S. algae. The resulting biogenic gold nanoparticle suspensions showed a large variation in color, ranging from pale pink to purple due to changes in nanoparticle morphology.

  15. In situ gold nanoparticles formation: contrast agent for dental optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braz, Ana K S; de Araujo, Renato E; Ohulchanskyy, Tymish Y; Shukla, Shoba; Bergey, Earl J; Gomes, Anderson S L; Prasad, Paras N

    2012-06-01

    In this work we demonstrate the potential use of gold nanoparticles as contrast agents for the optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging technique in dentistry. Here, a new in situ photothermal reduction procedure was developed, producing spherical gold nanoparticles inside dentinal layers and tubules. Gold ions were dispersed in the primer of commercially available dental bonding systems. After the application and permeation in dentin by the modified adhesive systems, the dental bonding materials were photopolymerized concurrently with the formation of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were visualized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The SEM images show the presence of gold nanospheres in the hybrid layer and dentinal tubules. The diameter of the gold nanoparticles was determined to be in the range of 40 to 120 nm. Optical coherence tomography images were obtained in two- and three-dimensions. The distribution of nanoparticles was analyzed and the extended depth of nanosphere production was determined. The results show that the OCT technique, using in situ formed gold nanoparticles as contrast enhancers, can be used to visualize dentin structures in a non-invasive and non-destructive way.

  16. Rapid colorimetric sensing of tetracycline antibiotics with in situ growth of gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Li; Chen, Jing; Li, Na; He, Pingli; Li, Zhen

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Tetracyclines directly reduce aurate into gold nanoparticles. • Gold nanoparticles showed characteristic plamson absorbance at 526 nm. • Quantitative detection of tetracyclines with the colorimetric assay. • Tetracyclines spiked urine samples can be detected with the assay. - Abstract: A colorimetric assay utilizing the formation of gold nanoparticles was developed to detect tetracycline antibiotics in fluidic samples. Tetracycline antibiotics showed the capability of directly reducing aurate salts into atomic gold which form gold nanoparticles spontaneously under proper conditions. The resulted gold nanoparticles showed characteristic plasmon absorbance at 526 nm, which can be visualized by naked eyes or with a spectrophotometer. UV–vis absorbance of the resulted gold nanoparticles is correlated directly with the concentrations of tetracycline antibiotics in the solution, allowing for quantitative colorimetric detection of tetracycline antibiotics. Reaction conditions, such as pH, temperature, reaction time, and ionic strength were optimized. Sensitivity of the colorimetric assay can be enhanced by the addition of gold nanoparticle seeds, a LOD as low as 20 ng mL −1 can be achieved with the help of seed particles. The colorimetric assay showed minimum interference from ethanol, methanol, urea, glucose, and other antibiotics such as sulfonamides, amino glycosides etc. Validity of the method was also evaluated on urine samples spiked with tetracycline antibiotics. The method provides a broad spectrum detection method for rapid and sensitive detection of reductive substances such as tetracycline antibiotics in liquid and biological samples

  17. Preparation, Physicochemical Characterization and Performance Evaluation of Gold Nanoparticles in Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kamiar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of the present study was preparation, physicochemical characterization and performance evaluation of gold nanoparticles (GNPs in radiotherapy. Another objective was the investigation of anti-bacterial efficacy of gold nanoparticle against E. coli clinical strains. Methods: Gold nanoparticles prepared by controlled reduction of an aqueous HAuCl4 solution using Tri sodium citrate. Particle size analysis and Transmission electron microscopy were used for physicochemical characterization. Polymer gel dosimetry was used for evaluation of the enhancement of absorbed dose. Diffusion method in agar media was used for investigation of anti-bacterial effect. Results: Gold nanoparticles synthesized in size range from 57 nm to 346 nm by planning different formulation. Gold nanoparticle in 57 nm size increased radiation dose effectiveness with the magnitude of about 21 %. At the concentration of 400 ppm, Nano gold exhibited significant anti-bacterial effect against E. coli clinical strains. Conclusion: It is concluded that gold nanoparticles can be applied as dose enhancer in radiotherapy. The Investigation of anti-bacterial efficacy showed that gold nanoparticle had significant effect against E. coli clinical strains.

  18. Novel fluorinated ligands for gold nanoparticle labelling with application in 19F-MRI.

    OpenAIRE

    Michelena Olatz; Padro Daniel; Carrillo-Carrión Carolina; del Pino Pablo; Blanco Jorge; Arnáiz Blanca; Parak Wolfgang J.; Carril Monica

    2017-01-01

    Novel fluorinated ligands for gold nanoparticle labelling have been designed and synthesised. Several types of gold nanoparticles have been prepared in the presence of these fluorinated ligands alone, or in combination with non-fluorinated ligands. Their colloidal stability in water and other solvents was tested and the magnetic resonance properties of the so-obtained nanoparticles were also assessed in detail. H-1 and F-19-NMR spectra were evaluated and MRI phantoms of the most promising nan...

  19. Substrate decomposition in galvanic displacement reaction: Contrast between gold and silver nanoparticle formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Tapas; Satpati, Biswarup, E-mail: biswarup.satpati@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata-700 064 (India); Kabiraj, D. [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi-110067 (India)

    2015-06-24

    We have investigated substrate decomposition during formation of silver and gold nanoparticles in galvanic displacement reaction on germanium surfaces. Silver and gold nanoparticles were synthesized by electroless deposition on sputter coated germanium thin film (∼ 200 nm) grown initially on silicon substrate. The nanoparticles formation and the substrate corrosion were studied using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy.

  20. Environmentally friendly synthesis of highly monodisperse biocompatible gold nanoparticles with urchin-like shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lehui; Ai, Kelong; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2008-02-05

    We report a facile and environmentally friendly strategy for high-yield synthesis of highly monodisperse gold nanoparticles with urchin-like shape. A simple protein, gelatin, was first used for the control over shape and orientation of the gold nanoparticles. These nanoparticles, ready to use for biological systems, are promising in the optical imaging-based disease diagnostics and therapy because of their tunable surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity.

  1. Green Chemistry Approach for the Synthesis of Gold Nanoparticles Using the Fungus Alternaria sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhanasekar, Naresh Niranjan; Rahul, Ganga Ravindran; Narayanan, Kannan Badri; Raman, Gurusamy; Sakthivel, Natarajan

    2015-07-01

    The synthesis of gold nanoparticles has gained tremendous attention owing to their immense applications in the field of biomedical sciences. Although several chemical procedures are used for the synthesis of nanoparticles, the release of toxic and hazardous by-products restricts their use in biomedical applications. In the present investigation, gold nanoparticles were synthesized biologically using the culture filtrate of the filamentous fungus Alternaria sp. The culture filtrate of the fungus was exposed to three different concentrations of chloroaurate ions. In all cases, the gold ions were reduced to Au(0), leading to the formation of stable gold nanoparticles of variable sizes and shapes. UV-Vis spectroscopy analysis confirmed the formation of nanoparticles by reduction of Au(3+) to Au(0). TEM analysis revealed the presence of spherical, rod, square, pentagonal, and hexagonal morphologies for 1 mM chloroaurate solution. However, quasi-spherical and spherical nanoparticles/heart-like morphologies with size range of about 7-13 and 15-18 nm were observed for lower molar concentrations of 0.3 and 0.5 mM gold chloride solution, respectively. The XRD spectrum revealed the face-centered cubic crystals of synthesized gold nanoparticles. FT-IR spectroscopy analysis confirmed the presence of aromatic primary amines, and the additional SPR bands at 290 and 230 nm further suggested that the presence of amino acids such as tryptophan/tyrosine or phenylalanine acts as the capping agent on the synthesized mycogenic gold nanoparticles.

  2. Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Stevia rebaudiana leaf extracts: Characterization and their stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Babak; Mohammadzadeh, M; Babakhani, B

    2015-07-01

    Various methods invented and developed for the synthesis of gold nanoparticles that increases daily consumed. According to this method, including potential environmental pollution problems and the complexity of the synthesis, in this study, the feasibility of using the leaves extract of Stevia rebaudiana (SR) for the reduction of gold ions to nanoparticles form have been studied. Stevia leaves were used to prepare the aqueous extract for this study. Gold nanoparticles were characterized with different techniques such as UV-vis spectroscopy, FT-IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Transmission electron microscopy experiments showed that these nanoparticles are spherical and uniformly distributed and its size is from 5 to 20 nm. FT-IR spectroscopy revealed that gold nanoparticles were functionalized with biomolecules that have primary amine group (NH2), carbonyl group, OH groups and other stabilizing functional groups. X-ray diffraction pattern showed high purity and face centered cubic structure of gold nanoparticles with size of 17 nm. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) implies the right of forming gold nanoparticles. The results, confirm that gold nanoparticles have synthesized by the leaves extract of S. rebaudiana (SR). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Gold nanoparticle formation in diamond-like carbon using two different methods: Gold ion implantation and co-deposition of gold and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Araújo, W. W. R.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Spirin, R. E.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-01-01

    We describe work in which gold nanoparticles were formed in diamond-like carbon (DLC), thereby generating a Au-DLC nanocomposite. A high-quality, hydrogen-free DLC thin film was formed by filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition, into which gold nanoparticles were introduced using two different methods. The first method was gold ion implantation into the DLC film at a number of decreasing ion energies, distributing the gold over a controllable depth range within the DLC. The second method was co-deposition of gold and carbon, using two separate vacuum arc plasma guns with suitably interleaved repetitive pulsing. Transmission electron microscope images show that the size of the gold nanoparticles obtained by ion implantation is 3-5 nm. For the Au-DLC composite obtained by co-deposition, there were two different nanoparticle sizes, most about 2 nm with some 6-7 nm. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the implanted sample contains a smaller fraction of sp 3 bonding for the DLC, demonstrating that some sp 3 bonds are destroyed by the gold implantation.

  4. A new green chemistry method based on plant extracts to synthesize gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes Castillo, Milka Odemariz

    Extraordinary chemical and physical properties exhibited by nanomaterials, as compared to their bulk counterparts, have made the area of nanotechnology a growing realm in the past three decades. It is the nanoscale size (from 1 to 100 nm) and the morphologies of nanomaterials that provide several properties and applications not possible for the same material in the bulk. Magnetic and optical properties, as well as surface reactivity are highly dependent on the size and morphology of the nanomaterial. Diverse nanomaterials are being widely used in molecular diagnostics as well as in medicine, electronic and optical devices. Among the most studied nanomaterials, gold nanoparticles are of special interest due to their multifunctional capabilities. For instance, spherical gold nanoparticles measuring 15-20 nm in diameter have been studied due to their insulin binding properties. Also, thiol functionalized gold nanoparticles between 5 and 30 nm are used in the detection of DNA. Thus, harnessing the shape and size of gold nanoparticles plays an important role in science and technology. The synthesis of gold nanoparticles via the reduction of gold salts, using citrate or other reducing agents, has been widely studied. In recent years, algae, fungi, bacteria, and living plants have been used to reduce trivalent gold (Au3+) to its zero oxidation state (Au 0) forming gold nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes. In addition, plant biomasses have also been studied for their gold-reducing power and nanoparticle formation. Although there is information about the synthesis of the gold nanoparticles by biologically based materials; to our knowledge, the study of the use of alfalfa extracts has not been reported. This innovation represents a significant improvement; that is an environmentally friendly method that does not use toxic chemicals. Also, the problem of extracting the formed gold nanoparticles from biomaterials is addressed in this research but still remains to be

  5. Production of gold nanoparticles by Streptomyces djakartensis isolate B-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Biglari

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available  Objective(s: Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (NGPs is environmentally safer than chemical and physical procedures. This method requires no use of toxic solvents and synthesis of dangerous products and is environmentally safe. In this study, we report the biosynthesis of NGPs using Streptomyces djakartensis isolate B-5. Materials and Methods: NGPs were biosynthesized by reducing aqueous gold chloride solution via a Streptomyces isolate without the need for any additive for protecting nanoparticles from aggregation. We characterized the responsible Streptomycete; its genome DNA was isolated, purified and 16S rRNA was amplified by PCR. The amplified isolate was sequenced; using the BLAST search tool from NCBI, the microorganism was identified to species level. Results: Treating chloroauric acid solutions with this bacterium resulted in reduction of gold ions and formation of stable NGPs. TEM and SEM electro micrographs of NGPs indicated size range from 2- 25 nm with average of 9.09 nm produced intracellular by the bacterium. SEM electro micrographs revealed morphology of spores and mycelia. The amplified PCR fragment of 16S rRNA gene was cloned and sequenced from both sides; it consisted of 741 nucleotides. According to NCBI GenBank, the bacterium had 97.1% homology with Streptomyces djakartensis strain RT-49. The GenBank accession number for partial 16S rRNA gene was recorded as JX162550. Conclusion: Optimized application of such findings may create applications of Streptomycetes for use as bio-factories in eco-friendly production of NGPs to serve in demanding industries and related biomedical areas. Research in this area should also focus on the unlocking the full mechanism of NGPs biosynthesis by Streptomycetes.

  6. Toxicity of silver and gold nanoparticles on marine microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Garrido, Ignacio; Pérez, Sara; Blasco, Julián

    2015-10-01

    The increased use of nanomaterials in several novel industrial applications during the last decade has led to a rise in concerns about the potential toxic effects of released engineered nanoparticles (NPs) into the environment, as their potential toxicity to aquatic organisms is just beginning to be recognised. Toxicity of metallic nanoparticles to aquatic organisms, including microalgae, seems to be related to their physical and chemical properties, as well as their behaviour in the aquatic media where processes of dissolution, aggregation and agglomeration can occur. Although the production of these particles has increased considerably in recent years, data on their toxicity on microalgae, especially those belonging to marine or estuarine environments remain scarce and scattered. The literature shows a wide variation of results on toxicity, mainly due to the different methodology used in bioassays involving microalgae. These can range for up to EC50 data, in the case of AgNPs, representing five orders of magnitude. The importance of initial cellular density is also addressed in the text, as well as the need for keeping test conditions as close as possible to environmental conditions, in order to increase their environmental relevance. This review focuses on the fate and toxicity of silver, gold, and gold-silver alloy nanoparticles on microalgae, as key organisms in aquatic ecosystems. It is prompted by their increased production and use, and taking into account that oceans and estuaries are the final sink for those NPs. The design of bioassays and further research in the field of microalgae nanoecotoxicology is discussed, with a brief survey on newly developed technology of green (algae mediated) production of Ag, Au and Ag-Au bimetallic NPs, as well as some final considerations about future research on this field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Potential therapeutic application of gold nanoparticles in B-chronic lymphocytic leukemia (BCLL: enhancing apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lichun

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract B-Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL is an incurable disease predominantly characterized by apoptosis resistance. We have previously described a VEGF signaling pathway that generates apoptosis resistance in CLL B cells. We found induction of significantly more apoptosis in CLL B cells by co-culture with an anti-VEGF antibody. To increase the efficacy of these agents in CLL therapy we have focused on the use of gold nanoparticles (GNP. Gold nanoparticles were chosen based on their biocompatibility, very high surface area, ease of characterization and surface functionalization. We attached VEGF antibody (AbVF to the gold nanoparticles and determined their ability to kill CLL B cells. Gold nanoparticles and their nanoconjugates were characterized using UV-Visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS. All the patient samples studied (N = 7 responded to the gold-AbVF treatment with a dose dependent apoptosis of CLL B cells. The induction of apoptosis with gold-AbVF was significantly higher than the CLL cells exposed to only AbVF or GNP. The gold-AbVF treated cells showed significant down regulation of anti-apoptotic proteins and exhibited PARP cleavage. Gold-AbVF treated and GNP treated cells showed internalization of the nanoparticles in early and late endosomes and in multivesicular bodies. Non-coated gold nanoparticles alone were able to induce some levels of apoptosis in CLL B cells. This paper opens up new opportunities in the treatment of CLL-B using gold nanoparticles and integrates nanoscience with therapy in CLL. In future, potential opportunities exist to harness the optoelectronic properties of gold nanoparticles in the treatment of CLL.

  8. Synthesis and physico-chemical characterization of gold nanoparticles softly coated by AOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, A.; Calandra, P.; Casaletto, M.P.; Giordano, C.; Venezia, A.M.; Liveri, V.Turco

    2006-01-01

    Size-controlled gold nanoparticles/surfactant stable systems were prepared by the combined action of the solvated metal atom dispersion (SMAD) technique and confinement in anhydrous sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT) micellar solution. From liquid samples, by evaporation of the organic solvent, solid gold nanoparticle-surfactant liquid crystals composites were obtained. Sample characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction (SAXS and WAXS), XPS spectroscopy and UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. All experimental data consistently revealed the coexistence of two gold nanoparticle size populations: bigger nanoparticles (size 20-50 A) and smaller ones (size of few A). The two differently-sized gold nanoparticles can be separated by resuspending the gold/surfactant nanocomposite in n-heptane. This operation causes the slow selective precipitation of the bigger nanoparticles softly coated by surfactant leaving, in the surnatant, only the smaller Au nanoparticles. The latter were found to be entrapped in the core of AOT reversed micelles and stabilised by the surfactant adsorption on their surface. Such nanoparticles, as shown by SAXS data, slowly rearrange to a narrower size distribution giving a surnatant containing stable and finely size-controlled gold nanoparticles

  9. Gold nanoparticles and films produced by a laser ablation/gas deposition (LAGD) method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakami, Yuji; Seto, Takafumi; Yoshida, Toshinobu; Ozawa, Eiichi

    2002-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles have great potential for various nanoelectronic applications such as single electron transistors, an infrared absorption sensor and so on. It is very important to understand and control the size distribution of the particles for such a variety of applications. In this paper, we report the size distribution of gold nanoparticles and the relationship between the nanoparticle-films and the electrical property produced by a laser ablation method. Gold nanoparticle-films were prepared by a technique, which sprays nanoparticles on the substrate through a nozzle. We call it a gas deposition method. The nanoparticles were generated by the nanosecond pulsed Nd:YAG laser ablation of a gold substrate under a low-pressure inert gas atmosphere. The ambient pressure was changed to control the average size and their distribution. The particles produced in the generation chamber were transported by a helium carrier gas to the deposition chamber and deposited on a substrate to form the films composed of gold nanoparticles. The electrical resistivity of the generated gold nanoparticle-films on the glass substrates was measured using a four-probe method. The size distribution of the nanoparticles was examined using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and a low-pressure differential mobility analyzer (LP-DMA). The relationship between the particle size and the electrical properties of each film made by the different synthesis conditions were analyzed. The electrical resistivity changed from the order of 10 -5 to 10 -1 Ω cm depending on the ambient pressure and the size distribution

  10. Ultrasmall gold nanoparticles anchored to graphene and enhanced photothermal effects by laser irradiation of gold nanostructures in graphene oxide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zedan, Abdallah F; Moussa, Sherif; Terner, James; Atkinson, Garrett; El-Shall, M Samy

    2013-01-22

    In this work we demonstrate the coupling of the photothermal effects of gold nanostructures of controlled size and shape with graphene oxide nanosheets dispersed in water. The enhanced photothermal effects can be tuned by controlling the shape and size of the gold nanostructures, which result in a remarkable increase in the heating efficiency of the laser-induced size reduction of gold nanostructures. The Raman spectra of the Au-graphene nanosheets provide direct evidence for the presence of more structural defects in the graphene lattice induced by laser irradiation of graphene oxide nanosheets in the presence of Au nanostructures. The large surface areas of the laser-reduced graphene oxide nanosheets with multiple defect sites and vacancies provide efficient nucleation sites for the ultrasmall gold nanoparticles with diameters of 2-4 nm to be anchored to the graphene surface. This defect filling mechanism decreases the mobility of the ultrasmall gold nanoparticles and, thus, stabilizes the particles against the Ostwald ripening process, which leads to a broad size distribution of the laser-size-reduced gold nanoparticles. The Au nanostructures/graphene oxide solutions and the ultrasmall gold-graphene nanocomposites are proposed as promising materials for photothermal therapy and for the efficient conversion of solar energy into usable heat for a variety of thermal, thermochemical, and thermomechanical applications.

  11. Modifying the chemistry of graphene with substrate selection: A study of gold nanoparticle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaniewski, Anna M.; Trimble, Christie J.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-03-01

    Graphene and metal nanoparticle composites are a promising class of materials with unique electronic, optical, and chemical properties. In this work, graphene is used as a reducing surface to grow gold nanoparticles out of solution-based metal precursors. The nanoparticle formation is found to strongly depend upon the graphene substrate selection. The studied substrates include diamond, p-type silicon, aluminum oxide, lithium niobate, and copper. Our results indicate that the chemical properties of graphene depend upon this selection. For example, for the same reaction times and concentration, the reduction of gold chloride to gold nanoparticles on graphene/lithium niobate results in 3% nanoparticle coverage compared to 20% coverage on graphene/silicon and 60% on graphene/copper. On insulators, nanoparticles preferentially form on folds and edges. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis is used to confirm the nanoparticle elemental makeup.

  12. Modifying the chemistry of graphene with substrate selection: A study of gold nanoparticle formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaniewski, Anna M.; Trimble, Christie J.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Graphene and metal nanoparticle composites are a promising class of materials with unique electronic, optical, and chemical properties. In this work, graphene is used as a reducing surface to grow gold nanoparticles out of solution-based metal precursors. The nanoparticle formation is found to strongly depend upon the graphene substrate selection. The studied substrates include diamond, p-type silicon, aluminum oxide, lithium niobate, and copper. Our results indicate that the chemical properties of graphene depend upon this selection. For example, for the same reaction times and concentration, the reduction of gold chloride to gold nanoparticles on graphene/lithium niobate results in 3% nanoparticle coverage compared to 20% coverage on graphene/silicon and 60% on graphene/copper. On insulators, nanoparticles preferentially form on folds and edges. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis is used to confirm the nanoparticle elemental makeup

  13. Surface plasmon enhancement in gold nanoparticles in the presence of an optical gain medium: an analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sathiyamoorthy, K; Sreekanth, K V; Sidharthan, R; Murukeshan, V M [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Xing Bengang, E-mail: mmurukeshan@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Chemistry and Biological Chemistry, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, 21 Nanyang Link, Singapore 637371 (Singapore)

    2011-10-26

    The localized surface plasmon (LSP) enhancement in a gold nanoparticle is demonstrated in this paper. The enhancement of LSP is influenced by both size and the dielectric gain medium surrounding the nanoparticles. The nanoparticle is found to induce plasmonic enhancement of varying degrees depending on its size, and it is inferred that a gold nanoparticle of size 60 nm exhibits the maximum LSP for 532 nm excitation. Singularity due to cancellation of SP loss by an infinite gain medium and LSP enhancement are studied using a pump-probe Rayleigh scattering experiment. Gold nanoparticles of average size 60 nm exhibit the lowest threshold power to observe Rayleigh scattering. Furthermore, compared with the bare nanoparticles, a 12.5 fold enhancement of LSP is observed when the nanoparticle of average size 60 nm is kept in the gain medium.

  14. Modifying the chemistry of graphene with substrate selection: A study of gold nanoparticle formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaniewski, Anna M.; Trimble, Christie J.; Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85281 (United States)

    2015-03-23

    Graphene and metal nanoparticle composites are a promising class of materials with unique electronic, optical, and chemical properties. In this work, graphene is used as a reducing surface to grow gold nanoparticles out of solution-based metal precursors. The nanoparticle formation is found to strongly depend upon the graphene substrate selection. The studied substrates include diamond, p-type silicon, aluminum oxide, lithium niobate, and copper. Our results indicate that the chemical properties of graphene depend upon this selection. For example, for the same reaction times and concentration, the reduction of gold chloride to gold nanoparticles on graphene/lithium niobate results in 3% nanoparticle coverage compared to 20% coverage on graphene/silicon and 60% on graphene/copper. On insulators, nanoparticles preferentially form on folds and edges. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis is used to confirm the nanoparticle elemental makeup.

  15. T7 bacteriophage induced changes of gold nanoparticle morphology: biopolymer capped gold nanoparticles as versatile probes for sensitive plasmonic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Palanisamy; Los, Marcin; Los, Joanna M; Niedziolka-Jonsson, Joanna

    2014-07-21

    The morphological changes of gold nanoparticles induced by T7 virus (bacteriophage) and the determination of its femtomolar concentration by a plasmonic method are presented. Carboxymethyl chitosan capped gold nanoparticles (CMC-AuNPs) are used as plasmonic probes and are synthesized by a simple one pot wet chemical method. HR-TEM images show that the spherical structure of the CMC-AuNPs is changed into chain-like nanostructures after the addition of T7 virus due to the strong coordination of CMC-AuNPs with T7. Since T7 capsids comprise a repeating motif of capsomers built from proteins that bind to the acid groups of chitosan, the conjugation of carboxymethyl chitosan-linked AuNPs with T7 virions enables colorimetric biosensing detection. The absorbance intensity (∼610 nm) increases in the concentration range of T7 from 2 × 10(-15) M to 2 × 10(-13) M and the detection limit is found to be 2 × 10(-15) M (2 fM). The present work demonstrates eco-friendly biopolymer stabilized AuNPs as potential nanomaterials for biosensing of viruses. Our method is very simple, low cost, selective and highly sensitive, and provides new insight into virus induced chain-like morphology of AuNPs.

  16. Gold nanoparticles delivery in mammalian live cells: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphaël Lévy

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Functional nanomaterials have recently attracted strong interest from the biology community, not only as potential drug delivery vehicles or diagnostic tools, but also as optical nanomaterials. This is illustrated by the explosion of publications in the field with more than 2,000 publications in the last 2 years (4,000 papers since 2000; from ISI Web of Knowledge, ‘nanoparticle and cell’ hit. Such a publication boom in this novel interdisciplinary field has resulted in papers of unequal standard, partly because it is challenging to assemble the required expertise in chemistry, physics, and biology in a single team. As an extreme example, several papers published in physical chemistry journals claim intracellular delivery of nanoparticles, but show pictures of cells that are, to the expert biologist, evidently dead (and therefore permeable. To attain proper cellular applications using nanomaterials, it is critical not only to achieve efficient delivery in healthy cells, but also to control the intracellular availability and the fate of the nanomaterial. This is still an open challenge that will only be met by innovative delivery methods combined with rigorous and quantitative characterization of the uptake and the fate of the nanoparticles. This review mainly focuses on gold nanoparticles and discusses the various approaches to nanoparticle delivery, including surface chemical modifications and several methods used to facilitate cellular uptake and endosomal escape. We will also review the main detection methods and how their optimum use can inform about intracellular localization, efficiency of delivery, and integrity of the surface capping. Raphaël Lévy is a BBSRC David Phillips Research Fellow at the University of Liverpool. He graduated in Physics at the University Louis Pasteur in Strasbourg (France. In 2002, after a Master in Soft Condensed Matter Physics, he obtained a PhD in Physics at the University Louis Pasteur. He then moved to

  17. Concentration Dependence of Gold Nanoparticles for Fluorescence Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Joel; Wittmershaus, Bruce

    Noble metal nanoparticles possess a unique property known as surface plasmon resonance in which the conduction electrons oscillate due to incoming light, dramatically increasing their absorption and scattering of light. The oscillating electrons create a varying electric field that can affect nearby molecules. The fluorescence and photostability of fluorophores can be enhanced significantly when they are near plasmonic nanoparticles. This effect is called metal enhanced fluorescence (MEF). MEF from two fluorescence organic dyes, Lucifer Yellow CH and Riboflavin, was measured with different concentrations of 50-nm colloidal gold nanoparticles (Au-NP). The concentration range of Au-NP was varied from 2.5 to 250 pM. To maximize the interaction, the dyes were chosen so their emission spectra had considerable overlap with the absorption spectra of the Au-NP, which is common in MEF studies. If the dye molecules are too close to the surface of Au-NP, fluorescence quenching can occur instead of MEF. To try to observe this difference, silica-coated Au-NP were compared to citrate-based Au-NP; however, fluorescence quenching was observed with both Au-NP. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant Number NSF-ECCS-1306157.

  18. Molecularly stabilised ultrasmall gold nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization and bioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leifert, Annika; Pan-Bartnek, Yu; Simon, Ulrich; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi

    2013-06-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are widely used as contrast agents in electron microscopy as well as for diagnostic tests. Due to their unique optical and electrical properties and their small size, there is also a growing field of potential applications in medical fields of imaging and therapy, for example as drug carriers or as active compounds in thermotherapy. Besides their intrinsic optical properties, facile surface decoration with (bio)functional ligands renders AuNPs ideally suited for many industrial and medical applications. However, novel AuNPs may have toxicological profiles differing from bulk and therefore a thorough analysis of the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) is required. Several mechanisms are proposed that cause adverse effects of nanoparticles in biological systems. Catalytic generation of reactive species due to the large and chemically active surface area of nanomaterials is well established. Because nanoparticles approach the size of biological molecules and subcellular structures, they may overcome natural barriers by active or passive uptake. Ultrasmall AuNPs with sizes of 2 nm or less may even behave as molecular ligands. These types of potential interactions would imply a size and ligand-dependent behaviour of any nanomaterial towards biological systems. Thus, to fully understand their QSAR, AuNPs bioactivity should be analysed in biological systems of increasing complexity ranging from cell culture to whole animal studies.

  19. Detection of the Presence of Gold Nanoparticles in Organs by Transmission Electron Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina C. Burger

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles of 10 nm and 250 nm were intravenously injected in rats. At 24 h after administration, tissues were collected and prepared for transmission electron microscopy (TEM. In the liver and spleen of animals treated with 10 nm gold nanoparticles, groups of nanoparticles were observed that could be positively identified by Energy Dispersive X-ray (EDX analysis to contain gold, while nanoparticles could not be detected in the heart, kidney and brain. The 10 nm gold nanoparticles were present in the phagocytic cells of the reticulo-endothelial system (RES. The 250 nm gold nanoparticles could not be detected in any of the organs investigated. Considering the number of 250 nm gold nanoparticles administered, calculations showed that it would indeed be almost impossible to detect the 250 nm gold nanoparticles in TEM preparations in view of the very low number of particles that would be theoretically present in one TEM tissue section. This shows that relatively high numbers of nanoparticles need to be administered to enable the detection of nanoparticles in organs by TEM. In a number of samples, several globular structures of approximately the expected size were found in liver cells and the endothelium of blood vessels in the brain. However, elemental analysis with EDX detection showed that these structures did not contain gold. Our studies thus indicate that the in vivo identification of nanoparticles cannot only depend on the detection of nanosized structures in cells. An additional identification of the composing elements of the nanomaterial is necessary for a positive identification of the nanomaterial.

  20. Synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles usingMukia maderaspatnaplant extract and its anticancer activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Guruviah Karthiga; Sathishkumar, Kannaiyan

    2017-03-01

    The present investigation reveals the in vitro cytotoxic effect of the biosynthesised metal nanoparticles on the MCF 7 breast cancer cell lines. The gold and silver nanoparticles were synthesised through an environmentally admissible route using the Mukia Maderaspatna plant extract. Initially, the biomolecules present in the plant extract were analysed using phytochemical analysis. Further, these biomolecules reduce the metal ion solution resulting from the formation of metal nanoparticles. The reaction parameters were optimised to control the size of nanoparticles which were confirmed by UV visible spectroscopy. Various instrumental techniques such as Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray and scanning electron microscopy were employed to characterise the synthesised gold and silver nanoparticles. The synthesised gold and silver nanoparticles were found to be 20-50 nm and were of different shapes including spherical, triangle and hexagonal. MTT and dual staining assays were carried out with different concentrations (1, 10, 25, 50 and 100 µg/ml) of gold and silver nanoparticles. The results show that the nanoparticles exhibited significant cytotoxic effects with IC 50 value of 44.8 µg/g for gold nanoparticles and 51.3 µg/g for silver nanoparticles. The observations in this study show that this can be developed as a promising nanomaterial in pharmaceutical and healthcare sector.

  1. PVA stabilized gold nanoparticles by use of unexplored albeit conventional reducing agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khanna, P.K.; Gokhale, R.; Subbarao, V.V.V.S.; Vishwanath, A. Kasi; Das, B.K.; Satyanarayana, C.V.V.

    2005-01-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) stabilized gold nanoparticles have been prepared in aqueous medium using two different reducing viz.; hydrazine hydrate, a stronger reducing agent and sodium formaldehydesulfoxylate (SFS), a slightly weaker reducing agent. SFS is used for first ever time for reduction of gold metal salt. The PVA stabilized gold nanoparticles solutions are wine red to blood red coloured and are stable over a long period of time with no indication of aggregation. The solution shows strong visible light absorptions in the range of 520-540 nm, characteristics of gold nanoparticles. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns of freshly prepared films containing gold nanoparticles indicated particles size to be about 15 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of a more than two-week-old sample revealed well-defined non-agglomerated spherical particles of about 50 nm diameter in solutions

  2. Gold nanoparticle arrays directly grown on nanostructured indium tin oxide electrodes: Characterization and electroanalytical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jingdong; Oyama, Munetaka

    2005-01-01

    This work describes an improved seed-mediated growth approach for the direct attachment and growth of mono-dispersed gold nanoparticles on nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces. It was demonstrated that, when the seeding procedure of our previously reported seed-mediated growth process on an ITO surface was modified, the density of gold nanospheres directly grown on the surface could be highly improved, while the emergence of nanorods was restrained. By field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and cyclic voltammetry, the growth of gold nanoparticles with increasing growth time on the defect sites of nanostructured ITO surface was monitored. Using a [Fe(China) 6 ] 3- /[Fe(China) 6 ] 4- redox probe, the increasingly facile heterogeneous electron transfer kinetics resulting from the deposition and growth of gold nanoparticle arrays was observed. The as-prepared gold nanoparticle arrays exhibited high catalytic activity toward the electrooxidation of nitric oxide, which could provide electroanalytical application for nitric oxide sensing

  3. Gold Nanoparticle-Based Sensors Activated by External Radio Frequency Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Della Vedova, Paolo; Ilieva, Mirolyuba; Zhurbenko, Vitaliy

    2015-01-01

    A novel molecular beacon (a nanomachine) is constructed that can be actuated by a radio frequency (RF) field. The nanomachine consists of the following elements arranged in molecular beacon configuration: a gold nanoparticle that acts both as quencher for fluorescence and a localized heat source...... by substituting the gold nanoparticle by an organic quencher, shows no increase in fluorescence signal when exposed to the RF field. It may therefore be concluded that the increased fluorescence for the gold nanoparticleconjugated nanomachines is not due to bulk heating of the solution, but is caused...... by the presence of the gold nanoparticles and their interaction with the RF field; however, existing models for heating of gold nanoparticles in a RF field are unable to explain the experimental results. Due to the biocompatibility of the construct and RF treatment, the nanomachines may possibly be used inside...

  4. Analytical detection and biological assay of antileukemic drug using gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvaraj, V. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Alagappa College of Technology, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India)]. E-mail: rajselva_77@yahoo.co.in; Alagar, M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Alagappa College of Technology, Anna University, Chennai 600025 (India)]. E-mail: mkalagar@yahoo.com; Hamerton, I. [Chemistry Division, School of Biomedical and Molecular Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2006-11-12

    Gold nanoparticles are reported and evaluated as probes for the detection of anticancer drug 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP). The nature of binding between 6-MP and the gold nanoparticles via complexation is investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrum, cyclic voltammetry, transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The bound antileukemic drug is fluorescent and the quenching property of gold nanoparticles could be exploited for biological investigations. The 6-MP-colloidal gold complex is observed to have appreciable antibacterial and antifungal activity against Micrococcus luteus, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli, Aspergillus fumigatus, and Aspergillus niger. The experimental studies suggest that gold nanoparticles have the potential to be used as effective carriers for anticancer drugs.

  5. Synthesis and characterization of silver and gold nanoparticles in ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prashant; Kumari, Kamlesh; Katyal, Anju; Kalra, Rashmi; Chandra, Ramesh

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, we report the reduction of silver and gold salts by methanolic solution of sodium borohydride in tetrazolium based ionic liquid as a solvent at 30 degrees C leads to pure phase of silver and gold nanoparticles. Silver and gold nanoparticles so-prepared were well characterized by powder X-ray diffraction measurements (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and QELS. XRD analysis revealed all relevant Bragg's reflection for crystal structure of silver and gold metal. XRD spectra also revealed no oxidation of silver nanoparticles to silver oxide. TEM showed nearly uniform distribution of the particles in methanol and it was confirmed by QELS. Silver and gold nanoparticles in ionic liquid can be easily synthesized and are quite stable too.

  6. Fungus-mediated biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles: potential in detection of liver cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Arun; Zubair, Swaleha; Tufail, Saba; Sherwani, Asif; Sajid, Mohammad; Raman, Suri C; Azam, Amir; Owais, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Background Nanomaterials are considered to be the pre-eminent component of the rapidly advancing field of nanotechnology. However, developments in the biologically inspired synthesis of nanoparticles are still in their infancy and consequently attracting the attention of material scientists throughout the world. Keeping in mind the fact that microorganism-assisted synthesis of nanoparticles is a safe and economically viable prospect, in the current study we report Candida albicans-mediated biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles. Methods and results Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and various spectrophotometric analyses were performed to characterize the gold nanoparticles. The morphology of the synthesized gold particles depended on the abundance of C. albicans cytosolic extract. Transmission electron microscopy, nanophox particle analysis, and atomic force microscopy revealed the size of spherical gold nanoparticles to be in the range of 20–40 nm and nonspherical gold particles were found to be 60–80 nm. We also evaluated the potential of biogenic gold nanoparticles to probe liver cancer cells by conjugating them with liver cancer cell surface-specific antibodies. The antibody-conjugated gold particles were found to bind specifically to the surface antigens of the cancer cells. Conclusion The antibody-conjugated gold particles synthesized in this study could successfully differentiate normal cell populations from cancerous cells. PMID:22072868

  7. Electrostatic complexation of polyelectrolyte and magnetic nanoparticles: from wild clustering to controllable magnetic wires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Minhao; Qu, Li; Fan, Jiangxia; Ren, Yong

    2014-05-01

    We present the electrostatic complexation between polyelectrolytes and charged nanoparticles. The nanoparticles in solution are γ-Fe2O3 (maghemite) spheres with 8.3 nm diameter and anionic surface charges. The complexation was monitored using three different formulation pathways such as direct mixing, dilution, and dialysis. In the first process, the hybrids were obtained by mixing stock solutions of polymers and nanoparticles. A `destabilization state' with sharp and intense maximum aggregation was found at charges stoichiometry (isoelectric point). While on the two sides of the isoelectric point, `long-lived stable clusters state' (arrested states) were observed. Dilution and dialysis processes were based on controlled desalting kinetics according to methods developed in molecular biology. Under an external magnetic field ( B = 0.3 T), from dialysis at isoelectric point and at arrested states, cationic polyelectrolytes can `paste' these magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) together to yield irregular aggregates (size of 100 μm) and regular rod-like aggregates, respectively. These straight magnetic wires were fabricated with diameters around 200 nm and lengths comprised between 1 μm and 0.5 mm. The wires can have either positive or negative charges on their surface. After analyzing their orientational behavior under an external rotating field, we also showed that the wires made from different polyelectrolytes have the same magnetic property. The recipe used a wide range of polyelectrolytes thereby enhancing the versatility and applied potentialities of the method. This simple and general approach presents significant perspective for the fabrication of hybrid functional materials.

  8. Eggshell membrane-templated porous gold membranes using nanoparticles as building blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashraf, S.; Khalid, Z. M.; Hussain, I.

    2013-01-01

    Highly porous gold membrane-like structures are formed using eggshell membrane, as such and heat denatured, as a template and gold nanoparticles as building blocks. Gold nanoparticles were produced in-situ on the eggshell membranes without using additional reducing agents. The morphology and loading of gold nanoparticles can easily be controlled by adjusting the pH and thus the redox potential of eggshell membranes. Lower pH favored the formation of irregularly-shaped but dense gold macro/ nanocrystals whereas higher pH(8-9) favored the formation of fairly uniform but less dense gold nanoparticles onto the eggshell membranes. Heat treatment of eggshell membrane-gold nanoparticle composites formed at pH 8-9 led to the formation of highly porous membrane like gold while mimicking the original structure of eggshell membrane. All these materials have been thoroughly characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (ISP-AES). These highly porous membrane-like gold materials may have potential applications in catalysis, biosensors, electrode materials, optically selective coatings, heat dissipation and biofiltration. (author)

  9. Effect of gold nanoparticle size on acoustic cavitation using chemical dosimetry method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanei, Ahmad; Shanei, Mohammad Mahdi

    2017-01-01

    When a liquid is irradiated with high intensities of ultrasound irradiation, acoustic cavitation occurs. Acoustic cavitation generates free radicals from the breakdown of water and other molecules. Cavitation can be fatal to cells and is utilized to destroy cancer tumors. The existence of particles in liquid provides nucleation sites for cavitation bubbles and leads to decrease the ultrasonic intensity threshold needed for cavitation onset. In the present investigation, the effect of gold nanoparticles with appropriate amount and size on the acoustic cavitation activity has been shown by determining hydroxyl radicals in terephthalic acid solutions containing 15, 20, 28 and 35nm gold nanoparticles sizes by using 1MHz low level ultrasound. The effect of sonication intensity in hydroxyl radical production was considered. The recorded fluorescence signal in terephthalic acid solutions containing gold nanoparticles was considerably higher than the terephthalic acid solutions without gold nanoparticles at different intensities of ultrasound irradiation. Also, the results showed that the recorded fluorescence signal intensity in terephthalic acid solution containing finer size of gold nanoparticles was lower than the terephthalic acid solutions containing larger size of gold nanoparticles. Acoustic cavitation in the presence of gold nanoparticles can be used as a way for improving therapeutic effects on the tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Green Synthesis of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles Using Averrhoa bilimbi Fruit Extract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimal Isaac, R.S.; Sakthivel, G.; Murthy, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    We report on rapid one-step green synthesis of gold and silver nanoparticles using fruit extract of Averrhoa bilimbi Linn. UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy was used to monitor the quantitative formation of gold and silver nanoparticles. The characteristics of the obtained gold and silver nanoparticles were studied using UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy (UV/Vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDX). UV/Vis spectrum showed Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) for both gold and silver nanoparticles at 540 and 420 nm. The EDX spectrum of the solution containing gold and silver nanoparticles confirmed the presence of elemental gold and silver signals. The average diameter of the prepared nanoparticles in solution was about 50–150 nm. Synthesized particles were either hexagonal or rhomboidal in shape. This synthesis approach of gold and silver nanoparticles is cost effective and can be widely used in biological systems. The effect of fruit extract and metal ion concentration was also studied.

  11. Impact of electrostatics on the chemodynamics of highly charged metal-polymer nanoparticle complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Jérôme F L; Farinha, José Paulo S; Pinheiro, José P

    2013-11-12

    In this work, the impact of electrostatics on the stability constant, the rate of association/dissociation, and the lability of complexes formed between Cd(II), Pb(II), and carboxyl-modified polymer nanoparticles (also known as latex particles) of radius ∼ 50 nm is systematically investigated via electroanalytical measurements over a wide range of pHs and NaNO3 electrolyte concentrations. The corresponding interfacial structure and key electrostatic properties of the particles are independently derived from their electrokinetic response, successfully interpreted using soft particle electrohydrodynamic formalism, and complemented by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis. The results underpin the presence of an ∼0.7-1 nm thick permeable and highly charged shell layer at the surface of the polymer nanoparticles. Their electrophoretic mobility further exhibits a minimum versus NaNO3 concentration due to strong polarization of the electric double layer. Integrating these structural and electrostatic particle features with recent theory on chemodynamics of particulate metal complexes yields a remarkable recovery of the measured increase in complex stability with increasing pH and/or decreasing solution salinity. In the case of the strongly binding Pb(II), the discrepancy at pH > 5.5 is unambiguously assigned to the formation of multidendate complexes with carboxylate groups located in the particle shell. With increasing pH and/or decreasing electrolyte concentration, the theory further predicts a kinetically controlled formation of metal complexes and a dramatic loss of their lability (especially for lead) on the time-scale of diffusion toward a macroscopic reactive electrode surface. These theoretical findings are again shown to be in agreement with experimental evidence.

  12. Durable PROX catalyst based on gold nanoparticles and hydrophobic silica

    KAUST Repository

    Laveille, Paco

    2016-01-20

    3 nm gold nanoparticles (Au NP) obtained by direct chemical reduction of AuPPh3Cl in the presence of methyl-terminated silica exhibit superior durability for low temperature CO oxidation in the presence of hydrogen (PROX). The activity of hydrophobic Au/SiO2-R972 indeed appears much more stable with time-on-stream than those of the OH-terminated, hydrophilic Au/TiO2 and Au/Al2O3 catalysts, with similar Au NP size. This enhanced stability is attributed to the peculiar catalyst surface of Au/SiO2-R972. Not only may the support hydrophobicity concentrate and facilitate reactant adsorption and product desorption over Au NP, but methyl-terminated SiO2-R972 likely also inhibits carbonatation of the Au/support interface. Hence, at a temperature at which H2/H2O “cleaning” of the carbonate-contaminated Au/Al2O3 and Au/TiO2 surface is inefficient (< 100°C), passivated Au/SiO2-R972 displays much more stable PROX activity. Besides, the virtual absence of surface hydroxyl groups, which provide sites for water formation in H2/O2 atmospheres, can also account for the improved PROX selectivity (>85%) observed over Au/SiO2-R972. This new example, of CO oxidation activity of gold nanoparticles dispersed over a hydrophobic, “inert” support, clearly emphasizes the role of hydrogen as a promoter for the gold-catalyzed oxidation of CO at low temperature. Unlike support-mediated oxygen activation, hydrogen-only mediated oxygen activation takes full advantage of the hydrophobic surface, which is much more resistant against CO2 and thus remains free of poisonous carbonate species, as compared with hydroxyl-terminated catalysts. Hence, although the absence of surface hydroxyl groups prevents the hydrophobic Au/SiO2-R972 catalyst to reach the state-of-the-art activities initially displayed by Au/TiO2 and Au/Al2O3, it brings long-term stability with time-on-stream and superior selectivity, which opens up promising perspectives in the development of viable PROX catalysts based on gold.

  13. Controlling the size of gold nanoparticles grown on indium tin oxide substrates prepared by seed mediated growth method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fauzia, Vivi; Pratiwi, Nur Intan; Adela, Faiz; Djuhana, Dede

    2016-01-01

    One of the unique optical properties of gold nanoparticles is the enhanced absorption and scattering light around metal nanoparticles commonly called the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR) effect of gold nanoparticles. This property is determined by the shape and size of gold nanoparticles. In this work, we observed the role of three materials used in synthesis process on the morphology and the LSPR effect of gold nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles were directly grown on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrates using the seed mediated growth method with three different concentrations of trisodium citrate (Na 3 C 6 H 5 O 7 ), C 16 TAB and ascorbic acid (C 6 H 8 O 6 ). Based on the FESEM image and optical absorption spectrum of gold nanoparticles, it was found that the higher concentration of those materials has decreased the size of gold nananoparticles and shifted the LSPR peaks to lower wavelength.

  14. Facile synthesis of biocompatible gold nanoparticles with organosilicone-coated surface properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Lijin; Yi Sijia; Lenaghan, Scott C.; Zhang Mingjun

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a simple method for one-step synthesis of gold nanoparticles has been developed using an organosilicone surfactant, Silwet L-77, as both a reducing and capping agent. Synthesis of gold nanoparticles using this method is rapid and can be conducted conveniently at ambient temperature. Further refinement of the method, through the addition of sodium hydroxide and/or silver nitrate, allowed fine control over the size of spherical nanoparticles produced. Coated on the surface with organosilicone, the as-prepared gold nanoparticles were biocompatible and stable over the pH range from 5 to 12, and have been proven effective at transportation into MC3T3 osteoblast cells. The proposed method is simple, fast, and can produce size-controlled gold nanoparticles with unique surface properties for biomedical applications.

  15. Identification of Dewetting Stages and Preparation of Single Chain Gold Nanoparticle Rings by Colloidal Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Norbert; Zámbó, Dániel; Pothorszky, Szilárd; Gergely-Fülöp, Eszter; Deák, András

    2016-02-02

    Massively parallel nanoparticle assembly was carried out by means of colloidal lithographic experiments over a silicon substrate supported (sub)microparticle Langmuir-Blodgett monolayer, using high purity aqueous solution of PEGylated gold nanoparticles. The size of the polystyrene template particles in the monolayer was varied between 608 nm and 2.48 μm, while gold nanoparticles with diameters between 18 and 65 nm were used. Thanks to the PEGylation of the gold nanoparticles, they could be used as tracer objects to follow the drying process. In this way, different dewetting stages could be identified in the confined space between and underneath the template polystyrene spheres. Depending on the concentration of the nanoparticles, the presented approach allows the preparation of single-particle width necklace structures composed of gold particles. At the same time, the high purity of the substrate as well as of the evolved particle rings is preserved and unwanted particle deposition on the substrate surface is minimized.

  16. Room Temperature, High-yield Synthesis of Block Copolymer-mediated Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Debes; Aswal, V. K.; Kohlbrecher, J.

    2010-12-01

    We report the high-yield synthesis of gold nanoparticles in block copolymer-mediated synthesis where the nanoparticles have been synthesized from hydrogen tetrachloroaureate (III) hydrate (HAuCl4ṡ3H2O) using P85 (EO26PO39EO26) block copolymers in aqueous solution at room temperature. The formation of gold nanoparticles in these systems has been confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy. The yield of nanoparticles simply does not increase with the increase in the gold salt concentration, which is limited by the gold ions reduction. Therefore, we have used the presence of additional reductant (tri-sodium citrate) to enhance the yield by manifold. The size distribution of the nanoparticles has been obtained by small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and the average size is found to increase with the yield.

  17. Anthelmintic efficacy of gold nanoparticles derived from a phytopathogenic fungus, Nigrospora oryzae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip Kumar Kar

    Full Text Available Exploring a green chemistry approach, this study brings to the fore, the anthelmintic efficacy of gold nanoparticles, highlighting the plausible usage of myconanotechnology. Gold nanoparticles of ∼6 to ∼18 nm diameter were synthesized by treating the mycelia-free culture filtrate of the phytopathogenic fungus with gold chloride. Their size and morphology were confirmed by UV-Vis spectroscopy, DLS data, AFM and TEM images. The XRD studies reveal a crystalline nature of the nanoparticles, which are in cubic phase. The FTIR spectroscopic studies before and after the formation of nanoparticles show the presence of possible functional groups responsible for the bio-reduction and capping of the synthesized gold nanoparticles. The latter were tested as vermifugal agents against a model cestode Raillietina sp., an intestinal parasite of domestic fowl. Further, ultrastructural and biochemical parameters were used to corroborate the efficacy study.

  18. Role of the ratio of biopolyelectrolyte persistence length to nanoparticle size in the structural tuning of electrostatic complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Li; Carn, Florent; Boué, François; Buhler, Eric

    2016-09-01

    Aggregation of nanoparticles of given size R induced by addition of a polymer strongly depends on its degree of rigidity. This is shown here on a large variety of silica nanoparticle self-assemblies obtained by electrostatic complexation with carefully selected oppositely charged biopolyelectrolytes of different rigidity. The effective rigidity is quantified by the total persistence length LT representing the sum of the intrinsic (Lp) and electrostatic (Le) polyelectrolyte persistence length, which depends on the screening, i.e., on ionic strength due to counterions and external salt concentrations. We experimentally show that the ratio LT/R is the main tuning parameter that controls the fractal dimension Df of the nanoparticles' self-assemblies, which is determined using small-angle neutron scattering: (i) For LT/R nanoparticles in excess, hence ramified structures with Df˜2 . (ii) For 0.3 nanoparticles), in good agreement with computer simulations. (iii) For LT/R >1 ,Le is strongly increased due to the absence of salt and repulsions between nanoparticles cannot be compensated for by the polyelectrolyte wrapping, which allows a spacing between nanoparticles and the formation of one-dimensional pearl necklace complexes. (iv) Finally, electrostatic screening, i.e., ionic strength, turned out to be a reliable way of controlling Df and the phase diagram behavior. It finely tunes the short-range interparticle potential, resulting in larger fractal dimensions at higher ionic strength.

  19. Gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent for in vivo tumor imaging with photoacoustic tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Q; Jiang, H; Iwakuma, N; Grobmyer, S R; Sharma, P; Moudgil, B M; Wu, C; McNeill, J

    2009-01-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is a rapidly emerging non-invasive imaging technology that integrates the merits of high optical contrast with high ultrasound resolution. The ability to quantitatively and non-invasively image nanoparticles has important implications for the development of nanoparticles as in vivo cancer diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In this study, the ability of systemically administered poly(ethylene glycol)-coated (PEGylated) gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent for in vivo tumor imaging with PAT has been evaluated. We demonstrate that gold nanoparticles (20 and 50 nm) have high photoacoustic contrast as compared to mouse tissue ex vivo. Gold nanoparticles can be visualized in mice in vivo following subcutaneous administration using PAT. Following intravenous administration of PEGylated gold nanoparticles to tumor-bearing mice, accumulation of gold nanoparticles in tumors can be effectively imaged with PAT. With gold nanoparticles as a contrast agent, PAT has important potential applications in the image guided therapy of superficial tumors such as breast cancer, melanoma and Merkel cell carcinoma.

  20. Extracellular biosynthesis of monodispersed gold nanoparticles by a SAM capping route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Li; Lin Zhonghua; Gu Pingying; Zhou Jianzhang; Yao Bingxing; Chen Guoliang; Fu Jinkun

    2009-01-01

    Monodispersed gold nanoparticles capped with a self-assembled monolayer of dodecanethiol were biosynthesized extracellularly by an efficient, simple, and environmental friendly procedure, which involved the use of Bacillus megatherium D01 as the reducing agent and the use of dodecanethiol as the capping ligand at 26 o C. The kinetics of gold nanoparticle formation was followed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. It was shown that reaction time was an important parameter in controlling the morphology of gold nanoparticles. The effect of thiol on the shape, size, and dispersity of gold nanoparticles was also studied. The results showed that the presence of thiol during the biosynthesis could induce the formation of small size gold nanoparticles (<2.5 nm), hold the shape of spherical nanoparticles, and promote the monodispersity of nanoparticles. Through the modulation of reaction time and the use of thiol, monodispersed spherical gold nanoparticles capped with thiol of 1.9 ± 0.8 nm size were formed by using Bacillus megatherium D01.

  1. Extracellular biosynthesis of monodispersed gold nanoparticles by a SAM capping route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen Li [Xiamen University, Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Lin Zhonghua [Xiamen University, State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces (China); Gu Pingying [Xiamen University, Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Zhou Jianzhang [Xiamen University, State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces (China); Yao Bingxing [Xiamen University, School of Life Sciences (China); Chen Guoliang; Fu Jinkun, E-mail: wenli_1976@163.co [Xiamen University, Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2009-02-15

    Monodispersed gold nanoparticles capped with a self-assembled monolayer of dodecanethiol were biosynthesized extracellularly by an efficient, simple, and environmental friendly procedure, which involved the use of Bacillus megatherium D01 as the reducing agent and the use of dodecanethiol as the capping ligand at 26 {sup o}C. The kinetics of gold nanoparticle formation was followed by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and UV-vis spectroscopy. It was shown that reaction time was an important parameter in controlling the morphology of gold nanoparticles. The effect of thiol on the shape, size, and dispersity of gold nanoparticles was also studied. The results showed that the presence of thiol during the biosynthesis could induce the formation of small size gold nanoparticles (<2.5 nm), hold the shape of spherical nanoparticles, and promote the monodispersity of nanoparticles. Through the modulation of reaction time and the use of thiol, monodispersed spherical gold nanoparticles capped with thiol of 1.9 {+-} 0.8 nm size were formed by using Bacillus megatherium D01.

  2. Biofabrication of gold and silver nanoparticles for pharmaceutical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Barabadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Biofabrication by using fungi is an exciting recent interest to develop an eco-friendly production of metallic nanoparticles (NPs for pharmaceutical applications. This study aimed to synthesize and characterize gold (Au and silver (Ag NPs by using Penicillium simplisimum. The fungus was grown in fluid czapek dox broth on shaker at 28 ºC and 200 rpm for ten days. Then the supernatant was separated from the mycelia to convert HAuCl4 and AgNO3 solution into Au and Ag NPs separately. After 24 hours, synthesized Au and Ag NPs were characterized by using UV-Visible Spectroscopy as well as Photon Correlation spectroscopy (PCS involves Polydispersity Index (PDI and zeta potential. The UV-Visible Spectroscopy analysis revealed a plasmon bond peak around 533 nm and 400 nm suggesting formation of Au and Ag NPs, respectively. Furthermore, the PCS analysis showed an average diameter of 68 nm and 76 nm with PDI value of 0.2 and 0.23 for Au and Ag NPs, successively, which demonstrated that the nanoparticles formed with fairly well-defined dimensions and good monodispersity. Besides, a negative zeta potential were found for nanoparticles indicating their stability in the solution. The current approach suggests that the rapid synthesis of nanoparticles would be suitable for developing a green process for mass scale production. Besides, we believe that development of eco-friendly process for the formulation of metallic NPs is an important step in the field of application of nanotechnology and its optimization may make it a potential procedure for industrial production of NPs.

  3. Feasibility of MR imaging in evaluating breast cancer lymphangiogenesis using Polyethylene glycol-GoldMag nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H.; Zou, L.G.; Zhang, S.; Gong, M.F.; Zhang, D.; Qi, Y.Y.; Zhou, S.W.; Diao, X.W.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the feasibility of evaluating tumour lymphangiogenesis using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo. Materials and methods: Water-soluble polyethylene glycol (PEG)-GoldMag nanoparticles were obtained by combining GoldMag with PEG. The PEG-GoldMag nanoparticles were bound to anti-podoplanin antibody (PodAb) to construct PEG-GoldMag-pod molecular probes targeting lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs). The characteristics of the PEG-GoldMag-pod nanoparticles were tested. Using these nanoparticles, tumour lymphangiogenesis was evaluated using MRI in vitro and in vivo. Results: The average size of PEG-GoldMag nanoparticles was about 66.8 nm, and the nanoparticles were stably dispersed in the liquid phase for at least 15 days. After incubation for 24 h at different iron concentrations ranging from 5–45 μg/ml, the LECs were labelled with PEG-GoldMag-pod nanoparticles, in particular the breast cancer LECs. Dose-dependence was observed in the labelling efficiencies and MRI images of the labelled cells. In vitro, the labelling efficiencies and MRI images showed that the nanoparticles could detect podoplanin expression in LECs. In induced rat models of breast cancer, PEG-GoldMag-pod nanoparticles combined with lymphatic vessels were significantly detectable at MRI 60 min after nanoparticle administration, the signal intensity was negatively correlated with the lymphatic vessel density of breast cancer (r = −0.864, P = 0.000). Conclusions: The present study proves the feasibility of evaluating tumour lymphangiogenesis with MRI in vivo

  4. Chrysopogon zizanioides aqueous extract mediated synthesis characterization of crystalline silver and gold nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arunachalam KD

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Kantha D Arunachalam, Sathesh Kumar Annamalai Center for Environmental Nuclear Research, Directorate of Research, SRM University, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Abstract: The exploitation of various plant materials for the biosynthesis of nanoparticles is considered a green technology as it does not involve any harmful chemicals. The aim of this study was to develop a simple biological method for the synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles using Chrysopogon zizanioides. To exploit various plant materials for the biosynthesis of nanoparticles was considered a green technology. An aqueous leaf extract of C. zizanioides was used to synthesize silver and gold nanoparticles by the bioreduction of silver nitrate (AgNO3 and chloroauric acid (HAuCl4 respectively. Water-soluble organics present in the plant materials were mainly responsible for reducing silver or gold ions to nanosized Ag or Au particles. The synthesized silver and gold nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet (UV-visible spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, and X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis. The kinetics decline reactions of aqueous silver/gold ion with the C. zizanioides crude extract were determined by UV-visible spectroscopy. SEM analysis showed that aqueous gold ions, when exposed to the extract were reduced and resulted in the biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles in the size range 20–50 nm. This eco-friendly approach for the synthesis of nanoparticles is simple, can be scaled up for large-scale production with powerful bioactivity as demonstrated by the synthesized silver nanoparticles. The synthesized nanoparticles can have clinical use as antibacterial, antioxidant, as well as cytotoxic agents and can be used for biomedical applications. Keywords: nanoparticles, bioreduction, SEM, silver, gold

  5. Antibacterial nanocarriers of resveratrol with gold and silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sohyun; Cha, Song-Hyun; Cho, Inyoung; Park, Soomin; Park, Yohan; Cho, Seonho; Park, Youmie

    2016-01-01

    This study focused on the preparation of resveratrol nanocarrier systems and the evaluation of their in vitro antibacterial activities. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for resveratrol nanocarrier systems were synthesized using green synthetic routes. During the synthesis steps, resveratrol was utilized as a reducing agent to chemically reduce gold and silver ions to AuNPs and AgNPs. This system provides green and eco-friendly synthesis routes that do not involve additional chemical reducing agents. Resveratrol nanocarriers with AuNPs (Res-AuNPs) and AgNPs (Res-AgNPs) were observed to be spherical and to exhibit characteristic surface plasmon resonance at 547 nm and at 412-417 nm, respectively. The mean size of the nanoparticles ranged from 8.32 to 21.84 nm, as determined by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The face-centered cubic structure of the Res-AuNPs was confirmed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Fourier-transform infrared spectra indicated that the hydroxyl groups and C=C in the aromatic ring of resveratrol were involved in the reduction reaction. Res-AuNPs retained excellent colloidal stability during ultracentrifugation and re-dispersion, suggesting that resveratrol also played a role as a capping agent. Zeta potentials of Res-AuNPs and Res-AgNPs were in the range of -20.58 to -48.54 mV. Generally, against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, the Res-AuNPs and Res-AgNPs exhibited greater antibacterial activity compared to that of resveratrol alone. Among the tested strains, the highest antibacterial activity of the Res-AuNPs was observed against Streptococcus pneumoniae. The addition of sodium dodecyl sulfate during the synthesis of Res-AgNPs slightly increased their antibacterial activity. These results suggest that the newly developed resveratrol nanocarrier systems with metallic nanoparticles show potential for application as nano-antibacterial agents with enhanced activities. Copyright © 2015

  6. Gold nanoparticle surface functionalization: a necessary requirement in the development of novel nanotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, James R; Dixon, Dorian; Coulter, Jonathan A

    2015-01-01

    With several gold nanoparticle-based therapies currently undergoing clinical trials, these treatments may soon be in the clinic as novel anticancer agents. Gold nanoparticles are the subject of a wide ranging international research effort with preclinical studies underway for multiple applications including photoablation, diagnostic imaging, radiosensitization and multifunctional drug-delivery vehicles. These applications require an increasingly complex level of surface modification in order to achieve efficacy and limit off-target toxicity. This review will discuss the main obstacles in relation to surface functionalization and the chemical approaches commonly utilized. Finally, we review a range of recent preclinical studies that aim to advance gold nanoparticle treatments toward the clinic.

  7. Glucomannan-mediated facile synthesis of gold nanoparticles for catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    A facile one-pot approach for synthesis of gold nanoparticles with narrow size distribution and good stability was presented by reducing chloroauric acid with a polysaccharide, konjac glucomannan (KGM) in alkaline solution, which is green and economically viable. Here, KGM served both as reducing agent and stabilizer. The effects of KGM on the formation and stabilization of as-synthesized gold nanoparticles were studied systematically by a combination of UV-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, dynamic light scattering, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Furthermore, the gold nanoparticles exhibited a notable catalytic activity toward the reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol. PMID:25177220

  8. Gold-coated iron nanoparticles in transparent Si3N4 matrix thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Marcos, J.; Céspedes, E.; Jiménez-Villacorta, F.; Muñoz-Martín, A.; Prieto, C.

    2013-06-01

    A new method to prepare thin films containing gold-coated iron nanoparticles is presented. The ternary Fe-Au-Si3N4 system prepared by sequential sputtering has revealed a progressive variation of microstructures from Au/Fe/Au/Si3N4 multilayers to iron nanoparticles. Microstructural characterization by transmission electron microscopy, analysis of the magnetic properties and probing of the iron short-range order by X-ray absorption spectroscopy confirm the existence of a gold-coated iron nanoparticles of 1-2 nm typical size for a specific range of iron and gold contents per layer in the transparent silicon nitride ceramic matrix.

  9. Enhanced Antimicrobial and Anticancer Activity of Silver and Gold Nanoparticles Synthesised Using Sargassum incisifolium Aqueous Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mmola, Mokone; Roes-Hill, Marilize Le; Durrell, Kim; Bolton, John J; Sibuyi, Nicole; Meyer, Mervin E; Beukes, Denzil R; Antunes, Edith

    2016-12-02

    A detailed, methodical approach was used to synthesise silver and gold nanoparticles using two differently prepared aqueous extracts of the brown algae Sargassum incisifolium . The efficiency of the extracts in producing nanoparticles were compared to commercially available brown algal fucoidans, a major constituent of brown algal aqueous extracts. The nanoparticles were characterised using TEM, XRD and UV/Vis spectroscopy and zeta potential measurements. The rate of nanoparticle formation was assessed using UV/Vis spectroscopy and related to the size, shape and morphology of the nanoparticles as revealed by TEM. The antioxidant, reducing power and total polyphenolic contents of the aqueous extracts and fucoidans were determined, revealing that the aqueous extracts with the highest contents produced smaller, spherical, more monodisperse nanoparticles at a faster rate. The nanoparticles were assessed against two gram-negative bacteria, two gram-positive bacteria and one yeast strain. In contrast to the literature, the silver nanoparticles produced using the aqueous extracts were particularly toxic to Gram-negative bacteria, while the gold nanoparticles lacked activity. The cytotoxic activity of the nanoparticles was also evaluated against cancerous (HT-29, MCF-7) and non-cancerous (MCF-12a) cell lines. The silver nanoparticles displayed selectivity, since the MCF-12a cell line was found to be resistant to the nanoparticles, while the cancerous HT-29 cell line was found to be sensitive (10% viability). The gold nanoparticles displayed negligible toxicity.

  10. Restriction of molecular twisting on a gold nanoparticle surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, Tushar; Dana, Jayanta; Maity, Partha; Lobo, Hyacintha; Shankarling, Ganapati S; Ghosh, Hirendra N

    2015-04-07

    To understand the photophysical properties of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) and twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) states on a gold nanoparticle (Au NP) surface, we have designed and synthesized a new coumarin molecule (C3) that exists both as ICT and TICT states in its excited state in a polar environment. On a Au NP surface, an excited C3 molecule only exists as an ICT state owing to restricted molecular rotation of a diethylamino group; as a result, no conversion from the ICT to TICT state was observed. Selection of the preferential state of a molecule with dual emitting states can be helpful for selected biological applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Cyclodextrin-Based [1]Rotaxanes on Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanli Zhao

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Transformation of mechanically interlocked molecules (e.g., rotaxanes and catenanes into nanoscale materials or devices is an important step towards their real applications. In our current work, an azobenzene-modified β-cyclodextrin (β-CD derivative that can form a self-inclusion complex in aqueous solution was prepared. The self-included β-CD derivative was then functionalized onto a gold nanoparticle (AuNP surface via a ligand-exchange reaction in aqueous solution, leading to the formation of AuNP-[1]rotaxane hybrids. Corresponding non-self-included β-CD derivative functionalized AuNPs were also developed in a DMF/H2O mixture solution for control experiments. These hybrids were fully characterized by UV-vis and circular dichroism spectroscopies, together with transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The competitive binding behavior of the hybrids with an adamantane dimer was investigated.

  12. Interaction of gold nanoparticles with proteins and cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Pengyang; Liu, Wei; Wang, Xin; Wang, Liming; Hou, Xiaoyang; Chen, Chunying

    2015-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) possess many advantages such as facile synthesis, controllable size and shape, good biocompatibility, and unique optical properties. Au NPs have been widely used in biomedical fields, such as hyperthermia, biocatalysis, imaging, and drug delivery. The broad application range may result in hazards to the environment and human health. Therefore, it is important to predict safety and evaluate therapeutic efficiency of Au NPs. It is necessary to establish proper approaches for the study of toxicity and biomedical effects. In this review, we first focus on the recent progress in biological effects of Au NPs at the molecular and cellular levels, and then introduce key techniques to study the interaction between Au NPs and proteins. Knowledge of the biomedical effects of Au NPs is significant for the rational design of functional nanomaterials and will help predict their safety and potential applications. (focus issue review)

  13. Stimuli-Responsive Gold Nanoparticles for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Tian

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An emerging concept is that cancers strongly depend on both internal and external signals for growth and invasion. In this review, we will discuss pathological and physical changes in the tumor microenvironment and how these changes can be exploited to design gold nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and therapy. These intrinsic changes include extracellular and intracellular pH, extracellular matrix enzymes, and glutathione concentration. External stimuli include the application of laser, ultrasound and X-ray. The biology behind these changes and the chemistry behind the responding mechanisms to these changes are reviewed. Examples of recent in vitro and in vivo studies are also presented, and the clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  14. Gold Nanoparticles and Nanocomposites in Clinical Diagnostics Using Electrochemical Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranjal Chandra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress and development in clinical diagnostics certainly focus upon the advances in the nanomaterials, particularly gold nanoparticles (AuNPs that offer promise to solve the biocompatible and sensitive detection systems. This paper focuses on the recent application of AuNPs in clinical diagnosis. Various important methods of AuNPs synthesis and their application in clinical detection of various biomolecules using electrochemical detection methods have been described. AuNPs alone and in various composites are also described based on the various biosensors design recently published for the detection of cancer biomarkers, proteins, bacteria, and cancer cells. The effect of AuNPs type and size in clinical detection has also been briefly illustrated.

  15. Dual-Specific Interaction to Detect DNA on Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Tobias Aveling Jenkins

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available An approach to selectively and efficiently detect single strand DNA is developed by using streptavidin coated gold nanoparticles (StAuNPs as efficient quenchers. The central concept for the successful detection is the combination the of streptavidin-biotin interaction with specific probe-target DNA hybridization. Biotin labeled probe DNAs act as “bridges” to bring Cy5 labeled targets to the particle surface and the fluorophore dye can be rapidly and efficiently quenched by StAuPNs. By measuring the changes of photoluminescence intensity of Cy5, an efficient, selective, and reversed detection of DNA hybridization is realized. The methodology may pave a new way for simple and rapid detections of biomolecules.

  16. Signal amplification for impedimetric genosensing using gold-streptavidin nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonanni, A.; Esplandiu, M.J. [Sensors and Biosensors Group, Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici Cn, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Valle, M. del [Sensors and Biosensors Group, Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici Cn, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain)], E-mail: manel.delvalle@uab.es

    2008-04-20

    Streptavidin-coated gold nanoparticles (strept-AuNPs) were used in this work to amplify the impedimetric signal generated in a biosensor detecting the DNA hybridization event. Probe oligomer was adsorbed onto a graphite epoxy composite (GEC) electrode surface and the impedance measurement was performed in a solution containing the redox marker ferrocyanide/ferricyanide. The biotinylated complementary oligomer was used as target. The change of interfacial charge transfer resistance (R{sub ct}), experimented by the redox marker, was recorded to confirm the hybrid formation. The addition of strept-AuNPs, binding to the target due to the strong streptavidin-biotin interaction, led to a further increment of R{sub ct} thus obtaining significant signal amplification. Strept-AuNPs on the electrode surface were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) after silver enhancement treatment. A competitive binding assay was also performed using unlabelled DNA target to demonstrate its applicability to real sample analysis.

  17. Gold nanoparticle cellular uptake, toxicity and radiosensitisation in hypoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jain, Suneil; Coulter, Jonathan A.; Butterworth, Karl T.; Hounsell, Alan R.; McMahon, Stephen J.; Hyland, Wendy B.; Muir, Mark F.; Dickson, Glenn R.; Prise, Kevin M.; Currell, Fred J.; Hirst, David G.; O’Sullivan, Joe M.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are novel agents that have been shown to cause radiosensitisation in vitro and in vivo. Tumour hypoxia is associated with radiation resistance and reduced survival in cancer patients. The interaction of GNPs with cells in hypoxia is explored. Materials and methods: GNP uptake, localization, toxicity and radiosensitisation were assessed in vitro under oxic and hypoxic conditions. Results: GNP cellular uptake was significantly lower under hypoxic than oxic conditions. A significant reduction in cell proliferation in hypoxic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells exposed to GNPs was observed. In these cells significant radiosensitisation occurred in normoxia and moderate hypoxia. However, in near anoxia no significant sensitisation occurred. Conclusions: GNP uptake occurred in hypoxic conditions, causing radiosensitisation in moderate, but not extreme hypoxia in a breast cancer cell line. These findings may be important for the development of GNPs for cancer therapy

  18. Green synthesis of well-dispersed gold nanoparticles using Macrotyloma uniflorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aromal, S. Aswathy; Vidhu, V. K.; Philip, Daizy

    2012-01-01

    The synthesis of metal nanoparticles of different sizes, shapes, chemical composition and controlled monodispersity is an important area of research in nanotechnology because of their interesting physical properties and technological applications. Present work describes an eco-friendly method for the synthesis of spherical gold nanoparticles using aqueous extract of Macrotyloma uniflorum. The effects of quantity of extract, temperature and pH on the formation of nanoparticles are studied. The nanoparticles are characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR analysis. The high crystallinity of nanoparticles with fcc phase is evident from HRTEM images, SAED and XRD patterns. Synthesized nanoparticles have size in the range 14-17 nm. FTIR spectrum indicates the presence of different functional groups present in the bio-molecule capping the nanoparticles. The possible mechanism leading to the formation of gold nanoparticles is suggested.

  19. Synthesis of tungsten oxide, silver, and gold nanoparticles by radio frequency plasma in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hattori, Yoshiaki; Nomura, Shinfuku; Mukasa, Shinobu; Toyota, Hiromichi; Inoue, Toru; Usui, Tomoya

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •RF plasma in water was used for nanoparticle synthesis. •Nanoparticles were produced from erosion of metallic electrode. •Rectangular and spherical tungsten oxide nanoparticles were produced. •No oxidations of the silver and gold spherical nanoparticles were produced. -- Abstract: A process for synthesis of nanoparticles using plasma in water generated by a radio frequency of 27.12 MHz is proposed. Tungsten oxide, silver, and gold nanoparticles were produced at 20 kPa through erosion of a metallic electrode exposed to plasma. Characterization of the produced nanoparticles was carried out by XRD, absorption spectrum, and TEM. The nanoparticle sizes were compared with those produced by a similar technique using plasma in liquid

  20. Targeting and molecular imaging of HepG2 cells using surface-functionalized gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathinaraj, Pierson [Auckland University of Technology, Institute of Biomedical Technologies (New Zealand); Lee, Kyubae; Choi, Yuri; Park, Soo-Young [Kyungpook National University, School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Graduate School (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Oh Hyeong [Kumoh National Institute of Technology, Department of Polymer Science and Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Inn-Kyu, E-mail: ikkang@knu.ac.kr [Kyungpook National University, School of Applied Chemical Engineering, Graduate School (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Mercaptosuccinic acid (M)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (GM) were prepared and characterized by transmission electron microscope and dynamic light scattering. M was used to improve the monodispersity and non-specific intracellular uptake of nanoparticles. Lactobionic acid (L) was subsequently conjugated to the GM to target preferentially HepG2 cells (liver cancer cells) that express asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPR) on their membrane surfaces and facilitate the transit of nanoparticles across the cell membrane. The mean size of lactobionic acid-conjugated gold nanoparticle (GL) was approximately 10 ± 0.2 nm. Finally, the Atto 680 dye (A6) was coupled to the nanoparticles to visualize their internalization into HepG2 cells. The interaction of surface-modified gold nanoparticles with HepG2 cells was studied after culturing cells in media containing the GM or L-conjugated GM (GL)

  1. A simple method for large scale synthesis of highly monodisperse gold nanoparticles at room temperature and their electron relaxation properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polavarapu, Lakshminarayana; Xu Qinghua

    2009-01-01

    Here we demonstrate a simple method for large scale preparation of monodisperse gold nanoparticles by simple mixing of chloroauricacid (HAuCl 4 ) with oleylamine (OA) at room temperature. The as-prepared gold nanoparticles have high monodispersity with an average diameter of 13 nm and can self-organize into two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal close-packed arrays. The size of the gold nanoparticles can be experimentally controlled. The capping agent, oleylamine, can be easily replaced with other capping agents such as thiol groups for further functionalization. The electron relaxation dynamics of these gold nanoparticles in toluene was studied by femtosecond pump-probe measurements, in comparison with the citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles in water. The phonon-phonon relaxation time of gold nanoparticles in toluene is slower than that of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles in water, due to the lower thermal conductivity of toluene than water. The electron-phonon relaxation of the gold nanoparticles in toluene was found to display weaker pump energy dependence, compared to that of citrate-capped gold nanoparticles in water. The different electron-phonon relaxation dynamics is ascribed to the extra vibrational states provided by gold- NH 2 , which serves as an extra nonradiative relaxation pathway for the e-ph relaxation in oleylamine-capped gold nanoparticles in toluene.

  2. Binding affinity of surface functionalized gold nanoparticles to hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ryan D; Roeder, Ryan K

    2011-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) have been investigated for a number of biomedical applications, including drug and gene delivery vehicles, thermal ablation therapy, diagnostic sensors, and imaging contrast agents. Surface functionalization with molecular groups exhibiting calcium affinity can enable targeted delivery of Au NPs to calcified tissue, including damaged bone tissue. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the binding affinity of functionalized Au NPs for targeted delivery to bone mineral, using hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals as a synthetic analog in vitro. Au NPs were synthesized to a mean particle size of 10-15 nm and surface functionalized with either L-glutamic acid, 2-aminoethylphosphonic acid, or alendronate, which exhibit a primary amine for binding gold opposite carboxylate, phosphonate, or bisphosphonate groups, respectively, for targeting calcium. Bisphosphonate functionalized Au NPs exhibited the most rapid binding kinetics and greatest binding affinity to HA, followed by glutamic acid and phosphonic acid. All functional groups reached complete binding after 24 h. Equilibrium binding constants in de-ionized water, determined by nonlinear regression of Langmuir isotherms, were 3.40, 0.69, and 0.25 mg/L for bisphosphonate, carboxylate, and phosphonate functionalized Au NPs, respectively. Functionalized Au NPs exhibited lower overall binding in fetal bovine serum compared to de-ionized water, but relative differences between functional groups were similar. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Direct Electrochemistry of Horseradish Peroxidase-Gold Nanoparticles Conjugate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chanchal K. Mitra

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We have studied the direct electrochemistry of horseradish peroxidase (HRP coupled to gold nanoparticles (AuNP using electrochemical techniques, which provide some insight in the application of biosensors as tools for diagnostics because HRP is widely used in clinical diagnostics kits. AuNP capped with (i glutathione and (ii lipoic acid was covalently linked to HRP. The immobilized HRP/AuNP conjugate showed characteristic redox peaks at a gold electrode. It displayed good electrocatalytic response to the reduction of H2O2, with good sensitivity and without any electron mediator. The covalent linking of HRP and AuNP did not affect the activity of the enzyme significantly. The response of the electrode towards the different concentrations of H2O2 showed the characteristics of Michaelis Menten enzyme kinetics with an optimum pH between 7.0 to 8.0. The preparation of the sensor involves single layer of enzyme, which can be carried out efficiently and is also highly reproducible when compared to other systems involving the layer-by-layer assembly, adsorption or encapsulation of the enzyme. The immobilized AuNP-HRP can be used for immunosensor applications

  4. Microreactors for Gold Nanoparticles Synthesis: From Faraday to Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Taifur Rahman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The seminal work of Michael Faraday in 1850s transmuted the “Alchemy of gold” into a fascinating scientific endeavor over the millennia, particularly in the past half century. Gold nanoparticles (GNPs arguably hold the central position of nanosciences due to their intriguing size-and-shape dependent physicochemical properties, non-toxicity, and ease of functionalization and potential for wide range of applications. The core chemistry involved in the syntheses is essentially not very different from what Michael Faraday resorted to: transforming ions into metallic gold using mild reducing agents. However, the process of such reduction and outcome (shapes and sizes are intricately dependent on basic operational parameters such as sequence of addition and efficiency of mixing of the reagents. Hence, irreproducibility in synthesis and maintaining batch-to-batch quality are major obstacles in this seemingly straightforward process, which poses challenges in scaling-up. Microreactors, by the virtue of excellent control over reagent mixing in space and time within narrow channel networks, opened a new horizon of possibilities to tackle such problems to produce GNPs in more reliable, reproducible and scalable ways. In this review, we will delineate the state-of-the-art of GNPs synthesis using microreactors and will discuss in length how such “flask-to-chip” paradigm shift may revolutionize the very concept of nanosyntheses.

  5. Gold Nanoparticles in Photonic Crystals Applications: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venditti, Iole

    2017-01-24

    This review concerns the recently emerged class of composite colloidal photonic crystals (PCs), in which gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) are included in the photonic structure. The use of composites allows achieving a strong modification of the optical properties of photonic crystals by involving the light scattering with electronic excitations of the gold component (surface plasmon resonance, SPR) realizing a combination of absorption bands with the diffraction resonances occurring in the body of the photonic crystals. Considering different preparations of composite plasmonic-photonic crystals, based on 3D-PCs in presence of AuNPs, different resonance phenomena determine the optical response of hybrid crystals leading to a broadly tunable functionality of these crystals. Several chemical methods for fabrication of opals and inverse opals are presented together with preparations of composites plasmonic-photonic crystals: the influence of SPR on the optical properties of PCs is also discussed. Main applications of this new class of composite materials are illustrated with the aim to offer the reader an overview of the recent advances in this field.

  6. Gold Nanoparticles in Photonic Crystals Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iole Venditti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This review concerns the recently emerged class of composite colloidal photonic crystals (PCs, in which gold nanoparticles (AuNPs are included in the photonic structure. The use of composites allows achieving a strong modification of the optical properties of photonic crystals by involving the light scattering with electronic excitations of the gold component (surface plasmon resonance, SPR realizing a combination of absorption bands with the diffraction resonances occurring in the body of the photonic crystals. Considering different preparations of composite plasmonic-photonic crystals, based on 3D-PCs in presence of AuNPs, different resonance phenomena determine the optical response of hybrid crystals leading to a broadly tunable functionality of these crystals. Several chemical methods for fabrication of opals and inverse opals are presented together with preparations of composites plasmonic-photonic crystals: the influence of SPR on the optical properties of PCs is also discussed. Main applications of this new class of composite materials are illustrated with the aim to offer the reader an overview of the recent advances in this field.

  7. Biofabrication of gold nanoparticles using marine endophytic fungus - Penicillium citrinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, Hulikere M; Joshi, Chandrashekhar G; Raju, Narayanappa Govinda

    2017-02-01

    Nanotechnology is one of the promising fields of research and generating new avenues and applications in medicine. Recently, marine floras such as, marine endophytes are gaining the attention of many researchers due to the myriad of bioactive molecules that they possess. In addition, they find applications in many pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. In this study, they have studied the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from Penicillium citrinum ( P. citrinum ) and its antioxidant activity. P. citrinum was isolated from brown algae. The identity of the fungus was established by comparing its 18S rDNA sequence. AuNPs were synthesised using P. citrinum and were characterised by UV-visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), X-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering (DLS). AuNPs were tested for free radical scavenging activity by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl method. The particle sizes of AuNps were determined by FESEM and DLS. The reduction of gold metal ion was confirmed from the UV-vis spectrum. AuNPs showed significant antioxidant potential and the activity was comparable to the standard ascorbic acid. Further, in vitro and in vivo studies on these AuNPs will help in developing an alternative, cost-effective and acceptable drug for various ailments.

  8. Synthesis and antimicrobial activity of gold nanoparticle conjugates with cefotaxime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titanova, Elena O.; Burygin, Gennady L.

    2016-04-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have attracted significant interest as a novel platform for various applications to nanobiotechnology and biomedicine. The conjugates of GNPs with antibiotics and antibodies were also used for selective photothermal killing of protozoa and bacteria. Also the conjugates of some antibiotics with GNPs decreased the number of bacterial growing cells. In this work was made the procedure optimization for conjugation of cefotaxime (a third-generation cephalosporin antibiotic) with GNPs (15 nm) and we examined the antimicrobial properties of this conjugate to bacteria culture of E. coli K-12. Addition of cefotaxime solution to colloidal gold does not change their color and extinction spectrum. For physiologically active concentration of cefotaxime (3 μg/mL), it was shown that the optimum pH for the conjugation was more than 9.5. A partial aggregation of the GNPs in saline medium was observed at pH 6.5-7.5. The optimum concentration of K2CO3 for conjugation cefotaxime with GNPs-15 was 5 mM. The optimum concentration of cefotaxime was at 0.36 μg/mL. We found the inhibition of the growth of E. coli K12 upon application cefotaxime-GNP conjugates.

  9. In Situ Gold Nanoparticle Gradient Formation in a 3D Meso- and Macroporous Polymer Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penders, Jelle; Rajasekharan, Anand K; Hulander, Mats; Andersson, Martin

    2017-08-01

    Herein, the development and characterization of a 3D gradient structure of gold nanoparticles is described. The gradient of gold nanoparticles is made in situ in a macroporous nonionic block copolymer hydrogel matrix, through gold ion diffusion control. The polymer provides a matrix for diffusion of gold ions, acts as a template for controlling nanoparticle growth, and facilitates the in situ reduction of gold ions to gold nanoparticles. A clear gradient in gold nanoparticles is observed across the 3D space of the polymer matrix using scanning electron microscopy, fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. The particle gradient is further functionalized with both hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups via thiol-gold linkage to demonstrate the ability to form gradients with different chemical functionalities. Using additive manufacturing, the polymer can also be printed as a porous network with possible applications for 3D cell culturing in, e.g., biomaterials research. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Green Synthesis, Characterization and Application of Proanthocyanidins-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biao, Linhai; Tan, Shengnan; Meng, Qinghuan; Gao, Jing; Zhang, Xuewei; Liu, Zhiguo; Fu, Yujie

    2018-01-01

    Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using plant extracts is one of the more promising approaches for obtaining environmentally friendly nanomaterials for biological applications and environmental remediation. In this study, proanthocyanidins-functionalized gold nanoparticles were synthesized via a hydrothermal method. The obtained gold nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. UV-Vis and FTIR results indicated that the obtained products were mainly spherical in shape, and that the phenolic hydroxyl of proanthocyanidins had strong interactions with the gold surface. TEM and XRD determination revealed that the synthesized gold nanoparticles had a highly crystalline structure and good monodispersity. The application of proanthocyanidins-functionalized gold nanoparticles for the removal of dyes and heavy metal ions Ni2+, Cu2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+ in an aqueous solution was investigated. The primary results indicate that proanthocyanidins-functionalized gold nanoparticles had high removal rates for the heavy metal ions and dye, which implies that they have potential applications as a new kind of adsorbent for the removal of contaminants in aqueous solution. PMID:29361727

  11. Green Synthesis, Characterization and Application of Proanthocyanidins-Functionalized Gold Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linhai Biao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles using plant extracts is one of the more promising approaches for obtaining environmentally friendly nanomaterials for biological applications and environmental remediation. In this study, proanthocyanidins-functionalized gold nanoparticles were synthesized via a hydrothermal method. The obtained gold nanoparticles were characterized by ultraviolet and visible spectrophotometry (UV-Vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, transmission electron microscopy (TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD measurements. UV-Vis and FTIR results indicated that the obtained products were mainly spherical in shape, and that the phenolic hydroxyl of proanthocyanidins had strong interactions with the gold surface. TEM and XRD determination revealed that the synthesized gold nanoparticles had a highly crystalline structure and good monodispersity. The application of proanthocyanidins-functionalized gold nanoparticles for the removal of dyes and heavy metal ions Ni2+, Cu2+, Cd2+ and Pb2+ in an aqueous solution was investigated. The primary results indicate that proanthocyanidins-functionalized gold nanoparticles had high removal rates for the heavy metal ions and dye, which implies that they have potential applications as a new kind of adsorbent for the removal of contaminants in aqueous solution.

  12. Bio-synthesis of gold nanoparticles by human epithelial cells, in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larios-Rodriguez, E; Rangel-Ayon, C; Herrera-Urbina, R; Castillo, S J; Zavala, G

    2011-01-01

    Healthy epithelial cells, in vivo, have the ability to synthesize gold nanoparticles when aqueous tetrachloroauric acid is made to react with human skin. Neither a reducing agent nor a protecting chemical is needed for this bio-synthesis method. The first indication of gold nanoparticle formation is the staining of the skin, which turns deep purple. Stereoscopic optical micrographs of human skin tissue in contact with aqueous tetrachloroauric acid clearly show the staining of the epithelial cells. The UV-Vis spectrum of these epithelial cells shows an absorption band with a maximum at 553 nm. This absorption peak is within the wavelength region where the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band of aqueous colloidal gold exhibits a maximum. Transmission electron micrographs show that gold nanoparticles synthesized by epithelial cells have sizes between 1 and 100 nm. The electron diffraction pattern of these nanoparticles reveals a crystalline structure whose interplanar distances correspond to fcc metallic gold. Transmission electron micrographs of ultra-thin (70 nm thick) slices of epithelial cells clearly and undoubtedly demonstrate that gold nanoparticles are inside the cell. According to high resolution transmission electron micrographs of intracellular single gold nanoparticles, they have the shape of a polyhedron.

  13. Sans Studies Insight Into Improving of Yield of Block Copolymer-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Debes; Aswal, V. K.

    2010-01-01

    Triblock copolymer poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) are well known as dispersion stabilizers. It has also been recently found that they can act as reducing agents along with stabilizers and these two properties of block copolymers together have provided a single-step synthesis and stabilization of gold nanoparticles at ambient temperature. We have studied the synthesis of stable gold nanoparticle solutions using block copolymer P85. Gold nanoparticles are prepared from 1 wt% aqueous solution of P85 mixed with varying concentration of HAuCl4.3H2O salt in the range 0.001 to 0.1 wt%. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) band in UV-visible absorption spectra confirm the formation of the gold nanoparticles and the maximum yield of the nanoparticles is found to be quite low at 0.005 wt% of the salt solution. Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) measurements in these systems suggest that a very small fraction of the block copolymers (nanoparticles and remaining form their own micelles, which probably results in the low yield. This can be explained as on an average a high block copolymer-to-gold ion ratio r0 (22) is required for 1 wt% P85 in the reduction reaction to produce gold nanoparticles. Based on this understanding, a step-addition method is used to enhance the yield of gold nanoparticles by manifold where the gold salt is added in small steps to maintain higher value of r(>r0) and therefore continuous formation of nanoparticles.

  14. Biosynthesis of antibacterial gold nanoparticles using brown alga, Stoechospermum marginatum (kützing).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arockiya Aarthi Rajathi, F; Parthiban, C; Ganesh Kumar, V; Anantharaman, P

    2012-12-01

    Biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles by brown alga, Stoechospermum marginatum biomasses through a green route was reported in this study. The formation of the gold nanoparticles was observed within 10 min. The properties of prepared nanoparticles were characterized by photoluminescence spectra, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, Transmission Electron Microscopy, X-ray diffraction, particle size analysis and quantified by Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectrophotometer. The synthesized gold nanoparticles were found to be photoluminescent. The formation of gold nanoparticles was confirmed by the presence of an absorption peak at 550 nm using UV-visible spectrophotometer. TEM image revealed that most of the particles are spherical in shape and some are hexagonal and triangle with size ranged from 18.7 to 93.7 nm. The nanoparticles were crystalline in nature and it was confirmed by XRD pattern and the presence of elemental gold (45.92%) was confirmed by WD-XRF. From the FTIR measurements it is noticed that the reduction has been carried out by hydroxyl groups present in the diterpenoids of the brown seaweed. Furthermore the biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles were found to be effective against bacterial pathogens. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Shape-controlled synthesis of NIR absorbing branched gold nanoparticles and morphology stabilization with alkanethiols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Broek, B; Frederix, F; Bonroy, K; Jans, H; Jans, K; Borghs, G; Maes, G

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles are ideal candidates for clinical applications if their plasmon absorption band is situated in the near infrared region (NIR) of the electromagnetic spectrum. Various parameters, including the nanoparticle shape, strongly influence the position of this absorption band. The aim of this study is to produce stabilized NIR absorbing branched gold nanoparticles with potential for biomedical applications. Hereto, the synthesis procedure for branched gold nanoparticles i