WorldWideScience

Sample records for goggles

  1. Do swimming goggles limit microbial contamination of contact lenses?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yvonne T; Tran, Jess; Truong, Michelle; Harmis, Najat; Zhu, Hua; Stapleton, Fiona

    2011-04-01

    Wearing goggles over contact lenses while swimming is often recommended by eye care professionals. Limited data are available to assess this recommendation. The purpose of this study was to examine whether wearing goggles while swimming limits bacterial colonization on contact lenses and whether the type of lens worn affects contamination rates. Twenty-three subjects underwent two swimming sessions at an ocean (salt water) pool (Maroubra beach Rock Pool, Sydney, Australia). Silicone hydrogel (Ciba Focus Night and Day) or hydrogel lenses (Ciba Focus Daily) were inserted into subjects' eyes before 30 min of swimming sessions, and subjects used modified goggles to mimic goggled and non-goggled conditions. At the end of each session, lenses were collected for microbial investigation. Viable bacterial colonies were classified as gram positive and gram negative and enumerated. The level of bacterial colonization on contact lenses between goggled and non-goggled conditions and between the two lens materials were compared. The range of colony forming units recovered from goggled lenses were 0 to 930 compared with 0 to 1210 on non-goggled lenses. The majority of subjects (16/23) had more microorganisms in the non-goggled condition than when wearing goggles (p = 0.03). Gram negative organisms were found in three non-goggled lenses. No significant difference was shown in the number of bacteria isolated from silicone hydrogel and hydrogel lenses (p > 0.6) irrespective of wearing goggles. Water samples had consistently higher numbers of bacterial counts than those adhered to the lenses; however, no association was found between the number of bacteria in the water sample and those found on the contact lenses. Consistently, fewer bacterial colonies were found on the goggled contact lens, thus suggesting goggles offer some protection against bacterial colonization of contact lenses while swimming. These data would support the recommendation encouraging lens wearers to use goggles

  2. A goggle navigation system for cancer resection surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junbin; Shao, Pengfei; Yue, Ting; Zhang, Shiwu; Ding, Houzhu; Wang, Jinkun; Xu, Ronald

    2014-02-01

    We describe a portable fluorescence goggle navigation system for cancer margin assessment during oncologic surgeries. The system consists of a computer, a head mount display (HMD) device, a near infrared (NIR) CCD camera, a miniature CMOS camera, and a 780 nm laser diode excitation light source. The fluorescence and the background images of the surgical scene are acquired by the CCD camera and the CMOS camera respectively, co-registered, and displayed on the HMD device in real-time. The spatial resolution and the co-registration deviation of the goggle navigation system are evaluated quantitatively. The technical feasibility of the proposed goggle system is tested in an ex vivo tumor model. Our experiments demonstrate the feasibility of using a goggle navigation system for intraoperative margin detection and surgical guidance.

  3. Stereoscopic Integrated Imaging Goggles for Multimodal Intraoperative Image Guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Mela

    Full Text Available We have developed novel stereoscopic wearable multimodal intraoperative imaging and display systems entitled Integrated Imaging Goggles for guiding surgeries. The prototype systems offer real time stereoscopic fluorescence imaging and color reflectance imaging capacity, along with in vivo handheld microscopy and ultrasound imaging. With the Integrated Imaging Goggle, both wide-field fluorescence imaging and in vivo microscopy are provided. The real time ultrasound images can also be presented in the goggle display. Furthermore, real time goggle-to-goggle stereoscopic video sharing is demonstrated, which can greatly facilitate telemedicine. In this paper, the prototype systems are described, characterized and tested in surgeries in biological tissues ex vivo. We have found that the system can detect fluorescent targets with as low as 60 nM indocyanine green and can resolve structures down to 0.25 mm with large FOV stereoscopic imaging. The system has successfully guided simulated cancer surgeries in chicken. The Integrated Imaging Goggle is novel in 4 aspects: it is (a the first wearable stereoscopic wide-field intraoperative fluorescence imaging and display system, (b the first wearable system offering both large FOV and microscopic imaging simultaneously,

  4. Stroboscopic Goggles for Reduction of Motion Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reschke, M. F.; Somers, Jeffrey T.

    2005-01-01

    A device built around a pair of electronic shutters has been demonstrated to be effective as a prototype of stroboscopic goggles or eyeglasses for preventing or reducing motion sickness. The momentary opening of the shutters helps to suppress a phenomenon that is known in the art as retinal slip and is described more fully below. While a number of different environmental factors can induce motion sickness, a common factor associated with every known motion environment is sensory confusion or sensory mismatch. Motion sickness is a product of misinformation arriving at a central point in the nervous system from the senses from which one determines one s spatial orientation. When information from the eyes, ears, joints, and pressure receptors are all in agreement as to one s orientation, there is no motion sickness. When one or more sensory input(s) to the brain is not expected, or conflicts with what is anticipated, the end product is motion sickness. Normally, an observer s eye moves, compensating for the anticipated effect of motion, in such a manner that the image of an object moving relatively to an observer is held stationary on the retina. In almost every known environment that induces motion sickness, a change in the gain (in the signal-processing sense of gain ) of the vestibular system causes the motion of the eye to fail to hold images stationary on the retina, and the resulting motion of the images is termed retinal slip. The present concept of stroboscopic goggles or eyeglasses (see figure) is based on the proposition that prevention of retinal slip, and hence, the prevention of sensory mismatch, can be expected to reduce the tendency toward motion sickness. A device according to this concept helps to prevent retinal slip by providing snapshots of the visual environment through electronic shutters that are brief enough that each snapshot freezes the image on each retina. The exposure time for each snapshot is less than 5 ms. In the event that a higher

  5. PLZT thermal/flash protective goggles: device concepts and constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cutchen, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    In 1975 Sandia Laboratories began the design and development of PLZT Goggles for the US Air Force to provide protection from temporary flashblindness and permanent retinal burns caused by the brilliant flash of nuclear explosions. The user requirements, system and physical constraints, and use/storage environments were all considered in arriving at the final design goals. When the program began, there was no industrial capability to manufacture large-aperture PLZT materials or bonded lens assemblies. The technology has been established from a laboratory baseline in a brief period, and operational testing and evaluation by the Air Force has been completed. The goggles, identified as the EEU-2/P,, are now in production

  6. Gunner Goggles: Implementing Augmented Reality into Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leo L; Wu, Hao-Hua; Bilici, Nadir; Tenney-Soeiro, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    There is evidence that both smartphone and tablet integration into medical education has been lacking. At the same time, there is a niche for augmented reality (AR) to improve this process through the enhancement of textbook learning. Gunner Goggles is an attempt to enhance textbook learning in shelf exam preparatory review with augmented reality. Here we describe our initial prototype and detail the process by which augmented reality was implemented into our textbook through Layar. We describe the unique functionalities of our textbook pages upon augmented reality implementation, which includes links, videos and 3D figures, and surveyed 24 third year medical students for their impression of the technology. Upon demonstrating an initial prototype textbook chapter, 100% (24/24) of students felt that augmented reality improved the quality of our textbook chapter as a learning tool. Of these students, 92% (22/24) agreed that their shelf exam review was inadequate and 19/24 (79%) felt that a completed Gunner Goggles product would have been a viable alternative to their shelf exam review. Thus, while students report interest in the integration of AR into medical education test prep, future investigation into how the use of AR can improve performance on exams is warranted.

  7. A Comparison of the AVS-9 and the Panoramic Night Vision Goggles During Rotorcraft Hover and Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szoboszlay, Zoltan; Haworth, Loran; Simpson, Carol

    2000-01-01

    A flight test was conducted to assess any differences in pilot-vehicle performance and pilot opinion between the use of a current generation night vision goggle (the AVS-9) and one variant of the prototype panoramic night vision goggle (the PNVGII). The panoramic goggle has more than double the horizontal field-of-view of the AVS-9, but reduced image quality. Overall the panoramic goggles compared well to the AVS-9 goggles. However, pilot comment and data are consistent with the assertion that some of the benefits of additional field-of-view with the panoramic goggles were negated by the reduced image quality of the particular variant of the panoramic goggles tested.

  8. Three-dimensional biomimetic head model as a platform for thermal testing of protective goggles for prevention of eye injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Rinat; Haimy, Ayelet; Gefen, Amit; Epstein, Yoram

    2018-04-22

    The rate of eye injury is steadily rising during military conflicts of the century, with thermal burns being the most common type of injury to the eyes. The present study focuses on assessing the heat resistance properties of military protective goggles using three-dimensional (3D) finite element head modeling fitted with the tested protective gear. A computational thermal impact was applied onto a 3D biomimetic human head model fitted with two goggle models - sports (Type 1) and square (Type 2). The resultant temperature of the eye tissues and the thermal injury thresholds were calculated by using the modeling, hence allowing to determine the protective efficacy of the goggles objectively, in a standardized, quantitative and cost-effective manner. Both types of goggles had a dramatic protective effect on the eyes. The specific goggle geometry had no notable effect on the level of protection to the inner tissues against the thermal insult. At the skin level goggles reduced temperatures by ~64% under the impact zone, with only a mild difference (10 °C) between the goggles. Little limitations on the shape and geometry of goggles were observed and any structure of goggles can provide an adequate protection against a thermal insult (per se) to inner cranial tissues, assuming the lenses are wide and thick enough to block direct skin contact of the heat insult. It was shown that our 3D biomimetic human head model provides a practical and cost-effective tool for determining the performance level of goggles with different attributed (i.e., shapes and thermal properties). Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Night-vision goggles for night-blind subjects : subjective evaluation after 2 years of use

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartong, D. T.; Kooijman, A. C.

    Purpose: To evaluate the usefulness of night-vision goggles (NVG) for night-blind subjects after 1 and 2 years of use. Methods: Eleven night-blind subjects with retinitis pigmentosa used NVG for a 2-year period. At the end of each year, they were requested to fill-in two questionnaires regarding

  10. Multifocal visual evoked responses to dichoptic stimulation using virtual reality goggles: Multifocal VER to dichoptic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvind, Hemamalini; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L; Grigg, John R

    2006-05-01

    Multifocal visual evoked potentials (mfVEPs) have demonstrated good diagnostic capabilities in glaucoma and optic neuritis. This study aimed at evaluating the possibility of simultaneously recording mfVEP for both eyes with dichoptic stimulation using virtual reality goggles and also to determine the stimulus characteristics that yield maximum amplitude. ten healthy volunteers were recruited and temporally sparse pattern pulse stimuli were presented dichoptically using virtual reality goggles. Experiment 1 involved recording responses to dichoptically presented checkerboard stimuli and also confirming true topographic representation by switching off specific segments. Experiment 2 involved monocular stimulation and comparison of amplitude with Experiment 1. In Experiment 3, orthogonally oriented gratings were dichoptically presented. Experiment 4 involved dichoptic presentation of checkerboard stimuli at different levels of sparseness (5.0 times/s, 2.5 times/s, 1.66 times/s and 1.25 times/s), where stimulation of corresponding segments of two eyes were separated by 16.7, 66.7,116.7 & 166.7 ms respectively. Experiment 1 demonstrated good traces in all regions and confirmed topographic representation. However, there was suppression of amplitude of responses to dichoptic stimulation by 17.9+/-5.4% compared to monocular stimulation. Experiment 3 demonstrated similar suppression between orthogonal and checkerboard stimuli (p = 0.08). Experiment 4 demonstrated maximum amplitude and least suppression (4.8%) with stimulation at 1.25 times/s with 166.7 ms separation between eyes. It is possible to record mfVEP for both eyes during dichoptic stimulation using virtual reality goggles, which present binocular simultaneous patterns driven by independent sequences. Interocular suppression can be almost eliminated by using a temporally sparse stimulus of 1.25 times/s with a separation of 166.7 ms between stimulation of corresponding segments of the two eyes.

  11. Phototherapy and orange-tinted goggles for night-shift adaptation of police officers on patrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Diane B; Boudreau, Philippe; Tremblay, Geneviève M

    2012-06-01

    The aim of the present combined field and laboratory study was to assess circadian entrainment in two groups of police officers working seven consecutive 8/8.5-h night shifts as part of a rotating schedule. Eight full-time police officers on patrol (mean age ± SD: 29.8 ± 6.5 yrs) were provided an intervention consisting of intermittent exposure to wide-spectrum bright light at night, orange-tinted goggles at sunrise, and maintenance of a regular sleep/darkness episode in the day. Orange-tinted goggles have been shown to block the melatonin-suppressing effect of light significantly more than neutral gray density goggles. Nine control group police officers (mean age ± SD: 30.3 ± 4.1 yrs) working the same schedule were enrolled. Police officers were studied before, after (in the laboratory), and during (ambulatory) a series of seven consecutive nights. Urine samples were collected at wake time and bedtime throughout the week of night work and during laboratory visits (1 × /3 h) preceding and following the work week to measure urinary 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (UaMT6s) excretion rate. Subjective alertness was assessed at the start, middle, and end of night shifts. A 10-min psychomotor vigilance task was performed at the start and end of each shift. Both laboratory visits consisted of two 8-h sleep episodes based on the prior schedule. Saliva samples were collected 2 × /h during waking episodes to assay their melatonin content. Subjective alertness (3 × /h) and performance (1 × /2 h) were assessed during wake periods in the laboratory. A mixed linear model was used to analyze the progression of UaMt6s excreted during daytime sleep episodes at home, as well as psychomotor performance and subjective alertness during night shifts. Two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) (factors: laboratory visit and group) were used to compare peak salivary melatonin and UaMT6s excretion rate in the laboratory. In both groups of police officers, the excretion rate of UaMT6s at home was

  12. A Comparison of the AVS-9 and the Panoramic Night Vision Goggle During Rotorcraft Hover and Landing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szoboszlay, Zoltan; Haworth, Loran; Simpson, Carol; Rutkowski, Michael (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this flight test was to measure any differences in pilot-vehicle performance and pilot opinion between the use of the current generation AVS-9 Night Vision Goggle and one variant of the prototype Panoramic Night Vision Goggle (the PNV.GII). The PNVGII has more than double the horizontal field-of-view of the AVS-9, but reduced image quality. The flight path of the AH-1S helicopter was used as a measure of pilot-vehicle performance. Also recorded were subjective measures of flying qualities, physical reserves of the pilot, situational awareness, and display usability. Pilot comment and data indicate that the benefits of additional FOV with the PNVGIIs are to some extent negated by the reduced image quality of the PNVGIIs.

  13. A self-report critical incident assessment tool for army night vision goggle helicopter operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Peter F; Wiggins, Mark W

    2007-04-01

    The present study sought to examine the utility of a self-report tool that was designed as a partial substitute for a face-to-face cognitive interview for critical incidents involving night vision goggles (NVGs). The use of NVGs remains problematic within the military environment, as these devices have been identified as a factor in a significant proportion of aircraft accidents and incidents. The self-report tool was structured to identify some of the cognitive features of human performance that were associated with critical incidents involving NVGs. The tool incorporated a number of different levels of analysis, ranging from specific behavioral responses to broader cognitive constructs. Reports were received from 30 active pilots within the Australian Army using the NVG Critical Incident Assessment Tool (NVGCIAT). The results revealed a correspondence between specific types of NVG-related errors and elements of the Human Factors Analysis and Classification System (HFACS). In addition, uncertainty emerged as a significant factor associated with the critical incidents that were recalled by operators. These results were broadly consistent with previous research and provide some support for the utility of subjective assessment tools as a means of extracting critical incident-related data when face-to-face cognitive interviews are not possible. In some circumstances, the NVGCIAT might be regarded as a substitute cognitive interview protocol with some level of diagnosticity.

  14. Development of an Automatic Testing Platform for Aviator’s Night Vision Goggle Honeycomb Defect Inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Lin Jian

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the direct influence of night vision equipment availability on the safety of night-time aerial reconnaissance, maintenance needs to be carried out regularly. Unfortunately, some defects are not easy to observe or are not even detectable by human eyes. As a consequence, this study proposed a novel automatic defect detection system for aviator’s night vision imaging systems AN/AVS-6(V1 and AN/AVS-6(V2. An auto-focusing process consisting of a sharpness calculation and a gradient-based variable step search method is applied to achieve an automatic detection system for honeycomb defects. This work also developed a test platform for sharpness measurement. It demonstrates that the honeycomb defects can be precisely recognized and the number of the defects can also be determined automatically during the inspection. Most importantly, the proposed approach significantly reduces the time consumption, as well as human assessment error during the night vision goggle inspection procedures.

  15. Night vision goggle stimulation using LCoS and DLP projection technology, which is better?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Masoud H.; Lyon, Paul; De Meerleer, Peter

    2014-06-01

    High fidelity night-vision training has become important for many of the simulation systems being procured today. The end-users of these simulation-training systems prefer using their actual night-vision goggle (NVG) headsets. This requires that the visual display system stimulate the NVGs in a realistic way. Historically NVG stimulation was done with cathode-ray tube (CRT) projectors. However, this technology became obsolete and in recent years training simulators do NVG stimulation with laser, LCoS and DLP projectors. The LCoS and DLP projection technologies have emerged as the preferred approach for the stimulation of NVGs. Both LCoS and DLP technologies have advantages and disadvantages for stimulating NVGs. LCoS projectors can have more than 5-10 times the contrast capability of DLP projectors. The larger the difference between the projected black level and the brightest object in a scene, the better the NVG stimulation effects can be. This is an advantage of LCoS technology, especially when the proper NVG wavelengths are used. Single-chip DLP projectors, even though they have much reduced contrast compared to LCoS projectors, can use LED illuminators in a sequential red-green-blue fashion to create a projected image. It is straightforward to add an extra infrared (NVG wavelength) LED into this sequential chain of LED illumination. The content of this NVG channel can be independent of the visible scene, which allows effects to be added that can compensate for the lack of contrast inherent in a DLP device. This paper will expand on the differences between LCoS and DLP projectors for stimulating NVGs and summarize the benefits of both in night-vision simulation training systems.

  16. Objective Assessment of Activity Limitation in Glaucoma with Smartphone Virtual Reality Goggles: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Rachel L Z; Kong, Yu Xiang George; McAlinden, Colm; Liu, John; Crowston, Jonathan G; Skalicky, Simon E

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the use of smartphone-based virtual reality to objectively assess activity limitation in glaucoma. Cross-sectional study of 93 patients (54 mild, 22 moderate, 17 severe glaucoma). Sociodemographics, visual parameters, Glaucoma Activity Limitation-9 and Visual Function Questionnaire - Utility Index (VFQ-UI) were collected. Mean age was 67.4 ± 13.2 years; 52.7% were male; 65.6% were driving. A smartphone placed inside virtual reality goggles was used to administer the Virtual Reality Glaucoma Visual Function Test (VR-GVFT) to participants, consisting of three parts: stationary, moving ball, driving. Rasch analysis and classical validity tests were conducted to assess performance of VR-GVFT. Twenty-four of 28 stationary test items showed acceptable fit to the Rasch model (person separation 3.02, targeting 0). Eleven of 12 moving ball test items showed acceptable fit (person separation 3.05, targeting 0). No driving test items showed acceptable fit. Stationary test person scores showed good criterion validity, differentiating between glaucoma severity groups ( P = 0.014); modest convergence validity, with mild to moderate correlation with VFQ-UI, better eye (BE) mean deviation, BE pattern deviation, BE central scotoma, worse eye (WE) visual acuity, and contrast sensitivity (CS) in both eyes ( R = 0.243-0.381); and suboptimal divergent validity. Multivariate analysis showed that lower WE CS ( P = 0.044) and greater age ( P = 0.009) were associated with worse stationary test person scores. Smartphone-based virtual reality may be a portable objective simulation test of activity limitation related to glaucomatous visual loss. The use of simulated virtual environments could help better understand the activity limitations that affect patients with glaucoma.

  17. WE-G-BRD-03: Development of a Real-Time Optical Tracking Goggle System (OTGS) for Intracranial Stereotactic Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittauer, K; Yan, G; Lu, B; Barraclough, B; Li, J; Liu, C [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Optical tracking systems (OTS) are an acceptable alternative to frame-based stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT). However, current surface-based OTS lack the ability to target exclusively rigid/bony anatomical features. We propose a novel marker-based optical tracking goggle system (OTGS) that provides real-time guidance based on the nose/facial bony anatomy. This ongoing study involves the development and characterization of the OTGS for clinical implementation in intracranial stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods: The OTGS consists of eye goggles, a custom thermoplastic nosepiece, and 6 infrared markers pre-attached to the goggles. A phantom and four healthy volunteers were used to evaluate the calibration/registration accuracy, intrafraction accuracy, interfraction reproducibility, and end-to-end accuracy of the OTGS. The performance of the OTGS was compared with that of the frameless SonArray system and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) for volunteer and phantom cases, respectively. The performance of the OTGS with commercial immobilization devices and under treatment conditions (i.e., couch rotation and translation range) was also evaluated. Results: The difference in the calibration/registration accuracy of 24 translations or rotation combinations between CBCT and in-house OTS software was within 0.5 mm/0.4°. The mean intrafraction and interfraction accuracy among the volunteers was 0.004+/−0.4mm with −0.09+/−0.5° (n=6,170) and −0.26+/−0.8mm with 0.15+/0.8° (n=11), respectively. The difference in end-to-end accuracy between the OTGS and CBCT was within 1.3 mm/1.1°. The predetermined marker pattern (1) minimized marker occlusions, (2) allowed for continuous tracking for couch angles +/− 90°, (3) and eliminated individual marker misplacement. The device was feasible with open and half masks for immobilization. Conclusion: Bony anatomical localization eliminated potential errors due to facial hair changes and/or soft tissue deformation. The

  18. The Effects of the Personal Armor System for Ground Troops (PASGT) and the Advanced Combat Helmet (ACH) with and without PVS-14 Night Vision Goggles (NVG) on Neck Biomechanics During Dismounted Soldier Movements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LaFiandra, Michael; Harman, Everett; Cornelius, Nancy; Frykman, Peter; Gutekunst, David; Nelson, Gabe

    2007-01-01

    Kevlar helmets provide the soldier with basic ballistic and impact protection. However, the helmet has recently become a mounting platform for devices such as night-vision goggles, drop down displays, weapon-aiming systems, etc...

  19. Feasibility of articulated arm mounted Oculus Rift Virtual Reality goggles for adjunctive pain control during occupational therapy in pediatric burn patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Hunter G; Meyer, Walter J; Ramirez, Maribel; Roberts, Linda; Seibel, Eric J; Atzori, Barbara; Sharar, Sam R; Patterson, David R

    2014-06-01

    For daily burn wound care and therapeutic physical therapy skin stretching procedures, powerful pain medications alone are often inadequate. This feasibility study provides the first evidence that entering an immersive virtual environment using very inexpensive (∼$400) wide field of view Oculus Rift Virtual Reality (VR) goggles can elicit a strong illusion of presence and reduce pain during VR. The patient was an 11-year-old male with severe electrical and flash burns on his head, shoulders, arms, and feet (36 percent total body surface area (TBSA), 27 percent TBSA were third-degree burns). He spent one 20-minute occupational therapy session with no VR, one with VR on day 2, and a final session with no VR on day 3. His rating of pain intensity during therapy dropped from severely painful during no VR to moderately painful during VR. Pain unpleasantness dropped from moderately unpleasant during no VR to mildly unpleasant during VR. He reported going "completely inside the computer generated world", and had more fun during VR. Results are consistent with a growing literature showing reductions in pain during VR. Although case studies are scientifically inconclusive by nature, these preliminary results suggest that the Oculus Rift VR goggles merit more attention as a potential treatment for acute procedural pain of burn patients. Availability of inexpensive but highly immersive VR goggles would significantly improve cost effectiveness and increase dissemination of VR pain distraction, making VR available to many more patients, potentially even at home, for pain control as well as a wide range of other VR therapy applications. This is the first clinical data on PubMed to show the use of Oculus Rift for any medical application.

  20. New weather depiction technology for night vision goggle (NVG) training: 3D virtual/augmented reality scene-weather-atmosphere-target simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folaron, Michelle; Deacutis, Martin; Hegarty, Jennifer; Vollmerhausen, Richard; Schroeder, John; Colby, Frank P.

    2007-04-01

    US Navy and Marine Corps pilots receive Night Vision Goggle (NVG) training as part of their overall training to maintain the superiority of our forces. This training must incorporate realistic targets; backgrounds; and representative atmospheric and weather effects they may encounter under operational conditions. An approach for pilot NVG training is to use the Night Imaging and Threat Evaluation Laboratory (NITE Lab) concept. The NITE Labs utilize a 10' by 10' static terrain model equipped with both natural and cultural lighting that are used to demonstrate various illumination conditions, and visual phenomena which might be experienced when utilizing night vision goggles. With this technology, the military can safely, systematically, and reliably expose pilots to the large number of potentially dangerous environmental conditions that will be experienced in their NVG training flights. A previous SPIE presentation described our work for NAVAIR to add realistic atmospheric and weather effects to the NVG NITE Lab training facility using the NVG - WDT(Weather Depiction Technology) system (Colby, et al.). NVG -WDT consist of a high end multiprocessor server with weather simulation software, and several fixed and goggle mounted Heads Up Displays (HUDs). Atmospheric and weather effects are simulated using state-of-the-art computer codes such as the WRF (Weather Research μ Forecasting) model; and the US Air Force Research Laboratory MODTRAN radiative transport model. Imagery for a variety of natural and man-made obscurations (e.g. rain, clouds, snow, dust, smoke, chemical releases) are being calculated and injected into the scene observed through the NVG via the fixed and goggle mounted HUDs. This paper expands on the work described in the previous presentation and will describe the 3D Virtual/Augmented Reality Scene - Weather - Atmosphere - Target Simulation part of the NVG - WDT. The 3D virtual reality software is a complete simulation system to generate realistic

  1. A Wearable Goggle Navigation System for Dual-Mode Optical and Ultrasound Localization of Suspicious Lesions: Validation Studies Using Tissue-Simulating Phantoms and an Ex Vivo Human Breast Tissue Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeshu Zhang

    Full Text Available Surgical resection remains the primary curative treatment for many early-stage cancers, including breast cancer. The development of intraoperative guidance systems for identifying all sites of disease and improving the likelihood of complete surgical resection is an area of active ongoing research, as this can lead to a decrease in the need of subsequent additional surgical procedures. We develop a wearable goggle navigation system for dual-mode optical and ultrasound imaging of suspicious lesions. The system consists of a light source module, a monochromatic CCD camera, an ultrasound system, a Google Glass, and a host computer. It is tested in tissue-simulating phantoms and an ex vivo human breast tissue model. Our experiments demonstrate that the surgical navigation system provides useful guidance for localization and core needle biopsy of simulated tumor within the tissue-simulating phantom, as well as a core needle biopsy and subsequent excision of Indocyanine Green (ICG-fluorescing sentinel lymph nodes. Our experiments support the contention that this wearable goggle navigation system can be potentially very useful and fully integrated by the surgeon for optimizing many aspects of oncologic surgery. Further engineering optimization and additional in vivo clinical validation work is necessary before such a surgical navigation system can be fully realized in the everyday clinical setting.

  2. What's crucial in night vision goggle simulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooi, Frank L.; Toet, Alexander

    2005-05-01

    Training is required to correctly interpret NVG imagery. Training night operations with simulated intensified imagery has great potential. Compared to direct viewing with the naked eye, intensified imagery is relatively easy to simulate and the cost of real NVG training is high (logistics, risk, civilian sleep deprivation, pollution). On the surface NVG imagery appears to have a structure similar to daylight imagery. However, in actuality its characteristics differ significantly from those of daylight imagery. As a result, NVG imagery frequently induces visual illusions. To achieve realistic training, simulated NVG imagery should at least reproduce the essential visual limitations of real NVG imagery caused by reduced resolution, reduced contrast, limited field-of-view, the absence of color, and the systems sensitivity to nearby infrared radiation. It is particularly important that simulated NVG imagery represents essential NVG visual characteristics, such as the high reflection of chlorophyll and halos. Current real-time simulation software falls short for training purposes because of an incorrect representation of shadow effects. We argue that the development of shading and shadowing merits priority to close the gap between real and simulated NVG flight conditions. Visual conspicuity can be deployed as an efficient metric to measure the 'perceptual distance' between the real NVG and the simulated NVG image.

  3. Night Vision Goggles Objectives Lens Focusing Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pinkus, Alan; Task, H. L

    2000-01-01

    ...: interpupillary distance, tilt, eye relief, height, eyepiece and objective lens focus. Currently, aircrew use a Hoffman 20/20 test unit to pre-focus their NVG objective lenses at optical infinity before boarding their aircraft...

  4. Through the Google Goggles: Sociopolitical Bias in Search Engine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, A.

    Search engines like Google are essential to navigating the Web's endless supply of news, political information, and citizen discourse. The mechanisms and conditions under which search results are selected should therefore be of considerable interest to media scholars, political theorists, and citizens alike. In this chapter, I adopt a "deliberative" ideal for search engines and examine whether Google exhibits the "same old" media biases of mainstreaming, hypercommercialism, and industry consolidation. In the end, serious objections to Google are raised: Google may favor popularity over richness; it provides advertising that competes directly with "editorial" content; it so overwhelmingly dominates the industry that users seldom get a second opinion, and this is unlikely to change. Ultimately, however, the results of this analysis may speak less about Google than about contradictions in the deliberative ideal and the so-called "inherently democratic" nature of the Web.

  5. AR goggles make crime scene investigation a desk job

    OpenAIRE

    Aron, Jacob; NORTHFIELD, Dean

    2012-01-01

    CRIME scene investigators could one day help solve murders without leaving the office. A pair of augmented reality glasses could allow local police to virtually tag objects in a crime scene, and build a clean record of the scene in 3D video before evidence is removed for processing.\\ud The system, being developed by Oytun Akman and colleagues at the Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands, consists of a head-mounted display receiving 3D video from a pair of attached cameras controll...

  6. Aural-Nondetectability Model Predictions for Night-Vision Goggles across Ambient Lighting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    MALHOTRA 1 ARMY RSCH LAB – HRED (PDF) RDRL HRM D T DAVIS BLDG 5400 RM C242 REDSTONE ARSENAL AL 35898-7290 1 ARMY RSCH LAB – HRED... HRM DG K GUNN BLDG 333 PICATINNY ARSENAL NJ 07806-5000 1 ARMY RSCH LAB – HRED (PDF) ARMC FIELD ELEMENT RDRL HRM CH C BURNS...THIRD AVE BLDG 1467B RM 336 FORT KNOX KY 40121 1 ARMY RSCH LAB – HRED (PDF) AWC FIELD ELEMENT RDRL HRM DJ D DURBIN BLDG

  7. Testing of Visual Field with Virtual Reality Goggles in Manual and Visual Grasp Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dariusz Wroblewski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automated perimetry is used for the assessment of visual function in a variety of ophthalmic and neurologic diseases. We report development and clinical testing of a compact, head-mounted, and eye-tracking perimeter (VirtualEye that provides a more comfortable test environment than the standard instrumentation. VirtualEye performs the equivalent of a full threshold 24-2 visual field in two modes: (1 manual, with patient response registered with a mouse click, and (2 visual grasp, where the eye tracker senses change in gaze direction as evidence of target acquisition. 59 patients successfully completed the test in manual mode and 40 in visual grasp mode, with 59 undergoing the standard Humphrey field analyzer (HFA testing. Large visual field defects were reliably detected by VirtualEye. Point-by-point comparison between the results obtained with the different modalities indicates: (1 minimal systematic differences between measurements taken in visual grasp and manual modes, (2 the average standard deviation of the difference distributions of about 5 dB, and (3 a systematic shift (of 4–6 dB to lower sensitivities for VirtualEye device, observed mostly in high dB range. The usability survey suggested patients’ acceptance of the head-mounted device. The study appears to validate the concepts of a head-mounted perimeter and the visual grasp mode.

  8. Testing of visual field with virtual reality goggles in manual and visual grasp modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Dariusz; Francis, Brian A; Sadun, Alfredo; Vakili, Ghazal; Chopra, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    Automated perimetry is used for the assessment of visual function in a variety of ophthalmic and neurologic diseases. We report development and clinical testing of a compact, head-mounted, and eye-tracking perimeter (VirtualEye) that provides a more comfortable test environment than the standard instrumentation. VirtualEye performs the equivalent of a full threshold 24-2 visual field in two modes: (1) manual, with patient response registered with a mouse click, and (2) visual grasp, where the eye tracker senses change in gaze direction as evidence of target acquisition. 59 patients successfully completed the test in manual mode and 40 in visual grasp mode, with 59 undergoing the standard Humphrey field analyzer (HFA) testing. Large visual field defects were reliably detected by VirtualEye. Point-by-point comparison between the results obtained with the different modalities indicates: (1) minimal systematic differences between measurements taken in visual grasp and manual modes, (2) the average standard deviation of the difference distributions of about 5 dB, and (3) a systematic shift (of 4-6 dB) to lower sensitivities for VirtualEye device, observed mostly in high dB range. The usability survey suggested patients' acceptance of the head-mounted device. The study appears to validate the concepts of a head-mounted perimeter and the visual grasp mode.

  9. Green Goggles: Designing and Teaching a General Chemistry Course to Nonmajors Using a Green Chemistry Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescott, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    A novel course using green chemistry as the context to teach general chemistry fundamentals was designed, implemented and is described here. The course design included an active learning approach, with major course graded components including a weekly blog entry, exams, and a semester project that was disseminated by wiki and a public symposium.…

  10. Head-motion-controlled video goggles: preliminary concept for an interactive laparoscopic image display (i-LID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aidlen, Jeremy T; Glick, Sara; Silverman, Kenneth; Silverman, Harvey F; Luks, Francois I

    2009-08-01

    Light-weight, low-profile, and high-resolution head-mounted displays (HMDs) now allow personalized viewing, of a laparoscopic image. The advantages include unobstructed viewing, regardless of position at the operating table, and the possibility to customize the image (i.e., enhanced reality, picture-in-picture, etc.). The bright image display allows use in daylight surroundings and the low profile of the HMD provides adequate peripheral vision. Theoretic disadvantages include reliance for all on the same image capture and anticues (i.e., reality disconnect) when the projected image remains static, despite changes in head position. This can lead to discomfort and even nausea. We have developed a prototype of interactive laparoscopic image display that allows hands-free control of the displayed image by changes in spatial orientation of the operator's head. The prototype consists of an HMD, a spatial orientation device, and computer software to enable hands-free panning and zooming of a video-endoscopic image display. The spatial orientation device uses magnetic fields created by a transmitter and receiver, each containing three orthogonal coils. The transmitter coils are efficiently driven, using USB power only, by a newly developed circuit, each at a unique frequency. The HMD-mounted receiver system links to a commercially available PC-interface PCI-bus sound card (M-Audiocard Delta 44; Avid Technology, Tewksbury, MA). Analog signals at the receiver are filtered, amplified, and converted to digital signals, which are processed to control the image display. The prototype uses a proprietary static fish-eye lens and software for the distortion-free reconstitution of any portion of the captured image. Left-right and up-down motions of the head (and HMD) produce real-time panning of the displayed image. Motion of the head toward, or away from, the transmitter causes real-time zooming in or out, respectively, of the displayed image. This prototype of the interactive HMD allows hands-free, intuitive control of the laparoscopic field, independent of the captured image.

  11. Comparative Visual Performance with ANVIS (Aviator’s Night Vision Imaging System) and AN/PVS-5A Night Vision Goggles under Starlight Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    inside or outside o•h United States without first obtaining me esport license. A violation of the ITAR or CAR m4ay be ublect to a penalty of up to to...clinical data are shown in Table 2. The subjects ranged in age from 24 to 61; there were 7 males and 3 females ; 6 of the subjects wore a visual

  12. Conference proceedings of Helmet Mounted Displays and Night Vision Goggles (Visuels Montes sur le Casque et Equipments de Vision Nocturne). Held in Pensacola, Florida, on May 2, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    seinble IAL aussi conduit par Ie VOR. Le plateau observe on exeinple de comporteinent de recherche, associant sacca- entr Ia2Em Ct3 Cne accae d...6quipements, emplacoment dot ycux, forme et dimensions L’informsttion auditive roy~t une importance fondlamontale doeI to tet, emplacement Ct

  13. 78 FR 22848 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Spare Guidance Sections, 18 AN/AVS-9(V) Night Vision Goggles, H-764G with GEM V Selective Availability... Simulator (PASIS), 10 AMRAAM Spare Guidance Sections, 18 AN/AVS-9(V) Night Vision Goggles, H-764G with GEM V... other documentation up to Secret. 2. The AN/AVS-9 Night Vision Goggles (NVG) are 3rd generation aviation...

  14. The Effects of 12 Hours of Low-Grade Hypoxia at 10,000 ft at Night in Special Operations Forces Aircraft Operations on Cognition, Night Vision, Goggle Vision and Subjective Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-28

    in scuba diving, or other hyperbaric exposures, for 48 h prior to the hypobaric exposures. Each subject was trained prior to study condition as...and another at 10,000 ft altitude in a hypobaric chamber. Half of the subjects performed moderate exercise. Results: Twelve hour exposure at 10,000...to 10,000 ft altitude pressure in a hypobaric chamber. Half (15) of the subjects performed moderate exercise on a cycle ergometer for 10 min every

  15. Effects of visual control training on the shooting performance of elite female basketball players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudejans, R.R.D.

    2012-01-01

    In the current study, a method was tested to train visual control in basketball shooting. Using a sender/receiver system, Plato liquid-crystal goggles were wirelessly and manually controlled by the experimenter to manipulate vision of players while they were shooting. During the training the goggles

  16. 77 FR 37879 - 36(b)(1) Arms Sales Notification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-25

    ... Detecting Sets, 26 M240H Machine Guns, and 26 AN/AVS-6 Night Vision Goggles. Also included are M206 infrared... Guns, and 26 AN/AVS-6 Night Vision Goggles. Also included are M206 infrared countermeasure flares, M211...

  17. Investigation into the verification of the Synapsys videonystagmography (VNG) Ulmer calibration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corless, Natalie; Goggins, Susannah

    2014-09-01

    To assess the accuracy and stability of the Synapsys VNG Ulmer calibration system when the goggles and infrared camera are repositioned, and the accuracy of the equipment's geometric calibration system. Prospective data collection involved participants conducting the system's horizontal calibration test. Eye measurements were then recorded for a 60° deviation (looking from 30° right to -30° left) and repeated after the goggles and infrared camera were removed/repositioned. Participants' eye measurements were also recorded after the geometric calibration had been activated. Twenty-two participants with no history of visual or vestibular pathology were recruited for this study. No significant differences were found when the goggles were removed and replaced (p = 0.21); when the infrared camera was repositioned within the goggles (p = 0.50); or when the goggles were removed and the camera repositioned (p = 0.18) after horizontal calibration. A significant difference was found during the assessment of geometric calibration (p < 0.01). Calibration is not affected by removal or repositioning of the goggles and/or infrared camera within the goggles, therefore suggesting recalibration may not be necessary. Caution should be exercised when using the equipment's geometric calibration and should only be used when the patient is unable to conduct the system's horizontal calibration test.

  18. [Evaluation of visualization of biological stains with the use of alternative light source (ALS) for the purpose of genetic identification. Part I. Blood and saliva stains analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeremeta, Michał; Pepiński, Witold; Niemcunowicz-Janica, Anna; Skawrońska, Małgorzata; Sackiewicz, Adam; Ptaszyńska-Sarosiek, Iwona; Okłota, Magdalena

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the investigation was evaluation of visualization of human blood and saliva stains with the use of alternative light source for the purpose of genetic identification. Experimental bloodstains on the bright base were the most clearly seen in the natural light and white light, up to blood dilution of 1:600. Complete typeability of AmpFISTR SGM Plus kit profiles was obtained from bloodstains at dilution 1:1500. Partial AmpFISTR SGM Plus kit profiles were typed from bloodstains at dilutions 1:1750 and 1:2000. Experimental saliva stains on the light-colored base were completely invisible in the natural light and white light, while they were visualized at wavelength range 300-415 nm through yellow goggles, and at wavelength range 300-455 nm through orange goggles at saliva dilution 1: 600. Complete typeability of AmpFISTR SGM Plus kit loci was obtained from saliva stains at dilution 1:1750. Partial AmpFISTR SGM Plus kit profiles were typed from saliva stains at dilution 1:2000. The wavelength of 455 nm and orange goggles were the optimal set for visualization of bloodstains on various, noncontrasting materials. Other useful wavelength/combinations of goggles were CSS light/red goggles. In case of saliva, the most useful general condition for visualization of stains on various, non-contrasting materials was with the wavelength set to 300-415 nm, while wearing yellow goggles. Other useful combinations of wavelength/goggles were 300-455 nm/orange or red goggles, and also CSS light/orange or red goggles.

  19. Development of a helmet-mounted PLZT thermal/flash protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, J.O. Jr.; Cutchen, J.T.; Pfoff, B.J.

    1976-01-01

    Sandia Laboratories is developing PLZT thermal/flash protective devices (TFPD's) goggles to prevent exposure and resultant eye damage from nuclear weapon detonations. The primary emphasis of the present program is to transfer technology and establish production capability for helmet-mounted PLZT/TFPD goggles for USAF flight crews, with a non-helmet-mounted configuration to follow. The first production units are anticipated in the fall of 1977. The operating principles of the PLZT/TFPD goggle device are briefly outlined, and the device configuration and operational characteristics are described

  20. Farm Health and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the United States. Farms have many health and safety hazards, including Chemicals and pesticides Machinery, tools and ... inspection and maintenance can help prevent accidents. Using safety gloves, goggles and other protective equipment can also ...

  1. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Some pediatric facilities also provide goggles or headsets so that the child can watch a movie while ... distort images of the facial area or brain, so you should let the radiologist know about them. ...

  2. Information seeking behaviour of undergraduates in a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information Impact: Journal of Information and Knowledge Management ... goggle, print textbooks, library materials and social media as major research resources. ... in line with the findings of the study: Training of students on computers skills, ...

  3. MRI of the Chest

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... questions and explain the procedure to relieve their anxiety. Some pediatric facilities also provide goggles or headsets so that the child can watch a movie while the scan is ...

  4. Sports and Exercise Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... re important for sports such as football , hockey, baseball, softball, biking, skateboarding, inline skating, skiing , and snowboarding — to ... in sports such as football, ice hockey , and softball and baseball when batting. Goggles are often worn ...

  5. About Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... some types of elastomeric respirator masks and protective eyewear such as goggles may be reused if the ... State & Local Officials Consumers Health Professionals Science & Research Industry Scroll back to top Popular Content Home Latest ...

  6. Assessment of the Knowledge and Practice of Universal Precaution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    for the Prevention of HIV Transmission by Health Workers in Mangu Local ... the respondents included gloves (93.1%), safety goggles ... in the USA had reported 57 occupational HIV infections. ... were doctors, lab scientists/technicians,.

  7. Annotated Bibliography of the Army Research Institute’s Training Research Supporting the Land Warrior and Ground Soldier Systems: 1998-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-07-01

    AN/ PAQ -4C and AN-PEQ-2A) which were used in conjunction with night vision goggles (NVGs, AN/PVS-7B), the thermal weapon sight (TWS, AN/PAS-13), and...lights (AN/ PAQ -4C and AN-PEQ-2A) which were used in conjunction with night vision goggles (NVGs, AN/PVS-7B), and the thermal weapon sight (TWS, AN/PAS

  8. A quantitative assessment of facial protection systems in elective hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirpara, Kieran Michael; O'Halloran, Emily; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2011-06-01

    We aimed to assess the risk to surgeons of blood splatter during total hip arthroplasty. Hoods from personal protection systems used in 34 consecutive total hip replacements were collected and the area of blood splatter was measured and compared to goggles and visors. Thirty one primary THA's (13 cemented, 4 hybrid, 14 uncemented) and 3 revisions (1 hybrid, 2 uncemented) were collected. Splashes were detected on all of the masks with a mean of 034% cover. Splatter was greatest for the operating surgeon, followed by the first assistant, though the difference was not statistically significant. Operating personnel were at greater risk of contamination during uncemented arthroplasty (p blood cover was outside the area protected by goggles and visors respectively. There was a significant difference between the Personal Protection Systems (PPS) and goggles (p = 0.0231; 95% CI) as well as between the PPS and visors (p = 0.0293; 95% CI).

  9. Assessment of New Marksmanship Strategies in 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    and 4N (CCO used during the day; Night vision device/goggles and AN/ PAQ -4 aiming light used at night)   DAY FIRING PRONE SUPPORTED  PRONE...Boresighting/zeroing an aiming light ( PAQ / PEQ) Y N Did not perform b. Boresighting/zeroing a CCO % Soldiers responding to each option OSUT 1 OSUT...magazines while engaging targets Y N g. Engaging targets at night with an aiming light ( PAQ /PEQ) and night vision goggles/device Y N h. Engaging

  10. Human kinematics and event control: On-line movement registration as a means for experimental manipulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudejans, R.R.D.; Coolen, H.

    2003-01-01

    In human movement and sports science, manipulations of perception and action are common and often comprise the control of events, such as opening or closing liquid crystal goggles. Most of these events are externally controlled, independent of the actions of the participants. Less common, although

  11. Indication and training protocols to provide “vision” aids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooijman, Aart C.; Steyvers, Franciscus J.J.M.; Melis, Bart; Havik, Else

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Support for visually impaired or blind people (VIPs) can be a selection out of a wide range of opportunities: optical magnifiers, CCTV magnifiers, guide dogs, Braille display, night vision goggles, GPS-based navigation systems, indoor navigation systems, orientation and route

  12. First on the Line: The 35th Engineer Battalion in World War Two and the Evolution of a High-Performance Combat Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-11

    white on one side), fur helmet, sweater, scarf, gloves, wool pants, two pairs of heavy shoes , numerous socks, wool underwear, goggles, and a sleeping...placed a blasting cap in it, to which a [ waterproof ] fuse . . . had been attached. Placing the device in his teeth, he lighted it, and with the fuse

  13. Lens Systems Incorporating A Zero Power Corrector Objectives And Magnifiers For Night Vision Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, M. W.; Klee, H. W.

    1986-02-01

    The use of the zero power corrector concept has been extended to the design of objective lenses and magnifiers suitable for use in night vision goggles. A novel design which can be used as either an f/1.2 objective or an f/2 magnifier is also described.

  14. Personal Visual Aids for Aircrew.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-06-01

    conventional optical correction of ametropias according to the type of mission considered. - Eventual correction by contact prostheses, with their...leucocytes and lymphocytes were identified and counted. The results were evaluated statistically and found to be so widely variable that there were no...relative usability of two bifocally configured night vision goggles. Both configurations were statistically better than the unmo Night vision devices

  15. EAMJ September 432-448.indd

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-09-09

    Sep 9, 2008 ... Objectives: To determine the utilisation rate of design specific eye protection by surgeons and to ... Such infections include HIV, hepatitis B and C virus to name but a ... blood is literally running down the goggles this will be classified as ... procedure was 2.48 drops for the surgeons and 1.49 for the assistants ...

  16. Ocular effects of chronic exposure to welding light on calabar welders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was generally observed that welders in Calabar, Nigeria did not always wear their protective goggles during welding. Since chronic exposure to welding light can impair vision this study was done to assess the effect of exposure to welding light on ocular function of welders in Calabar, Nigeria. There were 195 subjects ...

  17. Production and Characterization of Femtosecond-Laser-Induced Air Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    thereby eliminating the acoustic reflections. As advertised , the plasma spark was now visible to the goggled eye with the room lights on, marking a...focusing mirrors instead of achromatic lenses. This change would eliminate chromatic aberrations, although curved mirrors do introduce astigmatism into the

  18. Helmets: A Threat to the Preservation of Women's Lacrosse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Ashley; Cavanaugh, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    A recent debate has raised controversy over the implementation of helmets in the game of women's lacrosse. Women have been participating in this game of finesse and skill without the need for safety equipment, yet in the past decade goggles have been mandated to compensate for the technological advancements in equipment that has increased the…

  19. 30 CFR 56.15004 - Eye protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eye protection. 56.15004 Section 56.15004... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection § 56.15004 Eye protection. All persons shall wear safety glasses, goggles, or face shields or other suitable...

  20. 30 CFR 57.15004 - Eye protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eye protection. 57.15004 Section 57.15004... SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Personal Protection Surface and Underground § 57.15004 Eye protection. All persons shall wear safety glasses, goggles, or face...

  1. Negligence: What Principals Need to Know about Avoiding Liability

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeMitchell, Todd A.

    2006-01-01

    A science teacher forgets to remind her students to wear their safety goggles during a chemistry experiment and one student is injured when the caustic chemicals he is working with splash into his eyes. A teacher is late for recess duty and a student falls from the swings and is injured. A principal sends one teacher and one student teacher on a…

  2. 30 CFR 56.15014 - Eye protection when operating grinding wheels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eye protection when operating grinding wheels... MINES Personal Protection § 56.15014 Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. Face shields or goggles in good condition shall be worn when operating a grinding wheel. [53 FR 32526, Aug. 25, 1988] ...

  3. 30 CFR 57.15014 - Eye protection when operating grinding wheels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eye protection when operating grinding wheels. 57.15014 Section 57.15014 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... grinding wheels. Face shields or goggles in good condition shall be worn when operating a grinding wheel...

  4. Evaluation of a color fused dual-band NVG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hogervorst, M.A.; Toet, A.

    2009-01-01

    We designed and evaluated a dual-band Night Vision Goggles sensor system. The sensor system consists of two optically aligned NVGs fitted with filters splitting the sensitive range into a visual and a near-infrared band. The Color-the-night technique (Hogervorst & Toet, FUSION2008) was used to fuse

  5. Rifle Marksmanship Diagnostic and Training Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    there any techniques you use to help prepare Soldiers to transition to firing with aiming lights (PEQ-2 or PAQ -4) and night vision goggles (ARM 1)? If...firing skills with the PAQ -4? A‐5    15. Are there any other diagnostic techniques you use that we haven’t discussed? a. Think back on your

  6. Universal precautions for the prevention of HIV and HBV infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    not been measured. The cost to individual patients or ... contamination; (iv) cleaning/disinfecting/sterilising. Validation. ... of all facilities and equipment necessary for the ... where adequate equipment and supplies are not provided .... Use face/eye protection (face-shields, eye-goggles) where ... 65 - 700 e for 5 minutes). 4.5.

  7. 49 CFR 214.117 - Eye and face protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... corrective lenses, when required by this section to wear eye protection, shall be protected by goggles or... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eye and face protection. 214.117 Section 214.117..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD WORKPLACE SAFETY Bridge Worker Safety Standards § 214.117 Eye and face...

  8. 29 CFR 1926.102 - Eye and face protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... spectacles, when required by this regulation to wear eye protection, shall be protected by goggles or... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Eye and face protection. 1926.102 Section 1926.102 Labor... § 1926.102 Eye and face protection. (a) General. (1) Employees shall be provided with eye and face...

  9. Eye Safety At-A-Glance: Protecting Your Child's Vision in Sports

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association for Sport and Physical Education, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Sports-related eye injuries are quite common, yet the number of children who use protective eyewear (safety glasses or goggles) is extremely low. More than 600,000 eye injuries related to sports occur each year, and approximately one-third of these injuries occur in children. When children participate in sports they not only increase their…

  10. 29 CFR 1915.34 - Mechanical paint removers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... injury by using goggles or face shields in accordance with the requirements of subpart I of this part. (2... shall be protected by hoods and air line respirators, or by air helmets of a positive pressure type in... blast by appropriate protective clothing, including gloves. (v) Since surges from drops in pressure in...

  11. Human locomotion through a multiple obstacle environment : Strategy changes as a result of visual field limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, S.E.M.; Toet, A.; Werkhoven, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how human locomotion through an obstacle environment is influenced by visual field limitation. Participants were asked to walk at a comfortable pace to a target location while avoiding multiple vertical objects. During this task, they wore goggles restricting their visual

  12. Assessment of the Effectiveness of Combat Eyewear Protection Against Blast Overpressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramurthy, A; Skotak, M; Alay, E; Unnikrishnan, G; Mao, H; Duan, X; Williams, S T; Harding, T H; Chandra, N; Reifman, J

    2018-07-01

    It is unclear whether combat eyewear used by U. S. Service members is protective against blast overpressures (BOPs) caused by explosive devices. Here, we investigated the mechanisms by which BOP bypasses eyewear and increases eye surface pressure. We performed experiments and developed three-dimensional (3D) finite element (FE) models of a head form (HF) equipped with an advanced combat helmet (ACH) and with no eyewear, spectacles, or goggles in a shock tube at three BOPs and five head orientations relative to the blast wave. Overall, we observed good agreement between experimental and computational results, with average discrepancies in impulse and peak-pressure values of less than 15% over 90 comparisons. In the absence of eyewear and depending on the head orientation, we identified three mechanisms that contributed to pressure loading on the eyes. Eyewear was most effective at 0 deg orientation, with pressure attenuation ranging from 50 (spectacles) to 80% (goggles) of the peak pressures observed in the no-eyewear configuration. Spectacles and goggles were considerably less effective when we rotated the HF in the counter-clockwise direction around the superior-inferior axis of the head. Surprisingly, at certain orientations, spectacles yielded higher maximum pressures (80%) and goggles yielded larger impulses (150%) than those observed without eyewear. The findings from this study will aid in the design of eyewear that provides better protection against BOP.

  13. Predispositions of carcinoma of the breast: A review | Dodiyi-Manuel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    METHODS: Literature review was conducted using goggle search engine and hinari. Selected papers were taken for further reference and using books from author's collection. RESULTS: The cause of breast cancer is unknown but predisposing factors have been identified to indicate increase susceptibility to developing ...

  14. Management of Obesity: The Surgical Perspective | Dodiyi-Manuel ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: Literature review was conducted using Goggle Search Engine and Highwire Press. Selected papers were taken and books from the author's collection were used for further reference. Results: Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for morbid obesity producing long lasting weight loss and remission of ...

  15. A novel apparatus for interocular interaction evaluation in children with and without anisometropic amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Xin Jie Angela; Alexander, Jack; He, Ming Guang; Yang, Zhi Kuan; Suttle, Catherine

    2012-07-01

    Dichoptic visual stimulation may be achieved using shutter goggles and mirror systems. These methods vary in their feasibility for use in children. This study aims to investigate the feasibility of use of a simple trial frame-based system to evaluate interactions in children. Low contrast acuity, contrast sensitivity and alignment sensitivity were measured in the non-dominant eye of 10 normally-sighted children, 14 anisometropic children without amblyopia and 14 anisometropic amblyopic children (aged 5-11 years) using goggles and a trial frame apparatus (TFA). The dominant eye was either fully or partially occluded. The difference in visual functions in the non-dominant eye between the full and partial occlusion conditions was termed the 'interaction index'. Agreement between the TFA and goggles in terms of visual functions and interactions was assessed in anisometropic children with and without amblyopia using the Bland-Altman method and t-test. Training sessions allowed subjects to become accustomed to the systems and tasks. The duration of training, the number of breaks requested by subjects and their willingness to attend further experiments were recorded in 10 subjects from each group and were compared between groups and between systems. Both Bland-Altman and t-test methods indicated acceptable agreement between the TFA and goggles in visual function and interaction measures (p > 0.05), except for contrast sensitivity measured in anisometropic children without amblyopia (p = 0.042). For all subject groups, contrast sensitivity training was significantly longer using goggles than using the TFA (p ≤ 0.001). Significantly more breaks were requested in acuity and contrast sensitivity testing, when goggles were used than when the TFA was used (p amblyopia showed a significantly greater willingness to attend more experiments using the TFA than using goggles (p = 0.025). The TFA may be a useful tool in studies of interactions in amblyopes, particularly in studies

  16. Protection against ionizing radiation by leaded glass googles during interventional cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zett-Lobos, Claudio; Vera Munoz, Felipe; Arriola Alvarez, Katerina; Diaz Ramos, Oscar; Gamarra, Jorge; Fernandez Palomo, Cristian; Merello, Lorenzo; Mora D, Alex; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Catalan Reyes, Monica; Ramos Avasola, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is not known whether leaded glass goggles with 0.25 mm Pb equivalency, used in interventional cardiology procedures, attenuate radiation below the levels established by the latest recommendation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). Aim: To assess if the degree of attenuation of the secondary ionizing radiation achieved by the use of 0.25 mm Pb leaded glass goggles, in occupationally exposed workers in interventional cardiology procedures, meets the latest ICRP recommendations. Material and Methods : A prospective investigation was carried out to compare the eye exposure to secondary ionizing radiation received by occupationally exposed personnel in a 9 months period. A set of two thermo luminescent dosimeters was arranged in the front and back of leaded glass goggles in a cohort of seven members of an interventional cardiology service, exposed to 1057 consecutive procedures. Results:The monthly dose equivalent measurement performed in front of the goggles ranged between 1.1 and 6.5 mSv,for paramedics and interventional cardiologists. The radiation measured in the back of the glass varied between 0.66 and 2.75 mSv,respectively.The degree of attenuation of the dose at eye level ranged from 40% to 57.7%,respectively. The projected annual exposure would reach 33 mSv for the interventional cardiologist. Conclusions: With a similar load of work and wearing 0.25 mm Pb equivalent glass goggles, interventional cardiologists will exceed the crystalline equivalent dose limit recommended by the ICRP (20 mSv/year averaged over the past 5 years)

  17. Effectiveness of eye armor during blast loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailoor, Shantanu; Bhardwaj, Rajneesh; Nguyen, Thao D

    2015-11-01

    Ocular trauma is one of the most common types of combat injuries resulting from the interaction of military personnel with improvised explosive devices. Ocular blast injury mechanisms are complex, and trauma may occur through various injury mechanisms. However, primary blast injuries (PBI) are an important cause of ocular trauma that may go unnoticed and result in significant damage to internal ocular tissues and visual impairment. Further, the effectiveness of commonly employed eye armor, designed for ballistic and laser protection, in lessening the severity of adverse blast overpressures (BOP) is unknown. In this paper, we employed a three-dimensional (3D) fluid-structure interaction computational model for assessing effectiveness of the eye armor during blast loading on human eyes and validated results against free field blast measurements by Bentz and Grimm (2013). Numerical simulations show that the blast waves focused on the ocular region because of reflections from surrounding facial features and resulted in considerable increase in BOP. We evaluated the effectiveness of spectacles and goggles in mitigating the pressure loading using the computational model. Our results corroborate experimental measurements showing that the goggles were more effective than spectacles in mitigating BOP loading on the eye. Numerical results confirmed that the goggles significantly reduced blast wave penetration in the space between the armor and the eyes and provided larger clearance space for blast wave expansion after penetration than the spectacles. The spectacles as well as the goggles were more effective in reducing reflected BOP at higher charge mass because of the larger decrease in dynamic pressures after the impact. The goggles provided greater benefit of reducing the peak pressure than the spectacles for lower charge mass. However, the goggles resulted in moderate, sustained elevated pressure loading on the eye, that became 50-100% larger than the pressure loading

  18. False color viewing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    A viewing device for observing objects in near-infrared false-color comprising a pair of goggles with one or more filters in the apertures, and pads that engage the face for blocking stray light from the sides so that all light reaching the user's eyes come through the filters. The filters attenuate most visible light and pass near-infrared (having wavelengths longer than approximately 700 nm) and a small amount of blue-green and blue-violet (having wavelengths in the 500 to 520 nm and shorter than 435 nm, respectively). The goggles are useful for looking at vegetation to identify different species and for determining the health of the vegetation, and to detect some forms of camouflage. 7 figs

  19. Marine Corps Expeditionary Rifle Platoon Energy Burden

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    26  a.  Step 1: The Flight to MRP AOR ............................................26  b...Terrain and Troops MEU Marine Expeditionary Unit MRP Marine Rifle Platoon NVG Night Vision Goggles SAW Squad automatic weapon SPOD Seaport...rifle platoon ( MRP ). The MRP is an infantry unit, which is the core component of the GCE. Each MRP consists of 40–45 Marines and requires energy

  20. Final Environmental Assessment for Aerial Spraying for Invasive Species Control MacDill AFB, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    EYE PROTECTION: Chemical resistant gloves made of any waterproof material. Chemical goggles recommended. Shoes l!_lus socks. PRODUCT NAME...resistant coveralls, waterproof gloves, waterproof boots and face/eye protection. If dusting occurs, use NIOSH approved respirator protection. Initial...this product. Applicators and other handlers must wear: Long-sleeved shirt and long pants. Shoes plus socks. Follow manufacturer’s instructions for

  1. Tactical Level Commander and Staff Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    triggered by high winds and water includes life preservers and other marine-specific safety gear, waterproof boots, and special handling equipment for...especially to the hands, back, knees, and shoulders. Personnel should wear leather gloves, safety goggles, and steel-toed shoes and avoid lifting more than...floodwaters, put on plastic or rubber gloves, boots, and other protective clothing. Double gloving with a waterproof glove under a heavy work

  2. Improvement of Hungarian Joint Terminal Attack Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    LST Laser Spot Tracker NVG Night Vision Goggle ROMAD Radio Operator Maintainer and Driver ROVER Remotely Operated Video Enhanced Receiver TACP...visual target designation. The other component consists of a laser spot tracker (LST), which identifies targets by tracking laser energy reflecting...capability for every type of night time missions, laser spot tracker for laser spot search missions, remotely operated video enhanced receiver

  3. A Guide to the George Palmiter River Restoration Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    reduction. The raft is driven by a 35 h.p. ’ outboard engine, weighs 4 tons, and has 1500 lb. of flotation material under it. Additionally, the raft has a...Sycamore (Platanus occidentalis) 4. Red Maple (Acer rubrum) 5. Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum) 6. Pin Oak (Quercus palustris) 7. Red Oak (Quercus...safety goggles 5 - ear protectors 5 - flotation jackets 1, - industrial first aid kit--one that floats and is waterproof 1 - snake bite kit several

  4. Safety Day Prize Competition: results and answers

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    The three winners of the Safety Day Prize Competition are...   • 1st Prize: Fernando LEITE PEREIRA – smoke detector • 2nd Prize: Thomas DE BORTOLI – water filter jug • 3rd Prize: Matti KALLIOKOSKI – safety goggles Please see the image below for the answers to the questionnaire. If you have any questions regarding the Safety Day, please contact: safety.communication@cern.ch. And again, thank you to all the participants!

  5. Marksmanship Requirements from the Perspective of Combat Veterans - Volume 2: Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    M. McInroy who provided input to the questionnaire and insured that the Army’s Centers of Excellence were aware of the importance of their students ...combat gear Qualify with weapon in combat gear Hit targets at night using aiming lights & night vision goggles Hit targets at night with thermal ...conditions, the junior and some of the senior enlisted were not comfortable under these conditions making it unsatisfactory. 10 Engineer. Different

  6. A Test-Bed of Secure Mobile Cloud Computing for Military Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-13

    problem studied Many military applications have the following characteristics: they start from a mobile device (e.g., a night vision goggle...Issue 8, Vol. 65, pp. 6678 - 6691, June 2016. DOI: 10.1109/TVT.2015.2472993 [3] Gartner, “Worldwide smartphone sales to end users by operating system...SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Many military applications have the following characteristics: they start from a mobile device (e.g., a night vision

  7. Human-Agent Teaming for Multi-Robot Control: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    advent of the Goggle driverless car , autonomous farm equipment, and unmanned commercial aircraft (Mosher, 2012). The inexorable trend towards...because a robot cannot be automated to navigate in difficult terrain. However, this high ratio will not be sustainable if large numbers of autonomous ...Parasuraman et al., 2007). 3.5 RoboLeader Past research indicates that autonomous cooperation between robots can improve the performance of the human

  8. HoloR: Interactive Mixed-Reality Rooms

    OpenAIRE

    Schwede, Carsten; Hermann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Existing virtual reality technologies only cover certain areas of the mixed-reality spectrum: Augmented reality goggles are unable to provide immersion while head-mounted displays make it difficult to interact with the real world. In this paper we introduce HoloR - short for Holographic Room: A stereoscopic, multi-person, multi-viewer, spatial projected augmented reality system, which enables applications to fade between different parts of the mixed-reality spectrum. By using web-technologies...

  9. Personal Protective Measures Against Insects and Other Arthropods of Military Significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    repellent, and finally rubbing the netting between the hands. Repeat the process until all the netting has been lightly and evenly covered. It is not...such as eyeglass frames, plastic lenses, and cases; contact lenses; combs ; watch crystals; goggles; painted and varnished surfaces; and some synthetic...fabrics (nylon excepted). The water-repellent properties of Gore-Tex are also reduced by deet. Deet does NOT damage cotton or wool fabrics

  10. Feasibility of TBI Assessment Measures in a Field Environment: A Pilot Study for the Environmental Sensors in Training (ESiT) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-22

    MRI ]) afterwards. More severe TBI symptoms may last from a few days to multiple years following the injurious event, and repeated TBIs may result...touch-screen tablet computer that provides administrative capabilities to the tester, a virtual reality goggle visor with motion detection (see Figure 6...Evidence from functional MRI and neurogenetics. Journal of Neurotrauma, 23(10), 1450-1467. Mirksy, A. F. & van Buren, J. M. (1965). On the nature of

  11. Eye lens dose correlations with personal dose equivalent and patient exposure in paediatric interventional cardiology performed with a fluoroscopic biplane system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alejo, L; Koren, C; Corredoira, E; Sánchez, F; Bayón, J; Serrada, A; Guibelalde, E

    2017-04-01

    To analyse the correlations between the eye lens dose estimates performed with dosimeters placed next to the eyes of paediatric interventional cardiologists working with a biplane system, the personal dose equivalent measured on the thorax and the patient dose. The eye lens dose was estimated in terms of H p (0.07) on a monthly basis, placing optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) on goggles. The H p (0.07) personal dose equivalent was measured over aprons with whole-body OSLDs. Data on patient dose as recorded by the kerma-area product (P KA ) were collected using an automatic dose management system. The 2 paediatric cardiologists working in the facility were involved in the study, and 222 interventions in a 1-year period were evaluated. The ceiling-suspended screen was often disregarded during interventions. The annual eye lens doses estimated on goggles were 4.13±0.93 and 4.98±1.28mSv. Over the aprons, the doses obtained were 10.83±0.99 and 11.97±1.44mSv. The correlation between the goggles and the apron dose was R 2 =0.89, with a ratio of 0.38. The correlation with the patient dose was R 2 =0.40, with a ratio of 1.79μSvGy -1 cm -2 . The dose per procedure obtained over the aprons was 102±16μSv, and on goggles 40±9μSv. The eye lens dose normalized to P KA was 2.21±0.58μSvGy -1 cm -2 . Measurements of personal dose equivalent over the paediatric cardiologist's apron are useful to estimate eye lens dose levels if no radiation protection devices are typically used. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A quantitative assessment of facial protection systems in elective hip arthroplasty.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hirpara, Kieran Michael

    2011-06-01

    We aimed to assess the risk to surgeons of blood splatter during total hip arthroplasty. Hoods from personal protection systems used in 34 consecutive total hip replacements were collected and the area of blood splatter was measured and compared to goggles and visors. Thirty one primary THA\\'s (13 cemented, 4 hybrid, 14 uncemented) and 3 revisions (1 hybrid, 2 uncemented) were collected. Splashes were detected on all of the masks with a mean of 034% cover. Splatter was greatest for the operating surgeon, followed by the first assistant, though the difference was not statistically significant. Operating personnel were at greater risk of contamination during uncemented arthroplasty (p < 0.0001; 95% CI). On average 50.60% and 45.40% of blood cover was outside the area protected by goggles and visors respectively. There was a significant difference between the Personal Protection Systems (PPS) and goggles (p = 0.0231; 95% CI) as well as between the PPS and visors (p = 0.0293; 95% CI).

  13. Assessment of stereoscopic optic disc images using an autostereoscopic screen – experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaideanu Daniella

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Stereoscopic assessment of the optic disc morphology is an important part of the care of patients with glaucoma. The aim of this study was to assess stereoviewing of stereoscopic optic disc images using an example of the new technology of autostereoscopic screens compared to the liquid shutter goggles. Methods Independent assessment of glaucomatous disc characteristics and measurement of optic disc and cup parameters whilst using either an autostereoscopic screen or liquid crystal shutter goggles synchronized with a view switching display. The main outcome measures were inter-modality agreements between the two used modalities as evaluated by the weighted kappa test and Bland Altman plots. Results Inter-modality agreement for measuring optic disc parameters was good [Average kappa coefficient for vertical Cup/Disc ratio was 0.78 (95% CI 0.62–0.91 and 0.81 (95% CI 0.6–0.92 for observer 1 and 2 respectively]. Agreement between modalities for assessing optic disc characteristics for glaucoma on a five-point scale was very good with a kappa value of 0.97. Conclusion This study compared two different methods of stereo viewing. The results of assessment of the different optic disc and cup parameters were comparable using an example of the newly developing autostereoscopic display technologies as compared to the shutter goggles system used. The Inter-modality agreement was high. This new technology carries potential clinical usability benefits in different areas of ophthalmic practice.

  14. Simulated Prism Therapy in Virtual Reality produces larger after-effects than standard prism exposure in normal healthy subject - Implications for Neglect Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilms, Inge Linda

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Virtual reality is an important area of exploration within computer-based cognitive rehabilitation of visual neglect. Virtual reality will allow for closer monitoring of patient behaviour during prism adaptation therapy and perhaps change the way we induce prismatic after......-effects. OBJECTIVE: This study compares the effect of two different prism simulation conditions in virtual reality to a standard exposure to prism goggles after one session of Prism Adaptation Therapy in healthy subjects. METHOD: 20 healthy subjects were subjected to one session of prism adaptation therapy under...... training for rehabilitation of hemi spatial attentional deficits such as visual neglect....

  15. Physical Workload On Neck And Shoulder Muscles During Military Helicopter Flight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Olsen, Henrik Baare

    , Odense University Hospital, DK E-mail: mmurray@health.sdu.dk AIM: Flight-related neck/shoulder pain is common among military helicopter pilots and crew members. During flight, the flight helmet and additional Night Vision Goggles (NVG) pose a considerable load on the cervical spine. The aim of this study....... (TRA), the upper neck extensors (UNE) and sternocleido-mastoid m. (SCM). Nine repetitive flights were completed, encompassing: Patient-Transport (PT), Patient-Transport with NVG (PT+NVG) and Search And Rescue with NVG (SAR+NVG). A standard helmet (1.85 kg) and NVG (1.1 kg) were used. The EMG signal...

  16. Modifications of spontaneous oculomotor activity in microgravitational conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornilova, L. N.; Goncharenko, A. M.; Polyakov, V. V.; Grigorova, V.; Manev, A.

    Investigations on spontaneous oculomotor activity were carried out prior to and after (five cosmonauts) and during space flight (two cosmonauts) on the 3rd, 5th and 164th days of the space flight. Recording of oculomotor activity was carried out by electrooculography on automated data acquisition and processing system "Zora" based on personal computers. During the space flight and after it all the cosmonauts with the eyes closed or open and dark-goggled showed an essential increase of the movements' amplitude when removing the eyes into the extreme positions especially in a vertical direction, occurrence of correcting saccadic movements (or nystagmus), an increase in time of fixing reactions.

  17. I can invent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yeon Jung

    2001-10-15

    This book introduces the inventions which are unique and interesting. The titles of these are pots which boil very quick and safe, a desk with a pencil case, a scale which is not rusty, a book cover with a pocket, a skate with wax and mop, a seat belt airbag, a desk lamp which can control the light, a desk in the future, a recycling bin for cans, a blackboard eraser which erase very well, a useful crutches, swimming goggles attached convex lens, flower pots using waste tires, toilet paper holder with sawtooth, a brush which washes a flask, improved pump for petroleum.

  18. I can invent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yeon Jung

    2001-10-01

    This book introduces the inventions which are unique and interesting. The titles of these are pots which boil very quick and safe, a desk with a pencil case, a scale which is not rusty, a book cover with a pocket, a skate with wax and mop, a seat belt airbag, a desk lamp which can control the light, a desk in the future, a recycling bin for cans, a blackboard eraser which erase very well, a useful crutches, swimming goggles attached convex lens, flower pots using waste tires, toilet paper holder with sawtooth, a brush which washes a flask, improved pump for petroleum.

  19. Fatty acid composition of fish species with different feeding habits from an Arctic Lake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladyshev, M I; Sushchik, N N; Glushchenko, L A; Zadelenov, V A; Rudchenko, A E; Dgebuadze, Y Y

    2017-05-01

    We compared the composition and content of fatty acids (FAs) in fish with different feeding habits (sardine (least) cisco Coregonus sardinella, goggle-eyed charr (pucheglazka) form of Salvelinus alpinus complex, humpback whitefish Coregonus pidschian, broad whitefish Coregonus nasus, boganid charr Salvelinus boganidae, and northern pike Esox lucius from an Arctic Lake. Feeding habits of the studied fish (planktivore, benthivore, or piscivore) significantly affected the composition of biomarker fatty acids and the ratio of stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen in their biomass. The hypothesis on a higher content of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids in the fish of higher trophic level (piscivores) when compared within the same taxonomic group (order Salmoniformes) was confirmed.

  20. Perceptions of dental outpatients toward cross-infection control measures in Jabalpur city

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryakant C Deogade

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Infection control practices are crucial and important elements in clinical dentistry as there is an enormous increase in the prevalence of infectious diseases among dental patients. This necessitates the application of recommended procedures for infection control in the dental schools and clinics. Aim: The aim of this study was to assess patients' perception toward the use of protective barriers (such as gloves, face masks, and eye goggles by working dentists in a private dental teaching school in Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh (India. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study of a convenient sample of patients visiting the dental school of RDU was conducted in 2015. A structured, close-ended, self-administered questionnaire was distributed among 700 patients and a response rate of 89% was obtained. The questionnaire consisted of a series of questions related to awareness, knowledge, attitude, and perception of patients toward infection control measures. Data analysis included frequency distribution tables. Results: Of 664 patients (298 males and 366 females, 97.7%, 93.5%, and 43.6% of the patients believed that dentist should wear gloves, face masks, and eye goggles, respectively, when treating patients. The majority of them (95.3% refused to undergo treatment if the dentist is not wearing gloves and face masks. More than two-thirds (73.3% denied receiving treatment from a dentist, who is not immunized against hepatitis B. Nearly 79.2% of patients refused to attend school if they knew that human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis B virus (HBV patients treated there. The majority of patients (92.7%, 72.3%, and 23.1% believed that gloves, facemasks, and eye goggles protect both dentist and patient, respectively. Only 44.9% said that autoclave is the best method of sterilization. A significantly higher knowledge of infection control was observed among the previous dental visitors compared to the first-time visitors

  1. A new fixation aid for the radiotherapy of eye tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchgeister, Markus; Grisanti, Salvatore; Suesskind, Daniela; Bamberg, Michael; Paulsen, Frank

    2007-01-01

    A modified swim goggle holding a light spot as an optical guide for actively aligning the eye in a reproducible orientation has been constructed to perform radiotherapy of ocular tumors. This device is compatible with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging systems. Image fusion of these data sets yielded clinically acceptable results. The reproducibility of the eye's positioning is tested by repeated CT. The eye's alignment during radiotherapy is monitored by an infrared TV camera with individual markings of the eye's position on the TV-monitor screen. From 2003-2006, 50 patients were treated with this fixation aid by radiosurgery with good patient compliance

  2. Laser protective eyewear program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winburn, D.C.

    1980-01-01

    The proliferation of lasers at Los Alamos focused considerable attention on providing adequate eye protection for experimenters involved in the use of a wide variety of nonionizing radiation. Experiments with fast-pulsed lasers (Nd:YAG, HF, and CO 2 ) were performed to gain biological threshold data on ocular damage. In parallel, eye protection devices were evaluated, which resulted in the development of lightweight, comfortable spectacles of colored glass filters that can be ground to prescription specifications. Goggle styles are employed in specific applications

  3. Design of a high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, Daniel; Vankov, Alexander; Huie, Phil; Baccus, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that electrical stimulation of the retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. However, current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), whereas at least several thousand pixels would be required for functional restoration of sight. This paper presents the design of an optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system with a stimulating pixel density of up to 2500 pix mm(-2) (corresponding geometrically to a maximum visual acuity of 20/80). Requirements on proximity of neural cells to the stimulation electrodes are described as a function of the desired resolution. Two basic geometries of sub-retinal implants providing required proximity are presented: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. To provide for natural eye scanning of the scene, rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera, the system operates similar to 'virtual reality' devices. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted collimated infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for the simultaneous use of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical delivery of visual information to the implant allows for real-time image processing adjustable to retinal architecture, as well as flexible control of image processing algorithms and stimulation parameters.

  4. Impact of radiation protection means on the dose to the lens of the eye while handling radionuclides in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruchmann, Iris; Szermerski, Bastian; Geworski, Lilli [Medical School Hannover (Germany). Dept. for Radiation Protection and Medical Physics; Behrens, Rolf [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    The human eye lens appears to be more radiosensitive than previously assumed. The reduction of the limit for the dose to the lens of the eye to 20 mSv per year has been passed in the current Euratom Directives (2013). Therefore, in this work the impact of laboratory glasses and X-ray protective goggles was investigated and reciprocal attenuation factors (i.e. transmission factors) for different nuclides (Tc-99m, I-131, Y-90, F-18 and Ga-68) were determined. The radionuclides in typical geometry (syringe, applicator) were positioned at a distance of 50 cm to the eyes of four Alderson-Head-Phantoms. Different dosemeters measuring H{sub p}(3) respective H{sub p}(0.07) were fixed to the eyes of the phantoms, either behind the glasses or without any protection means, respectively. The mean reciprocal attenuation factors were determined to be between unity for F-18 and I-131 using laboratory glasses (no attenuation effect) and < 0.01 for Y-90 using X-ray protective goggles. All other results were between these extremes. It has been shown, that prospective doses to the lens of the eye can be reduced significantly by using appropriate radiation protection means, especially for those dose-relevant beta radiation emitting nuclides such as Y-90.

  5. Does listening to music with an audio ski helmet impair reaction time to peripheral stimuli?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruedl, G; Pocecco, E; Wolf, M; Schöpf, S; Burtscher, M; Kopp, M

    2012-12-01

    With the recent worldwide increase in ski helmet use, new market trends are developing, including audio helmets for listening to music while skiing or snowboarding. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether listening to music with an audio ski helmet impairs reaction time to peripheral stimuli. A within-subjects design study using the Compensatory-Tracking-Test was performed on 65 subjects (36 males and 29 females) who had a mean age of 23.3 ± 3.9 years. Using repeated measures analysis of variance, we found significant differences in reaction times between the 4 test conditions (p=0.039). The lowest mean reaction time (± SE) was measured for helmet use while listening to music (507.9 ± 13.2 ms), which was not different from helmet use alone (514.6 ± 12.5 ms) (p=0.528). However, compared to helmet use while listening to music, reaction time was significantly longer for helmet and ski goggles used together (535.8 ± 14.2 ms, p=0.005), with a similar trend for helmet and ski goggles used together while listening to music (526.9 ± 13.8 ms) (p=0.094). In conclusion, listening to music with an audio ski helmet did not increase mean reaction time to peripheral stimuli in a laboratory setting. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Design of a high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, Daniel; Vankov, Alexander; Huie, Phil; Baccus, Stephen

    2005-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that electrical stimulation of the retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. However, current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), whereas at least several thousand pixels would be required for functional restoration of sight. This paper presents the design of an optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system with a stimulating pixel density of up to 2500 pix mm-2 (corresponding geometrically to a maximum visual acuity of 20/80). Requirements on proximity of neural cells to the stimulation electrodes are described as a function of the desired resolution. Two basic geometries of sub-retinal implants providing required proximity are presented: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. To provide for natural eye scanning of the scene, rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera, the system operates similar to 'virtual reality' devices. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted collimated infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for the simultaneous use of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical delivery of visual information to the implant allows for real-time image processing adjustable to retinal architecture, as well as flexible control of image processing algorithms and stimulation parameters.

  7. Occupational eye lens doses in interventional cardiology. A multicentric study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, R M; Vano, E; Fernández, J M; Pifarré, X; Ordiales, J M; Rovira, J J; Carrera, F; Goicolea, J; Fernández-Ortiz, A

    2016-01-01

    New European regulation regarding radiological protection of workers and more specifically the new occupational dose limit for the eye lens recently reduced to 20 mSv yr −1 may affect interventional cardiologists. This paper presents a set of measurements of occupational doses performed in five interventional cardiology centres and then compared with the new dose limit. The measurement of occupational doses was performed over the apron at chest level using electronic dosemeters recording H p (10). In one of the centres, scatter dose at goggles was also measured with optically stimulated luminescence dosemeters calibrated in terms of H p (0.07). An average H p (10) over the apron of 46 μSv/procedure was measured for cardiologists. Lower doses were noted in other professionals like second cardiologists, nurses or anaesthetists. Procedures for valvular and other structural heart diseases involved the highest occupational doses, averaging over 100 μSv/procedure. Important differences in occupational doses among centres may be indicative of different radiation protection habits. The new occupational dose limit for the eye lens is likely to be exceeded by those among the interventionalists who do not use protection tools (ceiling suspended screen and/or goggles) even with standard workloads. (paper)

  8. Virtual Reality Educational Tool for Human Anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izard, Santiago González; Juanes Méndez, Juan A; Palomera, Pablo Ruisoto

    2017-05-01

    Virtual Reality is becoming widespread in our society within very different areas, from industry to entertainment. It has many advantages in education as well, since it allows visualizing almost any object or going anywhere in a unique way. We will be focusing on medical education, and more specifically anatomy, where its use is especially interesting because it allows studying any structure of the human body by placing the user inside each one. By allowing virtual immersion in a body structure such as the interior of the cranium, stereoscopic vision goggles make these innovative teaching technologies a powerful tool for training in all areas of health sciences. The aim of this study is to illustrate the teaching potential of applying Virtual Reality in the field of human anatomy, where it can be used as a tool for education in medicine. A Virtual Reality Software was developed as an educational tool. This technological procedure is based entirely on software which will run in stereoscopic goggles to give users the sensation of being in a virtual environment, clearly showing the different bones and foramina which make up the cranium, and accompanied by audio explanations. Throughout the results the structure of the cranium is described in detailed from both inside and out. Importance of an exhaustive morphological knowledge of cranial fossae is further discussed. Application for the design of microsurgery is also commented.

  9. Addressing dental fear in children with autism spectrum disorders: a randomized controlled pilot study using electronic screen media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isong, Inyang A; Rao, Sowmya R; Holifield, Chloe; Iannuzzi, Dorothea; Hanson, Ellen; Ware, Janice; Nelson, Linda P

    2014-03-01

    Dental care is a significant unmet health care need for children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Many children with ASD do not receive dental care because of fear associated with dental procedures; oftentimes they require general anesthesia for regular dental procedures, placing them at risk of associated complications. Many children with ASD have a strong preference for visual stimuli, particularly electronic screen media. The use of visual teaching materials is a fundamental principle in designing educational programs for children with ASD. To determine if an innovative strategy using 2 types of electronic screen media was feasible and beneficial in reducing fear and uncooperative behaviors in children with ASD undergoing dental visits. We conducted a randomized controlled trial at Boston Children's Hospital dental clinic. Eighty (80) children aged 7 to 17 years with a known diagnosis of ASD and history of dental fear were enrolled in the study. Each child completed 2 preventive dental visits that were scheduled 6 months apart (visit 1 and visit 2). After visit 1, subjects were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 groups: (1) group A, control (usual care); (2) group B, treatment (video peer modeling that involved watching a DVD recording of a typically developing child undergoing a dental visit); (3) group C, treatment (video goggles that involved watching a favorite movie during the dental visit using sunglass-style video eyewear); and (4) group D, treatment (video peer modeling plus video goggles). Subjects who refused or were unable to wear the goggles watched the movie using a handheld portable DVD player. During both visits, the subject's level of anxiety and behavior were measured using the Venham Anxiety and Behavior Scales. Analyses of variance and Fisher's exact tests compared baseline characteristics across groups. Using intention to treat approach, repeated measures analyses were employed to test whether the outcomes differed significantly: (1) between

  10. A prospective comparison of phakic collamer lenses and wavefront-optimized laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis for correction of myopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkhurst GD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gregory D Parkhurst1,2 1Refractive Surgery Center, Carl R Darnall Army Medical Center, Fort Hood, 2Parkhurst NuVision, San Antonio, TX, USA Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare night vision and low-luminance contrast sensitivity (CS in patients undergoing implantation of phakic collamer lenses or wavefront-optimized laser-assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK.Patients and methods: This is a nonrandomized, prospective study, in which 48 military personnel were recruited. Rabin Super Vision Test was used to compare the visual acuity and CS of Visian implantable collamer lens (ICL and LASIK groups under normal and low light conditions, using a filter for simulated vision through night vision goggles.Results: Preoperative mean spherical equivalent was –6.10 D in the ICL group and –6.04 D in the LASIK group (P=0.863. Three months postoperatively, super vision acuity (SVa, super vision acuity with (low-luminance goggles (SVaG, super vision contrast (SVc, and super vision contrast with (low luminance goggles (SVcG significantly improved in the ICL and LASIK groups (P<0.001. Mean improvement in SVaG at 3 months postoperatively was statistically significantly greater in the ICL group than in the LASIK group (mean change [logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution, LogMAR]: ICL =-0.134, LASIK =-0.085; P=0.032. Mean improvements in SVc and SVcG were also statistically significantly greater in the ICL group than in the LASIK group (SVc mean change [logarithm of the CS, LogCS]: ICL =0.356, LASIK =0.209; P=0.018 and SVcG mean change [LogCS]: ICL =0.390, LASIK =0.259; P=0.024. Mean improvement in SVa at 3 months was comparable in both groups (P=0.154.Conclusion: Simulated night vision improved with both ICL implantation and wavefront-optimized LASIK, but improvements were significantly greater with ICLs. These differences may be important in a military setting and may also affect satisfaction with civilian vision correction

  11. The Effect of a Diving Mask on Intraocular Pressure in a Healthy Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherina Josephine Goenadi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Swimming goggles increase the intraocular pressure (IOP via the periorbital frame pressure and suction effect. In comparison, diving masks have a larger frame rim and incorporate the nose. The exact effect(s of diving masks on IOP is unknown. This study evaluates the influence of diving masks on IOP in normal, healthy subjects. Methods: Tonometry was performed in both eyes of all subjects with an AVIA®Tono-Pen by a single investigator. Measurements were taken at baseline without the diving mask and with the subjects wearing a small-volume, double-window diving mask, but with the mask lenses removed. Two IOP readings in each eye were measured, and an additional reading was measured if the difference between the initial 2 was ≥2 mm Hg. Central corneal thickness (CCT was also measured in each eye, using a contact pachymeter (OcuScan®Alcon. Results: Forty eyes of 20 healthy volunteers (age 29.7 ± 9.3 years; range 21–52 were included. The mean CCT was 544.4 ± 43.5 µm. The mean IOP before the diving mask was worn had been 17.23 ± 2.18 mm Hg (n = 40. The IOP decreased by 0.43 mm Hg (p < 0.05 to 16.80 ± 2.57 mm Hg after the diving mask had been put on. There was no correlation between IOP change and age (r = 0.143, p = 0.337, gender (r = –0.174, p = 0.283 or CCT (r = –0.123, p = 0.445. Conclusion: There was no increase in IOP after the diving mask had been worn. A small but statistically significant decrease in IOP was observed. This study demonstrates that unlike swimming goggles, the strap tension and frame pressure on the periorbital tissue from a diving mask does not increase IOP. Diving masks may be a suitable alternative to swimming goggles for patients with advanced glaucoma or glaucoma filtration surgery.

  12. Studies on aerosols. XI. Influence of particulate matter on the eye irritation produced by volatile irritants and importance of particle size in connection with atmospheric pollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dautrebande, L; Shaver, J; Capps, R

    1951-01-01

    This is a review of smog irritation prevented by water filters which remove > 2-..mu..m particles. Formaldehyde, HNO/sub 3/, H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ vapors combined plus used oil produced stronger irritation than vapors alone. Vapors produced irritation essentially only at concentrations above 4.2 x 10/sup -3/ mg/liter air of each constituent. Three trained human volunteers were exposed to various aerosols via goggles. Blinking and lacrimation were observed. Reaction varied largely between the 3 and between different exposure periods. NaCl, Si dust, and used oil in combination required a much higher concentration to produce eye irritation than with vapors present. NaCl and Si combined did not irritate; used oil did. Photomicrographs showed small (approx. 0.05 ..mu..m), long-chained (1 to 7 ..mu..m), and aggregated (1 to 10 ..mu..m) particles.

  13. 360-degree videos: a new visualization technique for astrophysical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Christopher M. P.

    2017-11-01

    360-degree videos are a new type of movie that renders over all 4π steradian. Video sharing sites such as YouTube now allow this unique content to be shared via virtual reality (VR) goggles, hand-held smartphones/tablets, and computers. Creating 360° videos from astrophysical simulations is not only a new way to view these simulations as you are immersed in them, but is also a way to create engaging content for outreach to the public. We present what we believe is the first 360° video of an astrophysical simulation: a hydrodynamics calculation of the central parsec of the Galactic centre. We also describe how to create such movies, and briefly comment on what new science can be extracted from astrophysical simulations using 360° videos.

  14. Infrared to visible image up-conversion using optically addressed spatial light modulator utilizing liquid crystal and InGaAs photodiodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solodar, A., E-mail: asisolodar@gmail.com; Arun Kumar, T.; Sarusi, G.; Abdulhalim, I. [Department of Electro-Optics Engineering and The Ilse Katz Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2016-01-11

    Combination of InGaAs/InP heterojunction photodetector with nematic liquid crystal (LC) as the electro-optic modulating material for optically addressed spatial light modulator for short wavelength infra-red (SWIR) to visible light image conversion was designed, fabricated, and tested. The photodetector layer is composed of 640 × 512 photodiodes array based on heterojunction InP/InGaAs having 15 μm pitch on InP substrate and with backside illumination architecture. The photodiodes exhibit extremely low, dark current at room temperature, with optimum photo-response in the SWIR region. The photocurrent generated in the heterojunction, due to the SWIR photons absorption, is drifted to the surface of the InP, thus modulating the electric field distribution which modifies the orientation of the LC molecules. This device can be attractive for SWIR to visible image upconversion, such as for uncooled night vision goggles under low ambient light conditions.

  15. Laser training courses: new purpose-built room for practical exercises

    CERN Multimedia

    Safety Training, HSE Unit

    2015-01-01

    CERN’s Safety Training Centre, on the Prévessin site, now features a new facility for the “Laser - Expert” and “Laser - User” training courses: a dedicated room for practical exercises, near the theoretical training room. From now on, participants will be able to move from theory to practice in just a few steps!   The new room, equipped with real lasers ranging from levels 1 to 4, allows the participants to put their training into practice in real-life situations, solidifying the principles and lessons learned during the theory part – and all in complete safety, since the room was of course designed to allow the control of dangers posed by lasers. The participants and instructors are also provided with the required personal protective equipment (goggles, etc.) during the sessions. Efforts are being made to make the Centre's infrastructure more useful to improve the quality of training on offer. For example, the la...

  16. Music Audiences 3.0: Concert-Goers’ Psychological Motivations at the Dawn of Virtual Reality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe Charron

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Reviewing consumers’ motivations to attend performances in a continuously evolving social and technological context is essential because live concerts generate an important and growing share of revenues for the music industry. Evolving fans’ preferences and technological innovations constantly alter the way music is distributed and consumed. In a marketing 3.0 era, what consumers do with music is becoming more significant than simply owning or listening to a song. These changes are not only blurring the lines between production and consumption (i.e., co-creation, but also distorting the concept of live attendance altogether. Although mediated performances typically lack presence and authenticity, recent advances in immersive technologies, such as spherical videos and virtual reality goggles, could represent a new form of experiencing live music.

  17. Music Audiences 3.0: Concert-Goers' Psychological Motivations at the Dawn of Virtual Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Reviewing consumers' motivations to attend performances in a continuously evolving social and technological context is essential because live concerts generate an important and growing share of revenues for the music industry. Evolving fans' preferences and technological innovations constantly alter the way music is distributed and consumed. In a marketing 3.0 era, what consumers do with music is becoming more significant than simply owning or listening to a song. These changes are not only blurring the lines between production and consumption (i.e., co-creation), but also distorting the concept of live attendance altogether. Although mediated performances typically lack presence and authenticity, recent advances in immersive technologies, such as spherical videos and virtual reality goggles, could represent a new form of experiencing live music.

  18. Infection Management and Health Practices Among Forensic Science Investigators in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Kyeong-Sook; Cho, Ok-Hee; Yoo, Yang-Sook

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the current status of infection management for forensic science investigators in South Korea. This study included 104 forensic science investigators, of which 97.1% were exposed to the blood or body fluids of corpses during handling. Of these investigators, 98% claimed they wore gloves, and 12.9% used double-layered gloves. A total of 70.6% of the participants with relevant work experience wore masks to reduce infection risk; 43% wore gowns and goggles when at risk of contracting an infection. Furthermore, 59.8% of the investigators with pertinent work experience sought appropriate first aid and treatment when they experienced contaminated skin cuts or stab wounds. Working conditions and other problems should be analyzed consistently with the cooperation of employees, occupational health practitioners, and relevant organizations to prevent work-associated infections among forensic science investigators. © 2015 The Author(s).

  19. Clinical Management of a Patient with Chronic Recurrent Vertigo Following a Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric G. Johnson

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertigo, was provoked and right torsional up-beat nystagmus was observed in a 47-year-old patient when she was placed into the right Hallpike-Dix test position using infrared goggle technology. The clinical diagnosis was benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV, specifically right posterior canalithiasis, resulting from a mild traumatic brain injury (TBI suffered approximately six-months earlier. Previous medical consultations did not include vestibular system examination, and Meclizine was prescribed to suppress her chief complaint of vertigo. Ultimately, the patient was successfully managed by performing two canalith repositioning maneuvers during a single clinical session. The patient reported 100% resolution of symptoms upon reexamination the following day, and the Hallpike-Dix test was negative. Continued symptom resolution was subjectively reported 10 days postintervention via telephone consultation. This case report supports previous publications concerning the presence of BPPV following TBI and the need for inclusion of vestibular system examination during medical consultation.

  20. Effect of hypovolemia, infusion, and oral rehydration on plasma electrolytes, ADH, renin activity, and +G/z/ tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. E.; Brock, P. J.; Haines, R. F.; Rositano, S. A.; Montgomery, L. D.; Keil, L. C.

    1977-01-01

    Effects on plasma volume, electrolyte shifts, and +G(z) tolerance induced by: (1) blood withdrawal; (2) blood infusion; and (3) oral fluid intake, were determined at 0.5 G/min in centrifugation tests of six ambulatory male patients, aged 21 to 27 yrs. Hypovolemia induced by withdrawal of 400 ml blood, blood infusion followed by repeated centrifugation, effects of consuming an isotonic drink (0.9% NaCl) to achieve oral rehydration, and donning of red adaptation goggles were studied for effects on acceleration tolerance, pre-acceleration and post-acceleration plasma renin activity (PRA) and plasma vasopressin levels. No significant changes in post-acceleration PRA compared to pre-acceleration PRA were found, and administration of oral rehydration is found as effective as blood replacement in counteracting hypovolemic effects.

  1. Damage Mechanisms In Polymers Upon NIR Femtosecond Pulse Laser Irradiation: Sub-Threshold Processes And Their Implications For Laser Safety Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonse, Joern; Krueger, Joerg; Solis, Javier; Spielmann, Christian; Lippert, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    This contribution investigates laser-induced damage of thin film and bulk polymer samples, with the focus on physical processes occurring close to the damage threshold. In-situ real-time reflectivity (RTR) measurements with picosecond (ps) and nanosecond (ns) temporal resolution were performed on thin polymer films on a timescale up to a few microseconds (μs). A model for polymer thin film damage is presented, indicating that irreversible chemical modification processes take place already below the fluence threshold for macroscopic damage. On dye-doped bulk polymer filters (as used for laser goggles), transmission studies using fs-and ps-laser pulses reveal the optical saturation behavior of the material and its relation to the threshold of permanent damage. Implications of the sub-threshold processes for laser safety applications will be discussed for thin film and bulk polymer damage.

  2. Cerebral activity mapped by functional MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruening, R.; Danek, A.; Wu, R.H.; Berchtenbreiter, C.; Reiser, M.

    1997-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a method to noninvasively measure the changes in cerebral activation during sensitive, cognitive or motor activity. fMRI detects activity by subtraction of states of activity and rest. During activity the signal is increased presumably due to a decrease of deoxyhemoglobin in the capillary and venous structures. Using a full field visual stimulation by flashlight goggles, a signal increase of 3% was detected in the primary visual cortex (V1). Different sequences and postprocessing algorythms will be discussed. Data from the primary cortical areas suggest a high reproducability of the experiments. Successfull experiments highly depend on cooperation of subjects. Despite success in experiments fMRI still has to be established for clinical purposes. (orig.) [de

  3. Absorption of uv-radiation by Chibro trademark -Uvelin eye drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreder, J.G.; Blumthaler, M.; Daxer, A.; Ettl, A.

    1998-01-01

    The preparation Chibro trademark -Uvelin is recommended against both solar and artificial uv-radiation. At wavelengths greater than 290 nm and at an effective layer thickness of 10 μm measurements with a high resolution doublemonochromator showed a transmission larger than 90%. The solar spectrum is characterised by almost no irradiance on the earth's surface for wavelengths smaller than 290 nm due to absorption in the atmospheric ozon layer. Therefore, no significant protective effect of the eye-drops against keratitis and cataract under solar exposure can be expected. A significantly better sagging of the radiation of artificial UV-sources with a high amount of UV-C is reached. The recommended application as chemical protective goggles in this spectral range is not permissible. (orig.) [de

  4. Quantitative measurement of interocular suppression in children with amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasimhan, Sathyasri; Harrison, Emily R; Giaschi, Deborah E

    2012-08-01

    In this study we explored the possibility of using a dichoptic global motion technique to measure interocular suppression in children with amblyopia. We compared children (5-16 years old) with unilateral anisometropic and/or strabismic amblyopia to age-matched control children. Under dichoptic viewing conditions, contrast interference thresholds were determined with a global motion direction-discrimination task. Using virtual reality goggles, high contrast signal dots were presented to the amblyopic eye, while low contrast noise dots were presented to the non-amblyopic fellow eye. The contrast of the noise dots was increased until discrimination of the motion direction of the signal dots reached chance performance. Contrast interference thresholds were significantly lower in the strabismic group than in the anisometropic and control group. Our results suggest that interocular suppression is stronger in strabismic than in anisometropic amblyopia. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Modular uncooled video engines based on a DSP processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapiro, F.; Milstain, Y.; Aharon, A.; Neboshchik, A.; Ben-Simon, Y.; Kogan, I.; Lerman, I.; Mizrahi, U.; Maayani, S.; Amsterdam, A.; Vaserman, I.; Duman, O.; Gazit, R.

    2011-06-01

    The market demand for low SWaP (Size, Weight and Power) uncooled engines keeps growing. Low SWaP is especially critical in battery-operated applications such as goggles and Thermal Weapon Sights. A new approach for the design of the engines was implemented by SCD to optimize size and power consumption at system level. The new approach described in the paper, consists of: 1. A modular hardware design that allows the user to define the exact level of integration needed for his system 2. An "open architecture" based on the OMAPTM530 DSP that allows the integrator to take advantage of unused hardware (FPGA) and software (DSP) resources, for implementation of additional algorithms or functionality. The approach was successfully implemented on the first generation of 25μm pitch BIRD detectors, and more recently on the new, 640 x480, 17 μm pitch detector.

  6. Germanium blocked impurity band far infrared detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossington, C.S.

    1988-04-01

    The infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum has been of interest to scientist since the eighteenth century when Sir William Herschel discovered the infrared as he measured temperatures in the sun's spectrum and found that there was energy beyond the red. In the late nineteenth century, Thomas Edison established himself as the first infrared astronomer to look beyond the solar system when he observed the star Arcturus in the infrared. Significant advances in infrared technology and physics, long since Edison's time, have resulted in many scientific developments, such as the Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) which was launched in 1983, semiconductor infrared detectors for materials characterization, military equipment such as night-vision goggles and infrared surveillance equipment. It is now planned that cooled semiconductor infrared detectors will play a major role in the ''Star Wars'' nuclear defense scheme proposed by the Reagan administration

  7. Measurements of eye lens doses in interventional cardiology using OSL and electronic dosemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez, R.M.; Vano, E.; Fernandez, J.M.; Ginjaume, M.; Duch, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to test the appropriateness of OSL and electronic dosemeters to estimate eye lens doses at interventional cardiology environment. Using TLD as reference detectors, personal dose equivalent was measured in phantoms and during clinical procedures. For phantom measurements, OSL dose values resulted in an average difference of 215 % vs. TLD. Tests carried out with other electronic dosemeters revealed differences up to ±20 % versus TLD. With dosemeters positioned outside the goggles and when TLD doses were >20 μSv, the average difference OSL vs. TLD was 29 %. Eye lens doses of almost 700 μSv per procedure were measured in two cases out of a sample of 33 measurements in individual clinical procedures, thus showing the risk of high exposure to the lenses of the eye when protection rules are not followed. The differences found between OSL and TLD are acceptable for the purpose and range of doses measured in the survey (authors)

  8. Inaudible functional MRI using a truly mute gradient echo sequence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marcar, V.L.; Girard, F.; Rinkel, Y.; Schneider, J.F.; Martin, E.

    2002-01-01

    We performed functional MRI experiments using a mute version of a gradient echo sequence on adult volunteers using either a simple visual stimulus (flicker goggles: 4 subjects) or an auditory stimulus (music: 4 subjects). Because the mute sequence delivers fewer images per unit time than a fast echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence, we explored our data using a parametric ANOVA test and a non-parametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test in addition to performing a cross-correlation analysis. All three methods were in close agreement regarding the location of the BOLD contrast signal change. We demonstrated that, using appropriate statistical analysis, functional MRI using an MR sequence that is acoustically inaudible to the subject is feasible. Furthermore compared with the ''silent'' event-related procedures involving an EPI protocol, our mGE protocol compares favourably with respect to experiment time and the BOLD signal. (orig.)

  9. Music Audiences 3.0: Concert-Goers’ Psychological Motivations at the Dawn of Virtual Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Reviewing consumers’ motivations to attend performances in a continuously evolving social and technological context is essential because live concerts generate an important and growing share of revenues for the music industry. Evolving fans’ preferences and technological innovations constantly alter the way music is distributed and consumed. In a marketing 3.0 era, what consumers do with music is becoming more significant than simply owning or listening to a song. These changes are not only blurring the lines between production and consumption (i.e., co-creation), but also distorting the concept of live attendance altogether. Although mediated performances typically lack presence and authenticity, recent advances in immersive technologies, such as spherical videos and virtual reality goggles, could represent a new form of experiencing live music. PMID:28588528

  10. Information booklet on personal protective equipment: eye and face protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In all work places where hazards of various kinds are present and the same cannot be totally controlled by engineering methods, suitable personal protective equipment (PPE) shall be used. There are several types of eye and face protection devices available in the market and it is important that employees use the proper type for the particular job. The main classes of eye and face protection devices required for the industrial operations are as follows: (a) eye protection devices which includes: (i) safety goggles (ii) safety spectacles (iii) safety clipons and eye and face protection devices which are (i) eye shield, (ii) face shield, (iii) wire mesh screen guard. Guide lines for selecting appropriate ear and face protection equipment for nuclear installations are given. (M.K.V.). 4 annexures, 1 appendix

  11. Inaudible functional MRI using a truly mute gradient echo sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcar, V.L. [University of Zurich, Department of Psychology, Neuropsychology, Treichlerstrasse 10, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland); Girard, F. [GE Medical Systems SA, 283, rue de la Miniere B.P. 34, 78533 Buc Cedex (France); Rinkel, Y.; Schneider, J.F.; Martin, E. [University Children' s Hospital, Neuroradiology and Magnetic Resonance, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Steinwiesstrasse 75, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2002-11-01

    We performed functional MRI experiments using a mute version of a gradient echo sequence on adult volunteers using either a simple visual stimulus (flicker goggles: 4 subjects) or an auditory stimulus (music: 4 subjects). Because the mute sequence delivers fewer images per unit time than a fast echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence, we explored our data using a parametric ANOVA test and a non-parametric Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test in addition to performing a cross-correlation analysis. All three methods were in close agreement regarding the location of the BOLD contrast signal change. We demonstrated that, using appropriate statistical analysis, functional MRI using an MR sequence that is acoustically inaudible to the subject is feasible. Furthermore compared with the ''silent'' event-related procedures involving an EPI protocol, our mGE protocol compares favourably with respect to experiment time and the BOLD signal. (orig.)

  12. Questions about hygiene and work safety in operation of lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashuba, V A; Semenov, A M

    1976-08-01

    Lasers have found very wide use in science and technology. The USSR now uses several laser type instruments. Korund has tremendously accelerated output in a watch factory (jewel-drilling), freed hundreds of sq. meter space, and lowered personnel numbers by 470 workers (a photo is presented of an automated Korund-laser watch production section). Research by the F. F. Erisman Scientific Research Institute of Hygiene, in Moscow, demonstrated the positive effect of laser introduction in plants. The familiar hazards of use are noted, as are attending dangers from ir and uv, noise, and aerosols. Safety measures must include isolation of instruments shielding and protective goggles; hygienic, physiological, and ergonomic requirements of laser units must be met. Medical control of workers is said to be more intensive than in the USA.

  13. Optically transparent, mechanically durable, nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces enabled by spinodally phase-separated glass thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytug, Tolga; Simpson, John T; Lupini, Andrew R; Trejo, Rosa M; Jellison, Gerald E; Ivanov, Ilia N; Pennycook, Stephen J; Hillesheim, Daniel A; Winter, Kyle O; Christen, David K; Hunter, Scott R; Haynes, J Allen

    2013-08-09

    We describe the formation and properties of atomically bonded, optical quality, nanostructured thin glass film coatings on glass plates, utilizing phase separation by spinodal decomposition in a sodium borosilicate glass system. Following deposition via magnetron sputtering, thermal processing and differential etching, these coatings are structurally superhydrophilic (i.e., display anti-fogging functionality) and demonstrate robust mechanical properties and superior abrasion resistance. After appropriate chemical surface modification, the surfaces display a stable, non-wetting Cassie-Baxter state and exhibit exceptional superhydrophobic performance, with water droplet contact angles as large as 172°. As an added benefit, in both superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic states these nanostructured surfaces can block ultraviolet radiation and can be engineered to be anti-reflective with broadband and omnidirectional transparency. Thus, the present approach could be tailored toward distinct coatings for numerous markets, such as residential windows, windshields, specialty optics, goggles, electronic and photovoltaic cover glasses, and optical components used throughout the US military.

  14. Optically transparent, mechanically durable, nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces enabled by spinodally phase-separated glass thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytug, Tolga; Simpson, John T.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Trejo, Rosa M.; Jellison, Gerald E.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Hillesheim, Daniel A.; Winter, Kyle O.; Christen, David K.; Hunter, Scott R.; Haynes, J. Allen

    2013-08-01

    We describe the formation and properties of atomically bonded, optical quality, nanostructured thin glass film coatings on glass plates, utilizing phase separation by spinodal decomposition in a sodium borosilicate glass system. Following deposition via magnetron sputtering, thermal processing and differential etching, these coatings are structurally superhydrophilic (i.e., display anti-fogging functionality) and demonstrate robust mechanical properties and superior abrasion resistance. After appropriate chemical surface modification, the surfaces display a stable, non-wetting Cassie-Baxter state and exhibit exceptional superhydrophobic performance, with water droplet contact angles as large as 172°. As an added benefit, in both superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic states these nanostructured surfaces can block ultraviolet radiation and can be engineered to be anti-reflective with broadband and omnidirectional transparency. Thus, the present approach could be tailored toward distinct coatings for numerous markets, such as residential windows, windshields, specialty optics, goggles, electronic and photovoltaic cover glasses, and optical components used throughout the US military.

  15. Optically transparent, mechanically durable, nanostructured superhydrophobic surfaces enabled by spinodally phase-separated glass thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aytug, Tolga; Simpson, John T; Lupini, Andrew R; Trejo, Rosa M; Jellison, Gerald E; Ivanov, Ilia N; Pennycook, Stephen J; Hillesheim, Daniel A; Winter, Kyle O; Christen, David K; Hunter, Scott R; Allen Haynes, J

    2013-01-01

    We describe the formation and properties of atomically bonded, optical quality, nanostructured thin glass film coatings on glass plates, utilizing phase separation by spinodal decomposition in a sodium borosilicate glass system. Following deposition via magnetron sputtering, thermal processing and differential etching, these coatings are structurally superhydrophilic (i.e., display anti-fogging functionality) and demonstrate robust mechanical properties and superior abrasion resistance. After appropriate chemical surface modification, the surfaces display a stable, non-wetting Cassie–Baxter state and exhibit exceptional superhydrophobic performance, with water droplet contact angles as large as 172°. As an added benefit, in both superhydrophobic and superhydrophilic states these nanostructured surfaces can block ultraviolet radiation and can be engineered to be anti-reflective with broadband and omnidirectional transparency. Thus, the present approach could be tailored toward distinct coatings for numerous markets, such as residential windows, windshields, specialty optics, goggles, electronic and photovoltaic cover glasses, and optical components used throughout the US military. (paper)

  16. Production Experience with the ATLAS Event Service

    CERN Document Server

    Benjamin, Douglas; The ATLAS collaboration

    2016-01-01

    The ATLAS Event Service (ES) has been designed and implemented for efficient running of ATLAS production workflows on a variety of computing platforms, ranging from conventional Grid sites to opportunistic, often short-lived resources, such as spot market commercial clouds, supercomputers and volunteer computing. The Event Service architecture allows real time delivery of fine grained workloads to running payload applications which process dispatched events or event ranges and immediately stream the outputs to highly scalable Object Stores. Thanks to its agile and flexible architecture the ES is currently being used by grid sites for assigning low priority workloads to otherwise idle computing resources; similarly harvesting HPC resources in an efficient back-fill mode; and massively scaling out to the 50-100k concurrent core level on the Amazon spot market to efficiently utilize those transient resources for peak production needs. Platform ports in development include ATLAS@Home (BOINC) and the Goggle Comput...

  17. Exposition of the operator's eye lens and efficacy of radiation shielding in fluoroscopically guided interventions; Exposition der Augenlinse des Untersuchers und Effizienz der Strahlenschutzmittel bei fluoroskopischen Interventionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galster, M.; Adamus, R. [Klinikum Nuernberg-Nord, Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie; Guhl, C. [Klinikum Nuernberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizinische Physik; Uder, M. [Erlangen Univ. (Germany). Radiologisches Inst.

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: Efficacy of radiation protection tools for the eye lens dose of the radiologist in fluoroscopic interventions. Materials and Methods: A patient phantom was exposed using a fluoroscopic system. Dose measurements were made at the eye location of the radiologist using an ionization chamber. The setting followed typical fluoroscopic interventions. The reduction of scattered radiation by the equipment-mounted shielding (undercouch drapes and overcouch top) was evaluated. The ceiling-suspended lead acrylic glass screen was tested in scattered radiation generated by a slab phantom. The protective properties of different lead glass goggles and lead acrylic visors were evaluated by thermoluminescence measurements on a head phantom in the primary beam. Results: The exposition of the lens of about 110 to 550 {mu}Sv during radiologic interventions is only slightly reduced by the undercouch drapes. Applying the top in addition to the drapes reduces the lens dose by a factor of 2 for PA projections. In 25 LAO the dose is reduced by a factor between 1.2 and 5. The highest doses were measured for AP angulations furthermore the efficacy of the equipment-mounted shielding is minimal. The ceiling-suspended lead screen reduced scatter by a factor of about 30. The lead glass goggles and visors reduced the lens dose up to a factor of 8 to 10. Depending on the specific design, the tested models are less effective especially for radiation from lateral with cranial angulation of the beam. Occasionally the visors even caused an increase of dose. Conclusion: The exposition of the eye lens can be kept below the new occupational limit recommended by the ICRP if the radiation shielding equipment is used consistently. (orig.)

  18. The decrease in aqueous tear production associated with pepper spray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasier, Rifat; Kukner, Amber Senel; Sengul, Elvan Alper; Yalcin, Nazli Gul; Temizsoylu, Onur; Bahcecioglu, Halil Onder

    2015-04-01

    Pepper spray is used both by civilians and by law enforcement. Burning sensation occurs when exposed to skin, pain and temporary blindness occurs when exposed to the eyes. This study focused on the effect of pepper spray on lacrimal tear production and subsequently on corneal sensitivity in a large group after an intense exposure. Ninety-six people who were exposed to pepper spray during the Gezi park protests volunteered. Subjects were asked if they wore any protective goggles and if they irrigated their eyes after exposure. They were asked to record their symptoms regarding dry eye in a standardized questionnaire. Schirmer I and II tests were performed. Eighty-two people wore protective goggles during exposure, whereas 14 people did not have any protection. Both Schirmer results in unprotected subjects were significantly lower than that in protected subjects. Schirmer I and II results of unprotected subjects were not statistically different, whereas they were statistically different in protected subjects. Thirty-five percent of unprotected subjects and 24% of protected subjects expressed symptoms of dry eye. The active ingredient of pepper spray is oleoresin capsicum. It is randomly diffused to polymodal nerve terminals, leading to opening of non-selective cationic channels and block neuronal transmission. The lower results of both Schirmer in unprotected group emphasize the importance of a protective Google glass around the eyes during exposal, serving as a barrier minimalizing the contact of the spray with the eyes. The combination of the low results and lack of symptoms could suggest that corneal reflex lacrimation in our subjects was not abundant enough. The findings of this study could not fully represent long term findings but it could be assumed that our findings could be indicative of the sensory denervation and alterations demonstrated in studies investigating the long term effects of oleoresin capsicum.

  19. Exposition of the operator's eye lens and efficacy of radiation shielding in fluoroscopically guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galster, M.; Adamus, R.; Guhl, C.; Uder, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Efficacy of radiation protection tools for the eye lens dose of the radiologist in fluoroscopic interventions. Materials and Methods: A patient phantom was exposed using a fluoroscopic system. Dose measurements were made at the eye location of the radiologist using an ionization chamber. The setting followed typical fluoroscopic interventions. The reduction of scattered radiation by the equipment-mounted shielding (undercouch drapes and overcouch top) was evaluated. The ceiling-suspended lead acrylic glass screen was tested in scattered radiation generated by a slab phantom. The protective properties of different lead glass goggles and lead acrylic visors were evaluated by thermoluminescence measurements on a head phantom in the primary beam. Results: The exposition of the lens of about 110 to 550 μSv during radiologic interventions is only slightly reduced by the undercouch drapes. Applying the top in addition to the drapes reduces the lens dose by a factor of 2 for PA projections. In 25 LAO the dose is reduced by a factor between 1.2 and 5. The highest doses were measured for AP angulations furthermore the efficacy of the equipment-mounted shielding is minimal. The ceiling-suspended lead screen reduced scatter by a factor of about 30. The lead glass goggles and visors reduced the lens dose up to a factor of 8 to 10. Depending on the specific design, the tested models are less effective especially for radiation from lateral with cranial angulation of the beam. Occasionally the visors even caused an increase of dose. Conclusion: The exposition of the eye lens can be kept below the new occupational limit recommended by the ICRP if the radiation shielding equipment is used consistently. (orig.)

  20. Feasibility of an Immersive Virtual Reality Intervention for Hospitalized Patients: An Observational Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosadeghi, Sasan; Reid, Mark William; Martinez, Bibiana; Rosen, Bradley Todd; Spiegel, Brennan Mason Ross

    2016-06-27

    Virtual reality (VR) offers immersive, realistic, three-dimensional experiences that "transport" users to novel environments. Because VR is effective for acute pain and anxiety, it may have benefits for hospitalized patients; however, there are few reports using VR in this setting. The aim was to evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of VR in a diverse cohort of hospitalized patients. We assessed the acceptability and feasibility of VR in a cohort of patients admitted to an inpatient hospitalist service over a 4-month period. We excluded patients with motion sickness, stroke, seizure, dementia, nausea, and in isolation. Eligible patients viewed VR experiences (eg, ocean exploration; Cirque du Soleil; tour of Iceland) with Samsung Gear VR goggles. We then conducted semistructured patient interview and performed statistical testing to compare patients willing versus unwilling to use VR. We evaluated 510 patients; 423 were excluded and 57 refused to participate, leaving 30 participants. Patients willing versus unwilling to use VR were younger (mean 49.1, SD 17.4 years vs mean 60.2, SD 17.7 years; P=.01); there were no differences by sex, race, or ethnicity. Among users, most reported a positive experience and indicated that VR could improve pain and anxiety, although many felt the goggles were uncomfortable. Most inpatient users of VR described the experience as pleasant and capable of reducing pain and anxiety. However, few hospitalized patients in this "real-world" series were both eligible and willing to use VR. Consistent with the "digital divide" for emerging technologies, younger patients were more willing to participate. Future research should evaluate the impact of VR on clinical and resource outcomes. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02456987; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02456987 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6iFIMRNh3).

  1. MRI-compatible audio/visual system: impact on pediatric sedation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harned, R.K. II; Strain, J.D.

    2001-01-01

    Background. While sedation is necessary for much pediatric imaging, there are new alternatives that may help patients hold still without medication. Objective. We examined the effect of an audio/visual system consisting of video goggles and earphones on the need for sedation during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Materials and methods. All MRI examinations from May 1999 to October 1999 performed after installation of the MRVision 2000 (Resonance Technology, Inc.) were compared to the same 6-month period in 1998. Imaging and sedation protocols remained constant. Data collected included: patient age, type of examination, use of intravenous contrast enhancement, and need for sedation. The average supply charge and nursing cost per sedated patient were calculated. Results. The 955 patients from 1998 and 1,112 patients from 1999 were similar in demographics and examination distribution. There was an overall reduction in the percent of patients requiring sedation in the group using the video goggle system from 49 to 40 % (P < 0.001). There was no significant change for 0-2 years (P = 0.805), but there was a reduction from 53 to 40 % for age 3-10 years (P < 0.001) and 16 to 8 % for those older than 10 years (P < 0.001). There was a 17 % decrease in MRI room time for those patients whose examinations could be performed without sedation. Sedation costs per patient were $80 for nursing and $29 for supplies. Conclusion. The use of this video system reduced the number of children requiring sedation for MRI examination by 18 %. In addition to reducing patient risk, this can potentially reduce cost. (orig.)

  2. Vision in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchison, David A; Valentine, Emma L; Gibson, Georgina; Thomas, Hannah R; Oh, Sera; Pyo, Young Ah; Lacherez, Philippe; Mathur, Ankit

    2013-09-06

    The purpose of this study is to determine visual performance in water, including the influence of pupil size. The water environment was simulated by placing goggles filled with saline in front of the eyes with apertures placed at the front of the goggles. Correction factors were determined for the different magnification under this condition in order to estimate vision in water. Experiments were conducted on letter visual acuity (seven participants), grating resolution (eight participants), and grating contrast sensitivity (one participant). For letter acuity, mean loss of vision in water, compared to corrected vision in air, varied between 1.1 log min of arc resolution (logMAR) for a 1 mm aperture to 2.2 logMAR for a 7 mm aperture. The vision in min of arc was described well by a linear relationship with pupil size. For grating acuity, mean loss varied between 1.1 logMAR for a 2 mm aperture to 1.2 logMAR for a 6 mm aperture. Contrast sensitivity for a 2 mm aperture deteriorated as spatial frequency increased with a 2 log unit loss by 3 c/°. Superimposed on this deterioration were depressions (notches) in sensitivity with the first three notches occurring at 0.45, 0.8, and 1.3 c/° with estimates for water of 0.39, 0.70, and 1.13 c/°. In conclusion, vision in water is poor. It becomes worse as pupil size increases, but the effects are much more marked for letter targets than for grating targets.

  3. Toward high-resolution optoelectronic retinal prosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palanker, Daniel; Huie, Philip; Vankov, Alexander; Asher, Alon; Baccus, Steven

    2005-04-01

    It has been already demonstrated that electrical stimulation of retina can produce visual percepts in blind patients suffering from macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Current retinal implants provide very low resolution (just a few electrodes), while several thousand pixels are required for functional restoration of sight. We present a design of the optoelectronic retinal prosthetic system that can activate a retinal stimulating array with pixel density up to 2,500 pix/mm2 (geometrically corresponding to a visual acuity of 20/80), and allows for natural eye scanning rather than scanning with a head-mounted camera. The system operates similarly to "virtual reality" imaging devices used in military and medical applications. An image from a video camera is projected by a goggle-mounted infrared LED-LCD display onto the retina, activating an array of powered photodiodes in the retinal implant. Such a system provides a broad field of vision by allowing for natural eye scanning. The goggles are transparent to visible light, thus allowing for simultaneous utilization of remaining natural vision along with prosthetic stimulation. Optical control of the implant allows for simple adjustment of image processing algorithms and for learning. A major prerequisite for high resolution stimulation is the proximity of neural cells to the stimulation sites. This can be achieved with sub-retinal implants constructed in a manner that directs migration of retinal cells to target areas. Two basic implant geometries are described: perforated membranes and protruding electrode arrays. Possibility of the tactile neural stimulation is also examined.

  4. Protective measures and human antibody response during an avian influenza H7N3 outbreak in poultry in British Columbia, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skowronski, Danuta M; Li, Yan; Tweed, S Aleina; Tam, Theresa W S; Petric, Martin; David, Samara T; Marra, Fawziah; Bastien, Nathalie; Lee, Sandra W; Krajden, Mel; Brunham, Robert C

    2007-01-02

    In 2004 an outbreak of avian influenza of the H7N3 subtype occurred among poultry in British Columbia, Canada. We report compliance with recommended protective measures and associated human infections during this outbreak. We sought voluntary participation by anyone (cullers, farmers and their families) involved in efforts to control the poultry outbreak. Recruitment was by advertisements at the worker deployment site, in local media and through newsletters sent directly to farmers. Sera were tested for antibody to H7N3 by microneutralization assay. A subset of 16 sera (including convalescent sera from 2 unprotected workers with conjunctivitis from whom virus had been isolated) was further tested by Western blot and routine and modified hemagglutination inhibition assays. A total of 167 people (20% to 25% of all workers) participated between May 7 and July 26, 2004. Of these, 19 had experienced influenza-like illness and 21 had experienced red or watery eyes. There was no significant association between illness reports and exposure to infected birds. Among 65 people who entered barns with infected birds, 55 (85%) had received influenza vaccine, 48 (74%) had received oseltamivir, and 55 (85%), 54 (83%) and 36 (55%) reported always wearing gloves, mask or goggles, respectively. Antibody to the H7 subtype was not detected in any sera. During the BC outbreak, compliance with recommended protective measures, especially goggles, was incomplete. Multiple back-up precautions, including oseltamivir prophylaxis, may prevent human infections and should be readily accessible and consistently used by those involved in the control of future outbreaks of avian influenza in poultry. Localized human avian influenza infections may not result in serologic response despite confirmed viral detection and culture.

  5. [Exposition of the operator's eye lens and efficacy of radiation shielding in fluoroscopically guided interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galster, M; Guhl, C; Uder, M; Adamus, R

    2013-05-01

    Efficacy of radiation protection tools for the eye lens dose of the radiologist in fluoroscopic interventions. A patient phantom was exposed using a fluoroscopic system. Dose measurements were made at the eye location of the radiologist using an ionization chamber. The setting followed typical fluoroscopic interventions. The reduction of scattered radiation by the equipment-mounted shielding (undercouch drapes and overcouch top) was evaluated. The ceiling-suspended lead acrylic glass screen was tested in scattered radiation generated by a slab phantom. The protective properties of different lead glass goggles and lead acrylic visors were evaluated by thermoluminescence measurements on a head phantom in the primary beam. The exposition of the lens of about 110 to 550 μSv during radiologic interventions is only slightly reduced by the undercouch drapes. Applying the top in addition to the drapes reduces the lens dose by a factor of 2 for PA projections. In 25°LAO the dose is reduced by a factor between 1.2 and 5. The highest doses were measured for AP angulations furthermore the efficacy of the equipment-mounted shielding is minimal. The ceiling-suspended lead screen reduced scatter by a factor of about 30. The lead glass goggles and visors reduced the lens dose up to a factor of 8 to 10. Depending on the specific design, the tested models are less effective especially for radiation from lateral with cranial angulation of the beam. Occasionally the visors even caused an increase of dose. The exposition of the eye lens can be kept below the new occupational limit recommended by the ICRP if the radiation shielding equipment is used consistently. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Technical note: real-time web-based wireless visual guidance system for radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Danny; Kim, Siyong; Palta, Jatinder R; Kim, Taeho

    2017-06-01

    Describe a Web-based wireless visual guidance system that mitigates issues associated with hard-wired audio-visual aided patient interactive motion management systems that are cumbersome to use in routine clinical practice. Web-based wireless visual display duplicates an existing visual display of a respiratory-motion management system for visual guidance. The visual display of the existing system is sent to legacy Web clients over a private wireless network, thereby allowing a wireless setting for real-time visual guidance. In this study, active breathing coordinator (ABC) trace was used as an input for visual display, which captured and transmitted to Web clients. Virtual reality goggles require two (left and right eye view) images for visual display. We investigated the performance of Web-based wireless visual guidance by quantifying (1) the network latency of visual displays between an ABC computer display and Web clients of a laptop, an iPad mini 2 and an iPhone 6, and (2) the frame rate of visual display on the Web clients in frames per second (fps). The network latency of visual display between the ABC computer and Web clients was about 100 ms and the frame rate was 14.0 fps (laptop), 9.2 fps (iPad mini 2) and 11.2 fps (iPhone 6). In addition, visual display for virtual reality goggles was successfully shown on the iPhone 6 with 100 ms and 11.2 fps. A high network security was maintained by utilizing the private network configuration. This study demonstrated that a Web-based wireless visual guidance can be a promising technique for clinical motion management systems, which require real-time visual display of their outputs. Based on the results of this study, our approach has the potential to reduce clutter associated with wired-systems, reduce space requirements, and extend the use of medical devices from static usage to interactive and dynamic usage in a radiotherapy treatment vault.

  7. Dynamic Visual Acuity and Landing Sickness in Crewmembers Returning from Long-Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M.J.F; Peters, B.T.; Reschke, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    throughout the testing. Using the chair as a portable and reliable way to test DVA, we aim to test returning astronauts to assess the amount of retinal slip that they experience. By comparing these measurements to their motion sickness scores (using a scale of 1 to 20 where 20 is vomiting), we will correlate the amount of retinal slip to the level of motion sickness experienced. In addition to testing this in returning astronauts, we will perform ground-based studies to determine the effectiveness of stroboscopic goggles in reducing retinal slip and improving DVA. Finally, we will employ stroboscopic goggles in the field to astronauts experiencing high levels of motion sickness to minimize retinal slip and reduce their symptoms.

  8. Efficacy of Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation to Improve Locomotor Performance During Adaptation to Visuomotor and Somatosensory Distortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temple, David R; De Dios, Yiri E; Layne, Charles S; Bloomberg, Jacob J; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P

    2018-01-01

    Astronauts exposed to microgravity face sensorimotor challenges affecting balance control when readapting to Earth's gravity upon return from spaceflight. Small amounts of electrical noise applied to the vestibular system have been shown to improve balance control during standing and walking under discordant sensory conditions in healthy subjects, likely by enhancing information transfer through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that imperceptible levels of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) could improve short-term adaptation to a locomotor task in a novel sensory discordant environment. Healthy subjects (14 males, 10 females, age = 28.7 ± 5.3 years, height = 167.2 ± 9.6 cm, weight = 71.0 ± 12.8 kg) were tested for perceptual thresholds to sinusoidal currents applied across the mastoids. Subjects were then randomly and blindly assigned to an SVS group receiving a 0-30 Hz Gaussian white noise electrical stimulus at 50% of their perceptual threshold (stim) or a control group receiving zero stimulation during Functional Mobility Tests (FMTs), nine trials of which were done under conditions of visual discordance (wearing up/down vision reversing goggles). Time to complete the course (TCC) was used to test the effect of SVS between the two groups across the trials. Adaptation rates from the normalized TCCs were also compared utilizing exponent values of power fit trendline equations. A one-tailed independent-samples t -test indicated these adaptation rates were significantly faster in the stim group ( n = 12) than the control ( n = 12) group [ t (16.18) = 2.00, p = 0.031]. When a secondary analysis was performed comparing "responders" (subjects who showed faster adaptation rates) of the stim ( n = 7) group to the control group ( n = 12), independent-samples t -tests revealed significantly faster trial times for the last five trials with goggles in the stim group "responders" than the controls. The data

  9. Two Innovative Steps for Training on Maintenance: 'VIRMAN' Spanish Project based on Virtual Reality 'STARMATE' European Project based on Augmented Reality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez Anez, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents two development projects (STARMATE and VIRMAN) focused on supporting training on maintenance. Both projects aim at specifying, designing, developing, and demonstrating prototypes allowing computer guided maintenance of complex mechanical elements using Augmented and Virtual Reality techniques. VIRMAN is a Spanish development project. The objective is to create a computer tool for maintenance training course elaborations and training delivery based on 3D virtual reality models of complex components. The training delivery includes 3D record displays on maintenance procedures with all complementary information for intervention understanding. Users are requested to perform the maintenance intervention trying to follow up the procedure. Users can be evaluated about the level of knowledge achieved. Instructors can check the evaluation records left during the training sessions. VIRMAN is simple software supported by a regular computer and can be used in an Internet framework. STARMATE is a forward step in the area of virtual reality. STARMATE is a European Commission project in the frame of 'Information Societies Technologies'. A consortium of five companies and one research institute shares their expertise in this new technology. STARMATE provides two main functionalities (1) user assistance for achieving assembly/de-assembly and following maintenance procedures, and (2) workforce training. The project relies on Augmented Reality techniques, which is a growing area in Virtual Reality research. The idea of Augmented Reality is to combine a real scene, viewed by the user, with a virtual scene, generated by a computer, augmenting the reality with additional information. The user interface is see-through goggles, headphones, microphone and an optical tracking system. All these devices are integrated in a helmet connected with two regular computers. The user has his hands free for performing the maintenance intervention and he can navigate in the virtual

  10. The measurement and treatment of suppression in amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Joanna M; Hess, Robert F; Cooperstock, Jeremy R; To, Long; Thompson, Benjamin

    2012-12-14

    Amblyopia, a developmental disorder of the visual cortex, is one of the leading causes of visual dysfunction in the working age population. Current estimates put the prevalence of amblyopia at approximately 1-3%(1-3), the majority of cases being monocular(2). Amblyopia is most frequently caused by ocular misalignment (strabismus), blur induced by unequal refractive error (anisometropia), and in some cases by form deprivation. Although amblyopia is initially caused by abnormal visual input in infancy, once established, the visual deficit often remains when normal visual input has been restored using surgery and/or refractive correction. This is because amblyopia is the result of abnormal visual cortex development rather than a problem with the amblyopic eye itself(4,5) . Amblyopia is characterized by both monocular and binocular deficits(6,7) which include impaired visual acuity and poor or absent stereopsis respectively. The visual dysfunction in amblyopia is often associated with a strong suppression of the inputs from the amblyopic eye under binocular viewing conditions(8). Recent work has indicated that suppression may play a central role in both the monocular and binocular deficits associated with amblyopia(9,10) . Current clinical tests for suppression tend to verify the presence or absence of suppression rather than giving a quantitative measurement of the degree of suppression. Here we describe a technique for measuring amblyopic suppression with a compact, portable device(11,12) . The device consists of a laptop computer connected to a pair of virtual reality goggles. The novelty of the technique lies in the way we present visual stimuli to measure suppression. Stimuli are shown to the amblyopic eye at high contrast while the contrast of the stimuli shown to the non-amblyopic eye are varied. Patients perform a simple signal/noise task that allows for a precise measurement of the strength of excitatory binocular interactions. The contrast offset at which

  11. Is initiating tanning bed use as a minor associated with increased risky tanning behaviors and burning? An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidenberg, Andrew B; Noar, Seth M; Sontag, Jennah M

    2017-12-01

    Tanning bed use is most common among youth and young adults, and is associated with an increased risk of skin cancer. Recently, numerous states have adopted restrictions on minors' access to tanning beds; however, little has been reported on how such policies may impact tanning behaviors and burning. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between age of indoor tanning initiation and risky tanning behaviors and burning. Female students (n=567) attending a large southeastern public university completed a questionnaire (spring of 2015) assessing tanning bed use history, including age of initiation. The analytic sample was limited to participants reporting past year indoor tanning (n=134). Multivariable logistic regression was used to compare the odds of risky tanning behaviors and burning among those initiating indoor tanning before and after their 18th birthday. Participants initiating indoor tanning as a minor had significantly (pstanning bed 10 or more times in the previous year, typically indoor tanning for ≥10min, ever indoor tanning without wearing goggles, and ever fallen asleep inside a tanning bed. Further, those that initiated as a minor had significantly greater odds of ever burning from indoor tanning (ptanning initiation as a minor was associated with several risky tanning behaviors and burning. Youth access restrictions may help reduce the harms caused by tanning beds. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Exposure to air pollution and self-reported effects on Chinese students: A case study of 13 megacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Air pollution causes severe physical and psychological health complications. Considering China’s continuously-deteriorating air quality, this study aimed to assess the self-reported effects of air pollution on the behavior and physical health of the students of 13 densely populated cities, and their awareness, practices, and perception of air pollution and its associated public health risks. A detailed, closed-ended questionnaire was administered to 2100 students from 54 universities and schools across China. The questionnaire, which had 24 questions, was categorized into four sections. The first two sections were focused on air pollution-associated behavior and psychology, and physical effects; while the final two sections focused on the subjects’ awareness and perceptions, and practices and concerns about air pollution. The respondents reported that long-term exposure to air pollution had significantly affected their psychology and behavior, as well as their physical health. The respondents were aware of the different adverse impacts of air pollution (respiratory infections, allergies, and cardiovascular problems), and hence had adopted different preventive measures, such as the use of respiratory masks and glasses or goggles, regularly drinking water, and consuming rich foods. It was concluded that air pollution and haze had negative physical and psychological effects on the respondents, which led to severe changes in behavior. Proper management, future planning, and implementing strict environmental laws are suggested before this problem worsens and becomes life-threatening. PMID:29547657

  13. Photovoltaic Pixels for Neural Stimulation: Circuit Models and Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boinagrov, David; Lei, Xin; Goetz, Georges; Kamins, Theodore I; Mathieson, Keith; Galambos, Ludwig; Harris, James S; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Photovoltaic conversion of pulsed light into pulsed electric current enables optically-activated neural stimulation with miniature wireless implants. In photovoltaic retinal prostheses, patterns of near-infrared light projected from video goggles onto subretinal arrays of photovoltaic pixels are converted into patterns of current to stimulate the inner retinal neurons. We describe a model of these devices and evaluate the performance of photovoltaic circuits, including the electrode-electrolyte interface. Characteristics of the electrodes measured in saline with various voltages, pulse durations, and polarities were modeled as voltage-dependent capacitances and Faradaic resistances. The resulting mathematical model of the circuit yielded dynamics of the electric current generated by the photovoltaic pixels illuminated by pulsed light. Voltages measured in saline with a pipette electrode above the pixel closely matched results of the model. Using the circuit model, our pixel design was optimized for maximum charge injection under various lighting conditions and for different stimulation thresholds. To speed discharge of the electrodes between the pulses of light, a shunt resistor was introduced and optimized for high frequency stimulation.

  14. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervino, Laura I; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B

    2009-01-01

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  15. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervino, Laura I; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Diego, 3855 Health Sciences Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037-0843 (United States)], E-mail: sbjiang@ucsd.edu

    2009-11-21

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p < 0.001 for reproducibility, p < 0.01 for stability). Significant changes (>2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  16. Old-fashioned charm and newfangled electronics make today's oil scouts formidable figures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, A.

    1999-01-01

    A profile of oil scouting, a secretive trade within the petroleum industry, was presented. Scouting began as early as 1949 when, in a fiercely competitive industry, a scout had to gain any information anyway he could regarding a competitor's drilling activity. Scouts were particularly useful when the industry was new because it was profitable to pay a field scout to watch a competitor's well from a hilltop with binoculars. If a scout informed their company that a given lease looked promising, the company would snap up that lease and the scout earned his wages many times over. Today's oil scout is more likely to be an independent consultant than a company employee. Their equipment ranges from devices such as parabolic microphones, wireless transmitters, night vision goggles, de-bugging devices, tools for listening through solid objects, and cell phone monitors. Acquired information can be invaluable and can prevent companies from making expensive mistakes, particularly in take-over situations. Estimates range from 100 to 150 independent scouts in Alberta. 2 figs

  17. Risk communication concerning welding fumes for the primary preventive care of welding apprentices in southern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cezar-Vaz, Marta Regina; Bonow, Clarice Alves; Vaz, Joana Cezar

    2015-01-19

    This study's aim was to assess the perceptions of welding apprentices concerning welding fumes being associated with respiratory and cardiovascular disorders and assess the implementation of risk communication as a primary prevention tool in the welding training process. This quasi-experimental, non-randomized study with before-and-after design was conducted with 84 welding apprentices in Southern Brazil. Poisson Regression analysis was used. Relative Risk was the measure used with a 95% confidence interval and 5% (p ≤ 0.05) significance level. Significant association was found between perceptions of worsened symptoms of respiratory disorders caused by welding fumes and educational level (p = 0.049), the use of goggles to protect against ultraviolet rays (p = 0.023), and access to services in private health facilities without insurance coverage (p = 0.001). Apprentices younger than 25 years old were 4.9 times more likely to perceive worsened cardiovascular symptoms caused by welding fumes after risk communication (RR = 4.91; CI 95%: 1.09 to 22.2). The conclusion is that risk communication as a primary preventive measure in continuing education processes implemented among apprentices, who are future welders, was efficacious. Thus, this study confirms that risk communication can be implemented as a primary prevention tool in welding apprenticeships.

  18. A CASE OF SELF-INDUCED ACUTE HYDROPS IN A PATIENT WITH IMPULSE CONTROL DISORDER ASSOCIATED WITH COMPULSIVE EYE TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bindu Madhavi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE To describe acute hydrops in a patient with impulse control disorder (not otherwise specified secondary to self-induced repetitive eye trauma. METHODS A 22-year-old male patient was referred from a psychiatrist with a diagnosis of impulse control disorder not otherwise specified (compulsive impulse self-mutilating behaviour for opacity and watering of both eyes (left eye more than right eye. Left eye showed features of acute hydrops with Descemet’s tear and right eye showed corneal opacity with Descemet’s tear (status post hydrops. RESULT The patient was prescribed cycloplegics, hypertonic saline for left eye and was advised against scratching the eye and was given protective goggles and was told for close followup in conjunction with psychiatric management. CONCLUSION Impulse control disorders are relatively common psychiatric conditions, yet are poorly understood by clinicians, patients suffering from the disorder and public. And hence identification of this disorder and close observation of patient allows for avoiding complications such as progression of hydrops, perforation and infection.

  19. Positive-Buoyancy Rover for Under Ice Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichty, John M.; Klesh, Andrew T.; Berisford, Daniel F.; Matthews, Jaret B.; Hand, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    A buoyant rover has been developed to traverse the underside of ice-covered lakes and seas. The rover operates at the ice/water interface and permits direct observation and measurement of processes affecting freeze- over and thaw events in lake and marine environments. Operating along the 2- D ice-water interface simplifies many aspects of underwater exploration, especially when compared to submersibles, which have difficulty in station-keeping and precision mobility. The buoyant rover consists of an all aluminum body with two aluminum sawtooth wheels. The two independent body segments are sandwiched between four actuators that permit isolation of wheel movement from movement of the central tether spool. For normal operations, the wheels move while the tether spool feeds out line and the cameras on each segment maintain a user-controlled fixed position. Typically one camera targets the ice/water interface and one camera looks down to the lake floor to identify seep sources. Each wheel can be operated independently for precision turning and adjustments. The rover is controlled by a touch- tablet interface and wireless goggles enable real-time viewing of video streamed from the rover cameras. The buoyant rover was successfully deployed and tested during an October 2012 field campaign to investigate methane trapped in ice in lakes along the North Slope of Alaska.

  20. 360-degree videos: a new visualization technique for astrophysical simulations, applied to the Galactic Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    360-degree videos are a new type of movie that renders over all 4π steradian. Video sharing sites such as YouTube now allow this unique content to be shared via virtual reality (VR) goggles, hand-held smartphones/tablets, and computers. Creating 360-degree videos from astrophysical simulations not only provide a new way to view these simulations due to their immersive nature, but also yield engaging content for outreach to the public. We present our 360-degree video of an astrophysical simulation of the Galactic center: a hydrodynamics calculation of the colliding and accreting winds of the 30 Wolf-Rayet stars orbiting within the central parsec. Viewing the movie, which renders column density, from the location of the supermassive black hole gives a unique and immersive perspective of the shocked wind material inspiraling and tidally stretching as it plummets toward the black hole. We also describe how to create such movies, discuss what type of content does and does not look appealing in 360-degree format, and briefly comment on what new science can be extracted from astrophysical simulations using 360-degree videos.

  1. Spectral response variation of a negative-electron-affinity photocathode in the preparation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lei; Du Yujie; Chang Benkang; Yunsheng Qian

    2006-01-01

    In order to research the spectral response variation of a negative electron affinity (NEA) photocathode in the preparation process, we have done two experiments on a transmission-type GaAs photocathode.First, an automatic spectral response recording system is described, which is used to take spectral response curves during the activation procedure of the photocathode. By this system, the spectral response curves of a GaAs:Cs-Ophotocathode measured in situ are presented. Then, after the cathode is sealed with a microchannel plate and a fluorescence screen into the image tube, we measure the spectral response of the tube by another measurement instrument. By way of comparing and analyzing these curves, we can find the typical variation in spectral-responses.The reasons for the variation are discussed. Based on these curves, spectral matching factors of a GaAs cathode for green vegetation and rough concrete are calculated. The visual ranges of night-vision goggles under specific circumstances are estimated. The results show that the spectral response of the NEA photocathode degraded in the sealing process, especially at long wavelengths. The variation has also influenced the whole performance of the intensifier tube

  2. Risk exposures for human ornithosis in a poultry processing plant modified by use of personal protective equipment: an analytical outbreak study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, C J; Sillis, M; Fearne, V; Pezzoli, L; Beasley, G; Bracebridge, S; Reacher, M; Nair, P

    2013-09-01

    Ornithosis outbreaks in poultry processing plants are well-described, but evidence for preventive measures is currently lacking. This study describes a case-control study into an outbreak of ornithosis at a poultry processing plant in the East of England, identified following three employees being admitted to hospital. Workers at the affected plant were recruited via their employer, with exposures assessed using a self-completed questionnaire. Cases were ascertained using serological methods or direct antigen detection in sputum. 63/225 (28%) staff participated, with 10% of participants showing evidence of recent infection. Exposure to the killing/defeathering and automated evisceration areas, and contact with viscera or blood were the main risk factors for infection. Personal protective equipment (goggles and FFP3 masks) reduced the effect of exposure to risk areas and to self-contamination with potentially infectious material. Our study provides some evidence of effectiveness for respiratory protective equipment in poultry processing plants where there is a known and current risk of ornithosis. Further studies are required to confirm this tentative finding, but in the meantime respiratory protective equipment is recommended as a precautionary measure in plants where outbreaks of ornithosis occur.

  3. Potential risk of viral transmission from flying foxes to domestic animals and humans on the southern coast of West Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basri, Chaerul; Arifin, Eko Muhammad Zainal; Takemae, Hitoshi; Hengjan, Yupadee; Iida, Keisuke; Sudarnika, Etih; Zahid, Abdul; Soejoedono, Retno Damayanti; Susetya, Heru; Sumiarto, Bambang; Kobayashi, Ryosuke; Agungpriyono, Srihadi; Hondo, Eiichi

    2017-09-29

    Flying foxes have been considered to be involved in the transmission of serious infectious diseases to humans. Using questionnaires, we aimed to determine the direct and/or indirect contacts of flying foxes in an Indonesian nature conservation area with domestic animals and humans living in the surrounding area. We surveyed 150 residents of 10 villages in West Java. Villages were classified into 3 groups: inside and/or within 1 km from the outer border of the conservation area and 1-5 km or 5-10 km away from the reserve's outer border. Data were collected by direct interview using a structured questionnaire consisting of the respondent characteristics (age, sex and occupation); histories of contacts between flying foxes and humans, dogs and other domestic animals; and knowledge about infectious diseases, mainly rabies, in flying foxes. We found that flying foxes from the nature conservation area often enter residential areas at night to look for food, especially during the fruit season. In these residential areas, flying foxes had direct contacts with humans and a few contacts with domestic animals, especially dogs. People who encounter flying foxes seldom used personal protective equipment, such as leather gloves, goggles and caps. The residents living around the conservation area mostly had poor knowledge about flying foxes and disease transmission. This situation shows that the population in this region is at a quite high risk for contracting infectious diseases from flying foxes.

  4. PixonVision real-time video processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puetter, R. C.; Hier, R. G.

    2007-09-01

    PixonImaging LLC and DigiVision, Inc. have developed a real-time video processor, the PixonVision PV-200, based on the patented Pixon method for image deblurring and denoising, and DigiVision's spatially adaptive contrast enhancement processor, the DV1000. The PV-200 can process NTSC and PAL video in real time with a latency of 1 field (1/60 th of a second), remove the effects of aerosol scattering from haze, mist, smoke, and dust, improve spatial resolution by up to 2x, decrease noise by up to 6x, and increase local contrast by up to 8x. A newer version of the processor, the PV-300, is now in prototype form and can handle high definition video. Both the PV-200 and PV-300 are FPGA-based processors, which could be spun into ASICs if desired. Obvious applications of these processors include applications in the DOD (tanks, aircraft, and ships), homeland security, intelligence, surveillance, and law enforcement. If developed into an ASIC, these processors will be suitable for a variety of portable applications, including gun sights, night vision goggles, binoculars, and guided munitions. This paper presents a variety of examples of PV-200 processing, including examples appropriate to border security, battlefield applications, port security, and surveillance from unmanned aerial vehicles.

  5. Ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Valerie E; Garcìa, Hector D; Monds, Kathryn; Cooper, Bonnie L; James, John T

    2012-07-20

    Dust exposure is a well-known occupational hazard for terrestrial workers and astronauts alike and will continue to be a concern as humankind pursues exploration and habitation of objects beyond Earth. Humankind's limited exploration experience with the Apollo Program indicates that exposure to dust will be unavoidable. Therefore, NASA must assess potential toxicity and recommend appropriate mitigation measures to ensure that explorers are adequately protected. Visual acuity is critical during exploration activities and operations aboard spacecraft. Therefore, the present research was performed to ascertain the ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust. Small (mean particle diameter = 2.9 ± 1.0 μm), reactive lunar dust particles were produced by grinding bulk dust under ultrapure nitrogen conditions. Chemical reactivity and cytotoxicity testing were performed using the commercially available EpiOcularTM assay. Subsequent in vivo Draize testing utilized a larger size fraction of unground lunar dust that is more relevant to ocular exposures (particles lunar dust was minimally irritating. Minor irritation of the upper eyelids was noted at the 1-hour observation point, but these effects resolved within 24 hours. In addition, no corneal scratching was observed using fluorescein stain. Low-titanium mare lunar dust is minimally irritating to the eyes and is considered a nuisance dust for ocular exposure. No special precautions are recommended to protect against ocular exposures, but fully shielded goggles may be used if dust becomes a nuisance.

  6. Virtual reality visual feedback for hand-controlled scanning probe microscopy manipulation of single molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Leinen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Controlled manipulation of single molecules is an important step towards the fabrication of single molecule devices and nanoscale molecular machines. Currently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM is the only technique that facilitates direct imaging and manipulations of nanometer-sized molecular compounds on surfaces. The technique of hand-controlled manipulation (HCM introduced recently in Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1926–1932 simplifies the identification of successful manipulation protocols in situations when the interaction pattern of the manipulated molecule with its environment is not fully known. Here we present a further technical development that substantially improves the effectiveness of HCM. By adding Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles to our HCM set-up we provide the experimentalist with 3D visual feedback that displays the currently executed trajectory and the position of the SPM tip during manipulation in real time, while simultaneously plotting the experimentally measured frequency shift (Δf of the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM tuning fork sensor as well as the magnitude of the electric current (I flowing between the tip and the surface. The advantages of the set-up are demonstrated by applying it to the model problem of the extraction of an individual PTCDA molecule from its hydrogen-bonded monolayer grown on Ag(111 surface.

  7. Plasma-Induced, Self-Masking, One-Step Approach to an Ultrabroadband Antireflective and Superhydrophilic Subwavelength Nanostructured Fused Silica Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xin; Shao, Ting; Sun, Laixi; Wu, Jingjun; Wang, Fengrui; He, Junhui; Jiang, Xiaodong; Wu, Wei-Dong; Zheng, Wanguo

    2018-04-25

    In this work, antireflective and superhydrophilic subwavelength nanostructured fused silica surfaces have been created by one-step, self-masking reactive ion etching (RIE). Bare fused silica substrates with no mask were placed in a RIE vacuum chamber, and then nanoscale fluorocarbon masks and subwavelength nanostructures (SWSs) automatically formed on these substrate after the appropriate RIE plasma process. The mechanism of plasma-induced self-masking SWS has been proposed in this paper. Plasma parameter effects on the morphology of SWS have been investigated to achieve perfect nanocone-like SWS for excellent antireflection, including process time, reactive gas, and pressure of the chamber. Optical properties, i.e., antireflection and optical scattering, were simulated by the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. Calculated data agree well with the experiment results. The optimized SWS show ultrabroadband antireflective property (up to 99% from 500 to 1360 nm). An excellent improvement of transmission was achieved for the deep-ultraviolet (DUV) range. The proposed low-cost, highly efficient, and maskless method was applied to achieve ultrabroadband antireflective and superhydrophilic SWSs on a 100 mm optical window, which promises great potential for applications in the automotive industry, goggles, and optical devices.

  8. Dichoptic training improves contrast sensitivity in adults with amblyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinrong; Spiegel, Daniel P; Hess, Robert F; Chen, Zidong; Chan, Lily Y L; Deng, Daming; Yu, Minbin; Thompson, Benjamin

    2015-09-01

    Dichoptic training is designed to promote binocular vision in patients with amblyopia. Initial studies have found that the training effects transfer to both binocular (stereopsis) and monocular (recognition acuity) visual functions. The aim of this study was to assess whether dichoptic training effects also transfer to contrast sensitivity (CS) in adults with amblyopia. We analyzed CS data from 30 adults who had taken part in one of two previous dichoptic training studies and assessed whether the changes in CS exceeded the 95% confidence intervals for change based on test-retest data from a separate group of observers with amblyopia. CS was measured using Gabor patches (0.5, 3 and 10cpd) before and after 10days of dichoptic training. Training was delivered using a dichoptic video game viewed through video goggles (n=15) or on an iPod touch equipped with a lenticular overlay screen (n=15). In the iPod touch study, training was combined with anodal transcranial direct current stimulation of the visual cortex. We found that dichoptic training significantly improved CS across all spatial frequencies tested for both groups. These results suggest that dichoptic training modifies the sensitivity of the neural systems that underpin monocular CS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel Smart Glove Technology as a Biomechanical Monitoring Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan O’FLYNN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Developments in Virtual Reality (VR technology and its overall market have been occurring since the 1960s when Ivan Sutherland created the world’s first tracked head-mounted display (HMD – a goggle type head gear. In society today, consumers are expecting a more immersive experience and associated tools to bridge the cyber-physical divide. This paper presents the development of a next generation smart glove microsystem to facilitate Human Computer Interaction through the integration of sensors, processors and wireless technology. The objective of the glove is to measure the range of hand joint movements, in real time and empirically in a quantitative manner. This includes accurate measurement of flexion, extension, adduction and abduction of the metacarpophalangeal (MCP, Proximal interphalangeal (PIP and Distal interphalangeal (DIP joints of the fingers and thumb in degrees, together with thumb-index web space movement. This system enables full real-time monitoring of complex hand movements. Commercially available gloves are not fitted with sufficient sensors for full data capture, and require calibration for each glove wearer. Unlike these current state-of-the-art data gloves, the UU / Tyndall Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU glove uses a combination of novel stretchable substrate material and 9 degree of freedom (DOF inertial sensors in conjunction with complex data analytics to detect joint movement. Our novel IMU data glove requires minimal calibration and is therefore particularly suited to multiple application domains such as Human Computer interfacing, Virtual reality, the healthcare environment..

  10. Pesticide Application among Farmers in the Catchment of Ashaiman Irrigation Scheme of Ghana: Health Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Memuna M. Mattah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pesticide use in modern day agriculture has increased tremendously. Pesticides are used to control pests and weeds, as well as protect crops from postharvest losses; however, their effects on humans and the environment cannot be overstated. This study examined pesticide acquisition, handling, and use among 120 farmers within the catchment of a small urban irrigation scheme. Also, in-depth interviews and focus group discussions were conducted among selected farmers through which further data was collected to augment that of the survey. Twelve types of pesticides, including herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides, were found in use in the study areas. Three main sources of information about pesticides were identified, 43.3% from extension officers, 39.2% from agrochemical dealers, and 10% from colleague farmers. Seventy-five percent (75% of the respondents purchased the pesticides from agrochemical shops. Out of 74 farmers who were observed spraying pesticides on their farms, only 25.7% wore dresses that covered their whole body but without goggles. About sixty-seven percent (66.7% of the farmers whose chemical got finished left the containers on their farms or threw them into the bushes around. The frequency of application was influenced by affordability and size of farm, among others. The study recommended that training of farmers on pesticide handling and use should be intensified.

  11. Compensatory Postural Adjustments in an Oculus Virtual Reality Environment and the Risk of Falling in Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel F. Gago

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Alzheimer's disease (AD patients have an impaired ability to quickly reweight central sensory dependence in response to unexpected body perturbations. Herein, we aim to study provoked compensatory postural adjustments (CPAs in a conflicting sensory paradigm with unpredictable visual displacements using virtual reality goggles. Methods: We used kinematic time-frequency analyses of two frequency bands: a low-frequency band (LB; 0.3-1.5 Hz; mechanical strategy and a high-frequency band (HB; 1.5-3.5 Hz; cognitive strategy. We enrolled 19 healthy subjects (controls and 21 AD patients, divided according to their previous history of falls. Results: The AD faller group presented higher-power LB CPAs, reflecting their worse inherent postural stability. The AD patients had a time lag in their HB CPA reaction. Conclusion: The slower reaction by CPA in AD may be a reflection of different cognitive resources including body schema self-perception, visual motion, depth perception, or a different state of fear and/or anxiety.

  12. A compact bio-inspired visible/NIR imager for image-guided surgery (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shengkui; Garcia, Missael; Edmiston, Chris; York, Timothy; Marinov, Radoslav; Mondal, Suman B.; Zhu, Nan; Sudlow, Gail P.; Akers, Walter J.; Margenthaler, Julie A.; Liang, Rongguang; Pepino, Marta; Achilefu, Samuel; Gruev, Viktor

    2016-03-01

    Inspired by the visual system of the morpho butterfly, we have designed, fabricated, tested and clinically translated an ultra-sensitive, light weight and compact imaging sensor capable of simultaneously capturing near infrared (NIR) and visible spectrum information. The visual system of the morpho butterfly combines photosensitive cells with spectral filters at the receptor level. The spectral filters are realized by alternating layers of high and low dielectric constant, such as air and cytoplasm. We have successfully mimicked this concept by integrating pixelated spectral filters, realized by alternating silicon dioxide and silicon nitrate layers, with an array of CCD detectors. There are four different types of pixelated spectral filters in the imaging plane: red, green, blue and NIR. The high optical density (OD) of all spectral filters (OD>4) allow for efficient rejections of photons from unwanted bands. The single imaging chip weighs 20 grams with form factor of 5mm by 5mm. The imaging camera is integrated with a goggle display system. A tumor targeted agent, LS301, is used to identify all spontaneous tumors in a transgenic PyMT murine model of breast cancer. The imaging system achieved sensitivity of 98% and selectivity of 95%. We also used our imaging sensor to locate sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in patients with breast cancer using indocyanine green tracer. The surgeon was able to identify 100% of SLNs when using our bio-inspired imaging system, compared to 93% when using information from the lymphotropic dye and 96% when using information from the radioactive tracer.

  13. Designing a wearable navigation system for image-guided cancer resection surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Pengfei; Ding, Houzhu; Wang, Jinkun; Liu, Peng; Ling, Qiang; Chen, Jiayu; Xu, Junbin; Zhang, Shiwu; Xu, Ronald

    2014-11-01

    A wearable surgical navigation system is developed for intraoperative imaging of surgical margin in cancer resection surgery. The system consists of an excitation light source, a monochromatic CCD camera, a host computer, and a wearable headset unit in either of the following two modes: head-mounted display (HMD) and Google glass. In the HMD mode, a CMOS camera is installed on a personal cinema system to capture the surgical scene in real-time and transmit the image to the host computer through a USB port. In the Google glass mode, a wireless connection is established between the glass and the host computer for image acquisition and data transport tasks. A software program is written in Python to call OpenCV functions for image calibration, co-registration, fusion, and display with augmented reality. The imaging performance of the surgical navigation system is characterized in a tumor simulating phantom. Image-guided surgical resection is demonstrated in an ex vivo tissue model. Surgical margins identified by the wearable navigation system are co-incident with those acquired by a standard small animal imaging system, indicating the technical feasibility for intraoperative surgical margin detection. The proposed surgical navigation system combines the sensitivity and specificity of a fluorescence imaging system and the mobility of a wearable goggle. It can be potentially used by a surgeon to identify the residual tumor foci and reduce the risk of recurrent diseases without interfering with the regular resection procedure.

  14. Visual and flight performance recovery after PRK or LASIK in helicopter pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Pol, Corina; Greig, Joanna L; Estrada, Art; Bissette, Gina M; Bower, Kraig S

    2007-06-01

    Refractive surgery, specifically photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK), is becoming more accepted in the military environment. Determination of the impact on visual performance in the more demanding aviation environment was the impetus for this study. A prospective evaluation of 20 Black Hawk pilots pre-surgically and at 1 wk, 1 mo, and 6 mo postsurgery was conducted to assess both PRK and LASIK visual and flight performance outcomes on the return of aviators to duty. Of 20 pilots, 19 returned to flight status at 1 mo after surgery; 1 PRK subject was delayed due to corneal haze and subjective visual symptoms. Improvements were seen under simulator night and night vision goggle flight after LASIK; no significant changes in flight performance were measured in the aircraft. Results indicated a significantly faster recovery of all visual performance outcomes 1 wk after LASIK vs. PRK, with no difference between procedures at 1 and 6 mo. Low contrast acuity and contrast sensitivity only weakly correlated to flight performance in the early post-operative period. Overall flight performance assessed in this study after PRK and LASIK was stable or improved from baseline, indicating a resilience of performance despite measured decrements in visual performance, especially in PRK. More visually demanding flight tasks may be impacted by subtle changes in visual performance. Contrast tests are more sensitive to the effects of refractive surgical intervention and may prove to be a better indicator of visual recovery for return to flight status.

  15. Sounds of space: listening to the Sun-Earth connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, N.; Mendez, B.; Luhmann, J.; Sircar, I.

    2003-04-01

    NASA's STEREO/IMPACT Mission includes an Education and Public Outreach component that seeks to offer national programs for broad audiences highlighting the mission's solar and geo-space research. In an effort to make observations of the Sun more accessible and exciting for a general audience, we look for alternative ways to represent the data. Scientists most often represent data visually in images, graphs, and movies. However, any data can also be represented as sound audible to the human ear, a process known as sonification. We will present our plans for an exciting prototype program that converts the science results of solar energetic particle data to sound. We plan to make sounds, imagery, and data available to the public through the World Wide Web where they may create their own sonifications, as well as integrate this effort to a science museum kiosk format. The kiosk station would include information on the STEREO mission and monitors showing images of the Sun from each of STEREO's two satellites. Our goal is to incorporate 3D goggles and a headset into the kiosk, allowing visitors to see the current or archived images in 3D and hear stereo sounds resulting from sonification of the corresponding data. Ultimately, we hope to collaborate with composers and create musical works inspired by these sounds and related solar images.

  16. Prevalence of peptic ulcer in Iran: Systematic review and meta-analysis methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Abangah, Ghobad; Kalvandi, Gholamreza; Tavan, Hamed; Aazami, Sanaz

    2018-01-01

    Peptic ulcer is a prevalent problem and symptoms include epigastria pain and heartburn. This study aimed at investigating the prevalence and causes of peptic ulcers in Iran using systematic review and meta-analysis. Eleven Iranian papers published from 2002 to 2016 are selected using valid keywords in the SID, Goggle scholar, PubMed and Elsevier databases. Results of studies pooled using random effects model in meta-analysis. The heterogeneity of the sample was checked using Q test and I 2 index. Total sample size in this study consist of 1335 individuals with peptic ulcer (121 samples per article). The prevalence of peptic ulcers was estimated 34% (95% CI= 0.25 - 0.43). The prevalence of peptic ulcers was 30% and 60% in woman and man respectively. The highest environmental factor (cigarette) has been addressed in 30% (95% CI= 0.23-0.37) of patients. The prevalence of Helicobacter pylori was estimated in 62% (95% CI= 0.49-0.75) of patients. The results of this study show that prevalence of peptic ulcers in Iran (34%) is higher that worldwide rate (6% to 15%). There was an increasing trend in the prevalence of peptic ulcer over a decade from 2002 to 2016.

  17. Virtual world for helping teens practice assertiveness skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemire, Kenneth; Beil, Joshua; Swan, Ronald W.

    1999-05-01

    Smoking is on the rise among adolescents. This pilot project combined the well-documented benefits of Life Skills Training (LST) with the unique multisensory, 3D qualities of virtual environment (VE) technology to address some of the disadvantages of traditional prevention programs by engaging teens better, presenting information more persuasively, and making prevention programs continuously available in computer labs. In an eight-week pilot study, 45 seventh- grade students were randomly assigned to LST, VE, or non- intervention control groups. The VE system included goggles, synthesized speech, head and hand trackers, hand-held controller, and speech recognition. Questionnaires measured participants' smoking knowledge and behavior,a participants' reports on the usability of the VE system, and reports of simulator sickness symptoms. Structured interviews with randomly selected participants from each group revealed more detailed information. Data indicated the VE group retained more information and had more positive experiences learning about dangers of smoking and assertiveness skills than did the LST group. Usability data showed ease of use and learning of the VE system, with no significant symptoms of simulator sickness. These data indicated that this VE application is a promising tool for keeping teens healthy.

  18. The Future of Radiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Margulis

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been my good fortune to live and practice radiology during a long period of momentous change – to see the transformation of the discipline from a supportive service into a mainstream, essential branch of clinical medicine. I remember wearing red goggles to adapt my vision before performing fluoroscopy; observing the horrible, now thankfully obsolete, practice of ventriculography, which was considered advanced neuroradiology; and performing other, now rarely prescribed procedures, such as double-contrast barium enemas and intravenous pyelography. Witnessing the beginnings of interventional radiology, I suggested its name in an editorial. I also had the good fortune to see the introduction of computed tomography (CT and a technology first known as nuclear magnetic resonance imaging. Together with fellow members of a committee of the American College of Radiology and editors of prestigious radiological journals, I took part in changing the name of the latter modality to MRI, freeing it from threatening implications. Looking back on these experiences, one lesson stands out above all: Innovation and transformation never cease. Looking forward, it is clear that radiology, along with the rest of medicine, is now undergoing further momentous changes that will affect the future of all those already practicing as well as those yet to start their careers.

  19. Exposure to and precautions for blood and body fluids among workers in the funeral home franchises of Fort Worth, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwanyanwu, O C; Tabasuri, T H; Harris, G R

    1989-08-01

    In 1982 the Centers for Disease Control published a set of recommendations and measures to protect persons working in health care settings or performing mortician services from possible exposure to the human immunodeficiency virus. This study of a number of funeral homes in the Fort Worth area was designed to determine the level of exposure of funeral home workers to blood and other body fluids and also to assess existing protective measures and practices in the industry. Workers in 22 funeral home franchises were surveyed with a predesigned questionnaire. Eighty-five responses from 20 of the 22 establishments were received. All 85 respondents admitted exposure of varying degrees to blood and body fluids. Sixty persons (70%) admitted heavy exposure, that is, frequent splashes. Analysis of the responses showed that 81 of 85 (95.3%) persons consistently wore gloves while performing tasks that might expose them to blood or other body fluids. Of the 60 persons who were heavily exposed, 43 wore long-sleeved gowns, 27 wore waterproof aprons, 17 surgical masks, and 15 goggles. The study further revealed that 52.9% (45/85) of the respondents had sustained accidental cuts or puncture wounds on the job. In light of these findings it is important to target educational efforts to persons in this industry to help them minimize their risks of infection with blood and body fluid borne infections.

  20. Effects of awareness interventions on children's attitudes toward peers with a visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Raul; López, Víctor; Jiménez, Mario; García-Calvo, Tomás; Hutzler, Yeshayahu

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effect of two awareness programs (6-day vs. 1-day programs) on children's attitudes toward peers with a visual impairment. Three hundred and forty-four Spanish physical education students (164 girls and 180 boys) aged 10-15 years, took part in the study. A modified version of the Attitudes Toward Disability Questionnaire (ATDQ) was used, which includes three sub-scales: (i) cognitive perceptions, (ii) emotional perception, and (iii) behavioral readiness to interact with children with disabilities. The questionnaire was filled out during the regular physical education class before and immediately after the awareness activity. The 6-day didactical unit included a lecture on visual impairments and a video describing visual impairments and the game of 5-a-side soccer (first lesson), sensibilization activities toward visual impairment (second and third lessons), training and competitive 5-a-side soccer tasks using blindfolded goggles (fourth and fifth lessons), and a sport show and chat with soccer players with a visual impairment (sixth lesson). The 1-day awareness unit only included the final session of the didactical activity. Repeated measures analysis of variance revealed significant time effects in the cognitive, emotional, and behavioral subscales. Sex also was found to demonstrate significant effects, in which women showed more favorable results than men. A time-by-group intervention effect was only demonstrated in the cognitive sub-scale, and the 6-day didactic intervention was more effective than the 1-day awareness unit.

  1. Virtual reality boosts performance at AREVA Projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernasconi, F.

    2017-01-01

    AREVA Projects is one of the 6 business units of New AREVA and it is dedicated to engineering works in a vast fan of activities from mining to waste management via uranium chemistry and nuclear fuel recycling. AREVA projects has opted for innovation to improve performance. Since 2012 virtual reality has been used through the creation of a room equipped with a high-definition screen and stereoscopic goggles. At the beginning virtual reality was used to test and validate procedures for handling equipment thanks to a dynamical digital simulation of this equipment. Now virtual reality is massively used to validate the design phase of projects without having to fabricate a physical mock-up which saves time. The next step in the use of virtual reality is the implementation of a new version of devices like helmets, gloves... that will allow a better interaction with the virtual world. The continuously increasing of computer power is always pushing back the limits of what is possible in virtual reality. (A.C.)

  2. Smartphone Applications for Amblyopia Treatment: A Review of Current Apps and Professional Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paudel, Nabin

    2018-01-18

    The objective of this study was to review games for amblyopia (lazy eye) that are commercially available in mobile applications (apps) stores and assess the involvement of eye care professionals in their development. The Google play store and the Apple iTunes store were searched in July 2017 and updated in September 2017 for amblyopia games using the terms amblyopia, lazy eye, amblyopia therapy, lazy eye therapy, lazy eye exercises, amblyopia exercises, lazy eye games, and amblyopia games. General ophthalmology or optometry apps and apps in languages other than English were excluded. A total of 42 games were identified, 12 Android only (28%), 20 iOS only (48%), and 10 (24%) both Android and iOS. Most of the games were available under the medical category (60%). Most of the games were released in 2015. The price of the games ranged from $0.00 to $32.00 (USD). Nearly half of the games (45%) were to be played binocularly either using red-green goggles (38%) or a virtual reality set (7%). Only 7% of the games had explicitly documented the involvement of eye care professionals during game development. Only one game (app) was developed in collaboration with a research group and a children's hospital. This study identified that most of the currently available games do not have eye care professional input. An establishment of the quality assurance by a body of qualified eye care professionals could enhance the confidence of patients and clinicians using the game.

  3. Exposure to air pollution and self-reported effects on Chinese students: A case study of 13 megacities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajper, Sohail Ahmed; Ullah, Sana; Li, Zhongqiu

    2018-01-01

    Air pollution causes severe physical and psychological health complications. Considering China's continuously-deteriorating air quality, this study aimed to assess the self-reported effects of air pollution on the behavior and physical health of the students of 13 densely populated cities, and their awareness, practices, and perception of air pollution and its associated public health risks. A detailed, closed-ended questionnaire was administered to 2100 students from 54 universities and schools across China. The questionnaire, which had 24 questions, was categorized into four sections. The first two sections were focused on air pollution-associated behavior and psychology, and physical effects; while the final two sections focused on the subjects' awareness and perceptions, and practices and concerns about air pollution. The respondents reported that long-term exposure to air pollution had significantly affected their psychology and behavior, as well as their physical health. The respondents were aware of the different adverse impacts of air pollution (respiratory infections, allergies, and cardiovascular problems), and hence had adopted different preventive measures, such as the use of respiratory masks and glasses or goggles, regularly drinking water, and consuming rich foods. It was concluded that air pollution and haze had negative physical and psychological effects on the respondents, which led to severe changes in behavior. Proper management, future planning, and implementing strict environmental laws are suggested before this problem worsens and becomes life-threatening.

  4. Anne Fine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Gaydon

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available An interview with Anne Fine with an introduction and aside on the role of children’s literature in our lives and development, and our adult perceptions of the suitability of childhood reading material. Since graduating from Warwick in 1968 with a BA in Politics and History, Anne Fine has written over fifty books for children and eight for adults, won the Carnegie Medal twice (for Goggle-Eyes in 1989 and Flour Babies in 1992, been a highly commended runner-up three times (for Bill’s New Frock in 1989, The Tulip Touch in 1996, and Up on Cloud Nine in 2002, been shortlisted for the Hans Christian Andersen Award (the highest recognition available to a writer or illustrator of children’s books, 1998, undertaken the positon of Children’s Laureate (2001-2003, and been awarded an OBE for her services to literature (2003. Warwick presented Fine with an Honorary Doctorate in 2005. Philip Gaydon’s interview with Anne Fine was recorded as part of the ‘Voices of the University’ oral history project, co-ordinated by Warwick’s Institute of Advanced Study.

  5. [Effective Techniques to Reduce Radiation Exposure to Medical Staff during Assist of X-ray Computed Tomography Examination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyajima, Ryuichi; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Miyachi, Yusuke; Tateishi, Satoshi; Uno, Yoshinori; Amakawa, Kazutoshi; Ohura, Hiroki; Orita, Shinichi

    2018-01-01

    Medical staffs like radiological technologists, doctors, and nurses are at an increased risk of exposure to radiation while assisting the patient in a position or monitor contrast medium injection during computed tomography (CT). However, methods to protect medical staff from radiation exposure and protocols for using radiological protection equipment have not been standardized and differ among hospitals. In this study, the distribution of scattered X-rays in a CT room was measured by placing electronic personal dosimeters in locations where medical staff stands beside the CT scanner gantry while assisting the patient and the exposure dose was measured. Moreover, we evaluated non-uniform exposure and revealed effective techniques to reduce the exposure dose to medical staff during CT. The dose of the scattered X-rays was the lowest at the gantry and at the examination table during both head and abdominal CT. The dose was the highest at the trunk of the upper body of the operator corresponding to a height of 130 cm during head CT and at the head corresponding to a height of 150 cm during abdominal CT. The maximum dose to the crystalline lens was approximately 600 μSv during head CT. We found that the use of volumetric CT scanning and X-ray protective goggles, and face direction toward the gantry reduced the exposure dose, particularly to the crystalline lens, for which lower equivalent dose during CT scan has been recently recommended in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publication 118.

  6. Light resin curing devices - a hazard evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glansholm, A.

    1985-09-01

    An evaluation has been made of optical hazards to the eye from 18 specified lamps designed for curing dental composite plastic fillings. Radiation source in all of the investigated units were incandescent lamps of the tungsten metal halide type. Ultraviolet and visible radiation was measured with a calibrated EGandG 585 spectroradiometer system. Tables and diagrams of spectral radiance (Wm -2 nm -1 sr -1 ) are given. Hazard evaluation based on the ACGIH Threshold Limit Values of ultraviolet and visible radiation gave the following results: 1. Ultraviolet radiation is of no concern ( -2 UVA at 10 cm). 2. Reflexes from teeth are harmless. 3. Retinal thermal injury hazard (permanent burn damage) is diminnutive and non-existent if the equipment is handled with sense (irradiation of an unprotected eye at a distance less than 10 cm should be avoided). 4. Retinal photochemical (blue-light) injury may appear after direct viewing of the end of the fiber-optics cable. A table with safe exposure time for each apparatus is given. Proper protective goggles can eliminate the blue-light hazard. (Author)

  7. The Embodied GIS. Using Mixed Reality to explore multi-sensory archaeological landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Eve

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We are at a turning point in development and thought about multi-sensorial engagement using digital mediation. From Oculus Rift VR goggles, Google Cardboard, noise-reducing headphones, vibrating-haptic simulating gloves, smell generators and virtual treadmills, every week a new technology or software emerges that can be used to virtualise, augment or diminish our reality, across all of our senses. In many cases these technologies have been used by archaeologists or museum professionals to didactically present or reconstruct archaeological sites or artefacts. However, Mixed Reality is rarely used to actively explore or analyse archaeological sites. This article explores a number of ways that these new multi-sensory developments can be harnessed and linked to a traditional GIS database using Mixed Reality. Through the example of three different sensory applications, I will demonstrate the implementation of an embodied GIS – allowing a multi-sensorial experience of archaeological data in situ, and enabling archaeologists to explore data in new ways, encouraging new interpretations by thinking and working through the body.

  8. Holographic diffraction gratings as laser radiation protection filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pantelic, D.; Pantelic, G.

    2006-01-01

    Holographic volume diffraction gratings are used as attenuation filters, due to their selective spectral transmission. They can be tailored to reflect or transmit narrow spectral ranges by adjusting spatial frequency of Bragg grating in carefully chosen photosensitive materials, like silver-halide emulsion or di-chromated gelatin layers. If properly recorded and chemically processed, resulting gratings can significantly attenuate light at wavelengths corresponding to various laser spectral lines. Thus, they can be used as filters in laser protection goggles. We analyze the characteristics of Bragg gratings necessary to obtain high attenuation coefficients. Also, their angular selectivity is taken into account and corresponding experimental conditions are investigated. Although di-chromated gelatin seems to be almost ideal material, due to its almost 100% diffraction efficiency, environmental stability is poor (degradation under humid environment), thus making its practical usage difficult. Thus, we have analyzed alternative materials like di-chromated pullulan, which is stable under normal environmental conditions (without drop in diffraction efficiency after prolonged exposure to humidity). Pullulan is polymer (polysaccharide) of biologic origin produced by certain bacteria. If doped with chromium ions it becomes photosensitive, enabling recording of diffraction gratings with spatial frequency of more than 3000 lines/mm. Material is chemically processed by mixture of isopropyl alcohol and water. Both thick and thin layers can be produced by gravity settling. Spectral properties of resulting gratings are analyzed, showing that they can significantly attenuate laser light of particular wavelength, depending of grating period and its slant angle. (authors)

  9. Eye problems in mountain and remote areas: prevention and onsite treatment--official recommendations of the International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine ICAR MEDCOM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerton, John A; Zuljan, Igor; Agazzi, Giancelso; Boyd, Jeffrey J

    2009-01-01

    Although eyes are not frequently injured in the mountains, they are exposed to many adverse factors from the environment. This article, intended for first responders, paramedics, physicians, and mountaineers, is the consensus opinion of the International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine (ICAR-MEDCOM). Its aim is to give practical advice on the management of eye problems in mountainous and remote areas. Snow blindness and minor injuries, such as conjunctival and corneal foreign bodies, could immobilize a person and put him or her at risk of other injuries. Blunt or penetrating trauma can result in the loss of sight in the eye; this may be preventable if the injury is managed properly. In almost all cases of severe eye trauma, protecting the eye and arranging an immediate evacuation are necessary. The most common eye problems, however, are due to ultraviolet light and high altitude. People wearing contact lenses and with previous history of eye diseases are more vulnerable. Any sight-threatening eye problem or unexplained visual loss at high altitude necessitates descent. Wearing appropriate eye protection, such as sunglasses with sidepieces and goggles with polarized or photochromic lenses, could prevent most of the common eye problems in mountaineering.

  10. Efficacy of corneal eye shields in protecting patients' eyes from laser irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, S W; Dinehart, S M; Davis, I; Flock, S T

    1996-07-01

    The continuing development of new types and applications of lasers has appeared to surpass the development of specific eye protection for these lasers. There are a variety of eye shields on the market, but few are specifically designed for laser protection. Our purpose was to test a variety of eye shields by two parameters, light transmission and temperature rise, and to determine from these measurements the most protective shield for patients. We tested four plastic shields, one metal shield, and two sets of tanning goggles for temperature rise and light transmission when irradiated with a beam from a flashlamp-pumped, pulsed-dye laser. The temperature rise at the surface of the shield opposite the laser impacts was no more than 0.2 degree C in any case. White light was transmitted at significant levels through several of the shields, but yellow light transmittance was noted only through the green eye shield. Our measurements indicate that all except the green shield appeared safe from transmission of the 585-nm radiant energy. However, the optimal laser eye shield, in our opinion, would be a composite of several different shields' characteristics.

  11. Changes in the dark focus of accommodation associated with simulator sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlkes, Jennifer E.; Kennedy, Robert S.; Hettinger, Lawrence J.; Harm, Deborah L.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between the dark focus of accommodation and simulator sickness, a form of motion sickness, was examined in three experiments. In Experiment 1, dark focus was measured in 18 college students in a laboratory setting before and after they viewed a projected motion scene depicting low altitude helicopter flight. In Experiments 2 and 3, dark focus was measured in pilots (N = 16 and 23, respectively) before and after they 'flew' in moving-base helicopter flight simulators with optical infinity CRT visual systems. The results showed that individuals who experienced simulator sickness had either an inward (myopic) change in dark focus (Experiments 1 and 3) or attenuated outward shifts in dark focus (Experiment 2) relative to participants who did not get sick. These results are consonant with the hypothesis that parasympathetic activity, which may be associated with simulator sickness, should result in changes in dark focus that are in a myopic direction. Night vision goggles, virtual environments, extended periods in microgravity, and heads-up displays all produce related visual symptomatology. Changes in dark focus may occur in these conditions, as well, and should be measured.

  12. Neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring during an optic nerve schwannoma removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Juan, Daniel; Escanio Cortés, Manuel; Tena-Suck, Martha; Orozco Garduño, Adolfo Josué; López Pizano, Jesús Alejandro; Villanueva Domínguez, Jonathan; Fernández Gónzalez-Aragón, Maricarmen; Gómez-Amador, Juan Luis

    2017-10-01

    This paper reports the case of a patient with optic nerve schwannoma and the first use of neurophysiological intraoperative monitoring of visual evoked potentials during the removal of such tumor with no postoperative visual damage. Schwannomas are benign neoplasms of the peripheral nervous system arising from the neural crest-derived Schwann cells, these tumors are rarely located in the optic nerve and the treatment consists on surgical removal leading to high risk of damage to the visual pathway. Case report of a thirty-year-old woman with an optic nerve schwannoma. The patient underwent surgery for tumor removal on the left optic nerve through a left orbitozygomatic approach with intraoperative monitoring of left II and III cranial nerves. We used Nicolet Endeavour CR IOM (Carefusion, Middleton WI, USA) to performed visual evoked potentials stimulating binocularly with LED flash goggles with the patient´s eyes closed and direct epidural optic nerve stimulation delivering rostral to the tumor a rectangular current pulse. At follow up examinations 7 months later, the left eye visual acuity was 20/60; Ishihara score was 8/8 in both eyes; the right eye photomotor reflex was normal and left eye was mydriatic and arreflectic; optokinetic reflex and ocular conjugate movements were normal. In this case, the epidural direct electrical stimulation of optic nerve provided stable waveforms during optic nerve schwannoma resection without visual loss.

  13. Traumatic hyphaema: a report of 472 consecutive cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashaye, Adeyinka O

    2008-11-26

    Strategies for prevention of eye injuries require knowledge of the cause of the injuries. This study was done to determine the patient characteristics, the cause of injury, and where cases of traumatic hyphaema that necessitated admission to a tertiary hospital occurred. This may enable an appropriate intervention in the prevention of such injuries. Retrospective case analysis of 472 patients with traumatic hyphaema admitted to the University College Hospital, Ibadan between January 1997 and December 2006. The home was the single most frequent place of injury for all cases and for 75% of cases in children aged 0-10 years. Injuries that occurred at school comprised about one-fifth of cases. Sport-related injuries were uncommon. The most common activities preceding injuries were play, corporal punishment and assault. Stones, sticks and whiplash were the agents that caused traumatic hyphaema. Occupational-related hyphaema that caused injuries was mostly in farmers and artisans, few of whom used protective goggles. The majority of patients were males. Children and young adults aged school, and frequently affect children and young adolescents. Over one-third resulted in blindness in the affected eye. The focus should be on prevention of stick-related eye injuries at these locations and improving access to eye health services for patients who sustained eye injuries.

  14. Role of glutathione in immunity and inflammation in the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Ghezzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pietro GhezziBrighton and Sussex Medical School, Trafford Centre, Falmer, Brighton, UKAbstract: Reactive oxygen species and thiol antioxidants, including glutathione (GSH, regulate innate immunity at various levels. This review outlines the redox-sensitive steps of the cellular mechanisms implicated in inflammation and host defense against infection, and describes how GSH is not only important as an antioxidant but also as a signaling molecule. There is an extensive literature of the role of GSH in immunity. Most reviews are biased by an oversimplified picture where “bad” free radicals cause all sorts of diseases and “good” antioxidants protect from them and prevent oxidative stress. While this may be the case in certain fields (eg, toxicology, the role of thiols (the topic of this review in immunity certainly requires wearing scientist’s goggles and being prepared to accept a more complex picture. This review aims at describing the role of GSH in the lung in the context of immunity and inflammation. The first part summarizes the history and basic concepts of this picture. The second part focuses on GSH metabolism/levels in pathology, the third on the role of GSH in innate immunity and inflammation, and the fourth gives 4 examples describing the importance of GSH in the response to infections.Keywords: antioxidants, oxidative stress, sepsis, infection, cysteine

  15. Digital innovations for teaching and nuclear training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanjas, Y.; Schoevaerts, D.; Beliazi, L.

    2017-01-01

    The article reviews various digital tools that have been developed for nuclear training. The 'internet virtual laboratory' has been developed by the IAEA, it allows the live broadcasting through the web of experiments and practical exercises performed on the ISIS reactor located in France at Saclay. Virtual reality is booming and allows professionals to move in a nuclear facility virtually. For instance the SecureVI tool is based on 360 degrees photographs of the facility that are associated with goggles to get the immersive effect. The last generation of full-scale reactor simulators are based on 3-dimensional calculations made by the latest version of neutron transport codes and thermal-hydraulic codes. The EPR-FA3 simulator represents the control room of the Flamanville EPR, it is used for the training of reactor operators. The X1300 simulator replicates PWR operations and the SOFIA tool allows the trainees to understand how a nuclear reactor works. The CAVE tool was first developed to be used as an help to engineers and now it has been adapted to training purposes: CAVE allows a complete immersion in a nuclear facility. (A.C.)

  16. Virtual reality visual feedback for hand-controlled scanning probe microscopy manipulation of single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinen, Philipp; Green, Matthew F B; Esat, Taner; Wagner, Christian; Tautz, F Stefan; Temirov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    Controlled manipulation of single molecules is an important step towards the fabrication of single molecule devices and nanoscale molecular machines. Currently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is the only technique that facilitates direct imaging and manipulations of nanometer-sized molecular compounds on surfaces. The technique of hand-controlled manipulation (HCM) introduced recently in Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1926-1932 simplifies the identification of successful manipulation protocols in situations when the interaction pattern of the manipulated molecule with its environment is not fully known. Here we present a further technical development that substantially improves the effectiveness of HCM. By adding Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles to our HCM set-up we provide the experimentalist with 3D visual feedback that displays the currently executed trajectory and the position of the SPM tip during manipulation in real time, while simultaneously plotting the experimentally measured frequency shift (Δf) of the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) tuning fork sensor as well as the magnitude of the electric current (I) flowing between the tip and the surface. The advantages of the set-up are demonstrated by applying it to the model problem of the extraction of an individual PTCDA molecule from its hydrogen-bonded monolayer grown on Ag(111) surface.

  17. Advanced imaging techniques in pediatric body MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtier, Jesse [UCSF Benioff Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, San Francisco, CA (United States); Rao, Anil G. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology, Charleston, SC (United States); Anupindi, Sudha A. [Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    While there are many challenges specific to pediatric abdomino-pelvic MRI, many recent advances are addressing these challenges. It is therefore essential for radiologists to be familiar with the latest advances in MR imaging. Laudable efforts have also recently been implemented in many centers to improve the overall experience of pediatric patients, including the use of dedicated radiology child life specialists, MRI video goggles, and improved MR suite environments. These efforts have allowed a larger number of children to be scanned while awake, with fewer studies being done under sedation or anesthesia; this has resulted in additional challenges from patient motion and difficulties with breath-holding and tolerating longer scan times. In this review, we highlight common challenges faced in imaging the pediatric abdomen and pelvis and discuss the application of the newest techniques to address these challenges. Additionally, we highlight the newest advances in quantified imaging techniques, specifically in MR liver iron quantification. The techniques described in this review are all commercially available and can be readily implemented. (orig.)

  18. Pattern of diseases among rice farmers exposed to pesticides in the MUDA area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syarif Husin Lubis; Jamal Hisham Hashim; Noor Hassim Ismail; Salmaan Hussain Inayat Hussain

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this study was to find out the pattern of diseases among rice farmers exposed to pesticides in the Muda area, Kedah; and to identify those who suffered from these diseases so that they can be referred to the nearest clinic for treatment. A cross sectional study was conducted in August 1994 to identify the pattern of diseases among rice farmers exposed to pesticides. Cluster Random Sampling was employed and the sample size was 136 farmers. A guided questionnaire was used for assessing the usage of protective clothing, symptoms of the farmers diseases and the distribution of these symptoms. Blood obtained by finger prick was taken for cholesterol level, triglycerides, and blood glucose analysis by using the Reflotron. A medical examination was also conducted. The pattern of diseases detected among the rice farmers shows that 57.4% suffered from pterygium., 81.6% suffered contact dermatitis and 97.1% had central nervous system (CNS) symptoms. Regarding the cholesterol level, 47.1% of rice farmers were found with total cholesterol > 5.2 mmol/L and 40.0% with triglycerides > 2.3 mmol/L. The blood glucose level measured was > 6.1 mmol/L in 55.03% of rice farmers. Usage of protective equipment among rice farmers was: gloves (68.4%), boots (52.2%), goggles (40.4%), apron (38.3%) and face mask (77.2%). (Author)

  19. STANDARD PRECAUTIONS: AN ASSESSMENT OF AWARENESS AMONG HEALTH CARE PERSONNEL IN A TEACHING HOSPITAL, SOUTH INDIA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangeetha

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Standard precautions ar e crucial in the prevention and transmission of Healthcare associated infections ( HAI and transmission of blood - borne pathogens like Hepatitis B, Human Immunodeficiency Virus & Hepatitis C. They are not well u nderstood or implemented by health care practitioners. Hence this study was taken up to determine and compare knowledge, attitude of standard precautions among health care personnel at a teaching hospital, Bangalore. OBJECTIVE : To assess knowledge, attitud e, practices and compliance of Standard precautions among health care workers at a teaching hospital. METHODOLOGY : One hundred and fifty seven health care personnel participated in this study. A pretest and post test was administered to the study group. A pre - structured questionnaire on standard precautions was prepared which included knowledge, attitude and practices. RESULTS : 116 ( 73.88% nurses had knowledge about hand hygiene, but only 82 ( 52.2% nurses practiced hand hygiene before and after patient care. Knowledge about PPE measures like gloves, face mask & goggles, gowns were known to 101(64.33%, 56 ( 35.66% & 69 ( 43.94% nurses respectively. 117 ( 74.52% nurses discarded needles & sharps in correct puncture proof containers, but their correct knowled ge regarding colour coding of hospital waste segregation was comparatively less i.e. 104 ( 66.24%. 119 ( 75.79% of the nurses had practice of recapping the needles after use. CONCLUSION : There was significant improvement in the knowledge and practice of stan dard precautions in the present study after incorporating good training practices

  20. Ocular Injury in Cosmetic Laser Treatments of the Face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Amy; Phillips, Arianna; Adar, Tony; Hui, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    BACKGROUND: The eye is a vulnerable and commonly injured organ in cosmetic laser procedures of the face. Treatment of the eyelids and periorbital areas increases this risk, especially when ocular protection devices are not used or are removed during the procedure. A study has shown that injury from laser epilation of the periocular areas is one of the most common causes of litigation in cutaneous laser surgery. OBJECTIVE: The goal of this review is to determine the causes of ocular injury in cosmetic laser procedures and derive lessons on critical safety elements to prevent future injury. METHODS: We conducted a review of the current literature through a PubMed search on case reports of ocular injury in cosmetic laser treatments of the face. Twenty-one cases are examined. RESULTS: In more than 62 percent of cases, ocular protection was not used or protection was used but removed during the procedure to treat areas close to the eye. However, despite the proper use of intraocular corneal shields and wavelength-specific goggles, accidents occurred in 33 percent of cases. CONCLUSION: Ocular protection devices are essential to prevent most cases of laser-induced eye injury. Use of high fluence and long wavelength lasers increases the risk of ocular injury due to deeper penetration of the organ by radiation. Inadequate cooling between pulses also predisposes to injury by cosmetic lasers.

  1. EYE- RELATED TRAUMA AND INFECTION IN DENTISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan EKMEKÇİOĞLU

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite numerous technological and medical developments achieved in recent years, a significant amount of occupational health problems still exist in modern dentistry. The risk of eye injury is mostly attributed to the use of high-speed hand pieces and ultrasonic devices. A dental clinic may be the source of eye-related infection and injury because of mechanical, chemical, microbiological and electromagnetic irritants. Accidents may cause facial injuries that involve eyes of the clinicians, patients as well as dental assistants. Eye injuries can vary from mild irritation to blindness. The use of eye protection tools, such as protective goggles and visors, reduces the risk of eye damage or complete loss of vision while working with dangerous and floating materials. Therefore, all precautions should be taken, even when performing common procedures for which the risk expectancy is relatively low. Clinicians should be aware that they are also responsible for providing adequate protection for their assistants and patients, as well as themselves.

  2. Neck muscle strain when wearing helmet and NVG during acceleration on a trampoline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovelius, Roope; Oksa, Juha; Rintala, Harri; Huhtala, Heini; Siitonen, Simo

    2008-02-01

    The helmet-mounted equipment worn by military pilots increases the weight of the helmet system and shifts its center of gravity, increasing the loads on neck structures, especially during acceleration. The aim of this study was to determine neck muscle strain with different head-loads during trampoline-induced G loads (0 to +4 G). Under three conditions [no helmet, helmet, helmet with night vision goggles (NVG)], 14 subjects performed trampoline exercises including basic, hand-and-knee, and back bouncing. EMG activity was measured for the sternocleidomastoid (SCM), cervical erector spinae (CES), trapezoid (TRA), and thoracic erector spinae (TES) muscles. Muscle strain was determined as a percentage of maximal voluntary contraction (%MVC). For the three exercises combined, the following significant changes were found: compared to control, the helmet increased muscle strain by 18%, 28%, and 18% in the SCM, CES, and TRA, respectively; NVG produced a further increase of 11% in the SCM and 6% in the CES. During back bouncing, the helmet increased muscle strain by 14% in the SCM and 19% in the CES, and NVG further increased this strain by 14% in the SCM. Hand-and-knee bouncing loaded extensors: the helmet caused increases of 46% in the CES and 29% in the TES, while NVG produced a further 13% increase in CES activation. Helmet weight alone had a large effect on muscular workload. The additional frontal weight of the NVG caused a further increase in the activity of cervical muscles that were already subjected to high strain.

  3. Sports dentistry: a perspective for the future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Vinícius Soares

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sports Dentistry (SD acts in the prevention, maintenance and treatment of oral and facial injuries, as well as the collection and dissemination of information on dental trauma, beyond stimulus to research. Establishes as a duty for the dentist detect problems related to the athlete’s stomatognathic system. This essay is based on the provided data from the literature related to SD, including definition, practice areas and research fields. To discuss the data, six areas were categorized: shares in sports dentistry; oral health of athlete; sports-related dental implications; dental-facial trauma; face shields; and mouthguards. The analyzed data show that the SD is still an underexplored field of action by dentists, but it is expanding, despite not being recognized specialty by the Federal Council of Dentistry, but the Brazilian Academy of Sports Dentistry has been created with a mission to show the real importance of Dentistry in sport. The dentist should be part of the group of professionals associated with the athlete to perform periodic checks in order to ensure oral health which may contribute to athletes´performance. When impact occurs, however, it would be possible reduce the severity of the impact related to injuries, by using helmets, masks, goggles, face shields and mouthguard. Additionally, it is imperative that dentists, sports coaching, athletes, and professional who work with athletes be aware of the benefits of incorporating SD as an important academic and professional subject.

  4. Interocular Shift of Visual Attention Enhances Stereopsis and Visual Acuities of Anisometropic Amblyopes beyond the Critical Period of Visual Development: A Novel Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwen Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Increasing evidence shows that imbalanced suppressive drive prior to binocular combination may be the key factor in amblyopia. We described a novel binocular approach, interocular shift of visual attention (ISVA, for treatment of amblyopia in adult patients. Methods. Visual stimuli were presented anaglyphically on a computer screen. A square target resembling Landolt C had 2 openings, one in red and one in cyan color. Through blue-red goggles, each eye could only see one of the two openings. The patient was required to report the location of the opening presented to the amblyopic eye. It started at an opening size of 800 sec of arc, went up and down in 160 sec of arc step, and stopped when reaching the 5th reversals. Ten patients with anisometropic amblyopia older than age 14 (average age: 26.7 were recruited and received ISVA treatment for 6 weeks, with 2 training sessions per day. Results. Both Titmus stereopsis (z=-2.809, P=0.005 and Random-dot stereopsis (z=-2.317, P=0.018 were significantly improved. Average improvement in best corrected visual acuity (BCVA was 0.74 line (t=5.842, P<0.001. Conclusions. The ISVA treatment may be effective in treating amblyopia and restoring stereoscopic function.

  5. Microcontroller based fibre-optic visual presentation system for multisensory neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniawan, Veldri; Klemen, Jane; Chambers, Christopher D

    2011-10-30

    Presenting visual stimuli in physical 3D space during fMRI experiments carries significant technical challenges. Certain types of multisensory visuotactile experiments and visuomotor tasks require presentation of visual stimuli in peripersonal space, which cannot be accommodated by ordinary projection screens or binocular goggles. However, light points produced by a group of LEDs can be transmitted through fibre-optic cables and positioned anywhere inside the MRI scanner. Here we describe the design and implementation of a microcontroller-based programmable digital device for controlling fibre-optically transmitted LED lights from a PC. The main feature of this device is the ability to independently control the colour, brightness, and timing of each LED. Moreover, the device was designed in a modular and extensible way, which enables easy adaptation for various experimental paradigms. The device was tested and validated in three fMRI experiments involving basic visual perception, a simple colour discrimination task, and a blocked multisensory visuo-tactile task. The results revealed significant lateralized activation in occipital cortex of all participants, a reliable response in ventral occipital areas to colour stimuli elicited by the device, and strong activations in multisensory brain regions in the multisensory task. Overall, these findings confirm the suitability of this device for presenting complex fibre-optic visual and cross-modal stimuli inside the scanner. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Standard Test Method for Measuring Binocular Disparity in Transparent Parts

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the amount of binocular disparity that is induced by transparent parts such as aircraft windscreens, canopies, HUD combining glasses, visors, or goggles. This test method may be applied to parts of any size, shape, or thickness, individually or in combination, so as to determine the contribution of each transparent part to the overall binocular disparity present in the total “viewing system” being used by a human operator. 1.2 This test method represents one of several techniques that are available for measuring binocular disparity, but is the only technique that yields a quantitative figure of merit that can be related to operator visual performance. 1.3 This test method employs apparatus currently being used in the measurement of optical angular deviation under Method F 801. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not con...

  7. Health interventions for the metal working industry: which is the most cost-effective? A study from a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, A M; Villarreal, E; Nuñez, G M; Garza, M E; Briones, H; Navarro, O

    2002-05-01

    This study ranked the cost-effectiveness of health interventions in the metal working industry in a developing country. Data were based on 82 034 workers of the Northern region of Mexico. Effectiveness was measured through 'healthy life years' (HeaLYs) gained. Costs were estimated per worker according to type and appropriate inputs from selected health interventions. 'Hand' was the anatomical region that yielded the most gain of HeaLYs and amputation was the injury that yielded the most gain of HeaLYs. The most effective health intervention corresponded to training, followed by medical care, education, helmets, safety shoes, lumbar supports, safety goggles, gloves and safety aprons. In dollar terms, education presented the best cost-effectiveness ratio (US$637) and safety aprons presented the worst cost-effectiveness ratio (US$1 147 770). Training proved to be a very expensive intervention, but presented the best effectiveness outcome and the second best cost-effectiveness ratio (US$2084). Cost-effectiveness analyses in developing countries are critical. Corporations might not have the same funds and technology as those in developed countries or multinational companies.

  8. Post Disaster Assessment with Decision Support System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Florence J. Franco

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to develop an online system that would expedite the response of agencies after disaster strikes; generate a list of the kinds and volume of relief aids needed per family affected for a fair, precise and timely distribution; implement community-based ICT by remotely gathering all the necessary data needed for disaster assessment; and adhere to ISO 9126 standards. The system was designed to calculate the effects of disaster in human lives and economy. Integrated into the system were Goggle Maps, Mines and GeoSciences Bureau Hazard Maps, SMS sending features, best passable routes calculations, and decision support on the needs that has to be addressed. The system was made live at pdrrmcguimaras.herokuapp.com to allow remote data entry. The functionality and usability of the system were evaluated by 19 potential users by computing for the arithmetic Mean and Standard Deviation of the survey. The result showed that most of them strongly agreed that the system is acceptable based on these criteria. A group of IT experts also evaluated the system’s conformance to ISO 9126 standards using the same method. The result showed that majority of them strongly agreed that the system conforms to this international standard. The system is seen as a valuable tool for the Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction Management Council (PDRRMC and the National Disaster Risk Reduction Management Council (NDRRMC for it could help expedite the assessment of the effects of disasters and the formulation of response plans and strategies.

  9. Pesticides related knowledge, attitude and safety practices among small-scale vegetable farmers in lagoon wetlands, Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeola Alex Adesuyi

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available The unsafe and indiscriminate use of pesticides in wetlands for agriculture represents a major hazard to the environment and human health globally. The hazard of pesticide exposure and farmers susceptibility is due to lack of knowledge regarding its safe use, proper pesticides handling and practices. The aim of this study was to evaluate vegetable farmers’ knowledge, practices and exposure level during pesticides preparation and application in their crop production. A total of eighty one (81 vegetable farmers were identified in these wetlands. Four (4 declined the usage of pesticides because they are organic farmers. In all, seventy seven (77 vegetable farms and farmers were sampled for this study using a structured questionnaire. Data obtained were subjected to descriptive and inferential statistics. The results indicate high risks of exposure of the vegetable farmers to toxicity and health hazards to pesticides. 71.4% of the farmers agreed that pesticide use poses some potential risk to human health while 63.6% agreed that it poses risk also to the environment. The majority of the farmers (48.1% stored their pesticides in the open field. Some respondents also stored their pesticides in open shed meant just for pesticides (18.2, and locked chemical stores designated only for pesticides (14.3%. A worrying 6.5% of the farmers reported storing pesticides within their living area. Respondents with higher education levels were significantly less likely to store pesticides in their home (?2 = 24.65, p< 0.05. Over 67% of the farmers indicated using at least one PPE during handling, preparation and spraying of pesticides. Among respondents who reported using PPE, less that 11% wore all the recommended six key PPE items (coveralls, protective boots, glasses/goggles, gloves, respirator, and hat. A substantial number of respondents reported not wearing respirators/nose mask (84.6%, coveralls (59.6%, or glasses/goggles (46.1% at all. The PPE most often

  10. Tanning in solarium – knowledge, attitudes and Polish habits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Torzewska

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tanning devices are sources of UVA and UVB radiation. UV exposure can cause damage to the cornea of the eye, skin burns and even skin cancer. Appropriate use of solarium requires adequate knowledge of health effects resulting from the excessive use of sunbeds. The aim of the study was to examine knowledge, attitudes and habits in the solarium use. Material and methods. The study was based on our own questionnaire distributed among the citizens of a city located in Łódź Province. The study group consisted of 135 adults, mostly women and people with secondary and vocational education. Participants of the study were asked to answer specific questions included in the questionnaire concerning the knowledge of UV radiation, attitudes and the behaviour in the solarium. Results. 36% of the respondents were going to the solarium. 38% of the respondents weren’t going at all. Every fourth respondent used to go to the solarium in the past, however gave up this type of tanning for some reasons. Protecting goggles were used only by 18% of the respondents. 94% of the respondents never asked the service about CE certificates for the sunbeds intended for use. Conclusions. People tanning in the solarium, in comparison to those who do not use the artificial sun, enjoy better knowledge of the ultraviolet radiation. However they do not follow the requirements of the safe tanning. They are also not interested in technical conditions of the sunbeds. People who are not tanning in the solarium are more aware of health effects caused by UV radiation. Actions promoting public awareness on negative health effects of exposure to UV radiation in the solarium are needed.

  11. “Pushing the Envelope” a modeling-based approach to the development of organic, responsive architectural form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Yearley

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper tests design procedures for the development of complex, organic architectural forms. It illustrates a postgraduate student design process, implementing a development sequence based on the intelligent manipulation of architectural envelopes using a variety of existing modeling tools and emerging digital techniques. These stages of development respond to imposed spatial and environmental constraints. The tests began with full-scale modeling of small segments. The major constraints at this stage were spatial requirements and the physical characteristics of materials. The forms derived from the bending properties of prestressed green timber and the dimensions of shingle cladding. This was followed by digital 3D modeling using common commercial applications. At this stage initial models were derived from a traditional space requirement brief. The envelopes for these activities were then manipulated to respond to the spatial limitations imposed by surrounding buildings. This digital modeling process metaphorically “pushed the limits” as vertices of the envelope model were stretched and shifted to achieve a perceived “fit” between the two sets of spatial dimensions. The spatially manipulated geometry was then imported into Ecotect, an environmental analysis package. As an example, the envelope’s morphology and cladding material options on the acoustic qualities of the surrounding space were tested. The improved geometry was then imported into a Virtual Reality room, in which the spatial experience was simulated in presentations to the design team and potential occupants. This room utilized six projectors to create an immersive experience to users wearing stereoscopic goggles, and moving in a space surrounded by three large screens, creating a CAVE-like presentation space. Finally there was an attempt to complete the circle by returning from the simulated world to the physical worlds, by creating full-scale models from the digital

  12. Neck and shoulder muscle activity and posture among helicopter pilots and crew-members during military helicopter flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Mike; Lange, Britt; Chreiteh, Shadi Samir; Olsen, Henrik Baare; Nørnberg, Bo Riebeling; Boyle, Eleanor; Søgaard, Karen; Sjøgaard, Gisela

    2016-04-01

    Neck pain among helicopter pilots and crew-members is common. This study quantified the physical workload on neck and shoulder muscles using electromyography (EMG) measures during helicopter flight. Nine standardized sorties were performed, encompassing: cruising from location A to location B (AB) and performing search and rescue (SAR). SAR was performed with Night Vision Goggles (NVG), while AB was performed with (AB+NVG) and without NVG (AB-NVG). EMG was recorded for: trapezius (TRA), upper neck extensors (UNE), and sternocleido-mastoid (SCM). Maximal voluntary contractions (MVC) were performed for normalization of EMG (MVE). Neck posture of pilots and crew-members was monitored and pain intensity of neck, shoulder, and back was recorded. Mean muscle activity for UNE was ∼10% MVE and significantly higher than TRA and SCM, and SCM was significantly lower than TRA. There was no significant difference between AB-NVG and AB+NVG. Muscle activity in the UNE was significantly higher during SAR+NVG than AB-NVG. Sortie time (%) with non-neutral neck posture for SAR+NVG and AB-NVG was: 80.4%, 74.5% (flexed), 55.5%, 47.9% (rotated), 4.5%, 3.7% (lateral flexed). Neck pain intensity increased significantly from pre- (0.7±1.3) to post-sortie (1.6±1.9) for pilots (p=0.028). If sustained, UNE activity of ∼10% MVE is high, and implies a risk for neck disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Scorpion Hybrid Optical-based Inertial Tracker (HObIT) test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atac, Robert; Spink, Scott; Calloway, Tom; Foxlin, Eric

    2014-06-01

    High fidelity night-vision training has become important for many of the simulation systems being procured today. The end-users of these simulation-training systems prefer using their actual night-vision goggle (NVG) headsets. This requires that the visual display system stimulate the NVGs in a realistic way. Historically NVG stimulation was done with cathode-ray tube (CRT) projectors. However, this technology became obsolete and in recent years training simulators do NVG stimulation with laser, LCoS and DLP projectors. The LCoS and DLP projection technologies have emerged as the preferred approach for the stimulation of NVGs. Both LCoS and DLP technologies have advantages and disadvantages for stimulating NVGs. LCoS projectors can have more than 5-10 times the contrast capability of DLP projectors. The larger the difference between the projected black level and the brightest object in a scene, the better the NVG stimulation effects can be. This is an advantage of LCoS technology, especially when the proper NVG wavelengths are used. Single-chip DLP projectors, even though they have much reduced contrast compared to LCoS projectors, can use LED illuminators in a sequential red-green-blue fashion to create a projected image. It is straightforward to add an extra infrared (NVG wavelength) LED into this sequential chain of LED illumination. The content of this NVG channel can be independent of the visible scene, which allows effects to be added that can compensate for the lack of contrast inherent in a DLP device. This paper will expand on the differences between LCoS and DLP projectors for stimulating NVGs and summarize the benefits of both in night-vision simulation training systems.

  14. Gender and HIV/AIDS in Bangladesh: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joydeb Garai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The HIV/AIDS epidemic portrays a growing health threat in the world. In Bangladesh, the prevalence rate of HIV/AIDS is not yet high but it is gradually becoming a threat especially for women and young girls due to gender disparity. This systematic review was conducted to explore the gender-specific vulnerability to HIV/AIDS in Bangladesh in order to suggest to policy makers the best way for the prevention of HIV/AIDS in Bangladesh as well as in other low income countries. Methods: Peer review articles were identified using a systematic search of two databases: Pubmed and Goggle Scholar. The search was limited to studies published in English between 1998 and 2016 and included a special focus on articles addressing the gender-specific risk factors to HIV/ AIDS. Discussion and Conclusion: This paper analyzes how women and girls in marginalized position in the society fall victim to HIV/AIDS due to gender disparities and other related issues. The findings of the study indicate that women and young girls are the most vulnerable to HIV/AIDS infection among the general people. Along with biological susceptibility, other major causes of this vulnerability of women and girls are gender inequality, sexual abuse and violence, social stigma, inability to decision making power, economic dependency and men’s sexual power and privilege over women. This paper helps policy makers and invites them to take special care to reduce gender inequality before implementing any policy for the prevention of HIV/AIDS in Bangladesh as well as in low income countries.

  15. Perceptions and culture of safety among helicopter emergency medical service personnel in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesters, Adam; Grieve, Philip H; Hodgetts, Timothy J

    2016-11-01

    The use of helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) has increased significantly in the UK since 1987. To date there has been no research that addresses HEMS pilots and medical crews' own ideas on the risks that they view as inherent in their line of work and how to mitigate these risks. The aim of this survey is to describe and compare the attitudes and perceptions towards risk in HEMS operations of these staff. A questionnaire was administered electronically to a representative selection of HEMS doctors, paramedics and pilots in the UK. A number of questions were grouped into common themes, and presented as Likert scales and ranking where appropriate. Descriptive and comparative results were presented and statistically analysed. The target sample of 100 consecutive respondents was achieved. All questionnaires were entirely completed. Respondents attributed the most risk to night HEMS operations without the use of night vision goggles, commercial pressure and mechanical aircraft failure. There was no statistical difference in overall perception of safety and years of experience (p=0.58) or between professions (p=0.08). Those who had experienced a crash were more likely to believe that HEMS operations are not inherently safe (p=0.05). We have surveyed a cross-section of the HEMS operational community in the UK in order to describe their perceptions of safety and risk within their professional life. Two-thirds of respondents believed that HEMS operations were inherently safe. Those who did not seemed to be influenced by personal experience of a crash or serious incident. We support increased operational training for clinical crewmembers, an increased emphasis on incident reporting and a culture of safety, and careful attention to minimum training and equipment requirements for all HEMS missions. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. 360-degree video and X-ray modeling of the Galactic center's inner parsec

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Christopher Michael Post; Wang, Daniel; Cuadra, Jorge

    2017-08-01

    360-degree videos, which render an image over all 4pi steradian, provide a unique and immersive way to visualize astrophysical simulations. Video sharing sites such as YouTube allow these videos to be shared with the masses; they can be viewed in their 360° nature on computer screens, with smartphones, or, best of all, in virtual-reality (VR) goggles. We present the first such 360° video of an astrophysical simulation: a hydrodynamics calculation of the Wolf-Rayet stars and their ejected winds in the inner parsec of the Galactic center. Viewed from the perspective of the super-massive black hole (SMBH), the most striking aspect of the video, which renders column density, is the inspiraling and stretching of clumps of WR-wind material as they makes their way towards the SMBH. We will brielfy describe how to make 360° videos and how to publish them online in their desired 360° format. Additionally we discuss computing the thermal X-ray emission from a suite of Galactic-center hydrodynamic simulations that have various SMBH feedback mechanisms, which are compared to Chandra X-ray Visionary Program observations of the region. Over a 2-5” ring centered on Sgr A*, the spectral shape is well matched, indicating that the WR winds are the dominant source of the thermal X-ray emission. Furthermore, the X-ray flux depends on the SMBH feedback due to the feedback's ability to clear out material from the central parsec. A moderate outburst is necessary to explain the current thermal X-ray flux, even though the outburst ended ˜100 yr ago.

  17. Visual performance with sport-tinted contact lenses in natural sunlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Graham B; Horn, Fraser C; Barney, Tyler; Pexton, Brett; Baird, Richard Y

    2009-05-01

    The use of tinted and clear contact lenses (CLs) in all aspects of life is becoming a more popular occurrence, particularly in athletic activities. This study broadens previous research regarding performance-tinted CLs and their effects on measures of visual performance. Thirty-three subjects (14 male, 19 female) were fitted with clear B&L Optima 38, 50% visible light transmission Amber and 36% visible light transmission Gray-Green Nike Maxsight CLs in an individualized randomized sequence. Subjects were dark-adapted with welding goggles before testing and in between subtests involving a Bailey-Lovie chart and the Haynes Distance Rock test. The sequence of testing was repeated for each lens modality. The Amber and Gray-Green lenses enabled subjects to recover vision faster in bright sunlight compared with clear lenses. Also, subjects were able to achieve better visual recognition in bright sunlight when compared with clear lenses. Additionally, the lenses allowed the subjects to alternate fixation between a bright and shaded target at a more rapid rate in bright sunlight as compared with clear lenses. Subjects preferred both the Amber and Gray-Green lenses over clear lenses in the bright and shadowed target conditions. The results of the current study show that Maxsight Amber and Gray-Green lenses provide better contrast discrimination in bright sunlight, better contrast discrimination when alternating between bright and shaded target conditions, better speed of visual recovery in bright sunlight, and better overall visual performance in bright and shaded target conditions compared with clear lenses.

  18. Traumatic Hyphaema: A report of 472 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashaye Adeyinka O

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Strategies for prevention of eye injuries require knowledge of the cause of the injuries. This study was done to determine the patient characteristics, the cause of injury, and where cases of traumatic hyphaema that necessitated admission to a tertiary hospital occurred. This may enable an appropriate intervention in the prevention of such injuries. Methods Retrospective case analysis of 472 patients with traumatic hyphaema admitted to the University College Hospital, Ibadan between January 1997 and December 2006. Results The home was the single most frequent place of injury for all cases and for 75% of cases in children aged 0–10 years. Injuries that occurred at school comprised about one-fifth of cases. Sport-related injuries were uncommon. The most common activities preceeding injuries were play, corporal punishment and assault. Stones, sticks and whiplash were the agents that caused traumatic hyphaema. Occupational-related hyphaema that caused injuries was mostly in farmers and artisans, few of whom used protective goggles. The majority of patients were males. Children and young adults aged ≤ 20 years comprised 63.6% of patients. A total of 336 (76% eyes had at least one surgical intervention. While 298 (73.2% patients had visual acuity (VA less than 6/60 at presentation, 143 (37.0% of eyes had visual acuity (VA Conclusion The injuries leading to traumatic hyphaema occur mostly at home and school, and frequently affect children and young adolescents. Over one-third resulted in blindness in the affected eye. The focus should be on prevention of stick-related eye injuries at these locations and improving access to eye health services for patients who sustained eye injuries.

  19. Automated detection and labeling of high-density EEG electrodes from structural MR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Marco; Liu, Quanying; Brem, Silvia; Wenderoth, Nicole; Mantini, Dante

    2016-10-01

    Objective. Accurate knowledge about the positions of electrodes in electroencephalography (EEG) is very important for precise source localizations. Direct detection of electrodes from magnetic resonance (MR) images is particularly interesting, as it is possible to avoid errors of co-registration between electrode and head coordinate systems. In this study, we propose an automated MR-based method for electrode detection and labeling, particularly tailored to high-density montages. Approach. Anatomical MR images were processed to create an electrode-enhanced image in individual space. Image processing included intensity non-uniformity correction, background noise and goggles artifact removal. Next, we defined a search volume around the head where electrode positions were detected. Electrodes were identified as local maxima in the search volume and registered to the Montreal Neurological Institute standard space using an affine transformation. This allowed the matching of the detected points with the specific EEG montage template, as well as their labeling. Matching and labeling were performed by the coherent point drift method. Our method was assessed on 8 MR images collected in subjects wearing a 256-channel EEG net, using the displacement with respect to manually selected electrodes as performance metric. Main results. Average displacement achieved by our method was significantly lower compared to alternative techniques, such as the photogrammetry technique. The maximum displacement was for more than 99% of the electrodes lower than 1 cm, which is typically considered an acceptable upper limit for errors in electrode positioning. Our method showed robustness and reliability, even in suboptimal conditions, such as in the case of net rotation, imprecisely gathered wires, electrode detachment from the head, and MR image ghosting. Significance. We showed that our method provides objective, repeatable and precise estimates of EEG electrode coordinates. We hope our work

  20. Cluster of cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome among Toronto healthcare workers after implementation of infection control precautions: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ofner-Agostini, Marianna; Gravel, Denise; McDonald, L Clifford; Lem, Marcus; Sarwal, Shelley; McGeer, Allison; Green, Karen; Vearncombe, Mary; Roth, Virginia; Paton, Shirley; Loeb, Mark; Simor, Andrew

    2006-05-01

    To review the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) infection control practices, the types of exposure to patients with SARS, and the activities associated with treatment of such patients among healthcare workers (HCWs) who developed SARS in Toronto, Canada, after SARS-specific infection control precautions had been implemented. A retrospective review of work logs and patient assignments, detailed review of medical records of patients with SARS, and comprehensive telephone-based interviews of HCWs who met the case definition for SARS after implementation of infection control precautions. Seventeen HCWs from 6 hospitals developed disease that met the case definition for SARS after implementation of infection control precautions. These HCWs had a mean age (+/-SD) of 39+/-2.3 years. Two HCWs were not interviewed because of illness. Of the remaining 15, only 9 (60%) reported that they had received formal infection control training. Thirteen HCWs (87%) were unsure of proper order in which personal protective equipment should be donned and doffed. Six HCWs (40%) reused items (eg, stethoscopes, goggles, and cleaning equipment) elsewhere on the ward after initial use in a room in which a patient with SARS was staying. Use of masks, gowns, gloves, and eyewear was inconsistent among HCWs. Eight (54%) reported that they were aware of a breach in infection control precautions. HCWs reported fatigue due to an increased number and length of shifts; participants worked a median of 10 shifts during the 10 days before onset of symptoms. Seven HCWs were involved in the intubation of a patient with SARS. One HCW died, and the remaining 16 recovered. Multiple factors were likely responsible for SARS in these HCWs, including the performance of high-risk patient care procedures, inconsistent use of personal protective equipment, fatigue, and lack of adequate infection control training.

  1. SU-E-J-211: Design and Study of In-House Software Based Respiratory Motion Monitoring, Controlling and Breath-Hold Device for Gated Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmugam, Senthilkumar

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this present work was to fabricate an in-house software based respiratory monitoring, controlling and breath-hold device using computer software programme which guides the patient to have uniform breath hold in response to request during the gated radiotherapy. Methods: The respiratory controlling device consists of a computer, inhouse software, video goggles, a highly sensitive sensor for measurement of distance, mounting systems, a camera, a respiratory signal device, a speaker and a visual indicator. The computer is used to display the respiratory movements of the patient with digital as well as analogue respiration indicators during the respiration cycle, to control, breath-hold and analyze the respiratory movement using indigenously developed software. Results: Studies were conducted with anthropomophic phantoms by simulating the respiratory motion on phantoms and recording the respective movements using the respiratory monitoring device. The results show good agreement between the simulated and measured movements. Further studies were conducted for 60 cancer patients with several types of cancers in the thoracic region. The respiratory movement cycles for each fraction of radiotherapy treatment were recorded and compared. Alarm indications are provided in the system to indicate when the patient breathing movement exceeds the threshold level. This will help the patient to maintain uniform breath hold during the radiotherapy treatment. Our preliminary clinical test results indicate that our device is highly reliable and able to maintain the uniform respiratory motion and breathe hold during the entire course of gated radiotherapy treatment. Conclusion: An indigenous respiratory monitoring device to guide the patient to have uniform breath hold device was fabricated. The alarm feature and the visual waveform indicator in the system guide the patient to have normal respiration. The signal from the device can be connected to the radiation

  2. The differences of movement between children at risk of developmental coordination disorder and those not at risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrián Agricola

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Developmental coordination disorder (DCD is a syndrome unexplained by medical condition, which is marked by defects in the development of motor coordination. Children with this impairment are more dependent on visual information to perform movements than their typically developing (TD peers. Objective: The main aim of the research was to create a checklist for the evaluation of the head and limb movement while walking. After that, based on this tool, to find differences in the movement of various body segments in children at risk of DCD (DCDr compared to typically developing children under different visual conditions. Methods: A total of 32 children aged 8.7 ± 1.1 years participated in this study. The Movement Assessment Battery for Children - 2nd edition (MABC-2 was used to make a classification of motor competence level of the participants. PLATO goggles were used to make four different visual conditions. All trials were recorded. Based on the video analysis we completed a qualitative checklist. Results: The analysis between the children from the DCDr group and TD children showed significant differences in the head (p = .023 and the arm (p = .005 movements, in body position (p = .002 and total summary score (p = .001. The main effects of visual conditions showed significant differences in all cases; in the head (p = .015, with the arm (p = .006, trunk (p =  .009, leg (p = .001 movements, in body position (p = .001 and also in the total summary score (p = .001. The interaction between groups and visual conditions was significant in leg movements (p = .007 and body position (p = .002. Conclusions: This study has shown which movements of body segments are most affected by different visual conditions and how children at risk of DCD are dependent on visual perception.

  3. Comparative analysis of the radiation shield effect in an abdominal CT scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seon-Chil; Kim, Young-Jae; Lee, Joon-Seok; Dong, Kyung-Rae; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Lim, Chang-Seon

    2014-01-01

    This study measured and compared the dose on the eyeballs and the thyroid with and without the use of a shield by applying the abdominal examination protocol used in an actual examination to a 64-channel computed tomography (CT) scan. A dummy phantom manufactured from acryl was used to measure the dose to the eyeballs and the thyroid of a patient during a thoraco-abdominal CT scan. The dose was measured using three dosimeters (optically-stimulated luminescence dosimeter (OSLD), thermoluminescence dosimeter (TLD) and photoluminescence dosimeter (PLD)) attached to the surfaces of three parts (left and right eyeballs and thyroid) in a phantom with and without the use of a shield for the eyeballs and the thyroid. Two types of shields (1-mm barium shielding sheet and 1-mm tungsten shielding sheet) were used for the measurements. The goggles and the lead shield, which are normally used in clinical practice, were used to compare the shield ratios of the shields. According to the results of the measurements made by using the OSLD, the shield ratios of the barium and the tungsten sheets were in the range of 34 - 36%. The measurements made by using the TLD showed that the shield ratio of the barium sheet was 6.25% higher than that of the tungsten sheet. When the PLD was used for the measurement, the shield ratio of the barium sheet was 33.34%, which was equivalent to that of the tungsten sheet. These results confirmed that the cheap barium sheet had a better shielding effect than the expensive tungsten sheet.

  4. Two micron pore size MCP-based image intensifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glesener, John; Estrera, Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Image intensifiers (I2) have many advantages as detectors. They offer single photon sensitivity in an imaging format, they're light in weight and analog I2 systems can operate for hours on a single AA battery. Their light output is such as to exploit the peak in color sensitivity of the human eye. Until recent developments in CMOS sensors, they also were one of the highest resolution sensors available. The closest all solid state solution, the Texas Instruments Impactron chip, comes in a 1 megapixel format. Depending on the level of integration, an Impactron based system can consume 20 to 40 watts in a system configuration. In further investing in I2 technology, L-3 EOS determined that increasing I2 resolution merited a high priority. Increased I2 resolution offers the system user two desirable options: 1) increased detection and identification ranges while maintaining field-of-view (FOV) or 2) increasing FOV while maintaining the original system resolution. One of the areas where an investment in resolution is being made is in the microchannel plate (MCP). Incorporation of a 2 micron MCP into an image tube has the potential of increasing the system resolution of currently fielded systems. Both inverting and non-inverting configurations are being evaluated. Inverting tubes are being characterized in night vision goggle (NVG) and sights. The non-inverting 2 micron tube is being characterized for high resolution I2CMOS camera applications. Preliminary measurements show an increase in the MTF over a standard 5 micron pore size, 6 micron pitch plate. Current results will be presented.

  5. Encoding of movement in near extrapersonal space in primate area VIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank eBremmer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Many neurons in the macaque ventral intraparietal area (VIP are multimodal, i.e., they respond not only to visual but also to tactile, auditory and vestibular stimulation. Anatomical studies have shown distinct projections between area VIP and a region of premotor cortex controlling head movements. A specific function of area VIP could be to guide movements in order to head for and/or to avoid objects in near extra-personal space. This behavioral role would require a consistent representation of visual motion within 3-D space and enhanced activity for nearby motion signals. Accordingly, in our present study we investigated whether neurons in area VIP are sensitive to moving visual stimuli containing depth signals from horizontal disparity. We recorded single unit activity from area VIP of two awake behaving monkeys (M. mulatta fixating a central target on a projection screen. Sensitivity of neurons to horizontal disparity was assessed by presenting large field moving images (random dot fields stereoscopically to the two eyes by means of LCD shutter goggles synchronized with the stimulus computer. During an individual trial, stimuli had one of seven different disparity values ranging from 3 degrees uncrossed- (far to 3 degrees crossed- (near disparity in 1 degree steps. Stimuli moved at constant speed in all simulated depth planes. Different disparity values were presented across trials in pseudo-randomized order. 61% percent of the motion sensitive cells had a statistically significant selectivity for the horizontal disparity of the stimulus (p<0.05, distribution free ANOVA. 75% of them preferred crossed-disparity values, i.e. moving stimuli in near space, with the highest mean activity for the nearest stimulus. At the population level, preferred direction of visual stimulus motion was not affected by horizontal disparity. Thus, our findings are in agreement with the behavioral role of area VIP in the representation of movement in near extra

  6. Occupational exposure in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, H.J.; Lee, K.Y.; Cha, S.H.; Kang, Y.K.; Kim, H.J.; Oh, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    This study was conducted to survey of radiation safety control and to measure occupational radiation exposure dose of staff in interventional radiology in Korea. Interventioanl radiology requires the operator and assisting personnel to remain close to the patient, and thus close to primary beams of radiation. Therefore exposure doses of these personnel are significant from a radiological protection point of view. We surveyed the status of radiation safety on interventional radiology of 72 hospitals. The result were that 119 radiation equipments are using in interventional radiology and 744 staffs are composed of 307 radiologists, 116 residents of radiology, 5 general physicians, 171 radiologic technologists and 145 nurses. 81.4% and 20.2 % of operating physicians are using neck collar protector and goggle respectively. The average radiation dose was measured 0.46±0.15 mSv/10 hours fluoroscopy inside examination room in radiation protection facilities. Occupational radiation exposure data on the staff were assessed in interventional radiology procedures from 8 interventional radiology equipments of 6 university hospitals. The dose measurements were made by placing a thermoluminesent dosimeter(TLD) on various body surface of operation and assistant staff during actual interventional radiology. The measured points were the corner of the eyes, neck(on the thyroid) , wrists, chest(outside and inside of the protector), and back. Average radiation equivalent dose of the corner of left eye and left wrist of operating physicians were 1.19 mSv(0.11∼4.13 mSv)/100 minutes fluoroscopy and 4.32 mSv(0.16∼11.0 mSv)/100 minutes fluoroscopy respectively. Average exposure dose may vary depending on the type of procedure, personal skills and the quality of equipment. These results will be contributed to prepare the guide line in interventional radiology in Korea

  7. A Google Glass navigation system for ultrasound and fluorescence dual-mode image-guided surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zeshu; Pei, Jing; Wang, Dong; Hu, Chuanzhen; Ye, Jian; Gan, Qi; Liu, Peng; Yue, Jian; Wang, Benzhong; Shao, Pengfei; Povoski, Stephen P.; Martin, Edward W.; Yilmaz, Alper; Tweedle, Michael F.; Xu, Ronald X.

    2016-03-01

    Surgical resection remains the primary curative intervention for cancer treatment. However, the occurrence of a residual tumor after resection is very common, leading to the recurrence of the disease and the need for re-resection. We develop a surgical Google Glass navigation system that combines near infrared fluorescent imaging and ultrasonography for intraoperative detection of sites of tumor and assessment of surgical resection boundaries, well as for guiding sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping and biopsy. The system consists of a monochromatic CCD camera, a computer, a Google Glass wearable headset, an ultrasonic machine and an array of LED light sources. All the above components, except the Google Glass, are connected to a host computer by a USB or HDMI port. Wireless connection is established between the glass and the host computer for image acquisition and data transport tasks. A control program is written in C++ to call OpenCV functions for image calibration, processing and display. The technical feasibility of the system is tested in both tumor simulating phantoms and in a human subject. When the system is used for simulated phantom resection tasks, the tumor boundaries, invisible to the naked eye, can be clearly visualized with the surgical Google Glass navigation system. This system has also been used in an IRB approved protocol in a single patient during SLN mapping and biopsy in the First Affiliated Hospital of Anhui Medical University, demonstrating the ability to successfully localize and resect all apparent SLNs. In summary, our tumor simulating phantom and human subject studies have demonstrated the technical feasibility of successfully using the proposed goggle navigation system during cancer surgery.

  8. Virtual Reality Learning Activities for Multimedia Students to Enhance Spatial Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Molina-Carmona

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Reality is an incipient technology that is proving very useful for training different skills. Our hypothesis is that it is possible to design virtual reality learning activities that can help students to develop their spatial ability. To prove the hypothesis, we have conducted an experiment consisting of training the students using an on-purpose learning activity based on a virtual reality application and assessing the possible improvement of the students’ spatial ability through a widely accepted spatial visualization test. The learning activity consists of a virtual environment where some simple polyhedral shapes are shown and manipulated by moving, rotating and scaling them. The students participating in the experiment are divided into a control and an experimental group, carrying out the same learning activity with the only difference of the device used for the interaction: a traditional computer with screen, keyboard and mouse for the control group, and virtual reality goggles with a smartphone for the experimental group. To assess the experience, all the students have completed a spatial visualization test twice: just before performing the activities and four weeks later, once all the activities were performed. Specifically, we have used the well-known and widely used Purdue Spatial Visualization Test—Rotation (PSVT-R, designed to test rotational visualization ability. The results of the test show that there is an improvement in the test results for both groups, but the improvement is significantly higher in the case of the experimental group. The conclusion is that the virtual reality learning activities have shown to improve the spatial ability of the experimental group.

  9. SU-E-J-211: Design and Study of In-House Software Based Respiratory Motion Monitoring, Controlling and Breath-Hold Device for Gated Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shanmugam, Senthilkumar [Madurai Medical College ' Govt. Rajaji Hospital, Madurai (India)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this present work was to fabricate an in-house software based respiratory monitoring, controlling and breath-hold device using computer software programme which guides the patient to have uniform breath hold in response to request during the gated radiotherapy. Methods: The respiratory controlling device consists of a computer, inhouse software, video goggles, a highly sensitive sensor for measurement of distance, mounting systems, a camera, a respiratory signal device, a speaker and a visual indicator. The computer is used to display the respiratory movements of the patient with digital as well as analogue respiration indicators during the respiration cycle, to control, breath-hold and analyze the respiratory movement using indigenously developed software. Results: Studies were conducted with anthropomophic phantoms by simulating the respiratory motion on phantoms and recording the respective movements using the respiratory monitoring device. The results show good agreement between the simulated and measured movements. Further studies were conducted for 60 cancer patients with several types of cancers in the thoracic region. The respiratory movement cycles for each fraction of radiotherapy treatment were recorded and compared. Alarm indications are provided in the system to indicate when the patient breathing movement exceeds the threshold level. This will help the patient to maintain uniform breath hold during the radiotherapy treatment. Our preliminary clinical test results indicate that our device is highly reliable and able to maintain the uniform respiratory motion and breathe hold during the entire course of gated radiotherapy treatment. Conclusion: An indigenous respiratory monitoring device to guide the patient to have uniform breath hold device was fabricated. The alarm feature and the visual waveform indicator in the system guide the patient to have normal respiration. The signal from the device can be connected to the radiation

  10. Pathways for Learning from 3D Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, L. Mark; Rab, Saira S.; Rosen, Larry D.; Vasquez, Ludivina; Cheever, Nancy A.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to find out if 3D stereoscopic presentation of information in a movie format changes a viewer's experience of the movie content. Four possible pathways from 3D presentation to memory and learning were considered: a direct connection based on cognitive neuroscience research; a connection through "immersion" in that 3D presentations could provide additional sensorial cues (e.g., depth cues) that lead to a higher sense of being surrounded by the stimulus; a connection through general interest such that 3D presentation increases a viewer’s interest that leads to greater attention paid to the stimulus (e.g., "involvement"); and a connection through discomfort, with the 3D goggles causing discomfort that interferes with involvement and thus with memory. The memories of 396 participants who viewed two-dimensional (2D) or 3D movies at movie theaters in Southern California were tested. Within three days of viewing a movie, participants filled out an online anonymous questionnaire that queried them about their movie content memories, subjective movie-going experiences (including emotional reactions and "presence") and demographic backgrounds. The responses to the questionnaire were subjected to path analyses in which several different links between 3D presentation to memory (and other variables) were explored. The results showed there were no effects of 3D presentation, either directly or indirectly, upon memory. However, the largest effects of 3D presentation were on emotions and immersion, with 3D presentation leading to reduced positive emotions, increased negative emotions and lowered immersion, compared to 2D presentations. PMID:28078331

  11. The Use of Virtual Reality to Facilitate Mindfulness Skills Training in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nararro-Haro, Maria V; Hoffman, Hunter G; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Sampaio, Mariana; Alhalabi, Wadee; Hall, Karyn; Linehan, Marsha

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe mental disorder characterized by a dysfunctional pattern of affective instability, impulsivity, and disturbed interpersonal relationships. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT®) is the most effective treatment for Borderline Personality Disorder, but demand for DBT® far exceeds existing clinical resources. Most patients with BPD never receive DBT®. Incorporating computer technology into the DBT® could help increase dissemination. Immersive Virtual Reality technology (VR) is becoming widely available to mainstream consumers. This case study explored the feasibility/clinical potential of using immersive virtual reality technology to enhance DBT® mindfulness skills training of a 32 year old female diagnosed with BPD. Prior to using VR, the patient experienced difficulty practicing DBT® mindfulness due to her emotional reactivity, and difficulty concentrating. To help the patient focus her attention, and to facilitate DBT® mindfulness skills learning, the patient looked into virtual reality goggles, and had the illusion of slowly "floating down" a 3D computer-generated river while listening to DBT® mindfulness training audios. Urges to commit suicide, urges to self harm, urges to quit therapy, urges to use substances, and negative emotions were all reduced after each VR mindfulness session and VR mindfulness was well accepted/liked by the patient. Although case studies are scientifically inconclusive by nature, results from this feasibility study were encouraging. Future controlled studies are needed to quantify whether VR-enhanced mindfulness training has long term benefits e.g., increasing patient acceptance and/or improving therapeutic outcome. Computerizing some of the DBT® skills treatment modules would reduce cost and increase dissemination.

  12. Far-IR transparency and dynamic infrared signature control with novel conducting polymer systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, Prasanna; Dooley, T. J.

    1995-09-01

    Materials which possess transparency, coupled with active controllability of this transparency in the infrared (IR), are today an increasingly important requirement, for varied applications. These applications include windows for IR sensors, IR-region flat panel displays used in camouflage as well as in communication and sight through night-vision goggles, coatings with dynamically controllable IR-emissivity, and thermal conservation coatings. Among stringent requirements for these applications are large dynamic ranges (color contrast), 'multi-color' or broad-band characteristics, extended cyclability, long memory retention, matrix addressability, small area fabricability, low power consumption, and environmental stability. Among materials possessing the requirements for variation of IR signature, conducting polymers (CPs) appear to be the only materials with dynamic, actively controllable signature and acceptable dynamic range. Conventional CPs such as poly(alkyl thiophene), poly(pyrrole) or poly(aniline) show very limited dynamic range, especially in the far-IR, while also showing poor transparency. We have developed a number of novel CP systems ('system' implying the CP, the selected dopant, the synthesis method, and the electrolyte) with very wide dynamic range (up to 90% in both important IR regions, 3 - 5 (mu) and 8 - 12 (mu) ), high cyclability (to 105 cycles with less than 10% optical degradation), nearly indefinite optical memory retention, matrix addressability of multi-pixel displays, very wide operating temperature and excellent environmental stability, low charge capacity, and processability into areas from less than 1 mm2 to more than 100 cm2. The criteria used to design and arrive at these CP systems, together with representative IR signature data, are presented in this paper.

  13. [The occupational radiation-induced cataract in five industrial radiographers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzarti Mezni, A; Loukil, I; Hriz, N; Kallel, K; Mlaiki, N; Ben Jemaâ, A

    2012-04-01

    The industrial uses of ionizing radiation in Tunisia are expanding, especially in industry and most particularly in the nondestructive testing of welds. Thus workers operating in the non-destructive testing of welds may develop a radiation-induced cataract varying in time to onset depending on the dose. To describe the characteristics of the radiation-induced cataract in patients exposed to ionizing radiation, determine the risk factors of radiation-induced cataracts. This was an anamnestic, clinical, and environmental study of five cases of radiation-induced cataract in workers employed in non-destructive testing of welds. This series of five cases had a mean age of 30.2 years and 5.53 years of work experience, ranging from 14 months to 15 years. All the patients were male and industrial radiographers specialized in nondestructive testing of welds. The average duration of exposure to ionizing radiation was 5.53 years. None of the patients had worn protective gear such as eye goggles. The ophthalmic check-up for the five special industrial radiographers showed punctuate opacities in three cases, punctiform opacities in one eye in one case, and phacosclerosis with bilateral lens multiple crystalline stromal opacities in a case of micro-lens opacities in both eyes with opalescence of both eyes in one case. These cataracts had been declared as occupational diseases. The value of a specialized ophthalmologic surveillance among these workers and the early diagnosis of lens opacities must be emphasized. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Forget the hype or reality. Big data presents new opportunities in Earth Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T. J.

    2015-12-01

    Earth science is arguably one of the most mature science discipline which constantly acquires, curates, and utilizes a large volume of data with diverse variety. We deal with big data before there is big data. For example, while developing the EOS program in the 1980s, the EOS data and information system (EOSDIS) was developed to manage the vast amount of data acquired by the EOS fleet of satellites. EOSDIS continues to be a shining example of modern science data systems in the past two decades. With the explosion of internet, the usage of social media, and the provision of sensors everywhere, the big data era has bring new challenges. First, Goggle developed the search algorithm and a distributed data management system. The open source communities quickly followed up and developed Hadoop file system to facility the map reduce workloads. The internet continues to generate tens of petabytes of data every day. There is a significant shortage of algorithms and knowledgeable manpower to mine the data. In response, the federal government developed the big data programs that fund research and development projects and training programs to tackle these new challenges. Meanwhile, comparatively to the internet data explosion, Earth science big data problem has become quite small. Nevertheless, the big data era presents an opportunity for Earth science to evolve. We learned about the MapReduce algorithms, in memory data mining, machine learning, graph analysis, and semantic web technologies. How do we apply these new technologies to our discipline and bring the hype to Earth? In this talk, I will discuss how we might want to apply some of the big data technologies to our discipline and solve many of our challenging problems. More importantly, I will propose new Earth science data system architecture to enable new type of scientific inquires.

  15. Bacterial populations on silicone hydrogel and hydrogel contact lenses after swimming in a chlorinated pool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jennifer; Vuu, Kathy; Bergenske, Peter; Burnham, Kara; Smythe, Jennifer; Caroline, Patrick

    2005-02-01

    A number of reports have indicated an association between swimming with contact lenses and subsequent eye infection. This study tests whether a hydrophilic contact lens worn while swimming accumulates bacteria present in the water. It was of interest to determine whether lens type (silicone hydrogel vs. hydrogel) affected the result. Fifteen healthy noncontact lens wearers swam for 30 minutes with a silicone hydrogel lens (PureVision, Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY) on one eye and a hydrogel lens (Acuvue 2, Vistakon Inc., Jacksonville, FL) on the other. Lenses were removed aseptically and placed in sterile vials 10 minutes after the subjects left the water. Microbial growth was enumerated for total numbers of colonies and categorized by species present. Numbers of colonies were compared between the two lens groups and with a water sample taken from the pool at the time of the experiment. Eight of the subjects returned on a different day and wore new lenses for 50 minutes in normal room conditions. Two lenses were lost while swimming. Twenty-seven of the remaining 28 lenses worn while swimming showed colonization, principally with Staphylococcus epidermidis, which was also by far the most common species identified from the water itself. Small numbers of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus salivarius were also present in the water and on the lenses. Numbers of colonies varied among subjects (range, 0 to 230), but no differences were observed between the two lens groups. Lenses removed after 30 minutes of wear without swimming were mostly sterile, with 3 of 16 lenses showing just two colonies each. It appears that wearing a hydrophilic lens while swimming allows accumulation of microbial organisms on or in the lens, regardless of lens material. Swimmers should be advised to wear tight-fitting goggles if lenses are worn while swimming, and thorough disinfection of the lenses before overnight wear seems prudent.

  16. Piloted Evaluation of Modernized Limited Authority Control Laws in the NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahasrabudhe, Vineet; Melkers, Edgar; Faynberg, Alexander; Blanken, Chris L.

    2003-01-01

    The UH-60 BLACK HAWK was designed in the 1970s, when the US Army primarily operated during the day in good visual conditions. Subsequently, the introduction of night-vision goggles increased the BLACK HAWK'S mission effectiveness, but the accident rate also increased. The increased accident rate is strongly tied to increased pilot workload as a result of a degradation in visual cues. Over twenty years of research in helicopter flight control and handling qualities has shown that these degraded handling qualities can be recovered by modifying the response type of the helicopter in low speed flight. Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation initiated a project under the National Rotorcraft Technology Center (NRTC) to develop modern flight control laws while utilizing the existing partial authority Stability Augmentation System (SAS) of the BLACK HAWK. This effort resulted in a set of Modernized Control Laws (MCLAWS) that incorporate rate command and attitude command response types. Sikorsky and the US Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD) conducted a piloted simulation on the NASA-Ames Vertical h4otion Simulator, to assess potential handling qualities and to reduce the risk of subsequent implementation and flight test of these modern control laws on AFDD's EH-60L helicopter. The simulation showed that Attitude Command Attitude Hold control laws in pitch and roll improve handling qualities in the low speed flight regime. These improvements are consistent across a range of mission task elements and for both good and degraded visual environments. The MCLAWS perform better than the baseline UH-60A control laws in the presence of wind and turbulence. Finally, while the improved handling qualities in the pitch and roll axis allow the pilot to pay more attention to the vertical axis and hence altitude performance also improves, it is clear from pilot comments and altitude excursions that the addition of an Altitude Hold function would further reduce workload and improve overall

  17. NV-CMOS HD camera for day/night imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogelsong, T.; Tower, J.; Sudol, Thomas; Senko, T.; Chodelka, D.

    2014-06-01

    SRI International (SRI) has developed a new multi-purpose day/night video camera with low-light imaging performance comparable to an image intensifier, while offering the size, weight, ruggedness, and cost advantages enabled by the use of SRI's NV-CMOS HD digital image sensor chip. The digital video output is ideal for image enhancement, sharing with others through networking, video capture for data analysis, or fusion with thermal cameras. The camera provides Camera Link output with HD/WUXGA resolution of 1920 x 1200 pixels operating at 60 Hz. Windowing to smaller sizes enables operation at higher frame rates. High sensitivity is achieved through use of backside illumination, providing high Quantum Efficiency (QE) across the visible and near infrared (NIR) bands (peak QE camera, which operates from a single 5V supply. The NVCMOS HD camera provides a substantial reduction in size, weight, and power (SWaP) , ideal for SWaP-constrained day/night imaging platforms such as UAVs, ground vehicles, fixed mount surveillance, and may be reconfigured for mobile soldier operations such as night vision goggles and weapon sights. In addition the camera with the NV-CMOS HD imager is suitable for high performance digital cinematography/broadcast systems, biofluorescence/microscopy imaging, day/night security and surveillance, and other high-end applications which require HD video imaging with high sensitivity and wide dynamic range. The camera comes with an array of lens mounts including C-mount and F-mount. The latest test data from the NV-CMOS HD camera will be presented.

  18. Lift calculations based on accepted wake models for animal flight are inconsistent and sensitive to vortex dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Eric; Quinn, Daniel B; Chin, Diana D; Lentink, David

    2016-12-06

    There are three common methods for calculating the lift generated by a flying animal based on the measured airflow in the wake. However, these methods might not be accurate according to computational and robot-based studies of flapping wings. Here we test this hypothesis for the first time for a slowly flying Pacific parrotlet in still air using stereo particle image velocimetry recorded at 1000 Hz. The bird was trained to fly between two perches through a laser sheet wearing laser safety goggles. We found that the wingtip vortices generated during mid-downstroke advected down and broke up quickly, contradicting the frozen turbulence hypothesis typically assumed in animal flight experiments. The quasi-steady lift at mid-downstroke was estimated based on the velocity field by applying the widely used Kutta-Joukowski theorem, vortex ring model, and actuator disk model. The calculated lift was found to be sensitive to the applied model and its different parameters, including vortex span and distance between the bird and laser sheet-rendering these three accepted ways of calculating weight support inconsistent. The three models predict different aerodynamic force values mid-downstroke compared to independent direct measurements with an aerodynamic force platform that we had available for the same species flying over a similar distance. Whereas the lift predictions of the Kutta-Joukowski theorem and the vortex ring model stayed relatively constant despite vortex breakdown, their values were too low. In contrast, the actuator disk model predicted lift reasonably accurately before vortex breakdown, but predicted almost no lift during and after vortex breakdown. Some of these limitations might be better understood, and partially reconciled, if future animal flight studies report lift calculations based on all three quasi-steady lift models instead. This would also enable much needed meta studies of animal flight to derive bioinspired design principles for quasi-steady lift

  19. Prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome and its associated complications in Iranian women: A meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita Jalilian

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age and is the most common cause of infertility due to anovulation. There is no single criterion for the diagnosis of this syndrome. Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of PCOS and its associated complications in Iranian women using meta-analysis method. Materials and Methods: Prevalence of PCOS was investigated from the SID, Goggle scholar, PubMed, Magiran, Irandoc, and Iranmedex, and weighting of each study was calculated according to sample size and prevalence of the binomial distribution. Data were analyzed using a random-effects model meta-analysis (Random effects model and the software R and Stata Version 11.2. Results: 30 studies conducted between the years 2006 to 2011 were entered into meta-analysis. The total sample size was 19, 226 women aged between 10-45 years. The prevalence of PCOS based on National institute of child health and human disease of the U.S was, 6.8% (95 % CI: 4.11–8.5, based on Rotterdam was 19.5% (95 % CI: 2.24-8.14, and based on ultrasound was 4.41% (95% CI: 5.68-4.14. Also, the prevalence of hirsutism was estimated to be 13%, acne 26%, androgenic alopecia 9%, menstrual disorders 28%, overweight 21%, obesity 19%, and infertility 8%. Conclusion: The prevalence of PCOS in Iran is not high. However, given the risk of complications such as heart disease - cardiovascular and infertility, prevention of PCOS is important; we suggest that health officials must submit plans for the community in this respect.

  20. Prevalence of polycystic ovary syndrome and its associated complications in Iranian women: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Anahita; Kiani, Faezeh; Sayehmiri, Fatemeh; Sayehmiri, Kourosh; Khodaee, Zahra; Akbari, Malihe

    2015-10-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common endocrine disorder in women of reproductive age and is the most common cause of infertility due to anovulation. There is no single criterion for the diagnosis of this syndrome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of PCOS and its associated complications in Iranian women using meta-analysis method. Prevalence of PCOS was investigated from the SID, Goggle scholar, PubMed, Magiran, Irandoc, and Iranmedex, and weighting of each study was calculated according to sample size and prevalence of the binomial distribution. Data were analyzed using a random-effects model meta-analysis (Random effects model) and the software R and Stata Version 11.2. 30 studies conducted between the years 2006 to 2011 were entered into meta-analysis. The total sample size was 19, 226 women aged between 10-45 years. The prevalence of PCOS based on National institute of child health and human disease of the U.S was, 6.8% (95 % CI: 4.11-8.5), based on Rotterdam was 19.5% (95 % CI: 2.24-8.14), and based on ultrasound was 4.41% (95% CI: 5.68-4.14). Also, the prevalence of hirsutism was estimated to be 13%, acne 26%, androgenic alopecia 9%, menstrual disorders 28%, overweight 21%, obesity 19%, and infertility 8%. The prevalence of PCOS in Iran is not high. However, given the risk of complications such as heart disease - cardiovascular and infertility, prevention of PCOS is important; we suggest that health officials must submit plans for the community in this respect.

  1. The Use of Virtual Reality to Facilitate Mindfulness Skills Training in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nararro-Haro, Maria V.; Hoffman, Hunter G.; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Sampaio, Mariana; Alhalabi, Wadee; Hall, Karyn; Linehan, Marsha

    2016-01-01

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) is a severe mental disorder characterized by a dysfunctional pattern of affective instability, impulsivity, and disturbed interpersonal relationships. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT®) is the most effective treatment for Borderline Personality Disorder, but demand for DBT® far exceeds existing clinical resources. Most patients with BPD never receive DBT®. Incorporating computer technology into the DBT® could help increase dissemination. Immersive Virtual Reality technology (VR) is becoming widely available to mainstream consumers. This case study explored the feasibility/clinical potential of using immersive virtual reality technology to enhance DBT® mindfulness skills training of a 32 year old female diagnosed with BPD. Prior to using VR, the patient experienced difficulty practicing DBT® mindfulness due to her emotional reactivity, and difficulty concentrating. To help the patient focus her attention, and to facilitate DBT® mindfulness skills learning, the patient looked into virtual reality goggles, and had the illusion of slowly “floating down” a 3D computer-generated river while listening to DBT® mindfulness training audios. Urges to commit suicide, urges to self harm, urges to quit therapy, urges to use substances, and negative emotions were all reduced after each VR mindfulness session and VR mindfulness was well accepted/liked by the patient. Although case studies are scientifically inconclusive by nature, results from this feasibility study were encouraging. Future controlled studies are needed to quantify whether VR-enhanced mindfulness training has long term benefits e.g., increasing patient acceptance and/or improving therapeutic outcome. Computerizing some of the DBT® skills treatment modules would reduce cost and increase dissemination. PMID:27853437

  2. The Skull Vibration-Induced Nystagmus Test of Vestibular Function—A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Georges; Curthoys, Ian S.; Lion, Alexis; Perrin, Philippe; Schmerber, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    A 100-Hz bone-conducted vibration applied to either mastoid induces instantaneously a predominantly horizontal nystagmus, with quick phases beating away from the affected side in patients with a unilateral vestibular loss (UVL). The same stimulus in healthy asymptomatic subjects has little or no effect. This is skull vibration-induced nystagmus (SVIN), and it is a useful, simple, non-invasive, robust indicator of asymmetry of vestibular function and the side of the vestibular loss. The nystagmus is precisely stimulus-locked: it starts with stimulation onset and stops at stimulation offset, with no post-stimulation reversal. It is sustained during long stimulus durations; it is reproducible; it beats in the same direction irrespective of which mastoid is stimulated; it shows little or no habituation; and it is permanent—even well-compensated UVL patients show SVIN. A SVIN is observed under Frenzel goggles or videonystagmoscopy and recorded under videonystagmography in absence of visual-fixation and strong sedative drugs. Stimulus frequency, location, and intensity modify the results, and a large variability in skull morphology between people can modify the stimulus. SVIN to 100 Hz mastoid stimulation is a robust response. We describe the optimum method of stimulation on the basis of the literature data and testing more than 18,500 patients. Recent neural evidence clarifies which vestibular receptors are stimulated, how they cause the nystagmus, and why the same vibration in patients with semicircular canal dehiscence (SCD) causes a nystagmus beating toward the affected ear. This review focuses not only on the optimal parameters of the stimulus and response of UVL and SCD patients but also shows how other vestibular dysfunctions affect SVIN. We conclude that the presence of SVIN is a useful indicator of the asymmetry of vestibular function between the two ears, but in order to identify which is the affected ear, other information and careful clinical judgment are

  3. Laser Incident Lessons Learned and Action List

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarotski, Dmitry Anatolievitch [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-02-29

    On Thursday November 19, 2015, LANL postdoc received an eye injury from a reflected, nonvisible laser beam (Class 4, pulsed, wavelength 800 nanometer). The setup is configured to split the laser output into two work areas in which qualified operators conduct research experiments. During this incident, the laser output beam was being projected to both experimental work areas, although only one experimental area was actively being used. The second laser beam directed to the second work area was blocked by an inappropriate device (Plexiglas, reflective, non-normal incidence) that reflected substantial portion of the beam toward the first setup. In preparation for the measurements, worker stepped on the stepstool and decided to remove the laser goggles to better see the micrometer readings which were difficult to see due to insufficient lighting. Immediately, he noticed a flash of light in his eye. The operator quickly replaced the laser eye-wear and then, using an infrared viewer, located a stray laser beam being reflected from the plexiglas beam block. The operator did not think he had sustained any injury and continued working. Later that day, however, he noticed a blurry spot in the vision of his left eye. He notified his supervisor on Friday morning, November 20, 2015, and was taken by CINT management to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) medical facility for evaluation. SNL Medical did not find any abnormalities, but referred the operator to a local ophthalmologist for further evaluation. Further evaluations by the ophthalmologist on November 21 and November 23 identified a small spot of inflammation near the fovea on the retina in his left eye. The ophthalmologist stated that this spot would most likely heal on its own and that the blurry spot on the operator's vision would go away. A follow-up visit was scheduled. The employee was released back to work without restrictions.

  4. Poor compliance with standard precautions against infections during minor gynaecological procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharaj, Dushyant; Lawton, Beverley; Garrett, Sue

    2012-06-01

    Splash injuries occurring during minor surgical procedures are associated with a significant infective risk to the operator. It is a common misconception that minor operations carry low risks. To determine the prevalence of the practice of Standard Precautions by medical staff in the obstetric and gynaecology (O & G) units of two hospitals in New Zealand, and to assess self-observed splash injury rates. A cross-sectional survey of all doctors working in the O & G units of two public hospitals servicing a population of 435 000. A self-administered questionnaire was provided to 43 doctors with questions related to the use of Standard Precautions, perceived likelihood of infection from a splash and splash injuries sustained during procedures. The response rate was 76.6% (n = 33/43). Of the respondents, only 30.3% (n = 10) used Standard Precautions during minor procedures. Sixty-four per cent (n = 21) routinely used goggles/visor for eye protection. Forty-five per cent (n = 15) thought they were likely to get an infection from a splash, and 55% (n = 18) of clinicians had experienced a splash injury. Of the minor procedures during which splash injuries had occurred, repair of episiotomy 45.8% (n = 11) was the commonest. This survey shows poor compliance with guidelines for Standard Precautions to protect from infection despite self-reported rates of splash injury being high at 55%. Effective interventions are needed to increase compliance and prevent infection. © 2012 The Authors ANZJOG © 2012 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists.

  5. Using brain potentials to understand prism adaptation: the error-related negativity and the P300

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Joseph Maclean

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Prism adaptation (PA is both a perceptual-motor learning task as well as a promising rehabilitation tool for visuo-spatial neglect (VSN – a spatial attention disorder often experienced after stroke resulting in slowed and/or inaccurate motor responses to contralesional targets. During PA, individuals are exposed to prism-induced shifts of the visual-field while performing a visuo-guided reaching task. After adaptation, with goggles removed, visuo-motor responding is shifted to the opposite direction of that initially induced by the prisms. This visuo-motor aftereffect has been used to study visuo-motor learning and adaptation and has been applied clinically to reduce VSN severity by improving motor responding to stimuli in contralesional (usually left-sided space. In order to optimize PA’s use for VSN patients, it is important to elucidate the neural and cognitive processes that alter visuomotor function during PA. In the present study, healthy young adults underwent PA while event-related potentials (ERPs were recorded at the termination of each reach (screen-touch, then binned according to accuracy (hit vs. miss and phase of exposure block (early, middle, late. Results show that two ERP components were evoked by screen-touch: an early error-related negativity (ERN, and a P300. The ERN was consistently evoked on miss trials during adaptation, while the P300 amplitude was largest during the early phase of adaptation for both hit and miss trials. This study provides evidence of two neural signals sensitive to visual feedback during PA that may sub-serve changes in visuomotor responding. Prior ERP research suggests that the ERN reflects an error processing system in medial-frontal cortex, while the P300 is suggested to reflect a system for context updating and learning. Future research is needed to elucidate the role of these ERP components in improving visuomotor responses among individuals with VSN.

  6. Using brain potentials to understand prism adaptation: the error-related negativity and the P300.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Stephane J; Hassall, Cameron D; Ishigami, Yoko; Krigolson, Olav E; Eskes, Gail A

    2015-01-01

    Prism adaptation (PA) is both a perceptual-motor learning task as well as a promising rehabilitation tool for visuo-spatial neglect (VSN)-a spatial attention disorder often experienced after stroke resulting in slowed and/or inaccurate motor responses to contralesional targets. During PA, individuals are exposed to prism-induced shifts of the visual-field while performing a visuo-guided reaching task. After adaptation, with goggles removed, visuomotor responding is shifted to the opposite direction of that initially induced by the prisms. This visuomotor aftereffect has been used to study visuomotor learning and adaptation and has been applied clinically to reduce VSN severity by improving motor responding to stimuli in contralesional (usually left-sided) space. In order to optimize PA's use for VSN patients, it is important to elucidate the neural and cognitive processes that alter visuomotor function during PA. In the present study, healthy young adults underwent PA while event-related potentials (ERPs) were recorded at the termination of each reach (screen-touch), then binned according to accuracy (hit vs. miss) and phase of exposure block (early, middle, late). Results show that two ERP components were evoked by screen-touch: an error-related negativity (ERN), and a P300. The ERN was consistently evoked on miss trials during adaptation, while the P300 amplitude was largest during the early phase of adaptation for both hit and miss trials. This study provides evidence of two neural signals sensitive to visual feedback during PA that may sub-serve changes in visuomotor responding. Prior ERP research suggests that the ERN reflects an error processing system in medial-frontal cortex, while the P300 is suggested to reflect a system for context updating and learning. Future research is needed to elucidate the role of these ERP components in improving visuomotor responses among individuals with VSN.

  7. A consideration of ketamine dreams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejja, P; Galloon, S

    1975-01-01

    This study was designed to see whether covering of the eyes during and after ketamine anaesthesia would reduce the incidence of dreams. One hundred and fifty patients, randomly divided into three groups, underwent therapeutic abortion with ketamine as the sole anaesthesia. One hundred patients had their eyes completely covered, 50 in the operating room only and 50 in the operating room and in the recovery room. The third 50 were controls, with their eyes uncovered. All patients were questioned post-operatively about dreams, nausea and vomiting, headache, dizziness and experiences, and also how frequently they dreamed at home. Although covering the eyes in the recovery room only reduced the incidence of dreams marginally, it became obvious that the patients who dreamed after ketamine (in all 3 groups) were those who normally dreamed at home. There were 82 patients who were recorded as not being home-dreamers, and only two of these dreamed after ketamine. In contrast, of the 68 home-dreamers, 50 dreamed after ketamine, and 17 of these had unpleasant dreams. In the home-dreamers, covering the eyes reduced the incidence of dreams from 86 per cent in Group 1 to 72 per cent in Group 2 and 64 per cent in Group 3. It is suggested that goggles may be advantageous when dealing with home-dreamers, and a question about the patient's tendency to dream should be included in the preoperative questioning. Alterations in premedication and the use of a quiet dark room during recovery may even further reduce unpleasant dreams in this group.

  8. Preventive measures used by farmers during agricultural pesticide application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cihan Önen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study describes protective measures used by farmers during agricultural pesticide application in Çelikhan, Adıyaman. Methods: The target population of this descriptive study consists of 900 active farmers registered at Chamber of Agriculture in Çelikhan. The Sample included 381 farmers, who were interviewed, face to face, during January and February 2014. The Chi-square (Fisher’s exact test was used for the statistical evaluation. Results: Of the 363 farmers, who were growing tobacco, 358 used pesticides. The percentage of the farmers who use protective equipment during the application of pesticides was as follows: 78.8% used a face-mask, 73.2% used protective gloves, 29.6% used protective clothing, 16.8% used protective goggles and 15.6% used boots, while 4.7% never used any protective equipment. The following related to environmental factors: 72.3%, used appropriate doses and qualifications, 70.7% did not use pesticides during windy weather, 66.2% removed people from the field (55.6% kept it the pesticide in an appropriate warehouse and 17.6% used warning signs. A significant statistical relationship was found between the educational status and safe disposal of pesticide waste, not releasing pesticide boxes into the environment and knowing the harm of pesticide to human body (p<0.05. Conclusion: Farmers in this study are using masks and gloves for personal protection, a majority of them are not eating and drinking during spraying and nearly half of them are removing drug equipment safely. The need for protective equipment and for health education of the farmers is important as is the need for the safe disposal of waste materials. In order to awaken the interest of farmers, environmental and individual consciousness must be created.

  9. Neck Kinematics and Electromyography While Wearing Head Supported Mass During Running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Matthew M; Sefton, JoEllen M; Oliver, Gretchen D

    2018-01-01

    Advanced combat helmets (ACH) coupled with night-vision goggles (NVG) are required for tactical athletes during training and service. Head and neck injuries due to head supported mass (HSM) are a common occurrence in military personnel. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of HSM on neck muscle fatigue that may lead to chronic stress and injury of the head and neck. Subjects wore an ACH and were affixed with electromagnetic sensors to obtain kinematic data, as well as EMG electrodes to obtain muscle activations of bilateral sternocleidomastoid, upper trapezius, and paraspinal muscles while running on a treadmill. Subjects performed a 2-min warmup at a walking pace, a 5-min warmup jog, running at a pace equal to 90% maximum heart rate until absolute fatigue, and lastly a 2-min cooldown at a walking pace. Kinematic and EMG data were collected over each 2-min interval. Days later, the same subjects wore the same ACH in addition to the NVG and performed the same protocol as the first session. This study showed significant differences in muscle activation of the right upper trapezius [F(1,31) = 10.100] and both sternocleidomastoid [F(1,31) = 12.280] muscles from pre-fatigue to absolute fatigue. There were no significant differences noted in the kinematic variables. This study suggests that HSM can fatigue bilateral neck flexors and rotators, as well as fatigue the neck extensors and rotators on the contralateral side of the mounted NVG.Hanks MM, Sefton JM, Oliver GD. Neck kinematics and electromyography while wearing head supported mass during running. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2018; 89(1):9-13.

  10. Determination of eye lens doses and identification of risk groups among radiation exposed workers. An Austrian pilot study; Bestimmung der Augenlinsen-Dosis und Identifizierung von Risikogruppen bei beruflich strahlenexponierten Personen. Eine Pilotstudie in Oesterreich

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadtmann, H.; Hranitzky, C.; Willer, H. [Seibersdorf Labor GmbH, Seibersdorf (Austria). Radiation Protection Dosimetry; Strebl, F.; Ernst, G. [Seibersdorf Labor GmbH, Seibersdorf (Austria). Radiation Safety and Applications; Aspek, W. [Allgemeine Unfallversicherungsanstalt (AUVA), Wien (Austria). Abt. Unfallverhuetung und Berufskrankheitenbekaempfung (HUB)

    2015-07-01

    On European level, in 2014 the dose limit for the lens of the eye of radiation exposed workers has been reduced from 150 to 20 mSv per year (2013/59/Euratom). Data about eye lens exposition measured under realistic operational conditions of Austrian radiation exposed workers is sparse and there is no information to verify, if all professional groups identified to be at risk for elevated eye doses will remain below the new annual dose limit. Therefore, financed by the Austrian Workers Compensation Board, AUVA, a pilot study has been initiated to answer this question. Based on published information professional groups of radiation exposed workers and operational tasks with an enhanced risk of elevated eye lens doses have been identified. By dosimetric measurements with volunteers (forehead dose meters and parallel measurements with whole-body TL-dose meters above and under the lead apron) realistic lens doses will be estimated during selected radiation exposed tasks. Comparison of yielded doses will show whether a TLD outside the apron could serve as an alternative to forehead dose meters dedicated to measure eye lens doses. Measurements with leaded protective eyewear based on IEC61331 yield results for lead equivalent in good agreement with manufacturers' information. Results for eye lens doses determined by use of a RANDO head phantom and a standardized phantom simulating a body in a typical exposition situation for interventional radiologists show that wearing of leaded goggles allows for a 90% dose reduction. Under such conditions the eye lens dose is dominated by backscatter and stray radiation from the operator's head and patient body. This has to be considered for the evaluation of protective effectiveness for leaded eye wear.

  11. From the guest editors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowell, Gerardo; Feng, Zhilan; Song, Baojun

    2013-01-01

    Carlos Castilo-Chavez is a Regents Professor, a Joaquin Bustoz Jr. Professor of Mathematical Biology, and a Distinguished Sustainability Scientist at Arizona State University. His research program is at the interface of the mathematical and natural and social sciences with emphasis on (i) the role of dynamic social landscapes on disease dispersal; (ii) the role of environmental and social structures on the dynamics of addiction and disease evolution, and (iii) Dynamics of complex systems at the interphase of ecology, epidemiology and the social sciences. Castillo-Chavez has co-authored over two hundred publications (see goggle scholar citations) that include journal articles and edited research volumes. Specifically, he co-authored a textbook in Mathematical Biology in 2001 (second edition in 2012); a volume (with Harvey Thomas Banks) on the use of mathematical models in homeland security published in SIAM's Frontiers in Applied Mathematics Series (2003); and co-edited volumes in the Series Contemporary Mathematics entitled '' Mathematical Studies on Human Disease Dynamics: Emerging Paradigms and Challenges'' (American Mathematical Society, 2006) and Mathematical and Statistical Estimation Approaches in Epidemiology (Springer-Verlag, 2009) highlighting his interests in the applications of mathematics in emerging and re-emerging diseases. Castillo-Chavez is a member of the Santa Fe Institute's external faculty, adjunct professor at Cornell University, and contributor, as a member of the Steering Committee of the '' Committee for the Review of the Evaluation Data on the Effectiveness of NSF-Supported and Commercially Generated Mathematics Curriculum Materials,'' to a 2004 NRC report. The CBMS workshop '' Mathematical Epidemiology with Applications'' lectures delivered by C. Castillo-Chavez and F. Brauer in 2011 have been published by SIAM in 2013.

  12. Vestibular rehabilitation using the Nintendo® Wii Balance Board -- a user-friendly alternative for central nervous compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrer, Ingo; Duong Dinh, Thien An; Ilgner, Justus; Westhofen, Martin

    2013-03-01

    The Nintendo® Wii Balance Board is a cost-effective and user-friendly alternative to other popular frequently used systems that aid vestibular compensation, particularly in elderly patients. In addition, further treatment in the home environment is possible. This cohort study was designed to investigate the impact of the Nintendo® Wii Balance Board as a visual compensation device after acute vestibular neuritis. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups. Group A (n = 37) performed customized exercises with the Nintendo® Wii Balance Board. Group B (n = 34) performed only two elected exercises as a control group for comparison of the results. Both groups underwent additive therapy with steroids (intravenous) in decreasing doses (250 mg decreasing to 25 mg over 10 days). The Sensory Organization Test (SOT), Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS), and Tinneti questionnaire were evaluated immediately before treatment (baseline), at the end of treatment, i.e. at day 5, and after 10 weeks. The early use of a visual feedback system in the context of the balance training supports the central nervous vestibular compensation after peripheral labyrinthine disorders. Patients in group B (without training) required a longer in-patient stay (average 2.4 days, SD 0.4) compared with patients following early Wii rehabilitation. The absence of nystagmus under Frenzel's goggles in group A was observed 2.1 days (SD 0.5) earlier than in group B. Group A showed significantly better results in the SOT, DHI, VSS, and Tinneti questionnaire at all time points measured (p < 0.05).

  13. Monstrous Ice Cloud System in Titan's Present South Polar Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carrie; Samuelson, Robert; McLain, Jason; Achterberg, Richard; Flasar, F. Michael; Milam, Stefanie

    2015-11-01

    During southern autumn when sunlight was still available, Cassini's Imaging Science Subsystem discovered a cloud around 300 km near Titan's south pole (West, R. A. et al., AAS/DPS Abstracts, 45, #305.03, 2013); the cloud was later determined by Cassini's Visible and InfraRed Mapping Spectrometer to contain HCN ice (de Kok et al., Nature, 514, pp 65-67, 2014). This cloud has proven to be only the tip of an extensive ice cloud system contained in Titan's south polar stratosphere, as seen through the night-vision goggles of Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS). As the sun sets and the gloom of southern winter approaches, evidence is beginning to accumulate from CIRS far-IR spectra that a massive system of nitrile ice clouds is developing in Titan's south polar stratosphere. Even during the depths of northern winter, nothing like the strength of this southern system was evident in corresponding north polar regions.From the long slant paths that are available from limb-viewing CIRS far-IR spectra, we have the first definitive detection of the ν6 band of cyanoacetylene (HC3N) ice in Titan’s south polar stratosphere. In addition, we also see a strong blend of nitrile ice lattice vibration features around 160 cm-1. From these data we are able to derive ice abundances. The most prominent (and still chemically unidentified) ice emission feature, the Haystack, (at 220 cm-1) is also observed. We establish the vertical distributions of the ice cloud systems associated with both the 160 cm-1 feature and the Haystack. The ultimate aim is to refine the physical and possibly the chemical relationships between the two. Transmittance thin film spectra of nitrile ice mixtures obtained in our Spectroscopy for Planetary ICes Environments (SPICE) laboratory are used to support these analyses.

  14. Validating a new device for measuring tear evaporation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohit, Athira; Ehrmann, Klaus; Naduvilath, Thomas; Willcox, Mark; Stapleton, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    To calibrate and validate a commercially available dermatology instrument to measure tear evaporation rate of contact lens wearers. A dermatology instrument was modified by attaching a swim goggle cup such that the cup sealed around the eye socket. Results for the unmodified instrument are dependent on probe area and enclosed volume. Calibration curves were established using a model eye, to account for individual variations in chamber volume and exposed area. Fifteen participants were recruited and the study included a contact lens wear and a no contact lens wear stage. Day and diurnal variation of the measurements were assessed by taking the measurement three times a day over 2 days. The coefficient of repeatability of the measurement was calculated and a linear mixed model assessed the influence of humidity, temperature, contact lens wear, day and diurnal variations on tear evaporation rate. The associations between variables were assessed using Pearson correlation coefficient. Absolute evaporation rates with and without contact lens wear were calculated based on the new calibration. The measurements were most repeatable during the evening with no lens wear (COR = 49 g m⁻² h) and least repeatable during the evening with contact lens wear (COR = 93 g m⁻² h). Humidity (p = 0.007), and contact lens wear (p evaporation rate. However, temperature (p = 0.54) diurnal variation (p = 0.85) and different days (p = 0.65) had no significant effect after controlling for humidity. Tear evaporation rates can be measured using a modified dermatology instrument. Measurements were higher and more variable with lens wear consistent with previous literature. Control of environmental conditions is important as a higher humidity results in a reduced evaporation rate. © 2013 The Authors Ophthalmic & Physiological Optics © 2013 The College of Optometrists.

  15. Knowledge and practices of pharmaceutical laboratory workers on laboratory safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Emerce

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Laboratories are classified as very hazardous workplaces. Objective: The aim of this descriptive study was to determine the knowledge and practice of laboratory safety by analysts and technicians in the laboratories of the Turkish Medicine and Medical Devices Agency. Methods:  85.0% (n=93 of the workers (n=109 was reached. A pre-tested, laboratory safety oriented, self-administered questionnaire was completed under observation. Results: Participants were mostly female (66,7%, had 12.8±8.2 years of laboratory experience and worked 24.6±10.3 hours per week. 53.8% of the employees generally worked with flammable and explosive substances, 29.0% with acute toxic or carcinogenic chemicals and 30.1% with physical dangers. Of all surveyed, 14.0% had never received formal training on laboratory safety. The proportion of ‘always use’ of laboratory coats, gloves, and goggles were 84.9%, 66.7%, and 6.5% respectively. 11.9% of the participants had at least one serious injury throughout their working lives and 24.7% had at least one small injury within the last 6 months. Among these injuries, incisions, bites and tears requiring no stiches (21.0% and the inhalation of chemical vapors (16.1% took first place. The mean value for the number of correct responses to questions on basic safety knowledge was 65.4±26.5, out of a possible 100. Conclusion: Overall, the participants have failed in some safety practices and have been eager to get regular education on laboratory safety.  From this point onwards, it would be appropriate for the employers to organize periodic trainings on laboratory safety.Keywords: Health personnel, laboratory personnel, occupational health, occupational safety, pharmacy

  16. Integration of visual and non-visual self-motion cues during voluntary head movements in the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindler, Andreas; Bartels, Andreas

    2018-05-15

    Our phenomenological experience of the stable world is maintained by continuous integration of visual self-motion with extra-retinal signals. However, due to conventional constraints of fMRI acquisition in humans, neural responses to visuo-vestibular integration have only been studied using artificial stimuli, in the absence of voluntary head-motion. We here circumvented these limitations and let participants to move their heads during scanning. The slow dynamics of the BOLD signal allowed us to acquire neural signal related to head motion after the observer's head was stabilized by inflatable aircushions. Visual stimuli were presented on head-fixed display goggles and updated in real time as a function of head-motion that was tracked using an external camera. Two conditions simulated forward translation of the participant. During physical head rotation, the congruent condition simulated a stable world, whereas the incongruent condition added arbitrary lateral motion. Importantly, both conditions were precisely matched in visual properties and head-rotation. By comparing congruent with incongruent conditions we found evidence consistent with the multi-modal integration of visual cues with head motion into a coherent "stable world" percept in the parietal operculum and in an anterior part of parieto-insular cortex (aPIC). In the visual motion network, human regions MST, a dorsal part of VIP, the cingulate sulcus visual area (CSv) and a region in precuneus (Pc) showed differential responses to the same contrast. The results demonstrate for the first time neural multimodal interactions between precisely matched congruent versus incongruent visual and non-visual cues during physical head-movement in the human brain. The methodological approach opens the path to a new class of fMRI studies with unprecedented temporal and spatial control over visuo-vestibular stimulation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Portable Dynamic Fundus Instrument: Uses in telemedicine and research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Norwood; Caputo, Michael; Billica, Roger; Taylor, Gerald; Gibson, C. Robert; Manuel, F. Keith; Mader, Thomas; Meehan, Richard

    1994-01-01

    For years ophthalmic photographs have been used to track the progression of many ocular diseases such as macular degeneration and glaucoma as well as the ocular manifestations of diabetes, hypertension, and hypoxia. In 1987 a project was initiated at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) to develop a means of monitoring retinal vascular caliber and intracranial pressure during space flight. To conduct telemedicine during space flight operations, retinal images would require real-time transmissions from space. Film-based images would not be useful during in-flight operations. Video technology is beneficial in flight because the images may be acquired, recorded, and transmitted to the ground for rapid computer digital image processing and analysis. The computer analysis techniques developed for this project detected vessel caliber changes as small as 3 percent. In the field of telemedicine, the Portable Dynamic Fundus Instrument demonstrates the concept and utility of a small, self-contained video funduscope. It was used to record retinal images during the Gulf War and to transmit retinal images from the Space Shuttle Columbia during STS-50. There are plans to utilize this device to provide a mobile ophthalmic screening service in rural Texas. In the fall of 1993 a medical team in Boulder, Colorado, will transmit real-time images of the retina during remote consultation and diagnosis. The research applications of this device include the capability of operating in remote locations or small, confined test areas. There has been interest shown utilizing retinal imaging during high-G centrifuge tests, high-altitude chamber tests, and aircraft flight tests. A new design plan has been developed to incorporate the video instrumentation into face-mounted goggle. This design would eliminate head restraint devices, thus allowing full maneuverability to the subjects. Further development of software programs will broaden the application of the Portable Dynamic Fundus Instrument in

  18. A new measure for the assessment of visual awareness in individuals with tunnel vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlSaqr, Ali M; Dickinson, Chris M

    2017-01-01

    Individuals with a restricted peripheral visual field or tunnel vision (TV) have problems moving about and avoiding obstacles. Some individuals adapt better than others and some use assistive optical aids, so measurement of the visual field is not sufficient to describe their performance. In the present study, we developed a new clinical test called the 'Assessment of Visual Awareness (AVA)', which can be used to measure detection of peripheral targets. The participants were 20 patients with TV due to retinitis pigmentosa (PTV) and 50 normally sighted participants with simulated tunnel vision (STV) using goggles. In the AVA test, detection times were measured, when subjects searched for 24 individually presented, one degree targets, randomly positioned in a 60 degrees noise background. Head and eye movements were allowed and the presentation time was unlimited. The test validity was investigated by correlating the detection times with the 'percentage of preferred walking speed' (PPWS) and the 'number of collisions' on an indoor mobility course. In PTV and STV, the detection times had significant negative correlation with the field of view. The detection times had significant positive relations with target location. In the STV, the detection time was significantly negatively correlated with the PPWS and significantly positively correlated with the collisions score on the indoor mobility course. In the PTV, the relationship was not statistically significant. No significant difference in performance of STV was found when repeating the test one to two weeks later. The proposed AVA test was sensitive to the field of view and target location. The test is unique in design, quick, simple to deliver and both repeatable and valid. It could be a valuable tool to test different rehabilitation strategies in patients with TV. © 2016 Optometry Australia.

  19. Binocular Rivalry Measured 2 Hours After Occlusion Therapy Predicts the Recovery Rate of the Amblyopic Eye in Anisometropic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunghi, Claudia; Morrone, Maria Concetta; Secci, Jacopo; Caputo, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies on adults have shown that short-term monocular deprivation boosts the deprived eye signal in binocular rivalry, reflecting homeostatic plasticity. Here we investigate whether homeostatic plasticity is present also during occlusion therapy for moderate amblyopia. Binocular rivalry and visual acuity (using Snellen charts for children) were measured in 10 children (mean age 6.2 ± 1 years) with moderate anisometropic amblyopia before the beginning of treatment and at four intervals during occlusion therapy (2 hours, 1, 2, and 5 months). Visual stimuli were orthogonal gratings presented dichoptically through ferromagnetic goggles and children reported verbally visual rivalrous perception. Bangerter filters were applied on the spectacle lens over the best eye for occlusion therapy. Two hours of occlusion therapy increased the nonamblyopic eye predominance over the amblyopic eye compared with pretreatment measurements, consistent with the results in adults. The boost of the nonamblyopic eye was still present after 1 month of treatment, steadily decreasing afterward to reach pretreatment levels after 2 months of continuous occlusion. Across subjects, the increase in nonamblyopic eye predominance observed after 2 hours of occlusion correlated (rho = -0.65, P = 0.04) with the visual acuity improvement of the amblyopic eye measured after 2 months of treatment. Homeostatic plasticity operates during occlusion therapy for moderate amblyopia and the increase in nonamblyopic eye dominance observed at the beginning of treatment correlates with the amblyopic eye recovery rate. These results suggest that binocular rivalry might be used to monitor visual cortical plasticity during occlusion therapy, although further investigations on larger clinical populations are needed to validate the predictive power of the technique.

  20. The iPod binocular home-based treatment for amblyopia in adults: efficacy and compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Robert F; Babu, Raiju Jacob; Clavagnier, Simon; Black, Joanna; Bobier, William; Thompson, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    Occlusion therapy for amblyopia is predicated on the idea that amblyopia is primarily a disorder of monocular vision; however, there is growing evidence that patients with amblyopia have a structurally intact binocular visual system that is rendered functionally monocular due to suppression. Furthermore, we have found that a dichoptic treatment intervention designed to directly target suppression can result in clinically significant improvement in both binocular and monocular visual function in adult patients with amblyopia. The fact that monocular improvement occurs in the absence of any fellow eye occlusion suggests that amblyopia is, in part, due to chronic suppression. Previously the treatment has been administered as a psychophysical task and more recently as a video game that can be played on video goggles or an iPod device equipped with a lenticular screen. The aim of this case-series study of 14 amblyopes (six strabismics, six anisometropes and two mixed) ages 13 to 50 years was to investigate: 1. whether the portable video game treatment is suitable for at-home use and 2. whether an anaglyphic version of the iPod-based video game, which is more convenient for at-home use, has comparable effects to the lenticular version. The dichoptic video game treatment was conducted at home and visual functions assessed before and after treatment. We found that at-home use for 10 to 30 hours restored simultaneous binocular perception in 13 of 14 cases along with significant improvements in acuity (0.11 ± 0.08 logMAR) and stereopsis (0.6 ± 0.5 log units). Furthermore, the anaglyph and lenticular platforms were equally effective. In addition, the iPod devices were able to record a complete and accurate picture of treatment compliance. The home-based dichoptic iPod approach represents a viable treatment for adults with amblyopia. © 2014 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Optometry © 2014 Optometrists Association Australia.

  1. Virtual Reality Game Education to Learn Traffic Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andru Deva Lukito

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract – Traffic accident has become number 3 of children death cause in the world according to WHO[1]. Traffic accident that involve children often caused by their own by breaking the law or regulation. Therefor education about traffic regulation and law including traffic sign and its meaning must be given to children early. Because education means process to change a person or a group attitude and behavior in order to make them mature through teaching and training [2]. One of them that can be used is digital media.  One of interactive digital media is digital game, various form of digital game start from 2D, 2.5D, 3D with many point of view and new technology. VR (Virtual Reality as new digital media where alternate reality exist to test various theory without any real consequences, according to Greenbaum “Virtual Reality is an alternate world filled with computer-generated images that respond to human movements. These simulated environments are usually visited with the aid of an expensive data suit which features stereophonic video goggles and fiber-optic data gloves”[3]. Greenbaum statement before were make VR suitable to test traffic law and regulation and educate kid to obey the traffic sign and regulation without real consequences from real world. This Journal contain the result of using virtual reality as traffic regulation education media. Education material that arranged consisting traffic sign that appear on the road and safety riding gear. Keywords – Virtual Reality, Traffic sign, Road traffic, children, education

  2. Home particle repositioning maneuver to prevent the recurrence of posterior canal BPPV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Elshahat Ibrahem; Morgan, Ashraf Elsayed; Abdeltawwab, Mohamed Moustafa

    2018-03-08

    To check the value of home particle repositioning maneuver in the prevention of the recurrence of posterior canal benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (pc-BPPV). In this study, patients diagnosed as unilateral posterior canal BPPV were selected following an accurate evaluation using video goggle VNG system. All patients were managed by particle repositioning maneuver (PRM). Patients were instructed to do home PRM once weekly for five years. Then, they were divided into two groups (according to choice of patient to do PRM). The first group (control group) consisted of 144 patients who did not do home PRM; whereas the second group (study group) included 165 patients who performed home PRM. All patients (control & study groups) were followed up every four months for five years. The study found out that the recurrence rate of pc-BPPV in control group was 33 patients in the first year (27.2%), 11 patients in second year (9%), 5 patients in third year (4%), 3 patients in fourth year (2.5%) and 3 patients in fifth year (2.5%). The recurrence of pc-BPPV in the treated side (study group) of patients was reported as 5 patients in the first year (3.5%), 3 patients in the second year (2%), 2 patients in the third year (1.4%), 2 patients in the fourth year (1.4%), and 1 patient in the fifth year (0.7%). There was statistically significant difference between the control and the study groups regarding the recurrence rates in the first year follow up which was the highest in first four months. Home particle repositioning maneuver has the capacity to prevent the recurrence of pc-BPPV. It proved to be more successful and functional in minimizing the recurrence of the disease in the study than in the control group. Hence, home particle repositioning maneuver is highly recommended for one year at least in pc-BPPV. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A prospective study of blood splatter in ENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakhani, Raj; Loh, Yiwen; Zhang, Ting Ting; Kothari, Prasad

    2015-07-01

    Surgeons face an occupational risk of daily exposure to blood and body fluids. Potential sources of infection include sharps injuries and mucocutaneous contact. The transmission of blood-borne viruses, in particular human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C from the patient to healthcare workers is well documented in the literature. We studied the incidence and degree of blood splash in all otolaryngology (ENT) procedures undertaken in a single unit over a 12 week period. In addition, we investigated which intraoperative factors might predict the degree of splash. We undertook a prospective, non-blinded study of 102 patients undergoing a range of 'routine' elective ENT within one department over 12 weeks. A surgical mask with visor attached was worn in all procedures. Following each procedure, all splatter masks were collected and examined macroscopically and microscopically for blood splash. In addition, the procedure performed, technique used, total blood loss, operating time and grade of surgeon was noted. 54% of procedures resulted in splash mask contamination. The median number of splash spots per mask was 4.7 (range 0-63). Tonsillectomy was the most commonly performed procedure, accounting for over one-third of total procedures investigated. Each mask had an average of 8.2 splash marks. Tonsillectomy had a splash rate of 76.9%. Although the risk of developing HIV is low the operating surgeon has a duty to take all precautions to protect themselves during a procedure and therefore a protective mask and visor or suitable goggles must be worn.

  4. Safety Performance Improvement for Nuclear Power Plants Utilizing THOMAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Won June; Ryu, Jung Uk; Suh, Kune Y.

    2005-01-01

    THOMAS (Thermal Hydraulics Online Monitoring Advisory System) is equipped with a couple of salient features compared with existing monitoring systems. The first has to do with the three-dimensional (3D) visualization technique to support the nuclear power plant (NPP) operators and personnel using the virtual reality (VR) technology. VR depicts an environment simulated by a computer. Most of the VR environments primarily include visual experiences, displayed either on a monitor or though special stereoscopic goggles. Users can often interactively manipulate a VR environment, either through standard input devices like a keyboard, or through specially designed devices like a cybergloves. Additional devices were not applied the in THOMAS. The visualized model file is brought to the VR space from the computer-aided design (CAD) tool. In the VR space, using mapping, the component color is changed with linked value of the safety variables. Operators thus can easily recognize the plant condition. This is related with the human factor engineering. The second is the function of decision making using the influence diagram logic. The influence diagram logic is based on the total probability and Bayesian theory. The accident modeling is rooted in the emergency operating procedure (EOP). The final goal of this system is, in the accident situation, to present a success path to the operator for the recovery of the NPP system. At the current developing level, the database signals THOMAS. In other words, a spectrum of system analysis codes provides the safety parameter values to the database, which are subsequently supplied to THOMAS through the network

  5. The use of Virtual Reality to facilitate mindfulness skills training in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for Borderline Personality Disorder: A case study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria V Nararro-Haro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Borderline personality disorder (BPD is a severe mental disorder characterized by a dysfunctional pattern of affective instability, impulsivity, and disturbed interpersonal relationships. Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT® is the most effective treatment for Borderline Personality Disorder, but demand for DBT® far exceeds existing clinical resources. Most patients with BPD never receive DBT®. Incorporating computer technology into the DBT® could help increase dissemination. Immersive Virtual Reality technology (VR is becoming widely available to mainstream consumers. This case study explored the feasibility/clinical potential of using immersive virtual reality technology to enhance DBT® mindfulness skills training of a 32 year old female diagnosed with BPD. Prior to using VR, the patient experienced difficulty practicing DBT® mindfulness due to her emotional reactivity, and difficulty concentrating. To help the patient focus her attention, and to facilitate DBT® mindfulness skills learning, the patient looked into virtual reality goggles, and had the illusion of slowly floating down a 3D computer-generated river while listening to DBT® mindfulness training audios. Urges to suicide, self-harm, urges to quit therapy, urges to use substances, and negative emotions were all reduced after each VR mindfulness session. VR mindfulness was well accepted/liked by the patient, and increased positive emotions. Although case studies are scientifically inconclusive by nature, results from this feasibility study were encouraging. Future controlled studies are needed to quantify whether VR-enhanced mindfulness training has long term benefits e.g., increasing patient acceptance and/or improving therapeutic outcome. Computerizing some of the DBT® skills treatment modules would reduce cost and increase dissemination.

  6. Oxygen mask related nasal integument and osteocartilagenous disorders in F-16 fighter pilots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rieneke C Schreinemakers

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A preliminary survey showed half of the participating Royal Netherlands Air Force (RNLAF F-16 fighter pilots to have nasal integument and osteocartilagenous disorders related to wearing in-flight oxygen masks. AIM: To make an inventory of these disorders and possible associated factors. METHODS: All RNLAF F-16 pilots were requested to fill out a semi-structured questionnaire for a cross-sectional survey. Additionally, one squadron in The Netherlands and pilots in operational theater were asked to participate in a prospective study that required filling out a pain score after each flight. Pilot- and flight-related variables on all participants were collected from the RNLAF database. A linear mixed model was built to identify associated factors with the post-flight pain score. RESULTS: The response rate to the survey was 83%. Ninety of the 108 participants (88%, 6 missing reported tenderness, irritation, pain, erythema, skin lesions, callous skin, or swelling of nasal bridge integument or architecture. Seventy-two participants (71%, 6 missing reported their symptoms to be troublesome after a mean of 6±3 out of 10 flights (0;10, 54 missing. Sixty-six pilots participated in scoring post-flight pain. Pain scores were significantly higher if a participant had ≥3 nasal disorders, after longer than average flights, after flying abroad, and after flying with night vision goggles (respectively +2.7 points, p = 0.003; +0.2 points, p = 0.027; +1.8 points, p = 0.001; +1.2 points p = 0.005. Longer than average NVG flights and more than average NVG hours per annum decreased painscores (respectively -0.8 points, p = 0.017; -0.04 points, p = 0.005. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of the RNLAF F-16 fighter pilot community has nasal disorders in the contact area of the oxygen mask, including pain. Six pilot- or flight-related characteristics influence the experienced level of pain.

  7. The Use of Virtual Reality to Facilitate Mindfulness Skills Training in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Araceli; Linehan, Marsha M; Todd, S Rob; Hoffman, Hunter G

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Paralysis from a spinal cord injury (SCI) increases risk of psychological problems including suicide attempts, substance use disorder, negative emotions (e.g., anger), depression, anxiety, ASD/PTSD. Dialectical Behavioral Therapy® (DBT®) has been shown to be effective for treating similar psychological symptoms in non-SCI patient populations. The current study explored for the first time, the feasibility and clinical potential of using Immersive Virtual Reality (VR) enhanced DBT® Mindfulness skills training to help reduce psychological symptoms (negative emotions and anxiety, ASD/PTSD) of two patients with SCI. Patient 1 was a 39-year-old male patient suffering multiple spinal cord injuries, resulting in quadriplegia, after falling out of a four story building. Patient 1 had severe depression, and anxiety symptoms. Patient 2, was a 31 year old male with a C7 vertebral body fracture, leading to paresis, after suffering a blunt force trauma injury during an attempted suicide, jumping from a moving vehicle. Patient 2 had mild depression, and anxiety symptoms. Methods: Each patient looked into VR goggles, and had the illusion of slowly "floating down" a river in virtual reality while listening to DBT® Mindfulness Skills training instructions. Each patient filled out brief psychological ratings before and after each VR session, four VR DBT® sessions for patient 1, and two VR DBT® sessions for patient 2. Results: As predicted, patient 1 reported reductions in negative emotions after each VR DBT® Mindfulness session. Patient 2 had mixed results on some of the measures of negative emotions. And both patients reported feeling less depressed, less anxious, and less emotionally upset, after VR DBT® Mindfulness Skills learning. Patient 2 reported large reductions in short term ASD/PTSD symptoms after his first VR DBT® mindfulness skills training session. Conclusion: This study explored the feasibility of using VR DBT® with quadriplegic or paresis SCI

  8. The Use of Virtual Reality Facilitates Dialectical Behavior Therapy® "Observing Sounds and Visuals" Mindfulness Skills Training Exercises for a Latino Patient with Severe Burns: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Jocelyn; Hoffman, Hunter G; Bistricky, Steven L; Gonzalez, Miriam; Rosenberg, Laura; Sampaio, Mariana; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Navarro-Haro, Maria V; Alhalabi, Wadee; Rosenberg, Marta; Meyer, Walter J; Linehan, Marsha M

    2017-01-01

    Sustaining a burn injury increases an individual's risk of developing psychological problems such as generalized anxiety, negative emotions, depression, acute stress disorder, or post-traumatic stress disorder. Despite the growing use of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy® (DBT®) by clinical psychologists, to date, there are no published studies using standard DBT® or DBT® skills learning for severe burn patients. The current study explored the feasibility and clinical potential of using Immersive Virtual Reality (VR) enhanced DBT® mindfulness skills training to reduce negative emotions and increase positive emotions of a patient with severe burn injuries. The participant was a hospitalized (in house) 21-year-old Spanish speaking Latino male patient being treated for a large (>35% TBSA) severe flame burn injury. Methods: The patient looked into a pair of Oculus Rift DK2 virtual reality goggles to perceive the computer-generated virtual reality illusion of floating down a river, with rocks, boulders, trees, mountains, and clouds, while listening to DBT® mindfulness training audios during 4 VR sessions over a 1 month period. Study measures were administered before and after each VR session. Results: As predicted, the patient reported increased positive emotions and decreased negative emotions. The patient also accepted the VR mindfulness treatment technique. He reported the sessions helped him become more comfortable with his emotions and he wanted to keep using mindfulness after returning home. Conclusions: Dialectical Behavioral Therapy is an empirically validated treatment approach that has proved effective with non-burn patient populations for treating many of the psychological problems experienced by severe burn patients. The current case study explored for the first time, the use of immersive virtual reality enhanced DBT® mindfulness skills training with a burn patient. The patient reported reductions in negative emotions and increases in positive emotions

  9. [An analysis of 148 outpatient treated occupational accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicaeus, T; Erb, C; Rohrbach, M; Thiel, H J

    1996-10-01

    about protective devices at the place of employment should be required. We conclude that education about safety glasses in the workplace by tradespeople and trades assistants during tasks for which goggles are recommended could considerably reduce the rate of occupational eye traumata. The data of the University Eye Clinic of Tübingen are useful to identify strategies to prevent eye injuries such as wider and better use of safety glasses and improvement in engineering controls.

  10. Evaluation of Postural Control in Patients with Glaucoma Using a Virtual Reality Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz-Filho, Alberto; Boer, Erwin R; Gracitelli, Carolina P B; Abe, Ricardo Y; van Driel, Nienke; Yang, Zhiyong; Medeiros, Felipe A

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate postural control using a dynamic virtual reality environment and the relationship between postural metrics and history of falls in patients with glaucoma. Cross-sectional study. The study involved 42 patients with glaucoma with repeatable visual field defects on standard automated perimetry (SAP) and 38 control healthy subjects. Patients underwent evaluation of postural stability by a force platform during presentation of static and dynamic visual stimuli on stereoscopic head-mounted goggles. The dynamic visual stimuli presented rotational and translational ecologically valid peripheral background perturbations. Postural stability was also tested in a completely dark field to assess somatosensory and vestibular contributions to postural control. History of falls was evaluated by a standard questionnaire. Torque moments around the center of foot pressure on the force platform were measured, and the standard deviations of the torque moments (STD) were calculated as a measurement of postural stability and reported in Newton meters (Nm). The association with history of falls was investigated using Poisson regression models. Age, gender, body mass index, severity of visual field defect, best-corrected visual acuity, and STD on dark field condition were included as confounding factors. Patients with glaucoma had larger overall STD than controls during both translational (5.12 ± 2.39 Nm vs. 3.85 ± 1.82 Nm, respectively; P = 0.005) and rotational stimuli (5.60 ± 3.82 Nm vs. 3.93 ± 2.07 Nm, respectively; P = 0.022). Postural metrics obtained during dynamic visual stimuli performed better in explaining history of falls compared with those obtained in static and dark field condition. In the multivariable model, STD values in the mediolateral direction during translational stimulus were significantly associated with a history of falls in patients with glaucoma (incidence rate ratio, 1.85; 95% confidence interval, 1.30-2.63; P = 0.001). The study presented and

  11. A Study of the Unsafe Actions of Staff in the Maintenance and Overhaul Unit at a Petrochemical Complex and the Presentation of Control Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mousavipour

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Today, oil, gas, and petrochemical industries are of strategic significance in the macro-development of oil-rich countries. These industries, given the nature of the work and the technical complexity of the various processes, are hazardous and susceptible to occupational accidents. More than 90% of the accidents are related to the faults and unsafe actions of personnel, either directly or indirectly. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the unsafe actions of staff working in the maintenance unit of a petrochemical complex. Materials and Methods This is a descriptive and analytical study conducted on 167 morning-shift workers at the Mahshahr petrochemical complex. The data were collected based on a checklist of unsafe actions prepared through a direct observation of their activities and an analysis of work instructions, documents, and incident reports. SPSS statistical software was also used for data analysis and relevant testing. Results According to the results of this study, the mean number of unsafe actions performed by the employees was 42%. The highest number of unsafe actions achieved in the maintenance mechanical unit was 52.8%, 47.1% in repair services, and 43.8% in machinery. The highest frequency of unsafe actions were caused by indiscretion and negligence, a failure to use a face shield and goggles, and non-compliance with safety principles. Conclusions According to the findings, there has been a rise in the number of unsafe actions in machinery and maintenance service units compared to other maintenance units. As such, training courses based on the behavior-based safety principles at the beginning of employment, close monitoring of health safety environment (HSE officials on the implementation of regulations, and provision of appropriate scheduling based on weather conditions and the nature of maintenance services are recommended. In addition, a refrainment from hastiness in performing duties, enhanced

  12. The Use of Virtual Reality to Facilitate Mindfulness Skills Training in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy for Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli Flores

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Paralysis from a spinal cord injury (SCI increases risk of psychological problems including suicide attempts, substance use disorder, negative emotions (e.g., anger, depression, anxiety, ASD/PTSD. Dialectical Behavioral Therapy® (DBT® has been shown to be effective for treating similar psychological symptoms in non-SCI patient populations. The current study explored for the first time, the feasibility and clinical potential of using Immersive Virtual Reality (VR enhanced DBT® Mindfulness skills training to help reduce psychological symptoms (negative emotions and anxiety, ASD/PTSD of two patients with SCI. Patient 1 was a 39-year-old male patient suffering multiple spinal cord injuries, resulting in quadriplegia, after falling out of a four story building. Patient 1 had severe depression, and anxiety symptoms. Patient 2, was a 31 year old male with a C7 vertebral body fracture, leading to paresis, after suffering a blunt force trauma injury during an attempted suicide, jumping from a moving vehicle. Patient 2 had mild depression, and anxiety symptoms.Methods: Each patient looked into VR goggles, and had the illusion of slowly “floating down” a river in virtual reality while listening to DBT® Mindfulness Skills training instructions. Each patient filled out brief psychological ratings before and after each VR session, four VR DBT® sessions for patient 1, and two VR DBT® sessions for patient 2.Results: As predicted, patient 1 reported reductions in negative emotions after each VR DBT® Mindfulness session. Patient 2 had mixed results on some of the measures of negative emotions. And both patients reported feeling less depressed, less anxious, and less emotionally upset, after VR DBT® Mindfulness Skills learning. Patient 2 reported large reductions in short term ASD/PTSD symptoms after his first VR DBT® mindfulness skills training session.Conclusion: This study explored the feasibility of using VR DBT® with quadriplegic

  13. Analytical evaluation of the protection offered by sealed tractor cabins during crop pulverization with fenitrothion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barcellos, Michelle; Faletti, Milena Michele; Madureira, Luiz Augusto Dos Santos; Bauer, Fernando Cesar

    2016-12-01

    The practice of large-scale agriculture requires the use of pesticides in order to maximize production. This activity has gained increasing attention in recent years, especially from rural workers, due to the risks associated with long-term exposure to pesticides. To minimize these risks, personal protection equipment (e.g., covers, gloves, and goggles) and collective protection equipment (e.g., agricultural tractors with sealed cabins) have been developed. In general, these approaches are intended to reduce the contact of farmers and agricultural machinery operators with the more toxic and stable compounds, an example of which is fenitrothion. In this study, fenitrothion was used as a marker to evaluate the protection afforded inside a sealed tractor cabin. To simulate the pesticide exposure, tests were performed using artificial cotton targets as passive adsorptive agents inside the cabin during the pesticide application. Samples were extracted according to the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) procedure using ultrasonic extraction and as proposed by the Brazilian Standard for Solid Waste Classification (NBR 10004). The extracts were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). The chromatographic method was optimized using a factorial design. The combined results indicated that the best conditions were achieved using a mobile phase with a water/acetonitrile ratio of 35:65, a column temperature of 40 °C, and a flow rate of 1.0 mL/min, with a total analysis time of <10 min. The method was evaluated in the linear range of 0.50 to 2.01 mg/kg, with a determination coefficient of 0.9886. The precision was evaluated on different days and the relative standard deviations were between 0.17 and 3.41 %. In relation to the accuracy, recovery values of 95 to 104 % were obtained. The detection and quantification limits were 0.18 and 0.50 mg/kg, respectively. None of the target cottons showed concentrations of

  14. Utility Estimation of the Manufactured Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Hoon; Ahn, Jong Ho; Seo, Jeong Min; Shin, Eun Hyeak; Choi, Byeong Gi; Song, Gi Won

    2011-01-01

    Immobilizations used in order to maintain the reproducibility of a patient set-up and the stable posture for a long period are important more than anything else for the accurate treatment when the stereotactic body radiotherapy is underway. So the purpose of this study is to adapt the optimum immobilizations for the stereotactic body radiotherapy by comparing two commercial immobilizations with the self-manufactured immobilizations. Five people were selected for the experiment and three different immobilizations (A: Wing-board, B: BodyFix system, C: Arm up holder with vac-lock) were used to each target. After deciding on the target's most stable respiratory cycles, the targets were asked to wear a goggle monitor and maintain their respiration regularly for thirty minutes to obtain the respiratory signals. To analyze the respiratory signal, the standard deviation and the variation value of the peak value and the valley value of the respiratory signal were separated by time zone with the self-developed program at the hospital and each tie-downs were compared for the estimation by calculating a comparative index using the above. The stability of each immobilizations were measured in consideration of deviation changes studied in each respiratory time lapse. Comparative indexes of each immobilizations of each experimenter are shown to be A: 11.20, B: 4.87, C: 1.63 / A: 3.94, B: 0.67, C: 0.13 / A: 2.41, B: 0.29, C: 0.04 / A: 0.16, B: 0.19, C: 0.007 / A: 35.70, B: 2.37, C: 1.86. And when all five experimenters wore the immobilizations C, the test proved the most stable value while four people wearing A and one man wearing D expressed relatively the most unstable respiratory outcomes. The self-developed immobilizations, so called the arm up holder vac-lock for the stereotactic body radiotherapy is expected to improve the effect of the treatment by decreasing the intra-fraction organ motions because it keeps the respiration more stable than other two immobilizations

  15. NASA's Great Observatories Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for larger version In 1609, Galileo improved the newly invented telescope, turned it toward the heavens, and revolutionized our view of the universe. In celebration of the 400th anniversary of this milestone, 2009 has been designated as the International Year of Astronomy. Today, NASA's Great Observatories are continuing Galileo's legacy with stunning images and breakthrough science from the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory. While Galileo observed the sky using visible light seen by the human eye, technology now allows us to observe in many wavelengths, including Spitzer's infrared view and Chandra's view in X-rays. Each wavelength region shows different aspects of celestial objects and often reveals new objects that could not otherwise be studied. This image of the spiral galaxy Messier 101 is a composite of views from Spitzer, Hubble, and Chandra. The red color shows Spitzer's view in infrared light. It highlights the heat emitted by dust lanes in the galaxy where stars can form. The yellow color is Hubble's view in visible light. Most of this light comes from stars, and they trace the same spiral structure as the dust lanes. The blue color shows Chandra's view in X-ray light. Sources of X-rays include million-degree gas, exploded stars, and material colliding around black holes. Such composite images allow astronomers to see how features seen in one wavelength match up with those seen in another wavelength. It's like seeing with a camera, night vision goggles, and X-ray vision all at once. In the four centuries since Galileo, astronomy has changed dramatically. Yet our curiosity and quest for knowledge remain the same. So, too, does our wonder at the splendor of the universe. The International Year of Astronomy Great Observatories Image Unveiling is supported by the NASA Science Mission Directorate Astrophysics Division. The project is a

  16. The Use of Virtual Reality Facilitates Dialectical Behavior Therapy® “Observing Sounds and Visuals” Mindfulness Skills Training Exercises for a Latino Patient with Severe Burns: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Jocelyn; Hoffman, Hunter G.; Bistricky, Steven L.; Gonzalez, Miriam; Rosenberg, Laura; Sampaio, Mariana; Garcia-Palacios, Azucena; Navarro-Haro, Maria V.; Alhalabi, Wadee; Rosenberg, Marta; Meyer, Walter J.; Linehan, Marsha M.

    2017-01-01

    Sustaining a burn injury increases an individual's risk of developing psychological problems such as generalized anxiety, negative emotions, depression, acute stress disorder, or post-traumatic stress disorder. Despite the growing use of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy® (DBT®) by clinical psychologists, to date, there are no published studies using standard DBT® or DBT® skills learning for severe burn patients. The current study explored the feasibility and clinical potential of using Immersive Virtual Reality (VR) enhanced DBT® mindfulness skills training to reduce negative emotions and increase positive emotions of a patient with severe burn injuries. The participant was a hospitalized (in house) 21-year-old Spanish speaking Latino male patient being treated for a large (>35% TBSA) severe flame burn injury. Methods: The patient looked into a pair of Oculus Rift DK2 virtual reality goggles to perceive the computer-generated virtual reality illusion of floating down a river, with rocks, boulders, trees, mountains, and clouds, while listening to DBT® mindfulness training audios during 4 VR sessions over a 1 month period. Study measures were administered before and after each VR session. Results: As predicted, the patient reported increased positive emotions and decreased negative emotions. The patient also accepted the VR mindfulness treatment technique. He reported the sessions helped him become more comfortable with his emotions and he wanted to keep using mindfulness after returning home. Conclusions: Dialectical Behavioral Therapy is an empirically validated treatment approach that has proved effective with non-burn patient populations for treating many of the psychological problems experienced by severe burn patients. The current case study explored for the first time, the use of immersive virtual reality enhanced DBT® mindfulness skills training with a burn patient. The patient reported reductions in negative emotions and increases in positive emotions

  17. The Use of Virtual Reality Facilitates Dialectical Behavior Therapy® “Observing Sounds and Visuals” Mindfulness Skills Training Exercises for a Latino Patient with Severe Burns: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jocelyn Gomez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Sustaining a burn injury increases an individual's risk of developing psychological problems such as generalized anxiety, negative emotions, depression, acute stress disorder, or post-traumatic stress disorder. Despite the growing use of Dialectical Behavioral Therapy® (DBT® by clinical psychologists, to date, there are no published studies using standard DBT® or DBT® skills learning for severe burn patients. The current study explored the feasibility and clinical potential of using Immersive Virtual Reality (VR enhanced DBT® mindfulness skills training to reduce negative emotions and increase positive emotions of a patient with severe burn injuries. The participant was a hospitalized (in house 21-year-old Spanish speaking Latino male patient being treated for a large (>35% TBSA severe flame burn injury.Methods: The patient looked into a pair of Oculus Rift DK2 virtual reality goggles to perceive the computer-generated virtual reality illusion of floating down a river, with rocks, boulders, trees, mountains, and clouds, while listening to DBT® mindfulness training audios during 4 VR sessions over a 1 month period. Study measures were administered before and after each VR session.Results: As predicted, the patient reported increased positive emotions and decreased negative emotions. The patient also accepted the VR mindfulness treatment technique. He reported the sessions helped him become more comfortable with his emotions and he wanted to keep using mindfulness after returning home.Conclusions: Dialectical Behavioral Therapy is an empirically validated treatment approach that has proved effective with non-burn patient populations for treating many of the psychological problems experienced by severe burn patients. The current case study explored for the first time, the use of immersive virtual reality enhanced DBT® mindfulness skills training with a burn patient. The patient reported reductions in negative emotions and increases in

  18. Practical protective tools for occupational exposure: 1) double focus spectacles for the aged with highly refracted glass lens 2) remodeled barrier for radiation protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, S; Yabe, S; Takamura, A; Ishizaki, H; Aizawa, S

    2000-11-30

    Two practical protective tools for occupational exposure for neurointerventional radiologists are presented. The first purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of double focus spectacles for the aged with a highly refracted glass lens (special spectacles for the aged) for radiation protection of the crystalline lens of the eye in comparison with other spectacles on the market, based on the measurement of film density which was obtained by exposure of X-ray through those spectacles. As a result of the film densitometry mentioned above, the effectiveness of special spectacles for the aged in radiation protection was nearly equal to the effectiveness of a goggle type shield which is made with a 0.07 mm lead-equivalent plastic lens. The second purpose of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of the protective barrier, which we remodeled for cerebral angiography or neuroendovascular therapy, for radiation exposure, based on the measurement in a simulated study with a head phantom, and on the measurement of radiation exposure in operaters during procedures of clinical cases. In the experimental study radiation exposure in supposed position of the crystalline lens was reduced to about one third and radiation exposure in supposed position of the gonadal glands was reduced to about one seventh, compared to radiation exposure without employing the barrier. The radiation exposure was monitored at the left breast of three radiologists, in 215 cases of cerebral angiography. Employing the barrier in cerebral angiography, average equivalent dose at the left breast measured 1.49mu Sv during 10 min of fluoroscopy. In three kinds of neuroendovascular therapy in 40 cases, radiation exposure in an operator was monitored in the same fashion and the dose was recorded less than the result reported in previous papers in which any protective barrier have not been employed in the procedure (1,2). As a result, the two above mentioned protective tools are

  19. Do aging and dual-tasking impair the capacity to store and retrieve visuospatial information needed to guide perturbation-evoked reach-to-grasp reactions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth C Cheng

    Full Text Available A recent study involving young adults showed that rapid perturbation-evoked reach-to-grasp balance-recovery reactions can be guided successfully with visuospatial-information (VSI retained in memory despite: 1 a reduction in endpoint accuracy due to recall-delay (time between visual occlusion and perturbation-onset, PO and 2 slowing of the reaction when performing a concurrent cognitive task during the recall-delay interval. The present study aimed to determine whether this capacity is compromised by effects of aging. Ten healthy older adults were tested with the previous protocol and compared with the previously-tested young adults. Reactions to recover balance by grasping a small handhold were evoked by unpredictable antero-posterior platform-translation (barriers deterred stepping reactions, while using liquid-crystal goggles to occlude vision post-PO and for varying recall-delay times (0-10 s prior to PO (the handhold was moved unpredictably to one of four locations 2 s prior to vision-occlusion. Subjects also performed a spatial- or non-spatial-memory cognitive task during the delay-time in a subset of trials. Results showed that older adults had slower reactions than the young across all experimental conditions. Both age groups showed similar reduction in medio-lateral end-point accuracy when recall-delay was longest (10 s, but differed in the effect of recall delay on vertical hand elevation. For both age groups, engaging in either the non-spatial or spatial-memory task had similar (slowing effects on the arm reactions; however, the older adults also showed a dual-task interference effect (poorer cognitive-task performance that was specific to the spatial-memory task. This provides new evidence that spatial working memory plays a role in the control of perturbation-evoked balance-recovery reactions. The delays in completing the reaction that occurred when performing either cognitive task suggest that such dual-task situations in daily

  20. VISUAL3D - An EIT network on visualization of geomodels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Tobias

    2017-04-01

    Universität Leoben, Slovenian National Building and Civil Engineering Institute, Tallinn University of Technology and Turku University. The infrastructure within the network comprises different types of capturing and visualization hardware, ranging from high resolution cubes, VR walls, VR goggle solutions, high resolution photogrammetry, UAVs, lidar-scanners, and many more.

  1. Levodopa inhibits the development of form-deprivation myopia in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Junfeng; Liu, Shuangzhen; Qin, Wenjuan; Li, Fengyun; Wu, Xiaoying; Tan, Qian

    2010-01-01

    It has been shown that visual deprivation leads to a myopic refractive error and also reduces the retinal concentration of dopamine. Exogenously 3,4-dihydroxy-L-phenylalanine (levodopa, L-DOPA) can be converted into dopamine in vivo, which safely and effectively treats Parkinson disease. Moreover, L-DOPA was also used in the treatment of amblyopia in clinical studies. However, the effect of L-DOPA on the development of myopia has not been studied. The aim of this study was to investigate whether intraperitoneal injection of L-DOPA could inhibit form-deprivation myopia in guinea pigs and to explore a new strategy for drug treatment of myopia. Sixty guinea pigs, at age of 4 weeks, were randomly divided into six groups: normal control, L-DOPA group, saline group, deprived group, deprived plus L-DOPA group, and deprived plus saline group. Form deprivation was induced with translucent eye shields on the right eye and lasted for 10 days. L-DOPA was injected intraperitoneally into the guinea pig once a day. The corneal radius of curvature, refraction, and axial length were measured in all animals. Subsequently, retinal dopamine content was evaluated by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Ten days of eye occlusion caused the form-deprived eyes to elongate and become myopic, and retinal dopamine content to decrease, but the corneal radius of curvature was not affected. Repeated intraperitoneal injection of L-DOPA could inhibit the myopic shift (from -3.62 +/- 0.98 D to -1.50 +/- 0.38 D; p < 0.001) due to goggles occluding and compensate retinal dopamine (from 0.65 +/- 0.10 ng to 1.33 +/- 0.23 ng; p < 0.001). Administration of L-DOPA to the unoccluded animals had no effect on its ocular refraction. There was no effect of intraperitoneal saline on the ocular refractive state and retinal dopamine. Systemic L-DOPA was partly effective in this guinea pig model and, therefore, is worth testing for effectiveness in progressing human myopes.

  2. Night vision imaging systems design, integration, and verification in military fighter aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Roberto; Richardson, Mark A.; Cantiello, Maurizio; Toscano, Mario; Fiorini, Pietro; Jia, Huamin; Zammit-Mangion, David

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the developmental and testing activities conducted by the Italian Air Force Official Test Centre (RSV) in collaboration with Alenia Aerospace, Litton Precision Products and Cranfiled University, in order to confer the Night Vision Imaging Systems (NVIS) capability to the Italian TORNADO IDS (Interdiction and Strike) and ECR (Electronic Combat and Reconnaissance) aircraft. The activities consisted of various Design, Development, Test and Evaluation (DDT&E) activities, including Night Vision Goggles (NVG) integration, cockpit instruments and external lighting modifications, as well as various ground test sessions and a total of eighteen flight test sorties. RSV and Litton Precision Products were responsible of coordinating and conducting the installation activities of the internal and external lights. Particularly, an iterative process was established, allowing an in-site rapid correction of the major deficiencies encountered during the ground and flight test sessions. Both single-ship (day/night) and formation (night) flights were performed, shared between the Test Crews involved in the activities, allowing for a redundant examination of the various test items by all participants. An innovative test matrix was developed and implemented by RSV for assessing the operational suitability and effectiveness of the various modifications implemented. Also important was definition of test criteria for Pilot and Weapon Systems Officer (WSO) workload assessment during the accomplishment of various operational tasks during NVG missions. Furthermore, the specific technical and operational elements required for evaluating the modified helmets were identified, allowing an exhaustive comparative evaluation of the two proposed solutions (i.e., HGU-55P and HGU-55G modified helmets). The results of the activities were very satisfactory. The initial compatibility problems encountered were progressively mitigated by incorporating modifications both in the front and

  3. “SmartGlass” Obstacles for Dynamic Inducing of Light Scattering in Vision Research Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga DANILENKO

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe a technique that allows control of visual stimuli quality through the use of a setup with a polymer dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC film positioned in the optical pathway of one or both human eyes. Nowadays, PDLC films allow alteration of the resolution and contrast limits of the transmitted light due to continuous change in the light scattering that is obtained by the application of an AC electrical field. In our experimental setup, the use of a wide-aperture up to area of 20 x 15 cm2 PDLC sheet is combined with a flat-screen PC display or with a modified display emission block without its interference filter unit and with an installed individually controllable colored light-emitting diode (LED backlight. In the latter case, the spatial structure of visual stimulus remains constant, but the PDLC switching-on timing for intensity, color, and contrast of visual stimuli control is done by a PC via an Arduino USB interface. Arduino applies a voltage to the backlight colored LEDs and the low voltage up to 30 – 80 V to light-scattering PDLC sheet. Modifications to this setup can improve the resolution of the timing and screen stimulus intensity and color purity, and increase the flexibility of its application in visual research tasks. A particular use of PDLC scattering sheets involves the altering of the stimuli input strength of the eye in different binocular viewing schemes. In such applications, a restricted-optical-aperture PDLC element is mounted in a goggle frame, and the element is controlled by the application of low-voltage AC field. The efficacy of the setup is demonstrated in experiments of human vision contrast sensitivity adaptation studies. Studies allow to determine the characteristic time of the contrast sensitivity altering of 4 s during adaptation phase and the same order of the characteristic time during recovery.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.22.4.12907

  4. "Handling" seismic hazard: 3D printing of California Faults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriakopoulos, C.; Potter, M.; Richards-Dinger, K. B.

    2017-12-01

    As earth scientists, we face the challenge of how to explain and represent our work and achievements to the general public. Nowadays, this problem is partially alleviated by the use of modern visualization tools such as advanced scientific software (Paraview.org), high resolution monitors, elaborate video simulations, and even 3D Virtual Reality goggles. However, the ability to manipulate and examine a physical object in 3D is still an important tool to connect better with the public. For that reason, we are presenting a scaled 3D printed version of the complex network of earthquake faults active in California based on that used by the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast 3 (UCERF3) (Field et al., 2013). We start from the fault geometry in the UCERF3.1 deformation model files. These files contain information such as the coordinates of the surface traces of the faults, dip angle, and depth extent. The fault specified in the above files are triangulated at 1km resolution and exported as a facet (.fac) file. The facet file is later imported into the Trelis 15.1 mesh generator (csimsoft.com). We use Trelis to perform the following three operations: First, we scale down the model so that 100 mm corresponds to 100km. Second, we "thicken" the walls of the faults; wall thickness of at least 1mm is necessary in 3D printing. We thicken fault geometry by 1mm on each side of the faults for a total of 2mm thickness. Third, we break down the model into parts that will fit the printing bed size ( 25 x 20mm). Finally, each part is exported in stereolithography format (.stl). For our project, we are using the 3D printing facility within the Creat'R Lab in the UC Riverside Orbach Science Library. The 3D printer is a MakerBot Replicator Desktop, 5th Generation. The resolution of print is 0.2mm (Standard quality). The printing material is the MakerBot PLA Filament, 1.75 mm diameter, large Spool, green. The most complex part of the display model requires approximately 17

  5. Circadian adaptation to night-shift work by judicious light and darkness exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Diane B; James, Francine O

    2002-12-01

    In this combined field and laboratory investigation, the authors tested the efficacy of an intervention designed to promote circadian adaptation to night-shift work. Fifteen nurses working permanent night schedules (> or = 8 shifts/ 15 days) were recruited from area hospitals. Following avacation period of > or = 10 days on a regular daytime schedule, workers were admitted to the laboratory for the assessment of circadian phase via a 36-h constant routine. They returned to work approximately 12 night shifts on their regular schedules under one of two conditions. Treatment group workers (n = 10, mean age +/- SD = 41.7 +/- 8.8 years) received an intervention including 6 h of intermittent bright-light exposure in the workplace (approximately 3,243 lux) and shielding from bright morning outdoor light with tinted goggles (15% visual light transmission). Control group workers (n = 9, mean age +/- SD = 42.0 +/- 7.2 years) were observed in their habitual work environments. On work days, participants maintained regular sleep/wake schedules including a single 8-h sleep/darkness episode beginning 2 h after the end of the night shift. A second 36-h constant routine was performed following the series of night shifts. In the presence of the intervention, circadian rhythms of core body temperature and salivary melatonin cycles were delayed by an average (+/- SEM) of -9.32 +/- 1.06 h and -11.31 +/- 1.13 h, respectively. These were significantly greater than the phase delays of -4.09 +/- 1.94 h and -5.08 +/- 2.32 h displayed by the control group (p = 0.03 and p = 0.02, respectively). The phase angle between circadian markers and the shifted schedule was reestablished to its baseline position only in the treatment group of workers. These results support the efficacy of a practical intervention for promoting circadian adaptation to night-shift work under field conditions. They also underline the importance of controlling the overall pattern of exposure to light and darkness in

  6. Minimum standard guidelines of care on requirements for setting up a laser room

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhepe Niteen

    2009-08-01

    low humidity and dust free environment for longer life of machines. Patient chair: A dental/cosmetic chair with adjustable task light is a suitable option for patient positioning. The chair should have the option to tilt head down or ′syncope position′ to facilitate resuscitation of a patient in vaso-vagal shock. Maintenance: Annual maintenance contract (AMC is essential after warranty period is over and is essential for insurance purposes. Mobile Laser Unit: Mobile laser units are of relevance in the Indian context to render laser facility available in smaller towns. A laser with fiber optic delivery system can be made mobile after consultation with supplier. However a laser with an articulated arm delivery cannot be made mobile. Proper packing with shock absorbing material is necessary during transportation. The area where lasers are to be moved to and operated should have appropriate facilities as mentioned above. Records: Patient′s health declaration questionnaires, laser register are essential records. Digital photography before and at regular intervals after procedure is an essential record. Detailed informed consent in patients language for each procedure explaining nature of procedure, anesthesia used, and machine used, post operative down time should be signed by patient. Drugs, anesthesia and sterilization: An electrocautery machine to control bleeding, equipments for airway maintenance, other instruments for emergency resuscitation and an emergency drug tray are essential. Standard sterilization practices are adopted. For most of laser procedures topical anesthesia is sufficient. Safe laser use: Protocols of safe laser use to avoid burns or eye damage to patients or operator are adopted. Reflective surfaces like mirrors, reflective jewelleries are not allowed in laser room. Machine should always be on standby mode when not in direct use. It should be used by authorized operator only. Eye protection: Goggles of sufficient optical density (OD intended

  7. Making Physics Matter in Primary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Jackie; Cox, Wendy; Poole, Amanda; Watson, Jenny; Greygoose, Kirstin

    2016-04-01

    "Efforts to broaden students' aspirations, particularly in relation to STEM, need to begin in primary school." Kings College London "Aspires" Research Project 2013 From my outreach activity I have learnt that primary teachers could feel under pressure when faced with delivering the science curriculum. The teachers could be lacking confidence in their subject knowledge, lacking the equipment needed to deliver practical science or lacking enthusiasm for the subject. In addition, English and Mathematics were the subjects that were externally tested and reported to the authorities and so some teachers felt that time for science was being marginalised to ensure the best results in the externally assessed subjects. In my work with The Ogden Trust Primary Science team I have been involved in developing a range of strategies to address some of the issues outlined above. • CPD (Teacher Training) Programme We have provided free training to improve teachers knowledge and understanding of key physics concepts to GCSE standard and a practical workshop consisting of ten investigations, extension and challenge tasks. The teachers each receive a book of lesson plans and a resource box containing a class set of the equipment required. The four year programme covers Forces Light and Sound Electricity Earth & Space • "Phiz Labs" Funding from The Ogden Trust has allowed us to set up science laboratories within primary schools. The pupils have lab coats, goggles and access to a range of equipment that allows them to participate in more practical science activity and open-ended investigative work. My Phiz Lab is in the secondary school where I teach physics and practical workshops for primary pupils and teachers are held there on a regular basis. • Enrichment In order to enthuse and challenge the primary pupils a variety of enrichment activities take place. These include "Physics of Go-Karts" and "Particle Physics for Primary" workshops, competitions and regional Science Fairs

  8. NASA's Great Observatories Celebrate the International Year of Astronomy With a National Unveiling of Spectacular Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    In 1609, Galileo first turned his telescope to the heavens and gave birth to modern astronomy. To commemorate four hundred years of exploring the universe, 2009 is designated the International Year of Astronomy. NASA's Great Observatories - the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray Observatory - are marking the occasion with the release of a suite of images at over 100 planetariums, museums, nature centers, and schools across the country in conjunction with Galileo's birthday on February 15. The selected sites will unveil a large 9-square-foot print of the spiral galaxy Messier 101 that combines the optical view of Hubble, the infrared view of Spitzer, and the X-ray view of Chandra into one multi-wavelength picture. "It's like using your eyes, night vision goggles, and X-ray vision all at the same time," says Dr. Hashima Hasan, lead scientist for the International Year of Astronomy at NASA Headquarters in Washington. Cas A animation Chandra X-ray Image of M101 Participating institutions also will display a matched trio of Hubble, Spitzer, and Chandra images of Messier 101. Each image shows a different wavelength view of the galaxy that illustrates not only the different science uncovered by each observatory, but also just how far astronomy has come since Galileo. Messier 101 is a face-on spiral galaxy about 22 million light-years away in the constellation Ursa Major. It is in many ways similar to, but larger than, our own Milky Way galaxy. Hubble's visible light view shows off the swirls of bright stars and glowing gas that give the galaxy its nickname the Pinwheel Galaxy. In contrast, Spitzer's infrared-light image sees into the spiral arms and reveals the glow of dust lanes where dense clouds can collapse to form new stars. Chandra's X-ray picture uncovers the high-energy features in the galaxy, such as remnants of exploded stars or matter zooming around black holes. The juxtaposition of observations from these three telescopes

  9. MANAGEMENT OF THE PATIENTS WITH EBOLA VIRUS DESEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarenko A.V.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The largest in the history of the Ebola virus disease (EVD outbreak was recorded in 2014. There are 9976 lethal cases from 24282 infected people (data up to 8 March 2015 within a year from the time of its announcement in West African countries. The outbreak started in Guinea then spread to neighbouring Sierra Leone and Liberia across land borders, to Senegal and Mali by ground transportation, and to Nigeria, Spain, United States of America and the United Kingdom by air transport. If in the previous years disease was the problem of endemic countries in Central Africa nowadays it became a major medical and social problem all over the world. The effective licensed drugs for the treatment and prevention of the disease does not currently exist, experimental drugs (ZMapp, TKM-100802, AVI 7537 Sarepta, Favipiravir T705, BCX4430 Biocryst, Brincidofovir, Nano Silver et al. are extremely limited, and they are still under investigation. Evidence their effectiveness is suggestive, but not based on solid scientific data from clinical trials. Safety is also unknown. There is consensus that the hyperimmune globulin or convalescent plasma containing high titres of specific neutralizing antibodies to Ebola virus, which leads to decrease the viral load in the blood, is considering to use in an epidemic area as a matter of priority. Experience has shown that the risk of EVD importation into Ukraine remains high despite all preventive measures. Thereby health care providers should be prepared to confront this problem and know how to manage the symptoms of the disease. The management of the patients with EVD mainly should be aimed to early recognition of severe disease and its complications, in combination with appropriate symptomatic therapy. Health care workers should pay careful attention to standard precautions and wear special protective clothing, including goggles, masks and gloves while providing clinical care. Management of intoxication, dehydration

  10. Efficient operation of the liquid nitrogen supply station for the cryogenic equipment of the pilot plant for tritium and deuterium separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gherghinescu, Sorin; Popescu, Gheorghe

    2009-01-01

    Full text: At liquid nitrogen temperature the materials lose their elastic properties and become brittle. Protecting the personnel working with liquid nitrogen becomes difficult and to avoid accidents special equipment is used as helmets, gloves, goggles, special footwear, etc. The liquid nitrogen can destroy insulation of electrical cables, and so short circuits and electrocution can occur. Objects made of carbon steel (like pipes, props, containers, pillars, metal roofs, etc) when cooled by a sufficient amount of cryogenic liquid can break down to minimal mechanical stresses. Exceedingly dangerous is liquid nitrogen entered and retained into carbon steel ducts carrying pressured gas (even et low pressure values), since their cooling at extremely low temperatures can provoke their explosion. Resulting pieces and fragments are dangerous for both personnel and equipment around. The gas components of atmosphere (oxygen, nitrogen, argon) have critical parameters which allow liquefaction only at high pressure. For this reason they are called 'permanent gases'. Consequently, transformed in cryogenic liquids in closed precincts these gases will get totally vaporised when the precincts are not properly thermally isolated. The resulting raised pressure can lead to precinct destruction. For instance such event happens when an amount of liquid nitrogen is isolated into an external pipe between two closed taps while a relief valve is not in place. In such conditions isolation of liquid nitrogen ducts is absolutely necessary. This report reviews various solutions for obtaining an efficient isolation. All thermal isolations aim at reducing the heat transfer. In cryogenics the heat transfer from environment to the fluid in liquid phase is an important factor affecting the efficiency and yield of the liquefaction system. Choosing the type of isolation depends essentially on the specific application. The factors which must be considered are the cooling power, weight, the

  11. Correlation between vestibular and autonomous function after 6 months of spaceflight: Data of the SPIN and GAZE-SPIN experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuyts, Floris; Clement, Gilles; Naumov, Ivan; Kornilova, Ludmila; Glukhikh, Dmitriy; Hallgren, Emma; MacDougall, Hamish; Migeotte, Pierre-Francois; Delière, Quentin; Weerts, Aurelie; Moore, Steven; Diedrich, Andre

    In 13 cosmonauts, the vestibulo-autonomic reflex was investigated before and after 6 months duration spaceflight. Cosmonauts were rotated on the mini-centrifuge VVIS, which is installed in Star City. Initially, this mini-centrifuge flew on board of the Neurolab mission (STS-90), and served to generate intermittent artificial gravity during that mission, with apparent very positive effects on the preservation of the orthostatic tolerance upon return to earth in the 4 crew members that were subjected to the rotations in space. The current experiments SPIN and GAZE-SPIN are control experiments to test the hypothesis that intermittent artificial gravity in space can serve as a counter measure against several deleterious effects of microgravity. Additionally, the effect of microgravity on the gaze holding system is studied as well. Cosmonauts from a long duration stay in the International Space Station were tested on the VVIS (1 g centripetal interaural acceleration; consecutive right-ear-out anti-clockwise and left-ear-out clockwise measurement) on 5 different days. Two measurements were scheduled about one month and a half prior to launch and the remaining three immediately after their return from space (typically on R+2, R+4, R+9; R = return day from space). The ocular counter roll (OCR) as a measure of otolith function was measured on before, during and after the rotation in the mini centrifuge, using infrared video goggles. The perception of verticality was monitored using an ultrasound system. Gaze holding was tested before, during and after rotation. After the centrifugation part, the crew was installed on a tilt table, and instrumented with several cardiovascular recording equipment (ECG, continuous blood pressure monitoring, respiratory monitoring), as well as with impedance measurement devices to investigate fluid redistribution throughout the operational tilt test. To measure heart rate variability parameters, imposed breathing periods were included in the

  12. MS Non-Pharmacological Countermeasure to Decrease Landing Sickness and Improve Functional Performance While Disorientad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, M. J. F.; Kreutzberg, G. A.; Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Mulavara, A. P.; Reschke, M. F.

    2017-01-01

    subjects (n=20) participated in two test sessions, one in which they received +/-400 microA of SVS and one where they received no stimulation (0 microA); the study design was counterbalanced. Subjects began by performing a series of four functional tasks 3-5 times as baseline measurements of task performance. Then, to induce MS, subjects walked an obstacle course with up-down reversing prisms. If they completed the course before achieving our pre-determined level of MS, they were asked to read a poster while making large up-down head movements to a metronome while still wearing the reversing prism goggles. Subjects were stopped every two minutes and asked to report their MS symptoms. Using the Pensacola Scale for motion sickness, test operators evaluated the level of MS of each subject. Once a subject reached an 8 on this scale, which is equivalent to mild malaise, or 30 minutes had passed since the start of the MS induction, this protocol was stopped. Finally, immediately after MS induction, subjects were asked to complete the four functional tasks again. Although, 100% of our subjects experienced at least one MS symptom, only 55% of our subjects experienced stomach awareness to any degree. Without SVS, only 40% of subjects lasted the full 30-minute MS induction protocol, while 65% of subjects lasted the full 30 minutes with SVS, which is nearly a significant increase (p=0.056). In addition, subjects showed significant improvement from baseline when performing a tandem walk and a prone-to-stand test immediately after the MS induction protocol was stopped but the stimulation level was continued. The results are promising and future work includes comparing MS progression between PMZ and SVS directly in subjects that are provoked to a minimum of nausea. Low levels of SVS stimulation may serve as a non-pharmacological countermeasure to replace or reduce the PMZ dosage requirements and concurrently improve functional performance during transitions to new gravitational

  13. Handedness of children determines preferential facial and eye movements related to hemispheric specialization La lateralidad manual determina la preferencia motora ocular y facial en relación con la especialización hemisférica en niños

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmina Arteaga

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite repeated demonstrations of asymmetries in several brain functions, the biological bases of such asymmetries have remained obscure. OBJECTIVE: To investigate development of lateralized facial and eye movements evoked by hemispheric stimulation in right-handed and left-handed children. METHOD: Fifty children were tested according to handedness by means of four tests: I. Mono-syllabic non-sense words, II. Tri-syllabic sense words, III. Visual field occlusion by black wall, and presentation of geometric objects to both hands separately, IV. Left eye and the temporal half visual field of the right eye occlusion with special goggles, afterwards asking children to assemble a three-piece puzzle; same tasks were performed contra-laterally. RESULTS: Right-handed children showed higher percentage of eye movements to right side when stimulated by tri-syllabic words, while left-handed children shown higher percentages of eyes movements to left side when stimulated by the same type of words. Left-handed children spent more time in recognizing non-sense mono-syllabic words. Hand laterality correlated with tri-syllabic word recognition performance. Age contributed to laterality development in nearly all cases, except in second test. CONCLUSION: Eye and facial movements were found to be related to left- and right-hand preference and specialization for language development, as well as visual, haptic perception and recognition in an age-dependent fashion in a complex process.CONTEXTO: A pesar de las repetidas demostraciones de asimetría en varias funciones cerebrales, sus bases biológicas permanecen no bien conocidas aún. OBJECTIVO: Investigamos el desarrollo de la lateralización de los movimientos faciales y oculares provocados por la estimulación hemisférica preferencial en niños diestros y zurdos. MÉTODO: Se examinaron 50 niños que se dividieron de acuerdo a su lateralidad manual, se les aplicaron 4 pruebas: I. Discriminación de

  14. Aspek Keselamatan Kerja Pada Proses Pembentukan Batu Permata Menggunakan Mesin Gerinda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anom Santiana

    2015-07-01

    small pieces with a particular technique by usinga grinding cut. Next process is shaping. Small pieces of rock that has been formed by using agrindstone shapes adapted to suit customer orders or crafters own. While the end of theconstruction process of this gemstone is rubbed or hone gemstone so that smooth and shine. Ineach of these processes would have a risk of occupational accidents. The dangers of this grindingmachine include, among others, is a very fast grinding rounds, hit by items thrown out of the eyesharpening grinding machine, sparks coming out, fingers cut off, the dust out, and so on. For thatreasons was conducted observation of 12 workers gemstone craftsmen in Karangasem Bali.Grinding burrs used are the hands, the workload is calculated based on the pulse, musclecomplaints nordic predicted using body map. The results showed that the safety aspect that mustbe considered by the craftsmen is the use of PPE (personal protective equipment such as gloves,masks, and goggles, change in work attitude to be more natural, and working time arrangements.It is necessary for understanding the work procedures in the formation of gemstones before usingthe grinding machine.Keywords: safety, grinding machines, gemstone craftsmen

  15. Adesão às precauções padrão pela equipe do atendimento pré-hospitalar móvel de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil Adherence to standard precautions by the public pre-hospital health team in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Cristine Souza Lopes

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Estudo transversal com profissionais do Serviço de Atendimento Pré-hospitalar de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brasil, com o objetivo de avaliar a adesão às precauções padrão. Instrumento constou de questões sobre conhecimento, atitude e fatores facilitadores à adesão das precauções. Para verificar a adesão considerou-se percentual de adequação: > 75% de respostas corretas. Condutores apresentaram menor e médicos maior grau de conhecimento. No relato das atitudes, profissionais não alcançaram adequação para uso de máscara facial, óculos e equipamento proteção individual (EPI, e, condutores relataram atitude inadequada para todos itens. Na análise univariada, categoria profissional, sexo e unidade de lotação foram associados à adoção das precauções. Já na multivariada, apenas categoria profissional (condutor e técnico/auxiliar enfermagem. Fatores facilitadores mais citados para melhorar adesão foram: treinamentos sobre infecções, riscos ocupacionais e uso de EPI; reuniões periódicas de equipe; e criação de central para limpeza, desinfecção e esterilização de material. Profissionais do Serviço de Atendimento Pré-hospitalar demonstraram atitudes compatíveis com conhecimento. No entanto, a profissão interferiu no conhecimento das medidas de precaução e no relato de atitudes adequadas.This was a cross-sectional study of workers in the pre-hospital care team in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, aimed at evaluating adherence to precautions. The study instrument included questions on knowledge, attitudes, and facilitating factors for adherence to standard precautions. Adherence was verified by percentage of adequacy: > 75% correct answers. Drivers showed the lowest degree of knowledge and physicians the highest. In self-reported answers, none of the workers demonstrated adequate use of face masks, goggles, or personal protective equipment (PPE, and drivers reported inadequate attitudes on all

  16. Avaliação do equilíbrio estático de crianças e adolescentes com síndrome de Down Static balance assessment among children and adolescents with Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHZ Meneghetti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Avaliar o equilíbrio estático de crianças e adolescentes com Síndrome de Down (SD pela Biofotogrametria Computadorizada e verificar a influência da visão nesta situação. MÉTODOS: Participaram 11 crianças e adolescentes com SD e 14 crianças e adolescentes de ambos os gêneros, neurologicamente normais que compuseram o grupo controle. Durante as filmagens, os participantes se mantiveram na posição ortostática com os braços posicionados ao lado do corpo e com os pés paralelos sobre uma superfície plana. As crianças de ambos os grupos foram filmadas na vista anterior (plano frontal e na vista de perfil direito (plano sagital nas condições com visão e sem visão. Nas filmagens na condição de olhos fechados, foram utilizados óculos de natação totalmente vedados, com a finalidade do participante não ter nenhuma informação visual. O instrumento utilizado foi a Biofotogrametria Computadorizada, que serviu como referência angular para verificar as oscilações do corpo em equilíbrio estático. RESULTADOS:As crianças e adolescentes com SD oscilaram mais (pOBJECTIVES: To evaluate static balance and the influence of visual information among children and adolescents with Down Syndrome (DS by means of computerized biophotogrammetry. METHODS: Eleven children and adolescents with DS took part in the study and 14 neurologically normal children and adolescents comprised the control group (both genders. During filming, the subjects remained in the orthostatic position with arms to the side of the body and feet parallel on a flat surface. Both groups were filmed in anterior view (frontal plane and right lateral view (sagittal plane with and without the eyes covered. While being filmed with eyes covered, the subjects wore fully blacked-out swimming goggles to eliminate all visual information. The instrument used was computerized biophotogrammetry, which served as an angular reference for verifying body sway in static stance

  17. An accuracy analysis of Cyberknife tumor tracking radiotherapy according to unpredictable change of respiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Jung Min; Lee, Chang Yeol; Huh, Hyun Do; Kim, Wan Sun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inha university hospital, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    error is a sine curve breathing form, the size of the target of the movement is in response to the 5 mm, 10 mm, 20 mm, respectively, of the average 1.14 ± 0.13 mm, 1.05 ± 0.20 mm, with 2.37 ± 0.17 mm, suddenly for it is variations in breathing, respective average 1.87 ± 0.19 mm, 2.15 ± 0.21 mm, and analyzed with 2.44 ± 0.26 mm. If the correlation error can be defined by the length of the displacement vector in the target track is a sinusoidal breathing mode, the size of the target of the movement in response to 5 mm, 10 mm, 20 mm, respective average 0.84 ± 0.01 mm, 0.70 ± 0.13 mm, with 1.63 ± 0.10 mm, if it is a variant of sudden breathing respective average 0.97 ± 0.06 mm, 1.44 ± 0.11 mm, and analyzed with 1.98 ± 0.10 mm. The larger the correlation error values in both the both the respiratory form, the target error value is large. If the motion size of the target of the sine curve breathing form is greater than or equal to 20 mm, was measured at 1.5 mm or more is a recommendation value of both cyber knife manufacturer of both error value. Conclusion : There is a tendency that the correlation error value between about target error value magnitude of the target motion is large is increased, the error value becomes large in variation of rapid respiration than breathing the form of a sine curve. The more the shape of the breathing large movements regular shape of sine curves target accuracy of the tumor tracking system can be judged to be reduced. Using the algorithm of Cyber-Knife tumor tracking system, when there is a change in the sudden unpredictable respiratory due patient coughing during treatment enforcement is to stop the treatment, it is assumed to carry out the internal target validation process again, it is necessary to readjust the form of respiration. Patients under treatment is determined to be able to improve the treatment of accuracy to induce the observed form of regular breathing and put like to see the goggles monitor capable of the

  18. An accuracy analysis of Cyberknife tumor tracking radiotherapy according to unpredictable change of respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Jung Min; Lee, Chang Yeol; Huh, Hyun Do; Kim, Wan Sun

    2015-01-01

    error is a sine curve breathing form, the size of the target of the movement is in response to the 5 mm, 10 mm, 20 mm, respectively, of the average 1.14 ± 0.13 mm, 1.05 ± 0.20 mm, with 2.37 ± 0.17 mm, suddenly for it is variations in breathing, respective average 1.87 ± 0.19 mm, 2.15 ± 0.21 mm, and analyzed with 2.44 ± 0.26 mm. If the correlation error can be defined by the length of the displacement vector in the target track is a sinusoidal breathing mode, the size of the target of the movement in response to 5 mm, 10 mm, 20 mm, respective average 0.84 ± 0.01 mm, 0.70 ± 0.13 mm, with 1.63 ± 0.10 mm, if it is a variant of sudden breathing respective average 0.97 ± 0.06 mm, 1.44 ± 0.11 mm, and analyzed with 1.98 ± 0.10 mm. The larger the correlation error values in both the both the respiratory form, the target error value is large. If the motion size of the target of the sine curve breathing form is greater than or equal to 20 mm, was measured at 1.5 mm or more is a recommendation value of both cyber knife manufacturer of both error value. Conclusion : There is a tendency that the correlation error value between about target error value magnitude of the target motion is large is increased, the error value becomes large in variation of rapid respiration than breathing the form of a sine curve. The more the shape of the breathing large movements regular shape of sine curves target accuracy of the tumor tracking system can be judged to be reduced. Using the algorithm of Cyber-Knife tumor tracking system, when there is a change in the sudden unpredictable respiratory due patient coughing during treatment enforcement is to stop the treatment, it is assumed to carry out the internal target validation process again, it is necessary to readjust the form of respiration. Patients under treatment is determined to be able to improve the treatment of accuracy to induce the observed form of regular breathing and put like to see the goggles monitor capable of the

  19. Chemical Achievers: The Human Face of the Chemical Sciences (by Mary Ellen Bowden)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, George B.

    1999-02-01

    (formal and informal, familiar and unfamiliar), caricatures, apparatus, patent drawings, models, manuscripts, memoranda, laboratories, and plants and buildings are featured. The book presents many images of chemists in the work settings where they actually made their discoveries. The quaint pictures of Chandler with his wash bottle, William H. Walker with his slide rule, Carl Djerassi peering at a flask without goggle protection, and Edward Goodrich Acheson with his omnipresent cigar evoke a bygone era that will induce nostalgia in instructors and curiosity or disbelief in students. Many of the 80 featured chemists are minority scientists; 10 are women (Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin, Marie Curie, Iréne Joliot-Curie, Mme. Lavoisier, Rosalind Franklin, Stephanie L. Kwolek, Ellen Swallow Richards, Alice Hamilton, Rachel Carson, and Julia Brainerd Hall, whose role in her brother Charles Martin Hall's development of the electrolytic production of metal is underappreciated), and three are African-Americans (Percy Lavon Julian, Walter Lincoln Hawkins, and Henry Aaron Hill). The book's 11 sections, each prefaced with a short, helpful summary, and the number of scientists profiled in each are Forerunners, 4; Theory and Production of Gases, 4; Electrochemistry and Electrochemical Industries, 12; The Path to the Periodic Table, 9; Atomic and Nuclear Structure, 9; Chemical Synthesis, Structure, and Bonding, 9; Pharmaceuticals and the Path to Biomolecules, 10; Petroleum and Petrochemicals, 4; Plastics and Other Polymers, 6; Chemical Engineering (most of whose practitioners were unfamiliar to me), 6; and Human and Natural Environmental Concerns, 7. An extensive bibliography (five double-column pages), arranged according to these sections, includes books, articles, dissertations, collections, and oral histories. Items as recent as 1997 and even a 1998 book in press are cited. An index (three triple-column pages) facilitates location of material. Chemical Achievers is to some extent similar

  20. The effects of various visual conditions on the gait cycle in children with different level of motor coordination-a pilot study. [Cómo afectan diferentes condiciones visuales a la marcha en niños con diferente nivel de coordinación motriz- un studio piloto].

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Palomo-Nieto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The importance of vision and the visual control of movement have been addressed in the literature related to motor control. Many studies have demonstrated that children with low motor competence in comparison to their typically developing peers may rely more heavily on vision to perform movements. The aim of the study was to highlight the effects of different visual conditions on motor performance during walking in children with different levels of motor coordination. Participants (n=8, Mean age = 8.5±.5 years were divided into typical development (TD and low motor coordination (LMC group. They were asked to walk along a 10-meter walkway provided by Optojump-Next instrument that was placed in a portable construction (15 x 3 x 2.5m. This construction was surrounded by dark blue fibers in which all participants perceived the same visual information. They walked in a self-selected speed under four visual conditions: full vision (FV, limited vision 150 ms (LV-150, limited vision 100 ms (LV-100 and non-vision (NV. For visual occlusion during walking in LV-150 and LV-100, participants were equipped with Plato Goggles that opened for 150 and 100 ms, respectively, within each 2 sec. Data were analyzed in a two-way mixed between-within ANOVA including 2 (groups: TD vs. LMC x 4 (visual condition: FV, LV-150, LV-100 & NV with repeated-measures on the last factor (p≤.05. Results indicated that TD children walked faster and with longer strides than LMC children in which these parameters can influence on different periods of gait cycle including stance and swing phases. Also, perceiving visual information for 150 ms in comparison to 100 ms while walking was enough for similar performance in FV condition. The present findings highlight underlying parameters of gait cycle for walking in TD compared to LMC children are different. Resumen La importancia de la visión y del control visual en el movimiento es un asunto ampliamente abordado y tratado en la