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Sample records for godiva iv reactor

  1. Dosimetry characterization of the Godiva Reactor under burst conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickman, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Heinrichs, D. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hudson, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wong, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ward, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, C. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Clark, L. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Trompier, F. [Inst. for Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2017-06-22

    A series of sixteen (16) burst irradiations were performed in May 2014, fifteen of which were part of an international collaboration to characterize the Godiva IV fast burst reactor at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC). Godiva IV is a bare cylindrical assembly of approximately 65 kg of highly enriched uranium fuel (93.2% 235U metal alloyed with 1.5% molybdenum for strength) and is designed to perform controlled prompt critical excursions (Myers 2010, Goda 2013). Twelve of the irradiations were dedicated to neutron spectral measurements using a Bonner multiple sphere spectrometer. Three irradiations, with core temperature increases of 71.1°C, 136.9°C, and 229.9°C, were performed for generating comparative fluence data, establishing corrections for varying heights, testing linearity with burst temperature, and establishing gamma dose characteristics.

  2. Plan for IER-443 Testing of the Y-12 and AWE Criticality Accident Alarm System Detectors at the Godiva IV Burst Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scorby, J. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hickman, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hudson, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Garbett, S. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Auld, G. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Horrne, A. [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Beller, T. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Goda, J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Haught, C. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Woodrow, C. [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ward, D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-07-24

    This document provides the scope and details of the “Plan for Testing the Y-12 and AWE Criticality Accident Alarm System Detectors at the Godiva IV Burst Reactor”. Due to the relative simplicity of the testing goals, scope, and methodology, the NCSP Manager approved execution of the test when ready. No preliminary CED-1 or final design CED-2 reports were required or issued. The test will subject Criticality Accident Alarm System (CAAS) detectors supplied by Y- 12 and AWE to very intense and short duration mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields. The goals of the test will be to (1) substantiate functionality, for both existing and newly acquired Y- 12 CAAS detectors, and (2) the ability of the AWE detectors to provide quality temporal dose information after a hypothetical criticality accident. ANSI/ANS-8.3.1997 states that the “system shall be sufficiently robust as to actuate an alarm signal when exposed to the maximum radiation expected”, which has been defined at Y-12, in Documented Safety Analyses (DSAs), to be a dose rate of 10 Rad/s. ANSI/ANS-8.3.1997 further states that “alarm actuation shall occur as a result of a minimum duration transient” which may be assumed to be 1 msec. The pulse widths and dose rates which will be achieved in this test will exceed these requirements. Pulsed radiation fields will be produced by the Godiva IV fast metal burst reactor at the National Criticality Experimental Research Center (NCERC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The magnitude of the pulses and the relative distances to the detectors will be varied to afford a wide range of radiation fluence and pulse widths. The magnitude of the neutron and gamma fields will be determined by reactor temperature rise to fluence and dose conversions which have been previously established through extensive measurements performed under IER-147. The requirements for CAAS systems to detect and alarm under a “minimum accident of concern” as well as other

  3. Final Report for the Testing of the Y-12 Criticality Accident Alarm System Detectors at the Godiva IV Burst Reactor (IER-443)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scorby, John C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hickman, David [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hudson, Becka [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beller, Tim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Goda, Joetta [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Haught, Chris [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Woodrow, Christopher [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ward, Dann [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, Chris [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Clark, Leo [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom)

    2018-01-05

    This report documents the experimental conditions and final results for the performance testing of the Y-12 Criticality Accident Alarm System (CAAS) detectors at the Godiva IV Burst Reactor at the National Criticality Experimental Research Center (NCERC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). The testing followed a previously issued test plan and was conducted during the week of July 17, 2017, with completion on Thursday July 20. The test subjected CAAS detectors supplied by Y-12 to very intense and short duration mixed neutron and gamma radiation fields to establish compliance to maximum radiation and minimum pulse width requirements. ANSI/ANS- 8.3.1997 states that the “system shall be sufficiently robust as to actuate an alarm signal when exposed to the maximum radiation expected”, which has been defined at Y-12, in Documented Safety Analyses (DSAs), to be a dose rate of 10 Rad/s. ANSI/ANS-8.3.1997 further states that “alarm actuation shall occur as a result of a minimum duration transient” which may be assumed to be 1 msec. The pulse widths and dose rates provided by each burst during the test exceeded those requirements. The CAAS detectors all provided an immediate alarm signal and remained operable after the bursts establishing compliance to the requirements and fitness for re-deployment at Y-12.

  4. International Intercomparison Exercise for Nuclear Accident Dosimetry at the DAF Using GODIVA-IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hickman, David [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hudson, Becka [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The Nuclear Criticality Safety Program operated under the direction of Dr. Jerry McKamy completed the first NNSA Nuclear Accident Dosimetry exercise on May 27, 2016. Participants in the exercise were from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), Savanah River Site (SRS), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), US Navy, the Atomic Weapons Establishment (United Kingdom) under the auspices of JOWOG 30, and the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (France) by special invitation and NCSP memorandum of understanding. This exercise was the culmination of a series of Integral Experiment Requests (IER) that included the establishment of the Nuclear Criticality Experimental Research Center, (NCERC) the startup of the Godiva Reactor (IER-194), the establishment of a the Nuclear Accident Dosimetry Laboratory (NAD LAB) in Mercury, NV, and the determination of reference dosimetry values for the mixed neutron and photon radiation field of Godiva within NCERC.

  5. Final Design for an International Intercomparison Exercise for Nuclear Accident Dosimetry at the DAF Using Godiva-IV: IER-148 CED-2 Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinrichs, Dave [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Beller, Tim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Burch, Jennifer [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Cummings, Rick [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States) Nevada National Security Site; Duluc, Matthieu [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Sûrete Nucleaire (ISRN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Gadd, Milan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Goda, Joetta [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hickman, David [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McAvoy, Doug [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rathbone, Bruce [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sullivan, Randy [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Trompier, Francois [Inst. de Radioprotection et de Sûrete Nucleaire (ISRN), Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Veinot, Ken [Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ward, Dann [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Will, Rashelle [National Security Technologies, LLC. (NSTec), Mercury, NV (United States) Nevada National Security Site; Wilson, Chris [Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE), Berkshire (United Kingdom); Zieziulewicz, Thomas [Knolls Atomic Power Lab. (KAPL), Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2014-09-30

    This document is the Final Design (CED-2) Report for IER-148, “International Inter-comparison Exercise for Nuclear Accident Dosimetry at the DAF Using Godiva-IV.” The report describes the structure of the exercise consisting of three irradiations; identifies the participating laboratories and their points of contact; provides the details of all dosimetry elements and their placement in proximity to Godiva-IV on support stands or phantoms ; and lists the counting and spectroscopy equipment each laboratory will utilize in the Mercury NAD Lab. The exercise is tentatively scheduled for one week in August 2015.

  6. Generation IV reactors: economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dupraz, B.; Bertel, E.

    2003-01-01

    The operating nuclear reactors were built over a short period: no more than 10 years and today their average age rounds 18 years. EDF (French electricity company) plans to renew its reactor park over a far longer period : 30 years from 2020 to 2050. According to EDF this objective implies 3 constraints: 1) a service life of 50 to 60 years for a significant part of the present operating reactors, 2) to be ready to built a generation 3+ unit in 2020 which infers the third constraint: 3) to launch the construction of an EPR (European pressurized reactor) prototype as soon as possible in order to have it operating in 2010. In this scheme, generation 4 reactor will benefit the feedback experience of generation 3 and will take over in 2030. Economic analysis is an important tool that has been used by the generation 4 international forum to select the likely future reactor systems. This analysis is based on 4 independent criteria: the basic construction cost, the construction time, the operation and maintenance costs and the fuel cycle cost. This analysis leads to the evaluation of the global cost of electricity generation and of the total investment required for each of the reactor system. The former defines the economic competitiveness in a de-regulated energy market while the latter is linked to the financial risk taken by the investor. It appears, within the limits of the assumptions and models used, that generation 4 reactors will be characterized by a better competitiveness and an equivalent financial risk when compared with the previous generation. (A.C.)

  7. Generation IV reactors: international projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, F.; Fiorini, G.L.; Kupitz, J.; Depisch, F.; Hittner, D.

    2003-01-01

    Generation IV international forum (GIF) was initiated in 2000 by DOE (American department of energy) in order to promote nuclear energy in a long term view (2030). GIF has selected 6 concepts of reactors: 1) VHTR (very high temperature reactor system, 2) GHR (gas-cooled fast reactor system), 3) SFR (sodium-cooled fast reactor system, 4) SCWR (super-critical water-cooled reactor system), 5) LFR (lead-cooled fast reactor system), and 6) MFR (molten-salt reactor system). All these 6 reactor systems have been selected on criteria based on: - a better contribution to sustainable development (through their aptitude to produce hydrogen or other clean fuels, or to have a high energy conversion ratio...) - economic profitability, - safety and reliability, and - proliferation resistance. The 6 concepts of reactors are examined in the first article, the second article presents an overview of the results of the international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO) within IAEA. The project finished its first phase, called phase-IA. It has produced an outlook into the future role of nuclear energy and defined the need for innovation. The third article is dedicated to 2 international cooperations: MICANET and HTR-TN. The purpose of MICANET is to propose to the European Commission a research and development strategy in order to develop the assets of nuclear energy for the future. Future reactors are expected to be more multiple-purposes, more adaptable, safer than today, all these developments require funded and coordinated research programs. The aim of HTR-TN cooperation is to promote high temperature reactor systems, to develop them in a long term perspective and to define their limits in terms of burn-up and operating temperature. (A.C.)

  8. Materials for generation-IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, M. G.

    2009-01-01

    Materials science and materials development are key issues for the implementation of innovative reactor systems such as those defined in the framework of the Generation IV. Six systems have been selected for Generation IV consideration: gas-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, molten salt-cooled reactor, sodium-cooled fast reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and very high temperature reactor. The structural materials need to resist much higher temperatures, higher neutron doses and extremely corrosive environment, which are beyond the experience of the current nuclear power plants. For this reason, the first consideration in the development of Generation-IV concepts is selection and deployment of materials that operate successfully in the aggressive operating environments expected in the Gen-IV concepts. This paper summarizes the Gen-IV operating environments and describes the various candidate materials under consideration for use in different structural applications. (author)

  9. Pursuing public and professional perception of nuclear energy with the Smithsonian Lady Godiva replica and demonstration/display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grundl, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    The following topics were addressed by the speaker at the Fast Burst Reactor Workshop banquet: (1) Lady Godiva and the perception of nuclear energy, (2) the question of public and professional perception of nuclear energy, (3) notions of public perception among Lady Godiva replicators, and (4) the nuclear fission chain: complete embodiment of nuclear energy

  10. Sandia Pulse Reactor-IV Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuscher, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed, designed and operated fast burst reactors for over 20 years. These reactors have been used for a variety of radiation effects programs. During this period, programs have required larger irradiation volumes primarily to expose complex electronic systems to postulated threat environments. As experiment volumes increased, a new reactor was built so that these components could be tested. The Sandia Pulse Reactor-IV is a logical evolution of the two decades of fast burst reactor development at Sandia

  11. Generation-IV nuclear reactors, SFR concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufour, P.

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with development of sodium-cooled fast reactors and lead-cooled fast reactors. He concluded that: - SFR is a proved concept that has never achieved industrial deployment; - The GEN IV objectives need to reconsider the design of both the core and the reactor design : innovations are being analysed; Future design will benefit from considerable feedback of design, licensing, construction and operation of PX, SPX, etc.

  12. Experimental facilities for Generation IV reactors research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krecanova, E.; Di Gabriele, F.; Berka, J.; Zychova, M.; Macak, J.; Vojacek, A.

    2013-06-01

    Centrum Vyzkumu Rez (CVR) is research and development Company situated in Czech Republic and member of the UJV group. One of its major fields is material research for Generation IV reactor concepts, especially supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), very high temperature/gas-cooled fast reactor (VHTR/GFR) and lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR). The CVR is equipped by and is building unique experimental facilities which simulate the environment in the active zones of these reactor concepts and enable to pre-qualify and to select proper constructional materials for the most stressed components of the facility (cladding, vessel, piping). New infrastructure is founded within the Sustainable Energy project focused on implementation the Generation IV and fusion experimental facilities. The research of SCWR concept is divided to research and development of the constructional materials ensured by SuperCritical Water Loop (SCWL) and fuel components research on Fuel Qualification Test loop (SCWL-FQT). SCWL provides environment of the primary circuits of European SCWR, pressure 25 MPa, temperature 600 deg. C and its major purpose is to simulate behavior of the primary medium and candidate constructional materials. On-line monitoring system is included to collect the operational data relevant to experiment and its evaluation (pH, conductivity, chemical species concentration). SCWL-FQT is facility focused on the behavior of cladding material and fuel at the conditions of so-called preheater, the first pass of the medium through the fuel (in case of European SCWR concept). The conditions are 450 deg. C and 25 MPa. SCWL-FQT is unique facility enabling research of the shortened fuel rods. VHTR/GFR research covers material testing and also cleaning methods of the medium in primary circuit. The High Temperature Helium Loop (HTHL) enables exposure of materials and simulates the VHTR/GFR core environment to analyze the behavior of medium, especially in presence of organic compounds and

  13. Transient Analysis Needs for Generation IV Reactor Concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siefken, L.J.; Harvego, E.A.; Coryell, E.W.; Davis, C.B.

    2002-01-01

    The importance of nuclear energy as a vital and strategic resource in the U. S. and world's energy supply mix has led to an initiative, termed Generation IV by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to develop and demonstrate new and improved reactor technologies. These new Generation IV reactor concepts are expected to be substantially improved over the current generation of reactors with respect to economics, safety, proliferation resistance and waste characteristics. Although a number of light water reactor concepts have been proposed as Generation IV candidates, the majority of proposed designs have fundamentally different characteristics than the current generation of commercial LWRs operating in the U.S. and other countries. This paper presents the results of a review of these new reactor technologies and defines the transient analyses required to support the evaluation and future development of the Generation IV concepts. The ultimate objective of this work is to identify and develop new capabilities needed by INEEL to support DOE's Generation IV initiative. In particular, the focus of this study is on needed extensions or enhancements to SCDAP/RELAP5/3D code. This code and the RELAP5-3D code from which it evolved are the primary analysis tools used by the INEEL and others for the analysis of design-basis and beyond-design-basis accidents in current generation light water reactors. (authors)

  14. Policy-induced market introduction of Generation IV reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heek, Aliki Irina van; Roelofs, Ferry

    2011-01-01

    Almost 10 years ago the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) started the Generation IV Initiative (GenIV) with 9 other national governments with a positive ground attitude towards nuclear energy. Some of these Generation IV systems, like the fast reactors, are nearing the demonstration stage. The question on how their market introduction will be implemented becomes increasingly urgent. One main topic for future reactor technologies is the treatment of radioactive waste products. Technological solutions to this issue are being developed. One possible process is the transformation of long-living radioactive nuclides into short living ones; a process known as transmutation, which can be done in a nuclear reactor only. Various Generation IV reactor concepts are suitable for this process, and of these systems most experience has been gained with the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR). However, both these first generation SFR plants and their Generation IV successors are designed as electricity generating plants, and therefore supposed to be commercially viable in the electricity markets. Various studies indicate that the generation costs of a combined LWR-(S)FR nuclear generating park (LWR: light water reactor) will be higher than that of an LWR-only park. To investigate the effects of the deployment of the different reactors and fuel cycles on the waste produced, resources used and costs incurred as a function of time, a dynamic fuel cycle assessment is performed. This study will focus on the waste impact of the introduction of a fraction of fast reactors in the European nuclear reactor park with a cost increase as described in the previous paragraph. The nuclear fuel cycle scenario code DANESS is used for this, as well as the nuclear park model of the EU-27 used for the previous study. (orig.)

  15. Generation IV nuclear reactors: Current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Locatelli, Giorgio; Mancini, Mauro; Todeschini, Nicola

    2013-01-01

    Generation IV nuclear power plants (GEN IV NPPs) are supposed to become, in many countries, an important source of base load power in the middle–long term (2030–2050). Nowadays there are many designs of these NPPs but for political, strategic and economic reasons only few of them will be deployed. International literature proposes many papers and reports dealing with GEN IV NPPs, but there is an evident difference in the types and structures of the information and a general unbiased overview is missing. This paper fills the gap, presenting the state-of-the-art for GEN IV NPPs technologies (VHTR, SFR, SCWR, GFR, LFR and MSR) providing a comprehensive literature review of the different designs, discussing the major R and D challenges and comparing them with other advanced technologies available for the middle- and long-term energy market. The result of this research shows that the possible applications for GEN IV technologies are wider than current NPPs. The economics of some GEN IV NPPs is similar to actual NPPs but the “carbon cost” for fossil-fired power plants would increase the relative valuation. However, GEN IV NPPs still require substantial R and D effort, preventing short-term commercial adoption. - Highlights: • Generation IV reactors are the middle–long term technology for nuclear energy. • This paper provides an overview and a taxonomy for the designs under consideration. • R and D efforts are in the material, heat exchangers, power conversion unit and fuel. • The life cycle costs are competitive with other innovative technologies. • The hydrogen economy will foster the development of Generation IV reactors

  16. Overview of Generation IV (Gen IV) Reactor Designs - Safety and Radiological Protection Considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baudrand, Olivier; Blanc, Daniel; Ivanov, Evgeny; Bonneville, Herve; Clement, Bernard; Kissane, Martin; Meignen, Renaud; Monhardt, Daniel; Nicaise, Gregory; Bourgois, Thierry; Bruna, Giovanni; Hache, Georges; Repussard, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide an updated overview of specific safety and radiological protection issues for all the reactor concepts adopted by the GIF (Generation IV International Forum), independent of their advantages or disadvantages in terms of resource optimization or long-lived-waste reduction. In particular, this new document attempts to bring out the advantages and disadvantages of each concept in terms of safety, taking into account the Western European Nuclear Regulators' Association (WENRA) statement concerning safety objectives for new nuclear power plants. Using an identical framework for each reactor concept (sodium-cooled fast reactors or SFR, high / very-high temperature helium-cooled reactors of V/HTR, gas-cooled fast reactors or GFR, lead-or lead / bismuth-cooled fast reactors or LFR, molten salt reactors or MSR, and supercritical-water-cooled reactors or SCWR), this summary report provides some general conclusions regarding their safety and radiological protection issues, inspired by WENRA's safety objectives and on the basis of available information. Initial lessons drawn from the events at the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 have also been taken into account in IRSN's analysis of each reactor concept

  17. Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anghel, C.; Penttilae, S.

    2010-03-01

    A network for material issues for Generation IV nuclear power has been initiated within the Nordic countries. The objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) are to put the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen IV issues, especially focussing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Other issues include reactor physics, dynamics and diagnostics, core and fuel design. The present report summarizes the work performed during the year 2009. The efforts made include identification of organisations involved in Gen IV issues in the Nordic countries, update of the forum website, http://www.studsvik.se/GenerationIV, and investigation of capabilities for research within the area of Gen IV. Within the NOMAGE4 project a seminar on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems has been organized during 15-16th of October 2009. The aim of the seminar was to provide a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. As an outcome of the NOMAGE4, a few collaboration project proposals have been prepared/planned in 2009. The network was welcomed by the European Commission and was mentioned as an exemplary network with representatives from industries, universities, power companies and research institutes. NOMAGE4 has been invited to participate to the 'European Energy Research Alliance, EERA, workshop for nuclear structural materials' http://www.eera-set.eu/index.php?index=41 as external observers. Future plans include a new Nordic application for continuation of NOMAGE4 network. (author)

  18. Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anghel, C. (Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)); Penttilae, S. (Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT (Finland))

    2010-03-15

    A network for material issues for Generation IV nuclear power has been initiated within the Nordic countries. The objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) are to put the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen IV issues, especially focussing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Other issues include reactor physics, dynamics and diagnostics, core and fuel design. The present report summarizes the work performed during the year 2009. The efforts made include identification of organisations involved in Gen IV issues in the Nordic countries, update of the forum website, http://www.studsvik.se/GenerationIV, and investigation of capabilities for research within the area of Gen IV. Within the NOMAGE4 project a seminar on Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems has been organized during 15-16th of October 2009. The aim of the seminar was to provide a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. As an outcome of the NOMAGE4, a few collaboration project proposals have been prepared/planned in 2009. The network was welcomed by the European Commission and was mentioned as an exemplary network with representatives from industries, universities, power companies and research institutes. NOMAGE4 has been invited to participate to the 'European Energy Research Alliance, EERA, workshop for nuclear structural materials' http://www.eera-set.eu/index.php?index=41 as external observers. Future plans include a new Nordic application for continuation of NOMAGE4 network. (author)

  19. ASTRID, Generation IV advanced sodium technological reactor for industrial demonstration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauche, F.

    2013-01-01

    ASTRID (Advanced Sodium Technological Reactor for Industrial Demonstration) is an integrated technology demonstrator designed to demonstrate the operability of the innovative choices enabling fast neutron reactor technology to meet the Generation IV criteria. ASTRID is a sodium-cooled fast reactor with an electricity generating power of 600 MWe. In order to meet the generation IV goals, ASTRID will incorporate the following decisive innovations: -) an improved core with a very low, even negative void coefficient; -) the possible installation of additional safety devices in the core. For example, passive anti-reactivity insertion devices are explored; -) more core instrumentation; -) an energy conversion system with modular steam generators, to limit the effects of a possible sodium-water reaction, or sodium-nitrogen exchangers; -) considerable thermal inertia combined with natural convection to deal with decay heat; -)elimination of major sodium fires by bunkerization and/or inert atmosphere in the premises; -) to take into account off-site hazards (earthquake, airplane crash,...) right from the design stage; -) a complete rethink of the reactor architecture in order to limit the risk of proliferation. ASTRID will also include systems for reducing the length of refueling outages and increasing the burn-up and the duration of the cycle. In-service inspection, maintenance and repair are also taken into account right from the start of the project. The ASTRID prototype should be operational by about 2023. (A.C.)

  20. Effect on introduction of GEN IV nuclear reactor on environment friendliness in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Y. H.; Oh, W. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Lee, K. J.

    2002-01-01

    Nowadays GEN IV - international project for future type(Generation IV) nuclear reactor - is studied actively. Introduction of Fast Reactor and Acceleration Driven System which are GEN IV type reactors can reduce High Level Waste through the nuclear fuel cycle including them. In this study, some fuel cycle schemes including these types of reactors are to be analyzed in a view of material flow by new made calculation tool compared to scheme by only thermal reactors. In view of the results so far achieved in this study, introduction of Gen IV type reactors gives an advantage over another cases

  1. Generation IV: new reactor systems; Neue Reaktorsysteme innerhalb der Generation IV Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starflinger, J.; Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). IKET; Hofmeister, J. [RWE Power AG, Regenerative Stromerzeugung, Essen (Germany); Tromm, W. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Programm Nukleare Sicherheitsforschung

    2006-07-01

    Generation IV, an initiative for international cooperation in nuclear technology, was launched by 10 states in 2000 and joined by Euratom in July 2003. Its aim is to assess nuclear energy systems complying with future safety, disposal, proliferation, and public acceptance requirements. The Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe focuses on design, thermohydraulics, and neutron kinetics. Work is mainly devoted to the high-performance light water reactor (HPLWR) with supercritical steam conditions. Thus, competence can be maintained, as the HPLWR issues qualify for later work in nuclear industry. (orig.)

  2. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2008-08-01

    Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of

  3. European project SARGEN IV: safety approach and assessment of GEN IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammirabile, L.

    2013-01-01

    • SARGEN I V has elaborated a proposal for the harmonization of safety assessment practices for GEN IV NPP. • An overall reinforcement of DiD is expected for GEN I V NPP, including improved independence between all levels of DiD. • An inherent approach should reinforce the fulfillment of fundamental safety functions e.g. the consequences for some situations should be reduced and the grace periods should be extended. For the same reason, the use of passive systems can be envisaged. • The need of complementary and integrated deterministic and probabilistic approaches is reiterated. • Methodologies: Some of them are not yet applied. • Assessment of hazards would be a challenging aspect of next generation of NPP safety assessment and should be improved, which is confirmed by the first insights of Fukushima Daiichi TEPCO reactors accidents. • Provisions to cope with extreme events notably to improve the grace period before cliff-edge effects and thus allowing back-up measures to be implemented have to be defined and should be considered as hardened equipments

  4. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2). Detailed structure and user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Saitou, Hiroaki.

    1997-11-01

    A light water reactor fuel behavior analysis code FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2) was developed as an improved version of FEMAXI-IV. Development of FEMAXI-IV has been already finished in 1992, though a detailed structure and input manual of the code have not been open to users yet. Here, the basic theories and structure, the models and numerical solutions applied to FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2), and the material properties adopted in the code are described in detail. In FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2), programming bugs in previous FEMAXI-IV were eliminated, renewal of the pellet thermal conductivity was performed, and a model of thermal-stress restraint on FP gas release was incorporated. For facilitation of effective and wide-ranging application of the code, methods of input/output of the code are also described in detail, and sample output is included. (author)

  5. Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Halsey, William [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hayner, George [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2005-12-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

  6. A Virtual Reality Framework to Optimize Design, Operation and Refueling of GEN-IV Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizwan-uddin; Nick Karancevic; Stefano Markidis; Joel Dixon; Cheng Luo; Jared Reynolds

    2008-01-01

    Many GEN-IV candidate designs are currently under investigation. Technical issues related to material, safety and economics are being addressed at research laboratories, industry and in academia. After safety, economic feasibility is likely to be the most important criterion in the success of GEN-IV design(s). Lessons learned from the designers and operators of GEN-II (and GEN-III) reactors must play a vital role in achieving both safety and economic feasibility goals

  7. A Virtual Reality Framework to Optimize Design, Operation and Refueling of GEN-IV Reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizwan-uddin; Nick Karancevic; Stefano Markidis; Joel Dixon; Cheng Luo; Jared Reynolds

    2008-04-23

    many GEN-IV candidate designs are currently under investigation. Technical issues related to material, safety and economics are being addressed at research laboratories, industry and in academia. After safety, economic feasibility is likely to be the most important crterion in the success of GEN-IV design(s). Lessons learned from the designers and operators of GEN-II (and GEN-III) reactors must play a vital role in achieving both safety and economic feasibility goals.

  8. IGORR-IV: Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Group On Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbalm, K.F.

    1995-01-01

    The fourth meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors (IGORR-IV) was attended by was good 55 registered participants from 28 organizations in 13 countries, which compares well with the previous meetings. Twenty-nine papers were presented in five sessions over the two-day meeting. Session subjects were: Operating Research Reactors and Facility Upgrades; Research Reactors in Desin and Construction; Research, Development, and Analysis Results of Thermal Hydraulic Calculations, U 3 Si 2 Fuel Performance and Faibrication; Structural Materials Performance; Neutronics; Severe Accident analysis. Written versions of the papers or hard copies of the viewgraphs used are published in these Proceedings

  9. Nordic Forum for Generation IV Reactors,Status and activities in 2012

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Nieuwenhove, Rudi; Lauritzen, Bent; Nonbøl, Erik

    The Nordic-Gen4 (continuation from NOMAGE4) seminar was this year hosted by DTU Nutech at Risø, Denmark. The seminar was well attended (49 participants from 12 countries). The presentations covered many as-pects in Gen-IV reactor research and gave a good overview of the activi-ties within this fi...

  10. Standard interface files and procedures for reactor physics codes. Version IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Dell, R.D.

    1977-09-01

    Standards, procedures, and recommendations of the Committee on Computer Code Coordination for promoting the exchange of reactor physics codes are updated to Version IV status. Standards and procedures covering general programming, program structure, standard interface files, and file management and handling subroutines are included

  11. The ARIES-II and ARIES-IV second-stability tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmabadi, F.; Conn, R.W.; Hasan, M.Z.; Mau, T.-K.; Sharafat, S.; Baxi, C.B.; Leuer, J.A.; McQuillan, B.W.; Puhn, F.A.; Schultz, K.R.; Wong, C.P.C.; Brooks, J.; Ehst, D.A.; Hassanein, A.; Hua, T.; Hull, A.; Mattis, R.; Picologlou, B.; Sze, D.-K.; Dolan, T.J.; Herring, J.S.; Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Werley, K.A.; Bromberg, L.; Schultz, J.; Davis, F.; Holmes, J.A.; Lousteau, D.C.; Strickler, D.J.; Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.; Snead, L.; Steiner, D.; Valenti, M.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Emmert, G.A.; Khater, H.Y.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Cheng, E.T.

    1992-01-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-I design is a DT-burning reactor based on modest extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. The ARIES-III study focuses on the potential of tokamaks to operate with D- 3 He fuel system as an alternative to deuterium and tritium. The ARIES-II and ARIES-IV designs have the same fusion plasma but different fusion-power-core designs. The ARIES-II reactor uses liquid lithium as the coolant and tritium breeder and vanadium alloy as the structural material in order to study the potential of low-activation metallic blankets. The ARIES-IV reactor uses helium as the coolant, a solid tritium-breeding material, and silicon carbide composite as the structural material in order to achieve the safety and environmental characteristic of fusion. In this paper the authors describe the trade-off leading to the optimum regime of operation for the ARIES-II and ARIES-IV second-stability reactors and review the engineering design of the fusion power cores

  12. Generation IV SFR Nuclear Reactors: Under Sodium Robotics for ASTRID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouan-de-Kervenoael, T.; Rey, F.; Baque, F.

    2013-06-01

    For non-removable components of the future ASTRID prototype, repair operations will be performed in a gas environment. If the faulty area is located under the sodium free level, the gas-tight system will have to contain the inspection and repair tools and to protect them from the surrounding liquid sodium. Concerning repair tools, the unique laser tool has been selected for future SFRs: the repair scenario for in-sodium structures will first involve removing the sodium (after bulk draining), then machining and finally welding. Concerning conventional tools (brush or gas blower for sodium removal, milling machine for machining and TIG for welding for which its feasibility was demonstrated in the 1990's) are still considered as a back-up solution. The maintenance of future ASTRID nuclear reactor prototype (inspection, repair) will be performed during shut down periods with some robotic carriers which have to be introduced within the main vessel, in primary 200 deg. C sodium coolant with argon gas cover. Inspection campaigns will be 20 days long. These robots (or carriers) will allow bringing inspection and repairing tools up to concerned components and structures. The needed degrees of freedom associated to these operations will be assumed either directly by the carrier itself or by specifics lower end carrier device for accurate local positioning. Several carriers will be designed, well adapted to specific needs: type of maintenance operation and location of inspection and repair sites. Feedback experience was gained during Superphenix SFR operation with the MIR robot which allowed to successfully make the Non Destructive Examination of main vessel welding joints, the carrier being outside bulk sodium. Operating conditions for the ASTRID robots will be harder from those of the MIR robot: temperature ranging from 180 deg. C to 200 deg. C, radiation dose ranging from 105 to 106 Gy, but mainly direct immersion within liquid sodium coolant. At the design phase of

  13. ASAMPSA2 project: Appliance of LWR PSA2 methodology to GEN IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonneville, H.; Raimond, E.; Bassi, C.; Bertrand, F.; Serre, F.; Brinkman, J.L.; Burgazzi, L.; Jouve, S.; Vincon, L.; Polidoro, F.

    2012-01-01

    The European project ASAMPSA2 (Advanced Safety Assessment Methodology: level 2 PSA) of the 7. Framework Program aims at writing practical guidelines for conducting PSA level 2 studies on Light Water Reactors (PWR and BWR). The project includes also a supplemental task dealing with GEN IV reactors. Two main objectives are assigned to this task: 1) the verification of the potential compliance of L2PSA guidelines based on PWR/BWR reactors with Generation IV concepts; 2) a brief survey of the modelling needs to describe the new features of GEN IV reactor concepts in terms of performing a level 2 PSA. Taking into account the ASAMPSA2 partners knowledge, the project has focused on four concepts: SFR, LFR, GFR and VHTR. For each of those concepts, a conceptual design was selected as reference: the European Fast Reactor (EFR) for sodium cooled fast reactors, the ELSY project for lead cooled fast reactor, the CEA GFR2400 project and the ANTARES project for VHTR. As a first stage, relevant data for each concept have been collected when available. These included: 1) basic general parameters and design characteristics relevant for safety studies with a specific attention given to passive devices; 2) information about former PSA2 studies on such concepts; 3) expert reviews about accident phenomenology knowledge (like PIRT); 4) list of computational tools developed or used for accident progression studies with, if possible, some basic information about the tools (availability, level of development, validation, documentation). In a second stage, the collected data were used to evaluate the compliance of the LWR guideline chapters with GEN IV concepts. The LWR guidelines may be divided into two main sections: chapters dealing with a specific phenomenon induced by core degradation and chapters dealing with general PSA methodology (like interface between PSA1 and PSA2, human risk assessment, system modelling and the role of expert opinion). The overall conclusion is that methodology

  14. Fast reactor development and worldwide cooperation in Generation-IV International Forum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagayama, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    Objectives of Gen-IV systems development: Goals: Four challenging technology goals have been defined to be applied to innovative nuclear reactor concepts in the 21st century: 1) Safety and Reliability (safe and reliable operation, no offsite emergency response); 2) Sustainability (effective fuel utilization, minimization of nuclear waste); 3) Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection (to assure unattractive and the least desirable route for diversion or theft of weapons-usable materials, and provide increased physical protection against acts of terrorism); 4) Economic Competitiveness (life-cycle cost advantage over other energy resources). Phase: Each Generation-IV reactor system is one of three stages. 1) Viability Phase; 2) Performance Phase; 3) Demonstration Phase. Target: Commercial Deployment is expected around 2030s or beyond

  15. DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mynatt, Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs

  16. Generation IV reactors and the ASTRID prototype: lessons from the Fukushima accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauche, F.

    2012-01-01

    In France, the ASTRID prototype is an industrial demonstrator of a sodium-cooled fast neutron reactor (SFR), fulfilling the criteria for Generation IV reactors. ASTRID will meet safety requirements as stringent as for third generation reactors, and it takes into account lessons from the Fukushima accident. The objectives are to reinforce the robustness of the safety demonstration for all safety functions. ASTRID will feature an innovative core with a negative sodium void coefficient, it will take advantage of the large thermal inertia of SFR for decay heat removal, and will provide for a design either eliminating the sodium-water reaction, or guaranteeing no consequences for safety in case such reaction would take place. (author)

  17. DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mynatt Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

    2003-11-12

    The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs.

  18. Contribution of the IV generation fast reactors to the sustainable development; Contribucion de los reactores rapidos de IV Generacion al desarrollo sustentable

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza G, G.; Klapp E, J.L. [ININ, Centro Nuclear ' Dr. Nabor Carrillo Flores' Carretera Mexico Toluca, S/N. 52750 La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: gmg@nuclear.inin.mx

    2007-07-01

    During the XXI century all the energy forms are necessary for the sustainable development. A balanced energy politics has to use a mixture of energy sources that completes the objective of responding to the increase in the demand and that it uses non emitting gases sources of greenhouse effect like the nuclear one. It is evident the great existent difficulty to turn the objectives of emissions for the coming years without having the nuclear energy. Later on, the process continued outlining serious commitments among the development necessity, the improvement of the level of life and the competitiveness, and the execution from the established environmental requirements to world level. It is very foregone that the energy nuclear become the best energy source to improve the environmental conditions and that new initiatives are determined in those that this energy will have an important paper. The solution is to build a nuclear central of advanced design, using technologies that its help to brake the diffusion of the nuclear weapons. The nucleo electric energy at great scale should be developed on the base of designs of reactors and innovative processes of fuel that can lend technological support to the not nuclear proliferation regime, and that at the same time they contribute to satisfy the electricity demand in the world. In a scenario of increase of energy demand, mainly in the development countries, and of growing interest in the pollutants reduction originated by the use of fossil fuels, the nuclear reactors of IV Generation arise as proposal and challenge. Meanwhile the search of new technologies and innovations become imperative, translating an enormous evolution, not only in the conceptual projects, as well as in the fuel cycle so that, in a scenario of open economy, turn its more competitive. Inside the reactors of fourth generation, the quick reactors are configured as those that more assist to such demands and they will be, without a doubt, the reactors in

  19. Synergies in the design and development of fusion and generation IV fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusch, E.; Carre, F.; Knebel, J.; Aoto, K.

    2007-01-01

    Future fusion reactors or systems and Generation IV fission reactors are designed and developed in worldwide programmes mostly involving the same partners to investigate and assess their potential for realisation and contribution to meet the future energy needs beyond 2030. Huge scientific and financial effort is necessary to meet these objectives. First programmes have been launched in Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for fission and in the Broader Approach for fusion reactor system development. Except the physics basis for the energy source, future fusion and fission reactors, in particular those with fast neutron core face similar design issues and development needs. Therefore the call for the identification of synergies became evident. Beyond ITER cooled by water, future fusion reactors or systems will be designed for helium and liquid metal cooling and higher temperatures similar to those proposed for some of the six fission reactor concepts in GIF with their diverse coolants. Beside materials developments which are not discussed in this paper, design and performance of components and systems related to the diverse coolants including lifetime and maintenance aspects might offer significant potentials for synergies. Furthermore, the use of process heat for applications in addition to electricity production as well as their safety approaches might create synergistic design and development programmes. Therefore an early identification of possible synergies in the relevant programmes should be endorsed to minimise the effort for future power plants in terms of investments and resources. In addition to a general overview of a possible synergistic work programme which promotes the interaction between fusion and fission programmes towards an integrated organisation of their design and R and D programmes, some specific remarks will be given for joint design tools, numerical code systems and joint experiments in support of common technologies. (orig.)

  20. Synergies in the design and development of fusion and generation IV fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogusch, E.; Carre, F.; Knebel, J.U.; Aoto, K.

    2008-01-01

    Future fusion reactor and Generation IV fission reactor systems are designed and developed in worldwide programmes to investigate and assess their potential for realisation and contribution to the future energy needs beyond 2030 mostly involving the same partners. Huge scientific and financial effort is necessary to meet these objectives. First programmes have been launched in Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for fission and in the Broader Approach for fusion reactor system development. Except for the physics basis for the energy source, future fusion and fission reactors, in particular those with fast neutron core, face similar design issues and development needs. Therefore, the call for the identification of synergies became evident. Beyond ITER cooled by water, future fusion reactor systems will be designed for high-temperature helium and liquid metal cooling but also water including supercritical water and molten salt similar to those proposed for some of the six fission reactor concepts in GIF with their diverse coolants. Beside materials developments which are not discussed in this paper, design and performance of components and systems related to the diverse coolants including lifetime and maintenance aspects might offer significant potentials for synergies. Furthermore, the use of process heat for applications in addition to electricity production as well as their safety approaches can create synergistic design and development programmes. Therefore, an early identification of possible synergies in the relevant programmes should be endorsed to minimise the effort for future power plants in terms of investments and resources. In addition to a general overview of a possible synergistic work programme which promotes the interaction between fusion and fission programmes towards an integrated organisation of their design and R and D programmes, some specific remarks will be given for joint design tools, numerical code systems and joint experiments in

  1. Analysis of a Spanish energy scenario with Generation IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa, Raquel; Jimenez, Gonzalo; Perez-Martin, Sara

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • Spanish energy scenario for the hypothetical deployment of Gen-IV SFR reactors. • Availability of national resources is assessed, considering SFR’s breeding. • An assessment of the impact of transmuting MA on the final repository. • SERPENT code with own pre- and post-processing tools were employed. • The employed SFR core design is based on the specifications of the CP-ESFR. - Abstract: The advantages of fast-spectrum reactors consist not only of an efficient use of fuel through the breeding of fissile material and the use of natural or depleted uranium, but also of the potential reduction of the amount of actinides such as americium and neptunium contained in the irradiated fuel. The first aspect means a guaranteed future nuclear fuel supply. The second fact is key for high-level radioactive waste management, because these elements are the main responsible for the radioactivity of the irradiated fuel in the long term. The present study aims to analyze the hypothetical deployment of a Gen-IV Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) fleet in Spain. A nuclear fleet of fast reactors would enable a fuel cycle strategy different than the open cycle, currently adopted by most of the countries with nuclear power. A transition from the current Gen-II to Gen-IV fleet is envisaged through an intermediate deployment of Gen-III reactors. Fuel reprocessing from the Gen-II and Gen-III Light Water Reactors (LWR) has been considered. In the so-called advanced fuel cycle, the reprocessed fuel used to produce energy will breed new fissile fuel and transmute minor actinides at the same time. A reference case scenario has been postulated and further sensitivity studies have been performed to analyze the impact of the different parameters on the required reactor fleet. The potential capability of Spain to supply the required fleet for the reference scenario using national resources has been verified. Finally, some consequences on irradiated final fuel inventory are assessed

  2. The SGR Multipurpose - Generation IV - Transportable Cogeneration Nuclear Reactor with Innovative Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pahladsingh, R.R.

    2002-01-01

    Deregulation and liberalization are changing the global energy-markets. At the same time innovative technologies are introduced in the electricity industry; often as a requirement from the upcoming Digital Society. Energy solutions for the future are more seen as a mix of energy-sources for generation-, transmission- and distribution energy-services. The Internet Energy-web based 'Virtual' enterprises are coming up and will gradually change our society. It the fast changing world we have to realize that there will be less time to look for the adequate solutions to anticipate on global developments and the way they will influence our own societies. Global population may reach 9 billion people by 2030; this will put tremendous pressure on energy-, water- and food supply in the global economy. It is time to think about some major issues as described below and come up with the right answers. These are needed on very short term to secure a humane global economic growth and the sustainable global environment. The DOE (Department of Energy - USA) has started the Generation IV initiative for the new generation of nuclear reactors that must lead to much better safety, economics and public acceptance the new reactors. The SGR (Simplified Gas-cooled Reactor) is being proposed as a Generation IV modular nuclear reactor, using graphite pebbles as fuel, whereby an attempt has been made to meet all the DOE requirements, to be used for future nuclear reactors. The focus in this paper is on the changing and emerging global energy-markets and shows some relevant criteria to the nuclear industry and how we can anticipate with improved and new designs towards the coming Digital Society. (author)

  3. Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV Fission Reactors (Workshop Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoller, RE

    2004-07-15

    The ''Workshop on Advanced Computational Materials Science: Application to Fusion and Generation IV Fission Reactors'' was convened to determine the degree to which an increased effort in modeling and simulation could help bridge the gap between the data that is needed to support the implementation of these advanced nuclear technologies and the data that can be obtained in available experimental facilities. The need to develop materials capable of performing in the severe operating environments expected in fusion and fission (Generation IV) reactors represents a significant challenge in materials science. There is a range of potential Gen-IV fission reactor design concepts and each concept has its own unique demands. Improved economic performance is a major goal of the Gen-IV designs. As a result, most designs call for significantly higher operating temperatures than the current generation of LWRs to obtain higher thermal efficiency. In many cases, the desired operating temperatures rule out the use of the structural alloys employed today. The very high operating temperature (up to 1000 C) associated with the NGNP is a prime example of an attractive new system that will require the development of new structural materials. Fusion power plants represent an even greater challenge to structural materials development and application. The operating temperatures, neutron exposure levels and thermo-mechanical stresses are comparable to or greater than those for proposed Gen-IV fission reactors. In addition, the transmutation products created in the structural materials by the high energy neutrons produced in the DT plasma can profoundly influence the microstructural evolution and mechanical behavior of these materials. Although the workshop addressed issues relevant to both Gen-IV and fusion reactor materials, much of the discussion focused on fusion; the same focus is reflected in this report. Most of the physical models and computational methods

  4. Use of thorium in the generation IV Molten Salt reactors and perspectives for Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seneda, Jose A.; Lainetti, Paulo E.O.

    2013-01-01

    Interest in thorium stems mainly from the fact that it is expected a substantial increase in uranium prices over the next fifty years. The reactors currently in operation consume 65,500 tons of uranium per year. Each electrical gigawatt (GWe) additional need about 200 tU mined per year. So advanced fuel cycles, which increase the reserves of nuclear materials are interesting, particularly the use of thorium to produce the fissile isotope 233 U. It is important to mention some thorium advantages. Thorium is three to five times more abundant than uranium in the earth's crust. Thorium has only one oxidation state. Additionally, thoria produces less radiotoxicity than the UO 2 because it produces fewer amounts of actinides, reducing the radiotoxicity of long life nuclear waste. ThO 2 has higher corrosion resistance than UO 2 , besides being chemically stable due to their low water solubility. The burning of Pu in a reactor based in thorium also decreases the inventories of Pu from the current fuel cycles, resulting in lower risks of material diversion for use in nuclear weapons. There are some ongoing projects in the world, taking into consideration the proposed goals for Generation IV reactors, namely: sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, proliferation resistance and physical protection. Some developments on the use of thorium in reactors are underway, with the support of the IAEA and some governs. Can be highlighted some reactor concepts using thorium as fuel: CANDU; ADTR -Accelerator Driven Thorium Reactor; AHWR -Advanced Heavy Water Reactor proposed by India (light water cooled and moderated by heavy water) and the MSR -Molten Salt Reactor. The latter is based on a reactor concept that has already been successfully tested in the U.S. in the 50s, for use in aircrafts. In this paper, we discuss the future importance of thorium, particularly for Brazil, which has large mineral reserves of this strategic element, the characteristics of the molten salt

  5. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lap-Yan Cheng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow were evaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.

  6. Thermal stability study for candidate stainless steels of GEN IV reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simeg Veternikova, J., E-mail: jana.veternikova@stuba.sk [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Degmova, J. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Pekarcikova, M. [Institute of Materials Science, Faculty of Materials Science and Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Paulinska 16, 917 24 Trnava (Slovakia); Simko, F. [Department of Molten Salts, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia); Petriska, M. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Skarba, M. [Slovak University of Technology, Vazovova 5, 812 43 Bratislava (Slovakia); Mikula, P. [Institute of Nuclear and Physical Engineering, Faculty of Electrical and Information Technology, Slovak University of Technology, Ilkovicova 3, 812 19 Bratislava (Slovakia); Pupala, M. [Department of Molten Salts, Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 845 36 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2016-11-30

    Highlights: • Thermal resistance of advanced stainless steels were observed at 1000 °C. • GEN IV candidate steels were confronted to classic AISI steels. • ODS AISI 316 has weaker thermal resistance than classic AISI steel. • Ferritic ODS steels and NF 709 has better thermal resistance than AISI steels. - Abstract: Candidate stainless steels for GEN IV reactors were investigated in term of thermal and corrosion stability at high temperatures. New austenitic steel (NF 709), austenitic ODS steel (ODS 316) and two ferritic ODS steels (MA 956 and MA 957) were exposed to around 1000 °C in inert argon atmosphere at pressure of ∼8 MPa. The steels were further studied in a light of vacancy defects presence by positron annihilation spectroscopy and their thermal resistance was confronted to classic AISI steels. The thermal strain supported a creation of oxide layers observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  7. Study on Structural Concept Design Improvement for a Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae Han; Joo, Young Sang; Lee, Hyeong Yeon; Kim, Jong Bum; Kim, Seok Hoon; Park, Chang Kyu; Koo, Gyeong Hoi

    2010-02-15

    An economic improvement is a hot issue as one of the Gen-IV nuclear plant goals. To secure economic competitiveness of a SFR compared to a pressurized water reactor, several structural design concepts are adapted in without loosing the reactor safety level. One is the increase of the plant capacity with the minimum number of component and loop, which leads the reduction of the plant maintenance, repair, and construction costs by a large-size scale effect. Another is the simple system arrangement, compact reactor size for only two loop system for a 1200MWe capacity of a pool type SFR, and the minimization of IHTS piping length through the properly locating the SG and secondary pump. Several researches are also studied to attain the economic improvement target of the NSSS in structural point of view; for example, an integrated concept of a refueling machine and inspection device with a long waveguide sensor for reactor internals, a high temperature LBB (leak before break) technology application, which can minimize the large protection facility against a large sodium leak like as a guillotine pipe break

  8. Nordic forum for generation IV reactors, status and activities in 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R.; Lauritzen, B.; Nonboel, E.

    2012-12-01

    The Nordic-Gen4 (continuation from NOMAGE4) seminar was this year hosted by DTU Nutech at Risoe, Denmark. The seminar was well attended (49 participants from 12 countries). The presentations covered many aspects in Gen-IV reactor research and gave a good overview of the activities within this field at the various institutes and universities. The present report contains book of abstracts. The individual Power Point presentations are indexed in INIS and may be found at http://nordic-gen4.org/seminars/nordic-gen4-riso-2012-2/ (LN)

  9. Nordic forum for generation IV reactors, status and activities in 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R. [Institutt for Energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project, Kjeller (Norway); Lauritzen, B.; Nonboel, E. [Technical Univ. of Denmark. DTU Nutech, Roskilde (Denmark)

    2012-12-15

    The Nordic-Gen4 (continuation from NOMAGE4) seminar was this year hosted by DTU Nutech at Risoe, Denmark. The seminar was well attended (49 participants from 12 countries). The presentations covered many aspects in Gen-IV reactor research and gave a good overview of the activities within this field at the various institutes and universities. The present report contains book of abstracts. The individual Power Point presentations are indexed in INIS and may be found at http://nordic-gen4.org/seminars/nordic-gen4-riso-2012-2/ (LN)

  10. Metal Fuel Development and Verification for Prototype Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Chan Bock Lee; Jin Sik Cheon; Sung Ho Kim; Jeong-Yong Park; Hyung-Kook Joo

    2016-01-01

    Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) to be built by 2028. U–Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U–transuranics (TRU)–Zr fuel will gradually replace U–Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U–Zr fuel, work on U–Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U–TRU–Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochem...

  11. ASAMPSA2 best-practices guidelines for L2 PSA development and applications. Volume 3 - Extension to Gen IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassi, C.; Bonneville, H.; Brinkman, H.; Burgazzi, L.; Polidoro, F.; Vincon, L.; Jouve, S.

    2010-01-01

    The main objective assigned to the Work Package 4 (WP4) of the 'ASAMPSA2' project (EC 7. FPRD) consist in the verification of the potential compliance of L2PSA guidelines based on PWR/BWR reactors (which are specific tasks of WP2 and WP3) with Generation IV representative concepts. Therefore, in order to exhibit potential discrepancies between LWRs and new reactor types, the following work was based on the up-to-date designs of: - The European Fast Reactor (EFR) which will be considered as prototypical of a pool-type Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR); - The ELSY design for the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR) technology; - The ANTARES project which could be representative of a Very-High Temperature Reactor (VHTR); - The CEA 2400 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR). (authors)

  12. Assessment of the Technical Maturity of Generation IV Concepts for Test or Demonstration Reactor Applications, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a study the suitability of different advanced reactor concepts to support materials irradiations (i.e. a test reactor) or to demonstrate an advanced power plant/fuel cycle concept (demonstration reactor). As part of the study, an assessment of the technical maturity of the individual concepts was undertaken to see which, if any, can support near-term deployment. A Working Group composed of the authors of this document performed the maturity assessment using the Technical Readiness Levels as defined in DOE’s Technology Readiness Guide . One representative design was selected for assessment from of each of the six Generation-IV reactor types: gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR), molten salt reactor (MSR), supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), and very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Background information was obtained from previous detailed evaluations such as the Generation-IV Roadmap but other technical references were also used including consultations with concept proponents and subject matter experts. Outside of Generation IV activity in which the US is a party, non-U.S. experience or data sources were generally not factored into the evaluations as one cannot assume that this data is easily available or of sufficient quality to be used for licensing a US facility. The Working Group established the scope of the assessment (which systems and subsystems needed to be considered), adapted a specific technology readiness scale, and scored each system through discussions designed to achieve internal consistency across concepts. In general, the Working Group sought to determine which of the reactor options have sufficient maturity to serve either the test or demonstration reactor missions.

  13. Metal Fuel Development and Verification for Prototype Generation IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Bock Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR to be built by 2028. U–Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U–transuranics (TRU–Zr fuel will gradually replace U–Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U–Zr fuel, work on U–Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U–TRU–Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochemical processing of spent PWR (pressurized water reactor fuels, which contains highly radioactive minor actinides and chemically active lanthanide or rare earth elements as carryover impurities. An advanced fuel slug casting system, which can prevent vaporization of volatile elements through a control of the atmospheric pressure of the casting chamber and also deal with chemically active lanthanide elements using protective coatings in the casting crucible, was developed. Fuel cladding of the ferritic–martensitic steel FC92, which has higher mechanical strength at a high temperature than conventional HT9 cladding, was developed and fabricated, and is being irradiated in the fast reactor.

  14. Metal fuel development and verification for prototype generation- IV Sodium- Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chan Bock; Cheon, Jin Sik; Kim, Sung Ho; Park, Jeong Yong; Joo, Hyung Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Metal fuel is being developed for the prototype generation-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) to be built by 2028. U-Zr fuel is a driver for the initial core of the PGSFR, and U -transuranics (TRU)-Zr fuel will gradually replace U-Zr fuel through its qualification in the PGSFR. Based on the vast worldwide experiences of U-Zr fuel, work on U-Zr fuel is focused on fuel design, fabrication of fuel components, and fuel verification tests. U-TRU-Zr fuel uses TRU recovered through pyroelectrochemical processing of spent PWR (pressurized water reactor) fuels, which contains highly radioactive minor actinides and chemically active lanthanide or rare earth elements as carryover impurities. An advanced fuel slug casting system, which can prevent vaporization of volatile elements through a control of the atmospheric pressure of the casting chamber and also deal with chemically active lanthanide elements using protective coatings in the casting crucible, was developed. Fuel cladding of the ferritic-martensitic steel FC92, which has higher mechanical strength at a high temperature than conventional HT9 cladding, was developed and fabricated, and is being irradiated in the fast reactor.

  15. Fundamental Understanding of Crack Growth in Structural Components of Generation IV Supercritical Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iouri I. Balachov; Takao Kobayashi; Francis Tanzella; Indira Jayaweera; Palitha Jayaweera; Petri Kinnunen; Martin Bojinov; Timo Saario

    2004-11-17

    This work contributes to the design of safe and economical Generation-IV Super-Critical Water Reactors (SCWRs) by providing a basis for selecting structural materials to ensure the functionality of in-vessel components during the entire service life. During the second year of the project, we completed electrochemical characterization of the oxide film properties and investigation of crack initiation and propagation for candidate structural materials steels under supercritical conditions. We ranked candidate alloys against their susceptibility to environmentally assisted degradation based on the in situ data measure with an SRI-designed controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) arrangement. A correlation between measurable oxide film properties and susceptibility of austenitic steels to environmentally assisted degradation was observed experimentally. One of the major practical results of the present work is the experimentally proven ability of the economical CDE technique to supply in situ data for ranking candidate structural materials for Generation-IV SCRs. A potential use of the CDE arrangement developed ar SRI for building in situ sensors monitoring water chemistry in the heat transport circuit of Generation-IV SCWRs was evaluated and proved to be feasible.

  16. Progress reports for Gen IV sodium fast reactor activities FY 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J. E.; Tentner, A. M.

    2007-01-01

    for prevention of progression into severe accident conditions (prevention of core melting) or for mitigation of severe accident consequences (mitigation of the impact of core melting to protect public health and safety). Because design measures for severe accident prevention and mitigation are beyond the normal design basis, established regulatory guidelines and codes do not provide explicit identification of the design performance requirements for severe accident accommodation. The treatment of severe accidents is one of the key issues of R and D plans for the Gen IV systems in general, and for the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) in particular. Despite the lack of an unambiguous definition of safety approach applicable for severe accidents, there is an emerging consensus on the need for their consideration for the design. The US SFR program and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in particular have actively studied the potential scenarios and consequences of Hypothetical Core Disruptive Accidents (HCDA) for SFRs with oxide fuel during the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) programs in the 70s and 80s. Later, the focus of the US SFR safety R and D activities shifted to the prevention of all HCDAs through passive safety features of the SFRs with metal fuel in the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) program, and the study of severe accident consequences was de-emphasized. The goal of this paper is to provide an overview of the current SFR safety approach and the role of severe accidents in Japan and France, in preparation for an expected and more active collaboration in this area between the US, Japan, and France

  17. A Cylindrical Shielding Design Concept for the Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, Sunghwan; Kim, Sang Ji

    2014-01-01

    In the Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR), a metal fueled, blanket-free, pool type SFR concept is adopted to acquire the inherent safety characteristics and high proliferation-resistance. In the pool type fast reactor, the intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs), which transfer heat from the primary sodium pool to a secondary sodium loop, are placed inside of the reactor vessel. Hence, secondary sodium passing the IHXs can be radioactivated by a 23 Na(n,g) 24 Na reaction, and radioactivated secondary sodium causes a significant dose in the Steam Generator Building (SGB). Therefore, a typical core of a pool type fast reactor is usually surrounded by a massive quantity of shields. In addition, the blanket composed of depleted uranium plays a role as superior shielding material; a significant increase in shields is required in the blanket-free pool type SFR. In this paper, a new cylindrical shielding design concept is proposed for a blanket-free pool type SFR. In a conventional shielding design, massive axial shields are required to prevent irradiation of secondary sodium passing IHXs and they should be replaced according to the subassembly replacement in spite of negligible depletion of the shielding material. The proposed shielding design concept minimizes the quantity of shields without their replacement. In this paper, a new cylindrical shielding design concept is proposed for a blanket-free pool type SFR such as a PGSFR. The proposed design concept satisfied the dose limit in the steam generator building successfully without introducing a large quantity of B 4 C shielding inside the subassembly

  18. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2). Detailed structure and user`s manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Motoe [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Saitou, Hiroaki

    1997-11-01

    A light water reactor fuel behavior analysis code FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2) was developed as an improved version of FEMAXI-IV. Development of FEMAXI-IV has been already finished in 1992, though a detailed structure and input manual of the code have not been open to users yet. Here, the basic theories and structure, the models and numerical solutions applied to FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2), and the material properties adopted in the code are described in detail. In FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2), programming bugs in previous FEMAXI-IV were eliminated, renewal of the pellet thermal conductivity was performed, and a model of thermal-stress restraint on FP gas release was incorporated. For facilitation of effective and wide-ranging application of the code, methods of input/output of the code are also described in detail, and sample output is included. (author)

  19. Contribution of the IV generation fast reactors to the sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mendoza G, G.; Klapp E, J.L.

    2007-01-01

    During the XXI century all the energy forms are necessary for the sustainable development. A balanced energy politics has to use a mixture of energy sources that completes the objective of responding to the increase in the demand and that it uses non emitting gases sources of greenhouse effect like the nuclear one. It is evident the great existent difficulty to turn the objectives of emissions for the coming years without having the nuclear energy. Later on, the process continued outlining serious commitments among the development necessity, the improvement of the level of life and the competitiveness, and the execution from the established environmental requirements to world level. It is very foregone that the energy nuclear become the best energy source to improve the environmental conditions and that new initiatives are determined in those that this energy will have an important paper. The solution is to build a nuclear central of advanced design, using technologies that its help to brake the diffusion of the nuclear weapons. The nucleo electric energy at great scale should be developed on the base of designs of reactors and innovative processes of fuel that can lend technological support to the not nuclear proliferation regime, and that at the same time they contribute to satisfy the electricity demand in the world. In a scenario of increase of energy demand, mainly in the development countries, and of growing interest in the pollutants reduction originated by the use of fossil fuels, the nuclear reactors of IV Generation arise as proposal and challenge. Meanwhile the search of new technologies and innovations become imperative, translating an enormous evolution, not only in the conceptual projects, as well as in the fuel cycle so that, in a scenario of open economy, turn its more competitive. Inside the reactors of fourth generation, the quick reactors are configured as those that more assist to such demands and they will be, without a doubt, the reactors in

  20. Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vierow, Karen; Aldemir, Tunc

    2009-01-01

    The project entitled, 'Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors', was conducted as a DOE NERI project collaboration between Texas A and M University and The Ohio State University between March 2006 and June 2009. The overall goal of the proposed project was to develop practical approaches and tools by which dynamic reliability and risk assessment techniques can be used to augment the uncertainty quantification process in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and PRA applications for Generation IV reactors. This report is the Final Scientific/Technical Report summarizing the project.

  1. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28

    Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

  2. Pressurized water reactor core instrument tube ruptures: Experimental simulation at the ROSA-IV LSTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukita, Y.; Asaka, H.; Nakamura, H.; Tasaka, K.

    1990-01-01

    A small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) initiated by the rupture of pressurized water reactor (PWR) core instrument tubes was simulated using the ROSA-IV Large Scale Test Facility (LSTF). The experimental results were characterized by a single-phase liquid discharge continuing for a long period until the pressure vessel coolant inventory was significantly depleted. This experiment was analyzed using three advanced LOCA analysis codes, RELAP5/MOD2, TRACPF1/MOD1 and CATHARE-1, to assess the predictive abilities of these codes. Although all these codes simulated the experimental results qualitatively, discrepancies were found between the predictions and data regarding the break flowrate, spatial distribution of coolant in the primary system and core rod temperature responses. (orig.)

  3. A Stochastic Proof of the Resonant Scattering Kernel and its Applications for Gen IV Reactors Type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, B.; Dagan, R.; Broeders, C.H.M.; Lohnert, G.

    2008-01-01

    Monte Carlo codes such as MCNP are widely accepted as almost-reference for reactor analysis. The Monte Carlo Code should therefore use as few as possible approximations in order to produce 'experimental-level' calculations. In this study we deal with one of the most problematic approximations done in MCNP in which the resonances are ignored for the secondary neutron energy distribution, namely the change of the energy and angular direction of the neutron after interaction with a heavy isotope with pronounced resonances. The endeavour of exploiting the influence of the resonances on the scattering kernel goes back to 1944 where E. Wigner and J. Wilkins developed the first temperature dependent scattering kernel. However only in 1998, the full analytical solution for the double differential resonant dependent scattering kernel was suggested by W. Rothenstein and R. Dagan. An independent stochastic approach is presented for the first time to confirm the above analytical kernel with a complete different methodology. Moreover, by manipulating in a subtle manner the scattering subroutine COLIDN of MCNP, it is proven that this very subroutine is, to some extent, inappropriate as well as the relevant explanation in the MCNP manual. The impact of this improved resonance dependent scattering kernel on diverse types of reactors, in particular for the Generation IV innovative core design HTR, is shown to be significant. (authors)

  4. Application of a new cross section library based on ENDF/B-IV to reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima Bezerra, J. de.

    1991-04-01

    The use of the ENDF/B-IV library in the LEOPARD code for the Angra-1 reactor simulation is presented. The results are compared to those obtained using the ENDF/B-II library and show better values for the power distribution but an underestimated global reactivity as compared to experimental results. (F.E.). 1 ref, 55 figs, 1 tab

  5. Development of a High Fidelity System Analysis Code for Generation IV Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hongbin Zhang; Vincent Mousseau; Haihua Zhao

    2008-06-01

    Traditional nuclear reactor system analysis codes such as RELAP and TRAC employ an operator split methodology. In this approach, each of the physics (fluid flow, heat conduction and neutron diffusion) is solved separately and the coupling terms are done explicitly. This approach limits accuracy (first order in time at best) and makes the codes slow in running since the explicit coupling imposes stability restrictions on the time step size. These codes have been extensively tested and validated for the existing LWRs. However, for GEN IV nuclear reactor designs which tend to have long lasting transients resulting from passive safety systems, the performance is questionable and modern high fidelity simulation tools will be required. The requirement for accurate predictability is the motivation for a large scale overhaul of all of the models and assumptions in transient nuclear reactor safety simulation software. At INL we have launched an effort with the long term goal of developing a high fidelity system analysis code that employs modern physical models, numerical methods, and computer science for transient safety analysis of GEN IV nuclear reactors. Modern parallel solution algorithms will be employed through utilizing the nonlinear solution software package PETSc developed by Argonne National Laboratory. The physical models to be developed will have physically realistic length scales and time scales. The solution algorithm will be based on the physics-based preconditioned Jacobian-free Newton-Krylov solution methods. In this approach all of the physical models are solved implicitly and simultaneously in a single nonlinear system. This includes the coolant flow, nonlinear heat conduction, neutron kinetics, and thermal radiation, etc. Including modern physical models and accurate space and time discretizations will allow the simulation capability to be second order accurate in space and in time. This paper presents the current status of the development efforts as

  6. NOMAGE4 activities 2011. Part I, Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors: Status and activities in 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R.

    2012-01-01

    A network for materials issues has been initiated in 2009 within the Nordic countries. The original objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) were to form the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen-IV issues, especially focusing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Over the last years, other issues such as reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, safety and waste have gained in importance (within the network) and therefore the scope of the forum has been enlarged and a more appropriate and more general name, NORDIC-GEN4, has been chosen for the forum. Further, the interaction with non-Nordic countries (such as The Netherlands (JRC, NRG) and Czech Republic (CVR)) will be increased. Within the NOMAGE4 project, a seminar was organized by IFE-Halden during 31 October - 1 November 2011. The seminar attracted 65 participants from 12 countries. The seminar provided a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research reactor needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. The participants could also visit the Halden reactor site and the workshop. (Author)

  7. NOMAGE4 activities 2011. Part I, Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum for Generation IV Reactors: Status and activities in 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Nieuwenhove, R. (Institutt for Energiteknikk, OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway))

    2012-01-15

    A network for materials issues has been initiated in 2009 within the Nordic countries. The original objectives of the Generation IV Nordic Nuclear Materials Forum (NOMAGE4) were to form the basis of a sustainable forum for Gen-IV issues, especially focusing on fuels, cladding, structural materials and coolant interaction. Over the last years, other issues such as reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, safety and waste have gained in importance (within the network) and therefore the scope of the forum has been enlarged and a more appropriate and more general name, NORDIC-GEN4, has been chosen for the forum. Further, the interaction with non-Nordic countries (such as The Netherlands (JRC, NRG) and Czech Republic (CVR)) will be increased. Within the NOMAGE4 project, a seminar was organized by IFE-Halden during 31 October - 1 November 2011. The seminar attracted 65 participants from 12 countries. The seminar provided a forum for exchange of information, discussion on future research reactor needs and networking of experts on Generation IV reactor concepts. The participants could also visit the Halden reactor site and the workshop. (Author)

  8. Unfolding of neutron spectra from Godiva type critical assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, J.T.; Meason, J.L.; Wright, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    The results from three experiments conducted at the White Sands Missile Range Fast Burst Reactor Facility are discussed. The experiments were designed to measure the ''free-field'' neutron leakage spectrum and the neutron spectra from mildly perturbed environments. SAND-II was used to calculate the neutron spectrum utilizing several different trial input spectra for each experiment. Comparisons are made between the unfolded neutron spectrum for each trial input on the basis of the following parameters: average neutron energy (above 10 KeV), integral fluence (above 10 KeV), spectral index and the hardness parameter, phi/sub eq//phi

  9. RB Research nuclear reactor, Annual report for 1995, I-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovic, D.; Milosevic, M.; Pesic, M.; Marinkovic, P.; Ilic, R.; Dasic, N.; Milovanovic, S.; Ljubenov, V.; Petronijevic, M.; Jevremovic, M.

    1995-12-01

    Report on RB reactor operation during 1995 contains 3 parts. Part one contains a brief description of reactor operation and reactor components, relevant dosimetry data and radiation protection issues, personnel and financial data. Part two is devoted to maintenance of the reactor components, namely, fuel, heavy water, reactor vessel, heavy water circulation system, absorption rods and heavy water level-meters, maintenance of electronic, mechanical, electrical and auxiliary equipment. Part three contains data concerned with reactor operation and utilization with a comprehensive list of publications resulting from experiments done at the RB reactor

  10. RB Research nuclear reactor, Annual report for 1996, I-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovic, D.; Milosevic, M.; Pesic, M.; Marinkovic, P.; Ilic, R.; Dasic, N.; Milovanovic, S.; Ljubenov, V.; Petronijevic, M.; Jevremovic, M.

    1996-12-01

    Report on RB reactor operation during 1996 contains 3 parts. Part one contains a brief description of reactor operation and reactor components, relevant dosimetry data and radiation protection issues, personnel and financial data. Part two is devoted to maintenance of the reactor components, namely, fuel, heavy water, reactor vessel, heavy water circulation system, absorption rods and heavy water level-meters, maintenance of electronic, mechanical, electrical and auxiliary equipment. Part three contains data concerned with reactor operation and utilization with a list of publications resulting from experiments done at the RB reactor

  11. Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vierow, Karen; Aldemir, Tunc

    2009-09-10

    The project entitled, “Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors”, was conducted as a DOE NERI project collaboration between Texas A&M University and The Ohio State University between March 2006 and June 2009. The overall goal of the proposed project was to develop practical approaches and tools by which dynamic reliability and risk assessment techniques can be used to augment the uncertainty quantification process in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and PRA applications for Generation IV reactors. This report is the Final Scientific/Technical Report summarizing the project.

  12. Improvement of the decay heat removal characteristics of the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epiney, A. S.

    2010-09-01

    The majority of NPPs worldwide are currently light water reactors, using ordinary water as both coolant and moderator. (...) For the longer-term future, viz. beyond the year 2030, Research and Development is currently ongoing on Generation IV NPPs, aimed at achieving closure of the nuclear fuel cycle, and hence both drastically improved utilization of fuel resources and minimization of long-lived radioactive wastes. Since the very beginning of the international cooperation on Generation IV, viz. the year 2000, the main research interest in Europe as regards the advanced fast-spectrum systems needed for achieving complete fuel cycle closure, has been for the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). However, the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is currently considered as the main back-up solution. Like the SFR, the GFR is an efficient breeder, also able to work as iso-breeder using simply natural uranium as feed and producing waste which is predominantly in the form of fission products. The main drawback of the GFR is the difficulty to evacuate decay heat following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) due to the low thermal inertia of the core, as well as to the low coolant density. The present doctoral research focuses on the improvement of decay heat removal (DHR) for the Generation-IV GFR. The reference GFR system design considered in the thesis is the 2006 CEA concept, with a power of 2400 MWth. The CEA 2006 DHR strategy foresees, in all accidental cases (independent of the system pressure), that the reactor is shut down. For high pressure events, dedicated DHR loops with blowers and heat exchangers are designed to operate when the power conversion system cannot be used to provide acceptable core temperatures under natural convection conditions. For depressurized events, the strategy relies on a dedicated small containment (called the guard containment) providing an intermediate back-up pressure. The DHR blowers, designed to work under these pressure conditions, need to be

  13. Improvement of Sodium Neutronic Nuclear Data for the Computation of Generation IV Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Archier, P.

    2011-01-01

    The safety criteria to be met for Generation IV sodium fast reactors (SFR) require reduced and mastered uncertainties on neutronic quantities of interest. Part of these uncertainties come from nuclear data and, in the particular case of SFR, from sodium nuclear data, which show significant differences between available international libraries (JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, JENDL-4.0). The objective of this work is to improve the knowledge on sodium nuclear data for a better calculation of SFR neutronic parameters and reliable associated uncertainties. After an overview of existing 23 Na data, the impact of the differences is quantified, particularly on sodium void reactivity effects, with both deterministic and stochastic neutronic codes. Results show that it is necessary to completely re-evaluate sodium nuclear data. Several developments have been made in the evaluation code Conrad, to integrate new nuclear reactions models and their associated parameters and to perform adjustments with integral measurements. Following these developments, the analysis of differential data and the experimental uncertainties propagation have been performed with Conrad. The resolved resonances range has been extended up to 2 MeV and the continuum range begins directly beyond this energy. A new 23 Na evaluation and the associated multigroup covariances matrices were generated for future uncertainties calculations. The last part of this work focuses on the sodium void integral data feedback, using methods of integral data assimilation to reduce the uncertainties on sodium cross sections. This work ends with uncertainty calculations for industrial-like SFR, which show an improved prediction of their neutronic parameters with the new evaluation. (author) [fr

  14. Reactor technology. Progress report, January--March 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, J.L. (ed.)

    1978-07-01

    Progress is reported in eight program areas. The nuclear Space Electric Power Supply Program examined safety questions in the aftermath of the COSMOS 954 incident, examined the use of thermoelectric converters, examined the neutronic effectiveness of various reflecting materials, examined ways of connecting heat pipes to one another, studied the consequences of the failure of one heat pipe in the reactor core, and did conceptual design work on heat radiators for various power supplies. The Heat Pipe Program reported progress in the design of ceramic heat pipes, new application of heat pipes to solar collectors, and final performance tests of two pipes for HEDL applications. Under the Nuclear Process Heat Program, work continues on computer codes to model a pebble bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, adaptation of a set of German reactor calculation codes to use on U.S. computers, and a parametric study of a certain resonance integral required in reactor studies. Under the Nonproliferation Alternative Sources Assessment Program LASL has undertaken an evaluation of a study of gaseous core reactors by Southern Science Applications, Inc. Independently LASL has developed a proposal for a comprehensive study of gaseous uranium-fueled reactor technology. The Plasma Core Reactor Program has concentrated on restacking the beryllium reflector and redesigning the nuclear control system. The status of and experiments on four critical assemblies, SKUA, Godiva IV, Big Ten, and Flattop, are reported. The Nuclear Criticality Safety Program carried out several tasks including conducting a course, doing several annual safety reviews and evaluating the safety of two Nevada test devices. During the quarter one of the groups involved in reactor technology has acquired responsibility for the operation of a Cockroft-Walton accelerator. The present report contains information on the use of machine and improvements being made in its operation.

  15. Reactor technology. Progress report, January--March 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, J.L.

    1978-07-01

    Progress is reported in eight program areas. The nuclear Space Electric Power Supply Program examined safety questions in the aftermath of the COSMOS 954 incident, examined the use of thermoelectric converters, examined the neutronic effectiveness of various reflecting materials, examined ways of connecting heat pipes to one another, studied the consequences of the failure of one heat pipe in the reactor core, and did conceptual design work on heat radiators for various power supplies. The Heat Pipe Program reported progress in the design of ceramic heat pipes, new application of heat pipes to solar collectors, and final performance tests of two pipes for HEDL applications. Under the Nuclear Process Heat Program, work continues on computer codes to model a pebble bed high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, adaptation of a set of German reactor calculation codes to use on U.S. computers, and a parametric study of a certain resonance integral required in reactor studies. Under the Nonproliferation Alternative Sources Assessment Program LASL has undertaken an evaluation of a study of gaseous core reactors by Southern Science Applications, Inc. Independently LASL has developed a proposal for a comprehensive study of gaseous uranium-fueled reactor technology. The Plasma Core Reactor Program has concentrated on restacking the beryllium reflector and redesigning the nuclear control system. The status of and experiments on four critical assemblies, SKUA, Godiva IV, Big Ten, and Flattop, are reported. The Nuclear Criticality Safety Program carried out several tasks including conducting a course, doing several annual safety reviews and evaluating the safety of two Nevada test devices. During the quarter one of the groups involved in reactor technology has acquired responsibility for the operation of a Cockroft-Walton accelerator. The present report contains information on the use of machine and improvements being made in its operation

  16. Improvement of the decay heat removal characteristics of the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epiney, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    Gas cooling in nuclear power plants (NPPs) has a long history, the corresponding reactor types developed in France, the UK and the US having been thermal neutron spectrum systems using graphite as the moderator. The majority of NPPs worldwide, however, are currently light water reactors, using ordinary water as both coolant and moderator. These NPPs - of the so-called second generation - will soon need replacement, and a third generation is now being made available, offering increased safety while still based on light water technology. For the longer-term future, viz. beyond the year 2030, R and D is currently ongoing on Generation IV NPPs, aimed at achieving closure of the nuclear fuel cycle, and hence both drastically improved utilization of fuel resources and minimization of long-lived radioactive wastes. Like the SFR, the GFR is an efficient breeder, also able to work as iso-breeder using simply natural uranium as feed and producing waste which is predominantly in the form of fission products. The main drawback of the GFR is the difficulty to evacuate decay heat following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) due to the low thermal inertia of the core, as well as to the low coolant density. The present doctoral research focuses on the improvement of decay heat removal (DHR) for the Generation-IV GFR. The reference GFR system design considered in the thesis is the 2006 CEA concept, with a power of 2400 MWth. The CEA 2006 DHR strategy foresees, in all accidental cases (independent of the system pressure), that the reactor is shut down. For high pressure events, dedicated DHR loops with blowers and heat exchangers are designed to operate when the power conversion system cannot be used to provide acceptable core temperatures under natural convection conditions. For de-pressurized events, the strategy relies on a dedicated small containment (called the guard containment) providing an intermediate back-up pressure. The DHR blowers, designed to work under these pressure

  17. IGORR-IV - Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenbalm, K.F.

    1995-01-01

    The International Group on Research Reactors was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. Twenty-nine papers were presented in five sessions and written versions of the papers or hard copies of the vugraphs used are published in these proceedings. The five sessions were: (1) Operating Research Reactors and Facility Upgrades; (2) Research Reactors in Design and Construction; (3) ANS Closeout Activities; (4) and (5) Research, Development, and Analysis Results

  18. IGORR-IV -- Proceedings of the fourth meeting of the International Group on Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenbalm, K.F. [comp.

    1995-12-31

    The International Group on Research Reactors was formed to facilitate the sharing of knowledge and experience among those institutions and individuals who are actively working to design, build, and promote new research reactors or to make significant upgrades to existing facilities. Twenty-nine papers were presented in five sessions and written versions of the papers or hard copies of the vugraphs used are published in these proceedings. The five sessions were: (1) Operating Research Reactors and Facility Upgrades; (2) Research Reactors in Design and Construction; (3) ANS Closeout Activities; (4) and (5) Research, Development, and Analysis Results.

  19. Establishing a safety and licensing basis for generation IV advanced reactors. License by test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadak, Andrew C.

    2001-01-01

    The license by test approach to licensing is a novel method of licensing reactors. It provides an opportunity to deal with innovative non-water reactors in a direct way on a time scale that could permit early certification based on tests of a demonstration reactor. The uncertainties in the design and significant contributors to risk would be identified in the PRA during the design. Deterministic analysis computer codes could be tested on a real reactor. Scaling effects and associated uncertainties would be minimized. License by test is an approach that has sufficient merit to be developed and tested

  20. Belgian Contribution to the IAEA CRP-IV Programme on Assuring Structural Integrity of Reactor Pressure Vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Walle, E.; Chaouadi, R.; Scibetta, M.; Puzzolante, J.L.; Fabry, A.; Van de Velde, J.

    1997-10-01

    This report contains the actual status of the Belgian contribution to the IAEA CRP-IV program. Besides Charpy-V impact tests on as-received CRP-IV JRQ-specimens, fracture toughness tests were performed on two geometries: PCCV-specimens and CRB-specimens. The Charpy-V impact results correspond very well with the as-received CRP-III results. The fracture toughness data are also very consistent with identical tests recently performed on remaining as-received CRP-III material. Irradiated broken Charpy-V samples were reconstituted and tested in PCCV-mode. This was done in order to investigate the evolution of the ASME-curve versus the evolution of the mastercurve with irradiation. Initial results were reported. A new CHIVAS-irradiation in the CALLISTO-loop of the BR-2-reactor to support this investigation, is under preparation

  1. A general overview of generation IV molten salt reactor (MSR) and the use of thorium as fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamaguchi, Carlos H.; Stefani, Giovanni L.; Santos, Thiago A., E-mail: carlos.yamaguchi@usp.br, E-mail: giovanni.stefani@ipen.br, E-mail: thiago.santos@ufabc.edu.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Instituto de Fisica; Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Universidade Federal do ABC (CECS/UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Engenharia, Modelagem e Ciencias Sociais Aplicadas

    2017-07-01

    The molten salt reactors (MSRs) make use of fluoride salt as primary cooler, at low pressure. Although considered a generation IV reactor, your concept isn't new, since in the 1960 years the Oak Ridge National Laboratory created a little prototype of 8MWt. Over the 20{sup th} century, other countries, like UK, Japan, Russia, China and France also did research in the area, especially with the use of thorium as fuel. This goes with the fact that Brazil possess the biggest reserve of thorium in the world. In the center of nuclear engineering at IPEN is being created a study group connected to thorium reactors, which purpose is to investigate reactors using thorium to produce {sup 233}U and tailing burn, thus making the MSR using thorium as fuel, an object of study. This present work searches to do a general summary about the researches of MSR's, having as focus the utilization of thorium with the goal being to show it's efficiency and utilization is doable. (author)

  2. Safety Design Criteria (SDC) for Gen-IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakai, Ryodai

    2013-01-01

    SDC Development Background & Objectives: • Safety Design Criteria (SDC) Development for Gen-IV SFR: – Proposed at the GIF Policy Group (PG) meeting in October 2010 –SDC “harmonization” is increasingly important for: • Realization of enhanced safety designs meeting to Gen-IV safety goals and safety approach common to SFR systems; • Preparation for the forthcoming licensing in the near future; • Because Gen-IV SFR are progressing into conceptual design stage. • The SDC is the Reference criteria: – Of the designs of safety-related Structures, Systems & Components that are specific to the SFR system; – For clarifying the requisites systematically & comprehensively; – When the technology developers apply the basic safety approach and use the codes & standards for conceptual design of the Gen-IV SFR system

  3. Reactor technology. Progress report, July-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breslow, M.

    1980-12-01

    Progress in the Space Power Advanced Reactor (SPAR) Program includes indications that revision of the BeO reflector configuration can reduce system weight. Observed boiling limit restrictions on the performance of the annular-wick core heat pipe have accelerated transition to the development of the target-design arterial heat pipe. Successful bends of core heat pipes have been made with sodium as the mandrel material. With the phasing out of the GCFR Program, work on the Low Power Safety Experiments Program is now concentrated on completion of the third 37-rod Full Length Subgroup test. In the Reactor Safety/Structural Analysis area, effort on the Category I Structures Program is toward developing an experimental test plan focusing on a specific structural design. Buckling experiments on thin-walled cylindrical shells with circular cutouts are reported. Results of a three-dimensional analysis of thermal stresses in the Fort St. Vrain core support block are presented. Materials investigations and operation of a molybdenum-core SiC heat pipe are reported. Entrainment limits for gravity-assisted heat pipes and heat pipe configurations for application to energy conservation are being investigated. The new solution critical assembly, SHEBA, was completed. Godiva IV was temporarily relocated at TA-15. Influence of scattered radiations in the test vault on InRad measurements was determined from detector scans of the vault produced by 252 Cf neutron and 137 Cs gamma sources

  4. Millimeter-Wave Thermal Analysis Development and Application to GEN IV Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wosko, Paul; Sundram, S. K.

    2012-10-16

    New millimeter-wave thermal analysis instrumentation has been developed and studied for characterization of materials required for diverse fuel and structural needs in high temperature reactor environments such as the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). A two-receiver 137 GHz system with orthogonal polarizations for anisotropic resolution of material properties has been implemented at MIT. The system was tested with graphite and silicon carbide specimens at temperatures up to 1300 ºC inside an electric furnace. The analytic and hardware basis for active millimeter-wave radiometry of reactor materials at high temperature has been established. Real-time, non contact measurement sensitivity to anisotropic surface emissivity and submillimeter surface displacement was demonstrated. The 137 GHz emissivity of reactor grade graphite (NBG17) from SGL Group was found to be low, ~ 5 %, in the 500 – 1200 °C range and increases by a factor of 2 to 4 with small linear grooves simulating fracturing. The low graphite emissivity would make millimeter-wave active radiometry a sensitive diagnostic of graphite changes due to environmentally induced stress fracturing, swelling, or corrosion. The silicon carbide tested from Ortek, Inc. was found to have a much higher emissivity at 137 GHz of ~90% Thin coatings of silicon carbide on reactor grade graphite supplied by SGL Group were found to be mostly transparent to millimeter-waves, increasing the 137 GHz emissivity of the coated reactor grade graphite to about ~14% at 1250 ºC.

  5. SVBR-100 module-type fast reactor of the IV generation for regional power industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrodnikov, A. V.; Toshinsky, G. I.; Komlev, O. G.; Stepanov, V. S.; Klimov, N. N.

    2011-08-01

    In the report the following is presented: basic conceptual provisions of the innovative nuclear power technology (NPT) based on modular fast reactors (FR) SVBR-100, summarized results of calculations of the reactor, analysis of the opportunities of multi-purpose application of such reactor facilities (RF) including export potentials with due account of nonproliferation requirements. The most important features of the proposed NPT analyzed in the report are as follows: (1) integral (monoblock) arrangement of the primary circuit equipment with entire elimination of the primary circuit pipelines and valves that considerably reduces the construction and assembly works period and coupling with high boiling point of lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) deterministically eliminates accidents of the LOCA type, (2) option for 100 MWe power and dimensions of the reactor provide: on the one hand, an opportunity to transport the reactor monoblock in factory-readiness by railway as well as other kinds of transport, on the other hand, core breeding ratio (CBR) exceeds 1 while MOX-fuel is used. The preferable area of application of RF SVBR-100 is regional and small power requiring power-units of electric power in a range of (100-600) MW, which could be used for cogeneration-based district heating while locating them nearby cities as well as for generation of electric power in a mode of load tracking in the regions with low network systems.

  6. SVBR-100 module-type fast reactor of the IV generation for regional power industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zrodnikov, A.V. [FSUE State Scientific Center of Russian Federation Institute for Physics and Power Engineering 1, Bondarenko sq., Obninsk, Kaluga rg. 249033 (Russian Federation); Toshinsky, G.I., E-mail: toshinsky@ippe.ru [FSUE State Scientific Center of Russian Federation Institute for Physics and Power Engineering 1, Bondarenko sq., Obninsk, Kaluga rg. 249033 (Russian Federation); Komlev, O.G. [FSUE State Scientific Center of Russian Federation Institute for Physics and Power Engineering 1, Bondarenko sq., Obninsk, Kaluga rg. 249033 (Russian Federation); Stepanov, V.S.; Klimov, N.N. [JSC Experimental Design Bureau ' Gidropress' 21, Ordzhonikidze st., Podolsk, Moscow rg. 142103 (Russian Federation)

    2011-08-31

    In the report the following is presented: basic conceptual provisions of the innovative nuclear power technology (NPT) based on modular fast reactors (FR) SVBR-100, summarized results of calculations of the reactor, analysis of the opportunities of multi-purpose application of such reactor facilities (RF) including export potentials with due account of nonproliferation requirements. The most important features of the proposed NPT analyzed in the report are as follows: (1) integral (monoblock) arrangement of the primary circuit equipment with entire elimination of the primary circuit pipelines and valves that considerably reduces the construction and assembly works period and coupling with high boiling point of lead-bismuth coolant (LBC) deterministically eliminates accidents of the LOCA type, (2) option for 100 MWe power and dimensions of the reactor provide: on the one hand, an opportunity to transport the reactor monoblock in factory-readiness by railway as well as other kinds of transport, on the other hand, core breeding ratio (CBR) exceeds 1 while MOX-fuel is used. The preferable area of application of RF SVBR-100 is regional and small power requiring power-units of electric power in a range of (100-600) MW, which could be used for cogeneration-based district heating while locating them nearby cities as well as for generation of electric power in a mode of load tracking in the regions with low network systems.

  7. Eugene P. Wigner's visionary contributions to generations-I through IV fission reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carre, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Among Europe's greatest scientists who fled to Britain and America in the 1930's, Eugene P. Wigner made instrumental advances in reactor physics, reactor design and technology, and spent nuclear fuel processing for both purposes of developing atomic weapons during world-war II and nuclear power afterwards. Wigner who had training in chemical engineering and self-education in physics first gained recognition for his remarkable articles and books on applications of Group theory to Quantum mechanics, Solid state physics and other topics that opened new branches of Physics. (authors)

  8. Generation IV sodium fast reactor. Feedback reactivity coefficients to optimise safe natural core behaviour during accident transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaetta, Alain; Bernardin, Bruno; Vanier, Marc; Tommasi, Jean; Varaine, Frederic

    2009-01-01

    One of the key research goals for Generation IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFR) is to improve their safety levels, particularly by ensuring robust core behaviour during accident conditions. A dedicated approach called COCONS has been developed to reach these objectives. This paper discusses this approach which focuses on the design of naturally safe core. It can be broken down into three stages: The first stage involves defining the role of feedback reactivity coefficients applicable during accident transients, such as unprotected reactivity insertion transients (UTOP) or unprotected loss-of-cooling-flow transients (ULOF). The parametric study has revealed the impact of the Doppler effect on UTOP and sodium temperature coefficient which is directly related to the sodium void effect for ULOF. The second stage is to define optimised ranges for these reactivity coefficients to avoid any core damage by fuel meltdown or sodium boiling. Conclusions differ greatly depending on the fuel type, e.g. oxide, metal or carbide. Fuel temperature margins before fuel meltdown and average fuel temperatures play a very important role. The third stage involves recommending several core concepts that are capable of achieving these idealistic ranges. Several new oxide fuel subassembly designs are suggested in view of reducing the maximum fuel temperature and increasing margins to fuel meltdown. Ceramic carbide fuel seems to be a very promising choice from a reactor physics viewpoint. Combined with moderator material in the core or used with the new fuel 'plate' subassembly concept, ceramic carbide fuel seems capable of achieving safe natural behaviour during either a UTOP or ULOF transient. The COCONS approach appears to be a useful tool in terms of recommending new SFR core options and comparing overall performance levels with reactor safety levels. Final optimization will require more general comparisons, taking into account all the main Generation IV goals i.e. economic

  9. Consistent Multigroup Theory Enabling Accurate Course-Group Simulation of Gen IV Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahnema, Farzad; Haghighat, Alireza; Ougouag, Abderrafi

    2013-11-29

    The objective of this proposal is the development of a consistent multi-group theory that accurately accounts for the energy-angle coupling associated with collapsed-group cross sections. This will allow for coarse-group transport and diffusion theory calculations that exhibit continuous energy accuracy and implicitly treat cross- section resonances. This is of particular importance when considering the highly heterogeneous and optically thin reactor designs within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) framework. In such reactors, ignoring the influence of anisotropy in the angular flux on the collapsed cross section, especially at the interface between core and reflector near which control rods are located, results in inaccurate estimates of the rod worth, a serious safety concern. The scope of this project will include the development and verification of a new multi-group theory enabling high-fidelity transport and diffusion calculations in coarse groups, as well as a methodology for the implementation of this method in existing codes. This will allow for a higher accuracy solution of reactor problems while using fewer groups and will reduce the computational expense. The proposed research represents a fundamental advancement in the understanding and improvement of multi- group theory for reactor analysis.

  10. Economic Analysis on Direct Use of Spent Pressurized Water Reactor Fuel in CANDU Reactors - IV: DUPIC Fuel Cycle Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Won Il; Choi, Hangbok; Yang, Myung Seung

    2001-01-01

    This study examines the economics of the DUPIC fuel cycle using unit costs of fuel cycle components estimated based on conceptual designs. The fuel cycle cost (FCC) was calculated by a deterministic method in which reference values of fuel cycle components are used. The FCC was then analyzed by a Monte Carlo simulation to get the uncertainty of the FCC associated with the unit costs of the fuel cycle components. From the deterministic analysis on the equilibrium fuel cycle model, the DUPIC FCC was estimated to be 6.21 to 6.34 mills/kW.h for DUPIC fuel options, which is a little smaller than that of the once-through FCC by 0.07 to 0.27 mills/kW.h. Considering the uncertainty (0.40 to 0.44 mills/kW.h) of the FCC estimated by the Monte Carlo simulation method, the cost difference between the DUPIC and once-through fuel cycle is negligible. On the other hand, the material balance calculation has shown that the DUPIC fuel cycle can save natural uranium resources by ∼20% and reduce the spent fuel arising by ∼65% compared with the once-through fuel cycle. In conclusion, the DUPIC fuel cycle is comparable with the once-through fuel cycle from the viewpoint of FCC. In the future, it should be important to consider factors such as the environmental benefit owing to natural uranium savings, the capability of reusing spent pressurized water reactor fuel, and the safeguardability of the fuel cycle when deciding on an advanced nuclear fuel cycle option

  11. Conversion of actinide solutions for the production of MA bearing fuels for Gen IV fast reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.; McGinley, J.; Somers, J.

    2008-01-01

    The conversion of the solution to solid for fuels containing minor actinides for accelerator driven systems or Gen IV fast reactors cannot be made by conventional ammonia or oxalate precipitation as is the case in today's reprocessing plant. The small particle size and concomitant dust that is produced in subsequent processing steps will not permit use of these processes on industrial scale. Innovation is needed to avoid dust generating powders, and indeed to simplify the processes themselves. Two such processing routes have been developed at the JRC-ITU. The sol gel route has been used to produce fuel containing Am and Np for the SUPERFACT, TRABANT and other irradiation experiments. The infiltration process has also been established and fuels have been produced for the FUTURIX and HELIOS experiments. (authors)

  12. A Qualitative Assessment Of Diversion Scenarios For A Example Sodium Fast Reactor Using The Gen IV PR And PP Methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zentner, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    A working group was created in 2002 by the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the purpose of developing an internationally accepted methodology for assessing the Proliferation Resistance of a nuclear energy system (NES) and its individual elements. A two year case study is being performed by the experts group using this methodology to assess the proliferation resistance of a hypothetical NES called the Example Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR). This work demonstrates how the PR and PP methodology can be used to provide important information at various levels of details to NES designers, safeguard administrators and decision makers. The study analyzes the response of the complete ESFR nuclear energy system to different proliferation and theft strategies. The challenges considered include concealed diversion, concealed misuse and 'break out' strategies. This paper describes the work done in performing a qualitative assessment of concealed diversion scenarios from the ESFR.

  13. Solution properties of a heteropolysaccharide extracted from pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo, lady godiva).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yi; Zhao, Jing; Ni, Yuanying; Li, Quanhong

    2015-11-05

    A water-soluble galactoglucofucomannan was extracted from pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo, lady godiva variety). GC-MS analysis indicated that the polysaccharide was composed of 1,6-linked-glucosyl, 1,2,6-linked-mannosyl, 1,3,6-linked-mannosyl, 1,2,6-linked-galactosyl, 1,2,6-linked-galactosyl, terminal fucosyl and terminal glucose. The solution properties of the polysaccharide were studied systematically by using size-exclusion chromatography combined with multi-angle laser light scattering, viscometry and dynamic light scattering at 25 °C. The weight average molecular masses (Mw), intrinsic viscosity [η], radius of gyration (Rg) and hydrodynamic radius (Rh) were found to be 12.7 × 10(5)g/mol, 780 ml/g, 68 nm and 116 nm, respectively. The fraction dimension and value of ρ (Rg/Rh) of the polysaccharide revealed that it existed in a sphere-like conformation in distilled water. The dependence of zero shear specific viscosity on the coil overlap parameter was analyzed using different models. Furthermore, degradation of samples upon autoclaving has been observed and quantified by intrinsic viscosity determination and SEC-MALLS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. SARGEN-IV: Consideration on the possible content of the safety analysis report for innovative ESNII reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammirabile, L., E-mail: Luca.AMMIRABILE@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, Petten (Netherlands); Tuček, K. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy and Transport, Petten (Netherlands); Blanc, D. [Institut de radioprotection et de sûreté nucléaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Pabarcius, R.; Kaliatka, A. [Lithuanian Energy Institute, Kaunas (Lithuania); Mansani, L. [ANSALDO Nucleare, Genova (Italy); Carluec, B. [AREVA, Lyon (France); Dufour, P. [Commissariat à l’énergie atomique, Cadarache (France); Homann, C. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Highlights: • We present considerations on the content of the safety analysis report for innovative ESNII reactors. • The innovative ESNII reactor concepts require identification of safety objectives and engineering design requirements. • For innovative plant designs the SAR should clearly address all safety aspects to help the regulatory's safety evaluation. • It is recommended that parts of the SAR be discussed with the regulatory body at an early stage. - Abstract: In view of the potential deployment of demonstrators and prototypes associated with the European Sustainable Nuclear Industrial Initiative (ESNII), the present licensing framework, based on the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) technology, will have to adjust as necessary taking into account to the new safety aspects introduced by these innovative technologies. Within the SARGEN-IV project under the Euratom Framework Programme FP7, an extensive work has been done to review the critical safety features of the reactor concepts developed under ESNII. This review has also been used as a reference to provide guidelines on the structure and content of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) for the innovative ESNII reactors. Structure and content of a SAR generally differ among countries. The approach followed to give recommendations and guidance was to adopt as far as possible the format of the current practices for LWR based on the US NRC Reg Guide 1.70 together with IAEA publication GS-G-4.1 and to identify those chapters whose subjects need to be adapted to the specific design. Due to the innovative nature of the design, the licensing process for new ESNII concepts may take longer. The early involvement of regulators in defining safety objectives and criteria and acceptable solutions to meet these criteria may be beneficial to shorten this process. Therefore, it is recommended that parts of the SAR should be submitted to the regulatory body at an early stage and in accordance with an agreed

  15. First wall/blanket/shield design and power conversion for the ARIES-IV tokamak fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M.Z.; Conn, R.W.; Najmabadi, F.

    1994-01-01

    ARIES-IV is a conceptual, D-T burning, steady-state tokamak fusion reactor producing 1000 MWe net. It operates in the second plasma stability regime. The structural material is SiC composite and the primary coolant is helium at 10 MPa base pressure. The coolant flows poloidally in two loops, one inboard and one outboard. The coolant channels are circular tubes that form shells and are placed between two purge plates; the space between two adjacent tubes and the plate is purge gas flow area. The solid breeder is Li 2 O, and Be is used as neutron multiplier to ensure adequate TBR. Beryllium and Li 2 O are placed in between the adjacent tube shells. A computer code was developed to perform and optimize thermal-hydraulic design. Minimization of blanket thickness and the amount of Be, and the maximization of breeder zone thickness were done by iteration with neutronics. The gross thermal efficiency is 49%. The cost of electricity is 68 mills/kWh. The use of low activation SiC composite as the structural material, Li 2 O as the solid breeder, and avoidance of tungsten in the divertor has resulted in a good safety performance, and LSA rating of 1. Overall, SiC/He/Li 2 O ARIES-IV design is expected to have attractive economic and safety advantages

  16. {sup 20}F power measurement for generation IV sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coulon, R.; Normand, S.; Michel, M.; Barbot, L.; Domenech, T.; Boudergui, K.; Bourbotte, J.M.; Kondrasovs, V.; Frelin-Labalme, A.M.; Hamrita, H. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs et Architectures Electroniques, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); BAN, G. [ENSICAEN, 6 Boulevard Marechal Juin, F-14050 Caen Cedex 4 (France); Barat, E.; Dautremer, T.; Montagu, T.; Carrel, F. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Modelisation Simulation et Systemes, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Brau, H.P. [ICSM, Centre de Marcoule, BP 17171 F-30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Dumarcher, V. [AREVA NP, SET, F-84500 Bollene (France); Portier, J.L. [Centrale PHENIX, Centre de Marcoule, Groupe Essais Statistiques, F-30207 Bagnols sur Ceze (France); Jousset, P. [CEA, LIST, Laboratoire Capteurs Diamant, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Saurel, N. [CEA, DAM, Laboratoire Mesure de Dechets et Expertise, F-21120 Is-sur-Tille, France.F-84500 Bollene (France)

    2010-07-01

    The Phenix nuclear power plant has been a French Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) prototype producing electrical power between 1973 and 2010. The power was monitored using ex-core neutron measurements. This kind of measurement instantly estimates the power but needs to be often calibrated with the heat balance thermodynamic measurement. Large safety and security margins have then been set not to derive above the nominal operating point. It is important for future SFR to reduce this margin and working closer to the nominal operating point. This work deals with the use of delayed gamma to measure the power. The main activation product contained in the primary sodium coolant is the {sup 24}Na which is not convenient for neutron flux measurement due to its long decay period. The experimental study done at the Phenix reactor shows that the use of {sup 20}F as power tagging agent gives a fast and accurate power measurement closed to the thermal balance measurement thanks to its high energy photon emission (1.634 MeV) and its short decay period (11 s). (authors)

  17. Reprocessing techniques of LWR spent fuel for reutilization in hybrid systems and IV generation reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruquipa, Wilmer; Velasquez, Carlos E.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Costa, Antonella L. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Barros, Graiciany de P. [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Since the era of nuclear technology begins, nuclear reactors have been produced spent fuel. This spent fuel contains material that could be recycle and reprocessed by different processes. All these processes aim to reduce the contribution to the final repository through the re-utilization of the nuclear material. Therefore, some new reprocessing options with non-proliferation characteristics have been proposed and the goal is to compare the different techniques used to maximize the effectiveness of the spent fuel utilization and to reduce the volume and long-term radiotoxicity of high-level waste by irradiation with neutron with high energy such as the ones created in hybrid reactors. In order to compare different recovery methods, the cross sections of fuels are calculated with de MCNP code, the first set consists of thorium-232 spiked with the reprocessed material and the second set in depleted uranium that containing 4.5% of U-235 spiked with the reprocessed material; These sets in turn are compared with the cross section of the UO{sub 2} in order to evaluate the efficiency of the reprocessed fuel as nuclear fuel. (author)

  18. The safety R and D for GEN-IV reactors in the European nuclear energy technology platform strategic research agenda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruna, G.

    2009-01-01

    In the fall 2007 EC launched the Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform (SNE-TP). The SNE-TP governing board set-up three working groups (WG): 1) Strategic Research Agenda (SRA) WG, in charge of drafting road-maps to support research, development and demonstration for current and future NPPs; 2) Deployment Strategy (DS) WG, in charge of defining the research road-map implementation and 3) Education, Training and Knowledge management (ETKM) WG, which was aimed at issuing proposal to reinforce European education and attract young in the nuclear field. The SRA WG was mandated to prepare the SRA vision document based on the preliminary road-map sketched in the document published by the Commission earlier in 2007. The SRA WG was originally organized in 5 sub-groups covering specific topics (1) GEN II and III, III+, including Advanced LWR, 2) Advanced Fuel Cycle for waste minimization and resource optimization; 3) GEN IV Fast Systems (SFR, LFR, GFR, ADS); 4) GEN IV (V) HTR and non-electricity-production applications; 5) New Nuclear Large Research Infrastructures) and 5 other sub-groups dealing with more generic cross-cutting research activities applicable to many specific topics, namely: 1) Structural material research; 2) modeling, simulation and methods, including physical data and tools and means for qualification and validation; 3) Reactor Safety, including severe accidents and human factor; 4) Advanced Driver and Minor Actinide Fuels: science and properties; 5) Pre-normative Research, Codes and Standards.The present paper is mainly aimed at summarizing the content of the SRA Safety sub-chapter focusing on GEN-IV aspects

  19. Analysis of supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle control strategies and dynamic response for Generation IV Reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-04-12

    The analysis of specific control strategies and dynamic behavior of the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the two reactor types selected for continued development under the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative; namely, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). Direct application of the standard S-CO{sub 2} recompression cycle to the VHTR was found to be challenging because of the mismatch in the temperature drop of the He gaseous reactor coolant through the He-to-CO{sub 2} reactor heat exchanger (RHX) versus the temperature rise of the CO{sub 2} through the RHX. The reference VHTR features a large temperature drop of 450 C between the assumed core outlet and inlet temperatures of 850 and 400 C, respectively. This large temperature difference is an essential feature of the VHTR enabling a lower He flow rate reducing the required core velocities and pressure drop. In contrast, the standard recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycle wants to operate with a temperature rise through the RHX of about 150 C reflecting the temperature drop as the CO{sub 2} expands from 20 MPa to 7.4 MPa in the turbine and the fact that the cycle is highly recuperated such that the CO{sub 2} entering the RHX is effectively preheated. Because of this mismatch, direct application of the standard recompression cycle results in a relatively poor cycle efficiency of 44.9%. However, two approaches have been identified by which the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be successfully adapted to the VHTR and the benefits of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, especially a significant gain in cycle efficiency, can be realized. The first approach involves the use of three separate cascaded S-CO{sub 2} cycles. Each S-CO{sub 2} cycle is coupled to the VHTR through its own He-to-CO{sub 2} RHX in which the He temperature is reduced by 150 C. The three respective cycles have efficiencies of 54, 50, and 44%, respectively, resulting in a net cycle

  20. On a fast numerical tool for nuclear accidental dynamic phenomenology and application to the real time simulation of Lady Godiva

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindel, Laurent; Gamess, Andre; Jasserand, Frederic; Laporte, Sebastien

    2003-01-01

    This paper present a modern numerical method, implemented in a TUI-code named MacDSP, for solving any set of differential equations and in particular phenomenological accidental dynamic calculations. The speed efficiency of such an approach, thanks to the use of the hybrid-level power offered by C++ and an ad-hoc design, make it possible to construct the first kid of a family of real time simulator employing the video games technology DirectX TM : Lady Godiva Real Time Simulator. (author)

  1. Summary of ORSphere Critical and Reactor Physics Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, Margaret A.; Bess, John D.

    2016-09-01

    In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J. J. Lynn, and J. R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s. The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. This critical configuration has been evaluated. Preliminary results were presented at ND2013. Since then, the evaluation was finalized and judged to be an acceptable benchmark experiment for the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Project (ICSBEP). Additionally, reactor physics measurements were performed to determine surface button worths, central void worth, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron decay constant, fission density and neutron importance. These measurements have been evaluated and found to be acceptable experiments and are discussed in full detail in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments. The purpose of this paper is summary summarize all the critical and reactor physics measurements evaluations and, when possible, to compare them to GODIVA experiment results.

  2. Uranium enrichment reduction in the Prototype Gen-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) with PBO reflector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartanto, Donny; Kim, Chi Hyung; Kim, Yong Hee [Dept. of Nuclear and Quantum Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-04-15

    The Korean Prototype Gen-IV sodium-cooled fast reactor (PGSFR) is supposed to be loaded with a relatively-costly low-enriched U fuel, while its envisaged transuranic fuels are not available for transmutation. In this work, the U-enrichment reduction by improving the neutron economy is pursued to save the fuel cost. To improve the neutron economy of the core, a new reflector material, PbO, has been introduced to replace the conventional HT9 reflector in the current PGSFR core. Two types of PbO reflectors are considered: one is the conventional pin-type and the other one is an inverted configuration. The inverted PbO reflector design is intended to maximize the PbO volume fraction in the reflector assembly. In addition, the core radial configuration is also modified to maximize the performance of the PbO reflector. For the baseline PGSFR core with several reflector options, the U enrichment requirement has been analyzed and the fuel depletion analysis is performed to derive the equilibrium cycle parameters. The linear reactivity model is used to determine the equilibrium cycle performances of the core. Impacts of the new PbO reflectors are characterized in terms of the cycle length, neutron leakage, radial power distribution, and operational fuel cost.

  3. Study of diluting and absorber materials to control the reactivity during a postulated core meltdown accident in generation IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plevacova, Kamila

    2010-01-01

    In order to limit the consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors, absorber materials in or near the core, such as boron carbide B 4 C, and diluting materials in the core catcher will be used to prevent recriticality within the mixture of molten oxide fuel and molten structures called corium. The aim of the PhD thesis was to select materials of both types and to understand their behaviour during their interaction with corium, from chemical and thermodynamic points of view. Concerning B 4 C, thermodynamic calculations and experiments agree with the formation of two immiscible phases at high temperature in the B 4 C - UO 2 system: one oxide and one boride. This separation of phases can reduce the efficiency of the neutrons absorption inside the molten fuel contained in the oxide phase. Moreover, volatilization of a part of the boron element can occur. According to these results, the necessary quantity of B 4 C to be introduced should be reconsidered for postulated severe accident sequence. Other solution could be the use of Eu 2 O 3 or HfO 2 as absorber material. These oxides form a solid solution with the oxide fuel. Concerning the diluting materials, mixed oxides Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 were preselected. These systems being completely unknown to date at high temperature in association with UO 2 , first points on the corresponding ternary phase diagrams were researched. Contrary to Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 - UO 2 system, the Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 - UO 2 mixture presents only one eutectic and thus only one solidification path which makes easier forecasting the behaviour of corium in the core catcher. (author)

  4. Study of diluting and absorber materials to control reactivity during a postulated core melt down accident in Generation IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plevacova, K.

    2010-01-01

    In order to limit the consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors, absorber materials in or near the core, such as boron carbide B 4 C, and diluting materials in the core catcher will be used to prevent recriticality within the mixture of molten oxide fuel and molten structures called corium. The aim of the PhD thesis was to select materials of both types and to understand their behaviour during their interaction with corium, from chemical and thermodynamic point of view. Concerning B 4 C, thermodynamic calculations and experiments agree with the formation of two immiscible phases at high temperature in the B 4 C - UO 2 system: one oxide and one boride. This separation of phases can reduce the efficiency of the neutrons absorption inside the molten fuel contained in the oxide phase. Moreover, a volatilization of a part of the boron element can occur. According to these results, the necessary quantity of B 4 C to be introduced should be reconsidered for postulated severe accident sequence. Other solution could be the use of Eu 2 O 3 or HfO 2 as absorber material. These oxides form a solid solution with the oxide fuel. Concerning the diluting materials, mixed oxides Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 and Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 were preselected. These systems being completely unknown to date at high temperature in association with UO 2 , first points on the corresponding ternary phase diagrams were researched. Contrary to Al 2 O 3 - Eu 2 O 3 - UO 2 system, the Al 2 O 3 - HfO 2 - UO 2 mixture presents only one eutectic and thus only one solidification path which makes easier forecasting the behaviour of corium in the core catcher. (author) [fr

  5. Multi-criteria methodology to design a sodium-cooled carbide-fueled Gen-IV reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauff, N.

    2011-01-01

    Compared with earlier plant designs (Phenix, Super-Phenix, EFR), Gen IV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor requires improved economics while meeting safety and non-proliferation criteria. Mixed Oxide (U-Pu)O 2 fuels are considered as the reference fuels due to their important and satisfactory feedback experience. However, innovative carbide (U-Pu)C fuels can be considered as serious competitors for a prospective SFR fleet since carbide-fueled SFRs can offer another type of optimization which might overtake on some aspects the oxide fuel technology. The goal of this thesis is to reveal the potentials of carbide by designing an optimum carbide-fueled SFR with competitive features and a naturally safe behavior during transients. For a French nuclear fleet, a 1500 MW(e) break-even core is considered. To do so, a multi-physic approach was developed taking into account neutronics, fuel thermo-mechanics and thermal-hydraulic at a pre-design stage. Simplified modeling with the calculation of global neutronic feedback coefficients and a quasi-static evaluation was developed to estimate the behavior of a core during overpower transients, loss of flow and/or loss of heat removal transients. The breakthrough of this approach is to provide the designer with an overall view of the iterative process, emphasizing the well-suited innovations and the most efficient directions that can improve the SFR design project.This methodology was used to design a core that benefits from the favorable features of carbide fuels. The core developed is a large carbide-fueled SFR with high power density, low fissile inventory, break-even capability and forgiving behaviors during the un-scrammed transients studied that should prevent using expensive mitigate systems. However, the core-peak burnup is unlikely to significantly exceed 100 MWd/kg because of the large swelling of the carbide fuel leading to quick pellet-clad mechanical interaction and the low creep capacity of carbide. Moderate linear power fuel

  6. Effect of acetylation on antioxidant and cytoprotective activity of polysaccharides isolated from pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo, lady godiva).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yi; Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yuyu; Duan, Liusheng; Zhou, Chunli; Ni, Yuanying; Liao, Xiaojun; Li, Quanhong; Hu, Xiaosong

    2013-10-15

    Acetylation of pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo, lady godiva variety) polysaccharide using acetic anhydride with pyridines as catalyst under different conditions was conducted to obtain different degrees of acetylation on a laboratory scale. Furthermore, antioxidant activities and cytoprotective effects of pumpkin polysaccharide and its acetylated derivatives were investigated employing various established in vitro systems. Results showed that addition of pyridine as catalyst could increase the degree of substitution, whereas volume of acetic anhydride had little effect. The acetylated polysaccharides in DPPH scavenging radical activity assay, superoxide anion radical activity assay and reducing power assay exhibited higher antioxidant activity than that of unmodified polysaccharide. H2O2-induced oxidative damages on rat thymic lymphocyte were also prevented by pumpkin polysaccharide and its acetylated derivatives and the derivatives presented higher protective effects. On the whole, acetylated polysaccharide showed relevant antioxidant activity both in vitro and in a cell system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Generation IV nuclear energy system initiative. Large GFR core subassemblydesign for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffman, E. A.; Kulak, R. F.; Therios, I. U.; Wei, T. Y. C.

    2006-07-31

    Gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) designs are being developed to meet Gen IV goals of sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, and proliferation resistance and physical protection as part of an International Generation IV Nuclear Energy System Research Initiative effort. Different organizations are involved in the development of a variety of GFR design concepts. The current analysis has focused on the evaluation of low-pressure drop, pin-core designs with favorable passive cooling properties. Initial evaluation of the passive cooling safety case for the GFR during depressurized decay heat removal accidents with concurrent loss of electric power have resulted in requirements for a reduction of core power density to the 100 w/cc level and a low core pressure drop of 0.5 bars. Additional design constraints and the implementation of their constraints are evaluated in this study to enhance and passive cooling properties of the reactor. Passive cooling is made easier by a flat radial distribution of the decay heat. One goal of this study was to evaluate the radial power distribution and determine to what extent it can be flattened, since the decay heat is nearly proportional to the fission power at shutdown. In line with this investigation of the radial power profile, an assessment was also made of the control rod configuration. The layout provided a large number of control rod locations with a fixed area provided for control rods. The number of control rods was consistent with other fast reactor designs. The adequacy of the available control rod locations was evaluated. Future studies will be needed to optimize the control rod designs and evaluate the shutdown system. The case for low pressure drop core can be improved by the minimization of pressure drop sources such as the number of required fuel spacers in the subassembly design and by the details of the fuel pin design. The fuel pin design is determined by a number of neutronic, thermal-hydraulic (gas dynamics

  8. JSFR design progress related to development of safety design criteria for generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactors. (3) Progress of component design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enuma, Yasuhiro; Kawasaki, Nobuchika; Orita, Junichi; Eto, Masao; Miyagawa, Takayuki

    2015-01-01

    In the frame work of generation IV international forum (GIF), safety design criteria (SDC) and safety design guideline (SDG) for the generation IV sodium-cooled fast reactors have been developing in the circumstance of worldwide deployment of SFRs. JAEA, JAPC, MFBR have been investigating design study for JSFR to satisfy SDC in the feasibility study of SDG for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). In addition to the safety measures, maintainability, reparability and manufacturability are taken into account in the JSFR design study. This paper describes the design of main components. Enlargement of the access route for the inspection devices and addition of the access routes were carried out for the reactor structure. The pump-integrated IHX (pump/IHX) was modified for the primary heat exchanger (PHX), which was installed for the decay heat removal in the IHX at the upper plenum, to be removable for improved repair and maintenance. For the steam generator (SG), protective wall tube type design is under investigation as an option with less R and D risks. (author)

  9. Status of the design and safety project for the sodium-cooled fast reactor as a generation IV nuclear energy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Hajime; Fiorini, Gian-Luigi; Sim, Yoon-Sub; Lennox, Tom; Cahalan, James E.

    2005-01-01

    The Design and Safety Project Management Board (DSPMB) was established under the Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) System Steering Committee (SSC) in the Generation IV international Forum. The DSPMB will promote collaborative R and D activities on reactor core design, and safety assessment for candidate systems, and also integrate these results together with those from other PMBs such as advanced fuel and component to a whole fast reactor system in order to develop high performance systems that will satisfy the goals of Generation IV nuclear energy systems. The DSPMB has formulated the present R and D schedules for this purpose. Two SFR concepts were proposed: a loop-type system with primarily a MOX fuel core and a pool-type system with a metal fuel core. Study of innovative systems and their evaluation will also be included. The safety project will cover both the safety assessment of the design and the preparation of the methods/tools to be used for the assessment. After a rather short viability phase, the project will move to the performance phase for development of performance data and design optimization of conceptual designs. This paper describes the schedules, work packages and tasks for the collaborative studies of the member countries. (author)

  10. Study of a fuel assembly for the nuclear reactor of IV generation cooled with supercritical water; Estudio de un ensamble de combustible para el reactor nuclear de generacion IV enfriado con agua supercritica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barragan M, A.; Martin del Campo M, C.; Francois L, J. L. [UNAM, Facultad de Ingenieria, Departamento de Sistemas Energeticos, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Espinosa P, G., E-mail: albrm29@yahoo.com [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, Area de Ingenieria en Recursos Energeticos, Av. San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (MX)

    2011-11-15

    In this work a neutron study is presented about a square assembly design of double line of fuel rods, with moderator box to the center of the arrangement, for a nuclear reactor cooled with supercritical water (SCWR). The SCWR reactor was chosen by the characteristics of its design, mainly because is based in light water reactors (PWR and BWR), and the operational experience that has of them allow to use models and similar programs to simulate the fuel and the nucleus of this type of reactors. To develop the necessary models and to carry out the design and analysis of the SCWR reactor, the neutron codes MCNPX and Helios were used. The reason of using both codes, is because the code MCNPX used thoroughly in the neutron simulation of these reactors, it has been our reference code to analyze the results obtained with the Helios code which results are more efficient because its calculation times are minors. In the nucleus design the same parameters for both codes were considered. The results show that the design with Helios is a viable option to simulate these reactors since their values of the neutrons multiplication factor are very similar to those obtained with MCNPX. On the other hand, it could be corroborated that the CASMO-4 code is inadequate to simulate the fuel to the temperature conditions and water pressure in the SCWR. (Author)

  11. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  12. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Masaomi; Kashimura, Kazuo; Inoue, Kazuyuki; Nishioka, Kazuya.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To facilitate the construction of a reactor containment building, whereby the inspections of the outer wall of a reactor container after the completion of the construction of the reactor building can be easily carried out. Constitution: In a reactor accommodated in a container encircled by a building wall, a space is provided between the container and the building wall encircling the container, and a metal wall is provided in the space so that it is fitted in the building wall in an attachable or detatchable manner. (Aizawa, K.)

  13. Nuclear data processing for cross-sections generation for fusion-fission, ADS, and IV generation reactors utilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velasquez, Carlos E.; Fernandes, Lorena C.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria Auxiliadora F.; Costa, Antonella L. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-11-01

    One of the mains topics about nuclear reactors is the microscopic cross section for incident neutrons. Therefore, in this work, it is evaluated the microscopic and macroscopic cross section for a nuclide and a material. One of the nuclides microscopic cross-section studied is the {sup 56}Fe which is the highest compound from the material macroscopic cross section studied SS316. On the other hand, it was studied the microscopic cross section of the {sup 242}Pu which is one of the nuclides that composes the nuclear fuel. The nuclear fuel chosen is a spent fuel reprocessed by UREX+ technique and spiked with thorium with 20% of fissile material. Therefore it was studied the macroscopic cross section from this nuclear fuel. Both of them were compared by using three different ways to reprocess the nuclides, one for LWR, another for ADS and the last one for Fusion reactors. The library used was JEFF-3.2 recommend for the reactors studied. The comparison was made at 1200 K for the nuclear fuel and 700K for the SS316.The results present differences due to the energy discretization, the number of groups chosen for each reactor and some nuclear reactions taken into consideration according to the neutron spectrum for each reactor. The nuclides were processed by NJOY99.364 and plotted with MCNP-Vised. (author)

  14. Thermodynamic Data to Model the Interaction Between Coolant and Fuel in Gen IV Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinsdale, Alan; Gisby, John; Davies, Hugh; Konings, Rudy; Benes, Ondrej

    2013-06-01

    Understanding the behaviour of nuclear fuels in various environments is vital to the design and safe operation of nuclear reactors. While this is true if the reactor is operating within its design specification, it is even more so if accidents occur and the fuel is exposed to unexpected temperatures, pressures or chemical environments. It is clearly hazardous and costly to explore all such scenarios experimentally and therefore it is necessary to undertake modelling where possible using well-grounded theoretical approaches. This paper will show examples of where calculations of chemical and phase equilibria have been applied successfully to the long term storage of nuclear waste, phase formation during core meltdown and prediction of fission product release into the atmosphere. It will also highlight the development of thermodynamic data carried out during the European Metrology Research Project Metrofission required to model the potential interaction between the coolant, nuclear fuel, containment materials and atmosphere of a sodium cooled fast reactor. (authors)

  15. The ENEN-III project: Technical Training on the Concepts and Design of GEN IV nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkvens, T.; Renault, C.; Alonso, M.; Salomaa, R.; Schönfelder, C.

    2013-01-01

    Some conclusions: • Not enough training courses to cover the LO’s: – Especially GEN IV; – Many introductory courses, little specific courses; – Reach out to other partners for more courses. • Skills and Attitudes: – Much more difficult to train/measure; – To be treated in a separate project. • Use of Learning Outcomes must be promoted; • Involvement of human resources necessary for the successful implementation of the schemes: – End of project workshop

  16. Present status of reactor physics in the United States and Japan-IV. 2. Micro-Reactor Physics of MOX-Fueled Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Toshikazu

    2001-01-01

    Recently, fuel assemblies of light water reactors have become complicated because of the extension of fuel burnup and the use of high-enriched Gd and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, etc. In conventional assembly calculations, the detailed flux distribution, spectrum distribution, and space dependence of self-shielding within a fuel pellet are not directly taken into account. The experimental and theoretical study of investigating these microscopic properties is named micro-reactor physics. The purpose of this work is to show the importance of micro-reactor physics in the analysis of MOX fuel assemblies. Several authors have done related studies; however, their studies are limited to fuel pin cells, and they are never mentioned with regard to burnup effect, which is important for actual core design. We used the subgroup method to treat the space dependence of the self-shielding effect of heavy nuclides, and we used the characteristics method to treat the angular dependence of neutron flux in a fuel pellet. Figure 1 compares the power distributions in MOX and UO 2 fuel cells at the beginning of burnup. The power is calculated with and without considering the space dependence of the self-shielding effect of the cross sections. For the MOX cell, the power distribution has a peak at the cell edge because of large Pu absorption especially when considering the spatial self-shielding effect. When a MOX rod is adjacent to UO 2 fuel rods, the flux distribution has an azimuthal dependence in addition to the radial dependence within a rod. For example, consider a 2x2 fuel assembly composed of three UO 2 rods and one MOX rod, with the mirror reflection boundary condition. A burnup calculation was done with the condition; the radius of the MOX pellet is divided into two regions, and the azimuthal angle is divided into eight. The number density of 239 Pu at 44 000 MWd/t for the MOX rod shows azimuthal dependence by 20%. The maximum burnup occurs in the direction of the UO 2 rods. This is

  17. On the safety and performance demonstration tests of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor and validation and verification of computational codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Bum; Jeong, Ji Young; Lee, Tae Ho; Kim, Sung Kyun; Euh, Dong Jin; Joo, Hyung Kook [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The design of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR) has been developed and the validation and verification (V and V) activities to demonstrate the system performance and safety are in progress. In this paper, the current status of test activities is described briefly and significant results are discussed. The large-scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test program, Sodium Test Loop for Safety Simulation and Assessment-1 (STELLA-1), produced satisfactory results, which were used for the computer codes V and V, and the performance test results of the model pump in sodium showed good agreement with those in water. The second phase of the STELLA program with the integral effect tests facility, STELLA-2, is in the detailed design stage of the design process. The sodium thermal-hydraulic experiment loop for finned-tube sodium-to-air heat exchanger performance test, the intermediate heat exchanger test facility, and the test facility for the reactor flow distribution are underway. Flow characteristics test in subchannels of a wire-wrapped rod bundle has been carried out for safety analysis in the core and the dynamic characteristic test of upper internal structure has been performed for the seismic analysis model for the PGSFR. The performance tests for control rod assemblies (CRAs) have been conducted for control rod drive mechanism driving parts and drop tests of the CRA under scram condition were performed. Finally, three types of inspection sensors under development for the safe operation of the PGSFR were explained with significant results.

  18. Fission product data for thermal reactors. Final report. Part I. A data set for EPRI-CINDER using ENDF/B-IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Wilson, W.B.; Stamatelatos, M.G.

    1976-12-01

    A four-group fission-product neutron absorption library, appropriate for use in thermal reactors, is described. All decay parameters are taken from ENDF/B-IV. The absorption cross sections are also processed from ENDF/B-IV files, first into a 154-group set and subsequently collapsed into the 4-group set described in this report. The decay and cross section data were used to form 84 linear chains in the CINDER code format. These chains contain all significant fission products having half-lives exceeding 4 hours--a total of 186 nuclides. A 12-chain set containing one pseudo-chain for use in spatial depletion calculations is described. This set accurately reproduces the aggregate absorption buildup of the 84 chains. This report describes the chains and processed data, results of comparison calculations for various fuels, and a comparison of calculated temporal fission-product absorption buildup with corresponding results from a long-term fuel irradiation and cooling integral experiment

  19. NUCLEAR ENERGY RESEARCH INITIATIVE (NERI) PROGRAM GRANT NUMBER DE-FG03-00SF22168 TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT (Aug 15, 2002 to Nov. 15, 2002) - DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fred R. Mynatt; Andy Kadak; Marc Berte; Larry Miller; Lawrence Townsend; Martin Williamson; Rupy Sawhney; Jacob Fife

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to develop and evaluate nuclear power plant designs and layout concepts to maximize the benefits of compact modular Generation IV reactor concepts including factory fabrication and packaging for optimal transportation and siting. This report covers the ninth quarter of the project. The three reactor concept teams have completed initial plant concept development, evaluation and layout. A significant design effort has proceeded with substantial change and evolution from original ideas. The concepts have been reviewed by the industry participants and improvements have been implemented. The third phase, industrial engineering simulation of reactor fabrication has begun

  20. Propagation of epithermal neutrons in the empty mesh of the EDF3 reactor. Application of Zeus IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brisbois, Jacques; Sonnet, Alain; Rafalovitch, Armand

    1969-10-01

    The authors report the verification of the Zeus 4 Monte Carlo code by applying it to an actual example of neutron propagation in a large enclosure, the empty mesh of the EDF3 reactor, supplied through the box holes (for the passage of heat transfer fluid ducts). This enclosure is represented by 105 parallelepipedic meshes in which are placed 4 plane and square sources of same cross section as the holes, and emitting inwards in cos θ. Source intensity is determined by flow rate measurements during tests in the air, interpreted by a Zeus-based calculation and channel power measurements during a 387 MW level operation. The presence of ducts is taken into account by applying a global attenuation coefficient to the sources. Calculation and experiment results agree very well in view of geometry complexity [fr

  1. System and safety studies of accelerator driven systems and generation IV reactors for transmutation of minor actinides. Annual report 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergloef, Calle; Fokau, Andrei; Jolkkonen, Mikael; Tesinsky, Milan; Wallenius, Janne; Youpeng Zhang (Div. of Reactor Physics, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden))

    2010-03-15

    During 2009, the reactor physics division has made a design study of a source efficient ADS with nitride fuel and 15/15Ti cladding, based on the EFIT design made within the EUROTRANS project. It was shown that the source efficiency may be doubled as compared to the reference design with oxide fuel and T91 cladding. Transient analysis of a medium sized sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel allowed to define criteria in terms of power penalty for americium introduction. It was shown that for each percent of americium added to the fuel, the linear rating must be reduced by 6% in order for the fuel to survive postulated unprotected transients. The Sjoestrand area ratio method for reactivity determination has been evaluated experimentally in the strongly heterogeneous subcritical facility YALINA-Booster. Surprisingly, it has been found that the area ratio reactivity estimates may differ by a factor of two depending on detector position. It is shown that this strong spatial dependence can be explained based on a two-region point kinetics model and rectified by means of correction factors obtained through Monte Carlo simulations. For the purpose of measuring high energy neutron cross sections at the SCANDAL facility in Uppsala, Monte Carlo simulations of neutron to proton conversion efficiencies in CsI detectors have been performed. A uranium fuel fabrication laboratory has been taken into operation at KTH in 2009. Uranium and zirconium nitride powders have been fabricated by hydridation/nitridation of metallic source materials. Sample pellets have been pressed and ZrN discs have been sintered to 93% density by means of spark plasma sintering methods

  2. Summary of ORSphere critical and reactor physics measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall Margaret A.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader, J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF with highly enriched uranium (HEU metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s. The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. This critical configuration has been evaluated. Preliminary results were presented at ND2013. Since then, the evaluation was finalized and judged to be an acceptable benchmark experiment for the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Project (ICSBEP. Additionally, reactor physics measurements were performed to determine surface button worths, central void worth, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron decay constant, fission density and neutron importance. These measurements have been evaluated and found to be acceptable experiments and are discussed in full detail in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments. The purpose of this paper is to summarize all the evaluated critical and reactor physics measurements evaluations.

  3. Summary of ORSphere critical and reactor physics measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Margaret A.; Bess, John D.

    2017-09-01

    In the early 1970s Dr. John T. Mihalczo (team leader), J.J. Lynn, and J.R. Taylor performed experiments at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Facility (ORCEF) with highly enriched uranium (HEU) metal (called Oak Ridge Alloy or ORALLOY) to recreate GODIVA I results with greater accuracy than those performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in the 1950s. The purpose of the Oak Ridge ORALLOY Sphere (ORSphere) experiments was to estimate the unreflected and unmoderated critical mass of an idealized sphere of uranium metal corrected to a density, purity, and enrichment such that it could be compared with the GODIVA I experiments. This critical configuration has been evaluated. Preliminary results were presented at ND2013. Since then, the evaluation was finalized and judged to be an acceptable benchmark experiment for the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiment Project (ICSBEP). Additionally, reactor physics measurements were performed to determine surface button worths, central void worth, delayed neutron fraction, prompt neutron decay constant, fission density and neutron importance. These measurements have been evaluated and found to be acceptable experiments and are discussed in full detail in the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments. The purpose of this paper is to summarize all the evaluated critical and reactor physics measurements evaluations.

  4. Multi-objective technico-economic optimization of energy conversion systems: hydrogen and electricity cogeneration from Generation IV nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, A.

    2008-01-01

    With the increase in environmental considerations, such as the control of greenhouse emissions, and with the decrease in the fossil energy resources, hydrogen is currently considered as a promising energy vector. One of the main technological challenges of a future hydrogen economy is its large scale production without fossil fuel emissions. Under this context, nuclear energy is particularly adapted for hydrogen massive production by thermochemical cycles or high temperature electrolysis. One of the selected nuclear systems is the Very High Temperature Reactor (950 C/1200 C), cooled with helium, and dedicated to hydrogen production or to hydrogen electricity cogeneration. The main objective of this investigation, within the framework of a collaboration between CEA, French Atomic Agency (Cadarache) and LGC (Toulouse), consists in defining a technico-economic optimization methodology of electricity-hydrogen cogeneration systems, in order to identify and propose promising development strategies. Among the massive production processes of hydrogen, the thermochemical cycle Iodine-Sulphur has been considered. Taking into account the diversity of the used energies (i.e., heat and electricity) on the one hand and of the produced energies (hydrogen and electricity) on the other hand of the studied cogeneration system, an exergetic approach has been developed due to its ability to consider various energy forms on the same thermodynamical basis. The CYCLOP software tool (CEA) is used for the thermodynamic modelling of these systems. The economic criterion, calculated using the SEMER software tool (CEA), is based on the minimization of the total production site cost over its lifespan i.e., investment, operating costs and nuclear fuel cost. Capital investment involves the development of cost functions adapted to specific technologies and their specific operating conditions. The resulting optimization problems consist in maximizing the energy production, while minimizing the

  5. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Toru.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a boiling water reactor which can enhance a quake resisting strength and flatten power distribution. Structure: At least more than four fuel bundles, in which a plurality of fuel rods are arranged in lattice fashion which upper and lower portions are supported by tie-plates, are bundled and then covered by a square channel box. The control rod is movably arranged within a space formed by adjoining channel boxes. A spacer of trapezoidal section is disposed in the central portion on the side of the channel box over substantially full length in height direction, and a neutron instrumented tube is disposed in the central portion inside the channel box. Thus, where a horizontal load is exerted due to earthquake or the like, the spacers come into contact with each other to support the channel box and prevent it from abnormal vibrations. (Furukawa, Y.)

  6. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, R.M.

    1976-01-01

    Disclosed is a neutronic reactor having a moderator, coolant tubes traversing the moderator from an inlet end to an outlet end, bodies of material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy disposed within the coolant tubes, and means for circulating water through said coolant tubes characterized by the improved construction wherein the coolant tubes are constructed of aluminum having an outer diameter of 1.729 inches and a wall thickness of 0.059 inch, and the means for circulating a liquid coolant through the tubes includes a source of water at a pressure of approximately 350 pounds per square inch connected to the inlet end of the tubes, and said construction including a pressure reducing orifice disposed at the inlet ends of the tubes reducing the pressure of the water by approximately 150 pounds per square inch. 1 claim, 16 figures

  7. On the Safety and Performance Demonstration Tests of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor and Validation and Verification of Computational Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Bum Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The design of Prototype Gen-IV Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR has been developed and the validation and verification (V&V activities to demonstrate the system performance and safety are in progress. In this paper, the current status of test activities is described briefly and significant results are discussed. The large-scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test program, Sodium Test Loop for Safety Simulation and Assessment-1 (STELLA-1, produced satisfactory results, which were used for the computer codes V&V, and the performance test results of the model pump in sodium showed good agreement with those in water. The second phase of the STELLA program with the integral effect tests facility, STELLA-2, is in the detailed design stage of the design process. The sodium thermal-hydraulic experiment loop for finned-tube sodium-to-air heat exchanger performance test, the intermediate heat exchanger test facility, and the test facility for the reactor flow distribution are underway. Flow characteristics test in subchannels of a wire-wrapped rod bundle has been carried out for safety analysis in the core and the dynamic characteristic test of upper internal structure has been performed for the seismic analysis model for the PGSFR. The performance tests for control rod assemblies (CRAs have been conducted for control rod drive mechanism driving parts and drop tests of the CRA under scram condition were performed. Finally, three types of inspection sensors under development for the safe operation of the PGSFR were explained with significant results.

  8. Development of the control assembly pattern and dynamic analysis of the generation IV large gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girardin, G.

    2009-01-01

    Among the systems selected by the GIF, the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is a highly innovative system with advanced fuel geometry and materials. It is in the context of the large, 2400 MWth reference GFR design that the present doctoral research has been conducted, the principal aim having been to develop and qualify the control assembly (CA) pattern and corresponding CA implementation scheme for this system. The work has been carried out in three successive and complementary phases: (1) validation of the neutronics tools, (2) the CA pattern development and related static analysis, and (3) dynamic core behavior studies for hypothetical CA driven transients. During the first phase of the thesis, the reference PROTEUS test lattice from these experiments has been analyzed with ERANOS-2.0 and its associated, adjusted nuclear data library ERALIB1. Additionally, benchmark calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX, allowing one to both check the deterministic results and to analyze the sensitivity to different modern data libraries. It has been found that, for the main reaction rate ratios, the new analysis of the GCFR-PROTEUS reference lattice generally yields good agreement - within 1σ measurement uncertainty - with experimental values and with the Monte Carlo simulations. As shown by the analysis, the predictions were in somewhat better agreement in the case of the adjusted ERALIB1 library. The applicability of ERANOS-2.0/ERALIB1 as the reference neutronics tool for the GFR analysis could thus be demonstrated. Furthermore, neutronics aspects related to the novel features of the GFR, for which new experimental investigations are needed, were highlighted. In the second phase of the research, the CA pattern was developed for the GFR, based on iterative neutronics and thermal-hydraulics calculations, 2D and 3D neutronics models for the reactor core having first been set up using the reference ERANOS-2.0/ERALIB1 computational scheme. For the thermal

  9. Actions needed for RA reactor exploitation - I-IV, Part II, Design project VI-SA 1, Experimental loop for testing the EL-4 reactor fuel elements in the central vertical experimental channel of the RA reactor in Vinca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakovic, M.

    1961-12-01

    The objective of installing the VISA-1 loop was testing the fuel elements of the EL-4 reactor. The fuel elements planned for testing are natural UO 2 with beryllium cladding, cooled by CO 2 under nominal pressure of 60 at and temperature 600 deg C. central vertical experimental channel of the RA reactor was chosen for installing a test loop cooled by CO 2 . This report contains the detailed design project of the testing loop with the control system and safety analysis of the planned experiment

  10. Expected value of finite fission chain lengths of pulse reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianjun; Zhou Zhigao; Zhang Ben'ai

    2007-01-01

    The average neutron population necessary for sponsoring a persistent fission chain in a multiplying system, is discussed. In the point reactor model, the probability function θ(n, t 0 , t) of a source neutron at time t 0 leading to n neutrons at time t is dealt with. The non-linear partial differential equation for the probability generating function G(z; t 0 , t) is derived. By solving the equation, we have obtained an approximate analytic solution for a slightly prompt supercritical system. For the pulse reactor Godiva-II, the mean value of finite fission chain lengths is estimated in this work and shows that the estimated value is reasonable for the experimental analysis. (authors)

  11. (IV) phosphates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M(IV) phosphates of the class of tetravalent metal acid (TMA) salts where M (IV) = Zr, Ti, Sn has been synthesized by the sol-gel method. These materials have been characterized for elemental analysis (ICP-AES), thermal analysis (TGA, DSC), X-ray analysis and FTIR spectroscopy. Chemical resistivity of these materials ...

  12. Gen IV. Technical and economical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaluzny, Y.; Legee, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this presentation author deals with development of nuclear reactor type of Generation IV. He concluded that: - Nuclear energy is competitive with regards to the other generation sources; Its competitiveness also increases with CO 2 cost. Considering the nuclear cost breakdown of LWR reactors, it turns out that the uranium is currently not in the range of a threshold for FBR deployment; - The global balance of uranium supply and demand and also innovation required to fulfil GEN IV objectives would probably imply the emergence of fast reactor competitiveness after the turn of the mid-century; - We shall need fast reactors in the coming decade.

  13. Current status of NPP generation IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yohanes Dwi Anggoro; Dharu Dewi; Nurlaila; Arief Tris Yuliyanto

    2013-01-01

    Today development of nuclear technology has reached the stage of research and development of Generation IV nuclear power plants (advanced reactor systems) which is an innovative development from the previous generation of nuclear power plants. There are six types of power generation IV reactors, namely: Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), and Super Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR). The purpose of this study is to know the development of Generation IV nuclear power plants that have been done by the thirteen countries that are members of the Gen IV International Forum (GIF). The method used is review study and refers to various studies related to the current status of research and development of generation IV nuclear power. The result of this study showed that the systems and technology on Generation IV nuclear power plants offer significant advances in sustainability, safety and reliability, economics, and proliferation resistance and physical protection. In addition, based on the research and development experience is estimated that: SFR can be used optimally in 2015, VHTR in 2020, while NPP types GFR, LFR, MSR, and SCWR in 2025. Utilization of NPP generation IV said to be optimal if fulfill the goal of NPP generation IV, such as: capable to generate energy sustainability and promote long-term availability of nuclear fuel, minimize nuclear waste and reduce the long term stewardship burden, has an advantage in the field of safety and reliability compared to the previous generation of NPP and VHTR technology have a good prospects in Indonesia. (author)

  14. Safety approach and research and development presentation for the selected systems of the International forum Generation IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorini, G.L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with the six projects of the Generation IV forum: Sodium Fast reactor, lead fast reactor, gas fast reactor, very high temperature reactor, supercritical water reactor, molten salt reactor. The technical objectives of the reactor safety and the design/evaluation approach are discussed. (A.L.B.)

  15. Flow injection analysis-flame atomic absorption spectrometry system for indirect determination of sulfite after on-line reduction of solid-phase manganese (IV) dioxide reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zare-Dorabei, Rouholah; Boroun, Shokoufeh; Noroozifar, Meissam

    2018-02-01

    A new and simple flow injection method followed by atomic absorption spectrometry was developed for indirect determination of sulfite. The proposed method is based on the oxidation of sulfite to sulphate ion using solid-phase manganese dioxide (30% W/W suspended on silica gel beads) reactor. MnO 2 will be reduced to Mn(II) by sample injection in to the column under acidic carrier stream of HNO 3 (pH 2) with flow rate of 3.5mLmin -1 at room temperature. Absorption measurement of Mn(II) which is proportional to the concentration of sulfite in the sample was carried out by atomic absorption spectrometry. The calibration curve was linear up to 25mgL -1 with a detection limit (DL) of 0.08mgL -1 for 400µL injection sample volume. The presented method is efficient toward sulfite determination in sugar and water samples with a relative standard deviation (RSD) less than 1.2% and a sampling rate of about 60h -1 . Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Estudo histológico das estruturas periodontais comparando o afastamento gengival pelo uso do anel de cobre e godiva em relação ao uso do fio de algodão, em cães

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Pereira Leirião

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente estudo três cães foram submetidos ao afastamento gengival utilizando-se anel de cobre e godiva de baixa fusão e fio de algodão embebido em cloreto de alumínio com o objetivo de identificar, avaliar e comparar os danos que podem ocorrer ao periodonto de proteção em decorrência dos métodos de afastamento citados. Foram obtidas amostras nos períodos de 0 (zero, 07, 14 e 21 dias, as quais foram avaliadas histologicamente, utilizando-se as técnicas de coloração Hematoxilina / Eosina.

  17. Electromagnetic Near Field Measurements of Two Critical Assemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goettee, Jeffrey David

    2015-11-03

    The reactors employed, Godiva IV and WSMR Fast Burst Reactor, are described first. Then the point reactor kinetics model, electromagnetic potential, and the measurement of kinetics quantities are successively discussed. In summary, reactor power produces measurable electric energy. The electric signal mimics power curve for prompt burst operations - features in logarithmic derivatives match. The electric signature should be dependent on the power and not the derivative; therefore, steady-state modes should be measurable.

  18. Present status of reactor physics in the United States and Japan-IV. 7. Design Studies to Maximize the Discharge Burnup of Liquid-Metal-Cooled ATW Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, W.S.; Taiwo, T.A.

    2001-01-01

    retained within the fuel particles, which are contained within the matrix. As a result, a higher burnup can be achieved compared to the conventional metallic fuel, and thus, the discharge burnup is not likely to constrain the design. On the other hand, there is likely a fast fluence limit for the core structural material, and the peak fast fluence limit is assumed to be ∼4.0 x 10 23 n/cm 2 . This peak fluence limit on the blanket structural material constrains the fuel residence time. 3. The peak linear power is constrained by the need to limit the peak fuel centerline temperature. The minimum fuel volume fraction required to satisfy the specified constraint on the peak linear power increases as the power density increases. 4. The power density and coolant volume fraction are interrelated for adequate cooling. For a specified coolant velocity, the minimum coolant volume fraction increases as the power density increases. In the case of lead-based coolant, the coolant velocity is further limited because the corrosion and erosive wear of core structural materials are intensified as the coolant velocity increases. Subject to these design constraints, parametric studies were performed to determine design characteristics yielding the maximum discharge burnup for an 840-MW(thermal) ATW blanket. By adopting a short irradiation cycle approach to limiting the burnup reactivity loss, the present study focused on optimizing the blanket configuration and material volume fractions to maximize the discharge burnup under key design constraints. A fuel residence time of 4 yr at a 75% capacity factor was assumed with a cycle length of 1/2 yr. Blanket performance was evaluated for the equilibrium fuel cycle attained by repeated recycle of the TRU discharged from the blanket with light water reactor discharge TRU used as makeup for the TRU consumed by fission each cycle. The blanket power distribution was flattened by optimizing the split of the TRU loading among the concentric planar zones

  19. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  20. Environmental, financial and energy feasibility of the electrolysis of the water steam of a generation IV reactor cooling system during the moments of low consumption ef eletrical energy: challenges and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanelli, Eduardo J.; Vargas, Miltom; Garcia, Pedro L.; Seo, Emilia S.M.; Oliveira, Wagner de S.

    2009-01-01

    Our civilization is in an inflection moment. Our current decisions will lead us to drastic changes in the planet climate or to cleaner and more sustainable energy generation models. In a certain moment in the evolution of our society, we have privileged the productivity instead of the reasonable use of the planet's resources. This option has been leading us to a situation in which these resources are seriously jeopardized. New models of energy generation and use should be discussed and adopted in order to reverse this process. The electric-power consumption is not constant through time and it must be generated at the moment it is going to be used. There are moments of great idleness in the electric-power generation system, counterbalanced by high demand moments. This characteristic has induced us to the construction of a model of great generation capacity that remains without use most of the time, producing huge financial and environmental impacts. In this article, we discuss the environmental, financial and energy viability of using the idle capacity of the electric-power system to, through water steam electrolysis, produce hydrogen, which would be reconverted into electric power in peak moments by a fuel cell. In this study, we aim at investigating the viability of associating a SOFC (Solid Oxide Fuel Cell), acting as an electrolysis bow, to a generation IV reactor, in order to produce hydrogen from superheated water steam in the cooling of the reactor, which will be converted into electric power via SOFC (Solid Oxide Fuel Cell) in peak moments. The method used in this investigation was to study the electric charge variation consumed in a day, randomly selected in relation to the hour of the day, to launch a curve into a diagram 'Demand x hour of the day', to establish the peak moments, the minimum moments, and the average consumption, and, based on these data and geometrically, predict the viability of using the energetic potential of the moments in which the

  1. Environmental, financial and energy feasibility of the electrolysis of the water steam of a generation IV reactor cooling system during the moments of low consumption ef eletrical energy: challenges and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanelli, Eduardo J.; Vargas, Miltom; Garcia, Pedro L.; Seo, Emilia S.M.; Oliveira, Wagner de S. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: ipen@stefanelli.eng.br

    2009-07-01

    Our civilization is in an inflection moment. Our current decisions will lead us to drastic changes in the planet climate or to cleaner and more sustainable energy generation models. In a certain moment in the evolution of our society, we have privileged the productivity instead of the reasonable use of the planet's resources. This option has been leading us to a situation in which these resources are seriously jeopardized. New models of energy generation and use should be discussed and adopted in order to reverse this process. The electric-power consumption is not constant through time and it must be generated at the moment it is going to be used. There are moments of great idleness in the electric-power generation system, counterbalanced by high demand moments. This characteristic has induced us to the construction of a model of great generation capacity that remains without use most of the time, producing huge financial and environmental impacts. In this article, we discuss the environmental, financial and energy viability of using the idle capacity of the electric-power system to, through water steam electrolysis, produce hydrogen, which would be reconverted into electric power in peak moments by a fuel cell. In this study, we aim at investigating the viability of associating a SOFC (Solid Oxide Fuel Cell), acting as an electrolysis bow, to a generation IV reactor, in order to produce hydrogen from superheated water steam in the cooling of the reactor, which will be converted into electric power via SOFC (Solid Oxide Fuel Cell) in peak moments. The method used in this investigation was to study the electric charge variation consumed in a day, randomly selected in relation to the hour of the day, to launch a curve into a diagram 'Demand x hour of the day', to establish the peak moments, the minimum moments, and the average consumption, and, based on these data and geometrically, predict the viability of using the energetic potential of the moments

  2. Asteroids IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    . Asteroids, like planets, are driven by a great variety of both dynamical and physical mechanisms. In fact, images sent back by space missions show a collection of small worlds whose characteristics seem designed to overthrow our preconceived notions. Given their wide range of sizes and surface compositions, it is clear that many formed in very different places and at different times within the solar nebula. These characteristics make them an exciting challenge for researchers who crave complex problems. The return of samples from these bodies may ultimately be needed to provide us with solutions. In the book Asteroids IV, the editors and authors have taken major strides in the long journey toward a much deeper understanding of our fascinating planetary ancestors. This book reviews major advances in 43 chapters that have been written and reviewed by a team of more than 200 international authorities in asteroids. It is aimed to be as comprehensive as possible while also remaining accessible to students and researchers who are interested in learning about these small but nonetheless important worlds. We hope this volume will serve as a leading reference on the topic of asteroids for the decade to come. We are deeply indebted to the many authors and referees for their tremendous efforts in helping us create Asteroids IV. We also thank the members of the Asteroids IV scientific organizing committee for helping us shape the structure and content of the book. The conference associated with the book, "Asteroids Comets Meteors 2014" held June 30-July 4, 2014, in Helsinki, Finland, did an outstanding job of demonstrating how much progress we have made in the field over the last decade. We are extremely grateful to our host Karri Muinonnen and his team. The editors are also grateful to the Asteroids IV production staff, namely Renée Dotson and her colleagues at the Lunar and Planetary Institute, for their efforts, their invaluable assistance, and their enthusiasm; they made life as

  3. Implementation and qualification of MCNP 5 through the intercomparison with the benchmark for the calculation of critical systems Godiva and Jezebel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lara, Rafael G.; Maiorino, Jose R.

    2013-01-01

    This work aimed at the implementation and qualification of MCNP code in a supercomputer of the Universidade Federal do ABC, so that may be available a next-generation simulation tool for precise calculations of nuclear reactors and systems subject to radiation. The implementation of this tool will have multidisciplinary applications, covering various areas of engineering (nuclear, aerospace, biomedical), radiation physics and others

  4. Iris reactor conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carelli, M.D.; Conway, L.E.; Petrovic, B.; Paramonov, D.V. [Westinghouse Electric Comp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Galvin, M.; Todreas, N.E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Lombardi, C.V.; Maldari, F.; Ricotti, M.E. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Cinotti, L. [Ansaldo SpA, Genoa (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral, light water cooled, low-to-medium power (100-350 MWe) reactor which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, improved economics and fuel cycle sustainability. It relies on the proven technology of light water reactors and features innovative engineering, but it does not require new technology development. This paper discusses the current reference IRIS design, which features a 1000 MWt thermal core with proven 5%-enriched uranium oxide fuel and five-year long straight burn fuel cycle, integral reactor vessel housing helical tube steam generators and immersed spool pumps. Other major contributors to the high level of safety and economic attractiveness are the safety by design and optimized maintenance approaches, which allow elimination of some classes of accidents, lower capital cost, long operating cycle, and high capacity factors. (author)

  5. Development of generation IV nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsui, Kazuaki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ogawa, Masuro; Ichimiya, Masakazu; Noda, Hiroshi

    2003-01-01

    The fifth 'Generation IV International Forum (GIF), Policy Group Meetings' was held at the Zen-Nikku Hotel in Tokyo, on September 19-20, 2002, under participations of Abraham, Secretary of DOE in U.S.A., Columbani, Secretary of CEA in France, Fujiie, Chairman of CAE in Japan, Kano, Parliamental Minister of MIS in Japan, and so on. Ten nations entering GIF (Argentina, Brazil, Canada, France, Japan, Korea, South Africa, Switzerland, U.K., and U.S.A.) selected six next generation nuclear energy concepts for objects of international cooperative research and development aiming at its practice by 2030. These concepts applicable to not only power generation, but also hydrogen production, sea water purification, and so on, are sodium liquid metal cooled reactor (Japan), high temperature gas cooled reactor (France), Super-critical pressure water cooled reactor (SCWR: Canada), Lead metal cooled reactor (Switzerland), Gas cooled fast reactor (U.S.A.), and molten salts reactor. On the generation IV nuclear reactor systems aiming to further upgrade their sustainability, safety, economical efficiency, and nuclear non proliferation, the 'Plans on Technical Development' (Road-map) to decide priority of their R and Ds has been cooperatively discussed under frameworks of international research cooperation by the GIF members nations. Here were shared descriptions on nuclear fuel cycle as a remise of technical evaluation and adopted concepts by Japanese participants contributing to making up the Road-map. (G.K.)

  6. Mucopolysaccharidosis type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    MPS IV; Morquio syndrome; Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVA; MPS IVA; Galactosamine-6-sulfatase deficiency; Mucopolysaccharidosis type IVB; MPS IVB; Beta galactosidase deficiency; Lysosomal storage disease - mucopolysaccharidosis type IV

  7. The nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacher, P.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the various nuclear reactor systems, starting with the Generation II, then the present development of the Generation III and the stakes and challenges of the future Generation IV. Some have found appropriate to oppose reactor systems or generations one to another, especially by minimizing the enhancements of generation III compared to generation II or by expecting the earth from generation IV (meaning that generation III is already obsolete). In the first part of the document (chapter 2), some keys are given to the reader to develop its proper opinion. Chapter 3 describes more precisely the various reactor systems and generations. Chapter 4 discusses the large industrial manoeuvres around the generation III, and the last chapter gives some economical references, taking into account, for the various means of power generation, the impediments linked to climate protection

  8. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Bertrand

    2015-10-01

    After some remarks on the nuclear fuel, on the chain reaction control, on fuel loading and unloading, this article proposes descriptions of the design, principles and operations of different types of nuclear reactors as well as comments on their presence and use in different countries: pressurized water reactors (design of the primary and secondary circuits, volume and chemistry control, backup injection circuits), boiling water reactors, heavy water reactors, graphite and boiling water reactors, graphite-gas reactors, fast breeder reactors, and fourth generation reactors (definition, fast breeding). For these last ones, six concepts are presented: sodium-cooled fast reactor, lead-cooled fast reactor, gas-cooled fast reactor, high temperature gas-cooled reactor, supercritical water-cooled reactor, and molten salt reactor

  9. A worldwide overview of generation IV systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauche, F.; Guidez, J.

    2017-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is an initiative of the American Department of Energy (DOE) whose purpose is to create an international cooperation for proposing and studying a new generation of nuclear reactors. GIF's work began in 2000 and 6 types of reactors were rapidly proposed. This article gives an overview of the work done so far. The sodium-cooled fast reactor is the most advanced concept because there is a technological continuity from the first sodium reactors operating in the fifties. The use of a lead eutectic as heat transfer fluid is hampered by its corrosion power on metals. The molten salt reactor is a very innovative concept that requires a complex and adapting chemistry for the on-line reprocessing. High-temperature and Very-High-Temperature reactors (HTR an VHTR) require materials that can sustain high temperatures. The difficulty to design such materials has hindered the development of this concept. Gas-cooled fast reactors show difficulties to evacuate residual heat in case of accident. The supercritical water-cooled reactor concept wants to take advantage of the increased heat capacity of water in particular conditions. Technical issues like the resistance to high pressure or corrosion or safety issues have delayed this concept so far. (A.C.)

  10. IV treatment at home

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other IV treatments you may receive after you leave the hospital include: Treatment for hormone deficiencies Medicines for severe nausea that cancer chemotherapy or pregnancy may cause Patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) for pain (this is IV ...

  11. H Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The H Reactor was the first reactor to be built at Hanford after World War II.It became operational in October of 1949, and represented the fourth nuclear reactor on...

  12. New Materials for NGNP/Gen IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindeman, Robert W.; Marriott, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    The bounding conditions were briefly summarized for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) that is the leading candidate in the Department of Energy Generation IV reactor program. Metallic materials essential to the successful development and proof of concept for the NGNP were identified. The literature bearing on the materials technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was reviewed with emphasis on the needs identified for the NGNP. Several materials were identified for a more thorough study of their databases and behavioral features relative to the requirements ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH.

  13. New Materials for NGNP/Gen IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert W. Swindeman; Douglas L. Marriott

    2009-12-18

    The bounding conditions were briefly summarized for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) that is the leading candidate in the Department of Energy Generation IV reactor program. Metallic materials essential to the successful development and proof of concept for the NGNP were identified. The literature bearing on the materials technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was reviewed with emphasis on the needs identified for the NGNP. Several materials were identified for a more thorough study of their databases and behavioral features relative to the requirements ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH.

  14. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-01-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean/US/laboratory/university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program

  15. Advanced Computational Thermal Fluid Physics (CTFP) and Its Assessment for Light Water Reactors and Supercritical Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D.M. McEligot; K. G. Condie; G. E. McCreery; H. M. McIlroy; R. J. Pink; L.E. Hochreiter; J.D. Jackson; R.H. Pletcher; B.L. Smith; P. Vukoslavcevic; J.M. Wallace; J.Y. Yoo; J.S. Lee; S.T. Ro; S.O. Park

    2005-10-01

    Background: The ultimate goal of the study is the improvement of predictive methods for safety analyses and design of Generation IV reactor systems such as supercritical water reactors (SCWR) for higher efficiency, improved performance and operation, design simplification, enhanced safety and reduced waste and cost. The objective of this Korean / US / laboratory / university collaboration of coupled fundamental computational and experimental studies is to develop the supporting knowledge needed for improved predictive techniques for use in the technology development of Generation IV reactor concepts and their passive safety systems. The present study emphasizes SCWR concepts in the Generation IV program.

  16. Influence of the reprocessing on molten salt reactor behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Merle-Lucotte, E.; Mathieu, L.; Heuer, D.; Billebaud, A.; Brissot, R.; Le Brun, C.; Liatard, E.; Loiseaux, J.M.; Méplan, O.; Nuttin, A.; Wilson, J.

    2005-01-01

    International audience; The Molten Salt Reactor is one of the systems studied as a Generation IV reactor. Its main characteristic is the strong coupling between neutronics and salt reprocessing. Such nuclear reactors use a liquid fuel which is also the coolant. Elements produced during the reactor's operation, like Fission Products (FP) or TransUranians, modify the neutronic balance of the reactor by capturing neutrons. As the fuel is liquid, samples can be extracted and reprocessed to remove...

  17. Generation IV nuclear plant design strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altin, V.

    2007-01-01

    In this presentation Generation IV nuclear reactor design criteria are examined under the light of known nuclear properties of fissile and fertile nuclei. Their conflicting nature is elucidated along with the resulting inevitability of a multitude of designs. The designs selected as candidates for further development are evaluated with respect to their potential to serve the different design criteria, thereby revealing their more difficult aspects of realization and the strong research challenges lying ahead

  18. Verification of Unstructured Mesh Capabilities in MCNP6 for Reactor Physics Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, Timothy P.; Martz, Roger L.; Kiedrowski, Brian C.; Martin, William R.

    2012-01-01

    New unstructured mesh capabilities in MCNP6 (developmental version during summer 2012) show potential for conducting multi-physics analyses by coupling MCNP to a finite element solver such as Abaqus/CAE[2]. Before these new capabilities can be utilized, the ability of MCNP to accurately estimate eigenvalues and pin powers using an unstructured mesh must first be verified. Previous work to verify the unstructured mesh capabilities in MCNP was accomplished using the Godiva sphere [1], and this work attempts to build on that. To accomplish this, a criticality benchmark and a fuel assembly benchmark were used for calculations in MCNP using both the Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) native to MCNP and the unstructured mesh geometry generated using Abaqus/CAE. The Big Ten criticality benchmark [3] was modeled due to its geometry being similar to that of a reactor fuel pin. The C5G7 3-D Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Assembly Benchmark [4] was modeled to test the unstructured mesh capabilities on a reactor-type problem.

  19. Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rittenhouse, P.; Ren, W.

    2005-01-01

    A Gen IV Materials Handbook is being developed to provide an authoritative single source of highly qualified structural materials information and materials properties data for use in design and analyses of all Generation IV Reactor Systems. The Handbook will be responsive to the needs expressed by all of the principal government, national laboratory, and private company stakeholders of Gen IV Reactor Systems. The Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan provided here addresses the purpose, rationale, attributes, and benefits of the Handbook and will detail its content, format, quality assurance, applicability, and access. Structural materials, both metallic and ceramic, for all Gen IV reactor types currently supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) will be included in the Gen IV Materials Handbook. However, initial emphasis will be on materials for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Descriptive information (e.g., chemical composition and applicable technical specifications and codes) will be provided for each material along with an extensive presentation of mechanical and physical property data including consideration of temperature, irradiation, environment, etc. effects on properties. Access to the Gen IV Materials Handbook will be internet-based with appropriate levels of control. Information and data in the Handbook will be configured to allow search by material classes, specific materials, specific information or property class, specific property, data parameters, and individual data points identified with materials parameters, test conditions, and data source. Details on all of these as well as proposed applicability and consideration of data quality classes are provided in the Implementation Plan. Website development for the Handbook is divided into six phases including (1) detailed product analysis and specification, (2) simulation and design, (3) implementation and testing, (4) product release, (5) project/product evaluation, and (6) product

  20. Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rittenhouse, P.; Ren, W.

    2005-03-29

    A Gen IV Materials Handbook is being developed to provide an authoritative single source of highly qualified structural materials information and materials properties data for use in design and analyses of all Generation IV Reactor Systems. The Handbook will be responsive to the needs expressed by all of the principal government, national laboratory, and private company stakeholders of Gen IV Reactor Systems. The Gen IV Materials Handbook Implementation Plan provided here addresses the purpose, rationale, attributes, and benefits of the Handbook and will detail its content, format, quality assurance, applicability, and access. Structural materials, both metallic and ceramic, for all Gen IV reactor types currently supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) will be included in the Gen IV Materials Handbook. However, initial emphasis will be on materials for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Descriptive information (e.g., chemical composition and applicable technical specifications and codes) will be provided for each material along with an extensive presentation of mechanical and physical property data including consideration of temperature, irradiation, environment, etc. effects on properties. Access to the Gen IV Materials Handbook will be internet-based with appropriate levels of control. Information and data in the Handbook will be configured to allow search by material classes, specific materials, specific information or property class, specific property, data parameters, and individual data points identified with materials parameters, test conditions, and data source. Details on all of these as well as proposed applicability and consideration of data quality classes are provided in the Implementation Plan. Website development for the Handbook is divided into six phases including (1) detailed product analysis and specification, (2) simulation and design, (3) implementation and testing, (4) product release, (5) project/product evaluation, and (6) product

  1. Improvement of the decay heat removal characteristics of the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor; Amelioration des caracteristiques de la dissipation de la chaleur de decroissance pour les reacteurs a neutrons rapides de quatrieme generation refroidi au gaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epiney, A.S.

    2010-09-07

    The main drawback of the GFR is the difficulty to evacuate decay heat following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) due to the low thermal inertia of the core, as well as to the low coolant density. The present doctoral research focuses on the improvement of decay heat removal (DHR) for the Generation-IV GFR. The reference GFR system design considered in the thesis is the 2006 CEA concept, with a power of 2400 MWth. The CEA 2006 DHR strategy foresees, in all accidental cases (independent of the system pressure), that the reactor is shut down. For high pressure events, dedicated DHR loops with blowers and heat exchangers are designed to operate when the power conversion system cannot be used to provide acceptable core temperatures under natural convection conditions. For de-pressurized events, the strategy relies on a dedicated small containment (called the guard containment) providing an intermediate back-up pressure. The DHR blowers, designed to work under these pressure conditions, need to be powered either by the power grid or by batteries for at least 24 hours. The specific contributions of the present research - aimed at achieving enhanced passivity of the DHR system for the GFR - are design and analysis related to (1) the injection of heavy gas into the primary circuit after a LOCA, to enable natural convection cooling at an intermediate-pressure level, and (2) an autonomous Brayton loop to evacuate decay heat at low primary pressure in case of a loss of the guard containment pressure. Both these developments reduce the dependence on blower power availability considerably. First, the thermal-hydraulic codes used in the study - TRACE and CATHARE - are validated for gas cooling. The validation includes benchmark comparisons between the codes, serving to identify the sensitivity of the results to the different modeling assumptions. The parameters found to be the most sensitive in this analysis, such as heat transfer and friction models, are then validated via a

  2. Improving fuel cycle design and safety characteristics of a gas cooled fast reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooijen, W.F.G.

    2006-01-01

    This research concerns the fuel cycle and safety aspects of a Gas Cooled Fast Reactor, one of the so-called "Generation IV" nuclear reactor designs. The Generation IV Gas Cooled Fast Reactor uses helium as coolant at high temperature. The goal of the GCFR is to obtain a "closed nuclear fuel cycle",

  3. Development of technologies for nuclear reactors of small and medium sized

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-08-01

    This meeting include: countries presentations, themes and objectives of the training course, reactor types, design, EPR, APR1400, A P 1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER-1000, A PWR, ATMEA 1, VVER 1200, Boiling Water Reactor, A BWR, A BWR -II, ESBUR, Ke ren, AREVA, Heavy Water Reactor, Candu 6, Acr-1000, HWR, Bw, Iris, CAREM NuCcale, Smart, KLT-HOS, Westinghouse small modular Reactor, Gas Cooled Reactors, PBMR, React ores enfriados con metales liquidos, Hs, Prism,Terra Power, Hyper ion, appliance's no electric as de energia, Generation IV Reactors,VHTR, Gas Fast Reactor, Sodium Fast Reactor, Molten salt Reactor, Lfr, Water Cooled Reactor, Technology Assessment Process, Fukushima accident.

  4. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  5. Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ait Abderrahim, A.

    2001-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised

  6. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2002-04-01

    SCK-CEN's Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutron and gamma calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation and control, reactor code benchmarking and reactor safety calculations. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 materials testing reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2001 are summarised.

  7. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    1962-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  8. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  9. Thermo-hydraulic simulations of the experimental fast reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira Luz, M. da; Braz Filho, F.A.; Borges, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the core and performance of metallic fuel of the experimental fast reactor, from the thermal-hydraulic point of view, was carried out employing the COBRA IV-I code. The good safety characteristics of this reactor and the feasibility of using metallic fuel in experimental fast reactor were demonstrated. (Author) [pt

  10. Stark Broadening of Se IV, Sn IV, Sb IV and Te IV Spectral Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan S. Dimitrijević

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Stark broadening parameters, line width and shift, are needed for investigations, analysis and modelling of astrophysical, laboratory, laser produced and technological plasmas. Especially in astrophysics, due to constantly increasing resolution of satellite borne spectrographs, and large terrestrial telescopes, data on trace elements, which were previously insignificant, now have increasing importance. Using the modified semiempirical method of Dimitrijević and Konjević, here, Stark widths have been calculated for 2 Se IV, 6 Sn IV, 2 Sb IV and 1 Te IV transitions. Results have been compared with existing theoretical data for Sn IV. Obtained results will be implemented in the STARK-B database, which is also a part of Virtual atomic and molecular data center (VAMDC.

  11. Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Frederick H. [Argonne National Laboratory; Jacobson, Norman H.

    1968-09-01

    This booklet discusses research reactors - reactors designed to provide a source of neutrons and/or gamma radiation for research, or to aid in the investigation of the effects of radiation on any type of material.

  12. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Middleton, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    Reference is made to water cooled reactors and in particular to the cooling system of steam generating heavy water reactors (SGHWR). A two-coolant circuit is described for the latter. Full constructural details are given. (U.K.)

  13. Reactor Neutrinos

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Soo-Bong; Lasserre, Thierry; Wang, Yifang

    2013-01-01

    We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very ...

  14. BOILING REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untermyer, S.

    1962-04-10

    A boiling reactor having a reactivity which is reduced by an increase in the volume of vaporized coolant therein is described. In this system unvaporized liquid coolant is extracted from the reactor, heat is extracted therefrom, and it is returned to the reactor as sub-cooled liquid coolant. This reduces a portion of the coolant which includes vaporized coolant within the core assembly thereby enhancing the power output of the assembly and rendering the reactor substantially self-regulating. (AEC)

  15. Reactor vessel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Makkee, M.; Kapteijn, F.; Moulijn, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    A reactor vessel (1) comprises a reactor body (2) through which channels (3) are provided whose surface comprises longitudinal inwardly directed parts (4) and is provided with a catalyst (6), as well as buffer bodies (8, 12) connected to the channels (3) on both sides of the reactor body (2) and

  16. Nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    After an introduction and general explanation of nuclear power the following reactor types are described: magnox thermal reactor; advanced gas-cooled reactor (AGR); pressurised water reactor (PWR); fast reactors (sodium cooled); boiling water reactor (BWR); CANDU thermal reactor; steam generating heavy water reactor (SGHWR); high temperature reactor (HTR); Leningrad (RMBK) type water-cooled graphite moderated reactor. (U.K.)

  17. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronen, Y.; Elias, E.

    1994-01-01

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  18. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merchie, Francois

    2015-10-01

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  19. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Nagatomi, Shozo.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a jet and missile protective wall of a configuration being inflated toward the center of a reactor container on the inside of a body of the reactor container disposed within a biological shield wall to thereby increase safety of the reactor container. Structure: A jet and missile protective wall comprised of curved surfaces internally formed with a plurality of arch inflations filled with concrete between inner and outer iron plates and shape steel beam is provided between a reactor container surrounded by a biological shield wall and a thermal shield wall surrounding the reactor pressure vessel, and an adiabatic heat insulating material is filled in space therebetween. (Yoshino, Y.)

  20. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2016.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  1. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2014.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  2. NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table IV. Tuberculosis - 2015.This Table includes total number of cases reported in the United States, by region and by states, in accordance with the...

  3. SAGE IV Pathfinder

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Utilizing a unique, new occultation technique involving imaging, the SAGE IV concept will meet or exceed the quality of previous SAGE measurements at a small...

  4. Titanium(III, IV-Containing Catalytic Systems for Production of Ultrahigh Molecular Weight Polyethylene Nascent Reactor Powders, Suitable for Solventless Processing—Impact of Oxidation States of Transition Metal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav A. Tuskaev

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic systems containing TiCl4 or TiCl3, THF, organomagnesium (n-Bu2Mg and organoaluminum compounds capable of producing ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE were developed. The resulting polymers were characterized by a molecular weight in the range of (1.8–7.8 × 106 Da and desirable morphology, suitable for modern methods of polymer processing—the solvent-free solid-state processing of superhigh-strength (tensile strength up to 2.1 GPa and high-modulus (elastic modulus up to 125 GPa oriented films and film tapes. The impacts of a THF additive, the oxidation state of the titanium atom, and the composition and nature of the nontransition organometallic compounds on the formation of catalytic systems for UHMWPE production were evaluated. The results indicate the suitability of individual titanium chloride tetrahydrofuran complex application for the formation of THF-containing catalytic systems. This approach also results in a significant increase in the system catalytic activity and mechanical properties of UHMWPE. The catalysts based on Ti(III were inferior to systems containing Ti(IV in productivity but were markedly superior in the mechanical properties of UHMWPE.

  5. Creep in generation IV nuclear applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rissanen, L. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland))

    2010-05-15

    Nuclear power has an important role in fulfilling the world's growing energy needs and reducing the carbon dioxide emission. Six new, innovative nuclear energy systems have been identified and selected for further development by the international Generation Four International Forum (GIF). These generation four (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems include a variety of reactor, energy conversion and fuel cycle technologies. The successful development and deployment of these largely depend on the performance and reliability of the available structural materials. These potential materials need to sustain their mechanical properties up to high temperatures, high neutron doses and corrosive environments of the new or enhanced types of coolants. Current knowledge on material properties, material-coolant interaction and especially material degradation processes in these new environments are limited. This paper gives an overview of the Gen IV material issues with special emphasis on European design of supercritical light water reactor concept high performance light water reactor (HPLWR). The challenges for the structural materials and the components most likely to suffer from creep and creep-irradiation are highlighted. Some results from relatively short term creep testing in supercritical water are presented for AISI 316NG, 347H and 1.4970 steels. The 1.4970 steel was superior in creep and oxidation resistance (orig.)

  6. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowarski, L.

    1955-01-01

    It brings together the techniques data which are involved in the discussion about the utility for a research institute to acquire an atomic reactor for research purposes. This type of decision are often taken by non-specialist people who can need a brief presentation of a research reactor and its possibilities in term of research before asking advises to experts. In a first part, it draws up a list of the different research programs which can be studied by getting a research reactor. First of all is the reactor behaviour and kinetics studies (reproducibility factor, exploration of neutron density, effect of reactor structure, effect of material irradiation...). Physical studies includes study of the behaviour of the control system, studies of neutron resonance phenomena and study of the fission process for example. Chemical studies involves the study of manipulation and control of hot material, characterisation of nuclear species produced in the reactor and chemical effects of irradiation on chemical properties and reactions. Biology and medicine research involves studies of irradiation on man and animals, genetics research, food or medical tools sterilization and neutron beams effect on tumour for example. A large number of other subjects can be studied in a reactor research as reactor construction material research, fabrication of radioactive sources for radiographic techniques or applied research as in agriculture or electronic. The second part discussed the technological considerations when choosing the reactor type. The technological factors, which are considered for its choice, are the power of the reactor, the nature of the fuel which is used, the type of moderator (water, heavy water, graphite or BeO) and the reflector, the type of coolants, the protection shield and the control systems. In the third part, it described the characteristics (place of installation, type of combustible and comments) and performance (power, neutron flux ) of already existing

  7. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  8. Euratom contributions in Fast Reactor research programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanghänel, Th.; Somers, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sustainable Nuclear Initiative: • demonstrate long-term sustainability of nuclear energy; • demonstration reactors of Gen IV: •more efficient use of resources; • closed fuel cycle; • reduced proliferation risks; • enhanced safety features. • Systems pursued in Europe: • Sodium-cooled fast reactor SFR; • Lead-cooled fast reactor LFR; • Gas-cooled fast reactor GFR. Sustainable Nuclear Energy Technology Platform SNE-TP promotes research, development and demonstration of the nuclear fission technologies necessary to achieve the SET-Plan goals

  9. AREVA's nuclear reactors portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marincic, A.

    2009-01-01

    A reasonable assumption for the estimated new build market for the next 25 years is over 340 GWe net. The number of prospect countries is growing almost each day. To address this new build market, AREVA is developing a comprehensive portfolio of reactors intended to meet a wide range of power requirements and of technology choices. The EPR reactor is the flagship of the fleet. Intended for large power requirements, the four first EPRs are being built in Finland, France and China. Other countries and customers are in view, citing just two examples: the Usa where the U.S. EPR has been selected as the technology of choice by several U.S utilities; and the United Kingdom where the Generic Design Acceptance process of the EPR design submitted by AREVA and EDF is well under way, and where there is a strong will to have a plant on line in 2017. For medium power ranges, the AREVA portfolio includes a boiling water reactor and a pressurized water reactor which both offer all of the advantages of an advanced plant design, with excellent safety performance and competitive power generation cost: -) KERENA (1250+ MWe), developed in collaboration with several European utilities, and in particular with Eon; -) ATMEA 1 (1100+ MWe), a 3-loop evolutionary PWR which is being developed by AREVA and Mitsubishi. AREVA is also preparing the future and is deeply involved into Gen IV concepts. It has developed the ANTARES modular HTR reactor (pre-conceptual design completed) and is building upon its vast Sodium Fast Reactor experience to take part into the development of the next prototype. (author)

  10. Iris reactor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramonov, D.V.; Carelli, M.D. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Baltimore, MD (United States); Miller, K. [BNFL, Inc., (United Kingdom); Lombardi, C.V.; Ricotti, M.E. [Polytechnic of Milan, Polimi (Italy); Todreas, N.E. [Masachussets Institute of Technology, MIT (United States); Greenspan, E. [University of California at Berkeley, UCB (United States); Yamamoto, K. [JAPC Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan); Nagano, A. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Ninokata, H. [Tokyo Institut of Technology, TIT (Japan); Robertson, J. [Westinghouse and bechtel (United States); Oriolo, F. [Pisa Univ. (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    The development progress of the IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) nuclear power system is presented. IRIS is currently being developed by an international consortium of industry, laboratory, university and utility establishments, led by Westinghouse. It is aimed at achieving the four major objectives of the Generation IV nuclear systems, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, economic competitiveness and reduced waste. The project first year activities, which are summarized here, were focused on core neutronics, in-vessel configuration, steam generator and containment design, safety approach and economic performance. Details of these studies are provided in parallel papers in these proceedings. (author)

  11. Hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-01-01

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of 233 U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m -2 , and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid

  12. History of critical experiments at Pajarito Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, H.C.

    1983-03-01

    This account describes critical and subcritical assemblies operated remotely at the Pajarito Canyon Site at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Earliest assemblies, directed exclusively toward the nuclear weapons program, were for safety tests. Other weapon-related assemblies provided neutronic information to check detailed weapon calculations. Topsy, the first of these critical assemblies, was followed by Lady Godiva, Jezebel, Flattop, and ultimately Big Ten. As reactor programs came to Los Alamos, design studies and mockups were tested at Pajarito Site. For example, nearly all 16 Rover reactors intended for Nevada tests were preceded by zero-power mockups and proof tests at Pajarito Site. Expanded interest and capability led to fast-pulse assemblies, culminating in Godiva IV and Skua, and to the Kinglet and Sheba solution assemblies.

  13. History of critical experiments at Pajarito Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paxton, H.C.

    1983-03-01

    This account describes critical and subcritical assemblies operated remotely at the Pajarito Canyon Site at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Earliest assemblies, directed exclusively toward the nuclear weapons program, were for safety tests. Other weapon-related assemblies provided neutronic information to check detailed weapon calculations. Topsy, the first of these critical assemblies, was followed by Lady Godiva, Jezebel, Flattop, and ultimately Big Ten. As reactor programs came to Los Alamos, design studies and mockups were tested at Pajarito Site. For example, nearly all 16 Rover reactors intended for Nevada tests were preceded by zero-power mockups and proof tests at Pajarito Site. Expanded interest and capability led to fast-pulse assemblies, culminating in Godiva IV and Skua, and to the Kinglet and Sheba solution assemblies

  14. Heterogeneous reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura Neto, C. de; Nair, R.P.K.

    1979-08-01

    The microscopic study of a cell is meant for the determination of the infinite multiplication factor of the cell, which is given by the four factor formula: K(infinite) = n(epsilon)pf. The analysis of an homogeneous reactor is similar to that of an heterogeneous reactor, but each factor of the four factor formula can not be calculated by the formulas developed in the case of an homogeneous reactor. A great number of methods was developed for the calculation of heterogeneous reactors and some of them are discussed. (Author) [pt

  15. IV access in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fitzpatrick, J J

    2009-04-01

    Intravenous (IV) access is a valuable skill for dental practitioners in emergency situations and in IV sedation. However, many people feel some apprehension about performing this procedure. This article explains the basic principles behind IV access, and the relevant anatomy and physiology, as well as giving a step-by-step guide to placing an IV cannula.

  16. Advanced Reactors Around the World

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, Debu

    2003-01-01

    At the end of 2002, 441 nuclear power plants were operating around the globe and providing 17% of the world's electricity. Although the rate of population growth has slowed, recent United Nations data suggest that two billion more people will be added to the world by 2050. A special report commissioned by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change estimated that electricity demand would grow almost eight-fold from 2000 to 2050 in a high economic grown scenario and more than double in a low-growth scenario. There is also a global aspiration to keep the environment pristine. Because of these reasons, it is expected that a large number of new nuclear reactors may be operating by 2050. Realization of this has created an impetus for the development of a new generation of reactors in several countries. The goal is to make nuclear power cost-competitive with other resources and to enhance safety to a level that no evacuation outside a plant site would be necessary. It should also generate less waste, prevent materials diversion for weapons production, and be sustainable. This article discusses the status of next-generation reactors under development around the world. Specifically highlighted are efforts related to the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) and its six reactor concepts for research and development: Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR); Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR); Supercritical Water-Cooled Reactor (SCWR); Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR); Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor (LFR); and Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). Also highlighted are nuclear activities specific to Russia and India

  17. Dibromidodimethyldipyridineplatinum(IV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mairéad E. Kelly

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In the title complex, [PtBr2(CH32(C5H5N2], the PtIV metal centre lies on a twofold rotation axis and adopts a slightly distorted octahedral coordination geometry. The structure displays weak intramolecular C—H...Br hydrogen-bonding interactions.

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mysels, K.J.; Shenoy, A.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core consists of a number of fuel regions through each of which regulated coolant flows. The coolant from neighbouring fuel regions is combined in a manner which results in an averaging of the coolant temperature at the outlet of the core. By this method the presence of hot streaks in the reactor is reduced. (UK)

  19. Thermochemical investigation of molten fluoride salts for Generation IV nuclear applications - an equilibrium exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, J.P.M.

    2006-01-01

    The concept of the Molten Salt Reactor, one of the so-called Generation IV future reactors, is that the fuel, a fissile material, which is dissolved in a molten fluoride salt, circulates through a closed circuit. The heat of fission is transferred to a second molten salt coolant loop, the heat of

  20. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a nuclear reactor and especially a high-temperature reactor in which provision is made within a pressure vessel for a main cavity containing the reactor core and a series of vertical cylindrical pods arranged in spaced relation around the main cavity and each adapted to communicate with the cavity through two collector ducts or headers for the primary fluid which flows downwards through the reactor core. Each pod contains two superposed steam-generator and circulator sets disposed in substantially symmetrical relation on each side of the hot primary-fluid header which conveys the primary fluid from the reactor cavity to the pod, the circulators of both sets being mounted respectively at the bottom and top ends of the pod

  1. Enhanced Design Alternative IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, N.E.

    1999-01-01

    This report evaluates Enhanced Design Alternative (EDA) IV as part of the second phase of the License Application Design Selection (LADS) effort. The EDA IV concept was compared to the VA reference design using criteria from the Design Input Request for LADS Phase II EDA Evaluations (CRWMS M and O 1999b) and (CRWMS M and O 1999f). Briefly, the EDA IV concept arranges the waste packages close together in an emplacement configuration known as line load. Continuous pre-closure ventilation keeps the waste packages from exceeding their 350 C cladding and 200 C (4.3.6) drift wall temperature limits. This EDA concept keeps relatively high, uniform emplacement drift temperatures (post-closure) to drive water away from the repository and thus dry out the pillars between emplacement drifts. The waste package is shielded to permit human access to emplacement drifts and includes an integral filler inside the package to reduce the amount of water that can contact the waste form. Closure of the repository is desired 50 years after first waste is emplaced. Both backfill and drip shields will be emplaced at closure to improve post-closure performance. The EDA IV concept includes more defense-in-depth layers than the VA reference design because of its backfill, drip shield, waste package shielding, and integral filler features. These features contribute to the low dose-rate to the public achieved during the first 10,000 years of repository life as shown in Figure 3. Investigation of the EDA IV concept has led to the following general conclusions: (1) The total life cycle cost for EDA IV is about $21.7 billion which equates to a $11.3 billion net present value (both figures rounded up). (2) The incidence of design basis events for EDA IV is similar to the VA reference design. (3) The emplacement of the waste packages in drifts will be similar to the VA reference design. However, heavier equipment may be required because the shielded waste package will be heavier. (4) The heavier

  2. SLOWPOKE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, D.J.R.; Downs, W.E.

    1974-01-01

    The SLOWPOKE reactor is described, which is a small pool type with thermal neutron fluxes ranging from 10 11 -10 12 n cm -2 sec -1 . It differs in many ways from conventional pool type, namely small critical mass, beryllium reflector and a closed reactor container. The reactor is designed as small and simply as possible, and consistently with safety and good operating practice. Access to the present model is via pneumatic irradiation tubes only, which limits the use of the facility to activation analysis, tracer production and training. (Mori, K.)

  3. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, P.

    1980-01-01

    The reactor core of nuclear reactors usually is composed of individual elongated fuel elements that may be vertically arranged and through which coolant flows in axial direction, preferably from bottom to top. With their lower end the fuel elements gear in an opening of a lower support grid forming part of the core structure. According to the invention a locking is provided there, part of which is a control element that is movable along the fuel element axis. The corresponding locking element is engaged behind a lateral projection in the opening of the support grid. The invention is particularly suitable for breeder or converter reactors. (orig.) [de

  4. Nuclear Data Needs for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullhusen, Peter

    2006-04-01

    Nuclear data needs for generation IV systems. Future of nuclear energy and the role of nuclear data / P. Finck. Nuclear data needs for generation IV nuclear energy systems-summary of U.S. workshop / T. A. Taiwo, H. S. Khalil. Nuclear data needs for the assessment of gen. IV systems / G. Rimpault. Nuclear data needs for generation IV-lessons from benchmarks / S. C. van der Marck, A. Hogenbirk, M. C. Duijvestijn. Core design issues of the supercritical water fast reactor / M. Mori ... [et al.]. GFR core neutronics studies at CEA / J. C. Bosq ... [et al]. Comparative study on different phonon frequency spectra of graphite in GCR / Young-Sik Cho ... [et al.]. Innovative fuel types for minor actinides transmutation / D. Haas, A. Fernandez, J. Somers. The importance of nuclear data in modeling and designing generation IV fast reactors / K. D. Weaver. The GIF and Mexico-"everything is possible" / C. Arrenondo Sánchez -- Benmarks, sensitivity calculations, uncertainties. Sensitivity of advanced reactor and fuel cycle performance parameters to nuclear data uncertainties / G. Aliberti ... [et al.]. Sensitivity and uncertainty study for thermal molten salt reactors / A. Biduad ... [et al.]. Integral reactor physics benchmarks- The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP) / J. B. Briggs, D. W. Nigg, E. Sartori. Computer model of an error propagation through micro-campaign of fast neutron gas cooled nuclear reactor / E. Ivanov. Combining differential and integral experiments on [symbol] for reducing uncertainties in nuclear data applications / T. Kawano ... [et al.]. Sensitivity of activation cross sections of the Hafnium, Tanatalum and Tungsten stable isotopes to nuclear reaction mechanisms / V. Avrigeanu ... [et al.]. Generating covariance data with nuclear models / A. J. Koning. Sensitivity of Candu-SCWR reactors physics calculations to nuclear data files / K. S

  5. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  6. Reactor Neutrinos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Bong Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We review the status and the results of reactor neutrino experiments. Short-baseline experiments have provided the measurement of the reactor neutrino spectrum, and their interest has been recently revived by the discovery of the reactor antineutrino anomaly, a discrepancy between the reactor neutrino flux state of the art prediction and the measurements at baselines shorter than one kilometer. Middle and long-baseline oscillation experiments at Daya Bay, Double Chooz, and RENO provided very recently the most precise determination of the neutrino mixing angle θ13. This paper provides an overview of the upcoming experiments and of the projects under development, including the determination of the neutrino mass hierarchy and the possible use of neutrinos for society, for nonproliferation of nuclear materials, and geophysics.

  7. REACTOR SHIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H.L.

    1960-09-20

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fissionable material dispersed in graphite blocks, helium filling the voids of the blocks and the spaces therebetween, and means other than the helium in thermal conductive contact with the graphite for removing heat.

  9. Chemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  10. Reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdoes, P.

    1977-01-01

    This is one of a series of articles discussing aspects of nuclear engineering ranging from a survey of various reactor types for static and mobile use to mention of atomic thermo-electric batteries of atomic thermo-electric batteries for cardiac pacemakers. Various statistics are presented on power generation in Europe and U.S.A. and economics are discussed in some detail. Molten salt reactors and research machines are also described. (G.M.E.)

  11. Propulsion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1999-01-01

    A nuclear reactor equips the recently constructed French aircraft- carrier Charles-De-Gaulle, in a few months the second nuclear submarine (SNLE) of new generation will be operational. In last october the government launched the program Barracuda which consists of 6 submarines (SNA) whose series head will be operational in 2010. The main asset of nuclear propulsion is to allow an almost unlimited autonomy: soft water, air are produced inside the submarine and the maximum time spent underwater is only limited by human capacity to cope with confinement. CEA has 3 missions concerning country defence. First the designing, the fabrication and the maintenance of weapons, secondly the supplying of fissile materials and thirdly the nuclear propulsion. A new generation of propulsion reactors is being studied and a ground installation involving a test reactor equivalent to that on board is being built. This test reactor (RES) will simulate any type of on-board reactors by adjusting temperature, pressure, flowrate and even equipment such as steam generator. This reactor will validate the technological choices for the Barracuda program. (A.C.)

  12. Safety, Security And safeguards In GEN IV sodium fast reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Rossi, Fabiana

    2015-01-01

    This work presents first a study of the national and international laws in the fields of safety, security and safeguards. The international treaties and the recommendations issued by the IAEA as well as the national regulations in force in France, the United States and Italy are analyzed. As a result of this, a comparison among them is presented. Given the interest of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency for the aspects of criminal penalties and monetary, also the Japanese case is analyzed. The ...

  13. Fast reactor safety and related physics. Volume IV. Phenomenology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    Separate abstracts are included for 58 papers concerning single-phase flow and sodium boiling; sodium boiling and subassembly flow blockages; transient-overpower and loss-of-flow experiments; fuel and cladding behavior and relocation; fuel and cladding freezing; molten-fuel-coolant interaction; aerosols and fission product release, and post-accident heat removal. Thirteen papers have been perivously abstracted and included in ERA.

  14. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor program. Volume IV. Environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-12-01

    A broad overview is presented of the many implications of LMFBR program implementation, up to and encompassing a fully developed LMFBR power plant economy, including the secondary impacts, the unavoidable adverse environmental impacts, cumulative environmental impacts, and cost-benefit analyses, and alternative energy strategies. Under the heading of secondary impacts, the national implications of the availability of electricity from LMFBRs, and the specific economic impacts of the LMFBR program are examined. The currently feasible alternatives and potential future alternatives for mitigating adverse environmental impacts of the LMFBR fuel cycle are described. The problems of safeguarding special nuclear material from potential diversion to unauthorized purposes are analyzed. The cumulative environmental effects of LMFBR operation to the Year 2020, the decommissioning of LMFBRs and fuel cycle facilities upon the completion of their useful life, the irreversible and irretrievable commitments of resources that will accompany implementation of an LMFBR economy, and an analysis of the costs and benefits of implementing the LMFBR Program are included. (U.S.)

  15. Research reactors - an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, C.D.

    1997-01-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  16. Temperature capability for DTF-IV (DTF-71 version)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varela, D.W.; Philbin, J.S.

    1977-05-01

    A subroutine has been developed for calculating adiabatic temperature distributions as part of the activity edit in the DTF-IV S/sub N/ neutron transport code. The specific heat input is simple and versatile. The subroutine integrates the specific heat functions and solves for the temperatures which match the energy deposition supplied by the activity edit. There is no heat transfer modeling in the subroutine. The temperatures are only valid for cases where the energy deposition time is compared to the thermal relaxation time of the media. The code can be used, for example, to calculate the initial temperature distributions in certain pulsed reactors or pulsed reactor experiments

  17. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  18. Nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prescott, R.F.; George, B.V.; Baglin, C.J.

    1978-01-01

    Reference is made to thermal insulation on the inner surfaces of containment vessels of fluid cooled nuclear reactors and particularly in situations where the thermal insulation must also serve a structural function and transmit substantial load forces to the surface which it covers. An arrangement is described that meets this requirement and also provides for core support means that favourably influences the flow of hot coolant from the lower end of the core into a plenum space in the hearth of the reactor. The arrangement comprises a course of thermally insulating bricks arranged as a mosaic covering a wall of the reactor and a course of thermally insulating tiles arranged as a mosaic covering the course of bricks. Full constructional details are given. (UK)

  19. Reactor utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zecevic, V.

    1963-01-01

    In 1962, the RA reactor was operated almost three times more than in 1961, producing total of 25 555 MWh. Diagram containing comparative data about reactor operation for 1960, 1961, and 1962, percent of fuel used and U-235 burnup shows increase in reactor operation. Number of samples irradiated was 659, number of experiments done was 16. mean powered level was 5.93 MW. Fuel was added into the core twice during the reporting year. In fact the core was increased from 56 to 68 fuel channels and later to 84 fuel channels. Fuel was added to the core when the reactivity worth decreased to the minimum operation level due to burnup. In addition to this 5 central fuel channels were exchanged with fresh fuel in february for the purpose of irradiation in the VISA-2 channel

  20. Bioconversion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarty, Perry L.; Bachmann, Andre

    1992-01-01

    A bioconversion reactor for the anaerobic fermentation of organic material. The bioconversion reactor comprises a shell enclosing a predetermined volume, an inlet port through which a liquid stream containing organic materials enters the shell, and an outlet port through which the stream exits the shell. A series of vertical and spaced-apart baffles are positioned within the shell to force the stream to flow under and over them as it passes from the inlet to the outlet port. The baffles present a barrier to the microorganisms within the shell causing them to rise and fall within the reactor but to move horizontally at a very slow rate. Treatment detention times of one day or less are possible.

  1. Thermonuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Araki, Takao; Saito, Yasushi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the seismic wave responsivity of an exhaust duct shields thereby preventing the release of tritium in an evacuating device due to failures upon earthquakes. Constitution: The ends on the cutting side of upper outer exhaust duct shields of a thermonuclear reactor are connected with a plurality of support beams. In a case where seismic vibrations are exerted to such a thermonuclear reactor, since the ends on the cutting side are coupled with the support beams, vibrations of the upper outer exhaust duct shields are greatly restricted. Thus, since there is no more such a possibility, for example, that an exhaust duct connected to the upper portion of a reactor main body is greatly distorted due to the seismic response of the upper outside exhaust duct shields to result in the failure of the connection portion with a vacuum pump, the release of tritium due to failure of the evacuating device can be prevented. (Yoshino, Y.)

  2. Diaquatetrabromidotin(IV trihydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The title compound, [SnBr4(H2O2]·3H2O, forms large colourless crystals in originally sealed samples of tin tetrabromide. It constitutes the first structurally characterized hydrate of SnBr4 and is isostructural with the corresponding hydrate of SnCl4. It is composed of SnIV atoms octahedrally coordinated by four Br atoms and two cis-related water molecules. The octahedra exhibit site symmetry 2. They are arranged into columns along [001] via medium–strong O—H...O hydrogen bonds involving the two lattice water molecules (one situated on a twofold rotation axis while the chains are interconnected via longer O—H...Br hydrogen bonds, forming a three-dimensional network.

  3. US Nuclear Regulatory Commission region IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanderburch, C.

    1996-01-01

    The NRC has established a policy to provide for the timely through and systematic inspection of significant operational events at nuclear power plants. This includes the use of an Augmented Inspection Team to determine the causes, conditions, and circumstances relevant to an event and to communicate its findings and conclusions to NRC management. In accordance with NRC Inspection Manual Chapter 0325. The Region IV Regional Administrator dispatched an Augmented Inspection Team to the Wolf Creek Nuclear Generating Station to review the circumstances surrounding a manual reactor trip on January 30, 1996, with the failure of five control rods to fully insert into the core, a failure of the turbine-driven auxiliary feedwater pump, and the subsequent loss of one train of the essential service water system

  4. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilroy, J.E.

    1980-01-01

    An improved cover structure for liquid metal cooled fast breeder type reactors is described which it is claimed reduces the temperature differential across the intermediate grid plate of the core cover structure and thereby reduces its subjection to thermal stresses. (UK)

  5. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    The method of operating a water-cooled neutronic reactor having a graphite moderator is described which comprises flowing a gaseous mixture of carbon dioxide and helium, in which the helium comprises 40--60 volume percent of the mixture, in contact with the graphite moderator. 2 claims, 4 figures

  6. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wende, C.W.J.

    1976-01-01

    A safety rod for a nuclear reactor has an inner end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient and neutron capture cross section approximately equal to those of the adjacent shield, a central portion containing materials of high neutron capture cross section and an outer end portion having a gamma absorption coefficient at least equal to that of the adjacent shield

  7. Reactor licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvie, J.D.

    2002-01-01

    This presentation discusses reactor licensing and includes the legislative basis for licensing, other relevant legislation , the purpose of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act, important regulations, regulatory document, policies, and standards. It also discusses the role of the CNSC, its mandate and safety philosophy

  8. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carleton, J.T.

    1977-01-01

    A graphite-moderated nuclear reactor includes channels between blocks of graphite and also includes spacer blocks between adjacent channeled blocks with an axis of extension normal to that of the axis of elongation of the channeled blocks to minimize changes in the physical properties of the graphite as a result of prolonged neutron bombardment. 3 claims, 6 figures

  9. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Masaru; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Mogi, Toshihiko; Kanazawa, Nobuhiro.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor core, a fuel inventory at an outer peripheral region is made smaller than that at a central region. Fuel assemblies comprising a small number of large-diameter fuel rods are used at the central region and fuel assemblies comprising a great number of smalldiameter fuel rods are used at the outer peripheral region. Since a burning degradation rate of the fuels at the outer peripheral region can be increased, the burning degradation rate at the infinite multiplication factor of fuels at the outer region can substantially be made identical with that of the fuels in the inner region. As a result, the power distribution in the direction of the reactor core can be flattened throughout the entire period of the burning cycle. Further, it is also possible to make the degradation rate of fuels at the outer region substantially identical with that of fuels at the inner side. A power peak formed at the outer circumferential portion of the reactor core of advanced burning can be lowered to improve the fuel integrity, and also improve the reactor safety and operation efficiency. (N.H.)

  10. ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Redler, K.; Reis, E.E.; Will, R.; Cheng, E.; Hasan, C.M.; Sharafat, S.

    1993-11-01

    The ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket (NSB) Design is an alternate blanket concept of the ARIES-IV low activation helium-cooled reactor design. The reference design has the coolant routed in the poloidal direction and the inlet and outlet plena are located at the top and bottom of the torus. The NSB design has the high velocity coolant routed in the toroidal direction and the plena are located behind the blanket. This is of significance since the selected structural material is SiC-composite. The NSB is designed to have key high performance components with characteristic dimensions of no larger than 2 m. These components can be brazed to form the blanket module. For the diverter design, we eliminated the use of W as the divertor coating material by relying on the successful development of the gaseous divertor concept. The neutronics and thermal-hydraulic performance of both blanket concepts are similar. The selected blanket and divertor configurations can also meet all the projected structural, neutronics and thermal-hydraulics design limits and requirements. With the selected blanket and divertor materials, the design has a level of safety assurance rate of I (LSA-1), which indicates an inherently safe design

  11. IRIS Responsiveness to Generation IV Road-map Goals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M.D.; Paramonov, D.V.; Petrovic, B.

    2002-01-01

    The DOE Generation IV road-map process is in its second and final year. Almost one hundred concepts submitted from all over the world have been reviewed against the Generation IV goals of resources sustainability; safety and reliability; and, economics. Advanced LWRs are taken as the reference point. IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure), a 100-335 MWe integral light water reactor being developed by a vast international consortium led by Westinghouse, is one on the concepts being considered in the road-map and is perhaps the most visible representative of the concept set known as Integral Primary System Reactors (IPSR). This paper presents how IRIS satisfies the prescribed goals. The first goal of resource sustainability includes criteria like utilization of fuel resources, amount and toxicity of waste produced, environmental impact, proliferation and sabotage resistance. As a thermal reactor IRIS does not have the same fuel utilization as fast reactors. However, it has a significant flexibility in fuel cycles as it is designed to utilize either UO 2 or MOX with straight burn cycles of 4 to 10 years, depending on the fissile content. High discharge burnup and Pu recycling result in good fuel utilization and lower waste; IRIS has also attractive proliferation resistance characteristics, due to the reduced accessibility of the fuel. The safety and reliability goal include reliability, workers' exposure, robust safety features, models with well characterized uncertainty, source term and mechanisms of energy release, robust mitigation of accidents. IRIS is significantly better than advanced LWRs because of its safety by design which eliminates a variety of accidents such as LOCAs, its containment vessel coupled design which maintains the core safely covered during the accident sequences, its design simplification features such as no (or reduced) soluble boron, internal shielding and four-year refueling/maintenance interval which significantly reduce

  12. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbons, J.F.; McLaughlin, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    In the pressure vessel of the water-cooled nuclear reactor there is provided an internal flange on which the one- or two-part core barrel is hanging by means of an external flange. A cylinder is extending from the reactor vessel closure downwards to a seat on the core cupport structure and serves as compression element for the transmission of the clamping load from the closure head to the core barrel (upper guide structure). With the core barrel, subject to tensile stress, between the vessel internal flange and its seat on one hand and the compression of the cylinder resp. hold-down element between the closure head and the seat on the other a very strong, elastic sprung structure is obtained. (DG) [de

  13. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleite, W.; Bock, H.W.; Struensee, S.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the use of burnable poisons in a nuclear reactor, especially in PWRs, in order to improve the controllability of the reactor. An unsymmetrical arrangement in the lattice is provided, if necessary also by insertion of special rods for these additions. It is proposed to arrange the burnable poisons in fuel elements taken over from a previous burn-up cycle and to distribute them, going out from the side facing the control rods, over not more than 20% of the lenth of the fuel elements. It seems sufficient, for the burnable poisons to bind an initial reactivity of only 0.1% and to become ineffective after normal operation of 3 to 4 months. (ORU) [de

  14. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Hiroaki; Yoshida, Takashi.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent rain water falling along the outer wall of the container during the construction work of an atomic power plant from making ingress into the inner part of a reactor container through a large size material carry-in port. Constitution: A weir for preventing the ingress of rain water is provided on the border between the foot floor of a large material carry-in port provided on the side surface at the bottom part of the reactor container and the floor surface of the building. This weir is of a semi-circular plate shape, and formed so that the lower semi-circular part of the carry-in port is tightly closed. (Kamimura, M.)

  15. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Tadaharu; Saba, Kazuhisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the earthquake resistance as well as reduce the size of a container for a nuclear reactor with no adverse effects on the decrease of impact shock to the container and shortening of construction step. Constitution: Reinforcing profile steel materials are welded longitudinally and transversely to the inner surface of a container, and inner steel plates are secured to the above profile steel materials while keeping a gap between the materials and the container. Reactor shielding wall planted to the base concrete of the container is mounted to the pressure vessel, and main steam pipeways secured by the transverse beams and led to the outside of container is connected. This can improve the rigidity earthquake strength and the safetiness against the increase in the inside pressure upon failures of the container. (Yoshino, Y.)

  16. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyamada, Osamu; Furukawa, Hideyasu; Uozumi, Hiroto.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To lower the position of an intermediate slab within a reactor container and fitting a heat insulating material to the inner wall of said intermediate slab, whereby a space for a control rod exchanging device and thermal stresses of the inner peripheral wall are lowered. Constitution: In the pedestal at the lower part of a reactor pressure vessel there is formed an intermediate slab at a position lower than diaphragm floor slab of the outer periphery of the pedestal thereby to secure a space for providing automatic exchanging device of a control rod driving device. Futhermore, a heat insulating material is fitted to the inner peripheral wall at the upper side of the intermediate slab part, and the temperature gradient in the wall thickness direction at the time of a piping rupture trouble is made gentle, and thermal stresses at the inner peripheral wall are lowered. (Sekiya, K.)

  17. Neutronic reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    Disclosed is a graphite-moderated, water-cooled nuclear reactor including a plurality of rectangular graphite blocks stacked in abutting relationship in layers, alternate layers having axes which are normal to one another, alternate rows of blocks in alternate layers being provided with a channel extending through the blocks, said channeled blocks being provided with concave sides and having smaller vertical dimensions than adjacent blocks in the same layer, there being nuclear fuel in the channels

  18. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakawa, Toshihisa.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent cladding tube injuries due to thermal expansion of each of the pellets by successively extracting each of the control rods loaded in the reactor core from those having less number of notches, as well as facilitate the handling work for the control rods. Constitution: A recycle flow control device is provided to a circulation pump for forcibly circulating coolants in the reactor container and an operational device is provided for receiving each of the signals concerning number of notches for each of the control rods and flow control depending on the xenon poisoning effect obtained from the signals derived from the in-core instrument system connected to the reactor core. The operational device is connected with a control rod drive for moving each of the control rods up and down and a recycle flow control device. The operational device is set with a pattern for the aimed control rod power and the sequence of extraction. Upon extraction of the control rods, they are extracted successively from those having less notch numbers. (Moriyama, K.)

  19. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebata, Sakae.

    1990-01-01

    At least one valve rack is disposed in a reactor building, on which pipeways to a main closure valve, valves and bypasses of turbines are placed and contained. The valve rack is fixed to the main body of the building or to a base mat. Since the reactor building is designed as class A earthquake-proofness and for maintaining the S 1 function, the valve rack can be fixed to the building main body or to the base mat. With such a constitution, the portions for maintaining the S 1 function are concentrated to the reactor building. As a result, the dispersion of structures of earthquake-proof portion corresponding to the reference earthquake vibration S 1 can be prevented. Accordingly, the conditions for the earthquake-proof design of the turbine building and the turbine/electric generator supporting rack are defined as only the class B earthquake-proof design conditions. In view of the above, the amount of building materials can be saved and the time for construction can be shortened. (I.S.)

  20. Analysis and evaluation of the Dual Fluid Reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiang

    2017-06-27

    The Dual Fluid Reactor is a molten salt fast reactor developed by IFK in Berlin based on the Gen-IV Molten-Salt Reactor concept and the Liquid-Metal Cooled Reactor. The design aims to combine these two concepts to improve these two concepts. The Dissertation focuses on the concept and performs diverse calculations and estimations on the subjects of neutron physics, depletion and thermal-hydraulic behaviors to validate the new features of the concept. Based on the results it is concluded that this concept is feasible to its desired purpose and with great potential.

  1. Reactor core and passive safety systems descriptions of a next generation pressure tube reactor - mechanical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yetisir, M.; Gaudet, M.; Rhodes, D.; Hamilton, H.; Pencer, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Canada has been developing a channel-type supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor concept, often called the Canadian SCWR. The objective of this reactor concept is to meet the technology goals of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the next generation nuclear reactor development, which include enhanced safety features (inherent safe operation and deploying passive safety features), improved resource utilization, sustainable fuel cycle, and greater proliferation resistance than Generation III nuclear reactors. The Canadian SCWR core concept consists of a high-pressure inlet plenum, a separate low-pressure heavy water moderator contained in a calandria vessel, and 336 pressure tubes surrounded by the moderator. The reactor uses supercritical water as a coolant, and a direct steam power cycle to generate electricity. The reactor concept incorporates advanced safety features such as passive core cooling, long-term decay heat rejection to the environment and fuel melt prevention via passive moderator cooling. These features significantly reduce core damage frequency relative to existing nuclear reactors. This paper presents a description of the design concepts for the Canadian SCWR core, reactor building layout and the plant layout. Passive safety concepts are also described that address containment and core cooling following a loss-of coolant accident, as well as long term reactor heat removal at station blackout conditions. (author)

  2. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastenberg, William E.; Blandford, Edward; Kim, Lance

    2009-01-01

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  4. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.) [pt

  5. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2006-01-01

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  6. The Modern RPG IV Language

    CERN Document Server

    Cozzi, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This updated, classic work on the RPG language covers all the new functions and features that have been added since 2003, including new op codes and built-in functions, new chapters on free-format RPG IV and Web programming interfaces, information on implementing XML within RPG IV, and expanded information on procedures. This reference guide takes both novice and experienced RPG IV programmers through the language, from its foundation to its most advanced techniques. More than 100 charts and tables, as well as 350 real-life code samples of functions and operations are included, showing readers

  7. Photocatalytic reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Brian L.; Fain, Douglas E.; Stockdale, John A. D.

    1999-01-01

    A photocatalytic reactor for processing selected reactants from a fluid medium comprising at least one permeable photocatalytic membrane having a photocatalytic material. The material forms an area of chemically active sites when illuminated by light at selected wavelengths. When the fluid medium is passed through the illuminated membrane, the reactants are processed at these sites separating the processed fluid from the unprocessed fluid. A light source is provided and a light transmitting means, including an optical fiber, for transmitting light from the light source to the membrane.

  8. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anthony, A.J.; Gruber, E.A.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear reactor with control rods in channels between fuel assemblies wherein the fuel assemblies incorporate guide rods which protrude outwardly into the control rod channels to prevent the control rods from engaging the fuel elements. The guide rods also extend back into the fuel assembly such that they are relatively rigid members. The guide rods are tied to the fuel assembly end or support plates and serve as structural members which are supported independently of the fuel element. Fuel element spacing and support means may be attached to the guide rods. 9 claims

  9. A combined XAFS, ESI TOF-MS and LIBD study on the formation of polynuclear Zr(IV), Th(IV) and Pu(IV) species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothe, J.; Walther, C.; Brendebach, B.; Büchner, S.; Fuss, M.; Denecke, M. A.; Geckeis, H.

    2009-11-01

    The long term radiotoxicity of spent nuclear fuel disposed of in deep underground repositories after discharge from nuclear power reactors is determined by actinide elements, mainly plutonium. Water intrusion into the repository might cause container corrosion and leaching of the waste matrices, leading to the release of Pu and other actinides into the geological environment. Performance assessment for a future nuclear waste repository requires detailed knowledge on actinide aqueous chemistry in the aquifer surrounding the disposal site. Tetravalent actinides exhibit a strong tendency towards hydrolysis and subsequent polymerization and/or colloid formation. These species provide a potential pathway for migration of actinides away from the repository. Therefore, it is of fundamental interest to study their generation and properties in-situ. To this end, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy (XAFS) at the INE-Beamline for actinide research at ANKA, Electrospray Mass-Spectrometry (ESI TOF-MS) and Laser Induced Breakdown Detection (LIBD) are combined at FZK-INE in a comprehensive attempt to characterize Zr(IV) (An(IV) analogue), Th(IV) and Pu(IV) polymerization and colloid formation.

  10. D and DR Reactors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The world's second full-scale nuclear reactor was the D Reactor at Hanford which was built in the early 1940's and went operational in December of 1944.D Reactor ran...

  11. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  12. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T [Huntington Beach, CA; Sahimi, Muhammad [Altadena, CA; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak [Richmond, CA; Harale, Aadesh [Los Angeles, CA; Park, Byoung-Gi [Yeosu, KR; Liu, Paul K. T. [Lafayette Hill, PA

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  13. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Hirohide; Otonari, Jun-ichiro; Tozaki, Yuka.

    1993-01-01

    Partition walls are disposed between a reactor pressure vessel and a suppression chamber to separate a dry well to an upper portion and a lower portion. A communication pipe is disposed to the partition walls. One end of the communication pipe is opened in an upper portion of the dry well at a position higher than a hole disposed to a bent tube of the suppression chamber. When coolants overflow from a depressurization valve by an erroneous operation of an emergency reactor core cooling device, the coolants accumulate in the upper portion of the dry well. When the pipeline is ruptured at the upper portion of the pressure vessel, only the inside of the pressure vessel and the upper portion of the dry well are submerged in water. In this case, the water level of the coolants does not elevate to the opening of the commuication pipe but they flow into the suppression chamber from the hole disposed to the bent tube. Since the coolants do not flow out to the lower portion of the dry well, important equipments such as control rod drives disposed at the lower portion of the dry wall can be prevented from submerging in water. (I.N.)

  14. Reactor container

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oikawa, Hirohide; Otonari, Jun-ichiro; Tozaki, Yuka.

    1993-09-07

    Partition walls are disposed between a reactor pressure vessel and a suppression chamber to separate a dry well to an upper portion and a lower portion. A communication pipe is disposed to the partition walls. One end of the communication pipe is opened in an upper portion of the dry well at a position higher than a hole disposed to a bent tube of the suppression chamber. When coolants overflow from a depressurization valve by an erroneous operation of an emergency reactor core cooling device, the coolants accumulate in the upper portion of the dry well. When the pipeline is ruptured at the upper portion of the pressure vessel, only the inside of the pressure vessel and the upper portion of the dry well are submerged in water. In this case, the water level of the coolants does not elevate to the opening of the commuication pipe but they flow into the suppression chamber from the hole disposed to the bent tube. Since the coolants do not flow out to the lower portion of the dry well, important equipments such as control rod drives disposed at the lower portion of the dry wall can be prevented from submerging in water. (I.N.).

  15. Reactor monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Tamotsu.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention monitors a reactor so that each of the operations for the relocation of fuel assemblies and the withdrawal and the insertion of control rods upon exchange of fuel assemblies and control rods in the reactor. That is, when an operator conducts relocating operation by way of a fuel assembly operation section, the device of the present invention judges whether the operation indication is adequate or not, based on the information of control rod arrangement in a control rod memory section. When the operation indication is wrong, a stop signal is sent to a fuel assembly relocating device. Further, when the operator conducts control rod operation by way of a control rod operation section, the device of the present invention judges in the control rod withdrawal judging section, as to whether the operation indication given by the operator is adequate or not by comparing it with fuel assembly arrangement information. When the operation indication is wrong, a stop signal is sent to control rod drives. With such procedures, increase of nuclear heating upon occurrence of erroneous operation can be prevented. (I.S.)

  16. Study of diluting and absorber materials to control reactivity during a postulated core melt down accident in Generation IV reactors; Etude des materiaux sacrificiels absorbants et diluants pour le controle de la reactivite dans le cas d'un accidnet hypothetique de fusion du coeur de reacteurs de quatrieme generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plevacova, K.

    2010-12-16

    In order to limit the consequences of a hypothetical core meltdown accident in Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactors, absorber materials in or near the core, such as boron carbide B{sub 4}C, and diluting materials in the core catcher will be used to prevent recriticality within the mixture of molten oxide fuel and molten structures called corium. The aim of the PhD thesis was to select materials of both types and to understand their behaviour during their interaction with corium, from chemical and thermodynamic point of view. Concerning B{sub 4}C, thermodynamic calculations and experiments agree with the formation of two immiscible phases at high temperature in the B{sub 4}C - UO{sub 2} system: one oxide and one boride. This separation of phases can reduce the efficiency of the neutrons absorption inside the molten fuel contained in the oxide phase. Moreover, a volatilization of a part of the boron element can occur. According to these results, the necessary quantity of B{sub 4}C to be introduced should be reconsidered for postulated severe accident sequence. Other solution could be the use of Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} or HfO{sub 2} as absorber material. These oxides form a solid solution with the oxide fuel. Concerning the diluting materials, mixed oxides Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} were preselected. These systems being completely unknown to date at high temperature in association with UO{sub 2}, first points on the corresponding ternary phase diagrams were researched. Contrary to Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} - UO{sub 2} system, the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} - HfO{sub 2} - UO{sub 2} mixture presents only one eutectic and thus only one solidification path which makes easier forecasting the behaviour of corium in the core catcher. (author) [French] Resume: Afin de limiter les consequences d'un accident grave avec la fusion du coeur dans un reacteur a neutrons rapides de generation IV refroidi au sodium, la recriticite doit

  17. Engineering design of the Aries-IV gaseous divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, M.Z.; Najmabadi, F.; Sharafat, S.

    1994-01-01

    ARIES-IV is a conceptual, D-T burning, steady-state tokamak fusion reactor producing 1000 MWe net. It operates in the second plasma stability regime. The structural material is SiC composite and the primary coolant is helium at 10MPa base pressure. ARIES-IV uses double-null divertors for particle control. Total thermal power recovered from the divertors is 425MW, which is 16% of the total reactor thermal power. Among the desirable goals of divertor design were to avoid the use of tungsten and to use the same structural material and primary coolant as in the blanket design. In order to reduce peak heat flux, the innovative gaseous divertor has been used in ARIES-IV. A gaseous divertor reduces peak heat flux by increasing the surface area and by distributing particle and radiation energy more uniformly. Another benefit of gaseous divertor is the reduction of plasma temperature in the divertor chamber, so that material erosion due to sputtering, can be diminished. This makes the use of low-Z material possible in a gaseous divertor

  18. Assessment of the high performance light water reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starflinger, J. [Univ. of Stuttgart, IKE, (Germany); Schulenberg, T. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Tech., Karlsruhe (Germany); Bittermann, D. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Andreani, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Maraczy, C. [AEKI-KFKI, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-07-01

    From 2006-2010, the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) was investigated within a European Funded project called HPLWR Phase 2. Operated at 25MPa with a heat-up rate in the core from 280{sup o}C to 500{sup o}C, this reactor concept provides a technological challenge in the fields of design, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and heat transfer, materials, and safety. The assessment of the concept with respect to the goals of the technology roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Reactors of the Generation IV International Forum shows that the HPLWR has a potential to fulfil the goals of economics, safety and proliferation resistance and physical protection. In terms of sustainability, the HPLWR with a thermal neutron spectrum investigated within this project, does not differ from existing Light Water Reactors in terms of usage of fuel and waste production. (author)

  19. Nuclear reactors safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barre, Francois; Seiler, Nathalie

    2008-01-01

    fuels as well as the applied methodologies. The IRSN proceeds in a relevant and independent assessment of the submitted safety reports. To achieve this goal and maintain over time an independent and relevant assessment capability, the IRSN relies on the excellence of its experts and on state of art techniques and knowledge. The IRSN contributes by its work in key area to cutting edge research and development in order to drive nuclear industry towards making the best use of scientific and technological progress for improving safety, environmental protection and health. To maintain at all times the state of the art knowledge and the operational expertise necessary to deal efficiently with major nuclear accident consequences, the IRSN carries out, on the one hand, its own research and development programs to gain accurate knowledge on still unknown phenomena for safety analysis. On the other hand, the IRSN works out its own scientific calculation methodologies involving industrial calculation chain. Concerning more particularly the 'two-phase flows' thematic, The ISRN must correctly simulate the primary fluid behavior in the reactor in normal operation as well as in accidental situations, to estimate if, in such situations, the core reactor state is fully safe and any safety risk is undergone The research and development programs launched at the ISRN on two-phase flows gather work on advanced thermohydraulic configurations encounter in various reactor states (normal operation or accidental situations), in particular: (i)The estimation of the margin to the critical heat flux in normal operation (DNBR), (ii) The pressurized thermal shock, which is due to mechanical important constraints in the reactor vessel resulting from the injection of a cold fluid in case of emergency cooling (PTS), (iii) The reactivity insertion accident (RIA), (iv) The loss of coolant accident (LOCA), (vi) The accidents in spent-fuel pools and (vii) The severe accident, which could lead to core

  20. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schabert, H.P.; Weber, R.; Bauer, A.

    1975-01-01

    The refuelling of a PWR power reactor of about 1,200 MWe is performed by a transport pipe in the containment leading from an external to an internal fuel pit. A wagon to transport the fuel elements can go from a vertical loading position to an also vertical deloading position in the inner fuel pit via guide rollers. The necessary horizontal movement is effected by means of a cable line through the transport pipe which is inclined at least 10 0 . Gravity thus helps in the movement to the deloading position. The cable line with winch is fastened outside the containment. Swivelling devices tip the wagon from the horizontal to the vertical position or vice versa. Loading and deloading are done laterally. (TK/LH) [de

  1. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGarry, R.J.

    1958-04-22

    Fluid-cooled nuclear reactors of the type that utilize finned uranium fuel elements disposed in coolant channels in a moderater are described. The coolant channels are provided with removable bushings composed of a non- fissionable material. The interior walls of the bushings have a plurality of spaced, longtudinal ribs separated by grooves which receive the fins on the fuel elements. The lands between the grooves are spaced from the fuel elements to form flow passages, and the size of the now passages progressively decreases as the dlstance from the center of the core increases for the purpose of producing a greater cooling effect at the center to maintain a uniform temperature throughout the core.

  2. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schweiger, F.; Glahe, E.

    1976-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor of the kind which is charged with spherical reaction elements and in which control rods are arranged to be thrust directly into the charge, each control rod has at least one screw thread on its external surface so that as the rod is thrust into the charge it is caused to rotate and thus make penetration easier. The length of each control rod may have two distinct portions, a latter portion which carries a screw thread and a lead-in portion which is shorter than the latter portion and which may carry a thread of greater pitch than that on the latter portion or may have a number of axially extending ribs instead of a thread

  3. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  4. Plutonium(IV) and thorium(IV) hydrous polymer chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, G.L.; Toth, L.M.

    1978-05-01

    The recent attention given to Pu(IV) polymers has warranted a review of plutonium and thorium hydrolysis chemistry with respect to the various experimental approaches and insights gained therein. Differing terminologies used in the experimental procedures have often confused the understanding of the chemical processes which occur between the first hydrolysis reaction of the tetravalent actinide and its final dehydration to form the crystalline oxide. This report focuses on the polymer aging reaction which is defined here in terms of A. W. Thomas' ol to oxo conversion reaction and involves simply the conversion of hydroxyl-bridged polymer links to oxygen-bridged linkages. Thorium(IV) hydrolytic reactions are included because they are analogous in many respects to those of Pu(IV) and offer a simpler chemical system for experimental study. Future work using spectroscopic techniques should significantly improve the description of this aging phenomenon

  5. To question of NPP power reactor choice for Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, G.A.; Makhanov, Y.M.; Reznikova, R.A.; Sidorenco, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: The requirements to NPP power reactors that will be under construction in Kazakhstan are proved and given in the report. A comparative analysis of the most advanced projects of power reactors with light and heavy water under pressure of large, medium and low power is carried out. Different reactors have been considered as follows: 1. Reactors with high-power (700 MW(el) and up) such as EPR, French - German reactor; CANDU-9, Canadian heavy-water reactor; System 80+, developed by ABB Combustion Engineering company, USA; KNGR, Korean reactor of the next generation; APWR, Japanese advanced reactor; WWER-1000 (V-392) - development of Atomenergoproect /Gydropress, Russian Federation; EP 1000, European passive reactor. 2. Reactors with medium power (300 MW (el) - 700 MW (el): AP-600, passive PWR of the Westinghouse company; CANDU-6, Canadian heavy-water reactor; AC-600, Chinese passive PWR; WWER-640, Russian passive reactor; MS-600 Japanese reactor of Mitsubishi Company; KSNP-600, South Korean reactor. 3. Reactors with low power (a few MW(el)- 300 MW(el)): IRIS, reactor of IV generation, developed by the International Corporation of 13 organizations from 7 countries, SMART, South Korean integrated reactor; CAREM, Argentina integrated reactor; MRX, Japanese integrated reactor; 'UNITERM', Russian NPP with integrated reactor, development of NIKIET; AHEC-80, Russian NPP, developed by OKBM. A comparison of the projects of the above-mentioned power reactors was carried out with respect to 15 criteria of nuclear, radiating, ecological safety and economic competitiveness, developed especially for this case. Data on a condition and prospects of power production and power consumption, stations and networks in Kazakhstan necessary for the choice of projects of NPP reactors for Kazakhstan are given. According to the data a balance of power production and power consumption as a whole in the country was received at the level of 59 milliard kw/h. However, strong dis balance

  6. To question of NPP power reactor choice for Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batyrbekov, G.A.; Makhanov, Y.M.; Reznikova, R.A.; Sidorenco, A.V.

    2004-01-01

    The requirements to NPP power reactors that will be under construction in Kazakhstan are proved and given in the report. A comparative analysis of the most advanced projects of power reactors with light and heavy water under pressure of large, medium and low power is carried out. Different reactors have been considered as follows: 1. Reactors with high-power (700 MW(el) and up) such as EPR, French - German reactor; CANDU-9, Canadian heavy-water reactor; System 80+, developed by ABB Combustion Engineering company, USA; KNGR, Korean reactor of the next generation; APWR, Japanese advanced reactor; WWER-1000 (V-392) - development of Atomenergoproect /Gydropress, Russian Federation; EP 1000, European passive reactor. 2. Reactors with medium power (300 MW (el) - 700 MW (el): AP-600, passive PWR of the Westinghouse company; CANDU-6, Canadian heavy-water reactor; AC-600, Chinese passive PWR; WWER-640, Russian passive reactor; MS-600 Japanese reactor of Mitsubishi Company; KSNP-600, South Korean reactor. 3. Reactors with low power (a few MW(el)- 300 MW(el)): IRIS, reactor of IV generation, developed by the International Corporation of 13 organizations from 7 countries, SMART, South Korean integrated reactor; CAREM, Argentina integrated reactor; MRX, Japanese integrated reactor; 'UNITERM', Russian NPP with integrated reactor, development of NIKIET; AHEC-80, Russian NPP, developed by OKBM. A comparison of the projects of the above-mentioned power reactors was carried out with respect to 15 criteria of nuclear, radiating, ecological safety and economic competitiveness, developed especially for this case. Data on a condition and prospects of power production and power consumption, stations and networks in Kazakhstan necessary for the choice of projects of NPP reactors for Kazakhstan are given. According to the data a balance of power production and power consumption as a whole in the country was received at the level of 59 milliard kw/h. However, strong dis balance in the

  7. Experimental facilities for gas-cooled reactor safety studies. Task group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    In 2007, the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) completed a study on Nuclear Safety Research in OECD Countries: Support Facilities for Existing and Advanced Reactors (SFEAR) which focused on facilities suitable for current and advanced water reactor systems. In a subsequent collective opinion on the subject, the CSNI recommended to conduct a similar exercise for Generation IV reactor designs, aiming to develop a strategy for ' better preparing the CSNI to play a role in the planned extension of safety research beyond the needs set by current operating reactors'. In that context, the CSNI established the Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) in 2008 with the objective of providing an overview of facilities suitable for performing safety research relevant to gas-cooled reactors and sodium fast reactors. This report addresses gas-cooled reactors; a similar report covering sodium fast reactors is under preparation. The findings of the TAREF are expected to trigger internationally funded CSNI projects on relevant safety issues at the key facilities identified. Such CSNI-sponsored projects constitute a means for efficiently obtaining the necessary data through internationally co-ordinated research. This report provides an overview of experimental facilities that can be used to carry out nuclear safety research for gas-cooled reactors and identifies priorities for organizing international co-operative programmes at selected facilities. The information has been collected and analysed by a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) as part of an ongoing initiative of the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) which aims to define and to implement a strategy for the efficient utilisation of facilities and resources for Generation IV reactor systems. (author)

  8. Generation IV concepts - Presentation at ACRS workshop 'Regulatory challenges for future nuclear power plants'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versluis, Rob M.

    2001-01-01

    The concept of the Near-Term Deployment Working Group was to define a technical approach for Generation IV system with enough detail to allow evaluation against the goal, bur broad enough to allow for optional features and trade. The following concepts were taken into account: water coolant (water or heavy water), gas coolant, liquid metal coolants. Concepts were grouped according to concept sets of technology base share and design approach. Water coolant concepts were grouped as follows: PWR loop reactors, integral primary system PWRs, Integral BWRs, pressure tube reactors, high conversion cores, supercritical water reactors, advanced fuel cycle concepts. Gas coolant concepts were grouped as follows: pebble bed modular reactors; prismatic modular reactors, very high temperature reactors, fast spectrum reactors, others (fluidized bed, moving ignition zone concept). Liquid metal concepts were grouped in four major categories: Medium-to-large oxide-fueled systems; Medium-sized metal-fueled systems; Medium-sized Pb/Pb-Bi systems; Small-sized Pb/Pb-Bi systems. The three supporting technology areas were examined: Fuels (oxide, metal, nitride); Coolants (Na, Pb/Pb-Bi); Fuel Cycle (advanced aqueous, pyroprocess). Non-classical concepts were also grouped as follows: Eutectic metallic fuel; Molten salt fuel; Gas core reactor; Molten salt cooled/solid fuel; Organic cooled reactor; Solid conduction/heat pipe; Fission product direct energy conversion. The Technical working Groups are analyzing the candidate concepts for performance potential relative to the goals; and technology gaps

  9. Discussion on safety analysis approach for sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Soon Joon; Choo, Yeon Joon; Suh, Nam Duk; Shin, Ahn Dong; Bae, Moo Hoon

    2012-01-01

    Utilization of nuclear energy is increasingly necessary not only because of the increasing energy consumption but also because of the controls on greenhouse emissions against global warming. To keep step with such demands, advanced reactors are now world widely under development with the aims of highly economical advances, and enhanced safety. Recently, further elaborating is encouraged on the research and development program for Generation IV (GEN IV) reactors, and in collaboration with other interested countries through the Generation IV International Forum (GIF). Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) is a strong contender amongst the GEN IV reactor concepts. Korea also takes part in that program and plans to construct demonstration reactor of SFR. SFR is under the development for a candidate of small modular reactors, for example, PRISM (Power Reactor Innovative Small Module). Understanding of safety analysis approach has also advanced by the demand of increasing comprehensive safety requirement. Reviewing the past development of the licensing and safety basis in the advanced reactors, such approaches seemed primarily not so satisfactory because the reference framework of licensing and safety analysis approach in the advanced reactors was always the one in water reactors. And, the framework is very plant specific one and thereby the advanced reactors and their frameworks don't look like a well assorted couple. Recently as a result of considerable advances in probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), risk informed approaches are increasingly applied together with some of the deterministic approaches like as the ones in water reactors. Technology neutral framework (TNF) can be said to be the utmost works of such risk informed approaches, even though an intensive assessment of the applicability has not been sufficiently accomplished. This study discusses the viable safety analysis approaches for the urgent application to the construction of pool type SFR. As discussed in

  10. Gen IV International Forum - GIF, 2010 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF), created in 2000 to foster international collaboration at a detailed level of actual R and D, is a cooperative international endeavor, organized to develop the research necessary to test the feasibility and performance capabilities of fourth generation nuclear systems, with the goal of making such systems deployable in large numbers around 2030. Since its beginning, GIF members stated the following goals for the fourth generation of nuclear power plants when compared to previous generations: a) improve sustainability (including effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste); b) improve economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources); c) improve safety and reliability (e.g. no need for offsite emergency response); and d) improve proliferation resistance and physical protection. After an in-depth analysis of the different available concepts, whatever their level of development, the Forum selected six concepts as the most promising, and decided to focus R and D on these systems: - the very-high-temperature reactor (VHTR); - the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR); - the supercritical-water-cooled reactor (SCWR); - the gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR); - the lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR); - the molten salt reactor (MSR). Active members of the GIF are Canada, Euratom, France, Japan, People's Republic of China, Republic of Korea, Republic of South Africa, Russian Federation, Switzerland and the United States. Altogether, they represent around 90% of the world installed nuclear capacity for producing electricity, and all key technology holders. The forum is led by the policy group, where all members are represented, and currently chaired by Japan since December 2009, assisted by vice-chairs from France and United States. The year 2010 has seen some important achievements and decisions regarding these six systems. For example, two sodium-cooled fast reactors (re)started this year: Monju in Japan restarted after

  11. The concepts of liquid metal of IV generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonnier, J. L.

    2005-01-01

    The concepts of liquid metals, due to their large spectrum, show important possibility of sustainable development: two concepts of liquid metal (Sodium and Lead) were engaged in the frame of the IV generation. The reactors with sodium benefit from considerable background of experience and of important work on projects to aim at the price diminution and the increase of safety (EFR, JSFR). The commitment of Japan as a leader of this concept and the support by France allow to contemplate an industrial deployment from 2015. The lead reactors offer some advantages in the domain of safety but otherwise require a highly important research and development binded to the control of the corrosion, the perspective of deployment of this concept are more hypothetical

  12. Review on Korea Participation of Generation IV International Forum (GIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jewhan; Jeong, Ji-Young; Hahn, Dohee

    2015-01-01

    Generation IV International Forum (GIF) originates from US proposal of an initiative in 2000. The vision was to leapfrog LWR technology and collaborate with international partners to share R and D on advanced nuclear systems. Nine countries and EU joined the initiative and Gen IV concept was defined via technology goals and legal framework. Two years study with more than 100 experts worldwide has evaluated nearly 100 reactor designs and down selected six most promising concepts. In 2005, the first signatures on Framework Agreement were collected and the first research projects were defined in 2006. Korea is one of the founding members of GIF and actively participating in various areas. In 2013, TD was assigned to Korean expert and Korea is endeavoring to enhance the benefit of participation since this turning point. In this paper, pros and cons of engaging with GIF were briefly introduced and items to maximize the benefit were suggested

  13. Department of reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The activities of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risoe during 1979 are described. The work is presented in five chapters: Reactor Engineering, Reactor Physics and Dynamics, Heat Transfer and Hydraulics, The DR 1 Reactor, and Non-Nuclear Activities. A list of the staff and of publications is included. (author)

  14. Survey of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boek, H.; Villa, M.

    2004-06-01

    A survey of reasearch reactors based on the IAEA Nuclear Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) was done. This database includes information on 273 operating research reactors ranging in power from zero to several hundred MW. From these 273 operating research reactors 205 reactors have a power level below 5 MW, the remaining 68 reactors range from 5 MW up to several 100 MW thermal power. The major reactor types with common design are: Siemens Unterrichtsreaktors, 1.2 Argonaut reactors, Slowpoke reactors, the miniature neutron source reactors, TRIGA reactors, material testing reactors and high flux reactors. Technical data such as: power, fuel material, fuel type, enrichment, maximum neutron flux density and experimental facilities for each reactor type as well as a description of their utilization in physics and chemistry, medicine and biology, academic research and teaching, training purposes (students and physicists, operating personnel), industrial application (neutron radiography, silicon neutron transmutation doping facilities) are provided. The geographically distribution of these reactors is also shown. As conclusions the author discussed the advantages (low capital cost, low operating cost, low burn up, simple to operate, safe, less restrictive containment and sitting requirements, versatility) and disadvantages (lower sensitivity for NAA, limited radioisotope production, limited use of neutron beams, limited access to the core, licensing) of low power research reactors. 24 figs., refs. 15, Tab. 1 (nevyjel)

  15. FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Kimitaka; Fukuie, Ken; Iijima, Tooru; Shimpo, Masakazu.

    1994-01-01

    In an FBR type reactor for exchanging fuels by pulling up reactor core upper mechanisms, a connection mechanism is disposed for connecting the top of the reactor core and the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms. In addition, a cylindrical body is disposed surrounding the reactor core upper mechanisms, and a support member is disposed to the cylindrical body for supporting an intermediate portion of the reactor core upper mechanisms. Then, the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms is connected to the top of the reactor core. Same displacements are caused to both of them upon occurrence of earthquakes and, as a result, it is possible to eliminate mutual horizontal displacement between a control rod guide hole of the reactor core upper mechanisms and a control rod insertion hole of the reactor core. In addition, since the intermediate portion of the reactor core upper mechanisms is supported by the support member disposed to the cylindrical body surrounding the reactor core upper mechanisms, deformation caused to the lower end of the reactor core upper mechanisms is reduced, so that the mutual horizontal displacement with respect to the control rod insertion hole of the reactor core can be reduced. As a result, performance of control rod insertion upon occurrence of the earthquakes is improved, so that reactor shutdown is conducted more reliably to improve reactor safety. (N.H.)

  16. Confirmatory factor analysis of the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdnack, James A; Xiaobin Zhou; Larrabee, Glenn J; Millis, Scott R; Salthouse, Timothy A

    2011-06-01

    The Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) and the Wechsler Memory Scale-fourth edition (WMS-IV) were co-developed to be used individually or as a combined battery of tests. The independent factor structure of each of the tests has been identified; however, the combined factor structure has yet to be determined. Confirmatory factor analysis was applied to the WAIS-IV/WMS-IV Adult battery (i.e., age 16-69 years) co-norming sample (n = 900) to test 13 measurement models. The results indicated that two models fit the data equally well. One model is a seven-factor solution without a hierarchical general ability factor: Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Auditory Working Memory, Visual Working Memory, Auditory Memory, and Visual Memory. The second model is a five-factor model composed of Verbal Comprehension, Perceptual Reasoning, Processing Speed, Working Memory, and Memory with a hierarchical general ability factor. Interpretative implications for each model are discussed.

  17. Annual report 1990 annex IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.; Foskolos, K.

    1991-01-01

    The Nuclear Energy Research Department consists of three Laboratories: Reactor Physics and Systems Engineering (LRS), Thermal Hydraulics (LTH), and Materials and Nuclear Processes (LWV). There are additionally two Research Programmes: 'Waste Disposal' (PES) and LWR-Safety (PLS). The Department's activities focus on three main areas: safety and safety-related operational problems of the Swiss nuclear power plants (NPPs), contributions to the issues involved in radioactive waste disposal, future reactors. In addition, scientific-technical services are provided in the nuclear and non-nuclear sectors and for the operation of the relevant site facilities. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  18. A recent source modification for noble gases at the Los Alamos on-line mass analysis facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balestrini, S.J.; Forman, L.

    1976-01-01

    The Los Alamos on-line mass analysis experiment at the Godiva-IV burst reactor facility has been modified to determine independent fission yields of noble gases. The gases are released from a stearate target and ionization by electron bombardment. The distance traveled by the gases from the target to the ionization chamber is 20 cm. The efficiency of the electron bombardment source is lower than that of the surface ionization source that was employed to measure the yields of Rb and Cs. But this effect is compensated by the larger quantity of target metal that is possible when using a stearate target. (Auth.)

  19. Free-format RPG IV

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This how-to guide offers a concise and thorough introduction to the increased productivity, better readability, and easier program maintenance that comes with the free-format style of programming in RPG IV. Although free-format information is available in IBM manuals, it is not separated from everything else, thereby requiring hours of tedious research to track down the information needed. This book provides everything one needs to know to write RPG IV in the free-format style, and author Jim Martin not only teaches rules and syntax but also explains how this new style of coding has the pot

  20. Fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinzel, V.

    1975-01-01

    The author gives a survey of 'fast breeder reactors'. In detail the process of breeding, the reasons for the development of fast breeders, the possible breeder reactors, the design criteria, fuels, cladding, coolant, and safety aspects are reported on. Design data of some experimental reactors already in operation are summarized in stabular form. 300 MWe Prototype-Reactors SNR-300 and PFR are explained in detail and data of KWU helium-cooled fast breeder reactors are given. (HR) [de

  1. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understa...

  2. Nuclear reactor coolant channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macbeth, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    A nuclear reactor coolant channel is described that is suitable for sub-cooled reactors as in pressurised water reactors as well as for bulk boiling, as in boiling water reactors and steam generating nuclear reactors. The arrangement aims to improve heat transfer between the fuel elements and the coolant. Full constructional details are given. See also other similar patents by the author. (U.K.)

  3. Microstructural study of high irradiated reactor steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slugen, Vladimir; Petriska, Martin; Sojak, Stanislav; Veternikova, Jana [Slovak University of Technology, FEI, Bratislava (Slovakia); Krsjak, Vladimir [Institute for Energy, Joint Research Centre of the European Commission, Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    Positron Annihilation Spectroscopy (PAS) techniques in combination with other techniques were effectively used in the testing and selection process of optimal reactor steels for use in Generation III and IV reactors or thermonuclear fusion facilities. Conventional PAS lifetime technique and pulsed low energy positron system were applied on wide spectrum of reactor steels together with other techniques viz., Transmission Electron Microscopy and Moessbauer Spectroscopy focused on the role of Nickel in the steel microstructure. Experimental experiences in this area collected over the last twenty years were very useful in the actual study by avoiding many mistakes in handling with specimens or in careful interpretation of the results. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  4. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irion, L.; Tautz, J.; Ulrych, G.

    1976-01-01

    This additional patent complements the arrangement of non-return valves to prevent loss of cooling water on fracture of external tubes in the main coolant circuit (according to PS 24 24 427.7) by ensuring that the easily movable valves only operate in case of a fault, but do not flutter in operation, because the direction of flow is not the same at each location where they are installed. The remedy for this undesirable effect consists of allocating 1 non-return valve unit with 5 to 10 valves to each (of several) ducts for the cooling water intake. These units are installed in the annular space between the reactor vessel and the pressure vessel below the inlet of the ducts. Due to flow guidance surfaces in the same space, the incoming cooling water is deflected downwards and as the guiding surfaces are closed at the sides, must pass parallel to the valves of the non-return valve unit. On fracture of the external cooling water inlet pipe concerned, all valves of this unit close due to reversal of flow on the outlet side. (TK) [de

  5. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagawa, Tatsuo; Yanai, Ryoichi.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a reactor container which is free from water shock action or condensing vibrations and cannot be readily broken by a missile from a pump impeller, pipe whipping, steam jet reaction, etc., and which also quickly condenses issuing steam and possesses a large vibration-proof strength. Structure: A high pressure containment vessel accommodating a pressure container includes a plurality of pressurized water tanks arranged along its inner periphery, and a pneumatic valve is provided in a lower portion of each of these pressurized water tanks. If an accident occurs, vapor is caused to issue from the pressure container into the vessel. When a certain value is reached, the pneumatic valves are opened, whereby the gas within the pressurized water tanks causes pressurized water to flow through the pipe and be ejected from spray nozzles to cause condensation of water within the vessel. Further, water of a pool within the container is circulated to allow heat release to the outside. (Horiuchi, T.)

  6. VeVeRa-IV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Evelien Eggink; Debbie Oudijk; Klarita Sadiraj

    2012-01-01

    Original title: VeVeRa-IV The Dutch population is set to age rapidly in the coming years. More and more people will also attain a very great age. This means that the need for home care and care provided in nursing or residential care homes will also increase. As part of the Long-term Care

  7. 11. IV avati Draakoni galeriis...

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    Tanel Saare (sünd. 1979) näitus "Gott und huhn episode IV: seed shower". Eksponeeritakse väljavõtteid aktsioonidest aastatel 2000-2004 Turus, Nürnbergis, Berliinis, Lohusalus ja Soulis. Osa aktsioone toimus koos rühmitusega Non Grata

  8. Phase IV of Drug Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viraj Suvarna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Not all Phase IV studies are post-marketing surveillance (PMS studies but every PMS study is a phase IV study. Phase IV is also an important phase of drug development. In particular, the real world effectiveness of a drug as evaluated in an observational, non-interventional trial in a naturalistic setting which complements the efficacy data that emanates from a pre-marketing randomized controlled trial (RCT. No matter how many patients are studied pre-marketing in a controlled environment, the true safety profile of a drug is characterized only by continuing safety surveillance through a spontaneous adverse event monitoring system and a post-marketing surveillance/non-interventional study. Prevalent practice patterns can generate leads that could result in further evaluation of a new indication via the RCT route or even a signal that may necessitate regulatory action (change in labeling, risk management/minimization action plan. Disease registries are another option as are the large simple hybrid trials. Surveillance of spontaneously reported adverse events continues as long as a product is marketed. And so Phase IV in that sense never ends.

  9. A chiral Mn(IV)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Singlecrystal X-ray analysis revealed that compound 1 crystallises in the monoclinic 21 space group with six mononuclear [MnIVL2] units in the asymmetric unit along with three solvent DMF molecules. In the crystal structure, each Mn(IV) complex, acting as the building unit, undergoes supramolecular linking through C-H ...

  10. Closed Fuel Cycle and Minor Actinide Multirecycling in a Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Rooijen, W.F.G.; Kloosterman, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    The Generation IV International Forum has identified the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) as one of the reactor concepts for future deployment. The GCFR targets sustainability, which is achieved by the use of a closed nuclear fuel cycle where only fission products are discharged to a repository; all

  11. Calculation of fundamental parameters for the dynamical study of TRIGA-3-Salazar reactor (Mixed reactor core)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viais J, J.

    1994-01-01

    Kinetic parameters for dynamic study of two different configurations, 8 and 9, both with standard fuel, 20% enrichment and Flip (Fuel Life Improvement Program with 70% enrichment) fuel, for TRIGA Mark-III reactor from Mexico Nuclear Center, are obtained. A calculation method using both WIMS-D4 and DTF-IV and DAC1 was established, to decide which of those two configurations has the best safety and operational conditions. Validation of this methodology is done by calculate those parameters for a reactor core with new standard fuel. Configuration 9 is recommended to be use. (Author)

  12. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baeten, P.

    2007-01-01

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  13. The fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collier, J.

    1990-01-01

    The arguments for and against the fast breeder reactor are debated. The case for the fast reactor is that the world energy demand will increase due to increasing population over the next forty years and that the damage to the global environment from burning fossil fuels which contribute to the greenhouse effect. Nuclear fission is the only large scale energy source which can achieve a cut in the use of carbon based fuels although energy conservation and renewable sources will also be important. Fast reactors produce more energy from uranium than other types of (thermal) reactors such as AGRs and PWRs. Fast reactors would be important from about 2020 onwards especially as by then many thermal reactors will need to be replaced. Fast reactors are also safer than normal reactors. The arguments against fast reactors are largely economic. The cost, especially the capital cost is very high. The viability of the technology is also questioned. (UK)

  14. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  15. Nuclear reactor instrumentation at research reactor renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baers, B.; Pellionisz, P.

    1981-10-01

    The paper overviews the state-of-the-art of research reactor renewals. As a case study the instrumentation reconstruction of the Finnish 250 kW TRIGA reactor is described, with particular emphasis on the nuclear control instrumentation and equipment which has been developed and manufactured by the Central Research Institute for Physics, Budapest. Beside the presentation of the nuclear instrument family developed primarily for research reactor reconstructions, the quality assurance policy conducted during the manufacturing process is also discussed. (author)

  16. Isotope Mixes, Corresponding Nuclear Properties and Reactor Design Implications of Naturally Occurring Lead Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    as the coolant (i.e., water, helium, molten salt , sodium or lead) [1]. One of the promising Generation IV systems, suitable especially for small...physics, nuclear engineering, nuclear reactor, SSTAR, MCNP, MCNP5, monte carlo transport, geochemistry, lead, uranium , thorium 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 75...compact nuclear power systems, is the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), a fast- spectrum reactor concept in which the coolant is molten lead or a related

  17. Design and R&D Progress of China Lead-Based Reactor for ADS Research Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Yican

    2017-01-01

    In 2011, the Chinese Academy of Sciences launched an engineering project to develop an accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS) for nuclear waste transmutation. The China Lead-based Reactor (CLEAR), proposed by the Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, was selected as the reference reactor for ADS development, as well as for the technology development of the Generation IV lead-cooled fast reactor. The conceptual design of CLEAR-I with 10 MW thermal power has been completed. KYLIN ...

  18. Contribution of nonlinear acoustic to the characterization of micro-bubbles clouds in liquid sodium. Application to the generation IV nuclear reactors; Apport de l'acoustique non lineaire a la caracterisation de l'engazement du sodium liquide. Application aux reacteurs nucleaires de quatrieme generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaro, M.

    2010-11-15

    The SFR system chosen (Sodium Fast Reactor: fast neutron reactors cooled by liquid sodium) by France led to a fourth-generation prototype named ASTRID. The development of this kind of reactors presents several challenges, particularly in terms of improving the safety and monitoring operation. This involves, among other things, characterization of the bubbles presence in liquid sodium. The characterization of the bubbles presence is the subject of this thesis. It involves the determination of void fraction (gas volume fraction) and histogram of the radii of bubbles. The bibliographic work done has shown that linear acoustic techniques for the characterization of bubble clouds are inadequate to achieve this. However promising leads have been identified by studying nonlinear acoustic techniques. This last idea has therefore been explored. An experimental water bench for the generation and optical control of micro-bubbles cloud allowed us to validate finely the reconstruction of histograms of radii through a technique of nonlinear mixing of a high frequency with a low frequency. The potential of the mixing of two high frequencies, more interesting for the industrial point of view has also been demonstrated. Finally, the bases of the transposition of an original technique of nonlinear resonance spectroscopy applied to a bubbles cloud were explored through the introduction of acoustic resonators. The results offer many interesting opportunities, both in terms of industrial applications and for more fundamental understanding of non-linear behavior of a bubble excited by multiple frequencies and of bubbles clouds excited at low frequency. (author)

  19. Recent designs for advanced fusion reactor blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sze, D.K.

    1994-01-01

    A series of reactor design studies based on the Tokamak configuration have been carried out under the direction of Professor Robert Conn of UCLA. They are called ARIES-I through IV. The key mission of these studies is to evaluate the attractiveness of fusion assuming different degrees of advancement in either physics or engineering development. This paper discusses the directions and conclusions of the blanket and related engineering systems for those design studies. ARIES-1 investigated the use of SiC composite as the structural material to increase the blanket temperature and reduce the blanket activation. Li 2 ZrO 3 was used as the breeding material due to its high temperature stability and good tritium recovery characteristics. The ARIES-IV is a modification of ARIES-1. The plasma was in the second stability regime. Li 2 O was used as the breeding material to remove Zr. A gaseous divertor was used to replace the conventional divertor so that high Z divertor target is not required. The physics of ARIES-II was the same as ARIES-IV. The engineering design of the ARIES-II was based on a self-cooled lithium blanket with a V-alloy as the structural material. Even though it was assumed that the plasma was in the second stability regime, the plasma beta was still rather low (3.4%). The ARIES-III is an advanced fuel (D- 3 He) tokamak reactor. The reactor design assumed major advancement on the physics, with a plasma beta of 23.9%. A conventional structural material is acceptable due to the low neutron wall loading. From the radiation damage point of view, the first wall can last the life of the reactor, which is expected to be a major advantage from the engineering design and waste disposal point of view

  20. Reactor Physics Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Raedt, C.

    2000-01-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies

  1. Reactor Physics Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Raedt, C

    2000-07-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies.

  2. Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendroth-Asmussen, Lisa; Aksglaede, Lise; Gernow, Anne B

    2016-01-01

    molecular genetic analyses confirmed glycogen storage disease Type IV with the finding of compound heterozygosity for 2 mutations (c.691+2T>C and c.1570C>T, p.R524X) in the GBE1 gene. We conclude that glycogen storage disease Type IV can cause early miscarriage and that diagnosis can initially be made......A 30-yr-old woman presented with 2 consecutive miscarriages within 7 mo. Histopathologic examination of the placental tissue showed intracytoplasmic inclusion vacuoles with a strong reaction in Periodic acid-Schiff staining and a slightly pallor reaction in alcian blue staining. Additional...... on histopathologic examination. Genetic analysis is required to confirm the diagnosis and to offer prenatal genetic testing in future pregnancies....

  3. Uruguay; 2011 Article IV Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2011-01-01

    This 2011 Article IV Consultation highlights that the growth momentum in Uruguay has continued into 2011 but a slowdown is under way, led by weaker exports and slower public investment. Uruguay’s economic and financial vulnerabilities are modest, and the government has reduced debt vulnerabilities significantly and built important financial buffers. Executive Directors have commended authorities’ skillful macroeconomic management that has underpinned Uruguay’s excellent economic performance, ...

  4. A Grade IV Isthmic Spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolber, Morey J; Hanney, William J

    2017-12-01

    A 15-year-old adolescent boy was referred by an orthopaedic surgeon for treatment of right gluteal and thigh pain. Following treatment that reduced his pain, he experienced acute onset of bilateral radiculopathy. He was referred back to the physician, who ordered radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging, which identified a grade IV isthmic spondylolisthesis at the L5-S1 level. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2017;47(12):971. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7547.

  5. Research reactor instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2001-02-01

    This is a textbook on research reactor instrumentation for training purposes, it gives a survey on research reactor instrumentation requirements and eight exercises covering the major aspects of this topic are presented. (author)

  6. Nuclear reactors; graphical symbols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    This standard contains graphical symbols that reveal the type of nuclear reactor and is used to design graphical and technical presentations. Distinguishing features for nuclear reactors are laid down in graphical symbols. (orig.) [de

  7. Hybrid plasmachemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lelevkin, V. M., E-mail: lelevkin44@mail.ru; Smirnova, Yu. G.; Tokarev, A. V. [Kyrgyz-Russian Slavic University (Kyrgyzstan)

    2015-04-15

    A hybrid plasmachemical reactor on the basis of a dielectric barrier discharge in a transformer is developed. The characteristics of the reactor as functions of the dielectric barrier discharge parameters are determined.

  8. Ship propulsion reactors technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fribourg, Ch.

    2002-01-01

    This paper takes the state of the art on ship propulsion reactors technology. The french research programs with the corresponding technological stakes, the reactors specifications and advantages are detailed. (A.L.B.)

  9. Fusion reactor design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Santarius, J.F.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics on the ARIES tokamak: systems; plasma power balance; impurity control and fusion ash removal; fusion product ripple loss; energy conversion; reactor fueling; first wall design; shield design; reactor safety; and fuel cost and resources

  10. Reactor shutdown method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, Yoshitaka; Sawa, Toshio; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Osumi, Katsumi; Usui, Naoshi.

    1991-01-01

    A device for injecting a hydrogen gas, a chelating agent or a reducing agent is disposed in a reactor water recycling system. Upon reactor shutdown, the hydrogen gas, the chelating agent or the reducing agent is injected to primary coolants. With such a procedure, radioactive ions formed by the dissolution of oxide layers at the surface of pipelines and equipments in a reactor water recycling system and a reactor water cleanup system are removed from the primary coolants by a reactor water cleanup device. Accordingly, since the dose rate at the surface of the pipelines can be reduced, the operator's radiation dose can be reduced upon periodical inspection for a power plant. Further, the inner pressure of the reactor is kept higher than the saturated steam pressure at the reactor water temperature to suppress boiling of the reactor water. This can suppress the peeling of cruds deposited to the surface of the fuel cladding tube. (I.N.)

  11. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwards, R.M.; Power, M.A.; Bryan, M.

    1992-01-01

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  12. Reactor System Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, S. K.; Kim, G. K.; Yeo, J. W.

    2006-08-01

    SMART NPP(Nuclear Power Plant) has been developed for duel purpose, electricity generation and energy supply for seawater desalination. The objective of this project IS to design the reactor system of SMART pilot plant(SMART-P) which will be built and operated for the integrated technology verification of SMART. SMART-P is an integral reactor in which primary components of reactor coolant system are enclosed in single pressure vessel without connecting pipes. The major components installed within a vessel includes a core, twelve steam generator cassettes, a low-temperature self pressurizer, twelve control rod drives, and two main coolant pumps. SMART-P reactor system design was categorized to the reactor coe design, fluid system design, reactor mechanical design, major component design and MMIS design. Reactor safety -analysis and performance analysis were performed for developed SMART=P reactor system. Also, the preparation of safety analysis report, and the technical support for licensing acquisition are performed

  13. Nuclear reactor shutdown system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mangus, J.D.; Cooper, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor shutdown system is described comprising a temperature sensitive device connected to control the electric power supply to a magnetic latch holding a body of a neutron absorbing material. The temperature sensitive device is exposed to the reactor coolant so that when the reactor coolant temperature rises above a specific level, the temperature sensitive device will cause deenergization of the magnetic latch to allow the body of neutron absorbing material to enter the reactor core. (author)

  14. PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masood, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor is the only research reactor in Malaysia. This 1 MW TRIGA Mk II reactor first reached criticality on 28 June 1982 and is located at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency premise in Bangi, Malaysia. This reactor has been mainly utilised for research, training and education and isotope production. Over the years several systems have been refurbished or modernised to overcome ageing and obsolescence problems. Major achievements and milestones will also be elaborated in this paper. (author)

  15. Reactor power measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izumi, Mikio; Sano, Yuji; Seki, Eiji; Yoshida, Toshifumi; Ito, Toshiaki.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention provides a self-powered long detector having a sensitivity over the entire length of a reactor core as an entire control rod withdrawal range of a BWR type reactor, and a reactor power measuring device using a gamma ray thermometer which scarcely causes sensitivity degradation. That is, a hollow protection pipe is disposed passing through the reactor core from the outside of a reactor pressure vessel. The self-powered long detectors and the gamma ray thermometers are inserted and installed in the protection pipe. An average reactor power in an axial direction of the reactor relative to a certain position in the horizontal cross section of the reactor core is determined based on the power of the self-powered long detector over the entire length of the reactor core. Since the response of the self-powered detector relative to a local power change is rapid, the output is used as an input signal to a safety protection device of the reactor core. Further, a gamma ray thermometer secured in the reactor and having scarce sensitivity degradation is used instead of an incore travelling neutron monitor used for relative calibration of an existent neutron monitor secured in the reactor. (I.S.)

  16. Ulysse, mentor reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouquin, B.; Rio, I.; Safieh, J.

    1997-01-01

    On July 23, 1961, the ULYSSE reactor began its first power rise. Designed at that time to train nuclear engineering students and reactor operators, this reactor still remains an indispensable tool for nuclear teaching and a choice instrument for scientists. (author)

  17. Towards nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The results of nuclear fusion researches in JAERI are summarized. In this report, following themes are collected: the concept of fusion reactor (including ITER), fusion reactor safety, plasma confinement, fusion reactor equipment, and so on. Includes glossary. (J.P.N.)

  18. Refuelling nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, J.; Webb, J.; White, W.P.; McLaren, N.H.

    1981-01-01

    An improved nuclear reactor refuelling machine is described which can be left in the reactor vault to reduce the off-load refuelling time for the reactor. The system comprises a gripper device rangeable within a tubular chute, the gripper device being movable by a pantograph. (U.K.)

  19. The Jules Horowitz reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Jules Horowitz reactor is the future european reactor for irradiation. It will be used for materials and new fuels irradiation. Experiments for the safety and the validation of neutronics calculation will be also realized. This paper presents the design and the performance of the reactor and the schedule of the remaining design studies. (A.L.B.)

  20. Determination of U(IV) by spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coutinho, C.M.C.; Bastos, E.T.R.; Bastos, M.B.R.

    1984-01-01

    The determination of uranium (IV) concentration in acid solutions in the presence of U (IV), Fe (II) and Ti (IV) by spectrophotometry is studied, aiming at controlling the solutions in the ion exchange columns, used for uranium enrichment by isotope exchange. (E.G.) [pt

  1. Safety research for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hancox, W.T.

    1982-10-01

    Continuing research to develop and verify computer models of CANDU-PHW reactor process and safety systems is described. It is focussed on loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) because they are the precursors of more serious accidents. Research topics include: (i) fluid-dynamic and heat-transfer processes in the heat transport system during the blowdown and refilling phases of LOCAs; (ii) thermal and mechanical behaviour of fuel elements; (iii) thermal and mechanical behaviour of the fuel and the fuel-channel assembly in situations where the heavy-water moderator is the sink for decay heat produced in the fuel; (iv) chemical behaviour of fission gases that might be released into the reactor coolant and transported to the containment system; and (v) combustion of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures that would be produced if fuel temperatures were sufficiently high to initiate the zirconium-water reaction. The current status of the research on each of these topics is highlighted with particular emphasis on the conclusions reached to date and their impact on the continuing program

  2. High temperature fast reactor for hydrogen production in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Jamil A. do; Ono, Shizuca; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.

    2008-01-01

    The main nuclear reactors technology for the Generation IV, on development phase for utilization after 2030, is the fast reactor type with high temperature output to improve the efficiency of the thermo-electric conversion process and to enable applications of the generated heat in industrial process. Currently, water electrolysis and thermo chemical cycles using very high temperature are studied for large scale and long-term hydrogen production, in the future. With the possible oil scarcity and price rise, and the global warming, this application can play an important role in the changes of the world energy matrix. In this context, it is proposed a fast reactor with very high output temperature, ∼ 1000 deg C. This reactor will have a closed fuel cycle; it will be cooled by lead and loaded with nitride fuel. This reactor may be used for hydrogen, heat and electricity production in Brazil. It is discussed a development strategy of the necessary technologies and some important problems are commented. The proposed concept presents characteristics that meet the requirements of the Generation IV reactor class. (author)

  3. Thorium fueled reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipaun, S.

    2017-01-01

    Current development in thorium fueled reactors shows that they can be designed to operate in the fast or thermal spectrum. The thorium/uranium fuel cycle converts fertile thorium-232 into fissile uranium-233, which fissions and releases energy. This paper analyses the characteristics of thorium fueled reactors and discusses the thermal reactor option. It is found that thorium fuel can be utilized in molten salt reactors through many configurations and designs. A balanced assessment on the feasibility of adopting one reactor technology versus another could lead to optimized benefits of having thorium resource.

  4. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  5. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  6. Fundamentals of reactor chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsu, Eiko

    1981-12-01

    In the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI, many courses are presented for the people working in and around the nuclear reactors. The curricula of the courses contain also the subject material of chemistry. With reference to the foreign curricula, a plan of educational subject material of chemistry in the Nuclear Engineering School of JAERI was considered, and the fundamental part of reactor chemistry was reviewed in this report. Since the students of the Nuclear Engineering School are not chemists, the knowledge necessary in and around the nuclear reactors was emphasized in order to familiarize the students with the reactor chemistry. The teaching experience of the fundamentals of reactor chemistry is also given. (author)

  7. Generation III+ Reactor Portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    While the power generation needs of utilities are unique and diverse, they are all faced with the double challenge of meeting growing electricity needs while curbing CO 2 emissions. To answer these diverse needs and help tackle this challenge, AREVA has developed several reactor models which are briefly described in this document: The EPR TM Reactor: designed on the basis of the Konvoi (Germany) and N4 (France) reactors, the EPRTM reactor is an evolutionary model designed to achieve best-in-class safety and operational performance levels. The ATMEA1 TM reactor: jointly designed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and AREVA through ATMEA, their common company. This reactor design benefits from the competencies and expertise of the two mother companies, which have commissioned close to 130 reactor units. The KERENA TM reactor: Designed on the basis of the most recent German BWR reactors (Gundremmingen) the KERENA TM reactor relies on proven technology while also including innovative, yet thoroughly tested, features. The optimal combination of active and passive safety systems for a boiling water reactor achieves a very low probability of severe accident

  8. Spinning fluids reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  9. Reactor power monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dogen, Ayumi; Ozawa, Michihiro.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To significantly improve the working efficiency of a nuclear reactor by reflecting the control rod history effect on thermal variants required for the monitoring of the reactor operation. Constitution: An incore power distribution calculation section reads the incore neutron fluxes detected by neutron detectors disposed in the reactor to calculate the incore power distribution. A burnup degree distribution calculation section calculates the burnup degree distribution in the reactor based on the thus calculated incore power distribution. A control rod history date store device supplied with the burnup degree distribution renews the stored control rod history data based on the present control rod pattern and the burnup degree distribution. Then, thermal variants of the nuclear reactor are calculated based on the thus renewed control rod history data. Since the control rod history effect is reflected on the thermal variants required for the monitoring of the reactor operation, the working efficiency of the nuclear reactor can be improved significantly. (Seki, T.)

  10. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Yoshihiko; Arita, Setsuo; Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Fukazawa, Yukihisa; Ishii, Kazuhiko

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a reactor power control device capable of enhancing an operation efficiency while keeping high reliability and safety in a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a means for inputting a set value of a generator power and a set value of a reactor power, (2) a means for controlling the reactor power to either smaller one of the reactor power corresponding to the set value of the generator power and the set value of the reactor power. With such procedures, even if the nuclear power plant is set so as to operate it to make the reactor power 100%, when the generator power reaches the upper limit, the reactor power is controlled with a preference given to the upper limit value of the generator power. Accordingly, safety and reliability are not deteriorated. The operation efficiency of the plant can be improved. (I.S.)

  11. One piece reactor removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chia, Wei-Min; Wang, Song-Feng

    1993-01-01

    The strategy of Taiwan Research Reactor Renewal plan is to remove the old reactor block with One Piece Reactor Removal (OPRR) method for installing a new research reactor in original building. In this paper, the engineering design of each transportation works including the work method, the major equipments, the design policy and design criteria is described and discussed. In addition, to ensure the reactor block is safety transported for storage and to guarantee the integrity of reactor base mat is maintained for new reactor, operation safety is drawn special attention, particularly under seismic condition, to warrant safe operation of OPRR. ALARA principle and Below Regulatory Concern (BRC) practice were also incorporated in the planning to minimize the collective dose and the total amount of radioactive wastes. All these activities are introduced in this paper. (J.P.N.)

  12. ENDF/B-IV fission-product files: summary of major nuclide data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    England, T.R.; Schenter, R.E.

    1975-09-01

    The major fission-product parameters [sigma/sub th/, RI, tau/sub 1/2/, E-bar/sub β/, E-bar/sub γ/, E-bar/sub α/, decay and (n,γ) branching, Q, and AWR] abstracted from ENDF/B-IV files for 824 nuclides are summarized. These data are most often requested by users concerned with reactor design, reactor safety, dose, and other sundry studies. The few known file errors are corrected to date. Tabular data are listed by increasing mass number

  13. Thermal hydraulic core simulation of the MYRRHA Reactor in steady state operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferandes, Gustavo H.N.; Ramos, Mário C.; Carvalho, Athos M.S.S.; Cabrera, Carlos E.V.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia

    2017-01-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a prototype nuclear subcritical reactor driven by a particle accelerator. As a special property, the reactor maintains the nuclear fission chain reaction by means of an external neutron source provided by a particle accelerator. The main aim of this work is to study two types of coolants, LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) and Na (Sodium) that are two strong candidates to be used in ADS systems as well as in Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactors. Firstly, it was developed a thermal hydraulic model of the MYRRHA core using the RELAP5-3D, considering LBE as coolant (original project). After this, the LBE was substituted by Na coolant to investigate the reactor behavior in such case. Results have demonstrated the high heat transfer capacity of the LBE coolant in this type of system. (author)

  14. Thermal hydraulic core simulation of the MYRRHA Reactor in steady state operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferandes, Gustavo H.N.; Ramos, Mário C.; Carvalho, Athos M.S.S.; Cabrera, Carlos E.V.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: ghnfernandes@gmail.com, E-mail: marc5663@gmail.com, E-mail: athos1495@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: carlosvelcab@hotmail.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a prototype nuclear subcritical reactor driven by a particle accelerator. As a special property, the reactor maintains the nuclear fission chain reaction by means of an external neutron source provided by a particle accelerator. The main aim of this work is to study two types of coolants, LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) and Na (Sodium) that are two strong candidates to be used in ADS systems as well as in Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactors. Firstly, it was developed a thermal hydraulic model of the MYRRHA core using the RELAP5-3D, considering LBE as coolant (original project). After this, the LBE was substituted by Na coolant to investigate the reactor behavior in such case. Results have demonstrated the high heat transfer capacity of the LBE coolant in this type of system. (author)

  15. Issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulics research and development in nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, P.; Aksan, N.; Andersen, J.; Yan, J.; Simoneau, J.P.; Leung, L.; Bertrand, F.; Aoto, K.; Kamide, H.

    2013-01-01

    The paper archives the proceedings of an expert panel discussion on the issues and future direction of thermal-hydraulic research and development in nuclear power reactors held at the NURETH-14 conference in Toronto, Canada, in September 2011. Thermal-hydraulic issues related to both operating and advanced reactors are presented. Advances in thermal-hydraulics have significantly improved the performance of operating reactors. Further thermal-hydraulics research and development is continuing in both experimental and computational areas for operating reactors, reactors under construction or ready for near-term deployment, and advanced Generation-IV reactors. As the computing power increases, the fine-scale multi-physics computational models, coupled with the systems analysis code, are expected to provide answers to many challenging problems in both operating and advanced reactor designs

  16. Fast nuclear reactors. Associated international projects. State of the art and assessment of the concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azpitarte, O.; Ramilo, L.

    2013-01-01

    The recognition of the strategic importance of nuclear energy as a source of sustainable energy may be perceived in the continuous development, in many countries, of the technology of fast nuclear reactors with an associated closed fuel cycle, assuming that these Generation IV innovative systems will be required in the future. These reactors fulfill international requirements for safety and reliability, economic competitiveness, sustainability and proliferation resistance. They have the potential of using more efficiently the natural resources of Uranium and of reducing the volume and radiotoxicity of the nuclear waste by partitioning and transmutation of Minor Actinides. The national and international programs being carried out today are concentrated in the following concepts: Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR), Lead Fast Reactor (LFR), Gas Fast Reactor (GFR), Super Critical Water Reactor (SCWR) and Molten Salt Reactor (MSR). This article presents a short review of the technology of the mentioned concepts and details the current state of the main national and international related projects. (author)

  17. R-X Modeling Figures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goda, Joetta Marie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Thomas [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Grogan, Brandon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-26

    This document contains figures that will be included in an ORNL final report that details computational efforts to model an irradiation experiment performed on the Godiva IV critical assembly. This experiment was a collaboration between LANL and ORNL.

  18. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    The invention deals with disengaging the coupling of a reactor coolant pump of a nuclear reactor feeding pressurized coolant. The disengaging coupling has two parts joined by bolts, at least one of them containing a driving agent within a bore. This is provided with a speed-depending ignition device in such manner that, if the critical speed is reached, the driving charge is ignited and the coupling is disengaged by destroying the bolts. (UWI) [de

  19. Neutron fluxes in test reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youinou, Gilles Jean-Michel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Communicate the fact that high-power water-cooled test reactors such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) or the Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) cannot provide fast flux levels as high as sodium-cooled fast test reactors. The memo first presents some basics physics considerations about neutron fluxes in test reactors and then uses ATR, HFIR and JHR as an illustration of the performance of modern high-power water-cooled test reactors.

  20. Effects of Thermal Aging on Type 316H Stainless Steel for Reactor Vessel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ji Hyun; Hong, Seok Min; Lee, Bong Sang; Koo, Gyeong Hoi [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Type 316H stainless steel is a prime candidate for reactor vessel material of sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) which has been developed as one of the Gen IV nuclear reactors in Korea. The reactor vessel steel will be exposed to higher temperature for an extended design life time. It is known that austenitic stainless steel such as Type 316H stainless steel shows excellent toughness and adequate strength at a moderate temperature. However, the previous researches reported the mechanical properties of Type 316H stainless weld would be deteriorated by the aging at the elevated temperature range.

  1. Thai research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aramrattana, M.

    1987-01-01

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  2. Some Movement Mechanisms and Characteristics in Pebble Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingtuan Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pebblebed-type high temperature gas-cooled reactor is considered to be one of the promising solutions for generation IV advanced reactors, and the two-region arranged reactor core can enhance its advantages by flattening neutron flux. However, this application is held back by the existence of mixing zone between central and peripheral regions, which results from pebbles’ dispersion motions. In this study, experiments have been carried out to study the dispersion phenomenon, and the variation of dispersion region and radial distribution of pebbles in the specifically shaped flow field are shown. Most importantly, the standard deviation of pebbles’ radial positions in dispersion region, as a quantitative index to describe the size of dispersion region, is gotten through statistical analysis. Besides, discrete element method has been utilized to analyze the parameter influence on dispersion region, and this practice offers some strategies to eliminate or reduce mixing zone in practical reactors.

  3. International students workshop on innovative light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anglart, H. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Nuclear Reactor Technology; Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme; Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kern- und Energietechnik

    2008-06-15

    Nuclear reactor design is still one of the most fascinating subjects of mechanical engineering. Thirty students from 10 worldwide nations demonstrated this impressively in a recent workshop on supercritical water cooled reactors of the 4{sup th} generation, held from March 31 to April 3, 2008, in Karlsruhe, Germany, hosted by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Bachelor and master students as well as young scientists working on their doctorate presented their own particular contribution to design and analyses of innovative reactor components, including its safety systems and other plant design. Their presentations were accompanied by lectures of leading scientists working in the European project of the 'High Performance Light Water Reactor' which is sponsored by the European Commission as part of its 6{sup th} Framework Programme. The workshop is an initiative of the Generation IV International Forum. (orig.)

  4. International students workshop on innovative light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglart, H.; Laurien, E.; Schulenberg, T.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reactor design is still one of the most fascinating subjects of mechanical engineering. Thirty students from 10 worldwide nations demonstrated this impressively in a recent workshop on supercritical water cooled reactors of the 4 th generation, held from March 31 to April 3, 2008, in Karlsruhe, Germany, hosted by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Bachelor and master students as well as young scientists working on their doctorate presented their own particular contribution to design and analyses of innovative reactor components, including its safety systems and other plant design. Their presentations were accompanied by lectures of leading scientists working in the European project of the 'High Performance Light Water Reactor' which is sponsored by the European Commission as part of its 6 th Framework Programme. The workshop is an initiative of the Generation IV International Forum. (orig.)

  5. Safeguards Licensing Aspects of a Future Gen IV Test Facility - a Case Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, M. Aberg; Grape, S.; Hakansson, A.; Svaerd, S. Jacobsson

    2010-01-01

    The scope of this study covers safeguards licensing aspects of a possible future Gen IV demonstration facility. As a basis for the investigation, the facility was assumed to be located in Sweden, comprising a lead-cooled fast reactor and a reprocessing plant with fuel fabrication. The aim has been to identify safeguards requirements that may be set by the IAEA and the Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, and also to suggest how the safeguards system could be implemented in practice. The changed usage and handling of nuclear fuel, as compared to that of today, has been examined in order to determine how today's safeguards measures can be modified and extended to meet the needs of the demonstration facility. This work is part of GENIUS, the Swedish Gen IV research and development programme, which emphasizes lead-cooled fast reactors. (author)

  6. Knowledge gaps in economic analyses of advanced reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, M.; Pencer, J.; Leung, L.K.H.; Sadhankar, R.

    2014-01-01

    The development of next generation nuclear systems is predicated on improvement in sustainability, safety, proliferation resistance and economics. The economic assessment of the reactor concept is required as early as in the concept development stage. The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) has developed a methodology for economic assessment of the Generation IV (GEN-IV) nuclear energy systems. The GIF economics methodology was used for the assessment of one of the reactor concepts for the Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactors (SCWR), namely the European pressure-vessel type concept referred to as the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR). The economic analysis involved studying the sensitivity of two main economic indicators, namely, the Levelized Unit Electricity Cost (LUEC) and the Total Capital Investment Cost (TCIC). The knowledge gaps in estimating the capital costs and fuel costs, as well as the uncertainties in other cost parameters affecting the economic assessment of the nuclear energy system in the concept development stage are presented. (author)

  7. An autonomous control framework for advanced reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard T. Wood

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Several Generation IV nuclear reactor concepts have goals for optimizing investment recovery through phased introduction of multiple units on a common site with shared facilities and/or reconfigurable energy conversion systems. Additionally, small modular reactors are suitable for remote deployment to support highly localized microgrids in isolated, underdeveloped regions. The long-term economic viability of these advanced reactor plants depends on significant reductions in plant operations and maintenance costs. To accomplish these goals, intelligent control and diagnostic capabilities are needed to provide nearly autonomous operations with anticipatory maintenance. A nearly autonomous control system should enable automatic operation of a nuclear power plant while adapting to equipment faults and other upsets. It needs to have many intelligent capabilities, such as diagnosis, simulation, analysis, planning, reconfigurability, self-validation, and decision. These capabilities have been the subject of research for many years, but an autonomous control system for nuclear power generation remains as-yet an unrealized goal. This article describes a functional framework for intelligent, autonomous control that can facilitate the integration of control, diagnostic, and decision-making capabilities to satisfy the operational and performance goals of power plants based on multimodular advanced reactors.

  8. An autonomous control framework for advanced reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, Richard T.; Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Floyd, Dan C. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville (United States)

    2017-08-15

    Several Generation IV nuclear reactor concepts have goals for optimizing investment recovery through phased introduction of multiple units on a common site with shared facilities and/or reconfigurable energy conversion systems. Additionally, small modular reactors are suitable for remote deployment to support highly localized microgrids in isolated, underdeveloped regions. The long-term economic viability of these advanced reactor plants depends on significant reductions in plant operations and maintenance costs. To accomplish these goals, intelligent control and diagnostic capabilities are needed to provide nearly autonomous operations with anticipatory maintenance. A nearly autonomous control system should enable automatic operation of a nuclear power plant while adapting to equipment faults and other upsets. It needs to have many intelligent capabilities, such as diagnosis, simulation, analysis, planning, reconfigurability, self-validation, and decision. These capabilities have been the subject of research for many years, but an autonomous control system for nuclear power generation remains as-yet an unrealized goal. This article describes a functional framework for intelligent, autonomous control that can facilitate the integration of control, diagnostic, and decision-making capabilities to satisfy the operational and performance goals of power plants based on multimodular advanced reactors.

  9. GENIUS & the Swedish Fast Reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallenius, Janne

    2012-01-01

    Concluding remarks: Sweden’s growing fast reactor programme focuses on LFR technology, but we also participate in ASTRID. • An innovative facility for UN fabrication, an LBE thermal hydraulics loop and a lead corrosion facility are operational. • A plutonium fuel fabrication lab is is under installation (this week!) • The government is assessing the construction of ELECTRA-FCC, a centre for Gen IV-system R&D, at a tentative cost of ~ 140±20 M€. • Location: Oskarshamn (adjacent to intermediate repository) • Date of criticality: 2023 (best case) • Swedish participation in IAEA TWG-FR should intensify

  10. Hybrid reactors. [Fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R.W.

    1980-09-09

    The rationale for hybrid fusion-fission reactors is the production of fissile fuel for fission reactors. A new class of reactor, the fission-suppressed hybrid promises unusually good safety features as well as the ability to support 25 light-water reactors of the same nuclear power rating, or even more high-conversion-ratio reactors such as the heavy-water type. One 4000-MW nuclear hybrid can produce 7200 kg of /sup 233/U per year. To obtain good economics, injector efficiency times plasma gain (eta/sub i/Q) should be greater than 2, the wall load should be greater than 1 MW.m/sup -2/, and the hybrid should cost less than 6 times the cost of a light-water reactor. Introduction rates for the fission-suppressed hybrid are usually rapid.

  11. Fast Spectrum Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Donald; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Fast Spectrum Reactors presents a detailed overview of world-wide technology contributing to the development of fast spectrum reactors. With a unique focus on the capabilities of fast spectrum reactors to address nuclear waste transmutation issues, in addition to the well-known capabilities of breeding new fuel, this volume describes how fast spectrum reactors contribute to the wide application of nuclear power systems to serve the global nuclear renaissance while minimizing nuclear proliferation concerns. Readers will find an introduction to the sustainable development of nuclear energy and the role of fast reactors, in addition to an economic analysis of nuclear reactors. A section devoted to neutronics offers the current trends in nuclear design, such as performance parameters and the optimization of advanced power systems. The latest findings on fuel management, partitioning and transmutation include the physics, efficiency and strategies of transmutation, homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling, in addit...

  12. Multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuura, Shojiro; Nakahara, Yasuaki; Takano, Hideki

    1982-09-01

    Research and development activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1981 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  14. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1984 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, reactor physics experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  15. Spectral shift reactor control method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impink, A.J. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A method of operating a nuclear reactor having a core and coolant displacer elements arranged in the core wherein is established a reator coolant temperature set point at which it is desired to operate said reactor and first reactor coolant temperature band limits are provided within which said set point is located and it is desired to operate said reactor charactrized in that said reactor coolant displacer elements are moved relative to the reactor core for adjusting the volume of reactor coolant in said core as said reactor coolant temperature approaches said first band limits thereby to maintain said reactor coolant temperature near said set point and within said first band limits

  16. Seals in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    The aim of this invention is the provision of improved seals for reactor vessels in which fuel assemblies are located together with inlets and outlets for the circulation of a coolant. The object is to provide a seal arrangement for the rotatable plugs of nuclear reactor closure heads which has good sealing capacities over a wide gap during operation of the reactor but which also permits uninhibited rotation of the plugs for maintenance. (U.K.)

  17. Power reactors operational diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dach, K.; Pecinka, L.

    1976-01-01

    The definition of reactor operational diagnostics is presented and the fundamental trends of research are determined. The possible sources of power reactor malfunctions, the methods of defect detection, the data evaluation and the analysis of the results are discussed in detail. In view of scarcity of a theoretical basis and of insufficient in-core instrumentation, operational diagnostics cannot be as yet incorporated in a computer-aided reactor control system. (author)

  18. Pressurised water reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birnie, S.; Lamonby, J.K.

    1987-01-01

    The operation of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) is described with respect to the procedure for a unit start-up. The systems details and numerical data are for a four loop PWR station of the design proposed for Sizewell-'B', United Kingdom. A description is given of: the initial conditions, filling the reactor coolant system (RCS), heat-up and pressurisation of the RCS, secondary system preparations, reactor start-up, and reactivity control at power. (UK)

  19. Reactor BR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2000-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported

  20. Reactor BR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2000-07-01

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  1. TRIGA reactor characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boeck, H.; Villa, M.

    2007-01-01

    This module describes the general design, characteristics and parameters of TRIGA reactors and fuels. It is recommended that most of this information should be incorporated into any reactor operator training program and, in many cases, the facility Safety Analysis Report. It is oriented to teach the basics of the physics and mechanical design of the TRIGA fuel as well as its unique operational characteristics and the differences between TRIGA fuels and others more traditional reactor fuels. (nevyjel)

  2. The replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, R.

    1999-01-01

    As a consequences of the government decision in September 1997. ANSTO established a replacement research reactor project to manage the procurement of the replacement reactor through the necessary approval, tendering and contract management stages This paper provides an update of the status of the project including the completion of the Environmental Impact Statement. Prequalification and Public Works Committee processes. The aims of the project, management organisation, reactor type and expected capabilities are also described

  3. The Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.

    1988-01-01

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  4. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2008. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ning [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States); Rutherford, Phil [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States); Amar, Ravnesh [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    2009-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2008 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended by the DOE. The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2008 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  5. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2010. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ning [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States); Rutherford, Phil [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States); Amar, Ravnesh [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    2011-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2010 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2010 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  6. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2011. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ning [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States); Rutherford, Phil [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States); Dassler, David [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2011 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2011 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  7. Site Environmental Report For Calendar Year 2012. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ning [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States); Rutherford, Phil [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States); Dassler, David [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    2013-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2012 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, operation and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward environmental restoration and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2012 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  8. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2009. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ning [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States); Rutherford, Phil [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States); Amar, Ravnesh [The Boeing Company, Canoga Park, CA (United States)

    2010-09-01

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2009 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder reactor components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988, and all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. Liquid metal research and development ended in 2002. Since May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV have been suspended by the DOE, but the environmental monitoring and characterization programs have continued. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2009 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling.

  9. New reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meskens, G.; Govaerts, P.; Baugnet, J.-M.; Delbrassine, A.

    1998-11-01

    The document gives a summary of new nuclear reactor concepts from a technological point of view. Belgium supports the development of the European Pressurized-Water Reactor, which is an evolutionary concept based on the European experience in Pressurized-Water Reactors. A reorientation of the Belgian choice for this evolutionary concept may be required in case that a decision is taken to burn plutonium, when the need for flexible nuclear power plants arises or when new reactor concepts can demonstrate proved benefits in terms of safety and cost

  10. Remote Reactor Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Adam [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dazeley, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Dobie, Doug [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Marleau, Peter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Brennan, Jim [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gerling, Mark [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sumner, Matthew [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Sweany, Melinda [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-10-21

    The overall goal of the WATCHMAN project is to experimentally demonstrate the potential of water Cerenkov antineutrino detectors as a tool for remote monitoring of nuclear reactors. In particular, the project seeks to field a large prototype gadolinium-doped, water-based antineutrino detector to demonstrate sensitivity to a power reactor at ~10 kilometer standoff using a kiloton scale detector. The technology under development, when fully realized at large scale, could provide remote near-real-time information about reactor existence and operational status for small operating nuclear reactors out to distances of many hundreds of kilometers.

  11. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Conceptual design studies were made of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror-confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid and a small pilot-plant hybrid based on standard mirror confinement. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000-MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single-cell pilot plant

  12. Multi purpose research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, V.K.; Sasidharan, K.; Sengupta, Samiran; Singh, Tej

    2006-01-01

    At present Dhruva and Cirus reactors provide the majority of research reactor based facilities to cater to the various needs of a vast pool of researchers in the field of material sciences, physics, chemistry, bio sciences, research and development work for nuclear power plants and production of radio isotopes. With a view to further consolidate and expand the scope of research and development in nuclear and allied sciences, a new 20 MWt multi purpose research reactor is being designed. This paper describes some of the design features and safety aspects of this reactor

  13. Trench reactor: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spinrad, B.I.; Rohach, A.F.; Razzaque, M.M.; Sankoorikal, J.T.; Schmidt, R.S.; Lofshult, J.; Ramin, T.; Sokmen, N.; Lin, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    Recent fast, sodium-cooled reactor designs reflect new conditions. In nuclear energy these conditions are (a) emphasis on maintainability and operability, (b) design for more transparent safety, and (c) a surplus of uranium and enrichment availability that eases concerns about light water reactor fueling costs. In utility practice the demand is for less capital exposure, short construction time, smaller new unit sizes, and low capital cost. The PRISM, SAFR, and integral fast reactor (IFR) concepts are responses to these conditions. Fast reactors will not soon be deployed commercially, so more radical designs can be considered. The trench reactor is the product of such thinking. Its concepts are intended as contributions to the literature, which may be picked up by one of the existing programs or used in a new experimental project. The trench reactor is a thin-slab, pool-type reactor operated at very low power density and- for sodium-modest temperature. The thin slab is repeated in the sodium tank and the reactor core. The low power density permits a longer than conventional core height and a large-diameter fuel pin. Control is by borated steel slabs that can be lowered between the core and lateral sodium reflector. Shutdown is by semaphore slabs that can be swung into place just outside the control slabs. The paper presents major characteristics of the trench reactor that have been changed since the last report

  14. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed

  15. Nuclear reactor safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    A safety system for shutting down a nuclear reactor under overload conditions is described. The system includes a series of parallel-connected computer memory type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular reactor parameter and in each of which a precalculated functional value for that parameter is stored indicative of the percentage of maximum reactor load that the parameter contributes. The various functional values corresponding to the actual measured parameters are added together to provide a control signal used to shut down the reactor under overload conditions. (U.K.)

  16. Mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Moir, R.W.

    1978-01-01

    We have carried out conceptual design studies of fusion reactors based on the three current mirror confinement concepts: the standard mirror, the tandem mirror, and the field-reversed mirror. Recent studies of the standard mirror have emphasized its potential as a fusion-fission hybrid reactor, designed to produce fission fuel for fission reactors. We have designed a large commercial hybrid based on standard mirror confinement, and also a small pilot plant hybrid. Tandem mirror designs include a commercial 1000 MWe fusion power plant and a nearer term tandem mirror hybrid. Field-reversed mirror designs include a multicell commercial reactor producing 75 MWe and a single cell pilot plant

  17. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, E.; Andrews, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  18. Developing new nuclear curricula for GEN IV needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghitescu, P.; Pavel, G.L.

    2014-01-01

    States who wish to start and develop a nuclear program must take into consideration a strong proven strategy for developing a sustainable program. A complete nuclear research program must include: a good national strategy and support on the topic; strong research laboratories supported by good personnel; education component to provide sustainable and qualified workforce; national/international interest from stakeholders and governments and a well informed society. New demonstrators are foreseen for the next period to be built in Europe and skilled supporting personnel is strongly needed. Current situation in nuclear higher education with perspective will be analysed. EURATOM strongly supports development of multidisciplinary co-operational projects in order to built such novel initiatives. An example of such program supported by European Commission, ARCADIA, will be given. The project is based on the cooperation of a large number of participants all over Europe and the main purpose is to develop a road-map for Gen IV reactor. (authors)

  19. Genetics Home Reference: glycogen storage disease type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Glycogen storage disease type IV Glycogen storage disease type IV Printable PDF Open All Close All ... Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is an inherited disorder ...

  20. Reactor core monitor for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention provides a various information of a wide adaptability, such as a power distribution, to an operator by determining a reactor core performance of the reactor by a performance calculation with improved accuracy. That is, a calculation means determines a neutron flux distribution of the reactor and coolant temperature based on the neutron flux distribution. A measuring means measures a cooled temperature of a reactor core inlet and a temperature at the exit of a fuel assembly. The result of coolant temperature by the measuring means and the result of the calculation by the calculation means are compared. The result of the calculation for the neutron flux distribution obtained by the calculation means is corrected based on the result of the comparison. The calculation means introduces calculation at higher accuracy by adopting two-dimensional balance in the fuel assembly. Further, a more accurate three-dimensional neutron diffusion calculation model is introduced in an on-line computer. Then, the accuracy of the calculation for the neutron flux distribution, power distribution, temperature distribution, etc. is improved. In view of the above, adaptability of a reactor core monitor is widened. (I.S.)

  1. A Gaussian IV estimator of cointegrating relations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bårdsen, Gunnar; Haldrup, Niels

    2006-01-01

    -nonparametricestimators. Theoretically ideal instruments can be defined to ensure a limitingGaussian distribution of IV estimators, but unfortunately such instruments areunlikely to be found in real data. In the present paper we suggest an IV estimatorwhere the Hodrick-Prescott filtered trends are used as instruments forthe regressors...... in cointegrating regressions. These instruments are almost idealand simulations show that the IV estimator using such instruments alleviatethe endogeneity problem extremely well in both finite and large samples....

  2. Fuel Development For Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. K. Meyer

    2006-06-01

    The Generation IV Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) concept is proposed to combine the advantages of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (such as efficient direct conversion with a gas turbine and the potential for application of high-temperature process heat), with the sustainability advantages that are possible with a fast-spectrum reactor. The latter include the ability to fission all transuranics and the potential for breeding. The GFR is part of a consistent set of gas-cooled reactors that includes a medium-term Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR)-like concept, or concepts based on the Gas Turbine Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR), and specialized concepts such as the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), as well as actinide burning concepts [ ]. To achieve the necessary high power density and the ability to retain fission gas at high temperature, the primary fuel concept proposed for testing in the United States is a dispersion coated fuel particles in a ceramic matrix. Alternative fuel concepts considered in the U.S. and internationally include coated particle beds, ceramic clad fuel pins, and novel ceramic ‘honeycomb’ structures. Both mixed carbide and mixed nitride-based solid solutions are considered as fuel phases.

  3. RB Research nuclear reactor RB reactor, Annual report for 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milosevic, M.

    2000-12-01

    Report on RB reactor operation during 2000 contains 3 parts. Part one contains a brief description of reactor operation and reactor components, relevant dosimetry data and radiation protection issues, personnel and financial data. Part two is devoted to maintenance of the reactor components, namely, fuel, heavy water, reactor vessel, heavy water circulation system, absorption rods and heavy water level-meters, maintenance of electronic, mechanical, electrical and auxiliary equipment. Part three contains data concerned with reactor operation and utilization with a comprehensive list of publications resulting from experiments done at the RB reactor. It contains data about reactor operation during previous 14 years, i.e. from 1986 - 2000

  4. Fluid element in SAP IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, C.; Akkas, N.

    1979-01-01

    In previous studies a fluid element is incorporated in the widely used general purpose finite element program SAPIV. This type of problem is of interest in the design of nuclear components involving geometric complexities and nonlinearities. The elasticity matrix of a general-purpose finite element program is modified in such a way that it becomes possible to idealize fluid as a structural finite element with zero shear modulus and a given bulk modules. Using the modified version of SAPIV, several solid-fluid interactions problems are solved. The numerical solutions are compared with the available analytical solutions. They are shown to be in reasonable aggrement. It is also shown that by solving an exterior-fluid interaction problem, the pressure wave propagation in the acoustic medium can be solved with the same approach. In this study, two of the problem not studied in the previous work will be presented. These problems are namely the effects of the link elements used at solid-fluid interfaces and of the concentrated loads on the response of the fluid medium. Truss elements are used as the link elements. After these investigations, it is decided that general purpose finite element programs with slight modifications can be used in the safety analysis of nuclear reactor plants. By this procedure it is possible to handle two-dimensional plane strain and tridimensional axisymmetric problems of this type. (orig.)

  5. Studies of binary cerium(IV)-praseodymium(IV) and cerium(IV)-terbium(IV) oxides as pigments for ceramic applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furtado, L.M.L.

    1991-01-01

    It was investigated a series of pigments of general composition Ce 1-x Pr x O 2 , and Ce x Tb y O 2 , exhibiting radish and brown colors, respectively, and high temperature stability. The pigments were obtained by dissolving appropriate amounts of the pure lanthanide oxides in acids and precipitating the rare earths as mixed oxalates, which were isolated and calcined under air, at 1000 0 C. X-Ray powder diffractograms were consistent with a cubic structure for the pigments. Magnetic susceptibility measurements, using Gouy method, indicated the presence of Pr(IV) ions in the Ce 1-x Pr x O 2 pigments and of Terbium predominantly as Tb(III) ions in the Ce-tb mixed oxides. A new method, based on suspension of solid samples in PVA-STB gels (STB = sodium tetradecaborate), was employed for the measurements of the electronic spectra of the pigments. The thermal behaviour the pigments was investigated by the calcination of the oxalates in the temperature range of 500 to 1200 O C, from 10 to 60 minutes. (author)

  6. Alle har en historie, IV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydegaard, Torbjørn

    Alle har en historie IV: Pædagogik med Freedom Writers lader et væld af pædagogiske facetter udspringe af den kendte skole-film Freedom Writers’ scener og handlinger. Der er både fokus på en almen tilgang til pædagogik og på Freedom Writer-metodikken, dels gennem de filmscener, der sættes til...... drøftelse, dels gennem foreslåede øvelser. Det styrende princip i bogen er filmens scener og kronologi. Til hver afdeling af filmen knytter der sig oplæg til pædagogiske drøftelser primært rettet mod udsatte unge – og unge i al almindelighed – samt øvelser, der kan anvendes i mange forskellige...... undervisningssammenhænge. Bogens målgruppe er først og fremmest studerende inden for de pædagogiske fagområder, samt professionelle, der arbejder med unge, uanset baggrund. Torbjørn Ydegaard er kandidat i pædagogik, lektor ved University College Syd og uddannet Freedom Writer Teacher....

  7. Technical specifications, Hanford production reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilbert, W.D. [comp.

    1962-06-25

    These technical specifications are applicable to the eight operating production reactor facilities, B, C, D, DR, F, H, KE, and KW. Covered are operating and performance restrictions and administrative procedures. Areas covered by the operating and performance restrictions are reactivity, reactor control and safety elements, power level, temperature and heat flux, reactor fuel loadings, reactor coolant systems, reactor confinement, test facilities, code compliance, and reactor scram set points. Administrative procedures include process control procedures, training programs, audits and inspections, and reports and records.

  8. A nuclear power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borrman, B.E.; Broden, P.; Lundin, N.

    1979-12-01

    The invention consists of shock absorbing support beams fastened to the underside of the reactor tank lid of a BWR type reactor, whose purpose is to provide support to the steam separator and dryer unit against accelerations due to earthquakes, without causing undue thermal stresses in the unit due to differential expansion. (J.I.W.)

  9. Reactor cost driving items

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spears, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    Assuming that the design solutions presently perceived for NET can be extrapolated for use in a power reactor, and using costing experience with present day fusion experiments and with fission power plants, the major components of the cost of a tokamak fusion power reactor are described. The analysis shows the emphasis worth placing on various areas of plant design to reduce costs

  10. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Walle, E.

    2001-01-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  11. CAREM 25 nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossini, A.A.; Ordonez, J.P.; Rajoy, J.E.; Durione, C.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes the CAREM project reactor, its design philosophy, its main characteristics and its advantages with respect to similar reactors. The main objective is to use the nuclear energy at lower costs than those applied up to now. (Author) [es

  12. Molten salt reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sood, D.D.

    1980-01-01

    Molten salt reactor is an advanced breeder concept which is suited for the utilization of thorium for nuclear power production. This reactor is based on the use of solutions of uranium or plutonium fluorides in LiF-BeF 2 -ThF 4 as fuel. Unlike the conventional reactors, no external coolant is used in the reactor core and the fuel salt itself is circulated through heat exchangers to transfer the fission produced heat to a secondary salt (NaF-NaBF 4 ) for steam generation. A part of the fuel stream is continuously processed to isolate 233 Pa, so that it can decay to fissile 233 U without getting converted to 234 Pa, and for the removal of neutron absorbing fission products. This on-line processing scheme makes this reactor concept to achieve a breeding ratio of 1.07 which is the highest for any thermal breeder reactor. Experimental studies at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, have established the use of plutonium as fuel for this reactor. This molten salt reactor concept is described and the work conducted at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre is summarised. (auth.)

  13. International thermal reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebroski, E.L.

    1977-01-01

    The worldwide development of nuclear power plants is reviewed. Charts are presented which show the commitment to light-water reactor capacity construction with breakdown by region and country. Additional charts show the major nuclear research centers which have substantial scope in light water reactor development and extensive international activities

  14. The fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennan, M.H.

    1974-01-01

    Basic principles of the fusion reactor are outlined. Plasma heating and confinement schemes are described. These confinement systems include the linear Z pinch, magnetic mirrors and Tokamaks. A fusion reactor is described and a discussion is given of its environmental impact and its fuel situation. (R.L.)

  15. Advanced converter reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasten, P.R.

    1979-01-01

    Advanced converter reactors (ACRs) of primary US interest are those which can be commercialized within about 20 years, and are: Advanced Light-Water Reactors, Spectral-Shift-Control Reactors, Heavy-Water Reactors (CANDU type), and High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. These reactors can operate on uranium, thorium, or uranium-thorium fuel cycles, but have the greatest fuel utilization on thorium type cycles. The water reactors tend to operate more economically on uranium cycles, while the HTGR is more economical on thorium cycles. Thus, the HTGR had the greatest practical potential for improving fuel utilization. If the US has 3.4 to 4 million tons U 3 O 8 at reasonable costs, ACRs can make important contributions to maintaining a high nuclear power level for many decades; further, they work well with fast breeder reactors in the long term under symbiotic fueling conditions. Primary nuclear data needs of ACRs are integral measurements of reactivity coefficients and resonance absorption integrals

  16. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  17. Space Nuclear Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poston, David Irvin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-03-06

    We needed to find a space reactor concept that could be attractive to NASA for flight and proven with a rapid turnaround, low-cost nuclear test. Heat-pipe-cooled reactors coupled to Stirling engines long identified as the easiest path to near-term, low-cost concept.

  18. The Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Lineberry, M.J.

    1990-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory, since 1984, has been developing the Integral Fast Reactor (IFR). This paper will describe the way in which this new reactor concept came about; the technical, public acceptance, and environmental issues that are addressed by the IFR; the technical progress that has been made; and our expectations for this program in the near term. 5 refs., 3 figs

  19. Nuclear reactor instrumentation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Handa, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Katsumi; Nemesawa, Shigeki; Nemoto, Yuji; Ohashi, Masahisa.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention can appropriately monitor the state of a reactor core in an FBR type reactor which has a system of storing spent fuel assemblies in a reactor container while reducing the weight and making the structure compact in the reactor. That is, a fuel assembly having a shield lacking portion in upper axial shields is disposed. The shield lacking portion defines neutrons' leaking path from the reactor core. The leakage of neutrons from the path is detected by a neutron monitor disposed just above the fuel assembly. With such a constitution, influence of neutrons from stored spent fuel assemblies disposed to the out side of the radial shields can be reduced by a shielding effect of the existent radial shields around the reactor core. Further, if a shield lacking portion is locally disposed in the region of the upper axial shields just below the neutron monitor, neutrons from the reactor core can be monitored while suppressing excessive neutron leakage. As a result, it is unnecessary to dispose shields on the outer side of the spent fuel assembly disposed in the reactor core. (I.S.)

  20. Reactor building for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haidlen, F.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns the improvement of the design of a liner, supported by a latticed steel girder structure and destined for guaranteeing a gastight closure for the plant compartments in the reactor building of a pressurized water reactor. It is intended to provide the steel girder structure on their top side with grates, being suited for walking upon, and to hang on their lower side diaphragms in modular construction as a liner. At the edges they may be sealed with bellows in order to avoid thermal stresses. The steel girder structure may at the same time serve as supports for parts of the steam pipe. (RW) [de

  1. Reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkhardt, W.; Richter, G.

    1976-01-01

    An improvement is proposed concerning the easier disengagement of the coupling at the reactor coolant pump for a nuclear reactor transporting a pressurized coolant. According to the invention the disengaging coupling consists of two parts separated by screws. At least one of the screws contains a propellent charge ananged within a bore and provided with a speed-dependent ignition device in such a way that by separation of the screws at overspeeds the coupling is disengaged. The sub-claims are concerned with the kind of ignition ot the propellent charge. (UWI) [de

  2. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ning [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Rutherford, Phil [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Lenox, Art [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Blair, Lori [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Amar, Ravnesh [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Costa, Paul [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Galvez, Lydia [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Jameson, Blythe [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company; Galvez, Lydia [Santa Susana Field Laboratory, CA (United States). The Boeing Company

    2008-09-30

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2007 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeing’s Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended until DOE completes the SSFL Area IV Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2007 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2007.

  3. Mirror reactor surface study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, A. L.; Damm, C. C.; Futch, A. H.; Hiskes, J. R.; Meisenheimer, R. G.; Moir, R. W.; Simonen, T. C.; Stallard, B. W.; Taylor, C. E.

    1976-09-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included.

  4. Reactor control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukami, Haruo; Morimoto, Yoshinori.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To operate a reactor always with safety operation while eliminating the danger of tripping. Constitution: In a reactor control device adapted to detect the process variants of a reactor, control a control rod drive controlling system based on the detected signal to thereby control the driving the control rods, control the reactor power and control the electric power generated from an electric generator by the output from the reactor, detection means is provided for the detection of the electric power from said electric generator, and a compensation device is provided for outputting control rod driving compensation signals to the control rod driving controlling system in accordance with the amount of variation in the detected value. (Seki, T.)

  5. Mirror reactor surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, A.L.; Damm, C.C.; Futch, A.H.; Hiskes, J.R.; Meisenheimer, R.G.; Moir, R.W.; Simonen, T.C.; Stallard, B.W.; Taylor, C.E.

    1976-01-01

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  6. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  7. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Akira.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent misoperation in a control system for the adjustment of core coolant flow rate, and the increase in the neutron flux density caused from the misoperation in BWR type reactors. Constitution: In a reactor power control system adapted to control the reactor power by the adjustment of core flow rate, average neutron flux signals of a reactor core, entire core flow rate signals and operation state signals for coolant recycling system are inputted to a microcomputer. The outputs from the computer are sent to a recycling MG set speed controller to control the reactor core flow rate. The computer calculates the change ratio with time in the average neutron flux signals, correlation between the average neutron flux signals and the entire core flow rate signals, change ratio with time in the operation state signals for the coolant recycling system and the like and judges the abnormality in the coolant recycling system based on the calculated results. (Ikeda, J.)

  8. Status of French reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballagny, A.

    1997-01-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm 3 . The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U 3 Si 2 as soon as its present stock of UO 2 fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU

  9. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1983 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  10. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirota, Jitsuya; Asaoka, Takumi; Suzuki, Tomoo; Mitani, Hiroshi; Akino, Fujiyoshi

    1977-09-01

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1976 are described. Works of the division concern mainly the development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, fusion reactor engineering, and the development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (auth.)

  11. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    Research activities conducted in Reactor Engineering Division in fiscal 1975 are summarized in this report. Works in the division are closely related to the development of multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering research of thermonuclear fusion reactor. Many achievements are described concerning nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (auth.)

  12. Mirror reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moir, R.W.; Barr, W.L.; Bender, D.J.

    1977-01-01

    Design studies of a fusion mirror reactor, a fusion-fission mirror reactor, and two small mirror reactors are summarized. The fusion reactor uses 150-keV neutral-beam injectors based on the acceleration of negative ions. The injectors provide over 1 GW of continuous power at an efficiency greater than 80%. The fusion reactor has three-stage, modularized, Venetian blind, plasma direct converter with a predicted efficiency of 59% and a new concept for removal of the lune-shaped blanket: a crane is brought between the two halves of the Yin-Yang magnet, which are separated by a float. The design has desirable features such as steady-state operation, minimal impurity problems, and low first-wall thermal stress. The major disadvantage is low Q resulting in high re-circulating power and hence high cost of electrical power. However, the direct capital cost per unit of gross electrical power is reasonable [$1000/kW(e)]. By contrast, the fusion-fission reactor design is not penalized by re-circulating power and uses relatively near-term fusion technology being developed for the fusion power program. New results are presented on the Th- 233 U and the U- 239 Pu fuel cycles. The purpose of this hybrid is fuel production, with projected costs at $55/g of Pu or $127/g of 233 U. Blanket and cooling system designs, including an emergency cooling system, by General Atomic Company, lead us to the opinion that the reactor can meet expected safety standards for licensing. The smallest mirror reactor having only a shield between the plasma and the coil is the 4.2-m long fusion engineering research facility (FERF) designed for material irradiation. The smallest mirror reactor having both a blanket and shield is the 7.5-m long experimental power reactor (EPR), which has both a fusion and a fusion-fission version. (author)

  13. Multi-purpose reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The Multi-Purpose-Reactor (MPR), is a pool-type reactor with an open water surface and variable core arrangement. Its main feature is plant safety and reliability. Its power is 22MW t h, cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium. It has platetype fuel elements (MTR type, approx. 20%. enriched uranium) clad in aluminium. Its cobalt (Co 60 ) production capacity is 50000 Ci/yr, 200 Ci/gr. The distribution of the reactor core and associated control and safety systems is essentially based on the following design criteria: - upwards cooling flow, to waive the need for cooling flow inversion in case the reactor is cooled by natural convection if confronted with a loss of pumping power, and in order to establish a superior heat transfer potential (a higher coolant saturation temperature); - easy access to the reactor core from top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power, in order to facilitate actual implementation of experiments. Consequently, mechanisms associated to control and safety rods s,re located underneath the reactor tank; - free access of reactor personnel to top of pool level with the reactor operating at full power. This aids in the training of personnel and the actual carrying out of experiments, hence: - a vast water column was placed over the core to act as radiation shielding; - the core's external area is cooled by a downwards flow which leads to a decay tank beyond the pool (for N 16 to decay); - a small downwards flow was directed to stream downwards from above the reactor core in order to drag along any possibly active element; and - a stagnant hot layer system was placed at top of pool level so as to minimize the upwards coolant flow rising towards pool level

  14. Zirconium (IV) complexes with some polymethylenediimines | Na ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The syntheses of zirconium (IV) complexes have been carried out by the reaction of oxozirconium (IV) chloride with the appropriate diimines (Schiff bases). The complexes were isolated as yellow solids which are stable to heat. The complexes were found to be insoluble in most solvents. The infrared spectra, elemental ...

  15. IVS Working Group 4: VLBI Data Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gipson, John

    2010-01-01

    In 2007 the IVS Directing Board established IVS Working Group 4 on VLBI Data Structures. This note discusses the current VLBI data format, goals for a new format, the history and formation of the Working Group, and a timeline for the development of a new VLBI data format.

  16. Astragaloside IV liposomes ameliorates adriamycin-induced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Radix Astragali was one of the main compositions of 'Modified Danggui Buxue Decoction' used for treatment of various kidney diseases. Astragaloside IV was the active composition of Radix Astragali. Astragaloside IV liposomes were used for the treatment of adriamycin-induced nephropathy (AN) rats.

  17. Generation IV nuclear energy systems: road map and concepts. 2. Generation II Measurement Systems for Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Don W.

    2001-01-01

    need for substantial research. As we consider I and C systems in Generation IV reactors, we have the opportunity to take a much less 'timid' design philosophy than was taken in the design of I and C systems in the ALWRs. We need to make use of advanced technology to design an I and C system for the Generation IV multi-unit plant designs currently being considered. Such a design should accomplish the following: 1. provides for multi-unit control; 2. contributes to a plant design objective of a very low core damage frequency; 3. maximizes plant thermal efficiency (>50%); 4. maximizes plant capacity factor (>90%); 5. optimizes operability; 6. maximizes maintainability; 7. provides for on-line monitoring, calibration, and diagnostics; 8. provides optimum response to disturbances; 9. provides excellent load-following capability. When we consider the current situation in operating Generation I and II nuclear power plants and even Generation III ALWR design, we conclude that Generation IV reactors should employ at least Generation II measurement systems. Let us first consider data transmission, which is a form of communication, and ask the question: Do new communication-transferring methods by electrons flow in copper wires? The obvious answer is no. Virtually all new communication systems are using some electromagnetic method, such as light, microwaves, HF or VHF radio signals, and virtually no copper wires. When we envision Generation IV nuclear power plants, we should minimize the use of copper wires for data transmission. We should transmit data primarily by fiber optics and various wireless methods, some of which can penetrate thick barriers. Now let us consider sensors. If we use light for data transmission, then we should also use optical-based sensors. We should also take advantage of microprocessors, which provide opportunities to embed 'intelligence' in the sensor that can be used to increase accuracy, stability, and tolerance to external stressors (i.e., radiation

  18. Reactor performance calculations for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hicks, D.

    1970-04-01

    The principles of nuclear, thermal and hydraulic performance calculations for water cooled reactors are discussed. The principles are illustrated by describing their implementation in the UKAEA PATRIARCH scheme of computer codes. This material was originally delivered as a course of lectures at the Technical University of Helsinki in Summer of 1969.

  19. Reactor scram device for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumasaka, Katsuyuki; Arashida, Genji; Itooka, Satoshi.

    1991-01-01

    In a control rod attaching structure in a reactor scram device of an FBR type reactor, an anti-rising mechanism proposed so far against external upward force upon occurrence of earthquakes relies on the engagement of a mechanical structure but temperature condition is not taken into consideration. Then, in the present invention, a material having curie temperature characteristics and which exhibits ferromagnetism only under low temperature condition and a magnet device are disposed to one of a movable control rod and a portion secured to the reactor. Alternatively, a bimetal member or a shape memory alloy which actuates to fix to the mating member only under low temperature condition is secured. The fixing device is adapted to operate so as to secure the control rods when the low temperature state is caused depending on the temperature condition. With such a constitution, when the control rods are separated from a driving device, they are prevented from rising even if they undergo external upward force due to earthquakes and so on, which can improve the reactor safety. (N.H.)

  20. The modular helium reactor for future energy needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richards, Matthew B.; Shenoy, Arkal S.; Venneri, Francesco; LaBar, Malcolm P.; Schultz, Kenneth R.; Brown, Lloyd C.

    2006-01-01

    The Modular Helium Reactor (MHR) is one of the advanced reactor concepts within the internationally-supported Generation IV program. Because of its design features and design maturity, the MHR was selected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as the U.S. Generation IV design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Other countries, including Russia, Japan, South Korea, China, South Africa, and France are also developing this technology, and large-scale deployment of MHR technology is a realistic element of future energy-growth scenarios. In this paper, we discuss MHR conceptual designs for electricity and hydrogen production and their role in a sustainable energy future with significant growth in nuclear energy. For hydrogen production, two conceptual designs are described; one coupling the MHR to thermochemical water splitting using the sulfur-iodine (SI) process and the other coupling the MHR to high-temperature electrolysis (HTE). (authors)

  1. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1992 (April 1, 1992-March 31, 1993). The major Department's programs promoted in the year are the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor, the design activities of advanced reactor system and development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the engineering applications including TRU incineration. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on the nuclear data and group constants, the developments of theoretical methods and codes, the reactor physics experiments and their analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project were also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  2. Reactor engineering department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1989 (April 1, 1989 - March 31, 1990). One of major Department's programs is the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor and the design activities of advanced reactor system. Development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the nuclear engineering including is also TRU incineration promoted. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on nuclear data and group constants, theoretical methods and code development, on reactor physics experiments and analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics, technology assessment of nuclear energy and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  3. Fuel, structural material and coolant for an advanced fast micro-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Jamil A. do; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Ono, Shizuca

    2011-01-01

    The use of nuclear reactors in space, seabed or other Earth hostile environment in the future is a vision that some Brazilian nuclear researchers share. Currently, the USA, a leader in space exploration, has as long-term objectives the establishment of a permanent Moon base and to launch a manned mission to Mars. A nuclear micro-reactor is the power source chosen to provide energy for life support, electricity for systems, in these missions. A strategy to develop an advanced micro-reactor technologies may consider the current fast reactor technologies as back-up and the development of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials. The next generation reactors (GEN-IV) for terrestrial applications will operate with high output temperature to allow advanced conversion cycle, such as Brayton, and hydrogen production, among others. The development of an advanced fast micro-reactor may create a synergy between the GEN-IV and space reactor technologies. Considering a set of basic requirements and materials properties this paper discusses the choice of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials for a fast micro-reactor. The chosen candidate materials are: nitride, oxide as back-up, for fuel, lead, tin and gallium for coolant, ferritic MA-ODS and Mo alloys for core structures. The next step will be the neutronic and burnup evaluation of core concepts with this set of materials. (author)

  4. Reactor water sampling device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor water sampling device for sampling reactor water in an in-core monitor (neutron measuring tube) housing in a BWR type reactor. The upper end portion of a drain pipe of the reactor water sampling device is attached detachably to an in-core monitor flange. A push-up rod is inserted in the drain pipe vertically movably. A sampling vessel and a vacuum pump are connected to the lower end of the drain pipe. A vacuum pump is operated to depressurize the inside of the device and move the push-up rod upwardly. Reactor water in the in-core monitor housing flows between the drain pipe and the push-up rod and flows into the sampling vessel. With such a constitution, reactor water in the in-core monitor housing can be sampled rapidly with neither opening the lid of the reactor pressure vessel nor being in contact with air. Accordingly, operator's exposure dose can be reduced. (I.N.)

  5. Reactor safety protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishi, Hiroshi; Yokoyama, Tsuguo.

    1989-01-01

    A plurality of neutron detectors are disposed around a reactor core and detection signals from optional two neutron detectors are inputted into a ratio calculation device. If the ratio between both of the neutron flux level signals exceeds a predetermined value, a reactor trip signal is generated from an alarm setting device. Further, detection signals from all of the neutron detection devices are inputted into an average calculation device and the reactor trip signal is generated also in a case where the average value exceeds a predetermined set value. That is, when the reactor core power is increased locally, the detection signal from the neutron detector nearer to the point of power increase is greater than the increase rate for the entire reactor core power, while the detection signal from the neutron detector remote from the point of power increase is smaller. Thus, the local power increase ratio in the FBR reactor core can be detected efficiently by calculating the ratio for the neutron flux level signals from two neutron detectors, thereby enabling to exactly recognize the local power increase rate in the reactor core. (N.H.)

  6. Reactor power control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaruoka, Hiromitsu.

    1994-01-01

    A high pressure water injection recycling system comprising injection pipelines of a high pressure water injection system and a flow rate control means in communication with a pool of a pressure control chamber is disposed to a feedwater system of a BWR type reactor. In addition, the flow rate control means is controlled by a power control device comprising a scram impossible transient event judging section, a required injection flow rate calculation section for high pressure water injection system and a control signal calculation section. Feed water flow rate to be supplied to the reactor is controlled upon occurrence of a scram impossible transient event of the reactor. The scram impossible transient event is judged based on reactor output signals and scram operation demand signals and injection flow rate is calculated based on a predetermined reactor water level, and condensate storage tank water or pressure control chamber pool water is injected to the reactor. With such procedures, water level can be ensured and power can be suppressed. Further, condensate storage tank water of low enthalpy is introduced to the pressure suppression chamber pool to directly control elevation of water temperature and ensure integrity of the pressure vessel and the reactor container. (N.H.)

  7. Nuclear reactor containing facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidaka, Masataka; Murase, Michio.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor containing facility, a condensation means is disposed above the water level of a cooling water pool to condensate steams of the cooling water pool, and return the condensated water to the cooling water pool. Upon occurrence of a pipeline rupture accident, steams generated by after-heat of a reactor core are caused to flow into a bent tube, blown from the exit of the bent tube into a suppression pool and condensated in a suppression pool water, thereby suppressing the pressure in the reactor container. Cooling water in the cooling water pool is boiled by heat conduction due to the condensation of steams, then the steams are exhausted to the outside of the reactor container to remove the heat of the reactor container to the outside of the reactor. In addition, since cooling water is supplied to the cooling water pool quasi-permanently by gravity as a natural force, the reactor container can be cooled by the cooling water pool for a long period of time. Since the condensation means is constituted with a closed loop and interrupted from the outside, radioactive materials are never released to the outside. (N.H.)

  8. Reactor Safety Research Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edler, S. K.

    1981-07-01

    This document summarizes the work performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) from January 1 through March 31, 1981, for the Division of Reactor Safety Research within the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Evaluations of nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques and instrumentation are reported; areas of investigation include demonstrating the feasibility of determining the strength of structural graphite, evaluating the feasibility of detecting and analyzing flaw growth in reactor pressure boundary systems, examining NDE reliability and probabilistic fracture mechanics, and assessing the integrity of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generator tubes where service-induced degradation has been indicated. Experimental data and analytical models are being provided to aid in decision-making regarding pipeto- pipe impacts following postulated breaks in high-energy fluid system piping. Core thermal models are being developed to provide better digital codes to compute the behavior of full-scale reactor systems under postulated accident conditions. Fuel assemblies and analytical support are being provided for experimental programs at other facilities. These programs include loss-ofcoolant accident (LOCA) simulation tests at the NRU reactor, Chalk River, Canada; fuel rod deformation, severe fuel damage, and postaccident coolability tests for the ESSOR reactor Super Sara Test Program, Ispra, Italy; the instrumented fuel assembly irradiation program at Halden, Norway; and experimental programs at the Power Burst Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). These programs will provide data for computer modeling of reactor system and fuel performance during various abnormal operating conditions.

  9. The integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    On April 3rd, 1986, two demonstrations of the inherent capability of sodium-cooled fast reactors to survive unprotected loss of cooling accidents were carried out on the experimental sodium-cooled power reactor, EBR-II, on the Idaho site of Argonne National Laboratory. Transients potentially of the most serious kind, one an unprotected loss of flow, the other an unprotected loss of heat sink, both initiated from full power. In both cases the reactor quietly shut itself down, without damage of any kind. These tests were a part of the on-going development program at Argonne to develop an advanced reactor with significant new inherent safety characteristics. Called the integral fast reactor, or IFR, the basic thrust is to develop everything that is needed for a complete nuclear power system - reactor, closed fuel cycle, and waste processing - as a single optimized entity, and, for simplicity in concept, as an integral part of a single plant. The particular selection of reactor materials emphasizes inherent safety characteristics also makes possible a simplified close fuel cycle and waste process improvements. The paper describes the IFR concept, the inherent safety, tests, and status of IFR development today

  10. Water cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donaldson, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    In order to reduce any loss of primary water coolant from around a reactor core of a water cooled nuclear reactor caused by any failure of a pressure vessel, an inner vessel is positioned within and spaced from the pressure vessel. The reactor core and main portion of the primary water coolant circuit and a heat exchanger are positioned within the inner vessel to maintain some primary water coolant around the reactor core and to allow residual decay heat to be removed from the reactor core by the heat exchanger. In the embodiment shown an aperture at the upper region of the inner vessel is dimensioned configured and arranged to prevent steam from a steam space of an integral pressurised water cooled nuclear reactor for a ship entering the main portion of the primary water coolant circuit in the inner vessel if the longitudinal axis of the nuclear reactor is displaced from its normal substantially vertical position to an abnormal position at an angle to the vertical direction. Shields are integral with the inner vessel. (author)

  11. Slurry reactor design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Akgerman, A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Smith, J.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  12. Reactor monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kono, Shigehiro.

    1996-01-01

    The device of the present invention monitors the stability of a power of a BWR type reactor by using each of recycling flow rates in addition to a reactor core flow rate to improve monitoring accuracy. Namely, a set value registering means is disposed for registering reactor core flow rate set values corresponding to the number of recycling flow rates not reaching a reference value for each of the recycling flow rates. A reactor flow rate take-out means judges whether each of the recycling flow rates reaches the reference value or not. The set values of the set value registering means are taken out based on the number of each of the recycling flow rate signals not reaching the reference values. The taken out set value and calculated reactor core flow rate value are compared by an abnormal alarm means. When calculated value is smaller than the set value, abnormality is informed. The accuracy for the monitoring is improved by monitoring the reactor power by using each of recycling flow rates in addition to the reactor core flow rate. (I.S.)

  13. Nuclear reactor control column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachovchin, D.M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest crosssectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor

  14. The integral fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    On April 3rd, 1986, two dramatic demonstrations of the inherent capability of sodium-cooled fast reactors to survive unprotected loss of cooling accidents were carried out on the experimental sodium-cooled power reactor, EBR-II, on the Idaho site of Argonne National Laboratory. Transients potentially of the most serious kind, one an unprotected loss of flow, the other an unprotected loss of heat sink, both initiated from full power. In both cases the reactor quietly shut itself down, without damage of any kind. These tests were a part of the on-going development program at Argonne to develop an advanced reactor with significant new inherent safety characteristics. Called the Integral Fast Reactor, or IFR, the basic thrust is to develop everything that is needed for a complete nuclear power system - reactor, closed fuel cycle, and waste processing - as a single optimized entity, and, for simplicity in concept, as an integral part of a single plant. The particular selection of reactor materials emphasizes inherent safety characteristics and also makes possible a simplified closed fuel cycle and waste process improvements

  15. Reactor container cooling device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Koji; Kinoshita, Shoichiro

    1995-11-10

    The device of the present invention efficiently lowers pressure and temperature in a reactor container upon occurrence of a severe accident in a BWR-type reactor and can cool the inside of the container for a long period of time. That is, (1) pipelines on the side of an exhaustion tower of a filter portion in a filter bent device of the reactor container are in communication with pipelines on the side of a steam inlet of a static container cooling device by way of horizontal pipelines, (2) a back flow check valve is disposed to horizontal pipelines, (3) a steam discharge valve for a pressure vessel is disposed closer to the reactor container than the joint portion between the pipelines on the side of the steam inlet and the horizontal pipelines. Upon occurrence of a severe accident, when the pressure vessel should be ruptured and steams containing aerosol in the reactor core should be filled in the reactor container, the inlet valve of the static container cooling device is closed. Steams are flown into the filter bent device of the reactor container, where the aerosols can be removed. (I.S.).

  16. Reactor safety device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okada, Yasumasa.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To scram control rods by processing signals from a plurality of temperature detectors and generating abnormal temperature warning upon occurrence of abnormal temperature in a nuclear reactor. Constitution: A temperature sensor comprising a plurality of reactors each having a magnetic body as the magnetic core having a curie point different from each other and corresponding to the abnormal temperature against which reactor core fuels have to be protected is disposed in an identical instrumentation well near the reactor core fuel outlet/inlet of a reactor. A temperature detection device actuated upon detection of an abnormal temperature by the abrupt reduction of the reactance of each of the reactors is disposed. An OR circuit and an AND circuit for conducting OR and AND operations for each of the abnormal temperature detection signals from the temperature detection device are disposed. The output from the OR circuit is used as the abnormal temperature warning signal, while the output from the AND circuit is utilized as a signal for actuating the scram operation of control rod drive mechanisms. Accordingly, it is possible to improve the reliability of the reactor scram system, particularly, improve the reliability under a high temperature atmosphere. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Problems and prospects of small and medium power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, A.

    1977-01-01

    Prior to 1973 it was generally believed that small and medium power reactors (SMPRs) had a potentially large market and only their high capital costs prevented their large scale commercial application. In December, 1973, crude oil price rose from US $2.50 per barrel to more than US $11 per barrel. This changed the economic position of SMPRs so much so that even 100-200 MWe nuclear reactors were considered economic compared to oil-fired plants. A Market Survey by the International Atomic Energy Agency in 1974 showed that the potential market for reactors ranging from 150 to 400 MWe during 1980-1990 amounted to 140 units with a total installed capacity of 38,000 MWe. This potential market did not, however, generate the desired interest among the reactor manufacturers. So far only three manufacturers based in Europe have shown interest in SMPRs and at present small reactors are being built commercially only in India. Among developing countries, Bangladesh, Jamaica and Kuwait are seriously looking for reactors in sizes of 100-200 MWe. The paper analyses the historic background of SMPRs and problems related to their commercial application and suggests the following actions: i) The British 100 MWe SGHWR is considered proven and suitable for small grids and hence deserves financial support by British/International Financing Agencies. ii) Any re-engineered or slightly re-designed version of operating small light water reactors will find wider acceptability than available new adaptions of marine reactors. Manufacturers of operating small LWRs may be encouraged through international financial assistance to make such designs commercially available. iii) Small CANDU reactors may be suitable for most developing countries and need technical and economic support from Canada for their export. iv) The Agency must continue their effort more vigorously for making SMPRs commercially available to small developing countries

  18. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A.; Puente E, F.

    2014-10-01

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  19. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe, Av. Carlos Lazo No. 100, Santa Fe, 01389 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Puente E, F., E-mail: midori.chika@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  20. Status of neutron cross sections for reactor dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, M.F.; Fabry, A.; McElroy, W.N.

    1977-03-01

    The status of current international efforts to develop standardized sets of evaluated energy-dependent (differential) neutron cross sections for reactor dosimetry is reviewed. The status and availability of differential data are considered, some recent results of the data testing of the ENDF/B-IV dosimetry file using 252 Cf and 235 U benchmark reference neutron fields are presented, and a brief review is given of the current efforts to characterize and identify dosimetry benchmark radiation fields

  1. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of a Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kucukboyaci, V.N.; Oriani, L.

    2004-01-01

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) has been the object of interest throughout the nuclear Generation IV community because of its high potential: a simple, direct cycle, compact configuration; elimination of many traditional LWR components, operation at coolant temperatures much higher than traditional LWRs and thus high thermal efficiency. It could be said that the SWR was viewed as the water counterpart to the high temperature gas reactor

  2. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Reactors for Electric Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Philip MacDonald; Jacopo Buongiorno; James Sterbentz; Cliff Davis; Robert Witt; Gary Was; J. McKinley; S. Teysseyre; Luca Oriani; Vefa Kucukboyaci; Lawrence Conway; N. Jonsson: Bin Liu

    2005-02-13

    The supercritical water reactor (SCWR) has been the object of interest throughout the nuclear Generation IV community because of its high potential: a simple, direct cycle, compact configuration; elimination of many traditional LWR components, operation at coolant temperatures much higher than traditional LWRs and thus high thermal efficiency. It could be said that the SWR was viewed as the water counterpart to the high temperature gas reactor.

  3. Thermal fluid dynamics study of nuclear advanced reactors of high temperature using RELAP5-3D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scari, Maria Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Fourth Generation nuclear reactors (GEN-IV) are being designed with special features such as intrinsic safety, reduction of isotopic inventory and use of fuel in proliferation-resistant cycles. Therefore, the investigation and evaluation of operational and safety aspects of the GEN-IV reactors have been the subject of numerous studies by the international community and also in Brazil. In 2008, in Brazil, was created the National Institute of Science and Technology of Innovative Nuclear Reactors, focusing on studies of projects and systems of new generation reactors, which included GEN-IV reactors as well as advanced PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) concepts. The Department of Nuclear Engineering of the Federal University of Minas Gerais (DEN-UFMG) is a partner of this Institute, having started studies on the GEN-IV reactors in the year 2007. Therefore, in order to add knowledge to these studies, in this work, three projects of advanced reactors were considered to verify the simulation capability of the thermo-hydraulic RELAP5-3D code for these systems, either in stationary operation or in transient situations. The addition of new working fluids such as ammonia, carbon dioxide, helium, hydrogen, various types of liquid salts, among them Flibe, lead, lithium-bismuth, lithium-lead, was a major breakthrough in this version of the code, allowing also the simulation of GEN-IV reactors. The modeling of the respective core of an HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor), HTR-10 (High Temperature Test Module Reactor) and LS-VHTR (Liquid-Salt-Cooled Very-High-Temperature Reactor) were developed and verified in steady state comparing the values found through the calculations with reference data from other simulations, when it is possible. The first two reactors use helium gas as coolant and the LS-VHTR uses a mixture of 66% LiF and 34% of BeF 2 , the LiF-BeF 2 , also know as Flibe. All the studied reactors use enriched uranium as fuel, in form of TRISO (Tristructural

  4. Inherently safe reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maartensson, Anders

    1992-01-01

    A rethinking of nuclear reactor safety has created proposals for new designs based on inherent and passive safety principles. Diverging interpretations of these concepts can be found. This article reviews the key features of proposed advanced power reactors. An evaluation is made of the degree of inherent safety for four different designs: the AP-600, the PIUS, the MHTGR and the PRISM. The inherent hazards of today's most common reactor principles are used as reference for the evaluation. It is concluded that claims for the new designs being inherently, naturally or passively safe are not substantiated by experience. (author)

  5. Reactor safety assessment system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebo, D.E.; Bray, M.A.; King, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The Reactor Safety Assessment System (RSAS) is an expert system under development for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). RSA is designed for use at the USNRC Operations Center in the event of a serious incident at a licensed nuclear power plant. RSAS is a situation assessment expert system which uses plant parametric data to generate conclusions for use by the NRC Reactor Safety Team. RSAS uses multiple rule bases and plant specific setpoint files to be applicable to all licensed nuclear power plants in the United States. RSAS currently covers several generic reactor categories and multiple plants within each category

  6. Fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The subject of this invention is a liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor construction in which a concrete pit is lagged to protect it from the heat radiated from the reactor in normal operation but in which the efficiency of the lagging is reduced in case of emergency to allow the excess heat generated by the reactor to be dissipated throughout the pit. The lagging is in two layers, the first covering the internal surface of the pit wall is impermeable to the liquid metal, whilst the second layer over the first is permeable [fr

  7. Reactor shutdown device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuda, Hiroyuki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To provide a reactor shutdown device suitable to the low temperature shutdown of a heavy water-moderated type nuclear reactor and capable of ensuring an adequate shutdown margin. Constitution : Xenon reactivity is calculated based on the detection signals for reactor neutrons, the temperature reactivity is calculated based on the temperature of the moderators and of the coolants and, further, poisons in the moderators are detected. Injection amount of the poisons is calculated based on the result of the calculation and the detection, and the calculated amount of poisons is injected into the moderators. (Kamimura, M.)

  8. Mirror machine reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.; Moir, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Recent mirror reactor conceptual design studies are described. Considered in detail is the design of ''standard'' Yin-Yang fusion power reactors with classical and enhanced confinement. It is shown that to be economically competitive with estimates for other future energy sources, mirror reactors require a considerable increase in Q, or major design simplifications, or preferably both. These improvements may require a departure from the ''standard'' configuration. Two attractive possibilities, both of which would use much of the same physics and technology as the ''standard'' mirror, are the field reversed mirror and the end-stoppered mirror

  9. Reactor flux calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lhuillier, D. [Commissariat à l' Énergie Atomique et aux Énergies Alternatives, Centre de Saclay, IRFU/SPhN, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-02-15

    The status of the prediction of reactor anti-neutrino spectra is presented. The most accurate method is still the conversion of total β spectra of fissionning isotopes as measured at research reactors. Recent re-evaluations of the conversion process led to an increased predicted flux by few percent and were at the origin of the so-called reactor anomaly. The up to date predictions are presented with their main sources of error. Perspectives are given on the complementary ab-initio predictions and upcoming experimental cross-checks of the predicted spectrum shape.

  10. Reactor pressure tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorner, H.; Scholz, M.; Jungmann, A.

    1975-01-01

    In a reactor pressure tank for a nuclear reactor, self-locking hooks engage a steel ring disposed over the removable cover of the steel vessel. The hooks exert force upon the cover to maintain the cover in a closed position during operation of the reactor pressure tank. The force upon the removal cover is partly the result of the increasing temperature and thermal expansion of the steel vessel during operation. The steel vessel is surrounded by a reinforced-concrete tank. (U.S.)

  11. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-04-01

    The Operating Units Status Report --- Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff on NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non- power reactors in the US

  12. Reactor BR2: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2000-01-01

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. A safety audit was conduced by the IAEA, the conclusions of which demonstrated the excellent performance of the plant in terms of operational safety. In 1999, the CALLISTO facility was extensively used for various programmes involving LWR pressure vessel materials, IASCC of LWR structural materials, fusion reactor materials and martensic steels for use in ADS systems. In 1999, BR2's commercial programmes were further developed

  13. Nuclear reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2007-09-01

    This textbook is composed of two parts. Part 1 'Elements of Nuclear Reactor Theory' is composed of only elements but the main resource for the lecture of nuclear reactor theory, and should be studied as common knowledge. Much space is therefore devoted to the history of nuclear energy production and to nuclear physics, and the material focuses on the principles of energy production in nuclear reactors. However, considering the heavy workload of students, these subjects are presented concisely, allowing students to read quickly through this textbook. (J.P.N.)

  14. Power reactor design trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hogan, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    Cascade and Pulse Star represent new trends in ICF power reactor design that have emerged in the last few years. The most recent embodiments of these two concepts, and that of the HYLIFE design with which they will compare them, are shown. All three reactors depend upon protecting structural elements from neutrons, x rays and debris by injecting massive amounts of shielding material inside the reaction chamber. However, Cascade and Pulse Star introduce new ideas to improve the economics, safety, and environmental impact of ICF reactors. They also pose different development issues and thus represent technological alternatives to HYLIFE

  15. Reactor power control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomisawa, Teruaki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To restore reactor-power condition in a minimum time after a termination of turbine bypass by reducing the throttling of the reactor power at the time of load-failure as low as possible. Constitution: The transient change of the internal pressure of condenser is continuously monitored. When a turbine is bypassed, a speed-control-command signal for a coolant recirculating pump is generated according as the internal pressure of the condenser. When the signal relating to the internal pressure of the condenser indicates insufficient power, a reactor-control-rod-drive signal is generated. (J.P.N.)

  16. Research reactor support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Research reactors (RRs) have been used in a wide range of applications including nuclear power development, basic physics research, education and training, medical isotope production, geology, industry and other fields. However, many research reactors are fuelled with High Enriched Uranium (HEU), are underutilized and aging, and have significant quantities of spent fuel. HEU inventories (fresh and spent) pose security risks Unavailability of a high-density-reprocessable fuel hinders conversion and limits back-end options and represents a survival dilemma for many RRs. Improvement of interim spent fuel storage is required at some RRs. Many RRs are under-utilized and/or inadequately funded and need to find users for their services, or permanently shut down and eventually decommission. Reluctance to decommission affect both cost and safety (loss of experienced staff ) and many shut down but not decommissioned RR with fresh and/or spent fuel at the sites invoke serious concern. The IAEA's research reactor support helps to ensure that research reactors can be operated efficiently with fuels and targets of lower proliferation and security concern and that operators have appropriate technology and options to manage RR fuel cycle issues, especially on long term interim storage of spent research reactor fuel. Availability of a high-density-reprocessable fuel would expand and improve back end options. The International Atomic Energy Agency provides assistance to Member States to convert research reactors from High Enriched Uranium fuel and targets (for medical isotope production) to qualified Low Enriched Uranium fuel and targets while maintaining reactor performance levels. The assistance includes provision of handbooks and training in the performance of core conversion studies, advice for the procurement of LEU fuel, and expert services for LEU fuel acceptance. The IAEA further provides technical and administrative support for countries considering repatriation of its

  17. Reactors of the world

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    Basic data relating to 127 power reactors in 15 countries which are expected to be in operation at the end of this year, with a total installed electrical generating capacity of 35 340.15 MW(e), and a listing of 361 research reactors in 46 countries are given in the 1971 edition of the IAEA handbook, Power and Research Reactors in Member States, which has just been published. This edition, the fourth, was prepared especially for the Fourth International Conference on the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy. (author)

  18. Elmo Bumpy Torus Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McAlees, D.G.; Uckan, N.A.; Lidsky, L.M.

    1976-01-01

    In the Elmo Bumpy Torus Reactor (EBTR) study the feasibility of achieving a fusion power plant based on the EBT confinement concept was evaluated. If the present understanding of the physics can be extrapolated to reactor scale devices the reactor could operate at high beta, high power density, and at steady state. The high aspect ratio of the device eases the accessibility, structural design and remote maintenance problems which are common to low aspect ratio machines. A version of the EBTR reference design described here could be constructed with only minor extrapolations in available technology

  19. Nuclear reactor safety system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, R.M.; Roberts, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The invention provides a safety system for a nuclear reactor which uses a parallel combination of computer type look-up tables each of which receives data on a particular parameter (from transducers located in the reactor system) and each of which produces the functional counterpart of that particular parameter. The various functional counterparts are then added together to form a control signal for shutting down the reactor. The functional counterparts are developed by analysis of experimental thermal and hydraulic data, which are used to form expressions that define safe conditions

  20. Fusion Reactor Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decreton, M.

    2001-01-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components during and after irradiation. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; the detection of abrupt electrical degradation of insulating ceramics under high temperature and neutron irradiation; and the study of dismantling and waste disposal strategy for fusion reactors. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2000 are discussed

  1. First Algerian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1989-01-01

    In 1985, both the Algerian Commissariat of New Energies and the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission plus the firm INVAP S.E., started a series of mutual visits aimed at defining the mechanisms for cooperation in the nuclear field. Within this framework, a commercial contract was undersigned covering the supply of a low-power reactor (RUN), designed for basic and applied research in the fields of reactor physics and nuclear engineering. The reactor may also be used for performing experiences with neutron beams, for the irradiation of several materials and for the training of technicians, scientists and operators [es

  2. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts

  3. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thamer, B.J.; Bidwell, R.M.; Hammond, R.P.

    1959-09-15

    Homogeneous reactor fuel solutions are reported which provide automatic recombination of radiolytic gases and exhibit large thermal expansion characteristics, thereby providing stability at high temperatures and enabling reactor operation without the necessity of apparatus to recombine gases formed by the radiolytic dissociation of water in the fuel and without the necessity of liquid fuel handling outside the reactor vessel except for recovery processes. The fuels consist of phosphoric acid and water solutions of enriched uranium, wherein the uranium is in either the hexavalent or tetravalent state.

  4. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  5. ADVANCED SEISMIC BASE ISOLATION METHODS FOR MODULAR REACTORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanford, E.; Keldrauk, E.; Laufer, M.; Mieler, M.; Wei, J.; Stojadinovic, B.; Peterson, P.F.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced technologies for structural design and construction have the potential for major impact not only on nuclear power plant construction time and cost, but also on the design process and on the safety, security and reliability of next generation of nuclear power plants. In future Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors, structural and seismic design should be much more closely integrated with the design of nuclear and industrial safety systems, physical security systems, and international safeguards systems. Overall reliability will be increased, through the use of replaceable and modular equipment, and through design to facilitate on-line monitoring, in-service inspection, maintenance, replacement, and decommissioning. Economics will also receive high design priority, through integrated engineering efforts to optimize building arrangements to minimize building heights and footprints. Finally, the licensing approach will be transformed by becoming increasingly performance based and technology neutral, using best-estimate simulation methods with uncertainty and margin quantification. In this context, two structural engineering technologies, seismic base isolation and modular steel-plate/concrete composite structural walls, are investigated. These technologies have major potential to (1) enable standardized reactor designs to be deployed across a wider range of sites, (2) reduce the impact of uncertainties related to site-specific seismic conditions, and (3) alleviate reactor equipment qualification requirements. For Gen IV reactors the potential for deliberate crashes of large aircraft must also be considered in design. This report concludes that base-isolated structures should be decoupled from the reactor external event exclusion system. As an example, a scoping analysis is performed for a rectangular, decoupled external event shell designed as a grillage. This report also reviews modular construction technology, particularly steel-plate/concrete construction using

  6. ADVANCED SEISMIC BASE ISOLATION METHODS FOR MODULAR REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Blanford; E. Keldrauk; M. Laufer; M. Mieler; J. Wei; B. Stojadinovic; P.F. Peterson

    2010-09-20

    Advanced technologies for structural design and construction have the potential for major impact not only on nuclear power plant construction time and cost, but also on the design process and on the safety, security and reliability of next generation of nuclear power plants. In future Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors, structural and seismic design should be much more closely integrated with the design of nuclear and industrial safety systems, physical security systems, and international safeguards systems. Overall reliability will be increased, through the use of replaceable and modular equipment, and through design to facilitate on-line monitoring, in-service inspection, maintenance, replacement, and decommissioning. Economics will also receive high design priority, through integrated engineering efforts to optimize building arrangements to minimize building heights and footprints. Finally, the licensing approach will be transformed by becoming increasingly performance based and technology neutral, using best-estimate simulation methods with uncertainty and margin quantification. In this context, two structural engineering technologies, seismic base isolation and modular steel-plate/concrete composite structural walls, are investigated. These technologies have major potential to (1) enable standardized reactor designs to be deployed across a wider range of sites, (2) reduce the impact of uncertainties related to site-specific seismic conditions, and (3) alleviate reactor equipment qualification requirements. For Gen IV reactors the potential for deliberate crashes of large aircraft must also be considered in design. This report concludes that base-isolated structures should be decoupled from the reactor external event exclusion system. As an example, a scoping analysis is performed for a rectangular, decoupled external event shell designed as a grillage. This report also reviews modular construction technology, particularly steel-plate/concrete construction using

  7. Innovative fission reactors for this century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minguez, E.

    2007-01-01

    It is well known that global trends indicate a rebirth of nuclear energy due to several items: the climate change and the use of energies that emits CO 2 , the cost and dependence of gas and oil, the new innovative reactors which are competitive, safer, and sustainable and can support the Kyoto Protocol. The Advanced Reactors have safer systems than those developed in the Generation II, which demonstrates that are sustainable for the present and nuclear industry has also developed new concepts for the future which also will be sustainable. Now the new power plants that have being constructed are classified in the Generation III. Several units of this technology are in operation in Japan and other countries of the Pacific. Europe is now constructing the first unit in Finland (Olkilouto) with European technology: the European Pressurized Reactor (EPR). France has announced the beginning of the construction of an EPR in Flamanville next year. In 2000, several countries with advanced nuclear technology established the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) to develop and demonstrate nuclear energy systems that offer advantages in the following areas: sustainability, economics, safety and reliability and proliferation resistance and physical protection. These new systems will be deployed commercially after 2030. Six innovative concepts are under research, and the aim is not only produce electricity, but also hydrogen using the operational conditions of several concepts. Developed countries with NPPs in operation have strategies for the future of the nuclear energy. For the short term is to extend the operation of the NPPs until 60 years, or alternatively construction of new units of Generation III, to substitute those closed for decommissioning, keeping the percentage of contribution to the electricity generated. Between the period 2030-50, the solution is to operate the new innovative systems of the Generation IV, which uses the passive concept, and in the second part

  8. Tackling dipeptidyl peptidase IV in neurological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaith Al-Badri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-IV is a serine protease best known for its role in inactivating glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP, three stimulators of pancreatic insulin secretion with beneficial effects on glucose disposal. Owing to the relationship between DPP-IV and these peptides, inhibition of DPP-IV enzyme activity is considered as an attractive treatment option for diabetic patients. Nonetheless, increasing studies support the idea that DPP-IV might also be involved in the development of neurological disorders with a neuroinflammatory component, potentially through its non-incretin activities on immune cells. In this review article, we aim at highlighting recent literature describing the therapeutic value of DPP-IV inhibitors for the treatment of such neurological conditions. Finally, we will illustrate some of the promising results obtained using berberine, a plant extract with potent inhibitory activity on DPP-IV.

  9. Surprising Coordination Geometry Differences in Ce(IV)- and Pu(IV)-Maltol Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Raymond, Kenneth; Szigethy, Geza; Xu, Jide; Gorden, Anne E.V.; Teat, Simon J.; Shuh, David K.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-12

    As part of a study to characterize the detailed coordination behavior of Pu(IV), single crystal X-ray diffraction structures have been determined for Pu(IV) and Ce(IV) complexes with the naturally-occurring ligand maltol (3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one) and its derivative bromomaltol (5-bromo-3-hydroxy-2-methyl-pyran-4-one). Although Ce(IV) is generally accepted as a structural analog for Pu(IV), and the maltol complexes of these two metals are isostructural, the corresponding bromomaltol complexes are strikingly different with respect to ligand orientation about the metal ion: All complexes exhibit trigonal dodecahedral coordination geometry but the Ce(IV)-bromomaltol complex displays an uncommon ligand arrangement not mirrored in the Pu(IV) complex, although the two metal species are generally accepted to be structural analogs.

  10. Next generation advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turgut, M. H.

    2009-01-01

    Growing energy demand by technological developments and the increase of the world population and gradually diminishing energy resources made nuclear power an indispensable option. The renewable energy sources like solar, wind and geothermal may be suited to meet some local needs. Environment friendly nuclear energy which is a suitable solution to large scale demands tends to develop highly economical, advanced next generation reactors by incorporating technological developments and years of operating experience. The enhancement of safety and reliability, facilitation of maintainability, impeccable compatibility with the environment are the goals of the new generation reactors. The protection of the investment and property is considered as well as the protection of the environment and mankind. They became economically attractive compared to fossil-fired units by the use of standard designs, replacing some active systems by passive, reducing construction time and increasing the operation lifetime. The evolutionary designs were introduced at first by ameliorating the conventional plants, than revolutionary systems which are denoted as generation IV were verged to meet future needs. The investigations on the advanced, proliferation resistant fuel cycle technologies were initiated to minimize the radioactive waste burden by using new generation fast reactors and ADS transmuters.

  11. Fusion reactor radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaser, J.D.; Postma, A.K.; Bradley, D.J.

    1976-01-01

    Quantities and compositions of non-tritium radioactive waste are estimated for some current conceptual fusion reactor designs, and disposal of large amounts of radioactive waste appears necessary. Although the initial radioactivity of fusion reactor and fission reactor wastes are comparable, the radionuclides in fusion reactor wastes are less hazardous and have shorter half-lives. Areas requiring further research are discussed

  12. Special lecture on nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Nam Jin

    1993-08-01

    This book gives a special lecture on nuclear reactor, which is divided into two parts. The first part has explanation on nuclear design of nuclear reactor and analysis of core with theories of integral transports, diffusion Nodal, transports Nodal and Monte Carlo skill parallel computer and nuclear calculation and speciality of transmutation reactor. The second part deals with speciality of nuclear reactor and control with nonlinear stabilization of nuclear reactor, nonlinear control of nuclear reactor, neural network and control of nuclear reactor, control theory of observer and analysis method of Adomian.

  13. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-11-01

    Research activities in fiscal 1974 in Reactor Engineering Division of eight laboratories and computing center are described. Works in the division are closely related with the development of a multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of a Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor in Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering of thermonuclear fusion reactors. They cover nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and aspects of the computing center. (auth.)

  14. Market opportunities: U.S. - PADD IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, R.P.

    1997-01-01

    The current supply and demand balance, the short and long term expectations and marketing opportunities for Canadian crude oil in PADD IV, the Rocky Mountain region in the US, were reviewed. It was suggested that market opportunities in PADD IV are derived from the following four factors: (1) crude oil declines within that area, (2) federal regulations, (3) competitive presence with markets, and (4) population growth. The overall conclusion was that Canadian producers and PADD IV refiners will be looking at an ever-growing relationship based on freight equalized world crude prices. 8 tabs., 5 figs

  15. Preparation and characterization of complexes of uranium(VI), vanadium(IV), titanium(IV), zirconium(IV) and hafnium(IV) with mercapto triazoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, S.K.

    1983-01-01

    Complexes of UO 2 (VI), VO(VI), Tio(IV), ZrO(IV) and HfO(IV) with 4-amino-5-mercapto-3-trifluoromethyl-1,2,4-triazole (HAFT), 4-benzylidene-amino-5-mercapto-3-trifluoromethyl-1,2,4-triazole (HBFT) and 4-salicylidene-amino-5-mercapto-3-trifluoromethyl-1,2,3,-triazole (H 2 SFT) have been prepared and characterized on the basis of elemental analysis, electrical conductance, magnetic susceptibility and spectral (electronic and infrared) data. The ligands HAFT and HBFT act as NS - bidentate chelating agents whereas H 2 SFT acts as NS - O - tridentate chelating agent. (author)

  16. RA Reactor applications, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupac, S.; Vukadin, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: In 2000 Ra reactor was not operated. New instrumentation is not complete, without it, it is not possible to think about reactor start-up. Since 1985, when reactor operation was forbidden, there are 480 fuel elements left in 48 fuel channels in the reactor core. Heavy water was removed from the reactor core because of the repair of the heavy water pumps in 1986. The old instrumentation was removed. Eleven years after being left to its own destiny, it would be difficult to imagine that anybody would think of reactor restart without examining the state of reactor vessel and other vital reactor components. Maintaining the reactor under existing conditions without final decision about restart or permanent shutdown is destructive for this nuclear facility. The existing state that pertains for more than 10 years would have only one result, destruction of the RA reactor [sr

  17. RA Reactor applications, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupac, S.; Vukadin, Z.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: In 1998 Ra reactor was not operated. New instrumentation is not complete, without it, it is not possible to think about reactor start-up. Since 1985, when reactor operation was forbidden, there are 480 fuel elements left in 48 fuel channels in the reactor core. Heavy water was removed from the reactor core because of the repair of the heavy water pumps in 1986. The old instrumentation was removed. Eleven years after being left to its own destiny, it would be difficult to imagine that anybody would think of reactor restart without examining the state of reactor vessel and other vital reactor components. Maintaining the reactor under existing conditions without final decision about restart or permanent shutdown is destructive for this nuclear facility. The existing state that pertains for more than 10 years would have only one result, destruction of the RA reactor [sr

  18. RA Reactor applications, Annex A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupac, S.; Vukadin, Z.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: In 2000 Ra reactor was not operated. New instrumentation is not complete, without it, it is not possible to think about reactor start-up. Since 1985, when reactor operation was forbidden, there are 480 fuel elements left in 48 fuel channels in the reactor core. Heavy water was removed from the reactor core because of the repair of the heavy water pumps in 1986. The old instrumentation was removed. Eleven years after being left to its own destiny, it would be difficult to imagine that anybody would think of reactor restart without examining the state of reactor vessel and other vital reactor components. Maintaining the reactor under existing conditions without final decision about restart or permanent shutdown is destructive for this nuclear facility. The existing state that pertains for more than 10 years would have only one result, destruction of the RA reactor [sr

  19. Nuclear reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Hiroyuki.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the earthquake proofness and also increase the safety to a nuclear reactor container by preventing bucklings upon earthquake. Constitution: A device for absorbing the deformation exerted from nuclear reactor buildings is disposed to a suppression chamber constituting a reactor container. When a nclear power plant encounters earthquakes, the entire reactor buildings are shaken and deformations of buildings are transmitted by way of building shell walls to a container and the forcive deforming forces are absorbed in the deformation absorbing device. That is, bellows are formed at the base of the container, which are deformed by the deforming forces to absorb the forcive deforming amount to moderate the stresses resulted to the suppression chamber. Thus, the rigidity to the bending of the container can be reduced and allowable displacement to the bucklings can be increased to prevent the buckling, by which earthquake proofness is improved and the safety is increased. (Kamimura, M.)

  20. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1981-01-01

    An array of rods comprising zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets assembled to form a fuel element for a pressurised water reactor is claimed. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  1. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hindle, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    The fuel elements for a pressurised water reactor comprise arrays of rods of zirconium alloy sheathed nuclear fuel pellets. The helium gas pressure within each rod differs substantially from that of its closest neighbours

  2. Nuclear reactor (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maillard, M.L.

    1960-01-01

    The first French plutonium-making reactors G1, G2 and G3 built at Marcoule research center are linked to a power plant. The G1 electrical output does not offset the energy needed for operating this reactor. On the contrary, reactors G2 and G3 will each generate a net power of 25 to 30 MW, which will go into the EDF grid. This power is relatively small, but the information obtained from operation is great and will be helpful for starting up the power reactor EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3. The paper describes how, previous to any starting-up operation, the tests performed, especially those concerned with the power plant and the pressure vessel, have helped to bring the commissioning date closer. (author) [fr

  3. Backfitting of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delrue, R.; Noesen, T.

    1985-01-01

    The backfitting of research reactors covers a variety of activities. 1. Instrumentation and control: Control systems have developed rapidly and many reactor operators wish to replace obsolete equipment by new systems. 2. Pool liners: Some pools are lined internally with ceramic tiles. These may become pervious with time necessitating replacement, e.g. by a new stainless steel liner. 3. Heat removal system: Deficiencies can occur in one or more of the cooling system components. Upgrading may require modifications of the system such as addition of primary loops, introduction of deactivation tanks, pump replacement. Recent experience in such work has shown that renewal, backfitting and upgrading of an existing reactor is economically attractive since the related costs and delivery times are substantially lower than those required to install a new research reactor

  4. Ageing of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciocanescu, M.

    2001-01-01

    Historically, many of the research institutions were centred on a research reactor facility as main technological asset and major source of neutrons for research. Important achievements were made in time in these research institutions for development of nuclear materials technology and nuclear safety for nuclear energy. At present, ageing of nuclear research facilities among these research reactors and ageing of staff are considerable factors of reduction of competence in research centres. The safe way of mitigation of this trend deals with ageing management by so called, for power reactors, Plant Life Management and new investments in staff as investments in research, or in future resources of competence. A programmatic approach of ageing of research reactors in correlation with their actual and future utilisation, will be used as a basis for safety evaluation and future spending. (author)

  5. Integrated nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pales, I.; Hasko, V.

    1984-01-01

    The reactor is provided with an integrated circuit of primary medium circulation with hydraulic pump drive. The pump drive which is a blade hydraulic facility is placed in the reactor vessel together with the pump. The primary medium flows through the core and enters the inter-tube space of the secondary circuit heat exchanger. The secondary circuit medium is supplied under the bottom tube plate with a supply pipe. From it the flow of secondary medium is directed to the blades of the hydraulic facility, e.g. the turbine. The turbine drives the pump which transports the primary medium to the reactor core. The secondary medium enters the heat exchanger tubes and through their walls receives the heat from the primary medium. This design reduces capital costs of the reactor and increases its safety. (E.S.)

  6. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2001-04-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given.

  7. Inertial thermonuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madarame, Haruki; Oomura, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Norio.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the durability of the first wall. Constitution: A reactor cavity for performing inertial thermofusion is defined within a vessel of a thermonuclear reactor, and the first wall of a tubular structure flowing coolants for taking out thermonuclear energy generated in the reactor cavity as the heat energy to the outside of the reactor is disposed, in which jet nozzles are disposed to the inside of the first wall that pulse-width jet coolants to form coolant membranes on the inner circumferential surface of the first wall to thereby surround the fire ball by the membrane of the coolants. Thus, the energy of the fire ball can be reduced by the membrane of the coolants, whereby the thermal loads and impact loads to the first wall can be moderated to substantially increase the working life and improve the safety of the first wall for which the greatest stress load is expected. (Yoshihara, H.)

  8. Reactor pressure vessel support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butti, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    A link and pin support system provides the primary vertical and lateral support for a nuclear reactor pressure vessel without restricting thermally induced radial and vertical expansion and contraction

  9. Pressure tube reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Fujino, Michihira.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To equalize heavy water flow distribution by providing a nozzle for externally injecting heavy water from a vibration preventive plate to the upper portion to feed the heavy water in a pressure tube reactor and swallowing up heavy water in a calandria tank to supply the heavy water to the reactor core above the vibration preventive plate. Constitution: A moderator injection nozzle is mounted on the inner wall of a calandria tank. Heavy water is externally injected above the vibration preventive plate, and heavy water in the calandria tank is swallowed up to supply the heavy water to the core reactor above the vibration preventive plate. Therefore, the heavy water flow distribution can be equalized over the entire reactor core, and the distribution of neutron absorber dissolved in the heavy water is equalized. (Yoshihara, H.)

  10. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  11. The Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Till, C.E.

    1985-01-01

    During the past two years, scientists from Argonne have developed an advanced breeder reactor with a closed self contained fuel cycle. The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is a new reactor concept, adaptable to a variety of designs, that is based on a fuel cycle radically different from the CRBR line of breeder development. The essential features of the IFR are metal fuel, pool layout, and pyro- and electro-reprocessing in a facility integral with the reactor plant. The IFR shows promise to provide an inexhaustible, safe, economic, environmentally acceptable, and diversion resistant source of nuclear power. It shows potential for major improvement in all of the areas that have led to concern about nuclear power

  12. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gubel, P.

    2002-01-01

    The BR2 materials testing reactor is one of SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. In 2001, the reactor was operated for a total of 123 days at a mean power of 59 MW in order to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the internal and external programmes using mainly the CALLISTO PWR loop. The mean consumption of fresh fuel elements was 5.26 per 1000 MWd. Main achievements in 2001 included the development of a three-dimensional full-scale model of the BR2 reactor for simulation and prediction of irradiation conditions for various experiments; the construction of the FUTURE-MT device designed for the irradiation of fuel plates under representative conditions of geometry, neutron spectrum, heat flux and thermal-hydraulic conditions and the development of in-pile instrumentation and a data acquisition system

  13. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2002-04-01

    The BR2 materials testing reactor is one of SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. In 2001, the reactor was operated for a total of 123 days at a mean power of 59 MW in order to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the internal and external programmes using mainly the CALLISTO PWR loop. The mean consumption of fresh fuel elements was 5.26 per 1000 MWd. Main achievements in 2001 included the development of a three-dimensional full-scale model of the BR2 reactor for simulation and prediction of irradiation conditions for various experiments; the construction of the FUTURE-MT device designed for the irradiation of fuel plates under representative conditions of geometry, neutron spectrum, heat flux and thermal-hydraulic conditions and the development of in-pile instrumentation and a data acquisition system.

  14. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  15. Reactor vessel sealing plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooley, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    This invention relates to an apparatus and method for sealing the cold leg nozzles of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel from a remote location during maintenance and inspection of associated steam generators and pumps while the pressure vessel and refueling canal are filled with water. The apparatus includes a sealing plug for mechanically sealing the cold leg nozzle from the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. The sealing plugs include a primary and a secondary O-ring. An installation tool is suspended within the reactor vessel and carries the sealing plug. The tool telescopes to insert the sealing plug within the cold leg nozzle, and to subsequently remove the plug. Hydraulic means are used to activate the sealing plug, and support means serve to suspend the installation tool within the reactor vessel during installation and removal of the sealing plug

  16. Small reactor operating mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snell, V.G.

    1997-01-01

    There is a potential need for small reactors in the future for applications such as district heating, electricity production at remote sites, and desalination. Nuclear power can provide these at low cost and with insignificant pollution. The economies required by the small scale application, and/or the remote location, require a review of the size and location of the operating staff. Current concepts range all the way from reactors which are fully automatic, and need no local attention for days or weeks, to those with reduced local staff. In general the less dependent a reactor is on local human intervention, the greater its dependence on intrinsic safety features such as passive decay heat removal, low-stored energy and limited reactivity speed and depth in the control systems. A case study of the design and licensing of the SLOWPOKE Energy System heating reactor is presented. (author)

  17. New reactor type proposed

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Russian scientists at the Research Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering in Moscow are hoping to develop a new reactor that will use lead and bismuth as fuel instead of uranium and plutonium" (1/2 page).

  18. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  19. Pressurized water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, P.J.

    1975-01-01

    Design and mode of operation of the main PWR components are described: reactor core, pressure vessel and internals, cooling systems with pumps and steam generators, ancillary systems, and waste processing. (TK) [de

  20. Development of basic key technologies for Gen IV SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yeongil; Kim, Sungoh; Choi, Sukgi

    2012-04-01

    The advanced concepts, for the breakeven reactor(1,200MWe) and TRU burner(600MWe), were defined to satisfy the technology goals of Generation IV nuclear systems. Based on the advanced design concepts, a conceptual design of the demonstration SFR has been developed using the available licensing technology. The conceptual core design has been developed for the TRU burner in which an initial core is fueled with less than 20wt% enriched U235, and finally transformed to a self-recycled TRU core. The passive decay heat removal circuit ensuring reactor safety even in case of loss of emergency power has been developed and minimization of a reactor vessel and simplification of reactor internals have been conducted in the conceptual design. For development of advanced technologies, control logics for various power levels and the optimal design concept of heat exchanger applicable to supercritical CO 2 Brayton cycle as an energy conversion system was developed. A novel under-sodium waveguide sensor and a prototype under-sodium inspection system have been developed for under-sodium viewing of in-vessel structures submerged in an opaque liquid sodium. The fabrication technology of fuel slugs using the advanced fuel slug casting system was developed, and U-Zr alloy fuel rods were fabricated and examined. And a HT 9 cladding tube was manufactured using the developed cladding tube fabrication technology. For development of basic technologies, the cross section adjustment code ATCROSS and the MATRA-LMR code with HCFs have been developed to reduce core design uncertainties. The SIE ASME-NH computer program to evaluate high temperature structural design for 60 years design life, and the safety analysis code MARS-LMR with thermal-hydraulic and reactivity feedback models have been developed and validated. In addition, the sodium impurity measurement and control technology, the sodium water reaction event propagation model to predict the sodium leak propagation in a steam generator, and