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  1. Multi-response model for rheumatoid arthritis based on delay differential equations in collagen-induced arthritic mice treated with an anti-GM-CSF antibody.

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    Koch, Gilbert; Wagner, Thomas; Plater-Zyberk, Christine; Lahu, Gezim; Schropp, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an experimental model for rheumatoid arthritis, a human chronic inflammatory destructive disease. The therapeutic effect of neutralizing the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by an antibody was examined in the mouse disease in a view of deriving a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model. In CIA mice the development of disease is measured by a total arthritic score (TAS) and an ankylosis score (AKS). We present a multi-response PKPD model which describes the time course of the unperturbed and perturbed TAS and AKS. The antibody acts directly on GM-CSF by binding to it. Therefore, a compartment for the cytokine GM-CSF is an essential component of the mathematical model. This compartment drives the disease development in the PKPD model. Different known properties of arthritis development in the CIA model are included in the PKPD model. Firstly, the inflammation, driven by GM-CSF, dominates at the beginning of the disease and decreases after some time. Secondly, a destructive (ankylosis) part evolves in the TAS that is delayed in time. In order to model these two properties a delay differential equation was used. The PKPD model was applied to different experiments with doses ranging from 0.1 to 100 mg/kg. The influence of the drug was modeled by a non-linear approach. The final mathematical model consists of three differential equations representing the compartments for GM-CSF, inflammation and destruction. Our mathematical model described well all available dosing schedules by a simultaneous fit. We also present an equivalent and easy reformulation as ordinary differential equation which grants the use of standard PKPD software.

  2. Delivery of GM-CSF to Protect against Influenza Pneumonia

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    Subramaniam, Renuka; Hillberry, Zachary; Chen, Han; Feng, Yan; Fletcher, Kalyn; Neuenschwander, Pierre; Shams, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Background Since adaptive immunity is thought to be central to immunity against influenza A virus (IAV) pneumonias, preventive strategies have focused primarily on vaccines. However, vaccine efficacy has been variable, in part because of antigenic shift and drift in circulating influenza viruses. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of innate immunity in protecting against influenza. Methods Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) contributes to maturation of mononuclear phagocytes, enhancing their capacity for phagocytosis and cytokine production. Results Overexpression of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the lung of transgenic mice provides remarkable protection against IAV, which depends on alveolar macrophages (AM). In this study, we report that pulmonary delivery of GM-CSF to wild type young and aged mice abrogated mortality from IAV. Conclusion We also demonstrate that protection is species specific and human GM-CSF do not protect the mice nor stimulates mouse immunity. We also show that IAV-induced lung injury is the culprit for side-effects of GM-CSF in treating mice after IAV infection, and introduce a novel strategy to deliver the GM-CSF to and retain it in the alveolar space even after IAV infection. PMID:25923215

  3. Delivery of GM-CSF to Protect against Influenza Pneumonia.

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    Renuka Subramaniam

    Full Text Available Since adaptive immunity is thought to be central to immunity against influenza A virus (IAV pneumonias, preventive strategies have focused primarily on vaccines. However, vaccine efficacy has been variable, in part because of antigenic shift and drift in circulating influenza viruses. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of innate immunity in protecting against influenza.Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF contributes to maturation of mononuclear phagocytes, enhancing their capacity for phagocytosis and cytokine production.Overexpression of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF in the lung of transgenic mice provides remarkable protection against IAV, which depends on alveolar macrophages (AM. In this study, we report that pulmonary delivery of GM-CSF to wild type young and aged mice abrogated mortality from IAV.We also demonstrate that protection is species specific and human GM-CSF do not protect the mice nor stimulates mouse immunity. We also show that IAV-induced lung injury is the culprit for side-effects of GM-CSF in treating mice after IAV infection, and introduce a novel strategy to deliver the GM-CSF to and retain it in the alveolar space even after IAV infection.

  4. GM-CSF produced by non-hematopoietic cells is required for early epithelial cell proliferation and repair of injured colonic mucosa1,2

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    Egea, Laia; McAllister, Christopher S.; Lakhdari, Omar; Minev, Ivelina; Shenouda, Steve; Kagnoff, Martin F.

    2012-01-01

    GM-CSF is a growth factor that promotes the survival and activation of macrophages and granulocytes, and dendritic cell (DC) differentiation and survival in vitro. The mechanism by which exogenous GM-CSF ameliorates the severity of Crohn’s disease in humans and colitis in murine models has been considered mainly to reflect its activity on myeloid cells. We used GM-CSF deficient (GM-CSF−/−) mice to probe the functional role of endogenous host-produced GM-CSF in a colitis model induced after injury to the colon epithelium. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) at doses that resulted in little epithelial damage and mucosal ulceration in wild type (WT) mice resulted in marked colon ulceration and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF−/− mice. Colon crypt epithelial cell proliferation in vivo was significantly decreased in GM-CSF−/− mice at early times after DSS injury. This was paralleled by decreased expression of crypt epithelial cell genes involved in cell cycle, proliferation, and wound healing. Decreased crypt cell proliferation and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF−/− mice were rescued by exogenous GM-CSF, indicating the lack of a developmental abnormality in the epithelial cell proliferative response in those mice. Non-hematopoietic cells and not myeloid cells produced the GM-CSF important for colon epithelial proliferation after DSS-induced injury as revealed by bone marrow chimera and DC depletion experiments, with colon epithelial cells being the cellular source of GM-CSF. Endogenous epithelial cell produced GM-CSF has a novel non-redundant role in facilitating epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer healing in response to injury of the colon crypt epithelium. PMID:23325885

  5. Unique transcriptome signatures and GM-CSF expression in lymphocytes from patients with spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mossawi, M H; Chen, L; Fang, H; Ridley, A; de Wit, J; Yager, N; Hammitzsch, A; Pulyakhina, I; Fairfax, B P; Simone, D; Yi, Yao; Bandyopadhyay, S; Doig, K; Gundle, R; Kendrick, B; Powrie, F; Knight, J C; Bowness, P

    2017-11-15

    Spondyloarthritis encompasses a group of common inflammatory diseases thought to be driven by IL-17A-secreting type-17 lymphocytes. Here we show increased numbers of GM-CSF-producing CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes in the blood and joints of patients with spondyloarthritis, and increased numbers of IL-17A + GM-CSF + double-producing CD4, CD8, γδ and NK cells. GM-CSF production in CD4 T cells occurs both independently and in combination with classical Th1 and Th17 cytokines. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells producing predominantly GM-CSF are expanded in synovial tissues from patients with spondyloarthritis. GM-CSF + CD4 + cells, isolated using a triple cytokine capture approach, have a specific transcriptional signature. Both GM-CSF + and IL-17A + GM-CSF + double-producing CD4 T cells express increased levels of GPR65, a proton-sensing receptor associated with spondyloarthritis in genome-wide association studies and pathogenicity in murine inflammatory disease models. Silencing GPR65 in primary CD4 T cells reduces GM-CSF production. GM-CSF and GPR65 may thus serve as targets for therapeutic intervention of spondyloarthritis.

  6. MDSCs are involved in the protumorigenic potentials of GM-CSF in colitis-associated cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Liu, Qilin; Hou, Lin; Wang, Yalin; Liu, Ziling

    2017-06-01

    Chronic inflammation is thought to be a major driving force for the development of colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). As one member of proinflammatory cytokine family, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been identified to play a key role in CAC pathogenesis recently. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulated increasingly in the lesions during the progression from colitis to cancer, which was critical for CAC formation. Importantly, this MDSC accumulation was controlled by GM-CSF. MDSC number decreased significantly in GM-CSF-deficient mice suffering from CAC induction, and transfusion of MDSCs from wild-type CAC-bearing mice into GM-CSF-deficient counterparts led to recurrence of CAC. Furthermore, the supernatants of CAC lesions or GM-CSF alone was sufficient to differentiate hematopoietic precursors into MDSCs. Addition of neutralizing anti-GM-CSF antibody impaired the MDSC-differentiating effects of the supernatants of CAC lesions. Overall, these findings shed new insights into the mechanisms of GM-CSF underlying CAC development, by inducing/recruiting CAC-promoting MDSCs. Blocking GM-CSF activity or MDSC function may represent new therapeutic strategies for CAC in clinic.

  7. Recombinant Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (rGM-CSF) : A Review of its Pharmacological Properties and Prospective Role in the Management of Myelosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Susan M; Heel, Rennie C

    1992-04-01

    -only treatment groups suggest that, after > 6 months, the rate of transformation to acute leukaemia is similar in both groups but that rGM-CSF recipients have a sustained increase in neutrophil counts and an associated reduction in infection rate. rGM-CSF 1 to 5 µg/kg/day by subcutaneous injection ameliorates leucopenia associated with HIV infection and corrects zidovudine (azidothymidine)-induced neutropenia without affecting the disease course as determined by p24 antigen levels, CD4: CD8 ratios and recovery of HIV from mononuclear cells. Similar dosages ameliorate myelosuppression induced by ganciclovir in the treatment of AIDS-associated cytomegalovirus retinitis and by the combination of zidovudine and interferon-α in treating Kaposi's sarcoma. A trilineage response to rGM-CSF has been seen occasionally (e.g. some children with aplastic anaemia and some patients with myelodysplasia). Disease-or drug-induced anaemia or thrombocytopenia is generally not improved; however, both significant increases and decreases in platelet count have been reported, and the effect of rGM-CSF on megakaryocytosis and splenic phagocyte function require clarification. The combination of rGM-CSF with other recombinant colony-stimulating factors to expand the lineages stimulated is an exciting future possibility. At clinically useful dosages rGM-CSF is generally well tolerated. Limited comparison with placebo suggests that the type and incidence of adverse reactions reported are generally similar in both groups with the possible exception of slightly higher incidences of diarrhoea, asthenia, rash and malaise. However, reports from noncomparative and open-label trials indicate that mild to moderate flu-like symptoms (myalgias, bone pain, fatigue and headache) are common with rGM-CSF. Management of patients in whom this agent is indicated may be complicated by rGM-CSF-induced fever and, rarely, by a capillary leak syndrome causing fluid retention and potentially peripheral oedema, pericardial or

  8. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

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    Koshida, Ryusuke, E-mail: rkoshida-myz@umin.ac.jp; Oishi, Hisashi, E-mail: hoishi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  9. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Songqin; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2015-11-17

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs.

  10. Pivotal Roles of GM-CSF in Autoimmunity and Inflammation

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    Shiomi, Aoi; Usui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor, which stimulates the proliferation of granulocytes and macrophages from bone marrow precursor cells. In autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, Th17 cells have been considered as strong inducers of tissue inflammation. However, recent evidence indicates that GM-CSF has prominent proinflammatory functions and that this growth factor (not IL-17) is critical for the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the mechanism of GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cell differentiation and the role of GM-CSF in the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are gaining increasing attention. This review summarizes the latest knowledge of GM-CSF and its relationship with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The potential therapies targeting GM-CSF as well as their possible side effects have also been addressed in this review. PMID:25838639

  11. Overcoming HBV immune tolerance to eliminate HBsAg-positive hepatocytes via pre-administration of GM-CSF as a novel adjuvant for a hepatitis B vaccine in HBV transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianzheng; Dong, Aihua; Xiao, Jingjing; Zhou, Xingjun; Mi, Haili; Xu, Hanqian; Zhang, Jiming; Wang, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is known to be a potential vaccine adjuvant despite contradictory results from animal and human studies. The discrepancies may be due to the different doses and regimens of GM-CSF that were used, given that either mature or immature dendritic cells (DCs) could be induced under different conditions. To test the hypothesis that GM-CSF can be used as a novel adjuvant for a hepatitis B virus (HBV) therapeutic vaccine, we administered GM-CSF once per day for three days prior to vaccination with recombinant HBV vaccine (rHBVvac) in mice. We observed greater DC maturation in these pre-treated animals at day 3 as compared to day 1 or day 2 of daily GM-CSF administration. This strategy was further investigated for its ability to break the immune tolerance established in hepatitis B surface antigen-transgenic (HBsAg-Tg) animals. We found that the levels of induced anti-HBsAg antibodies were significantly higher in animals following three days of GM-CSF pre-treatment before rHBV vaccination after the third immunization. In addition to the increase in anti-HBsAg antibody levels, cell-mediated anti-HBsAg responses, including delayed-type hypersensitivity, T-cell proliferation, interferon-γ production, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, were dramatically enhanced in the three-day GM-CSF pre-treated group. After adoptive transfers of CD8 + T cells from immunized animals, antigen-specific CD8 + T cells were observed in the livers of recipient HBsAg-Tg animals. Moreover, the three-day pre-treatments with GM-CSF prior to rHBVvac vaccination could significantly eliminate HBsAg-positive hepatocytes, suggesting beneficial therapeutic effects. Therefore, this protocol utilizing GM-CSF as an adjuvant in combination with the rHBVvac vaccine has the potential to become a novel immunotherapy for chronic hepatitis B patients.

  12. [The therapeutic effect of HSV1-hGM-CSF combined with doxorubicin on the mouse breast cancer model].

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    Zhuang, X F; Zhang, S R; Liu, B L; Wu, J L; Li, X Q; Gu, H G; Shu, Y

    2018-03-23

    Objective: To evaluate the oncolytic effect of herpes simplex virus type 1 which carried recombined human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (HSV1-hGM-CSF) on the mouse breast cancer cell line 4T1 and compare the anticancer effects of HSV1-hGM-CSF, doxorubicin alone or combination on the breast cancer in mice. Methods: We investigated the cytotoxic effect on 4T1 cells in vitro, the cell growth, cell apoptosis and cell cycle of 4T1 cells treated with oncolytic HSV1-hGM-CSF at different MOIs (0, 0.5, 1 and 2) and doxorubicin at different concentrations (0, 2, 4 and 8 μg/ml). The effects of oncolytic HSV1-hGM-CSF and doxorubicin on the tumor growth, survival time and their side effects on the mouse breast cancer model were observed. Results: Both oncolytic HSV1-hGM-CSF and doxorubicin significantly inhibited the proliferation of 4T1 cells in vitro . Doxorubicin induced the G(2)/M phase arrest of 4T1 cells, while the cytotoxicity of oncolytic HSV1-hGM-CSF was no cell cycle-dependent.At day 16 after treatment with doxorubicin and HSV1-hGM-CSF, the tumor volume of 4T1 tumor bearing mice were (144.40±27.68)mm(3,) (216.80±57.18)mm(3,) (246.10±21.90)mm(3,) (327.50±44.24)mm(3,) (213.30±32.31)mm(3) and (495.80±75.87)mm(3) in the groups of doxorubicin combined with high dose HSV1-hGM-CSF, doxorubicin combined with low dose HSV1-hGM-CSF, doxorubicin alone, high dose HSV1-hGM-CSF alone, low dose HSV1-hGM-CSF alone and control, respectively.Compared with the control group, both doxorubicin and HSV1-hGM-CSF treatment exhibited significant reduction of primary tumor volume in vivo ( P CSF alone and low dose HSV1-hGM-CSF alone were significantly longer than that of control ( P CSF is observed in 4T1 mouse breast cancer.

  13. Epithelial GM-CSF induction by Candida glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, A

    2009-08-01

    The main cytokine induced by the interaction of oral epithelial cells with C. glabrata is granulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); however, the mechanisms regulating this response are unknown. Based on previously published information on the interactions of C. albicans with oral epithelial cells, we hypothesized that interaction with viable C. glabrata triggers GM-CSF synthesis via NF-kappaB activation. We found that C. glabrata-induced GM-CSF synthesis was adhesion-dependent, enhanced by endocytosis, and required fungal viability. NF-kappaB activation was noted during interaction of epithelial cells with C. glabrata, and pre-treatment with an NF-kappaB inhibitor partly inhibited GM-CSF synthesis. Blocking TLR4 with anti-TLR4 antibody did not inhibit GM-CSF production. In contrast, an anti-CDw17 antibody triggered significant inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and GM-CSF synthesis. beta-glucans did not stimulate GM-CSF synthesis, suggesting that the CDw17/NF-kappaB/GM-CSF pathway may be beta-glucan-independent. This study provides new insights into the mechanism of GM-CSF induction by C. glabrata.

  14. GM-CSF: An Immune Modulatory Cytokine that can Suppress Autoimmunity

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    Bhattacharya, Palash; Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Elshabrawy, Hatem A.; Alharshawi, Khaled; Kumar, Prabhakaran; Prabhakar, Bellur S.

    2015-01-01

    GM-CSF was originally identified as a colony stimulating factor (CSF) because of its ability to induce granulocyte and macrophage populations from precursor cells. Multiple studies have demonstrated that GM-CSF is also an immune-modulatory cytokine, capable of affecting not only the phenotype of myeloid lineage cells, but also T-cell activation through various myeloid intermediaries. This property has been implicated in the sustenance of several autoimmune diseases like arthritis and multiple sclerosis. In contrast, several studies using animal models have shown that GM-CSF is also capable of suppressing many autoimmune diseases like Crohn's disease, Type-1 diabetes, Myasthenia gravis and experimental autoimmune thyroiditis. Knockout mouse studies have suggested that the role of GM-CSF in maintaining granulocyte and macrophage populations in the physiological steady state is largely redundant. Instead, its immune-modulatory role plays a significant role in the development or resolution of autoimmune diseases. This is mediated either through the differentiation of precursor cells into specialized non-steady state granulocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, or through the modulation of the phenotype of mature myeloid cells. Thus, outside of myelopoiesis, GM-CSF has a profound role in regulating the immune response and maintaining immunological tolerance. PMID:26113402

  15. Dual Role of GM-CSF as a Pro-Inflammatory and a Regulatory Cytokine: Implications for Immune Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Palash; Budnick, Isadore; Singh, Medha; Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Alharshawi, Khaled; Elshabrawy, Hatem; Holterman, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is generally recognized as an inflammatory cytokine. Its inflammatory activity is primarily due its role as a growth and differentiation factor for granulocyte and macrophage populations. In this capacity, among other clinical applications, it has been used to bolster anti-tumor immune responses. GM-CSF-mediated inflammation has also been implicated in certain types of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Thus, agents that can block GM-CSF or its receptor have been used as anti-inflammatory therapies. However, a review of literature reveals that in many situations GM-CSF can act as an anti-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine. We and others have shown that GM-CSF can modulate dendritic cell differentiation to render them “tolerogenic,” which, in turn, can increase regulatory T-cell numbers and function. Therefore, the pro-inflammatory and regulatory effects of GM-CSF appear to depend on the dose and the presence of other relevant cytokines in the context of an immune response. A thorough understanding of the various immunomodulatory effects of GM-CSF will facilitate more appropriate use and thus further enhance its clinical utility. PMID:25803788

  16. [Effects of cell-mediated immunity induced by intramuscular chitosan-pJME/ GM-CSF nano-DNA vaccine in BAlb/c mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yong-Zhen; Zhou, Yan; Ma, Li; Feng, Guo-He

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the immune adjuvant effect and mechanism induced by chitosan nanoparticles carrying pJME/GM-CSF. In this study, plasmid DNA (pJME/GM-CSF) was encapsulated in chitosan to prepare chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles using a complex coacervation process. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the type of infiltrating cells at the site of intramuscular injection. The phenotype and functional changes of splenic DCs were measured by flow cytometry after different immunogens were injected intramuscularly. The killing activity of CTLs was assessed using the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. The preparation of chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles matched the expected theoretical results. Our results also found that, after pJME/GM-CSF injection, the incoming cells were a mixture of macrophages, neutrophils, and immature DCs. Meanwhile, pJME/GM-CSF increased the expression of MHC class II molecules on splenic DCs, and enhanced their Ag capture and presentation functions. Cell-mediated immunity was induced by the vaccine. Furthermore, chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles outperformed the administration of standard pJME/GM-CSF in terms of DC recruitment, antigen processing and presentation, and vaccine enhancement. These findings reveal that chitosan could be used as delivery vector for DNA vaccine intramuscular immunizations, and enhance pJME/GM-CSF-induced cellular immune responses.

  17. The role of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in radiation-induced tumor cell migration.

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    Vilalta, Marta; Brune, Jourdan; Rafat, Marjan; Soto, Luis; Graves, Edward E

    2018-03-13

    Recently it has been observed in preclinical models that that radiation enhances the recruitment of circulating tumor cells to primary tumors, and results in tumor regrowth after treatment. This process may have implications for clinical radiotherapy, which improves control of a number of tumor types but which, despite continued dose escalation and aggressive fractionation, is unable to fully prevent local recurrences. By irradiating a single tumor within an animal bearing multiple lesions, we observed an increase in tumor cell migration to irradiated and unirradiated sites, suggesting a systemic component to this process. Previous work has identified the cytokine GM-CSF, produced by tumor cells following irradiation, as a key effector of this process. We evaluated the ability of systemic injections of a PEGylated form of GM-CSF to stimulate tumor cell migration. While increases in invasion and migration were observed for tumor cells in a transwell assay, we found that daily injections of PEG-GM-CSF to tumor-bearing animals did not increase migration of cells to tumors, despite the anticipated changes in circulating levels of granulocytes and monocytes produced by this treatment. Combination of PEG-GM-CSF treatment with radiation also did not increase tumor cell migration. These findings suggest that clinical use of GM-CSF to treat neutropenia in cancer patients will not have negative effects on the aggressiveness of residual cancer cells. However, further work is needed to characterize the mechanism by which GM-CSF facilitates systemic recruitment of trafficking tumor cells to tumors.

  18. Effects of prostaglandin E2 and cAMP elevating drugs on GM-CSF release by cultured human airway smooth muscle cells. Relevance to asthma therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzeri, N; Belvisi, M G; Patel, H J; Yacoub, M H; Chung, K F; Mitchell, J A

    2001-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells release granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and express cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 (resulting in the release of prostaglandin [PG] E2) after stimulation with cytokines. Because COX-2 activity can regulate a number of inflammatory processes, we have assessed its effects, as well as those of agents that modulate cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), on GM-CSF release by HASM cells. Cells stimulated with a combination of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha each at 10 ng/ml) for 24 h released significant amounts of PGE2 (measured by radioimmunoassay) and GM-CSF (measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Indomethacin and other COX-1/COX-2 inhibitors caused concentration-dependent inhibitions of PGE2 concomitantly with increases in GM-CSF formation. Addition of exogenous PGE2 or the beta2-agonist fenoterol, which increase cAMP, to cytokine-treated HASM cells had no effect on GM-CSF release unless COX activity was first blocked with indomethacin. The type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitors rolipram and SB 207499 both caused concentration-dependent reductions in GM-CSF production. Thus, when HASM cells are activated with cytokines they release PGE2, which acts as a "braking mechanism" to limit the coproduction of GM-CSF. Moreover, agents that elevate cAMP also reduce GM-CSF formation by these cells.

  19. Needle-free Biojector injection of a dengue virus type 1 DNA vaccine with human immunostimulatory sequences and the GM-CSF gene increases immunogenicity and protection from virus challenge in Aotus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Ewing, Dan; Simmons, Monika; Porter, Kevin R.; Jones, Trevor R.; Hayes, Curtis G.; Stout, Richard; Murphy, Gerald S.

    2003-01-01

    A dengue-1 DNA vaccine containing sequences encoding premembrane and envelope proteins (DIME) was previously shown to elicit virus neutralizing antibodies in rhesus and Aotus monkeys, and the primates were partially protected from viremia upon challenge. To increase the neutralizing antibody levels and subsequent protection from virus challenge, four strategies were evaluated: (a) coimmunization with a plasmid expressing Aotus GM-CSF gene; (b) coimmunization with a plasmid containing human immunostimulatory sequences (ISS); (c) coimmunization with both the GM-CSF gene and ISS; and (d) delivery of vaccine using the needle-free Biojector system. Vaccination with the mixed formulation containing DIME, GM-CSF gene, and ISS, by either needle injection or Biojector, led to neutralizing antibody titers that were stable for up to 6 months after vaccination. Furthermore, 6 of 7 monkeys (85%), and 7 of 8 monkeys (87%) receiving this formulation were completely protected from viremia when challenged 1 and 6 months after vaccination, respectively. This is a significant improvement compared to our previous study in which one of three monkeys (33%) receiving just the DIME vaccine was completely protected from viremia at 6 months after immunization

  20. Human autologous in vitro models of glioma immunogene therapy using B7-2, GM-CSF, and IL12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parney, I.F.; Farr-Jones, M.A.; Kane, K.; Chang, L.-J.; Petruk, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    Cancer immunogene therapy is based on vaccination with radiated, autologous tumor cells transduced with immunostimulatory genes. To help determine an optimal glioma immunogene therapy strategy, we stimulated lymphocytes with autologous human glioma cells transduced with B7-2 (CD86), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and/or interleukin-12 (IL12). A human glioma-derived cell culture (Ed147.BT) was transduced with B7-2, GM-CSF, and/or IL12 using retroviral vectors. Autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were co-cultured with irradiated gene-transduced tumor alone or a combination of radiated wild type and gene-transduced cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation was determined by serial cell counts. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry for CD4, CD8, and CD16. Anti-tumor cytotoxicity was determined by chromium-51 ( 51 Cr) release assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells cell numbers all decreased during primary stimulation but tumor cells expressing B7-2 or GM-CSF consistently caused secondary proliferation. Tumors expressing B7-2 and GM-CSF or B7-2,GM-CSF,and IL12 consistently increased PBMC CD8+ (cytotoxic T) and CD16+ (natural killer) percentages. Interestingly, anti-tumor cytotoxicity only exceeded that of PBMC stimulated with wild type tumor alone when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with both wild type tumor and B7-2/GM-CSF- (but not IL12) transduced cells. PBMC proliferation and phenotype is altered as expected by exposure to immunostimulatory gene-transduced tumor. However, transduced tumor cells alone do not stimulate greater anti-tumor cytotoxicity than wild type tumor. Only B7-2/GM-CSF-transduced cells combined with wild type produced increased cytotoxicity. This may reflect selection of turnor subclones with limited antigenic spectra during retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. (author)

  1. GM-CSF enhances tumor invasion by elevated MMP-2, -9, and -26 expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutschalk, Claudia M; Yanamandra, Archana K; Linde, Nina; Meides, Alice; Depner, Sofia; Mueller, Margareta M

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) promotes tumor progression in different tumor models in an autocrine and paracrine manner. However, at the same time GM-CSF is used in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia. We have previously shown in GM-CSF and G-CSF expressing or negative skin or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that GM-CSF expression is associated with a highly angiogenic and invasive tumor phenotype. To determine the functional contribution of GM-CSF to tumor invasion, we stably transfected a GM-CSF negative colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29 with GM-CSF or treated the same cell line with exogenous GM-CSF. While GM-CSF overexpression and treatment reduced tumor cell proliferation and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, respectively, it contributed to tumor progression. Together with an enhanced migratory capacity in vitro, we observed a striking increase in tumor cell invasion into the surrounding tissue concomitant with the induction of an activated tumor stroma in GM-CSF overexpressing or GM-CSF treated tumors. In a complex 3D in vitro model, enhanced GM-CSF expression was associated with a discontinued basement membrane deposition that might be mediated by the increased expression and activation of MMP-2, -9, and -26. Treatment with GM-CSF blocking antibodies reversed this effect. The increased presence and activity of these tumor cell derived proteases was confirmed in vivo. Here, expression of MMP-26 protein was predominantly located in pre- and early-invasive areas suggesting MMP-26 expression as an early event in promoting GM-CSF dependent tumor invasion

  2. GM-CSF overexpression after influenza a virus infection prevents mortality and moderates M1-like airway monocyte/macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, E Scott; Umstead, Todd M; Davies, Michael L; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Silveyra, Patricia; Howyrlak, Judie; Yang, Linlin; Guo, Weichao; Hu, Sanmei; Hewage, Eranda Kurundu; Chroneos, Zissis C

    2018-01-05

    Influenza A viruses cause life-threatening pneumonia and lung injury in the lower respiratory tract. Application of high GM-CSF levels prior to infection has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality from pathogenic influenza infection in mice, but the mechanisms of protection and treatment efficacy have not been established. Mice were infected intranasally with influenza A virus (PR8 strain). Supra-physiologic levels of GM-CSF were induced in the airways using the double transgenic GM-CSF (DTGM) or littermate control mice starting on 3 days post-infection (dpi). Assessment of respiratory mechanical parameters was performed using the flexiVent rodent ventilator. RNA sequence analysis was performed on FACS-sorted airway macrophage subsets at 8 dpi. Supra-physiologic levels of GM-CSF conferred a survival benefit, arrested the deterioration of lung mechanics, and reduced the abundance of protein exudates in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid to near baseline levels. Transcriptome analysis, and subsequent validation ELISA assays, revealed that excess GM-CSF re-directs macrophages from an "M1-like" to a more "M2-like" activation state as revealed by alterations in the ratios of CXCL9 and CCL17 in BAL fluid, respectively. Ingenuity pathway analysis predicted that GM-CSF surplus during IAV infection elicits expression of anti-inflammatory mediators and moderates M1 macrophage pro-inflammatory signaling by Type II interferon (IFN-γ). Our data indicate that application of high levels of GM-CSF in the lung after influenza A virus infection alters pathogenic "M1-like" macrophage inflammation. These results indicate a possible therapeutic strategy for respiratory virus-associated pneumonia and acute lung injury.

  3. GM-CSF augments the immunosuppressive capacity of neonatal spleen cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, P.J.; Ireland, R.

    1991-01-01

    Addition of exogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to cultures of adult murine spleen cells with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) results in an augmented plaque forming cell (PFC) response. The influence of GM-CSF on the ability of neonatal spleen cells to suppress the anti-SRBC plaque forming response of adult spleen cells was tested by adding GM-CSF to cultures of neonatal and adult spleen cells. The suppressive capacity of the neonatal spleen cells was augmented by exogenous GM-CSF. The augmented suppression of the neonatal spleen cells was dependent on a G-10 adherent population since the addition of GM-CSF to cultures containing G-10 passed neonatal spleen cells resulted in an augmented PFC response and not suppression. Neonatal splenic glass adherent cells were also capable of suppressing the response. Neonatal spleen cells or purified neonatal glass adherent spleen cells cultured in the presence of GM-CSF had markedly increased levels of PGE2 in the culture supernatant. Neonatal spleen cells cultured with GM-CSF had increased numbers of morphologically identifiable macrophages after 48 hr of culture. Both irradiation and G-10 passage of the neonatal spleen diminished the numbers of macrophages formed in response to GM-CSF, and both of these manipulations resulted in reversal of suppression in response to GM-CSF. Thus, the augmented suppressive capacity of neonatal spleen cells in response to GM-CSF is probably mediated by its ability to drive monocyte to macrophage differentiation as well as increase the suppressive capacity of the existing neonatal splenic macrophages by increasing their production of PGE2

  4. Targeting the GM-CSF receptor for the treatment of CNS autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifergan, Igal; Davidson, Todd S; Kebir, Hania; Xu, Dan; Palacios-Macapagal, Daphne; Cann, Jennifer; Rodgers, Jane M; Hunter, Zoe N; Pittet, Camille L; Beddow, Sara; Jones, Clare A; Prat, Alexandre; Sleeman, Matthew A; Miller, Stephen D

    2017-11-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), there is a growing interest in inhibiting the pro-inflammatory effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We sought to evaluate the therapeutic potential and underlying mechanisms of GM-CSF receptor alpha (Rα) blockade in animal models of MS. We show that GM-CSF signaling inhibition at peak of chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) results in amelioration of disease progression. Similarly, GM-CSF Rα blockade in relapsing-remitting (RR)-EAE model prevented disease relapses and inhibited T cell responses specific for both the inducing and spread myelin peptides, while reducing activation of mDCs and inflammatory monocytes. In situ immunostaining of lesions from human secondary progressive MS (SPMS), but not primary progressive MS patients shows extensive recruitment of GM-CSF Rα + myeloid cells. Collectively, this study reveals a pivotal role of GM-CSF in disease relapses and the benefit of GM-CSF Rα blockade as a potential novel therapeutic approach for treatment of RRMS and SPMS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. GM-CSF ameliorates microvascular barrier integrity via pericyte-derived Ang-1 in wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Min; Hu, Yange; Yao, Min; Bao, Shisan; Fang, Yong

    2017-11-01

    Skin wound healing involves complex coordinated interactions of cells, tissues, and mediators. Maintaining microvascular barrier integrity is one of the key events for endothelial homeostasis during wound healing. Vasodilation is observed after vasoconstriction, which causes blood vessels to become porous, facilitates leukocyte infiltration and aids angiogenesis at the wound-area, postinjury. Eventually, vessel integrity has to be reestablished for vascular maturation. Numerous studies have found that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) accelerates wound healing by inducing recruitment of repair cells into the injury area and releases of cytokines. However, whether GM-CSF is involving in the maintaining of microvascular barrier integrity and the underlying mechanism remain still unclear. Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GM-CSF on modulation of microvascular permeability in wound healing and underlying mechanisms. Wound closure and microvascular leakage was investigated using a full-thickness skin wound mouse model after GM-CSF intervention. The endothelial permeability was measured by Evans blue assay in vivo and in vitro endothelium/pericyte co-culture system using a FITC-Dextran permeability assay. To identify the source of angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), double staining is used in vivo and ELISA and qPCR are used in vitro. To determine the specific effect of Ang-1 on GM-CSF maintaining microvascular stabilization, Ang-1 siRNA was applied to inhibit Ang-1 production in vivo and in vitro. Wound closure was significantly accelerated and microvascular leakage was ameliorated after GM-CSF treatment in mouse wound sites. GM-CSF decreased endothelial permeability through tightening endothelial junctions and increased Ang-1 protein level that was derived by perictye. Furthermore, applications of siRNAAng-1 inhibited GM-CSF mediated protection of microvascular barrier integrity both in vivo and in vitro. Our data indicate that GM-CSF

  6. A novel combination treatment of armed oncolytic adenovirus expressing IL-12 and GM-CSF with radiotherapy in murine hepatocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wonwoo; Seong, Jinsil; Oh, Hae-Jin; Koom, Woong-Sub; Choi, Kyung-Joo; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel combination treatment of armed oncolytic adenovirus expressing interleukin 12 (IL-12) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with radiation was investigated for antitumor and antimetastatic effect in a murine hepatic cancer (HCa-I) model. Tumor bearing syngeneic mice were treated with radiation, armed oncolytic virus Ad-ΔE1Bmt7 (dB7) expressing both IL-12 and GM-CSF (armed dB7), or a combination of both. The adenovirus was administered by intratumoral injection 1 x 10 8 plaque forming units (PFU) per tumor in 50 μl of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) four times every other day. Tumor response to treatment was determined by a tumor growth delay assay. Metastatic potential was evaluated by a lung metastasis model. To understand the underlying mechanism, the level of apoptosis was examined as well as the change in microvessel density and expression of immunological markers: CD4+, CD8+ and Cd11c. The combination of armed dB7 and radiation resulted in significant growth delay of murine hepatic cancer, HCa-1, with an enhancement factor of 4.3. The combination treatment also resulted in significant suppression of lung metastasis. Increase of apoptosis level as well as decrease of microvessel density was shown in the combination treatment, suggesting an underlying mechanism for the enhancement of antitumor effect. Expression of immunological markers: CD4+, CD8+ and Cd11c also increased in the combination treatment. This study showed that a novel combination treatment of radiotherapy with armed oncolytic adenovirus expressing IL-12 and GM-CSF was effective in suppressing primary tumor growth. (author)

  7. GM-CSF-Producing Th Cells in Rats Sensitive and Resistant to Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Pilipović, Ivan; Vujnović, Ivana; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Petrović, Raisa; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Given that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is identified as the key factor to endow auto-reactive Th cells with the potential to induce neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models, the frequency and phenotype of GM-CSF-producing (GM-CSF+) Th cells in draining lymph nodes (dLNs) and spinal cord (SC) of Albino Oxford (AO) and Dark Agouti (DA) rats immunized for EAE were examined. The generation of neuroantigen-specific GM-CSF+ Th lymphocytes was impaired in dLNs of AO rats (relatively resistant to EAE induction) compared with their DA counterparts (susceptible to EAE) reflecting impaired CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation and less supportive of GM-CSF+ Th cell differentiation dLN cytokine microenvironment. Immunophenotyping of GM-CSF+ Th cells showed their phenotypic heterogeneity in both strains and revealed lower frequency of IL-17+IFN-γ+, IL-17+IFN-γ-, and IL-17-IFN-γ+ cells accompanied by higher frequency of IL-17-IFN-γ- cells among them in AO than in DA rats. Compared with DA, in AO rats was also found (i) slightly lower surface density of CCR2 (drives accumulation of highly pathogenic GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cells in SC) on GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 lymphocytes from dLNs, and (ii) diminished CCL2 mRNA expression in SC tissue, suggesting their impaired migration into the SC. Moreover, dLN and SC cytokine environments in AO rats were shown to be less supportive of GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cell differentiation (judging by lower expression of mRNAs for IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23/p19). In accordance with the (i) lower frequency of GM-CSF+ Th cells in dLNs and SC of AO rats and their lower GM-CSF production, and (ii) impaired CCL2 expression in the SC tissue, the proportion of proinflammatory monocytes among peripheral blood cells and their progeny (CD45hi cells) among the SC CD11b+ cells were reduced in AO compared with DA rats. Collectively, the results indicate that the strain specificities in efficacy of several mechanisms

  8. Experimental study of changes of skin blister fluid NPY, IL-12, sICAM-1 and GM-CSF levels in patients with vitiligo in progressive stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi Mingye; Huang Haifen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the significance of changes of skin blister fluid NPY, IL-12, sICAM-1 and GM-CSF levels in patients with vitiligo in progressive stage. Methods: 80 patients with vitiligo in progressive stage were divided into two groups (vulgaris vitiligo groups : n=54, segmental vitiligo groups : n=26) Their blister fluid levels of NPY and GM-CSF were determined by radioimmunoassay(RIA), and IL-12 and sICAM-1 were determined by enzyme immunoassay. Results: The levels of skin blister fluid NPY were definitely higher in vitiliginous skin than those in non-vitiliginous patches in segmental vitiligo groups (P 0.05). The levels of skin blister fluid IL-12, sICAM-1 and GM-CSF were all obviously higher in vitiliginous skin than that in non-vitiliginous patches in vulgaris vitiligo groups (P 0.05). Conclusion: The changes of skin blister fluid NPY, IL-12, sICAM-1 and GM-CSF levels in vitiliginous skin may be closely related to development of difference type vitiligo patients with vitiligo, determination of 4 indexes might be helpful for studying the pathogenesis and clinical diagnosis of vitiligo. (authors)

  9. Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins with Potent Intrinsic Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed EnvGM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized EnvGM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric EnvGM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins. PMID:23565193

  10. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  11. Electronegative L5-LDL induces the production of G-CSF and GM-CSF in human macrophages through LOX-1 involving NF-κB and ERK2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tzu-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Lu, Shao-Chun

    2017-12-01

    Circulating levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are associated with the severity of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, what causes increases in G-CSF and GM-CSF is unclear. In this study, we investigated whether L5-low-density lipoprotein (LDL), a mildly oxidized LDL from AMI, can induce G-CSF and GM-CSF production in human macrophages. L1-LDL and L5-LDL were isolated through anion-exchange chromatography from AMI plasma. Human macrophages derived from THP-1 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with L1-LDL, L5-LDL, or copper-oxidized LDL (Cu-oxLDL) and G-CSF and GM-CSF protein levels in the medium were determined. In addition, the effects of L5-LDL on G-CSF and GM-CSF production were tested in lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), CD36, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1, and ERK2 knockdown THP-1 macrophages. L5-LDL but not L1-LDL or Cu-oxLDL significantly induced production of G-CSF and GM-CSF in macrophages. In vitro oxidation of L1-LDL and L5-LDL altered their ability to induce G-CSF and GM-CSF, suggesting that the degree of oxidation is critical for the effects. Knockdown and antibody neutralization experiments suggested that the effects were caused by LOX-1. In addition, nuclear factor (NF)-κB and ERK1/2 inhibition resulted in marked reductions of L5-LDL-induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production. Moreover, knockdown of ERK2, but not ERK1, hindered L5-LDL-induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production. The results indicate that L5-LDL, a naturally occurring mild oxidized LDL, induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production in human macrophages through LOX-1, ERK2, and NF-κB dependent pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF biological actions on human dermal fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Montagnani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are involved in all pathologies characterized by increased ExtraCellularMatrix synthesis, from wound healing to fibrosis. Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF is a cytokine isolated as an hemopoietic growth factor but recently indicated as a differentiative agent on endothelial cells. In this work we demonstrated the expression of the receptor for GM-CSF (GMCSFR on human normal skin fibroblasts from healthy subjects (NFPC and on a human normal fibroblast cell line (NHDF and we try to investigate the biological effects of this cytokine. Human normal fibroblasts were cultured with different doses of GM-CSF to study the effects of this factor on GMCSFR expression, on cell proliferation and adhesion structures. In addition we studied the production of some Extra-Cellular Matrix (ECM components such as Fibronectin, Tenascin and Collagen I. The growth rate of fibroblasts from healthy donors (NFPC is not augmented by GM-CSF stimulation in spite of increased expression of the GM-CSFR. On the contrary, the proliferation of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF cell line seems more influenced by high concentration of GM-CSF in the culture medium. The adhesion structures and the ECM components appear variously influenced by GM-CSF treatment as compared to fibroblasts cultured in basal condition, but newly only NHDF cells are really induced to increase their synthesis activity. We suggest that the in vitro treatment with GM-CSF can shift human normal fibroblasts towards a more differentiated state, due or accompanied by an increased expression of GM-CSFR and that such “differentiation” is an important event induced by such cytokine.

  13. Use of rhu-GM-CSF in pulmonary tuberculosis patients: results of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Brasil Pedral-Sampaio

    Full Text Available It has been postulated that deficient or incomplete clinical and/or microbiological response to tuberculosis treatment is associated with cell-mediated immunological dysfunction involving monocytes and macrophages. A phase 2 safety trial was conducted by treating patients with either recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhu-GM-CSF or a placebo, both in combination with anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Thirty-one patients with documented pulmonary tuberculosis were treated with rifampin/isoniazid for six months, plus pyrazinamide for the first two months. At the beginning of treatment, rhu-GM-CSF (125µg/M² was randomly assigned to 16 patients and injected subcutaneously twice weekly for four weeks; the other 15 patients received a placebo. The patients were accompanied in the hospital for two weeks, then monthly on an out patient basis, for 12 months. Clinical outcomes were similar in both groups, with no difference in acid-fast bacilli (AFB clearance in sputum at the end of the fourth week of treatment. Nevertheless, a trend to faster conversion to negative was observed in the rhu-GM-CSF group until the eighth week of treatment (p=0.07, after which all patients converted to AFB negative. Adverse events in the rhu-GM-CSF group were local skin inflammation and an increase in the leukocyte count after each injection, returning to normal 72 hours after rhu-GM-CSF injection. Three patients developed SGOP and SGPT > 2.5 times the normal values. All patients included in the GM-CSF group were culture negative at six months, except one who had primary TB resistance. None of the patients had to discontinue the treatment in either group. We conclude that rhu-GM-CSF adjuvant immunotherapy could be safely explored in a phase 3 trial with patients who have active tuberculosis.

  14. Use of rhu-GM-CSF in pulmonary tuberculosis patients: results of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedral-Sampaio Diana Brasil

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been postulated that deficient or incomplete clinical and/or microbiological response to tuberculosis treatment is associated with cell-mediated immunological dysfunction involving monocytes and macrophages. A phase 2 safety trial was conducted by treating patients with either recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhu-GM-CSF or a placebo, both in combination with anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Thirty-one patients with documented pulmonary tuberculosis were treated with rifampin/isoniazid for six months, plus pyrazinamide for the first two months. At the beginning of treatment, rhu-GM-CSF (125µg/M² was randomly assigned to 16 patients and injected subcutaneously twice weekly for four weeks; the other 15 patients received a placebo. The patients were accompanied in the hospital for two weeks, then monthly on an out patient basis, for 12 months. Clinical outcomes were similar in both groups, with no difference in acid-fast bacilli (AFB clearance in sputum at the end of the fourth week of treatment. Nevertheless, a trend to faster conversion to negative was observed in the rhu-GM-CSF group until the eighth week of treatment (p=0.07, after which all patients converted to AFB negative. Adverse events in the rhu-GM-CSF group were local skin inflammation and an increase in the leukocyte count after each injection, returning to normal 72 hours after rhu-GM-CSF injection. Three patients developed SGOP and SGPT > 2.5 times the normal values. All patients included in the GM-CSF group were culture negative at six months, except one who had primary TB resistance. None of the patients had to discontinue the treatment in either group. We conclude that rhu-GM-CSF adjuvant immunotherapy could be safely explored in a phase 3 trial with patients who have active tuberculosis.

  15. Coadministration of Recombinant Adenovirus Expressing GM-CSF with Inactivated H5N1 Avian Influenza Vaccine Increased the Immune Responses and Protective Efficacy Against a Wild Bird Source of H5N1 Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangwei; Wang, Xinglong; Jia, Yanqing; Wang, Chongyang; Tang, Qiuxia; Han, Qingsong; Xiao, Sa; Yang, Zengqi

    2017-10-01

    Wild birds play a key role in the spread of avian influenza virus (AIV). There is a continual urgent requirement for AIV vaccines to address the ongoing genetic changes of AIV. In the current study, we trialed a novel AIV vaccine against the wild bird source of H5N1 type AIV with recombinant adenovirus expressing granulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an adjuvant. A total of 150-day-old commercial chicks, with AIV-maternal-derived antibody, were divided into 6 groups. The primary vaccination was performed at day 14 followed by a subsequent boosting and intramuscular challenge on day 28 and 42, respectively. Recombinant GM-CSF (rGM-CSF) expressed by adenovirus, named as rAd-GM-CSF, raised the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers (log 2 ) against AIV from 7.0 (vaccinate with inactivated vaccine alone) to 8.4 after booster immunization. Moreover, the rGM-CSF addition markedly increased the expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-4, and major histocompatibility complex-II in the lungs, compared with those immunized with inactivated vaccine alone on day 29, that is, 18 h post booster immunization. Following challenge, chicks inoculated with the inactivated AIV vaccine and rAd-GM-CSF together exhibited mild clinical signs and 62% survivals compared to 33% in the group immunized with inactivated AIV vaccine alone. Higher level of HI titers, immune related molecule expressions, and protection ratio demonstrates a good potential of rGM-CSF in improving humoral and cell mediated immune responses of inactivated AIV vaccines.

  16. Tumour-derived GM-CSF promotes granulocyte immunosuppression in mesothelioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Swati; Graef, Suzanne; Mussai, Francis; Thomas, Anish; Wali, Neha; Yenidunya, Bahar Guliz; Yuan, Constance M; Morrow, Betsy; Zhang, Jingli; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F; Steinberg, Seth M; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Middleton, Gary; De Santo, Carmela; Hassan, Raffit

    2018-03-30

    The cross talk between tumour cells, myeloid cells, and T cells play a critical role in tumour pathogenesis and response to immunotherapies. Although the aetiology of mesothelioma is well understood the impact of mesothelioma on the surrounding immune microenvironment is less well studied. In this study the effect of the mesothelioma microenvironment on circulating and infiltrating granulocytes and T cells is investigated. Tumour and peripheral blood from mesothelioma patients were evaluated for presence of granulocytes, which were then tested for their T cell suppression. Co-cultures of granulocytes, mesothelioma cells, T cells were used to identify the mechanism of T cell inhibition. Analysis of tumours showed that the mesothelioma microenvironment is enriched in infiltrating granulocytes, which inhibit T cell proliferation and activation. Characterisation of the blood at diagnosis identified similar, circulating, immunosuppressive CD11b+CD15+HLADR- granulocytes at increased frequency compared to healthy controls. Culture of healthy-donor granulocytes with human mesothelioma cells showed that GM-CSF upregulates NOX2 expression and the release of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) from granulocytes, resulting in T cell suppression. Immunohistochemistry and transcriptomic analysis revealed that a majority of mesothelioma tumours express GM-CSF and that higher GM-CSF expression correlated with clinical progression. Blockade of GM-CSF with neutralising antibody, or ROS inhibition, restored T cell proliferation suggesting that targeting of GM-CSF could be of therapeutic benefit in these patients. Our study presents the mechanism behind the cross-talk between mesothelioma and the immune micro-environment and indicates that targeting GM-CSF could be a novel treatment strategy to augment immunotherapy. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Improved survival and marrow engraftment of mice transplanted with bone marrov of GM-CSF-treated donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballin, A.; Sagi, O.; Schiby, G.; Meytes, D.

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) administered to bone marrow (BM) transplant recipients is associated with earlier recovery. We have investigated the possibility of stimulating normal donor mice in vivo with GM-CSF. Donor balb/c mice were injected i.p. with GM-CSF (5000 u) or saline. Seventy-two hours later 5 x 105 BM cells from either GM-CSF-treated or control donors were infused into lethally irradiated (850 R) recipients. In the recipients of BM from GM-CSF-treated donors, significantly higher CFU-S and significantly higher survival rate (57% [n = 65]; vs. 30% [n = 63]; p < 0.05) were noted. Donor mice of the GM-CSF group did not differ in bone-marrow cellularity and composition from their controls. However, recipients of BM from GM-CSF-treated mice had higher blood counts of haemoglobin, Leukocytes and platelets compared to controls. These data demonstrate that pretreatment of BM donors with GM-CSF may be of benefit in improving survival and marrow engraftment in mice. (au) (13 refs.)

  18. Clinical role of GM-CSF in neutrophil recovery in relation to health care parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, LS; DeVries, EGE; UylDeGroot, CA; Vellenga, E

    Recombinant human growth factors, particularly granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have been only available for a few years. Since their introduction they have affected the management of drug-induced neutropenia, the use of dose intensive chemotherapy regimens and in the

  19. CC chemokine receptor 4 is required for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by regulating GM-CSF and IL-23 production in dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppensieker, Karola; Otte, David-Marian; Schürmann, Britta; Limmer, Andreas; Dresing, Philipp; Drews, Eva; Schumak, Beatrix; Klotz, Luisa; Raasch, Jennifer; Mildner, Alexander; Waisman, Ari; Scheu, Stefanie; Knolle, Percy; Förster, Irmgard; Prinz, Marco; Maier, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Alferink, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are pivotal for the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the mechanisms by which they control disease remain to be determined. This study demonstrates that expression of CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) by DCs is required for EAE induction. CCR4−/− mice presented enhanced resistance to EAE associated with a reduction in IL-23 and GM-CSF expression in the CNS. Restoring CCR4 on myeloid cells in bone marrow chimeras or intracerebral microinjection of CCR4-competent DCs, but not macrophages, restored EAE in CCR4−/− mice, indicating that CCR4+ DCs are cellular mediators of EAE development. Mechanistically, CCR4−/− DCs were less efficient in GM-CSF and IL-23 production and also TH-17 maintenance. Intraspinal IL-23 reconstitution restored EAE in CCR4−/− mice, whereas intracerebral inoculation using IL-23−/− DCs or GM-CSF−/− DCs failed to induce disease. Thus, CCR4-dependent GM-CSF production in DCs required for IL-23 release in these cells is a major component in the development of EAE. Our study identified a unique role for CCR4 in regulating DC function in EAE, harboring therapeutic potential for the treatment of CNS autoimmunity by targeting CCR4 on this specific cell type. PMID:22355103

  20. Cytokine-primed bone marrow stem cells vs. peripheral blood stem cells for autologous transplantation: a randomized comparison of GM-CSF vs. G-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisdorf, D; Miller, J; Verfaillie, C; Burns, L; Wagner, J; Blazar, B; Davies, S; Miller, W; Hannan, P; Steinbuch, M; Ramsay, N; McGlave, P

    1997-10-01

    Autologous transplantation for non-Hodgkins lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease is widely used as standard therapy for those with high-risk or relapsed tumor. Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collections have nearly completely replaced bone marrow stem cell (BMSC) harvests because of the perceived advantages of more rapid engraftment, less tumor contamination in the inoculum, and better survival after therapy. The advantage of PBSC, however, may derive from the hematopoietic stimulating cytokines used for PBSC mobilization. Therefore, we tested a randomized comparison of GM-CSF vs. G-CSF used to prime either BMSC or PBSC before collection for use in autologous transplantation. Sixty-two patients receiving transplants (31 PBSC; 31 BMSC) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 51) or Hodgkin's disease (n = 11) were treated. All patients received 6 days of randomly assigned cytokine. Those with cellular marrow in morphologic remission underwent BMSC harvest, while those with hypocellular marrow or microscopic marrow tumor involvement had PBSC collected. Neutrophil recovery was similarly rapid in all groups (median 14 days; range 10-23 days), though two patients had delayed neutrophil recovery using GM-CSF primed PBSC (p = 0.01). Red cell and platelet recovery were significantly quicker after BMSC mobilized with GM-CSF or PBSC mobilized with G-CSF. This speedier hematologic recovery resulted in earlier hospital discharge as well. However, in multivariate analysis, neither the stem cell source nor randomly assigned G-CSF vs. GM-CSF was independently associated with earlier multilineage hematologic recovery or shorter hospital stay. Relapse-free survival was not independently affected by either the assigned stem cell source or the randomly assigned priming cytokine, though malignant relapse was more frequent in those assigned to PBSC (RR of relapse 3.15, p = 0.03). These data document that BMSC, when collected following cytokine priming, can yield a similarly rapid hematologic

  1. Molecular cloning of a second subunit of the receptor for human granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF): Reconstitution of a high-affinity GM-CSF receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Toshio; Gorman, D.M.; Miyajima, Atsushi; Arai, Kenichi; Yokota, Takashi

    1990-01-01

    Using the mouse interleukin 3 (IL-3) receptor cDNA as a probe, the authors obtained a monologous cDNA (KH97) from a cDNA library of a human hemopoietic cell line, TF-1. The protein encoded by the KH97 cDNA has 56% amino acid sequence identity with the mouse IL-3 receptor and retains features common to the family of cytokine receptors. Fibroblasts transfected with the KH97 cDNA expressed a protein of 120 kDa but did not bind any human cytokines, including IL-3 and granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Interestingly, cotransfection of cDNAs for KH97 and the low-affinity human GM-CSF receptor in fibroblasts resulted in formation of a high-affinity receptor for GM-CSF. The dissociation rate of GM-CSF from the reconstituted high-affinity receptor was slower than that from the low-affinity site, whereas the association rate was unchanged. Cross-linking of 125 I-labeled GM-CSF to fibroblasts cotransfected with both cDNAs revealed the same cross-linking patterns as in TF-1 cells - i.e., two major proteins of 80 and 120 kDa which correspond to the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein, respectively. These results indicate that the high-affinity GM-CSF receptor is composed of at least two components in a manner analogous to the IL-2 receptor. They therefore propose to designate the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein as the α and β subunits of the GM-CSF receptor, respectively

  2. Functional paralysis of GM-CSF-derived bone marrow cells productively infected with ectromelia virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Szulc-Dąbrowska

    Full Text Available Ectromelia virus (ECTV is an orthopoxvirus responsible for mousepox, a lethal disease of certain strains of mice that is similar to smallpox in humans, caused by variola virus (VARV. ECTV, similar to VARV, exhibits a narrow host range and has co-evolved with its natural host. Consequently, ECTV employs sophisticated and host-specific strategies to control the immune cells that are important for induction of antiviral immune response. In the present study we investigated the influence of ECTV infection on immune functions of murine GM-CSF-derived bone marrow cells (GM-BM, comprised of conventional dendritic cells (cDCs and macrophages. Our results showed for the first time that ECTV is able to replicate productively in GM-BM and severely impaired their innate and adaptive immune functions. Infected GM-BM exhibited dramatic changes in morphology and increased apoptosis during the late stages of infection. Moreover, GM-BM cells were unable to uptake and process antigen, reach full maturity and mount a proinflammatory response. Inhibition of cytokine/chemokine response may result from the alteration of nuclear translocation of NF-κB, IRF3 and IRF7 transcription factors and down-regulation of many genes involved in TLR, RLR, NLR and type I IFN signaling pathways. Consequently, GM-BM show inability to stimulate proliferation of purified allogeneic CD4+ T cells in a primary mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR. Taken together, our data clearly indicate that ECTV induces immunosuppressive mechanisms in GM-BM leading to their functional paralysis, thus compromising their ability to initiate downstream T-cell activation events.

  3. ZO-1 expression is suppressed by GM-CSF via miR-96/ERG in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hu; Zhang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jilin; Liu, Dongxin; Wei, Jiayi; Fang, Wengang; Zhao, Weidong; Chen, Yuhua; Shang, Deshu

    2018-05-01

    The level of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increases in some disorders such as vascular dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis. We previously reported that in Alzheimer's disease patients, a high level of GM-CSF in the brain parenchyma downregulated expression of ZO-1, a blood-brain barrier tight junction protein, and facilitated the infiltration of peripheral monocytes across the blood-brain barrier. However, the molecular mechanism underlying regulation of ZO-1 expression by GM-CSF is unclear. Herein, we found that the erythroblast transformation-specific (ETS) transcription factor ERG cooperated with the proto-oncogene protein c-MYC in regulation of ZO-1 transcription in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). The ERG expression was suppressed by miR-96 which was increased by GM-CSF through the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Inhibition of miR-96 prevented ZO-1 down-regulation induced by GM-CSF both in vitro and in vivo. Our results revealed the mechanism of ZO-1 expression reduced by GM-CSF, and provided a potential target, miR-96, which could block ZO-1 down-regulation caused by GM-CSF in BMECs.

  4. ILC3 GM-CSF production and mobilisation orchestrate acute intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Claire; Thornton, Emily E; McKenzie, Brent; Schaupp, Anna-Lena; Huskens, Nicky; Griseri, Thibault; West, Nathaniel; Tung, Sim; Seddon, Benedict P; Uhlig, Holm H; Powrie, Fiona

    2016-01-18

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) contribute to host defence and tissue repair but can induce immunopathology. Recent work has revealed tissue-specific roles for ILCs; however, the question of how a small population has large effects on immune homeostasis remains unclear. We identify two mechanisms that ILC3s utilise to exert their effects within intestinal tissue. ILC-driven colitis depends on production of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which recruits and maintains intestinal inflammatory monocytes. ILCs present in the intestine also enter and exit cryptopatches in a highly dynamic process. During colitis, ILC3s mobilize from cryptopatches, a process that can be inhibited by blocking GM-CSF, and mobilization precedes inflammatory foci elsewhere in the tissue. Together these data identify the IL-23R/GM-CSF axis within ILC3 as a key control point in the accumulation of innate effector cells in the intestine and in the spatio-temporal dynamics of ILCs in the intestinal inflammatory response.

  5. Research Upregulation of CD23 (FcεRII Expression in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells (huASMC in Response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lew D Betty

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway smooth muscle cells play a key role in remodeling that contributes to airway hyperreactivity. Airway smooth muscle remodeling includes hypertrophy and hyperplasia. It has been previously shown that the expression of CD23 on ASMC in rabbits can be induced by the IgE component of the atopic serum. We examined if other components of atopic serum are capable of inducing CD23 expression independent of IgE. Methods Serum starved huASMC were stimulated with either IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-13, IL-5, PGD2, LTD4, tryptase or a combination of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 each with GM-CSF for a period of 24 h. CD23 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, western blot, and indirect immunofluorescence. Results The CD23 protein expression was upregulated in huASMC in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The percentage of cells with increased fluorescence intensity above the control was 25.1 ± 4.2% (IL-4, 15.6 ± 2.7% (GM-CSF and 32.9 ± 13.9% (IL-4/GMCSF combination(n = 3. The protein content of IL-4/GMCSF stimulated cells was significantly elevated. Expression of CD23 in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-4/GM-CSF was accompanied by changes in cell morphology including depolymerization of isoactin fibers, cell spreading, and membrane ruffling. Western blot revealed abundant expression of the IL-4Rα and a low level expression of IL-2Rγc in huASMC. Stimulation with IL-4 resulted in the phosphorylation of STAT-6 and an increase in the expression of the IL-2Rγc. Conclusion CD23 on huASMC is upregulated by IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The expression of CD23 is accompanied by an increase in cell volume and an increase in protein content per cell, suggesting hypertrophy. Upregulation of CD23 by IL-4/GM-CSF results in phenotypic changes in huASMC that could play a role in cell migration or a change in the synthetic function of the cells. Upregulation of CD23 in huASMC by IL-4 and GM-CSF can contribute to changes in huASMC and may provide an avenue

  6. Influence of rhTPO/GM-CSF fusion protein on hemopoiesis in mice irradiated with 60Co γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Hua; Ge Zhongliang; Zhang Qunwei; Liu Xiuzhen

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To find a new biological therapy for secondary hematopoietic failure including anemia, infection and hemorrhage after administration of chemotherapeutic drugs etc. Methods: hGM-CSF gene was ligated with hTPO gene isolated from human fetal liver mRNA and a new fusion protein rh TPO/GM-CSF obtained. Results: The new fusion protein could promote recovery of peripheral WBC and PLT of 5.0 Gy irradiated mice. BFU-E, CFU-Meg and CFU-GM in bone marrow of mice after irradiation recovered significantly by treatment with rhTPO/GM-CSF fusion protein for 10 days. Conclusion: These results suggest that the new fusion protein has the biological activity of both hTPO and hGM-CSF simultaneously and can stimulate the proliferation of megakaryocytes and granulocyte progenitors

  7. Enhancement of an Allogeneic GM-CSF-Secreting Breast Cancer Vaccine by Immunomodulatory Doses of Cyclophosphamide and Doxorubicin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emens, Leisha

    2003-01-01

    .... We have applied the use of tumor cells genetically modified to secrete GM-CSF to the preclinical neu transgenic mouse model, characterized by spontaneous tumor development and pre-existing immune tolerance to HER-2/neu...

  8. Regulation of dendritic cell development by GM-CSF: molecular control and implications for immune homeostasis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Laar, Lianne; Coffer, Paul J; Woltman, Andrea M

    2012-04-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a small and heterogeneous fraction of the hematopoietic system, specialized in antigen capture, processing, and presentation. The different DC subsets act as sentinels throughout the body and perform a key role in the induction of immunogenic as well as tolerogenic immune responses. Because of their limited lifespan, continuous replenishment of DC is required. Whereas the importance of GM-CSF in regulating DC homeostasis has long been underestimated, this cytokine is currently considered a critical factor for DC development under both steady-state and inflammatory conditions. Regulation of cellular actions by GM-CSF depends on the activation of intracellular signaling modules, including JAK/STAT, MAPK, PI3K, and canonical NF-κB. By directing the activity of transcription factors and other cellular effector proteins, these pathways influence differentiation, survival and/or proliferation of uncommitted hematopoietic progenitors, and DC subset-specific precursors, thereby contributing to specific aspects of DC subset development. The specific intracellular events resulting from GM-CSF-induced signaling provide a molecular explanation for GM-CSF-dependent subset distribution as well as clues to the specific characteristics and functions of GM-CSF-differentiated DCs compared with DCs generated by fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand. This knowledge can be used to identify therapeutic targets to improve GM-CSF-dependent DC-based strategies to regulate immunity.

  9. GM-CSF production from human airway smooth muscle cells is potentiated by human serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria B. Sukkar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC actively participate in the airway inflammatory process in asthma. Interleukin–1β (IL–1β and tumour necrosis factor–α (TNF–α induce ASMC to release inflammatory mediators in vitro. ASMC mediator release in vivo, however, may be influenced by features of the allergic asthmatic phenotype. We determined whether; (1 allergic asthmatic serum (AAS modulates ASMC mediator release in response to IL–1β and TNF–α, and (2 IL–1β/TNF–α prime ASMC to release mediators in response to AAS. IL–5 and GMCSF were quantified by ELISA in culture supernatants of; (1 ASMC pre-incubated with either AAS, non-allergic non-asthmatic serum (NAS or MonomedTM (a serum substitute and subsequently stimulated with IL–1β and TNF–α and (2 ASMC stimulated with IL–1β/TNF–α and subsequently exposed to either AAS, NAS or MonomedTM. IL-1g and TNF–α induced GM-CSF release in ASMC pre-incubated with AAS was not greater than that in ASMC pre-incubated with NAS or MonomedTM. IL–1β and TNF–α, however, primed ASMC to release GM-CSF in response to human serum. GM-CSF production following IL–1β/TNF–α and serum exposure (AAS or NAS was significantly greater than that following IL–1β /TNF–α and MonomedTM exposure or IL–1β/TNF–α exposure only. Whilst the potentiating effects of human serum were not specific to allergic asthma, these findings suggest that the secretory capacity of ASMC may be up-regulated during exacerbations of asthma, where there is evidence of vascular leakage.

  10. The influence of protein malnutrition on the production of GM-CSF and M-CSF by macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Cunha de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is well established that protein malnutrition (PM impairs immune defenses and increases susceptibility to infection. Macrophages are cells that play a central role in innate immunity, constituting one of the first barriers against infections. Macrophages produce several soluble factors, including cytokines and growth factors, important to the immune response. Among those growth factors, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. GM-CSF and M-CSF are important to monocyte and macrophage development and stimulation of the immune response process. Knowing the importance of GM-CSF and M-CSF, we sought to investigate the influence of PM on macrophage production of these growth factors. Two-month-old male BALB/c mice were subjected to PM with a low-protein diet (2% and compared to a control diet (12% mouse group. Nutritional status, hemogram and the number of peritoneal cells were evaluated. Additionally, peritoneal macrophages were cultured and the production of GM-CSF and M-CSF and mRNA expression were evaluated. To determine if PM altered macrophage production of GM-CSF and M-CSF, they were stimulated with TNF-α. The PM animals had anemia, leukopenia and a reduced number of peritoneal cells. The production of M-CSF was not different between groups; however, cells from PM animals, stimulated with or without TNF-α, presented reduced capability to produce GM-CSF. These data imply that PM interferes with the production of GM-CSF, and consequently would affect the production and maturation of hematopoietic cells and the immune response.

  11. Reduced expression of granule proteins during extended survival of eosinophils in splenocyte culture with GM-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seul Hye; Na, Hye Young; Sohn, Moah; Han, Sun Murray; Choi, Wanho; In, Hyunju; Hong, Sookyung; Jeon, Hyejin; Seo, Jun-Young; Ahn, Jongcheol; Park, Chae Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a multifaceted hematopoietic cytokine and the culture of mouse bone marrow with GM-CSF produces a variety of myeloid cells including granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. In the present study, we cultured mouse splenocytes with GM-CSF and examined the changes in hematopoietic cell populations over a week. Most of the splenic hematopoietic cells disappeared significantly from culture within 6days with or without the presence of GM-CSF. Among the splenic granulocyte populations, only eosinophils fully survived throughout the culture with GM-CSF for more than a week. During 10days of culture with GM-CSF, splenic eosinophils maintained their morphology as well as most of their surface molecules at high levels, including CCR3 and Siglec F. Meanwhile, the expression of mRNAs encoding major basic protein-1 (MBP-1) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), two major eosinophil-derived granule proteins, was diminished significantly from the cultured eosinophils. EPO assays also revealed that eosinophils in culture for more than 5days retained 30% or less EPO activity compared to those in uncultured splenocytes. In contrast, culture of splenocytes with GM-CSF did not change the capacity of eosinophils to migrate in response to eotaxin-1. Our results indicate that mouse splenic eosinophils are effectively cultured for lengthy periods while their expression of eosinophil-derived granule proteins is specifically suppressed. The relevance of these findings to eosinophilic inflammatory response is discussed. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular cloning, sequencing and structural studies of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    KAUST Repository

    Sugumar, Thennarasu; Ganesan, Pugalenthi; Harishankar, Murugesan; Dhinakar Raj, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that is essential for growth and development of progenitors of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we report molecular cloning, sequencing and characterization of GM-CSF from Indian water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. In addition, we performed sequence and structural analysis for buffalo GM-CSF. Buffalo GM-CSF has been compared with 17 mammalian GM-CSFs using multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional model for buffalo GM-CSF and human receptor complex was built using homology modelling to study cross-reactivity between two species. Detailed analysis was performed to study GM-CSF interface and various interactions at the interface. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Molecular cloning, sequencing and structural studies of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    KAUST Repository

    Sugumar, Thennarasu

    2013-06-25

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that is essential for growth and development of progenitors of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we report molecular cloning, sequencing and characterization of GM-CSF from Indian water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. In addition, we performed sequence and structural analysis for buffalo GM-CSF. Buffalo GM-CSF has been compared with 17 mammalian GM-CSFs using multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional model for buffalo GM-CSF and human receptor complex was built using homology modelling to study cross-reactivity between two species. Detailed analysis was performed to study GM-CSF interface and various interactions at the interface. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Coadministration of cruzipain and GM-CSF DNAs, a new immunotherapeutic vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Natacha; Sánchez Alberti, Andrés; Bivona, Augusto E; De Marzi, Mauricio C; Frank, Fernanda M; Cazorla, Silvia I; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccine research and development are especially important in Chagas disease considering the characteristics of the chronic infection and the number of people in the Americas living with a parasite infection for decades. We have previously reported the efficacy of attenuated Salmonella enterica (S) carrying plasmid encoding cruzipain (SCz) to protect against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In the present work we investigated whether Cz DNA vaccine immunotherapy could be effective in controlling an ongoing T. cruzi infection in mice. We here report the intramuscular administration of naked Cz DNA or the oral administration of Salmonella as Cz DNA delivery system as therapeutic vaccines in mice during acute or chronic infection. The coadministration of a plasmid encoding GM-CSF improved vaccine performance, indicating that the stimulation of innate immune cells is needed in the event of an ongoing infection. These therapeutic vaccines were able to address the response to a protective and sustained Th1 biased profile not only against Cz but also against a variety of parasite antigens. The combined therapeutic vaccine during the chronic phase of infection prevents tissue pathology as shown by a reduced level of enzyme activity characteristic of tissue damage and a tissue status compatible with normal tissue. The obtained results suggest that immunotherapy with Cz and GM-CSF DNAs, either alone or in combination with other drug treatments, may represent a promising alternative for Chagas disease therapy.

  15. Human papillomavirus infection is associated with decreased levels of GM-CSF in cervico-vaginal fluid of infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comar, Manola; Monasta, Lorenzo; Zanotta, Nunzia; Vecchi Brumatti, Liza; Ricci, Giuseppe; Zauli, Giorgio

    2013-10-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection, there are very scant data about the influence of this virus on the in vitro fertilization outcome. To assess the presence of HPV in the cervico-vaginal fluid in relationship to the in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome and to the concentration of selected cytokines, known to affect embryo implantation and gestation: granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). Cervico-vaginal samples were collected on the day of oocyte pick-up from 82 women. Vaginas were flushed with 50 mL of sterile water and 3 mL of fluid was collected. Twelve women (15%) were positive for HPV. Interestingly, among HPV(+) women live birth rate was about half of the rate in HPV(-) women, although the differences were not statistically significant due to the low number of cases. Cervico-vaginal samples of a sub-group of 29 (8 HPV(+) and 21 HPV(-)) women were analyzed for GM-CSF and G-CSF by ELISA. GM-CSF but not G-CSF was significantly lower in the cervico-vaginal fluid of HPV(+) than in HPV(-) women. Since GM-CSF plays an important role during pregnancy, the reduced levels of GM-CSF in the cervico-vaginal fluid of HPV(+) women might contribute to explain the reduced live birth rate observed in HPV(+) women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Rae Rho

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs. We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF. An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  17. IL-2 and GM-CSF are regulated by DNA demethylation during activation of T cells, B cells and macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); Ohms, Stephen J. [ACRF Biomolecular Resource Facility, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); Shannon, Frances M. [Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); The University of Canberra, ACT 2602 (Australia); Sun, Chao, E-mail: sunchao2775@163.com [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Fan, Jun Y., E-mail: jun.fan@anu.edu.au [Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation is dynamic and flexible and changes rapidly upon cell activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation controls the inducible gene expression in a given cell type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some enzymes are involved in maintaining the methylation profile of immune cells. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation has been found to occur at the promoters of a number of actively expressed cytokines and is believed to play a critical role in transcriptional regulation. While many DNA demethylation studies have focused on T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation, changes in DNA methylation in other types of immune cells are less well studied. We found that the expression of two cytokines (IL-2 and GM-CSF) responded differently to activation in three types of immune cells: EL4, A20 and RAW264.7 cells. Using the McrBC and MeDIP approaches, we observed decreases in DNA methylation at a genome-wide level and at the promoters of the genes of these cytokines. The expression of several potential enzymes/co-enzymes involved in the DNA demethylation pathways seemed to be associated with immune cell activation.

  18. IL-2 and GM-CSF are regulated by DNA demethylation during activation of T cells, B cells and macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yan; Ohms, Stephen J.; Shannon, Frances M.; Sun, Chao; Fan, Jun Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► DNA methylation is dynamic and flexible and changes rapidly upon cell activation. ► DNA methylation controls the inducible gene expression in a given cell type. ► Some enzymes are involved in maintaining the methylation profile of immune cells. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation has been found to occur at the promoters of a number of actively expressed cytokines and is believed to play a critical role in transcriptional regulation. While many DNA demethylation studies have focused on T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation, changes in DNA methylation in other types of immune cells are less well studied. We found that the expression of two cytokines (IL-2 and GM-CSF) responded differently to activation in three types of immune cells: EL4, A20 and RAW264.7 cells. Using the McrBC and MeDIP approaches, we observed decreases in DNA methylation at a genome-wide level and at the promoters of the genes of these cytokines. The expression of several potential enzymes/co-enzymes involved in the DNA demethylation pathways seemed to be associated with immune cell activation.

  19. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum GM-CSF, IL-8, IL-6 levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Hongfeng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum GM-CSF, IL-8 and IL-6 levels both before and after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum GM-CSF, IL-8 and IL-6 levels were measured with RIA in 32 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum GM-CSF, IL-8, IL-6 levels were significantly higher in the patients than those in the controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Abnormal high serum GM-CSF, IL-8, IL-6 levels played important role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma in children. (authors)

  20. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum GM-CSF and platelet granular membrance protein (PGMP) contents after treatment in patients with cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang Zhizhong; Pan Shengying; Tang Yong; Wang Jun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum GM-CSF and PGMP levels after treatment in patients with cerebral infarction. Methods: Serum GM-CSF and PGMP contents were measured with RIA in 36 patients with cerebral infarction both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum GM-CSF and PGMP levels in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.01). After 6 months' treatment, the levels (though dropped markedly), remained significantly higher (P<0.05). Conclusion: Serum GM-CSF and PGMP levels might be of prognostic value in patients with cerebral infarction. (authors)

  1. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum GM-CSF, CGRP levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lihua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of serum GM-CSF and CGRP levels both before and after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum GM-CSF and CGRP levels were measured with RIA in 33 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum GM-CSF levels was significantly higher in the patients than those in the controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Abnormal high serum GM -CSF and low CGRP levels played important role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma in children. (authors)

  2. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum NO, NOS and GM-CSF levels after treatment in children with bronchopneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongmei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum NO, NOS and GM-CSF levels after treatment in children with bronchopneumonia. Methods: Serum GM-CSF levels were determined with RIA, and serum NO, NOS levels were determined with biochemical methods both before and after treatment in 48 children with bronehopneumonia as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment the serum concentrations of NO, NOS and GM-CSF in the patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Detection of serum NO, NOS and GM-CSF levels were useful for assessment of therapeutic efficacy. (authors)

  3. Clinical significance of determination of serum TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF levels in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Donglin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF levels were measured with RIA in 32 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma and 30 controls. Results: Serum levels of TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF were very significantly higher in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma than those in controls (P<0.01). After one week treatment, the levels dropped considerably but still remained significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.05). Conclusion: These cytokines participated in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Monitoring the changes of their serum levels was helpful for the management of the diseases. (authors)

  4. Lentivirus-ABCG1 instillation reduces lipid accumulation and improves lung compliance in GM-CSF knock-out mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malur, Anagha; Huizar, Isham [Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Wells, Greg [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Barna, Barbara P. [Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Malur, Achut G. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Thomassen, Mary Jane, E-mail: thomassenm@ecu.edu [Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lentivirus-ABCG1 reduces lipid accumulation in lungs of GM-CSF knock-out mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up-regulation of ABCG1 improves lung function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of ABCG1 improves surfactant metabolism. -- Abstract: We have shown decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and the PPAR{gamma}-regulated ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) in alveolar macrophages from patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). PAP patients also exhibit neutralizing antibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an upregulator of PPAR{gamma}. In association with functional GM-CSF deficiency, PAP lung is characterized by surfactant-filled alveolar spaces and lipid-filled alveolar macrophages. Similar pathology characterizes GM-CSF knock-out (KO) mice. We reported previously that intratracheal instillation of a lentivirus (lenti)-PPAR{gamma} plasmid into GM-CSF KO animals elevated ABCG1 and reduced alveolar macrophage lipid accumulation. Here, we hypothesized that instillation of lenti-ABCG1 might be sufficient to decrease lipid accumulation and improve pulmonary function in GM-CSF KO mice. Animals received intratracheal instillation of lenti-ABCG1 or control lenti-enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) plasmids and alveolar macrophages were harvested 10 days later. Alveolar macrophage transduction efficiency was 79% as shown by lenti-eGFP fluorescence. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated a threefold (p = 0.0005) increase in ABCG1 expression with no change of PPAR{gamma} or ABCA1 in alveolar macrophages of lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. ABCG1 was unchanged in control lenti-eGFP and PBS-instilled groups. Oil Red O staining detected reduced intracellular neutral lipid in alveolar macrophages from lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. Extracellular cholesterol and phospholipids were also decreased as shown by

  5. Lentivirus-ABCG1 instillation reduces lipid accumulation and improves lung compliance in GM-CSF knock-out mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malur, Anagha; Huizar, Isham; Wells, Greg; Barna, Barbara P.; Malur, Achut G.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Lentivirus-ABCG1 reduces lipid accumulation in lungs of GM-CSF knock-out mice. ► Up-regulation of ABCG1 improves lung function. ► Upregulation of ABCG1 improves surfactant metabolism. -- Abstract: We have shown decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) and the PPARγ-regulated ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) in alveolar macrophages from patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). PAP patients also exhibit neutralizing antibodies to granulocyte–macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an upregulator of PPARγ. In association with functional GM-CSF deficiency, PAP lung is characterized by surfactant-filled alveolar spaces and lipid-filled alveolar macrophages. Similar pathology characterizes GM-CSF knock-out (KO) mice. We reported previously that intratracheal instillation of a lentivirus (lenti)-PPARγ plasmid into GM-CSF KO animals elevated ABCG1 and reduced alveolar macrophage lipid accumulation. Here, we hypothesized that instillation of lenti-ABCG1 might be sufficient to decrease lipid accumulation and improve pulmonary function in GM-CSF KO mice. Animals received intratracheal instillation of lenti-ABCG1 or control lenti-enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) plasmids and alveolar macrophages were harvested 10 days later. Alveolar macrophage transduction efficiency was 79% as shown by lenti-eGFP fluorescence. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated a threefold (p = 0.0005) increase in ABCG1 expression with no change of PPARγ or ABCA1 in alveolar macrophages of lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. ABCG1 was unchanged in control lenti-eGFP and PBS-instilled groups. Oil Red O staining detected reduced intracellular neutral lipid in alveolar macrophages from lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. Extracellular cholesterol and phospholipids were also decreased as shown by analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Lung compliance was diminished in untreated GMCSF KO mice

  6. [Therapeutic use of hematopoietic growth factors. II. GM-CSF and G-CSF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, B; Arock, M

    1998-01-01

    The second part of this review on haematopoietic growth factors is focused on the therapeutic use of GM-CSF and G-CSF. Such therapeutic applications have raised very great hopes for clinical haematology. However, it should not be forgotten that these haematopoietic growth factors, which are very costly, are powerful two-edged weapons capable of triggering a cascade of reactions, and have a field of activity that often goes beyond the single highly specific property which it is hoped they possess. The risks and costs of their use are currently being evaluated. Waited developments concerning these molecules focus on three axes: a best use of factors already commercialized, especially concerning adaptation of posologies and new indications, the development of hybrid molecules from already known haematopoietic growth factors, possessing the advantages of respective factors, but not their disadvantages, the discovery of new haematopoietic growth factors with potential therapeutic application.

  7. A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium for in vitro fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebe, Søren; Loft, Anne; Povlsen, Betina B

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium on ongoing implantation rate (OIR).......To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium on ongoing implantation rate (OIR)....

  8. GM-CSF, IL-3 and G-CSF receptors on acute myeloid leukemia cells : function, regulation of expression, and ligand binding characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Budel (Leo)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF stimulate proliferation of human acute myeloid leukemia in vitro, but patterns of response among clinical cases are diverse. As described in Chapters 2 and 3, numbers and affinity of IL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF receptors on cells of patients with AML were assessed and

  9. Specific Contributions of CSF-1 and GM-CSF to the Dynamics of the Mononuclear Phagocyte System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Cynthia; Cook, Andrew D; Lacey, Derek; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Vlahos, Ross; Anderson, Gary P; Hamilton, John A

    2015-07-01

    M-CSF (or CSF-1) and GM-CSF can regulate the development and function of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS). To address some of the outstanding and sometimes conflicting issues surrounding this biology, we undertook a comparative analysis of the effects of neutralizing mAbs to these CSFs on murine MPS populations in the steady-state and during acute inflammatory reactions. CSF-1 neutralization, but not of GM-CSF, in normal mice rapidly reduced the numbers of more mature Ly6C(-) monocytes in blood and bone marrow, without any effect on proliferating precursors, and also the numbers of the resident peritoneal macrophages, observations consistent with CSF-1 signaling being essential only at a relatively late state in steady-state MPS development; in contrast, GM-CSF neutralization had no effect on the numbers of these particular populations. In Ag-induced peritonitis (AIP), thioglycolate-induced peritonitis, and LPS-induced lung inflammation, CSF-1 neutralization lowered inflammatory macrophage number; in the AIP model, this reduced number was not due to suppressed proliferation. More detailed studies with the convenient AIP model indicated that CSF-1 neutralization led to a relatively uniform reduction in all inflammatory cell populations; GM-CSF neutralization, in contrast, was more selective, resulting in the preferential loss among the MPS populations of a cycling, monocyte-derived inflammatory dendritic cell population. Some mechanistic options for the specific CSF-dependent biologies enumerated are discussed. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  10. Distinct changes in pulmonary surfactant homeostasis in common beta-chain-and GM-CSF-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reed, JA; Ikegami, M; Robb, L; Begley, CG; Ross, G; Whitsett, JA

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is caused by inactivation of either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) or GM receptor common beta-chain (beta(c)) genes in mice [GM(-/-), beta(c)(-/-)], demonstrating a critical role of GM-CSF signaling in surfactant homeostasis. To

  11. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α levels after treatment in children with acute nephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaoyan; Zhou Hong; Xu Weiqin; Li Xinghua

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of determination of changes of serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF- α levels after treatment in children with acute nephritis. Methods: Serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α levels (with RIA) were measured in 31 pediatric patients with acute nephritis and 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α levels in the patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P< O.01). After treatment for 3 months, the serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α levels, though markedly corrected, remained significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.05). Conclusion: Determination of changes of serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α contents after treatment might be of prognostic importance in pediatric patients with acute nephritis. (authors)

  12. Differential transfection efficiency rates of the GM-CSF gene into human renal cell carcinoma lines by lipofection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, A; Zöller, K; Enczmann, J; Ebert, T; Schmitz-Draeger, B; Ackermann, R; Wernet, P

    1997-01-01

    One of the major questions in any gene therapy approach is the selection of the appropriate vector system. Here, the optimization of a gene transfer protocol for renal cell carcinoma using lipofection as a nonviral gene transduction system was evaluated. To select the promoter which gives the highest expression, different plasmids which are able to express Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene as a reporter gene under the control of different promoters were tested: human cytomegalovirus promoter (pCMVbeta), simian virus 40 promoter (pSVbeta), adenovirus promoter (ADbeta), and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter (TKbeta). The pCMVbeta revealed the highest expression of the beta-gal gene in the renal cell carcinoma (RCC) lines. Thus this CMV promoter was selected for the expression of the granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulator factor (GM-CSF) gene. Three different lipids (LipofectAmine, LipofectAce, and Lipofectin) were compared for their transduction efficiency, and the optimal conditions for quantitatively high lipofection rates were established. The consistently best results regarding gene expression as well as viability of the RCC lines were obtained when Lipofectin was used. Gene expression was monitored by a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and functionally validated by a cell proliferation test. The GM-CSF expression profile showed a peak at 48 hours after transfection and was still detectable after 5 days. Here the feasibility of efficient lipofection of the GM-CSF gene into RCC lines is demonstrated. Most importantly, considerable differences in the relative quantity of GM-CSF gene transfer into the different RCC lines was observed here. This may be of critical relevance for the design of any clinical gene transduction protocol in tumor cell vaccination attempts.

  13. A sequential erythropoietin and GM-CSF schedule offers clinical benefits in the treatment of anaemia in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernell, P; Stenke, L; Wallvik, J; Hippe, E; Hast, R

    1996-08-01

    In order to reduce anaemia in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) a stepwise treatment protocol including erythropoietin (EP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was designed. Thirty-seven MDS patients (stages I-III) with symptomatic anaemia were first given EPO 10,000 U s.c. 3 times weekly for 6 weeks. Those not responding, i.e. increased their haemoglobin levels > 15 g/l, proceeded into the second phase of the study where GM-CSF (200 micrograms/d. s.c. on weeks 1-6) was combined with EPO (10,000 U s.c. 3 times weekly on weeks 5-14). Following the initial EPO treatment phase, 14 of the 37 patients (38%) responded with increased haemoglobin levels. Responders were significantly different from non-responders in that their pre-treatment values of s-EPO, s-LDH and bone marrow blast cell counts were lower, their baseline haemoglobin levels higher and their transfusion dependency less pronounced. Eighteen of the 23 non-responders proceeded into the second phase, 13 of those were evaluable having completed the entire schedule. Three of the 13 initially EPO resistant patients (23%) responded to the GM-CSF/EPO combination with increased haemoglobin levels, suggesting a positive synergy between the two cytokines. Thus, the overall response rate to the present protocol was 46% (17 of 37 cases), but only a limited subset of the patients did clearly benefit from the combined GM-CSF/EPO administration. Therefore, we believe this step-wise approach to multiple growth factor treatment in MDS, starting with EPO alone and reserving the combination for refractory cases, has considerable advantages, taking into account both medical and socio-economical aspects.

  14. The Combined Impact of Surgery and Immunomodulation With Low Dose Cytoxan and GM-CSF in the Early Treatment of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kendra, Kari L

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the combined impact of surgery and immunomodulation with low dose cytoxan and GM-CSF on the development of dendritic cells and the activation of T cells in vivo...

  15. X-ray-induced production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by mouse spleen cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoda, M.; Shinoda, M.; Tsuneoka, K.; Shikita, M.

    1980-01-01

    Spleen cells were collected from normal mice and cultured in a medium containing 20% calf serum. Addition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the culture significantly increased the production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and a maximum induction was attained in 5 days. Irradiation of the spleen cells with 300 to 3000 R x rays also enhanced the production of GM-CSF, but there was a latent period of about 5 days before the factor appeared in the culture medium. The observed difference between LPS and x rays in the timing of inducing GM-CSF production in the spleen cell culture was consistent with the difference observed in animals. These results suggest that different mechanisms of GM-CSF production operate in the spleen in response to either LPS or x rays

  16. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum NO, NOS and GM-CSF levels after massage therapy in patients with periarthritis of shoulder diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Feng; Chen Lixia; Pan Xiaohong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum NO, NOS and GM-CSF levels after massage therapy in patients with periarthritis of shoulder diseases. Methods: Serum GM-CSF level was determined with RIA and serum NO, NOS levels were determined with chemical methods both before and after massage therapy in 33 patients with periarthritis of shoulder diseases as well as in 35 normal healthy controls. Results: Before massage therapy the serum concertration of NO, NOS and GM-CSF in the patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Detection of serum NO, NOS and GM-CSF levels were closely related to the occurrence and development of the disease also provides important value clinically. (authors)

  17. Clinical significance of measurement of changes in serum TNF-α and GM-CSF levels after treatment in children with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Heng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of the changes of levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) after treatment in children with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum TNF-α and GM-CSF levels were measured with RIA in 32 patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment the serum TNF-α and GM-CSF levels in patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P 0.05 ). Conclusion: Changes of serum TNF-α and GM-CSF levels contents after treatment might be of prognostic importance in children with bronchial asthma. (authors)

  18. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Wenjing

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of Serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels were measured with RIA in 33 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Detection of serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels were useful for assessment of therapeutic efficacy and were of important clinical values in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. (authors)

  19. Clinical significance of determination of serum IL-2, IL-6 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhuo; Sun Jin; Yao Li

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum IL-2, IL-6 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum levels of IL-2, IL-6 and GM-CSF were measured with RIA in 36 pediatric patients with bronchiol asthma and 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum levels of IL-6, GM-CSF were significantly higher in the patients than those in controls (P 0.05), Serum IL-2 levels were negatively correlated with the IL-6 and GM-CSF levels (r=-0.5846, -0.6018, P<0.01). Conclusion: These cytokines participated in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma in pediatric patients. Mornitoring the changes of their serum levels was helpful for the management of the diseases. (authors)

  20. Adenoviral vector-mediated GM-CSF gene transfer improves anti-mycobacterial immunity in mice - role of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singpiel, Alena; Kramer, Julia; Maus, Regina; Stolper, Jennifer; Bittersohl, Lara Friederike; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Welte, Tobias; Sparwasser, Tim; Maus, Ulrich A

    2018-03-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor involved in differentiation, survival and activation of myeloid and non-myeloid cells with important implications for lung antibacterial immunity. Here we examined the effect of pulmonary adenoviral vector-mediated delivery of GM-CSF (AdGM-CSF) on anti-mycobacterial immunity in M. bovis BCG infected mice. Exposure of M. bovis BCG infected mice to AdGM-CSF either applied on 6h, or 6h and 7days post-infection substantially increased alveolar recruitment of iNOS and IL-12 expressing macrophages, and significantly increased accumulation of IFNγ pos T cells and particularly regulatory T cells (Tregs). This was accompanied by significantly reduced mycobacterial loads in the lungs of mice. Importantly, diphtheria toxin-induced depletion of Tregs did not influence mycobacterial loads, but accentuated immunopathology in AdGM-CSF-exposed mice infected with M. bovis BCG. Together, the data demonstrate that AdGM-CSF therapy improves lung protective immunity against M. bovis BCG infection in mice independent of co-recruited Tregs, which however critically contribute to limit lung immunopathology in BCG-infected mice. These data may be relevant to the development of immunomodulatory strategies to limit immunopathology-based lung injury in tuberculosis in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  1. CD14-dependent monocyte isolation enhances phagocytosis of listeria monocytogenes by proinflammatory, GM-CSF-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Neu

    Full Text Available Macrophages are an important line of defence against invading pathogens. Human macrophages derived by different methods were tested for their suitability as models to investigate Listeria monocytogenes (Lm infection and compared to macrophage-like THP-1 cells. Human primary monocytes were isolated by either positive or negative immunomagnetic selection and differentiated in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF into pro- or anti-inflammatory macrophages, respectively. Regardless of the isolation method, GM-CSF-derived macrophages (GM-Mφ stained positive for CD206 and M-CSF-derived macrophages (M-Mφ for CD163. THP-1 cells did not express CD206 or CD163 following incubation with PMA, M- or GM-CSF alone or in combination. Upon infection with Lm, all primary macrophages showed good survival at high multiplicities of infection whereas viability of THP-1 was severely reduced even at lower bacterial numbers. M-Mφ generally showed high phagocytosis of Lm. Strikingly, phagocytosis of Lm by GM-Mφ was markedly influenced by the method used for isolation of monocytes. GM-Mφ derived from negatively isolated monocytes showed low phagocytosis of Lm whereas GM-Mφ generated from positively selected monocytes displayed high phagocytosis of Lm. Moreover, incubation with CD14 antibody was sufficient to enhance phagocytosis of Lm by GM-Mφ generated from negatively isolated monocytes. By contrast, non-specific phagocytosis of latex beads by GM-Mφ was not influenced by treatment with CD14 antibody. Furthermore, phagocytosis of Lactococcus lactis, Escherichia coli, human cytomegalovirus and the protozoan parasite Leishmania major by GM-Mφ was not enhanced upon treatment with CD14 antibody indicating that this effect is specific for Lm. Based on these observations, we propose macrophages derived by ex vivo differentiation of negatively selected human primary monocytes as the most

  2. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and sucralfate in prevention of radiation-induced mucositis: a prospective randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makkonen, Tuula A.; Minn, Heikki; Jekunen, Antti; Vilja, Pekka; Tuominen, Juhani; Joensuu, Heikki

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To compare subcutaneously given molgramostim (GM-CSF) and sucralfate mouth washings to sucralfate mouth washings in prevention of radiation-induced mucositis. Methods and Materials: Forty head and neck cancer patients were randomly assigned to use either GM-CSF and sucralfate (n = 20) or sucralfate alone (n = 20) during radiotherapy. Sucralfate was used as 1.0 g mouth washing 6 times daily after the first 10 Gy of radiotherapy, and 150-300 μg GM-CSF was given subcutaneously. The grade of radiation mucositis and blood cell counts were monitored weekly. Salivary lactoferrin was measured as a surrogate marker for oral mucositis. Results: We found no significant difference between the molgramostim and the control groups in the oral mucositis grade, oral pain, use of analgesic drugs, weight loss, or survival. The median maximum neutrophil counts (median, 9.2 x 10 9 /L vs. 5.9 x 10 9 /L, p = 0.0005), eosinophil counts (median, 1.3 x 10 9 /L vs. 0.2 x 10 9 /L, p = 0.0004), and salivary lactoferrin concentrations were higher in patients who received GM-CSF. The most common toxicities in the GM-CSF plus sucralfate group were skin reactions at the GM-CSF injection site (65%), fever (30%), bone pain (25%), and nausea (15%), whereas the toxicity of sucralfate given alone was minimal. Conclusion: We found no evidence indicating that subcutaneously given GM-CSF reduces the severity of radiation-induced mucositis

  3. GM-CSF and IL-3 Modulate Human Monocyte TNF-α Production and Renewal in In Vitro Models of Trained Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Loffredo, Stefania; Scamardella, Eloise; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Granata, Francescopaolo; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    GM-CSF and IL-3 are hematopoietic cytokines that also modulate the effector functions of several immune cell subsets. In particular, GM-CSF and IL-3 exert a significant control on monocyte and macrophage effector functions, as assessed in experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and also in human studies. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms and the extent to which GM-CSF and IL-3 modulate the pro-inflammatory, LPS-mediated, activation of human CD14 + monocytes taking into account the new concept of trained immunity (i.e., the priming stimulus modulates the response to subsequent stimuli mainly by inducing chromatin remodeling and increased transcription at relevant genetic loci). We demonstrate that GM-CSF and IL-3 priming enhances TNF-α production upon subsequent LPS stimulation (short-term model of trained immunity) in a p38- and SIRT2-dependent manner without increasing TNF primary transcript levels (a more direct measure of transcription), thus supporting a posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-α in primed monocytes. GM-CSF and IL-3 priming followed by 6 days of resting also results in increased TNF-α production upon LPS stimulation (long-term model of trained immunity). In this case, however, GM-CSF and IL-3 priming induces a c-Myc-dependent monocyte renewal and increase in cell number that is in turn responsible for heightened TNF-α production. Overall, our results provide insights to understand the biology of monocytes in health and disease conditions in which the hematopoietic cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3 play a role and also extend our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trained immunity.

  4. Synovial CD4+ T-cell-derived GM-CSF supports the differentiation of an inflammatory dendritic cell population in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, G; Gibbon, J R; Pratt, A G; Wood, M J; Coady, D; Raftery, G; Lorenzi, A R; Gray, A; Filer, A; Buckley, C D; Haniffa, M A; Isaacs, J D; Hilkens, C M U

    2016-01-01

    Objective A population of synovial inflammatory dendritic cells (infDCs) has recently been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is thought to be monocyte-derived. Here, we investigated the role and source of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the differentiation of synovial infDC in RA. Methods Production of GM-CSF by peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) CD4+ T cells was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. In vitro CD4+ T-cell polarisation experiments were performed with T-cell activating CD2/CD3/CD28-coated beads in the absence or presence of pro-Th1 or pro-Th17 cytokines. CD1c+ DC and CD16+ macrophage subsets were flow-sorted and analysed morphologically and functionally (T-cell stimulatory/polarising capacity). Results RA-SF CD4+ T cells produced abundant GM-CSF upon stimulation and significantly more than RA-SF mononuclear cells depleted of CD4+ T cells. GM-CSF-producing T cells were significantly increased in RA-SF compared with non-RA inflammatory arthritis SF, active RA PB and healthy donor PB. GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells were expanded by Th1-promoting but not Th17-promoting conditions. Following coculture with RA-SF CD4+ T cells, but not healthy donor PB CD4+ T cells, a subpopulation of monocytes differentiated into CD1c+ infDC; a process dependent on GM-CSF. These infDC displayed potent alloproliferative capacity and enhanced GM-CSF, interleukin-17 and interferon-γ production by CD4+ T cells. InfDC with an identical phenotype to in vitro generated cells were significantly enriched in RA-SF compared with non-RA-SF/tissue/PB. Conclusions We demonstrate a therapeutically tractable feedback loop of GM-CSF secreted by RA synovial CD4+ T cells promoting the differentiation of infDC with potent capacity to induce GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells. PMID:25923217

  5. Efficacy and safety of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on the frequency and severity of radiation mucositis in patients with head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, V.; Bapsy, Poonamallee P.; Anantha, Naranappa; Doval, Dinesh Chandra; Vaithianathan, Hema; Banumathy, G.; Reddy, Krishnamurthy B.; Kumaraswamy, Saklaspur Veerappaiah; Shenoy, Ashok Mohan

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the clinical evidence of mucosal protection by GM-CSF during cytotoxic chemotherapy, a pilot study was undertaken to determine the safety and mucosal reaction of patients receiving GM-CSF while undergoing definitive conventional fractionated radiotherapy in head and neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients were considered eligible if buccal mucosa and oropharynx were included in the teleradiation field. Ten adult patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (buccal mucosa--8 and posterior (1(3)) tongue--2) were entered into the trial. Radiation therapy was delivered with telecobalt machine at conventional 2 Gy fraction and 5 fractions/week. The radiation portals consisted of two parallel opposing lateral fields. GM-CSF was given subcutaneously at a dose of 1 μg/kg body weight, daily, after 20 Gy until the completion of radiation therapy. Patients were evaluated daily for mucosal reaction, pain, and functional impairment. Results: The median radiation dose was 66 Gy. Eight patients received ≥60 Gy. The tolerance to GM-CSF was good. All 10 patients completed the planned daily dose of GM-CSF without interruption. Mucosal toxicity was Grade I in four patients till the completion of radiotherapy (dose range 50-66 Gy). Six patients developed Grade II reaction, fibrinous mucosal lesions of maximum size 1.0-1.5 cm, during radiotherapy. None developed Grade III mucositis. The maximum mucosal pain was Grade I during GM-CSF therapy. In two patients after starting GM-CSF the pain reduced in intensity. Functional impairment was mild to moderate. All patients were able to maintain adequate oral intake during the treatment period. Total regression of mucosal reaction occurred within 8 days following completion of radiotherapy. Conclusions: GM-CSF administration concurrently with conventional fractionated radiotherapy was feasible without significant toxicity. The acute side effects of radiotherapy namely mucositis, pain, and functional

  6. GM-CSF and IL-4 produced by NKT cells inversely regulate IL-1β production by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sehee; Jeong, Dongjin; Oh, Sae Jin; Ahn, Jiye; Lee, Seung Hyo; Chung, Doo Hyun

    2017-02-01

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are distinct T cell subset that link innate and adaptive immune responses. IL-1β, produced by various immune cells, plays a key role in the regulation of innate immunity in vivo. However, it is unclear whether NKT cells regulate IL-1β production by macrophages. To address this, we co-cultured NKT cells and peritoneal macrophages in the presence of TCR stimulation and inflammasome activators. Among cytokines secreted from NKT cells, GM-CSF enhanced IL-1β production by macrophages via regulating LPS-mediated pro-IL-1β expression and NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation, whereas IL-4 enhanced M2-differentiation of macrophages and decreased IL-1β production. Together, our findings suggest the NKT cells have double-sided effects on IL-1β-mediated innate immune responses by producing IL-4 and GM-CSF. These findings may be helpful for a comprehensive understanding of NKT cell-mediated regulatory mechanisms of the pro-inflammatory effects of IL-1β in inflammatory diseases in vivo. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Summary of bi-shRNA/GM-CSF augmented autologous tumor cell immunotherapy (FANG™) in advanced cancer of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemunaitis, John; Barve, Minal; Orr, Douglas; Kuhn, Joseph; Magee, Mitchell; Lamont, Jeffrey; Bedell, Cynthia; Wallraven, Gladice; Pappen, Beena O; Roth, Alyssa; Horvath, Staci; Nemunaitis, Derek; Kumar, Padmasini; Maples, Phillip B; Senzer, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Therapies for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are limited. We carried out a phase I trial of a novel autologous whole-cell tumor cell immunotherapy (FANG™), which incorporates a dual granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) expressive/bifunctional small hairpin RNA interference (bi-shRNAi) vector. The bi-shRNAi DNA targets furin, which is a proconvertase of transforming growth factors beta (TGFβ) 1 and 2. Safety, mechanism, immunoeffectiveness, and suggested benefit were previously shown [Senzer et al.: Mol Ther 2012;20:679-689; Senzer et al.: J Vaccines Vaccin 2013;4:209]. We now provide further follow-up of a subset of 8 HCC patients. FANG manufacturing was successful in 7 of 8 attempts (one failure due to insufficient cell yield). Median GM-CSF expression was 144 pg/10(6) cells, TGFβ1 knockdown was 100%, and TGFβ2 knockdown was 93% of the vector-transported cells. Five patients were vaccinated (1 or 2.5×10(7) cells/intradermal injection, 6-11 vaccinations). No FANG toxicity was observed. Three of these patients demonstrated evidence of an immune response to the autologous tumor cell sample. Long-term follow-up demonstrated survival of 319, 729, 784, 931+, and 1,043+ days of the FANG-treated patients. In conclusion, evidence supports further assessment of the FANG immunotherapy in HCC. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Use of an oncolytic virus secreting GM-CSF as combined oncolytic and immunotherapy for treatment of colorectal and hepatic adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Sandeep; Kim, Teresa; Zager, Jonathan; Bennett, Joseph; Ebright, Michael; D'Angelica, Michael; Fong, Yuman

    2007-04-01

    Oncolytic cancer therapy using herpes simplex viruses (HSV) that have direct tumoricidal effects and cancer immunotherapy using the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) have each been effective in preclinical testing. NV1034 is a multimutated oncolytic HSV carrying the gene for murine GM-CSF that attempts to combine these 2 anticancer strategies. The purpose of this study was to compare NV1034 to NV1023, the parent HSV mutants lacking GM-CSF, to determine if such combined oncolytic and immunotherapy using a single vector has advantages over oncolytic therapy alone. Expression GM-CSF in vitro did not alter the infectivity, cytotoxicity, or replication of NV1034 compared to the noncytokine-secreting control. Tumors infected with NV1034 produced GM-CSF in picogram quantities. In vivo efficacy of the viruses against murine colorectal carcinoma CT26 and murine hepatoma Hepa l-6 was then tested in subcutaneous tumors in syngeneic Balb/c and C57 L/J mice, respectively. In these immune-competent models, NV1034 and NV1023 each demonstrated potent antitumor activity. Treatment with NV1034 had significantly better antitumor effect compared to treatment with NV1023. Furthermore, there was no difference in the antitumor efficacy of these viruses in mice depleted of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. Viral vectors combining oncolytic and immunotherapy are promising agents in treatment of colorectal carcinoma and hepatoma.

  9. Local application of GM-CSF for treatment of chemoirradiation-induced mucositis in patients with advanced carcinoma of the head and neck: results of controlled clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichtomann, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: the study was designed to assess prospectively the efficacy of GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) mouthwash solution in the management of chemoirradiation induced oral mucositis for head and neck cancer patients. Methods and materials: thirty-five patients with advanced carcinoma of the head and neck were evaluated for mucositis during the first cycle of chemoirradiation therapy. GM-CSF 400 μg in 250 cc of water for 1 h of mouth washing was prescribed. Active comparator was a conventional mucositis therapy combination. The procedure started once mucositis grade 1 (using the WHO grading) was detected. Patients, examined twice a week, were evaluated for oral mucositis and oral infections. Assessment of subjective pain was provided using a visual analogue scale. Blood tests were taken weekly. Results: the results of statistical evaluation of mucositis using the WHO-grading showed no significant differences between the two treatment groups. Local application of GM-CSF significantly reduced subjective pain during the second week of chemoirradiation therapy. Statistical analysis of the leucocytes-, platelet count, haemoglobin level and development of oral infections revealed no significant differences between the two treatment groups. Conclusion: in combined chemoirradiation therapy schemes the RTOG/EORTC toxicity scale should be used. In selected cases of mucositis attended with severe pain, GM-CSF should be observed within the therapeutic considerations. Controlled clinical trials with larger patient population are required to evaluate the role of GM-CSF in this indication. (author)

  10. Autoimmune Th17 Cells Induced Synovial Stromal and Innate Lymphoid Cell Secretion of the Cytokine GM-CSF to Initiate and Augment Autoimmune Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Keiji; Hashimoto, Motomu; Ito, Yoshinaga; Matsuura, Mayumi; Ito, Hiromu; Tanaka, Masao; Watanabe, Hitomi; Kondoh, Gen; Tanaka, Atsushi; Yasuda, Keiko; Kopf, Manfred; Potocnik, Alexandre J; Stockinger, Brigitta; Sakaguchi, Noriko; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2018-06-19

    Despite the importance of Th17 cells in autoimmune diseases, it remains unclear how they control other inflammatory cells in autoimmune tissue damage. Using a model of spontaneous autoimmune arthritis, we showed that arthritogenic Th17 cells stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes via interleukin-17 (IL-17) to secrete the cytokine GM-CSF and also expanded synovial-resident innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in inflamed joints. Activated synovial ILCs, which expressed CD25, IL-33Ra, and TLR9, produced abundant GM-CSF upon stimulation by IL-2, IL-33, or CpG DNA. Loss of GM-CSF production by either ILCs or radio-resistant stromal cells prevented Th17 cell-mediated arthritis. GM-CSF production by Th17 cells augmented chronic inflammation but was dispensable for the initiation of arthritis. We showed that GM-CSF-producing ILCs were present in inflamed joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Thus, a cellular cascade of autoimmune Th17 cells, ILCs, and stromal cells, via IL-17 and GM-CSF, mediates chronic joint inflammation and can be a target for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel insights in preventing Gram-negative bacterial infection in cirrhotic patients: review on the effects of GM-CSF in maintaining homeostasis of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Zhao, Manzhi; Song, Yuhu; Song, Jianxin; Huang, Yuancheng; Wang, Junshuai

    2015-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients with dysfunctional and/or low numbers of leukocytes are often infected with bacteria, especially Gram-negative bacteria, which is characterized by producing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that influences the production, maturation, function, and survival of various immune cells. In this paper, we reviewed not only Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway and its immunological effect, but also the specific stimulating function and autocrine performance of GM-CSF on hematopoietic cells, as well as the recent discovery of innate response activator-B cells in protection against microbial sepsis and the direct LPS-TLR4 signaling on hematopoiesis. Thus we concluded that GM-CSF might play important roles in preventing Gram-negative bacterial infections in cirrhotic patients through maintaining immune system functions and homeostasis.

  12. GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β chain (CD131 expression as a biomarker of antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maric Dragan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upon Ag-activation cytotoxic T cells (CTLs produce IFN-γ GM-CSF and TNF-α, which deliver simultaneously pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory signals to the surrounding microenvironment. Whether this secretion affects in an autocrine loop the CTLs themselves is unknown. Methods Here, we compared the transcriptional profile of Ag-activated, Flu-specific CTL stimulated with the FLU M1:58-66 peptide to that of convivial CTLs expanded in vitro in the same culture. PBMCs from 6 HLA-A*0201 expressing donors were expanded for 7 days in culture following Flu M1:58-66 stimulation in the presence of 300 IU/ml of interleukin-2 and than sorted by high speed sorting to high purity CD8+ expressing T cells gated according to FluM1:58-66 tetrameric human leukocyte antigen complexes expression. Results Ag-activated CTLs displayed higher levels of IFN-γ, GM-CSF (CSF2 and GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β- chain (CD131 but lacked completely expression of IFN-γ receptor-II and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs. This observation suggested that Ag-activated CTLs in preparation for the release of IFN-γ and GM-CSF shield themselves from the potentially apoptotic effects of the former entrusting their survival to GM-SCF. In vitro phenotyping confirmed the selective surface expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs and their increased proliferation upon exogenous administration of GM-CSF. Conclusion The selective responsiveness of Ag-activated CTLs to GM-CSF may provide an alternative explanation to the usefulness of this chemokine as an adjuvant for T cell aimed vaccines. Moreover, the selective expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs proposes CD131 as a novel biomarker of Ag-dependent CTL activation.

  13. Novel adapter proteins that link the human GM-CSF receptor to the phosphatidylino-sitol 3-kinase and Shc/Grb2/ras signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jücker, M; Feldman, R A

    1996-01-01

    We have used a human GM-CSF-dependent hematopoietic cell line that responds to physiological concentrations of hGM-CSF to analyze a set of signaling events that occur in normal myelopoiesis and whose deregulation may lead to leukemogenesis. Stimulation of these cells with hGM-CSF induced the assembly of multimeric complexes that contained known and novel phosphotyrosyl proteins. One of the new proteins was a major phosphotyrosyl substrate of 76-85 kDa (p80) that was directly associated with the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase through the SH2 domains of p85. p80 also associated with the beta subunit of the activated hGM-CSF receptor, and assembly of this complex correlated with activation of PI 3-kinase. A second phosphotyrosyl protein we identified, p140, associated with the Shc and Grb2 adapter proteins by direct binding to a novel phosphotyrosine-interacting domain located at the N-terminus of Shc. and to the SH3 domains of Grb2, respectively. The Shc/p140/Grb2 complex was found to be constitutively activated in acute myeloid leukemia cells, indicating that activation of this pathway may be a necessary step in the development of some leukemias. The p80/p85/PI 3-kinase and the Shc/Grb2/p140 complexes were tightly associated with Src family kinases, which were prime candidates for phosphorylation of Shc, p80, p140 and other phosphotyrosyl substrates present in these complexes. Our studies suggest that p80 and p140 may link the hGM-CSF receptor to the PI 3-kinase and Shc/Grb2/ras signaling pathways, respectively, and that abnormal activation of hGM-CSF-dependent targets may play a role in leukemogenesis.

  14. The Activin A-Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Axis Contributes to the Transcriptome of GM-CSF-Conditioned Human Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Concha; Bragado, Rafael; Municio, Cristina; Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Alonso, Bárbara; Escribese, María M; Domínguez-Andrés, Jorge; Ardavín, Carlos; Castrillo, Antonio; Vega, Miguel A; Puig-Kröger, Amaya; Corbí, Angel L

    2018-01-01

    GM-CSF promotes the functional maturation of lung alveolar macrophages (A-MØ), whose differentiation is dependent on the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) transcription factor. In fact, blockade of GM-CSF-initiated signaling or deletion of the PPARγ-encoding gene PPARG leads to functionally defective A-MØ and the onset of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. In vitro , macrophages generated in the presence of GM-CSF display potent proinflammatory, immunogenic and tumor growth-limiting activities. Since GM-CSF upregulates PPARγ expression, we hypothesized that PPARγ might contribute to the gene signature and functional profile of human GM-CSF-conditioned macrophages. To verify this hypothesis, PPARγ expression and activity was assessed in human monocyte-derived macrophages generated in the presence of GM-CSF [proinflammatory GM-CSF-conditioned human monocyte-derived macrophages (GM-MØ)] or M-CSF (anti-inflammatory M-MØ), as well as in ex vivo isolated human A-MØ. GM-MØ showed higher PPARγ expression than M-MØ, and the expression of PPARγ in GM-MØ was found to largely depend on activin A. Ligand-induced activation of PPARγ also resulted in distinct transcriptional and functional outcomes in GM-MØ and M-MØ. Moreover, and in the absence of exogenous activating ligands, PPARγ knockdown significantly altered the GM-MØ transcriptome, causing a global upregulation of proinflammatory genes and significantly modulating the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and migration. Similar effects were observed in ex vivo isolated human A-MØ, where PPARγ silencing led to enhanced expression of genes coding for growth factors and chemokines and downregulation of cell surface pathogen receptors. Therefore, PPARγ shapes the transcriptome of GM-CSF-dependent human macrophages ( in vitro derived GM-MØ and ex vivo isolated A-MØ) in the absence of exogenous activating ligands, and its expression is primarily regulated by activin A

  15. Prolongation of the survival of breast cancer-bearing mice immunized with GM-CSF-secreting syngeneic/allogeneic fibroblasts transfected with a cDNA expression library from breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae S; Jung, Mi Y; Cho, Daeho; Cohen, Edward P

    2006-10-30

    Breast cancer cells, like other types of neoplastic cells, form weakly immunogenic tumor-associated antigens. The antigenic properties of the tumor-associated antigens can be enhanced if they are expressed by highly immunogenic cells. In this study, a cancer vaccine was prepared by transfer of a cDNA expression library from SB5b breast carcinoma into mouse fibroblast cells of C3H/He mouse origin (H-2(k)), that had been previously modified to secrete GM-CSF and to express allogeneic class I-determinants (H-2(b)). The transfected syngeneic/allogeneic fibroblasts secreting GM-CSF were used as a vaccine in C3H/He mice. Robust cell-mediated immunity toward the breast cancer cells was generated in mice immunized with the cDNA-based vaccine. The immunity, mediated predominantly by CD8(+) T lymphocytes, was directed toward the breast cancer cells, but not against either of two other non-cross-reactive neoplasms of C3H/He mice. The immunity was sufficient to prolong the survival of mice with established breast cancer. Among other advantages, preparation of the vaccine by cDNA-transfer into a fibroblast cell line enabled the recipient cells to be modified in advance of DNA-transfer to augment their immunogenic properties. As the transferred DNA is replicated as the transfected cells divide, the vaccine could be prepared from microgram quantities of tumor tissue.

  16. GM-CSF Controls Nonlymphoid Tissue Dendritic Cell Homeostasis but Is Dispensable for the Differentiation of Inflammatory Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greter, Melanie; Helft, Julie; Chow, Andrew; Hashimoto, Daigo; Mortha, Arthur; Agudo-Cantero, Judith; Bogunovic, Milena; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Miller, Jennifer; Leboeuf, Marylene; Lu, Geming; Aloman, Costica; Brown, Brian D.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Xiong, Huabao; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Frenette, Paul S.; Merad, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY GM-CSF (Csf-2) is a critical cytokine for the in vitro generation of dendritic cells (DCs) and is thought to control the development of inflammatory DCs and resident CD103+ DCs in some tissues. Here we showed that in contrast to the current understanding, Csf-2 receptor acts in the steady state to promote the survival and homeostasis of nonlymphoid tissue-resident CD103+ and CD11b+ DCs. Absence of Csf-2 receptor on lung DCs abrogated the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity after immunization with particulate antigens. In contrast, Csf-2 receptor was dispensable for the differentiation and innate function of inflammatory DCs during acute injuries. Instead, inflammatory DCs required Csf-1 receptor for their development. Thus, Csf-2 is important in vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell immunity through the regulation of nonlymphoid tissue DC homeostasis rather than control of inflammatory DCs in vivo. PMID:22749353

  17. Determination of the levels of serum TNF-α, GM-CSF and HA in asthmatic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qing; Ma Yunbao

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the diversity of the state of asthma and the three serum markers (TNF-α, GM-CSF and HA). Methods: RIA was adopted to measure the three markers in 66 asthmatic patients and 30 controls. Results: The levels of the three markers in patients during attack (n = 36) were significantly higher than those in controls (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, p < 0.05). The three markers declined significantly in remission group (n = 30), but were still significantly higher than those in controls (p < 0.05). Conclusion: There is a close relationship between the levels of the three markers and the attack of asthma. Immunomodulator is therefore suggested to be used in addition to anti inflammatory treatment

  18. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with inserted gene coding for GM-CSF as a new vector for cancer immunogene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janke, M.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Leeuw, de O.S.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Arnold, A.; Fournier, P.; Schirrmacher, V.

    2007-01-01

    This is the first report describing recombinant (rec) Newcastle disease virus (NDV) as vector for gene therapy of cancer. The gene encoding granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was inserted as an additional transcription unit at two different positions into the NDV genome. The

  19. Cost-effectiveness and quality-of-life assessment of GM-CSF as an adjunct to intensive remission induction chemotherapy in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyl-de Groot, CA; Lowenberg, B; Vellenga, E; Suciu, S; Willemze, R; Rutten, FFH

    We conducted a prospective, randomized, multicentre clinical trial comparing the effects and costs of GM-CSF as an adjunct to intensive chemotherapy in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The patients were randomized to either daunomycin-cytosine arabinoside (control arm: rr = 161)

  20. Cellular immunotherapy using irradiated lung cancer cell vaccine co-expressing GM-CSF and IL-18 can induce significant antitumor effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Hongwei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Dai, Lei; Chen, Xiaolei; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Yang; Yu, Dechao; Wei, Yuquan; Deng, Hongxin; Shi, Gang; Yang, Guoyou; Zhang, Junfeng; Li, Yiming; Du, Tao; Wang, Jianzhou; Xu, Fen; Cheng, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Although the whole tumor cell vaccine can provide the best source of immunizing antigens, there is still a limitation that most tumors are not naturally immunogenic. Tumor cells genetically modified to secrete immune activating cytokines have been proved to be more immunogenic. IL-18 could augment proliferation of T cells and cytotoxicity of NK cells. GM-CSF could stimulate dendritic cells, macrophages and enhance presentation of tumor antigens. In our study, we used mouse GM-CSF combined with IL-18 to modify Lewis lung cancer LL/2, then investigated whether vaccination could suppress tumor growth and promote survival. The Lewis lung cancer LL/2 was transfected with co-expressing mouse GM-CSF and IL-18 plasmid by cationic liposome, then irradiated with a sublethal dose X ray (100 Gy) to prepare vaccines. Mice were subcutaneously immunized with this inactivated vaccine and then inoculated with autologous LL/2 to estimate the antitumor efficacy. The studies reported here showed that LL/2 tumor cell vaccine modified by a co-expressing mouse GM-CSF and IL-18 plasmid could significantly inhibit tumor growth and increased survival of the mice bearing LL/2 tumor whether prophylactic or adoptive immunotherapy in vivo. A significant reduction of proliferation and increase of apoptosis were also observed in the tumor treated with vaccine of co-expressing GM-CSF and IL-18. The potent antitumor effect correlated with higher secretion levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-18, GM-CSF, interferon-γ in serum, the proliferation of CD4 + IFN-γ + , CD8 + IFN-γ + T lymphocytes in spleen and the infiltration of CD4 + , CD8 + T in tumor. Furthermore, the mechanism of tumor-specific immune response was further proved by 51 Cr cytotoxicity assay in vitro and depletion of CD4, CD8, NK immune cell subsets in vivo. The results suggested that the antitumor mechanism was mainly depended on CD4 + , CD8 + T lymphocytes. These results provide a new insight into therapeutic mechanisms

  1. GM-CSF Monocyte-Derived Cells and Langerhans Cells As Part of the Dendritic Cell Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred B. Lutz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages (Mph share many characteristics as components of the innate immune system. The criteria to classify the multitude of subsets within the mononuclear phagocyte system are currently phenotype, ontogeny, transcription patterns, epigenetic adaptations, and function. More recently, ontogenetic, transcriptional, and proteomic research approaches uncovered major developmental differences between Flt3L-dependent conventional DCs as compared with Mphs and monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs, the latter mainly generated in vitro from murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs or human CD14+ peripheral blood monocytes. Conversely, in vitro GM-CSF-dependent monocyte-derived Mphs largely resemble MoDCs whereas tissue-resident Mphs show a common embryonic origin from yolk sac and fetal liver with Langerhans cells (LCs. The novel ontogenetic findings opened discussions on the terminology of DCs versus Mphs. Here, we bring forward arguments to facilitate definitions of BM-DCs, MoDCs, and LCs. We propose a group model of terminology for all DC subsets that attempts to encompass both ontogeny and function.

  2. Biological role of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on cells of the myeloid lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushach, Irina; Zlotnik, Albert

    2016-01-01

    M-CSF and GM-CSF are 2 important cytokines that regulate macrophage numbers and function. Here, we review their known effects on cells of the macrophage-monocyte lineage. Important clues to their function come from their expression patterns. M-CSF exhibits a mostly homeostatic expression pattern, whereas GM-CSF is a product of cells activated during inflammatory or pathologic conditions. Accordingly, M-CSF regulates the numbers of various tissue macrophage and monocyte populations without altering their "activation" status. Conversely, GM-CSF induces activation of monocytes/macrophages and also mediates differentiation to other states that participate in immune responses [i.e., dendritic cells (DCs)]. Further insights into their function have come from analyses of mice deficient in either cytokine. M-CSF signals through its receptor (CSF-1R). Interestingly, mice deficient in CSF-1R expression exhibit a more significant phenotype than mice deficient in M-CSF. This observation was explained by the discovery of a novel cytokine (IL-34) that represents a second ligand of CSF-1R. Information about the function of these ligands/receptor system is still developing, but its complexity is intriguing and strongly suggests that more interesting biology remains to be elucidated. Based on our current knowledge, several therapeutic molecules targeting either the M-CSF or the GM-CSF pathways have been developed and are currently being tested in clinical trials targeting either autoimmune diseases or cancer. It is intriguing to consider how evolution has directed these pathways to develop; their complexity likely mirrors the multiple functions in which cells of the monocyte/macrophage system are involved. PMID:27354413

  3. Hemopoietic stem cells in rhesus monkeys : surface antigens, radiosensitivity, and responses to GM-CSF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Wielenga (Jenne)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractRhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were bred at the Primate Center TNO, Rijswijk, The Netherlands!. Both male and female animals were used for the experiments. The monkeys weighed 2.5-4 kg and were 2-4 years old at the time of the experiment. They were all typed for RhLA-A, -B and -DR

  4. Enrichment of Ly6Chi monocytes by multiple GM-CSF injections with HBV vaccine contributes to viral clearance in a HBV mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weidong; Zhou, Xian; Zhao, Gan; Lin, Qing; Wang, Xianzheng; Yu, Xueping; Wang, Bin

    2017-12-02

    Adjuvants are considered a necessary component for HBV therapeutic vaccines but few are licensed in clinical practice due to concerns about safety or efficiency. In our recent study, we established that a combination protocol of 3-day pretreatments with GM-CSF before a vaccination (3 × GM-CSF+VACCINE) into the same injection site could break immune tolerance and cause over 90% reduction of HBsAg level in the HBsAg transgenic mouse model. Herein, we further investigated the therapeutic potential of the combination in AAV8-1.3HBV-infected mice. After 4 vaccinations, both serum HBeAg and HBsAg were cleared and there was a 95% reduction of HBV-positive hepatocytes, in addition to the presence of large number of infiltrating CD8 + T cells in the livers. Mechanistically, the HBV-specific T-cell responses were elicited via a 3 × GM-CSF+VACCINE-induced conversion of CCR2-dependent CD11b + Ly6C hi monocytes into CD11b + CD11c + DCs. Experimental depletion of Ly6C hi monocytes resulted in a defective HBV-specific immune response thereby abrogating HBV eradication. This vaccination strategy could lead to development of an effective therapeutic protocol against chronic HBV in infected patients.

  5. Clinical significance of measurement of plasma relevant cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-2, TPO, EPO) levels in patients with aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Tintin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of relevant cytokines in the development and pathogenesis of aplastic anemia. Methods: Plasma GM-CSF, IL-2, TPO (with RIA) and EPO (with CLIA) contents were measured in 100 patients (acute 43, chronic 57) with aplastic anemia and 50 controls. Complete blood count was also performed in all these subjects. Results: The peripheral RBC, WBC, platelet counts and GM-CSF contents were significantly lower in the patients with aplastic anemia than those in the controls (P<0.05), while the IL-2, EPO and TPO contents were significantly higher in the patients (P<0.05). GM-CSF contents were positively correlated with the WBC numbers. EPO contents were negatively correlated with the RBC counts and TPO contents were correlated (negatively) with the platelet counts. Conclusion: There was correlationship between each blood elements (WBC, RBC, platelet) and its corresponding cytokine (GS-CSF, EPO, TPO respectively). IL-2 contents were not correlated with WBC counts. (authors)

  6. In vivo characterization of fusion protein comprising of A1 subunit of Shiga toxin and human GM-CSF: Assessment of its immunogenicity and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloomi, Mana; Bouzari, Saeid; Shariati, Elaheh

    2010-10-01

    Most cancer cells become resistant to anti-cancer agents. In the last few years, a new approach for targeted therapy of human cancer has been developed using immunotoxins which comprise both the cell targeting and the cell killing moieties. In the present study, the recombinant Shiga toxin A1 subunit fused to human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (A1-GM-CSF), previously produced in E. coli, was further characterized. The recombinant protein could cause 50% cytotoxicity and induced apoptosis in cells bearing GM-CSF receptors. The non-specific toxicity of the fusion protein was assessed in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. No mortality was observed in either group of mice, with different concentration of fusion protein. The lymphocyte proliferation assay, induction of specific IgG response and a mixed (Th1/Th2) response were observed only in BALB/c mice. The mixed response in BALB/c mice (Th1/Th2) could be explained on the basis of the two components of the fusion protein i.e. A1 and GM-CSF.

  7. GM-CSF production allows the identification of immunoprevalent antigens recognized by human CD4+ T cells following smallpox vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Judkowski

    Full Text Available The threat of bioterrorism with smallpox and the broad use of vaccinia vectors for other vaccines have led to the resurgence in the study of vaccinia immunological memory. The importance of the role of CD4+ T cells in the control of vaccinia infection is well known. However, more CD8+ than CD4+ T cell epitopes recognized by human subjects immunized with vaccinia virus have been reported. This could be, in part, due to the fact that most of the studies that have identified human CD4+ specific protein-derived fragments or peptides have used IFN-γ production to evaluate vaccinia specific T cell responses. Based on these findings, we reasoned that analyzing a large panel of cytokines would permit us to generate a more complete analysis of the CD4 T cell responses. The results presented provide clear evidence that TNF-α is an excellent readout of vaccinia specificity and that other cytokines such as GM-CSF can be used to evaluate the reactivity of CD4+ T cells in response to vaccinia antigens. Furthermore, using these cytokines as readout of vaccinia specificity, we present the identification of novel peptides from immunoprevalent vaccinia proteins recognized by CD4+ T cells derived from smallpox vaccinated human subjects. In conclusion, we describe a "T cell-driven" methodology that can be implemented to determine the specificity of the T cell response upon vaccination or infection. Together, the single pathogen in vitro stimulation, the selection of CD4+ T cells specific to the pathogen by limiting dilution, the evaluation of pathogen specificity by detecting multiple cytokines, and the screening of the clones with synthetic combinatorial libraries, constitutes a novel and valuable approach for the elucidation of human CD4+ T cell specificity in response to large pathogens.

  8. In whole blood, LPS, TNF-alpha and GM-CSF increase monocyte uptake of {sup 99m}technetium stannous colloid but do not affect neutrophil uptake

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    Ramsay, Stuart C. [Townsville Nuclear Medicine, Mater Hospital, Pimlico, Queensland 4812 (Australia) and School of Medicine, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia)]. E-mail: stuart.ramsay1@jcu.edu.au; Maggs, Jacqueline [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Townsville Hospital, Townsville, Queensland 4814 (Australia); Powell, Kellie [School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); School of Medicine, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); Barnes, Jodie [School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); Ketheesan, Natkunam [School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); School of Medicine, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia)

    2006-07-15

    Introduction: {sup 99m}Technetium stannous colloid (TcSnC) is used in white cell scanning. It labels neutrophils and monocytes via phagocytosis, with uptake mediated by the phagocytic receptor CD11b/CD18 in neutrophils. Uptake of TcSnC is altered by gram-negative infection, possibly due to the endotoxin component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or to cytokines released during infection (e.g., TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma). Endotoxemia and increased TNF-alpha levels also occur in inflammatory bowel disease. Another potential confounder in cell labeling is that sepsis patients may be treated with GM-CSF and G-CSF, which alter phagocytic cell function. This study aimed to determine how these factors affect TcSnC cellular uptake. Methods: Whole blood from six healthy volunteers was incubated with LPS, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, GM-CSF or G-CSF. Samples were then mixed with TcSnC. Blood was separated across density gradients and imaged using a gamma camera. Three radioactive count peaks were observed in each tube: free plasma activity, mononuclear cell uptake and neutrophil uptake. Results: Compared with controls, significant increases in mononuclear cell uptake were induced by LPS, TNF-alpha and GM-CSF stimulation. It was incidentally noted that exogenous estrogens appear to affect TcSnC labeling and may influence the neutrophil response to stimulation. Neutrophil uptake and plasma activity were not significantly affected. IFN-gamma and G-CSF had no significant effect. Conclusions: In whole blood, the effect of LPS on TcSnC monocyte uptake is different to its effect on neutrophils, consistent with previously reported differences in CD11b/CD18 expression. TNF-alpha response parallels LPS response. GM-CSF also increases TcSnC uptake by monocytes. These effects should be considered when using TcSnC for imaging purposes, as they will tend to increase monocyte labeling. Estrogens may also affect TcSnC labeling. Responses to IFN-gamma and G-CSF are consistent with previously reported effects

  9. Interleukin-4 enhances trafficking and functional activities of GM-CSF-stimulated mouse myeloid-derived dendritic cells at late differentiation stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Shu-Yi; Wang, Chien-Yu; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2011-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) are being employed as an important model for translational research into the development of DC-based therapeutics. For such use, the localization and specialized mobility of injected BMDCs within specific immune tissues are known to define their immunity and usefulness in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that IL-4, a key driving factor for in vitro propagation and differentiation of BMDCs, when added during a late culture stage can enhance the in vivo trafficking activity of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-induced BMDCs. It suggests that the temporal control of IL-4 stimulation during the in vitro generation of DCs drastically affects the DC trafficking efficiency in vivo. With this modification of IL-4 stimulation, we also show that much less cytokine was needed to generate BMDCs with high purity and yield that secrete a high level of cytokines and possess a good capacity to induce proliferation of allogeneic CD4 + T cells, as compared to the conventional method that uses a continuous supplement of GM-CSF and IL-4 throughout cultivation. These results provide us with an important know-how for differentiation of BMDCs from myeloid stem cells, and for use of other immune cells in related medical or stem cell applications.

  10. Interleukin-4 enhances trafficking and functional activities of GM-CSF-stimulated mouse myeloid-derived dendritic cells at late differentiation stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Shu-Yi, E-mail: in_shuyi@hotmail.com [Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Biotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Taiwan International Graduate Program (TIGP), Molecular and Biological Agricultural Sciences Program, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Chien-Yu, E-mail: sallywang1973@hotmail.com [Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yang, Ning-Sun, E-mail: nsyang@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Biotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Taiwan International Graduate Program (TIGP), Molecular and Biological Agricultural Sciences Program, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2011-09-10

    Mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) are being employed as an important model for translational research into the development of DC-based therapeutics. For such use, the localization and specialized mobility of injected BMDCs within specific immune tissues are known to define their immunity and usefulness in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that IL-4, a key driving factor for in vitro propagation and differentiation of BMDCs, when added during a late culture stage can enhance the in vivo trafficking activity of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-induced BMDCs. It suggests that the temporal control of IL-4 stimulation during the in vitro generation of DCs drastically affects the DC trafficking efficiency in vivo. With this modification of IL-4 stimulation, we also show that much less cytokine was needed to generate BMDCs with high purity and yield that secrete a high level of cytokines and possess a good capacity to induce proliferation of allogeneic CD4{sup +}T cells, as compared to the conventional method that uses a continuous supplement of GM-CSF and IL-4 throughout cultivation. These results provide us with an important know-how for differentiation of BMDCs from myeloid stem cells, and for use of other immune cells in related medical or stem cell applications.

  11. CCR6+ Th cells in the cerebrospinal fluid of persons with multiple sclerosis are dominated by pathogenic non-classic Th1 cells and GM-CSF-only-secreting Th cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restorick, S M; Durant, L; Kalra, S; Hassan-Smith, G; Rathbone, E; Douglas, M R; Curnow, S J

    2017-08-01

    Considerable attention has been given to CCR6 + IL-17-secreting CD4 + T cells (Th17) in the pathology of a number of autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS). However, other Th subsets also play important pathogenic roles, including those that secrete IFNγ and GM-CSF. CCR6 expression by Th17 cells allows their migration across the choroid plexus into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), where they are involved in the early phase of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and in MS these cells are elevated in the CSF during relapses and contain high frequencies of autoreactive cells. However, the relatively low frequency of Th17 cells suggests they cannot by themselves account for the high percentage of CCR6 + cells in MS CSF. Here we identify the dominant CCR6 + T cell subsets in both the blood and CSF as non-classic Th1 cells, including many that secrete GM-CSF, a key encephalitogenic cytokine. In addition, we show that Th cells secreting GM-CSF but not IFNγ or IL-17, a subset termed GM-CSF-only-secreting Th cells, also accumulate in the CSF. Importantly, in MS the proportion of IFNγ- and GM-CSF-secreting T cells expressing CCR6 was significantly enriched in the CSF, and was elevated in MS, suggesting these cells play a pathogenic role in this disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Serum concentrations of GM-CSF and G-CSF correlate with the Th1/Th2 cytokine response in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Pressler, Tacjana

    2005-01-01

    mobilizing monocytes and PMNs from the bone marrow, GM-CSF, G-CSF and IL-3 select subsets of dendritic cells, which subsequently induce distinct Th responses. Therefore, the present study examines the correlation between the mobilizing cytokines in serum and the Th responses. The IFN-gamma and IL-4...... production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the concentrations of GM-CSF and G-CSF in serum as well as lung function, were determined in 37 CF patients with and 6 CF patients without chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection. The GM-CSF/G-CSF ratio correlated both with the IFN-gamma production and good...... lung function. In addition, an inverse correlation between IL-3 and IFN-gamma was observed. The results indicate involvement of endogenous GM-CSF, G-CSF and IL-3 in the skewed Th response in CF, and change to a Th1-dominated response might be achieved with GM-CSF treatment....

  13. Effect of intramammary infusion of recombinant bovine GM-CSF and IL-8 on CMT score, somatic cell count, and milk mononuclear cell populations in Holstein cows with Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiku, Yoshio; Ozawa, Tomomi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kushibiki, Shiro; Inumaru, Shigeki; Shingu, Hiroyuki; Nagasawa, Yuya; Watanabe, Atsushi; Hata, Eiji; Hayashi, Tomohito

    2017-09-01

    The effect of intramammary infusion of recombinant bovine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rbGM-CSF) and interleukin-8 (rbIL-8) on mononuclear cell populations in quarters, somatic cell count (SCC) and the California Mastitis Test (CMT) score were investigated. From the selected cows with naturally occurring Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis, one quarter of each cow were selected for the infusions of rbGM-CSF (400 μg/5 mL/quarter, n = 9), rbIL-8 (1 mg/5 mL/quarter, n = 9), and phosphate-buffered saline (5 mL/quarter, n = 7). The CMT score of both cytokines post infusion temporarily increased between days 0 and 1 and significantly decreased between days 7 and 14 compared to the preinfusion level. The SCC on day 14 after infusions of rbGM-CSF tended to be lower than that of the control group. The percentage of CD14+ cells increased on days 1 and 2 post infusion of rbGM-CSF. The percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells also increased on days 2 and 3, suggesting that the infusion of rbGM-CSF enhanced cellular immunity in the mammary gland. In contrast, the percentage of CD14+ cells decreased on days 0.25 and 1 post infusion of rbIL-8. No significant changes in the percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in milk after infusion of rbIL-8 were evident during the experimental period, which suggested that rbIL-8 had little effect on the function of T cells in the mammary gland. These results indicated that rbGM-CSF and rbIL-8 decreased the CMT score by a different mechanism and may have a potential as therapeutic agents for subclinical mastitis.

  14. Mapping of monoclonal antibody- and receptor-binding domains on human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) using a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laricchia-Robbio, L; Liedberg, B; Platou-Vikinge, T; Rovero, P; Beffy, P; Revoltella, R P

    1996-10-01

    An automated surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor system has been used for mapping antibody and receptor-binding regions on the recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) molecule. A rabbit antimouse IgG1-Fc antibody (RAM.Fc) was coupled to an extended carboxymethylated-hydrogel matrix attached to a gold surface in order to capture an anti-rhGM-CSF monoclonal antibody (MAb) injected over the sensing layer. rhGM-CSF was subsequently injected and allowed to bind to this antibody. Multisite binding assays were then performed, by flowing sequentially other antibodies and peptides over the surface, and the capacity of the latter to interact with the entrapped rhGM-CSF in a multimolecular complex was monitored in real time with SPR. Eleven MAb (all IgG1K), were analyzed: respectively, four antipeptide MAb raised against three distinct epitopes of the cytokine (two clones against residues 14-24, that includes part of the first alpha-helix toward the N-terminal region; one clone against peptide 30-41, an intrahelical loop; and one clone against residues 79-91, including part of the third alpha-helix) and seven antiprotein MAbs raised against the entire rhGM-CSF, whose target native epitopes are still undetermined. In addition, the binding capacity to rhGM-CSF of a synthetic peptide, corresponding to residues 238-254 of the extracellular human GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain, endowed with rhGM-CSF binding activity, was tested. The results from experiments performed with the biosensor were compared with those obtained by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using the same reagents. The features of the biosensor technology (fully automated, measure in real time, sharpened yes/no response, less background disturbances, no need for washing step or labeling of the reagent) offered several advantages in these studies of MAb immunoreactivity and epitope mapping, giving a much better resolution and enabling more distinct

  15. Granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (GM-CSF increases circulating dendritic cells but does not abrogate suppression of adaptive cellular immunity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Micaela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced cancer and chemotherapy are both associated with immune system suppression. We initiated a clinical trial in patients receiving chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer to determine if administration of GM-CSF in this setting was immunostimulatory. Methods Between June, 2003 and January, 2007, 20 patients were enrolled in a clinical trial (NCT00257322 in which they received 500 ug GM-CSF daily for 4 days starting 24 hours after each chemotherapy cycle. There were no toxicities or adverse events reported. Blood was obtained before chemotherapy/GM-CSF administration and 24 hours following the final dose of GM-CSF and evaluated for circulating dendritic cells and adaptive immune cellular subsets by flow cytometry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC expression of γ-interferon and T-bet transcription factor (Tbx21 by quantitative real-time PCR was performed as a measure of Th1 adaptive cellular immunity. Pre- and post-treatment (i.e., chemotherapy and GM-CSF samples were evaluable for 16 patients, ranging from 1 to 5 cycles (median 3 cycles, 6 biologic sample time points. Dendritic cells were defined as lineage (- and MHC class II high (+. Results 73% of patients had significant increases in circulating dendritic cells of ~3x for the overall group (5.8% to 13.6%, p = 0.02 and ~5x excluding non-responders (3.2% to 14.5%, p Tbx21 levels declined by 75% following each chemotherapy cycle despite administration of GM-CSF (p = 0.02. PBMC γ-interferon expression, however was unchanged. Conclusions This clinical trial confirms the suppressive effects of chemotherapy on Th1 cellular immunity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer but demonstrates that mid-cycle administration of GM-CSF can significantly increase the proportion of circulating dendritic cells. As the role of dendritic cells in anti-tumor immunity becomes better defined, GM-CSF administration may provide a non-toxic intervention to augment this arm

  16. Successful use of a defined antigen/GM-CSF adjuvant vaccine to treat mucosal leishmaniasis refractory to antimony: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badaro Roberto

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy has been proposed as a method to treat mucosal leishmaniasis for many years, but the approach has been hampered by poor definition and variability of antigens used, and results have been inconclusive. We report here a case of antimonial-refractory mucosal leishmaniasis in a 45 year old male who was treated with three single injections (one per month with a cocktail of four Leishmania recombinant antigens selected after documented hypo-responsiveness of the patient to these antigens, plus 50mg of GM-CSF as vaccine adjuvant. Three months after treatment, all lesions had resolved completely and the patient remains without relapse after two years. Side effects of the treatment included only moderate erythema and induration at the injection site after the second and third injections. We conclude that carefully selected microbial antigens and cytokine adjuvant can be successful as immunotherapy for patients with antimonial-refractory mucosal leishmaniasis.

  17. CD1d(hi)CD5+ B cells expanded by GM-CSF in vivo suppress experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Quan, Songhua; Soliven, Betty

    2014-09-15

    IL-10-competent subset within CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, has been shown to regulate autoimmune diseases. Whether B10 cells can prevent or suppress the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) has not been studied. In this study, we investigated whether low-dose GM-CSF, which suppresses EAMG, can expand B10 cells in vivo, and whether adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells would prevent or suppress EAMG. We found that treatment of EAMG mice with low-dose GM-CSF increased the proportion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells and B10 cells. In vitro coculture studies revealed that CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells altered T cell cytokine profile but did not directly inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast, CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells inhibited B cell proliferation and its autoantibody production in an IL-10-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells to mice could prevent disease, as well as suppress EAMG after disease onset. This was associated with downregulation of mature dendritic cell markers and expansion of regulatory T cells resulting in the suppression of acetylcholine receptor-specific T cell and B cell responses. Thus, our data have provided significant insight into the mechanisms underlying the tolerogenic effects of B10 cells in EAMG. These observations suggest that in vivo or in vitro expansion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells or B10 cells may represent an effective strategy in the treatment of human myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. GM-CSF increases mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza DNA vaccine administered into the epidermis of non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Loudon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent H5N1 avian and H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus outbreaks reaffirm that the threat of a world-wide influenza pandemic is both real and ever-present. Vaccination is still considered the best strategy for protection against influenza virus infection but a significant challenge is to identify new vaccine approaches that offer accelerated production, broader protection against drifted and shifted strains, and the capacity to elicit anti-viral immune responses in the respiratory tract at the site of viral entry. As a safe alternative to live attenuated vaccines, the mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza (A/New Caledonia/20/99 HA DNA vaccine administered by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED or gene gun was analyzed in rhesus macaques.Macaques were immunized at weeks 0, 8, and 16 using a disposable single-shot particle-mediated delivery device designed for clinical use that delivers plasmid DNA directly into cells of the epidermis. Significant levels of hemagglutination inhibiting (HI antibodies and cytokine-secreting HA-specific T cells were observed in the periphery of macaques following 1-3 doses of the PMED HA DNA vaccine. In addition, HA DNA vaccination induced detectable levels of HA-specific mucosal antibodies and T cells in the lung and gut-associated lymphoid tissues of vaccinated macaques. Importantly, co-delivery of a DNA encoding the rhesus macaque GM-CSF gene was found to significantly enhance both the systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of the HA DNA vaccine.These results provide strong support for the development of a particle-mediated epidermal DNA vaccine for protection against respiratory pathogens such as influenza and demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of skin-delivered GM-CSF to serve as an effective mucosal adjuvant for vaccine induction of immune responses in the gut and respiratory tract.

  19. Combination of intratumoral injections of vaccinia virus MVA expressing GM-CSF and immunization with DNA vaccine prolongs the survival of mice bearing HPV16 induced tumors with downregulated expression of MHC class I molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němečková, Š.; Šmahel, M.; Hainz, P.; Macková, J.; Zurková, K.; Gabriel, P.; Indrová, Marie; Kutinová, L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 4 (2007), s. 326-333 ISSN 0028-2685 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : vaccinia virus MVA expressing GM- CSF * DNA vaccine * HPV16 induced tumors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.208, year: 2007

  20. Heat shock protein 27-derived atheroprotection involves reverse cholesterol transport that is dependent on GM-CSF to maintain ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression in ApoE-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulakazhi Venu, Vivek Krishna; Adijiang, Ayinuer; Seibert, Tara; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Shi, Chunhua; Batulan, Zarah; O'Brien, Edward R

    2017-06-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that heat shock protein (HSP)-27 is protective against the development of experimental atherosclerosis, reducing plaque cholesterol content by more than 30%. Moreover, elevated HSP-27 levels are predictive of relative freedom from clinical cardiovascular events. HSP-27 signaling occurs via the activation of NF-κB, which induces a marked up-regulation in expression of granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a cytokine that is known to alter ABC transporters involved in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Therefore, we hypothesized that HSP-27-derived GM-CSF has a potent role in impeding plaque formation by promoting macrophage RCT and sought to better characterize this pathway. Treatment of THP-1 cells, RAW-Blue cells, and primary macrophages with recombinant HSP-27 resulted in NF-κB activation via TLR-4 and was inhibited by various pharmacologic blockers of this pathway. Moreover, HSP-27-induced upregulation of GM-CSF expression was dependent on TLR-4 signaling. Recombinant (r)HSP-27 treatment of ApoE -/- female (but not male) mice for 4 wk yielded reductions in plaque area and cholesterol clefts of 33 and 47%, respectively, with no effect on GM-CSF -/- ApoE -/- mice. With 12 wk of rHSP-27 treatment, both female and male mice showed reductions in plaque burden (55 and 42%, respectively) and a 60% reduction in necrotic core area but no treatment effect in GM-CSF -/- ApoE -/- mice. In vitro functional studies revealed that HSP-27 enhanced the expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1, as well as facilitated cholesterol efflux in vitro by ∼10%. These novel findings establish a paradigm for HSP-27-mediated RCT and set the stage for the development of HSP-27 atheroprotective therapeutics.-Pulakazhi Venu, V. K., Adijiang, A., Seibert, T., Chen, Y.-X., Shi, C., Batulan, Z., O'Brien, E. R. Heat shock protein 27-derived atheroprotection involves reverse cholesterol transport that is dependent on GM-CSF to maintain ABCA1 and ABCG1

  1. [Cytokines in cancer chemotherapy: present state and problems in use of G- and GM-CSF for solid tumors in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawara, M

    1998-01-01

    The present state and the problems of G and GM-CSF in cancer chemotherapy, especially for solid tumors in Japan, were reviewed. One of the problems is that adaptation is restricted to several tumors, and the other that recommended doses are about half or one-fourth as much as in North America or Europe. With G-CSF after dose-intensive chemotherapy in small-cell lung cancer, three studies showed G-CSF shortened the duration of neutropenia, and reduced the incidence of neutropenic fever, use of antibiotics and hospitalization, while they showed no advantages in terms of response rate and the incidence of infection-related death. Moreover, the effect on survival has not been proved. In afebrile neutropenic patients, G-CSF could accelerate recovery from neutropenia, but did not reduce the incidence of neutropenic fever. In febrile neutropenic patients with antibiotics, it could also accelerate recovery from neutropenia, but did not reduce neutropenic fever compared with no CSF except in some subsets. Our retrospective study showed the effects of G-CSF in grade 4 neutropenia were comparable with grade 3 neutropenia. The functions of neutrophils with G-CSF after chemotherapy were reported to be increased or maintained. Clinical benefits were only obtained in certain dose-intensive chemotherapy or in limited subsets. Additional clinical trials and a guideline like ASCO's should be planned.

  2. Disabled infectious single cycle herpes simplex virus (DISC-HSV) is a candidate vector system for gene delivery/expression of GM-CSF in human prostate cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Richard J; Mian, Shahid; Bishop, Michael C; Gray, Trevor; Li, Geng; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Ali, Selman; Rees, Robert C

    2003-06-15

    DISC-HSV is a replication incompetent herpes simplex virus that is a highly efficient vector for the transduction of genes in vivo and in vitro. We examine the ability of DISC-HSV to infect human prostate cancer cell-lines and xenograft tumor models, and induce expression of reporter and therapeutic cytokine genes. Infection was confirmed by cellular staining for the beta-galactosidase reporter gene product, and by EM. Human GM-CSF production following DISC-hGMCSF infection was measured using ELISA. The metabolic activity of infected cells was determined by NADP/NADPH assay. Cell death was estimated by cell-cycle analysis using flow cytometry with propidium iodide staining. Infection of DU145, PC3 and LNCaP cells with DISC-HSV was dose dependent. Cells infected with DISC-hGM-CSF released significant levels of hGM-CSF for 3 days. NADP/NADPH assay suggested that infected cells continued to be metabolically active for 3 days post-infection, which was consistent with flow cytometry findings that cell death did not occur within 7 days of infection. Tumor xenografts injected with DISC-HSV expressed beta-galactosidase, and intracellular viral particles were demonstrated using EM. We have previously reported the rejection of established tumors following intra-tumoral injection of DISC-GMCSF. This study demonstrates the ability of DISC-HSV to infect prostate cancer and express GMCSF at significant levels. We suggest that prostate cancer is a potential target for therapy using DISC-HSV containing GM-CSF. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Effect of the association of IGF-I, IGF-II, bFGF, TGF-beta1, GM-CSF, and LIF on the development of bovine embryos produced in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira, J A; Tainturier, D; Peña, M A; Martal, J

    2010-03-15

    This study examined the influence of the following growth factors and cytokines on early embryonic development: insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I, IGF-II), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor (TGF-beta), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Synthetic oviduct fluid (SOF) was used as the culture medium. We studied the development of bovine embryos produced in vitro and cultured until Day 9 after fertilization. TGF-beta1, bFGF, GM-CSF, and LIF used on their own significantly improved the yield of hatched blastocysts. IGF-I, bFGF, TGF-beta1, GM-CSF, and LIF significantly accelerated embryonic development, especially the change from the expanded blastocyst to hatched blastocyst stages. Use of a combination of these growth factors and cytokines (GF-CYK) in SOF medium produced higher percentages of blastocysts and hatched blastocysts than did use of SOF alone (45% and 22% vs. 24% and 12%; PGM-CSF, produces similar results to 10% fetal calf serum for the development of in vitro-produced bovine embryos. This entirely synthetic method of embryo culture has undeniable advantages for the biosecurity of embryo transfer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Distinct Properties of Human M-CSF and GM-CSF Monocyte-Derived Macrophages to Simulate Pathological Lung Conditions In Vitro: Application to Systemic and Inflammatory Disorders with Pulmonary Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescoat, Alain; Ballerie, Alice; Augagneur, Yu; Morzadec, Claudie; Vernhet, Laurent; Fardel, Olivier; Jégo, Patrick; Jouneau, Stéphane; Lecureur, Valérie

    2018-03-17

    Macrophages play a central role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases. However, alveolar macrophages (AM) are poorly available in humans to perform in vitro studies due to a limited access to broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL). In this study, to identify the best alternative in vitro model for human AM, we compared the phenotype of AM obtained from BAL of patients suffering from three lung diseases (lung cancers, sarcoidosis and Systemic Sclerosis (SSc)-associated interstitial lung disease) to human blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) differentiated with M-CSF or GM-CSF. The expression of eight membrane markers was evaluated by flow cytometry. Globally, AM phenotype was closer to GM-CSF MDMs. However, the expression levels of CD163, CD169, CD204, CD64 and CD36 were significantly higher in SSc-ILD than in lung cancers. Considering the expression of CD204 and CD36, the phenotype of SSc-AM was closer to MDMs, from healthy donors or SSc patients, differentiated by M-CSF rather than GM-CSF. The comparative secretion of IL-6 by SSc-MDMs and SSc-AM is concordant with these phenotypic considerations. Altogether, these results support the M-CSF MDM model as a relevant in vitro alternative to simulate AM in fibrotic disorders such as SSc.

  5. SV-BR-1-GM, a Clinically Effective GM-CSF-Secreting Breast Cancer Cell Line, Expresses an Immune Signature and Directly Activates CD4+ T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus D. Lacher

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Targeted cancer immunotherapy with irradiated, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF-secreting, allogeneic cancer cell lines has been an effective approach to reduce tumor burden in several patients. It is generally assumed that to be effective, these cell lines need to express immunogenic antigens coexpressed in patient tumor cells, and antigen-presenting cells need to take up such antigens then present them to patient T cells. We have previously reported that, in a phase I pilot study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00095862, a subject with stage IV breast cancer experienced substantial regression of breast, lung, and brain lesions following inoculation with clinical formulations of SV-BR-1-GM, a GM-CSF-secreting breast tumor cell line. To identify diagnostic features permitting the prospective identification of patients likely to benefit from SV-BR-1-GM, we conducted a molecular analysis of the SV-BR-1-GM cell line and of patient-derived blood, as well as a tumor specimen. Compared to normal human breast cells, SV-BR-1-GM cells overexpress genes encoding tumor-associated antigens (TAAs such as PRAME, a cancer/testis antigen. Curiously, despite its presumptive breast epithelial origin, the cell line expresses major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II genes (HLA-DRA, HLA-DRB3, HLA-DMA, HLA-DMB, in addition to several other factors known to play immunostimulatory roles. These factors include MHC class I components (B2M, HLA-A, HLA-B, ADA (encoding adenosine deaminase, ADGRE5 (CD97, CD58 (LFA3, CD74 (encoding invariant chain and CLIP, CD83, CXCL8 (IL8, CXCL16, HLA-F, IL6, IL18, and KITLG. Moreover, both SV-BR-1-GM cells and the responding study subject carried an HLA-DRB3*02:02 allele, raising the question of whether SV-BR-1-GM cells can directly present endogenous antigens to T cells, thereby inducing a tumor-directed immune response. In support of this, SV-BR-1-GM cells (which also carry the HLA-DRB3*01:01 allele treated with

  6. Silencing of Foxp3 enhances the antitumor efficacy of GM-CSF genetically modified tumor cell vaccine against B16 melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Miguel,1 Luis Sendra,1 Verónica Noé,2 Carles J Ciudad,2 Francisco Dasí,3,4 David Hervas,5 María José Herrero,1,6 Salvador F Aliño17 1Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia, 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, 3Research University Hospital of Valencia, INCLIVA Health Research Institute, 4Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia Foundation, 5Biostatistics Unit, 6Pharmacogenetics Unit, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria La Fe (IIS La Fe, 7Clinical Pharmacology Unit, ACM Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Valencia, Spain Abstract: The antitumor response after therapeutic vaccination has a limited effect and seems to be related to the presence of T regulatory cells (Treg, which express the immunoregulatory molecules CTLA4 and Foxp3. The blockage of CTLA4 using antibodies has shown an effective antitumor response conducing to the approval of the human anti-CTLA4 antibody ipilimumab by the US Food and Drug Administration. On the other hand, Foxp3 is crucial for Treg development. For this reason, it is an attractive target for cancer treatment. This study aims to evaluate whether combining therapeutic vaccination with CTLA4 or Foxp3 gene silencing enhances the antitumor response. First, the “in vitro” cell entrance and gene silencing efficacy of two tools, 2'-O-methyl phosphorotioate-modified oligonucleotides (2'-OMe-PS-ASOs and polypurine reverse Hoogsteen hairpins (PPRHs, were evaluated in EL4 cells and cultured primary lymphocytes. Following B16 tumor transplant, C57BL6 mice were vaccinated with irradiated B16 tumor cells engineered to produce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and were intraperitoneally treated with CTLA4 and Foxp3 2'-OMe-PS-ASO before and after vaccination. Tumor growth, mice survival, and CTLA4 and Foxp3 expression in blood cells were measured. The following

  7. A randomized phase II study of immunization with dendritic cells modified with poxvectors encoding CEA and MUC1 compared with the same poxvectors plus GM-CSF for resected metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael A; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Marshall, John L; Garrett, Christopher; Chang, David Z; Aklilu, Mebea; Crocenzi, Todd S; Cole, David J; Dessureault, Sophie; Hobeika, Amy C; Osada, Takuya; Onaitis, Mark; Clary, Bryan M; Hsu, David; Devi, Gayathri R; Bulusu, Anuradha; Annechiarico, Robert P; Chadaram, Vijaya; Clay, Timothy M; Lyerly, H Kim

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether 1 of 2 vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) and poxvectors encoding CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) and MUC1 (PANVAC) would lengthen survival in patients with resected metastases of colorectal cancer (CRC). Recurrences after complete resections of metastatic CRC remain frequent. Immune responses to CRC are associated with fewer recurrences, suggesting a role for cancer vaccines as adjuvant therapy. Both DCs and poxvectors are potent stimulators of immune responses against cancer antigens. Patients, disease-free after CRC metastasectomy and perioperative chemotherapy (n = 74), were randomized to injections of autologous DCs modified with PANVAC (DC/PANVAC) or PANVAC with per injection GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Endpoints were recurrence-free survival overall survival, and rate of CEA-specific immune responses. Clinical outcome was compared with that of an unvaccinated, contemporary group of patients who had undergone CRC metastasectomy, received similar perioperative therapy, and would have otherwise been eligible for the study. Recurrence-free survival at 2 years was similar (47% and 55% for DC/PANVAC and PANVAC/GM-CSF, respectively) (χ P = 0.48). At a median follow-up of 35.7 months, there were 2 of 37 deaths in the DC/PANVAC arm and 5 of 37 deaths in the PANVAC/GM-CSF arm. The rate and magnitude of T-cell responses against CEA was statistically similar between study arms. As a group, vaccinated patients had superior survival compared with the contemporary unvaccinated group. Both DC and poxvector vaccines have similar activity. Survival was longer for vaccinated patients than for a contemporary unvaccinated group, suggesting that a randomized trial of poxvector vaccinations compared with standard follow-up after metastasectomy is warranted. (NCT00103142).

  8. PU.1 is essential for CD11c expression in CD8(+/CD8(- lymphoid and monocyte-derived dendritic cells during GM-CSF or FLT3L-induced differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Jun Zhu

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs regulate innate and acquired immunity through their roles as antigen-presenting cells. Specific subsets of mature DCs, including monocyte-derived and lymphoid-derived DCs, can be distinguished based on distinct immunophenotypes and functional properties. The leukocyte integrin, CD11c, is considered a specific marker for DCs and it is expressed by all DC subsets. We created a strain of mice in which DCs and their progenitors could be lineage traced based on activity of the CD11c proximal promoter. Surprisingly, we observed levels of CD11c promoter activity that were similar in DCs and in other mature leukocytes, including monocytes, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. We sought to identify DNA elements and transcription factors that regulate DC-associated expression of CD11c. The ets transcription factor, PU.1, is a key regulator of DC development, and expression of PU.1 varies in different DC subsets. GM-CSF increased monocyte-derived DCs in mice and from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro, but it did not increase CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs or B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. FLT3L increased both monocyte-derived DCs and lymphoid-derived DCs from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro. GM-CSF increased the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter activity in monocyte-derived DCs and CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs, but not in B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. In contrast, FLT3L increased the CD11c proximal promoter activity in both monocyte-derived DCs and B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. We used shRNA gene knockdown and chromatin immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that PU.1 is required for the effects of GM-CSF or FLT3L on monocyte-derived DCs. We conclude that both GM-CSF and FLT3L act through PU.1 to activate the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter in DCs and to induce differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs. We also confirm that the CD11c proximal promoter is not sufficient to direct lineage specificity of CD11c expression, and that additional DNA elements are required

  9. IL-12 and GM-CSF in DNA/MVA immunizations against HIV-1 CRF12_BF Nef induced T-cell responses with an enhanced magnitude, breadth and quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Rodríguez

    Full Text Available In Argentina, the HIV epidemic is characterized by the co-circulation of subtype B and BF recombinant viral variants. Nef is an HIV protein highly variable among subtypes, making it a good tool to study the impact of HIV variability in the vaccine design setting. We have previously reported a specific cellular response against NefBF with low cross-reactivity to NefB in mice. The aim of this work was to analyze whether the co-administration of IL-12 and GM-CSF, using DNA and MVA vaccine vectors, could improve the final cellular response induced. Mice received three DNA priming doses of a plasmid that express NefBF plus DNAs expressing IL-12 and/or GM-CSF. Afterwards, all the groups were boosted with a MVAnefBF dose. The highest increase in the magnitude of the NefBF response, compared to that induced in the control was found in the IL-12 group. Importantly, a response with higher breadth was detected in groups which received IL-12 or GM-CSF, evidenced as an increased frequency of recognition of homologous (BF and heterologous (B Nef peptides, as well as a higher number of other Nef peptide pools representing different viral subtypes. However, these improvements were lost when both DNA cytokines were simultaneously administered, as the response was focused against the immunodominant peptide with a detrimental response towards subdominant epitopes. The pattern of cytokines secreted and the specific-T-cell proliferative capacity were improved in IL-12 and IL-12+GM-CSF groups. Importantly IL-12 generated a significant higher T-cell avidity against a B heterologous peptide.This study indicates that the incorporation of DNA expressing IL-12 in DNA/MVA schemes produced the best results in terms of improvements of T-cell-response key properties such as breadth, cross-reactivity and quality (avidity and pattern of cytokines secreted. These relevant results contribute to the design of strategies aimed to induce T-cell responses against HIV antigens with

  10. The frequency of clinical pregnancy and implantation rate after cultivation of embryos in a medium with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with preceding failed attempts of ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevkin, S; Lokshin, V; Shishimorova, M; Polumiskov, V

    2014-10-01

    The application in IVF practice of modern techniques can improve positive outcome of each cycle in the assisted reproductive technology (ART) programs and the effectiveness of treatment as a whole. There are embryos in the female reproductive tract in physiological medium which contain various cytokines and growth factors. It plays an important role in the regulation of normal embryonic development, improve implantation and subsequently optimizing the development of the fetus and the placenta. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is one of the cytokines playing an important role in reproductive function. Addition of recombinant GM-CSF to the culture medium can makes closer human embryos culture to in vivo conditions and improve the efficacy ART cycles. The analysis of culture embryos in EmbryoGen medium has shown that fertilization rate embryo culture and transfer to patients with previous unsuccessful attempts increases clinical pregnancy rate compared to the control group 39.1 versus 27.8%, respectively. It is noted that the implantation rate (on 7 weeks' gestation) and progressive clinical pregnancy rate (on 12 weeks' gestation) were significantly higher in group embryos culture in EmbryoGen medium compared to standard combination of medium (ISM1+VA), and were 20.4 and 17.4% versus 11.6 and 9.1%, respectively.

  11. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor does not increase the potency or efficacy of a foot-and-mouth disease virus subunit vaccine Fator estimulante de colônias de granu-lócitos e macrófagos (GM-CSF não aumenta a eficácia ou potência da vacina de subunidades da febre aftosa em suínos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luizinho Caron

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is one of the most feared diseases of livestock worldwide. Vaccination has been a very effective weapon in controlling the disease, however a number of concerns with the current vaccine including the inability of approved diagnostic tests to reliably distinguish vaccinated from infected animals and the need for high containment facilities for vaccine production, have limited its use during outbreaks in countries previously free of the disease. A number of FMD vaccine candidates have been tested and a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vector containing the FMDV capsid (P1-2A and 3C protease coding regions has been shown to completely protect pigs against challenge with the homologous virus (FMDV A12 and A24. An Ad5-P1-2A+3C vaccine for FMDV O1 Campos (Ad5-O1C, however, only induced a low FMDV-specific neutralizing antibody response in swine potency tests. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF has been successfully used to stimulate the immune response in vaccine formulations against a number of diseases, including HIV, hepatitis C and B. To attempt to improve the FMDV-specific immune response induced by Ad5-O1C, we inoculated swine with Ad5-O1C and an Ad5 vector containing the gene for porcine GM-CSF (pGM-CSF. However, in the conditions used in this trial, pGM-CSF did not improve the immune response to Ad5-O1C and adversely affected the level of protection of swine challenged with homologous FMDV.A febre aftosa é uma das doenças mais temidas nos rebanhos em todo o mundo. A vacinação tem sido uma arma eficiente no controle da doença, no entanto há preocupações com as vacinas atualmente utilizadas incluindo a necessidade de instalações de alta segurança para a produção dessas vacinas e a falta de um teste de diagnóstico aprovado que faça distinção precisa entre animais vacinados dos infectados. Várias vacinas têm sido testadas contra a febre aftosa e uma dessas

  12. TL1A increases expression of CD25, LFA-1, CD134 and CD154, and induces IL-22 and GM-CSF production from effector CD4 T-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichwald, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Tina Z.; Skov, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Elevated levels of the cytokine TL1A is associated with several autoimmune diseases e.g. rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the exact role of TL1A remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the function of TL1A in a pro-inflammatory setting. We show that TL1A toget...... of CD25 (IL-2Rα) and CD11a (α-chain of LFA-1) on CD4 T-cells, likely governing increased IL-2/IL-15 sensitivity and cell-cell contact. Along with this, TL1A co-stimulation caused a specific induction of IL-22 and GM-CSF from the activated T-cells. These results substantially contribute...

  13. Tuberculous Lymphadenitis: Skin Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tuberculous Lymphadenitis: Skin Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity Reaction and Cellular Immune Responses. ... The tuberculin skin test (TST) and peripheral blood mono-nuclear cells (PBMCs) culture were conducted using PPD. The cytokines were measured using commercial kits. Results: The mean TST was 24.6 ±8.0 ...

  14. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Distinct Metabolic Differences Between Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) and Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (M-CSF) Grown Macrophages Derived from Murine Bone Marrow Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yi Rang; Hong, Ji Hye; Lee, Min Yong; Jung, Jae Hun; Jung, Daun; Kim, Young Won; Son, Dain; Choi, Murim; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucial in controlling infectious agents and tissue homeostasis. Macrophages require a wide range of functional capabilities in order to fulfill distinct roles in our body, one being rapid and robust immune responses. To gain insight into macrophage plasticity and the key regulatory protein networks governing their specific functions, we performed quantitative analyses of the proteome and phosphoproteome of murine primary GM-CSF and M-CSF grown bone marrow derived macrophages (GM-BMMs and M-BMMs, respectively) using the latest isobaric tag based tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Strikingly, metabolic processes emerged as a major difference between these macrophages. Specifically, GM-BMMs show significant enrichment of proteins involving glycolysis, the mevalonate pathway, and nitrogen compound biosynthesis. This evidence of enhanced glycolytic capability in GM-BMMs is particularly significant regarding their pro-inflammatory responses, because increased production of cytokines upon LPS stimulation in GM-BMMs depends on their acute glycolytic capacity. In contrast, M-BMMs up-regulate proteins involved in endocytosis, which correlates with a tendency toward homeostatic functions such as scavenging cellular debris. Together, our data describes a proteomic network that underlies the pro-inflammatory actions of GM-BMMs as well as the homeostatic functions of M-BMMs. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Regulation of CTL responses to MHC-restricted class I peptide of the gp70 tumour antigen by splenic parenchymal CD4+ T cells in mice failing immunotherapy with DISC-mGM-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Murrium; Rees, Robert C; McArdle, Stephanie E; Li, Geng; Mian, Shahid; Entwisle, Claire; Loudon, Peter; Ali, Selman A

    2005-07-20

    Direct intratumour injection of the disabled infectious single-cycle-herpes simplex virus-encoding murine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (DISC-HSV-mGM-CSF) into established colon carcinoma CT26 tumours induced complete tumour rejection in up to 70% of treated animals (regressors), while the remaining mice developed progressive tumours (progressors). This murine Balb/c model was used to dissect the cellular mechanisms involved in tumour regression or progression following immunotherapy. CTLs were generated by coculturing lymphocytes and parenchymal cells from the same spleens of individual regressor or progressor animals in the presence of the relevant AH-1 peptide derived from the gp70 tumour-associated antigens expressed by CT26 tumours. Tumour regression was correlated with potent CTL responses, spleen weight and cytokine (IFN-gamma) production. Conversely, progressor splenocytes exhibited weak to no CTL activity and poor IFN-gamma production, concomitant with the presence of a suppressor cell population in the progressor splenic parenchymal cell fraction. Further fractionation of this parenchymal subpopulation demonstrated that cells inhibitory to the activation of AH-1-specific CTLs, restimulated in vitro with peptide, were present in the nonadherent parenchymal fraction. In vitro depletion of progressor parenchymal CD3+/CD4+ T cells restored the CTL response of the cocultured splenocytes (regressor lymphocytes and progressor parenchymal cells) and decreased the production of IL-10, suggesting that CD3+CD4+ T lymphocytes present in the parenchymal fraction regulated the CTL response to AH-1. We examined the cellular responses associated with tumour rejection and progression, identifying regulatory pathways associated with failure to respond to immunotherapy. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. A novel delay-dependent criterion for delayed neural networks of neutral type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.M.; Kwon, O.M.; Park, Ju H.

    2010-01-01

    This Letter considers a robust stability analysis method for delayed neural networks of neutral type. By constructing a new Lyapunov functional, a novel delay-dependent criterion for the stability is derived in terms of LMIs (linear matrix inequalities). A less conservative stability criterion is derived by using nonlinear properties of the activation function of the neural networks. Two numerical examples are illustrated to show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Stability of neutral type descriptor system with mixed delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hong; Li Houbiao; Zhong Shouming

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, the stability problems of general neutral type descriptor system with mixed delays are considered. Some new delay-independent stability and robust stability criteria, which are simpler and less conservative than existing results, are derived in terms of the stability of a new operator I and linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Therefore, criteria can be easily checked by utilizing the Matlab LMI toolbox

  18. Global exponential convergence of neutral-type Hopfield neural networks with multi-proportional delays and leakage delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Changjin; Li, Peiluan

    2017-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a class of neutral-type Hopfield neural networks with multi-proportional delays and leakage delays. Using the differential inequality theory, a set of sufficient conditions which guarantee that all solutions of neutral-type Hopfield neural networks with multi-proportional delays and leakage delays converge exponentially to zero vector are derived. Computer simulations are carried out to verify our theoretical findings. The obtained results of this paper are new and complement some previous studies.

  19. EVOLVING TO TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE WITH SHORT DELAY TIMES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bo; Chen Xuefei; Han Zhanwen; Meng Xiangcun

    2009-01-01

    The single-degenerate model is currently a favorable progenitor model for Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). Recent investigations on the white dwarf (WD) + He star channel of the single-degenerate model imply that this channel is noteworthy for producing SNe Ia. In this paper, we studied SN Ia birthrates and delay times of this channel via a detailed binary population synthesis approach. We found that the Galactic SN Ia birthrate from the WD + He star channel is ∼0.3 x 10 -3 yr -1 according to our standard model, and that this channel can explain SNe Ia with short delay times (∼4.5 x 10 7 -1.4 x 10 8 yr). Meanwhile, these WD + He star systems may be related to the young supersoft X-ray sources prior to SN Ia explosions.

  20. RATES AND DELAY TIMES OF TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiter, Ashley J.; Belczynski, Krzysztof; Fryer, Chris

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the evolution of binary stars to calculate synthetic rates and delay times of the most promising Type Ia Supernovae (SNe Ia) progenitors. We present and discuss evolutionary scenarios in which a white dwarf (WD) reaches the Chandrasekhar mass and potentially explodes in a SNe Ia. We consider Double Degenerate (DDS; merger of two WDs), Single Degenerate (SDS; WD accreting from H-rich companion), and AM Canum Venaticorum (AM CVn; WD accreting from He-rich companion) scenarios. The results are presented for two different star formation histories: burst (elliptical-like galaxies) and continuous (spiral-like galaxies). It is found that delay times for the DDS in our standard model (with common envelope efficiency α CE = 1) follow a power-law distribution. For the SDS we note a wide range of delay times, while AM CVn progenitors produce a short burst of SNe Ia at early times. The DDS median delay time falls between ∼0.5 and 1 Gyr; the SDS between ∼2 and 3 Gyr; and the AM CVn between ∼0.8 and 0.6 Gyr depending on the assumed α CE . For a Milky-Way-like (MW-like) galaxy, we estimate the rates of SNe Ia arising from different progenitors as: ∼10 -4 yr -1 for the SDS and AM CVn, and ∼10 -3 yr -1 for the DDS. We point out that only the rates for two merging carbon-oxygen WDs, the only systems found in the DDS, are consistent with the observed rates for typical MW-like spirals. We also note that DDS progenitors are the dominant population in elliptical galaxies. The fact that the delay time distribution for the DDS follows a power law implies more SNe Ia (per unit mass) in young rather than in aged populations. Our results do not exclude other scenarios, but strongly indicate that the DDS is the dominant channel generating SNe Ia in spiral galaxies, at least in the framework of our adopted evolutionary models. Since it is believed that WD mergers cannot produce a thermonuclear explosion given the current understanding of accreting WDs, either the

  1. Combination Immunotherapy of B16 Melanoma Using Anti–Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte–Associated Antigen 4 (Ctla-4) and Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (Gm-Csf)-Producing Vaccines Induces Rejection of Subcutaneous and Metastatic Tumors Accompanied by Autoimmune Depigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elsas, Andrea; Hurwitz, Arthur A.; Allison, James P.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) blockade, alone or in combination with a granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)–expressing tumor cell vaccine, on rejection of the highly tumorigenic, poorly immunogenic murine melanoma B16-BL6. Recently established tumors could be eradicated in 80% (68/85) of the cases using combination treatment, whereas each treatment by itself showed little or no effect. Tumor rejection was dependent on CD8+ and NK1.1+ cells but occurred irrespective of the presence of CD4+ T cells. Mice surviving a primary challenge rejected a secondary challenge with B16-BL6 or the parental B16-F0 line. The same treatment regimen was found to be therapeutically effective against outgrowth of preestablished B16-F10 lung metastases, inducing long-term survival. Of all mice surviving B16-BL6 or B16-F10 tumors after combination treatment, 56% (38/68) developed depigmentation, starting at the site of vaccination or challenge and in most cases progressing to distant locations. Depigmentation was found to occur in CD4-depleted mice, strongly suggesting that the effect was mediated by CTLs. This study shows that CTLA-4 blockade provides a powerful tool to enhance T cell activation and memory against a poorly immunogenic spontaneous murine tumor and that this may involve recruitment of autoreactive T cells. PMID:10430624

  2. Delay-dependent stability of neural networks of neutral type with time delay in the leakage term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Xiaodi; Cao, Jinde

    2010-01-01

    This paper studies the global asymptotic stability of neural networks of neutral type with mixed delays. The mixed delays include constant delay in the leakage term (i.e. 'leakage delay'), time-varying delays and continuously distributed delays. Based on the topological degree theory, Lyapunov method and linear matrix inequality (LMI) approach, some sufficient conditions are derived ensuring the existence, uniqueness and global asymptotic stability of the equilibrium point, which are dependent on both the discrete and distributed time delays. These conditions are expressed in terms of LMI and can be easily checked by the MATLAB LMI toolbox. Even if there is no leakage delay, the obtained results are less restrictive than some recent works. It can be applied to neural networks of neutral type with activation functions without assuming their boundedness, monotonicity or differentiability. Moreover, the differentiability of the time-varying delay in the non-neutral term is removed. Finally, two numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed method

  3. Desensitization of delayed-type hypersensitivity in mice: suppressive environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Katsura

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The systemic injection of high doses of antigen into a preimmunized animal results in transient unresponsiveness of cell-mediated immune responses. This phenomenon is known as desensitization. Serum interleukin 2 (IL-2 activity was found transiently in desensitized mice at 3 h after the antigen challenge. These mice could not reveal antigen nonspecific delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH 1 d after the challenge. Specific suppression of DTH was observed at later stages. Sera from 3 h desensitized mice showed suppressive effects on DTH in preo immunized mice. Administration of recombinant IL-2 into preimmunized mice led to the failure of development of DTH to antigens. These observations suggest that IL-2 plays an important role in the suppressive environment.

  4. The role for decorin in delayed-type hypersensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidler, Daniela G.; Mohamed, Negia A.; Bocian, Carla; Stadtmann, Anika; Hermann, Sven; Schäfers, Klaus; Schäfers, Michael; Iozzo, Renato V.; Zarbock, Alexander; Götte, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Decorin, a small leucine-rich proteoglycan, regulates extracellular matrix organization, growth factor-mediated signaling and cell growth. As decorin may directly modulate immune responses, we investigated its role in a mouse model of contact allergy (oxazolone-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity, DTH) in decorin-deficient (Dcn−/−) and wild-type mice. Dcn−/− mice showed a reduced ear swelling 24 hours after oxazolone treatment with a concurrent attenuation of leukocyte infiltration. These findings were corroborated by reduced glucose metabolism as determined by 18FDG uptake in positron emission tomography scans. Unexpectedly, polymorphonuclear leukocyte numbers in Dcn−/− blood vessels were significantly increased, accompanied by large numbers of flattened leukocytes adherent to the endothelium. Intravital microscopy, flow chamber and static adhesion assays confirmed increased adhesion and reduced transmigration of Dcn−/− leukocytes. Circulating blood neutrophil numbers were significantly increased in Dcn−/− mice 24 hours after DTH elicitation, but only moderately increased in wild-type mice. Expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-α was reduced, while syndecan-1 and ICAM-1 were overexpressed in inflamed ears of Dcn−/− mice, indicating that these adhesion molecules could be responsible for increased leukocyte adhesion. Decorin treatment of endothelial cells increased tyrosine phosphorylation and reduced syndecan-1 expression. Notably, absence of syndecan-1 in a genetic background lacking decorin rescued the attenuated DTH phenotype of Dcn−/− mice. Collectively, these results implicate a role for decorin in mediating DTH responses by influencing polymorphonuclear leukocyte attachment to the endothelium. This occurs via two non-mutually exclusive mechanisms that involve a direct anti-adhesive effect on polymorphonuclear leukocytes and a negative regulation of ICAM-1 and syndecan-1 expression. PMID:22043007

  5. Sharp Gronwall-Bellman type integral inequalities with delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    István Győri

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Various attempts have been made to give an upper bound for the solutions of the delayed version of the Gronwall-Bellman integral inequality, but the obtained estimations are not sharp. In this paper a new approach is presented to get sharp estimations for the nonnegative solutions of the considered delayed inequalities. The results are based on the idea of the generalized characteristic inequality. Our method gives sharp estimation, and therefore the results are more exact than the earlier ones.

  6. Exponential convergence rate estimation for uncertain delayed neural networks of neutral type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien, C.-H.; Yu, K.-W.; Lin, Y.-F.; Chung, Y.-J.; Chung, L.-Y.

    2009-01-01

    The global exponential stability for a class of uncertain delayed neural networks (DNNs) of neutral type is investigated in this paper. Delay-dependent and delay-independent criteria are proposed to guarantee the robust stability of DNNs via LMI and Razumikhin-like approaches. For a given delay, the maximal allowable exponential convergence rate will be estimated. Some numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of our results. The simulation results reveal significant improvement over the recent results.

  7. Energy decay in a Timoshenko-type system for thermoelasticity of type III with distributed delay and past history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghao Hao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we consider a one-dimensional Timoshenko system of thermoelasticity of type III with past history and distributive delay. It is known that an arbitrarily small delay may be the source of instability. We establish the well-posedness and the stability of the system for the cases of equal and nonequal speeds of wave propagation respectively. Our results show that the damping effect is strong enough to uniformly stabilize the system even in the presence of time delay under suitable conditions and improve the related results.

  8. Entire solutions of a diffusive and competitive Lotka–Volterra type system with nonlocal delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Mingxin; Lv, Guangying

    2010-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the entire solution of a diffusive and competitive Lotka–Volterra type system with nonlocal delays. The existence of the entire solution is proved by transforming the system with nonlocal delays to a four-dimensional system without delay and using the comparing argument and the sub-super-solution method. Here an entire solution means a classical solution defined for all space and time variables, which behaves as two wave fronts coming from both sides of the x-axis

  9. Type a niemann-pick disease. Description of three cases with delayed myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, A; Sibilio, M; Caranci, F; Bartiromo, F; Taurisano, R; Balivo, F; Melis, D; Parenti, G; Cirillo, S; Elefante, R; Brunetti, A

    2008-06-03

    We describe three patients with type A Niemann-Pick disease (NPD-A). NPD-A is an autosomal recessive neuronal storage disease classified among the sphingolipidoses, characterized by accumulation of sphingomyelin in various tissues and in the brain. Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI) of our three patients showed a marked delay of myelination with frontal atrophy. Few descriptions of this MRI pattern of delayed myelination have been published to date.

  10. Not All Types of Delay Are Equal: Postsecondary Delay in the U.S. and Taking a Gap Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoe, Nina DePena

    2014-01-01

    Postsecondary delay in the U.S. is a topic that has generated interest in the field of higher education in recent decades. Seventeen percent of U.S. students under the age of 24 who began their postsecondary education in 2004 delayed their entrance for some period of time. At the national level, studies have indicated that students who delay are…

  11. Stochastic stability analysis for delayed neural networks of neutral type with Markovian jump parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lou Xuyang; Cui Baotong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of stochastic stability for a class of delayed neural networks of neutral type with Markovian jump parameters is investigated. The jumping parameters are modelled as a continuous-time, discrete-state Markov process. A sufficient condition guaranteeing the stochastic stability of the equilibrium point is derived for the Markovian jumping delayed neural networks (MJDNNs) with neutral type. The stability criterion not only eliminates the differences between excitatory and inhibitory effects on the neural networks, but also can be conveniently checked. The sufficient condition obtained can be essentially solved in terms of linear matrix inequality. A numerical example is given to show the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  12. Improved Delay-Dependent Robust Stability Criteria for a Class of Uncertain Neutral Type Lur’e Systems with Discrete and Distributed Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaibo Shi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with the problem of delay-dependent robust stability analysis for a class of uncertain neutral type Lur’e systems with mixed time-varying delays. The system has not only time-varying uncertainties and sector-bounded nonlinearity, but also discrete and distributed delays, which has never been discussed in the previous literature. Firstly, by employing one effective mathematical technique, some less conservative delay-dependent stability results are established without employing the bounding technique and the mode transformation approach. Secondly, by constructing an appropriate new type of Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional with triple terms, improved delay-dependent stability criteria in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs derived in this paper are much brief and valid. Furthermore, both nonlinearities located in finite sector and infinite one have been also fully taken into account. Finally, three numerical examples are presented to illustrate lesser conservatism and the advantage of the proposed main results.

  13. Finite-time stability of neutral-type neural networks with random time-varying delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M. Syed; Saravanan, S.; Zhu, Quanxin

    2017-11-01

    This paper is devoted to the finite-time stability analysis of neutral-type neural networks with random time-varying delays. The randomly time-varying delays are characterised by Bernoulli stochastic variable. This result can be extended to analysis and design for neutral-type neural networks with random time-varying delays. On the basis of this paper, we constructed suitable Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional together and established a set of sufficient linear matrix inequalities approach to guarantee the finite-time stability of the system concerned. By employing the Jensen's inequality, free-weighting matrix method and Wirtinger's double integral inequality, the proposed conditions are derived and two numerical examples are addressed for the effectiveness of the developed techniques.

  14. AN OPTIMAL REPLENISHMENT POLICY FOR DETERIORATING ITEMS WITH RAMP TYPE DEMAND UNDER PERMISSIBLE DELAY IN PAYMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sanjay Jain

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to develop an optimal replenishment policy for inventory models of deteriorating items with ramp type demand under permissible delay in payments. Deterioration of items begins on their arrival in stock.  An example is also presented to illustrate the application of developed model.

  15. Nonlinear Delay Discrete Inequalities and Their Applications to Volterra Type Difference Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Delay discrete inequalities with more than one nonlinear term are discussed, which generalize some known results and can be used in the analysis of various problems in the theory of certain classes of discrete equations. Application examples to show boundedness and uniqueness of solutions of a Volterra type difference equation are also given.

  16. Razumikhin-Type Stability Criteria for Differential Equations with Delayed Impulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Zhu, Quanxin

    2013-01-01

    This paper studies stability problems of general impulsive differential equations where time delays occur in both differential and difference equations. Based on the method of Lyapunov functions, Razumikhin technique and mathematical induction, several stability criteria are obtained for differential equations with delayed impulses. Our results show that some systems with delayed impulses may be exponentially stabilized by impulses even if the system matrices are unstable. Some less restrictive sufficient conditions are also given to keep the good stability property of systems subject to certain type of impulsive perturbations. Examples with numerical simulations are discussed to illustrate the theorems. Our results may be applied to complex problems where impulses depend on both current and past states.

  17. Razumikhin-type stability criteria for differential equations with delayed impulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies stability problems of general impulsive differential equations where time delays occur in both differential and difference equations. Based on the method of Lyapunov functions, Razumikhin technique and mathematical induction, several stability criteria are obtained for differential equations with delayed impulses. Our results show that some systems with delayed impulses may be exponentially stabilized by impulses even if the system matrices are unstable. Some less restrictive sufficient conditions are also given to keep the good stability property of systems subject to certain type of impulsive perturbations. Examples with numerical simulations are discussed to illustrate the theorems. Our results may be applied to complex problems where impulses depend on both current and past states.

  18. Variable delay generator, type GRV 1; Generateur de retards variables, type GRV 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillet, C.; Chaigne, M.; Janot, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    This apparatus has been designed mainly for simulating the passage of a fluid circulating inside a pipe. It is assumed that no heat exchange occurs during the passage so that the temperature of the fluid is the same at the entry and at the exit. A consequence of this is that the apparatus memorizes the value of the temperature on entry and reproduces it again at the end of the passage. The memorizing is effected by means of condensers which are charged at a given moment and whose voltage across the terminals is read after a time which is proportional to the variable flow of the fluid. The object is therefore to delay a given value, whence the name of variable delay generator. In its present form the apparatus can produce delays of from 1,4 seconds to 3000 seconds and more. (authors) [French] Cet appareil a ete concu principalement pour simuler la duree de trajet d'un fluide circulant a l'interieur d'une tuyauterie. On admet qu'il n'y a aucun echange de chaleur durant le trajet de sorte que la temperature du fluide a la sortie est egale a celle qu'il avait a l'entree. Il en resulte que l'appareil met en memoire la valeur de la temperature a l'entree et la restitue a la fin de la duree du trajet. La memoire est realisee par des condensateurs qui sont charges a un instant donne et dont la tension aux bornes est lue apres un temps proportionnel au debit variable du fluide. Tout revient donc a retarder une grandeur, d'ou le nom de generateur de retards variables. Dans sa forme actuelle l'appareil permet d'obtenir des retards allant de 1,4 secondes a 3000 secondes et davantage. (auteurs)

  19. Variable delay generator, type GRV 1; Generateur de retards variables, type GRV 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caillet, C; Chaigne, M; Janot, P [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1964-07-01

    This apparatus has been designed mainly for simulating the passage of a fluid circulating inside a pipe. It is assumed that no heat exchange occurs during the passage so that the temperature of the fluid is the same at the entry and at the exit. A consequence of this is that the apparatus memorizes the value of the temperature on entry and reproduces it again at the end of the passage. The memorizing is effected by means of condensers which are charged at a given moment and whose voltage across the terminals is read after a time which is proportional to the variable flow of the fluid. The object is therefore to delay a given value, whence the name of variable delay generator. In its present form the apparatus can produce delays of from 1,4 seconds to 3000 seconds and more. (authors) [French] Cet appareil a ete concu principalement pour simuler la duree de trajet d'un fluide circulant a l'interieur d'une tuyauterie. On admet qu'il n'y a aucun echange de chaleur durant le trajet de sorte que la temperature du fluide a la sortie est egale a celle qu'il avait a l'entree. Il en resulte que l'appareil met en memoire la valeur de la temperature a l'entree et la restitue a la fin de la duree du trajet. La memoire est realisee par des condensateurs qui sont charges a un instant donne et dont la tension aux bornes est lue apres un temps proportionnel au debit variable du fluide. Tout revient donc a retarder une grandeur, d'ou le nom de generateur de retards variables. Dans sa forme actuelle l'appareil permet d'obtenir des retards allant de 1,4 secondes a 3000 secondes et davantage. (auteurs)

  20. Almost periodic cellular neural networks with neutral-type proportional delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Songlin

    2018-03-01

    This paper presents a new result on the existence, uniqueness and generalised exponential stability of almost periodic solutions for cellular neural networks with neutral-type proportional delays and D operator. Based on some novel differential inequality techniques, a testable condition is derived to ensure that all the state trajectories of the system converge to an almost periodic solution with a positive exponential convergence rate. The effectiveness of the obtained result is illustrated by a numerical example.

  1. Exponential p-stability of delayed Cohen-Grossberg-type BAM neural networks with impulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Yonghui; Huang Zhenkun; Han Maoan

    2008-01-01

    An impulsive Cohen-Grossberg-type bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks with distributed delays is studied. Some new sufficient conditions are established for the existence and global exponential stability of a unique equilibrium without strict conditions imposed on self regulation functions. The approaches are based on Laypunov-Kravsovskii functional and homeomorphism theory. When our results are applied to the BAM neural networks, our results generalize some previously known results. It is believed that these results are significant and useful for the design and applications of Cohen-Grossberg-type bidirectional associative memory networks

  2. Epidermal Langerhans' cell induction of immunity against an ultraviolet-induced skin tumour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavanagh, L.L.; Sluyter, R.; Henderson, K.G.; Barnetson, R.St.C.; Halliday, G.M.

    1996-01-01

    Lanerghans' cells (LC) have been shown experimentally to induce immune response against many antigens; however, their role in the initiation of anti-tumour immunity has received little attention. This study examined the ability of murine epidermal LC to induce immunity to an ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced skin tumour. Freshly prepared epidermal cells (EC) were cultured for 2 or 20 hr with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), pulsed with an extract of the UV-13-1 tumour, then used to immunize naive syngeneic mice. Delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) was elicited 10 days after immunization by injection of UV-13-1 tumour cells into the ear pinna, and measured 24 hr later. EC cultured with GM-CSF for 2 hr induced anti-tumour DTH, as did EC cultured for 20 hr without GM-CSF. Conversely, EC cultured for 2 hr without GM-CSF, or EC cultured for 20 hr with GM-CSF were unable to induce a DTH. Induction of immunity required active presentation of tumour antigens by Ia + EC and was tumour specific. Thus Ia + epidermal cells are capable of inducing anti-tumour immunity to UV-induced skin tumours, but only when they contact antigen in particular states of maturation. (author)

  3. The role of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor in gastrointestinal immunity to salmonellosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, C; Beagley, K W; Bao, S

    2009-08-01

    Human Salmonella infection, in particular, typhoid fever is a highly infectious disease that remains a major public health problem causing significant morbidity and mortality. The outcome of these infections depends on the host's immune response, particularly the actions of granulocytes and macrophages. Using a mouse model of human typhoid fever, with Salmonella typhimurium infection of wild type and granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) knock out mice we show a delay in the onset of immune-mediated tissue damage in the spleens and livers of GM-CSF(-/-) mice. Furthermore, GM-CSF(-/-) mice have a prolonged sequestration of S. typhimurium in affected tissues despite an increased production of F4/80+ effector cells. Moreover in the absence of GM-CSF, a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression of tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-12 (IL-12) and IL-18 was found, which may alter the host's immune response to infection. GM-CSF appears to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Salmonellosis, and may contribute significantly to the development of protective gastrointestinal mucosal immune responses against oral pathogens.

  4. Stability in Cohen Grossberg-type bidirectional associative memory neural networks with time-varying delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jinde; Song, Qiankun

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, the exponential stability problem is investigated for a class of Cohen-Grossberg-type bidirectional associative memory neural networks with time-varying delays. By using the analysis method, inequality technique and the properties of an M-matrix, several novel sufficient conditions ensuring the existence, uniqueness and global exponential stability of the equilibrium point are derived. Moreover, the exponential convergence rate is estimated. The obtained results are less restrictive than those given in the earlier literature, and the boundedness and differentiability of the activation functions and differentiability of the time-varying delays are removed. Two examples with their simulations are given to show the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  5. Explicit Bounds to Some New Gronwall-Bellman-Type Delay Integral Inequalities in Two Independent Variables on Time Scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanwei Meng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Some new Gronwall-Bellman-type delay integral inequalities in two independent variables on time scales are established, which provide a handy tool in the research of qualitative and quantitative properties of solutions of delay dynamic equations on time scales. The established inequalities generalize some of the results in the work of Zhang and Meng 2008, Pachpatte 2002, and Ma 2010.

  6. Global asymptotic stability to a generalized Cohen-Grossberg BAM neural networks of neutral type delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhengqiu; Liu, Wenbin; Zhou, Dongming

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we first discuss the existence of a unique equilibrium point of a generalized Cohen-Grossberg BAM neural networks of neutral type delays by means of the Homeomorphism theory and inequality technique. Then, by applying the existence result of an equilibrium point and constructing a Lyapunov functional, we study the global asymptotic stability of the equilibrium solution to the above Cohen-Grossberg BAM neural networks of neutral type. In our results, the hypothesis for boundedness in the existing paper, which discussed Cohen-Grossberg neural networks of neutral type on the activation functions, are removed. Finally, we give an example to demonstrate the validity of our global asymptotic stability result for the above neural networks. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Local and global Hopf bifurcation analysis in a neutral-type neuron system with two delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qiuyu; Liao, Xiaofeng

    2018-03-01

    In recent years, neutral-type differential-difference equations have been applied extensively in the field of engineering, and their dynamical behaviors are more complex than that of the delay differential-difference equations. In this paper, the equations used to describe a neutral-type neural network system of differential difference equation with two delays are studied (i.e. neutral-type differential equations). Firstly, by selecting τ1, τ2 respectively as a parameter, we provide an analysis about the local stability of the zero equilibrium point of the equations, and sufficient conditions of asymptotic stability for the system are derived. Secondly, by using the theory of normal form and applying the theorem of center manifold introduced by Hassard et al., the Hopf bifurcation is found and some formulas for deciding the stability of periodic solutions and the direction of Hopf bifurcation are given. Moreover, by applying the theorem of global Hopf bifurcation, the existence of global periodic solution of the system is studied. Finally, an example is given, and some computer numerical simulations are taken to demonstrate and certify the correctness of the presented results.

  8. A Note on a Semilinear Fractional Differential Equation of Neutral Type with Infinite Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisle M. Mophou

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We deal in this paper with the mild solution for the semilinear fractional differential equation of neutral type with infinite delay: Dαx(t+Ax(t=f(t,xt, t∈[0,T], x(t=ϕ(t, t∈]−∞,0], with T>0 and 0<α<1. We prove the existence (and uniqueness of solutions, assuming that −A is a linear closed operator which generates an analytic semigroup (T(tt≥0 on a Banach space 𝕏 by means of the Banach's fixed point theorem. This generalizes some recent results.

  9. Plant responses to precipitation in desert ecosystems: integrating functional types, pulses, thresholds, and delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogle, Kiona; Reynolds, James F

    2004-10-01

    The 'two-layer' and 'pulse-reserve' hypotheses were developed 30 years ago and continue to serve as the standard for many experiments and modeling studies that examine relationships between primary productivity and rainfall variability in aridlands. The two-layer hypothesis considers two important plant functional types (FTs) and predicts that woody and herbaceous plants are able to co-exist in savannas because they utilize water from different soil layers (or depths). The pulse-reserve model addresses the response of individual plants to precipitation and predicts that there are 'biologically important' rain events that stimulate plant growth and reproduction. These pulses of precipitation may play a key role in long-term plant function and survival (as compared to seasonal or annual rainfall totals as per the two-layer model). In this paper, we re-evaluate these paradigms in terms of their generality, strengths, and limitations. We suggest that while seasonality and resource partitioning (key to the two-layer model) and biologically important precipitation events (key to the pulse-reserve model) are critical to understanding plant responses to precipitation in aridlands, both paradigms have significant limitations. Neither account for plasticity in rooting habits of woody plants, potential delayed responses of plants to rainfall, explicit precipitation thresholds, or vagaries in plant phenology. To address these limitations, we integrate the ideas of precipitation thresholds and plant delays, resource partitioning, and plant FT strategies into a simple 'threshold-delay' model. The model contains six basic parameters that capture the nonlinear nature of plant responses to pulse precipitation. We review the literature within the context of our threshold-delay model to: (i) develop testable hypotheses about how different plant FTs respond to pulses; (ii) identify weaknesses in the current state-of-knowledge; and (iii) suggest future research directions that will

  10. Neural Network-Based Passive Filtering for Delayed Neutral-Type Semi-Markovian Jump Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Peng; Li, Fanbiao; Wu, Ligang; Lim, Cheng-Chew

    2017-09-01

    This paper investigates the problem of exponential passive filtering for a class of stochastic neutral-type neural networks with both semi-Markovian jump parameters and mixed time delays. Our aim is to estimate the states by designing a Luenberger-type observer, such that the filter error dynamics are mean-square exponentially stable with an expected decay rate and an attenuation level. Sufficient conditions for the existence of passive filters are obtained, and a convex optimization algorithm for the filter design is given. In addition, a cone complementarity linearization procedure is employed to cast the nonconvex feasibility problem into a sequential minimization problem, which can be readily solved by the existing optimization techniques. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed techniques.

  11. Ultraviolet-irradiated urocanic acid suppresses delayed-type hypersensitivity to herpes simplex virus in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, J.A.; Howie, S.E.; Norval, M.; Maingay, J.; Simpson, T.J.

    1986-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is known to induce a transient defect in epidermal antigen presentation which leads to the generation of antigen-specific suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response. The putative receptor in skin for the primary event in UV-suppression is urocanic acid (UCA) which may then interact locally, or systemically, with antigen presenting cells or initiate a cascade of events resulting in suppression. We present the first direct evidence that UCA, when irradiated with a dose (96 mJ/cm2) of UVB radiation known to suppress the DTH response to herpes simplex virus, type 1 (HSV-1) in mice, can induce suppression following epidermal application or s.c. injection of the irradiated substance. This suppression is transferable with nylon wool-passed spleen cells

  12. Comparative study of skin blood flow in various types of delayed deltopectoral flaps using the xenon-133 clearance method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchida, Yukihide; Ogo, Ken (Kyorin Univ., Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine); Tsuya, Akira; Uchida, Masaoki; Kamata, Shinetsu; Ohura, Takehiko

    1984-07-01

    We investigated the skin blood flow in five types of delayed deltopectoral flaps and the optimal time for transfer after delay operation using the local clearance method of Xenon-133. The results obtained are reported. 1) Characteristic differences were observed in recovery patterns of the distal blood flow among the five types of delay procedure. 2) The recovery in the distal blood flow of the D-P flap lined with a split-skin graft appeared the fastest among the five types, followed by the tubed D-P flap. 3) When using a bipedicled D-P flap, lateral incision should be performed within 10 days after delay procedure. 4) The skin blood flow of less than 5 ml/100g/min indicated a high risk of necrosis of the deltopectoral flap. 5) The optimal time for transfer was found to be when the skin blood flow of the distal region recovered to the control level.

  13. Menarche delay and menstrual irregularities persist in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McFann Kim

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Menarche delay has been reported in adolescent females with type 1 diabetes (T1DM, perhaps due to poor glycemic control. We sought to compare age at menarche between adolescent females with T1DM and national data, and to identify factors associated with delayed menarche and menstrual irregularity in T1DM. Methods This was a cross-sectional study and females ages 12- 24 years (n = 228 with at least one menstrual period were recruited during their outpatient diabetes clinic appointment. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES 2001-2006 data (n = 3690 for females 12-24 years were used as a control group. Results Age at menarche was later in adolescent females with T1DM diagnosed prior to menarche (12.81 +/- 0.09 years (mean+/- SE (n = 185 than for adolescent females diagnosed after menarche (12.17 0.19 years, p = 0.0015 (n = 43. Average age of menarche in NHANES was 12.27 +/- 0.038 years, which was significantly earlier than adolescent females with T1DM prior to menarche (p p = 0.77. Older age at menarche was negatively correlated with BMI z-score (r = -0.23 p = 0.0029 but not hemoglobin A1c (A1c at menarche (r = 0.01, p = 0.91. Among 181 adolescent females who were at least 2 years post menarche, 63 (35% reported usually or always irregular cycles. Conclusion Adolescent females with T1DM had a later onset of menarche than both adolescent females who developed T1DM after menarche and NHANES data. Menarche age was negatively associated with BMI z-score, but not A1c. Despite improved treatment in recent decades, menarche delay and high prevalence of menstrual irregularity is still observed among adolescent females with T1DM.

  14. Spatiotemporal dynamics on small-world neuronal networks: The roles of two types of time-delayed coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Hao; Jiang Huijun [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Hou Zhonghuai, E-mail: hzhlj@ustc.edu.cn [Hefei National Laboratory for Physical Sciences at the Microscale and Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2011-10-15

    Highlights: > We compare neuronal dynamics in dependence on two types of delayed coupling. > Distinct results induced by different delayed coupling can be achieved. > Time delays in type 1 coupling can induce a most spatiotemporal ordered state. > For type 2 coupling, the systems exhibit synchronization transitions with delay. - Abstract: We investigate temporal coherence and spatial synchronization on small-world networks consisting of noisy Terman-Wang (TW) excitable neurons in dependence on two types of time-delayed coupling: {l_brace}x{sub j}(t - {tau}) - x{sub i}(t){r_brace} and {l_brace}x{sub j}(t - {tau}) - x{sub i}(t - {tau}){r_brace}. For the former case, we show that time delay in the coupling can dramatically enhance temporal coherence and spatial synchrony of the noise-induced spike trains. In addition, if the delay time {tau} is tuned to nearly match the intrinsic spike period of the neuronal network, the system dynamics reaches a most ordered state, which is both periodic in time and nearly synchronized in space, demonstrating an interesting resonance phenomenon with delay. For the latter case, however, we cannot achieve a similar spatiotemporal ordered state, but the neuronal dynamics exhibits interesting synchronization transitions with time delay from zigzag fronts of excitations to dynamic clustering anti-phase synchronization (APS), and further to clustered chimera states which have spatially distributed anti-phase coherence separated by incoherence. Furthermore, we also show how these findings are influenced by the change of the noise intensity and the rewiring probability of the small-world networks. Finally, qualitative analysis is given to illustrate the numerical results.

  15. Spatiotemporal dynamics on small-world neuronal networks: The roles of two types of time-delayed coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Hao; Jiang Huijun; Hou Zhonghuai

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We compare neuronal dynamics in dependence on two types of delayed coupling. → Distinct results induced by different delayed coupling can be achieved. → Time delays in type 1 coupling can induce a most spatiotemporal ordered state. → For type 2 coupling, the systems exhibit synchronization transitions with delay. - Abstract: We investigate temporal coherence and spatial synchronization on small-world networks consisting of noisy Terman-Wang (TW) excitable neurons in dependence on two types of time-delayed coupling: {x j (t - τ) - x i (t)} and {x j (t - τ) - x i (t - τ)}. For the former case, we show that time delay in the coupling can dramatically enhance temporal coherence and spatial synchrony of the noise-induced spike trains. In addition, if the delay time τ is tuned to nearly match the intrinsic spike period of the neuronal network, the system dynamics reaches a most ordered state, which is both periodic in time and nearly synchronized in space, demonstrating an interesting resonance phenomenon with delay. For the latter case, however, we cannot achieve a similar spatiotemporal ordered state, but the neuronal dynamics exhibits interesting synchronization transitions with time delay from zigzag fronts of excitations to dynamic clustering anti-phase synchronization (APS), and further to clustered chimera states which have spatially distributed anti-phase coherence separated by incoherence. Furthermore, we also show how these findings are influenced by the change of the noise intensity and the rewiring probability of the small-world networks. Finally, qualitative analysis is given to illustrate the numerical results.

  16. Electromechanical delay components during skeletal muscle contraction and relaxation in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Fabio; Cè, Emiliano; Rampichini, Susanna; Limonta, Eloisa; Venturelli, Massimo; Monti, Elena; Bet, Luciano; Fossati, Barbara; Meola, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    The electromechanical delay during muscle contraction and relaxation can be partitioned into mainly electrochemical and mainly mechanical components by an EMG, mechanomyographic, and force combined approach. Component duration and measurement reliability were investigated during contraction and relaxation in a group of patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1, n = 13) and in healthy controls (n = 13). EMG, mechanomyogram, and force were recorded in DM1 and in age- and body-matched controls from tibialis anterior (distal muscle) and vastus lateralis (proximal muscle) muscles during maximum voluntary and electrically-evoked isometric contractions. The electrochemical and mechanical components of the electromechanical delay during muscle contraction and relaxation were calculated off-line. Maximum strength was significantly lower in DM1 than in controls under both experimental conditions. All electrochemical and mechanical components were significantly longer in DM1 in both muscles. Measurement reliability was very high in both DM1 and controls. The high reliability of the measurements and the differences between DM1 patients and controls suggest that the EMG, mechanomyographic, and force combined approach could be utilized as a valid tool to assess the level of neuromuscular dysfunction in this pathology, and to follow the efficacy of pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Relationship between systemic inflammation and delayed-type hypersensitivity response to Candida antigen in older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandt D Pence

    Full Text Available Research has shown that aging is associated with increased systemic inflammation as well as a reduction in the strength of immune responses. However, little evidence exists linking the decrease in cell-mediated immunity in older adults with other health parameters. We sought to examine the relationship between cell-mediated immunity as measured in vivo by the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH response to candida antigen and demographic and physiological variables in older (65-80 y.o. adults. Candida antigen response was not related to gender or obesity, or to a number of other physiological variables including fitness and body composition. However, positive responders had significantly lower serum C-reactive protein levels (CRP, p4.75 mg•L(-1. Therefore, positive responses to candida antigen in older adults appears to be related to lower levels of systemic inflammation.

  18. Fexofenadine Suppresses Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity in the Murine Model of Palladium Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Matsubara

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Palladium is frequently used in dental materials, and sometimes causes metal allergy. It has been suggested that the immune response by palladium-specific T cells may be responsible for the pathogenesis of delayed-type hypersensitivity in study of palladium allergic model mice. In the clinical setting, glucocorticoids and antihistamine drugs are commonly used for treatment of contact dermatitis. However, the precise mechanism of immune suppression in palladium allergy remains unknown. We investigated inhibition of the immune response in palladium allergic mice by administration of prednisolone as a glucocorticoid and fexofenadine hydrochloride as an antihistamine. Compared with glucocorticoids, fexofenadine hydrochloride significantly suppressed the number of T cells by interfering with the development of antigen-presenting cells from the sensitization phase. Our results suggest that antihistamine has a beneficial effect on the treatment of palladium allergy compared to glucocorticoids.

  19. Global Robust Stability of Switched Interval Neural Networks with Discrete and Distributed Time-Varying Delays of Neural Type

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaiqin Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available By combing the theories of the switched systems and the interval neural networks, the mathematics model of the switched interval neural networks with discrete and distributed time-varying delays of neural type is presented. A set of the interval parameter uncertainty neural networks with discrete and distributed time-varying delays of neural type are used as the individual subsystem, and an arbitrary switching rule is assumed to coordinate the switching between these networks. By applying the augmented Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional approach and linear matrix inequality (LMI techniques, a delay-dependent criterion is achieved to ensure to such switched interval neural networks to be globally asymptotically robustly stable in terms of LMIs. The unknown gain matrix is determined by solving this delay-dependent LMIs. Finally, an illustrative example is given to demonstrate the validity of the theoretical results.

  20. The In Vivo Granulopoietic Response to Dexamethasone Injection Is Abolished in Perforin-Deficient Mutant Mice and Corrected by Lymphocyte Transfer from Nonsensitized Wild-Type Donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Xavier-Elsas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Exogenously administered glucocorticoids enhance eosinophil and neutrophil granulocyte production from murine bone-marrow. A hematological response dependent on endogenous glucocorticoids underlies bone-marrow eosinophilia induced by trauma or allergic sensitization/challenge. We detected a defect in granulopoiesis in nonsensitized, perforin-deficient mice. In steady-state conditions, perforin- (Pfp- deficient mice showed significantly decreased bone-marrow and blood eosinophil and neutrophil counts, and colony formation in response to GM-CSF, relative to wild-type controls of comparable age and/or weight. By contrast, peripheral blood or spleen total cell and lymphocyte numbers were not affected by perforin deficiency. Dexamethasone enhanced colony formation by GM-CSF-stimulated progenitors from wild-type controls, but not Pfp mice. Dexamethasone injection increased bone-marrow eosinophil and neutrophil counts in wild-type controls, but not Pfp mice. Because perforin is expressed in effector lymphocytes, we examined whether this defect would be corrected by transferring wild-type lymphocytes into perforin-deficient recipients. Short-term reconstitution of the response to dexamethasone was separately achieved for eosinophils and neutrophils by transfer of distinct populations of splenic lymphocytes from nonsensitized wild-type donors. Transfer of the same amount of splenic lymphocytes from perforin-deficient donors was ineffective. This demonstrates that the perforin-dependent, granulopoietic response to dexamethasone can be restored by transfer of innate lymphocyte subpopulations.

  1. Robust Stability Analysis of Neutral-Type Hybrid Bidirectional Associative Memory Neural Networks with Time-Varying Delays

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Feng; Simon X. Yang; Haixia Wu

    2014-01-01

    The global asymptotic robust stability of equilibrium is considered for neutral-type hybrid bidirectional associative memory neural networks with time-varying delays and parameters uncertainties. The results we obtained in this paper are delay-derivative-dependent and establish various relationships between the network parameters only. Therefore, the results of this paper are applicable to a larger class of neural networks and can be easily verified when compared with the previously reported ...

  2. Anxiety type modulates immediate versus delayed engagement of attention-related brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M; De Leon, Angeline A; Bredemeier, Keith; Heller, Wendy; Engels, Anna S; Warren, Stacie L; Crocker, Laura D; Sutton, Bradley P; Miller, Gregory A

    2013-09-01

    Background Habituation of the fear response, critical for the treatment of anxiety, is inconsistently observed during exposure to threatening stimuli. One potential explanation for this inconsistency is differential attentional engagement with negatively valenced stimuli as a function of anxiety type. Methods The present study tested this hypothesis by examining patterns of neural habituation associated with anxious arousal, characterized by panic symptoms and immediate engagement with negatively valenced stimuli, versus anxious apprehension, characterized by engagement in worry to distract from negatively valenced stimuli. Results As predicted, the two anxiety types evidenced distinct patterns of attentional engagement. Anxious arousal was associated with immediate activation in attention-related brain regions that habituated over time, whereas anxious apprehension was associated with delayed activation in attention-related brain regions that occurred only after habituation in a worry-related brain region. Conclusions Results further elucidate mechanisms involved in attention to negatively valenced stimuli and indicate that anxiety is a heterogeneous construct with regard to attention to such stimuli.

  3. Investigation into the effect of different fuels on ignition delay of M-type diesel combustion process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibić Dževad

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available An ignition delay is a very complex process which depends on a great number of parameters. In practice, definition of the ignition delay is based on the use of correlation expressions. However, the correlation expressions have very often limited application field. This paper presents a new correlation which has been developed during the research project on the direct injection M-type diesel engine using both the diesel and biodiesel fuel, as well as different values of a static injection timing. A dynamic start of injection, as well as the ignition delay, is defined in two ways. The first approach is based on measurement of a needle lift, while the second is based on measurement of a fuel pressure before the injector. The latter approach requires calculation of pressure signals delay through the fuel injection system and the variation of a static advance injection angle changing. The start of a combustion and the end of the ignition delay is defined on the basis of measurements of an in-cylinder pressure and its point of separation from a skip-fire pressure trace. The developed correlation gives better prediction of the ignition delay definition for the M-type direct injection diesel engine in the case of diesel and biodiesel fuel use when compared with the classic expression by the other authors available in the literature.

  4. Chronic Endotoxemia in Subjects with Type-1 Diabetes Is Seen Much before the Onset of Microvascular Complications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivekanandhan Aravindhan

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS/Endotoxin is hypothesized to play an important role in chronic inflammation associated with Type-1 diabetes (T1DM and its complications. Endotoxin core antibodies (EndoCAb, LPS binding protein (LBP and soluble CD14 (sCD14 act as modulators of LPS induced activation of innate immune system in vivo. For the present study we estimated the levels of LPS and its translocation markers in T1DM subjects with and without microvascular complications (MVC and correlate them with clinical parameters of T1DM and serum inflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and GM-CSF.A total of 197 subjects (64 normal glucose tolerance (NGT subjects, 97 T1DM subjects without MVC and 36 with MVC were included in this study and the levels of serum LPS, its translocation markers and cytokines measured by immunoassays.Compared to NGT, T1DM subjects (both with and without MVC had significantly higher levels of LPS, reduced levels of LBP and EndoCAb along with significant increase in the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and GM-CSF (p<0.05. No significant change was seen in the levels of these biomarkers between T1DM subjects with and without MVC.Decreased levels of EndoCAb and LBP suggest sustained endotoxin activity in T1DM subjects even before the onset of microvascular complications.

  5. Delayed recognition of Wolfram syndrome frequently misdiagnosed as type 1 diabetes with early chronic complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zmyslowska, A; Borowiec, M; Fichna, P; Iwaniszewska, B; Majkowska, L; Pietrzak, I; Szalecki, M; Szypowska, A; Mlynarski, W

    2014-01-01

    Improvements in diagnostic methods and greater genetic awareness have brought remarkable progress in the recognition of monogenic forms of diabetes, including Wolfram syndrome (WFS). WFS is diagnosed based on clinical criteria of coexistence of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy, and confirmed by molecular analysis; however, the condition is still sometimes misdiagnosed. To begin to understand the reasons for misdiagnosis, we conducted a retrospective analysis of WFS patients who were originally misdiagnosed. The medical histories of 13 pediatric patients with clinical misdiagnosis of type 1 diabetes and early chronic complications made in the years 1995-2010 and who were subsequently correctly diagnosed with WFS based on genetic testing in 2008-2011 were analyzed. The average age of the patients at diabetes onset was 5 (4.4-6.3) years, and the mean HbA1c level at diagnosis was 9.1±2.3%. Initially, all of these patients were treated as having type 1 diabetes with progressive visual impairment despite good metabolic control (mean HbA1c 7.5±1.3%). Diagnosis of optic atrophy was made at an average age of 9 (5.9-11.5) years, which corresponds to 4 years after diabetes recognition (p=0.002). At the time of genetic analysis, the average age of the patients was 16 (12-18.7) years, which corresponds to 7 years after recognition of coexistence of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy (p=0.007). Delays of at least 7 years occurred before recognition of WFS among a cohort of pediatric patients with diabetes. All patients with WFS were primarily misdiagnosed as having type 1 diabetes. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Aldosterone downregulates delayed rectifier potassium currents through an angiotensin type 1 receptor-dependent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Yankun; Wang, Yanjun; Zhu, Xiaoran; Zhang, Hua

    2018-01-01

    We have previously shown that aldosterone downregulates delayed rectifier potassium currents (I Ks ) via activation of the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) in adult guinea pig cardiomyocytes. Here, we investigate whether angiotensin II/angiotensin type 1 receptor (AngII/AT1R) and intracellular calcium also play a role in these effects. Ventricular cardiomyocytes were isolated from adult guinea pigs and incubated with aldosterone (1 μmol·L -1 ) either alone or in combination with enalapril (1 μmol·L -1 ), losartan (1 μmol·L -1 ), nimodipine (1 μmol·L -1 ), or BAPTA-AM (2.5 μmol·L -1 ) for 24 h. We used the conventional whole cell patch-clamp technique to record the I Ks component. In addition, we evaluated expression of the I Ks subunits KCNQ1 and KCNE1 using Western blotting. Our results showed that both enalapril and losartan, but not nimodipine or BAPTA-AM, completely reversed the aldosterone-induced inhibition of I Ks and its effects on KCNQ1/KCNE1 protein levels. Furthermore, we found that AngII/AT1R mediates the inhibitory effects of aldosterone on I Ks . Finally, the downregulation of I Ks induced by aldosterone did not occur secondarily to a change in intracellular calcium concentrations. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that crosstalk between MR and AT1R underlies the effects of aldosterone, and provide new insights into the mechanism underlying potassium channels.

  7. Rhynchophylline from Uncaria rhynchophylla functionally turns delayed rectifiers into A-Type K+ channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chun-Hsiao; Gong, Chi-Li; Chao, Chia-Chia; Lin, Chia-Huei; Kwan, Chiu-Yin; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Leung, Yuk-Man

    2009-05-22

    Rhynchophylline (1), a neuroprotective agent isolated from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Uncaria rhynchophylla, was shown to affect voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channel slow inactivation in mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells. Extracellular 1 (30 microM) accelerated the slow decay of Kv currents and shifted the steady-state inactivation curve to the left. Intracellular dialysis of 1 did not accelerate the slow current decay, suggesting that this compound acts extracellularly. In addition, the percent blockage of Kv currents by this substance was independent of the degree of depolarization and the intracellular K(+) concentration. Therefore, 1 did not appear to directly block the outer channel pore, with the results obtained suggesting that it drastically accelerated Kv channel slow inactivation. Interestingly, 1 also shifted the activation curve to the left. This alkaloid also strongly accelerated slow inactivation and caused a left shift of the activation curve of Kv1.2 channels heterologously expressed in HEK293 cells. Thus, this compound functionally turned delayed rectifiers into A-type K(+) channels.

  8. Comparison of Helicopter Emergency Medical Services Transport Types and Delays on Patient Outcomes at Two Level I Trauma Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Brodie; Tien, Homer; Sawadsky, Bruce; Rizoli, Sandro; McFarlan, Amanda; Phillips, Andrea; Ackery, Alun

    2017-01-01

    Helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) have become an engrained component of trauma systems. In Ontario, transportation for trauma patients is through one of three ways: scene call, modified scene call, or interfacility transfer. We hypothesize that differences exist between these types of transports in both patient demographics and patient outcomes. This study compares the characteristics of patients transported by each of these methods to two level 1 trauma centers and assesses for any impact on morbidity or mortality. As a secondary outcome reasons for delay were identified. A local trauma registry was used to identify and abstract data for all patients transported to two trauma centers by HEMS over a 36-month period. Further chart abstraction using the HEMS patient care reports was done to identify causes of delay during HEMS transport. During the study period HEMS transferred a total of 911 patients of which 139 were scene calls, 333 were modified scene calls and 439 were interfacility transfers. Scene calls had more patients with an ISS of less than 15 and had more patients discharged home from the ED. Modified scene calls had more patients with an ISS greater than 25. The most common delays that were considered modifiable included the sending physician doing a procedure, waiting to meet a land EMS crew, delays for diagnostic imaging and confirming disposition or destination. Differences exist between the types of transports done by HEMS for trauma patients. Many identified reasons for delay to HEMS transport are modifiable and have practical solutions. Future research should focus on solutions to identified delays to HEMS transport. Key words: helicopter emergency medical services; trauma; prehospital care; delays.

  9. The Effect of Online Gaming, Cognition and Feedback Type in Facilitating Delayed Achievement of Different Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Brian; Dwyer, Francis

    2005-01-01

    Online and computer-based instructional gaming is becoming a viable instructional strategy at all levels of education. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of (a) gaming, (b) gaming plus embedded questions, and (c) gaming plus questions plus feedback on delayed retention of different types of educational objectives for students…

  10. Relationship between interstitial and blood glucose in type 1 diabetes patients: delay and the push-pull phenomenon revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wentholt, Iris M. E.; Hart, Augustus A. M.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Interpretation of glucose sensor results requires clarification of the relationship between interstitial (IG) and blood (BG) glucose. We examined the delay of IG upon BG change and reinvestigated the push-pull phenomenon in type 1 diabetes patients. The push-pull phenomenon postulates

  11. Performance investigation of stochastic resonance in bistable systems with time-delayed feedback and three types of asymmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jian; Wang, Youguo

    2018-03-01

    The simultaneous influence of potential asymmetries and time-delayed feedback on stochastic resonance (SR) subject to both periodic force and additive Gaussian white noise is investigated by using two-state theory and small-delay approximation, where three types of asymmetries include well-depth, well-width, and both well-depth and well-width asymmetries, respectively. The asymmetric types and time-delayed feedback determine the behaviors of SR, especially output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) peaks, optimal additive noise intensity and feedback intensity. Moreover, the largest SNR in asymmetric SR is found to be relatively larger than symmetric one in some cases, whereas in other cases the symmetric SR is superior to asymmetric one, which is of dependence on time delay and feedback intensity. In addition, the SR with well-width asymmetry can suppress stronger noise than that with well-depth asymmetry under the action of same time delay, which is beneficial to weak signal detection.

  12. Time Delays Between Decimetric Type-Iii Bursts and Associated Hard X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawant, H. S.; Lattari, C. J. B.; Benz, A. O.; Dennis, B. R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. En julio de 1987, se efectuaron radio observaciones en 1.6 CHz usando la antena de 13.7-m de Itapetinga con un tiempo de resoluci5n de 3 ms. Las observaciones en rayos-X fueron obtenidas del HXRBS en SMM. Comparaciones de observaciones de 1.6 CHz con espectro dinamico en el intervalo de (1000 - 100) MHz y rayos-X duros muestran los siguientes resultados: I) en 12 casos, identificamos la continuaci6n de brotes de tipo Ill-RD hasta 1.6 GHz. ii) Por primera vez, hemos identificadopicos de rayos-X demorados en comparaci6n con el brote decimetrico tipolll-RD. Estos retardos son mas largos - 1 5 - que lo esperado ( " 100 ms) y han sido interpretados suponiendo que la emisi6n decimetrica es la 2a. ar- m6nica y esta causada por el borde delantero del excitador, mientras que los picos de los rayos-X han sido atribuidos a la entrada completa del excitador dentro de la regi6n que produce los rayos-X. ABSTRACT. In July, 1985 radio observations were made at 1.6 GHz using 13.7 m Itapetinga antenna with time resolution of 3 ms. The hard X-ray observations were obtained from HXRBS on SMM. Comparison of 1.6 GHz observations with dynamic spectra in the frequency range of (1000 - 100) MHz and hard X-rays shows the following results: i) In 12 cases, we identify continuation of type Ill-RD bursts up to 1.6 GHz suggesting presence of type Ill-RD bursts at 1.6 GHz. ii) For the first time, we have idetified hard X-ray peaks delayed in comparison to decimetric type Ill-RD bursts. These dalays are longer - 1 5 - than expected ( 100 ms) and have been interpreted assuming that the decimetric emission is at 2 nd harmonic and caused by the leading edge of the exciter, whereas peaks of X-rays have been attributed to entire entry of the exciter into the X-ray producing region. Keq : SUN BURSTS - SUN-

  13. The Association of Increased Total Glycosylated Hemoglobin Levels with Delayed Age at Menarche in Young Women with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Kirstie K.; Palta, Mari; Allen, Catherine; D’Alessio, Donn J.

    2005-01-01

    Context: Delayed menarche is associated with subsequent reproductive and skeletal complications. Previous research has found delayed growth and pubertal maturation with type 1 diabetes and with poor glycemic control. The effect of diabetes management on menarche is important to clarify because tighter control might prevent these complications. Objective: To investigate age at menarche in young women with type 1 diabetes, and examine the effect of diabetes management (e.g. total glycosylated hemoglobin (GHb) level, number of blood glucose checks, insulin therapy intensity, insulin dose) on age at menarche in those diagnosed before menarche. Design: The Wisconsin Diabetes Registry Project is a follow-up study of a type 1 diabetes population-based incident cohort initially enrolled 1987 – 1992. Setting: Twenty-eight counties in south-central Wisconsin. Patients or Other Participants: Recruited through referrals, self-report, and hospital/clinic ascertainment. Individuals with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes, <30 years old, were invited to participate. Of 288 young women enrolled, 188 reported menarche by 2002; 105 were diagnosed before menarche. Interventions: Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure: Age at menarche. Results: Mean age at menarche was 12.78 years, compared to 12.54 years in the United States (p = 0.01). Ages at menarche and diagnosis were not associated. For those diagnosed before menarche, age at menarche was delayed 1.3 months with each one percent increase in mean total GHb level in the three years prior to menarche. Conclusions: Age at menarche was moderately delayed in young women with type 1 diabetes. Delayed menarche could potentially be minimized with improved GHb levels. PMID:16204372

  14. An existence theorem for a type of functional differential equation with infinite delay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Izsak, F.

    We prove an existence theorem for a functional differential equation with infinite delay using the Schauder fixpoint theorem. We extend a result in [19] applying the fixed point procedure in an appropriate function space.

  15. Gastrointestinal motor mechanisms in hyperglycaemia induced delayed gastric emptying in type I diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samsom, M.; Akkermans, L. M.; Jebbink, R. J.; van Isselt, H.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Smout, A. J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hyperglycaemia delays gastric emptying, both in healthy controls and in patients with diabetes mellitus. The effect of hyperglycaemia on antroduodenal motility in diabetes has not yet been studied. AIM: To investigate the gastrointestinal motor mechanisms involved in the hyperglycaemia

  16. Robust Stability Analysis of Neutral-Type Hybrid Bidirectional Associative Memory Neural Networks with Time-Varying Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Feng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The global asymptotic robust stability of equilibrium is considered for neutral-type hybrid bidirectional associative memory neural networks with time-varying delays and parameters uncertainties. The results we obtained in this paper are delay-derivative-dependent and establish various relationships between the network parameters only. Therefore, the results of this paper are applicable to a larger class of neural networks and can be easily verified when compared with the previously reported literature results. Two numerical examples are illustrated to verify our results.

  17. Isoflurane depolarizes bronchopulmonary C neurons by inhibiting transient A-type and delayed rectifier potassium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenxiong; Zhuang, Jianguo; Zhang, Cancan; Xu, Fadi

    2013-04-01

    Inhalation of isoflurane (ISO), a widely used volatile anesthetic, can produce clinical tachypnea. In dogs, this response is reportedly mediated by bronchopulmonary C-fibers (PCFs), but the relevant mechanisms remain unclear. Activation of transient A-type potassium current (IA) channels and delayed rectifier potassium current (IK) channels hyperpolarizes neurons, and inhibition of both channels by ISO increases neural firing. Due to the presence of these channels in the cell bodies of rat PCFs, we determined whether ISO could stimulate PCFs to produce tachypnea in anesthetized rats, and, if so, whether this response resulted from ISO-induced depolarization of the pulmonary C neurons via the inhibition of IA and IK. We recorded ventilatory responses to 5% ISO exposure in anesthetized rats before and after blocking PCF conduction and the responses of pulmonary C neurons (extracellularly recorded) to ISO exposure. ISO-induced (1mM) changes in pulmonary C neuron membrane potential and IA/IK were tested using the perforated patch clamp technique. We found that: (1) ISO inhalation evoked a brief tachypnea (∼7s) and that this response disappeared after blocking PCF conduction; (2) the ISO significantly elevated (by 138%) the firing rate of most pulmonary C neurons (17 out of 21) in the nodose ganglion; and (3) ISO perfusion depolarized the pulmonary C neurons in the vitro and inhibited both IA and IK, and this evoked-depolarization was largely diminished after blocking both IA and IK. Our results suggest that ISO is able to stimulate PCFs to elicit tachypnea in rats, at least partly, via inhibiting IA and IK, thereby depolarizing the pulmonary C neurons. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Delayed-type hypersensitivity to Babesia microti-infected erythrocytes in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruebush, M.J.; Troutman, E.H.; Kennedy, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Strong delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to Babesia microti was elicited when intraerythrocytic parasites (IEP) were inoculated subcutaneously into the flank of normal mice 6 to 14 days before challenge in the ipsilateral footpad with 10(8) IEP. Intraperitoneal or intravenous administration of antigen did not sensitize mice for DTH. When challenge was given 21 days after immunization, the response was approximately half of the maximum and then rose again slowly over the next 3 weeks to levels that were not significantly different from those maximal values. The response was classified as a true DTH reaction on the basis of kinetics, histology, and the transfer of responsiveness with immune T lymphocytes of the Ly 1+ phenotype, but not with serum. The reaction was specific for IEP since control groups given two injections of red blood cells from uninfected syngeneic mice (NRBC) or one injection of NRBC or sheep red blood cells (SRBC) and one of IEP never developed significant footpad swelling. Freed parasites obtained by osmotic rupture, density gradient sedimentation, and lethally irradiated IEP were also effective for elicitation of DTH. Anti-IEP DTH was expressed in a dose-dependent fashion with 10(6), 10(7), or 10(8) parasites sufficing for immunizing inoculum as long as 10(8) parasites were used as the challenge dose. Mice immunized and challenged with 10(8) lethally irradiated IEP (60 krad, 60Co), were protected against subsequent intraperitoneal challenge with 10(8) viable IEP. If mice were infected intraperitoneally with 10(8) IEP at any time between 21 days before immunization to 2 hr after challenge, their ability to respond to immunization and challenge was profoundly depressed. Development of a strong anti-parasite DTH response can occur in parallel with resistance to infection, but is not a rapid sequela of bloodborne infection

  19. State estimation for neural neutral-type networks with mixed time-varying delays and Markovian jumping parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshmanan, S.; Park, Ju H.; Jung, H. Y.; Balasubramaniam, P.

    2012-01-01

    This paper is concerned with a delay-dependent state estimator for neutral-type neural networks with mixed time-varying delays and Markovian jumping parameters. The addressed neural networks have a finite number of modes, and the modes may jump from one to another according to a Markov process. By construction of a suitable Lyapunov—Krasovskii functional, a delay-dependent condition is developed to estimate the neuron states through available output measurements such that the estimation error system is globally asymptotically stable in a mean square. The criterion is formulated in terms of a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), which can be checked efficiently by use of some standard numerical packages

  20. Patterns of prospective memory impairment among individuals with depression: the influence of cue type and delay interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanqi Ryan; Weinborn, Michael; Loft, Shayne; Maybery, Murray

    2013-07-01

    The present study investigated the impact of cue type and delay interval on prospective memory performance in depressed, compared to non-depressed, individuals using a clinically relevant measure, the Memory for Intentions Screening Test. The depressed group demonstrated impaired performance on time-based, but not event-based, prospective memory tasks relative to the nondepressed group. The depressed group also demonstrated impaired prospective memory on tasks with longer delay intervals (15 min), but not on tasks with shorter delay intervals (2 min). These data support theoretical frameworks that posit that depression is associated with deficits in cognitive initiative (i.e., reduced ability to voluntarily direct attention to relevant tasks) and thus that depressed individuals are susceptible to poor performance on strategically demanding tasks. The results also raise multiple avenues for developing interventions (e.g., implementation intentions) to improve prospective memory performance among individuals with depression, with potential implications for medication and other treatment adherence.

  1. Ultraviolet irradiation of herpes simplex virus (type 1): delayed transcription and comparative sensitivites of virus functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eglin, R P; Gugerli, P; Wildy, P

    1980-07-01

    The delay in the replication of herpes simplex virus surviving u.v. irradiation occurs after the uncoating of virus, as judged by sensitivity to DNase. It occurs before translation, judged by the kinetics of appearance of various virus-specific proteins, and before transcription, judged by the detection of virus-specific RNA by in situ hybridization. Since the delays in both transcription and translation are reversed by photoreactivation, the simplest hypothesis is that pyrimidine dimers directly obstruct transcription;unless these are broken by photoreactivating enzymes, there will be transcriptional delay until reactivating processes have repaired the lesion. The u.v. sensitivities of the abilities to induce various enzymes (thymidine kinase, DNase and DNA polymerase) were only about four times less than that of infectivity. The The ability to induce the three enzymes was three times less sensitive than that of the structural antigen (Band II).

  2. Ultraviolet irradiation of herpes simplex virus (type 1): delayed transcription and comparative sensitivities of virus functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eglin, R.P.; Gugerli, P.; Wildy, P.

    1980-01-01

    The delay in the replication of herpes simplex virus surviving u.v. irradiation occurs after the uncoating of virus, as judged by sensitivity to DNase. It occurs before translation, judged by the kinetics of appearance of various virus-specific proteins, and before transcription, judged by the detection of virus-specific RNA by in situ hybridization. Since the delays in both transcription and translation are reversed by photoreactivation, the simplest hypothesis is that pyrimidine dimers directly obstruct transcription; unless these are broken by photoreactivating enzymes, there will be transcriptional delay until reactivating processes have repaired the lesion. The u.v. sensitivities of the abilities to induce various enzymes (thymidine kinase, DNase and DNA polymerase) were only about four times less than that of infectivity. The ability to induce the three enzymes was three times less sensitive than that of the structural antigen (Band II). (U.K.)

  3. Synchronization criterion for Lur'e type complex dynamical networks with time-varying delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, D.H.; Park, Ju H.; Yoo, W.J.; Won, S.C.; Lee, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this Letter, the synchronization problem for a class of complex dynamical networks in which every identical node is a Lur'e system with time-varying delay is considered. A delay-dependent synchronization criterion is derived for the synchronization of complex dynamical network that represented by Lur'e system with sector restricted nonlinearities. The derived criterion is a sufficient condition for absolute stability of error dynamics between the each nodes and the isolated node. Using a convex representation of the nonlinearity for error dynamics, the stability condition based on the discretized Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional is obtained via LMI formulation. The proposed delay-dependent synchronization criterion is less conservative than the existing ones. The effectiveness of our work is verified through numerical examples.

  4. Endothelial-derived GM-CSF influences expression of oncostatin M

    Science.gov (United States)

    During and following transendothelial migration, neutrophils undergo a number of phenotypic changes resulting from encounters with endothelial-derived factors. This report uses an in vitro model with HUVEC and isolated human neutrophils to examine the effects of two locally-derived cytokines, granul...

  5. Myshkis type oscillation criteria for second-order linear delay differential equations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Opluštil, Z.; Šremr, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 178, č. 1 (2015), s. 143-161 ISSN 0026-9255 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : linear second-order delay differential equation * oscillation criteria Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.664, year: 2015 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs00605-014-0719-y

  6. Safety and skin delayed-type hypersensitivity response in vervet monkeys immunized with Leishmania donovani sonicate antigen delivered with adjuvants

    OpenAIRE

    Mutiso,Joshua M.; Macharia,John C.; Taracha,Evans; Wafula,Kellern; Rikoi,Hitler; Gicheru,Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we report on the safety and skin delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), responses of the Leishmania donovani whole cell sonicate antigen delivered in conjunction with alum-BCG (AlBCG), Montanide ISA 720 (MISA) or Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) in groups of vervet monkeys. Following three intradermal injections of the inoculums on days 0, 28 and 42, safety and DTH responses were assessed. Preliminary tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) levels ...

  7. Reduction of structured population models to threshold-type delay equations and functional differential equations: A case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, H.L. (Arizona State Univ., Tempe (United States))

    1993-01-01

    It is shown by way of a simple example that certain structured population models lead naturally to differential delay equations of the threshold type and that these equations can be transformed in a natural way to functional differential equations. The model examined can be viewed as a model of competition between adults and juveniles of a single population. The results indicate the possibility that this competition leads to instability. 28 refs., 2 figs.

  8. State estimation for Markov-type genetic regulatory networks with delays and uncertain mode transition rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Jinling; Lam, James; Wang Zidong

    2009-01-01

    This Letter is concerned with the robust state estimation problem for uncertain time-delay Markovian jumping genetic regulatory networks (GRNs) with SUM logic, where the uncertainties enter into both the network parameters and the mode transition rate. The nonlinear functions describing the feedback regulation are assumed to satisfy the sector-like conditions. The main purpose of the problem addressed is to design a linear estimator to approximate the true concentrations of the mRNA and protein through available measurement outputs. By resorting to the Lyapunov functional method and some stochastic analysis tools, it is shown that if a set of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs) is feasible, the desired state estimator, that can ensure the estimation error dynamics to be globally robustly asymptotically stable in the mean square, exists. The obtained LMI conditions are dependent on both the lower and the upper bounds of the delays. An illustrative example is presented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed estimation schemes.

  9. Delayed-type hypersensitivity to fragrance materials in a select North American population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsito, Donald V; Fowler, Joseph F; Sasseville, Denis; Marks, James G; De Leo, Vincent A; Storrs, Frances J

    2006-03-01

    In published reports from Europe, 3- and 4-(4-hydroxy-4-methylpentyl)cyclohexene-1-carboxaldehyde (HMPCC) (Lyral) has been described as a common cause of allergic contact dermatitis (ACD). In Europe, the rates of reaction to HMPCC among patients undergoing patch testing for suspected ACD have varied from 1.2 to 17.0%, depending on the country. Data on the incidence of sensitivity to HMPCC among North Americans with suspected ACD have not been reported. The goals of this study were (1) to assess the incidence of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to HMPCC among patients undergoing patch testing for evaluation of eczematous dermatitis at six centers throughout North America; (2) to determine the most appropriate concentration of HMPCC to use in performing patch tests; and (3) to compare and contrast the incidence rates for HMPCC hypersensitivity to those for other fragrance materials screened with the North American Contact Dermatitis Group (NACDG) screening tray, which includes fragrance mix, Myroxilon pereirae (balsam of Peru), cinnamic aldehyde, ylang ylang oil, jasmine absolute, and tea tree oil. This report represents the prospective multicenter data on patients tested with the fragrance-related allergens on the NACDG standard screening tray and with HMPCC at 5%, 1.5%, and 0.5% concentrations in petrolatum. Statistical analyses were performed with Student's t-test (two tailed) and the chi-square test. Data from 1,603 patients evaluated at five US sites and one Canadian site were analyzed. Most patients (87.8%) were Caucasian. The majority (67%) were women, and 26.2% had a history consistent with atopic dermatitis. The patients ranged in age from 1 to 88 years, and the mean +/- standard deviation was 46.3 +/- 16.5 years. Myroxilon pereirae (balsam of Peru) and fragrance mix were the most frequent patch-test-positive fragrance allergens (6.6% and 5.9%, respectively). Cinnamic aldehyde (1.7%), ylang ylang oil (0.6%), jasmine absolute (0.4%), HMPCC (0.4% for 5

  10. Online failed fuel identification using delayed neutron detector signals in pool type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyay, Chandra Kant; Sivaramakrishna, M.; Nagaraj, C.P.; Madhusoodanan, K.

    2011-01-01

    In todays world, nuclear reactors are at the forefront of modern day innovation and reactor designs are increasingly incorporating cutting edge technology. It is of utmost importance to detect failure or defects in any part of a nuclear reactor for healthy operation of reactor as well as the safety aspects of the environment. Despite careful fabrication and manufacturing of fuel pins, there is a chance of clad failure. After fuel pin clad rupture takes place, it allows fission products to enter in to sodium pool. There are some potential consequences due to this such as Total Instantaneous Blockage (TIB) of coolant and primary component contamination. At present, the failed fuel detection techniques such as cover gas monitoring (alarming the operator), delayed neutron detection (DND-automatic trip) and standalone failed fuel localization module (FFLM) are exercised in various reactors. The first technique is a quantitative measurement of increase in the cover gas activity background whereas DND system causes automatic trip on detecting certain level of activity during clad wet rupture. FFLM is subsequently used to identify the failed fuel subassembly. The later although accurate, but mainly suffers from downtime and reduction in power during identification process. The proposed scheme, reported in this paper, reduces the operation of FFLM by predicting the faulty sector and therefore reducing reactor down time and thermal shocks. The neutron evolution pattern gets modulated because fission products are the delay neutron precursors. When they travel along with coolant to Intermediate heat Exchangers, experienced three effects i.e. delay; decay and dilution which make the neutron pulse frequency vary depending on the location of failed fuel sub assembly. This paper discusses the method that is followed to study the frequency domain properties, so that it is possible to detect exact fuel subassembly failure online, before the reactor automatically trips. (author)

  11. Modulation of type I immediate and type IV delayed immunoreactivity using direct suggestion and guided imagery during hypnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariae, R; Bjerring, P; Arendt-Nielsen, L

    1989-11-01

    Cutaneous reactivity against histamine skin prick test (Type I) and purified tuberculin protein derivative (Mantoux reaction, Type IV) was studied in eight volunteers under hypnosis. Types I and IV immunoreactivity were modulated by direct suggestion (Type I) and guided imagery (Type IV). The volunteers were highly susceptible subjects, selected by means of the Harvard Group Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form A. When the volunteers underwent hypnotic suggestion to decrease the cutaneous reaction to histamine prick test, a significant (P less than 0.02) reduction of the flare reaction (area of erythema) was observed compared with control histamine skin prick tests. The wheal reaction did not respond to hypnotic suggestion. Neither wheal nor flare reaction could be increased in size by hypnotic suggestion compared with control histamine skin prick tests. A hypnotic suggestion of increasing the Type IV reaction on one arm and decreasing the reaction on the other revealed a significant difference in both erythema size (P less than 0.02) and palpable induration (P less than 0.01). In two cases the reactions were monitored by laser doppler blood flowmetry and skin thickness measurement by ultrasound. The difference between the suggested increased and decreased reaction was 19% for the laser doppler bloodflow (in favor of the augmented side), and 44% for the dermal infiltrate thickness. This study objectively supports the numerous uncontrolled case reports of modulation of immunoreactivity in allergic diseases involving both Type I and Type IV skin reactions following hypnotic suggestions.

  12. Lactoferrin, myeloperoxidase, lysozyme and eosinophil cationic protein in exudate in delayed type hypersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lerche, A; Bisgaard, H; Christensen, J D

    1988-01-01

    allergic patients with nickel challenge in the chamber medium showed a time-dependent increase of mononuclear cells, eosinophils and basophils and a concomitant decrease of polymorphonuclear granulocytes, characteristic of a combined specific and unspecific inflammation. The morphology of the exudate...... in contact allergic patients exposed to nickel showed a dominance of polymorphonuclear granulocytes throughout the study period, while mononuclear cells, eosinophils and basophils were detected at a much lower quantity and with a considerable delay. Further, we studied the kinetics of the leucocyte granule...... proteins: lactoferrin, myeloperoxidase, lysozyme and eosinophil cationic protein in exudate fluid in a parallel test. A significant higher flux was found for all during the second day of allergen exposure compared to contact allergic patients without allergen challenge as well as normal volunteers...

  13. Nucleosynthesis as a result of multiple delayed detonations in type Ia supernovae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Senz, Domingo; Bravo, Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    The explosion of a white dwarf of mass 1.36 M [odot] has been simulated in three dimensions with the aid of a SPH code. The explosion follows the delayed detonation paradigm. In this case the deflagration-detonation transition is induced by the large corrugation of the flame front resulting from Rayleigh-Taylor instability and turbulence. The nucleosynthetic yields have been calculated, showing that some neutronized isotopes such as 54 Fe or 58 Ni are not overproduced with respect to the solar system ratios. The distribution of intermediate-mass elements is also compatible with the spectra of normal SNIa. The exception is, however, the abundance of carbon and oxygen, which are overproduced

  14. Multistability of delayed complex-valued recurrent neural networks with discontinuous real-imaginary-type activation functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Yu-Jiao; Hu Hai-Gen

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the multistability issue is discussed for delayed complex-valued recurrent neural networks with discontinuous real-imaginary-type activation functions. Based on a fixed theorem and stability definition, sufficient criteria are established for the existence and stability of multiple equilibria of complex-valued recurrent neural networks. The number of stable equilibria is larger than that of real-valued recurrent neural networks, which can be used to achieve high-capacity associative memories. One numerical example is provided to show the effectiveness and superiority of the presented results. (paper)

  15. Exponential synchronization of delayed neutral-type neural networks with Lévy noise under non-Lipschitz condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuo; Kang, Yanmei

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the exponential synchronization of stochastic neutral-type neural networks with time-varying delay and Lévy noise under non-Lipschitz condition is investigated for the first time. Using the general Itô's formula and the nonnegative semi-martingale convergence theorem, we derive general sufficient conditions of two kinds of exponential synchronization for the drive system and the response system with adaptive control. Numerical examples are presented to verify the effectiveness of the proposed criteria.

  16. POSITIVE SOLUTIONS TO TWO TYPES OF NEUTRAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS WITH DISTRIBUTED DELAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study two types of neutral functional differential equations with finite or unbounded distributed deviating arguments. By Banach contraction princi-ple, we obtain some sufficient conditions for the existence of positive solutions to such equations.

  17. Bi-periodicity evoked by periodic external inputs in delayed Cohen-Grossberg-type bidirectional associative memory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jinde; Wang, Yanyan

    2010-05-01

    In this paper, the bi-periodicity issue is discussed for Cohen-Grossberg-type (CG-type) bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks (NNs) with time-varying delays and standard activation functions. It is shown that the model considered in this paper has two periodic orbits located in saturation regions and they are locally exponentially stable. Meanwhile, some conditions are derived to ensure that, in any designated region, the model has a locally exponentially stable or globally exponentially attractive periodic orbit located in it. As a special case of bi-periodicity, some results are also presented for the system with constant external inputs. Finally, four examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  18. Bi-periodicity evoked by periodic external inputs in delayed Cohen-Grossberg-type bidirectional associative memory networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Jinde; Wang Yanyan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the bi-periodicity issue is discussed for Cohen-Grossberg-type (CG-type) bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks (NNs) with time-varying delays and standard activation functions. It is shown that the model considered in this paper has two periodic orbits located in saturation regions and they are locally exponentially stable. Meanwhile, some conditions are derived to ensure that, in any designated region, the model has a locally exponentially stable or globally exponentially attractive periodic orbit located in it. As a special case of bi-periodicity, some results are also presented for the system with constant external inputs. Finally, four examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results.

  19. Delay In The Issuing Of D-Type Swiss Cartes De Legitimation

    CERN Multimedia

    DSU Department

    2007-01-01

    The Permanent Mission of Switzerland to the International Organisations in Geneva has informed CERN that, for technical reasons, the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (Département fédéral des Affaires étrangères - DFAE) will be unable to issue D-type cartes de légitimation until after 15 December 2007. This is because, following the introduction of a new graphic design decided by the Swiss Federal Council, stocks of this type of card have run out. In the meantime, the Mission will issue E-type cards to the individuals concerned. These are valid for six months and will be gradually exchanged for D-type cards between December 2007 and February 2008. The Mission points out that the holding of an E-type card for a limited period will have no impact on the status of the officials in question, who will continue to benefit from immunity from jurisdiction in the discharge of their duties and be exempt from the payment of the annual tax on vehicles (a special note to this effect will be sent to the relevant...

  20. Delay in the issuing of D-type Swiss cartes de légitimation

    CERN Multimedia

    DSU Department

    2007-01-01

    The Permanent Mission of Switzerland to the International Organisations in Geneva has informed CERN that, for technical reasons, the Federal Department of Foreign Affairs (Département fédéral des Affaires étrangères - DFAE) will be unable to issue D-type cartes de légitimation until after 15 December 2007. This is because, following the introduction of a new graphic design decided by the Swiss Federal Council, stocks of this type of card have run out. In the meantime, the Mission will issue E-type cards to the individuals concerned. These are valid for six months and will be gradually exchanged for D-type cards between December 2007 and February 2008. The Mission points out that the holding of an E-type card for a limited period will have no impact on the status of the officials in question, who will continue to benefit from immunity from jurisdiction in the discharge of their duties and be exempt from the payment of the annual tax on vehicles (a special note to this e...

  1. Delayed polarization of mononuclear phagocyte transcriptional program by type I interferon isoforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ena

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interferon (IFN-α is considered a key modulator of immunopathological processes through a signature-specific activation of mononuclear phagocytes (MPs. This study utilized global transcript analysis to characterize the effects of the entire type I IFN family in comparison to a broad panel of other cytokines on MP previously exposed to Lipopolysaccharide (LPS stimulation in vitro. Results Immature peripheral blood CD14+ MPs were stimulated with LPS and 1 hour later with 42 separate soluble factors including cytokines, chemokines, interleukins, growth factors and IFNs. Gene expression profiling of MPs was analyzed 4 and 9 hours after cytokine stimulation. Four hours after stimulation, the transcriptional analysis of MPs revealed two main classes of cytokines: one associated with the alternative and the other with the classical pathway of MP activation without a clear polarization of type I IFNs effects. In contrast, after 9 hours of stimulation most type I IFN isoforms induced a characteristic and unique transcriptional pattern separate from other cytokines. These "signature" IFNs included; IFN-β, IFN-α2b/α2, IFN-αI, IFN-α2, IFN-αC, IFN-αJ1, IFN-αH2, and INF-α4B and induced the over-expression of 44 genes, all of which had known functional relationships with IFN such as myxovirus resistance (Mx-1, Mx-2, and interferon-induced hepatitis C-associated microtubular aggregation protein. A second group of type I IFNs segregated separately and in closer association with the type II IFN-γ. The phylogenetic relationship of amino acid sequences among type I IFNs did not explain their sub-classification, although differences at positions 94 through 109 and 175 through 189 were present between the signature and other IFNs. Conclusion Seven IFN-α isoforms and IFN-β participate in the late phase polarization of MPs conditioned by LPS. This information broadens the previous view of the central role played by IFN-α in

  2. Effect of ultraviolet B irradiation on delayed-type hypersensitivity, cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity, and skin graft rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamaki, K.; Iijima, M.

    1989-01-01

    The influence of ultraviolet B irradiation on the induction of delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to alloantigens by epidermal cells (EC), on the generation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity to alloantigens, and on skin graft rejection was studied. After the skin was irradiated with UVB in vitro, EC were obtained. The EC were injected subcutaneously, and the DTH reaction was compared with that induced by non-UVB-irradiated EC. A reduction in the DTH reaction was observed (from 62% to 99.1%). CTL activity in these mice was assessed after in vitro stimulation. CTL activity in mice sensitized with UVB-irradiated EC was significantly reduced. Furthermore, mice sensitized with UVB-irradiated EC did not reject a subsequent skin allograft in an accelerated fashion, whereas mice sensitized with non-UVB-irradiated EC did. The mechanism(s) of these reactions and the clinical application of the UVB irradiation prior to grafting are discussed

  3. Laryngotracheoesophageal Cleft Type 3 and Severe Laryngotracheomalacia; Delayed Surgical Repair, a Treatment Challenge with an Excellent Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Khaleghnejad

    Full Text Available Laryngotracheoesophageal clefts (LTEC are rare malformations which involve the upper respiratory and digestive tract. Surgical repair should be undertaken promptly to maintain a secure airway and prevent serious pulmonary aspiration. This paper reports the first case of LTEC type 3 with severe laryngotracheomalacia that was brought to Mofid children's hospital in late infancy with a poor health status. Delayed defect correction was our team strategy for the patient when she had achieved good weight gain. At the age of 22 months in collaboration with the pediatric surgical and otolaryngologist team, the repair of the laryngeal cleft was done with lateral open approach method. She was discharged with tracheostomy and gastrostomy. In the next six months follow up after the surgery tracheostomy decannulation and gastrostomy tube removal were done and the infant is now in regular follow-up. Keywords: Laryngotracheoesophageal clefts, Laryngotracheomalacia, Surgical repair

  4. THE SUPERNOVA DELAY TIME DISTRIBUTION IN GALAXY CLUSTERS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR TYPE-Ia PROGENITORS AND METAL ENRICHMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maoz, Dan; Sharon, Keren; Avishay Gal-Yam

    2010-01-01

    Knowledge of the supernova (SN) delay time distribution (DTD)-the SN rate versus time that would follow a hypothetical brief burst of star formation-can shed light on SN progenitors and physics, as well as on the timescales of chemical enrichment in different environments. We compile recent measurements of the Type-Ia SN (SN Ia) rate in galaxy clusters at redshifts from z = 0 out to z = 1.45, just 2 Gyr after cluster star formation at z ∼ 3. We review the plausible range for the observed total iron-to-stellar mass ratio in clusters, based on the latest data and analyses, and use it to constrain the time-integrated number of SN Ia events in clusters. With these data, we recover the DTD of SNe Ia in cluster environments. The DTD is sharply peaked at the shortest time-delay interval we probe, 0Gyr -1.2±0.3 from t = 400 Myr to a Hubble time can satisfy both constraints. Shallower power laws such as t -1/2 cannot, assuming a single DTD, and a single star formation burst (either brief or extended) at high z. This implies that 50%-85% of SNe Ia explode within 1 Gyr of star formation. DTDs from double-degenerate (DD) models, which generically have ∼t -1 shapes over a wide range of timescales, match the data, but only if their predictions are scaled up by factors of 5-10. Single-degenerate (SD) DTDs always give poor fits to the data, due to a lack of delayed SNe and overall low numbers of SNe. The observations can also be reproduced with a combination of two SN Ia populations-a prompt SD population of SNe Ia that explodes within a few Gyr of star formation, and produces about 60% of the iron mass in clusters, and a DD population that contributes the events seen at z < 1.5. An alternative scenario of a single, prompt, SN Ia population, but a composite star formation history in clusters, consisting of a burst at high z, followed by a constant star formation rate, can reproduce the SN rates, but is at odds with direct measurements of star formation in clusters at 0 < z

  5. Predictive Control of the Blood Glucose Level in Type I Diabetic Patient Using Delay Differential Equation Wang Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esna-Ashari, Mojgan; Zekri, Maryam; Askari, Masood; Khalili, Noushin

    2017-01-01

    Because of increasing risk of diabetes, the measurement along with control of blood sugar has been of great importance in recent decades. In type I diabetes, because of the lack of insulin secretion, the cells cannot absorb glucose leading to low level of glucose. To control blood glucose (BG), the insulin must be injected to the body. This paper proposes a method for BG level regulation in type I diabetes. The control strategy is based on nonlinear model predictive control. The aim of the proposed controller optimized with genetics algorithms is to measure BG level each time and predict it for the next time interval. This merit causes a less amount of control effort, which is the rate of insulin delivered to the patient body. Consequently, this method can decrease the risk of hypoglycemia, a lethal phenomenon in regulating BG level in diabetes caused by a low BG level. Two delay differential equation models, namely Wang model and Enhanced Wang model, are applied as controller model and plant, respectively. The simulation results exhibit an acceptable performance of the proposed controller in meal disturbance rejection and robustness against parameter changes. As a result, if the nutrition of the person decreases instantly, the hypoglycemia will not happen. Furthermore, comparing this method with other works, it was shown that the new method outperforms previous studies.

  6. Anti-Epileptic Drugs Delay Age-Related Loss of Spiral Ganglion Neurons via T-type Calcium Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Debin; Gao, Xia; Perez, Philip; Ohlemiller, Kevin K; Chen, Chien-Chang; Campbell, Kevin P.; Hood, Aizhen Yang; Bao, Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    Loss of spiral ganglion neurons is a major cause of age-related hearing loss (presbycusis). Despite being the third most prevalent condition afflicting elderly persons, there are no known medications to prevent presbycusis. Because calcium signaling has long been implicated in age-related neuronal death, we investigated T-type calcium channels. This family is comprised of three members (Cav3.1, Cav3.2, and Cav3.3), based on their respective main pore-forming alpha subunits: α1G, α1H, and α1I. In the present study, we report a significant delay of age-related loss of cochlear function and preservation of spiral ganglion neurons in α1H null and heterozygous mice, clearly demonstrating an important role for Cav3.2 in age-related neuronal loss. Furthermore, we show that anticonvulsant drugs from a family of T-type calcium channel blockers can significantly preserve spiral ganglion neurons during aging. To our knowledge, this is the first report of drugs capable of diminishing age-related loss of spiral ganglion neurons. PMID:21640179

  7. A boy with developmental delay, malformations, and evidence of a connective tissue disorder: possibly a new type of cutis laxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Linlea; Jimenez, Carmencita; Hunter, Alasdair G W

    2003-05-15

    We report a 7.5-year-old boy with loose translucent skin, aortic dilatation, hyperextensible veins, recurrent respiratory problems, pectus excavatum, arthralgias, lax joints, mild epiphyseal dysplasia, and umbilical and inguinal hernias. He also has developmental delay, progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, an unusual facial appearance, terminal digit hypoplasia with unusual radiographic changes in some of the phalanges, glandular hypospadias, shawl scrotum, and undescended testes. Biochemical investigations, including electrophoresis of Types 1 and 3 procollagens and collagens, and quantification of serum copper and ceruloplasmin, are normal. Relative to age-matched control patients the electron micrographs of the boy's dermis show elastin fibers to be decreased in number, and abnormal in appearance, with a low matrix to microfibril ratio. The organ distribution of abnormalities and the nature of the findings suggest a connective tissue disorder. We contrast and compare this boy's phenotype to those of the classic connective tissue disorders. We conclude that he has cutis laxa with features that distinguish him from previously described types of cutis laxa. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Tolerance and immunity in mice infected with herpes simplex virus: simultaneous induction of protective immunity and tolerance to delayed-type hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, A A; Gell, P G; Wildy, P

    1981-05-01

    Unresponsiveness to delayed type hypersensitivity was induced in mice following an intravenous injection of herpes simplex virus. The principal tolerogens used were thymidine kinase-deficient virus mutants which grow poorly in vivo; u.v.-inactivated and to a lesser extent formalin-inactivated virus were also tolerogenic. The tolerance induced was specific for the virus type. Despite the tolerance to delayed hypersensitivity, anti-viral immunity is present as determined by the rapid inactivation of infectious virus. The mechanism of tolerance to herpes virus and the importance of these observations for the pathogenesis of viral disease is discussed.

  9. Tolerance and immunity in mice infected with herpes simplex virus: studies on the mechanism of tolerance to delayed-type hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, A A; Phelan, J; Gell, P G; Wildy, P

    1981-06-01

    Tolerance to delayed-type hypersensitivity is produced in mice following an intravenous injection of herpes simplex virus. This form of tolerance is produced early on, following simultaneous injections of virus subcutaneously and intravenously, and is long lasting (greater than 100 days). The early tolerance mechanism is resistant to high doses of cyclophosphamide and is not transferable by serum or spleen cells taken after 7 days. However, spleen cells taken at 14 days onwards inhibit the induction of delayed hypersensitivity when transferred to normal syngeneic recipients. These cells are T lymphocytes and are specific for the herpes type used in the induction.

  10. Delayed, spontaneous conversion of type 2 closure to type 1 closure following surgery for traumatic macular hole associated with submacular hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pukhraj Rishi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year-old man presented with diminution of vision in the left eye following a firecracker injury. Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA was 20/20 in the right eye and 20/125 in the left eye. Fundus examination revealed vitreous hemorrhage, a macular hole, and submacular hemorrhage in the left eye. The patient underwent vitrectomy, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA-assisted evacuation of the submacular hemorrhage, internal limiting membrane (ILM peeling, and 14% C3F8 gas insufflation. After two months, the BCVA remained 20/125 and optical coherence tomography (OCT showed type 2 macular hole closure. On a follow-up, seven months after surgery, BCVA improved to 20/80, N6, with type 1 closure of the macular hole. The clinical findings were confirmed on OCT. Delayed and spontaneous conversion of the traumatic macular hole could occur several months after the primary surgery and may be associated with improved visual outcome. Larger studies are required to better understand the factors implicated in such a phenomenon.

  11. Delayed-type hypersensitivity lesions in the central nervous system are prevented by inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyszak, M K; Perry, V H

    1996-09-01

    We have studied the effect of an inhibitor of matrix metalloproleinases, BB-1101, on a delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in the CNS. We used a recently described model in which heat-killed bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) sequestered behind the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is targeted by a T-cell mediated response after subcutaneous injection of BCG (Matyszak and Perry, 1995). The DTH lesions are characterised by breakdown of the BBB, macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration and tissue damage including myelin loss. Treatment with BB-1101, which is not only a potent inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases but also strongly inhibits TNF-alpha release, dramatically attenuated the CNS lesions. Breakdown of the BBB and the recruitment of T-cells into the site of the lesion were significantly reduced. There were many fewer inflammatory macrophages in DTH lesions than in comparable lesions from untreated animals. There was also significantly less myelin damage (assessed by staining with anti-MBP antibody). The DTH response in animals treated with dexamethasone was also reduced, but to a lesser degree. No significant effect was seen after administration of pentoxifylline, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor with effects including the inhibition of TNF-alpha production. Our results suggest that inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases may be of considerable therapeutic benefit in neuroinflammatory diseases.

  12. Safety and skin delayed-type hypersensitivity response in vervet monkeys immunized with Leishmania donovani sonicate antigen delivered with adjuvants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Mutiso

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we report on the safety and skin delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH, responses of the Leishmania donovani whole cell sonicate antigen delivered in conjunction with alum-BCG (AlBCG, Montanide ISA 720 (MISA or Monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA in groups of vervet monkeys. Following three intradermal injections of the inoculums on days 0, 28 and 42, safety and DTH responses were assessed. Preliminary tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and interferon gamma (IFN-γ levels were also measured and these were compared with DTH. Only those animals immunized with alum-BCG reacted adversely to the inoculum by producing ulcerative erythematous skin indurations. Non-parametric analysis of variance followed by a post-test showed significantly higher DTH responses in the MISA+Ag group compared with other immunized groups (p < 0.001. The MPLA+Ag group indicated significantly lower DTH responses to the sonicate antigen compared with the AlBCG+Ag group. There was a significant correlation between the DTH and cytokine responses (p < 0.0001. Based on this study we conclude that Leishmania donovani sonicate antigen containing MISA 720 is safe and is associated with a strong DTH reaction following immunization.

  13. Irradiated mice lose the capacity to 'process' fed antigen for systemic tolerance of delayed-type hypersensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce, M G; Strobel, S; Hanson, D G; Ferguson, A

    1987-12-01

    'Intestinal antigen processing' is a function of the gastro-intestinal tract whereby shortly after an animal has been fed an immunogenic protein antigen, such as ovabumin (OVA), a tolerogenic form of the protein is generated and can be detected in the circulation. The effect of damage to the intestinal epithelium on the processing of OVA has been examined in lethally irradiated mice. Irradiated animals were fed 25 mg OVA and their serum collected 1 h later. When this serum was transferred intraperitoneally into naive recipient mice, this did not induce the typical suppression of systemic delayed-type hypersensitivity. Results were similar when the serum donors were at 2 days after irradiation, with crypt hypoplasia, and at 5 days after irradiation when there was reactive crypt hyperplasia. However reconstitution of donors with normal spleen cells immediately after irradiation restored their capacity to generate a tolerogenic form of the antigen. Immunoreactive OVA was detected by ELISA in both tolerizing and non-tolerizing sera, and the immunological properties of these sera were not related to serum levels of OVA after feeding. The results suggest that lymphoid cells may be involved in the phenomenon of antigen processing.

  14. THE IMMUNOPATHOBIOLOGY OF SYPHILIS: THE MANIFESTATIONS AND COURSE OF SYPHILIS ARE DETERMINED BY THE LEVEL OF DELAYED-TYPE HYPERSENSITIVITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, J. Andrew; Dabiri, Ganary; Cribier, Bernard; Sell, Stewart

    2013-01-01

    Syphilis has plagued mankind for centuries and is currently resurgent in the Western hemisphere. While there has been a significant reduction of tertiary disease, and recognition of facilitative interactions with HIV infection, the natural history of syphilis has remained largely unchanged; thus, new strategies are required to more effectively combat this pathogen. The immunopathologic features of experimental syphilis in the rabbit; the course, stages, and pathology of human syphilis; and a comparison of human syphilis with leprosy suggest that the clinical course of syphilis and its tissue manifestations are determined by the balance between delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and humoral immunity to the causative agent, Treponema pallidum. A strong DTH response is associated with clearance of the infecting organisms in a well-developed chancre, whereas a cytotoxic T-cell response or strong humoral antibody response is associated with prolonged infection and progression to tertiary disease. Many of the protean symptoms/appearances of secondary and tertiary human syphilis are manifestations of immune reactions that fail to clear the organism, due to a lack of recruitment and more importantly, activation of macrophages by sensitized CD4 T-cells. The Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) vaccination can enhance DTH and has been shown to produce a low, but measurable beneficial effect in the prevention of leprosy, a disease that shows a disease spectrum with characteristics in common with syphilis. In the prevention of syphilis, a potential vaccine protective against syphilis should be designed to augment the DTH response. PMID:21694502

  15. Berberine Attenuates Inflammation Associated with Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity via Suppressing Th1 Response and Inhibiting Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhigang; Chen, Zhe; Chen, Tao; Yi, Tao; Zheng, Zhou; Fan, Hong; Chen, Zebin

    2017-02-01

    Berberine, one of the active alkaloids from Rhizoma Coptidis, has been indicated to have anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. The aim of this study was to determine the role of berberine on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and its potential mechanisms. Berberine treatment significantly reduced footpad swelling, inflammatory cells infiltration, anti-OVA IgG levels, IgE concentration in serum, and the tetramer + CD8 + cells. In homogenized footpad tissue, the production of Th1-mediated cytokines including IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 were suppressed following the administration of berberine. Detailed studies revealed that berberine prevented differentiation into Th1 cells in the OVA-primed lymphocytes, resulting from suppressing the expression of T-bet and secretion of IFN-γ but not IL-4. Concanavalin A stimulation assay and MTT assay also indicated inhibiting effect of berberine treatment on IFN-γ production and decreased cytotoxicity in lymphocytes proliferation, respectively. Additionally, berberine obviously decreased the cell apoptosis and enzymatic activity of caspase-3, which was further confirmed by the facts that berberine clearly lowered Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and expression of cleaved caspase-3 protein. On correlation analysis, the percentage of apoptotic cells showed a significant positive relationship with IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio of supernatant from footpad tissue in berberine-treated DTH mice. These results demonstrated that berberine attenuated Th1-mediated inflammation in OVA-induced DTH by curbing Th1 response and inhibiting cell apoptosis, suggesting a therapeutic potential for berberine for the treatment of type IV hypersensitivity.

  16. Prevalence and reasons for delaying and foregoing necessary care by the presence and type of disability among working-age adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, Amanda; Stransky, Michelle; Phillips, Kimberly; McClain, Monica; Drum, Charles

    2017-01-01

    While it is commonly accepted that disparities in unmet need for care vary by age, race/ethnicity, income, education, and access to care, literature documenting unmet needs experienced by adults with different types of disabilities is developing. The main objective was to determine whether subgroups of people with disabilities are more likely than people without disabilities to delay/forgo necessary care, in general and among the insured. We used pooled Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data (2004-2010) to examine delaying or forgoing medical, dental, and pharmacy care among five disability subgroups (physical, cognitive, visual, hearing, multiple) and the non-disabled population. Logistic regression was conducted to examine delayed/forgone care, controlling for sociodemographic, health, and health care factors. Over 13% of all working-age adults delayed/forwent necessary care; lack of insurance was the strongest predictor of unmet needs. Among the insured, disability subgroups were greater than two times more likely to report delayed/forgone care than adults without disabilities. Insured working-age adults with multiple chronic conditions and those with ADL/IADL assistance needs had higher odds of delayed or forgone care than their peers without these characteristics. Reasons related to affordability were most often listed as leading to unmet needs, regardless of disability. Although insurance status most strongly predicted unmet needs for care, many people with insurance delayed/forewent necessary care. Even among the insured, all disability subgroups had significantly greater likelihood of having to delay/forgo care than those without disabilities. Differences also existed between the disability subgroups. Cost was most frequently cited reason for unmet needs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. The efficacy of the skin delayed-type hypersensitivity using a brucellin prepared from a mucoid strain of Brucella abortus to detect brucellosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bercovich, Z.; Muskens, J.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Eight-hundred-and-ninety-six cattle belonging to herds officially designated Brucella-free, and 190 cattle belonging to infected herds were tested with the skin delayed-type hypersensitivity (SDTH) test, using brucellin (273) prepared from a rnucoid strain of Brucella abortus. An increase in

  18. Supernatants from oral epithelial cells and gingival fibroblasts modulate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 promoter activation induced by periodontopathogens in monocytes/macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, O A; Ebersole, J L; Huang, C B

    2010-04-01

    Bacterial and host cell products during coinfections of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1-positive (HIV-1(+)) patients regulate HIV-1 recrudescence in latently infected cells (e.g. T cells, monocytes/macrophages), impacting highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) failure and progression of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. A high frequency of oral opportunistic infections (e.g. periodontitis) in HIV-1(+) patients has been demonstrated; however, their potential to impact HIV-1 exacerbation is unclear. We sought to determine the ability of supernatants derived from oral epithelial cells (OKF4) and human gingival fibroblasts (Gin-4) challenged with periodontal pathogens, to modulate the HIV-1 promoter activation in monocytes/macrophages. BF24 monocytes/macrophages transfected with the HIV-1 promoter driving the expression of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) were stimulated with Porphyromonas gingivalis, Fusobacterium nucleatum, or Treponema denticola in the presence of supernatants from OKF4 or Gin4 cells either unstimulated or previously pulsed with bacteria. CAT levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and cytokine production was evaluated by Luminex beadlyte assays. OKF4 and Gin4 supernatants enhanced HIV-1 promoter activation particularly related to F. nucleatum challenge. An additive effect was observed in HIV-1 promoter activation when monocytes/macrophages were simultaneously stimulated with gingival cell supernatants and bacterial extracts. OKF4 cells produced higher levels of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukins -6 and -8 in response to F. nucleatum and P. gingivalis. Preincubation of OKF4 supernatants with anti-GM-CSF reduced the additive effect in periodontopathogen-induced HIV-1 promoter activation. These results suggest that soluble mediators produced by gingival resident cells in response to periodontopathogens could contribute to HIV-1 promoter activation in monocytes

  19. Effects of processing delay, temperature, and transport tube type on results of quantitative bacterial culture of canine urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Carly A; Bishop, Micah A; Pack, Julie D; Cook, Audrey K; Lawhon, Sara D

    2016-01-15

    To determine the impact of processing delay, temperature, and transport tube type on results of quantitative bacterial culture (QBC) of canine urine. Diagnostic test evaluation. 60 mL of pooled urine from 4 dogs, divided into six 10-mL aliquots. Urine aliquots were spiked with bacteria from 1 of 6 independent Escherichia coli cultures to achieve a target bacterial concentration of 10(5) CFUs/mL. One milliliter from each aliquot was transferred into 5 silicone-coated clot tubes (SCTs) and 5 urine transport tubes (UTTs). Samples were stored at 4°C (39°F) and 25°C (77°F) for 0, 8, and 24 hours, and then standard QBCs were performed. Median bacterial concentration for urine samples stored in a UTT for 24 hours at 4°C was lower than that for samples stored in an SCT under the same conditions. Conversely, a substantial decrease in median bacterial concentration was identified for samples stored for 24 hours in an SCT at 25°C, compared with the median concentration for samples stored in a UTT under the same conditions. Median bacterial concentration in samples stored in an SCT at 25°C for 24 hours (275 CFUs/mL) was less than the cutoff typically used to define clinically important bacteriuria by use of urine samples obtained via cystocentesis (ie, > 1,000 CFUs/mL). Canine urine samples submitted for immediate QBC should be transported in plain sterile tubes such as SCTs. When prolonged (24-hour) storage at room temperature is anticipated, urine samples should be transported in UTTs.

  20. Biobreeding rat islets exhibit reduced antioxidative defense and N-acetyl cysteine treatment delays type 1 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdani, Marika; Henschel, Angela M.; Kansra, Sanjay; Fuller, Jessica M.; Geoffrey, Rhonda; Jia, Shuang; Kaldunski, Mary L.; Pavletich, Scott; Prosser, Simon; Chen, Yi-Guang; Lernmark, Åke; Hessner, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    Islet-level oxidative stress has been proposed as a trigger for type 1 diabetes (T1D), and release of cytokines by infiltrating immune cells further elevates reactive oxygen species (ROS), exacerbating β cell duress. To identify genes/mechanisms involved with diabeto-genesis at the β cell level, gene expression profiling and targeted follow-up studies were used to investigate islet activity in the biobreeding (BB) rat. Forty-day-old spontaneously diabetic lymphopenic BB DRlyp/lyp rats (before T cell insulitis) as well as nondiabetic BB DR+/+ rats, nondiabetic but lymphopenic F344lyp/lyp rats, and healthy Fischer (F344) rats were examined. Gene expression profiles of BB rat islets were highly distinct from F344 islets and under-expressed numerous genes involved in ROS metabolism, including glutathione S-transferase (GST) family members (Gstm2, Gstm4, Gstm7, Gstt1, Gstp1, and Gstk1), superoxide dismutases (Sod2 and Sod3), peroxidases, and peroxiredoxins. This pattern of under-expression was not observed in brain, liver, or muscle. Compared with F344 rats, BB rat pancreata exhibited lower GST protein levels, while plasma GST activity was found significantly lower in BB rats. Systemic administration of the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine to DRlyp/lyp rats altered abundances of peripheral eosinophils, reduced severity of insulitis, and significantly delayed but did not prevent diabetes onset. We find evidence of β cell dysfunction in BB rats independent of T1D progression, which includes lower expression of genes related to antioxidative defense mechanisms during the pre-onset period that may contribute to overall T1D susceptibility. PMID:23111281

  1. Patient and Process Factors Associated With Type of First Neuroimaging and Delayed Diagnosis in Childhood Arterial Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daverio, Marco; Bressan, Silvia; Gregori, Dario; Babl, Franz E; Mackay, Mark T

    2016-09-01

    In-hospital factors contribute more to delayed diagnosis of childhood arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) than prehospital factors. We aimed to explore process and patient factors associated with type of and timing to neuroimaging in childhood AIS in the emergency department (ED). This was a retrospective hospital registry-based study of children with AIS, presenting to an Australian tertiary pediatric ED between January 2003 and December 2012. Neuroimaging data and timelines of care were also collected from referring hospitals for transferred patients. Seventy-one AIS episodes and 19 transient ischemic attacks were recorded. The majority (56%) were initially seen at a referring hospital. Patients underwent computed tomography (CT) as first scan more frequently than magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as first scan (61% vs. 32%) at both the referring and the tertiary hospitals. Time to first scan as CT was significantly shorter compared with MRI (median = 1.5 hours vs. 10.9 hours, p first presenting to a referring hospital and those directly accessing the tertiary center. Patient characteristics including age, past medical history, conscious state, focal symptoms, and signs on arrival were not associated with the type of first neuroimaging or time to diagnostic MRI. Patients presenting during weekends were less likely to receive an MRI as first scan (odds ratio [OR] = 0.3, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.1-0.8), while time to MRI was significantly longer for children presenting after hours (5 pm-8 am; median = 17.6 hours vs. 8.4 hours, p = 0.026). MRI overall and as first scan was associated with a higher use of sedation than CT (OR = 6.5, 95% CI = 1.3-32.9; and OR = 3.9, 95% CI = 1.3-11.8), particularly for children younger than 5 years of age (OR = 12.5, 95% CI = 3-52.4). Strategies to improve rapid diagnosis of pediatric stroke should include shared regional hospital networks protocols to optimize local imaging strategies and where possible rapid transfer to the

  2. Design of robust reliable control for T-S fuzzy Markovian jumping delayed neutral type neural networks with probabilistic actuator faults and leakage delays: An event-triggered communication scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Ali, M; Vadivel, R; Saravanakumar, R

    2018-06-01

    This study examines the problem of robust reliable control for Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy Markovian jumping delayed neural networks with probabilistic actuator faults and leakage terms. An event-triggered communication scheme. First, the randomly occurring actuator faults and their failures rates are governed by two sets of unrelated random variables satisfying certain probabilistic failures of every actuator, new type of distribution based event triggered fault model is proposed, which utilize the effect of transmission delay. Second, Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy model is adopted for the neural networks and the randomness of actuators failures is modeled in a Markov jump model framework. Third, to guarantee the considered closed-loop system is exponential mean square stable with a prescribed reliable control performance, a Markov jump event-triggered scheme is designed in this paper, which is the main purpose of our study. Fourth, by constructing appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, employing Newton-Leibniz formulation and integral inequalities, several delay-dependent criteria for the solvability of the addressed problem are derived. The obtained stability criteria are stated in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), which can be checked numerically using the effective LMI toolbox in MATLAB. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and reduced conservatism of the proposed results over the existing ones, among them one example was supported by real-life application of the benchmark problem. Copyright © 2018 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Action of granulopoiesis-stimulating cytokines rhG-CSF, rhGM-CSF, and rmGM-CSF on murine hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Vacek, Antonín; Weiterová, Lenka

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 54, - (2005), s. 207-213 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS5004009; GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK5011112; GA ČR(CZ) GP305/03/D050 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : murine hematopoiesis * GM-CFC * rhG- CSF Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2005

  4. Effect of immediate and delayed dentin sealing on the fracture strength, failure type and Weilbull characteristics of lithiumdisilicate laminate veneers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gresnigt, Marco M.M.; Cune, Marco S.; de Roos, Joanne G.; Özcan, Mutlu

    OBJECTIVES: Adhesion on dentin is less reliable than on enamel, which could affect the durability of laminate veneers (LV). Immediate dentin sealing (IDS) is suggested instead of delayed dentin sealing (DDS) to overcome hypersensitivity and prevent debonding from dentin. This study evaluated the

  5. Delayed diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia with salt wasting due to type II 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Trine H; Mallet, Delphine; Dige-Petersen, Harriet

    2005-01-01

    Classical 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3beta-HSD) deficiency is a rare cause of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. We report two sisters presenting with delayed diagnoses of classical 3beta-HSD, despite salt wasting (SW) episodes in infancy. Sibling 1 was referred for premature pubarche, slig...

  6. The effect of prophylaxis with chloroquine and proguanil on delayed-type hypersensitivity and antibody production following vaccination with diphtheria, tetanus, polio, and pneumococcal vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyhrs, A; Pedersen, B K; Bygbjerg, I

    1991-01-01

    (1,000 mg/week), or 4) proguanil hydrochloride (200 mg/day) for six weeks. Skin testing was performed on days 0 and 28. Vaccinations with diphtheria, tetanus, polio, and pneumococcal polysaccharide antigen vaccines were performed on day 28, and the presence of specific antibodies was determined...... dosages, does not induce any detectable suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity or vaccination responses to diphtheria, tetanus, polio, or pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens....

  7. Cell-mediated immunity in herpes simplex virus-infected mice: H-2 mapping of the delayed-type hypersensitivity response and the antiviral T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, A A; Phelan, J; Wildy, P

    1981-04-01

    An adoptive transfer system was used to investigate the H-2 restriction of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to herpes simplex virus. A successful DTH transfer was achieved when donor and recipient were compatible at the I-A region, with K and D region compatibility unnecessary. However, the rapid clearance of infectious virus from the inoculation site was found only when the donor and recipients were compatible at H-2K (and presumably D) and I-A regions.

  8. Unique microRNAs appear at different times during the course of a delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulati, Nicholas; Løvendorf, Marianne B; Zibert, John R

    2015-01-01

    Diphencyprone (DPCP) is a hapten that induces delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression and have been implicated in various inflammatory skin diseases, but their role in DTH reactions is not well understood......, and therefore, may inform on the paradoxical ability of DPCP to treat both autoimmune conditions (alopecia areata) and conditions of ineffective immunity (melanoma)....

  9. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Production by T Cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothchild, Alissa C; Stowell, Britni; Goyal, Girija; Nunes-Alves, Cláudio; Yang, Qianting; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Sassetti, Christopher M; Dranoff, Glenn; Chen, Xinchun; Lee, Jinhee; Behar, Samuel M

    2017-10-24

    Mice deficient for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF -/- ) are highly susceptible to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis , and clinical data have shown that anti-GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies can lead to increased susceptibility to tuberculosis in otherwise healthy people. GM-CSF activates human and murine macrophages to inhibit intracellular M. tuberculosis growth. We have previously shown that GM-CSF produced by iNKT cells inhibits growth of M. tuberculosis However, the more general role of T cell-derived GM-CSF during infection has not been defined and how GM-CSF activates macrophages to inhibit bacterial growth is unknown. Here we demonstrate that, in addition to nonconventional T cells, conventional T cells also produce GM-CSF during M. tuberculosis infection. Early during infection, nonconventional iNKT cells and γδ T cells are the main source of GM-CSF, a role subsequently assumed by conventional CD4 + T cells as the infection progresses. M. tuberculosis -specific T cells producing GM-CSF are also detected in the peripheral blood of infected people. Under conditions where nonhematopoietic production of GM-CSF is deficient, T cell production of GM-CSF is protective and required for control of M. tuberculosis infection. However, GM-CSF is not required for T cell-mediated protection in settings where GM-CSF is produced by other cell types. Finally, using an in vitro macrophage infection model, we demonstrate that GM-CSF inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth requires the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Thus, we identified GM-CSF production as a novel T cell effector function. These findings suggest that a strategy augmenting T cell production of GM-CSF could enhance host resistance against M. tuberculosis IMPORTANCE Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, the leading cause of death by any infection worldwide. T cells are critical components of the immune

  10. Regulation of dendritic cell development by GM-CSF: Molecular control and implications for immune homeostasis and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van de Laar (Lianne); P.J. Coffer (Paul); A.M. Woltman (Andrea)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DCs) represent a small and heterogeneous fraction of the hematopoietic system, specialized in antigen capture, processing, and presentation. The different DC subsets act as sentinels throughout the body and perform a key role in the induction of immunogenic as well as

  11. Cuscuta chinensis Ameliorates Immunosuppression and Urotoxic Effect of Cyclophosphamide by Regulating Cytokines - GM-CSF and TNF-Alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Nidhi; Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Kannan, Narayanan; Vinod Prabhu, Venugopal; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is commonly used as anticancer drug which causes toxicity by its reactive metabolites such as acroline and phosphoramide mustard. In this study, Cuscuta chinensis (C. chinensis) (family: Convolvulaceae) was assessed for ability to restore mice against CTX-induced toxicity. Coadministration of C. chinensis extract (10 mg/kg BW, IP, daily) for ten consecutive days reduced CTX-induced (25 mg/kg BW, IP, daily) toxicity. Treatment with C. chinensis extract significantly (p < 0.01) increased the relative organ weight and body weight. Moreover, administration of C. chinensis extract significantly increased bone marrow cellulatity and α-esterase activity in CTX-treated mice which suggested its protective role on the hematopoietic system. The GSH content was drastically reduced by CTX administration in urinary bladder which was enhanced by treatment with C. chinensis extract, indicating that preventing acroline-mediated tissue damage or cell toxicity and also the extract decreased the urinary bladder nitric oxide (NO) level which proves recovery over urinary tract injury associated with CTX treatment. The administration of C. chinensis extract decreased serum urea, creatinine, and bilirubin levels when compared to CTX-alone-treated group. Histopathological analysis of the urinary bladder of CTX-alone-treated group showed necrotic damage whereas the C. chinensis-treated group showed normal bladder architecture. The above data clearly demonstrates chemoprotective role of C. chinensis against CTX-induced toxicities by regulating antioxidant and inflammatory mediators.

  12. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isik, Gözde; van Montfort, Thijs; Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env

  13. Immunization With AFP + GM CSF Plasmid Prime and AFP Adenoviral Vector Boost in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Hepatoma; Liver Cancer, Adult; Liver Cell Carcinoma; Liver Cell Carcinoma, Adult; Cancer of Liver; Cancer of the Liver; Cancer, Hepatocellular; Hepatic Cancer; Hepatic Neoplasms; Hepatocellular Cancer; Liver Cancer; Neoplasms, Hepatic; Neoplasms, Liver

  14. Growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF differentially preserve chemotaxis of neutrophils aging in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolach, Baruch; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Maianski, Nikolai A.; Tool, Anton T. J.; van Bruggen, Robin; Roos, Dirk; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The ability of human neutrophils to migrate was studied during culture in vitro. METHODS: Neutrophils were isolated from human blood and cultured at 37 degrees C. Apoptosis was determined by Annexin-V fluorescein isothiocyanate binding. Receptor expression was measured by fluorescence in

  15. Short-term retention of pictures and words as a function of type of distraction and length of delay interval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, J W; Siegel, A W; Dhawan, M

    1976-01-01

    Picture and word triads were tested in a Brown-Peterson short-term retention task at varying delay intervals (3, 10, or 30 sec) and under acoustic and simultaneous acoustic and visual distraction. Pictures were superior to words at all delay intervals under single acoustic distraction. Dual distraction consistently reduced picture retention while simultaneously facilitating word retention. The results were interpreted in terms of the dual coding hypothesis with modality-specific interference effects in the visual and acoustic processing systems. The differential effects of dual distraction were related to the introduction of visual interference and differential levels of functional acoustic interference across dual and single distraction tasks. The latter was supported by a constant 2/1 ratio in the backward counting rates of the acoustic vs. dual distraction tasks. The results further suggest that retention may not depend on total processing load of the distraction task, per se, but rather that processing load operates within modalities.

  16. Insulin secretagogues for prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its associated complications in persons at increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Sonne, David Peick; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Richter, Bernd

    2016-10-17

    The projected rise in the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) could develop into a substantial health problem worldwide. Whether insulin secretagogues (sulphonylureas and meglitinide analogues) are able to prevent or delay T2DM and its associated complications in people at risk for the development of T2DM is unknown. To assess the effects of insulin secretagogues on the prevention or delay of T2DM and its associated complications in people with impaired glucose tolerance, impaired fasting blood glucose, moderately elevated glycosylated haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) or any combination of these. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, PubMed, Embase, ClinicalTrials.gov, the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform, and the reference lists of systematic reviews, articles and health technology assessment reports. We asked investigators of the included trials for information about additional trials. The date of the last search of all databases was April 2016. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with a duration of 12 weeks or more comparing insulin secretagogues with any pharmacological glucose-lowering intervention, behaviour-changing intervention, placebo or no intervention in people with impaired fasting glucose, impaired glucose tolerance, moderately elevated HbA1c or combinations of these. Two review authors read all abstracts and full-text articles/records, assessed quality and extracted outcome data independently. One review author extracted data which were checked by a second review author. We resolved discrepancies by consensus or the involvement of a third review author. For meta-analyses we used a random-effects model with investigation of risk ratios (RRs) for dichotomous outcomes and mean differences (MDs) for continuous outcomes, using 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for effect estimates. We carried out trial sequential analyses (TSAs) for all outcomes that could be meta

  17. Multiple types of synchronization analysis for discontinuous Cohen-Grossberg neural networks with time-varying delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiarong; Jiang, Haijun; Hu, Cheng; Yu, Zhiyong

    2018-03-01

    This paper is devoted to the exponential synchronization, finite time synchronization, and fixed-time synchronization of Cohen-Grossberg neural networks (CGNNs) with discontinuous activations and time-varying delays. Discontinuous feedback controller and Novel adaptive feedback controller are designed to realize global exponential synchronization, finite time synchronization and fixed-time synchronization by adjusting the values of the parameters ω in the controller. Furthermore, the settling time of the fixed-time synchronization derived in this paper is less conservative and more accurate. Finally, some numerical examples are provided to show the effectiveness and flexibility of the results derived in this paper. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Delayed small intestinal transit in patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes mellitus: investigation of the relationships with clinical features, gastric emptying, psychological distress, and nutritional parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Mariza; Pavin, Elizabeth João; Parisi, Maria Cândida Ribeiro; Lorena, Sônia Letícia Silva; Brunetto, Sérgio Quirino; Ramos, Celso Dario; Pavan, Célia Regina; Mesquita, Maria Aparecida

    2013-01-01

    Studies on small intestinal transit in type 1 diabetes mellitus have reported contradictory results. This study assessed the orocecal transit time (OCTT) in a group of patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and its relationships with gastrointestinal symptoms, glycemic control, chronic complications of diabetes, anthropometric indices, gastric emptying, small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO), and psychological distress. Twenty-eight patients with long-standing (>10 years) type 1 diabetes mellitus (22 women, six men; mean age, 39 ± 9 years) participated in the study. The lactulose hydrogen breath test was used to determine OCTT and the occurrence of SIBO. The presence of anxiety and depression was assessed by the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale. Gastric emptying was measured by scintigraphy. Anthropometric indices included body mass index, percentage body fat, midarm circumference, and arm muscle area. There was a statistically significant increase in OCTT values in diabetes patients (79 ± 41 min) in comparison with controls (54 ± 17 min) (P=0.01). Individual analysis showed that OCTT was above the upper limit (mean+2 SD) in 30.8% of patients. All anthropometric parameters were significantly decreased (Pdiabetic retinopathy, glycated hemoglobin, delayed gastric emptying, SIBO, anxiety, or depression. Small bowel transit may be delayed in about one-third of patients with long-standing type 1 diabetes mellitus. This abnormality seems to have a negative effect on nutritional status in these patients.

  19. A continuous time delay-difference type model (CTDDM) applied to stock assessment of the southern Atlantic albacore Thunnus alalunga

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIAO Baochao; LIU Qun; ZHANG Kui; Abdul BASET; Aamir Mahmood MEMON; Khadim Hussain MEMON; HAN Yanan

    2016-01-01

    A continuous time delay-difference model (CTDDM) has been established that considers continuous time delays of biological processes.The southern Atlantic albacore (Thunnus alalunga) stock is the one of the commercially important tuna population in the marine world.The age structured production model (ASPM) and the surplus production model (SPM) have already been used to assess the albacore stock.However,the ASPM requires detailed biological information and the SPM lacks the biological realism.In this study,we focus on applying a CTDDM to the southern Atlantic albacore (T.alalunga) species,which provides an alternative method to assess this fishery.It is the first time that CTDDM has been provided for assessing the Atlantic albacore (T.alalunga) fishery.CTDDM obtained the 80% confidence interval of MSY (maximum sustainable yield) of(21510 t,23118 t).The catch in 2011 (24100 t) is higher than the MSY values and the relative fishing mortality ratio (F2011/FMSY) is higher than 1.0.The results of CTDDM were analyzed to verify the proposed methodology and provide reference information for the sustainable management of the southern Atlantic albacore stock.The CTDDM treats the recruitment,the growth,and the mortality rates as all varying continuously over time and fills gaps between ASPM and SPM in this stock assessment.

  20. β-delayed γ decay of 20Mg and the 19Ne(p , γ) 20 Na breakout reaction in Type I X-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, B. E.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Wrede, C.; Allen, J.; Bardayan, D. W.; Bennett, M. B.; Brown, B. A.; Chipps, K. A.; Febbraro, M.; Friedman, M.; Fry, C.; Hall, M. R.; Hall, O.; Liddick, S. N.; O'Malley, P.; Ong, W. J.; Pain, S. D.; Prokop, C.; Schwartz, S. B.; Shidling, P.; Sims, H.; Thompson, P.; Zhang, H.

    2018-03-01

    Certain astrophysical environments such as thermonuclear outbursts on accreting neutron stars (Type-I X-ray bursts) are hot enough to allow for breakout from the Hot CNO hydrogen burning cycles to the rapid proton capture (rp) process. An important breakout reaction sequence is 15O(α,γ)19Ne(p,γ)20Na and the 19Ne(p,γ)20Na reaction rate is expected to be dominated by a single resonance at 457 keV above the proton threshold in 20Na. The resonance strength and, hence, reaction rate depends strongly on whether this 20Na state at an excitation energy of 2647 keV has spin and parity of 1+ or 3+. Previous 20Mg (Jπ =0+) β+ decay experiments have relied almost entirely on searches for β-delayed proton emission from this resonance in 20Na to limit the log ft value and, hence, Jπ. However there is a non-negligible γ-ray branch expected that must also be limited experimentally to determine the log ft value and constrain Jπ. We have measured the β-delayed γ decay of 20Mg to complement previous β-delayed proton decay work and provide the first complete limit based on all energetically allowed decay channels through the 2647 keV state. Our limit confirms that a 1+ assignment for this state is highly unlikely.

  1. Type D personality is associated with delaying patients to medical assessment and poor quality of life among rectal cancer survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jia-kui; Fang, Li-li; Zhang, De-wei; Jin, Qiu; Wu, Xiao-mei; Liu, Ji-chao; Zhang, Chun-dong; Dai, Dong-qiu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to explore quality of life (QoL), mental health status, type D personality, symptom duration, and emergency admissions of Chinese rectal cancer patients as well as the relationship between these factors. Type D personality was measured with the 14-item Type D Personality Scale (DS14). Mental health status was measured with the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The QoL outcomes were assessed longitudinally using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 and QLQ-CR38 questionnaires at the baseline and 6 months after diagnosis. Of the 852 survivors who responded (94 %), 187 (22 %) had a type D personality. The proportion of patients with duration of symptoms >1 month and being diagnosed after emergency admissions in type D group is significantly higher than that in non-type D group. At both of the time points, type D patients reported statistically significant lower scores on most of the functional scales, global health status/QoL scales, and worse symptom scores compared to patients without a type D personality. At the 6-month time point, a higher percentage of patients in the type D group demonstrated QoL deterioration. Clinically elevated levels of anxiety and depression were more prevalent in type D than in non-type D survivors. Type D personality was associated with poor QoL and mental health status among survivors of rectal cancer, even after adjustment for confounding background variables. Type D personality might be a general vulnerability factor to screen for subgroups at risk for longer symptom duration and emergency admissions in clinical practice.

  2. Delayed fission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsukawa, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-07-01

    Delayed fission is a nuclear decay process that couples {beta} decay and fission. In the delayed fission process, a parent nucleus undergoes {beta} decay and thereby populates excited states in the daughter. If these states are of energies comparable to or greater than the fission barrier of the daughter, then fission may compete with other decay modes of the excited states in the daughter. In this paper, mechanism and some experiments of the delayed fission will be discussed. (author)

  3. The effect of prophylaxis with chloroquine and proguanil on delayed-type hypersensitivity and antibody production following vaccination with diphtheria, tetanus, polio, and pneumococcal vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyhrs, A; Pedersen, B K; Bygbjerg, I; Henrichsen, J; Heron, I; Petersen, I; Skinhoj, P

    1991-11-01

    In vitro studies have shown that anti-malarial drugs suppress immunity. In this study, the effects of chloroquine and proguanil (Paludrine) on the cellular and humoral immune system were measured by two in vivo methods: 1) cell-mediated immunity (delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity) i.e., skin tests with seven delayed-type common antigens (Multitest) and 2) humoral immunity by measurement of specific antibody response to vaccination. Sixty healthy young individuals were randomized into four groups and given 1) no treatment (controls), 2) chloroquine diphosphate (500 mg/week), 3) chloroquine diphosphate (1,000 mg/week), or 4) proguanil hydrochloride (200 mg/day) for six weeks. Skin testing was performed on days 0 and 28. Vaccinations with diphtheria, tetanus, polio, and pneumococcal polysaccharide antigen vaccines were performed on day 28, and the presence of specific antibodies was determined on days 0, 28, and 42. The skin tests induced a significant increase in skin reactive areas from day 0 to day 28 in all groups. Furthermore, the skin test induced an increase in the level of specific IgG for diphtheria and tetanus, but had no effect on antibodies to antigens not included in the skin test. The results showed that there were no significant differences among the four groups regarding skin test areas and increases in antibody titers following vaccination. Therefore, it is concluded that in healthy persons, six weeks intake of chloroquine, even in double doses, or proguanil in chemoprophylactic dosages, does not induce any detectable suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity or vaccination responses to diphtheria, tetanus, polio, or pneumococcal polysaccharide antigens.

  4. An Improved Genetic Algorithm to Optimize Spatial Locations for Double-Wishbone Type Suspension System with Time Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available By taking account of double-wishbone independent suspension with two unequal-length arms, the coordinate values of articulated geometry are based on structural limitations and constraint equations of alignment parameters. The sensitivities of front wheel alignment parameters are analyzed using the space analytic geometry method with insight module in ADAMS® software. The multiobjective optimization functions are designed to calculate the coordinate values of hardpoints with front suspension since the effect of time delay due to wheelbase can be easily obtained by vehicle speed. The K&C characteristics have been investigated using GA solutions in the simulation environment. The camber angle decreases from 1.152° to 1.05° and toe-in angle reduces from 1.036° to 0.944°. The simulation results demonstrate that the suggested optimization method is able to satisfy the suspension motion to enhance ride comfort. Experimental results, obtained by K&C test bench, also indicate that the optimized suspension can track the desired trajectory while keeping the vehicle performance in various road conditions.

  5. Delayed charge recovery discrimination of passivated surface alpha events in P-type point-contact detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruszko, J.; Majorana Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The Majorana Demonstrator searches for neutrinoless double-beta decay of 76Ge using arrays of high-purity germanium detectors. If observed, this process would demonstrate that lepton number is not a conserved quantity in nature, with implications for grand-unification and for explaining the predominance of matter over antimatter in the universe. A problematic background in such large granular detector arrays is posed by alpha particles. In the Majorana Demonstrator, events have been observed that are consistent with energy-degraded alphas originating on the passivated surface, leading to a potential background contribution in the region-of-interest for neutrinoless double-beta decay. However, it is also observed that when energy deposition occurs very close to the passivated surface, charges drift through the bulk onto that surface, and then drift along it with greatly reduced mobility. This leads to both a reduced prompt signal and a measurable change in slope of the tail of a recorded pulse. In this contribution we discuss the characteristics of these events and the development of a filter that can identify the occurrence of this delayed charge recovery, allowing for the efficient rejection of passivated surface alpha events in analysis.

  6. Induction of suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity to herpes simplex virus by epidermal cells exposed to UV-irradiated urocanic acid in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, J.A.; Howie, S.E.; Norval, M.; Maingay, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    Urocanic acid (UCA), the putative photoreceptor for ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced suppression, undergoes a UV-dependent trans to cis isomerisation. Epidermal cells from mice painted with UCA, containing a known proportion of the cis-isomer, generate suppression of the delayed type hypersensitivity response to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) when transferred to naive syngeneic recipients at the same time and site as infection with HSV-1. One T suppressor cell subset, of phenotype (Thy1+, L3T4+, Ly2-), is induced by the cis-UCA modified epidermal cell transfer. Flow cytometric analysis of the epidermal cells from skin treated with UV or cis-UCA indicates an overall reduction from normal in the number of cells expressing MHC Class II antigens, but no alteration in the number expressing I-J antigens

  7. Tuberculin-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction in a model of hu-PBMC-SCID mice grafted with autologous skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsicopoulos, A.; Pestel, J.; Fahy, O.; Vorng, H.; Vandenbusche, F.; Porte, H.; Eraldi, L.; Wurtz, A.; Akoum, H.; Hamid, Q.; Wallaert, B.; Tonnel, A. B.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed an animal model to study human delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Previous studies in humans have shown after tuberculin injection the presence of a mononuclear cell infiltration, with almost no eosinophils, associated with a preferential Th-1-type cytokine profile. Human skin graft obtained from tuberculin-reactive donors was grafted onto the back of severe combined immunodeficient mice. After healing, mice were reconstituted intraperitoneally with peripheral mononuclear cells. Tuberculin and diluent were injected intradermally, and skin biopsies were performed 72 hours later. Skin grafts were divided into two parts, one for immunohistochemistry and one for in situ hybridization studies. Immunohistochemistry was performed on cryostat sections using the alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase technique. In the tuberculin-injected sites as compared with the diluent-injected sites, there were significant increases in the number of CD45+ pan leukocytes and CD4+, CD8+, CD45RO+ T cells but not in CD68+ monocytes/macrophages and EG2 or MBP+ eosinophils. The activation markers CD25 and HLA-DR were up-regulated in the tuberculin-injected sites. In situ hybridization was performed using 35S-labeled riboprobes for interleukin (IL)-2, interferon (IFN)-gamma, IL-4, and IL-5. After tuberculin injection, a preferential Th-1-type cytokine profile was observed with significant increases in the numbers of IL-2 and IFN-gamma mRNA-expressing cells. These results are similar to those reported after tuberculin-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity in humans, suggesting that this model might be useful to study cutaneous inflammatory reaction. Images Figure 4 PMID:9626072

  8. Diet, physical activity or both for prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its associated complications in people at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Gimenez-Perez, Gabriel; Mauricio, Didac

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The projected rise in the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) could develop into a substantial health problem worldwide. Whether diet, physical activity or both can prevent or delay T2DM and its associated complications in at-risk people is unknown. OBJECTIVES: To assess...... the effects of diet, physical activity or both on the prevention or delay of T2DM and its associated complications in people at increased risk of developing T2DM. SEARCH METHODS: This is an update of the Cochrane Review published in 2008. We searched the CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, ClinicalTrials.gov, ICTRP...... RESULTS: We included 12 RCTs randomising 5238 people. One trial contributed 41% of all participants. The duration of the interventions varied from two to six years. We judged none of the included trials at low risk of bias for all 'Risk of bias' domains.Eleven trials compared diet plus physical activity...

  9. The delayed rectifier, IKI, is the major conductance in type I vestibular hair cells across vestibular end organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, A. J.; Rennie, K. J.; Correia, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Hair cells were dissociated from the semicircular canal, utricle, lagena and saccule of white king pigeons. Type I hair cells were identified morphologically based on the ratios of neck width to cuticular plate width (NPR rectifier characterized previously in semicircular canal hair cells as IKI.

  10. Delayed heart rate recovery after exercise as a risk factor of incident type 2 diabetes mellitus after adjusting for glycometabolic parameters in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tae Yang; Jee, Jae Hwan; Bae, Ji Cheol; Hong, Won-Jung; Jin, Sang-Man; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Lee, Moon-Kyu

    2016-10-15

    Some studies have reported that delayed heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise is associated with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study aimed to investigate the longitudinal association of delayed HRR following a graded exercise treadmill test (GTX) with the development of T2DM including glucose-associated parameters as an adjusting factor in healthy Korean men. Analyses including fasting plasma glucose, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β, and HbA1c as confounding factors and known confounders were performed. HRR was calculated as peak heart rate minus heart rate after a 1-min rest (HRR 1). Cox proportional hazards model was used to quantify the independent association between HRR and incident T2DM. During 9082 person-years of follow-up between 2006 and 2012, there were 180 (10.1%) incident cases of T2DM. After adjustment for age, BMI, systolic BP, diastolic BP, smoking status, peak heart rate, peak oxygen uptake, TG, LDL-C, HDL-C, fasting plasma glucose, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β, and HbA1c, the hazard ratios (HRs) [95% confidence interval (CI)] of incident T2DM comparing the second and third tertiles to the first tertile of HRR 1 were 0.867 (0.609-1.235) and 0.624 (0.426-0.915), respectively (p for trend=0.017). As a continuous variable, in the fully-adjusted model, the HR (95% CI) of incident T2DM associated with each 1 beat increase in HRR 1 was 0.980 (0.960-1.000) (p=0.048). This study demonstrated that delayed HRR after exercise predicts incident T2DM in men, even after adjusting for fasting glucose, HOMA-IR, HOMA-β, and HbA1c. However, only HRR 1 had clinical significance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Lag synchronization of unknown chaotic delayed Yang-Yang-type fuzzy neural networks with noise perturbation based on adaptive control and parameter identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yonghui; Yang, Zijiang; Han, Maoan

    2009-07-01

    This paper considers the lag synchronization (LS) issue of unknown coupled chaotic delayed Yang-Yang-type fuzzy neural networks (YYFCNN) with noise perturbation. Separate research work has been published on the stability of fuzzy neural network and LS issue of unknown coupled chaotic neural networks, as well as its application in secure communication. However, there have not been any studies that integrate the two. Motivated by the achievements from both fields, we explored the benefits of integrating fuzzy logic theories into the study of LS problems and applied the findings to secure communication. Based on adaptive feedback control techniques and suitable parameter identification, several sufficient conditions are developed to guarantee the LS of coupled chaotic delayed YYFCNN with or without noise perturbation. The problem studied in this paper is more general in many aspects. Various problems studied extensively in the literature can be treated as special cases of the findings of this paper, such as complete synchronization (CS), effect of fuzzy logic, and noise perturbation. This paper presents an illustrative example and uses simulated results of this example to show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed adaptive scheme. This research also demonstrates the effectiveness of application of the proposed adaptive feedback scheme in secure communication by comparing chaotic masking with fuzziness with some previous studies. Chaotic signal with fuzziness is more complex, which makes unmasking more difficult due to the added fuzzy logic.

  12. Syphacia muris infection delays the onset of hyperglycemia in WBN/Kob-Leprfa rats, a new type 2 diabetes mellitus model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taira K.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common endocrine disorders and its continuous global increase is due to factors as population growth, urbanization, aging, and increasing prevalence of obesity and physical inactivity. The effect of pinworm infection on the development of hyperglycemia was examined in WBN/K-Lepf (fa/fa rats, a new model of the obese type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM with pancreatitis. The rats were orally administered Syphacia muris eggs (infected group and distilled water (control group. Hyperglycemia onset in the infected group was significantly delayed compared to the control group. Neither body weight nor intake of food and water were affected by S. muris infection. This study demonstrated that S. muris infection delayed the onset of T2DM in fa/fa rats and suggested that elucidation of the underlying mechanism and relevant pathways in the helminth-mediated protection may lead to the development of a new strategy to prevent diabetes mellitus.

  13. Delayed Ejaculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cases, it is due to a combination of physical and psychological concerns. Psychological causes of delayed ejaculation include: Depression, anxiety or other mental health conditions Relationship problems due to stress, poor communication ...

  14. Delayed growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Slow rate of growth; Retarded growth and development; Growth delay Images Toddler development References Cooke DW, Divall SA, Radovick S. Normal and aberrant growth in children. In: Melmed S, Polonsky KS, Larsen PR, ...

  15. Richner-Hanhart Syndrome (Tyrosinemia Type II A Case Report of Delay Diagnosis with Hyperkeratotic Lesions of Palmes and Soles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Alian

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Richner-Hanhart syndrome (tyrosinemia type II is a rare autosomal recessive disease associated with high serum tyrosine levels caused by the deficiency of tyrosine ami-notransferase enzyme. Case Report: We report a 7-year-old female patient with complaints of hyperkeratosis lesions of palms and soles which started 3 years ago. Chromatography of serum amino acids showed a tyrosine level of 120micromole/L (normal range: 22-87. She had normal ophthalmologic examination and mild mental retardation was detected. One month after the tyrosine- and phenylalanine-restricted diet, her tyrosine level dropped to 42 micromol/L level, her keratotic lesions subsided, and a symptomatic relief in learning was achieved. Conclusion: Tyrosinemia type II should be suspected in patients demonstrating dermatologic signs, especially palmoplantar keratosis, associated with bilateral pseudodendritic corneal lesions unresponsive to antiviral therapy and mild to moderate mental retardation, although our patient without ophthalmic lesions is a very rare case of this syndrome. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (3: 251-254

  16. Transmission of the allergy reaction of a delayed type against Salmonella abortus ovis through blood plasma of gamma-irradiated guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kostov, G.

    1977-01-01

    Use is made of blood plasma taken from guinea pigs (sensibilized with a live culture of Salmonella abortus ovis and then irradiated with 800 rad gamma-rays) to transmit the skin allergy reaction to normal, nonsensibilized guinea pigs. The allergy reaction has been demonstrated in the recipients of plasma as early as the 3-4th hour following the injection of the allergen into the skin. It reaches its peak at the 12-24th hour and later on strongly diminishes, remaining in few of the animals only up to the 48th hour. The infiltrate at the site of injection in the skin of positively reacting animals contains at the 24th hour cells of the polymorphonuclear type, which predominate, while the cells of the mononuclear type are few in number. There are no precipitins in the plasma of the donors, and the titer of the agglutinins and the cytophile antibodies is very low. Regardless of these findings it is concluded that the transmitted allergy reaction is of the fast type (after Arthuss), and not of the delayed one. (author)

  17. Overexpression of PvPin1, a Bamboo Homolog of PIN1-Type Parvulin 1, Delays Flowering Time in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Zheng

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Because of the long and unpredictable flowering period in bamboo, the molecular mechanism of bamboo flowering is unclear. Recent study showed that Arabidopsis PIN1-type parvulin 1 (Pin1At is an important floral activator and regulates floral transition by facilitating the cis/trans isomerization of the phosphorylated Ser/Thr residues preceding proline motifs in suppressor of overexpression of CO 1 (SOC1 and agamous-like 24 (AGL24. Whether bamboo has a Pin1 homolog and whether it works in bamboo flowering are still unknown. In this study, we cloned PvPin1, a homolog of Pin1At, from Phyllostachys violascens (Bambusoideae. Bioinformatics analysis showed that PvPin1 is closely related to Pin1-like proteins in monocots. PvPin1 was widely expressed in all tested bamboo tissues, with the highest expression in young leaf and lowest in floral bud. Moreover, PvPin1 expression was high in leaves before bamboo flowering then declined during flower development. Overexpression of PvPin1 significantly delayed flowering time by downregulating SOC1 and AGL24 expression in Arabidopsis under greenhouse conditions and conferred a significantly late flowering phenotype by upregulating OsMADS56 in rice under field conditions. PvPin1 showed subcellular localization in both the nucleus and cytolemma. The 1500-bp sequence of the PvPin1 promoter was cloned, and cis-acting element prediction showed that ABRE and TGACG-motif elements, which responded to abscisic acid (ABA and methyl jasmonate (MeJA, respectively, were characteristic of P. violascens in comparison with Arabidopsis. On promoter activity analysis, exogenous ABA and MeJA could significantly inhibit PvPin1 expression. These findings suggested that PvPin1 may be a repressor in flowering, and its delay of flowering time could be regulated by ABA and MeJA in bamboo.

  18. Overexpression of PvPin1, a Bamboo Homolog of PIN1-Type Parvulin 1, Delays Flowering Time in Transgenic Arabidopsis and Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhigang; Yang, Xiaoming; Fu, Yaping; Zhu, Longfei; Wei, Hantian; Lin, Xinchun

    2017-01-01

    Because of the long and unpredictable flowering period in bamboo, the molecular mechanism of bamboo flowering is unclear. Recent study showed that Arabidopsis PIN1-type parvulin 1 (Pin1At) is an important floral activator and regulates floral transition by facilitating the cis/trans isomerization of the phosphorylated Ser/Thr residues preceding proline motifs in suppressor of overexpression of CO 1 (SOC1) and agamous-like 24 (AGL24). Whether bamboo has a Pin1 homolog and whether it works in bamboo flowering are still unknown. In this study, we cloned PvPin1 , a homolog of Pin1At , from Phyllostachys violascens (Bambusoideae). Bioinformatics analysis showed that PvPin1 is closely related to Pin1-like proteins in monocots. PvPin1 was widely expressed in all tested bamboo tissues, with the highest expression in young leaf and lowest in floral bud. Moreover, PvPin1 expression was high in leaves before bamboo flowering then declined during flower development. Overexpression of PvPin1 significantly delayed flowering time by downregulating SOC1 and AGL24 expression in Arabidopsis under greenhouse conditions and conferred a significantly late flowering phenotype by upregulating OsMADS56 in rice under field conditions. PvPin1 showed subcellular localization in both the nucleus and cytolemma. The 1500-bp sequence of the PvPin1 promoter was cloned, and cis -acting element prediction showed that ABRE and TGACG-motif elements, which responded to abscisic acid (ABA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA), respectively, were characteristic of P. violascens in comparison with Arabidopsis . On promoter activity analysis, exogenous ABA and MeJA could significantly inhibit PvPin1 expression. These findings suggested that PvPin1 may be a repressor in flowering, and its delay of flowering time could be regulated by ABA and MeJA in bamboo.

  19. THE MULTI-EPOCH NEARBY CLUSTER SURVEY: TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA RATE MEASUREMENT IN z ∼ 0.1 CLUSTERS AND THE LATE-TIME DELAY TIME DISTRIBUTION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sand, David J.; Graham, Melissa L.; Bildfell, Chris; Pritchet, Chris; Zaritsky, Dennis; Just, Dennis W.; Herbert-Fort, Stéphane; Hoekstra, Henk; Sivanandam, Suresh; Foley, Ryan J.; Mahdavi, Andisheh

    2012-01-01

    We describe the Multi-Epoch Nearby Cluster Survey, designed to measure the cluster Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate in a sample of 57 X-ray selected galaxy clusters, with redshifts of 0.05 200 (1 Mpc) of 0.042 +0.012 –0.010 +0.010 –0.008 SNuM (0.049 +0.016 –0.014 +0.005 –0.004 SNuM) and an SN Ia rate within red-sequence galaxies of 0.041 +0.015 –0.015 +0.005 –0.010 SNuM (0.041 +0.019 –0.015 +0.005 –0.004 SNuM). The red-sequence SN Ia rate is consistent with published rates in early-type/elliptical galaxies in the 'field'. Using our red-sequence SN Ia rate, and other cluster SN measurements in early-type galaxies up to z ∼ 1, we derive the late-time (>2 Gyr) delay time distribution (DTD) of SN Ia assuming a cluster early-type galaxy star formation epoch of z f = 3. Assuming a power-law form for the DTD, Ψ(t)∝t s , we find s = –1.62 ± 0.54. This result is consistent with predictions for the double degenerate SN Ia progenitor scenario (s ∼ –1) and is also in line with recent calculations for the double detonation explosion mechanism (s ∼ –2). The most recent calculations of the single degenerate scenario DTD predicts an order-of-magnitude drop-off in SN Ia rate ∼6-7 Gyr after stellar formation, and the observed cluster rates cannot rule this out.

  20. Effects of itopride hydrochloride on the delayed rectifier K+ and L-type CA2+ currents in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisawa, T; Hasegawa, J; Hama, R; Kitano, M; Kishimoto, Y; Kawasaki, H

    1999-01-01

    The effects of itopride hydrochloride, a new drug used to regulate motility in the gastrointestinal tract, on the delayed rectifier K+ current (I(K)) and the L-type Ca2+ current (I(Ca)) were evaluated in guinea-pig ventricular myocytes at concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 microM to determine whether the drug has a proarrhythmic effect through blockade of I(K). Itopride did not affect I(K) at concentrations of 100 microM or less, and no significant effects of 1, 10 or 100 microM itopride were observed on the inward rectifier K+ current (I(K1)) responsible for the resting potential and final repolarization phase of the action potential. We next investigated the effects of itopride on L-type Ca2+ current (I(Ca)). Significant inhibition of I(Ca) was observed at itopride concentrations greater than 10 microM. These results suggested that itopride hydrochloride has an inhibitory effect on I(Ca) at concentrations much higher than those in clinical use.

  1. Modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by recombinant human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Nielsen, H; Hovgaard, D

    1991-01-01

    by up to 43-fold. rhGM-CSF treatment did not affect degranulation of the neutrophils as measured by release of vitamin B12 binding protein. Degree of modulation of neutrophil and monocyte function by rhGM-CSF was independent of rhGM-CSF dosages administered. These data suggest that phagocytic defence...... and chemiluminescence responses to f-Met-Leu-Phe, zymosan activated serum (ZAS) and opsonized zymosan (OZ) were determined. It was observed that chemotactic response of neutrophils to f-Met-Leu-Phe and ZAS was reduced, whereas the chemiluminescence response of both cell types to f-Met-Leu-Phe and zymosan was enhanced...

  2. Developmental delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nutrition support is essential for the care of the child with developmental delay. After a thorough evaluation, an individualized intervention plan that accounts for the child’s nutrition status, feeding ability, and medical condition may be determined. Nutrition assessments may be performed at leas...

  3. Delayed fracture healing and increased callus adiposity in a C57BL/6J murine model of obesity-associated type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew L Brown

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Impaired healing and non-union of skeletal fractures is a major public health problem, with morbidity exacerbated in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM. DM is prevalent worldwide and affects approximately 25.8 million US adults, with >90% having obesity-related type 2 DM (T2DM. While fracture healing in type 1 DM (T1DM has been studied using animal models, an investigation into delayed healing in an animal model of T2DM has not yet been performed. METHODS: Male C57BL/6J mice at 5 weeks of age were placed on either a control lean diet or an experimental high-fat diet (HFD for 12 weeks. A mid-diaphyseal open tibia fracture was induced at 17 weeks of age and a spinal needle was used for intra-medullary fixation. Mice were sacrificed at days 7, 10, 14, 21, 28, and 35 for micro-computed tomography (μCT, histology-based histomorphometry and molecular analyses, and biomechanical testing. RESULTS: HFD-fed mice displayed increased body weight and impaired glucose tolerance, both characteristic of T2DM. Compared to control mice, HFD-fed mice with tibia fractures showed significantly (p<0.001 decreased woven bone at day 28 by histomorphometry and significantly (p<0.01 decreased callus bone volume at day 21 by μCT. Interestingly, fracture calluses contained markedly increased adiposity in HFD-fed mice at days 21, 28, and 35. HFD-fed mice also showed increased PPARγ immunohistochemical staining at day 14. Finally, calluses from HFD-fed mice at day 35 showed significantly (p<0.01 reduced torsional rigidity compared to controls. DISCUSSION: Our murine model of T2DM demonstrated delayed fracture healing and weakened biomechanical properties, and was distinctly characterized by increased callus adiposity. This suggests altered mesenchymal stem cell fate determination with a shift to the adipocyte lineage at the expense of the osteoblast lineage. The up-regulation of PPARγ in fracture calluses of HFD-fed mice is likely involved in the proposed

  4. Delayed bone regeneration and low bone mass in a rat model of insulin-resistant type 2 diabetes mellitus is due to impaired osteoblast function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Christine; Goettsch, Claudia; Mettelsiefen, Jan; Henkenjohann, Veit; Rauner, Martina; Hempel, Ute; Bernhardt, Ricardo; Fratzl-Zelman, Nadja; Roschger, Paul; Rammelt, Stefan; Günther, Klaus-Peter; Hofbauer, Lorenz C

    2011-12-01

    Patients with diabetes mellitus have an impaired bone metabolism; however, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the impact of type 2 diabetes mellitus on bone physiology and regeneration using Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats, an established rat model of insulin-resistant type 2 diabetes mellitus. ZDF rats develop diabetes with vascular complications when fed a Western diet. In 21-wk-old diabetic rats, bone mineral density (BMD) was 22.5% (total) and 54.6% (trabecular) lower at the distal femur and 17.2% (total) and 20.4% (trabecular) lower at the lumbar spine, respectively, compared with nondiabetic animals. BMD distribution measured by backscattered electron imaging postmortem was not different between diabetic and nondiabetic rats, but evaluation of histomorphometric indexes revealed lower mineralized bone volume/tissue volume, trabecular thickness, and trabecular number. Osteoblast differentiation of diabetic rats was impaired based on lower alkaline phosphatase activity (-20%) and mineralized matrix formation (-55%). In addition, the expression of the osteoblast-specific genes bone morphogenetic protein-2, RUNX2, osteocalcin, and osteopontin was reduced by 40-80%. Osteoclast biology was not affected based on tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase staining, pit formation assay, and gene profiling. To validate the implications of these molecular and cellular findings in a clinically relevant model, a subcritical bone defect of 3 mm was created at the left femur after stabilization with a four-hole plate, and bone regeneration was monitored by X-ray and microcomputed tomography analyses over 12 wk. While nondiabetic rats filled the defects by 57%, diabetic rats showed delayed bone regeneration with only 21% defect filling. In conclusion, we identified suppressed osteoblastogenesis as a cause and mechanism for low bone mass and impaired bone regeneration in a rat model of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  5. Delayed-type hypersensitivity skin test responses to PPD and other antigens among BCG-vaccinated HIV-1-infected and healthy children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Natalia Moriya Xavierda; Albuquerque, Maly de; Lins, Janaína Bacelar Acioli; Alvares-Junior, João Teixeira; Stefani, Mariane Martins de Araújo

    2011-10-01

    Among HIV-1-infected patients, CD4+ T cell counts are well-established markers of cell-mediated immunity. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin tests can be used to evaluate in vivo cell-mediated immunity to common antigens. DTH responses to tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD), sporotrichin, trichophytin, candidin and streptokinase/streptodornase antigens were assessed. Thirty-six HIV-1-infected children/adolescents and 56 age- and sex-matched HIV-1/HIV-2-seronegative participants were tested. All participants had a BCG scar. Fisher's exact test was used to evaluate significant differences between groups (pPPD positivity prevailed among healthy participants (40/56, 71.4%). PPD reactivity in the HIV-1-positive group was 8.3% (pPPD induration was 2.5mm (range: 2-5mm) in the HIV-1 group and 6.0 mm among healthy participants (range: 3-15 mm). There was no correlation between PPD positivity and age. No correlation between CD4+ T cell counts and DTH reactivity was observed among HIV-1-infected patients. DTH skin test responses, including PPD reactivity, were significantly lower among HIV-1-infected participants compared to healthy controls, which likely reflects advanced disease and T cell depletion.

  6. Increased Blood Levels of Growth Factors, Proinflammatory Cytokines, and Th17 Cytokines in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnek, Kristi; Kisand, Kalle; Heilman, Kaire; Peet, Aleksandr; Varik, Karin; Uibo, Raivo

    2015-01-01

    The production of several cytokines could be dysregulated in type 1 diabetes (T1D). In particular, the activation of T helper (Th) type 1 (Th1) cells has been proposed to underlie the autoimmune pathogenesis of the disease, although roles for inflammatory processes and the Th17 pathway have also been shown. Nevertheless, despite evidence for the role of cytokines before and at the onset of T1D, the corresponding findings are inconsistent across studies. Moreover, conflicting data exist regarding the blood cytokine levels in T1D patients. The current study was performed to investigate genetic and autoantibody markers in association with the peripheral blood cytokine profiles by xMap multiplex technology in newly diagnosed young T1D patients and age-matched healthy controls. The onset of young-age T1D was characterized by the upregulation of growth factors, including granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin (IL)-7, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β (but not IL-6 or tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α), Th17 cytokines, and the regulatory cytokines IL-10 and IL-27. Ketoacidosis and autoantibodies (anti-IA-2 and -ZnT8), but not human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype, influenced the blood cytokine levels. These findings broaden the current understanding of the dysregulation of systemic levels of several key cytokines at the young-age onset of T1D and provide a further basis for the development of novel immunoregulatory treatments in this disease.

  7. THE MULTI-EPOCH NEARBY CLUSTER SURVEY: TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA RATE MEASUREMENT IN z {approx} 0.1 CLUSTERS AND THE LATE-TIME DELAY TIME DISTRIBUTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sand, David J.; Graham, Melissa L. [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Bildfell, Chris; Pritchet, Chris [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, STN CSC, Victoria BC V8W 3P6 (Canada); Zaritsky, Dennis; Just, Dennis W.; Herbert-Fort, Stephane [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Hoekstra, Henk [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, Niels Bohrweg 2, NL-2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands); Sivanandam, Suresh [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H4 (Canada); Foley, Ryan J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Mahdavi, Andisheh, E-mail: dsand@lcogt.net [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States)

    2012-02-20

    We describe the Multi-Epoch Nearby Cluster Survey, designed to measure the cluster Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) rate in a sample of 57 X-ray selected galaxy clusters, with redshifts of 0.05 < z < 0.15. Utilizing our real-time analysis pipeline, we spectroscopically confirmed twenty-three cluster SNe Ia, four of which were intracluster events. Using our deep Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope/MegaCam imaging, we measured total stellar luminosities in each of our galaxy clusters, and we performed detailed supernova (SN) detection efficiency simulations. Bringing these ingredients together, we measure an overall cluster SN Ia rate within R{sub 200} (1 Mpc) of 0.042{sup +0.012}{sub -0.010}{sup +0.010}{sub -0.008} SNuM (0.049{sup +0.016}{sub -0.014}{sup +0.005}{sub -0.004} SNuM) and an SN Ia rate within red-sequence galaxies of 0.041{sup +0.015}{sub -0.015}{sup +0.005}{sub -0.010} SNuM (0.041{sup +0.019}{sub -0.015}{sup +0.005}{sub -0.004} SNuM). The red-sequence SN Ia rate is consistent with published rates in early-type/elliptical galaxies in the 'field'. Using our red-sequence SN Ia rate, and other cluster SN measurements in early-type galaxies up to z {approx} 1, we derive the late-time (>2 Gyr) delay time distribution (DTD) of SN Ia assuming a cluster early-type galaxy star formation epoch of z{sub f} = 3. Assuming a power-law form for the DTD, {Psi}(t){proportional_to}t{sup s} , we find s = -1.62 {+-} 0.54. This result is consistent with predictions for the double degenerate SN Ia progenitor scenario (s {approx} -1) and is also in line with recent calculations for the double detonation explosion mechanism (s {approx} -2). The most recent calculations of the single degenerate scenario DTD predicts an order-of-magnitude drop-off in SN Ia rate {approx}6-7 Gyr after stellar formation, and the observed cluster rates cannot rule this out.

  8. alpha-Glucosidase inhibition (acarbose) fails to enhance secretion of glucagon-like peptide 1 (7-36 amide) and to delay gastric emptying in Type 2 diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hücking, K; Kostic, Z; Pox, C

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Acarbose is able to enhance GLP-1 release and delay gastric emptying in normal subjects. The effect of alpha-glucosidase inhibition on GLP-1 has been less evident in Type 2 diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of acarbose on GLP-1 release and gas...

  9. Delayed Puberty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolby, Nanna; Busch, Alexander Siegfried; Juul, Anders

    2017-01-01

    . The underlying reasons for the large variation in the age at pubertal onset are not fully established; however, nutritional status and socioeconomic and environmental factors are known to be influencing, and a significant amount of influencing genetic factors have also been identified. The challenges...... optimal in discriminating especially CDGP from HH. Management of the delayed puberty depends on the etiology. For boys with CDGP an observational period will often reveal imminent puberty. If puberty is not progressing spontaneously, sex steroid replacement is effective in stimulating the development...

  10. Delay of insulin initiation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus inadequately controlled with oral hypoglycemic agents (analysis of patient- and physician-related factors): A prospective observational DIPP-FACTOR study in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sin Gon; Kim, Nam Hoon; Ku, Bon Jeong; Shon, Ho Sang; Kim, Doo Man; Park, Tae Sun; Kim, Yong-Seong; Kim, In Joo; Choi, Dong Seop

    2017-05-01

    To assess the time to initiation of insulin therapy, and concurrently investigate both patient- and physician-related factors associated with delaying insulin therapy in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled by oral hypoglycemic agents (OHAs). This prospective, observational disease registry study was carried out across 69 centers in Korea. Type 2 diabetes patients who had received two or more OHAs within the past 5 years, had a glycated hemoglobin ≥8% in the past 6 months and had not received insulin were included. Data recorded on data collection forms during a 12-month period were analyzed. Of 2168 patients enrolled, 1959 were evaluated and classified as the insulin-initiated or insulin-delayed group. Insulin was prescribed for just 20% of the patients during a 1-year follow-up period, and less than half (44.5%) of the patients who were taking two OHAs started insulin after 6 years. Patient-related factors for delay in insulin initiation included older age, shorter duration of diabetes and lower glycated hemoglobin. Physician-related factors included age (~50 to 1000) of patients consulted per month. Patient refusal (33.6%) and physicians' concerns of patient non-compliance (26.5%) were the major physician-reported reasons for delaying insulin therapy. Inconvenience of insulin therapy (51.6%) and fear of injection (48.2%) were the major reasons for patient refusal. Insulin initiation is delayed in patients with type 2 diabetes uncontrolled by two or more OHAs in Korea. Patient- and physician-related factors associated with this delay need to be addressed for better diabetes management. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Diabetes Investigation published by Asian Association for the Study of Diabetes (AASD) and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Effect of treatment with cyclophosphamide in low doses upon the onset of delayed type hypersensitivity in mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi: involvement of heart interstitial dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torriceli Souza The

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute infection with Trypanosoma cruzi results in intense myocarditis, which progresses to a chronic, asymptomatic indeterminate form. The evolution toward this chronic cardiac form occurs in approximately 30% of all cases of T. cruzi infection. Suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH has been proposed as a potential explanation of the indeterminate form. We investigated the effect of cyclophosphamide (CYCL treatment on the regulatory mechanism of DTH and the participation of heart interstitial dendritic cells (IDCs in this process using BALB/c mice chronically infected with T. cruzi. One group was treated with CYCL (20 mg/kg body weight for one month. A DTH skin test was performed by intradermal injection of T. cruzi antigen (3 mg/mL in the hind-footpad and measured the skin thickness after 24 h, 48 h and 72 h. The skin test revealed increased thickness in antigen-injected footpads, which was more evident in the mice treated with CYCL than in those mice that did not receive treatment. The thickened regions were characterised by perivascular infiltrates and areas of necrosis. Intense lesions of the myocardium were present in three/16 cases and included large areas of necrosis. Morphometric evaluation of lymphocytes showed a predominance of TCD8 cells. Heart IDCs were immunolabelled with specific antibodies (CD11b and CD11c and T. cruzi antigens were detected using a specific anti-T. cruzi antibody. Identification of T. cruzi antigens, sequestered in these cells using specific anti-T. cruzi antibodies was done, showing a significant increase in the number of these cells in treated mice. These results indicate that IDCs participate in the regulatory mechanisms of DTH response to T. cruzi infection.

  12. Marijuana-derived Δ-9-tetrahydrocannabinol suppresses Th1/Th17 cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity through microRNA regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sido, Jessica M; Jackson, Austin R; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2016-09-01

    ∆(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is one of the major bioactive cannabinoids derived from the Cannabis sativa plant and is known for its anti-inflammatory properties. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) is driven by proinflammatory T helper cells including the classic inflammatory Th1 lineage as well as the more recently discovered Th17 lineage. In the current study, we investigated whether THC can alter the induction of Th1/Th17 cells involved in mBSA-induced DTH response. THC treatment (20 mg/kg) of C57BL/6 mice with DTH caused decreased swelling and infiltration of immune cells at the site of antigen rechallenge. Additionally, THC treatment decreased lymphocyte activation as well as Th1/Th17 lineage commitment, including reduced lineage-specific transcription factors and cytokines. Interestingly, while DTH caused an overexpression of miR-21, which increases Th17 differentiation via SMAD7 inhibition, and downregulation of miR-29b, an IFN-γ inhibitor, THC treatment reversed this microRNA (miR) dysregulation. Furthermore, when we transfected primary cells from DTH mice with miR-21 inhibitor or miR-29b mimic, as seen with THC treatment, the expression of target gene message was directly impacted increasing SMAD7 and decreasing IFN-γ expression, respectively. In summary, the current study suggests that THC treatment during DTH response can simultaneously inhibit Th1/Th17 activation via regulation of microRNA (miRNA) expression. • THC treatment inhibits simultaneous Th1/Th17 driven inflammation. • THC treatment corrects DTH-mediated microRNA dysregulation. • THC treatment regulates proinflammatory cytokines and transcription factors.

  13. Anandamide attenuates Th-17 cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity response by triggering IL-10 production and consequent microRNA induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Austin R Jackson

    Full Text Available Endogenous cannabinoids [endocannabinoids] are lipid signaling molecules that have been shown to modulate immune functions. However, their role in the regulation of Th17 cells has not been studied previously. In the current study, we used methylated Bovine Serum Albumin [mBSA]-induced delayed type hypersensitivity [DTH] response in C57BL/6 mice, mediated by Th17 cells, as a model to test the anti-inflammatory effects of endocannabinoids. Administration of anandamide [AEA], a member of the endocannabinoid family, into mice resulted in significant mitigation of mBSA-induced inflammation, including foot pad swelling, cell infiltration, and cell proliferation in the draining lymph nodes [LN]. AEA treatment significantly reduced IL-17 and IFN-γ production, as well as decreased RORγt expression while causing significant induction of IL-10 in the draining LNs. IL-10 was critical for the AEA-induced mitigation of DTH response inasmuch as neutralization of IL-10 reversed the effects of AEA. We next analyzed miRNA from the LN cells and found that 100 out of 609 miRNA species were differentially regulated in AEA-treated mice when compared to controls. Several of these miRNAs targeted proinflammatory mediators. Interestingly, many of these miRNA were also upregulated upon in vitro treatment of LN cells with IL-10. Together, the current study demonstrates that AEA may suppress Th-17 cell-mediated DTH response by inducing IL-10 which in turn triggers miRNA that target proinflammatory pathways.

  14. A Randomised Controlled Trial to Delay or Prevent Type 2 Diabetes after Gestational Diabetes: Walking for Exercise and Nutrition to Prevent Diabetes for You

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Peacock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To develop a program to support behaviour changes for women with a history of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM and a Body Mass Index (BMI > 25 kg/m2 to delay or prevent Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Methods. Women diagnosed with GDM in the previous 6 to 24 months and BMI > 25 kg/m2 were randomized to an intervention (I (n=16 or a control (C (n=15 group. The intervention was a pedometer program combined with nutrition coaching, with the primary outcome increased weight loss in the intervention group. Secondary outcomes included decreased waist and hip measurements, improved insulin sensitivity and body composition, increased physical activity, and improved self-efficacy in eating behaviours. Results. Median (IQR results were as follows: weight: I −2.5 (2.3 kg versus C +0.2 (1.6 kg (P=0.009, waist: I −3.6 (4.5 cm versus C −0.1 (3.6 cm (P=0.07, and hip: I −5.0 (3.3 cm versus C −0.2 (2.6 cm (P=0.002. There was clinical improvement in physical activity and eating behaviours and no significant changes in glucose metabolism or body composition. Conclusion. A pedometer program and nutrition coaching proved effective in supporting weight loss, waist circumference, physical activity, and eating behaviours in women with previous GDM.

  15. Obstacles delaying the prompt deployment of piston-type mechanical cardiopulmonary resuscitation devices during emergency department resuscitation: a video-recording and time-motion study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Edward Pei-Chuan; Wang, Hui-Chih; Ko, Patrick Chow-In; Chang, Anna Marie; Fu, Chia-Ming; Chen, Jiun-Wei; Liao, Yen-Chen; Liu, Hung-Chieh; Fang, Yao-De; Yang, Chih-Wei; Chiang, Wen-Chu; Ma, Matthew Huei-Ming; Chen, Shyr-Chyr

    2013-09-01

    The quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) is important to survival after cardiac arrest. Mechanical devices (MD) provide constant CPR, but their effectiveness may be affected by deployment timeliness. To identify the timeliness of the overall and of each essential step in the deployment of a piston-type MD during emergency department (ED) resuscitation, and to identify factors associated with delayed MD deployment by video recordings. Between December 2005 and December 2008, video clips from resuscitations with CPR sessions using a MD in the ED were reviewed using time-motion analyses. The overall deployment timeliness and the time spent on each essential step of deployment were measured. There were 37 CPR recordings that used a MD. Deployment of MD took an average 122.6 ± 57.8s. The 3 most time-consuming steps were: (1) setting the device (57.8 ± 38.3s), (2) positioning the patient (33.4 ± 38.0 s), and (3) positioning the device (14.7 ± 9.5s). Total no flow time was 89.1 ± 41.2s (72.7% of total time) and associated with the 3 most time-consuming steps. There was no difference in the total timeliness, no-flow time, and no-flow ratio between different rescuer numbers, time of day of the resuscitation, or body size of patients. Rescuers spent a significant amount of time on MD deployment, leading to long no-flow times. Lack of familiarity with the device and positioning strategy were associated with poor performance. Additional training in device deployment strategies are required to improve the benefits of mechanical CPR. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Avian influenza A virus PB2 promotes interferon type I inducing properties of a swine strain in porcine dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocaña-Macchi, Manuela; Ricklin, Meret E.; Python, Sylvie; Monika, Gsell-Albert; Stech, Jürgen; Stech, Olga; Summerfield, Artur

    2012-01-01

    The 2009 influenza A virus (IAV) pandemic resulted from reassortment of avian, human and swine strains probably in pigs. To elucidate the role of viral genes in host adaptation regarding innate immune responses, we focussed on the effect of genes from an avian H5N1 and a porcine H1N1 IAV on infectivity and activation of porcine GM-CSF-induced dendritic cells (DC). The highest interferon type I responses were achieved by the porcine virus reassortant containing the avian polymerase gene PB2. This finding was not due to differential tropism since all viruses infected DC equally. All viruses equally induced MHC class II, but porcine H1N1 expressing the avian viral PB2 induced more prominent nuclear NF-κB translocation compared to its parent IAV. The enhanced activation of DC may be detrimental or beneficial. An over-stimulation of innate responses could result in either pronounced tissue damage or increased resistance against IAV reassortants carrying avian PB2.

  17. Avian influenza A virus PB2 promotes interferon type I inducing properties of a swine strain in porcine dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocana-Macchi, Manuela; Ricklin, Meret E.; Python, Sylvie; Monika, Gsell-Albert [Institute of Virology and Immunoprophylaxis, Mittelhaeusern (Switzerland); Stech, Juergen; Stech, Olga [Friedrich-Loeffler Institut, Greifswald-Insel Riems (Germany); Summerfield, Artur, E-mail: artur.summerfield@ivi.admin.ch [Institute of Virology and Immunoprophylaxis, Mittelhaeusern (Switzerland)

    2012-05-25

    The 2009 influenza A virus (IAV) pandemic resulted from reassortment of avian, human and swine strains probably in pigs. To elucidate the role of viral genes in host adaptation regarding innate immune responses, we focussed on the effect of genes from an avian H5N1 and a porcine H1N1 IAV on infectivity and activation of porcine GM-CSF-induced dendritic cells (DC). The highest interferon type I responses were achieved by the porcine virus reassortant containing the avian polymerase gene PB2. This finding was not due to differential tropism since all viruses infected DC equally. All viruses equally induced MHC class II, but porcine H1N1 expressing the avian viral PB2 induced more prominent nuclear NF-{kappa}B translocation compared to its parent IAV. The enhanced activation of DC may be detrimental or beneficial. An over-stimulation of innate responses could result in either pronounced tissue damage or increased resistance against IAV reassortants carrying avian PB2.

  18. Electro-acupuncture at Acupoint ST36 Ameliorates Inflammation and Regulates Th1/Th2 Balance in Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhigang; Chen, Tao; Long, Man; Chen, Longyun; Wang, Lei; Yin, Nina; Chen, Zebin

    2017-04-01

    Increasing evidence indicates anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory effects of electro-acupuncture (EA) therapy. However, its underlying mechanism on delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), a classic allergic inflammatory disease, still remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to explore the immunomodulatory mechanism of EA intervention in a mouse model of ovalbumin (OVA)-induced DTH. Mice were randomly divided into four groups: Control, OVA-DTH, DTH + EA, DTH + Sham. "Zusanli" acupoint (ST36) was used for DTH + EA, whereas a non-acupoint (localized 5 mm below the "Zusanli" acupoint) was selected for DTH + Sham. Footpad thickness was checked, and the infiltration of inflammatory cells was estimated by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Levels of IgG and IgE in serum of different groups and inflammatory cytokines in the supernatants from homogenized footpads, including IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-4, and IL-5, were determined by ELISA. Cell proliferation of spleen lymphocytes was assayed by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT). The frequency of CD4 + IFN-γ + and CD4 + IL-4 + T cells was analyzed with flow cytometry. In addition, the mRNA and protein expression of T-bet and GATA-3 were evaluated by real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Our data showed EA treatment at acupoint ST36 relieved the pathological progression of DTH responses via reduction in footpad swelling, infiltration of inflammatory cells, levels of IgG and IgE as well as decreased production of IFN-γ and TNF-α in homogenized footpad tissue. Moreover, detailed studies were performed revealing that EA attenuated the percentage of CD4 + IFN-γ + T cells and prevented Th cells differentiation into Th1 cells, and this results from inhibiting secretion of IFN-γ and suppressing expression of T-bet, an IFN-γ transcription factor. The results indicated that EA treatment improved Th1-mediated allergic skin inflammation via restoring Th1/Th2 balance by curbing Th1

  19. Regulation of wound healing by granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor after vocal fold injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Yol Lim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Vocal fold (VF scarring remains a therapeutic challenge. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF facilitates epithelial wound healing, and recently, growth factor therapy has been applied to promote tissue repair. This study was undertaken to investigate the effect of GM-CSF on VF wound healing in vivo and in vitro. METHODS: VF scarring was induced in New Zealand white rabbits by direct injury. Immediately thereafter, either GM-CSF or PBS was injected into the VFs of rabbits. Endoscopic, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and biomechanical evaluations of VFs were performed at 3 months post-injury. Human vocal fold fibroblasts (hVFFs were cultured with GM-CSF. Production of type I and III collagen was examined immunocytochemically, and the synthesis of elastin and hyaluronic acids was evaluated by ELISA. The mRNA levels of genes related to ECM components and ECM production-related growth factors, such as HGF and TGF-ß1, were examined by real time RT-PCR. RESULTS: The GM-CSF-treated VFs showed reduced collagen deposition in comparison to the PBS-injected controls (P<0.05. Immunohistochemical staining revealed lower amounts of type I collagen and fibronectin in the GM-CSF-treated VFs (P<0.05 and P<0.01, respectively. Viscous and elastic shear moduli of VF samples were significantly lower in the GM-CSF group than in the PBS-injected group (P<0.001 and P<0.01, respectively. Mucosal waves in the GM-CSF group showed significant improvement when compared to the PBS group (P = 0.0446. GM-CSF inhibited TGF-β1-induced collagen synthesis by hVFFs (P<0.05 and the production of hyaluronic acids increased at 72 hours post-treatment (P<0.05. The expressions of HAS-2, tropoelastin, MMP-1, HGF, and c-Met mRNA were significantly increased by GM-CSF, although at different time points (P<0.05. CONCLUSION: The present study shows that GM-CSF offers therapeutic potential for the remodeling of VF wounds and the promotion of VF

  20. Reasons for diagnostic delay in gynecological malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandborg, Mai Partridge; Christensen, René dePont Christensen; Kragstrup, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    (≤ or > 60 years), performance of gynecological examination by the GP and notification of cancer suspicion on first referral from GP’s on the diagnostic delay (short delay ≤90 days and long delay >90 days). Results Across cancer type a median total delay of 101 days was observed. The 10% of women......Aim The primary aim of this study was to identify and describe different delay types in women with gynecologic cancer, and to analyze the relationship between diagnostic delay and a number of characteristics for patients, cancers and the health care system. Setting A cohort study of women newly......) and The Danish Gynecological Cancer Database (DGCD). 161 women were included; ovarian cancer: 63, endometrial cancer: 50, cervical cancer: 34 and vulvar cancer: 14. Outcome measures were different delay types counted in days and the influence of four clinical important variables: Presence of alarm symptoms, age...

  1. Delayed puberty in girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sexual development - girls; Pubertal delay - girls; Constitutional delayed puberty ... In most cases of delayed puberty, growth changes just begin later than usual, sometimes called a late bloomer. Once puberty begins, it progresses normally. This pattern runs ...

  2. Delayed Puberty (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Delayed Puberty KidsHealth / For Teens / Delayed Puberty What's in this ... wonder if there's anything wrong. What Is Delayed Puberty? Puberty is the time when your body grows ...

  3. Activation of adenosine A3 receptors potentiates stimulatory effects of IL-3, SCF, and GM-CSF on mouse granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Vacek, Antonín; Pospíšil, Milan; Holá, Jiřina; Štreitová, Denisa; Znojil, V.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2009), s. 247-252 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/06/0015; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/08/0158 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : hematopoiesis * adenosine A3 receptor agonist * hematopoietic growth factors Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009

  4. Effect on Antibody and T-Cell Responses of Mixing Five GMP-Produced DNA Plasmids and Administration With Plasmid Expressing GM-CSF

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sedegah, M; Charoenvit, Y; Aguiar, J; Sacci, J; Hedstrom, R; Kumar, S; Belmonte, A; Lanar, DE; Jones, TR; Abot, E

    2004-01-01

    .... In preparation for a clinical trial, we assessed the immunogenicity of GMP-produced plasmids encoding five Plasmodium falciparum proteins, PfCSP, PfSSP2, PfEXP1, PfLSA1, and PfLSA3, given as a mixture, or alone...

  5. Treatment of minimal residual disease after surgery or chemotherapy in mice carrying HPV16-associated tumours: cytokine and gene therapy with IL-2 and GM-CSF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikyšková, Romana; Indrová, Marie; Šímová, Jana; Jandlová, Táňa; Bieblová, Jana; Jinoch, P.; Bubeník, Jan; Vonka, V.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 1 (2004), s. 161-167 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC7148; GA MZd NC7552; GA ČR GA301/01/0985 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : HPV16 * gene therapy * minimal residual tumour disease Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 3.056, year: 2004

  6. Delayed enhanced MRI in intraparenchymal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Takahiko; Morimoto, Tetsuya; Takeshima, Toshikazu

    1991-01-01

    Delayed enhanced MRI was performed on 20 intraparenchymal tumors, and these findings were compared with those of early enhanced MRI. Using the spin-echo technique (SE: 400-500/20 msec), early scans were obtained 5 minutes, and delayed scans were obtained 60 minutes, after the intravenous injection of 0.1 nmol of gadolinium-DTPA/Kg. We discussed the changes in the delayed scan with regard to the change in the pattern of enhancement and the boundary of enhancement. In these twenty intraparenchymal tumors, there were three low-grade astrocytomas, two anaplastic astrocytomas, seven glioblastomas, and eight metastatic tumors. The changes in the enhanced pattern showed three types as follows: Type I: heterogeneous enhancement in both early and delayed scans; Type II: heterogeneous enhancement in early scan and homogeneous enhancement in delayed scan; Type III: homogeneous enhancement in both early and delayed scans. Most malignant tumors, such as glioblastomas (6/8), anaplastic astrocytomas (2/2), and metastatic tumors (7/8), revealed Type I, although low-grade astrocytomas showed Type II (3/2) and Type III (1/3). The heterogeneous enhancement in delayed scan was found in malignant tumors and in low-grade astrocytoma; even if the early scan revealed heterogeneous enhancement, the delayed scan showed homogeneous enhancement. In the delayed scan, most enhanced boundaries spread out of the boundaries in the early scan. Glioblastomas spread markedly in the delayed scan, although none of the low-grade astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, or metastases revealed marked spreading. We called these marked increases in the delayed scan a 'spreading sign' and thought that this sign was specific to glioblastomas. Recently some authors have emphasized the usefulness of serial scans. Delayed enhanced MRI 60 minutes after the administration of a contrast medium was here found also to be useful for the accurate diagnosis for brain tumors. (author)

  7. Speech and Language Delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OTC Relief for Diarrhea Home Diseases and Conditions Speech and Language Delay Condition Speech and Language Delay Share Print Table of Contents1. ... Treatment6. Everyday Life7. Questions8. Resources What is a speech and language delay? A speech and language delay ...

  8. The effects of HIV disease and older age on laboratory-based, naturalistic, and self-perceived symptoms of prospective memory: does retrieval cue type and delay interval matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avci, G; Loft, S; Sheppard, D P; Woods, S P

    2016-11-01

    There is a rising prevalence of older HIV+ adults who are at risk of deficits in higher order neurocognitive functions and associated problems in everyday functioning. The current study applied multiprocess theory to examine the effects of HIV and aging on measures of laboratory-based, naturalistic, and self-perceived symptoms of prospective memory (PM). Participants included 125 Younger (48 with HIV, age = 32 ± 4.6 years) and 189 Older (112 with HIV, age = 56 ± 4.9 years) adults. Controlling for global neurocognitive functioning, mood, and other demographics, older age and HIV had independent effects on long-delay time-based PM in the laboratory, whereas on a naturalistic PM task older HIV- adults performed better than older HIV+ adults and younger persons. In line with the naturalistic findings, older age, but not HIV, was associated with a relative sparing of self-perceived PM failures in daily life across longer delay self-cued intervals. Findings suggest that, even in relatively younger aging cohorts, the effects of HIV and older age on PM can vary across PM delay intervals by the strategic demands of the retrieval cue type, are expressed differently in the laboratory and in daily life, and are independent of other higher order neurocognitive functions (e.g., retrospective memory).

  9. Diet, physical activity or both for prevention or delay of type 2 diabetes mellitus and its associated complications in people at increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingsen, Bianca; Gimenez-Perez, Gabriel; Mauricio, Didac; Roqué I Figuls, Marta; Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Richter, Bernd

    2017-12-04

    The projected rise in the incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) could develop into a substantial health problem worldwide. Whether diet, physical activity or both can prevent or delay T2DM and its associated complications in at-risk people is unknown. To assess the effects of diet, physical activity or both on the prevention or delay of T2DM and its associated complications in people at increased risk of developing T2DM. This is an update of the Cochrane Review published in 2008. We searched the CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, ClinicalTrials.gov, ICTRP Search Portal and reference lists of systematic reviews, articles and health technology assessment reports. The date of the last search of all databases was January 2017. We continuously used a MEDLINE email alert service to identify newly published studies using the same search strategy as described for MEDLINE up to September 2017. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) with a duration of two years or more. We used standard Cochrane methodology for data collection and analysis. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence using GRADE. We included 12 RCTs randomising 5238 people. One trial contributed 41% of all participants. The duration of the interventions varied from two to six years. We judged none of the included trials at low risk of bias for all 'Risk of bias' domains.Eleven trials compared diet plus physical activity with standard or no treatment. Nine RCTs included participants with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), one RCT included participants with IGT, impaired fasting blood glucose (IFG) or both, and one RCT included people with fasting glucose levels between 5.3 to 6.9 mmol/L. A total of 12 deaths occurred in 2049 participants in the diet plus physical activity groups compared with 10 in 2050 participants in the comparator groups (RR 1.12, 95% CI 0.50 to 2.50; 95% prediction interval 0.44 to 2.88; 4099 participants, 10 trials; very low-quality evidence). The definition of T2DM incidence

  10. High Whey Protein Intake Delayed the Loss of Lean Body Mass in Healthy Old Rats, whereas Protein Type and Polyphenol/Antioxidant Supplementation Had No Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosoni, Laurent; Gatineau, Eva; Gatellier, Philippe; Migné, Carole; Savary-Auzeloux, Isabelle; Rémond, Didier; Rocher, Emilie; Dardevet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Our aim was to compare and combine 3 nutritional strategies to slow down the age-related loss of muscle mass in healthy old rats: 1) increase protein intake, which is likely to stimulate muscle protein anabolism; 2) use leucine rich, rapidly digested whey proteins as protein source (whey proteins are recognized as the most effective proteins to stimulate muscle protein anabolism). 3) Supplement animals with a mixture of chamomile extract, vitamin E, vitamin D (reducing inflammation and oxidative stress is also effective to improve muscle anabolism). Such comparisons and combinations were never tested before. Nutritional groups were: casein 12% protein, whey 12% protein, whey 18% protein and each of these groups were supplemented or not with polyphenols/antioxidants. During 6 months, we followed changes of weight, food intake, inflammation (plasma fibrinogen and alpha-2-macroglobulin) and body composition (DXA). After 6 months, we measured muscle mass, in vivo and ex-vivo fed and post-absorptive muscle protein synthesis, ex-vivo muscle proteolysis, and oxidative stress parameters (liver and muscle glutathione, SOD and total antioxidant activities, muscle carbonyls and TBARS). We showed that although micronutrient supplementation reduced inflammation and oxidative stress, the only factor that significantly reduced the loss of lean body mass was the increase in whey protein intake, with no detectable effect on muscle protein synthesis, and a tendency to reduce muscle proteolysis. We conclude that in healthy rats, increasing protein intake is an effective way to delay sarcopenia. PMID:25268515

  11. UAVs and Control Delays

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    de Vries, S. C

    2005-01-01

    .... Delays of about 250-300 ms often lead to unacceptable airplane handling qualities. Techniques such as filtering and predictive displays may extend the range of acceptable delays up to about 400 ms...

  12. Delayed puberty in boys

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007695.htm Delayed puberty in boys To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Delayed puberty in boys is when puberty does not begin ...

  13. Diverse manifestations of tumorigenicity and immunogenicity displayed by the poorly immunogenic B16-BL6 melanoma transduced with cytokine genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arca, M J; Krauss, J C; Strome, S E; Cameron, M J; Chang, A E

    1996-05-01

    We evaluated the in vivo response to the poorly immunogenic B16-BL6 (BL6) murine melanoma genetically altered to secrete interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-4, interferon gamma (IFN gamma) and granulocyte/macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Three parameters were evaluated: (1) tumorigenicity, (2) vaccination of naive animals, and (3) assessment of antitumor reactivity of T cells derived from tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN). Secretion of IL-2 abrogated the tumorigenicity of BL6, while IFN gamma and IL-4 partially reduced tumorigenicity, and GM-CSF had no effect. Protective immunity to wild-type tumor challenge could not be achieved by vaccination with irradiated cytokine-secreting tumors, although IL-2 and IL-4 secretion appeared to retard the growth of the challenge inoculum significantly. An alternative method to evaluate the immunogenicity of the cytokine-secreting tumors was to measure the ability of T cells obtained from TDLN to mediate regression of wild-type tumor in adoptive immunotherapy. Neither IL-2 nor IFN gamma secretion resulted in the induction of immune T cells. By contrast, GM-CSF and IL-4 secretion were found to induce immune T cells in the TDLN with GM-CSF being superior to IL-4. The combined secretion of GM-CSF and IL-4 did not lead to enhanced induction of immune T cells. GM-CSF secretion was found to upregulate B7-1 expression in TDLN, consistent with an increase in the population of antigen-presenting cells. These studies demonstrated that reduced tumorigenicity by cytokine secretion did not correlate with increased immunogenicity. With the cytokines examined, there was limited capability of developing protective immunity against the BL6 tumor. Nevertheless, GM-CSF and IL-4 secretion significantly enhanced T cell immune reactivity to the poorly immunogenic BL6 tumor.

  14. Increased de novo lipogenesis and delayed conversion of large VLDL into intermediate density lipoprotein particles contribute to Hyperlipidemia in glycogen storage disease type 1a

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bandsma, Robert H. J.; Prinsen, Berthil H.; Van Der Velden, Monique De Sain; Rake, Jan-Peter; Boer, Theo; Smit, G. Peter A.; Reijngoud, Dirk-Jan; Kuipers, Folkert

    Glycogen storage disease type 1a (GSD-1a) is a metabolic disorder characterized by fasting-induced hypoglycemia, hepatic steatosis, and hyperlipidemia. The mechanisms underlying the lipid abnormalities are largely unknown. To investigate these mechanisms seven GSD-1a patients and four healthy

  15. Delayed Orgasm and Anorgasmia

    OpenAIRE

    Jenkins, Lawrence C.; Mulhall, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Delayed orgasm/anorgasmia defined as the persistent or recurrent difficulty, delay in, or absence of attaining orgasm after sufficient sexual stimulation, which causes personal distress. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia are associated with significant sexual dissatisfaction. A focused medical history can shed light on the potential etiologies; which include: medications, penile sensation loss, endocrinopathies, penile hyperstimulation and psychological etiologies, amongst others. Unfortunately, ...

  16. Characterization and molecular features of the cell surface receptor for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, S.; Tojo, A.; Kitamura, T.; Urabe, A.; Miyazono, K.; Takaku, F.

    1990-01-01

    The receptors for human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on the surfaces of normal and leukemic myeloid cells were characterized using 125I-labeled bacterially synthesized GM-CSF. The binding was rapid, specific, time dependent, and saturable. Scatchard analysis of the 125I-GM-CSF binding to peripheral blood neutrophils indicated the presence of a single class of binding site (Kd = 99 +/- 21 pM; 2,304 +/- 953 sites/cell). However, for peripheral blood monocytes and two GM-CSF-responsive myeloid cell lines (U-937 and TF-1), the Scatchard plots were biphasic curvilinear, which were best fit by curves derived from two binding site model: one with high affinity (Kd1 = 10-40 pM) and the other with low affinity (Kd2 = 0.9-2.0 nM). For U-937 cells, the number of high-affinity receptors was 1,058 +/- 402 sites/cell and that of low-affinity receptors was estimated to be 10,834 +/- 2,396 sites/cell. Cross-linking studies yielded three major bands with molecular masses of 150 kDa, 115 kDa, and 95 kDa, which were displaced by an excess amount of unlabeled GM-CSF, suggesting 135-kDa, 100-kDa, and 80-kDa species for the individual components of the human GM-CSF receptor. These bands comigrated for different cell types including peripheral blood neutrophils, U-937 cells and TF-1 cells. In experiments using U-937 cells, only the latter two bands appeared to be labeled in a dose-dependent manner in a low-affinity state. These results suggest that the human GM-CSF receptor possibly forms a multichain complex

  17. Increased Blood Levels of Growth Factors, Proinflammatory Cytokines, and Th17 Cytokines in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Type 1 Diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi Alnek

    Full Text Available The production of several cytokines could be dysregulated in type 1 diabetes (T1D. In particular, the activation of T helper (Th type 1 (Th1 cells has been proposed to underlie the autoimmune pathogenesis of the disease, although roles for inflammatory processes and the Th17 pathway have also been shown. Nevertheless, despite evidence for the role of cytokines before and at the onset of T1D, the corresponding findings are inconsistent across studies. Moreover, conflicting data exist regarding the blood cytokine levels in T1D patients. The current study was performed to investigate genetic and autoantibody markers in association with the peripheral blood cytokine profiles by xMap multiplex technology in newly diagnosed young T1D patients and age-matched healthy controls. The onset of young-age T1D was characterized by the upregulation of growth factors, including granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF and interleukin (IL-7, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1β (but not IL-6 or tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α, Th17 cytokines, and the regulatory cytokines IL-10 and IL-27. Ketoacidosis and autoantibodies (anti-IA-2 and -ZnT8, but not human leukocyte antigen (HLA genotype, influenced the blood cytokine levels. These findings broaden the current understanding of the dysregulation of systemic levels of several key cytokines at the young-age onset of T1D and provide a further basis for the development of novel immunoregulatory treatments in this disease.

  18. Interleukin-27 is a potent inhibitor of cis HIV-1 replication in monocyte-derived dendritic cells via a type I interferon-independent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Chen

    Full Text Available IL-27, a member of the IL-12 family of cytokines, plays an important and diverse role in the function of the immune system. Whilst generally recognized as an anti-inflammatory cytokine, in addition IL-27 has been found to have broad anti-viral effects. Recently, IL-27 has been shown to be a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 infection in CD4+ T cells and macrophages. The main objective of this study was to see whether IL-27 has a similar inhibitory effect on HIV-1 replication in dendritic cells (DCs. Monocytes were differentiated into immature DCs (iDCs and mature DCs (mDCs with standard techniques using a combination of GM-CSF, IL-4 and LPS. Following differentiation, iDCs were infected with HIV-1 and co-cultured in the presence or absence of IL-27. IL-27 treated DCs were shown to be highly potent inhibitors of cis HIV-1, particularly of CCR5 tropic strains. Of note, other IL-12 family members (IL-12, IL-23 and IL-35 had no effect on HIV-1 replication. Microarray studies of IL-27 treated DCs showed no up-regulation of Type I (IFN gene expression. Neutralization of the Type-I IFN receptor had no impact on the HIV inhibition. Lastly, IL-27 mediated inhibition was shown to act post-viral entry and prior to completion of reverse transcription. These results show for the first time that IL-27 is a potent inhibitor of cis HIV-1 infection in DCs by a Type I IFN independent mechanism. IL-27 has previously been reported to inhibit HIV-1 replication in CD4+ T cells and macrophages, thus taken together, this cytokine is a potent anti-HIV agent against all major cell types targeted by the HIV-1 virus and may have a therapeutic role in the future.

  19. Evaluation of standard haemodynamic tests of autonomic function and HbA1c as predictors of delayed gastric emptying in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lydon, A

    2012-02-03

    We examined the relation between chronic glycaemic control (using glycosylated haemoglobin), haemodynamic autonomic function and rate of gastric emptying in 16 patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Gastric emptying was measured using a paracetamol absorption technique. Parameters of gastric emptying include area under the plasma paracetamol concentration time curve. Patients were classified as diabetic autonomic neuropathy positive or negative using five standardized haemodynamic reflex tests. Area under the plasma paracetamol concentration time curve in the neuropathy positive (10.36 (4.5) mmol.-1. min) and negative (9.84 (3.0) mmol.-1. min) groups were similar (.P.=0.42) using unpaired Student\\'s.t. -tests. Glycosylated haemoglobin concentration and area under the plasma paracetamol concentration time curve (.n.=16) demonstrated a Pearson\\'s correlation co-efficient of 0.24. Neither tests of haemodynamic autonomic function, nor concentration of glycosylated haemoglobin, are predictive of diabetic gastroparesis.

  20. Mutations in PPIB (cyclophilin B) delay type I procollagen chain association and result in perinatal lethal to moderate osteogenesis imperfecta phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyott, Shawna M; Schwarze, Ulrike; Christiansen, Helena E; Pepin, Melanie G; Leistritz, Dru F; Dineen, Richard; Harris, Catharine; Burton, Barbara K; Angle, Brad; Kim, Katherine; Sussman, Michael D; Weis, Maryann; Eyre, David R; Russell, David W; McCarthy, Kevin J; Steiner, Robert D; Byers, Peter H

    2011-04-15

    Recessive mutations in the cartilage-associated protein (CRTAP), leucine proline-enriched proteoglycan 1 (LEPRE1) and peptidyl prolyl cis-trans isomerase B (PPIB) genes result in phenotypes that range from lethal in the perinatal period to severe deforming osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). These genes encode CRTAP (encoded by CRTAP), prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 (P3H1; encoded by LEPRE1) and cyclophilin B (CYPB; encoded by PPIB), which reside in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and can form a complex involved in prolyl 3-hydroxylation in type I procollagen. CYPB, a prolyl cis-trans isomerase, has been thought to drive the prolyl-containing peptide bonds to the trans configuration needed for triple helix formation. Here, we describe mutations in PPIB identified in cells from three individuals with OI. Cultured dermal fibroblasts from the most severely affected infant make some overmodified type I procollagen molecules. Proα1(I) chains are slow to assemble into trimers, and abnormal procollagen molecules concentrate in the RER, and bind to protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) and prolyl 4-hydroxylase 1 (P4H1). These findings suggest that although CYPB plays a role in helix formation another effect is on folding of the C-terminal propeptide and trimer formation. The extent of procollagen accumulation and PDI/P4H1 binding differs among cells with mutations in PPIB, CRTAP and LEPRE1 with the greatest amount in PPIB-deficient cells and the least in LEPRE1-deficient cells. These findings suggest that prolyl cis-trans isomerase may be required to effectively fold the proline-rich regions of the C-terminal propeptide to allow proα chain association and suggest an order of action for CRTAP, P3H1 and CYPB in procollagen biosynthesis and pathogenesis of OI.

  1. Acceptable Channel Switching Delays for Mobile TV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleury, Alexandre; Pedersen, Jakob Schou; Larsen, Lars Bo

    2011-01-01

    as well as three potential effect factors: the transition type, the test environment and the audiovisual content. The results show that delays longer than 5.7 seconds annoyed test participants, and that the transition type had a significant impact on the rating of channel switching delays. However......, neither the test environment nor the audiovisual content influenced the ratings significantly. Finally, a discussion of these results and directions for future research are proposed....

  2. Itopride hydrochloride efficacy in the management of delayed gastric emptying in type 1 diabetis mellitus patients in the presence of autonomic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Yur’evna Budennaya

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Evaluation of the itopride (Ganaton?, Abbot therapy efficacy in the management of gastrointestinal (GI symptoms and gastric motor function (GMF in type 1 diabetis mellitus (T1DM patients (pts in the presence of GMF dysfunction and other forms of diabetic autonomic neuropathy (DAN. Materials and Methods. The total of 34 patients with T1DM, GMF dysfunction and DAN were selected for randomized, prospective, open-label, comparative study. The duration of the study was 6 weeks. The study group (17 pts received itopride 150 mg total daily. The control group (17 pts did not receive any treatment for GMF. А questionnaire was used for the assessment of gastrointestinal (GI symptoms. Gastric emptying velocity was evaluated with 13C-octanoate breath test. Results. As a result of itopride therapy there was a statistically significant decrease in the amount of time (T1/2 needed for the gastric emptying. The median amount of time decreased from 89.0 [82.3; 101.0] min to 53.0 [82.3; 101.0] min (p

  3. Delayed presentation of congenital diaphragmatic hernia manifesting as combined-type acute gastric volvulus: a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya-Ayala, Javier E; Naik-Mathuria, Bindi; Olutoye, Oluyinka O

    2008-03-01

    Acute gastric volvulus associated with congenital diaphragmatic hernia is an unusual surgical emergency. We describe a case of an 11-year-old girl who presented with a 4-day history of abdominal pain, nonproductive retching, cough, and shortness of breath. A chest radiograph revealed a large air-fluid level in left hemithorax and the presence of intestinal loops with marked mediastinal deviation. Nasogastric decompression was unsuccessful. Via a thoracoscopic approach, the large fluid-filled stomach was percutaneously decompressed but could not be reduced. Through a left subcostal incision, a left-sided diaphragmatic defect about 4 x 5 cm was encountered. A large portion of small intestines, ascending and transverse colon, strangulated but viable stomach, and a large spleen herniated through the defect. The contents were reduced, revealing a combined gastric volvulus. Once the diaphragmatic defect was repaired primarily, there was insufficient space in the abdominal cavity to contain all the viscera reduced form the chest. Therefore, we placed an AlloDerm patch on the fascia and closed with a wound V.A.C (Kinetic Concepts Inc, San Antonio, TX). Two weeks later, the wound was definitively closed; she recovered uneventfully and was discharged home 3 days later. To our knowledge, only 26 previous cases of acute gastric volvulus complicating a congenital diaphragmatic hernia in children have been reported in the literature. Our patient represents the 27th case and the first combined type acute gastric volvulus case.

  4. Functional Defects in Type 3 Innate Lymphoid Cells and Classical Monocytes in a Patient with Hyper-IgE Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuna; Kang, Sung-Yoon; Kim, Jihyun; Kang, Hye-Ryun; Kim, Hye Young

    2017-10-01

    Hyper-IgE syndrome (HIES) is a very rare primary immune deficiency characterized by elevated serum IgE levels, recurrent bacterial infections, chronic dermatitis, and connective tissue abnormalities. Autosomal dominant (AD) HIES involves a mutation in signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) that leads to an impaired T H 17 response. STAT3 signaling is also involved in the function of RORγt + type 3 innate lymphoid cells (ILC3s) and RORγt + T H 17 cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of innate immune cells such as innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), granulocytes, and monocytes in a patient with HIES. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from a patient with HIES and three age-matched healthy controls were obtained for the analysis of the innate and adaptive immune cells. The frequencies of ILCs in PBMCs were lower in the patient with HIES than in the controls. Moreover, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and IL-17A produced by ILC3s in PBMCs were lower in the patient with HIES than the controls. Compared with the controls, classical monocytes (CD14 + CD16 low ), which have a high antimicrobial capability, were also lower in the patient with HIES, while non-classical monocytes (CD14 low CD16 + ) as well as intermediate monocytes (CD14 + CD16 intermediate ) were higher. Taken together, these results indicate that the impaired immune defense against pathogenic microbes in the patient with HIES might be partially explained by functional defects in ILC3s and inflammatory monocytes.

  5. Prevention of bone marrow cell apoptosis and regulation of hematopoiesis by type I IFNs during systemic responses to pneumocystis lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, David; Wilkison, Michelle; Voyich, Jovanka; Meissner, Nicole

    2011-05-15

    We recently demonstrated that lack of type I IFN signaling (IFNAR knockout) in lymphocyte-deficient mice (IFrag(-/-)) results in bone marrow (BM) failure after Pneumocystis lung infection, whereas lymphocyte-deficient mice with intact IFNAR (RAG(-/-)) had normal hematopoiesis. In the current work, we performed studies to define further the mechanisms involved in the induction of BM failure in this system. BM chimera experiments revealed that IFNAR expression was required on BM-derived but not stroma-derived cells to prevent BM failure. Signals elicited after day 7 postinfection appeared critical in determining BM cell fate. We observed caspase-8- and caspase-9-mediated apoptotic cell death, beginning with neutrophils. Death of myeloid precursors was associated with secondary oxidative stress, and decreasing colony-forming activity in BM cell cultures. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine could slow the progression of, but not prevent, BM failure. Type I IFN signaling has previously been shown to expand the neutrophil life span and regulate the expression of some antiapoptotic factors. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated reduced mRNA abundance for the antiapoptotic factors BCL-2, IAP2, MCL-1, and others in BM cells from IFrag(-/-) compared with that in BM cells from RAG(-/-) mice at day 7. mRNA and protein for the proapoptotic cytokine TNF-α was increased, whereas mRNA for the growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF was reduced. In vivo anti-TNF-α treatment improved precursor cell survival and activity in culture. Thus, we propose that lack of type I IFN signaling results in decreased resistance to inflammation-induced proapoptotic stressors and impaired replenishment by precursors after systemic responses to Pneumocystis lung infection. Our finding may have implications in understanding mechanisms underlying regenerative BM depression/failure during complex immune deficiencies such as AIDS.

  6. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Lawrence C; Mulhall, John P

    2015-11-01

    Delayed orgasm/anorgasmia defined as the persistent or recurrent difficulty, delay in, or absence of attaining orgasm after sufficient sexual stimulation, which causes personal distress. Delayed orgasm and anorgasmia are associated with significant sexual dissatisfaction. A focused medical history can shed light on the potential etiologies, which include medications, penile sensation loss, endocrinopathies, penile hyperstimulation, and psychological etiologies. Unfortunately, there are no excellent pharmacotherapies for delayed orgasm/anorgasmia, and treatment revolves largely around addressing potential causative factors and psychotherapy. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. American Dream Delayed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khorunzhina, Natalia; Miller, Robert A.

    This paper investigates the delay in homeownership and a subsequent reduction in homeownership rate observed over the past decades. We focus on the delay in giving birth to children and increased labor market participation as contributing factors to homeownership dynamics for prime-age female hou...

  8. Study of transmitting electric power utility communications in IP network. Transmission of existing electric power utility communications in best effort type IP network under delay constraint; Denryokuyo tsushin kaisen no IP mo eno shuyo kento. Chien jikan seiyakuka ni okeru best effort gata IP mo eno kison denryokuyo tsushin kaisen no shuyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyake, H.

    2000-07-01

    Since IP network does best effort behavior fundamentally, it always generates delay time and delay variation. For this reason, IP network has been unsuitable to transmit real time data such as a voice. However, in recent years, the technologies which transmit real time data in IP network, e.g. VoIP, have spread. If it is possible to transmit the existing electric power utility communications in IP network using these technologies, total network cost can be reduced by the reduction of required bandwidth and the simplification of communication network systems. In this report, it is examined quantitatively whether end-end delay time of the existing electric power utility communications, e.g. on-line, telephone, carrier relay, CDT (cyclic digital transmission equipment), video conference, ITV(industrial television), is within their permission delay time when they are transmitted in the best effort type IP network. (author)

  9. Multiwire proportional counter (lecture by an electromagnetic delay line)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruere-Dawson, R.

    1989-01-01

    For track localisation of ionizing particles with multiwire proportional chamber, an electronic chain including amplifying, shaping and memorizing circuits is required for each wire. In order to lower the cost of this type of detector, an electromagnetic delay line is proposed among various possibilities. In this paper, different coupling modes between chamber and delay line are studied with their respective advantages. The realization of one meter long delay line with a unit delay time of 15 ns per cm is also presented [fr

  10. Delayed power analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, L.A.; Azarov, V.V.

    1999-01-01

    Time dependent core power behavior in a nuclear reactor is described with well-known neutron kinetics equations. At the same time, two portions are distinguished in energy released from uranium nuclei fission; one released directly at fission and another delayed (residual) portion produced during radioactive decay of fission products. While prompt power is definitely described with kinetics equations, the delayed power presentation still remains outstanding. Since in operation the delayed power part is relatively small (about 6%) operation, it can be neglected for small reactivity disturbances assuming that entire power obeys neutron kinetics equations. In case of a high negative reactivity rapidly inserted in core (e.g. reactor scram initiation) the prompt and delayed components can be calculated separately with practically no impact on each other, employing kinetics equations for prompt power and known approximation formulas for delayed portion, named residual in this specific case. Under substantial disturbances the prompt component in the dynamic process becomes commensurable with delayed portion, thus making necessary to take into account their cross impact. A system of differential equations to describe time-dependent behavior of delayed power is presented. Specific NPP analysis shows a way to significantly simplify the task formulation. (author)

  11. Neutron delayed choice experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernstein, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    Delayed choice experiments for neutrons can help extend the interpretation of quantum mechanical phenomena. They may also rule out alternative explanations which static interference experiments allow. A simple example of a feasible neutron test is presented and discussed. (orig.)

  12. Quad nanosecond delay module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, R.J.; Hunter, J.B.; Wozniak, G.J.

    1986-04-01

    Four nanosecond (ns) delay units have been designed to fit in a single-width NIM module. This module is particularly suited for use in conjunction with quad constant fraction timing discriminators (CFTDs) since it has four delay units that can be placed adjacent to the four units of the CFTD. A series of different length cables connected via DIP toggle switches provide delays of 0.60 ns in 4 ns increments. Thus, the CFTD delay can be optimized for pulses of different rise times from approx.10-100 ns. Design work for the PC board and silkscreening of the front panel were done with the MacDraw program on the Apple Mackintosh computer and printed with the Lasewriter printer. 6 refs

  13. Delayed rule following

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, David R.

    2001-01-01

    Although the elements of a fully stated rule (discriminative stimulus [SD], some behavior, and a consequence) can occur nearly contemporaneously with the statement of the rule, there is often a delay between the rule statement and the SD. The effects of this delay on rule following have not been studied in behavior analysis, but they have been investigated in rule-like settings in the areas of prospective memory (remembering to do something in the future) and goal pursuit. Discriminative even...

  14. Vernier Delay Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierce, W.B.

    1984-10-01

    This module will accept differential ECL pulses from the auxiliary rear panel or NIM level pulses from the front panel. The pulses are produced at the output with a fixed delay that is software programmable in steps of 0.1 ns over the range of 0.1 to 10.5 ns. Multiple outputs are available at the front panel. Minimum delay through the module is 9 ns

  15. Quad precision delay generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krishnan, Shanti; Gopalakrishnan, K.R.; Marballi, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    A Quad Precision Delay Generator delays a digital edge by a programmed amount of time, varying from nanoseconds to microseconds. The output of this generator has an amplitude of the order of tens of volts and rise time of the order of nanoseconds. This was specifically designed and developed to meet the stringent requirements of the plasma focus experiments. Plasma focus is a laboratory device for producing and studying nuclear fusion reactions in hot deuterium plasma. 3 figs

  16. Modelling delays in pharmacokinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, Z.H.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1990-01-01

    Linear system analysis has come to form the backbone of pharmacokinetics. Natural systems usually involve time delays, thus models incorporating them would be an order closer approximation to the real world compared to those that do not. Delays may be modelled in several ways. The approach considered in this study is to have a discrete-time delay dependent rate with the delay respresenting the duration between the entry of a drug into a compartment and its release in some form (may be as a metabolite) from the compartment. Such a delay may be because of one or more of several physiological reasons, like, formation of a reservoir, slow metabolism, or receptor binding. The mathematical structure this gives rise to is a system of delay-differential equations. Examples are given of simple one and two compartment systems with drugs like bumetanide, carbamazepine, and quinolone-caffeine interaction. In these examples generally a good fit is obtained and the suggested models form a good approximation. 21 refs., 6 figs

  17. Delays in the operating room: signs of an imperfect system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Janice; Khu, Kathleen Joy; Kaderali, Zul; Bernstein, Mark

    2010-06-01

    Delays in the operating room have a negative effect on its efficiency and the working environment. In this prospective study, we analyzed data on perioperative system delays. One neurosurgeon prospectively recorded all errors, including perioperative delays, for consecutive patients undergoing elective procedures from May 2000 to February 2009. We analyzed the prevalence, causes and impact of perioperative system delays that occurred in one neurosurgeon's practice. A total of 1531 elective surgical cases were performed during the study period. Delays were the most common type of error (33.6%), and more than half (51.4%) of all cases had at least 1 delay. The most common cause of delay was equipment failure. The first cases of the day and cranial cases had more delays than subsequent cases and spinal cases, respectively. A delay in starting the first case was associated with subsequent delays. Delays frequently occur in the operating room and have a major effect on patient flow and resource utilization. Thorough documentation of perioperative delays provides a basis for the development of solutions for improving operating room efficiency and illustrates the principles underlying the causes of operating room delays across surgical disciplines.

  18. Compensating for telecommunication delays during robotic telerehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consoni, Leonardo J; Siqueira, Adriano A G; Krebs, Hermano I

    2017-07-01

    Rehabilitation robotic systems may afford better care and telerehabilitation may extend the use and benefits of robotic therapy to the home. Data transmissions over distance are bound by intrinsic communication delays which can be significant enough to deem the activity unfeasible. Here we describe an approach that combines unilateral robotic telerehabilitation and serious games. This approach has a modular and distributed design that permits different types of robots to interact without substantial code changes. We demonstrate the approach through an online multiplayer game. Two users can remotely interact with each other with no force exchanges, while a smoothing and prediction algorithm compensates motions for the delay in the Internet connection. We demonstrate that this approach can successfully compensate for data transmission delays, even when testing between the United States and Brazil. This paper presents the initial experimental results, which highlight the performance degradation with increasing delays as well as improvements provided by the proposed algorithm, and discusses planned future developments.

  19. Mechanism of action and efficacy of RX-111, a thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivative and small molecule inhibitor of protein interaction with glycosaminoglycans (SMIGs), in delayed-type hypersensitivity, TNBS-induced colitis and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Nicholas; Koppel, Juraj; Zsila, Ferenc; Juhas, Stefan; Il'kova, Gabriela; Kogan, Faina Yurgenzon; Lahmy, Orly; Wildbaum, Gizi; Karin, Nathan; Zhuk, Regina; Gregor, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Elucidate the mechanism of action of the small molecule inhibitor of protein binding to glycosaminoglycans, RX-111 and assay its anti-inflammatory activity in animal models of inflammatory disease. The glycosaminoglycan, heparin, was used in the mechanism of action study of RX-111. Human T lymphocytes and umbilical vein endothelial cells were used to assay the in vitro activity of RX-111. Mouse and rat models of disease were used to assay the anti-inflammatory activity of RX-111 in vivo. Circular dichroism and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy were used to study the binding of RX-111 to the glycosaminoglycan, heparin. T lymphocyte rolling on endothelial cells under shear flow was used to assay RX-111 activity in vitro. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and tri-nitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced colitis in mice and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in rats were used to assay anti-inflammatory activity of RX-111 in vivo. RX-111 was shown to bind directly to heparin. It inhibited leukocyte rolling on endothelial cells under shear flow and reduced inflammation in the mouse model of DTH. RX-111 was efficacious in the mouse model of inflammatory bowel disease, TNBS-induced colitis and the rat model of multiple sclerosis, EAE. RX-111 exercises its broad spectrum anti-inflammatory activity by a singular mechanism of action, inhibition of protein binding to the cell surface GAG, heparan sulfate. RX-111 and related thieno[2,3-c]pyridine derivatives are potential therapeutics for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  20. Optimal Joint Expected Delay Forwarding in Delay Tolerant Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Xu; Xin Feng; Wen Jun Yang; Ru Chuan Wang; Bing Qing Han

    2013-01-01

    Multicopy forwarding schemes have been employed in delay tolerant network (DTN) to improve the delivery delay and delivery rate. Much effort has been focused on reducing the routing cost while retaining high performance. This paper aims to provide an optimal joint expected delay forwarding (OJEDF) protocol which minimizes the expected delay while satisfying a certain constant on the number of forwardings per message. We propose a comprehensive forwarding metric called joint expected delay (JE...

  1. Characterisation of the clinical and activated T cell response to repeat delayed-type hypersensitivity skin challenges in human subjects, with KLH and PPD, as a potential model to test T cell-targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belson, Alexandra; Schmidt, Tim; Fernando, Disala; Hardes, Kelly; Scott, Nicola; Brett, Sara; Clark, Deborah; Oliveira, João Joaquim; Davis, Bill; McHugh, Simon; Stone, John

    2016-05-01

    To characterise the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin reaction to repeated challenges of keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) in healthy volunteers, as a potential model to test T cell-targeted investigational agents. Forty-nine subjects received either KLH, PPD, or PBS repeat skin challenges, and clinical assessments including induration, erythema and Laser Doppler Imaging. Skin biopsies or suction blisters were taken after challenge to investigate the cellular infiltrate of the challenge site, the T cell activation status, as determined by LAG-3 expression, and, specifically for the blister, the concentrations of inflammatory cytokines. Point estimates, estimates of variation and corresponding 95% confidence intervals were constructed for each type of challenge and timepoint. The DTH response could be measured at 48 and 120 h post-KLH and PPD challenge with induration, erythema and Laser Doppler Imaging, with 48 h post-challenge demonstrating the peak of the response. PPD was well tolerated in subjects after multiple challenges, however, a significant number of KLH-treated subjects demonstrated an injection site reaction 6-7 days following the SC injection. PPD demonstrated a boost effect on the second challenge as measured by increased induration, where as this was not noted consistently for KLH. Compared to unchallenged and PBS control-injected skin, increased T cell numbers were detected in the challenge site by both the skin suction blister and biopsy technique, at either time point following KLH or PPD challenge. Use of the T cell activation marker LAG-3 demonstrated the activated phenotype of these cells. In skin blisters, higher numbers of LAG-3+ T cells were detected at 48 h post-challenge, whereas in the biopsies, similar numbers of LAG-3+ cells were observed at both 48 and 120 h. Analysis of blister T cell subpopulations revealed some differences in phenotypes between the time points and between the CD4

  2. Design and development of a surface micro-machined push–pull-type true-time-delay phase shifter on an alumina substrate for Ka-band T/R module application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dey, Sukomal; Koul, Shiban K

    2012-01-01

    A radio frequency micro-electro-mechanical system (RF-MEMS) phase shifter based on the distributed MEMS transmission line (DMTL) concept towards maximum achievable phase shift with low actuation voltage with good figure of merit (FOM) is presented in this paper. This surface micro-machined analog DMTL phase shifter demonstrates low power consumption for implementation in a Ka-band transmit/receive (T/R) module. The push–pull-type switch has been designed and optimized with an analytical method and validated with simulation, which is the fundamental building block of the design of a true-time-delay phase shifter. Change in phase has been designed and optimized in push and pull states with reference to the up-state performance of the phase shifter. The working principle of this push–pull-type DMTL phase shifter has been comprehensively worked out. A thorough detail of the design and performance analysis of the phase shifter has been carried out with various structural parameters using commercially available simulation tools with reference to a change in phase shift and has been verified using a system level simulation. The phase shifter is fabricated on the alumina substrate, using a suspended gold bridge membrane with a surface micromachining process. Asymmetric behaviour of push–pull bridge configuration has been noted and a corresponding effect on mechanical, electrical and RF performances has been extensively investigated. It is demonstrated 114° dB −1 FOM over 0–40 GHz band, which is the highest achievable FOM from a unit cell on an alumina substrate reported so far. A complete phase shifter contributes to a continuous differential phase shift of 0°–360° over 0–40 GHz band with a minimum actuation voltage of 8.1 V which is the highest achievable phase shift with the lowest actuation voltage as per till date on the alumina substrate with good repeatability and return loss better than 11.5 dB over 0–40 GHz band. (paper)

  3. Assessing delay discounting in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Suzanne H.

    2014-01-01

    Delay discounting (also intertemporal choice or impulsive choice) is the process by which delayed outcomes, such as delayed food delivery, are valued less than the same outcomes delivered immediately or with a shorter delay. This process is of interest because many psychopathologies, including substance dependence, pathological gambling, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and conduct disorder, are characterized by heightened levels of delay discounting. Some of these disorders are herit...

  4. Estimating Delays In ASIC's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Gary; Nesheiwat, Jeffrey; Su, Ling

    1994-01-01

    Verification is important aspect of process of designing application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). Design must not only be functionally accurate, but must also maintain correct timing. IFA, Intelligent Front Annotation program, assists in verifying timing of ASIC early in design process. This program speeds design-and-verification cycle by estimating delays before layouts completed. Written in C language.

  5. Permissible Delay in Payments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Fu Huang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper wants to investigate the optimal retailer's lot-sizing policy with two warehouses under partially permissible delay in payments within the economic order quantity (EOQ framework. In this paper, we want to extend that fully permissible delay in payments to the supplier would offer the retailer partially permissible delay in payments. That is, the retailer must make a partial payment to the supplier when the order is received. Then the retailer must pay off the remaining balance at the end of the permissible delay period. In addition, we want to add the assumption that the retailer's storage space is limited. That is, the retailer will rent the warehouse to store these exceeding items when the order quantity is larger than retailer's storage space. Under these conditions, we model the retailer's inventory system as a cost minimization problem to determine the retailer's optimal cycle time and optimal order quantity. Three theorems are developed to efficiently determine the optimal replenishment policy for the retailer. Finally, numerical examples are given to illustrate these theorems and obtained a lot of managerial insights.

  6. Delayed neutrons in ANSTO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, T.

    1988-01-01

    Delayed neutron analysis carried out at the Australian Nuclear Scientific and Technology Organization facilities, provides a fast, high sensitivity, low cost, reliable method, particularly suitable for large batches of samples, and for non destructive analysis of a range of materials. While its main use has been in uranium exploration, other applications include archeological investigations, agriculture, oceanography and biology

  7. Exponential synchronization of two nonlinearly non-delayed and delayed coupled complex dynamical networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Song

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the exponential synchronization between two nonlinearly coupled complex networks with non-delayed and delayed coupling is investigated with Lyapunov-Krasovskii-type functionals. Based on the stability analysis of the impulsive differential equation and the linear matrix inequality, sufficient delay-dependent conditions for exponential synchronization are derived, and a linear impulsive controller and simple updated laws are also designed. Furthermore, the coupling matrices need not be symmetric or irreducible. Numerical examples are presented to verify the effectiveness and correctness of the synchronization criteria obtained.

  8. Depletion of regulatory T cells leads to an exacerbation of delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis in C57BL/6 mice that can be counteracted by IL-17 blockade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Hoffmann, Ute; Hamann, Alf; Bach, Emil; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Niels Banhos; Kristiansen, Karsten; Serikawa, Kyle; Fox, Brian; Kruse, Kim; Haase, Claus; Skov, Søren; Nansen, Anneline

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rodent models of arthritis have been extensively used in the elucidation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and are instrumental in the development of therapeutic strategies. Here we utilise delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA), a model in C57BL/6 mice affecting one paw with synchronised onset, 100% penetrance and low variation. We investigate the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in DTHA through selective depletion of Tregs and the role of IL-17 in connection with Treg depletion. Given the relevance of Tregs in RA, and the possibility of developing Treg-directed therapies, this approach could be relevant for advancing the understanding of Tregs in inflammatory arthritis. Selective depletion of Tregs was achieved using a Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse, which expresses the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under control of the Foxp3 gene. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used for IL-17 blockade. Numbers and activation of Tregs increased in the paw and its draining lymph node in DTHA, and depletion of Tregs resulted in exacerbation of disease as shown by increased paw swelling, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, increased bone remodelling and increased production of inflammatory mediators, as well as increased production of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Anti-IL-17 mAb treatment demonstrated that IL-17 is important for disease severity in both the presence and absence of Tregs, and that IL-17 blockade is able to rescue mice from the exacerbated disease caused by Treg depletion and caused a reduction in RANKL, IL-6 and the number of neutrophils. We show that Tregs are important for the containment of inflammation and bone remodelling in DTHA. To our knowledge, this is the first study using the Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse on a C57BL/6 background for Treg depletion in an arthritis model, and we here demonstrate the usefulness of the approach to study the role of Tregs and IL-17 in arthritis

  9. Stability analysis of linear switching systems with time delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Ping; Zhong Shouming; Cui Jinzhong

    2009-01-01

    The issue of stability analysis of linear switching system with discrete and distributed time delays is studied in this paper. An appropriate switching rule is applied to guarantee the stability of the whole switching system. Our results use a Riccati-type Lyapunov functional under a condition on the time delay. So, switching systems with mixed delays are developed. A numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of our results.

  10. Topological Acoustic Delay Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhiwang; Tian, Ye; Cheng, Ying; Wei, Qi; Liu, Xiaojun; Christensen, Johan

    2018-03-01

    Topological protected wave engineering in artificially structured media is at the frontier of ongoing metamaterials research that is inspired by quantum mechanics. Acoustic analogues of electronic topological insulators have recently led to a wealth of new opportunities in manipulating sound propagation with strikingly unconventional acoustic edge modes immune to backscattering. Earlier fabrications of topological insulators are characterized by an unreconfigurable geometry and a very narrow frequency response, which severely hinders the exploration and design of useful devices. Here we establish topologically protected sound in reconfigurable phononic crystals that can be switched on and off simply by rotating its three-legged "atoms" without altering the lattice structure. In particular, we engineer robust phase delay defects that take advantage of the ultrabroadband reflection-free sound propagation. Such topological delay lines serve as a paradigm in compact acoustic devices, interconnects, and electroacoustic integrated circuits.

  11. Delayed traumatic intracranial hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomita, Hiroki

    1984-01-01

    CT was performed serially within 24 hours after head injury in 64 patients having Glasgow Coma Scale of 14 or less or cranial fracture shown on roentgenogram. Delayed traumatic extradural hematoma was observed within 7-12 hours after head injury in 6 cases (9.4%). This was prominent in the frontal and occipital regions (67%). Good recovery was seen in 83.3%. Delayed traumatic intracerebral hematoma was observed within 6-24 hours after head injury in 17 cases (26.6%). This higher incidence was related to contre coup injury. Conservative treatment was possible in 14 of the 17 patients (82.4%), showing good recovery in 70%. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Time-Delay Interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tinto

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Equal-arm detectors of gravitational radiation allow phase measurements many orders of magnitude below the intrinsic phase stability of the laser injecting light into their arms. This is because the noise in the laser light is common to both arms, experiencing exactly the same delay, and thus cancels when it is differenced at the photo detector. In this situation, much lower level secondary noises then set the overall performance. If, however, the two arms have different lengths (as will necessarily be the case with space-borne interferometers, the laser noise experiences different delays in the two arms and will hence not directly cancel at the detector. In order to solve this problem, a technique involving heterodyne interferometry with unequal arm lengths and independent phase-difference readouts has been proposed. It relies on properly time-shifting and linearly combining independent Doppler measurements, and for this reason it has been called time-delay interferometry (TDI. This article provides an overview of the theory, mathematical foundations, and experimental aspects associated with the implementation of TDI. Although emphasis on the application of TDI to the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA mission appears throughout this article, TDI can be incorporated into the design of any future space-based mission aiming to search for gravitational waves via interferometric measurements. We have purposely left out all theoretical aspects that data analysts will need to account for when analyzing the TDI data combinations.

  13. Treatment with anti-C5aR mAb leads to early-onset clinical and mechanistic effects in the murine delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Nansen, Anneline; Usher, Pernille A.

    2015-01-01

    Blockade of the complement cascade at the C5a/C5a receptor (C5aR)-axis is believed to be an attractive treatment avenue in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, the effects of such interventions during the early phases of arthritis remain to be clarified. In this study we use the murine delayed-typ...

  14. The delayed neutron method of uranium analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wall, T.

    1989-01-01

    The technique of delayed neutron analysis (DNA) is discussed. The DNA rig installed on the MOATA reactor, the assay standards and the types of samples which have been assayed are described. Of the total sample throughput of about 55,000 units since the uranium analysis service began, some 78% has been concerned with analysis of uranium ore samples derived from mining and exploration. Delayed neutron analysis provides a high sensitivity, low cost uranium analysis method for both uranium exploration and other applications. It is particularly suitable for analysis of large batch samples and for non-destructive analysis over a wide range of matrices. 8 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  15. Delayed Stochastic Linear-Quadratic Control Problem and Related Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chen

    2012-01-01

    stochastic differential equations (FBSDEs with Itô’s stochastic delay equations as forward equations and anticipated backward stochastic differential equations as backward equations. Especially, we present the optimal feedback regulator for the time delay system via a new type of Riccati equations and also apply to a population optimal control problem.

  16. Growth of meromorphic solutions of delay differential equations

    OpenAIRE

    Halburd, Rod; Korhonen, Risto

    2016-01-01

    Necessary conditions are obtained for certain types of rational delay differential equations to admit a non-rational meromorphic solution of hyper-order less than one. The equations obtained include delay Painlev\\'e equations and equations solved by elliptic functions.

  17. Abdominal CT findings of delayed postoperative complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zissin, R.; Osadchy, A. [Sapir Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Kfar Saba (Israel)]. E-mail: zisinrivka@clalit.org.il; Gayer, G. [Assaf Harofe Medical Center, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Zrifin (Israel)

    2007-10-15

    Despite progress in surgical techniques and modern medical treatment, postoperative complications occur not infrequently and vary according to type of surgery, clinical setting, and time elapsed since surgery. In general, they can be divided into early and delayed complications. Delayed postoperative complications can be classified as specific and nonspecific. The common nonspecific delayed complications are incisional hernia and postoperative bowel obstruction. Bowel obstruction can be further categorized as obstruction related to benign or neoplastic etiology, the latter occurring in oncology patients in whom the primary surgery was related to an underlying abdominal neoplasm. Gossypiboma is another, fortunately rare, postoperative complication. Specific complications appear after specific operations and include the following: Splenosis - following splenectomy. Retained gallstones and spilled gallstones - following cholecystectomy, mainly laparoscopic. Dropped appendicolith and stump appendicitis - following appendectomy, mainly laparoscopic. Obturation obstruction by a bezoar - following gastric surgery. Afferent loop syndrome (ALS) - following Bilroth II gastrectomy. (author)

  18. Delay-induced cluster patterns in coupled Cayley tree networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A.; Jalan, S.

    2013-07-01

    We study effects of delay in diffusively coupled logistic maps on the Cayley tree networks. We find that smaller coupling values exhibit sensitiveness to value of delay, and lead to different cluster patterns of self-organized and driven types. Whereas larger coupling strengths exhibit robustness against change in delay values, and lead to stable driven clusters comprising nodes from last generation of the Cayley tree. Furthermore, introduction of delay exhibits suppression as well as enhancement of synchronization depending upon coupling strength values. To the end we discuss the importance of results to understand conflicts and cooperations observed in family business.

  19. Delayed child-bearing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jo-Ann; Tough, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    To provide an overview of delayed child-bearing and to describe the implications for women and health care providers. Delayed child-bearing, which has increased greatly in recent decades, is associated with an increased risk of infertility, pregnancy complications, and adverse pregnancy outcome. This guideline provides information that will optimize the counselling and care of Canadian women with respect to their reproductive choices. Maternal age is the most important determinant of fertility, and obstetric and perinatal risks increase with maternal age. Many women are unaware of the success rates or limitations of assisted reproductive technology and of the increased medical risks of delayed child-bearing, including multiple births, preterm delivery, stillbirth, and Caesarean section. This guideline provides a framework to address these issues. Studies published between 2000 and August 2010 were retrieved through searches of PubMed and the Cochrane Library using appropriate key words (delayed child-bearing, deferred pregnancy, maternal age, assisted reproductive technology, infertility, and multiple births) and MeSH terms (maternal age, reproductive behaviour, fertility). The Internet was also searched using similar key words, and national and international medical specialty societies were searched for clinical practice guidelines and position statements. Data were extracted based on the aims, sample, authors, year, and results. The quality of evidence was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table 1). The Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. RECOMMENDATIONS 1. Women who delay child-bearing are at increased risk of infertility. Prospective parents, especially women, should know that their fecundity and fertility begin to decline significantly after 32 years of age. Prospective parents should know that assisted reproductive technologies cannot guarantee a live birth or completely

  20. Assessing the costs attributed to project delay during project pre-construction stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This project for the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) developed a simple but sound : methodology for estimating the cost of delaying most types of highway projects. Researchers considered the : cost of delays during the pre-construction pha...

  1. Delaying information search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaniv Shani

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In three studies, we examined factors that may temporarily attenuate information search. People are generally curious and dislike uncertainty, which typically encourages them to look for relevant information. Despite these strong forces that promote information search, people sometimes deliberately delay obtaining valuable information. We find they may do so when they are concerned that the information might interfere with future pleasurable activities. Interestingly, the decision to search or to postpone searching for information is influenced not only by the value and importance of the information itself but also by well-being maintenance goals related to possible detrimental effects that negative knowledge may have on unrelated future plans.

  2. A review on high-resolution CMOS delay lines: towards sub-picosecond jitter performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulrazzaq, Bilal I; Abdul Halin, Izhal; Kawahito, Shoji; Sidek, Roslina M; Shafie, Suhaidi; Yunus, Nurul Amziah Md

    2016-01-01

    A review on CMOS delay lines with a focus on the most frequently used techniques for high-resolution delay step is presented. The primary types, specifications, delay circuits, and operating principles are presented. The delay circuits reported in this paper are used for delaying digital inputs and clock signals. The most common analog and digitally-controlled delay elements topologies are presented, focusing on the main delay-tuning strategies. IC variables, namely, process, supply voltage, temperature, and noise sources that affect delay resolution through timing jitter are discussed. The design specifications of these delay elements are also discussed and compared for the common delay line circuits. As a result, the main findings of this paper are highlighting and discussing the followings: the most efficient high-resolution delay line techniques, the trade-off challenge found between CMOS delay lines designed using either analog or digitally-controlled delay elements, the trade-off challenge between delay resolution and delay range and the proposed solutions for this challenge, and how CMOS technology scaling can affect the performance of CMOS delay lines. Moreover, the current trends and efforts used in order to generate output delayed signal with low jitter in the sub-picosecond range are presented.

  3. Synchronization of conference presentation sequence using delay equalization approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godavari, Rakesh K.; Celenk, Mehmet

    2001-11-01

    provided with a shared workspace among the web servers acting as administrators in the network. The arrival times and the presentation durations of the data packets at the recipient workstations are recorded in this shared workspace. For a case study, a Poisson distribution type delay density is selected to be the input for the delay equalizer with the desired output to be uniformly distributed. The transfer function input and output distributions are derived and depicted in a parametric form for different values of mean in the simulation results to illustrate the effectiveness of the equalization process. We have demonstrated that this method is appropriate for equalizing the lumped communication channel delays. Further work is in progress for developing the distributed channel delay equalization.

  4. Vehicle barrier with access delay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swahlan, David J; Wilke, Jason

    2013-09-03

    An access delay vehicle barrier for stopping unauthorized entry into secure areas by a vehicle ramming attack includes access delay features for preventing and/or delaying an adversary from defeating or compromising the barrier. A horizontally deployed barrier member can include an exterior steel casing, an interior steel reinforcing member and access delay members disposed within the casing and between the casing and the interior reinforcing member. Access delay members can include wooden structural lumber, concrete and/or polymeric members that in combination with the exterior casing and interior reinforcing member act cooperatively to impair an adversarial attach by thermal, mechanical and/or explosive tools.

  5. Delayed rule following.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, D R

    2001-01-01

    Although the elements of a fully stated rule (discriminative stimulus [S(D)], some behavior, and a consequence) can occur nearly contemporaneously with the statement of the rule, there is often a delay between the rule statement and the S(D). The effects of this delay on rule following have not been studied in behavior analysis, but they have been investigated in rule-like settings in the areas of prospective memory (remembering to do something in the future) and goal pursuit. Discriminative events for some behavior can be event based (a specific setting stimulus) or time based. The latter are more demanding with respect to intention following and show age-related deficits. Studies suggest that the specificity with which the components of a rule (termed intention) are stated has a substantial effect on intention following, with more detailed specifications increasing following. Reminders of an intention, too, are most effective when they refer specifically to both the behavior and its occasion. Covert review and written notes are two effective strategies for remembering everyday intentions, but people who use notes appear not to be able to switch quickly to covert review. By focusing on aspects of the setting and rule structure, research on prospective memory and goal pursuit expands the agenda for a more complete explanation of rule effects.

  6. Pseudotumoral delayed cerebral radionecrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciaudo-Lacroix, C.; Lapresle, J.

    1985-01-01

    A 60 year-old woman with a scalp epithelioma underwent radiotherapy, the dose being 57 Gray. A first epileptic seizure occurred twenty months later. Neurological examination revealed signs of left hemisphere involvement. γEG, angiography, CT scans, demonstrated a pseudotumoral avascular process. On account of the localisation, the patient being right-handed, no surgical procedure was performed. In spite of corticotherapy and anticonvulsive treatment, seizures recurred and neurological signs slowly progressed. The patient died, 22 months after the first seizure, of an associated disseminated carcinoma with cachexia. Neuropathological examination showed a massive lesion presenting all the features of delayed radionecrosis in the left hemisphere: situated mainly in the white matter; numerous vascular abnormalities; wide-spread demyelination; disappearance of oligoglial cells. The Authors recall the clinical and anatomical aspects of this condition for which the only successful treatment is surgical removal when location and size of the lesion permit. Finally, the mechanisms which have been proposed to explain this delayed cerebral radionecrosis are discussed [fr

  7. Pseudotumoral delayed cerebral radionecrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciaudo-Lacroix, C; Lapresle, J [Centre Hospitalier de Bicetre, 94 - Le Kremlin-Bicetre (France)

    1985-01-01

    A 60 year-old woman with a scalp epithelioma underwent radiotherapy, the dose being 57 Gray. A first epileptic seizure occurred twenty months later. Neurological examination revealed signs of left hemisphere involvement. ..gamma..EG, angiography, CT scans, demonstrated a pseudotumoral avascular process. On account of the localisation, the patient being right-handed, no surgical procedure was performed. In spite of corticotherapy and anticonvulsive treatment, seizures recurred and neurological signs slowly progressed. The patient died, 22 months after the first seizure, of an associated disseminated carcinoma with cachexia. Neuropathological examination showed a massive lesion presenting all the features of delayed radionecrosis in the left hemisphere: situated mainly in the white matter; numerous vascular abnormalities; wide-spread demyelination; disappearance of oligoglial cells. The Authors recall the clinical and anatomical aspects of this condition for which the only successful treatment is surgical removal when location and size of the lesion permit. Finally, the mechanisms which have been proposed to explain this delayed cerebral radionecrosis are discussed.

  8. Novel global robust stability criterion for neural networks with delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vimal

    2009-01-01

    A novel criterion for the global robust stability of Hopfield-type interval neural networks with delay is presented. An example illustrating the improvement of the present criterion over several recently reported criteria is given.

  9. Biomarkers of spontaneous preterm birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Polettini, Jossimara; Cobo, Teresa; Kacerovsky, Marian

    2017-01-01

    ) followed by MIP-1β, GM-CSF, Eotaxin, and TNF-RI (two studies) were reported more than once in maternal serum. However, results could not be combined due to heterogeneity in type of sample, study population, assay, and analysis methods. By this systematic review, we conclude that multiplex assays...

  10. Stability and delay sensitivity of neutral fractional-delay systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Shi, Min; Wang, Zaihua

    2016-08-01

    This paper generalizes the stability test method via integral estimation for integer-order neutral time-delay systems to neutral fractional-delay systems. The key step in stability test is the calculation of the number of unstable characteristic roots that is described by a definite integral over an interval from zero to a sufficient large upper limit. Algorithms for correctly estimating the upper limits of the integral are given in two concise ways, parameter dependent or independent. A special feature of the proposed method is that it judges the stability of fractional-delay systems simply by using rough integral estimation. Meanwhile, the paper shows that for some neutral fractional-delay systems, the stability is extremely sensitive to the change of time delays. Examples are given for demonstrating the proposed method as well as the delay sensitivity.

  11. Delayed breast implant reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Gitte B.; Hölmich, Lisbet R.; Steding-Jessen, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the association between radiation therapy and severe capsular contracture or reoperation after 717 delayed breast implant reconstruction procedures (288 1- and 429 2-stage procedures) identified in the prospective database of the Danish Registry for Plastic Surgery of the Breast during...... of radiation therapy was associated with a non-significantly increased risk of reoperation after both 1-stage (HR = 1.4; 95% CI: 0.7-2.5) and 2-stage (HR = 1.6; 95% CI: 0.9-3.1) procedures. Reconstruction failure was highest (13.2%) in the 2-stage procedures with a history of radiation therapy. Breast...... reconstruction approaches other than implants should be seriously considered among women who have received radiation therapy....

  12. Delay tolerant networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Longxiang; Luan, Tom H

    2015-01-01

    This brief presents emerging and promising communication methods for network reliability via delay tolerant networks (DTNs). Different from traditional networks, DTNs possess unique features, such as long latency and unstable network topology. As a result, DTNs can be widely applied to critical applications, such as space communications, disaster rescue, and battlefield communications. The brief provides a complete investigation of DTNs and their current applications, from an overview to the latest development in the area. The core issue of data forward in DTNs is tackled, including the importance of social characteristics, which is an essential feature if the mobile devices are used for human communication. Security and privacy issues in DTNs are discussed, and future work is also discussed.

  13. The closely related CD103+ dendritic cells (DCs and lymphoid-resident CD8+ DCs differ in their inflammatory functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhijun Jiao

    Full Text Available Migratory CD103+ and lymphoid-resident CD8+ dendritic cells (DCs share many attributes, such as dependence on the same transcription factors, cross-presenting ability and expression of certain surface molecules, such that it has been proposed they belong to a common sub-lineage. The functional diversity of the two DC types is nevertheless incompletely understood. Here we reveal that upon skin infection with herpes simplex virus, migratory CD103+ DCs from draining lymph nodes were more potent at inducing Th17 cytokine production by CD4+ T cells than CD8+ DCs. This superior capacity to drive Th17 responses was also evident in CD103+ DCs from uninfected mice. Their differential potency to induce Th17 differentiation was reflected by higher production of IL-1β and IL-6 by CD103+ DCs compared with CD8+ DCs upon stimulation. The two types of DCs from isolated lymph nodes also differ in expression of certain pattern recognition receptors. Furthermore, elevated levels of GM-CSF, typical of those found in inflammation, substantially increased the pool size of CD103+ DCs in lymph nodes and skin. We argue that varied levels of GM-CSF may explain the contrasting reports regarding the positive role of GM-CSF in regulating development of CD103+ DCs. Together, we find that these two developmentally closely-related DC subsets display functional differences and that GM-CSF has differential effect on the two types of DCs.

  14. Atmospheric Phase Delay in Sentinel SAR Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnakumar, V.; Monserrat, O.; Crosetto, M.; Crippa, B.

    2018-04-01

    The repeat-pass Synthetic Aperture Radio Detection and Ranging (RADAR) Interferometry (InSAR) has been a widely used geodetic technique for observing the Earth's surface, especially for mapping the Earth's topography and deformations. However, InSAR measurements are prone to atmospheric errors. RADAR waves traverse the Earth's atmosphere twice and experience a delay due to atmospheric refraction. The two major layers of the atmosphere (troposphere and ionosphere) are mainly responsible for this delay in the propagating RADAR wave. Previous studies have shown that water vapour and clouds present in the troposphere and the Total Electron Content (TEC) of the ionosphere are responsible for the additional path delay in the RADAR wave. The tropospheric refractivity is mainly dependent on pressure, temperature and partial pressure of water vapour. The tropospheric refractivity leads to an increase in the observed range. These induced propagation delays affect the quality of phase measurement and introduce errors in the topography and deformation fields. The effect of this delay was studied on a differential interferogram (DInSAR). To calculate the amount of tropospheric delay occurred, the meteorological data collected from the Spanish Agencia Estatal de Meteorología (AEMET) and MODIS were used. The interferograms generated from Sentinel-1 carrying C-band Synthetic Aperture RADAR Single Look Complex (SLC) images acquired on the study area are used. The study area consists of different types of scatterers exhibiting different coherence. The existing Saastamoinen model was used to perform a quantitative evaluation of the phase changes caused by pressure, temperature and humidity of the troposphere during the study. Unless the phase values due to atmospheric disturbances are not corrected, it is difficult to obtain accurate measurements. Thus, the atmospheric error correction is essential for all practical applications of DInSAR to avoid inaccurate height and deformation

  15. ATMOSPHERIC PHASE DELAY IN SENTINEL SAR INTERFEROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Krishnakumar

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The repeat-pass Synthetic Aperture Radio Detection and Ranging (RADAR Interferometry (InSAR has been a widely used geodetic technique for observing the Earth’s surface, especially for mapping the Earth’s topography and deformations. However, InSAR measurements are prone to atmospheric errors. RADAR waves traverse the Earth’s atmosphere twice and experience a delay due to atmospheric refraction. The two major layers of the atmosphere (troposphere and ionosphere are mainly responsible for this delay in the propagating RADAR wave. Previous studies have shown that water vapour and clouds present in the troposphere and the Total Electron Content (TEC of the ionosphere are responsible for the additional path delay in the RADAR wave. The tropospheric refractivity is mainly dependent on pressure, temperature and partial pressure of water vapour. The tropospheric refractivity leads to an increase in the observed range. These induced propagation delays affect the quality of phase measurement and introduce errors in the topography and deformation fields. The effect of this delay was studied on a differential interferogram (DInSAR. To calculate the amount of tropospheric delay occurred, the meteorological data collected from the Spanish Agencia Estatal de Meteorología (AEMET and MODIS were used. The interferograms generated from Sentinel-1 carrying C-band Synthetic Aperture RADAR Single Look Complex (SLC images acquired on the study area are used. The study area consists of different types of scatterers exhibiting different coherence. The existing Saastamoinen model was used to perform a quantitative evaluation of the phase changes caused by pressure, temperature and humidity of the troposphere during the study. Unless the phase values due to atmospheric disturbances are not corrected, it is difficult to obtain accurate measurements. Thus, the atmospheric error correction is essential for all practical applications of DInSAR to avoid inaccurate

  16. Delayed Luminescence and Biophotons from Biological Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoesel, Ernst; Hann, Patrick; Garzon, Maria; Pfeiffer, Erik; Lofland, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    There has recently been increased interest in the field of biophotonics, since it is a non-invasive technique. Many biological systems, such as yeast, bacteria, leaves, seeds, and algae display the unusual phenomenon of a weak, delayed luminescence on the timescale of seconds to minutes after transient illumination. It is also observed that the time decay of the biophotonic emission is not exponential, even after the delay, and that there can be oscillations in intensity with time, which depend on the duration of the illumination. Results from two types of yeast, i.e. bread yeast, and saccharomyces, as well as those from several types of algae are presented. Possible mechanisms for the source of the ultraweak photon emission are discussed.

  17. Delayed reactions to reusable protective gloves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontén, Ann; Dubnika, Inese

    2009-04-01

    The materials in plastic protective gloves are thought to cause less contact allergy than rubber gloves. Our aim was to estimate the frequency of delayed reactions to different types of reusable protective gloves among dermatitis patients. 2 x 2 cm pieces of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) gloves, nitrile gloves, and natural rubber latex (NRL) gloves were tested as is in consecutive dermatitis patients tested with the baseline series. Among 658 patients, 6 patients reacted to PVC gloves and 6 patients to the NRL gloves. None reacted to both these types of gloves. Five of six patients with reactions to rubber gloves reacted to thiuram mix in the baseline series. Delayed reactions to reusable PVC gloves may be as common as to reusable NRL gloves. In contrast to most reactions to the NRL glove, the reactions to the PVC glove had no obvious association with reactions to any allergen(s) in the baseline series.

  18. Location Estimation using Delayed Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Martin; Larsen, Thomas Dall; Nørgård, Peter Magnus

    1998-01-01

    When combining data from various sensors it is vital to acknowledge possible measurement delays. Furthermore, the sensor fusion algorithm, often a Kalman filter, should be modified in order to handle the delay. The paper examines different possibilities for handling delays and applies a new techn...... technique to a sensor fusion system for estimating the location of an autonomous guided vehicle. The system fuses encoder and vision measurements in an extended Kalman filter. Results from experiments in a real environment are reported...

  19. Modeling delay in genetic networks: from delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Bennett, Matthew R; Josić, Krešimir; Ott, William

    2014-05-28

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay.

  20. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Ott, William [Department of Mathematics, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Bennett, Matthew R. [Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77204, USA and Institute of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005 (United States); Josić, Krešimir [Department of Mathematics, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77004 (United States); Department of Biology and Biochemistry, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2014-05-28

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay.

  1. Modeling delay in genetic networks: From delay birth-death processes to delay stochastic differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Chinmaya; López, José Manuel; Azencott, Robert; Ott, William; Bennett, Matthew R.; Josić, Krešimir

    2014-01-01

    Delay is an important and ubiquitous aspect of many biochemical processes. For example, delay plays a central role in the dynamics of genetic regulatory networks as it stems from the sequential assembly of first mRNA and then protein. Genetic regulatory networks are therefore frequently modeled as stochastic birth-death processes with delay. Here, we examine the relationship between delay birth-death processes and their appropriate approximating delay chemical Langevin equations. We prove a quantitative bound on the error between the pathwise realizations of these two processes. Our results hold for both fixed delay and distributed delay. Simulations demonstrate that the delay chemical Langevin approximation is accurate even at moderate system sizes. It captures dynamical features such as the oscillatory behavior in negative feedback circuits, cross-correlations between nodes in a network, and spatial and temporal information in two commonly studied motifs of metastability in biochemical systems. Overall, these results provide a foundation for using delay stochastic differential equations to approximate the dynamics of birth-death processes with delay

  2. Proceedings of the specialists' meeting on delayed neutron nuclear data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katakura, Jun-ichi

    1999-07-01

    This report is the Proceedings of the Specialists' Meeting on Delayed Neutron Nuclear Data. The meeting was held on January 28-29, 1999, at the Tokai Research Establishment of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute with the participation of thirty specialists, who are evaluators, theorist, experimentalists. Although the fraction of the delayed neutron is no more than 1% in the total neutrons emitted in the fission process, it plays an important roll in the control of fission reactor. In the meeting, the following topics were reported: the present status of delayed neutron data in the major evaluated data libraries, measurements of effective delayed neutron fraction using FCA (Fast Critical Assembly) and TCA (Tank-type Critical Assembly) and their analyses, sensitivity analysis for fast reactor, measurements of delayed neutron emission from actinides and so on. As another topics, delayed neutron in transmutation system and fission yield data were also presented. Free discussion was held on the future activity of delayed neutron data evaluation. The discussion was helpful for the future activity of the delayed neutron working group of JNDC aiming to the evaluation of delayed neutron data for JENDL-3.3. The 15 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  3. Factors associated with long diagnostic delay in celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Valma; Kurppa, Kalle; Huhtala, Heini; Collin, Pekka; Mäki, Markku; Kaukinen, Katri

    2014-11-01

    Here, we investigated the factors associated with long diagnostic delay in celiac disease and the impact of the national Current Care Guidelines in reducing the delay. This population-based study involved 825 adult celiac disease patients. The diagnosis was considered delayed when the interval between first symptoms and diagnosis was >10 years. The patients were asked about the duration and type of symptoms before diagnosis, time and site (tertiary, secondary, or primary care) of the diagnosis, family history of the disease, and presence of significant comorbidities. Analysis was performed by binary logistic regression. Altogether, 261 (32%) out of 825 participants reported a diagnostic delay of >10 years. Female gender, neurological or musculoskeletal disorders and presence of diarrhea, abdominal pain, and malabsorption were associated with prolonged delay. Male gender, diagnosis after the introduction of the first Current Care Guidelines in 1997, and being detected by serological screening, and family history of celiac disease were associated with a lower risk of delayed diagnosis. Factors not associated with the delay were site of diagnosis, age, and presence of dermatitis herpetiformis, type 1 diabetes, or thyroidal disease. The number of long diagnostic delays in celiac disease has decreased over the past decades. The shift of diagnostics from secondary and tertiary care to primary care has not been detrimental. National guidelines together with increased awareness and active screening in at-risk groups of celiac disease are important in these circumstances.

  4. Systematic of delayed neutron parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isaev, S.G.; Piksaikin, V.M.

    2000-01-01

    The experimental studies of the energy dependence of the delayed neutron (DN) parameters for various fission systems has shown that the behaviour of a some combination of delayed neutron parameters has a similar features. On the basis of this findings the systematics of delayed neutron experimental data for thorium, uranium, plutonium and americium isotopes have been investigated with the purpose to find a correlation of DN parameters with characteristics of fissioning system as well as a correlation between the delayed neutron parameters themselves. It was presented the preliminary results which were obtained during study the physics interpretation of the results [ru

  5. Time Delay of CGM Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmelzeisen-Redeker, Günther; Schoemaker, Michael; Kirchsteiger, Harald; Freckmann, Guido; Heinemann, Lutz; del Re, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is a powerful tool to support the optimization of glucose control of patients with diabetes. However, CGM systems measure glucose in interstitial fluid but not in blood. Rapid changes in one compartment are not accompanied by similar changes in the other, but follow with some delay. Such time delays hamper detection of, for example, hypoglycemic events. Our aim is to discuss the causes and extent of time delays and approaches to compensate for these. Methods: CGM data were obtained in a clinical study with 37 patients with a prototype glucose sensor. The study was divided into 5 phases over 2 years. In all, 8 patients participated in 2 phases separated by 8 months. A total number of 108 CGM data sets including raw signals were used for data analysis and were processed by statistical methods to obtain estimates of the time delay. Results: Overall mean (SD) time delay of the raw signals with respect to blood glucose was 9.5 (3.7) min, median was 9 min (interquartile range 4 min). Analysis of time delays observed in the same patients separated by 8 months suggests a patient dependent delay. No significant correlation was observed between delay and anamnestic or anthropometric data. The use of a prediction algorithm reduced the delay by 4 minutes on average. Conclusions: Prediction algorithms should be used to provide real-time CGM readings more consistent with simultaneous measurements by SMBG. Patient specificity may play an important role in improving prediction quality. PMID:26243773

  6. Tumor regression induced by intratumor therapy with a disabled infectious single cycle (DISC) herpes simplex virus (HSV) vector, DISC/HSV/murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, correlates with antigen-specific adaptive immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Selman A; Lynam, June; McLean, Cornelia S; Entwisle, Claire; Loudon, Peter; Rojas, José M; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Li, Geng; Mian, Shahid; Rees, Robert C

    2002-04-01

    Direct intratumor injection of a disabled infectious single cycle HSV-2 virus encoding the murine GM-CSF gene (DISC/mGM-CSF) into established murine colon carcinoma CT26 tumors induced a significant delay in tumor growth and complete tumor regression in up to 70% of animals. Pre-existing immunity to HSV did not reduce the therapeutic efficacy of DISC/mGM-CSF, and, when administered in combination with syngeneic dendritic cells, further decreased tumor growth and increased the incidence of complete tumor regression. Direct intratumor injection of DISC/mGM-CSF also inhibited the growth of CT26 tumor cells implanted on the contralateral flank or seeded into the lungs following i.v. injection of tumor cells (experimental lung metastasis). Proliferation of splenocytes in response to Con A was impaired in progressor and tumor-bearer, but not regressor, mice. A potent tumor-specific CTL response was generated from splenocytes of all mice with regressing, but not progressing tumors following in vitro peptide stimulation; this response was specific for the gp70 AH-1 peptide SPSYVYHQF and correlated with IFN-gamma, but not IL-4 cytokine production. Depletion of CD8(+) T cells from regressor splenocytes before in vitro stimulation with the relevant peptide abolished their cytolytic activity, while depletion of CD4(+) T cells only partially inhibited CTL generation. Tumor regression induced by DISC/mGM-CSF virus immunotherapy provides a unique model for evaluating the immune mechanism(s) involved in tumor rejection, upon which tumor immunotherapy regimes may be based.

  7. Delay-dependent exponential stability for neural networks with discrete and distributed time-varying delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Xunlin; Wang Youyi

    2009-01-01

    This Letter studies the exponential stability for a class of neural networks (NNs) with both discrete and distributed time-varying delays. Under weaker assumptions on the activation functions, by defining a more general type of Lyapunov functionals and developing a new convex combination technique, new less conservative and less complex stability criteria are established to guarantee the global exponential stability of the discussed NNs. The obtained conditions are dependent on both discrete and distributed delays, are expressed in terms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), and contain fewer decision variables. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness and the less conservatism of the proposed conditions.

  8. Drinking status but not acute alcohol consumption influences delay discounting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Sally; Attwood, Angela S; Munafò, Marcus R

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the following: (a) the effects of acute alcohol on delay discounting; (b) the effects of drinking status on delayed discounting; and (c) whether these effects differ according to reward type (alcohol vs. money). Heavy and light social alcohol users (n = 96) were randomized to receive either an acute dose of alcohol at 0.4 or 0.6 g/kg or placebo in a between-subjects, double-blind design. Delay discounting of alcohol and monetary rewards was measured using a hyperbolic model, with higher scores indicative of greater delay discounting. ANOVA of discount scores indicated a main effect of reward type, where all participants had higher discount scores for alcohol versus money rewards. A main effect of drinking status was also observed, where heavier drinkers had higher discount scores compared with lighter drinkers. We did not observe a main effect of acute alcohol use on delay discounting or the hypothesized interactions between acute alcohol use and drinking status with reward type. Our data suggest that heavier drinkers discount the value of delayed rewards more steeply than lighter drinkers. Delay discounting may therefore be a promising marker of heavy alcohol consumption in social drinkers. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Adenosine potentiates stimulatory effects on granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro of IL-3 and SCF, but not those of G-CSF, GM-CSF and IL-11

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Vacek, Antonín; Pospíšil, Milan; Weiterová, Lenka; Holá, Jiřina; Štreitová, Denisa; Znojil, V.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 5 (2006), s. 591-596 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/06/0015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : hematopoiesis * adenosine * cytokines Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2006

  10. Phase I trial of anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8 plus GM-CSF: Impact of body weight, immunogenicity and anti-GD2 response on pharmacokinetics and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Irene Y; Kushner, Brian H; Modak, Shakeel; Basu, Ellen M; Roberts, Stephen S; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2017-01-01

    Fifty-seven stage 4 patients with refractory/relapsed neuroblastoma were enrolled in a phase I trial (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01757626) using humanized anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8 in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The influence of body weight and human anti-human antibody (HAHA) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of hu3F8, and the effect of de novo anti-GD2 response on patient outcome were explored. Serum samples before hu3F8 infusion, and serially up to day 12 during treatment cycle #1, and at 5 min after each hu3F8 infusion for all subsequent cycles were collected. PK was analyzed using non-compartmental modeling. Immunogenicity was assayed by HAHA response, and vaccination effect by induced host anti-GD2 response measured periodically until disease progression or last followup. Progression-free and overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Despite dosing being based on body weight, smaller patients had consistently lower area-under-the-curve and faster clearance over the 15 dose levels (0.9 to 9.6 mg/kg per treatment cycle) in this trial. Positive HAHA, defined by the upper limit of normal, when measured within 10 days from the last hu3F8 dose received, was associated with significantly lower serum hu3F8. Despite prior sensitization to other anti-GD2 antibody, e.g. mouse 3F8 or ch14.18, 75% of the patients never developed HAHA response even after getting more treatment cycles. Hu3F8 induced a de novo anti-GD2 response in patients, which was prognostic of progression-free survival. We conclude that hu3F8 had low immunogenicity. During treatment, positive HAHA and low body weight affected PK adversely, whereas induced anti-GD2 response was an outcome predictor.

  11. Chemoimmunotherapy in mice carrying HPV16-associated, MHC class I+ and class I- tumours: effects of CBM-4A potentiated with IL-2, IL-12, GM-CSF and genetically modified tumour vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Indrová, Marie; Bubeník, Jan; Mikyšková, Romana; Mendoza, Luis; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Jandlová, Táňa; Jinoch, P.; Šmahel, M.; Vonka, V.; Pajtasz-Piasecka, E.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2003), s. 691-695 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC7148; GA ČR GA301/00/0114; GA ČR GA301/01/0985; GA AV ČR IAA5052203; GA AV ČR IAA7052002 Grant - others:KBN(PL) P04A12314; Liga proti rakovině(CZ) - Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : chemotherapy -induced residual tumour disease * immunotherapy * HPV16-associated tumours Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 2.536, year: 2003

  12. Delayed Auditory Feedback and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfordresher, Peter Q.; Dalla Bella, Simone

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that timing of rhythm production is disrupted by delayed auditory feedback (DAF), and that disruption varies with delay length. We tested the hypothesis that disruption depends on the state of the movement trajectory at the onset of DAF. Participants tapped isochronous rhythms at a rate specified by a metronome while hearing DAF…

  13. #FakeNobelDelayReasons

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Tuesday’s hour-long delay of the Nobel Prize in Physics announcement was (and still is) quite the cause for speculation. But on the Twittersphere, it was simply the catalyst for some fantastic puns, so-bad-they're-good physics jokes and other shenanigans. Here are some of our favourite #FakeNobelDelayReasons.    

  14. Picosecond resolution programmable delay line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suchenek, Mariusz

    2009-01-01

    The note presents implementation of a programmable delay line for digital signals. The tested circuit has a subnanosecond delay range programmable with a resolution of picoseconds. Implementation of the circuit was based on low-cost components, easily available on the market. (technical design note)

  15. Finding determinants of audit delay by pooled OLS regression analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Vuko

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to investigate determinants of audit delay. Audit delay is measured as the length of time (i.e. the number of calendar days from the fiscal year-end to the audit report date. It is important to understand factors that influence audit delay since it directly affects the timeliness of financial reporting. The research is conducted on a sample of Croatian listed companies, covering the period of four years (from 2008 to 2011. We use pooled OLS regression analysis, modelling audit delay as a function of the following explanatory variables: audit firm type, audit opinion, profitability, leverage, inventory and receivables to total assets, absolute value of total accruals, company size and audit committee existence. Our results indicate that audit committee existence, profitability and leverage are statistically significant determinants of audit delay in Croatia.

  16. Project delay analysis of HRSG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvianita; Novega, A. S.; Rosyid, D. M.; Suntoyo

    2017-08-01

    Completion of HRSG (Heat Recovery Steam Generator) fabrication project sometimes is not sufficient with the targeted time written on the contract. The delay on fabrication process can cause some disadvantages for fabricator, including forfeit payment, delay on HRSG construction process up until HRSG trials delay. In this paper, the author is using semi quantitative on HRSG pressure part fabrication delay with configuration plant 1 GT (Gas Turbine) + 1 HRSG + 1 STG (Steam Turbine Generator) using bow-tie analysis method. Bow-tie analysis method is a combination from FTA (Fault tree analysis) and ETA (Event tree analysis) to develop the risk matrix of HRSG. The result from FTA analysis is use as a threat for preventive measure. The result from ETA analysis is use as impact from fabrication delay.

  17. Delayed radiation neuropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagashima, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Beppu, H.; Hirose, K.; Yamada, K. (Tokyo Metropolitan Neurological Hospital (Japan))

    1981-07-01

    A case of cervical plexus neuropathy was reported in association with chronic radio-dermatitis, myxedema with thyroid adenoma and epiglottic tumor. A 38-year-old man has noticed muscle weakness and wasting of the right shoulder girdle since age 33. A detailed history taking revealed a previous irradiation to the neck because of the cervical lymphadenopathy at age 10 (X-ray 3,000 rads), keroid skin change at age 19, obesity and edema since 26, and hoarseness at 34. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a tumor on the right vocal cord, diagnosed as benign papilloma by histological study. In addition, there were chronic radio-dermatitis around the neck, primary hypothyroidism with a benign functioning adenoma on the right lobe of the thyroid, the right phrenic nerve palsy and the right recurrent nerve palsy. All these lesions were considered to be the late sequellae of radiation to the neck in childhood. Other neurological signs were weakness and amyotrophy of the right shoulder girdle with patchy sensory loss, and areflexia of the right arm. Gross power was fairly well preserved in the right hand. EMG showed neurogenic changes in the tested muscles, suggesting a peripheral nerve lesion. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. No abnormal findings were revealed by myelography and spinal CT. The neurological findings of the patient were compatible with the diagnosis of middle cervical plexus palsy apparently due to late radiation effect. In the literature eight cases of post-radiation neuropathy with a long latency have been reported. The present case with the longest latency after the radiation should be included in the series of the reported cases of ''delayed radiation neuropathy.'' (author).

  18. Delayed radiation neuropathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Toshiko; Miyamoto, Kazuto; Beppu, Hirokuni; Hirose, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Katsuhiro

    1981-01-01

    A case of cervical plexus neuropathy was reported in association with chronic radio-dermatitis, myxedema with thyroid adenoma and epiglottic tumor. A 38-year-old man has noticed muscle weakness and wasting of the right shoulder girdle since age 33. A detailed history taking revealed a previous irradiation to the neck because of the cervical lymphadenopathy at age 10 (X-ray 3,000 rads), keroid skin change at age 19, obesity and edema since 26, and hoarseness at 34. Laryngoscopic examination revealed a tumor on the right vocal cord, diagnosed as benign papilloma by histological study. In addition, there were chronic radio-dermatitis around the neck, primary hypothyroidism with a benign functioning adenoma on the right lobe of the thyroid, the right phrenic nerve palsy and the right recurrent nerve palsy. All these lesions were considered to be the late sequellae of radiation to the neck in childhood. Other neurological signs were weakness and amyotrophy of the right shoulder girdle with patchy sensory loss, and areflexia of the right arm. Gross power was fairly well preserved in the right hand. EMG showed neurogenic changes in the tested muscles, suggesting a peripheral nerve lesion. Nerve conduction velocities were normal. No abnormal findings were revealed by myelography and spinal CT. The neurological findings of the patient were compatible with the diagnosis of middle cervical plexus palsy apparently due to late radiation effect. In the literature eight cases of post-radiation neuropathy with a long latency have been reported. The present case with the longest latency after the radiation should be included in the series of the reported cases of ''delayed radiation neuropathy.'' (author)

  19. Modelling the Probability Density Function of IPTV Traffic Packet Delay Variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Halas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with modelling the Probability density function of IPTV traffic packet delay variation. The use of this modelling is in an efficient de-jitter buffer estimation. When an IP packet travels across a network, it experiences delay and its variation. This variation is caused by routing, queueing systems and other influences like the processing delay of the network nodes. When we try to separate these at least three types of delay variation, we need a way to measure these types separately. This work is aimed to the delay variation caused by queueing systems which has the main implications to the form of the Probability density function.

  20. [Neuropsychomotor developmental delay: conceptual map, term definitions, uses and limitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornelas, Lílian de Fátima; Duarte, Neuza Maria de Castro; Magalhães, Lívia de Castro

    2015-01-01

    To retrieve the origin of the term neuropsychomotor developmental delay" (NPMD), its conceptual evolution over time, and to build a conceptual map based on literature review. A literature search was performed in the SciELO Brazil, Web of Science, Science Direct, OneFile (GALE), Pubmed (Medline), Whiley Online, and Springer databases, from January of 1940 to January of 2013, using the following keywords NPMD delay, NPMD retardation, developmental delay, and global developmental delay. A total of 71 articles were selected, which were used to build the conceptual map of the term. Of the 71 references, 55 were international and 16 national. The terms developmental delay and global developmental delay were the most frequently used in the international literature and, in Brazil, delayed NPMD was the most often used. The term developmental delay emerged in the mid 1940s, gaining momentum in the 1990 s. In Brazil, the term delayed NPMD started to be used in the 1980s, and has been frequently cited and published in the literature. Delayed development was a characteristic of 13 morbidities described in 23 references. Regarding the type of use, 19 references were found, with seven forms of use. Among the references, 34 had definitions of the term, and 16 different concepts were identified. Developmental delay is addressed in the international and national literature under different names, various applications, and heterogeneous concepts. Internationally, ways to improve communication between professionals have been indicated, with standardized definition of the term and use in very specific situations up to the fifth year of life, which was not found in Brazilian publications. Copyright © 2014 Associação de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor primes interleukin-13 production by macrophages via protease-activated receptor-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Manabu; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Ono, Tomomichi; Sakamoto, Arisa; Narahara, Shinji; Sugiuchi, Hiroyuki; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-04-01

    Chronic inflammation is often linked to the presence of type 2-polarized macrophages, which are induced by the T helper type 2 cytokines interleukin-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13). IL-13 is a key mediator of tissue fibrosis caused by T helper type 2-based inflammation. Human neutrophil elastase (HNE) plays a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. This study investigated the priming effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on IL-13 expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE. Adherent macrophages were obtained from primary cultures of human mononuclear cells. Expression of IL-13 mRNA and protein by GM-CSF-dependent macrophages was investigated after stimulation with HNE, using the polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. GM-CSF had a priming effect on IL-13 mRNA and protein expression by macrophages stimulated with HNE, while this effect was not observed for various other cytokines. GM-CSF-dependent macrophages showed a significant increase in the expression of protease activated receptor-2 (PAR-2) mRNA and protein. The response of IL-13 mRNA to HNE was significantly decreased by pretreatment with alpha1-antitrypsin, a PAR-2 antibody (SAM11), or a PAR-2 antagonist (ENMD-1068). These findings suggest that stimulation with HNE can induce IL-13 production by macrophages, especially GM-CSF-dependent macrophages. Accordingly, neutrophil elastase may have a key role in fibrosis associated with chronic inflammation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of Confounding in Studies of Delay and Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Marie Louise; Vedsted, Peter; Frydenberg, Morten

    BACKGROUND: Whether longer time to diagnosis (diagnostic delay) in patients with cancer symptoms is directly and independently associated with poor prognosis cannot be determined in randomised controlled trials. Analysis of observational data is therefore necessary. Many previous studies of the i......BACKGROUND: Whether longer time to diagnosis (diagnostic delay) in patients with cancer symptoms is directly and independently associated with poor prognosis cannot be determined in randomised controlled trials. Analysis of observational data is therefore necessary. Many previous studies......) Clarify which factors are considered confounders or intermediate variables in the literature. 2) Assess how and to what extent these factors bias survival estimates. CONSIDERATIONS: As illustrated in Figure 1, symptoms of cancer may alert patients, GP's, and hospital doctors differently and influence both...... delay and survival time in different ways. We therefore assume that the impact of confounding factors depends on the type of delay studied (e.g., patient delay, GP delay, referral delay, or treatment delay). MATERIALS & METHODS: The project includes systematic review and methodological developments...

  3. Flight delay performance at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grigoriy Yablonsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main objective of this paper is to determine the annual cyclical flight delays at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Then using other data such as annual precipitation, passenger and aircraft traffic volumes and other factors, we attempted to correlate these factors with overall delays. These data could assist airport management in predicting periods of flight delay.Design/methodology/approach: Data were taken and analyzed from the data base “Research and Innovation Technology Administration” (RITA for the years 2005-2011 for Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. The data included 2.8 million flights originating and departing from this airport. Data were also gathered from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA showing precipitation. Additional data were gathered from the FAA regarding delay causes, number and types of delays and changes to the infrastructure of ATL airportFindings: There is a repeatable annual pattern of delays at ATL that can be modeled using delay data from the Bureau of Transportation Statistics. This pattern appears to be caused primarily by the frequency and amount of precipitation that falls at ATL and by the amount of flights that arrive and depart at ATL.Originality/value: This information could assist airport operations personnel, FAA air traffic controllers and airlines in anticipating and mitigating delays at specific times of the year.

  4. Convergent dynamics for multistable delayed neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shih, Chih-Wen; Tseng, Jui-Pin

    2008-01-01

    This investigation aims at developing a methodology to establish convergence of dynamics for delayed neural network systems with multiple stable equilibria. The present approach is general and can be applied to several network models. We take the Hopfield-type neural networks with both instantaneous and delayed feedbacks to illustrate the idea. We shall construct the complete dynamical scenario which comprises exactly 2 n stable equilibria and exactly (3 n − 2 n ) unstable equilibria for the n-neuron network. In addition, it is shown that every solution of the system converges to one of the equilibria as time tends to infinity. The approach is based on employing the geometrical structure of the network system. Positively invariant sets and componentwise dynamical properties are derived under the geometrical configuration. An iteration scheme is subsequently designed to confirm the convergence of dynamics for the system. Two examples with numerical simulations are arranged to illustrate the present theory

  5. Approximating chaotic saddles for delay differential equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S Richard; Campbell, Sue Ann

    2007-04-01

    Chaotic saddles are unstable invariant sets in the phase space of dynamical systems that exhibit transient chaos. They play a key role in mediating transport processes involving scattering and chaotic transients. Here we present evidence (long chaotic transients and fractal basins of attraction) of transient chaos in a "logistic" delay differential equation. We adapt an existing method (stagger-and-step) to numerically construct the chaotic saddle for this system. This is the first such analysis of transient chaos in an infinite-dimensional dynamical system, and in delay differential equations in particular. Using Poincaré section techniques we illustrate approaches to visualizing the saddle set, and confirm that the saddle has the Cantor-like fractal structure consistent with a chaotic saddle generated by horseshoe-type dynamics.

  6. Approximating chaotic saddles for delay differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, S. Richard; Campbell, Sue Ann

    2007-04-01

    Chaotic saddles are unstable invariant sets in the phase space of dynamical systems that exhibit transient chaos. They play a key role in mediating transport processes involving scattering and chaotic transients. Here we present evidence (long chaotic transients and fractal basins of attraction) of transient chaos in a “logistic” delay differential equation. We adapt an existing method (stagger-and-step) to numerically construct the chaotic saddle for this system. This is the first such analysis of transient chaos in an infinite-dimensional dynamical system, and in delay differential equations in particular. Using Poincaré section techniques we illustrate approaches to visualizing the saddle set, and confirm that the saddle has the Cantor-like fractal structure consistent with a chaotic saddle generated by horseshoe-type dynamics.

  7. Attosecond Delays in Molecular Photoionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppert, Martin; Jordan, Inga; Baykusheva, Denitsa; von Conta, Aaron; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2016-08-26

    We report measurements of energy-dependent photoionization delays between the two outermost valence shells of N_{2}O and H_{2}O. The combination of single-shot signal referencing with the use of different metal foils to filter the attosecond pulse train enables us to extract delays from congested spectra. Remarkably large delays up to 160 as are observed in N_{2}O, whereas the delays in H_{2}O are all smaller than 50 as in the photon-energy range of 20-40 eV. These results are interpreted by developing a theory of molecular photoionization delays. The long delays measured in N_{2}O are shown to reflect the population of molecular shape resonances that trap the photoelectron for a duration of up to ∼110 as. The unstructured continua of H_{2}O result in much smaller delays at the same photon energies. Our experimental and theoretical methods make the study of molecular attosecond photoionization dynamics accessible.

  8. Fundamental Matrix for a Class of Point Delay Linear Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, M. de la; Alastruey, C. F.

    1998-01-01

    It is difficult to establish explicit analytic forms for fundamental matrices of delayed linear systems. In this paper, an explicit form of exponential type is given for such a matrix in the case of punctual delays. The existence of real and complex fundamental matrices, for the case of real parameterizations of the differential system, is studied and discussed. Some additional commutativity properties involving the matrices parameters and the fundamental matrices as well as explicit expressions for the solution of the delayed differential system are also given. (Author)

  9. Effect of Time Delay on Recognition Memory for Pictures: The Modulatory Role of Emotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the modulatory role of emotion in the effect of time delay on recognition memory for pictures. Participants viewed neutral, positive and negative pictures, and took a recognition memory test 5 minutes, 24 hours, or 1 week after learning. The findings are: 1) For neutral, positive and negative pictures, overall recognition accuracy in the 5-min delay did not significantly differ from that in the 24-h delay. For neutral and positive pictures, overall recognition accuracy in the 1-week delay was lower than in the 24-h delay; for negative pictures, overall recognition in the 24-h and 1-week delay did not significantly differ. Therefore negative emotion modulates the effect of time delay on recognition memory, maintaining retention of overall recognition accuracy only within a certain frame of time. 2) For the three types of pictures, recollection and familiarity in the 5-min delay did not significantly differ from that in the 24-h and the 1-week delay. Thus emotion does not appear to modulate the effect of time delay on recollection and familiarity. However, recollection in the 24-h delay was higher than in the 1-week delay, whereas familiarity in the 24-h delay was lower than in the 1-week delay. PMID:24971457

  10. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor enhances the modulatory effect of cytokines on monocyte-derived multinucleated giant cell formation and fungicidal activity against Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magda Paula Pereira do Nascimento

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Multinucleated giant cells (MGC are cells present in characteristic granulomatous inflammation induced by intracellular infectious agents or foreign materials. The present study evaluated the modulatory effect of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF in association with other cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (IL-10 or transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β1 on the formation of MGC from human peripheral blood monocytes stimulated with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis antigen (PbAg. The generation of MGC was determined by fusion index (FI and the fungicidal activity of these cells was evaluated after 4 h of MGC co-cultured with viable yeast cells of P. brasiliensis strain 18 (Pb18. The results showed that monocytes incubated with PbAg and GM-CSF plus IFN-γ had a significantly higher FI than in all the other cultures, while the addition of IL-10 or TGF-β1 had a suppressive effect on MGC generation. Monocytes incubated with both pro and anti-inflammatory cytokines had a higher induction of foreign body-type MGC rather than Langhans-type MGC. MGC stimulated with PbAg and GM-CSF in association with the other cytokines had increased fungicidal activity and the presence of GM-CSF also partially inhibited the suppressive effects of IL-10 and TGF-β1. Together, these results suggest that GM-CSF is a positive modulator of PbAg-stimulated MGC generation and on the fungicidal activity against Pb18.

  11. Synchronization of Markovian jumping stochastic complex networks with distributed time delays and probabilistic interval discrete time-varying delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongjie; Yue Dong

    2010-01-01

    The paper investigates the synchronization stability problem for a class of complex dynamical networks with Markovian jumping parameters and mixed time delays. The complex networks consist of m modes and the networks switch from one mode to another according to a Markovian chain with known transition probability. The mixed time delays are composed of discrete and distributed delays, the discrete time delay is assumed to be random and its probability distribution is known a priori. In terms of the probability distribution of the delays, the new type of system model with probability-distribution-dependent parameter matrices is proposed. Based on the stochastic analysis techniques and the properties of the Kronecker product, delay-dependent synchronization stability criteria in the mean square are derived in the form of linear matrix inequalities which can be readily solved by using the LMI toolbox in MATLAB, the solvability of derived conditions depends on not only the size of the delay, but also the probability of the delay-taking values in some intervals. Finally, a numerical example is given to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed method.

  12. Congestion control for vehicular delay tolerant network routing protocols

    OpenAIRE

    Oham, Chuka Finbars

    2014-01-01

    The Vehicular Delay Tolerant Network (VDTN) is a special and challenging type of the Delay Tolerant Network because of its high mobility, frequent disconnections and nodal congestion features. These challenging features make it prone to congestion which leads to a considerable amount of message drops in the network. To minimize the impact of congestion in the network, we designed and implemented the Congestion Aware Spray and Wait (CASaW) routing protocol. We varied the buffer sizes of the no...

  13. The dynamics of second-order equations with delayed feedback and a large coefficient of delayed control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashchenko, Sergey A.

    2016-12-01

    The dynamics of second-order equations with nonlinear delayed feedback and a large coefficient of a delayed equation is investigated using asymptotic methods. Based on special methods of quasi-normal forms, a new construction is elaborated for obtaining the main terms of asymptotic expansions of asymptotic residual solutions. It is shown that the dynamical properties of the above equations are determined mostly by the behavior of the solutions of some special families of parabolic boundary value problems. A comparative analysis of the dynamics of equations with the delayed feedback of three types is carried out.

  14. Delays and networked control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Hetel, Laurentiu; Daafouz, Jamal; Johansson, Karl

    2016-01-01

    This edited monograph includes state-of-the-art contributions on continuous time dynamical networks with delays. The book is divided into four parts. The first part presents tools and methods for the analysis of time-delay systems with a particular attention on control problems of large scale or infinite-dimensional systems with delays. The second part of the book is dedicated to the use of time-delay models for the analysis and design of Networked Control Systems. The third part of the book focuses on the analysis and design of systems with asynchronous sampling intervals which occur in Networked Control Systems. The last part of the book exposes several contributions dealing with the design of cooperative control and observation laws for networked control systems. The target audience primarily comprises researchers and experts in the field of control theory, but the book may also be beneficial for graduate students. .

  15. Linear rotary optical delay lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerboukha, Hichem; Qu, Hang; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2016-03-01

    We present a semi-analytical solution for the design of a high-speed rotary optical delay line that use a combination of two rotating curvilinear reflectors. We demonstrate that it is possible to design an infinite variety of the optical delay lines featuring linear dependence of the optical delay on the rotation angle. This is achieved via shape optimization of the rotating reflector surfaces. Moreover, a convenient spatial separation of the incoming and outgoing beams is possible. For the sake of example, we present blades that fit into a circle of 10cm diameter. Finally, a prototype of a rotary delay line is fabricated using CNC machining, and its optical properties are characterized.

  16. Systematics in delayed neutron yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohsawa, Takaaki [Kinki Univ., Higashi-Osaka, Osaka (Japan). Atomic Energy Research Inst.

    1998-03-01

    An attempt was made to reproduce the systematic trend observed in the delayed neutron yields for actinides on the basis of the five-Gaussian representation of the fission yield together with available data sets for delayed neutron emission probability. It was found that systematic decrease in DNY for heavier actinides is mainly due to decrease of fission yields of precursors in the lighter side of the light fragment region. (author)

  17. Advanced gastric cancer. The findings of delayed phase dynamic CT and radiologic-histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monzawa, Shuichi; Omata, Kosaku; Nakazima, Hiroto; Yokosuka, Noriko; Ito, Atuko; Araki, Tsutomu

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe delayed phase dynamic CT findings of advanced (T2-T4) gastric cancer and to correlate with histopathologic findings. Quadruple phase dynamic CT including delayed imaging taken five minutes after the start of injection of contrast material was performed in 43 patients with 45 advanced gastric cancer and 20 control subjects with no gastric lesions. On delayed phase CT scans, the attenuation of the gastric wall was equal to or lower than that of the liver parenchyma in the control subjects, therefore, the presence of higher attenuation in the gastric wall was considered to be abnormal and defined as delayed enhancement. Histopathologic findings in the tumors showing delayed enhancement were compared with those in the tumors without this feature. Delayed enhancement was seen in 26 (57%) of the 45 tumors. Eleven of 25 differentiated-type tumors and 15 of 20 undifferentiated-type tumors showed delayed enhancement (p<.05). Delayed enhancement was seen in one of five medullary type tumors, in 11 of 25 intermediate-type tumors, and in 14 of 15 scirrhous-type tumors (p<.005). Delayed enhancement was frequently seen in the tumors with abundant fibrous tissue stroma. Delayed phase dynamic CT may be useful for the characterization of advanced gastric cancer. (author)

  18. Analytical applications for delayed neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eccleston, G.W.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical formulations that describe the time dependence of neutron populations in nuclear materials contain delayed-neutron dependent terms. These terms are important because the delayed neutrons, even though their yields in fission are small, permit control of the fission chain reaction process. Analytical applications that use delayed neutrons range from simple problems that can be solved with the point reactor kinetics equations to complex problems that can only be solved with large codes that couple fluid calculations with the neutron dynamics. Reactor safety codes, such as SIMMER, model transients of the entire reactor core using coupled space-time neutronics and comprehensive thermal-fluid dynamics. Nondestructive delayed-neutron assay instruments are designed and modeled using a three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code. Calculations on high-burnup spent fuels and other materials that contain a mix of uranium and plutonium isotopes require accurate and complete information on the delayed-neutron periods, yields, and energy spectra. A continuing need exists for delayed-neutron parameters for all the fissioning isotopes

  19. PROMPT Ia SUPERNOVAE ARE SIGNIFICANTLY DELAYED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskin, Cody; Scannapieco, Evan; Rhoads, James; Della Valle, Massimo

    2009-01-01

    The time delay between the formation of a population of stars and the onset of type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) sets important limits on the masses and nature of SN Ia progenitors. Here, we use a new observational technique to measure this time delay by comparing the spatial distributions of SNe Ia to their local environments. Previous work attempted such analyses encompassing the entire host of each SN Ia, yielding inconclusive results. Our approach confines the analysis only to the relevant portions of the hosts, allowing us to show that even so-called prompt SNe Ia that trace star formation on cosmic timescales exhibit a significant delay time of 200-500 million years. This implies that either the majority of Ia companion stars have main-sequence masses less than 3 M sun , or that most SNe Ia arise from double white dwarf binaries. Our results are also consistent with a SNe Ia rate that traces the white dwarf formation rate, scaled by a fixed efficiency factor.

  20. A note on exponential convergence of neural networks with unbounded distributed delays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu Tianguang [Intelligent Control Laboratory, Center for Systems and Control, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)]. E-mail: chutg@pku.edu.cn; Yang Haifeng [Intelligent Control Laboratory, Center for Systems and Control, Department of Mechanics and Engineering Science, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2007-12-15

    This note examines issues concerning global exponential convergence of neural networks with unbounded distributed delays. Sufficient conditions are derived by exploiting exponentially fading memory property of delay kernel functions. The method is based on comparison principle of delay differential equations and does not need the construction of any Lyapunov functionals. It is simple yet effective in deriving less conservative exponential convergence conditions and more detailed componentwise decay estimates. The results of this note and [Chu T. An exponential convergence estimate for analog neural networks with delay. Phys Lett A 2001;283:113-8] suggest a class of neural networks whose globally exponentially convergent dynamics is completely insensitive to a wide range of time delays from arbitrary bounded discrete type to certain unbounded distributed type. This is of practical interest in designing fast and reliable neural circuits. Finally, an open question is raised on the nature of delay kernels for attaining exponential convergence in an unbounded distributed delayed neural network.

  1. A note on exponential convergence of neural networks with unbounded distributed delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Tianguang; Yang Haifeng

    2007-01-01

    This note examines issues concerning global exponential convergence of neural networks with unbounded distributed delays. Sufficient conditions are derived by exploiting exponentially fading memory property of delay kernel functions. The method is based on comparison principle of delay differential equations and does not need the construction of any Lyapunov functionals. It is simple yet effective in deriving less conservative exponential convergence conditions and more detailed componentwise decay estimates. The results of this note and [Chu T. An exponential convergence estimate for analog neural networks with delay. Phys Lett A 2001;283:113-8] suggest a class of neural networks whose globally exponentially convergent dynamics is completely insensitive to a wide range of time delays from arbitrary bounded discrete type to certain unbounded distributed type. This is of practical interest in designing fast and reliable neural circuits. Finally, an open question is raised on the nature of delay kernels for attaining exponential convergence in an unbounded distributed delayed neural network

  2. Multivalued stochastic delay differential equations and related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We study the existence and uniqueness of a solution for the multivalued stochastic differential equation with delay (the multivalued term is of subdifferential type):. dX(t) + aφ (X(t))dt ∍ b(t,X(t), Y(t), Z(t)) dt. ⎨ +σ (t, X (t), Y (t), Z (t)) dW (t), t ∈ (s, T). X(t) = ξ (t - s), t ∈ [s - δ, s]. Specify that in this case the coefficients at time t ...

  3. A New Method for Calibrating the Time Delay of a Piezoelectric Probe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bengt Hurup

    1974-01-01

    A simple method for calibrating the time delay of a piezoelectric probe of the type often used in plasma physics is described.......A simple method for calibrating the time delay of a piezoelectric probe of the type often used in plasma physics is described....

  4. Global exponential stability of octonion-valued neural networks with leakage delay and mixed delays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Călin-Adrian

    2018-06-08

    This paper discusses octonion-valued neural networks (OVNNs) with leakage delay, time-varying delays, and distributed delays, for which the states, weights, and activation functions belong to the normed division algebra of octonions. The octonion algebra is a nonassociative and noncommutative generalization of the complex and quaternion algebras, but does not belong to the category of Clifford algebras, which are associative. In order to avoid the nonassociativity of the octonion algebra and also the noncommutativity of the quaternion algebra, the Cayley-Dickson construction is used to decompose the OVNNs into 4 complex-valued systems. By using appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals, with double and triple integral terms, the free weighting matrix method, and simple and double integral Jensen inequalities, delay-dependent criteria are established for the exponential stability of the considered OVNNs. The criteria are given in terms of complex-valued linear matrix inequalities, for two types of Lipschitz conditions which are assumed to be satisfied by the octonion-valued activation functions. Finally, two numerical examples illustrate the feasibility, effectiveness, and correctness of the theoretical results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Exploring delay causes of road construction projects in

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remon F. Aziz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Construction delays are a common phenomenon in civil engineering projects in Egypt including road construction projects. Therefore, it is essential to study and analyze causes of road construction delays. This paper studied a list of construction delay causes gathered from literature having different types of construction, different countries, different periods and different numbers of delay causes and delay groups. A questionnaire and personal interviews have formed the basis of this paper listing 293 delay causes. The questionnaire survey was distributed to 500 construction participants and 389 were received who represent consultants, contractors and site/design engineers excluding the owner representing the government in road projects as one party only. Relative Importance Index (RII is calculated and according to the highest values the top twenty and the least twenty delay causes of construction projects in Egypt are determined. A case study is analyzed and compared to the most important delay causes in the paper. The test results reveal good correlation of causes and groups between contractors and site/design engineers and between consultants and site design engineers and a somewhat low correlation between contractors and consultants. So there are no root causes that can be taking for granted to be most or least effective delay causes. Proposed model for predicting actual road construction project duration was developed; a real case study tested the accuracy of proposed model. According to the analysis of case study, the most contributing causes and groups to delays were discussed, and some future recommendations were proposed in order to control and minimize delays in road construction projects. These findings can be helpful for project managers to mitigate the road construction delays in Egypt. In order to effectively overcome the road construction delays in developing countries, suggestions are made for fundamental and large

  6. Opportunities for Process Monitoring Techniques at Delayed Access Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, Michael M.; Gitau, Ernest TN; Johnson, Shirley J.; Schanfein, Mark; Toomey, Christopher

    2013-09-20

    Except for specific cases where the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) maintains a continuous presence at a facility (such as the Japanese Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant), there is always a period of time or delay between the moment a State is notified or aware of an upcoming inspection, and the time the inspector actually enters the material balance area or facility. Termed by the authors as “delayed access,” this period of time between inspection notice and inspector entrance to a facility poses a concern. Delayed access also has the potential to reduce the effectiveness of measures applied as part of the Safeguards Approach for a facility (such as short-notice inspections). This report investigates the feasibility of using process monitoring to address safeguards challenges posed by delayed access at a subset of facility types.

  7. Fractional Delayer Utilizing Hermite Interpolation with Caratheodory Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang DU

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Fractional delay is indispensable for many sorts of circuits and signal processing applications. Fractional delay filter (FDF utilizing Hermite interpolation with an analog differentiator is a straightforward way to delay discrete signals. This method has a low time-domain error, but a complicated sampling module than the Shannon sampling scheme. A simplified scheme, which is based on Shannon sampling and utilizing Hermite interpolation with a digital differentiator, will lead a much higher time-domain error when the signal frequency approaches the Nyquist rate. In this letter, we propose a novel fractional delayer utilizing Hermite interpolation with Caratheodory representation. The samples of differential signal are obtained by Caratheodory representation from the samples of the original signal only. So, only one sampler is needed and the sampling module is simple. Simulation results for four types of signals demonstrate that the proposed method has significantly higher interpolation accuracy than Hermite interpolation with digital differentiator.

  8. UWB delay and multiply receiver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dallum, Gregory E.; Pratt, Garth C.; Haugen, Peter C.; Romero, Carlos E.

    2013-09-10

    An ultra-wideband (UWB) delay and multiply receiver is formed of a receive antenna; a variable gain attenuator connected to the receive antenna; a signal splitter connected to the variable gain attenuator; a multiplier having one input connected to an undelayed signal from the signal splitter and another input connected to a delayed signal from the signal splitter, the delay between the splitter signals being equal to the spacing between pulses from a transmitter whose pulses are being received by the receive antenna; a peak detection circuit connected to the output of the multiplier and connected to the variable gain attenuator to control the variable gain attenuator to maintain a constant amplitude output from the multiplier; and a digital output circuit connected to the output of the multiplier.

  9. Chaos in the delay logistic equation with discontinuous delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Ayan; Mukherjee, Debasis

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes a delay logistic equation which models a feedback control problem. Interval map associated to the system is derived. By calculating Lyapunov exponent, we indicate stable orbit and chaotic phenomenon respectively. The results are verified through computer simulation. We identify the parameter which controls the dynamics.

  10. Postraumatic delayed loss of vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partington, C.R.; Graves, V.B.; Ruetenacht, D.A.; Weinstein, J.M.; Strother, C.M.

    1989-01-01

    The imaging studies and clinical findings in 10 patients who suffered delayed vision loss beginning 1 day to 13 years after head trauma have been reviewed. Two different primary lesions could be identified: pseudoaneurysm of the internal carotid artery and carotid cavernous fistula. The pathologic changes associated with pseudoaneurysm included compression of the optic nerves and/or chiasm by arterial aneurysm and intracranial hematoma. Carotid cavernous fistula caused delayed vision loss by compression of the optic nerves and chiasm by saccular dilatation of the cavernous sinus and by abnormal orbital venous drainage with retinal venous stasis, retinal edema, and glaucoma

  11. Time delayed Ensemble Nudging Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Zhe; Abarbanel, Henry

    Optimal nudging method based on time delayed embedding theory has shows potentials on analyzing and data assimilation in previous literatures. To extend the application and promote the practical implementation, new nudging assimilation method based on the time delayed embedding space is presented and the connection with other standard assimilation methods are studied. Results shows the incorporating information from the time series of data can reduce the sufficient observation needed to preserve the quality of numerical prediction, making it a potential alternative in the field of data assimilation of large geophysical models.

  12. 49 CFR 236.563 - Delay time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Delay time. 236.563 Section 236.563 Transportation... Cab Signal Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.563 Delay time. Delay time of automatic... requirements of § 236.24 shall take into consideration the delay time. ...

  13. Separate valuation subsystems for delay and effort decision costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prévost, Charlotte; Pessiglione, Mathias; Météreau, Elise; Cléry-Melin, Marie-Laure; Dreher, Jean-Claude

    2010-10-20

    Decision making consists of choosing among available options on the basis of a valuation of their potential costs and benefits. Most theoretical models of decision making in behavioral economics, psychology, and computer science propose that the desirability of outcomes expected from alternative options can be quantified by utility functions. These utility functions allow a decision maker to assign subjective values to each option under consideration by weighting the likely benefits and costs resulting from an action and to select the one with the highest subjective value. Here, we used model-based neuroimaging to test whether the human brain uses separate valuation systems for rewards (erotic stimuli) associated with different types of costs, namely, delay and effort. We show that humans devalue rewards associated with physical effort in a strikingly similar fashion to those they devalue that are associated with delays, and that a single computational model derived from economics theory can account for the behavior observed in both delay discounting and effort discounting. However, our neuroimaging data reveal that the human brain uses distinct valuation subsystems for different types of costs, reflecting in opposite fashion delayed reward and future energetic expenses. The ventral striatum and the ventromedial prefrontal cortex represent the increasing subjective value of delayed rewards, whereas a distinct network, composed of the anterior cingulate cortex and the anterior insula, represent the decreasing value of the effortful option, coding the expected expense of energy. Together, these data demonstrate that the valuation processes underlying different types of costs can be fractionated at the cerebral level.

  14. Can the Onset of Type 2 Diabetes Be Delayed by a Group-Based Lifestyle Intervention in Women with Prediabetes following Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM? Findings from a Randomized Control Mixed Methods Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela O’Dea

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate a 12-week group-based lifestyle intervention programme for women with prediabetes following gestational diabetes (GDM. Design. A two-group, mixed methods randomized controlled trial in which 50 women with a history of GDM and abnormal glucose tolerance postpartum were randomly assigned to intervention (n=24 or wait control (n=26 and postintervention qualitative interviews with participants. Main Outcome Measures. Modifiable biochemical, anthropometric, behavioural, and psychosocial risk factors associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The primary outcome variable was the change in fasting plasma glucose (FPG from study entry to one-year follow-up. Results. At one-year follow-up, the intervention group showed significant improvements over the wait control group on stress, diet self-efficacy, and quality of life. There was no evidence of an effect of the intervention on measures of biochemistry or anthropometry; the effect on one health behaviour, diet adherence, was close to significance. Conclusions. Prevention programmes must tackle the barriers to participation faced by this population; home-based interventions should be investigated. Strategies for promoting long-term health self-management need to be developed and tested.

  15. Can the Onset of Type 2 Diabetes Be Delayed by a Group-Based Lifestyle Intervention in Women with Prediabetes following Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM)? Findings from a Randomized Control Mixed Methods Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, Angela; Tierney, Marie; McGuire, Brian E; Newell, John; Glynn, Liam G; Gibson, Irene; Noctor, Eoin; Danyliv, Andrii; Connolly, Susan B; Dunne, Fidelma P

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate a 12-week group-based lifestyle intervention programme for women with prediabetes following gestational diabetes (GDM). A two-group, mixed methods randomized controlled trial in which 50 women with a history of GDM and abnormal glucose tolerance postpartum were randomly assigned to intervention (n = 24) or wait control (n = 26) and postintervention qualitative interviews with participants. Modifiable biochemical, anthropometric, behavioural, and psychosocial risk factors associated with the development of type 2 diabetes. The primary outcome variable was the change in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) from study entry to one-year follow-up. At one-year follow-up, the intervention group showed significant improvements over the wait control group on stress, diet self-efficacy, and quality of life. There was no evidence of an effect of the intervention on measures of biochemistry or anthropometry; the effect on one health behaviour, diet adherence, was close to significance. Prevention programmes must tackle the barriers to participation faced by this population; home-based interventions should be investigated. Strategies for promoting long-term health self-management need to be developed and tested.

  16. Early-delayed radiation rhombencephalopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nightingale, S.; Dawes, P.J.D.K.; Cartlidge, N.E.F.; Newcastle upon Tyne Univ.

    1982-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman developed an early-delayed rhombencephalopathy 7 weeks after completing a course of radiotherapy to a glomus jugulare tumour. The clinical features, comprising nystagmus, skew strabismus, unilateral facial weakness, dysarthria and ataxia, are compared with four previously reported patients with this syndrome. (author)

  17. Another definition for time delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narnhofer, H.

    1980-01-01

    Time delay is defined by geometrical considerations which work in classical as well as in quantum mechanics, and its connection with the S-matrix and the virial is proven for potentials with V(x vector) and x vector V(x vector) vanishing as rsup(-1-epsilon) for r -> infinity. (Author)

  18. Weather delay costs to trucking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-01

    Estimates of the nations freight sector of transportation range to upwards of $600 billion of total gross domestic product with 70 percent of total value and 60 percent of total weight moving by truck. Weather-related delays can add significantly ...

  19. Diagnostic Delay in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølbaek, Karen; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Primdahl, Jette

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To prevent joint damage among patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is a need to minimize delays from the onset of symptoms until the initiation of appropriate therapy. The present study explored the factors that have an impact on the time it takes for Danish patients with RA...

  20. Design flaw could delay collider

    CERN Multimedia

    Cho, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    "A magnet for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) failed during a key test at the European particle physics laboratory CERN last week. Physicists and engineers will have to repair the damaged magnet and retrofit others to correct the underlynig design flaw, which could delay the start-up of the mammouth subterranean machine." (1,5 page)

  1. Concurrent Delay in Construction Disputes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleri, Sylvie Cécile

    the delay is contractually defined as a contractor's risk, the contractor is liable to pay liquidated damages to the employer; if it is not, the contractor can under certain circumstances claim an extension of time and in some cases also economic compensation from the employer. The situation where a given...

  2. Deconstructing delayed posttraumatic stress disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smid, G

    2011-01-01

    According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, delayed posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) must be diagnosed in individuals fulfilling criteria for PTSD if the onset of symptoms is at least six months after the trauma. The purpose of this thesis was to establish the

  3. Livermore blasted for project delay

    CERN Multimedia

    1999-01-01

    In a 12 page report issued last week, a review committee set up by the University of California has concluded that mismanagement and poor planning are to blame for significant cost overruns and delays in the construction of NIF, the worlds largest laser (1 page).

  4. Providing delay guarantees in Bluetooth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ait Yaiz, R.; Heijenk, Geert; Titsworth, F.

    2003-01-01

    Bluetooth polling, also referred to as Bluetooth MAC scheduling or intra-piconet scheduling, is the mechanism that schedules the traffic between the participants in a Bluetooth network. Hence, this mechanism is highly determining with respect to the delay packets experience in a Bluetooth network.

  5. Asymptotic Behavior of Solutions of Delayed Difference Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Diblík

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is devoted to the investigation of the asymptotic behavior of delayed difference equations with an integer delay. We prove that under appropriate conditions there exists at least one solution with its graph staying in a prescribed domain. This is achieved by the application of a more general theorem which deals with systems of first-order difference equations. In the proof of this theorem we show that a good way is to connect two techniques—the so-called retract-type technique and Liapunov-type approach. In the end, we study a special class of delayed discrete equations and we show that there exists a positive and vanishing solution of such equations.

  6. The energy spectrum of delayed neutrons from thermal neutron induced fission of 235U and its analytical approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doroshenko, A.Yu.; Tarasko, M.Z.; Piksaikin, V.M.

    2002-01-01

    The energy spectrum of the delayed neutrons is the poorest known of all input data required in the calculation of the effective delayed neutron fractions. In addition to delayed neutron spectra based on the aggregate spectrum measurements there are two different approaches for deriving the delayed neutron energy spectra. Both of them are based on the data related to the delayed neutron spectra from individual precursors of delayed neutrons. In present work these two different data sets were compared with the help of an approximation by gamma-function. The choice of this approximation function instead of the Maxwellian or evaporation type of distribution is substantiated. (author)

  7. Analysis of a first-order delay differential-delay equation containing two delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, C.; Vallée, R.; Delisle, C.

    1989-09-01

    An experimental and numerical analysis of the behavior of a two-delay differential equation is presented. It is shown that much of the system's behavior can be related to the stability behavior of the underlying linearized modes. A new phenomenon, mode crossing, is explored.

  8. The Ecological Rationality of Delay Tolerance: Insights from Capuchin Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addessi, Elsa; Paglieri, Fabio; Focaroli, Valentina

    2011-01-01

    Both human and non-human animals often face decisions between options available at different times, and the capacity of delaying gratification has usually been considered one of the features distinguishing humans from other animals. However, this characteristic can widely vary across individuals, species, and types of task and it is still unclear…

  9. Plain radiographic findings of lung cancer with delayed diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, Kyu Ok; Chung, Jin Ill

    1994-01-01

    In Korea, Lung cancer is the Second most common prevailing malignancy among male population next to stomach cancer. Although CT scan and MRI is widely used in the staging of lung cancer, plain chest x-ray still plays an important role in screening and diagnosis. Our intention was to review the confusing radiographic features which result in delayed diagnosis of lung cancer. Of the 160 patients with lung cancer evaluated by us, 62 patients(39%) with delayed diagnosis and average diagnostic duration of 5.1 months compared with 2.1 months for those without delay. We reviewed the plain chest x-ray findings of those 62 patients. The diagnosis of lung cancer was delayed more than half of the cases under the impression of intrathoracic tuberculosis. Upon reviewing the roentgenologic findings in patients with diagnostic delay, central type appeared as a small hilar or mediastinal mass with or without obstructive pneumonia. Peripheral type appeared as an ill-defined pulmonary module, a nodule hidden by overlapping structures, or as a lung cancer associated with pulmonary tuberculosis. Some cases were misinterpreted as extranodal spread of malignancy. To solve above mentioned problems, we recommend proper understanding of natural history of lung cancer, incorporation of high kVp technique in chest radiographs, routine acquisition of lateral chest radiograph to increase diagnostic accuracy, and appropriate use of CT scan in cases of difficult diagnosis

  10. Risk-factors for surgical delay following hip fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Reig, J; Salvador Marín, J; Ferrández Martínez, J; Orozco Beltrán, D; Martínez López, J F

    To identify pre-operative risk factors for surgical delay of more than 2 days after admission in patients older than 65 years with a hip fracture. A prospective observational study was conducted on 180 hip fractures in patients older than 65 years of age admitted to our hospital from January 2015 to April 2016. The data recorded included, patient demographics, day of admission, pre-fracture comorbidities, mental state, level of mobility and physical function, type of fracture, antiaggregant and anticoagulant medication, pre-operative haemoglobin value, type of treatment, and surgical delay. The mean age of the patients was 83.7 years. The mean Charlson Index was 2.8. The pre-fracture baseline co-morbidities were equal or greater than 2 in 70% of cases. Mean timing of surgery was 3.1 days. At the time of admission, 122 (67.7%) patients were fit for surgery, of which 80 (44.4%) underwent surgery within 2 days. A Charlson index greater than 2, anticoagulant therapy, and admission on Thursday to Saturday, were independently associated with a surgical delay greater than 2 days. The rate of hip fracture patients undergoing surgery within 2 days is low. Risk factors associated to surgical delay are non-modifiable. However, their knowledge should allow the development of protocols that can reduce surgical delay in this group of patients. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Human fMRI Reveals That Delayed Action Re-Recruits Visual Perception

    OpenAIRE

    Singhal, Anthony; Monaco, Simona; Kaufman, Liam D.; Culham, Jody C.

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral and neuropsychological research suggests that delayed actions rely on different neural substrates than immediate actions; however, the specific brain areas implicated in the two types of actions remain unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure human brain activation during delayed grasping and reaching. Specifically, we examined activation during visual stimulation and action execution separated by a 18-s delay interval in which subjects had to rememb...

  12. Relativistic time delays in the Dirac approach to nucleon-nucleus scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, T.

    1993-01-01

    In connection with a characteristic feature of the effective optical potential in the Dirac approach two types of time delays are considered in the relativistic eikonal approximation. One is obtained from the scattering amplitude and the other given by the wave packet motion in the interaction region. These time delays turn out to differ in sign at intermediate energies, in contrast to the agreement between corresponding nonrelativistic time delays. (orig.)

  13. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-11-09

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  14. Depressive illness delayed Hamlet's revenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, A B; Pickering, Neil

    2002-12-01

    If Hamlet had not delayed his revenge there would have been no play. Many explanations of the delay have been offered in the last four centuries. None is convincing. The interpretation which best fits the evidence best is that Hamlet was suffering from an acute depressive illness, with some obsessional features. He could not make a firm resolve to act. In Shakespeare's time there was no concept of acute depressive illness, although melancholy was well known. Melancholy, however, would have been seen as a character defect. In the tragic model the hero brings himself and others to ruin because of a character defect. Thus, at the time, the play conformed to the tragic model. With today's knowledge, it does not. This analysis adds to, but does not replace, other insights into the play.

  15. Air congestion delay: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Alberto Pamplona

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This article is a literature review of the air congestion delay and its costs. Air congestion is a worldwide problem. Its existence brings costs for airlines and discomfort for passengers. With the increasing demand for air transport, the study of air congestion has attracted the attention of many researchers around the world. The cause for the delays is erroneously attributed only to the lack of infrastructure investments. The literature review shows that other factors such as population growth, increasing standards of living, lack of operational planning and environmental issues exercise decisive influence. Several studies have been conducted in order to analyze and propose solutions to this problem that affects society as a whole.

  16. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-01-08

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  17. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong; Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh

    2017-01-01

    We present a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves relative to background motion at some unknown time in the video, and the goal is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Due to unreliability of motion between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Our method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  18. Coping with persistent environmental problems: systemic delays in reducing eutrophication of the Baltic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riku Varjopuro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we focus on systemic delays in the Baltic Sea that cause the problem of eutrophication to persist. These problems are demonstrated in our study by addressing three types of delays: (1 decision delay: the time it takes for an idea or perceived need to be launched as a policy; (2 implementation delay: the time from the launch of a policy to the actual implementation; (3 ecosystem delay: the time difference between the implementation and an actual measurable effects. A policy process is one characterized by delays. It may take years from problem identification to a decision to taking action and several years further for actual implementation. Ecosystem responses to measures illustrate that feedback can keep the ecosystem in a certain state and cause a delay in ecosystem response. These delays can operate on decadal scales. Our aim in this paper is to analyze these systemic delays and especially to discuss how the critical delays can be better addressed in marine protection policies by strengthening the adaptive capacity of marine protection. We conclude that the development of monitoring systems and reflexive, participatory analysis of dynamics involved in the implementation are keys to improve understanding of the systemic delays. The improved understanding is necessary for the adaptive management of a persistent environmental problem. In addition to the state of the environment, the monitoring and analysis should be targeted also at the implementation of policies to ensure that the societies are investing in the right measures.

  19. Teriparatide Induced Delayed Persistent Hypercalcemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirosshan Thiruchelvam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Teriparatide, a recombinant PTH, is an anabolic treatment for osteoporosis that increases bone density. Transient hypercalcemia is a reported side effect of teriparatide that is seen few hours following administration of teriparatide and resolves usually within 16 hours of drug administration. Persistent hypercalcemia, although not observed in clinical trials, is rarely reported. The current case describes a rare complication of teriparatide induced delayed persistent hypercalcemia.

  20. Assembly delay line pulse generators

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    Assembly of six of the ten delay line pulse generators that will power the ten kicker magnet modules. One modulator part contains two pulse generators. Capacitors, inductances, and voltage dividers are in the oil tank on the left. Triggered high-pressure spark gap switches are on the platforms on the right. High voltage pulse cables to the kicker magnet emerge under the spark gaps. In the centre background are the assembled master gaps.

  1. HAMLET treatment delays bladder cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Hou, Yuchuan; Svensson, Majlis; Holmqvist, Bo; Svanborg, Catharina

    2010-04-01

    HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that kills different types of cancer cells. Recently we observed a rapid reduction in human bladder cancer size after intravesical HAMLET treatment. In this study we evaluated the therapeutic effect of HAMLET in the mouse MB49 bladder carcinoma model. Bladder tumors were established by intravesical injection of MB49 cells into poly L-lysine treated bladders of C57BL/6 mice. Treatment groups received repeat intravesical HAMLET instillations and controls received alpha-lactalbumin or phosphate buffer. Effects of HAMLET on tumor size and putative apoptotic effects were analyzed in bladder tissue sections. Whole body imaging was used to study HAMLET distribution in tumor bearing mice compared to healthy bladder tissue. HAMLET caused a dose dependent decrease in MB49 cell viability in vitro. Five intravesical HAMLET instillations significantly decreased tumor size and delayed development in vivo compared to controls. TUNEL staining revealed selective apoptotic effects in tumor areas but not in adjacent healthy bladder tissue. On in vivo imaging Alexa-HAMLET was retained for more than 24 hours in the bladder of tumor bearing mice but not in tumor-free bladders or in tumor bearing mice that received Alexa-alpha-lactalbumin. Results show that HAMLET is active as a tumoricidal agent and suggest that topical HAMLET administration may delay bladder cancer development. Copyright (c) 2010 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Minimum Delay Moving Object Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Lao, Dong

    2017-05-14

    This thesis presents a general framework and method for detection of an object in a video based on apparent motion. The object moves, at some unknown time, differently than the “background” motion, which can be induced from camera motion. The goal of proposed method is to detect and segment the object as soon it moves in an online manner. Since motion estimation can be unreliable between frames, more than two frames are needed to reliably detect the object. Observing more frames before declaring a detection may lead to a more accurate detection and segmentation, since more motion may be observed leading to a stronger motion cue. However, this leads to greater delay. The proposed method is designed to detect the object(s) with minimum delay, i.e., frames after the object moves, constraining the false alarms, defined as declarations of detection before the object moves or incorrect or inaccurate segmentation at the detection time. Experiments on a new extensive dataset for moving object detection show that our method achieves less delay for all false alarm constraints than existing state-of-the-art.

  3. Development of delayed radiation necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, ShigFeki; Takagi, Terumasa; Shibata, Taichiro; Nagai, Hajime.

    1983-01-01

    The authors discussed the developing process of delayed radiation necrosis of the brain from the case of a 42-year-old female who developed intracranial hypertension and left hemiparesis 5 and a half years after radiotherapy for pituitary adenoma. The initial sign of radiation necrosis was from a CT scan taken 3 and a half years after radiotherapy showing an irregular low density lesion in the right temporal lobe. CT scan 2 years later demonstrated displacement of the midline structures to the left and a larger low density lesion with partially high density in the right MCA territory that was enhanced with intravenous contrast medium. Recovery after a right temporal lobectomy and administration of steroid hormone were uneventful. Eight months later there were no signs of raised intracranial pressure nor of neurological deficits. Tissues obtained from the right temporal lobe at lobectomy revealed the characteristic changes of delayed radiation necrosis; a mixture of fresh, recent, and old vascular lesions in the same specimen. From these findings, it was speculated that delayed radiation necrosis might initially occur within several years after radiotherapy and might gradually take a progressive and extended course, even in cases whose clinical symptoms develop much later. (author)

  4. Delay discounting of food by rhesus monkeys: Cocaine and food choice in isomorphic and allomorphic situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huskinson, Sally L; Woolverton, William L; Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel; Freeman, Kevin B

    2015-06-01

    Research on delay discounting has focused largely on nondrug reinforcers in an isomorphic context in which choice is between alternatives that involve the same type of reinforcer. Less often, delay discounting has been studied with drug reinforcers in a more ecologically valid allomorphic context where choice is between alternatives involving different types of reinforcers. The present experiment is the first to examine discounting of drug and nondrug reinforcers in both isomorphic and allomorphic situations using a theoretical model (i.e., the hyperbolic discounting function) that allows for comparisons of discounting rates between reinforcer types and amounts. The goal of the current experiment was to examine discounting of a delayed, nondrug reinforcer (food) by male rhesus monkeys when the immediate alternative was either food (isomorphic situation) or cocaine (allomorphic situation). In addition, we sought to determine whether there was a magnitude effect with delayed food in the allomorphic situation. Choice of immediate food and immediate cocaine increased with amount and dose, respectively. Choice functions for immediate food and cocaine generally shifted leftward as delay increased. Compared to isomorphic situations in which food was the immediate alternative, delayed food was discounted more steeply in allomorphic situations where cocaine was the immediate alternative. Notably, discounting was not affected by the magnitude of the delayed reinforcer. These data indicate that how steeply a delayed nondrug reinforcer is discounted may depend more on the qualitative characteristics of the immediate reinforcer and less on the magnitude of the delayed one. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. Relativity time-delay experiments utilizing 'Mariner' spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, P. B.; Anderson, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    Relativity predicts that the transit time of a signal propagated from the earth to a spacecraft and retransmitted back to earth ought to exhibit an additional, variable time delay. The present work describes some of the analytical techniques employed in experiments using Mariner spacecraft designed to test the accuracy of this prediction. Two types of data are analyzed in these relativity experiments; these include phase-coherent, two-way Doppler shift and round-trip, transit-time measurements. Results of Mariner 6 and 7 relativistic time-delay experiments are in agreement with Einstein's theory of general relativity with an uncertainty of 3%.

  6. Complex Dynamics of Delay-Coupled Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xiaochen

    2016-09-01

    This paper reveals the complicated dynamics of a delay-coupled system that consists of a pair of sub-networks and multiple bidirectional couplings. Time delays are introduced into the internal connections and network-couplings, respectively. The stability and instability of the coupled network are discussed. The sufficient conditions for the existence of oscillations are given. Case studies of numerical simulations are given to validate the analytical results. Interesting and complicated neuronal activities are observed numerically, such as rest states, periodic oscillations, multiple switches of rest states and oscillations, and the coexistence of different types of oscillations.

  7. Synchronization in networks with heterogeneous coupling delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Andreas; Radons, Günter; Bachrathy, Dániel; Orosz, Gábor

    2018-01-01

    Synchronization in networks of identical oscillators with heterogeneous coupling delays is studied. A decomposition of the network dynamics is obtained by block diagonalizing a newly introduced adjacency lag operator which contains the topology of the network as well as the corresponding coupling delays. This generalizes the master stability function approach, which was developed for homogenous delays. As a result the network dynamics can be analyzed by delay differential equations with distributed delay, where different delay distributions emerge for different network modes. Frequency domain methods are used for the stability analysis of synchronized equilibria and synchronized periodic orbits. As an example, the synchronization behavior in a system of delay-coupled Hodgkin-Huxley neurons is investigated. It is shown that the parameter regions where synchronized periodic spiking is unstable expand when increasing the delay heterogeneity.

  8. Delayed Transient Post-Traumatic Quadriplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaloud Al-Shaaibi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transient neurological deficit following cervical trauma have been reported following sports injuries, and has been referred to as cervical cord neurapraxia. The so-called "whiplash injuries" following minor motor vehicle collisions usually do not produce any neurological deficit. Here we report the case of a whiplash type of injury presenting with a delayed onset neurological deficit, which was followed by rapid and complete recovery. The patient, an otherwise healthy 34-year-old male, attended the emergency department of Sultan Qaboos University Hospital following a rear-end motor vehicle collision. We present images showing degenerative disc disease causing spinal canal narrowing and mild cord compression in the patient, but no spinal instability. Differential diagnoses are also discussed.

  9. Mutations in HIVEP2 are associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and dysmorphic features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steinfeld, Hallie; Cho, Megan T.; Retterer, Kyle; Person, Rick; Schaefer, G. Bradley; Danylchuk, Noelle; Malik, Saleem; Wechsler, Stephanie Burns; Wheeler, Patricia G.; van Gassen, Koen L I; Terhal, P. A.; Verhoeven, Virginie J M; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon A.; Monaghan, Kristin G.; Henderson, Lindsay B.; Chung, Wendy K.

    Human immunodeficiency virus type I enhancer binding protein 2 (HIVEP2) has been previously associated with intellectual disability and developmental delay in three patients. Here, we describe six patients with developmental delay, intellectual disability, and dysmorphic features with de novo likely

  10. Eye Movement Control in Scene Viewing and Reading: Evidence from the Stimulus Onset Delay Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, Steven G.; Nuthmann, Antje; Henderson, John M.

    2013-01-01

    The present study used the stimulus onset delay paradigm to investigate eye movement control in reading and in scene viewing in a within-participants design. Short onset delays (0, 25, 50, 200, and 350 ms) were chosen to simulate the type of natural processing difficulty encountered in reading and scene viewing. Fixation duration increased…

  11. Synchronization analysis of coloured delayed networks under ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper investigates synchronization of coloured delayed networks under decentralized pinning intermittent control. To begin with, the time delays are taken into account in the coloured networks. In addition, we propose a decentralized pinning intermittent control for coloured delayed networks, which is different from that ...

  12. Deterministic Brownian motion generated from differential delay equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Jinzhi; Mackey, Michael C

    2011-10-01

    This paper addresses the question of how Brownian-like motion can arise from the solution of a deterministic differential delay equation. To study this we analytically study the bifurcation properties of an apparently simple differential delay equation and then numerically investigate the probabilistic properties of chaotic solutions of the same equation. Our results show that solutions of the deterministic equation with randomly selected initial conditions display a Gaussian-like density for long time, but the densities are supported on an interval of finite measure. Using these chaotic solutions as velocities, we are able to produce Brownian-like motions, which show statistical properties akin to those of a classical Brownian motion over both short and long time scales. Several conjectures are formulated for the probabilistic properties of the solution of the differential delay equation. Numerical studies suggest that these conjectures could be "universal" for similar types of "chaotic" dynamics, but we have been unable to prove this.

  13. Low-complexity controllers for time-delay systems

    CERN Document Server

    Özbay, Hitay; Bonnet, Catherine; Mounier, Hugues

    2014-01-01

    This volume in the newly established series Advances in Delays and Dynamics (ADD@S) provides a collection of recent results on the design and analysis of Low Complexity Controllers for Time Delay Systems. A widely used indirect method to obtain low order controllers for time delay systems is to design a controller for the reduced order model of the plant. In the dual indirect approach, an infinite dimensional controller is designed first for the original plant model; then, the controller is approximated by keeping track of the degradation in performance and stability robustness measures. The present volume includes new techniques used at different stages of the indirect approach. It also includes new direct design methods for fixed structure and low order controllers. On the other hand, what is meant by low complexity controller is not necessarily low order controller. For example, Smith predictor or similar type of controllers include a copy of the plant internally in the controller, so they are technically ...

  14. An approach to constitutional delay of growth and puberty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf T Soliman

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Constitutional delay of growth and puberty is a transient state of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism associated with prolongation of childhood phase of growth, delayed skeletal maturation, delayed and attenuated pubertal growth spurt, and relatively low insulin-like growth factor-1 secretion. In a considerable number of cases, the final adult height (Ht does not reach the mid-parental or the predicted adult Ht for the individual, with some degree of disproportionately short trunk. In the pre-pubertal male, testosterone (T replacement therapy can be used to induce pubertal development, accelerate growth and relieve the psychosocial complaints of the adolescents. However, some issues in the management are still unresolved. These include type, optimal timing, dose and duration of sex steroid treatment and the possible use of adjunctive or alternate therapy including: oxandrolone, aromatase inhibitors and human growth hormone.

  15. Heterogeneous Cellular Networks with Spatio-Temporal Traffic: Delay Analysis and Scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Yi; Quek, Tony Q. S.; Ge, Xiaohu

    2016-01-01

    Emergence of new types of services has led to various traffic and diverse delay requirements in fifth generation (5G) wireless networks. Meeting diverse delay requirements is one of the most critical goals for the design of 5G wireless networks. Though the delay of point-to-point communications has been well investigated, the delay of multi-point to multi-point communications has not been thoroughly studied since it is a complicated function of all links in the network. In this work, we propo...

  16. The ecological rationality of delay tolerance: insights from capuchin monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addessi, Elsa; Paglieri, Fabio; Focaroli, Valentina

    2011-04-01

    Both human and non-human animals often face decisions between options available at different times, and the capacity of delaying gratification has usually been considered one of the features distinguishing humans from other animals. However, this characteristic can widely vary across individuals, species, and types of task and it is still unclear whether it is accounted for by phylogenetic relatedness, feeding ecology, social structure, or metabolic rate. To disentangle these hypotheses, we evaluated temporal preferences in capuchin monkeys, South-American primates that, despite splitting off from human lineage approximately 35 million years ago, show striking behavioural analogies with the great apes. Then, we compared capuchins' performance with that of the other primate species tested so far with the same procedure. Overall, capuchins showed a delay tolerance significantly higher than closely related species, such as marmosets and tamarins, and comparable to that shown by great apes. Capuchins' tool use abilities might explain their comparatively high preference for delayed options in inter-temporal choices. Moreover, as in humans, capuchin females showed a greater delay tolerance than males, possibly because of their less opportunistic foraging style. Thus, our results shed light on the evolutionary origins of self-control supporting explanations of delay tolerance in terms of feeding ecology. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Delay and death-thought accessibility: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Christopher T; Updegraff, John A

    2015-12-01

    The dual-process component of Terror Management Theory (TMT) proposes that different types of threats lead to increases in death-thought accessibility (DTA) after different delay intervals. Experimental studies of terror management threats' effect on DTA were collected and coded for their use of explicitly death-related (vs. not explicitly death-related) threats, and for their use of delay and task-switching during the delay. Results reveal that studies using death-related threats achieved larger DTA effect-sizes when they included more task-switching or a longer delay between the threat and the DTA measurement. In contrast, studies using threats that were not explicitly death-related achieved smaller DTA effect-sizes when they included more task-switching between the threat and the DTA measurement. These findings provide partial support for the dual-process component's predictions regarding delay and DTA. Limitations and future directions are discussed. © 2015 by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology, Inc.

  18. A Polynomial Estimate of Railway Line Delay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerreto, Fabrizio; Harrod, Steven; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2017-01-01

    Railway service may be measured by the aggregate delay over a time horizon or due to an event. Timetables for railway service may dampen aggregate delay by addition of additional process time, either supplement time or buffer time. The evaluation of these variables has previously been performed...... by numerical analysis with simulation. This paper proposes an analytical estimate of aggregate delay with a polynomial form. The function returns the aggregate delay of a railway line resulting from an initial, primary, delay. Analysis of the function demonstrates that there should be a balance between the two...

  19. Delay Variation Model with Two Service Queues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Rezac

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Delay in VoIP technology is very unpleasant issue and therefore a voice packets prioritization must be ensured. To maintain the high call quality a maximum information delivery time from the sender to the recipient is set to 150 ms. This paper focuses on the design of a mathematical model of end-to-end delay of a VoIP connection, in particular on a delay variation. It describes all partial delay components and mechanisms, their generation, facilities and mathematical formulations. A new approach to the delay variation model is presented and its validation has been done by experimention.

  20. Delay induced stability switch, multitype bistability and chaos in an intraguild predation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Hongying; Hu, Xi; Wang, Lin; Watmough, James

    2015-12-01

    In many predator-prey models, delay has a destabilizing effect and induces oscillations; while in many competition models, delay does not induce oscillations. By analyzing a rather simple delayed intraguild predation model, which combines both the predator-prey relation and competition, we show that delay in intraguild predation models promotes very complex dynamics. The delay can induce stability switches exhibiting a destabilizing role as well as a stabilizing role. It is shown that three types of bistability are possible: one stable equilibrium coexists with another stable equilibrium (node-node bistability); one stable equilibrium coexists with a stable periodic solution (node-cycle bistability); one stable periodic solution coexists with another stable periodic solution (cycle-cycle bistability). Numerical simulations suggest that delay can also induce chaos in intraguild predation models.

  1. Estimation of time- and state-dependent delays and other parameters in functional differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, K. A.

    1990-01-01

    A parameter estimation algorithm is developed which can be used to estimate unknown time- or state-dependent delays and other parameters (e.g., initial condition) appearing within a nonlinear nonautonomous functional differential equation. The original infinite dimensional differential equation is approximated using linear splines, which are allowed to move with the variable delay. The variable delays are approximated using linear splines as well. The approximation scheme produces a system of ordinary differential equations with nice computational properties. The unknown parameters are estimated within the approximating systems by minimizing a least-squares fit-to-data criterion. Convergence theorems are proved for time-dependent delays and state-dependent delays within two classes, which say essentially that fitting the data by using approximations will, in the limit, provide a fit to the data using the original system. Numerical test examples are presented which illustrate the method for all types of delay.

  2. Delay-enhanced coherence of spiral waves in noisy Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Qingyun; Perc, Matjaz; Duan Zhisheng; Chen Guanrong

    2008-01-01

    We study the spatial dynamics of spiral waves in noisy Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal ensembles evoked by different information transmission delays and network topologies. In classical settings of coherence resonance the intensity of noise is fine-tuned so as to optimize the system's response. Here, we keep the noise intensity constant, and instead, vary the length of information transmission delay amongst coupled neurons. We show that there exists an intermediate transmission delay by which the spiral waves are optimally ordered, hence indicating the existence of delay-enhanced coherence of spatial dynamics in the examined system. Additionally, we examine the robustness of this phenomenon as the diffusive interaction topology changes towards the small-world type, and discover that shortcut links amongst distant neurons hinder the emergence of coherent spiral waves irrespective of transmission delay length. Presented results thus provide insights that could facilitate the understanding of information transmission delay on realistic neuronal networks

  3. Fuzzy delay model based fault simulator for crosstalk delay fault test ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, a fuzzy delay model based crosstalk delay fault simulator is proposed. As design trends move towards nanometer technologies, more number of new parameters affects the delay of the component. Fuzzy delay models are ideal for modelling the uncertainty found in the design and manufacturing steps.

  4. Perceived Discrimination and Reported Delay of Pharmacy Prescriptions and Medical Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Houtven, Courtney Harold; Voils, Corrine I; Oddone, Eugene Z; Weinfurt, Kevin P; Friedman, Joëlle Y; Schulman, Kevin A; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Access to health care varies according to a person's race and ethnicity. Delaying treatment is one measure of access with important health consequences. OBJECTIVE Determine whether perceptions of unfair treatment because of race or ethnicity are associated with reported treatment delays, controlling for economic constraints, self-reported health, depression, and demographics. DESIGN Cross-sectional, observational study. PARTICIPANTS A randomly selected community sample of 181 blacks, 148 Latinos, and 193 whites in Durham County, NC. MEASUREMENTS A phone survey conducted in 2002 to assess discrimination, trust in medical care, quality of care, and access to care. Treatment delays were measured by whether or not a person reported delaying or forgoing filling a prescription and delaying or forgoing having a medical test/treatment in the past 12 months. Perceived discrimination was measured as unfair treatment in health care and as racism in local health care institutions. RESULTS The odds of delaying filling prescriptions were significantly higher (odds ratio (OR)=2.02) for persons who perceived unfair treatment, whereas the odds of delaying tests or treatments were significantly higher (OR=2.42) for persons who thought racism was a problem in health care locally. People with self-reported depression and people who reported not working had greater odds of delaying both types of care. CONCLUSIONS A prospective cohort study with both personal and macro measures of discrimination, as well as more refined measures of treatment delays, would help us better understand the relationship between perceived discrimination and treatment delays. PMID:16050850

  5. Guarded dependent type theory with coinductive types

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bizjak, Aleš; Grathwohl, Hans Bugge; Clouston, Ranald

    2016-01-01

    We present guarded dependent type theory, gDTT, an extensional dependent type theory with a later' modality and clock quantifiers for programming and proving with guarded recursive and coinductive types. The later modality is used to ensure the productivity of recursive definitions in a modular......, type based, way. Clock quantifiers are used for controlled elimination of the later modality and for encoding coinductive types using guarded recursive types. Key to the development of gDTT are novel type and term formers involving what we call delayed substitutions’. These generalise the applicative...... functor rules for the later modality considered in earlier work, and are crucial for programming and proving with dependent types. We show soundness of the type theory with respect to a denotational model....

  6. Precise delay measurement through combinatorial logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Gary R. (Inventor); Chen, Yuan (Inventor); Sheldon, Douglas J. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A high resolution circuit and method for facilitating precise measurement of on-chip delays for FPGAs for reliability studies. The circuit embeds a pulse generator on an FPGA chip having one or more groups of LUTS (the "LUT delay chain"), also on-chip. The circuit also embeds a pulse width measurement circuit on-chip, and measures the duration of the generated pulse through the delay chain. The pulse width of the output pulse represents the delay through the delay chain without any I/O delay. The pulse width measurement circuit uses an additional asynchronous clock autonomous from the main clock and the FPGA propagation delay can be displayed on a hex display continuously for testing purposes.

  7. Temperature Dependent Wire Delay Estimation in Floorplanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Andreas Thor; Liu, Wei; Nannarelli, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Due to large variations in temperature in VLSI circuits and the linear relationship between metal resistance and temperature, the delay through wires of the same length can be different. Traditional thermal aware floorplanning algorithms use wirelength to estimate delay and routability. In this w......Due to large variations in temperature in VLSI circuits and the linear relationship between metal resistance and temperature, the delay through wires of the same length can be different. Traditional thermal aware floorplanning algorithms use wirelength to estimate delay and routability....... In this work, we show that using wirelength as the evaluation metric does not always produce a floorplan with the shortest delay. We propose a temperature dependent wire delay estimation method for thermal aware floorplanning algorithms, which takes into account the thermal effect on wire delay. The experiment...

  8. Elite athletes and pubertal delay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapczuk, Karina

    2017-10-01

    Intensive physical training and participation in competitive sports during childhood and early adolescence may affect athletes' pubertal development. On the other hand, pubertal timing, early or late, may impact on an athlete selection for a particular sport. Genetic predisposition, training load, nutritional status and psychological stress determine athletes' pubertal timing. Athletes that practice esthetic sports, especially gymnasts, are predisposed to a delay in pubertal development. The growing evidence indicates that energy deficiency, not a systemic training per se, plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of functional hypothalamic hypogonadism in female athletes. Metabolic and psychologic stress activate hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and suppress hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. Female athletes who do not begin secondary sexual development by the age of 14 or menstruation by the age of 16 warrant a comprehensive evaluation and a targeted treatment. Somatic growth and sexual maturation of elite female athletes are largely sport-specific since each sport favors a particular somatotype and requires a specific training. Chronic negative energy balance resulting from a systemic physical training and inadequate energy intake may delay pubertal development in elite athletes. Youth athletes, especially those engaged in competitive sports that emphasize prepubertal or lean appearance, are at risk of developing relative energy deficiency in sport associated with disordered eating or eating disorders. Management strategies should address the complex conditions underlying functional hypothalamic hypogonadism.

  9. Delayed recombination and cosmic parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galli, Silvia; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Bean, Rachel; Silk, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    Current cosmological constraints from cosmic microwave background anisotropies are typically derived assuming a standard recombination scheme, however additional resonance and ionizing radiation sources can delay recombination, altering the cosmic ionization history and the cosmological inferences drawn from the cosmic microwave background data. We show that for recent observations of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy, from the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe satellite mission (WMAP) 5-year survey and from the arcminute cosmology bolometer array receiver experiment, additional resonance radiation is nearly degenerate with variations in the spectral index, n s , and has a marked effect on uncertainties in constraints on the Hubble constant, age of the universe, curvature and the upper bound on the neutrino mass. When a modified recombination scheme is considered, the redshift of recombination is constrained to z * =1078±11, with uncertainties in the measurement weaker by 1 order of magnitude than those obtained under the assumption of standard recombination while constraints on the shift parameter are shifted by 1σ to R=1.734±0.028. From the WMAP5 data we obtain the following constraints on the resonance and ionization sources parameters: ε α i <0.058 at 95% c.l.. Although delayed recombination limits the precision of parameter estimation from the WMAP satellite, we demonstrate that this should not be the case for future, smaller angular scales measurements, such as those by the Planck satellite mission.

  10. Asymptotic Delay Analysis for Cross-Layer Delay-Based Routing in Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Jacquet

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the problem of the evaluation of the delay distribution via analytical means in IEEE 802.11 wireless ad hoc networks. We show that the asymptotic delay distribution can be expressed as a power law. Based on the latter result, we present a cross-layer delay estimation protocol and we derive new delay-distribution-based routing algorithms, which are well adapted to the QoS requirements of real-time multimedia applications. In fact, multimedia services are not sensitive to average delays, but rather to the asymptotic delay distributions. Indeed, video streaming applications drop frames when they are received beyond a delay threshold, determined by the buffer size. Although delay-distribution-based routing is an NP-hard problem, we show that it can be solved in polynomial time when the delay threshold is large, because of the asymptotic power law distribution of the link delays.

  11. Robust Moving Horizon H∞ Control of Discrete Time-Delayed Systems with Interval Time-Varying Delays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yıldız Tascikaraoglu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, design of a delay-dependent type moving horizon state-feedback control (MHHC is considered for a class of linear discrete-time system subject to time-varying state delays, norm-bounded uncertainties, and disturbances with bounded energies. The closed-loop robust stability and robust performance problems are considered to overcome the instability and poor disturbance rejection performance due to the existence of parametric uncertainties and time-delay appeared in the system dynamics. Utilizing a discrete-time Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, some delay-dependent linear matrix inequality (LMI based conditions are provided. It is shown that if one can find a feasible solution set for these LMI conditions iteratively at each step of run-time, then we can construct a control law which guarantees the closed-loop asymptotic stability, maximum disturbance rejection performance, and closed-loop dissipativity in view of the actuator limitations. Two numerical examples with simulations on a nominal and uncertain discrete-time, time-delayed systems, are presented at the end, in order to demonstrate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  12. A delay-dependent approach to robust control for neutral uncertain neural networks with mixed interval time-varying delays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Chien-Yu

    2011-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of delay-dependent global robust stabilization for discrete, distributed and neutral interval time-varying delayed neural networks described by nonlinear delay differential equations of the neutral type. The parameter uncertainties are norm bounded. The activation functions are assumed to be bounded and globally Lipschitz continuous. Using a Lyapunov functional approach and linear matrix inequality (LMI) techniques, the stability criteria for the uncertain neutral neural networks with interval time-varying delays are established in the form of LMIs, which can be readily verified using the standard numerical software. An important feature of the result reported is that all the stability conditions are dependent on the upper and lower bounds of the delays. Another feature of the results lies in that it involves fewer free weighting matrix strategy, and upper bounds of the inner product between two vectors are not introduced to reduce the conservatism of the criteria. Two illustrative examples are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness and the reduced conservatism of the proposed method

  13. Modular networks with delayed coupling: Synchronization and frequency control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslennikov, Oleg V.; Nekorkin, Vladimir I.

    2014-07-01

    We study the collective dynamics of modular networks consisting of map-based neurons which generate irregular spike sequences. Three types of intramodule topology are considered: a random Erdös-Rényi network, a small-world Watts-Strogatz network, and a scale-free Barabási-Albert network. The interaction between the neurons of different modules is organized by relatively sparse connections with time delay. For all the types of the network topology considered, we found that with increasing delay two regimes of module synchronization alternate with each other: inphase and antiphase. At the same time, the average rate of collective oscillations decreases within each of the time-delay intervals corresponding to a particular synchronization regime. A dual role of the time delay is thus established: controlling a synchronization mode and degree and controlling an average network frequency. Furthermore, we investigate the influence on the modular synchronization by other parameters: the strength of intermodule coupling and the individual firing rate.

  14. Delay in the Diagnosis of Stable Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseinzadeh, Pooya; Iwinski, Henry J; Salava, Jonathon; Oeffinger, Donna

    2017-01-01

    Delays in the diagnosis of stable slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is common due to the vague symptomatology and the lack of awareness of this entity by healthcare providers. Delays in the diagnosis of this condition can lead to poor outcomes for the patients. This study was designed to identify factors that contributed to delays in the diagnosis or the treatment of patients with SCFE seen at our institution. A retrospective chart review of patients with the diagnosis of a stable SCFE who had undergone screw stabilization between 1989 and 2010 at our hospital was performed. For each patient, demographic data, the date of initial onset of symptoms, the date of the first visit to the medical provider, the type of provider seen initially (orthopaedic surgeon or not), the date of diagnosis of SCFE, the type of physician who made the diagnosis (orthopaedic surgeon or not), and the date of surgery were recorded. For each patient, the presenting symptom was recorded as hip, thigh, or knee pain. The effect of demographic data, presenting symptoms, and the type of initial provider seen on the delay to diagnosis was studied using 2 Cox models. A total of 149 patients with 196 stable SCFE were included. The average time from the first physician visit to diagnosis was 94 days in the group seen by a nonorthopaedic provider compared with an average of 2.9 days in the group seen by an orthopaedist (Pprovider versus 97% in the group seen by orthopaedic surgeons. It took significantly longer to be diagnosed with SCFE in patients who presented with initial knee pain (P=0.0097) compared with those who presented with hip pain at the initial visit. This study shows a significant delay in the diagnosis of SCFE in the United States, particularly in patients seen by nonorthopaedic providers initially. Level III-prognostic.

  15. Factors Associated with Delayed Cancer Diagnosis in Egyptian Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.R. Abdelkhalek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Despite tremendous importance of early cancer diagnosis in children, few studies on this topic have been conducted in Egypt. Early stage diagnosis can have a positive effect on prognoses and the quality of life of children with cancer. We investigated delays in the diagnosis of childhood cancers in Egypt and determined the factors associated with these delays. Methods This retrospective study included 172 children with cancer from two pediatric oncology units. The interval between symptoms onset and final diagnosis for each child was estimated and examined by univariate and multivariate analyses to determine correlations with the child's sex, age at diagnosis, type and site of malignancy, family residence, socioeconomic status, and parental educational level. Findings The median total diagnosis delay period was 47 days caused by patients and/or parents (8 days and diagnosis (28 days. Statistically significant patient factors associated with delayed diagnosis were age (<5 years, lower parental education, and socioeconomic status. Sex residence and family size were not significant. Malignancy type and tumor site significantly affected the time for diagnosis. The lowest median value was associated with germ cell tumors (GCTs and leukemia, and the highest value was in children with brain tumor. Missed diagnoses were initially recorded in 39.5% of the patients and were associated with patient and tumor factors. Interpretation Delayed diagnosis of childhood cancer is related to age, family, socioeconomic status and parental education, and cancer type and site. Efforts should be made to promote awareness, develop effective steps to eliminate possible contributing factors, and determine the best intervention method.

  16. Cucker-Smale model with normalized communication weights and time delay

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Young-Pil; Haskovec, Jan

    2017-01-01

    We study a Cucker-Smale-type system with time delay in which agents interact with each other through normalized communication weights. We construct a Lyapunov functional for the system and provide sufficient conditions for asymptotic flocking, i

  17. Oscillation Criteria in First Order Neutral Delay Impulsive Differential Equations with Constant Coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimitrova, M. B.; Donev, V. I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is dealing with the oscillatory properties of first order neutral delay impulsive differential equations and corresponding to them inequalities with constant coefficients. The established sufficient conditions ensure the oscillation of every solution of this type of equations.

  18. Delays by people living with HIV/AIDS in accessing antiretroviral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To understand, by qualitative enquiry, the underlying reasons and narratives ... denial, practical clinic constraints and appropriate types of health education. Keywords: qualitative research, delays, access, antiretroviral drugs, ARVs ...

  19. Recombinant Vaccinia Viruses Coding Transgenes of Apoptosis-Inducing Proteins Enhance Apoptosis But Not Immunogenicity of Infected Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachenko, Anastasiya; Richter, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    Genetic modifications of the oncolytic vaccinia virus (VV) improve selective tumor cell infection and death, as well as activation of antitumor immunity. We have engineered a double recombinant VV, coding human GM-CSF, and apoptosis-inducing protein apoptin (VV-GMCSF-Apo) for comparing with the earlier constructed double recombinant VV-GMCSF-Lact, coding another apoptosis-inducing protein, lactaptin, which activated different cell death pathways than apoptin. We showed that both these recombinant VVs more considerably activated a set of critical apoptosis markers in infected cells than the recombinant VV coding GM-CSF alone (VV-GMCSF-dGF): these were phosphatidylserine externalization, caspase-3 and caspase-7 activation, DNA fragmentation, and upregulation of proapoptotic protein BAX. However, only VV-GMCSF-Lact efficiently decreased the mitochondrial membrane potential of infected cancer cells. Investigating immunogenic cell death markers in cancer cells infected with recombinant VVs, we demonstrated that all tested recombinant VVs were efficient in calreticulin and HSP70 externalization, decrease of cellular HMGB1, and ATP secretion. The comparison of antitumor activity against advanced MDA-MB-231 tumor revealed that both recombinants VV-GMCSF-Lact and VV-GMCSF-Apo efficiently delay tumor growth. Our results demonstrate that the composition of GM-CSF and apoptosis-inducing proteins in the VV genome is very efficient tool for specific killing of cancer cells and for activation of antitumor immunity. PMID:28951871

  20. Estimation of delays and other parameters in nonlinear functional differential equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, H. T.; Lamm, P. K. D.

    1983-01-01

    A spline-based approximation scheme for nonlinear nonautonomous delay differential equations is discussed. Convergence results (using dissipative type estimates on the underlying nonlinear operators) are given in the context of parameter estimation problems which include estimation of multiple delays and initial data as well as the usual coefficient-type parameters. A brief summary of some of the related numerical findings is also given.