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  1. Dual Role of GM-CSF as a Pro-Inflammatory and a Regulatory Cytokine: Implications for Immune Therapy

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    Bhattacharya, Palash; Budnick, Isadore; Singh, Medha; Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Alharshawi, Khaled; Elshabrawy, Hatem; Holterman, Mark J.

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is generally recognized as an inflammatory cytokine. Its inflammatory activity is primarily due its role as a growth and differentiation factor for granulocyte and macrophage populations. In this capacity, among other clinical applications, it has been used to bolster anti-tumor immune responses. GM-CSF-mediated inflammation has also been implicated in certain types of autoimmune diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Thus, agents that can block GM-CSF or its receptor have been used as anti-inflammatory therapies. However, a review of literature reveals that in many situations GM-CSF can act as an anti-inflammatory/regulatory cytokine. We and others have shown that GM-CSF can modulate dendritic cell differentiation to render them “tolerogenic,” which, in turn, can increase regulatory T-cell numbers and function. Therefore, the pro-inflammatory and regulatory effects of GM-CSF appear to depend on the dose and the presence of other relevant cytokines in the context of an immune response. A thorough understanding of the various immunomodulatory effects of GM-CSF will facilitate more appropriate use and thus further enhance its clinical utility. PMID:25803788

  2. Delivery of GM-CSF to Protect against Influenza Pneumonia

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    Subramaniam, Renuka; Hillberry, Zachary; Chen, Han; Feng, Yan; Fletcher, Kalyn; Neuenschwander, Pierre; Shams, Homayoun

    2015-01-01

    Background Since adaptive immunity is thought to be central to immunity against influenza A virus (IAV) pneumonias, preventive strategies have focused primarily on vaccines. However, vaccine efficacy has been variable, in part because of antigenic shift and drift in circulating influenza viruses. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of innate immunity in protecting against influenza. Methods Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) contributes to maturation of mononuclear phagocytes, enhancing their capacity for phagocytosis and cytokine production. Results Overexpression of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the lung of transgenic mice provides remarkable protection against IAV, which depends on alveolar macrophages (AM). In this study, we report that pulmonary delivery of GM-CSF to wild type young and aged mice abrogated mortality from IAV. Conclusion We also demonstrate that protection is species specific and human GM-CSF do not protect the mice nor stimulates mouse immunity. We also show that IAV-induced lung injury is the culprit for side-effects of GM-CSF in treating mice after IAV infection, and introduce a novel strategy to deliver the GM-CSF to and retain it in the alveolar space even after IAV infection. PMID:25923215

  3. Delivery of GM-CSF to Protect against Influenza Pneumonia.

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    Renuka Subramaniam

    Full Text Available Since adaptive immunity is thought to be central to immunity against influenza A virus (IAV pneumonias, preventive strategies have focused primarily on vaccines. However, vaccine efficacy has been variable, in part because of antigenic shift and drift in circulating influenza viruses. Recent studies have highlighted the importance of innate immunity in protecting against influenza.Granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF contributes to maturation of mononuclear phagocytes, enhancing their capacity for phagocytosis and cytokine production.Overexpression of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF in the lung of transgenic mice provides remarkable protection against IAV, which depends on alveolar macrophages (AM. In this study, we report that pulmonary delivery of GM-CSF to wild type young and aged mice abrogated mortality from IAV.We also demonstrate that protection is species specific and human GM-CSF do not protect the mice nor stimulates mouse immunity. We also show that IAV-induced lung injury is the culprit for side-effects of GM-CSF in treating mice after IAV infection, and introduce a novel strategy to deliver the GM-CSF to and retain it in the alveolar space even after IAV infection.

  4. Pivotal Roles of GM-CSF in Autoimmunity and Inflammation

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    Shiomi, Aoi; Usui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor, which stimulates the proliferation of granulocytes and macrophages from bone marrow precursor cells. In autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, Th17 cells have been considered as strong inducers of tissue inflammation. However, recent evidence indicates that GM-CSF has prominent proinflammatory functions and that this growth factor (not IL-17) is critical for the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the mechanism of GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cell differentiation and the role of GM-CSF in the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are gaining increasing attention. This review summarizes the latest knowledge of GM-CSF and its relationship with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The potential therapies targeting GM-CSF as well as their possible side effects have also been addressed in this review. PMID:25838639

  5. Epithelial GM-CSF induction by Candida glabrata.

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    Li, L; Dongari-Bagtzoglou, A

    2009-08-01

    The main cytokine induced by the interaction of oral epithelial cells with C. glabrata is granulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF); however, the mechanisms regulating this response are unknown. Based on previously published information on the interactions of C. albicans with oral epithelial cells, we hypothesized that interaction with viable C. glabrata triggers GM-CSF synthesis via NF-kappaB activation. We found that C. glabrata-induced GM-CSF synthesis was adhesion-dependent, enhanced by endocytosis, and required fungal viability. NF-kappaB activation was noted during interaction of epithelial cells with C. glabrata, and pre-treatment with an NF-kappaB inhibitor partly inhibited GM-CSF synthesis. Blocking TLR4 with anti-TLR4 antibody did not inhibit GM-CSF production. In contrast, an anti-CDw17 antibody triggered significant inhibition of NF-kappaB activation and GM-CSF synthesis. beta-glucans did not stimulate GM-CSF synthesis, suggesting that the CDw17/NF-kappaB/GM-CSF pathway may be beta-glucan-independent. This study provides new insights into the mechanism of GM-CSF induction by C. glabrata.

  6. Regulation of dendritic cell development by GM-CSF: molecular control and implications for immune homeostasis and therapy.

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    van de Laar, Lianne; Coffer, Paul J; Woltman, Andrea M

    2012-04-12

    Dendritic cells (DCs) represent a small and heterogeneous fraction of the hematopoietic system, specialized in antigen capture, processing, and presentation. The different DC subsets act as sentinels throughout the body and perform a key role in the induction of immunogenic as well as tolerogenic immune responses. Because of their limited lifespan, continuous replenishment of DC is required. Whereas the importance of GM-CSF in regulating DC homeostasis has long been underestimated, this cytokine is currently considered a critical factor for DC development under both steady-state and inflammatory conditions. Regulation of cellular actions by GM-CSF depends on the activation of intracellular signaling modules, including JAK/STAT, MAPK, PI3K, and canonical NF-κB. By directing the activity of transcription factors and other cellular effector proteins, these pathways influence differentiation, survival and/or proliferation of uncommitted hematopoietic progenitors, and DC subset-specific precursors, thereby contributing to specific aspects of DC subset development. The specific intracellular events resulting from GM-CSF-induced signaling provide a molecular explanation for GM-CSF-dependent subset distribution as well as clues to the specific characteristics and functions of GM-CSF-differentiated DCs compared with DCs generated by fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand. This knowledge can be used to identify therapeutic targets to improve GM-CSF-dependent DC-based strategies to regulate immunity.

  7. Effects of prostaglandin E2 and cAMP elevating drugs on GM-CSF release by cultured human airway smooth muscle cells. Relevance to asthma therapy.

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    Lazzeri, N; Belvisi, M G; Patel, H J; Yacoub, M H; Chung, K F; Mitchell, J A

    2001-01-01

    Human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells release granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and express cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 (resulting in the release of prostaglandin [PG] E2) after stimulation with cytokines. Because COX-2 activity can regulate a number of inflammatory processes, we have assessed its effects, as well as those of agents that modulate cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), on GM-CSF release by HASM cells. Cells stimulated with a combination of proinflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1beta and tumor necrosis factor-alpha each at 10 ng/ml) for 24 h released significant amounts of PGE2 (measured by radioimmunoassay) and GM-CSF (measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Indomethacin and other COX-1/COX-2 inhibitors caused concentration-dependent inhibitions of PGE2 concomitantly with increases in GM-CSF formation. Addition of exogenous PGE2 or the beta2-agonist fenoterol, which increase cAMP, to cytokine-treated HASM cells had no effect on GM-CSF release unless COX activity was first blocked with indomethacin. The type 4 phosphodiesterase inhibitors rolipram and SB 207499 both caused concentration-dependent reductions in GM-CSF production. Thus, when HASM cells are activated with cytokines they release PGE2, which acts as a "braking mechanism" to limit the coproduction of GM-CSF. Moreover, agents that elevate cAMP also reduce GM-CSF formation by these cells.

  8. GM-CSF enhances tumor invasion by elevated MMP-2, -9, and -26 expression

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    Gutschalk, Claudia M; Yanamandra, Archana K; Linde, Nina; Meides, Alice; Depner, Sofia; Mueller, Margareta M

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) promotes tumor progression in different tumor models in an autocrine and paracrine manner. However, at the same time GM-CSF is used in cancer therapies to ameliorate neutropenia. We have previously shown in GM-CSF and G-CSF expressing or negative skin or head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that GM-CSF expression is associated with a highly angiogenic and invasive tumor phenotype. To determine the functional contribution of GM-CSF to tumor invasion, we stably transfected a GM-CSF negative colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT-29 with GM-CSF or treated the same cell line with exogenous GM-CSF. While GM-CSF overexpression and treatment reduced tumor cell proliferation and tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, respectively, it contributed to tumor progression. Together with an enhanced migratory capacity in vitro, we observed a striking increase in tumor cell invasion into the surrounding tissue concomitant with the induction of an activated tumor stroma in GM-CSF overexpressing or GM-CSF treated tumors. In a complex 3D in vitro model, enhanced GM-CSF expression was associated with a discontinued basement membrane deposition that might be mediated by the increased expression and activation of MMP-2, -9, and -26. Treatment with GM-CSF blocking antibodies reversed this effect. The increased presence and activity of these tumor cell derived proteases was confirmed in vivo. Here, expression of MMP-26 protein was predominantly located in pre- and early-invasive areas suggesting MMP-26 expression as an early event in promoting GM-CSF dependent tumor invasion

  9. Unique transcriptome signatures and GM-CSF expression in lymphocytes from patients with spondyloarthritis.

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    Al-Mossawi, M H; Chen, L; Fang, H; Ridley, A; de Wit, J; Yager, N; Hammitzsch, A; Pulyakhina, I; Fairfax, B P; Simone, D; Yi, Yao; Bandyopadhyay, S; Doig, K; Gundle, R; Kendrick, B; Powrie, F; Knight, J C; Bowness, P

    2017-11-15

    Spondyloarthritis encompasses a group of common inflammatory diseases thought to be driven by IL-17A-secreting type-17 lymphocytes. Here we show increased numbers of GM-CSF-producing CD4 and CD8 lymphocytes in the blood and joints of patients with spondyloarthritis, and increased numbers of IL-17A + GM-CSF + double-producing CD4, CD8, γδ and NK cells. GM-CSF production in CD4 T cells occurs both independently and in combination with classical Th1 and Th17 cytokines. Type 3 innate lymphoid cells producing predominantly GM-CSF are expanded in synovial tissues from patients with spondyloarthritis. GM-CSF + CD4 + cells, isolated using a triple cytokine capture approach, have a specific transcriptional signature. Both GM-CSF + and IL-17A + GM-CSF + double-producing CD4 T cells express increased levels of GPR65, a proton-sensing receptor associated with spondyloarthritis in genome-wide association studies and pathogenicity in murine inflammatory disease models. Silencing GPR65 in primary CD4 T cells reduces GM-CSF production. GM-CSF and GPR65 may thus serve as targets for therapeutic intervention of spondyloarthritis.

  10. MDSCs are involved in the protumorigenic potentials of GM-CSF in colitis-associated cancer.

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    Ma, Ning; Liu, Qilin; Hou, Lin; Wang, Yalin; Liu, Ziling

    2017-06-01

    Chronic inflammation is thought to be a major driving force for the development of colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC). As one member of proinflammatory cytokine family, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) has been identified to play a key role in CAC pathogenesis recently. The underlying mechanisms, however, remain largely unknown. In this study, we found that myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) accumulated increasingly in the lesions during the progression from colitis to cancer, which was critical for CAC formation. Importantly, this MDSC accumulation was controlled by GM-CSF. MDSC number decreased significantly in GM-CSF-deficient mice suffering from CAC induction, and transfusion of MDSCs from wild-type CAC-bearing mice into GM-CSF-deficient counterparts led to recurrence of CAC. Furthermore, the supernatants of CAC lesions or GM-CSF alone was sufficient to differentiate hematopoietic precursors into MDSCs. Addition of neutralizing anti-GM-CSF antibody impaired the MDSC-differentiating effects of the supernatants of CAC lesions. Overall, these findings shed new insights into the mechanisms of GM-CSF underlying CAC development, by inducing/recruiting CAC-promoting MDSCs. Blocking GM-CSF activity or MDSC function may represent new therapeutic strategies for CAC in clinic.

  11. The Activin A-Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Axis Contributes to the Transcriptome of GM-CSF-Conditioned Human Macrophages.

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    Nieto, Concha; Bragado, Rafael; Municio, Cristina; Sierra-Filardi, Elena; Alonso, Bárbara; Escribese, María M; Domínguez-Andrés, Jorge; Ardavín, Carlos; Castrillo, Antonio; Vega, Miguel A; Puig-Kröger, Amaya; Corbí, Angel L

    2018-01-01

    GM-CSF promotes the functional maturation of lung alveolar macrophages (A-MØ), whose differentiation is dependent on the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) transcription factor. In fact, blockade of GM-CSF-initiated signaling or deletion of the PPARγ-encoding gene PPARG leads to functionally defective A-MØ and the onset of pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. In vitro , macrophages generated in the presence of GM-CSF display potent proinflammatory, immunogenic and tumor growth-limiting activities. Since GM-CSF upregulates PPARγ expression, we hypothesized that PPARγ might contribute to the gene signature and functional profile of human GM-CSF-conditioned macrophages. To verify this hypothesis, PPARγ expression and activity was assessed in human monocyte-derived macrophages generated in the presence of GM-CSF [proinflammatory GM-CSF-conditioned human monocyte-derived macrophages (GM-MØ)] or M-CSF (anti-inflammatory M-MØ), as well as in ex vivo isolated human A-MØ. GM-MØ showed higher PPARγ expression than M-MØ, and the expression of PPARγ in GM-MØ was found to largely depend on activin A. Ligand-induced activation of PPARγ also resulted in distinct transcriptional and functional outcomes in GM-MØ and M-MØ. Moreover, and in the absence of exogenous activating ligands, PPARγ knockdown significantly altered the GM-MØ transcriptome, causing a global upregulation of proinflammatory genes and significantly modulating the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation and migration. Similar effects were observed in ex vivo isolated human A-MØ, where PPARγ silencing led to enhanced expression of genes coding for growth factors and chemokines and downregulation of cell surface pathogen receptors. Therefore, PPARγ shapes the transcriptome of GM-CSF-dependent human macrophages ( in vitro derived GM-MØ and ex vivo isolated A-MØ) in the absence of exogenous activating ligands, and its expression is primarily regulated by activin A

  12. GM-CSF augments the immunosuppressive capacity of neonatal spleen cells in vitro

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    Morrissey, P.J.; Ireland, R.

    1991-01-01

    Addition of exogenous granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) to cultures of adult murine spleen cells with sheep red blood cells (SRBC) results in an augmented plaque forming cell (PFC) response. The influence of GM-CSF on the ability of neonatal spleen cells to suppress the anti-SRBC plaque forming response of adult spleen cells was tested by adding GM-CSF to cultures of neonatal and adult spleen cells. The suppressive capacity of the neonatal spleen cells was augmented by exogenous GM-CSF. The augmented suppression of the neonatal spleen cells was dependent on a G-10 adherent population since the addition of GM-CSF to cultures containing G-10 passed neonatal spleen cells resulted in an augmented PFC response and not suppression. Neonatal splenic glass adherent cells were also capable of suppressing the response. Neonatal spleen cells or purified neonatal glass adherent spleen cells cultured in the presence of GM-CSF had markedly increased levels of PGE2 in the culture supernatant. Neonatal spleen cells cultured with GM-CSF had increased numbers of morphologically identifiable macrophages after 48 hr of culture. Both irradiation and G-10 passage of the neonatal spleen diminished the numbers of macrophages formed in response to GM-CSF, and both of these manipulations resulted in reversal of suppression in response to GM-CSF. Thus, the augmented suppressive capacity of neonatal spleen cells in response to GM-CSF is probably mediated by its ability to drive monocyte to macrophage differentiation as well as increase the suppressive capacity of the existing neonatal splenic macrophages by increasing their production of PGE2

  13. Targeting the GM-CSF receptor for the treatment of CNS autoimmunity.

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    Ifergan, Igal; Davidson, Todd S; Kebir, Hania; Xu, Dan; Palacios-Macapagal, Daphne; Cann, Jennifer; Rodgers, Jane M; Hunter, Zoe N; Pittet, Camille L; Beddow, Sara; Jones, Clare A; Prat, Alexandre; Sleeman, Matthew A; Miller, Stephen D

    2017-11-01

    In multiple sclerosis (MS), there is a growing interest in inhibiting the pro-inflammatory effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We sought to evaluate the therapeutic potential and underlying mechanisms of GM-CSF receptor alpha (Rα) blockade in animal models of MS. We show that GM-CSF signaling inhibition at peak of chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) results in amelioration of disease progression. Similarly, GM-CSF Rα blockade in relapsing-remitting (RR)-EAE model prevented disease relapses and inhibited T cell responses specific for both the inducing and spread myelin peptides, while reducing activation of mDCs and inflammatory monocytes. In situ immunostaining of lesions from human secondary progressive MS (SPMS), but not primary progressive MS patients shows extensive recruitment of GM-CSF Rα + myeloid cells. Collectively, this study reveals a pivotal role of GM-CSF in disease relapses and the benefit of GM-CSF Rα blockade as a potential novel therapeutic approach for treatment of RRMS and SPMS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. MafB antagonizes phenotypic alteration induced by GM-CSF in microglia

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    Koshida, Ryusuke, E-mail: rkoshida-myz@umin.ac.jp; Oishi, Hisashi, E-mail: hoishi@md.tsukuba.ac.jp; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru

    2015-07-17

    Microglia are tissue-resident macrophages which are distributed throughout the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that microglia are a unique myeloid population distinct from peripheral macrophages in terms of origin and gene expression signature. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a pleiotropic cytokine regulating myeloid development, has been shown to stimulate proliferation and alter phenotype of microglia in vitro. However, how its signaling is modulated in microglia is poorly characterized. MafB, a bZip transcriptional factor, is highly expressed in monocyte-macrophage lineage cells including microglia, although its role in microglia is largely unknown. We investigated the crosstalk between GM-CSF signaling and MafB by analyzing primary microglia. We found that Mafb-deficient microglia grew more rapidly than wild-type microglia in response to GM-CSF. Moreover, the expression of genes associated with microglial differentiation was more downregulated in Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF. Notably, such differences between the genotypes were not observed in the presence of M-CSF. In addition, we found that Mafb-deficient microglia cultured with GM-CSF barely extended their membrane protrusions, probably due to abnormal activation of RhoA, a key regulator of cytoskeletal remodeling. Altogether, our study reveals that MafB is a negative regulator of GM-CSF signaling in microglia. These findings could provide new insight into the modulation of cytokine signaling by transcription factors in microglia. - Highlights: • GM-CSF alters the phenotype of microglia in vitro more potently than M-CSF. • Transcription factor MafB antagonizes the effect of GM-CSF on microglia in vitro. • MafB deficiency leads to RhoA activation in microglia in response to GM-CSF. • We show for the first time the function of MafB in microglia.

  15. GM-CSF ameliorates microvascular barrier integrity via pericyte-derived Ang-1 in wound healing.

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    Yan, Min; Hu, Yange; Yao, Min; Bao, Shisan; Fang, Yong

    2017-11-01

    Skin wound healing involves complex coordinated interactions of cells, tissues, and mediators. Maintaining microvascular barrier integrity is one of the key events for endothelial homeostasis during wound healing. Vasodilation is observed after vasoconstriction, which causes blood vessels to become porous, facilitates leukocyte infiltration and aids angiogenesis at the wound-area, postinjury. Eventually, vessel integrity has to be reestablished for vascular maturation. Numerous studies have found that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) accelerates wound healing by inducing recruitment of repair cells into the injury area and releases of cytokines. However, whether GM-CSF is involving in the maintaining of microvascular barrier integrity and the underlying mechanism remain still unclear. Aim of this study was to investigate the effects of GM-CSF on modulation of microvascular permeability in wound healing and underlying mechanisms. Wound closure and microvascular leakage was investigated using a full-thickness skin wound mouse model after GM-CSF intervention. The endothelial permeability was measured by Evans blue assay in vivo and in vitro endothelium/pericyte co-culture system using a FITC-Dextran permeability assay. To identify the source of angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1), double staining is used in vivo and ELISA and qPCR are used in vitro. To determine the specific effect of Ang-1 on GM-CSF maintaining microvascular stabilization, Ang-1 siRNA was applied to inhibit Ang-1 production in vivo and in vitro. Wound closure was significantly accelerated and microvascular leakage was ameliorated after GM-CSF treatment in mouse wound sites. GM-CSF decreased endothelial permeability through tightening endothelial junctions and increased Ang-1 protein level that was derived by perictye. Furthermore, applications of siRNAAng-1 inhibited GM-CSF mediated protection of microvascular barrier integrity both in vivo and in vitro. Our data indicate that GM-CSF

  16. GM-CSF-Producing Th Cells in Rats Sensitive and Resistant to Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis.

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    Stojić-Vukanić, Zorica; Pilipović, Ivan; Vujnović, Ivana; Nacka-Aleksić, Mirjana; Petrović, Raisa; Arsenović-Ranin, Nevena; Dimitrijević, Mirjana; Leposavić, Gordana

    2016-01-01

    Given that granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is identified as the key factor to endow auto-reactive Th cells with the potential to induce neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) models, the frequency and phenotype of GM-CSF-producing (GM-CSF+) Th cells in draining lymph nodes (dLNs) and spinal cord (SC) of Albino Oxford (AO) and Dark Agouti (DA) rats immunized for EAE were examined. The generation of neuroantigen-specific GM-CSF+ Th lymphocytes was impaired in dLNs of AO rats (relatively resistant to EAE induction) compared with their DA counterparts (susceptible to EAE) reflecting impaired CD4+ lymphocyte proliferation and less supportive of GM-CSF+ Th cell differentiation dLN cytokine microenvironment. Immunophenotyping of GM-CSF+ Th cells showed their phenotypic heterogeneity in both strains and revealed lower frequency of IL-17+IFN-γ+, IL-17+IFN-γ-, and IL-17-IFN-γ+ cells accompanied by higher frequency of IL-17-IFN-γ- cells among them in AO than in DA rats. Compared with DA, in AO rats was also found (i) slightly lower surface density of CCR2 (drives accumulation of highly pathogenic GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cells in SC) on GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 lymphocytes from dLNs, and (ii) diminished CCL2 mRNA expression in SC tissue, suggesting their impaired migration into the SC. Moreover, dLN and SC cytokine environments in AO rats were shown to be less supportive of GM-CSF+IFN-γ+ Th17 cell differentiation (judging by lower expression of mRNAs for IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-23/p19). In accordance with the (i) lower frequency of GM-CSF+ Th cells in dLNs and SC of AO rats and their lower GM-CSF production, and (ii) impaired CCL2 expression in the SC tissue, the proportion of proinflammatory monocytes among peripheral blood cells and their progeny (CD45hi cells) among the SC CD11b+ cells were reduced in AO compared with DA rats. Collectively, the results indicate that the strain specificities in efficacy of several mechanisms

  17. Chimeric HIV-1 Envelope Glycoproteins with Potent Intrinsic Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) Activity*

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    Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed EnvGM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized EnvGM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric EnvGM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins. PMID:23565193

  18. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF activity.

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    Gözde Isik

    Full Text Available HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env. An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env makes the elicitation of such BrNAbs challenging. Co-stimulatory molecules can increase the immunogenicity of Env and we have engineered a soluble chimeric Env trimer with an embedded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF domain. This chimeric molecule induced enhanced B and helper T cell responses in mice compared to Env without GM-CSF. We studied whether we could optimize the activity of the embedded GM-CSF as well as the antigenic structure of the Env component of the chimeric molecule. We assessed the effect of truncating GM-CSF, removing glycosylation-sites in GM-CSF, and adjusting the linker length between GM-CSF and Env. One of our designed Env(GM-CSF chimeras improved GM-CSF-dependent cell proliferation by 6-fold, reaching the same activity as soluble recombinant GM-CSF. In addition, we incorporated GM-CSF into a cleavable Env trimer and found that insertion of GM-CSF did not compromise Env cleavage, while Env cleavage did not compromise GM-CSF activity. Importantly, these optimized Env(GM-CSF proteins were able to differentiate human monocytes into cells with a macrophage-like phenotype. Chimeric Env(GM-CSF should be useful for improving humoral immunity against HIV-1 and these studies should inform the design of other chimeric proteins.

  19. Recombinant rabies virus expressing dog GM-CSF is an efficacious oral rabies vaccine for dogs.

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    Zhou, Ming; Wang, Lei; Zhou, Songqin; Wang, Zhao; Ruan, Juncheng; Tang, Lijun; Jia, Ziming; Cui, Min; Zhao, Ling; Fu, Zhen F

    2015-11-17

    Developing efficacious oral rabies vaccines is an important step to increase immunization coverage for stray dogs, which are not accessible for parenteral vaccination. Our previous studies have demonstrated that recombinant rabies virus (RABV) expressing cytokines/chemokines induces robust protective immune responses after oral immunization in mice by recruiting and activating dendritic cells (DCs) and B cells. To develop an effective oral rabies vaccine for dogs, a recombinant attenuated RABV expressing dog GM-CSF, designated as LBNSE-dGM-CSF was constructed and used for oral vaccination in a dog model. Significantly more DCs or B cells were activated in the peripheral blood of dogs vaccinated orally with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than those vaccinated with the parent virus LBNSE, particularly at 3 days post immunization (dpi). As a result, significantly higher levels of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNAs) were detected in dogs immunized with LBNSE-dGM-CSF than with the parent virus. All the immunized dogs were protected against a lethal challenge with 4500 MICLD50 of wild-type RABV SXTYD01. LBNSE-dGM-CSF was found to replicate mainly in the tonsils after oral vaccination as detected by nested RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Taken together, our results indicate that LBNSE-dGM-CSF could be a promising oral rabies vaccine candidate for dogs.

  20. Multi-response model for rheumatoid arthritis based on delay differential equations in collagen-induced arthritic mice treated with an anti-GM-CSF antibody.

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    Koch, Gilbert; Wagner, Thomas; Plater-Zyberk, Christine; Lahu, Gezim; Schropp, Johannes

    2012-02-01

    Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) in mice is an experimental model for rheumatoid arthritis, a human chronic inflammatory destructive disease. The therapeutic effect of neutralizing the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by an antibody was examined in the mouse disease in a view of deriving a pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PKPD) model. In CIA mice the development of disease is measured by a total arthritic score (TAS) and an ankylosis score (AKS). We present a multi-response PKPD model which describes the time course of the unperturbed and perturbed TAS and AKS. The antibody acts directly on GM-CSF by binding to it. Therefore, a compartment for the cytokine GM-CSF is an essential component of the mathematical model. This compartment drives the disease development in the PKPD model. Different known properties of arthritis development in the CIA model are included in the PKPD model. Firstly, the inflammation, driven by GM-CSF, dominates at the beginning of the disease and decreases after some time. Secondly, a destructive (ankylosis) part evolves in the TAS that is delayed in time. In order to model these two properties a delay differential equation was used. The PKPD model was applied to different experiments with doses ranging from 0.1 to 100 mg/kg. The influence of the drug was modeled by a non-linear approach. The final mathematical model consists of three differential equations representing the compartments for GM-CSF, inflammation and destruction. Our mathematical model described well all available dosing schedules by a simultaneous fit. We also present an equivalent and easy reformulation as ordinary differential equation which grants the use of standard PKPD software.

  1. Granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF biological actions on human dermal fibroblasts

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    S Montagnani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Fibroblasts are involved in all pathologies characterized by increased ExtraCellularMatrix synthesis, from wound healing to fibrosis. Granulocyte Macrophage-Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF is a cytokine isolated as an hemopoietic growth factor but recently indicated as a differentiative agent on endothelial cells. In this work we demonstrated the expression of the receptor for GM-CSF (GMCSFR on human normal skin fibroblasts from healthy subjects (NFPC and on a human normal fibroblast cell line (NHDF and we try to investigate the biological effects of this cytokine. Human normal fibroblasts were cultured with different doses of GM-CSF to study the effects of this factor on GMCSFR expression, on cell proliferation and adhesion structures. In addition we studied the production of some Extra-Cellular Matrix (ECM components such as Fibronectin, Tenascin and Collagen I. The growth rate of fibroblasts from healthy donors (NFPC is not augmented by GM-CSF stimulation in spite of increased expression of the GM-CSFR. On the contrary, the proliferation of normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF cell line seems more influenced by high concentration of GM-CSF in the culture medium. The adhesion structures and the ECM components appear variously influenced by GM-CSF treatment as compared to fibroblasts cultured in basal condition, but newly only NHDF cells are really induced to increase their synthesis activity. We suggest that the in vitro treatment with GM-CSF can shift human normal fibroblasts towards a more differentiated state, due or accompanied by an increased expression of GM-CSFR and that such “differentiation” is an important event induced by such cytokine.

  2. Use of rhu-GM-CSF in pulmonary tuberculosis patients: results of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Brasil Pedral-Sampaio

    Full Text Available It has been postulated that deficient or incomplete clinical and/or microbiological response to tuberculosis treatment is associated with cell-mediated immunological dysfunction involving monocytes and macrophages. A phase 2 safety trial was conducted by treating patients with either recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhu-GM-CSF or a placebo, both in combination with anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Thirty-one patients with documented pulmonary tuberculosis were treated with rifampin/isoniazid for six months, plus pyrazinamide for the first two months. At the beginning of treatment, rhu-GM-CSF (125µg/M² was randomly assigned to 16 patients and injected subcutaneously twice weekly for four weeks; the other 15 patients received a placebo. The patients were accompanied in the hospital for two weeks, then monthly on an out patient basis, for 12 months. Clinical outcomes were similar in both groups, with no difference in acid-fast bacilli (AFB clearance in sputum at the end of the fourth week of treatment. Nevertheless, a trend to faster conversion to negative was observed in the rhu-GM-CSF group until the eighth week of treatment (p=0.07, after which all patients converted to AFB negative. Adverse events in the rhu-GM-CSF group were local skin inflammation and an increase in the leukocyte count after each injection, returning to normal 72 hours after rhu-GM-CSF injection. Three patients developed SGOP and SGPT > 2.5 times the normal values. All patients included in the GM-CSF group were culture negative at six months, except one who had primary TB resistance. None of the patients had to discontinue the treatment in either group. We conclude that rhu-GM-CSF adjuvant immunotherapy could be safely explored in a phase 3 trial with patients who have active tuberculosis.

  3. Use of rhu-GM-CSF in pulmonary tuberculosis patients: results of a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedral-Sampaio Diana Brasil

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been postulated that deficient or incomplete clinical and/or microbiological response to tuberculosis treatment is associated with cell-mediated immunological dysfunction involving monocytes and macrophages. A phase 2 safety trial was conducted by treating patients with either recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhu-GM-CSF or a placebo, both in combination with anti-tuberculosis chemotherapy. Thirty-one patients with documented pulmonary tuberculosis were treated with rifampin/isoniazid for six months, plus pyrazinamide for the first two months. At the beginning of treatment, rhu-GM-CSF (125µg/M² was randomly assigned to 16 patients and injected subcutaneously twice weekly for four weeks; the other 15 patients received a placebo. The patients were accompanied in the hospital for two weeks, then monthly on an out patient basis, for 12 months. Clinical outcomes were similar in both groups, with no difference in acid-fast bacilli (AFB clearance in sputum at the end of the fourth week of treatment. Nevertheless, a trend to faster conversion to negative was observed in the rhu-GM-CSF group until the eighth week of treatment (p=0.07, after which all patients converted to AFB negative. Adverse events in the rhu-GM-CSF group were local skin inflammation and an increase in the leukocyte count after each injection, returning to normal 72 hours after rhu-GM-CSF injection. Three patients developed SGOP and SGPT > 2.5 times the normal values. All patients included in the GM-CSF group were culture negative at six months, except one who had primary TB resistance. None of the patients had to discontinue the treatment in either group. We conclude that rhu-GM-CSF adjuvant immunotherapy could be safely explored in a phase 3 trial with patients who have active tuberculosis.

  4. GM-CSF: An Immune Modulatory Cytokine that can Suppress Autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Palash; Thiruppathi, Muthusamy; Elshabrawy, Hatem A.; Alharshawi, Khaled; Kumar, Prabhakaran; Prabhakar, Bellur S.

    2015-01-01

    GM-CSF was originally identified as a colony stimulating factor (CSF) because of its ability to induce granulocyte and macrophage populations from precursor cells. Multiple studies have demonstrated that GM-CSF is also an immune-modulatory cytokine, capable of affecting not only the phenotype of myeloid lineage cells, but also T-cell activation through various myeloid intermediaries. This property has been implicated in the sustenance of several autoimmune diseases like arthritis and multiple sclerosis. In contrast, several studies using animal models have shown that GM-CSF is also capable of suppressing many autoimmune diseases like Crohn's disease, Type-1 diabetes, Myasthenia gravis and experimental autoimmune thyroiditis. Knockout mouse studies have suggested that the role of GM-CSF in maintaining granulocyte and macrophage populations in the physiological steady state is largely redundant. Instead, its immune-modulatory role plays a significant role in the development or resolution of autoimmune diseases. This is mediated either through the differentiation of precursor cells into specialized non-steady state granulocytes, macrophages and dendritic cells, or through the modulation of the phenotype of mature myeloid cells. Thus, outside of myelopoiesis, GM-CSF has a profound role in regulating the immune response and maintaining immunological tolerance. PMID:26113402

  5. Tumour-derived GM-CSF promotes granulocyte immunosuppression in mesothelioma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Swati; Graef, Suzanne; Mussai, Francis; Thomas, Anish; Wali, Neha; Yenidunya, Bahar Guliz; Yuan, Constance M; Morrow, Betsy; Zhang, Jingli; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F; Steinberg, Seth M; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Middleton, Gary; De Santo, Carmela; Hassan, Raffit

    2018-03-30

    The cross talk between tumour cells, myeloid cells, and T cells play a critical role in tumour pathogenesis and response to immunotherapies. Although the aetiology of mesothelioma is well understood the impact of mesothelioma on the surrounding immune microenvironment is less well studied. In this study the effect of the mesothelioma microenvironment on circulating and infiltrating granulocytes and T cells is investigated. Tumour and peripheral blood from mesothelioma patients were evaluated for presence of granulocytes, which were then tested for their T cell suppression. Co-cultures of granulocytes, mesothelioma cells, T cells were used to identify the mechanism of T cell inhibition. Analysis of tumours showed that the mesothelioma microenvironment is enriched in infiltrating granulocytes, which inhibit T cell proliferation and activation. Characterisation of the blood at diagnosis identified similar, circulating, immunosuppressive CD11b+CD15+HLADR- granulocytes at increased frequency compared to healthy controls. Culture of healthy-donor granulocytes with human mesothelioma cells showed that GM-CSF upregulates NOX2 expression and the release of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) from granulocytes, resulting in T cell suppression. Immunohistochemistry and transcriptomic analysis revealed that a majority of mesothelioma tumours express GM-CSF and that higher GM-CSF expression correlated with clinical progression. Blockade of GM-CSF with neutralising antibody, or ROS inhibition, restored T cell proliferation suggesting that targeting of GM-CSF could be of therapeutic benefit in these patients. Our study presents the mechanism behind the cross-talk between mesothelioma and the immune micro-environment and indicates that targeting GM-CSF could be a novel treatment strategy to augment immunotherapy. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Improved survival and marrow engraftment of mice transplanted with bone marrov of GM-CSF-treated donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballin, A.; Sagi, O.; Schiby, G.; Meytes, D.

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) administered to bone marrow (BM) transplant recipients is associated with earlier recovery. We have investigated the possibility of stimulating normal donor mice in vivo with GM-CSF. Donor balb/c mice were injected i.p. with GM-CSF (5000 u) or saline. Seventy-two hours later 5 x 105 BM cells from either GM-CSF-treated or control donors were infused into lethally irradiated (850 R) recipients. In the recipients of BM from GM-CSF-treated donors, significantly higher CFU-S and significantly higher survival rate (57% [n = 65]; vs. 30% [n = 63]; p < 0.05) were noted. Donor mice of the GM-CSF group did not differ in bone-marrow cellularity and composition from their controls. However, recipients of BM from GM-CSF-treated mice had higher blood counts of haemoglobin, Leukocytes and platelets compared to controls. These data demonstrate that pretreatment of BM donors with GM-CSF may be of benefit in improving survival and marrow engraftment in mice. (au) (13 refs.)

  7. Clinical role of GM-CSF in neutrophil recovery in relation to health care parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofstra, LS; DeVries, EGE; UylDeGroot, CA; Vellenga, E

    Recombinant human growth factors, particularly granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), have been only available for a few years. Since their introduction they have affected the management of drug-induced neutropenia, the use of dose intensive chemotherapy regimens and in the

  8. GM-CSF Controls Nonlymphoid Tissue Dendritic Cell Homeostasis but Is Dispensable for the Differentiation of Inflammatory Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greter, Melanie; Helft, Julie; Chow, Andrew; Hashimoto, Daigo; Mortha, Arthur; Agudo-Cantero, Judith; Bogunovic, Milena; Gautier, Emmanuel L.; Miller, Jennifer; Leboeuf, Marylene; Lu, Geming; Aloman, Costica; Brown, Brian D.; Pollard, Jeffrey W.; Xiong, Huabao; Randolph, Gwendalyn J.; Chipuk, Jerry E.; Frenette, Paul S.; Merad, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY GM-CSF (Csf-2) is a critical cytokine for the in vitro generation of dendritic cells (DCs) and is thought to control the development of inflammatory DCs and resident CD103+ DCs in some tissues. Here we showed that in contrast to the current understanding, Csf-2 receptor acts in the steady state to promote the survival and homeostasis of nonlymphoid tissue-resident CD103+ and CD11b+ DCs. Absence of Csf-2 receptor on lung DCs abrogated the induction of CD8+ T cell immunity after immunization with particulate antigens. In contrast, Csf-2 receptor was dispensable for the differentiation and innate function of inflammatory DCs during acute injuries. Instead, inflammatory DCs required Csf-1 receptor for their development. Thus, Csf-2 is important in vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell immunity through the regulation of nonlymphoid tissue DC homeostasis rather than control of inflammatory DCs in vivo. PMID:22749353

  9. [The therapeutic effect of HSV1-hGM-CSF combined with doxorubicin on the mouse breast cancer model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, X F; Zhang, S R; Liu, B L; Wu, J L; Li, X Q; Gu, H G; Shu, Y

    2018-03-23

    Objective: To evaluate the oncolytic effect of herpes simplex virus type 1 which carried recombined human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (HSV1-hGM-CSF) on the mouse breast cancer cell line 4T1 and compare the anticancer effects of HSV1-hGM-CSF, doxorubicin alone or combination on the breast cancer in mice. Methods: We investigated the cytotoxic effect on 4T1 cells in vitro, the cell growth, cell apoptosis and cell cycle of 4T1 cells treated with oncolytic HSV1-hGM-CSF at different MOIs (0, 0.5, 1 and 2) and doxorubicin at different concentrations (0, 2, 4 and 8 μg/ml). The effects of oncolytic HSV1-hGM-CSF and doxorubicin on the tumor growth, survival time and their side effects on the mouse breast cancer model were observed. Results: Both oncolytic HSV1-hGM-CSF and doxorubicin significantly inhibited the proliferation of 4T1 cells in vitro . Doxorubicin induced the G(2)/M phase arrest of 4T1 cells, while the cytotoxicity of oncolytic HSV1-hGM-CSF was no cell cycle-dependent.At day 16 after treatment with doxorubicin and HSV1-hGM-CSF, the tumor volume of 4T1 tumor bearing mice were (144.40±27.68)mm(3,) (216.80±57.18)mm(3,) (246.10±21.90)mm(3,) (327.50±44.24)mm(3,) (213.30±32.31)mm(3) and (495.80±75.87)mm(3) in the groups of doxorubicin combined with high dose HSV1-hGM-CSF, doxorubicin combined with low dose HSV1-hGM-CSF, doxorubicin alone, high dose HSV1-hGM-CSF alone, low dose HSV1-hGM-CSF alone and control, respectively.Compared with the control group, both doxorubicin and HSV1-hGM-CSF treatment exhibited significant reduction of primary tumor volume in vivo ( P CSF alone and low dose HSV1-hGM-CSF alone were significantly longer than that of control ( P CSF is observed in 4T1 mouse breast cancer.

  10. Molecular cloning of a second subunit of the receptor for human granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF): Reconstitution of a high-affinity GM-CSF receptor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Kazuhiro; Kitamura, Toshio; Gorman, D.M.; Miyajima, Atsushi; Arai, Kenichi; Yokota, Takashi

    1990-01-01

    Using the mouse interleukin 3 (IL-3) receptor cDNA as a probe, the authors obtained a monologous cDNA (KH97) from a cDNA library of a human hemopoietic cell line, TF-1. The protein encoded by the KH97 cDNA has 56% amino acid sequence identity with the mouse IL-3 receptor and retains features common to the family of cytokine receptors. Fibroblasts transfected with the KH97 cDNA expressed a protein of 120 kDa but did not bind any human cytokines, including IL-3 and granulocyte - macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). Interestingly, cotransfection of cDNAs for KH97 and the low-affinity human GM-CSF receptor in fibroblasts resulted in formation of a high-affinity receptor for GM-CSF. The dissociation rate of GM-CSF from the reconstituted high-affinity receptor was slower than that from the low-affinity site, whereas the association rate was unchanged. Cross-linking of 125 I-labeled GM-CSF to fibroblasts cotransfected with both cDNAs revealed the same cross-linking patterns as in TF-1 cells - i.e., two major proteins of 80 and 120 kDa which correspond to the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein, respectively. These results indicate that the high-affinity GM-CSF receptor is composed of at least two components in a manner analogous to the IL-2 receptor. They therefore propose to designate the low-affinity GM-CSF receptor and the KH97 protein as the α and β subunits of the GM-CSF receptor, respectively

  11. ZO-1 expression is suppressed by GM-CSF via miR-96/ERG in brain microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hu; Zhang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jilin; Liu, Dongxin; Wei, Jiayi; Fang, Wengang; Zhao, Weidong; Chen, Yuhua; Shang, Deshu

    2018-05-01

    The level of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) increases in some disorders such as vascular dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and multiple sclerosis. We previously reported that in Alzheimer's disease patients, a high level of GM-CSF in the brain parenchyma downregulated expression of ZO-1, a blood-brain barrier tight junction protein, and facilitated the infiltration of peripheral monocytes across the blood-brain barrier. However, the molecular mechanism underlying regulation of ZO-1 expression by GM-CSF is unclear. Herein, we found that the erythroblast transformation-specific (ETS) transcription factor ERG cooperated with the proto-oncogene protein c-MYC in regulation of ZO-1 transcription in brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMECs). The ERG expression was suppressed by miR-96 which was increased by GM-CSF through the phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K)/Akt pathway. Inhibition of miR-96 prevented ZO-1 down-regulation induced by GM-CSF both in vitro and in vivo. Our results revealed the mechanism of ZO-1 expression reduced by GM-CSF, and provided a potential target, miR-96, which could block ZO-1 down-regulation caused by GM-CSF in BMECs.

  12. ILC3 GM-CSF production and mobilisation orchestrate acute intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Claire; Thornton, Emily E; McKenzie, Brent; Schaupp, Anna-Lena; Huskens, Nicky; Griseri, Thibault; West, Nathaniel; Tung, Sim; Seddon, Benedict P; Uhlig, Holm H; Powrie, Fiona

    2016-01-18

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) contribute to host defence and tissue repair but can induce immunopathology. Recent work has revealed tissue-specific roles for ILCs; however, the question of how a small population has large effects on immune homeostasis remains unclear. We identify two mechanisms that ILC3s utilise to exert their effects within intestinal tissue. ILC-driven colitis depends on production of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), which recruits and maintains intestinal inflammatory monocytes. ILCs present in the intestine also enter and exit cryptopatches in a highly dynamic process. During colitis, ILC3s mobilize from cryptopatches, a process that can be inhibited by blocking GM-CSF, and mobilization precedes inflammatory foci elsewhere in the tissue. Together these data identify the IL-23R/GM-CSF axis within ILC3 as a key control point in the accumulation of innate effector cells in the intestine and in the spatio-temporal dynamics of ILCs in the intestinal inflammatory response.

  13. Research Upregulation of CD23 (FcεRII Expression in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells (huASMC in Response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lew D Betty

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Airway smooth muscle cells play a key role in remodeling that contributes to airway hyperreactivity. Airway smooth muscle remodeling includes hypertrophy and hyperplasia. It has been previously shown that the expression of CD23 on ASMC in rabbits can be induced by the IgE component of the atopic serum. We examined if other components of atopic serum are capable of inducing CD23 expression independent of IgE. Methods Serum starved huASMC were stimulated with either IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-13, IL-5, PGD2, LTD4, tryptase or a combination of IL-4, IL-5, IL-13 each with GM-CSF for a period of 24 h. CD23 expression was analyzed by flow cytometry, western blot, and indirect immunofluorescence. Results The CD23 protein expression was upregulated in huASMC in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The percentage of cells with increased fluorescence intensity above the control was 25.1 ± 4.2% (IL-4, 15.6 ± 2.7% (GM-CSF and 32.9 ± 13.9% (IL-4/GMCSF combination(n = 3. The protein content of IL-4/GMCSF stimulated cells was significantly elevated. Expression of CD23 in response to IL-4, GM-CSF, IL-4/GM-CSF was accompanied by changes in cell morphology including depolymerization of isoactin fibers, cell spreading, and membrane ruffling. Western blot revealed abundant expression of the IL-4Rα and a low level expression of IL-2Rγc in huASMC. Stimulation with IL-4 resulted in the phosphorylation of STAT-6 and an increase in the expression of the IL-2Rγc. Conclusion CD23 on huASMC is upregulated by IL-4, GM-CSF, and IL-4/GM-CSF. The expression of CD23 is accompanied by an increase in cell volume and an increase in protein content per cell, suggesting hypertrophy. Upregulation of CD23 by IL-4/GM-CSF results in phenotypic changes in huASMC that could play a role in cell migration or a change in the synthetic function of the cells. Upregulation of CD23 in huASMC by IL-4 and GM-CSF can contribute to changes in huASMC and may provide an avenue

  14. Influence of rhTPO/GM-CSF fusion protein on hemopoiesis in mice irradiated with 60Co γ-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Hua; Ge Zhongliang; Zhang Qunwei; Liu Xiuzhen

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To find a new biological therapy for secondary hematopoietic failure including anemia, infection and hemorrhage after administration of chemotherapeutic drugs etc. Methods: hGM-CSF gene was ligated with hTPO gene isolated from human fetal liver mRNA and a new fusion protein rh TPO/GM-CSF obtained. Results: The new fusion protein could promote recovery of peripheral WBC and PLT of 5.0 Gy irradiated mice. BFU-E, CFU-Meg and CFU-GM in bone marrow of mice after irradiation recovered significantly by treatment with rhTPO/GM-CSF fusion protein for 10 days. Conclusion: These results suggest that the new fusion protein has the biological activity of both hTPO and hGM-CSF simultaneously and can stimulate the proliferation of megakaryocytes and granulocyte progenitors

  15. Enhancement of an Allogeneic GM-CSF-Secreting Breast Cancer Vaccine by Immunomodulatory Doses of Cyclophosphamide and Doxorubicin

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emens, Leisha

    2003-01-01

    .... We have applied the use of tumor cells genetically modified to secrete GM-CSF to the preclinical neu transgenic mouse model, characterized by spontaneous tumor development and pre-existing immune tolerance to HER-2/neu...

  16. The role of granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in radiation-induced tumor cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilalta, Marta; Brune, Jourdan; Rafat, Marjan; Soto, Luis; Graves, Edward E

    2018-03-13

    Recently it has been observed in preclinical models that that radiation enhances the recruitment of circulating tumor cells to primary tumors, and results in tumor regrowth after treatment. This process may have implications for clinical radiotherapy, which improves control of a number of tumor types but which, despite continued dose escalation and aggressive fractionation, is unable to fully prevent local recurrences. By irradiating a single tumor within an animal bearing multiple lesions, we observed an increase in tumor cell migration to irradiated and unirradiated sites, suggesting a systemic component to this process. Previous work has identified the cytokine GM-CSF, produced by tumor cells following irradiation, as a key effector of this process. We evaluated the ability of systemic injections of a PEGylated form of GM-CSF to stimulate tumor cell migration. While increases in invasion and migration were observed for tumor cells in a transwell assay, we found that daily injections of PEG-GM-CSF to tumor-bearing animals did not increase migration of cells to tumors, despite the anticipated changes in circulating levels of granulocytes and monocytes produced by this treatment. Combination of PEG-GM-CSF treatment with radiation also did not increase tumor cell migration. These findings suggest that clinical use of GM-CSF to treat neutropenia in cancer patients will not have negative effects on the aggressiveness of residual cancer cells. However, further work is needed to characterize the mechanism by which GM-CSF facilitates systemic recruitment of trafficking tumor cells to tumors.

  17. GM-CSF production from human airway smooth muscle cells is potentiated by human serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria B. Sukkar

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent evidence suggests that airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC actively participate in the airway inflammatory process in asthma. Interleukin–1β (IL–1β and tumour necrosis factor–α (TNF–α induce ASMC to release inflammatory mediators in vitro. ASMC mediator release in vivo, however, may be influenced by features of the allergic asthmatic phenotype. We determined whether; (1 allergic asthmatic serum (AAS modulates ASMC mediator release in response to IL–1β and TNF–α, and (2 IL–1β/TNF–α prime ASMC to release mediators in response to AAS. IL–5 and GMCSF were quantified by ELISA in culture supernatants of; (1 ASMC pre-incubated with either AAS, non-allergic non-asthmatic serum (NAS or MonomedTM (a serum substitute and subsequently stimulated with IL–1β and TNF–α and (2 ASMC stimulated with IL–1β/TNF–α and subsequently exposed to either AAS, NAS or MonomedTM. IL-1g and TNF–α induced GM-CSF release in ASMC pre-incubated with AAS was not greater than that in ASMC pre-incubated with NAS or MonomedTM. IL–1β and TNF–α, however, primed ASMC to release GM-CSF in response to human serum. GM-CSF production following IL–1β/TNF–α and serum exposure (AAS or NAS was significantly greater than that following IL–1β /TNF–α and MonomedTM exposure or IL–1β/TNF–α exposure only. Whilst the potentiating effects of human serum were not specific to allergic asthma, these findings suggest that the secretory capacity of ASMC may be up-regulated during exacerbations of asthma, where there is evidence of vascular leakage.

  18. Human autologous in vitro models of glioma immunogene therapy using B7-2, GM-CSF, and IL12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parney, I.F.; Farr-Jones, M.A.; Kane, K.; Chang, L.-J.; Petruk, K.C.

    2002-01-01

    Cancer immunogene therapy is based on vaccination with radiated, autologous tumor cells transduced with immunostimulatory genes. To help determine an optimal glioma immunogene therapy strategy, we stimulated lymphocytes with autologous human glioma cells transduced with B7-2 (CD86), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and/or interleukin-12 (IL12). A human glioma-derived cell culture (Ed147.BT) was transduced with B7-2, GM-CSF, and/or IL12 using retroviral vectors. Autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were co-cultured with irradiated gene-transduced tumor alone or a combination of radiated wild type and gene-transduced cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells proliferation was determined by serial cell counts. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells phenotype was assessed by flow cytometry for CD4, CD8, and CD16. Anti-tumor cytotoxicity was determined by chromium-51 ( 51 Cr) release assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells cell numbers all decreased during primary stimulation but tumor cells expressing B7-2 or GM-CSF consistently caused secondary proliferation. Tumors expressing B7-2 and GM-CSF or B7-2,GM-CSF,and IL12 consistently increased PBMC CD8+ (cytotoxic T) and CD16+ (natural killer) percentages. Interestingly, anti-tumor cytotoxicity only exceeded that of PBMC stimulated with wild type tumor alone when peripheral blood mononuclear cells were stimulated with both wild type tumor and B7-2/GM-CSF- (but not IL12) transduced cells. PBMC proliferation and phenotype is altered as expected by exposure to immunostimulatory gene-transduced tumor. However, transduced tumor cells alone do not stimulate greater anti-tumor cytotoxicity than wild type tumor. Only B7-2/GM-CSF-transduced cells combined with wild type produced increased cytotoxicity. This may reflect selection of turnor subclones with limited antigenic spectra during retrovirus-mediated gene transfer. (author)

  19. The influence of protein malnutrition on the production of GM-CSF and M-CSF by macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Cunha de Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT It is well established that protein malnutrition (PM impairs immune defenses and increases susceptibility to infection. Macrophages are cells that play a central role in innate immunity, constituting one of the first barriers against infections. Macrophages produce several soluble factors, including cytokines and growth factors, important to the immune response. Among those growth factors, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF. GM-CSF and M-CSF are important to monocyte and macrophage development and stimulation of the immune response process. Knowing the importance of GM-CSF and M-CSF, we sought to investigate the influence of PM on macrophage production of these growth factors. Two-month-old male BALB/c mice were subjected to PM with a low-protein diet (2% and compared to a control diet (12% mouse group. Nutritional status, hemogram and the number of peritoneal cells were evaluated. Additionally, peritoneal macrophages were cultured and the production of GM-CSF and M-CSF and mRNA expression were evaluated. To determine if PM altered macrophage production of GM-CSF and M-CSF, they were stimulated with TNF-α. The PM animals had anemia, leukopenia and a reduced number of peritoneal cells. The production of M-CSF was not different between groups; however, cells from PM animals, stimulated with or without TNF-α, presented reduced capability to produce GM-CSF. These data imply that PM interferes with the production of GM-CSF, and consequently would affect the production and maturation of hematopoietic cells and the immune response.

  20. Reduced expression of granule proteins during extended survival of eosinophils in splenocyte culture with GM-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seul Hye; Na, Hye Young; Sohn, Moah; Han, Sun Murray; Choi, Wanho; In, Hyunju; Hong, Sookyung; Jeon, Hyejin; Seo, Jun-Young; Ahn, Jongcheol; Park, Chae Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a multifaceted hematopoietic cytokine and the culture of mouse bone marrow with GM-CSF produces a variety of myeloid cells including granulocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. In the present study, we cultured mouse splenocytes with GM-CSF and examined the changes in hematopoietic cell populations over a week. Most of the splenic hematopoietic cells disappeared significantly from culture within 6days with or without the presence of GM-CSF. Among the splenic granulocyte populations, only eosinophils fully survived throughout the culture with GM-CSF for more than a week. During 10days of culture with GM-CSF, splenic eosinophils maintained their morphology as well as most of their surface molecules at high levels, including CCR3 and Siglec F. Meanwhile, the expression of mRNAs encoding major basic protein-1 (MBP-1) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), two major eosinophil-derived granule proteins, was diminished significantly from the cultured eosinophils. EPO assays also revealed that eosinophils in culture for more than 5days retained 30% or less EPO activity compared to those in uncultured splenocytes. In contrast, culture of splenocytes with GM-CSF did not change the capacity of eosinophils to migrate in response to eotaxin-1. Our results indicate that mouse splenic eosinophils are effectively cultured for lengthy periods while their expression of eosinophil-derived granule proteins is specifically suppressed. The relevance of these findings to eosinophilic inflammatory response is discussed. Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular cloning, sequencing and structural studies of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    KAUST Repository

    Sugumar, Thennarasu; Ganesan, Pugalenthi; Harishankar, Murugesan; Dhinakar Raj, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that is essential for growth and development of progenitors of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we report molecular cloning, sequencing and characterization of GM-CSF from Indian water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. In addition, we performed sequence and structural analysis for buffalo GM-CSF. Buffalo GM-CSF has been compared with 17 mammalian GM-CSFs using multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional model for buffalo GM-CSF and human receptor complex was built using homology modelling to study cross-reactivity between two species. Detailed analysis was performed to study GM-CSF interface and various interactions at the interface. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Molecular cloning, sequencing and structural studies of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) from Indian water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis)

    KAUST Repository

    Sugumar, Thennarasu

    2013-06-25

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a cytokine that is essential for growth and development of progenitors of granulocytes and monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we report molecular cloning, sequencing and characterization of GM-CSF from Indian water buffalo, Bubalus bubalis. In addition, we performed sequence and structural analysis for buffalo GM-CSF. Buffalo GM-CSF has been compared with 17 mammalian GM-CSFs using multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic tree. Three-dimensional model for buffalo GM-CSF and human receptor complex was built using homology modelling to study cross-reactivity between two species. Detailed analysis was performed to study GM-CSF interface and various interactions at the interface. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Coadministration of cruzipain and GM-CSF DNAs, a new immunotherapeutic vaccine against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerny, Natacha; Sánchez Alberti, Andrés; Bivona, Augusto E; De Marzi, Mauricio C; Frank, Fernanda M; Cazorla, Silvia I; Malchiodi, Emilio L

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccine research and development are especially important in Chagas disease considering the characteristics of the chronic infection and the number of people in the Americas living with a parasite infection for decades. We have previously reported the efficacy of attenuated Salmonella enterica (S) carrying plasmid encoding cruzipain (SCz) to protect against Trypanosoma cruzi infection. In the present work we investigated whether Cz DNA vaccine immunotherapy could be effective in controlling an ongoing T. cruzi infection in mice. We here report the intramuscular administration of naked Cz DNA or the oral administration of Salmonella as Cz DNA delivery system as therapeutic vaccines in mice during acute or chronic infection. The coadministration of a plasmid encoding GM-CSF improved vaccine performance, indicating that the stimulation of innate immune cells is needed in the event of an ongoing infection. These therapeutic vaccines were able to address the response to a protective and sustained Th1 biased profile not only against Cz but also against a variety of parasite antigens. The combined therapeutic vaccine during the chronic phase of infection prevents tissue pathology as shown by a reduced level of enzyme activity characteristic of tissue damage and a tissue status compatible with normal tissue. The obtained results suggest that immunotherapy with Cz and GM-CSF DNAs, either alone or in combination with other drug treatments, may represent a promising alternative for Chagas disease therapy.

  4. Human papillomavirus infection is associated with decreased levels of GM-CSF in cervico-vaginal fluid of infected women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comar, Manola; Monasta, Lorenzo; Zanotta, Nunzia; Vecchi Brumatti, Liza; Ricci, Giuseppe; Zauli, Giorgio

    2013-10-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection, there are very scant data about the influence of this virus on the in vitro fertilization outcome. To assess the presence of HPV in the cervico-vaginal fluid in relationship to the in vitro fertilization (IVF) outcome and to the concentration of selected cytokines, known to affect embryo implantation and gestation: granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF). Cervico-vaginal samples were collected on the day of oocyte pick-up from 82 women. Vaginas were flushed with 50 mL of sterile water and 3 mL of fluid was collected. Twelve women (15%) were positive for HPV. Interestingly, among HPV(+) women live birth rate was about half of the rate in HPV(-) women, although the differences were not statistically significant due to the low number of cases. Cervico-vaginal samples of a sub-group of 29 (8 HPV(+) and 21 HPV(-)) women were analyzed for GM-CSF and G-CSF by ELISA. GM-CSF but not G-CSF was significantly lower in the cervico-vaginal fluid of HPV(+) than in HPV(-) women. Since GM-CSF plays an important role during pregnancy, the reduced levels of GM-CSF in the cervico-vaginal fluid of HPV(+) women might contribute to explain the reduced live birth rate observed in HPV(+) women. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Effects of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating (GM-CSF Factor on Corneal Epithelial Cells in Corneal Wound Healing Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Rae Rho

    Full Text Available Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is a pleiotropic cytokine that activates granulocyte and macrophage cell lineages. It is also known to have an important function in wound healing. This study investigated the effect of GM-CSF in wound healing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs. We used human GM-CSF derived from rice cells (rice cell-derived recombinant human GM-CSF; rhGM-CSF. An in vitro migration assay was performed to investigate the migration rate of HCECs treated with various concentrations of rhGM-CSF (0.1, 1.0, and 10.0 μg/ml. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis were used to evaluate the proliferative effect of rhGM-CSF. The protein level of p38MAPK was analyzed by western blotting. For in vivo analysis, 100 golden Syrian hamsters were divided into four groups, and their corneas were de-epithelialized with alcohol and a blade. The experimental groups were treated with 10, 20, or 50 μg/ml rhGM-CSF four times daily, and the control group was treated with phosphate-buffered saline. The corneal wound-healing rate was evaluated by fluorescein staining at the initial wounding and 12, 24, 36, and 48 hours after epithelial debridement. rhGM-CSF accelerated corneal epithelial wound healing both in vitro and in vivo. MTT assay and flow cytometric analysis revealed that rhGM-CSF treatment had no effects on HCEC proliferation. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression level of phosphorylated p38MAPK increased with rhGM-CSF treatment. These findings indicate that rhGM-CSF enhances corneal wound healing by accelerating cell migration.

  6. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum GM-CSF, IL-8, IL-6 levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Hongfeng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum GM-CSF, IL-8 and IL-6 levels both before and after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum GM-CSF, IL-8 and IL-6 levels were measured with RIA in 32 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum GM-CSF, IL-8, IL-6 levels were significantly higher in the patients than those in the controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Abnormal high serum GM-CSF, IL-8, IL-6 levels played important role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma in children. (authors)

  7. [Effects of cell-mediated immunity induced by intramuscular chitosan-pJME/ GM-CSF nano-DNA vaccine in BAlb/c mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yong-Zhen; Zhou, Yan; Ma, Li; Feng, Guo-He

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the immune adjuvant effect and mechanism induced by chitosan nanoparticles carrying pJME/GM-CSF. In this study, plasmid DNA (pJME/GM-CSF) was encapsulated in chitosan to prepare chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles using a complex coacervation process. Immunohistochemistry was used to detect the type of infiltrating cells at the site of intramuscular injection. The phenotype and functional changes of splenic DCs were measured by flow cytometry after different immunogens were injected intramuscularly. The killing activity of CTLs was assessed using the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. The preparation of chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles matched the expected theoretical results. Our results also found that, after pJME/GM-CSF injection, the incoming cells were a mixture of macrophages, neutrophils, and immature DCs. Meanwhile, pJME/GM-CSF increased the expression of MHC class II molecules on splenic DCs, and enhanced their Ag capture and presentation functions. Cell-mediated immunity was induced by the vaccine. Furthermore, chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles outperformed the administration of standard pJME/GM-CSF in terms of DC recruitment, antigen processing and presentation, and vaccine enhancement. These findings reveal that chitosan could be used as delivery vector for DNA vaccine intramuscular immunizations, and enhance pJME/GM-CSF-induced cellular immune responses.

  8. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum GM-CSF and platelet granular membrance protein (PGMP) contents after treatment in patients with cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang Zhizhong; Pan Shengying; Tang Yong; Wang Jun

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the changes of serum GM-CSF and PGMP levels after treatment in patients with cerebral infarction. Methods: Serum GM-CSF and PGMP contents were measured with RIA in 36 patients with cerebral infarction both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum GM-CSF and PGMP levels in the patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P<0.01). After 6 months' treatment, the levels (though dropped markedly), remained significantly higher (P<0.05). Conclusion: Serum GM-CSF and PGMP levels might be of prognostic value in patients with cerebral infarction. (authors)

  9. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum GM-CSF, CGRP levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Lihua

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of serum GM-CSF and CGRP levels both before and after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum GM-CSF and CGRP levels were measured with RIA in 33 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum GM-CSF levels was significantly higher in the patients than those in the controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Abnormal high serum GM -CSF and low CGRP levels played important role in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma in children. (authors)

  10. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum NO, NOS and GM-CSF levels after treatment in children with bronchopneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Hongmei

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum NO, NOS and GM-CSF levels after treatment in children with bronchopneumonia. Methods: Serum GM-CSF levels were determined with RIA, and serum NO, NOS levels were determined with biochemical methods both before and after treatment in 48 children with bronehopneumonia as well as in 35 controls. Results: Before treatment the serum concentrations of NO, NOS and GM-CSF in the patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Detection of serum NO, NOS and GM-CSF levels were useful for assessment of therapeutic efficacy. (authors)

  11. Clinical significance of determination of serum TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF levels in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Donglin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of serum TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF levels were measured with RIA in 32 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma and 30 controls. Results: Serum levels of TNF, IL-8 and GM-CSF were very significantly higher in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma than those in controls (P<0.01). After one week treatment, the levels dropped considerably but still remained significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.05). Conclusion: These cytokines participated in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Monitoring the changes of their serum levels was helpful for the management of the diseases. (authors)

  12. Lentivirus-ABCG1 instillation reduces lipid accumulation and improves lung compliance in GM-CSF knock-out mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malur, Anagha; Huizar, Isham [Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Wells, Greg [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Barna, Barbara P. [Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Malur, Achut G. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Thomassen, Mary Jane, E-mail: thomassenm@ecu.edu [Program in Lung Cell Biology and Translational Research, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States)

    2011-11-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lentivirus-ABCG1 reduces lipid accumulation in lungs of GM-CSF knock-out mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Up-regulation of ABCG1 improves lung function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of ABCG1 improves surfactant metabolism. -- Abstract: We have shown decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR{gamma}) and the PPAR{gamma}-regulated ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) in alveolar macrophages from patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). PAP patients also exhibit neutralizing antibodies to granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an upregulator of PPAR{gamma}. In association with functional GM-CSF deficiency, PAP lung is characterized by surfactant-filled alveolar spaces and lipid-filled alveolar macrophages. Similar pathology characterizes GM-CSF knock-out (KO) mice. We reported previously that intratracheal instillation of a lentivirus (lenti)-PPAR{gamma} plasmid into GM-CSF KO animals elevated ABCG1 and reduced alveolar macrophage lipid accumulation. Here, we hypothesized that instillation of lenti-ABCG1 might be sufficient to decrease lipid accumulation and improve pulmonary function in GM-CSF KO mice. Animals received intratracheal instillation of lenti-ABCG1 or control lenti-enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) plasmids and alveolar macrophages were harvested 10 days later. Alveolar macrophage transduction efficiency was 79% as shown by lenti-eGFP fluorescence. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated a threefold (p = 0.0005) increase in ABCG1 expression with no change of PPAR{gamma} or ABCA1 in alveolar macrophages of lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. ABCG1 was unchanged in control lenti-eGFP and PBS-instilled groups. Oil Red O staining detected reduced intracellular neutral lipid in alveolar macrophages from lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. Extracellular cholesterol and phospholipids were also decreased as shown by

  13. Lentivirus-ABCG1 instillation reduces lipid accumulation and improves lung compliance in GM-CSF knock-out mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malur, Anagha; Huizar, Isham; Wells, Greg; Barna, Barbara P.; Malur, Achut G.; Thomassen, Mary Jane

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: ► Lentivirus-ABCG1 reduces lipid accumulation in lungs of GM-CSF knock-out mice. ► Up-regulation of ABCG1 improves lung function. ► Upregulation of ABCG1 improves surfactant metabolism. -- Abstract: We have shown decreased expression of the nuclear transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPARγ) and the PPARγ-regulated ATP-binding cassette transporter G1 (ABCG1) in alveolar macrophages from patients with pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP). PAP patients also exhibit neutralizing antibodies to granulocyte–macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), an upregulator of PPARγ. In association with functional GM-CSF deficiency, PAP lung is characterized by surfactant-filled alveolar spaces and lipid-filled alveolar macrophages. Similar pathology characterizes GM-CSF knock-out (KO) mice. We reported previously that intratracheal instillation of a lentivirus (lenti)-PPARγ plasmid into GM-CSF KO animals elevated ABCG1 and reduced alveolar macrophage lipid accumulation. Here, we hypothesized that instillation of lenti-ABCG1 might be sufficient to decrease lipid accumulation and improve pulmonary function in GM-CSF KO mice. Animals received intratracheal instillation of lenti-ABCG1 or control lenti-enhanced Green Fluorescent Protein (eGFP) plasmids and alveolar macrophages were harvested 10 days later. Alveolar macrophage transduction efficiency was 79% as shown by lenti-eGFP fluorescence. Quantitative PCR analyses indicated a threefold (p = 0.0005) increase in ABCG1 expression with no change of PPARγ or ABCA1 in alveolar macrophages of lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. ABCG1 was unchanged in control lenti-eGFP and PBS-instilled groups. Oil Red O staining detected reduced intracellular neutral lipid in alveolar macrophages from lenti-ABCG1 treated mice. Extracellular cholesterol and phospholipids were also decreased as shown by analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Lung compliance was diminished in untreated GMCSF KO mice

  14. [Therapeutic use of hematopoietic growth factors. II. GM-CSF and G-CSF].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royer, B; Arock, M

    1998-01-01

    The second part of this review on haematopoietic growth factors is focused on the therapeutic use of GM-CSF and G-CSF. Such therapeutic applications have raised very great hopes for clinical haematology. However, it should not be forgotten that these haematopoietic growth factors, which are very costly, are powerful two-edged weapons capable of triggering a cascade of reactions, and have a field of activity that often goes beyond the single highly specific property which it is hoped they possess. The risks and costs of their use are currently being evaluated. Waited developments concerning these molecules focus on three axes: a best use of factors already commercialized, especially concerning adaptation of posologies and new indications, the development of hybrid molecules from already known haematopoietic growth factors, possessing the advantages of respective factors, but not their disadvantages, the discovery of new haematopoietic growth factors with potential therapeutic application.

  15. A randomized clinical trial to evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium for in vitro fertilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ziebe, Søren; Loft, Anne; Povlsen, Betina B

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium on ongoing implantation rate (OIR).......To evaluate the effect of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in embryo culture medium on ongoing implantation rate (OIR)....

  16. GM-CSF, IL-3 and G-CSF receptors on acute myeloid leukemia cells : function, regulation of expression, and ligand binding characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Budel (Leo)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractIL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF stimulate proliferation of human acute myeloid leukemia in vitro, but patterns of response among clinical cases are diverse. As described in Chapters 2 and 3, numbers and affinity of IL-3, GM-CSF and G-CSF receptors on cells of patients with AML were assessed and

  17. Specific Contributions of CSF-1 and GM-CSF to the Dynamics of the Mononuclear Phagocyte System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Cynthia; Cook, Andrew D; Lacey, Derek; Fleetwood, Andrew J; Vlahos, Ross; Anderson, Gary P; Hamilton, John A

    2015-07-01

    M-CSF (or CSF-1) and GM-CSF can regulate the development and function of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS). To address some of the outstanding and sometimes conflicting issues surrounding this biology, we undertook a comparative analysis of the effects of neutralizing mAbs to these CSFs on murine MPS populations in the steady-state and during acute inflammatory reactions. CSF-1 neutralization, but not of GM-CSF, in normal mice rapidly reduced the numbers of more mature Ly6C(-) monocytes in blood and bone marrow, without any effect on proliferating precursors, and also the numbers of the resident peritoneal macrophages, observations consistent with CSF-1 signaling being essential only at a relatively late state in steady-state MPS development; in contrast, GM-CSF neutralization had no effect on the numbers of these particular populations. In Ag-induced peritonitis (AIP), thioglycolate-induced peritonitis, and LPS-induced lung inflammation, CSF-1 neutralization lowered inflammatory macrophage number; in the AIP model, this reduced number was not due to suppressed proliferation. More detailed studies with the convenient AIP model indicated that CSF-1 neutralization led to a relatively uniform reduction in all inflammatory cell populations; GM-CSF neutralization, in contrast, was more selective, resulting in the preferential loss among the MPS populations of a cycling, monocyte-derived inflammatory dendritic cell population. Some mechanistic options for the specific CSF-dependent biologies enumerated are discussed. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Distinct changes in pulmonary surfactant homeostasis in common beta-chain-and GM-CSF-deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reed, JA; Ikegami, M; Robb, L; Begley, CG; Ross, G; Whitsett, JA

    Pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (PAP) is caused by inactivation of either granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GMCSF) or GM receptor common beta-chain (beta(c)) genes in mice [GM(-/-), beta(c)(-/-)], demonstrating a critical role of GM-CSF signaling in surfactant homeostasis. To

  19. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α levels after treatment in children with acute nephritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiaoyan; Zhou Hong; Xu Weiqin; Li Xinghua

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of determination of changes of serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF- α levels after treatment in children with acute nephritis. Methods: Serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α levels (with RIA) were measured in 31 pediatric patients with acute nephritis and 35 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α levels in the patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P< O.01). After treatment for 3 months, the serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α levels, though markedly corrected, remained significantly higher than those in controls (P<0.05). Conclusion: Determination of changes of serum IGF-II, GM-CSF and TNF-α contents after treatment might be of prognostic importance in pediatric patients with acute nephritis. (authors)

  20. Differential transfection efficiency rates of the GM-CSF gene into human renal cell carcinoma lines by lipofection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, A; Zöller, K; Enczmann, J; Ebert, T; Schmitz-Draeger, B; Ackermann, R; Wernet, P

    1997-01-01

    One of the major questions in any gene therapy approach is the selection of the appropriate vector system. Here, the optimization of a gene transfer protocol for renal cell carcinoma using lipofection as a nonviral gene transduction system was evaluated. To select the promoter which gives the highest expression, different plasmids which are able to express Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase gene as a reporter gene under the control of different promoters were tested: human cytomegalovirus promoter (pCMVbeta), simian virus 40 promoter (pSVbeta), adenovirus promoter (ADbeta), and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase promoter (TKbeta). The pCMVbeta revealed the highest expression of the beta-gal gene in the renal cell carcinoma (RCC) lines. Thus this CMV promoter was selected for the expression of the granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulator factor (GM-CSF) gene. Three different lipids (LipofectAmine, LipofectAce, and Lipofectin) were compared for their transduction efficiency, and the optimal conditions for quantitatively high lipofection rates were established. The consistently best results regarding gene expression as well as viability of the RCC lines were obtained when Lipofectin was used. Gene expression was monitored by a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and functionally validated by a cell proliferation test. The GM-CSF expression profile showed a peak at 48 hours after transfection and was still detectable after 5 days. Here the feasibility of efficient lipofection of the GM-CSF gene into RCC lines is demonstrated. Most importantly, considerable differences in the relative quantity of GM-CSF gene transfer into the different RCC lines was observed here. This may be of critical relevance for the design of any clinical gene transduction protocol in tumor cell vaccination attempts.

  1. A sequential erythropoietin and GM-CSF schedule offers clinical benefits in the treatment of anaemia in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernell, P; Stenke, L; Wallvik, J; Hippe, E; Hast, R

    1996-08-01

    In order to reduce anaemia in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) a stepwise treatment protocol including erythropoietin (EP) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was designed. Thirty-seven MDS patients (stages I-III) with symptomatic anaemia were first given EPO 10,000 U s.c. 3 times weekly for 6 weeks. Those not responding, i.e. increased their haemoglobin levels > 15 g/l, proceeded into the second phase of the study where GM-CSF (200 micrograms/d. s.c. on weeks 1-6) was combined with EPO (10,000 U s.c. 3 times weekly on weeks 5-14). Following the initial EPO treatment phase, 14 of the 37 patients (38%) responded with increased haemoglobin levels. Responders were significantly different from non-responders in that their pre-treatment values of s-EPO, s-LDH and bone marrow blast cell counts were lower, their baseline haemoglobin levels higher and their transfusion dependency less pronounced. Eighteen of the 23 non-responders proceeded into the second phase, 13 of those were evaluable having completed the entire schedule. Three of the 13 initially EPO resistant patients (23%) responded to the GM-CSF/EPO combination with increased haemoglobin levels, suggesting a positive synergy between the two cytokines. Thus, the overall response rate to the present protocol was 46% (17 of 37 cases), but only a limited subset of the patients did clearly benefit from the combined GM-CSF/EPO administration. Therefore, we believe this step-wise approach to multiple growth factor treatment in MDS, starting with EPO alone and reserving the combination for refractory cases, has considerable advantages, taking into account both medical and socio-economical aspects.

  2. Functional paralysis of GM-CSF-derived bone marrow cells productively infected with ectromelia virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Szulc-Dąbrowska

    Full Text Available Ectromelia virus (ECTV is an orthopoxvirus responsible for mousepox, a lethal disease of certain strains of mice that is similar to smallpox in humans, caused by variola virus (VARV. ECTV, similar to VARV, exhibits a narrow host range and has co-evolved with its natural host. Consequently, ECTV employs sophisticated and host-specific strategies to control the immune cells that are important for induction of antiviral immune response. In the present study we investigated the influence of ECTV infection on immune functions of murine GM-CSF-derived bone marrow cells (GM-BM, comprised of conventional dendritic cells (cDCs and macrophages. Our results showed for the first time that ECTV is able to replicate productively in GM-BM and severely impaired their innate and adaptive immune functions. Infected GM-BM exhibited dramatic changes in morphology and increased apoptosis during the late stages of infection. Moreover, GM-BM cells were unable to uptake and process antigen, reach full maturity and mount a proinflammatory response. Inhibition of cytokine/chemokine response may result from the alteration of nuclear translocation of NF-κB, IRF3 and IRF7 transcription factors and down-regulation of many genes involved in TLR, RLR, NLR and type I IFN signaling pathways. Consequently, GM-BM show inability to stimulate proliferation of purified allogeneic CD4+ T cells in a primary mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR. Taken together, our data clearly indicate that ECTV induces immunosuppressive mechanisms in GM-BM leading to their functional paralysis, thus compromising their ability to initiate downstream T-cell activation events.

  3. The Combined Impact of Surgery and Immunomodulation With Low Dose Cytoxan and GM-CSF in the Early Treatment of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kendra, Kari L

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the combined impact of surgery and immunomodulation with low dose cytoxan and GM-CSF on the development of dendritic cells and the activation of T cells in vivo...

  4. X-ray-induced production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by mouse spleen cells in culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onoda, M.; Shinoda, M.; Tsuneoka, K.; Shikita, M.

    1980-01-01

    Spleen cells were collected from normal mice and cultured in a medium containing 20% calf serum. Addition of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in the culture significantly increased the production of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and a maximum induction was attained in 5 days. Irradiation of the spleen cells with 300 to 3000 R x rays also enhanced the production of GM-CSF, but there was a latent period of about 5 days before the factor appeared in the culture medium. The observed difference between LPS and x rays in the timing of inducing GM-CSF production in the spleen cell culture was consistent with the difference observed in animals. These results suggest that different mechanisms of GM-CSF production operate in the spleen in response to either LPS or x rays

  5. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum NO, NOS and GM-CSF levels after massage therapy in patients with periarthritis of shoulder diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Feng; Chen Lixia; Pan Xiaohong

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum NO, NOS and GM-CSF levels after massage therapy in patients with periarthritis of shoulder diseases. Methods: Serum GM-CSF level was determined with RIA and serum NO, NOS levels were determined with chemical methods both before and after massage therapy in 33 patients with periarthritis of shoulder diseases as well as in 35 normal healthy controls. Results: Before massage therapy the serum concertration of NO, NOS and GM-CSF in the patients were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Detection of serum NO, NOS and GM-CSF levels were closely related to the occurrence and development of the disease also provides important value clinically. (authors)

  6. Clinical significance of measurement of changes in serum TNF-α and GM-CSF levels after treatment in children with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Heng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical significance of the changes of levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) after treatment in children with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum TNF-α and GM-CSF levels were measured with RIA in 32 patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment the serum TNF-α and GM-CSF levels in patients were significantly higher than those in the controls (P 0.05 ). Conclusion: Changes of serum TNF-α and GM-CSF levels contents after treatment might be of prognostic importance in children with bronchial asthma. (authors)

  7. Clinical significance of determination of changes of serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Wenjing

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the changes of Serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels were measured with RIA in 33 pediatric patients with bronchial asthma both before and after treatment as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels were significantly higher than those in controls (P 0.05). Conclusion: Detection of serum IL-6, IL-10 and GM-CSF levels were useful for assessment of therapeutic efficacy and were of important clinical values in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. (authors)

  8. Clinical significance of determination of serum IL-2, IL-6 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhuo; Sun Jin; Yao Li

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical significance of changes of serum IL-2, IL-6 and GM-CSF levels after treatment in pediatric patients with bronchial asthma. Methods: Serum levels of IL-2, IL-6 and GM-CSF were measured with RIA in 36 pediatric patients with bronchiol asthma and 30 controls. Results: Before treatment, the serum levels of IL-6, GM-CSF were significantly higher in the patients than those in controls (P 0.05), Serum IL-2 levels were negatively correlated with the IL-6 and GM-CSF levels (r=-0.5846, -0.6018, P<0.01). Conclusion: These cytokines participated in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma in pediatric patients. Mornitoring the changes of their serum levels was helpful for the management of the diseases. (authors)

  9. GM-CSF produced by non-hematopoietic cells is required for early epithelial cell proliferation and repair of injured colonic mucosa1,2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Laia; McAllister, Christopher S.; Lakhdari, Omar; Minev, Ivelina; Shenouda, Steve; Kagnoff, Martin F.

    2012-01-01

    GM-CSF is a growth factor that promotes the survival and activation of macrophages and granulocytes, and dendritic cell (DC) differentiation and survival in vitro. The mechanism by which exogenous GM-CSF ameliorates the severity of Crohn’s disease in humans and colitis in murine models has been considered mainly to reflect its activity on myeloid cells. We used GM-CSF deficient (GM-CSF−/−) mice to probe the functional role of endogenous host-produced GM-CSF in a colitis model induced after injury to the colon epithelium. Dextran sodium sulfate (DSS) at doses that resulted in little epithelial damage and mucosal ulceration in wild type (WT) mice resulted in marked colon ulceration and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF−/− mice. Colon crypt epithelial cell proliferation in vivo was significantly decreased in GM-CSF−/− mice at early times after DSS injury. This was paralleled by decreased expression of crypt epithelial cell genes involved in cell cycle, proliferation, and wound healing. Decreased crypt cell proliferation and delayed ulcer healing in GM-CSF−/− mice were rescued by exogenous GM-CSF, indicating the lack of a developmental abnormality in the epithelial cell proliferative response in those mice. Non-hematopoietic cells and not myeloid cells produced the GM-CSF important for colon epithelial proliferation after DSS-induced injury as revealed by bone marrow chimera and DC depletion experiments, with colon epithelial cells being the cellular source of GM-CSF. Endogenous epithelial cell produced GM-CSF has a novel non-redundant role in facilitating epithelial cell proliferation and ulcer healing in response to injury of the colon crypt epithelium. PMID:23325885

  10. Adenoviral vector-mediated GM-CSF gene transfer improves anti-mycobacterial immunity in mice - role of regulatory T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singpiel, Alena; Kramer, Julia; Maus, Regina; Stolper, Jennifer; Bittersohl, Lara Friederike; Gauldie, Jack; Kolb, Martin; Welte, Tobias; Sparwasser, Tim; Maus, Ulrich A

    2018-03-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor involved in differentiation, survival and activation of myeloid and non-myeloid cells with important implications for lung antibacterial immunity. Here we examined the effect of pulmonary adenoviral vector-mediated delivery of GM-CSF (AdGM-CSF) on anti-mycobacterial immunity in M. bovis BCG infected mice. Exposure of M. bovis BCG infected mice to AdGM-CSF either applied on 6h, or 6h and 7days post-infection substantially increased alveolar recruitment of iNOS and IL-12 expressing macrophages, and significantly increased accumulation of IFNγ pos T cells and particularly regulatory T cells (Tregs). This was accompanied by significantly reduced mycobacterial loads in the lungs of mice. Importantly, diphtheria toxin-induced depletion of Tregs did not influence mycobacterial loads, but accentuated immunopathology in AdGM-CSF-exposed mice infected with M. bovis BCG. Together, the data demonstrate that AdGM-CSF therapy improves lung protective immunity against M. bovis BCG infection in mice independent of co-recruited Tregs, which however critically contribute to limit lung immunopathology in BCG-infected mice. These data may be relevant to the development of immunomodulatory strategies to limit immunopathology-based lung injury in tuberculosis in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. CD14-dependent monocyte isolation enhances phagocytosis of listeria monocytogenes by proinflammatory, GM-CSF-derived macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Neu

    Full Text Available Macrophages are an important line of defence against invading pathogens. Human macrophages derived by different methods were tested for their suitability as models to investigate Listeria monocytogenes (Lm infection and compared to macrophage-like THP-1 cells. Human primary monocytes were isolated by either positive or negative immunomagnetic selection and differentiated in the presence of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF into pro- or anti-inflammatory macrophages, respectively. Regardless of the isolation method, GM-CSF-derived macrophages (GM-Mφ stained positive for CD206 and M-CSF-derived macrophages (M-Mφ for CD163. THP-1 cells did not express CD206 or CD163 following incubation with PMA, M- or GM-CSF alone or in combination. Upon infection with Lm, all primary macrophages showed good survival at high multiplicities of infection whereas viability of THP-1 was severely reduced even at lower bacterial numbers. M-Mφ generally showed high phagocytosis of Lm. Strikingly, phagocytosis of Lm by GM-Mφ was markedly influenced by the method used for isolation of monocytes. GM-Mφ derived from negatively isolated monocytes showed low phagocytosis of Lm whereas GM-Mφ generated from positively selected monocytes displayed high phagocytosis of Lm. Moreover, incubation with CD14 antibody was sufficient to enhance phagocytosis of Lm by GM-Mφ generated from negatively isolated monocytes. By contrast, non-specific phagocytosis of latex beads by GM-Mφ was not influenced by treatment with CD14 antibody. Furthermore, phagocytosis of Lactococcus lactis, Escherichia coli, human cytomegalovirus and the protozoan parasite Leishmania major by GM-Mφ was not enhanced upon treatment with CD14 antibody indicating that this effect is specific for Lm. Based on these observations, we propose macrophages derived by ex vivo differentiation of negatively selected human primary monocytes as the most

  12. A novel combination treatment of armed oncolytic adenovirus expressing IL-12 and GM-CSF with radiotherapy in murine hepatocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wonwoo; Seong, Jinsil; Oh, Hae-Jin; Koom, Woong-Sub; Choi, Kyung-Joo; Yun, Chae-Ok

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a novel combination treatment of armed oncolytic adenovirus expressing interleukin 12 (IL-12) and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with radiation was investigated for antitumor and antimetastatic effect in a murine hepatic cancer (HCa-I) model. Tumor bearing syngeneic mice were treated with radiation, armed oncolytic virus Ad-ΔE1Bmt7 (dB7) expressing both IL-12 and GM-CSF (armed dB7), or a combination of both. The adenovirus was administered by intratumoral injection 1 x 10 8 plaque forming units (PFU) per tumor in 50 μl of phosphate buffered saline (PBS) four times every other day. Tumor response to treatment was determined by a tumor growth delay assay. Metastatic potential was evaluated by a lung metastasis model. To understand the underlying mechanism, the level of apoptosis was examined as well as the change in microvessel density and expression of immunological markers: CD4+, CD8+ and Cd11c. The combination of armed dB7 and radiation resulted in significant growth delay of murine hepatic cancer, HCa-1, with an enhancement factor of 4.3. The combination treatment also resulted in significant suppression of lung metastasis. Increase of apoptosis level as well as decrease of microvessel density was shown in the combination treatment, suggesting an underlying mechanism for the enhancement of antitumor effect. Expression of immunological markers: CD4+, CD8+ and Cd11c also increased in the combination treatment. This study showed that a novel combination treatment of radiotherapy with armed oncolytic adenovirus expressing IL-12 and GM-CSF was effective in suppressing primary tumor growth. (author)

  13. PU.1 is essential for CD11c expression in CD8(+/CD8(- lymphoid and monocyte-derived dendritic cells during GM-CSF or FLT3L-induced differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Jun Zhu

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs regulate innate and acquired immunity through their roles as antigen-presenting cells. Specific subsets of mature DCs, including monocyte-derived and lymphoid-derived DCs, can be distinguished based on distinct immunophenotypes and functional properties. The leukocyte integrin, CD11c, is considered a specific marker for DCs and it is expressed by all DC subsets. We created a strain of mice in which DCs and their progenitors could be lineage traced based on activity of the CD11c proximal promoter. Surprisingly, we observed levels of CD11c promoter activity that were similar in DCs and in other mature leukocytes, including monocytes, granulocytes, and lymphocytes. We sought to identify DNA elements and transcription factors that regulate DC-associated expression of CD11c. The ets transcription factor, PU.1, is a key regulator of DC development, and expression of PU.1 varies in different DC subsets. GM-CSF increased monocyte-derived DCs in mice and from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro, but it did not increase CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs or B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. FLT3L increased both monocyte-derived DCs and lymphoid-derived DCs from mouse bone marrow cultured in vitro. GM-CSF increased the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter activity in monocyte-derived DCs and CD8(+ lymphoid-derived DCs, but not in B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. In contrast, FLT3L increased the CD11c proximal promoter activity in both monocyte-derived DCs and B220(+ plasmacytoid DCs. We used shRNA gene knockdown and chromatin immunoprecipitation to demonstrate that PU.1 is required for the effects of GM-CSF or FLT3L on monocyte-derived DCs. We conclude that both GM-CSF and FLT3L act through PU.1 to activate the 5.3 Kb CD11c proximal promoter in DCs and to induce differentiation of monocyte-derived DCs. We also confirm that the CD11c proximal promoter is not sufficient to direct lineage specificity of CD11c expression, and that additional DNA elements are required

  14. Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and sucralfate in prevention of radiation-induced mucositis: a prospective randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makkonen, Tuula A.; Minn, Heikki; Jekunen, Antti; Vilja, Pekka; Tuominen, Juhani; Joensuu, Heikki

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To compare subcutaneously given molgramostim (GM-CSF) and sucralfate mouth washings to sucralfate mouth washings in prevention of radiation-induced mucositis. Methods and Materials: Forty head and neck cancer patients were randomly assigned to use either GM-CSF and sucralfate (n = 20) or sucralfate alone (n = 20) during radiotherapy. Sucralfate was used as 1.0 g mouth washing 6 times daily after the first 10 Gy of radiotherapy, and 150-300 μg GM-CSF was given subcutaneously. The grade of radiation mucositis and blood cell counts were monitored weekly. Salivary lactoferrin was measured as a surrogate marker for oral mucositis. Results: We found no significant difference between the molgramostim and the control groups in the oral mucositis grade, oral pain, use of analgesic drugs, weight loss, or survival. The median maximum neutrophil counts (median, 9.2 x 10 9 /L vs. 5.9 x 10 9 /L, p = 0.0005), eosinophil counts (median, 1.3 x 10 9 /L vs. 0.2 x 10 9 /L, p = 0.0004), and salivary lactoferrin concentrations were higher in patients who received GM-CSF. The most common toxicities in the GM-CSF plus sucralfate group were skin reactions at the GM-CSF injection site (65%), fever (30%), bone pain (25%), and nausea (15%), whereas the toxicity of sucralfate given alone was minimal. Conclusion: We found no evidence indicating that subcutaneously given GM-CSF reduces the severity of radiation-induced mucositis

  15. GM-CSF and IL-3 Modulate Human Monocyte TNF-α Production and Renewal in In Vitro Models of Trained Immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borriello, Francesco; Iannone, Raffaella; Di Somma, Sarah; Loffredo, Stefania; Scamardella, Eloise; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Varricchi, Gilda; Granata, Francescopaolo; Portella, Giuseppe; Marone, Gianni

    2016-01-01

    GM-CSF and IL-3 are hematopoietic cytokines that also modulate the effector functions of several immune cell subsets. In particular, GM-CSF and IL-3 exert a significant control on monocyte and macrophage effector functions, as assessed in experimental models of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases and also in human studies. Here, we sought to investigate the mechanisms and the extent to which GM-CSF and IL-3 modulate the pro-inflammatory, LPS-mediated, activation of human CD14 + monocytes taking into account the new concept of trained immunity (i.e., the priming stimulus modulates the response to subsequent stimuli mainly by inducing chromatin remodeling and increased transcription at relevant genetic loci). We demonstrate that GM-CSF and IL-3 priming enhances TNF-α production upon subsequent LPS stimulation (short-term model of trained immunity) in a p38- and SIRT2-dependent manner without increasing TNF primary transcript levels (a more direct measure of transcription), thus supporting a posttranscriptional regulation of TNF-α in primed monocytes. GM-CSF and IL-3 priming followed by 6 days of resting also results in increased TNF-α production upon LPS stimulation (long-term model of trained immunity). In this case, however, GM-CSF and IL-3 priming induces a c-Myc-dependent monocyte renewal and increase in cell number that is in turn responsible for heightened TNF-α production. Overall, our results provide insights to understand the biology of monocytes in health and disease conditions in which the hematopoietic cytokines GM-CSF and IL-3 play a role and also extend our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trained immunity.

  16. GM-CSF overexpression after influenza a virus infection prevents mortality and moderates M1-like airway monocyte/macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstead, E Scott; Umstead, Todd M; Davies, Michael L; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Silveyra, Patricia; Howyrlak, Judie; Yang, Linlin; Guo, Weichao; Hu, Sanmei; Hewage, Eranda Kurundu; Chroneos, Zissis C

    2018-01-05

    Influenza A viruses cause life-threatening pneumonia and lung injury in the lower respiratory tract. Application of high GM-CSF levels prior to infection has been shown to reduce morbidity and mortality from pathogenic influenza infection in mice, but the mechanisms of protection and treatment efficacy have not been established. Mice were infected intranasally with influenza A virus (PR8 strain). Supra-physiologic levels of GM-CSF were induced in the airways using the double transgenic GM-CSF (DTGM) or littermate control mice starting on 3 days post-infection (dpi). Assessment of respiratory mechanical parameters was performed using the flexiVent rodent ventilator. RNA sequence analysis was performed on FACS-sorted airway macrophage subsets at 8 dpi. Supra-physiologic levels of GM-CSF conferred a survival benefit, arrested the deterioration of lung mechanics, and reduced the abundance of protein exudates in bronchoalveolar (BAL) fluid to near baseline levels. Transcriptome analysis, and subsequent validation ELISA assays, revealed that excess GM-CSF re-directs macrophages from an "M1-like" to a more "M2-like" activation state as revealed by alterations in the ratios of CXCL9 and CCL17 in BAL fluid, respectively. Ingenuity pathway analysis predicted that GM-CSF surplus during IAV infection elicits expression of anti-inflammatory mediators and moderates M1 macrophage pro-inflammatory signaling by Type II interferon (IFN-γ). Our data indicate that application of high levels of GM-CSF in the lung after influenza A virus infection alters pathogenic "M1-like" macrophage inflammation. These results indicate a possible therapeutic strategy for respiratory virus-associated pneumonia and acute lung injury.

  17. Recombinant Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (rGM-CSF) : A Review of its Pharmacological Properties and Prospective Role in the Management of Myelosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Susan M; Heel, Rennie C

    1992-04-01

    Recombinant granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) is a polypeptide hormone produced through recombinant DNA technologies in glycosylated (yeast or mammalian expression systems) or nonglycosylated (Escherichia coli expression system) form. It is a multilineage haematopoietin which stimulates proliferation and differentiation of bone marrow myeloid progenitors and increases peripheral white blood cell counts when administered systemically. Treatment is generally well tolerated, although mild to moderate flu-like symptoms are common and rGM-CSF-induced fever and fluid retention may be problematic in occasional patients. rGM-CSF accelerates recovery of peripheral neutrophil counts after bone marrow transplantation, and results of a placebo-controlled randomised trial correlate this with reduced infectious episodes and shortened length of hospitalisation in patients with lymphoid malignancies. A substantial number of patients with graft failure after bone marrow transplantation also respond to rGM-CSF. The duration of myelosuppression secondary to cancer chemotherapy can be significantly reduced by rGM-CSF which has permitted investigation of antineoplastic dose-intensity escalation. In some haematopoietic disorders (e.g. aplastic anaemia, myelodysplasia and neutropenia secondary to HIV infection and antiviral therapy), rGM-CSF produces clinically useful increases in peripheral blood granulocyte counts, although the effect is generally not sustained after drug withdrawal. The potential for rGM-CSF to stimulate proliferation of the abnormal clone in myelodysplasia and in acute myelogenous leukaemia following induction therapy is of concern. Available data suggest, however, that with appropriate monitoring and exclusion of high-risk patients this serious potential risk can be avoided, and that myelopoiesis is enhanced in such patients by rGM-CSF treatment. Recombinant colony-stimulating factors are a new therapeutic modality; hence many aspects of

  18. Synovial CD4+ T-cell-derived GM-CSF supports the differentiation of an inflammatory dendritic cell population in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, G; Gibbon, J R; Pratt, A G; Wood, M J; Coady, D; Raftery, G; Lorenzi, A R; Gray, A; Filer, A; Buckley, C D; Haniffa, M A; Isaacs, J D; Hilkens, C M U

    2016-01-01

    Objective A population of synovial inflammatory dendritic cells (infDCs) has recently been identified in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and is thought to be monocyte-derived. Here, we investigated the role and source of granulocyte macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the differentiation of synovial infDC in RA. Methods Production of GM-CSF by peripheral blood (PB) and synovial fluid (SF) CD4+ T cells was assessed by ELISA and flow cytometry. In vitro CD4+ T-cell polarisation experiments were performed with T-cell activating CD2/CD3/CD28-coated beads in the absence or presence of pro-Th1 or pro-Th17 cytokines. CD1c+ DC and CD16+ macrophage subsets were flow-sorted and analysed morphologically and functionally (T-cell stimulatory/polarising capacity). Results RA-SF CD4+ T cells produced abundant GM-CSF upon stimulation and significantly more than RA-SF mononuclear cells depleted of CD4+ T cells. GM-CSF-producing T cells were significantly increased in RA-SF compared with non-RA inflammatory arthritis SF, active RA PB and healthy donor PB. GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells were expanded by Th1-promoting but not Th17-promoting conditions. Following coculture with RA-SF CD4+ T cells, but not healthy donor PB CD4+ T cells, a subpopulation of monocytes differentiated into CD1c+ infDC; a process dependent on GM-CSF. These infDC displayed potent alloproliferative capacity and enhanced GM-CSF, interleukin-17 and interferon-γ production by CD4+ T cells. InfDC with an identical phenotype to in vitro generated cells were significantly enriched in RA-SF compared with non-RA-SF/tissue/PB. Conclusions We demonstrate a therapeutically tractable feedback loop of GM-CSF secreted by RA synovial CD4+ T cells promoting the differentiation of infDC with potent capacity to induce GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cells. PMID:25923217

  19. Efficacy and safety of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) on the frequency and severity of radiation mucositis in patients with head and neck carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kannan, V.; Bapsy, Poonamallee P.; Anantha, Naranappa; Doval, Dinesh Chandra; Vaithianathan, Hema; Banumathy, G.; Reddy, Krishnamurthy B.; Kumaraswamy, Saklaspur Veerappaiah; Shenoy, Ashok Mohan

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Based on the clinical evidence of mucosal protection by GM-CSF during cytotoxic chemotherapy, a pilot study was undertaken to determine the safety and mucosal reaction of patients receiving GM-CSF while undergoing definitive conventional fractionated radiotherapy in head and neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Patients were considered eligible if buccal mucosa and oropharynx were included in the teleradiation field. Ten adult patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck (buccal mucosa--8 and posterior (1(3)) tongue--2) were entered into the trial. Radiation therapy was delivered with telecobalt machine at conventional 2 Gy fraction and 5 fractions/week. The radiation portals consisted of two parallel opposing lateral fields. GM-CSF was given subcutaneously at a dose of 1 μg/kg body weight, daily, after 20 Gy until the completion of radiation therapy. Patients were evaluated daily for mucosal reaction, pain, and functional impairment. Results: The median radiation dose was 66 Gy. Eight patients received ≥60 Gy. The tolerance to GM-CSF was good. All 10 patients completed the planned daily dose of GM-CSF without interruption. Mucosal toxicity was Grade I in four patients till the completion of radiotherapy (dose range 50-66 Gy). Six patients developed Grade II reaction, fibrinous mucosal lesions of maximum size 1.0-1.5 cm, during radiotherapy. None developed Grade III mucositis. The maximum mucosal pain was Grade I during GM-CSF therapy. In two patients after starting GM-CSF the pain reduced in intensity. Functional impairment was mild to moderate. All patients were able to maintain adequate oral intake during the treatment period. Total regression of mucosal reaction occurred within 8 days following completion of radiotherapy. Conclusions: GM-CSF administration concurrently with conventional fractionated radiotherapy was feasible without significant toxicity. The acute side effects of radiotherapy namely mucositis, pain, and functional

  20. GM-CSF and IL-4 produced by NKT cells inversely regulate IL-1β production by macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sehee; Jeong, Dongjin; Oh, Sae Jin; Ahn, Jiye; Lee, Seung Hyo; Chung, Doo Hyun

    2017-02-01

    Natural Killer T (NKT) cells are distinct T cell subset that link innate and adaptive immune responses. IL-1β, produced by various immune cells, plays a key role in the regulation of innate immunity in vivo. However, it is unclear whether NKT cells regulate IL-1β production by macrophages. To address this, we co-cultured NKT cells and peritoneal macrophages in the presence of TCR stimulation and inflammasome activators. Among cytokines secreted from NKT cells, GM-CSF enhanced IL-1β production by macrophages via regulating LPS-mediated pro-IL-1β expression and NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation, whereas IL-4 enhanced M2-differentiation of macrophages and decreased IL-1β production. Together, our findings suggest the NKT cells have double-sided effects on IL-1β-mediated innate immune responses by producing IL-4 and GM-CSF. These findings may be helpful for a comprehensive understanding of NKT cell-mediated regulatory mechanisms of the pro-inflammatory effects of IL-1β in inflammatory diseases in vivo. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Summary of bi-shRNA/GM-CSF augmented autologous tumor cell immunotherapy (FANG™) in advanced cancer of the liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemunaitis, John; Barve, Minal; Orr, Douglas; Kuhn, Joseph; Magee, Mitchell; Lamont, Jeffrey; Bedell, Cynthia; Wallraven, Gladice; Pappen, Beena O; Roth, Alyssa; Horvath, Staci; Nemunaitis, Derek; Kumar, Padmasini; Maples, Phillip B; Senzer, Neil

    2014-01-01

    Therapies for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are limited. We carried out a phase I trial of a novel autologous whole-cell tumor cell immunotherapy (FANG™), which incorporates a dual granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) expressive/bifunctional small hairpin RNA interference (bi-shRNAi) vector. The bi-shRNAi DNA targets furin, which is a proconvertase of transforming growth factors beta (TGFβ) 1 and 2. Safety, mechanism, immunoeffectiveness, and suggested benefit were previously shown [Senzer et al.: Mol Ther 2012;20:679-689; Senzer et al.: J Vaccines Vaccin 2013;4:209]. We now provide further follow-up of a subset of 8 HCC patients. FANG manufacturing was successful in 7 of 8 attempts (one failure due to insufficient cell yield). Median GM-CSF expression was 144 pg/10(6) cells, TGFβ1 knockdown was 100%, and TGFβ2 knockdown was 93% of the vector-transported cells. Five patients were vaccinated (1 or 2.5×10(7) cells/intradermal injection, 6-11 vaccinations). No FANG toxicity was observed. Three of these patients demonstrated evidence of an immune response to the autologous tumor cell sample. Long-term follow-up demonstrated survival of 319, 729, 784, 931+, and 1,043+ days of the FANG-treated patients. In conclusion, evidence supports further assessment of the FANG immunotherapy in HCC. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Use of an oncolytic virus secreting GM-CSF as combined oncolytic and immunotherapy for treatment of colorectal and hepatic adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, Sandeep; Kim, Teresa; Zager, Jonathan; Bennett, Joseph; Ebright, Michael; D'Angelica, Michael; Fong, Yuman

    2007-04-01

    Oncolytic cancer therapy using herpes simplex viruses (HSV) that have direct tumoricidal effects and cancer immunotherapy using the cytokine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) have each been effective in preclinical testing. NV1034 is a multimutated oncolytic HSV carrying the gene for murine GM-CSF that attempts to combine these 2 anticancer strategies. The purpose of this study was to compare NV1034 to NV1023, the parent HSV mutants lacking GM-CSF, to determine if such combined oncolytic and immunotherapy using a single vector has advantages over oncolytic therapy alone. Expression GM-CSF in vitro did not alter the infectivity, cytotoxicity, or replication of NV1034 compared to the noncytokine-secreting control. Tumors infected with NV1034 produced GM-CSF in picogram quantities. In vivo efficacy of the viruses against murine colorectal carcinoma CT26 and murine hepatoma Hepa l-6 was then tested in subcutaneous tumors in syngeneic Balb/c and C57 L/J mice, respectively. In these immune-competent models, NV1034 and NV1023 each demonstrated potent antitumor activity. Treatment with NV1034 had significantly better antitumor effect compared to treatment with NV1023. Furthermore, there was no difference in the antitumor efficacy of these viruses in mice depleted of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. Viral vectors combining oncolytic and immunotherapy are promising agents in treatment of colorectal carcinoma and hepatoma.

  3. Local application of GM-CSF for treatment of chemoirradiation-induced mucositis in patients with advanced carcinoma of the head and neck: results of controlled clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichtomann, K.A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: the study was designed to assess prospectively the efficacy of GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) mouthwash solution in the management of chemoirradiation induced oral mucositis for head and neck cancer patients. Methods and materials: thirty-five patients with advanced carcinoma of the head and neck were evaluated for mucositis during the first cycle of chemoirradiation therapy. GM-CSF 400 μg in 250 cc of water for 1 h of mouth washing was prescribed. Active comparator was a conventional mucositis therapy combination. The procedure started once mucositis grade 1 (using the WHO grading) was detected. Patients, examined twice a week, were evaluated for oral mucositis and oral infections. Assessment of subjective pain was provided using a visual analogue scale. Blood tests were taken weekly. Results: the results of statistical evaluation of mucositis using the WHO-grading showed no significant differences between the two treatment groups. Local application of GM-CSF significantly reduced subjective pain during the second week of chemoirradiation therapy. Statistical analysis of the leucocytes-, platelet count, haemoglobin level and development of oral infections revealed no significant differences between the two treatment groups. Conclusion: in combined chemoirradiation therapy schemes the RTOG/EORTC toxicity scale should be used. In selected cases of mucositis attended with severe pain, GM-CSF should be observed within the therapeutic considerations. Controlled clinical trials with larger patient population are required to evaluate the role of GM-CSF in this indication. (author)

  4. Autoimmune Th17 Cells Induced Synovial Stromal and Innate Lymphoid Cell Secretion of the Cytokine GM-CSF to Initiate and Augment Autoimmune Arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Keiji; Hashimoto, Motomu; Ito, Yoshinaga; Matsuura, Mayumi; Ito, Hiromu; Tanaka, Masao; Watanabe, Hitomi; Kondoh, Gen; Tanaka, Atsushi; Yasuda, Keiko; Kopf, Manfred; Potocnik, Alexandre J; Stockinger, Brigitta; Sakaguchi, Noriko; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2018-06-19

    Despite the importance of Th17 cells in autoimmune diseases, it remains unclear how they control other inflammatory cells in autoimmune tissue damage. Using a model of spontaneous autoimmune arthritis, we showed that arthritogenic Th17 cells stimulated fibroblast-like synoviocytes via interleukin-17 (IL-17) to secrete the cytokine GM-CSF and also expanded synovial-resident innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) in inflamed joints. Activated synovial ILCs, which expressed CD25, IL-33Ra, and TLR9, produced abundant GM-CSF upon stimulation by IL-2, IL-33, or CpG DNA. Loss of GM-CSF production by either ILCs or radio-resistant stromal cells prevented Th17 cell-mediated arthritis. GM-CSF production by Th17 cells augmented chronic inflammation but was dispensable for the initiation of arthritis. We showed that GM-CSF-producing ILCs were present in inflamed joints of rheumatoid arthritis patients. Thus, a cellular cascade of autoimmune Th17 cells, ILCs, and stromal cells, via IL-17 and GM-CSF, mediates chronic joint inflammation and can be a target for therapeutic intervention. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Novel insights in preventing Gram-negative bacterial infection in cirrhotic patients: review on the effects of GM-CSF in maintaining homeostasis of the immune system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dong; Zhao, Manzhi; Song, Yuhu; Song, Jianxin; Huang, Yuancheng; Wang, Junshuai

    2015-01-01

    Cirrhotic patients with dysfunctional and/or low numbers of leukocytes are often infected with bacteria, especially Gram-negative bacteria, which is characterized by producing lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that influences the production, maturation, function, and survival of various immune cells. In this paper, we reviewed not only Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway and its immunological effect, but also the specific stimulating function and autocrine performance of GM-CSF on hematopoietic cells, as well as the recent discovery of innate response activator-B cells in protection against microbial sepsis and the direct LPS-TLR4 signaling on hematopoiesis. Thus we concluded that GM-CSF might play important roles in preventing Gram-negative bacterial infections in cirrhotic patients through maintaining immune system functions and homeostasis.

  6. GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β chain (CD131 expression as a biomarker of antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maric Dragan

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Upon Ag-activation cytotoxic T cells (CTLs produce IFN-γ GM-CSF and TNF-α, which deliver simultaneously pro-apoptotic and pro-inflammatory signals to the surrounding microenvironment. Whether this secretion affects in an autocrine loop the CTLs themselves is unknown. Methods Here, we compared the transcriptional profile of Ag-activated, Flu-specific CTL stimulated with the FLU M1:58-66 peptide to that of convivial CTLs expanded in vitro in the same culture. PBMCs from 6 HLA-A*0201 expressing donors were expanded for 7 days in culture following Flu M1:58-66 stimulation in the presence of 300 IU/ml of interleukin-2 and than sorted by high speed sorting to high purity CD8+ expressing T cells gated according to FluM1:58-66 tetrameric human leukocyte antigen complexes expression. Results Ag-activated CTLs displayed higher levels of IFN-γ, GM-CSF (CSF2 and GM-CSF/IL-3/IL-5 receptor common β- chain (CD131 but lacked completely expression of IFN-γ receptor-II and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs. This observation suggested that Ag-activated CTLs in preparation for the release of IFN-γ and GM-CSF shield themselves from the potentially apoptotic effects of the former entrusting their survival to GM-SCF. In vitro phenotyping confirmed the selective surface expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs and their increased proliferation upon exogenous administration of GM-CSF. Conclusion The selective responsiveness of Ag-activated CTLs to GM-CSF may provide an alternative explanation to the usefulness of this chemokine as an adjuvant for T cell aimed vaccines. Moreover, the selective expression of CD131 by Ag-activated CTLs proposes CD131 as a novel biomarker of Ag-dependent CTL activation.

  7. Novel adapter proteins that link the human GM-CSF receptor to the phosphatidylino-sitol 3-kinase and Shc/Grb2/ras signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jücker, M; Feldman, R A

    1996-01-01

    We have used a human GM-CSF-dependent hematopoietic cell line that responds to physiological concentrations of hGM-CSF to analyze a set of signaling events that occur in normal myelopoiesis and whose deregulation may lead to leukemogenesis. Stimulation of these cells with hGM-CSF induced the assembly of multimeric complexes that contained known and novel phosphotyrosyl proteins. One of the new proteins was a major phosphotyrosyl substrate of 76-85 kDa (p80) that was directly associated with the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinase through the SH2 domains of p85. p80 also associated with the beta subunit of the activated hGM-CSF receptor, and assembly of this complex correlated with activation of PI 3-kinase. A second phosphotyrosyl protein we identified, p140, associated with the Shc and Grb2 adapter proteins by direct binding to a novel phosphotyrosine-interacting domain located at the N-terminus of Shc. and to the SH3 domains of Grb2, respectively. The Shc/p140/Grb2 complex was found to be constitutively activated in acute myeloid leukemia cells, indicating that activation of this pathway may be a necessary step in the development of some leukemias. The p80/p85/PI 3-kinase and the Shc/Grb2/p140 complexes were tightly associated with Src family kinases, which were prime candidates for phosphorylation of Shc, p80, p140 and other phosphotyrosyl substrates present in these complexes. Our studies suggest that p80 and p140 may link the hGM-CSF receptor to the PI 3-kinase and Shc/Grb2/ras signaling pathways, respectively, and that abnormal activation of hGM-CSF-dependent targets may play a role in leukemogenesis.

  8. Determination of the levels of serum TNF-α, GM-CSF and HA in asthmatic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Qing; Ma Yunbao

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the relationship between the diversity of the state of asthma and the three serum markers (TNF-α, GM-CSF and HA). Methods: RIA was adopted to measure the three markers in 66 asthmatic patients and 30 controls. Results: The levels of the three markers in patients during attack (n = 36) were significantly higher than those in controls (p < 0.01, p < 0.01, p < 0.05). The three markers declined significantly in remission group (n = 30), but were still significantly higher than those in controls (p < 0.05). Conclusion: There is a close relationship between the levels of the three markers and the attack of asthma. Immunomodulator is therefore suggested to be used in addition to anti inflammatory treatment

  9. Recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) with inserted gene coding for GM-CSF as a new vector for cancer immunogene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janke, M.; Peeters, B.P.H.; Leeuw, de O.S.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Arnold, A.; Fournier, P.; Schirrmacher, V.

    2007-01-01

    This is the first report describing recombinant (rec) Newcastle disease virus (NDV) as vector for gene therapy of cancer. The gene encoding granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) was inserted as an additional transcription unit at two different positions into the NDV genome. The

  10. Experimental study of changes of skin blister fluid NPY, IL-12, sICAM-1 and GM-CSF levels in patients with vitiligo in progressive stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bi Mingye; Huang Haifen

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To explore the significance of changes of skin blister fluid NPY, IL-12, sICAM-1 and GM-CSF levels in patients with vitiligo in progressive stage. Methods: 80 patients with vitiligo in progressive stage were divided into two groups (vulgaris vitiligo groups : n=54, segmental vitiligo groups : n=26) Their blister fluid levels of NPY and GM-CSF were determined by radioimmunoassay(RIA), and IL-12 and sICAM-1 were determined by enzyme immunoassay. Results: The levels of skin blister fluid NPY were definitely higher in vitiliginous skin than those in non-vitiliginous patches in segmental vitiligo groups (P 0.05). The levels of skin blister fluid IL-12, sICAM-1 and GM-CSF were all obviously higher in vitiliginous skin than that in non-vitiliginous patches in vulgaris vitiligo groups (P 0.05). Conclusion: The changes of skin blister fluid NPY, IL-12, sICAM-1 and GM-CSF levels in vitiliginous skin may be closely related to development of difference type vitiligo patients with vitiligo, determination of 4 indexes might be helpful for studying the pathogenesis and clinical diagnosis of vitiligo. (authors)

  11. Cost-effectiveness and quality-of-life assessment of GM-CSF as an adjunct to intensive remission induction chemotherapy in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukaemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uyl-de Groot, CA; Lowenberg, B; Vellenga, E; Suciu, S; Willemze, R; Rutten, FFH

    We conducted a prospective, randomized, multicentre clinical trial comparing the effects and costs of GM-CSF as an adjunct to intensive chemotherapy in elderly patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML). The patients were randomized to either daunomycin-cytosine arabinoside (control arm: rr = 161)

  12. Cellular immunotherapy using irradiated lung cancer cell vaccine co-expressing GM-CSF and IL-18 can induce significant antitumor effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Hongwei; Zhang, Xiaomei; Dai, Lei; Chen, Xiaolei; Zhang, Shuang; Yang, Yang; Yu, Dechao; Wei, Yuquan; Deng, Hongxin; Shi, Gang; Yang, Guoyou; Zhang, Junfeng; Li, Yiming; Du, Tao; Wang, Jianzhou; Xu, Fen; Cheng, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Although the whole tumor cell vaccine can provide the best source of immunizing antigens, there is still a limitation that most tumors are not naturally immunogenic. Tumor cells genetically modified to secrete immune activating cytokines have been proved to be more immunogenic. IL-18 could augment proliferation of T cells and cytotoxicity of NK cells. GM-CSF could stimulate dendritic cells, macrophages and enhance presentation of tumor antigens. In our study, we used mouse GM-CSF combined with IL-18 to modify Lewis lung cancer LL/2, then investigated whether vaccination could suppress tumor growth and promote survival. The Lewis lung cancer LL/2 was transfected with co-expressing mouse GM-CSF and IL-18 plasmid by cationic liposome, then irradiated with a sublethal dose X ray (100 Gy) to prepare vaccines. Mice were subcutaneously immunized with this inactivated vaccine and then inoculated with autologous LL/2 to estimate the antitumor efficacy. The studies reported here showed that LL/2 tumor cell vaccine modified by a co-expressing mouse GM-CSF and IL-18 plasmid could significantly inhibit tumor growth and increased survival of the mice bearing LL/2 tumor whether prophylactic or adoptive immunotherapy in vivo. A significant reduction of proliferation and increase of apoptosis were also observed in the tumor treated with vaccine of co-expressing GM-CSF and IL-18. The potent antitumor effect correlated with higher secretion levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-18, GM-CSF, interferon-γ in serum, the proliferation of CD4 + IFN-γ + , CD8 + IFN-γ + T lymphocytes in spleen and the infiltration of CD4 + , CD8 + T in tumor. Furthermore, the mechanism of tumor-specific immune response was further proved by 51 Cr cytotoxicity assay in vitro and depletion of CD4, CD8, NK immune cell subsets in vivo. The results suggested that the antitumor mechanism was mainly depended on CD4 + , CD8 + T lymphocytes. These results provide a new insight into therapeutic mechanisms

  13. SV-BR-1-GM, a Clinically Effective GM-CSF-Secreting Breast Cancer Cell Line, Expresses an Immune Signature and Directly Activates CD4+ T Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus D. Lacher

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Targeted cancer immunotherapy with irradiated, granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF-secreting, allogeneic cancer cell lines has been an effective approach to reduce tumor burden in several patients. It is generally assumed that to be effective, these cell lines need to express immunogenic antigens coexpressed in patient tumor cells, and antigen-presenting cells need to take up such antigens then present them to patient T cells. We have previously reported that, in a phase I pilot study (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00095862, a subject with stage IV breast cancer experienced substantial regression of breast, lung, and brain lesions following inoculation with clinical formulations of SV-BR-1-GM, a GM-CSF-secreting breast tumor cell line. To identify diagnostic features permitting the prospective identification of patients likely to benefit from SV-BR-1-GM, we conducted a molecular analysis of the SV-BR-1-GM cell line and of patient-derived blood, as well as a tumor specimen. Compared to normal human breast cells, SV-BR-1-GM cells overexpress genes encoding tumor-associated antigens (TAAs such as PRAME, a cancer/testis antigen. Curiously, despite its presumptive breast epithelial origin, the cell line expresses major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II genes (HLA-DRA, HLA-DRB3, HLA-DMA, HLA-DMB, in addition to several other factors known to play immunostimulatory roles. These factors include MHC class I components (B2M, HLA-A, HLA-B, ADA (encoding adenosine deaminase, ADGRE5 (CD97, CD58 (LFA3, CD74 (encoding invariant chain and CLIP, CD83, CXCL8 (IL8, CXCL16, HLA-F, IL6, IL18, and KITLG. Moreover, both SV-BR-1-GM cells and the responding study subject carried an HLA-DRB3*02:02 allele, raising the question of whether SV-BR-1-GM cells can directly present endogenous antigens to T cells, thereby inducing a tumor-directed immune response. In support of this, SV-BR-1-GM cells (which also carry the HLA-DRB3*01:01 allele treated with

  14. GM-CSF Monocyte-Derived Cells and Langerhans Cells As Part of the Dendritic Cell Family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manfred B. Lutz

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs and macrophages (Mph share many characteristics as components of the innate immune system. The criteria to classify the multitude of subsets within the mononuclear phagocyte system are currently phenotype, ontogeny, transcription patterns, epigenetic adaptations, and function. More recently, ontogenetic, transcriptional, and proteomic research approaches uncovered major developmental differences between Flt3L-dependent conventional DCs as compared with Mphs and monocyte-derived DCs (MoDCs, the latter mainly generated in vitro from murine bone marrow-derived DCs (BM-DCs or human CD14+ peripheral blood monocytes. Conversely, in vitro GM-CSF-dependent monocyte-derived Mphs largely resemble MoDCs whereas tissue-resident Mphs show a common embryonic origin from yolk sac and fetal liver with Langerhans cells (LCs. The novel ontogenetic findings opened discussions on the terminology of DCs versus Mphs. Here, we bring forward arguments to facilitate definitions of BM-DCs, MoDCs, and LCs. We propose a group model of terminology for all DC subsets that attempts to encompass both ontogeny and function.

  15. IL-2 and GM-CSF are regulated by DNA demethylation during activation of T cells, B cells and macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yan [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); Ohms, Stephen J. [ACRF Biomolecular Resource Facility, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); Shannon, Frances M. [Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia); The University of Canberra, ACT 2602 (Australia); Sun, Chao, E-mail: sunchao2775@163.com [College of Animal Science and Technology, Northwest A and F University, Yangling, Shaanxi 712100 (China); Fan, Jun Y., E-mail: jun.fan@anu.edu.au [Department of Genome Biology, John Curtin School of Medical Research, The Australian National University, ACT 2601 (Australia)

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation is dynamic and flexible and changes rapidly upon cell activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA methylation controls the inducible gene expression in a given cell type. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Some enzymes are involved in maintaining the methylation profile of immune cells. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation has been found to occur at the promoters of a number of actively expressed cytokines and is believed to play a critical role in transcriptional regulation. While many DNA demethylation studies have focused on T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation, changes in DNA methylation in other types of immune cells are less well studied. We found that the expression of two cytokines (IL-2 and GM-CSF) responded differently to activation in three types of immune cells: EL4, A20 and RAW264.7 cells. Using the McrBC and MeDIP approaches, we observed decreases in DNA methylation at a genome-wide level and at the promoters of the genes of these cytokines. The expression of several potential enzymes/co-enzymes involved in the DNA demethylation pathways seemed to be associated with immune cell activation.

  16. IL-2 and GM-CSF are regulated by DNA demethylation during activation of T cells, B cells and macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Yan; Ohms, Stephen J.; Shannon, Frances M.; Sun, Chao; Fan, Jun Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► DNA methylation is dynamic and flexible and changes rapidly upon cell activation. ► DNA methylation controls the inducible gene expression in a given cell type. ► Some enzymes are involved in maintaining the methylation profile of immune cells. -- Abstract: DNA demethylation has been found to occur at the promoters of a number of actively expressed cytokines and is believed to play a critical role in transcriptional regulation. While many DNA demethylation studies have focused on T cell activation, proliferation and differentiation, changes in DNA methylation in other types of immune cells are less well studied. We found that the expression of two cytokines (IL-2 and GM-CSF) responded differently to activation in three types of immune cells: EL4, A20 and RAW264.7 cells. Using the McrBC and MeDIP approaches, we observed decreases in DNA methylation at a genome-wide level and at the promoters of the genes of these cytokines. The expression of several potential enzymes/co-enzymes involved in the DNA demethylation pathways seemed to be associated with immune cell activation.

  17. Biological role of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) on cells of the myeloid lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushach, Irina; Zlotnik, Albert

    2016-01-01

    M-CSF and GM-CSF are 2 important cytokines that regulate macrophage numbers and function. Here, we review their known effects on cells of the macrophage-monocyte lineage. Important clues to their function come from their expression patterns. M-CSF exhibits a mostly homeostatic expression pattern, whereas GM-CSF is a product of cells activated during inflammatory or pathologic conditions. Accordingly, M-CSF regulates the numbers of various tissue macrophage and monocyte populations without altering their "activation" status. Conversely, GM-CSF induces activation of monocytes/macrophages and also mediates differentiation to other states that participate in immune responses [i.e., dendritic cells (DCs)]. Further insights into their function have come from analyses of mice deficient in either cytokine. M-CSF signals through its receptor (CSF-1R). Interestingly, mice deficient in CSF-1R expression exhibit a more significant phenotype than mice deficient in M-CSF. This observation was explained by the discovery of a novel cytokine (IL-34) that represents a second ligand of CSF-1R. Information about the function of these ligands/receptor system is still developing, but its complexity is intriguing and strongly suggests that more interesting biology remains to be elucidated. Based on our current knowledge, several therapeutic molecules targeting either the M-CSF or the GM-CSF pathways have been developed and are currently being tested in clinical trials targeting either autoimmune diseases or cancer. It is intriguing to consider how evolution has directed these pathways to develop; their complexity likely mirrors the multiple functions in which cells of the monocyte/macrophage system are involved. PMID:27354413

  18. Enrichment of Ly6Chi monocytes by multiple GM-CSF injections with HBV vaccine contributes to viral clearance in a HBV mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weidong; Zhou, Xian; Zhao, Gan; Lin, Qing; Wang, Xianzheng; Yu, Xueping; Wang, Bin

    2017-12-02

    Adjuvants are considered a necessary component for HBV therapeutic vaccines but few are licensed in clinical practice due to concerns about safety or efficiency. In our recent study, we established that a combination protocol of 3-day pretreatments with GM-CSF before a vaccination (3 × GM-CSF+VACCINE) into the same injection site could break immune tolerance and cause over 90% reduction of HBsAg level in the HBsAg transgenic mouse model. Herein, we further investigated the therapeutic potential of the combination in AAV8-1.3HBV-infected mice. After 4 vaccinations, both serum HBeAg and HBsAg were cleared and there was a 95% reduction of HBV-positive hepatocytes, in addition to the presence of large number of infiltrating CD8 + T cells in the livers. Mechanistically, the HBV-specific T-cell responses were elicited via a 3 × GM-CSF+VACCINE-induced conversion of CCR2-dependent CD11b + Ly6C hi monocytes into CD11b + CD11c + DCs. Experimental depletion of Ly6C hi monocytes resulted in a defective HBV-specific immune response thereby abrogating HBV eradication. This vaccination strategy could lead to development of an effective therapeutic protocol against chronic HBV in infected patients.

  19. Clinical significance of measurement of plasma relevant cytokines (GM-CSF, IL-2, TPO, EPO) levels in patients with aplastic anemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Tintin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the role of relevant cytokines in the development and pathogenesis of aplastic anemia. Methods: Plasma GM-CSF, IL-2, TPO (with RIA) and EPO (with CLIA) contents were measured in 100 patients (acute 43, chronic 57) with aplastic anemia and 50 controls. Complete blood count was also performed in all these subjects. Results: The peripheral RBC, WBC, platelet counts and GM-CSF contents were significantly lower in the patients with aplastic anemia than those in the controls (P<0.05), while the IL-2, EPO and TPO contents were significantly higher in the patients (P<0.05). GM-CSF contents were positively correlated with the WBC numbers. EPO contents were negatively correlated with the RBC counts and TPO contents were correlated (negatively) with the platelet counts. Conclusion: There was correlationship between each blood elements (WBC, RBC, platelet) and its corresponding cytokine (GS-CSF, EPO, TPO respectively). IL-2 contents were not correlated with WBC counts. (authors)

  20. In vivo characterization of fusion protein comprising of A1 subunit of Shiga toxin and human GM-CSF: Assessment of its immunogenicity and toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oloomi, Mana; Bouzari, Saeid; Shariati, Elaheh

    2010-10-01

    Most cancer cells become resistant to anti-cancer agents. In the last few years, a new approach for targeted therapy of human cancer has been developed using immunotoxins which comprise both the cell targeting and the cell killing moieties. In the present study, the recombinant Shiga toxin A1 subunit fused to human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (A1-GM-CSF), previously produced in E. coli, was further characterized. The recombinant protein could cause 50% cytotoxicity and induced apoptosis in cells bearing GM-CSF receptors. The non-specific toxicity of the fusion protein was assessed in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice. No mortality was observed in either group of mice, with different concentration of fusion protein. The lymphocyte proliferation assay, induction of specific IgG response and a mixed (Th1/Th2) response were observed only in BALB/c mice. The mixed response in BALB/c mice (Th1/Th2) could be explained on the basis of the two components of the fusion protein i.e. A1 and GM-CSF.

  1. CC chemokine receptor 4 is required for experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by regulating GM-CSF and IL-23 production in dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppensieker, Karola; Otte, David-Marian; Schürmann, Britta; Limmer, Andreas; Dresing, Philipp; Drews, Eva; Schumak, Beatrix; Klotz, Luisa; Raasch, Jennifer; Mildner, Alexander; Waisman, Ari; Scheu, Stefanie; Knolle, Percy; Förster, Irmgard; Prinz, Marco; Maier, Wolfgang; Zimmer, Andreas; Alferink, Judith

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are pivotal for the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). However, the mechanisms by which they control disease remain to be determined. This study demonstrates that expression of CC chemokine receptor 4 (CCR4) by DCs is required for EAE induction. CCR4−/− mice presented enhanced resistance to EAE associated with a reduction in IL-23 and GM-CSF expression in the CNS. Restoring CCR4 on myeloid cells in bone marrow chimeras or intracerebral microinjection of CCR4-competent DCs, but not macrophages, restored EAE in CCR4−/− mice, indicating that CCR4+ DCs are cellular mediators of EAE development. Mechanistically, CCR4−/− DCs were less efficient in GM-CSF and IL-23 production and also TH-17 maintenance. Intraspinal IL-23 reconstitution restored EAE in CCR4−/− mice, whereas intracerebral inoculation using IL-23−/− DCs or GM-CSF−/− DCs failed to induce disease. Thus, CCR4-dependent GM-CSF production in DCs required for IL-23 release in these cells is a major component in the development of EAE. Our study identified a unique role for CCR4 in regulating DC function in EAE, harboring therapeutic potential for the treatment of CNS autoimmunity by targeting CCR4 on this specific cell type. PMID:22355103

  2. GM-CSF production allows the identification of immunoprevalent antigens recognized by human CD4+ T cells following smallpox vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Judkowski

    Full Text Available The threat of bioterrorism with smallpox and the broad use of vaccinia vectors for other vaccines have led to the resurgence in the study of vaccinia immunological memory. The importance of the role of CD4+ T cells in the control of vaccinia infection is well known. However, more CD8+ than CD4+ T cell epitopes recognized by human subjects immunized with vaccinia virus have been reported. This could be, in part, due to the fact that most of the studies that have identified human CD4+ specific protein-derived fragments or peptides have used IFN-γ production to evaluate vaccinia specific T cell responses. Based on these findings, we reasoned that analyzing a large panel of cytokines would permit us to generate a more complete analysis of the CD4 T cell responses. The results presented provide clear evidence that TNF-α is an excellent readout of vaccinia specificity and that other cytokines such as GM-CSF can be used to evaluate the reactivity of CD4+ T cells in response to vaccinia antigens. Furthermore, using these cytokines as readout of vaccinia specificity, we present the identification of novel peptides from immunoprevalent vaccinia proteins recognized by CD4+ T cells derived from smallpox vaccinated human subjects. In conclusion, we describe a "T cell-driven" methodology that can be implemented to determine the specificity of the T cell response upon vaccination or infection. Together, the single pathogen in vitro stimulation, the selection of CD4+ T cells specific to the pathogen by limiting dilution, the evaluation of pathogen specificity by detecting multiple cytokines, and the screening of the clones with synthetic combinatorial libraries, constitutes a novel and valuable approach for the elucidation of human CD4+ T cell specificity in response to large pathogens.

  3. Cytokine-primed bone marrow stem cells vs. peripheral blood stem cells for autologous transplantation: a randomized comparison of GM-CSF vs. G-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisdorf, D; Miller, J; Verfaillie, C; Burns, L; Wagner, J; Blazar, B; Davies, S; Miller, W; Hannan, P; Steinbuch, M; Ramsay, N; McGlave, P

    1997-10-01

    Autologous transplantation for non-Hodgkins lymphoma and Hodgkin's disease is widely used as standard therapy for those with high-risk or relapsed tumor. Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) collections have nearly completely replaced bone marrow stem cell (BMSC) harvests because of the perceived advantages of more rapid engraftment, less tumor contamination in the inoculum, and better survival after therapy. The advantage of PBSC, however, may derive from the hematopoietic stimulating cytokines used for PBSC mobilization. Therefore, we tested a randomized comparison of GM-CSF vs. G-CSF used to prime either BMSC or PBSC before collection for use in autologous transplantation. Sixty-two patients receiving transplants (31 PBSC; 31 BMSC) for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (n = 51) or Hodgkin's disease (n = 11) were treated. All patients received 6 days of randomly assigned cytokine. Those with cellular marrow in morphologic remission underwent BMSC harvest, while those with hypocellular marrow or microscopic marrow tumor involvement had PBSC collected. Neutrophil recovery was similarly rapid in all groups (median 14 days; range 10-23 days), though two patients had delayed neutrophil recovery using GM-CSF primed PBSC (p = 0.01). Red cell and platelet recovery were significantly quicker after BMSC mobilized with GM-CSF or PBSC mobilized with G-CSF. This speedier hematologic recovery resulted in earlier hospital discharge as well. However, in multivariate analysis, neither the stem cell source nor randomly assigned G-CSF vs. GM-CSF was independently associated with earlier multilineage hematologic recovery or shorter hospital stay. Relapse-free survival was not independently affected by either the assigned stem cell source or the randomly assigned priming cytokine, though malignant relapse was more frequent in those assigned to PBSC (RR of relapse 3.15, p = 0.03). These data document that BMSC, when collected following cytokine priming, can yield a similarly rapid hematologic

  4. Electronegative L5-LDL induces the production of G-CSF and GM-CSF in human macrophages through LOX-1 involving NF-κB and ERK2 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Tzu-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Kuo, Tzu-Ling; Lu, Shao-Chun

    2017-12-01

    Circulating levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) are associated with the severity of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, what causes increases in G-CSF and GM-CSF is unclear. In this study, we investigated whether L5-low-density lipoprotein (LDL), a mildly oxidized LDL from AMI, can induce G-CSF and GM-CSF production in human macrophages. L1-LDL and L5-LDL were isolated through anion-exchange chromatography from AMI plasma. Human macrophages derived from THP-1 and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were treated with L1-LDL, L5-LDL, or copper-oxidized LDL (Cu-oxLDL) and G-CSF and GM-CSF protein levels in the medium were determined. In addition, the effects of L5-LDL on G-CSF and GM-CSF production were tested in lectin-type oxidized LDL receptor-1 (LOX-1), CD36, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) 1, and ERK2 knockdown THP-1 macrophages. L5-LDL but not L1-LDL or Cu-oxLDL significantly induced production of G-CSF and GM-CSF in macrophages. In vitro oxidation of L1-LDL and L5-LDL altered their ability to induce G-CSF and GM-CSF, suggesting that the degree of oxidation is critical for the effects. Knockdown and antibody neutralization experiments suggested that the effects were caused by LOX-1. In addition, nuclear factor (NF)-κB and ERK1/2 inhibition resulted in marked reductions of L5-LDL-induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production. Moreover, knockdown of ERK2, but not ERK1, hindered L5-LDL-induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production. The results indicate that L5-LDL, a naturally occurring mild oxidized LDL, induced G-CSF and GM-CSF production in human macrophages through LOX-1, ERK2, and NF-κB dependent pathways. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. In whole blood, LPS, TNF-alpha and GM-CSF increase monocyte uptake of {sup 99m}technetium stannous colloid but do not affect neutrophil uptake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramsay, Stuart C. [Townsville Nuclear Medicine, Mater Hospital, Pimlico, Queensland 4812 (Australia) and School of Medicine, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia)]. E-mail: stuart.ramsay1@jcu.edu.au; Maggs, Jacqueline [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Townsville Hospital, Townsville, Queensland 4814 (Australia); Powell, Kellie [School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); School of Medicine, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); Barnes, Jodie [School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); Ketheesan, Natkunam [School of Veterinary and Biomedical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia); School of Medicine, James Cook University, Townsville, Queensland 4811 (Australia)

    2006-07-15

    Introduction: {sup 99m}Technetium stannous colloid (TcSnC) is used in white cell scanning. It labels neutrophils and monocytes via phagocytosis, with uptake mediated by the phagocytic receptor CD11b/CD18 in neutrophils. Uptake of TcSnC is altered by gram-negative infection, possibly due to the endotoxin component lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or to cytokines released during infection (e.g., TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma). Endotoxemia and increased TNF-alpha levels also occur in inflammatory bowel disease. Another potential confounder in cell labeling is that sepsis patients may be treated with GM-CSF and G-CSF, which alter phagocytic cell function. This study aimed to determine how these factors affect TcSnC cellular uptake. Methods: Whole blood from six healthy volunteers was incubated with LPS, TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, GM-CSF or G-CSF. Samples were then mixed with TcSnC. Blood was separated across density gradients and imaged using a gamma camera. Three radioactive count peaks were observed in each tube: free plasma activity, mononuclear cell uptake and neutrophil uptake. Results: Compared with controls, significant increases in mononuclear cell uptake were induced by LPS, TNF-alpha and GM-CSF stimulation. It was incidentally noted that exogenous estrogens appear to affect TcSnC labeling and may influence the neutrophil response to stimulation. Neutrophil uptake and plasma activity were not significantly affected. IFN-gamma and G-CSF had no significant effect. Conclusions: In whole blood, the effect of LPS on TcSnC monocyte uptake is different to its effect on neutrophils, consistent with previously reported differences in CD11b/CD18 expression. TNF-alpha response parallels LPS response. GM-CSF also increases TcSnC uptake by monocytes. These effects should be considered when using TcSnC for imaging purposes, as they will tend to increase monocyte labeling. Estrogens may also affect TcSnC labeling. Responses to IFN-gamma and G-CSF are consistent with previously reported effects

  6. Coadministration of Recombinant Adenovirus Expressing GM-CSF with Inactivated H5N1 Avian Influenza Vaccine Increased the Immune Responses and Protective Efficacy Against a Wild Bird Source of H5N1 Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangwei; Wang, Xinglong; Jia, Yanqing; Wang, Chongyang; Tang, Qiuxia; Han, Qingsong; Xiao, Sa; Yang, Zengqi

    2017-10-01

    Wild birds play a key role in the spread of avian influenza virus (AIV). There is a continual urgent requirement for AIV vaccines to address the ongoing genetic changes of AIV. In the current study, we trialed a novel AIV vaccine against the wild bird source of H5N1 type AIV with recombinant adenovirus expressing granulocyte monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as an adjuvant. A total of 150-day-old commercial chicks, with AIV-maternal-derived antibody, were divided into 6 groups. The primary vaccination was performed at day 14 followed by a subsequent boosting and intramuscular challenge on day 28 and 42, respectively. Recombinant GM-CSF (rGM-CSF) expressed by adenovirus, named as rAd-GM-CSF, raised the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers (log 2 ) against AIV from 7.0 (vaccinate with inactivated vaccine alone) to 8.4 after booster immunization. Moreover, the rGM-CSF addition markedly increased the expression of interferon-γ, interleukin-4, and major histocompatibility complex-II in the lungs, compared with those immunized with inactivated vaccine alone on day 29, that is, 18 h post booster immunization. Following challenge, chicks inoculated with the inactivated AIV vaccine and rAd-GM-CSF together exhibited mild clinical signs and 62% survivals compared to 33% in the group immunized with inactivated AIV vaccine alone. Higher level of HI titers, immune related molecule expressions, and protection ratio demonstrates a good potential of rGM-CSF in improving humoral and cell mediated immune responses of inactivated AIV vaccines.

  7. Overcoming HBV immune tolerance to eliminate HBsAg-positive hepatocytes via pre-administration of GM-CSF as a novel adjuvant for a hepatitis B vaccine in HBV transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianzheng; Dong, Aihua; Xiao, Jingjing; Zhou, Xingjun; Mi, Haili; Xu, Hanqian; Zhang, Jiming; Wang, Bin

    2016-11-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is known to be a potential vaccine adjuvant despite contradictory results from animal and human studies. The discrepancies may be due to the different doses and regimens of GM-CSF that were used, given that either mature or immature dendritic cells (DCs) could be induced under different conditions. To test the hypothesis that GM-CSF can be used as a novel adjuvant for a hepatitis B virus (HBV) therapeutic vaccine, we administered GM-CSF once per day for three days prior to vaccination with recombinant HBV vaccine (rHBVvac) in mice. We observed greater DC maturation in these pre-treated animals at day 3 as compared to day 1 or day 2 of daily GM-CSF administration. This strategy was further investigated for its ability to break the immune tolerance established in hepatitis B surface antigen-transgenic (HBsAg-Tg) animals. We found that the levels of induced anti-HBsAg antibodies were significantly higher in animals following three days of GM-CSF pre-treatment before rHBV vaccination after the third immunization. In addition to the increase in anti-HBsAg antibody levels, cell-mediated anti-HBsAg responses, including delayed-type hypersensitivity, T-cell proliferation, interferon-γ production, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes, were dramatically enhanced in the three-day GM-CSF pre-treated group. After adoptive transfers of CD8 + T cells from immunized animals, antigen-specific CD8 + T cells were observed in the livers of recipient HBsAg-Tg animals. Moreover, the three-day pre-treatments with GM-CSF prior to rHBVvac vaccination could significantly eliminate HBsAg-positive hepatocytes, suggesting beneficial therapeutic effects. Therefore, this protocol utilizing GM-CSF as an adjuvant in combination with the rHBVvac vaccine has the potential to become a novel immunotherapy for chronic hepatitis B patients.

  8. Interleukin-4 enhances trafficking and functional activities of GM-CSF-stimulated mouse myeloid-derived dendritic cells at late differentiation stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Shu-Yi; Wang, Chien-Yu; Yang, Ning-Sun

    2011-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) are being employed as an important model for translational research into the development of DC-based therapeutics. For such use, the localization and specialized mobility of injected BMDCs within specific immune tissues are known to define their immunity and usefulness in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that IL-4, a key driving factor for in vitro propagation and differentiation of BMDCs, when added during a late culture stage can enhance the in vivo trafficking activity of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-induced BMDCs. It suggests that the temporal control of IL-4 stimulation during the in vitro generation of DCs drastically affects the DC trafficking efficiency in vivo. With this modification of IL-4 stimulation, we also show that much less cytokine was needed to generate BMDCs with high purity and yield that secrete a high level of cytokines and possess a good capacity to induce proliferation of allogeneic CD4 + T cells, as compared to the conventional method that uses a continuous supplement of GM-CSF and IL-4 throughout cultivation. These results provide us with an important know-how for differentiation of BMDCs from myeloid stem cells, and for use of other immune cells in related medical or stem cell applications.

  9. Interleukin-4 enhances trafficking and functional activities of GM-CSF-stimulated mouse myeloid-derived dendritic cells at late differentiation stage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Shu-Yi, E-mail: in_shuyi@hotmail.com [Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Biotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Taiwan International Graduate Program (TIGP), Molecular and Biological Agricultural Sciences Program, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wang, Chien-Yu, E-mail: sallywang1973@hotmail.com [Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Yang, Ning-Sun, E-mail: nsyang@gate.sinica.edu.tw [Agricultural Biotechnology Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Graduate Institute of Biotechnology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Taiwan International Graduate Program (TIGP), Molecular and Biological Agricultural Sciences Program, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2011-09-10

    Mouse bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) are being employed as an important model for translational research into the development of DC-based therapeutics. For such use, the localization and specialized mobility of injected BMDCs within specific immune tissues are known to define their immunity and usefulness in vivo. In this study, we demonstrate that IL-4, a key driving factor for in vitro propagation and differentiation of BMDCs, when added during a late culture stage can enhance the in vivo trafficking activity of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)-induced BMDCs. It suggests that the temporal control of IL-4 stimulation during the in vitro generation of DCs drastically affects the DC trafficking efficiency in vivo. With this modification of IL-4 stimulation, we also show that much less cytokine was needed to generate BMDCs with high purity and yield that secrete a high level of cytokines and possess a good capacity to induce proliferation of allogeneic CD4{sup +}T cells, as compared to the conventional method that uses a continuous supplement of GM-CSF and IL-4 throughout cultivation. These results provide us with an important know-how for differentiation of BMDCs from myeloid stem cells, and for use of other immune cells in related medical or stem cell applications.

  10. CCR6+ Th cells in the cerebrospinal fluid of persons with multiple sclerosis are dominated by pathogenic non-classic Th1 cells and GM-CSF-only-secreting Th cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restorick, S M; Durant, L; Kalra, S; Hassan-Smith, G; Rathbone, E; Douglas, M R; Curnow, S J

    2017-08-01

    Considerable attention has been given to CCR6 + IL-17-secreting CD4 + T cells (Th17) in the pathology of a number of autoimmune diseases including multiple sclerosis (MS). However, other Th subsets also play important pathogenic roles, including those that secrete IFNγ and GM-CSF. CCR6 expression by Th17 cells allows their migration across the choroid plexus into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), where they are involved in the early phase of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), and in MS these cells are elevated in the CSF during relapses and contain high frequencies of autoreactive cells. However, the relatively low frequency of Th17 cells suggests they cannot by themselves account for the high percentage of CCR6 + cells in MS CSF. Here we identify the dominant CCR6 + T cell subsets in both the blood and CSF as non-classic Th1 cells, including many that secrete GM-CSF, a key encephalitogenic cytokine. In addition, we show that Th cells secreting GM-CSF but not IFNγ or IL-17, a subset termed GM-CSF-only-secreting Th cells, also accumulate in the CSF. Importantly, in MS the proportion of IFNγ- and GM-CSF-secreting T cells expressing CCR6 was significantly enriched in the CSF, and was elevated in MS, suggesting these cells play a pathogenic role in this disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Serum concentrations of GM-CSF and G-CSF correlate with the Th1/Th2 cytokine response in cystic fibrosis patients with chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moser, Claus; Jensen, Peter Østrup; Pressler, Tacjana

    2005-01-01

    mobilizing monocytes and PMNs from the bone marrow, GM-CSF, G-CSF and IL-3 select subsets of dendritic cells, which subsequently induce distinct Th responses. Therefore, the present study examines the correlation between the mobilizing cytokines in serum and the Th responses. The IFN-gamma and IL-4...... production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and the concentrations of GM-CSF and G-CSF in serum as well as lung function, were determined in 37 CF patients with and 6 CF patients without chronic P. aeruginosa lung infection. The GM-CSF/G-CSF ratio correlated both with the IFN-gamma production and good...... lung function. In addition, an inverse correlation between IL-3 and IFN-gamma was observed. The results indicate involvement of endogenous GM-CSF, G-CSF and IL-3 in the skewed Th response in CF, and change to a Th1-dominated response might be achieved with GM-CSF treatment....

  12. Effect of intramammary infusion of recombinant bovine GM-CSF and IL-8 on CMT score, somatic cell count, and milk mononuclear cell populations in Holstein cows with Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiku, Yoshio; Ozawa, Tomomi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Kushibiki, Shiro; Inumaru, Shigeki; Shingu, Hiroyuki; Nagasawa, Yuya; Watanabe, Atsushi; Hata, Eiji; Hayashi, Tomohito

    2017-09-01

    The effect of intramammary infusion of recombinant bovine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rbGM-CSF) and interleukin-8 (rbIL-8) on mononuclear cell populations in quarters, somatic cell count (SCC) and the California Mastitis Test (CMT) score were investigated. From the selected cows with naturally occurring Staphylococcus aureus subclinical mastitis, one quarter of each cow were selected for the infusions of rbGM-CSF (400 μg/5 mL/quarter, n = 9), rbIL-8 (1 mg/5 mL/quarter, n = 9), and phosphate-buffered saline (5 mL/quarter, n = 7). The CMT score of both cytokines post infusion temporarily increased between days 0 and 1 and significantly decreased between days 7 and 14 compared to the preinfusion level. The SCC on day 14 after infusions of rbGM-CSF tended to be lower than that of the control group. The percentage of CD14+ cells increased on days 1 and 2 post infusion of rbGM-CSF. The percentage of CD4+ and CD8+ cells also increased on days 2 and 3, suggesting that the infusion of rbGM-CSF enhanced cellular immunity in the mammary gland. In contrast, the percentage of CD14+ cells decreased on days 0.25 and 1 post infusion of rbIL-8. No significant changes in the percentages of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in milk after infusion of rbIL-8 were evident during the experimental period, which suggested that rbIL-8 had little effect on the function of T cells in the mammary gland. These results indicated that rbGM-CSF and rbIL-8 decreased the CMT score by a different mechanism and may have a potential as therapeutic agents for subclinical mastitis.

  13. Mapping of monoclonal antibody- and receptor-binding domains on human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) using a surface plasmon resonance-based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laricchia-Robbio, L; Liedberg, B; Platou-Vikinge, T; Rovero, P; Beffy, P; Revoltella, R P

    1996-10-01

    An automated surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensor system has been used for mapping antibody and receptor-binding regions on the recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rhGM-CSF) molecule. A rabbit antimouse IgG1-Fc antibody (RAM.Fc) was coupled to an extended carboxymethylated-hydrogel matrix attached to a gold surface in order to capture an anti-rhGM-CSF monoclonal antibody (MAb) injected over the sensing layer. rhGM-CSF was subsequently injected and allowed to bind to this antibody. Multisite binding assays were then performed, by flowing sequentially other antibodies and peptides over the surface, and the capacity of the latter to interact with the entrapped rhGM-CSF in a multimolecular complex was monitored in real time with SPR. Eleven MAb (all IgG1K), were analyzed: respectively, four antipeptide MAb raised against three distinct epitopes of the cytokine (two clones against residues 14-24, that includes part of the first alpha-helix toward the N-terminal region; one clone against peptide 30-41, an intrahelical loop; and one clone against residues 79-91, including part of the third alpha-helix) and seven antiprotein MAbs raised against the entire rhGM-CSF, whose target native epitopes are still undetermined. In addition, the binding capacity to rhGM-CSF of a synthetic peptide, corresponding to residues 238-254 of the extracellular human GM-CSF receptor alpha-chain, endowed with rhGM-CSF binding activity, was tested. The results from experiments performed with the biosensor were compared with those obtained by a sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), using the same reagents. The features of the biosensor technology (fully automated, measure in real time, sharpened yes/no response, less background disturbances, no need for washing step or labeling of the reagent) offered several advantages in these studies of MAb immunoreactivity and epitope mapping, giving a much better resolution and enabling more distinct

  14. Granulocyte-macrophage stimulating factor (GM-CSF increases circulating dendritic cells but does not abrogate suppression of adaptive cellular immunity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer receiving chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinez Micaela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advanced cancer and chemotherapy are both associated with immune system suppression. We initiated a clinical trial in patients receiving chemotherapy for metastatic colorectal cancer to determine if administration of GM-CSF in this setting was immunostimulatory. Methods Between June, 2003 and January, 2007, 20 patients were enrolled in a clinical trial (NCT00257322 in which they received 500 ug GM-CSF daily for 4 days starting 24 hours after each chemotherapy cycle. There were no toxicities or adverse events reported. Blood was obtained before chemotherapy/GM-CSF administration and 24 hours following the final dose of GM-CSF and evaluated for circulating dendritic cells and adaptive immune cellular subsets by flow cytometry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC expression of γ-interferon and T-bet transcription factor (Tbx21 by quantitative real-time PCR was performed as a measure of Th1 adaptive cellular immunity. Pre- and post-treatment (i.e., chemotherapy and GM-CSF samples were evaluable for 16 patients, ranging from 1 to 5 cycles (median 3 cycles, 6 biologic sample time points. Dendritic cells were defined as lineage (- and MHC class II high (+. Results 73% of patients had significant increases in circulating dendritic cells of ~3x for the overall group (5.8% to 13.6%, p = 0.02 and ~5x excluding non-responders (3.2% to 14.5%, p Tbx21 levels declined by 75% following each chemotherapy cycle despite administration of GM-CSF (p = 0.02. PBMC γ-interferon expression, however was unchanged. Conclusions This clinical trial confirms the suppressive effects of chemotherapy on Th1 cellular immunity in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer but demonstrates that mid-cycle administration of GM-CSF can significantly increase the proportion of circulating dendritic cells. As the role of dendritic cells in anti-tumor immunity becomes better defined, GM-CSF administration may provide a non-toxic intervention to augment this arm

  15. Successful use of a defined antigen/GM-CSF adjuvant vaccine to treat mucosal leishmaniasis refractory to antimony: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badaro Roberto

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy has been proposed as a method to treat mucosal leishmaniasis for many years, but the approach has been hampered by poor definition and variability of antigens used, and results have been inconclusive. We report here a case of antimonial-refractory mucosal leishmaniasis in a 45 year old male who was treated with three single injections (one per month with a cocktail of four Leishmania recombinant antigens selected after documented hypo-responsiveness of the patient to these antigens, plus 50mg of GM-CSF as vaccine adjuvant. Three months after treatment, all lesions had resolved completely and the patient remains without relapse after two years. Side effects of the treatment included only moderate erythema and induration at the injection site after the second and third injections. We conclude that carefully selected microbial antigens and cytokine adjuvant can be successful as immunotherapy for patients with antimonial-refractory mucosal leishmaniasis.

  16. CD1d(hi)CD5+ B cells expanded by GM-CSF in vivo suppress experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jian Rong; Quan, Songhua; Soliven, Betty

    2014-09-15

    IL-10-competent subset within CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, has been shown to regulate autoimmune diseases. Whether B10 cells can prevent or suppress the development of experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG) has not been studied. In this study, we investigated whether low-dose GM-CSF, which suppresses EAMG, can expand B10 cells in vivo, and whether adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells would prevent or suppress EAMG. We found that treatment of EAMG mice with low-dose GM-CSF increased the proportion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells and B10 cells. In vitro coculture studies revealed that CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells altered T cell cytokine profile but did not directly inhibit T cell proliferation. In contrast, CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells inhibited B cell proliferation and its autoantibody production in an IL-10-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells to mice could prevent disease, as well as suppress EAMG after disease onset. This was associated with downregulation of mature dendritic cell markers and expansion of regulatory T cells resulting in the suppression of acetylcholine receptor-specific T cell and B cell responses. Thus, our data have provided significant insight into the mechanisms underlying the tolerogenic effects of B10 cells in EAMG. These observations suggest that in vivo or in vitro expansion of CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells or B10 cells may represent an effective strategy in the treatment of human myasthenia gravis. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. GM-CSF increases mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza DNA vaccine administered into the epidermis of non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter T Loudon

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The recent H5N1 avian and H1N1 swine-origin influenza virus outbreaks reaffirm that the threat of a world-wide influenza pandemic is both real and ever-present. Vaccination is still considered the best strategy for protection against influenza virus infection but a significant challenge is to identify new vaccine approaches that offer accelerated production, broader protection against drifted and shifted strains, and the capacity to elicit anti-viral immune responses in the respiratory tract at the site of viral entry. As a safe alternative to live attenuated vaccines, the mucosal and systemic immunogenicity of an H1N1 influenza (A/New Caledonia/20/99 HA DNA vaccine administered by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (PMED or gene gun was analyzed in rhesus macaques.Macaques were immunized at weeks 0, 8, and 16 using a disposable single-shot particle-mediated delivery device designed for clinical use that delivers plasmid DNA directly into cells of the epidermis. Significant levels of hemagglutination inhibiting (HI antibodies and cytokine-secreting HA-specific T cells were observed in the periphery of macaques following 1-3 doses of the PMED HA DNA vaccine. In addition, HA DNA vaccination induced detectable levels of HA-specific mucosal antibodies and T cells in the lung and gut-associated lymphoid tissues of vaccinated macaques. Importantly, co-delivery of a DNA encoding the rhesus macaque GM-CSF gene was found to significantly enhance both the systemic and mucosal immunogenicity of the HA DNA vaccine.These results provide strong support for the development of a particle-mediated epidermal DNA vaccine for protection against respiratory pathogens such as influenza and demonstrate, for the first time, the ability of skin-delivered GM-CSF to serve as an effective mucosal adjuvant for vaccine induction of immune responses in the gut and respiratory tract.

  18. Combination of intratumoral injections of vaccinia virus MVA expressing GM-CSF and immunization with DNA vaccine prolongs the survival of mice bearing HPV16 induced tumors with downregulated expression of MHC class I molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Němečková, Š.; Šmahel, M.; Hainz, P.; Macková, J.; Zurková, K.; Gabriel, P.; Indrová, Marie; Kutinová, L.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 4 (2007), s. 326-333 ISSN 0028-2685 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR8004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : vaccinia virus MVA expressing GM- CSF * DNA vaccine * HPV16 induced tumors Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.208, year: 2007

  19. Heat shock protein 27-derived atheroprotection involves reverse cholesterol transport that is dependent on GM-CSF to maintain ABCA1 and ABCG1 expression in ApoE-/- mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulakazhi Venu, Vivek Krishna; Adijiang, Ayinuer; Seibert, Tara; Chen, Yong-Xiang; Shi, Chunhua; Batulan, Zarah; O'Brien, Edward R

    2017-06-01

    Recently, we demonstrated that heat shock protein (HSP)-27 is protective against the development of experimental atherosclerosis, reducing plaque cholesterol content by more than 30%. Moreover, elevated HSP-27 levels are predictive of relative freedom from clinical cardiovascular events. HSP-27 signaling occurs via the activation of NF-κB, which induces a marked up-regulation in expression of granulocyte-monocyte colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a cytokine that is known to alter ABC transporters involved in reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Therefore, we hypothesized that HSP-27-derived GM-CSF has a potent role in impeding plaque formation by promoting macrophage RCT and sought to better characterize this pathway. Treatment of THP-1 cells, RAW-Blue cells, and primary macrophages with recombinant HSP-27 resulted in NF-κB activation via TLR-4 and was inhibited by various pharmacologic blockers of this pathway. Moreover, HSP-27-induced upregulation of GM-CSF expression was dependent on TLR-4 signaling. Recombinant (r)HSP-27 treatment of ApoE -/- female (but not male) mice for 4 wk yielded reductions in plaque area and cholesterol clefts of 33 and 47%, respectively, with no effect on GM-CSF -/- ApoE -/- mice. With 12 wk of rHSP-27 treatment, both female and male mice showed reductions in plaque burden (55 and 42%, respectively) and a 60% reduction in necrotic core area but no treatment effect in GM-CSF -/- ApoE -/- mice. In vitro functional studies revealed that HSP-27 enhanced the expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1, as well as facilitated cholesterol efflux in vitro by ∼10%. These novel findings establish a paradigm for HSP-27-mediated RCT and set the stage for the development of HSP-27 atheroprotective therapeutics.-Pulakazhi Venu, V. K., Adijiang, A., Seibert, T., Chen, Y.-X., Shi, C., Batulan, Z., O'Brien, E. R. Heat shock protein 27-derived atheroprotection involves reverse cholesterol transport that is dependent on GM-CSF to maintain ABCA1 and ABCG1

  20. Regulation of dendritic cell development by GM-CSF: Molecular control and implications for immune homeostasis and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. van de Laar (Lianne); P.J. Coffer (Paul); A.M. Woltman (Andrea)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DCs) represent a small and heterogeneous fraction of the hematopoietic system, specialized in antigen capture, processing, and presentation. The different DC subsets act as sentinels throughout the body and perform a key role in the induction of immunogenic as well as

  1. [Cytokines in cancer chemotherapy: present state and problems in use of G- and GM-CSF for solid tumors in Japan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawara, M

    1998-01-01

    The present state and the problems of G and GM-CSF in cancer chemotherapy, especially for solid tumors in Japan, were reviewed. One of the problems is that adaptation is restricted to several tumors, and the other that recommended doses are about half or one-fourth as much as in North America or Europe. With G-CSF after dose-intensive chemotherapy in small-cell lung cancer, three studies showed G-CSF shortened the duration of neutropenia, and reduced the incidence of neutropenic fever, use of antibiotics and hospitalization, while they showed no advantages in terms of response rate and the incidence of infection-related death. Moreover, the effect on survival has not been proved. In afebrile neutropenic patients, G-CSF could accelerate recovery from neutropenia, but did not reduce the incidence of neutropenic fever. In febrile neutropenic patients with antibiotics, it could also accelerate recovery from neutropenia, but did not reduce neutropenic fever compared with no CSF except in some subsets. Our retrospective study showed the effects of G-CSF in grade 4 neutropenia were comparable with grade 3 neutropenia. The functions of neutrophils with G-CSF after chemotherapy were reported to be increased or maintained. Clinical benefits were only obtained in certain dose-intensive chemotherapy or in limited subsets. Additional clinical trials and a guideline like ASCO's should be planned.

  2. Disabled infectious single cycle herpes simplex virus (DISC-HSV) is a candidate vector system for gene delivery/expression of GM-CSF in human prostate cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Richard J; Mian, Shahid; Bishop, Michael C; Gray, Trevor; Li, Geng; McArdle, Stephanie E B; Ali, Selman; Rees, Robert C

    2003-06-15

    DISC-HSV is a replication incompetent herpes simplex virus that is a highly efficient vector for the transduction of genes in vivo and in vitro. We examine the ability of DISC-HSV to infect human prostate cancer cell-lines and xenograft tumor models, and induce expression of reporter and therapeutic cytokine genes. Infection was confirmed by cellular staining for the beta-galactosidase reporter gene product, and by EM. Human GM-CSF production following DISC-hGMCSF infection was measured using ELISA. The metabolic activity of infected cells was determined by NADP/NADPH assay. Cell death was estimated by cell-cycle analysis using flow cytometry with propidium iodide staining. Infection of DU145, PC3 and LNCaP cells with DISC-HSV was dose dependent. Cells infected with DISC-hGM-CSF released significant levels of hGM-CSF for 3 days. NADP/NADPH assay suggested that infected cells continued to be metabolically active for 3 days post-infection, which was consistent with flow cytometry findings that cell death did not occur within 7 days of infection. Tumor xenografts injected with DISC-HSV expressed beta-galactosidase, and intracellular viral particles were demonstrated using EM. We have previously reported the rejection of established tumors following intra-tumoral injection of DISC-GMCSF. This study demonstrates the ability of DISC-HSV to infect prostate cancer and express GMCSF at significant levels. We suggest that prostate cancer is a potential target for therapy using DISC-HSV containing GM-CSF. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Effect of the association of IGF-I, IGF-II, bFGF, TGF-beta1, GM-CSF, and LIF on the development of bovine embryos produced in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira, J A; Tainturier, D; Peña, M A; Martal, J

    2010-03-15

    This study examined the influence of the following growth factors and cytokines on early embryonic development: insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I, IGF-II), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor (TGF-beta), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). Synthetic oviduct fluid (SOF) was used as the culture medium. We studied the development of bovine embryos produced in vitro and cultured until Day 9 after fertilization. TGF-beta1, bFGF, GM-CSF, and LIF used on their own significantly improved the yield of hatched blastocysts. IGF-I, bFGF, TGF-beta1, GM-CSF, and LIF significantly accelerated embryonic development, especially the change from the expanded blastocyst to hatched blastocyst stages. Use of a combination of these growth factors and cytokines (GF-CYK) in SOF medium produced higher percentages of blastocysts and hatched blastocysts than did use of SOF alone (45% and 22% vs. 24% and 12%; PGM-CSF, produces similar results to 10% fetal calf serum for the development of in vitro-produced bovine embryos. This entirely synthetic method of embryo culture has undeniable advantages for the biosecurity of embryo transfer. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Distinct Properties of Human M-CSF and GM-CSF Monocyte-Derived Macrophages to Simulate Pathological Lung Conditions In Vitro: Application to Systemic and Inflammatory Disorders with Pulmonary Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lescoat, Alain; Ballerie, Alice; Augagneur, Yu; Morzadec, Claudie; Vernhet, Laurent; Fardel, Olivier; Jégo, Patrick; Jouneau, Stéphane; Lecureur, Valérie

    2018-03-17

    Macrophages play a central role in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases. However, alveolar macrophages (AM) are poorly available in humans to perform in vitro studies due to a limited access to broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL). In this study, to identify the best alternative in vitro model for human AM, we compared the phenotype of AM obtained from BAL of patients suffering from three lung diseases (lung cancers, sarcoidosis and Systemic Sclerosis (SSc)-associated interstitial lung disease) to human blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) differentiated with M-CSF or GM-CSF. The expression of eight membrane markers was evaluated by flow cytometry. Globally, AM phenotype was closer to GM-CSF MDMs. However, the expression levels of CD163, CD169, CD204, CD64 and CD36 were significantly higher in SSc-ILD than in lung cancers. Considering the expression of CD204 and CD36, the phenotype of SSc-AM was closer to MDMs, from healthy donors or SSc patients, differentiated by M-CSF rather than GM-CSF. The comparative secretion of IL-6 by SSc-MDMs and SSc-AM is concordant with these phenotypic considerations. Altogether, these results support the M-CSF MDM model as a relevant in vitro alternative to simulate AM in fibrotic disorders such as SSc.

  5. Needle-free Biojector injection of a dengue virus type 1 DNA vaccine with human immunostimulatory sequences and the GM-CSF gene increases immunogenicity and protection from virus challenge in Aotus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raviprakash, Kanakatte; Ewing, Dan; Simmons, Monika; Porter, Kevin R.; Jones, Trevor R.; Hayes, Curtis G.; Stout, Richard; Murphy, Gerald S.

    2003-01-01

    A dengue-1 DNA vaccine containing sequences encoding premembrane and envelope proteins (DIME) was previously shown to elicit virus neutralizing antibodies in rhesus and Aotus monkeys, and the primates were partially protected from viremia upon challenge. To increase the neutralizing antibody levels and subsequent protection from virus challenge, four strategies were evaluated: (a) coimmunization with a plasmid expressing Aotus GM-CSF gene; (b) coimmunization with a plasmid containing human immunostimulatory sequences (ISS); (c) coimmunization with both the GM-CSF gene and ISS; and (d) delivery of vaccine using the needle-free Biojector system. Vaccination with the mixed formulation containing DIME, GM-CSF gene, and ISS, by either needle injection or Biojector, led to neutralizing antibody titers that were stable for up to 6 months after vaccination. Furthermore, 6 of 7 monkeys (85%), and 7 of 8 monkeys (87%) receiving this formulation were completely protected from viremia when challenged 1 and 6 months after vaccination, respectively. This is a significant improvement compared to our previous study in which one of three monkeys (33%) receiving just the DIME vaccine was completely protected from viremia at 6 months after immunization

  6. Silencing of Foxp3 enhances the antitumor efficacy of GM-CSF genetically modified tumor cell vaccine against B16 melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Antonio Miguel,1 Luis Sendra,1 Verónica Noé,2 Carles J Ciudad,2 Francisco Dasí,3,4 David Hervas,5 María José Herrero,1,6 Salvador F Aliño17 1Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia, 2Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, 3Research University Hospital of Valencia, INCLIVA Health Research Institute, 4Department of Physiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Valencia Foundation, 5Biostatistics Unit, 6Pharmacogenetics Unit, Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria La Fe (IIS La Fe, 7Clinical Pharmacology Unit, ACM Hospital Universitario y Politécnico La Fe, Valencia, Spain Abstract: The antitumor response after therapeutic vaccination has a limited effect and seems to be related to the presence of T regulatory cells (Treg, which express the immunoregulatory molecules CTLA4 and Foxp3. The blockage of CTLA4 using antibodies has shown an effective antitumor response conducing to the approval of the human anti-CTLA4 antibody ipilimumab by the US Food and Drug Administration. On the other hand, Foxp3 is crucial for Treg development. For this reason, it is an attractive target for cancer treatment. This study aims to evaluate whether combining therapeutic vaccination with CTLA4 or Foxp3 gene silencing enhances the antitumor response. First, the “in vitro” cell entrance and gene silencing efficacy of two tools, 2'-O-methyl phosphorotioate-modified oligonucleotides (2'-OMe-PS-ASOs and polypurine reverse Hoogsteen hairpins (PPRHs, were evaluated in EL4 cells and cultured primary lymphocytes. Following B16 tumor transplant, C57BL6 mice were vaccinated with irradiated B16 tumor cells engineered to produce granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and were intraperitoneally treated with CTLA4 and Foxp3 2'-OMe-PS-ASO before and after vaccination. Tumor growth, mice survival, and CTLA4 and Foxp3 expression in blood cells were measured. The following

  7. A randomized phase II study of immunization with dendritic cells modified with poxvectors encoding CEA and MUC1 compared with the same poxvectors plus GM-CSF for resected metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Michael A; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Marshall, John L; Garrett, Christopher; Chang, David Z; Aklilu, Mebea; Crocenzi, Todd S; Cole, David J; Dessureault, Sophie; Hobeika, Amy C; Osada, Takuya; Onaitis, Mark; Clary, Bryan M; Hsu, David; Devi, Gayathri R; Bulusu, Anuradha; Annechiarico, Robert P; Chadaram, Vijaya; Clay, Timothy M; Lyerly, H Kim

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether 1 of 2 vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) and poxvectors encoding CEA (carcinoembryonic antigen) and MUC1 (PANVAC) would lengthen survival in patients with resected metastases of colorectal cancer (CRC). Recurrences after complete resections of metastatic CRC remain frequent. Immune responses to CRC are associated with fewer recurrences, suggesting a role for cancer vaccines as adjuvant therapy. Both DCs and poxvectors are potent stimulators of immune responses against cancer antigens. Patients, disease-free after CRC metastasectomy and perioperative chemotherapy (n = 74), were randomized to injections of autologous DCs modified with PANVAC (DC/PANVAC) or PANVAC with per injection GM-CSF (granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor). Endpoints were recurrence-free survival overall survival, and rate of CEA-specific immune responses. Clinical outcome was compared with that of an unvaccinated, contemporary group of patients who had undergone CRC metastasectomy, received similar perioperative therapy, and would have otherwise been eligible for the study. Recurrence-free survival at 2 years was similar (47% and 55% for DC/PANVAC and PANVAC/GM-CSF, respectively) (χ P = 0.48). At a median follow-up of 35.7 months, there were 2 of 37 deaths in the DC/PANVAC arm and 5 of 37 deaths in the PANVAC/GM-CSF arm. The rate and magnitude of T-cell responses against CEA was statistically similar between study arms. As a group, vaccinated patients had superior survival compared with the contemporary unvaccinated group. Both DC and poxvector vaccines have similar activity. Survival was longer for vaccinated patients than for a contemporary unvaccinated group, suggesting that a randomized trial of poxvector vaccinations compared with standard follow-up after metastasectomy is warranted. (NCT00103142).

  8. IL-12 and GM-CSF in DNA/MVA immunizations against HIV-1 CRF12_BF Nef induced T-cell responses with an enhanced magnitude, breadth and quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Rodríguez

    Full Text Available In Argentina, the HIV epidemic is characterized by the co-circulation of subtype B and BF recombinant viral variants. Nef is an HIV protein highly variable among subtypes, making it a good tool to study the impact of HIV variability in the vaccine design setting. We have previously reported a specific cellular response against NefBF with low cross-reactivity to NefB in mice. The aim of this work was to analyze whether the co-administration of IL-12 and GM-CSF, using DNA and MVA vaccine vectors, could improve the final cellular response induced. Mice received three DNA priming doses of a plasmid that express NefBF plus DNAs expressing IL-12 and/or GM-CSF. Afterwards, all the groups were boosted with a MVAnefBF dose. The highest increase in the magnitude of the NefBF response, compared to that induced in the control was found in the IL-12 group. Importantly, a response with higher breadth was detected in groups which received IL-12 or GM-CSF, evidenced as an increased frequency of recognition of homologous (BF and heterologous (B Nef peptides, as well as a higher number of other Nef peptide pools representing different viral subtypes. However, these improvements were lost when both DNA cytokines were simultaneously administered, as the response was focused against the immunodominant peptide with a detrimental response towards subdominant epitopes. The pattern of cytokines secreted and the specific-T-cell proliferative capacity were improved in IL-12 and IL-12+GM-CSF groups. Importantly IL-12 generated a significant higher T-cell avidity against a B heterologous peptide.This study indicates that the incorporation of DNA expressing IL-12 in DNA/MVA schemes produced the best results in terms of improvements of T-cell-response key properties such as breadth, cross-reactivity and quality (avidity and pattern of cytokines secreted. These relevant results contribute to the design of strategies aimed to induce T-cell responses against HIV antigens with

  9. Prolongation of the survival of breast cancer-bearing mice immunized with GM-CSF-secreting syngeneic/allogeneic fibroblasts transfected with a cDNA expression library from breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae S; Jung, Mi Y; Cho, Daeho; Cohen, Edward P

    2006-10-30

    Breast cancer cells, like other types of neoplastic cells, form weakly immunogenic tumor-associated antigens. The antigenic properties of the tumor-associated antigens can be enhanced if they are expressed by highly immunogenic cells. In this study, a cancer vaccine was prepared by transfer of a cDNA expression library from SB5b breast carcinoma into mouse fibroblast cells of C3H/He mouse origin (H-2(k)), that had been previously modified to secrete GM-CSF and to express allogeneic class I-determinants (H-2(b)). The transfected syngeneic/allogeneic fibroblasts secreting GM-CSF were used as a vaccine in C3H/He mice. Robust cell-mediated immunity toward the breast cancer cells was generated in mice immunized with the cDNA-based vaccine. The immunity, mediated predominantly by CD8(+) T lymphocytes, was directed toward the breast cancer cells, but not against either of two other non-cross-reactive neoplasms of C3H/He mice. The immunity was sufficient to prolong the survival of mice with established breast cancer. Among other advantages, preparation of the vaccine by cDNA-transfer into a fibroblast cell line enabled the recipient cells to be modified in advance of DNA-transfer to augment their immunogenic properties. As the transferred DNA is replicated as the transfected cells divide, the vaccine could be prepared from microgram quantities of tumor tissue.

  10. The frequency of clinical pregnancy and implantation rate after cultivation of embryos in a medium with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in patients with preceding failed attempts of ART.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevkin, S; Lokshin, V; Shishimorova, M; Polumiskov, V

    2014-10-01

    The application in IVF practice of modern techniques can improve positive outcome of each cycle in the assisted reproductive technology (ART) programs and the effectiveness of treatment as a whole. There are embryos in the female reproductive tract in physiological medium which contain various cytokines and growth factors. It plays an important role in the regulation of normal embryonic development, improve implantation and subsequently optimizing the development of the fetus and the placenta. Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF is one of the cytokines playing an important role in reproductive function. Addition of recombinant GM-CSF to the culture medium can makes closer human embryos culture to in vivo conditions and improve the efficacy ART cycles. The analysis of culture embryos in EmbryoGen medium has shown that fertilization rate embryo culture and transfer to patients with previous unsuccessful attempts increases clinical pregnancy rate compared to the control group 39.1 versus 27.8%, respectively. It is noted that the implantation rate (on 7 weeks' gestation) and progressive clinical pregnancy rate (on 12 weeks' gestation) were significantly higher in group embryos culture in EmbryoGen medium compared to standard combination of medium (ISM1+VA), and were 20.4 and 17.4% versus 11.6 and 9.1%, respectively.

  11. TL1A increases expression of CD25, LFA-1, CD134 and CD154, and induces IL-22 and GM-CSF production from effector CD4 T-cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reichwald, Kirsten; Jørgensen, Tina Z.; Skov, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Elevated levels of the cytokine TL1A is associated with several autoimmune diseases e.g. rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. However, the exact role of TL1A remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the function of TL1A in a pro-inflammatory setting. We show that TL1A toget...... of CD25 (IL-2Rα) and CD11a (α-chain of LFA-1) on CD4 T-cells, likely governing increased IL-2/IL-15 sensitivity and cell-cell contact. Along with this, TL1A co-stimulation caused a specific induction of IL-22 and GM-CSF from the activated T-cells. These results substantially contribute...

  12. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Distinct Metabolic Differences Between Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) and Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (M-CSF) Grown Macrophages Derived from Murine Bone Marrow Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Yi Rang; Hong, Ji Hye; Lee, Min Yong; Jung, Jae Hun; Jung, Daun; Kim, Young Won; Son, Dain; Choi, Murim; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2015-10-01

    Macrophages are crucial in controlling infectious agents and tissue homeostasis. Macrophages require a wide range of functional capabilities in order to fulfill distinct roles in our body, one being rapid and robust immune responses. To gain insight into macrophage plasticity and the key regulatory protein networks governing their specific functions, we performed quantitative analyses of the proteome and phosphoproteome of murine primary GM-CSF and M-CSF grown bone marrow derived macrophages (GM-BMMs and M-BMMs, respectively) using the latest isobaric tag based tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Strikingly, metabolic processes emerged as a major difference between these macrophages. Specifically, GM-BMMs show significant enrichment of proteins involving glycolysis, the mevalonate pathway, and nitrogen compound biosynthesis. This evidence of enhanced glycolytic capability in GM-BMMs is particularly significant regarding their pro-inflammatory responses, because increased production of cytokines upon LPS stimulation in GM-BMMs depends on their acute glycolytic capacity. In contrast, M-BMMs up-regulate proteins involved in endocytosis, which correlates with a tendency toward homeostatic functions such as scavenging cellular debris. Together, our data describes a proteomic network that underlies the pro-inflammatory actions of GM-BMMs as well as the homeostatic functions of M-BMMs. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Regulation of CTL responses to MHC-restricted class I peptide of the gp70 tumour antigen by splenic parenchymal CD4+ T cells in mice failing immunotherapy with DISC-mGM-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Murrium; Rees, Robert C; McArdle, Stephanie E; Li, Geng; Mian, Shahid; Entwisle, Claire; Loudon, Peter; Ali, Selman A

    2005-07-20

    Direct intratumour injection of the disabled infectious single-cycle-herpes simplex virus-encoding murine granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (DISC-HSV-mGM-CSF) into established colon carcinoma CT26 tumours induced complete tumour rejection in up to 70% of treated animals (regressors), while the remaining mice developed progressive tumours (progressors). This murine Balb/c model was used to dissect the cellular mechanisms involved in tumour regression or progression following immunotherapy. CTLs were generated by coculturing lymphocytes and parenchymal cells from the same spleens of individual regressor or progressor animals in the presence of the relevant AH-1 peptide derived from the gp70 tumour-associated antigens expressed by CT26 tumours. Tumour regression was correlated with potent CTL responses, spleen weight and cytokine (IFN-gamma) production. Conversely, progressor splenocytes exhibited weak to no CTL activity and poor IFN-gamma production, concomitant with the presence of a suppressor cell population in the progressor splenic parenchymal cell fraction. Further fractionation of this parenchymal subpopulation demonstrated that cells inhibitory to the activation of AH-1-specific CTLs, restimulated in vitro with peptide, were present in the nonadherent parenchymal fraction. In vitro depletion of progressor parenchymal CD3+/CD4+ T cells restored the CTL response of the cocultured splenocytes (regressor lymphocytes and progressor parenchymal cells) and decreased the production of IL-10, suggesting that CD3+CD4+ T lymphocytes present in the parenchymal fraction regulated the CTL response to AH-1. We examined the cellular responses associated with tumour rejection and progression, identifying regulatory pathways associated with failure to respond to immunotherapy. Copyright 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. (-)Deprenyl and (-)1-phenyl-2-propylaminopentane, [(-)PPAP], act primarily as potent stimulants of action potential-transmitter release coupling in the catecholaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoll, J; Miklya, I; Knoll, B; Markó, R; Kelemen, K

    1996-01-01

    The activity of the catecholaminergic neurons in the rat brain is enhanced significantly 30 min after the subcutaneous injection of very small doses of (-)deprenyl (threshold doses: 0.01 mg/kg for noradrenergic neurons and 0.025 mg/kg for dopaminergic neurons). As a catecholaminergic activity enhancer (CAE) substance (-)deprenyl is about ten times more potent than its parent compound, (-)methamphetamine. While the (+)methamphetamine is 3-5 times more potent than (-)methamphetammine in releasing catecholamines, the (-)methamphetamine is the more potent CAE substance. The mechanism of the CAE effect of (-)deprenyl and (-)PPAP, a deprenyl-derived substance devoid of MAO inhibitory potency, was studied in rats by measuring: a) the release of catecholamines from striatum, substantia nigra, tuberculum olfactorium and locus coeruleus; b) the stimulation induced release of 3H-noradrenaline from the isolated brain stem; and c) the antagonistic effect against tetrabenazine-induced depression of learning in the shuttle box. The CAE effect was found to be unrelated: a) to the inhibition of MAO activity; b) to the inhibition of presynaptic catecholamine receptors; c) to the inhibition of the uptake of catecholamines; and d) to the release of catecholamines. It was concluded that (-)deprenyl and (-)PPAP act primarily as potent stimulants of action potential-transmitter release coupling in the catecholaminergic neurons of the brain. We show that both (-)deprenyl and (-)PPAP enhance the inward Ca2+ current in sino-auricular fibers of the frog heart. (-)PPAP was much more potent than either (+)PPAP or (-)deprenyl in this test.

  15. Combination Immunotherapy of B16 Melanoma Using Anti–Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte–Associated Antigen 4 (Ctla-4) and Granulocyte/Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor (Gm-Csf)-Producing Vaccines Induces Rejection of Subcutaneous and Metastatic Tumors Accompanied by Autoimmune Depigmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Elsas, Andrea; Hurwitz, Arthur A.; Allison, James P.

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effectiveness of cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) blockade, alone or in combination with a granulocyte/macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF)–expressing tumor cell vaccine, on rejection of the highly tumorigenic, poorly immunogenic murine melanoma B16-BL6. Recently established tumors could be eradicated in 80% (68/85) of the cases using combination treatment, whereas each treatment by itself showed little or no effect. Tumor rejection was dependent on CD8+ and NK1.1+ cells but occurred irrespective of the presence of CD4+ T cells. Mice surviving a primary challenge rejected a secondary challenge with B16-BL6 or the parental B16-F0 line. The same treatment regimen was found to be therapeutically effective against outgrowth of preestablished B16-F10 lung metastases, inducing long-term survival. Of all mice surviving B16-BL6 or B16-F10 tumors after combination treatment, 56% (38/68) developed depigmentation, starting at the site of vaccination or challenge and in most cases progressing to distant locations. Depigmentation was found to occur in CD4-depleted mice, strongly suggesting that the effect was mediated by CTLs. This study shows that CTLA-4 blockade provides a powerful tool to enhance T cell activation and memory against a poorly immunogenic spontaneous murine tumor and that this may involve recruitment of autoreactive T cells. PMID:10430624

  16. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor does not increase the potency or efficacy of a foot-and-mouth disease virus subunit vaccine Fator estimulante de colônias de granu-lócitos e macrófagos (GM-CSF não aumenta a eficácia ou potência da vacina de subunidades da febre aftosa em suínos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luizinho Caron

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD is one of the most feared diseases of livestock worldwide. Vaccination has been a very effective weapon in controlling the disease, however a number of concerns with the current vaccine including the inability of approved diagnostic tests to reliably distinguish vaccinated from infected animals and the need for high containment facilities for vaccine production, have limited its use during outbreaks in countries previously free of the disease. A number of FMD vaccine candidates have been tested and a replication-defective human adenovirus type 5 (Ad5 vector containing the FMDV capsid (P1-2A and 3C protease coding regions has been shown to completely protect pigs against challenge with the homologous virus (FMDV A12 and A24. An Ad5-P1-2A+3C vaccine for FMDV O1 Campos (Ad5-O1C, however, only induced a low FMDV-specific neutralizing antibody response in swine potency tests. Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF has been successfully used to stimulate the immune response in vaccine formulations against a number of diseases, including HIV, hepatitis C and B. To attempt to improve the FMDV-specific immune response induced by Ad5-O1C, we inoculated swine with Ad5-O1C and an Ad5 vector containing the gene for porcine GM-CSF (pGM-CSF. However, in the conditions used in this trial, pGM-CSF did not improve the immune response to Ad5-O1C and adversely affected the level of protection of swine challenged with homologous FMDV.A febre aftosa é uma das doenças mais temidas nos rebanhos em todo o mundo. A vacinação tem sido uma arma eficiente no controle da doença, no entanto há preocupações com as vacinas atualmente utilizadas incluindo a necessidade de instalações de alta segurança para a produção dessas vacinas e a falta de um teste de diagnóstico aprovado que faça distinção precisa entre animais vacinados dos infectados. Várias vacinas têm sido testadas contra a febre aftosa e uma dessas

  17. Endothelial-derived GM-CSF influences expression of oncostatin M

    Science.gov (United States)

    During and following transendothelial migration, neutrophils undergo a number of phenotypic changes resulting from encounters with endothelial-derived factors. This report uses an in vitro model with HUVEC and isolated human neutrophils to examine the effects of two locally-derived cytokines, granul...

  18. Hemopoietic stem cells in rhesus monkeys : surface antigens, radiosensitivity, and responses to GM-CSF

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.J. Wielenga (Jenne)

    1990-01-01

    textabstractRhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were bred at the Primate Center TNO, Rijswijk, The Netherlands!. Both male and female animals were used for the experiments. The monkeys weighed 2.5-4 kg and were 2-4 years old at the time of the experiment. They were all typed for RhLA-A, -B and -DR

  19. 29 CFR 780.607 - “Primarily employed” in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âPrimarily employedâ in agriculture. 780.607 Section 780... AGRICULTURE, PROCESSING OF AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES, AND RELATED SUBJECTS UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Employment in Agriculture and Livestock Auction Operations Under the Section 13(b)(13) Exemption Requirements...

  20. Action of granulopoiesis-stimulating cytokines rhG-CSF, rhGM-CSF, and rmGM-CSF on murine hematopoietic progenitor cells for granulocytes and macrophages (GM-CFC)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Vacek, Antonín; Weiterová, Lenka

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 54, - (2005), s. 207-213 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS5004009; GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK5011112; GA ČR(CZ) GP305/03/D050 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : murine hematopoiesis * GM-CFC * rhG- CSF Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.806, year: 2005

  1. Cuscuta chinensis Ameliorates Immunosuppression and Urotoxic Effect of Cyclophosphamide by Regulating Cytokines - GM-CSF and TNF-Alpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Nidhi; Sakthivel, Kunnathur Murugesan; Kannan, Narayanan; Vinod Prabhu, Venugopal; Guruvayoorappan, Chandrasekaran

    2015-06-01

    Cancer is the leading cause of death worldwide. Cyclophosphamide (CTX) is commonly used as anticancer drug which causes toxicity by its reactive metabolites such as acroline and phosphoramide mustard. In this study, Cuscuta chinensis (C. chinensis) (family: Convolvulaceae) was assessed for ability to restore mice against CTX-induced toxicity. Coadministration of C. chinensis extract (10 mg/kg BW, IP, daily) for ten consecutive days reduced CTX-induced (25 mg/kg BW, IP, daily) toxicity. Treatment with C. chinensis extract significantly (p < 0.01) increased the relative organ weight and body weight. Moreover, administration of C. chinensis extract significantly increased bone marrow cellulatity and α-esterase activity in CTX-treated mice which suggested its protective role on the hematopoietic system. The GSH content was drastically reduced by CTX administration in urinary bladder which was enhanced by treatment with C. chinensis extract, indicating that preventing acroline-mediated tissue damage or cell toxicity and also the extract decreased the urinary bladder nitric oxide (NO) level which proves recovery over urinary tract injury associated with CTX treatment. The administration of C. chinensis extract decreased serum urea, creatinine, and bilirubin levels when compared to CTX-alone-treated group. Histopathological analysis of the urinary bladder of CTX-alone-treated group showed necrotic damage whereas the C. chinensis-treated group showed normal bladder architecture. The above data clearly demonstrates chemoprotective role of C. chinensis against CTX-induced toxicities by regulating antioxidant and inflammatory mediators.

  2. Chimeric HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins with potent intrinsic granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Isik, Gözde; van Montfort, Thijs; Boot, Maikel; Cobos Jiménez, Viviana; Kootstra, Neeltje A.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 acquisition can be prevented by broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) that target the envelope glycoprotein complex (Env). An ideal vaccine should therefore be able to induce BrNAbs that can provide immunity over a prolonged period of time, but the low intrinsic immunogenicity of HIV-1 Env

  3. Immunization With AFP + GM CSF Plasmid Prime and AFP Adenoviral Vector Boost in Patients With Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular Carcinoma; Hepatoma; Liver Cancer, Adult; Liver Cell Carcinoma; Liver Cell Carcinoma, Adult; Cancer of Liver; Cancer of the Liver; Cancer, Hepatocellular; Hepatic Cancer; Hepatic Neoplasms; Hepatocellular Cancer; Liver Cancer; Neoplasms, Hepatic; Neoplasms, Liver

  4. Growth factors G-CSF and GM-CSF differentially preserve chemotaxis of neutrophils aging in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolach, Baruch; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; Maianski, Nikolai A.; Tool, Anton T. J.; van Bruggen, Robin; Roos, Dirk; Kuijpers, Taco W.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The ability of human neutrophils to migrate was studied during culture in vitro. METHODS: Neutrophils were isolated from human blood and cultured at 37 degrees C. Apoptosis was determined by Annexin-V fluorescein isothiocyanate binding. Receptor expression was measured by fluorescence in

  5. CD4+ Th1 HER2-Specific T Cells as a Novel Treatment for HER2-Overexpressing Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lai, Vy P

    2007-01-01

    .... Second, we have thoroughly characterized the cytokine production by our ex vivo expanded T cells and observed high levels of secreted Th1 cytokines, primarily IFN and GM-CSF, but also, interestingly...

  6. Primarily Experimental Results for a W Wire Array Z Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuai Bin; Aici, Qiu; Wang Liangping; Zeng Zhengzhong; Wang Wensheng; Cong Peitian; Gai Tongyang; Wei Fuli; Guo Ning; Zhang Zhong

    2006-01-01

    Primarily experimental results are given for a W wire array Z pinch imploded with up to 2 MA in 100 ns on a Qiangguang-I pulsed power generator. The configuration and parameters of the generator, the W wire array load assembly and the diagnostic system for the experiment are described. The total X-ray energy has been obtained with a averaged power of X-ray radiation of 1.28 TW

  7. Human punishment is not primarily motivated by inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczyk, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    Previous theorizing about punishment has suggested that humans desire to punish inequality per se. However, the research supporting such an interpretation contains important methodological confounds. The main objective of the current experiment was to remove those confounds in order to test whether generating inequality per se is punished. Participants were recruited from an online market to take part in a wealth-alteration game with an ostensible second player. The participants were given an option to deduct from the other player's payment as punishment for their behavior during the game. The results suggest that human punishment does not appear to be motivated by inequality per se, as inequality that was generated without inflicting costs on others was not reliably punished. Instead, punishment seems to respond primarily to the infliction of costs, with inequality only becoming relevant as a secondary input for punishment decisions. The theoretical significance of this finding is discussed in the context of its possible adaptive value.

  8. Human punishment is not primarily motivated by inequality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marczyk, Jesse

    2017-01-01

    Previous theorizing about punishment has suggested that humans desire to punish inequality per se. However, the research supporting such an interpretation contains important methodological confounds. The main objective of the current experiment was to remove those confounds in order to test whether generating inequality per se is punished. Participants were recruited from an online market to take part in a wealth-alteration game with an ostensible second player. The participants were given an option to deduct from the other player’s payment as punishment for their behavior during the game. The results suggest that human punishment does not appear to be motivated by inequality per se, as inequality that was generated without inflicting costs on others was not reliably punished. Instead, punishment seems to respond primarily to the infliction of costs, with inequality only becoming relevant as a secondary input for punishment decisions. The theoretical significance of this finding is discussed in the context of its possible adaptive value. PMID:28187166

  9. Human punishment is not primarily motivated by inequality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse Marczyk

    Full Text Available Previous theorizing about punishment has suggested that humans desire to punish inequality per se. However, the research supporting such an interpretation contains important methodological confounds. The main objective of the current experiment was to remove those confounds in order to test whether generating inequality per se is punished. Participants were recruited from an online market to take part in a wealth-alteration game with an ostensible second player. The participants were given an option to deduct from the other player's payment as punishment for their behavior during the game. The results suggest that human punishment does not appear to be motivated by inequality per se, as inequality that was generated without inflicting costs on others was not reliably punished. Instead, punishment seems to respond primarily to the infliction of costs, with inequality only becoming relevant as a secondary input for punishment decisions. The theoretical significance of this finding is discussed in the context of its possible adaptive value.

  10. GOLD HULL AND INTERNODE2 encodes a primarily multifunctional cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kewei; Qian, Qian; Huang, Zejun; Wang, Yiqin; Li, Ming; Hong, Lilan; Zeng, Dali; Gu, Minghong; Chu, Chengcai; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2006-03-01

    Lignin content and composition are two important agronomic traits for the utilization of agricultural residues. Rice (Oryza sativa) gold hull and internode phenotype is a classical morphological marker trait that has long been applied to breeding and genetics study. In this study, we have cloned the GOLD HULL AND INTERNODE2 (GH2) gene in rice using a map-based cloning approach. The result shows that the gh2 mutant is a lignin-deficient mutant, and GH2 encodes a cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). Consistent with this finding, extracts from roots, internodes, hulls, and panicles of the gh2 plants exhibited drastically reduced CAD activity and undetectable sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity. When expressed in Escherichia coli, purified recombinant GH2 was found to exhibit strong catalytic ability toward coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde, while the mutant protein gh2 completely lost the corresponding CAD and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activities. Further phenotypic analysis of the gh2 mutant plants revealed that the p-hydroxyphenyl, guaiacyl, and sinapyl monomers were reduced in almost the same ratio compared to the wild type. Our results suggest GH2 acts as a primarily multifunctional CAD to synthesize coniferyl and sinapyl alcohol precursors in rice lignin biosynthesis.

  11. GOLD HULL AND INTERNODE2 Encodes a Primarily Multifunctional Cinnamyl-Alcohol Dehydrogenase in Rice1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kewei; Qian, Qian; Huang, Zejun; Wang, Yiqin; Li, Ming; Hong, Lilan; Zeng, Dali; Gu, Minghong; Chu, Chengcai; Cheng, Zhukuan

    2006-01-01

    Lignin content and composition are two important agronomic traits for the utilization of agricultural residues. Rice (Oryza sativa) gold hull and internode phenotype is a classical morphological marker trait that has long been applied to breeding and genetics study. In this study, we have cloned the GOLD HULL AND INTERNODE2 (GH2) gene in rice using a map-based cloning approach. The result shows that the gh2 mutant is a lignin-deficient mutant, and GH2 encodes a cinnamyl-alcohol dehydrogenase (CAD). Consistent with this finding, extracts from roots, internodes, hulls, and panicles of the gh2 plants exhibited drastically reduced CAD activity and undetectable sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activity. When expressed in Escherichia coli, purified recombinant GH2 was found to exhibit strong catalytic ability toward coniferaldehyde and sinapaldehyde, while the mutant protein gh2 completely lost the corresponding CAD and sinapyl alcohol dehydrogenase activities. Further phenotypic analysis of the gh2 mutant plants revealed that the p-hydroxyphenyl, guaiacyl, and sinapyl monomers were reduced in almost the same ratio compared to the wild type. Our results suggest GH2 acts as a primarily multifunctional CAD to synthesize coniferyl and sinapyl alcohol precursors in rice lignin biosynthesis. PMID:16443696

  12. Activation of adenosine A3 receptors potentiates stimulatory effects of IL-3, SCF, and GM-CSF on mouse granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Vacek, Antonín; Pospíšil, Milan; Holá, Jiřina; Štreitová, Denisa; Znojil, V.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 2 (2009), s. 247-252 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/06/0015; GA ČR(CZ) GA305/08/0158 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : hematopoiesis * adenosine A3 receptor agonist * hematopoietic growth factors Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.430, year: 2009

  13. Effect on Antibody and T-Cell Responses of Mixing Five GMP-Produced DNA Plasmids and Administration With Plasmid Expressing GM-CSF

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sedegah, M; Charoenvit, Y; Aguiar, J; Sacci, J; Hedstrom, R; Kumar, S; Belmonte, A; Lanar, DE; Jones, TR; Abot, E

    2004-01-01

    .... In preparation for a clinical trial, we assessed the immunogenicity of GMP-produced plasmids encoding five Plasmodium falciparum proteins, PfCSP, PfSSP2, PfEXP1, PfLSA1, and PfLSA3, given as a mixture, or alone...

  14. Treatment of minimal residual disease after surgery or chemotherapy in mice carrying HPV16-associated tumours: cytokine and gene therapy with IL-2 and GM-CSF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikyšková, Romana; Indrová, Marie; Šímová, Jana; Jandlová, Táňa; Bieblová, Jana; Jinoch, P.; Bubeník, Jan; Vonka, V.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 1 (2004), s. 161-167 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC7148; GA MZd NC7552; GA ČR GA301/01/0985 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : HPV16 * gene therapy * minimal residual tumour disease Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 3.056, year: 2004

  15. Privacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn about the Privacy Act of 1974, the Electronic Government Act of 2002, the Federal Information Security Management Act, and other information about the Environmental Protection Agency maintains its records.

  16. Biological properties in vitro of a combination of recombinant murine interleukin-3 and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riklis, I; Kletter, Y; Bleiberg, I; Fabian, I

    1989-04-01

    The effect of recombinant murine interleukin-3 (rIL-3) and recombinant murine granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (rGM-CSF) on in vitro murine myeloid progenitor cell (CFU-C) growth and on the function of murine resident peritoneal macrophages was investigated. Both rIL-3 and rGM-CSF are known to support the growth of CFU-C and, when combined, were found to act synergistically to induce the development of an increased number of CFU-C. The distribution pattern of myeloid colonies in the presence of these two growth factors was in general similar to that in the presence of rGM-CSF alone. Both rGM-CSF and rIL-3 enhanced the phagocytosis of Candida albicans (CA) by mature macrophages producing an increase in the percentage of phagocytosing cells as well as an increase in the number of yeast particles ingested per cell. No additive effect on the phagocytosis was observed when the two growth factors were added concurrently. rGM-CSF, but not rIL-3, enhanced the killing of CA by macrophages. This killing was inhibited by scavengers of oxygen radicals.

  17. Adolescent Pornography Use and Dating Violence among a Sample of Primarily Black and Hispanic, Urban-Residing, Underage Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily F. Rothman

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study was designed to characterize the pornography viewing preferences of a sample of U.S.-based, urban-residing, economically disadvantaged, primarily Black and Hispanic youth (n = 72, and to assess whether pornography use was associated with experiences of adolescent dating abuse (ADA victimization. The sample was recruited from a large, urban, safety net hospital, and participants were 53% female, 59% Black, 19% Hispanic, 14% Other race, 6% White, and 1% Native American. All were 16–17 years old. More than half (51% had been asked to watch pornography together by a dating or sexual partner, and 44% had been asked to do something sexual that a partner saw in pornography. Adolescent dating abuse (ADA victimization was associated with more frequent pornography use, viewing pornography in the company of others, being asked to perform a sexual act that a partner first saw in pornography, and watching pornography during or after marijuana use. Approximately 50% of ADA victims and 32% of non-victims reported that they had been asked to do a sexual act that their partner saw in pornography (p = 0.15, and 58% did not feel happy to have been asked. Results suggest that weekly pornography use among underage, urban-residing youth is common, and may be associated with ADA victimization.

  18. Adolescent Pornography Use and Dating Violence among a Sample of Primarily Black and Hispanic, Urban-Residing, Underage Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Emily F.; Adhia, Avanti

    2015-01-01

    This cross-sectional study was designed to characterize the pornography viewing preferences of a sample of U.S.-based, urban-residing, economically disadvantaged, primarily Black and Hispanic youth (n = 72), and to assess whether pornography use was associated with experiences of adolescent dating abuse (ADA) victimization. The sample was recruited from a large, urban, safety net hospital, and participants were 53% female, 59% Black, 19% Hispanic, 14% Other race, 6% White, and 1% Native American. All were 16–17 years old. More than half (51%) had been asked to watch pornography together by a dating or sexual partner, and 44% had been asked to do something sexual that a partner saw in pornography. Adolescent dating abuse (ADA) victimization was associated with more frequent pornography use, viewing pornography in the company of others, being asked to perform a sexual act that a partner first saw in pornography, and watching pornography during or after marijuana use. Approximately 50% of ADA victims and 32% of non-victims reported that they had been asked to do a sexual act that their partner saw in pornography (p = 0.15), and 58% did not feel happy to have been asked. Results suggest that weekly pornography use among underage, urban-residing youth may be common, and may be associated with ADA victimization. PMID:26703744

  19. Hydrogen peroxide production is not primarily increased in human myotubes established from type 2 diabetic subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minet, A D; Gaster, M

    2011-09-01

    Increased oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction have been implicated in the development of insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes. To date, it is unknown whether increased mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in skeletal muscle from patients with type 2 diabetes is primarily increased or a secondary adaptation to environmental, lifestyle, and hormonal factors. This study investigates whether ROS production is primarily increased in isolated diabetic myotubes. Mitochondrial membrane potential, hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), superoxide, and mitochondrial mass were determined in human myotubes precultured under normophysiological conditions. Furthermore, the corresponding ATP synthesis was measured in isolated mitochondria. Muscle biopsies were taken from 10 lean subjects, 10 obese subjects, and 10 subjects with type 2 diabetes; satellite cells were isolated, cultured, and differentiated to myotubes. Mitochondrial mass, membrane potential/mitochondrial mass, and superoxide-production/mitochondrial mass were not different between groups. In contrast, H(2)O(2) production/mitochondrial mass and ATP production were significantly reduced in diabetic myotubes compared to lean controls (P production is not primarily increased in diabetic myotubes but rather is reduced. Moreover, the comparable ATP/H(2)O(2) ratios indicate that the reduced ROS production in diabetic myotubes parallels the reduced ATP production because ROS production in diabetic myotubes must be considered to be in a proportion comparable to lean. Thus, the increased ROS production seen in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients is an adaptation to the in vivo conditions.

  20. Triacylglycerol Accumulation is not primarily affected in Myotubes established from Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2006-01-01

    In the present study, we investigated triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation, glucose and fatty acid (FA) uptake, and glycogen synthesis (GS) in human myotubes from healthy, lean, and obese subjects with and without type 2 diabetes (T2D), exposed to increasing palmitate (PA) and oleate (OA...... uptake (P0.05). These results indicate that (1) TAG accumulation is not primarily affected in skeletal muscle tissue of obese and T2D; (2) induced inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation is followed by TAG accumulation...... in skeletal muscle of obese and T2D subjects is adaptive....

  1. ACTS 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Co-curator of ACTS 2014 together with Rasmus Holmboe, Judith Schwarzbart and Sanne Kofoed. ACTS is the Museum of Contemporary Art’s international bi-annual festival. ACTS was established in 2011 and, while the primary focus is on sound and performance art, it also looks toward socially oriented art....... For the 2014 festival, the museum has entered into a collaboration with the Department for Performance Design at Roskilde University – with continued focus on sound and performance art, and social art in public spaces. With ACTS, art moves out of its usual exhibition space and instead utilizes the city, its...... various possibilities and public spaces as a stage. ACTS takes place in and around the museum and diverse locations in Roskilde city. ACTS is partly curated by the museum staff and partly by guest curators. ACTS 2014 is supported by Nordea-fonden and is a part of the project The Museum goes downtown....

  2. Disgust sensitivity is primarily associated with purity-based moral judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagemans, Fieke M A; Brandt, Mark J; Zeelenberg, Marcel

    2018-03-01

    Individual differences in disgust sensitivity are associated with a range of judgments and attitudes related to the moral domain. Some perspectives suggest that the association between disgust sensitivity and moral judgments will be equally strong across all moral domains (i.e., purity, authority, loyalty, care, fairness, and liberty). Other perspectives predict that disgust sensitivity is primarily associated with judgments of specific moral domains (e.g., primarily purity). However, no study has systematically tested if disgust sensitivity is associated with moral judgments of the purity domain specifically, more generally to moral judgments of the binding moral domains, or to moral judgments of all of the moral domains equally. Across 5 studies (total N = 1,104), we find consistent evidence for the notion that disgust sensitivity relates more strongly to moral condemnation of purity-based transgressions (meta-analytic r = .40) than to moral condemnation of transgressions of any of the other domains (range meta-analytic rs: .07-.27). Our findings are in line with predictions from Moral Foundations Theory, which predicts that personality characteristics like disgust sensitivity make people more sensitive to a certain set of moral issues. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Lamin A/C mutation affecting primarily the right side of the heart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ollila

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available LMNA mutations are amongst the most important causes of familial dilated cardiomyopathy. The most important cause of arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy (ARVC is desmosomal pathology. The aim of the study was to elucidate the role of LMNA mutations among Finnish cardiomyopathy patients. We screened 135 unrelated cardiomyopathy patients for LMNA mutations. Because of unusual phenotype, two patients were screened for the known Finnish ARVC-related mutations of desmosomal genes, and their Plakophilin-2b gene was sequenced. Myocardial samples from two patients were examined by immunohistochemical plakoglobin staining and in one case by electron microscopy. We found a new LMNA mutation Phe237Ser in a family of five affected members with a cardiomyopathy affecting primarily the right side of the heart. The phenotype resembles ARVC but does not fulfill the Task Force Criteria. The main clinical manifestations of the mutation were severe tricuspid insufficiency, right ventricular enlargement and failure. Three of the affected patients died of the heart disease, and the two living patients received heart transplants at ages 44 and 47. Electron microscopy showed nuclear blebbing compatible with laminopathy. Immunohisto - chemical analysis did not suggest desmosomal pathology. No desmosomal mutations were found. The Phe237Ser LMNA mutation causes a phenotype different from traditional cardiolaminopathy. Our findings suggest that cardiomyopathy affecting primarily the right side of the heart is not always caused by desmosomal pathology. Our observations highlight the challenges in classifying cardiomyopathies, as there often is significant overlap between the traditional categories.

  4. Direct healthcare costs of selected diseases primarily or partially transmitted by water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, S A; Stockman, L J; Hicks, L A; Garrison, L E; Zhou, F J; Beach, M J

    2012-11-01

    Despite US sanitation advancements, millions of waterborne disease cases occur annually, although the precise burden of disease is not well quantified. Estimating the direct healthcare cost of specific infections would be useful in prioritizing waterborne disease prevention activities. Hospitalization and outpatient visit costs per case and total US hospitalization costs for ten waterborne diseases were calculated using large healthcare claims and hospital discharge databases. The five primarily waterborne diseases in this analysis (giardiasis, cryptosporidiosis, Legionnaires' disease, otitis externa, and non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection) were responsible for over 40 000 hospitalizations at a cost of $970 million per year, including at least $430 million in hospitalization costs for Medicaid and Medicare patients. An additional 50 000 hospitalizations for campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, shigellosis, haemolytic uraemic syndrome, and toxoplasmosis cost $860 million annually ($390 million in payments for Medicaid and Medicare patients), a portion of which can be assumed to be due to waterborne transmission.

  5. Temporal integration of loudness in listeners with hearing losses of primarily cochlear origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buus, Søren; Florentine, Mary; Poulsen, Torben

    1999-01-01

    To investigate how hearing loss of primarily cochlear origin affects the loudness of brief tones, loudness matches between 5- and 200-ms tones were obtained as a function of level for 15 listeners with cochlear impairments and for seven age-matched controls. Three frequencies, usually 0.5, 1, and 4...... of temporal integration—defined as the level difference between equally loud short and long tones—varied nonmonotonically with level and was largest at moderate levels. No consistent effect of frequency was apparent. The impaired listeners varied widely, but most showed a clear effect of level on the amount...... of temporal integration. Overall, their results appear consistent with expectations based on knowledge of the general properties of their loudness-growth functions and the equal-loudness-ratio hypothesis, which states that the loudness ratio between equal-SPL long and brief tones is the same at all SPLs...

  6. The Serotonin Transporter Undergoes Constitutive Internalization and Is Primarily Sorted to Late Endosomes and Lysosomal Degradation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Bay, Tina; Eriksen, Jacob; Gether, Ulrik; Jørgensen, Trine Nygaard

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin transporter (SERT) plays a critical role in regulating serotonin signaling by mediating reuptake of serotonin from the extracellular space. The molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling SERT levels in the membrane remain poorly understood. To study trafficking of the surface resident SERT, two functional epitope-tagged variants were generated. Fusion of a FLAG-tagged one-transmembrane segment protein Tac to the SERT N terminus generated a transporter with an extracellular epitope suited for trafficking studies (TacSERT). Likewise, a construct with an extracellular antibody epitope was generated by introducing an HA (hemagglutinin) tag in the extracellular loop 2 of SERT (HA-SERT). By using TacSERT and HA-SERT in antibody-based internalization assays, we show that SERT undergoes constitutive internalization in a dynamin-dependent manner. Confocal images of constitutively internalized SERT demonstrated that SERT primarily co-localized with the late endosomal/lysosomal marker Rab7, whereas little co-localization was observed with the Rab11, a marker of the “long loop” recycling pathway. This sorting pattern was distinct from that of a prototypical recycling membrane protein, the β2-adrenergic receptor. Furthermore, internalized SERT co-localized with the lysosomal marker LysoTracker and not with transferrin. The sorting pattern was further confirmed by visualizing internalization of SERT using the fluorescent cocaine analog JHC1-64 and by reversible and pulse-chase biotinylation assays showing evidence for lysosomal degradation of the internalized transporter. Finally, we found that SERT internalized in response to stimulation with 12-myristate 13-acetate co-localized primarily with Rab7- and LysoTracker-positive compartments. We conclude that SERT is constitutively internalized and that the internalized transporter is sorted mainly to degradation. PMID:24973209

  7. Curatorial Acts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bal, M.

    2012-01-01

    In a self-critical inquiry into my own recent work of co-curating and the experience of seeing my video work being curated by others, this article examines acts of framing as performative acts that seek to transform visitors' preconceptions. This affective effect is pursued by means of immersion,

  8. Dreams and acting out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinberg, L

    1987-01-01

    Dreams can be used as containers that free patients from increased tension. This may be the principal function of certain types of dreams, called "evacuative dreams." They are dreams used for getting rid of unbearable affects and unconscious fantasies, or as a safety valve for partial discharge of instinctual drives. These dreams are observed primarily in borderline and psychotic patients, but can also be seen in the regressive states of neurotic patients during weekends and other periods of separation. Such dreams have to be differentiated from "elaborative dreams," which have a working-through function and stand in an inverse relationship to acting out: the greater the production of elaborative dreams, the less the tendency to act out, and vice versa.

  9. Nitric oxide circulates in mammalian plasma primarily as an S-nitroso adduct of serum albumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamler, J S; Jaraki, O; Osborne, J; Simon, D I; Keaney, J; Vita, J; Singel, D; Valeri, C R; Loscalzo, J

    1992-01-01

    We have recently shown that nitric oxide or authentic endothelium-derived relaxing factor generated in a biologic system reacts in the presence of specific protein thiols to form S-nitrosoprotein derivatives that have endothelium-derived relaxing factor-like properties. The single free cysteine of serum albumin, Cys-34, is particularly reactive toward nitrogen oxides (most likely nitrosonium ion) under physiologic conditions, primarily because of its anomalously low pK; given its abundance in plasma, where it accounts for approximately 0.5 mM thiol, we hypothesized that this plasma protein serves as a reservoir for nitric oxide produced by the endothelial cell. To test this hypothesis, we developed a methodology, which involves UV photolytic cleavage of the S--NO bond before reaction with ozone for chemiluminescence detection, with which to measure free nitric oxide, S-nitrosothiols, and S-nitrosoproteins in biologic systems. We found that human plasma contains approximately 7 microM S-nitrosothiols, of which 96% are S-nitrosoproteins, 82% of which is accounted for by S-nitroso-serum albumin. By contrast, plasma levels of free nitric oxide are only in the 3-nM range. In rabbits, plasma S-nitrosothiols are present at approximately 1 microM; 60 min after administration of NG-monomethyl-L-arginine at 50 mg/ml, a selective and potent inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetases, S-nitrosothiols decreased by approximately 40% (greater than 95% of which were accounted for by S-nitrosoproteins, and approximately 80% of which was S-nitroso-serum albumin); this decrease was accompanied by a concomitant increase in mean arterial blood pressure of 22%. These data suggest that naturally produced nitric oxide circulates in plasma primarily complexed in S-nitrosothiol species, principal among which is S-nitroso-serum albumin. This abundant, relatively long-lived adduct likely serves as a reservoir with which plasma levels of highly reactive, short-lived free nitric oxide can be

  10. The development and characterization of a primarily mineral calcium phosphate - poly(epsilon-caprolactone) biocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkley, Ian Robert

    Orthopaedic reconstruction often involves the surgical introduction of structural implants that provide for rigid fixation, skeletal stabilization, and bone integration. The high stresses incurred by these implanted devices have historically limited material choices to metallic and select polymeric formulations. While mechanical requirements are achieved, these non-degradable materials do not participate actively in the remodeling of the skeleton and present the possibility of long-term failure or rejection. This is particularly relevant in cervical fusion, an orthopaedic procedure to treat damaged, degenerative or diseased intervertebral discs. A significant improvement on the available synthetic bone replacement/regeneration options for implants to treat these conditions in the cervical spine may be achieved with the development of primarily mineral biocomposites comprised of a bioactive ceramic matrix reinforced with a biodegradable polymer. Such a biocomposite may be engineered to possess the clinically required mechanical properties of a particular application, while maintaining the ability to be remodeled completely by the body. A biocomposite of Si-doped calcium phosphate (Si-CaP) and poly(epsilon-caprolactone) (PCL) was developed for application as such a synthetic bone material for potential use as a fusion device in the cervical spine. In this thesis, a method by which high mineral content Si-CaP/PCL biocomposites with interpenetrating matrices of mineral and polymer phases may be prepared will be demonstrated, in addition to the effects of the various preparation parameters on the biocomposite density, porosity and mechanical properties. This new technique by which dense, primarily ceramic Si-CaP/PCL biocomposites were prepared, allowed for the incorporation of mineral contents ranging between 45-97vol%. Polymer infiltration, accomplished solely by passive capillary uptake over several days, was found to be capable of fully infiltrating the microporosity

  11. Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response in mice is primarily dependent on the Ah phenotype of lymphoid tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silkworth, J.B.; Antrim, L.A.; Sack, G.

    1986-01-01

    Halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons act through the aromatic hydrocarbon (Ah) receptor in mice to produce a series of toxic effects of the immune system. The receptor protein is a product of the Ah gene locus. Ah responsive (Ahb/Ahb) mice express a high affinity receptor in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues whereas nonresponsive Ahd/Ahd mice express a poor affinity receptor. To determine the role of the Ah receptor of lymphoid tissue relative to that of nonlymphoid tissue in the induction of immune impairment, bone marrow was used to reconstitute lethally irradiated mice of the same or opposite Ah phenotype. All mice were given 3,3',4,4'-tetrachlorobiphenyl (35 and 350 mumol/kg) ip 2 days before immunization with sheep erythrocytes (SRBC). The immune response to this T dependent antigen and organ weights were determined 5 or 7 days later in normal or chimeric mice, respectively. Monoclonal Lyt 1.1 and Lyt 1.2 antibodies were used to establish the origin of the cells which repopulated the chimeric thymuses. The immune responses of both BALB/cBy (Ahb/Ahb) and the BALB/cBy X DBA/2 hybrid, CByD2F1 (Ahb/Ahd), were significantly suppressed but DBA/2 mice were unaffected. The immune responses of chimeric BALB/cBy----BALB/cBy and BALB/cBy----DBA/2 (donor----recipient) mice were also significantly suppressed and thymic atrophy was observed in both cases. The serum anti-SRBC antibody titers of DBA/2----BALB/cBy chimeras were also significantly decreased although not to the same extent as in BALB/cBy----DBA/2 mice. Chimeric DBA/2----DBA/2 mice were not affected. These results indicate that the sensitivity to Ah receptor mediated suppression of the antibody response is primarily determined by the Ah phenotype of the lymphoid tissue

  12. Social Media Use and its Association with Sexual Risk and Parental Monitoring among a Primarily Hispanic Adolescent Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, Dina L; Garnett, Chelsea; Younger, Alayna P; Stockwell, Melissa S; Soren, Karen; Catallozzi, Marina; Neu, Natalie

    2017-08-01

    In this study we assessed the association between social media (SM) use with sexual risk, and with parental monitoring among Hispanic adolescents. Self-administered anonymous survey. Urban primary care clinics. Primarily Hispanic adolescents ages 13-21 years old. Chi-square and regression analyses controlling for age and gender were used to assess associations between SM use or sexting and sexual behaviors (kissing, touching genitals, vaginal oral, and anal sex), sexual risk (≥4 lifetime partners, >1 recent partner, inconsistent condom use, and history of sexually transmitted infection diagnosis) and contraceptive use. Similar analyses were used to assess relationships between adolescent-reported parental monitoring and SM use, and sexting. Participants with frequent SM use (social networking sites or apps) had greater odds of all sexual activity. Ever sexters had greater odds of penetrative sex only (oral, vaginal, and anal sex) as well as use of hormonal contraception (except long-acting reversible contraception). Approximately half of the participants reported parental access to profiles on SM. Female participants had higher odds of parental access to online profiles and having a parental discussion of privacy settings. Those having privacy discussions had greater odds of "private" profiles on SM and lower odds of ever sexting. Frequent SM use and sexting was associated with an increase in all types of sexual behaviors; sexting alone was associated with more lifetime and recent sexual partners. Parental discussion of privacy settings was found to be protective. Providers and parents should be aware of the effect of SM use on sexual behaviors. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Efficient transfection of DNA into primarily cultured rat sertoli cells by electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuping; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Okada, Keisuke; Matsushita, Kei; Enatsu, Noritoshi; Chiba, Koji; Yue, Huanxun; Fujisawa, Masato

    2013-03-01

    The expression of exogenous DNA in Sertoli cells is essential for studying its functional genomics, pathway analysis, and medical applications. Electroporation is a valuable tool for nucleic acid delivery, even in primarily cultured cells, which are considered difficult to transfect. In this study, we developed an optimized protocol for electroporation-based transfection of Sertoli cells and compared its efficiency with conventional lipofection. Sertoli cells were transfected with pCMV-GFP plasmid by square-wave electroporation under different conditions. After transfection of plasmid into Sertoli cells, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression could be easily detected by fluorescent microscopy, and cell survival was evaluated by dye exclusion assay using Trypan blue. In terms of both cell survival and the percentage expressing EGFP, 250 V was determined to produce the greatest number of transiently transfected cells. Keeping the voltage constant (250 V), relatively high cell survival (76.5% ± 3.4%) and transfection efficiency (30.6% ± 5.6%) were observed with a pulse length of 20 μm. The number of pulses significantly affected cell survival and EGFP expression (P transfection methods, the transfection efficiency of electroporation (21.5% ± 5.7%) was significantly higher than those of Lipofectamine 2000 (2.9% ± 1.0%) and Effectene (1.9% ± 0.8%) in this experiment (P transfection of Sertoli cells.

  14. Perceptions of Mindfulness in a Low-income, Primarily African American Treatment-Seeking Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spears, Claire Adams; Houchins, Sean C; Bamatter, Wendy P; Barrueco, Sandra; Hoover, Diana Stewart; Perskaudas, Rokas

    2017-12-01

    Individuals with low socioeconomic status (SES) and members of racial/ethnic minority groups often experience profound disparities in mental health and physical well-being. Mindfulness-based interventions show promise for improving mood and health behaviors in higher-SES and non-Latino White populations. However, research is needed to explore what types of adaptations, if any, are needed to best support underserved populations. This study used qualitative methods to gain information about a) perceptions of mindfulness, b) experiences with meditation, c) barriers to practicing mindfulness, and d) recommendations for tailoring mindfulness-based interventions in a low-income, primarily African American treatment-seeking sample. Eight focus groups were conducted with 32 adults (16 men and 16 women) currently receiving services at a community mental health center. Most participants (91%) were African American. Focus group data were transcribed and analyzed using NVivo 10. A team of coders reviewed the transcripts to identify salient themes. Relevant themes included beliefs that mindfulness practice might improve mental health (e.g., managing stress and anger more effectively) and physical health (e.g., improving sleep and chronic pain, promoting healthier behaviors). Participants also discussed ways in which mindfulness might be consistent with, and even enhance, their religious and spiritual practices. Results could be helpful in tailoring mindfulness-based treatments to optimize feasibility and effectiveness for low-SES adults receiving mental health services.

  15. Identification of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is primarily expressed in Brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemazanyy, Ivan; Panasyuk, Ganna; Breus, Oksana; Zhyvoloup, Alexander; Filonenko, Valeriy; Gout, Ivan T.

    2006-01-01

    CoA and its derivatives Acetyl-CoA and Acyl-CoA are important players in cellular metabolism and signal transduction. CoA synthase is a bifunctional enzyme which mediates the final stages of CoA biosynthesis. In previous studies, we have reported molecular cloning, biochemical characterization, and subcellular localization of CoA synthase (CoASy). Here, we describe the existence of a novel CoA synthase isoform, which is the product of alternative splicing and possesses a 29aa extension at the N-terminus. We termed it CoASy β and originally identified CoA synthase, CoASy α. The transcript specific for CoASy β was identified by electronic screening and by RT-PCR analysis of various rat tissues. The existence of this novel isoform was further confirmed by immunoblot analysis with antibodies directed to the N-terminal peptide of CoASy β. In contrast to CoASy α, which shows ubiquitous expression, CoASy β is primarily expressed in Brain. Using confocal microscopy, we demonstrated that both isoforms are localized on mitochondria. The N-terminal extension does not affect the activity of CoA synthase, but possesses a proline-rich sequence which can bring the enzyme into complexes with signalling proteins containing SH3 or WW domains. The role of this novel isoform in CoA biosynthesis, especially in Brain, requires further elucidation

  16. ACT Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to clot, the higher the degree of clotting inhibition. During surgery, the ACT is kept above a ... What is ECLS? An Introduction to Extracorporeal Life Support. University of Michigan Health System [On-line information]. ...

  17. Homogenous stretching or detachment faulting? Which process is primarily extending the Aegean crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumerics, C.; Ring, U.

    2003-04-01

    In extending orogens like the Aegean Sea of Greece and the Basin-and-Range province of the western United States, knowledge of rates of tectonic processes are important for understanding which process is primarily extending the crust. Platt et al. (1998) proposed that homogeneous stretching of the lithosphere (i.e. vertical ductile thinning associated with a subhorizontal foliation) at rates of 4-5 km Myr-1 is the dominant process that formed the Alboran Sea in the western Mediterranean. The Aegean Sea in the eastern Mediterranean is well-known for its low-angle normal faults (detachments) (Lister et al., 1984; Lister &Forster, 1996) suggesting that detachment faulting may have been the primary agent achieving ~>250 km (McKenzie, 1978) of extension since the Miocene. Ring et al. (2003) provided evidence for a very fast-slipping detachment on the islands of Syros and Tinos in the western Cyclades, which suggests that normal faulting was the dominant tectonic process that formed the Aegean Sea. However, most extensional detachments in the Aegean do not allow to quantify the amount of vertical ductile thinning associated with extension and therefore a full evaluation of the significance of vertical ductile thinning is not possible. On the Island of Ikaria in the eastern Aegean Sea, a subhorizontal extensional ductile shear zone is well exposed. We studied this shear zone in detail to quantify the amount of vertical ductile thinning associated with extension. Numerous studies have shown that natural shear zones usually deviate significantly from progressive simple shear and are characterized by pronounced shortening perpendicular to the shear zone. Numerous deformed pegmatitic veins in this shear zone on Ikaria allow the reconstruction of deformation and flow parameters (Passchier, 1990), which are necessary for quantifying the amount of vertical ductile thinning in the shear zone. Furthermore, a flow-path and finite-strain study in a syn-tectonic granite, which

  18. Eningiomas: outcome, and analysis of prognostic factors of primarily resected tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stafford, S.L.; Perry, A.; Suman, V.; Meyer, B.; Scheithauer, B.W.; Shaw, E.G.; Earle, J.D.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: 582 consecutive cases of primary intracranial meningioma undergoing resection at the Mayo Clinic, (Rochester, MN) were reviewed to determine overall survival (OS), progression free survival(PFS), prognostic factors predicting recurrence, and to determine the importance of radiation therapy in the management of this tumor. Materials and Methods: Between 1978-1988, 582 cases of primarily resected meningiomas were identified based on the tumor and operative registries where diagnosis was between 1978-1988 inclusive. PFS was identified by radiographic progression. Follow-up was accomplished by chart review, and a detailed questionnaire sent to patients and referring physicians. Estimation of OS and PFS distributions were done by the Kaplan-Meier method. The log rank test was used to assess which factors were associated with PFS. Proportional hazard modeling was performed to obtain a subset of independent predictors of PFS. Results: the median age was 57(5-93). 67% were female. CT identified the tumor in 91% of cases. There was associated edema in 21% and 2% were radiographically en plaque. There were 17 patients with multiple tumors, four of whom had a known diagnosis of neurofibromatosis. Gross total resection (GTR) was accomplished in 80%, radical subtotal or subtotal resection(STR) in 20%, and biopsy in 53) cellularity, and four or more mitoses per 10 HPF. Multivariate analysis indicated young age, male sex, en plaque at surgery, were significant for decreased PFS when only patient characteristics were considered. When treatment and pathologic factors were also considered, then young age, male sex, less than GTR, and tumor sheeting were predictors for decreased PFS. 10 patients had RT after initial resection, two of whom recurred. There were 107 first recurrences. 50 were observed(no intervention within 3 months), 35 treated by surgery alone, 11 had S+RT, and 11 were treated with RT alone. Considering those patients treated at recurrence (n=57), PFS was at

  19. Analysis of survival for patients with chronic kidney disease primarily related to renal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jitao; Suk-Ouichai, Chalairat; Dong, Wen; Antonio, Elvis Caraballo; Derweesh, Ithaar H; Lane, Brian R; Demirjian, Sevag; Li, Jianbo; Campbell, Steven C

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate predictors of long-term survival for patients with chronic kidney disease primarily due to surgery (CKD-S). Patients with CKD-S have generally good survival that approximates patients who do not have CKD even after renal cancer surgery (RCS), yet there may be heterogeneity within this cohort. From 1997 to 2008, 4 246 patients underwent RCS at our centre. The median (interquartile range [IQR]) follow-up was 9.4 (7.3-11.0) years. New baseline glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was defined as highest GFR between nadir and 6 weeks after RCS. We retrospectively evaluated three cohorts: no-CKD (new baseline GFR of ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ); CKD-S (new baseline GFR of cancer-related survival (NRCRS) for the CKD-S cohort. Kaplan-Meier analysis assessed the longitudinal impact of new baseline GFR (45-60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 vs <45 mL/min/1.73 m 2 ) and Cox regression evaluated relative impact of preoperative GFR, new baseline GFR, and relevant demographics/comorbidities. Of the 4 246 patients who underwent RCS, 931 had CKD-S and 1 113 had CKD-M/S, whilst 2 202 had no-CKD even after RCS. Partial/radical nephrectomy (PN/RN) was performed in 54%/46% of the patients, respectively. For CKD-S, 641 patients had a new baseline GFR of 45-60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 and 290 had a new baseline GFR of <45 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Kaplan-Meier analysis showed significantly reduced NRCRS for patients with CKD-S with a GFR of <45 mL/min/1.73 m 2 compared to those with no-CKD or CKD-S with a GFR of 45-60 mL/min/1.73 m 2 (both P ≤ 0.004), and competing risk analysis confirmed this (P < 0.001). Age, gender, heart disease, and new baseline GFR were all associated independently with NRCRS for patients with CKD-S (all P ≤ 0.02). Our data suggest that CKD-S is heterogeneous, and patients with a reduced new baseline GFR have compromised survival, particularly if <45 mL/min/1.73 m 2 . Our findings may have implications regarding choice of PN/RN in patients at risk of developing

  20. Adenosine potentiates stimulatory effects on granulocyte-macrophage hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro of IL-3 and SCF, but not those of G-CSF, GM-CSF and IL-11

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hofer, Michal; Vacek, Antonín; Pospíšil, Milan; Weiterová, Lenka; Holá, Jiřina; Štreitová, Denisa; Znojil, V.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 5 (2006), s. 591-596 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA305/06/0015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507 Keywords : hematopoiesis * adenosine * cytokines Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.093, year: 2006

  1. Phase I trial of anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8 plus GM-CSF: Impact of body weight, immunogenicity and anti-GD2 response on pharmacokinetics and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Irene Y; Kushner, Brian H; Modak, Shakeel; Basu, Ellen M; Roberts, Stephen S; Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2017-01-01

    Fifty-seven stage 4 patients with refractory/relapsed neuroblastoma were enrolled in a phase I trial (Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01757626) using humanized anti-GD2 monoclonal antibody hu3F8 in combination with granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The influence of body weight and human anti-human antibody (HAHA) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of hu3F8, and the effect of de novo anti-GD2 response on patient outcome were explored. Serum samples before hu3F8 infusion, and serially up to day 12 during treatment cycle #1, and at 5 min after each hu3F8 infusion for all subsequent cycles were collected. PK was analyzed using non-compartmental modeling. Immunogenicity was assayed by HAHA response, and vaccination effect by induced host anti-GD2 response measured periodically until disease progression or last followup. Progression-free and overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Despite dosing being based on body weight, smaller patients had consistently lower area-under-the-curve and faster clearance over the 15 dose levels (0.9 to 9.6 mg/kg per treatment cycle) in this trial. Positive HAHA, defined by the upper limit of normal, when measured within 10 days from the last hu3F8 dose received, was associated with significantly lower serum hu3F8. Despite prior sensitization to other anti-GD2 antibody, e.g. mouse 3F8 or ch14.18, 75% of the patients never developed HAHA response even after getting more treatment cycles. Hu3F8 induced a de novo anti-GD2 response in patients, which was prognostic of progression-free survival. We conclude that hu3F8 had low immunogenicity. During treatment, positive HAHA and low body weight affected PK adversely, whereas induced anti-GD2 response was an outcome predictor.

  2. Chemoimmunotherapy in mice carrying HPV16-associated, MHC class I+ and class I- tumours: effects of CBM-4A potentiated with IL-2, IL-12, GM-CSF and genetically modified tumour vaccines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Indrová, Marie; Bubeník, Jan; Mikyšková, Romana; Mendoza, Luis; Šímová, Jana; Bieblová, Jana; Jandlová, Táňa; Jinoch, P.; Šmahel, M.; Vonka, V.; Pajtasz-Piasecka, E.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 3 (2003), s. 691-695 ISSN 1019-6439 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC7148; GA ČR GA301/00/0114; GA ČR GA301/01/0985; GA AV ČR IAA5052203; GA AV ČR IAA7052002 Grant - others:KBN(PL) P04A12314; Liga proti rakovině(CZ) - Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : chemotherapy -induced residual tumour disease * immunotherapy * HPV16-associated tumours Subject RIV: FD - Oncology ; Hematology Impact factor: 2.536, year: 2003

  3. Examining Change in K-3 Teachers' Mathematical Knowledge, Attitudes, and Beliefs: The Case of Primarily Math

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutaka, T. S.; Ren, L.; Smith, W. M.; Beattie, H. L.; Edwards, C. P.; Green, J. L.; Chernyavskiy, P.; Stroup, W.; Heaton, R. M.; Lewis, W. J.

    2018-01-01

    This study examines the impact of the Primarily Math Elementary Mathematics Specialist program on K-3 teachers' mathematical content knowledge for teaching, attitudes toward learning mathematics, and beliefs about mathematics teaching and learning. Three cohorts of teachers participating in the program were compared to a similar group of…

  4. X-ray and CT signs of connective tissue dysplasia in patients with primarily diagnosed infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sukhanova, L.A.; Sharmazanova, O.P.

    2009-01-01

    The x-ray signs of connective tissue systemic dysplasia (CTSD) in patients with primarily diagnosed pulmonary tuberculosis was investigated. Fifty-four patients (28 med and 26 women aged 18-70) with primarily diagnosed infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis underwent x-ray study. In patients with infiltration pulmonary tuberculosis CTSD in the lungs manifests by their diminishing, deformity of the lung pattern, high position of the diaphragm cupola, mediastinum shift to the side of the pathology, which is better seen on CT. The degree of CTSD x-ray signs in the lungs depends on the number of phenotypical signs that is the degree of the disease manifestation. CT allows more accurate determining of the signs of connective tissue dysplasia in which tuberculosis develops

  5. Assessment of Vegetation Variation on Primarily Creation Zones of the Dust Storms Around the Euphrates Using Remote Sensing Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Amanollahi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, period frequency and effect domain of the dust storms that enter Iran from Iraq have increased. In this study, in addition to detecting the creation zones of the dust storms, the effect of vegetation cover variation on their creation was investigated using remote sensing. Moderate resolution image Spectroradiometer (MODIS and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM5 have been utilized to identify the primarily creation zones of the dust storms and to assess the vegetation cover variation, respectively. Vegetation cover variation was studied using Normalized Differences Vegetation Index (NDVI obtained from band 3 and band 4 of the Landsate satellite. The results showed that the surrounding area of the Euphrates in Syria, the desert in the vicinity of this river in Iraq, including the deserts of Alanbar Province, and the north deserts of Saudi Arabia are the primarily creation zones of the dust storms entering west and south west of Iran. The results of NDVI showed that excluding the deserts in the border of Syria and Iraq, the area with very weak vegetation cover have increased between 2.44% and 20.65% from 1991 to 2009. In the meanwhile, the retention pound surface areas in the south deserts of Syria as well as the deserts in its border with Iraq have decreased 6320 and 4397 hectares, respectively. As it can be concluded from the findings, one of the main environmental parameters initiating these dust storms is the decrease in the vegetation cover in their primarily creation zones.

  6. Acting to gain information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenchein, Stanley J.; Burns, J. Brian; Chapman, David; Kaelbling, Leslie P.; Kahn, Philip; Nishihara, H. Keith; Turk, Matthew

    1993-01-01

    This report is concerned with agents that act to gain information. In previous work, we developed agent models combining qualitative modeling with real-time control. That work, however, focused primarily on actions that affect physical states of the environment. The current study extends that work by explicitly considering problems of active information-gathering and by exploring specialized aspects of information-gathering in computational perception, learning, and language. In our theoretical investigations, we analyzed agents into their perceptual and action components and identified these with elements of a state-machine model of control. The mathematical properties of each was developed in isolation and interactions were then studied. We considered the complexity dimension and the uncertainty dimension and related these to intelligent-agent design issues. We also explored active information gathering in visual processing. Working within the active vision paradigm, we developed a concept of 'minimal meaningful measurements' suitable for demand-driven vision. We then developed and tested an architecture for ongoing recognition and interpretation of visual information. In the area of information gathering through learning, we explored techniques for coping with combinatorial complexity. We also explored information gathering through explicit linguistic action by considering the nature of conversational rules, coordination, and situated communication behavior.

  7. FADD Expression as a Prognosticator in Early-Stage Glottic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx Treated Primarily With Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrijvers, Michiel L.; Pattje, Wouter J.; Slagter-Menkema, Lorian; Mastik, Mirjam F.; Gibcus, Johan H.; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Wal, Jacqueline E. van der; Laan, Bernard F.A.M. vn der; Schuuring, E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We recently reported on the identification of the Fas-associated death domain (FADD) as a possible driver of the chromosome 11q13 amplicon and the association between increased FADD expression and disease-specific survival in advanced-stage laryngeal carcinoma. The aim of this study was to examine whether expression of FADD and its Ser194-phosphorylated isoform (pFADD) predicts local control in patients with early-stage glottic carcinoma primarily treated with radiotherapy only. Methods and Materials: Immunohistochemical staining for FADD and pFADD was performed on pretreatment biopsy specimens of 92 patients with T1–T2 glottic squamous cell carcinoma primarily treated with radiotherapy between 1996 and 2005. Cox regression analysis was used to correlate expression levels with local control. Results: High levels of pFADD were associated with significantly better local control (hazard ratio, 2.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.04–5.55; p = 0.040). FADD overexpression showed a trend toward better local control (hazard ratio, 3.656; 95% confidence interval, 0.853–15.663; p = 0.081). Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that high pFADD expression was the best predictor of local control after radiotherapy. Conclusions: This study showed that expression of phosphorylated FADD is a new prognostic biomarker for better local control after radiotherapy in patients with early-stage glottic carcinomas.

  8. Atomic Energy Commission Act, 2000 (Act 588)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Act 588 of the Republic of Ghana entitled, Atomic Energy Commission Act, 2000, amends and consolidates the Atomic Energy Commission Act, 204 of 1963 relating to the establishment of the Atomic Energy Commission. Act 588 makes provision for the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission to establish more institutes for the purpose of research in furtherance of its functions and also promote the commercialization of its research and development results. (E.A.A.)

  9. Accumulation of a poly(hydroxyalkanoate) copolymer containing primarily 3-hydroxyvalerate from simple carbohydrate substrates by Rhodococcus sp. NCIMB 40126.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, G W; Anderson, A J; Williams, D R; Dawes, E A; Ewing, D F

    1991-04-01

    A number of taxonomically-related bacteria have been identified which accumulate poly(hydroxyalkanoate) (PHA) copolymers containing primarily 3-hydroxyvalerate (3HV) monomer units from a range of unrelated single carbon sources. One of these, Rhodococcus sp. NCIMB 40126, was further investigated and shown to produce a copolymer containing 75 mol% 3HV and 25 mol% 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) from glucose as sole carbon source. Polyesters containing both 3HV and 3HB monomer units, together with 4-hydroxybutyrate (4HB), 5-hydroxyvalerate (5HV) or 3-hydroxyhexanoate (3HHx), were also produced by this organism from certain accumulation substrates. With valeric acid as substrate, almost pure (99 mol% 3HV) poly(3-hydroxyvalerate) was produced. N.m.r. analysis confirmed the composition of these polyesters. The thermal properties and molecular weight of the copolymer produced from glucose were comparable to those of PHB produced by Alcaligenes eutrophus.

  10. Gender, Sexual Orientation, and Rape Myth Acceptance: Preliminary Findings From a Sample of Primarily LGBQ-Identified Survey Respondents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Corina; Koon-Magnin, Sarah

    2017-02-01

    This study is among the first to examine the relationship between sexual orientation and rape myth adherence using a nationwide survey of primarily lesbian, gay, bisexual, and queer (LGBQ) respondents (n = 184). The more established Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance Scale and a modified Male Rape Survey serve as the primary instruments to test both rape myth adherence and instrument-appropriateness. Results suggest that respondents were most likely to support myths that discredit sexual assault allegations or excuse rape as a biological imperative and least likely to support myths related to physical resistance. Consistent with previous work, men exhibited higher levels of rape myth adherence than women. Regarding sexual orientation, respondents who identified as queer consistently exhibited lower levels of rape myth adherence than respondents who identified as gay.

  11. Multi-Province Listeriosis Outbreak Linked to Contaminated Deli Meat Consumed Primarily in Institutional Settings, Canada, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Andrea; Farber, Jeffrey M; Nadon, Céline; Sharma, Davendra; Whitfield, Yvonne; Gaulin, Colette; Galanis, Eleni; Bekal, Sadjia; Flint, James; Tschetter, Lorelee; Pagotto, Franco; Lee, Brenda; Jamieson, Fred; Badiani, Tina; MacDonald, Diane; Ellis, Andrea; May-Hadford, Jennifer; McCormick, Rachel; Savelli, Carmen; Middleton, Dean; Allen, Vanessa; Tremblay, Francois-William; MacDougall, Laura; Hoang, Linda; Shyng, Sion; Everett, Doug; Chui, Linda; Louie, Marie; Bangura, Helen; Levett, Paul N; Wilkinson, Krista; Wylie, John; Reid, Janet; Major, Brian; Engel, Dave; Douey, Donna; Huszczynski, George; Di Lecci, Joe; Strazds, Judy; Rousseau, Josée; Ma, Kenneth; Isaac, Leah; Sierpinska, Urszula

    2015-08-01

    A multi-province outbreak of listeriosis occurred in Canada from June to November 2008. Fifty-seven persons were infected with 1 of 3 similar outbreak strains defined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, and 24 (42%) individuals died. Forty-one (72%) of 57 individuals were residents of long-term care facilities or hospital inpatients during their exposure period. Descriptive epidemiology, product traceback, and detection of the outbreak strains of Listeria monocytogenes in food samples and the plant environment confirmed delicatessen meat manufactured by one establishment and purchased primarily by institutions was the source of the outbreak. The food safety investigation identified a plant environment conducive to the introduction and proliferation of L. monocytogenes and persistently contaminated with Listeria spp. This outbreak demonstrated the need for improved listeriosis surveillance, strict control of L. monocytogenes in establishments producing ready-to-eat foods, and advice to vulnerable populations and institutions serving these populations regarding which high-risk foods to avoid.

  12. Development and Sensitivity Analysis of a Frost Risk model based primarily on freely distributed Earth Observation data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louka, Panagiota; Petropoulos, George; Papanikolaou, Ioannis

    2015-04-01

    The ability to map the spatiotemporal distribution of extreme climatic conditions, such as frost, is a significant tool in successful agricultural management and decision making. Nowadays, with the development of Earth Observation (EO) technology, it is possible to obtain accurately, timely and in a cost-effective way information on the spatiotemporal distribution of frost conditions, particularly over large and otherwise inaccessible areas. The present study aimed at developing and evaluating a frost risk prediction model, exploiting primarily EO data from MODIS and ASTER sensors and ancillary ground observation data. For the evaluation of our model, a region in north-western Greece was selected as test site and a detailed sensitivity analysis was implemented. The agreement between the model predictions and the observed (remotely sensed) frost frequency obtained by MODIS sensor was evaluated thoroughly. Also, detailed comparisons of the model predictions were performed against reference frost ground observations acquired from the Greek Agricultural Insurance Organization (ELGA) over a period of 10-years (2000-2010). Overall, results evidenced the ability of the model to produce reasonably well the frost conditions, following largely explainable patterns in respect to the study site and local weather conditions characteristics. Implementation of our proposed frost risk model is based primarily on satellite imagery analysis provided nowadays globally at no cost. It is also straightforward and computationally inexpensive, requiring much less effort in comparison for example to field surveying. Finally, the method is adjustable to be potentially integrated with other high resolution data available from both commercial and non-commercial vendors. Keywords: Sensitivity analysis, frost risk mapping, GIS, remote sensing, MODIS, Greece

  13. Healthy younger and older adults control foot placement to avoid small obstacles during gait primarily by modulating step width

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schulz Brian W

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are a significant problem in the older population. Most falls occur during gait, which is primarily regulated by foot placement. Variability of foot placement has been associated with falls, but these associations are inconsistent and generally for smooth, level flooring. This study investigates the control of foot placement and the associated gait variability in younger and older men and women (N=7/group, total N=28 while walking at three different speeds (slow, preferred, and fast across a control surface with no obstacles and surfaces with multiple (64 small (10cm long ×13mm high visible and hidden obstacles. Results Minimum obstacle distance between the shoe and nearest obstacle during each footfall was greater on the visible obstacles surface for older subjects because some of them chose to actively avoid obstacles. This obstacle avoidance strategy was implemented primarily by modulating step width and to a lesser extent step length as indicated by linear regressions of step width and length variability on minimum obstacle distance. Mean gait speed, step length, step width, and step time did not significantly differ by subject group, flooring surface, or obstacle avoidance strategy. Conclusions Some healthy older subjects choose to actively avoid small obstacles that do not substantially perturb their gait by modulating step width and, to a lesser extent, step length. It is not clear if this obstacle avoidance strategy is appropriate and beneficial or overcautious and maladaptive, as it results in fewer obstacles encountered at a consequence of a less efficient gait pattern that has been shown to indicate increased fall risk. Further research is needed on the appropriateness of strategy selection when the environmental demands and/or task requirements have multiple possible completion strategies with conflicting objectives (i.e. perceived safety vs. efficiency.

  14. Predictors of moderated drinking in a primarily alcohol dependent sample of men who have sex with men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuerbis, Alexis; Morgenstern, Jon; Hail, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Understanding for whom moderated drinking is a viable, achievable, and sustainable goal among those with a range of alcohol use disorders (AUD) remains an important public health question. Despite common acceptance as severe risk factors, there is little empirical evidence to conclude whether co-occurring mental health disorders or drug dependence contribute to an individual’s inability to successfully moderate his drinking. Utilizing secondary data analysis, the purpose of this study was to identify predictors of moderation among both treatment seeking and non-treatment seeking, primarily alcohol dependent, problem drinking men who have sex with men (MSM), with an emphasis on the high risk factors psychiatric comorbidity and drug dependence. Problem drinkers (N=187) were assessed, provided feedback about their drinking, given the option to receive brief AUD treatment or change their drinking on their own, and then followed for 15 months. Findings revealed that neither psychiatric comorbidity or drug dependence predicted ability to achieve moderation when controlling for alcohol dependence severity. Those who were younger, more highly educated, and had more mild alcohol dependence were more likely to achieve moderated drinking. Impact of treatment on predictors is explored. Limitations of this study and arenas for future research are discussed. PMID:22201219

  15. Diet Quality and Nutrient Intake of Urban Overweight and Obese Primarily African American Older Adults with Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevasti Vergis

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Diet quality may be a unique target for preventing and managing obesity-related osteoarthritis (OA. Using the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI-2010, this study examined the nutrient intake and diet quality of 400 urban overweight and obese primarily African American older adults with self-reported lower extremity OA. Associations between sociodemographic and health-related factors and diet quality were explored. Participants (mean age 67.8 years, SD 5.9 were included. Habitual dietary intake was assessed using a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. Nutrient intake and diet quality were calculated from the FFQ. Results indicated that diet quality needs improvement (HEI-2010: 66.3 (SD 10.5. Age, body mass index, employment (multivariable model only, and OA severity (bivariate model only were significant predictors of HEI-2010 total score in linear models. Mean intakes for fiber, calcium, and vitamin D were below recommendations, while percentage of calories as total fat exceeded recommendations. These findings can inform future dietary intervention trials and public health messaging for a sub-population at a high risk for obesity-related OA.

  16. Nuclear Regulatory Authority Act, 2015 (Act 895)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-04-01

    An Act to establish a Nuclear Regulatory Authority in Ghana. This Act provides for the regulation and management of activities and practices for the peaceful use of nuclear material or energy, and to provide for the protection of persons and the environment against the harmful effects of radiation; and to ensure the effective implementation of the country’s international obligations and for related matters. This Act replaced the Radiation Protection Instrument, of 1993 (LI 1559).

  17. Inward Rectifier K+ Currents Are Regulated by CaMKII in Endothelial Cells of Primarily Cultured Bovine Pulmonary Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Lihui; Yu, Lei; Wang, Yanli; Jin, Xin; Zhang, Qianlong; Lu, Ping; Yu, Xiufeng; Zhong, Weiwei; Zheng, Xiaodong; Cui, Ningren; Jiang, Chun; Zhu, Daling

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium lines the interior surface of vascular walls and regulates vascular tones. The endothelial cells sense and respond to chemical and mechanical stimuli in the circulation, and couple the stimulus signals to vascular smooth muscles, in which inward rectifier K+ currents (Kir) play an important role. Here we applied several complementary strategies to determine the Kir subunit in primarily cultured pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) that was regulated by the Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM)-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII). In whole-cell voltage clamp, the Kir currents were sensitive to micromolar concentrations of extracellular Ba2+. In excised inside-out patches, an inward rectifier K+ current was observed with single-channel conductance 32.43 ± 0.45 pS and Popen 0.27 ± 0.04, which were consistent with known unitary conductance of Kir 2.1. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that expression of Kir 2.1 was significantly stronger than that of other subtypes in PAECs. Pharmacological analysis of the Kir currents demonstrated that insensitivity to intracellular ATP, pinacidil, glibenclamide, pH, GDP-β-S and choleratoxin suggested that currents weren't determined by KATP, Kir2.3, Kir2.4 and Kir3.x. The currents were strongly suppressed by exposure to CaMKII inhibitor W-7 and KN-62. The expression of Kir2.1 was inhibited by knocking down CaMKII. Consistently, vasodilation was suppressed by Ba2+, W-7 and KN-62 in isolated and perfused pulmonary arterial rings. These results suggest that the PAECs express an inward rectifier K+ current that is carried dominantly by Kir2.1, and this K+ channel appears to be targeted by CaMKII-dependent intracellular signaling systems.

  18. Inward Rectifier K+ Currents Are Regulated by CaMKII in Endothelial Cells of Primarily Cultured Bovine Pulmonary Arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Qu

    Full Text Available Endothelium lines the interior surface of vascular walls and regulates vascular tones. The endothelial cells sense and respond to chemical and mechanical stimuli in the circulation, and couple the stimulus signals to vascular smooth muscles, in which inward rectifier K+ currents (Kir play an important role. Here we applied several complementary strategies to determine the Kir subunit in primarily cultured pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs that was regulated by the Ca2+/calmodulin (CaM-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII. In whole-cell voltage clamp, the Kir currents were sensitive to micromolar concentrations of extracellular Ba2+. In excised inside-out patches, an inward rectifier K+ current was observed with single-channel conductance 32.43 ± 0.45 pS and Popen 0.27 ± 0.04, which were consistent with known unitary conductance of Kir 2.1. RT-PCR and western blot results showed that expression of Kir 2.1 was significantly stronger than that of other subtypes in PAECs. Pharmacological analysis of the Kir currents demonstrated that insensitivity to intracellular ATP, pinacidil, glibenclamide, pH, GDP-β-S and choleratoxin suggested that currents weren't determined by KATP, Kir2.3, Kir2.4 and Kir3.x. The currents were strongly suppressed by exposure to CaMKII inhibitor W-7 and KN-62. The expression of Kir2.1 was inhibited by knocking down CaMKII. Consistently, vasodilation was suppressed by Ba2+, W-7 and KN-62 in isolated and perfused pulmonary arterial rings. These results suggest that the PAECs express an inward rectifier K+ current that is carried dominantly by Kir2.1, and this K+ channel appears to be targeted by CaMKII-dependent intracellular signaling systems.

  19. Y-Chromosomal Diversity in Europe Is Clinal and Influenced Primarily by Geography, Rather than by Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Zoë H.; Zerjal, Tatiana; Hurles, Matthew E.; Adojaan, Maarja; Alavantic, Dragan; Amorim, António; Amos, William; Armenteros, Manuel; Arroyo, Eduardo; Barbujani, Guido; Beckman, Gunhild; Beckman, Lars; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Bosch, Elena; Bradley, Daniel G.; Brede, Gaute; Cooper, Gillian; Côrte-Real, Helena B. S. M.; de Knijff, Peter; Decorte, Ronny; Dubrova, Yuri E.; Evgrafov, Oleg; Gilissen, Anja; Glisic, Sanja; Gölge, Mukaddes; Hill, Emmeline W.; Jeziorowska, Anna; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Kayser, Manfred; Kivisild, Toomas; Kravchenko, Sergey A.; Krumina, Astrida; Kučinskas, Vaidutis; Lavinha, João; Livshits, Ludmila A.; Malaspina, Patrizia; Maria, Syrrou; McElreavey, Ken; Meitinger, Thomas A.; Mikelsaar, Aavo-Valdur; Mitchell, R. John; Nafa, Khedoudja; Nicholson, Jayne; Nørby, Søren; Pandya, Arpita; Parik, Jüri; Patsalis, Philippos C.; Pereira, Luísa; Peterlin, Borut; Pielberg, Gerli; Prata, Maria João; Previderé, Carlo; Roewer, Lutz; Rootsi, Siiri; Rubinsztein, D. C.; Saillard, Juliette; Santos, Fabrício R.; Stefanescu, Gheorghe; Sykes, Bryan C.; Tolun, Aslihan; Villems, Richard; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Jobling, Mark A.

    2000-01-01

    Clinal patterns of autosomal genetic diversity within Europe have been interpreted in previous studies in terms of a Neolithic demic diffusion model for the spread of agriculture; in contrast, studies using mtDNA have traced many founding lineages to the Paleolithic and have not shown strongly clinal variation. We have used 11 human Y-chromosomal biallelic polymorphisms, defining 10 haplogroups, to analyze a sample of 3,616 Y chromosomes belonging to 47 European and circum-European populations. Patterns of geographic differentiation are highly nonrandom, and, when they are assessed using spatial autocorrelation analysis, they show significant clines for five of six haplogroups analyzed. Clines for two haplogroups, representing 45% of the chromosomes, are continentwide and consistent with the demic diffusion hypothesis. Clines for three other haplogroups each have different foci and are more regionally restricted and are likely to reflect distinct population movements, including one from north of the Black Sea. Principal-components analysis suggests that populations are related primarily on the basis of geography, rather than on the basis of linguistic affinity. This is confirmed in Mantel tests, which show a strong and highly significant partial correlation between genetics and geography but a low, nonsignificant partial correlation between genetics and language. Genetic-barrier analysis also indicates the primacy of geography in the shaping of patterns of variation. These patterns retain a strong signal of expansion from the Near East but also suggest that the demographic history of Europe has been complex and influenced by other major population movements, as well as by linguistic and geographic heterogeneities and the effects of drift. PMID:11078479

  20. 49 CFR 37.195 - Purchase or lease of OTRBs by private entities not primarily in the business of transporting people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... primarily in the business of transporting people. 37.195 Section 37.195 Transportation Office of the... transporting people. This section applies to all purchases or leases of new vehicles by private entities which are not primarily engaged in the business of transporting people, with respect to buses delivered to...

  1. Atomic Act amended

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.

    2002-01-01

    In the paper by the chairwoman of the Czech nuclear regulatory authority, the history of Czech nuclear legislation is outlined, the reasons for the amendment of the Atomic Act (Act No. 18/1997) are explained, and the amendments themselves are highlighted. The Act No. 13/2002 of 18 December 2001 is reproduced from the official Collection of Acts of the Czech Republic in the facsimile form. The following acts were thereby amended: Atomic Act No. 18/1997, Metrology Act No. 505/1990, Public Health Protection Act No. 258/2000, and Act No. 2/1969 on the Establishment of Ministries and Other Governmental Agencies of the Czech Republic. (P.A.)

  2. TRPA1 is functionally expressed primarily by IB4-binding, non-peptidergic mouse and rat sensory neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie E Barabas

    functionally expressed primarily in the IB4-positive, CGRP-negative subpopulation of small lumbar DRG neurons from rodents. Thus, IB4 binding is a better indicator than neuropeptides for TRPA1 expression.

  3. TRPA1 Is Functionally Expressed Primarily by IB4-Binding, Non-Peptidergic Mouse and Rat Sensory Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucky, Cheryl L.

    2012-01-01

    primarily in the IB4-positive, CGRP-negative subpopulation of small lumbar DRG neurons from rodents. Thus, IB4 binding is a better indicator than neuropeptides for TRPA1 expression. PMID:23133534

  4. Poly-thymidine oligonucleotides mediate activation of murine glial cells primarily through TLR7, not TLR8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Du

    Full Text Available The functional role of murine TLR8 in the inflammatory response of the central nervous system (CNS remains unclear. Murine TLR8 does not appear to respond to human TLR7/8 agonists, due to a five amino acid deletion in the ectodomain. However, recent studies have suggested that murine TLR8 may be stimulated by alternate ligands, which include vaccinia virus DNA, phosphothioate oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs or the combination of phosphothioate poly-thymidine oligonucleotides (pT-ODNs with TLR7/8 agonists. In the current study, we analyzed the ability of pT-ODNs to induce activation of murine glial cells in the presence or absence of TLR7/8 agonists. We found that TLR7/8 agonists induced the expression of glial cell activation markers and induced the production of multiple proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in mixed glial cultures. In contrast, pT-ODNs alone induced only low level expression of two cytokines, CCL2 and CXCL10. The combination of pT-ODNs along with TLR7/8 agonists induced a synergistic response with substantially higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines compared to CL075. This enhancement was not due to cellular uptake of the agonist, indicating that the pT-ODN enhancement of cytokine responses was due to effects on an intracellular process. Interestingly, this response was also not due to synergistic stimulation of both TLR7 and TLR8, as the loss of TLR7 abolished the activation of glial cells and cytokine production. Thus, pT-ODNs act in synergy with TLR7/8 agonists to induce strong TLR7-dependent cytokine production in glial cells, suggesting that the combination of pT-ODNs with TLR7 agonists may be a useful mechanism to induce pronounced glial activation in the CNS.

  5. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Therapeutics Lab Developing New Treatments The CF Foundation offers a number of resources for learning about clinical ... her father: Demonstrate and discuss common ACT therapies Offer their tips for fitting ACTs into daily life ...

  6. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Treatments and Therapies Airway Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. ... or caregiver. Older kids and adults can choose ACTs that they can do on their own. Share ...

  7. Nuclear Installations Act 1965

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    This Act governs all activities related to nuclear installations in the United Kingdom. It provides for the licensing procedure for nuclear installations, the duties of licensees, the competent authorities and carriers of nuclear material in respect of nuclear occurrences, as well as for the system of third party liability and compensation for nuclear damage. The Act repeals the Nuclear Installations (Licensing and Insurance) Act 1959 and the Nuclear Installations (Amendment Act) 1965 except for its Section 17(2). (NEA) [fr

  8. Effect of beta2-adrenoceptor agonists and other cAMP-elevating agents on inflammatory gene expression in human ASM cells: a role for protein kinase A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Manminder; Holden, Neil S; Wilson, Sylvia M; Sukkar, Maria B; Chung, Kian Fan; Barnes, Peter J; Newton, Robert; Giembycz, Mark A

    2008-09-01

    In diseases such as asthma, airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells play a synthetic role by secreting inflammatory mediators such as granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), IL-6, or IL-8 and by expressing surface adhesion molecules, including ICAM-1. In the present study, PGE(2), forskolin, and short-acting (salbutamol) and long-acting (salmeterol and formoterol) beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists reduced the expression of ICAM-1 and the release of GM-CSF evoked by IL-1beta in ASM cells. IL-1beta-induced IL-8 release was also repressed by PGE(2) and forskolin, whereas the beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists were ineffective. In each case, repression of these inflammatory indexes was prevented by adenoviral overexpression of PKIalpha, a highly selective PKA inhibitor. These data indicate a PKA-dependent mechanism of repression and suggest that agents that elevate intracellular cAMP, and thereby activate PKA, may have a widespread anti-inflammatory effect in ASM cells. Since ICAM-1 and GM-CSF are highly NF-kappaB-dependent genes, we used an adenoviral-delivered NF-kappaB-dependent luciferase reporter to examine the effects of forskolin and the beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists on NF-kappaB activation. There was no effect on luciferase activity measured in the presence of forskolin or beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists. This finding is consistent with the observation that IL-1beta-induced expression of IL-6, a known NF-kappaB-dependent gene in ASM, was also unaffected by beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists, forskolin, PGE(2), 8-bromo-cAMP, or rolipram. Collectively, these results indicate that repression of IL-1beta-induced ICAM-1 expression and GM-CSF release by cAMP-elevating agents, including beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists, may not occur through a generic effect on NF-kappaB.

  9. Opposite cytokine synthesis by fibroblasts in contact co-culture with osteosarcoma cells compared with transwell co-cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Manu S; Kelly, Elizabeth; Zoellner, Hans

    2013-04-01

    We recently reported exchange of membrane and cytoplasm during contact co-culture between human Gingival Fibroblasts (h-GF) and SAOS-2 osteosarcoma cells, a process we termed 'cellular sipping' to reflect the manner in which cells become morphologically diverse through uptake of material from the opposing cell type, independent of genetic change. Cellular sipping is increased by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α), and we here show for the first time altered cytokine synthesis in contact co-culture supporting cellular sipping compared with co-culture where h-GF and SAOS-2 were separated in transwells. SAOS-2 had often undetectably low cytokine levels, while Interleukin-6 (IL-6), Granulocyte Colony Stimulating Factor (G-CSF) and Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony Stimulating Factor (GM-CSF) were secreted primarily by TNF-α stimulated h-GF and basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF) was prominent in h-GF lysates (p cultures permitting cellular sipping had lower IL-6, G-CSF and GM-CSF levels, as well as higher lysate FGF levels compared with TNF-α treated h-GF alone (p cultures in transwells, with increased IL-6, G-CSF and GM-CSF levels (p cultures where cellular sipping occurs, potentially contributing to tumor inflammatory responses. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 13 CFR 500.107 - Freedom of Information Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., microfilm, audiovisual materials, or machine-readable documentation (e.g., magnetic tape or disk). (5... OF INFORMATION ACT REQUEST. (3) Contents of request. The request shall contain the following... disclosure, that disclosure is primarily in the commercial interest of the requester. (ii) Contents of...

  11. Radioactive Substances Act 1960

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1960-01-01

    This Act regulates the keeping and use of radioactive material and makes provision for the disposal and storage of radioactive waste in the United Kingdom. It provides for a licensing system for such activities and for exemptions therefrom, in particular as concerns the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority. The Act repeals Section 4(5) of the Atomic Energy Authority Act, 1954 which made temporary provision for discharge of waste on or from premises occupied by the Authority. (NEA) [fr

  12. Learning dialog act processing

    OpenAIRE

    Wermter, Stefan; Löchel, Matthias

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we describe a new approach for learning dialog act processing. In this approach we integrate a symbolic semantic segmentation parser with a learning dialog act network. In order to support the unforeseeable errors and variations of spoken language we have concentrated on robust data-driven learning. This approach already compares favorably with the statistical average plausibility method, produces a segmentation and dialog act assignment for all utterances in a robust manner,...

  13. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reform Could Impact People With CF The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy Achievements Advocacy News Briefings, Testimonies, and Regulatory ...

  14. Radiological Protection Act 1970

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This Act provides for the establishment of a Radiological Protection Board to undertake research and advise on protection from radiation hazards. Its functions include provision of advice to Government departments with responsibilities in relation to protection of sectors of the community or the community as a whole against the hazards of ionizing radiation. The Act, which lays down that the Board shall replace certain departments concerned with radiation protection, repeals several Sections of the Radioactive Substances Act 1948 and the Science and Technology Act 1965. (NEA) [fr

  15. 25 CFR 700.33 - Act (The Act).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Act (The Act). 700.33 Section 700.33 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.33 Act (The Act). (a) The Act. The Act is Pub. L. 93-531, (88 Stat...

  16. Christ, the Spirit and the Community of God: Essays on the Acts of the Apostles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwiep, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    This volume collects text-critical, exegetical and biblical-theological essays on the Acts of the Apostles, dealing primarily with the opening chapters of Acts in the wider context of first-century Christianity and its Umwelt. The articles include treatments of the ascension and exaltation of Jesus

  17. Marine Mammal Protection Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Mammal Protection Act (MMPA or Act) prohibits, with certain exceptions, the "take" of marine mammals in U.S. waters and by U.S. citizens on the high seas,...

  18. Collective speech acts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijers, A.W.M.; Tsohatzidis, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    From its early development in the 1960s, speech act theory always had an individualistic orientation. It focused exclusively on speech acts performed by individual agents. Paradigmatic examples are ‘I promise that p’, ‘I order that p’, and ‘I declare that p’. There is a single speaker and a single

  19. Americans with Disabilities Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaesberg, Mary Ann; Murray, Kenneth T.

    1994-01-01

    Presents a 35-item checklist of practical activities for school district compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The checklist is based on ADA statutes, other civil rights legislation and litigation, as well as pertinent regulations and the legislative history of the act contained in the Congressional Record. (MLF)

  20. Radiation emitting devices act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This Act, entitled the Radiation Emitting Devices Act, is concerned with the sale and importation of radiation emitting devices. Laws relating to the sale, lease or import, labelling, advertising, packaging, safety standards and inspection of these devices are listed as well as penalties for any person who is convicted of breaking these laws

  1. Nuclear Installations Act 1969

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1969-01-01

    The purpose of this Act is to amend the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 to bring it into full compliance with the international conventions on nuclear third party liability to which the United Kingdom is a Signatory, namely, the Paris Convention, the Brussels Supplementary Convention and the Vienna Convention. (NEA) [fr

  2. Nanoparticles affect PCR primarily via surface interactions with PCR components: using amino-modified silica-coated magnetic nanoparticles as a main model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanomaterials have been widely reported to affect the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, many studies in which these effects were observed were not comprehensive, and many of the proposed mechanisms have been primarily speculative. In this work, we used amino-modified silica-coated magnetic n...

  3. The Radiation Protection Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persson, L.

    1989-01-01

    The new Radiation Protection Act (1988:220) entered into force in Sweden on July 1st, 1988. This book presents the Act as well as certain regulations connected to it. As previously, the main responsibility for public radiation protection will rest with one central radiation protection authority. According to the 1988 Act, the general obligations with regard to radiation protection will place a greater responsibility than in the past on persons carrying out activities involving radiation. Under the act, it is possible to adjust the licensing and supervisory procedures to the level of danger of the radiation source and the need for adequate competence, etc. The Act recognises standardised approval procedures combined with technical regulations for areas where the risks are well known. The Act contains several rules providing for more effective supervision. The supervising authority may in particular decide on the necessary regulations and prohibitions for each individual case. The possibilities of using penal provisions have been extended and a rule on the mandatory execution of orders has been introduced. The Ordinance on Radiation Protection (1988:293) designates the National Institute of Radiation Protection (SSI) as the central authority referred to in the Radiation Protection Act. The book also gives a historic review of radiation protection laws in Sweden, lists regulations issued by SSI and presents explanations of radiation effects and international norms in the area. (author)

  4. Canada's Clean Air Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This paper provided an outline of Canada's Clean Air Act and examined some of the regulatory changes that will occur as a result of its implementation. The Act is being introduced to strengthen the legislative basis for taking action on reducing air pollution and GHGs, and will allow the government to regulate both indoor and outdoor air pollutants and GHGs. The Act will require the Ministers of the Environment and Health to establish national air quality objectives, as well as to monitor and report on their attainment. The Canadian Environmental Protection Act will be amended to enable the government to regulate the blending of fuels and their components. The Motor Vehicle Fuel Consumption Standards Act will also be amended to enhance the government's authority to regulate vehicle fuel efficiency. The Energy Efficiency Act will also be expanded to allow the government to set energy efficiency standards and labelling requirements for a wider range of consumer and commercial products. The Act will commit to short, medium and long-term industrial air pollution targets. Regulations will be proposed for emissions from industry; on-road and off-road vehicles and engines; and consumer and commercial products. It was concluded that the Government of Canada will continue to consult with provinces, territories, industries and Canadians to set and reach targets for the reduction of both indoor and outdoor air pollutants and GHG emissions. 6 figs

  5. The Energy Act 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Part II of This Act came into force on 1 September 1983 and is concerned with nuclear installations. Its main purpose is to amend the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 to give effect to the provisions of two Protocols amending the Paris Convention on nuclear third party liability and the Brussels Convention Supplementary to the Paris Convention respectively. The principal effect of these modifications is to increase the sums available to meet claims for nuclear damage. The United Kingdom is a Party to both Conventions and the provisions of the 1983 Act will enable it to ratify the Protocols. (NEA) [fr

  6. An interpretation of schedule 1 of the Radioactive Substances Act 1993 and related issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, M.; Wakerley, M.W.

    2000-09-01

    Schedule 1 of the UK's Radioactive Substances Act 1993 was originally Schedule 3 of the 1960 Act of the same name. It is possible that different methods are currently being employed to interpret how Schedule 1 should be used. This report provides an interpretation and guidance on this and related issues. It is primarily for technical specialists already familiar with the workings of the Act. This report covers the period 1999/2000

  7. 75 FR 63703 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 12 CFR Part 261a [Docket No. R-1313] Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act... implementing the Privacy Act of 1974 (Privacy Act). The primary changes concern the waiver of copying fees... records under the Privacy Act; the amendment of special procedures for the release of medical records to...

  8. Abandoned Shipwreck Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data represents the extent of the Abandoned Shipwreck Act (ASA). The ASA allows states to manage a broad range of resources within submerged lands, including...

  9. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy ... the value of tapping into the expertise that only people with CF and their families have. We invite you to share insights to ...

  10. Energy Policy Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Energy Policy Act (EPA) addresses energy production in the United States, including: (1) energy efficiency; (2) renewable energy; (3) oil and gas; (4) coal; (5)...

  11. ACTS – SUCCESS STORY

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. ACTS – SUCCESS STORY. Totally 103 experiments were conducted and the programme succeeded in the areas. Medicine; Education; Defence; Emergency Response; Maritime and Aeronautical Mobile Communications; Science and Astronomy.

  12. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy to do. Infants and toddlers will ... best ACT is the one that you are most likely to perform as part of your daily ...

  13. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to loosen mucus from airway walls. See how different airway clearance techniques work to help you clear the thick, sticky mucus ... Offer their tips for fitting ACTs into daily life Airway Clearance Techniques | Webcast ... Facebook Twitter ...

  14. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CF Community in Health Care Reform Milestones in Health Care Reform How Tax Reform Could Impact People With CF The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy Achievements ...

  15. Clean Water Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data represent geographic terms used within the Clean Water Act (CWA). The CWA establishes the basic structure for regulating the addition of pollutants...

  16. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... toddlers will need help from a parent or caregiver. Older kids and adults can choose ACTs that ... into the smaller airways to attack bacteria. Choose What's Best for You Your respiratory therapist or another ...

  17. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... that help thin and move the mucus, and antibiotics. Bronchodilators should be inhaled before you start ACTs. This medication helps to widen your airways (bronchi) by relaxing the ...

  18. Endangered Species Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The purpose of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) is to protect and recover imperiled species and the ecosystems upon which they depend. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  19. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reform Could Impact People With CF The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy Achievements ... on their own. Share Facebook Twitter Email More options Print Share Facebook Twitter Email Print Permalink All ...

  20. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 3-D Structure Consortium CFTR Folding Consortium Epithelial Stem Cell Consortium Mucociliary Clearance Consortium SUCCESS WITH THERAPIES RESEARCH ... ACTs involve coughing or huffing . Many of them use percussion (clapping) or vibration to loosen mucus from ...

  1. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... today. ANNUAL FUND Become a Corporate Supporter Cause Marketing Make a Charitable Gift Our Corporate Supporters Workplace ... Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your airways. Most are easy to ...

  2. Marine Pollution Prevention Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Marine Pollution Prevention Act of 2008 implements the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, including related Protocols (MARPOL)...

  3. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... CF Community in Health Care Reform Milestones in Health Care Reform How Tax Reform Could Impact People With CF The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy Achievements Advocacy News Briefings, Testimonies, and Regulatory ...

  4. Preventive Radiation Protection Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roewer, H.

    1988-01-01

    The commentary is intended to contribute to protection of the population by a practice-oriented discussion and explanation of questions arising in connection with the Preventive Radiation Protection Act. Leaving aside discussions about abandonment of nuclear power, or criticism from any legal point of view, the commentary adopts the practical approach that accepts, and tries to help implementing, the act as it is. It is a guide for readers who are not experts in the law and gives a line of orientation by means of explanations and sometimes by citations from other acts (in footnotes). The commentary also presents the EURATOM Directive No. 3954/87 dated 22 December 1987, the EC Directive No. 3955/87 dated 22 December 1987, and the EC Directive No. 1983/88 dated 5 July 1988. A tabular survey shows the system of duties and competences defined by the Preventive Radiation Protection Act. (RST) [de

  5. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Contraception and Protection How Does CF Affect the Female Reproductive System? How Does CF Affect the Male ... Reform Could Impact People With CF The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy Achievements ...

  6. ACT250 Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The ACT 250 Districts layer is part of a larger dataset that contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset includes...

  7. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ACTs involve coughing or huffing . Many of them use percussion (clapping) or vibration to loosen mucus from airway walls. See how different airway clearance techniques work to help you clear the thick, sticky mucus ...

  8. Acts of Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelund, Sidsel

    place mostly in seminars and articles, in which knowledge is often discussed as an intrinsic quality of the artwork. Acts of Research, however, is devoted to studying the rise of knowledge production in contemporary art from the perspective of artistic, curatorial and educational research...... described as knowledge producers and exhibitions and art works as instances of knowledge production. Acts of Research: Knowledge Production in Contemporary Arts between Knowledge Economy and Critical Practices analyses this development. The academic discussion of knowledge production in the arts has taken...... with an awareness of larger political, economic, geographical and art-related aspects. The concept of ‘acts of research’ is suggested as a way to understand knowledge production as a creative act in which research carried out in relation to a specific material challenges and resists the protocols of conventional...

  9. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Congressional Cystic Fibrosis Caucus Our Policy Agenda Policy Principles SIGN UP FOR ADVOCACY ACTION ALERTS Community We ... options Print Share Facebook Twitter Email Print Permalink All ACTs involve coughing or huffing . Many of them ...

  10. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... How Does CF Affect the Male Reproductive System? Sex and CF: Some Practical Advice Family Planning and ... need help from a parent or caregiver. Older kids and adults can choose ACTs that they can ...

  11. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... FOR ADVOCACY ACTION ALERTS Community We recognize the value of tapping into the expertise that only people ... ACTs involve coughing or huffing . Many of them use percussion (clapping) or vibration to loosen mucus from ...

  12. National Environmental Policy Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) was the first major environmental law in the United States and established national environmental policies for the...

  13. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reform Could Impact People With CF The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy Achievements ... Board of Trustees Our Leadership Careers Reports and Financials Contact Us Governance and Policies What is CF? ...

  14. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... own. Share Facebook Twitter Email More options Print Share Facebook Twitter Email Print Permalink All ACTs involve ... CF Care Team Research About Our Research Developing New Treatments Researcher Resources Assistance Services Find Resources: CF ...

  15. Affordable Care Act (ACA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Affordable Care Act (ACA) is a federal statute enacted with a goal of increasing the quality and affordability of health insurance. Through a web service, CMS...

  16. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy Achievements Advocacy News Briefings, Testimonies, and Regulatory Comments Congressional Cystic Fibrosis Caucus Our Policy Agenda Policy Principles SIGN UP FOR ADVOCACY ACTION ...

  17. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... people with cystic fibrosis so that they make smart decisions about CF-related research, treatment, and access ... The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy Achievements Advocacy News Briefings, Testimonies, and Regulatory ...

  18. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What to Consider Regarding a Lung Transplant Medications Antibiotics Bronchodilators CFTR Modulator Therapies Mucus Thinners Nebulizer Care ... that help thin and move the mucus, and antibiotics. Bronchodilators should be inhaled before you start ACTs. ...

  19. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resources you need to continuously build upon this work. Awards and Grants Career Development Awards Research Awards ... The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy Achievements Advocacy News Briefings, Testimonies, and Regulatory ...

  20. The Corporations Act 2001

    OpenAIRE

    Bostock, Tom

    2002-01-01

    The author outlines reforms made in Australia in the area of company law with an analysis of the Corporations Act 2001, which along with the Australian Securities and Investments Commission Act 2001 comprises Corporations legislation in Australia. Article by Tom Bostock (a partner in the law firm Mallesons Stephen Jaques, Melbourne, Australia). Published in Amicus Curiae - Journal of the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies and its Society for Advanced Legal Studies. The Journal is produced by...

  1. Incidence of diseases primarily affecting the skin by age group: population-based epidemiologic study in Olmsted County, Minnesota, and comparison with age-specific incidence rates worldwide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessman, Laurel L; Andersen, Louise K; Davis, Mark D P

    2018-01-29

    Understanding the effects of age on the epidemiology of diseases primarily affecting the skin is important to the practice of dermatology, both for proper allocation of resources and for optimal patient-centered care. To fully appreciate the effect that age may have on the population-based calculations of incidence of diseases primarily affecting the skin in Olmsted County, Minnesota, and worldwide, we performed a review of all relevant Rochester Epidemiology Project-published data and compared them to similar reports in the worldwide English literature. Using the Rochester Epidemiology Project, population-based epidemiologic studies have been performed to estimate the incidence of specific skin diseases over the past 50 years. In older persons (>65 years), nonmelanoma skin cancer, lentigo maligna, herpes zoster, delusional infestation, venous stasis syndrome, venous ulcer, and burning mouth syndrome were more commonly diagnosed. In those younger than 65 years, atypical nevi, psoriatic arthritis, pityriasis rosea, herpes progenitalis, genital warts, alopecia areata, hidradenitis suppurativa, infantile hemangioma, Behçet's disease, and sarcoidosis (isolated cutaneous, with sarcoidosis-specific cutaneous lesions and with erythema nodosum) had a higher incidence. Many of the incidence rates by age group of diseases primarily affecting the skin derived from the Rochester Epidemiology Project were similar to those reported elsewhere. © 2018 The International Society of Dermatology.

  2. Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data represents geographic terms used within the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act (OCSLA or Act). The Act defines the United States outer continental shelf...

  3. No 592 - Radiation Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Act will enter into force on 1 January 1992. The scope of the Act is extensive as, in addition to ionizing radiation, it will also apply to activities involving exposure to natural radiation and non-ionizing radiation. Its purpose is to prevent and restrict harmful effects to health resulting from radiation. The basic principles of the Act are that the practice involving radiation should be justified; radiation protection should be optimized; and radiation doses should be as low as reasonably achievable. Licensed organisations using radiation will be responsible for the safety of the activity involving exposure to radiation and for having available the appropriate expertise to this effect. The required so-called safety licence provides the regulatory control to ensure that radiation is used sensibly, that the equipment and shields are technically acceptable and the operating personnel is competent, and that the radioactive waste is dealt with appropriately. The Radiation Act will also apply to nuclear activities within the scope of the 1987 Nuclear Energy Act [fr

  4. The Clean Air Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coburn, L.L.

    1990-01-01

    The Clean Air Act amendments alter the complex laws affecting atmospheric pollution and at the same time have broad implications for energy. Specifically, the Clean Air Act amendments for the first time deal with the environmental problem of acid deposition in a way that minimizes energy and economic impacts. By relying upon a market-based system of emission trading, a least cost solution will be used to reduce sulfur dioxide (SO 2 ) emissions by almost 40 percent. The emission trading system is the centerpiece of the Clean Air Act (CAA) amendments effort to resolve energy and environmental interactions in a manner that will maximize environmental solutions while minimizing energy impacts. This paper will explore how the present CAA amendments deal with the emission trading system and the likely impact of the emission trading system and the CAA amendments upon the electric power industry

  5. ST–ACTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gidofalvi, Gyozo; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2006-01-01

    hot issue in the area of spatio–temporal databases [7]. While existing Moving Object Simulators (MOSs) address different physical aspects of mobility, they neglect the important social and geo–demographical aspects of it. This paper presents ST–ACTS, a Spatio–Temporal ACTivity Simulator that, using...... various geo–statistical data sources and intuitive principles, models the so far neglected aspects. ST–ACTS considers that (1) objects (representing mobile users) move from one spatio–temporal location to another with the objective of performing a certain activity at the latter location; (2) not all users...

  6. Atomic Energy Act 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    This Act, which entered into force on 1 september 1989, contains a series of provisions dealing with different subjects: increase of public financing for British Nuclear Fuels plc, amendment of the Nuclear Installations Act 1965 regarding the powers of the Health and Safety Executive to recover expenses directly from nuclear operators and obligation of the UKAEA to take out insurance or other financial security to cover its liability and finally, measures to enable the UK to ratify the IAEA Convention on Assistance in Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency [fr

  7. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NACFC Carolyn and C Richard Mattingly Leadership in Mental Health Care Award Mary M. Kontos Award NACFC Reflections ... CF Community in Health Care Reform Milestones in Health Care Reform How Tax Reform Could ... Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy Achievements ...

  8. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Team Your cystic fibrosis care team includes a group of CF health care professionals who partner with ... Awards and Grants Career Development Awards Research Awards Training Awards CF ... Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ...

  9. "Act in Good Faith."

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKay, Robert B.

    1979-01-01

    It is argued that the Supreme Court's Bakke decision overturning the University of California's minority admissions program is good for those who favor affirmative action programs in higher education. The Supreme Court gives wide latitude for devising programs that take race and ethnic background into account if colleges are acting in good faith.…

  10. Atomic Energy Control Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This act provides for the establishment of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The board is responsible for the control and supervision of the development, application and use of atomic energy. The board is also considered necessary to enable Canada to participate effectively in measures of international control of atomic energy

  11. Special Appropriation Act Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA is sometimes directed to provide funding to a specific entity for study, purpose, or activity.This information will be of interest to a community or other entity that has been identified in one of EPA's appropriations acts to receive such funding.

  12. Radioactive Substances Act 1948

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1948-01-01

    This Act regulates the use of radioactive substances and radiation producing devices in the United Kingdom. It provides for the control of import, export, sale, supply etc. of such substances and devices and lays down the safety regulations to be complied with when dealing with them. (NEA) [fr

  13. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Reform Could Impact People With CF The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy Achievements ... AWARENESS Tomorrow’s Leaders About Us News Blog Chapters Facebook Twitter YouTube Instagram Email DONATE Breadcrumb Navigation Home ...

  14. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Practical Advice Family Planning and Parenting With CF Making Your Family Planning Decisions Pregnancy and CF Alternative Ways to Build a ... with cystic fibrosis so that they make smart decisions about CF-related research, treatment, and access to care. ... Act Our Advocacy Work Advocacy Achievements ...

  15. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... programs and policies to improve the lives of people with CF. Help us by raising awareness of CF, participating in a fundraising event, or volunteering ... clear your airways. Most are easy to do. Infants and toddlers will need help from a parent or caregiver. Older kids and adults can choose ACTs that they ...

  16. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Their Families When There's More Than One Person With CF in the Same School Daily Life ... Awards and Grants Career Development Awards Research Awards Training Awards CF ... Clearance Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs) There are different ways to clear your ...

  17. Ocean Dumping Control Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This Act provides for the control of dumping of wastes and other substances in the ocean in accordance with the London Convention of 1972 on Prevention of Marine Pollution by the Dumping of Wastes and other Matter to which Canada is a Party. Radioactive wastes are included in the prohibited and restricted substances. (NEA)

  18. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to try. However, the best ACT is the one that you are most likely to perform as part of your daily treatment plan. Watch the webcast below to hear a respiratory therapist, a child with CF and her father: Demonstrate and discuss ...

  19. The Child Justice Act

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Stephan

    1995-06-16

    Jun 16, 1995 ... Gallinetti "Child Justice" 648; Le Roux-Kemp 2008 Annual Survey of South African Law 298 (the. Act contains a "separate, but parallel, ... The various aspects of section 68 are then evaluated. The greatest challenges lie in the ... See also, eg, Picardi Hotels v Thekwini. Properties 2009 1 SA 493 (SCA) para ...

  20. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Data Requests Get Involved X close Advocate Our goal is to educate policy makers about the needs ... Reform Could Impact People With CF The Preserving Employee Wellness Programs Act Our Advocacy ... Assistance Services Find Resources: CF Foundation Compass Insurance Get ...

  1. Airway Clearance Techniques (ACTs)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Offer their tips for fitting ACTs into daily life Airway Clearance Techniques | Webcast To learn more about how you can help your infant or child manage their lung health, watch parents of children with CF and a respiratory therapist ...

  2. Cost that is Directly Incurred as a Result of Operating the Train Service on the 1520 mm Rail with Primarily Freight Transportation

    OpenAIRE

    Hudenko, J; Ribakova, N; Počs, R

    2016-01-01

    Under the Directive 2012/34/EU (21 November 2012) "the charges for … [rail] infrastructure … shall be set at the cost that is directly incurred as a result of operating the train service". This charging rule is new for Baltic States’ railways, where due to the favorable geographic position a full cost application without detalization was possible. Although, a big number of relevant studies on the issue was made in EU, all of them covered only 1435mm railways with primarily passenger transport...

  3. A randomized trial of a DWI intervention program for first offenders: intervention outcomes and interactions with antisocial personality disorder among a primarily American-Indian sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodall, W Gill; Delaney, Harold D; Kunitz, Stephen J; Westerberg, Verner S; Zhao, Hongwei

    2007-06-01

    Randomized trial evidence on the effectiveness of incarceration and treatment of first-time driving while intoxicated (DWI) offenders who are primarily American Indian has yet to be reported in the literature on DWI prevention. Further, research has confirmed the association of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) with problems with alcohol including DWI. A randomized clinical trial was conducted, in conjunction with 28 days of incarceration, of a treatment program incorporating motivational interviewing principles for first-time DWI offenders. The sample of 305 offenders including 52 diagnosed as ASPD by the Diagnostic Interview Schedule were assessed before assignment to conditions and at 6, 12, and 24 months after discharge. Self-reported frequency of drinking and driving as well as various measures of drinking over the preceding 90 days were available at all assessments for 244 participants. Further, DWI rearrest data for 274 participants were available for analysis. Participants randomized to receive the first offender incarceration and treatment program reported greater reductions in alcohol consumption from baseline levels when compared with participants who were only incarcerated. Antisocial personality disorder participants reported heavier and more frequent drinking but showed significantly greater declines in drinking from intake to posttreatment assessments. Further, the treatment resulted in larger effects relative to the control on ASPD than non-ASPD participants. Nonconfrontational treatment may significantly enhance outcomes for DWI offenders with ASPD when delivered in an incarcerated setting, and in the present study, such effects were found in a primarily American-Indian sample.

  4. Evaluating a County-Sponsored Social Marketing Campaign to Increase Mothers' Initiation of HPV Vaccine for their Pre-teen Daughters in a Primarily Rural Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Joan R; Shafer, Autumn; Diehl, Sandra J; Deal, Allison M

    2011-01-01

    Routine vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV), the main cause of cervical cancer, is recommended for 11-12 year old girls, yet vaccine uptake is low. This study evaluates a social marketing campaign initiated by 13 North Carolina counties to raise awareness among parents and reduce barriers to accessing the vaccine in a primarily rural area. The 3-month campaign targeted mothers of girls ages 11-12 and healthcare practices serving pre-teen girls in four counties. Principles of social marketing were: product (recommended vaccine against HPV), price (cost, perception of safety and efficacy, and access), promotion (posters, brochures, website, news releases, doctor's recommendation), and place (doctors' offices, retail outlets). We analyzed (1) website traffic, hotline calls, and media placement; (2) cross-sectional surveys of mothers and providers; and (3) HPV immunization rates in intervention versus non-intervention counties. Of respondent mothers (n=225), 82% heard or saw campaign messages or materials. Of respondent providers (n=35), 94% used campaign brochures regularly or occasionally in conversations with parents. HPV vaccination rates within six months of campaign launch were 2% higher for 9-13 year old girls in two of the four intervention counties compared to 96 non-intervention counties. This evaluation supports campaign use in other primarily rural and underserved areas.

  5. Fragment-Specific Fixation Versus Volar Locking Plates in Primarily Nonreducible or Secondarily Redisplaced Distal Radius Fractures: A Randomized Controlled Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landgren, Marcus; Abramo, Antonio; Geijer, Mats; Kopylov, Philippe; Tägil, Magnus

    2017-03-01

    To compare the patient-reported, clinical, and radiographic outcome of 2 methods of internal fixation in distal radius fractures. Fifty patients, mean age 56 years (range, 21-69 years) with primarily nonreducible or secondarily redisplaced distal radius fractures were randomized to open reduction internal fixation using volar locking plates (n = 25) or fragment-specific fixation (n = 25). The patients were assessed on grip strength, range of motion, patient-reported outcome (Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand), pain (visual analog scale), health-related quality of life (Short Form-12 [SF-12]), and radiographic evaluation. Grip strength at 12 months was the primary outcome measure. At 12 months, no difference was found in grip strength, which was 90% of the uninjured side in the volar plate group and 87% in the fragment-specific fixation group. No differences were found in range of motion and the median Quick Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand score was 5 in both groups. The overall complication rate was significant, 21% in the volar locking plate group, compared with 52% in the fragment-specific group. In treatment of primarily nonreducible or secondarily redisplaced distal radius fractures, volar locking plates and fragment-specific fixation both achieve good and similar patient-reported outcomes, although more complications were recorded in the fragment-specific group. Therapeutic II. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluating a County-Sponsored Social Marketing Campaign to Increase Mothers’ Initiation of HPV Vaccine for their Pre-teen Daughters in a Primarily Rural Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, Joan R.; Shafer, Autumn; Diehl, Sandra J.; Deal, Allison M.

    2011-01-01

    Routine vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV), the main cause of cervical cancer, is recommended for 11–12 year old girls, yet vaccine uptake is low. This study evaluates a social marketing campaign initiated by 13 North Carolina counties to raise awareness among parents and reduce barriers to accessing the vaccine in a primarily rural area. The 3-month campaign targeted mothers of girls ages 11–12 and healthcare practices serving pre-teen girls in four counties. Principles of social marketing were: product (recommended vaccine against HPV), price (cost, perception of safety and efficacy, and access), promotion (posters, brochures, website, news releases, doctor’s recommendation), and place (doctors’ offices, retail outlets). We analyzed (1) website traffic, hotline calls, and media placement; (2) cross-sectional surveys of mothers and providers; and (3) HPV immunization rates in intervention versus non-intervention counties. Of respondent mothers (n=225), 82% heard or saw campaign messages or materials. Of respondent providers (n=35), 94% used campaign brochures regularly or occasionally in conversations with parents. HPV vaccination rates within six months of campaign launch were 2% higher for 9–13 year old girls in two of the four intervention counties compared to 96 non-intervention counties. This evaluation supports campaign use in other primarily rural and underserved areas. PMID:21804767

  7. Challenges Persist Under Americans With Disabilities Act Amendments Act: How Can Oncology Providers Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuerstein, Michael; Gehrke, Amanda K; McMahon, Brian T; McMahon, Megan C

    2017-06-01

    To determine whether the Amendments to the hallmark Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA; effective January 2009), which provide increased access to the antidiscrimination laws for many with chronic illness, are related to changes in workplace discrimination allegations in individuals with a history of cancer. Information collected by the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission was used to compare allegations of discrimination and their merit before (2001 to 2008) and after (2009 to 2011) implementation of the Amendments Act. Allegations related to terms of employment (eg, promotions, wages) were more likely to be filed (odds ratio [OR], 1.34; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.61) and determined to have merit (OR, 1.35; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.77) after implementation of the Amendments Act. Allegations related to workplace relations (eg, harassment, discipline, discharge) were also more likely to be filed post Amendments Act (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.23 to 1.78), although the merit of this complaint remained stable. Filing of all other allegations of discrimination (ie, hiring, reasonable accommodation, and termination) and their merit remained unchanged post Amendments Act. Despite the implementation of the Amendments Act, discrimination allegations in those with a history of cancer persisted or in certain areas increased. Although prevention of workplace discrimination rests primarily with employers, the oncology care team is uniquely qualified to provide information related to residual symptoms and function that can facilitate more personalized solutions to workplace discrimination, such as successful workplace accommodations. Information is provided that can assist the oncology team in their efforts to improve work outcomes.

  8. Atomic Energy Act 1946

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1946-01-01

    This Act provides for the development of atomic energy in the United Kingdom and for its control. It details the duties and powers of the competent Minister, in particular his powers to obtain information on and to inspect materials, plant and processes, to control production and use of atomic energy and publication of information thereon. Also specified is the power to search for and work minerals and to acquire property. (NEA) [fr

  9. Radiological protection act, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Act provides for the establishment of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland and dissolves An Bord Fuinnimh Nuicleigh (the Board), transferring its assets and liabilities to the Institute. It sets out a range of radiation protection measures to be taken by various Ministers in the event of a radiological emergency and gives effect at national level to the Assistance Convention, the Early Notification Convention and the Physical Protection Convention. The Institute is the competent Irish authority for the three Conventions. (NEA) [fr

  10. Toxic Substances Control Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Toxic Substances Control Act and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  11. Interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha sensitize primarily resistant human endometrial stromal cells to Fas-mediated apoptosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fluhr, Herbert; Krenzer, Stefanie; Stein, Gerburg M

    2007-01-01

    The subtle interaction between the implanting embryo and the maternal endometrium plays a pivotal role during the process of implantation. Human endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) express Fas and the implanting trophoblast cells secrete Fas ligand (FASLG, FasL), suggesting a possible role for Fas......-mediated signaling during early implantation. Here we show that ESCs are primarily resistant to Fas-mediated apoptosis independently of their state of hormonal differentiation. Pre-treatment of ESCs with interferon (IFN)-gamma and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha sensitizes them to become apoptotic upon stimulation...... of Fas by an agonistic anti-Fas antibody. Incubation of ESCs with the early embryonic signal human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG, CGB) does not influence their reaction to Fas stimulation. The sensitizing effect of IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha was accompanied by a significant upregulation of Fas and FLICE...

  12. Williamson Act - The California Land Conservation Act of 1965

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Natural Resource Agency — The California Land Conservation Act of 1965 - commonly referred to as the Williamson Act - is the State's primary program for the conservation of private land in...

  13. Elevated plasma 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α levels in human smokers originate primarily from enzymatic instead of non-enzymatic lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van 't Erve, Thomas J; Lih, Fred B; Kadiiska, Maria B; Deterding, Leesa J; Mason, Ronald P

    2018-02-01

    It is widely accepted that free radicals in tobacco smoke lead to oxidative stress and generate the popular lipid peroxidation biomarker 8-iso-prostaglandin F 2α (8-iso-PGF 2α ). However, 8-iso-PGF 2α can simultaneously be produced in vivo by the prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthases (PGHS) induced by inflammation. This inflammation-dependent mechanism has never been considered as a source of elevated 8-iso-PGF 2α in tobacco smokers. The goal of this study is to quantify the distribution of chemical- and PGHS-dependent 8-iso-PGF 2α formation in the plasma of tobacco smokers and non-smokers. The influences of gender and hormonal contraceptive use were accounted for. The distribution was determined by measuring the 8-iso-PGF 2α /prostaglandin F 2α (PGF 2α ) ratio. When comparing smokers (n = 28) against non-smokers (n = 30), there was a statistically significant increase in the 8-iso-PGF 2α concentration. The source of this increased 8-iso-PGF 2α was primarily from PGHS. When stratifying for gender, the increase in 8-iso-PGF 2α in male smokers (n = 9) was primarily from PGHS. Interestingly, female smokers on hormonal contraceptives had increased 8-iso-PGF 2α in both pathways, whereas those not on hormonal contraceptives did not have increased 8-iso-PGF 2α . In conclusion, increased plasma 8-iso-PGF 2α in tobacco smokers has complex origins, with PGHS-dependent formation as the primary source. Accounting for both pathways provides a definitive measurement of both oxidative stress and inflammation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. German Atomic Energy Act turns fifty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, Horst

    2009-01-01

    going to be the future of the German Atomic Energy Act after 50 years? The boundary conditions for its development in detail are set primarily by national politics. The next few years will show whether again there will be more or less heated debates of a parliamentary majority and (extra-)parliamentary protests. For national nuclear power policy and for nuclear law it is also important that the international framework with its European, even global, lines in energy and climate policies be taken into account. (orig.)

  15. Act to amend cost regulations of the Atomic Energy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    Article 21 is replaced by articles 21 to 21b. According to this, fees or reimbursements for expenses for official acts (e.g. decisions, supervisory acts, safeguarding of nuclear fuels) as well as for the use of facilities according to article 9a, section 3, of the Atomic Energy Act (e.g. Laender facilities to collect nuclear waste). (HP) [de

  16. Teaching Speech Acts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teaching Speech Acts

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I argue that pragmatic ability must become part of what we teach in the classroom if we are to realize the goals of communicative competence for our students. I review the research on pragmatics, especially those articles that point to the effectiveness of teaching pragmatics in an explicit manner, and those that posit methods for teaching. I also note two areas of scholarship that address classroom needs—the use of authentic data and appropriate assessment tools. The essay concludes with a summary of my own experience teaching speech acts in an advanced-level Portuguese class.

  17. The Experiment as Act

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Morten

    In December 1965, an experiment took place at The Independent Art Space in Copenhagen (Den Frie Kunstbygning). Short named POEX65, it was looking to create and activate POetry EXperiments across artistic genres and formats (thus, in essence, making a POetry EXposition). The POEX65 event framed many...... to be able to analyse the phenomena found at POEX65. Here I will use the notion of the ‘ontological theatre’ (Pickering), which, according to Pickering, is acted out in experimental art productions. The experiment could thus be seen as an ‘agency-realism’ – as an ‘act’ of relations across the aesthetics...

  18. Atomic Energy Authority Act 1954

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1954-01-01

    This Act provides for the setting up of an Atomic Energy Authority for the United Kingdom. It also makes provision for the Authority's composition, powers, duties, rights and liabilities, and may amend, as a consequence of the establishment of the Authority and in connection therewith, the Atomic Energy Act, 1946, the Radioactive Substances Act 1948 and other relevant enactments. (NEA) [fr

  19. 76 FR 59073 - Privacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-23

    ... CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY 32 CFR Part 1901 Privacy Act AGENCY: Central Intelligence Agency. ACTION: Proposed rule. SUMMARY: Consistent with the Privacy Act (PA), the Central Intelligence Agency...-1379. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Consistent with the Privacy Act (PA), the CIA has undertaken and...

  20. Chlamydia trachomatis recombinant MOMP encapsulated in PLGA nanoparticles triggers primarily T helper 1 cellular and antibody immune responses in mice: a desirable candidate nanovaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairley SJ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Stacie J Fairley, Shree R Singh, Abebayehu N Yilma, Alain B Waffo, Praseetha Subbarayan, Saurabh Dixit, Murtada A Taha, Chino D Cambridge, Vida A Dennis Center for NanoBiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL, USA Abstract: We recently demonstrated by in vitro experiments that PLGA (poly D, L-lactide-co-glycolide potentiates T helper 1 (Th1 immune responses induced by a peptide derived from the recombinant major outer membrane protein (rMOMP of Chlamydia trachomatis, and may be a promising vaccine delivery system. Herein we evaluated the immune-potentiating potential of PLGA by encapsulating the full-length rMOMP (PLGA-rMOMP, characterizing it in vitro, and investigating its immunogenicity in vivo. Our hypothesis was that PLGA-rMOMP triggers Th1 immune responses in mice, which are desirable prerequisites for a C. trachomatis candidate nanovaccine. Physical-structural characterizations of PLGA-rMOMP revealed its size (approximately 272 nm, zeta potential (−14.30 mV, apparent spherical smooth morphology, and continuous slow release pattern. PLGA potentiated the ability of encapsulated rMOMP to trigger production of cytokines and chemokines by mouse J774 macrophages. Flow cytometric analyses revealed that spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with PLGA-rMOMP had elevated numbers of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets, and secreted more rMOMP-specific interferon-gamma (Th1 and interleukin (IL-12p40 (Th1/Th17 than IL-4 and IL-10 (Th2 cytokines. PLGA-rMOMP-immunized mice produced higher serum immunoglobulin (IgG and IgG2a (Th1 than IgG1 (Th2 rMOMP-specific antibodies. Notably, sera from PLGA-rMOMP-immunized mice had a 64-fold higher Th1 than Th2 antibody titer, whereas mice immunized with rMOMP in Freund's adjuvant had only a four-fold higher Th1 than Th2 antibody titer, suggesting primarily induction of a Th1 antibody response in PLGA-rMOMP-immunized mice. Our data underscore PLGA as an effective delivery system for a C

  1. Prostaglandin (PG) E3 synthesis elicted by adrenergic stimuli in guinea-pig trachea (GPT) is mediated primarily by B2 adrenergic receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nadel, G.L.; Malik, K.U.; Lew, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism and to characterize the type of adrenergic receptor (AR) involved in the production of the major metabolite of this fatty acid. [ 14 C]AA was incubated with GPT-rings and the radiolabelled products were extracted and separated by TLC method. The medium was also assayed for radiolabelled immunoreactive PG's (iPG's) and leukotrienes (LT) B4 and C4 by RIA or Enzyme immunoassay (EIA) after exposure to various AR agonists. [ 14 C]AA was incorporated into GPT-rings and metabolized mainly into iPGE2 and smaller amounts into PGF2α. Trace amounts of PGD2 and 6-keto-PGF1α but not LTB4 or LTC4 were detected by RIA and/or EIA. Incubation of GPT rings for 15 minutes with isoproterenol and salbutamol resulted in a significant increase of PGE2 synthesis (optimum conc: 10 -7 , 10 -7 M respectively). In contrast, dobutamine, norepinephrine, phenylnephrine and xylazine (up to 10 -6 M) did not significantly increase PGE2 production. Isoproterenol-induced iPGE2 production was inhibited by a selective β2 antagonist, butoxamine (70%: 10 -7 M, 91%: 10 -6 M) and somewhat reduced by β1 antagonists practolol and metoprolol (30-64%:10 -6 M). These data suggest that isoproterenol induced iPGE2 synthesis is primarily mediated via activation of β2 adrenergic receptor

  2. Hydroa vacciniforme-like lymphoma with primarily periorbital swelling: 7 cases of an atypical clinical manifestation of this rare cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Jose A; Sangueza, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Hydroa vacciniforme-like lymphoma (HVL) is a rare cutaneous T-cell lymphoma that is usually seen in children of Hispanic or Asian origin. Association between chronic latent Epstein-Barr virus infection in both hydroa vacciniforme (HV) and HVL has been demonstrated and has recently been categorized by the World Health Organization as one of the Epstein Barr virus-positive lymphoproliferative disorders of childhood. Patients with HVL present with a cutaneous rash characterized by edema, blisters, ulcers, and scars mainly seen on the face and extremities that mimic HV; however, unlike in HV, the lesions tend to be extensive and deeper and are associated with severe scarring, necrosis, and systemic manifestations. We are reporting 7 cases of an unusual clinical variant of HVL with primarily periorbital edema. All of our patients in this series presented with progressive periorbital edema that was accompanied with systemic symptoms including fever, malaise, and lymphadenopathy. Most cases were initially misinterpreted as inflammatory processes including cellulitis, arthropod bite reactions, and periorbital lupus erythematosus. The biopsy of these lesions revealed an atypical lymphocytic infiltrate predominantly distributed in the deep dermis and in subcutaneous fat. Immunohistochemistry studies revealed a cytotoxic T-cell (CD8) profile. All cases were associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection. Our study presents a rare clinical variant of HVL with predominant periorbital edema. This variant could potentially be overlooked and misdiagnosed as an inflammatory condition; thus, it needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of periorbital edema in young patients.

  3. High mobility group protein number17 cross-links primarily to histone H2A in the reconstituted HMG 17 - nucleosome core particle complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, G.R.; Yau, P.; Yasuda, H.; Traut, R.R.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The neighbor relationship of lamb thymus High Mobility Group (HMG) protein 17 to native HeLa nucleosome core particle histones in the reconstituted complex has been studied. 125 I-labeled HMG 17 was cross-linking to core histones using the protein-protein cross-linking reagent 2-iminothiolane. Specific cross-linked products were separated on a two-dimensional Triton-acid-urea/SDS gel system, located by autoradiography, excised and quantified. Disulfide bonds in the cross links were then cleaved and the protein constituents were identified by SDS gel electrophoresis. HMG 17 cross-linked primarily to histone H2A while lower levels of cross-linking occurred between HMG 17 and the other histones. In contrast, cross-linking between two HMG 17 molecules bound on the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that the same nucleosome was relatively rare. It is concluded that H2A comprises part of the HMG 17 binding site but that HMG 17 is sufficiently elongated and mobile to permit cross-linking to the other histones and to a second HMG 17 molecule. These results are in agreement with the current model for the structure of the nucleosome and the proposed binding sites for HMG 17

  4. Bacterial diversity shift determined by different diets in the gut of the spotted wing fly Drosophila suzukii is primarily reflected on acetic acid bacteria

    KAUST Repository

    Vacchini, Violetta

    2016-11-25

    The pivotal role of diet in shaping gut microbiota has been evaluated in different animal models, including insects. Drosophila flies harbour an inconstant microbiota among which acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are important components. Here, we investigated the bacterial and AAB components of the invasive pest Drosophila suzukii microbiota, by studying the same insect population separately grown on fruit-based or non-fruit artificial diet. AAB were highly prevalent in the gut under both diets (90 and 92% infection rates with fruits and artificial diet, respectively). Fluorescent in situ hybridization and recolonization experiments with green fluorescent protein (Gfp)-labelled strains showed AAB capability to massively colonize insect gut. High-throughput sequencing on 16S rRNA gene indicated that the bacterial microbiota of guts fed with the two diets clustered separately. By excluding AAB-related OTUs from the analysis, insect bacterial communities did not cluster separately according to the diet, suggesting that diet-based diversification of the community is primarily reflected on the AAB component of the community. Diet influenced also AAB alpha-diversity, with separate OTU distributions based on diets. High prevalence, localization and massive recolonization, together with AAB clustering behaviour in relation to diet, suggest an AAB role in the D. suzukii gut response to diet modification. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Salinity-induced inhibition of growth in the aquatic pteridophyte Azolla microphylla primarily involves inhibition of photosynthetic components and signaling molecules as revealed by proteome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thagela, Preeti; Yadav, Ravindra Kumar; Mishra, Vagish; Dahuja, Anil; Ahmad, Altaf; Singh, Pawan Kumar; Tiwari, Budhi Sagar; Abraham, Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Salinity stress causes adverse physiological and biochemical changes in the growth and productivity of a plant. Azolla, a symbiotic pteridophyte and potent candidate for biofertilizer due to its nitrogen fixation ability, shows reduced growth and nitrogen fixation during saline stress. To better understand regulatory components involved in salinity-induced physiological changes, in the present study, Azolla microphylla plants were exposed to NaCl (6.74 and 8.61 ds/m) and growth, photochemical reactions of photosynthesis, ion accumulation, and changes in cellular proteome were studied. Maximum dry weight was accumulated in control and untreated plant while a substantial decrease in dry weight was observed in the plants exposed to salinity. Exposure of the organism to different concentrations of salt in hydroponic conditions resulted in differential level of Na + and K + ion accumulation. Comparative analysis of salinity-induced proteome changes in A. microphylla revealed 58 salt responsive proteins which were differentially expressed during the salt exposure. Moreover, 42 % spots among differentially expressed proteins were involved in different signaling events. The identified proteins are involved in photosynthesis, energy metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis, protein synthesis, and defense. Downregulation of these key metabolic proteins appears to inhibit the growth of A. microphylla in response to salinity. Altogether, the study revealed that in Azolla, increased salinity primarily affected signaling and photosynthesis that in turn leads to reduced biomass.

  6. Comparative Transcriptional Profiling Established the Awn as the Major Photosynthetic Organ of the Barley Spike While the Lemma and the Palea Primarily Protect the Seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tilahun Abebe

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The lemma, palea, and awn of a barley ( L. spike are photosynthetic organs that supply the developing seed with carbohydrates. The lemma and palea also enclose the seed and protect it from pathogens and insects. Despite the important roles they play, little information exists on gene expression in these organs that identifies their function. In this study, we compared gene expression among the lemma, palea, awn, and developing seed of barley during grain filling using the Barley1 Genome Array to identify highly expressed genes involved in the primary function of these organs. Hierarchical clustering and mixed model analysis revealed that the lemma and palea have closely related gene expression patterns. In addition, the lemma and palea overexpressed defense-related genes compared with the awn. The awn preferentially expressed genes for photosynthesis, the biosynthesis of chlorophyll and carotenoids, and reactive oxygen species scavenging. This suggests the lemma and palea are mainly protective organs whereas the awn is primarily a photosynthetic structure. The seed was enriched with genes for the biosynthesis of starch, storage proteins, enzyme inhibitors, and cell proliferation.

  7. Is Walking Capacity in Subjects with Multiple Sclerosis Primarily Related to Muscle Oxidative Capacity or Maximal Muscle Strength? A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Hansen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Purpose. Walking capacity is reduced in subjects with multiple sclerosis (MS. To develop effective exercise interventions to enhance walking capacity, it is important to determine the impact of factors, modifiable by exercise intervention (maximal muscle strength versus muscle oxidative capacity, on walking capacity. The purpose of this pilot study is to discriminate between the impact of maximal muscle strength versus muscle oxidative capacity on walking capacity in subjects with MS. Methods. From 24 patients with MS, muscle oxidative capacity was determined by calculation of exercise-onset oxygen uptake kinetics (mean response time during submaximal exercise bouts. Maximal muscle strength (isometric knee extension and flexion peak torque was assessed on dynamometer. All subjects completed a 6-minute walking test. Relationships between walking capacity (as a percentage of normal value and muscle strength (of knee flexors and extensors versus muscle oxidative capacity were assessed in multivariate regression analyses. Results. The expanded disability status score (EDSS showed a significant univariate correlation (r=-0.70, P<0.004 with walking capacity. In multivariate regression analyses, EDSS and mean response time, but not muscle strength, were independently related to walking capacity (P<0.05. Conclusions. Walking distance is, next to disability level and not taking neurologic symptoms/deficits into account, primarily related to muscle oxidative capacity in subjects with MS. Additional study is needed to further examine/verify these findings.

  8. Factors affecting the number and type of student research products for chemistry and physics students at primarily undergraduate institutions: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellis, Birgit; Soto, Patricia; Bruce, Chrystal D; Lacueva, Graciela; Wilson, Anne M; Jayasekare, Rasitha

    2018-01-01

    For undergraduate students, involvement in authentic research represents scholarship that is consistent with disciplinary quality standards and provides an integrative learning experience. In conjunction with performing research, the communication of the results via presentations or publications is a measure of the level of scientific engagement. The empirical study presented here uses generalized linear mixed models with hierarchical bootstrapping to examine the factors that impact the means of dissemination of undergraduate research results. Focusing on the research experiences in physics and chemistry of undergraduates at four Primarily Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) from 2004-2013, statistical analysis indicates that the gender of the student does not impact the number and type of research products. However, in chemistry, the rank of the faculty advisor and the venue of the presentation do impact the number of research products by undergraduate student, whereas in physics, gender match between student and advisor has an effect on the number of undergraduate research products. This study provides a baseline for future studies of discipline-based bibliometrics and factors that affect the number of research products of undergraduate students.

  9. Factors affecting the number and type of student research products for chemistry and physics students at primarily undergraduate institutions: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Patricia; Bruce, Chrystal D.; Lacueva, Graciela; Wilson, Anne M.; Jayasekare, Rasitha

    2018-01-01

    For undergraduate students, involvement in authentic research represents scholarship that is consistent with disciplinary quality standards and provides an integrative learning experience. In conjunction with performing research, the communication of the results via presentations or publications is a measure of the level of scientific engagement. The empirical study presented here uses generalized linear mixed models with hierarchical bootstrapping to examine the factors that impact the means of dissemination of undergraduate research results. Focusing on the research experiences in physics and chemistry of undergraduates at four Primarily Undergraduate Institutions (PUIs) from 2004–2013, statistical analysis indicates that the gender of the student does not impact the number and type of research products. However, in chemistry, the rank of the faculty advisor and the venue of the presentation do impact the number of research products by undergraduate student, whereas in physics, gender match between student and advisor has an effect on the number of undergraduate research products. This study provides a baseline for future studies of discipline-based bibliometrics and factors that affect the number of research products of undergraduate students. PMID:29698502

  10. A contextual analysis of the hate speech provisions of the equality act

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article presents a detailed contextual analysis of the categorical prohibition of hate speech in terms of section 10(1) of the Equality Act. It is argued that this provision is not primarily intended to describe and effectively regulate the extreme expression that falls within the narrow ambit of "hate speech" as defined in section ...

  11. A Critical Analysis of Criticisms of the Oregon Death with Dignity Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werth, James L., Jr.; Wineberg, Howard

    2005-01-01

    This article critically examines the validity of common criticisms of the Oregon Death with Dignity Act, primarily through reviewing published research and analyses. After summarizing the law and recent developments, 11 areas of concerns are examined: (a) the amount of data collected, (b) the availability of the data, (c) the reporting process,…

  12. 77 FR 57199 - 2012 Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (Regulation X) Mortgage Servicing Proposal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... servicers under a variety of business models. In some cases, creditors service mortgage loans that they... business model, servicers act primarily as payment collectors and processors, and provide minimal customer... (2011) (Thompson), available at http://digital.law.washington.edu/dspace-law/bitstream/handle/1773.1...

  13. The Danish School Acts of 1814 and the Emergence of Mass Schooling in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Christian

    , the absolutist state sought the principle seriously implemented. In 1814, the Danish King Frederik VI enacted a set of schools laws. The acts of 1814 set out the framework for children’s education in the Danish monarchy, but the laws did not create schools; they primarily regulated diversity and confirmed...

  14. Cis-Natural Antisense Transcripts Are Mainly Co-expressed with Their Sense Transcripts and Primarily Related to Energy Metabolic Pathways during Muscle Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yunxia; Hou, Ye; Zhao, Changzhi; Liu, Fei; Luan, Yu; Jing, Lu; Li, Xinyun; Zhu, Mengjin; Zhao, Shuhong

    2016-01-01

    Cis-natural antisense transcripts (cis-NATs) are a new class of RNAs identified in various species. However, the biological functions of cis-NATs are largely unknown. In this study, we investigated the transcriptional characteristics and functions of cis-NATs in the muscle tissue of lean Landrace and indigenous fatty Lantang pigs. In total, 3,306 cis-NATs of 2,469 annotated genes were identified in the muscle tissue of pigs. More than 1,300 cis-NATs correlated with their sense genes at the transcriptional level, and approximately 80% of them were co-expressed in the two breeds. Furthermore, over 1,200 differentially expressed cis-NATs were identified during muscle development. Function annotation showed that the cis-NATs participated in muscle development mainly by co-expressing with genes involved in energy metabolic pathways, including citrate cycle (TCA cycle), glycolysis or gluconeogenesis, mitochondrial activation and so on. Moreover, these cis-NATs and their sense genes abruptly increased at the transition from the late fetal stages to the early postnatal stages and then decreased along with muscle development. In conclusion, the cis-NATs in the muscle tissue of pigs were identified and determined to be mainly co-expressed with their sense genes. The co-expressed cis-NATs and their sense gene were primarily related to energy metabolic pathways during muscle development in pigs. Our results offered novel evidence on the roles of cis-NATs during the muscle development of pigs.

  15. HIV/AIDS stigma among a sample of primarily African-American and Latino men who have sex with men social media users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garett, Renee; Smith, Justin; Chiu, Jason; Young, Sean D

    2016-01-01

    The recent increase in social media use allows these technologies to rapidly reach communities with higher HIV prevalence, such as African-American and Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). However, no studies have looked at HIV/AIDS stigma among social media users from African-American and Latino MSM communities, or the association between stigma and social media use among these groups. This study sought to assess the level of HIV/AIDS stigma among a sample of social media-using African-American and Latino MSM from Los Angeles. A total of 112 (primarily African-American and Latino, n = 98, 88%) MSM Facebook users completed a survey on demographics, online social network use, and HIV/AIDS stigma. A composite stigma score was created by taking the cumulative score from a 15-item stigma questionnaire. Cumulative logistic models were used to assess the association between HIV/AIDS stigma and online social network use. In general, participants reported a low level of HIV/AIDS stigma (mean = 22.2/75, SD = 5.74). HIV/AIDS stigma composite score was significantly associated with increased time spent on online social networks each day (Adjusted odds ratios (AOR): 1.07, 95% CI: 1.00, 1.15). Among this diverse sample of MSM online social network users, findings suggest that HIV/AIDS stigma is associated with usage of social media. We discuss the implications of this work for future HIV prevention.

  16. Prostaglandin (PG) E3 synthesis elicted by adrenergic stimuli in guinea-pig trachea (GPT) is mediated primarily by B2 adrenergic receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadel, G.L.; Malik, K.U.; Lew, D.B. (Univ. of Tennessee, Memphis (United States))

    1990-02-26

    The purpose of this study was to examine arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism and to characterize the type of adrenergic receptor (AR) involved in the production of the major metabolite of this fatty acid. ({sup 14}C)AA was incubated with GPT-rings and the radiolabelled products were extracted and separated by TLC method. The medium was also assayed for radiolabelled immunoreactive PG's (iPG's) and leukotrienes (LT) B4 and C4 by RIA or Enzyme immunoassay (EIA) after exposure to various AR agonists. ({sup 14}C)AA was incorporated into GPT-rings and metabolized mainly into iPGE2 and smaller amounts into PGF2{alpha}. Trace amounts of PGD2 and 6-keto-PGF1{alpha} but not LTB4 or LTC4 were detected by RIA and/or EIA. Incubation of GPT rings for 15 minutes with isoproterenol and salbutamol resulted in a significant increase of PGE2 synthesis (optimum conc: 10{sup {minus}7}, 10{sup {minus}7}M respectively). In contrast, dobutamine, norepinephrine, phenylnephrine and xylazine (up to 10{sup {minus}6}M) did not significantly increase PGE2 production. Isoproterenol-induced iPGE2 production was inhibited by a selective {beta}2 antagonist, butoxamine (70%: 10{sup {minus}7}M, 91%: 10{sup {minus}6}M) and somewhat reduced by {beta}1 antagonists practolol and metoprolol (30-64%:10{sup {minus}6}M). These data suggest that isoproterenol induced iPGE2 synthesis is primarily mediated via activation of {beta}2 adrenergic receptor.

  17. Sitagliptin reduces cardiac apoptosis, hypertrophy and fibrosis primarily by insulin-dependent mechanisms in experimental type-II diabetes. Potential roles of GLP-1 isoforms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Picatoste

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Myocardial fibrosis is a key process in diabetic cardiomyopathy. However, their underlying mechanisms have not been elucidated, leading to a lack of therapy. The glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 enhancer, sitagliptin, reduces hyperglycemia but may also trigger direct effects on the heart. METHODS: Goto-Kakizaki (GK rats developed type-II diabetes and received sitagliptin, an anti-hyperglycemic drug (metformin or vehicle (n=10, each. After cardiac structure and function assessment, plasma and left ventricles were isolated for biochemical studies. Cultured cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts were used for in vitro assays. RESULTS: Untreated GK rats exhibited hyperglycemia, hyperlipidemia, plasma GLP-1 decrease, and cardiac cell-death, hypertrophy, fibrosis and prolonged deceleration time. Moreover, cardiac pro-apoptotic/necrotic, hypertrophic and fibrotic factors were up-regulated. Importantly, both sitagliptin and metformin lessened all these parameters. In cultured cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts, high-concentration of palmitate or glucose induced cell-death, hypertrophy and fibrosis. Interestingly, GLP-1 and its insulinotropic-inactive metabolite, GLP-1(9-36, alleviated these responses. In addition, despite a specific GLP-1 receptor was only detected in cardiomyocytes, GLP-1 isoforms attenuated the pro-fibrotic expression in cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts. In addition, GLP-1 receptor signalling may be linked to PPARδ activation, and metformin may also exhibit anti-apoptotic/necrotic and anti-fibrotic direct effects in cardiac cells. CONCLUSIONS: Sitagliptin, via GLP-1 stabilization, promoted cardioprotection in type-II diabetic hearts primarily by limiting hyperglycemia e hyperlipidemia. However, GLP-1 and GLP-1(9-36 promoted survival and anti-hypertrophic/fibrotic effects on cultured cardiac cells, suggesting cell-autonomous cardioprotective actions.

  18. THE TRANS-MISSOURI CASE: DOES THE SHERMAN ACT APPLY TO THE RAILROADS?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Landry

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1887, in answer to railroad abuses of monopoly power, Congress passed the Interstate Commerce Act, which created the Interstate Commerce Commission (ICC. In the next decade the Commission’s powers were considerably diminished by a series of Supreme Court decisions in cases in which the railroads appealed ICC rulings. In only one case during this period, the United States v. Trans-Missouri Freight Association, did the Court uphold an ICC decision. This case was primarily about collaborative ratemaking in rate bureaus but covered several larger issues, especially the possibly conflicting jurisdictions of the Sherman Act and the Interstate Commerce Act.

  19. The Price-Anderson Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.

    2000-01-01

    The Price-Anderson Act establishes nuclear liability law in the United States. First passed in 1957, it has influenced other nuclear liability legislation around the world. The insurer response the nuclear accident at Three Mile Island in 1979 demonstrates the application of the Act in a real life situation. The Price-Anderson Act is scheduled to be renewed in 2002, and the future use of commercial nuclear power in tge United States will be influenced by this renewal. (author)

  20. The new Swiss Energy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tami, R.

    1999-01-01

    The new Swiss Energy Act and the accompanying regulation enable the instructions given in the poll by the electorate in 1990 -- the Energy Article in the Swiss Constitution -- to be implemented. The Energy Act creates the necessary basis for an advanced and sustainable energy policy. It should contribute to a sufficient, broadly based, dependable, economical and environment-friendly energy supply. The Energy Act and the Energy Regulation entered into force on January 1, 1999. (author)

  1. Atomic Energy Authority Act 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    This Act provides for the transfer of property, rights, liabilities and obligations of parts of the undertaking of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Autority, to two new Compagnies set up for this purpose: the Bristish Nuclear Fuels Limited, and the Radiochemical Centre Limited. Patents licences and registered designs owned by the Autority at the time of the transfer are not included therein. The Act also includes amendments to the Nuclear Installations Act 1965, notably as regards permits to operate granted to a body corporate. Finally, the Schedule to this Act lays down a certain number of provisions relating to security and the preservation of secrets. (NEA) [fr

  2. [Euthanasia and medical act].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Right to life -as the prohibition of intentionally and arbitrarily taking life, even with authorization of the concerned one- is an internationally recognized right. In many countries, debate regarding euthanasia is more centered in its convenience, social acceptability and how it is regulated, than in its substantial legitimacy. Some argue that euthanasia should be included as part of clinical practice of health professionals, grounded on individual's autonomy claims-everyone having the liberty to choose how to live and how to die. Against this, others sustain that life has a higher value than autonomy, exercising autonomy without respecting the right to life would become a serious moral and social problem. Likewise, euthanasia supporters some-times claim a 'right to live with dignity', which must be understood as a personal obligation, referred more to the ethical than to the strictly legal sphere. In countries where it is already legalized, euthanasia practice has extended to cases where it is not the patient who requests this but the family or some healthcare professional, or even the legal system-when they think that the patient is living in a condition which is not worthy to live. Generalization of euthanasia possibly will end in affecting those who need more care, such as elder, chronically ill or dying people, damaging severely personal basic rights. Nature, purpose and tradition of medicine rule out the practice of euthanasia, which ought not be considered a medical act or legitimately compulsory for physicians. Today's medicine counts with effective treatments for pain and suffering, such as palliative care, including sedative therapy, which best preserves persons dignity and keeps safe the ethos of the medical profession.

  3. 7 CFR 65.100 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 65.100 Section 65.100 Agriculture Regulations of... MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) COUNTRY OF ORIGIN LABELING OF BEEF..., AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.100 Act. Act means the Agricultural Marketing Act of...

  4. Nuclear Material (Offences) Act 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The main purpose of this Act is to enable the United Kingdom to ratify the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material which opened for signature at Vienne and New York on 3 March 1980. The Act extends throughout the United Kingdom. (NEA) [fr

  5. Nurse Reinvestment Act. Public Law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This document contains the text of the Nurse Reinvestment Act, which amends the Public Health Service Act to address the increasing shortage of registered nurses by instituting a series of policies to improve nurse recruitment and nurse retention. Title I details two initiatives to boost recruitment of nurses. The first initiative includes the…

  6. Online Challenge versus Offline ACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Irvin

    2010-01-01

    This article compares essays written in response to the ACT Essay prompt and a locally developed prompt used for placement. The two writing situations differ by time and genre: the ACT Essay is timed and argumentative; the locally developed is untimed and explanatory. The article analyzes the differences in student performance and predictive…

  7. Nuclear industry (Finance) Act 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The purpose of the Act is to enable British Nuclear Fuels Limited to make borrowings backed by Government guarantees in order to finance its ten year investment programme. More specifically, the Act raises the financial limit applicable to British Nuclear Fuels Limited from pound 500 million to pound 1,000 million. (NEA) [fr

  8. 78 FR 46256 - Privacy Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-31

    ... FEDERAL ELECTION COMMISSION 11 CFR Part 1 Privacy Act CFR Correction In Title 11 of the Code of Federal Regulations, revised as of January 1, 2012, on page 5, in Sec. 1.2, the words ``95 and 96 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1954.'' are added at the end of the definition of Act. [FR Doc. 2013-18535 Filed 7...

  9. Atomic Energy Commission Act, 1963

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1963-01-01

    Promulgated in 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission Act (204) established and vested in the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission the sole responsibility for all matters relating to the peaceful uses of atomic energy in the country. Embodied in the Act are provisions relating to the powers, duties, rights and liabilities of the Commission. (EAA)

  10. Act local, think global

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Chris; McRoberts, Doug

    2002-01-01

    Tip O'Neill, one of the grand old men of modem US politics, once famously remarked that all politics is local. Like most politicians who succeed on the national stage - and not just in the US - it was a truth he never lost sight of. What is true for politicians is equally true in the communications business. We may increasingly live in a global village, but successful companies - even multi-nationals - forget the importance of local and regional public relations at their peril. Think of Douglas Ivester, the CEO of Coca-Cola at the time of the 1999 Belgian contamination scandal, who allegedly reacted to first reports of the crisis by asking: 'Where the hell is Belgium?' A more appropriate question today - several years after Coke's share price toppled and the CEO was unceremoniously sacked - might be: 'Who the hell is Douglas Nester?' But - to adapt another famous phrase - the fact that communications (and marketing) professionals still need to 'act local' as much as ever before should not blind us to the growing need to 'think global'. In the nuclear industry, as in the world economy generally, increasing global integration is a reality, as are the international nature of the news media and the increasingly global nature of the anti-nuclear pressure groups. Indeed, it was the growing need for a truly global information network to counter these trends, by increasing the overall speed and accuracy of the worldwide nuclear information flow, that led the nuclear community to establish NucNet in 1991. So where exactly is the line between local and regional nuclear communications on the one hand, and global communications on the other? Is there one spin for a regional audience, and another for a global audience? This presentation proposes some guiding principles, by examining the response of nuclear communicators world-wide to the new communications agenda imposed in the wake of the September 11th suicide attacks in the US. NucNet President Doug McRoberts and Executive

  11. Building Footprints, Primarily residential, at risk buildings such as hospitals, nursing homes, etc for use in Emergency Management Hazard Mitigation planning., Published in 2010, 1:4800 (1in=400ft) scale, Carroll County Government.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Local Govt | GIS Inventory — Building Footprints dataset current as of 2010. Primarily residential, at risk buildings such as hospitals, nursing homes, etc for use in Emergency Management Hazard...

  12. Naturalistic Observations of Nonverbal Children with Autism: A Study of Intentional Communicative Acts in the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Drain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined evoked and spontaneous communicative acts in six nonverbal children with autism (10–15 years, M = 12.8, SD = 2.1. All participants attended the same special school for children with autism but were in different classes. Each was observed for 30 minutes during a typical school day. An observer coded the presence/absence of an antecedent, the form and function of the communicative act, and the teacher’s response to the child. One hundred and fifty-five communicative acts were observed, 41% were spontaneous and 59% were evoked. The main antecedents to evoked communicative acts were verbal prompts, and most of the evoked communicative acts were physical in nature (i.e., motor acts and gestures. However, verbalizations and the use of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS were higher for spontaneous communicative acts. The functions of spontaneous communicative acts were primarily requests. Results showed a substantial number of “nonresponses” from teachers, even following evoked communicative acts. These results suggest that teachers may not actively promote intentional communication as much as possible. Therefore, our findings provide information concerning ways in which educators could facilitate intentional communication in non-verbal children with autism.

  13. Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) is a mechanism with which EPA can patent its inventions and license them to companies, through which innovative technologies can enter the marketplace to improve the environment and human health.

  14. Endangered Species Act Critical Habitat

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Critical habitat (CH) is designated for the survival and recovery of species listed as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). Critical...

  15. Healing Arts Radiation Protection Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-07-01

    The Healing Arts Radiation Protection Act is concerned with regulating the registration, installation, operation, inspection and safety of X-ray machines. The Act provides for the establishment of the Healing Arts Radiation Protection Commission which is responsible for reporting on all the above matters to the Ontario Minister of Health. In addition the board is responsible for the continuing development of an X-ray safety code and for the submission of an annual report of their activities to the minister

  16. Atomic Energy Authority Act 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Under this Act the UKAEA is given power to borrow so that it can finance its capital expenditure programme, and will undertake a debt to the Secretary of State for Energy representing its assets. Power is given for the Government to guarantee such borrowing. The UKAEA has been organised financially on the basis of a trading fund. The Act came into force on 1 April 1986. (NEA) [fr

  17. 7 CFR 956.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 956.2 Section 956.2 Agriculture Regulations of... OF SOUTHEAST WASHINGTON AND NORTHEAST OREGON Definitions § 956.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10... Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (Sec. 1-19, 48 Stat. 31, as amended; 7 U.S.C. 601 et seq.). ...

  18. 7 CFR 983.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 983.2 Section 983.2 Agriculture Regulations of... NEW MEXICO Definitions § 983.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73rd Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as re-enacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Order Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat...

  19. 7 CFR 930.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 930.1 Section 930.1 Agriculture Regulations of... Definitions § 930.1 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended, and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31, as...

  20. 7 CFR 984.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 984.2 Section 984.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Handling Definitions § 984.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C. 601 et seq.). ...

  1. 7 CFR 925.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 925.2 Section 925.2 Agriculture Regulations of... SOUTHEASTERN CALIFORNIA Definitions § 925.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48...

  2. 7 CFR 917.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 917.2 Section 917.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 917.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended, and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as...

  3. 7 CFR 915.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 915.2 Section 915.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Regulating Handling Definitions § 915.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48...

  4. 7 CFR 959.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 959.2 Section 959.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Handling Definitions § 959.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (sections 1-19, 48 Stat...

  5. 7 CFR 1260.128 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1260.128 Section 1260.128 Agriculture... Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1260.128 Act. Act means the Beef Promotion and Research Act of 1985, Title XVI, Subtitle A of the Food Security Act of 1985, Pub. L. 99-198 and any amendments thereto. ...

  6. 7 CFR 982.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 982.2 Section 982.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 982.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C...

  7. 7 CFR 932.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 932.2 Section 932.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Handling Definitions § 932.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933) as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31...

  8. 7 CFR 981.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 981.2 Section 981.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Handling Definitions § 981.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31, as amended...

  9. 7 CFR 906.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 906.2 Section 906.2 Agriculture Regulations of... GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 906.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as re-enacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of...

  10. 7 CFR 966.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 966.2 Section 966.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Handling Definitions § 966.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31, as amended...

  11. 7 CFR 916.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 916.2 Section 916.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Regulating Handling Definitions § 916.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48...

  12. 7 CFR 993.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 993.2 Section 993.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Regulating Handling Definitions § 993.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C. 601 et seq.). ...

  13. 7 CFR 35.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 35.1 Section 35.1 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices... Definitions § 35.1 Act. Act or Export Grape and Plum Act means “An Act to promote the foreign trade of the...

  14. 7 CFR 923.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 923.2 Section 923.2 Agriculture Regulations of... IN WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 923.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d... Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31, as amended; 7 U.S.C. 601 et seq.; 68 Stat. 906, 1047). ...

  15. 7 CFR 927.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 927.2 Section 927.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Regulating Handling Definitions § 927.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48...

  16. 7 CFR 946.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 946.2 Section 946.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Regulating Handling Definitions § 946.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31, as...

  17. 7 CFR 989.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 989.2 Section 989.2 Agriculture Regulations of... CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 989.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended, and as re-enacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended...

  18. 7 CFR 1170.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Act. 1170.2 Section 1170.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Orders; Milk), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DAIRY PRODUCT MANDATORY REPORTING § 1170.2 Act. Act means the Agricultural Marketing Act of 1946, 7 U.S.C. 1621 et seq., as amended by the Dairy Market Enhancement Act of...

  19. 7 CFR 987.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 987.2 Section 987.2 Agriculture Regulations of... RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 987.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of...

  20. 7 CFR 948.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 948.2 Section 948.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Regulating Handling Definitions § 948.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (sections 1-19, 48...

  1. 7 CFR 922.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 922.2 Section 922.2 Agriculture Regulations of... WASHINGTON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 922.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of...

  2. 7 CFR 33.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices... AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Definitions § 33.1 Act. Act and Export Apple Act are synonymous and mean “An act to promote the foreign trade of the United States in apples to protect the reputation of...

  3. Regional trends in the use of short-acting and long-acting contraception accessed through the private and public sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugaz, Jorge I; Chatterji, Minki; Gribble, James N; Mitchell, Susan

    2015-08-01

    To examine trends in the source of modern contraception (public versus private sector); method choice (long-acting or permanent methods versus short-acting methods); and method and source combined. A retrospective analysis was conducted using data collected by national Demographic and Health Surveys and Reproductive Health Surveys during the period 1992-2012. The dataset included 18 low-income countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, 10 from Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), and 8 from Asia. A substantial proportion-between 40% and 49%-of modern contraceptive users relied on the private sector in Asia and LAC in the last 20years, yet the proportion has been smaller in Sub-Saharan Africa, between 27% and 30%. Increased use of short-acting methods from both public and private sectors has driven the rise in contraceptive prevalence in Asia and LAC. Similarly, increased contraceptive prevalence in Sub-Saharan Africa reflected the increased use of short-acting methods obtained mainly through the public sector, with only limited use of long-acting or permanent methods through the private sector. The private sector has played a key role in the increase of modern CPR and the provision of modern contraceptives around the world, providing almost half of them in low-income countries. Yet, such increase was driven primarily by a more substantial role in the provision of short-acting methods than long acting and permanent methods. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Tenth act amending the German atomic energy act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, W.

    2009-01-01

    On January 14, 2009, the German federal government introduced into parliament the 10th Act Amending the Atomic Energy Act. In the first reading in the federal parliament, Federal Minister for the Environment Gabriel emphasized 2 main points: Intensified protection of nuclear facilities and of transports of radioactive substances against unauthorized interventions; transfer by law to the Federal Office for Radiological Protection (BfS) of decommissioning of the Asse mine. Reliability review: The amendment to Sec.12 b of the Atomic Energy Act is to meet the different safety and security conditions after the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001 in the United States and other terrorist activities afterwards (London, Madrid) also with respect to hazards arising to nuclear facilities and nuclear transports. The bill must be seen in conjunction with the Ordinance on Reliability Reviews under the Atomic Energy Act dated July 1, 1999 which covers reviews of reliability of persons holding special responsibilities. Asse II mine: The competence of the Federal Office for Radiological Protection is achieved by an amendment to Sec.23, Para.1, Number 2, Atomic Energy Act, in which the words ''and for the Asse II mine'' are added after the word ''waste.'' Further proceedings depend on the additional provision in a new Sec.57 b, Atomic Energy Act. Accordingly, the operation and decommissioning of the Asse II mine are subject to the regulations applicable to facilities of the federation pursuant to Sec.9a, Para.3. In this way, Asse II is given the same legal status as the federal waste management facilities. Moreover, it is stipulated that the mine is to be shut down immediately. (orig.)

  5. The articulation of voices in two film projects about violence – The Act of Killing and Gzim Rewind

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth; Bjerregaard, Mette

    2014-01-01

    . Primarily, the analysis focuses on The Act of Killing and its reception by an Indonesian audience. The discussion concerns how these kinds of film projects open up very different voices and how this diversity potentially contributes to new understandings of the past, thereby fuelling social and political...

  6. 78 FR 3920 - Notice of Permit Applications Received; Under the Antarctic Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-17

    ... Conservation Act of 1978 (Pub. L. 95-541) AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of Permit... explore for, discover, and collect vertebrate fossils (primarily those of fishes, marine reptiles, non... be shed on the evolution, faunal dynamics, and/or paleobiogeography of such important vertebrate...

  7. 7 CFR 1210.302 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE WATERMELON RESEARCH AND PROMOTION PLAN Watermelon Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1210.302 Act. Act means the Watermelon...

  8. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for clinically distressed health care workers: Waitlist-controlled evaluation of an ACT workshop in a routine practice setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Cerith S; Frude, Neil; Flaxman, Paul E; Boyd, Jane

    2018-03-01

    To examine the effects of a 1-day acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) workshop on the mental health of clinically distressed health care employees, and to explore ACT's processes of change in a routine practice setting. A quasi-controlled design, with participants block allocated to an ACT intervention or waiting list control group based on self-referral date. Participants were 35 health care workers who had self-referred for the ACT workshop via a clinical support service for staff. Measures were completed by ACT and control group participants at pre-intervention and 3 months post-intervention. Participants allocated to the waitlist condition went on to receive the ACT intervention and were also assessed 3 months later. At 3 months post-intervention, participants in the ACT group reported a significantly lower level of psychological distress compared to the control group (d = 1.41). Across the 3-month evaluation period, clinically significant change was exhibited by 50% of ACT participants, compared to 0% in the control group. When the control group received the same ACT intervention, 69% went on to exhibit clinically significant change. The ACT intervention also resulted in significant improvements in psychological flexibility, defusion, and mindfulness skills, but did not significantly reduce the frequency of negative cognitions. Bootstrapped mediation analyses indicated that the reduction in distress in the ACT condition was primarily associated with an increase in mindfulness skills, especially observing and non-reactivity. These findings provide preliminary support for providing brief ACT interventions as part of routine clinical support services for distressed workers. A 1-day ACT workshop delivered in the context of a routine staff support service was effective for reducing psychological distress among health care workers. The brief nature of this group intervention means it may be particularly suitable for staff support and primary care mental

  9. Air traffic security act unconstitutional

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, W.

    2006-01-01

    In the interest of more effective protective measures against terrorist attacks, the German federal parliament inter alia added a clause to the Air Traffic Security Act (Sec. 14, Para. 3, Air Traffic Security Act) empowering the armed forces to shoot down aircraft to be used as a weapon against human lives. In Germany, this defense possibility has been discussed also in connection with deliberate crashes of hijacked aircraft on nuclear power plants. The 1 st Division of the German Federal Constitutional Court, in its decision of February 15, 2006, ruled that Sec. 14, Para. 3, Air Traffic Security Act was incompatible with the Basic Law and thus was null and void (file No. 1 BvR 357/05) for two reasons: - There was no legislative authority on the part of the federal government. - The provision was incompatible with the basic right of life and the guarantee of human dignity as enshrined in the Basic Law. (orig.)

  10. The Problem of Agency; How Humans Act, How Machines Act

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Jeremy; Jones, M.; Truex, D.

    2003-01-01

    A long-standing debate in the IS literature concerns the relationship between technology and organization. Is it technology that acts on organizations, or humans that determine how technology is used? Proposals for a middle way between the extremes of technological and social determinism have bee...

  11. Self-acting shaft seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, L. P.

    1978-01-01

    Self-acting seals are described in detail. The mathematical models for obtaining a seal force balance and the equilibrium operating film thickness are outlined. Particular attention is given to primary ring response (seal vibration) to rotating seat face runout. This response analysis reveals three different vibration models with secondary seal friction being an important parameter. Leakage flow inlet pressure drop and affects of axisymmetric sealing face deformations are discussed. Experimental data on self-acting face seals operating under simulated gas turbine conditions are given. Also a spiral groove seal design operated to 244 m/sec (800 ft/sec) is described.

  12. HASP: human acts simulation program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asai, Kiyoshi; Kambayashi, Shaw; Higuchi, Kenji; Kume, Etsuo; Otani, Takayuki; Fujii, Minoru; Uenaka, Junji; Fujisaki, Masahide.

    1990-01-01

    The Human Acts Simulation Program (HASP) aims computer simulations of mechanized human acts in a nuclear plant by a human shaped intelligent robot. The HASP has started as a ten-year program at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute since 1987. The purposes of HASP are threefold as follows; development of basic and generalized design technologies for intelligent robots, development of basic technologies for an advanced intelligent and automatic nuclear power plant, and provision of artificial intelligence techniques for researchers in the nuclear field. In this paper, the contents of the HASP are described. (author)

  13. Short-term effects of early-acting and multilineage hematopoietic growth factors on the repair and proliferation of irradiated pure cord blood (CB) CD34 hematopoietic progenitor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, Benedikt L.; Sandor, Peter S.; Plappert, Ulla; Thoma, Stefan; Mueller, Robert; Bock, Thomas; Thomas, Christian A.; Nothdurft, Wilhelm; Fliedner, Theodor M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: Hematopoietic growth factor(s) (GF) may exert positive effects in vitro or in vivo on the survival of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells after accidental or therapeutic total body irradiation. Methods and Materials: We studied the clonogenic survival and DNA repair of irradiated (0.36, 0.73, and 1.46 Gy) CD34 + cord blood (CB) cells after short-term incubation (24 h) with GFs. CD34 + cells were stimulated with basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), stem cell factor/c-kit ligand (SCF), interleukin-3 (IL-3), IL-6, leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), and granulocyte-monocyte colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) alone or in combination in short-term serum-free liquid suspension cultures (LSC) immediately after irradiation and then assayed for clonogenic progenitors. DNA repair was evaluated by analysis of DNA strand breaks using the comet assay. Survival of CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-Mix was determined and dose-response curves were fitted to the data. Results: The radiobiological parameters (D 0 and n) showed significant GF(s) effects. Combination of IL-3 with IL-6, SCF or GM-CSF resulted in best survival for CFU-GM BFU-E and CFU-Mix, respectively. Combinations of three or more GFs did not increase the survival of clonogenic CD34 + cells compared to optimal two-factor combinations. The D 0 values for CFU-GM, BFU-E, and CFU-Mix ranged between 0.56-1.15, 0.41-2.24, and 0.56-1.29 Gy, respectively. As for controls, the curves remained strictly exponential, i.e., all survival curves were strictly exponential without any shoulder (extrapolation numbers n = 1 for all tested GF(s). DNA repair capacity of CD34 + cells determined by comet assay, was measured before, immediately after irradiation, as well as 30 and 120 min after irradiation at 1 Gy. Notably, after irradiation the 2-h repair of cytokine-stimulated and unstimulated CD34 + cells was similar. Conclusion: Our data indicate that increased survival of irradiated CB CD34 + cells after short-term GF treatment is

  14. Podocytes Degrade Endocytosed Albumin Primarily in Lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, John M.; Okamura, Kayo; Wakashin, Hidefumi; McFann, Kim; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Blaine, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong, independent predictor of chronic kidney disease progression. We hypothesize that podocyte processing of albumin via the lysosome may be an important determinant of podocyte injury and loss. A human urine derived podocyte-like epithelial cell (HUPEC) line was used for in vitro experiments. Albumin uptake was quantified by Western blot after loading HUPECs with fluorescein-labeled (FITC) albumin. Co-localization of albumin with lysosomes was determined by confocal microscopy. Albumin degradation was measured by quantifying FITC-albumin abundance in HUPEC lysates by Western blot. Degradation experiments were repeated using HUPECs treated with chloroquine, a lysosome inhibitor, or MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Lysosome activity was measured by fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching (FRAP). Cytokine production was measured by ELISA. Cell death was determined by trypan blue staining. In vivo, staining with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) was performed on tissue from a Denys-Drash trangenic mouse model of nephrotic syndrome. HUPECs endocytosed albumin, which co-localized with lysosomes. Choloroquine, but not MG-132, inhibited albumin degradation, indicating that degradation occurs in lysosomes. Cathepsin B activity, measured by FRAP, significantly decreased in HUPECs exposed to albumin (12.5% of activity in controls) and chloroquine (12.8%), and declined further with exposure to albumin plus chloroquine (8.2%, palbumin and chloroquine alone, and these effects were potentiated by exposure to albumin plus chloroquine. Compared to wild-type mice, glomerular staining of LAMP-1 was significantly increased in Denys-Drash mice and appeared to be most prominent in podocytes. These data suggest lysosomes are involved in the processing of endocytosed albumin in podocytes, and lysosomal dysfunction may contribute to podocyte injury and glomerulosclerosis in albuminuric diseases. Modifiers of lysosomal activity may have therapeutic potential in slowing the progression of glomerulosclerosis by enhancing the ability of podocytes to process and degrade albumin. PMID:24924335

  15. Podocytes degrade endocytosed albumin primarily in lysosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, John M; Okamura, Kayo; Wakashin, Hidefumi; McFann, Kim; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Blaine, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong, independent predictor of chronic kidney disease progression. We hypothesize that podocyte processing of albumin via the lysosome may be an important determinant of podocyte injury and loss. A human urine derived podocyte-like epithelial cell (HUPEC) line was used for in vitro experiments. Albumin uptake was quantified by Western blot after loading HUPECs with fluorescein-labeled (FITC) albumin. Co-localization of albumin with lysosomes was determined by confocal microscopy. Albumin degradation was measured by quantifying FITC-albumin abundance in HUPEC lysates by Western blot. Degradation experiments were repeated using HUPECs treated with chloroquine, a lysosome inhibitor, or MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Lysosome activity was measured by fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching (FRAP). Cytokine production was measured by ELISA. Cell death was determined by trypan blue staining. In vivo, staining with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) was performed on tissue from a Denys-Drash trangenic mouse model of nephrotic syndrome. HUPECs endocytosed albumin, which co-localized with lysosomes. Choloroquine, but not MG-132, inhibited albumin degradation, indicating that degradation occurs in lysosomes. Cathepsin B activity, measured by FRAP, significantly decreased in HUPECs exposed to albumin (12.5% of activity in controls) and chloroquine (12.8%), and declined further with exposure to albumin plus chloroquine (8.2%, plysosomes are involved in the processing of endocytosed albumin in podocytes, and lysosomal dysfunction may contribute to podocyte injury and glomerulosclerosis in albuminuric diseases. Modifiers of lysosomal activity may have therapeutic potential in slowing the progression of glomerulosclerosis by enhancing the ability of podocytes to process and degrade albumin.

  16. Sport supporting act: terminology issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Vlček

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The text deals with terminology issues from an interdisciplinary point of view. It is based on two different disciplines, law and kinanthropology, in an area of their overlap. AIM: The aim of the author is to point out some possible legislative problems, which could arise due to the current reading of the sport supporting act (Act no. 115/2001. The second aim of the author is to contribute to the discussion of kinantropologists (possibly also the educational researchers and lawyers and to stress the importance of the systematic approach to terminology formulation. METHODS: The author uses the method of language interpretation. We also use the basic analytical methods, induction and deduction, while we stress the systematic approach to the term formulation. RESULTS: The analysis of the sport supporting act terminology shows some specific legislative problems, which could arise due to the definition of sport in the sport supporting act. The author discusses a possible alternative solution. CONCLUSION: According to the opinion of the author, clear, obvious and unified terminology of kinantropologists as specialists in their discipline should represent a source, from which other sciences could derive their terminology. Defined and inexpert terminology used in other disciplines should not be used as an argument for its adopting in kinanthropology.

  17. Against acts of nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, W.

    2007-01-01

    The Act on the International Convention of the United Nations of April 13, 2005 on Combating Acts of Nuclear Terrorism was promulgated in the German Federal Gazette and entered into force one day later. The Convention expresses the deep concern about the worldwide escalation of all kinds and manifestations of acts of terrorism. What was true in April 2005 (the year the UN convention was adopted) is even more true today. At the same time, however, the Convention recognizes the right of all nations to develop and use nuclear power for peaceful purposes, acknowledging their justified interest in the possible benefits of the peaceful uses of nuclear power. As the Convention was signed in German still during the term of office of the Red-Green government, this passage is a remarkable acceptance of the realities of the world and past peaceful uses of nuclear power in Germany. Whether or not the convention will become an effective instrument to be used against acts of nuclear terrorism and threats depends on its entering into force after deposition of 22 ratification documents, and on as many states as possible acceding to it. Irrespective of these aspects, action in the spirit of the Convention should be taken now, criminal law should be adapted, and international cooperation should be improved and strengthened. (orig.)

  18. The American Inventors Protection Act

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoffmann, Arvid O.I.; Kleimeier, Stefanie; Mimiroglu, Nagihan; Pennings, Joost M.E.

    2018-01-01

    We examine the impact of innovation disclosure through patenting on firms' cost of debt, focusing on the American Inventors Protection Act (AIPA) as an exogenous shock in innovation disclosure regulation. Post-AIPA, firms have an incentive to apply for patents only if commercial success is likely.

  19. Paraconsistent semantics of speech acts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunin-Kȩplicz, Barbara; Strachocka, Alina; Szałas, Andrzej; Verbrugge, Rineke

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses an implementation of four speech acts: assert, concede, request and challenge in a paraconsistent framework. A natural four-valued model of interaction yields multiple new cognitive situations. They are analyzed in the context of communicative relations, which partially replace

  20. Nuclear Activities (Prohibitions) Act 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this Act is to protect the health and safety of the people of Victoria and its environment by prohibiting nuclear activities from being carried out and regulating the possession of certain nuclear material in a manner consistent with assisting Australia in meeting its international nuclear non-proliferation objectives. (NEA) [fr

  1. Dumping at Sea Act 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This Act enables the United Kingdom Government to ratify both the Oslo Convention of 1972 for the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping from Ships and Aircraft and the London Convention of 1972 on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and Other Matter. (NEA) [fr

  2. Affordable Care Act and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quality care for older women, and ends the gender discrimination that requires women to pay more for the same insurance coverage ... the Affordable Care Act and 13 million more women will gain coverage by 2016. Maternity Coverage Preventive ... Expanded Insurance Coverage Endnotes Download "rb. ...

  3. 22 CFR 901.10 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Act. 901.10 Section 901.10 Foreign Relations FOREIGN SERVICE GRIEVANCE BOARD GENERAL Meanings of Terms As Used in This Chapter § 901.10 Act. Act means the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (Pub. L. 96-465, October 17, 1980), as amended. [56 FR 55458, Oct. 28...

  4. 7 CFR 1280.101 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1280.101 Section 1280.101 Agriculture... INFORMATION ORDER Lamb Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1280.101 Act. Act means the Commodity Promotion, Research, and Information Act of 1996 (7 U.S.C. 7411-7425; Pub. L. 104-127; 110 Stat...

  5. 7 CFR 1150.101 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Act. 1150.101 Section 1150.101 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and... Definitions § 1150.101 Act. Act means Title I, Subtitle B, of the Dairy and Tobacco Adjustment Act of 1983...

  6. 12 CFR 541.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 541.2 Section 541.2 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY DEFINITIONS FOR REGULATIONS AFFECTING FEDERAL SAVINGS ASSOCIATIONS § 541.2 Act. The term Act means the Home Owners' Loan Act of 1933, as amended. ...

  7. 7 CFR 1250.302 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1250.302 Section 1250.302 Agriculture... Research and Promotion Order Definitions § 1250.302 Act. Act means the Egg Research and Consumer Information Act and as it may be amended (Pub. L. 93-428). ...

  8. 7 CFR 1207.302 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1207.302 Section 1207.302 Agriculture... Potato Research and Promotion Plan Definitions § 1207.302 Act. Act means the Potato Research and Promotion Act, Title III of Public Law 91-670, 91st Congress, approved January 11, 1971, 84 Stat. 2041, as...

  9. 7 CFR 985.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 985.2 Section 985.2 Agriculture Regulations of... SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 985.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended, and reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing...

  10. 7 CFR 1230.601 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1230.601 Section 1230.601 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Definitions § 1230.601 Act. The term Act means the Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act of 1985 (7 U.S.C. 4801-4819) and any...

  11. 29 CFR 401.17 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Act. 401.17 Section 401.17 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor OFFICE OF LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR LABOR-MANAGEMENT STANDARDS MEANING OF TERMS USED IN THIS SUBCHAPTER § 401.17 Act. Act means the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure Act...

  12. 7 CFR 1218.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1218.1 Section 1218.1 Agriculture Regulations of... INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.1 Act. Act means the Commodity Promotion, Research, and Information Act of 1996 (7 U.S.C. 7401-7425; Pub. L. 104-127; 110 Stat...

  13. 7 CFR 1216.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1216.1 Section 1216.1 Agriculture Regulations of... ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.1 Act. Act means the Commodity Promotion, Research, and Information Act of 1996 (7 U.S.C. 7401-7425; Public Law 104-127, 110 Stat...

  14. 7 CFR 924.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 924.2 Section 924.2 Agriculture Regulations of... WASHINGTON AND IN UMATILLA COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 924.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as re-enacted and amended by the Agricultural...

  15. 34 CFR 300.4 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Act. 300.4 Section 300.4 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES... Definitions Used in This Part § 300.4 Act. Act means the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, as...

  16. 7 CFR 1206.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1206.1 Section 1206.1 Agriculture Regulations of... Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.1 Act. Act means the Commodity Promotion, Research, and Information Act of 1996 (7 U.S.C. 7411-7425; Public Law 104-127; 110 Stat. 1029...

  17. 7 CFR 1220.600 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1220.600 Section 1220.600 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures To Request a Referendum Definitions § 1220.600 Act. Act means the Soybean, Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act set forth in title XIX, subtitle E, of the Food...

  18. 7 CFR 1205.302 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1205.302 Section 1205.302 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS... Research and Promotion Order Definitions § 1205.302 Act. Act means the Cotton Research and Promotion Act...

  19. 7 CFR 1212.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1212.1 Section 1212.1 Agriculture Regulations of..., Consumer Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1212.1 Act. “Act” means the Commodity Promotion, Research, and Information Act of 1996, (7 U.S.C. 7411-7425), and any amendments to that Act. ...

  20. 7 CFR 1221.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1221.1 Section 1221.1 Agriculture Regulations of... INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.1 Act. Act means the Commodity Promotion, Research, and Information Act of 1996 (7 U.S.C. 7411-7425), and any amendments thereto. ...

  1. 7 CFR 1219.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1219.1 Section 1219.1 Agriculture Regulations of... INFORMATION Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1219.1 Act. Act means the Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Act of 2000, Public Law 106-387, 7 U.S.C. 7801-7813...

  2. 7 CFR 1220.101 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1220.101 Section 1220.101 Agriculture... CONSUMER INFORMATION Soybean Promotion and Research Order Definitions § 1220.101 Act. The term Act means the Soybean Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Act, subtitle E of title XIX, of the Food...

  3. 7 CFR 958.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 958.2 Section 958.2 Agriculture Regulations of... IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 958.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing...

  4. 34 CFR 303.6 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Act. 303.6 Section 303.6 Education Regulations of the..., Eligibility, and Other General Provisions § 303.6 Act. As used in this part, Act means the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. (Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1400) ...

  5. 7 CFR 945.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 945.2 Section 945.2 Agriculture Regulations of... COUNTIES IN IDAHO, AND MALHEUR COUNTY, OREGON Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 945.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing...

  6. 78 FR 4462 - Sunshine Act; Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-22

    ... goals for 2013 5. Panel presentation and discussion on Succession Planning and Leadership Development... comment 7. Consider and act on other business 8. Consider and act on motion to adjourn the meeting... comment 8. Consider and act on other business 9. Consider and act on adjournment of meeting Institutional...

  7. 40 CFR 1508.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Act. 1508.2 Section 1508.2 Protection of Environment COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY TERMINOLOGY AND INDEX § 1508.2 Act. Act means the National Environmental Policy Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321, et seq.) which is also referred to as “NEPA.” ...

  8. Draft of a Fourth Act amending the Atomic Energy Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The bill comprises regulations concerning 1. the handling over and treatment of radioactive waste as well as its final storage under federal adminstration (article 87, section 3, sentence 1 Basic Law), 2. authorizations regarding the issuing of statuatory orders supplementing and extending sections 11 and 12 of the Atomic Energy Act, particulary in aim of the rationalization of licensing and the carrying-out of governmental supervision, 3. supplementing penal provisions. (LN) [de

  9. 7 CFR 905.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 905.2 Section 905.2 Agriculture Regulations of... TANGELOS GROWN IN FLORIDA Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 905.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10... Agreement Act of 1937, as amended. (48 Stat. 31, as amended; 7 U.S.C. 601 et seq.; 68 Stat. 906, 1047.) ...

  10. 7 CFR 955.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 955.2 Section 955.2 Agriculture Regulations of... § 955.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (Sec. 1-19, 48 Stat. 31, as...

  11. 7 CFR 920.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 920.2 Section 920.2 Agriculture Regulations of... § 920.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress (May 12, 1933), as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31, as amended; 7 U.S.C...

  12. 7 CFR 929.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 929.2 Section 929.2 Agriculture Regulations of... ISLAND IN THE STATE OF NEW YORK Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 929.2 Act. Act means Public Act... Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (secs. 1-19, 48 Stat. 31, as amended; 7 U.S.C. 601-674). ...

  13. 7 CFR 947.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 947.2 Section 947.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Definitions § 947.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as reenacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (48 Stat. 31, as amended; 7 U.S.C. 601 et...

  14. 29 CFR 4.103 - The Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true The Act. 4.103 Section 4.103 Labor Office of the Secretary... Contract Act Introductory § 4.103 The Act. The McNamara-O'Hara Service Contract Act of 1965 (Pub. L. 89-286, 79 Stat. 1034, 41 U.S.C. 351 et seq.), hereinafter referred to as the Act, was approved by the...

  15. 7 CFR 953.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 953.2 Section 953.2 Agriculture Regulations of... Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 953.2 Act. Act means Public Act No. 10, 73d Congress, as amended and as re-enacted and amended by the Agricultural Marketing Agreement Act of 1937, as amended (7 U.S.C...

  16. 7 CFR 1160.101 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 9 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Act. 1160.101 Section 1160.101 Agriculture Regulations... Definitions § 1160.101 Act. Act means the Fluid Milk Promotion Act of 1990, Subtitle H of Title XIX of the Food, Agriculture, Conservation, and Trade Act of 1990, Public Law 101-624, 7 U.S.C. 6401-6417, and any...

  17. False memories for aggressive acts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laney, Cara; Takarangi, Melanie K T

    2013-06-01

    Can people develop false memories for committing aggressive acts? How does this process compare to developing false memories for victimhood? In the current research we used a simple false feedback procedure to implant false memories for committing aggressive acts (causing a black eye or spreading malicious gossip) or for victimhood (receiving a black eye). We then compared these false memories to other subjects' true memories for equivalent events. False aggressive memories were all too easy to implant, particularly in the minds of individuals with a proclivity towards aggression. Once implanted, the false memories were indistinguishable from true memories for the same events, on several dimensions, including emotional content. Implications for aggression-related memory more generally as well as false confessions are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Act No 282 reorganising ENEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This Act reorganises the National Agency for Research and Development of Nuclear and Alternative Energies - ENEA - and reorients its responsibilities. It is now called the National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and the Environment and retains its acronym (Ente per le nouve tecnologies, l'energia e l'ambiente - ENEA). It will also deal with environmental questions and new technologies, in particular, carrying out studies and research on the latter and evaluating their economic, social and environmental consequences. Already in 1982, the National Nuclear Energy Committee (CNEN) had been entrusted with wider tasks and renamed ENEA. The present ENEA retains its competence regarding nuclear activities, notably in the field of nuclear safety and radiation protection. The new Act confirms the tasks already conferred on the Nuclear Safety and Health Protection Directorate (DISP), we well as its operational independence while remaining within ENEA [fr

  19. Clean Air Act. Revision 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Air Act, as amended, and those regulations that implement the statute and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. This Reference Book has been completely revised and is current through February 15, 1994.

  20. High level of expression of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor in transgenic rice cell suspension culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shin, Yun-Ji; Hong, Shin-Young; Kwon, Tae-Ho

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) has been previously produced in tobacco cell suspension cultures. However, the amount of hGM-CSF accumulated in the culture medium dropped quickly from its maximum of 150 microg/L at 5 d after incubation. To overcome...... of recombinant hGM-CSF in transgenic rice cell suspension culture and protease activity of this culture medium was low compared to that of tobacco culture system....

  1. 78 FR 29659 - Forfeiture Procedures Under the Endangered Species Act and the Lacey Act Amendments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-21

    .... APHIS-2007-0086] RIN 0579-AD50 Forfeiture Procedures Under the Endangered Species Act and the Lacey Act... Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (ESA), and the Lacey Act Amendments of 1981, as amended, that... INFORMATION: Background The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended (16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq.), was...

  2. 76 FR 64115 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (11-092)] Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act... retirement of one Privacy Act system of records notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with the Privacy Act of 1974, NASA is giving notice that it proposes to cancel the following Privacy Act system of records notice...

  3. Chronic Endotoxemia in Subjects with Type-1 Diabetes Is Seen Much before the Onset of Microvascular Complications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivekanandhan Aravindhan

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS/Endotoxin is hypothesized to play an important role in chronic inflammation associated with Type-1 diabetes (T1DM and its complications. Endotoxin core antibodies (EndoCAb, LPS binding protein (LBP and soluble CD14 (sCD14 act as modulators of LPS induced activation of innate immune system in vivo. For the present study we estimated the levels of LPS and its translocation markers in T1DM subjects with and without microvascular complications (MVC and correlate them with clinical parameters of T1DM and serum inflammatory cytokine levels (TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and GM-CSF.A total of 197 subjects (64 normal glucose tolerance (NGT subjects, 97 T1DM subjects without MVC and 36 with MVC were included in this study and the levels of serum LPS, its translocation markers and cytokines measured by immunoassays.Compared to NGT, T1DM subjects (both with and without MVC had significantly higher levels of LPS, reduced levels of LBP and EndoCAb along with significant increase in the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and GM-CSF (p<0.05. No significant change was seen in the levels of these biomarkers between T1DM subjects with and without MVC.Decreased levels of EndoCAb and LBP suggest sustained endotoxin activity in T1DM subjects even before the onset of microvascular complications.

  4. The G1/S Specific Cyclin D2 Is a Regulator of HIV-1 Restriction in Non-proliferating Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badia, Roger; Pujantell, Maria; Riveira-Muñoz, Eva; Puig, Teresa; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Martí, Ramón; Clotet, Bonaventura; Ampudia, Rosa M.; Ballana, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are a heterogeneous cell population strongly influenced by differentiation stimuli that become susceptible to HIV-1 infection after inactivation of the restriction factor SAMHD1 by cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK). Here, we have used primary human monocyte-derived macrophages differentiated through different stimuli to evaluate macrophage heterogeneity on cell activation and proliferation and susceptibility to HIV-1 infection. Stimulation of monocytes with GM-CSF induces a non-proliferating macrophage population highly restrictive to HIV-1 infection, characterized by the upregulation of the G1/S-specific cyclin D2, known to control early steps of cell cycle progression. Knockdown of cyclin D2, enhances HIV-1 replication in GM-CSF macrophages through inactivation of SAMHD1 restriction factor by phosphorylation. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments show that cyclin D2 forms a complex with CDK4 and p21, a factor known to restrict HIV-1 replication by affecting the function of the downstream cascade that leads to SAMHD1 deactivation. Thus, we demonstrate that cyclin D2 acts as regulator of cell cycle proteins affecting SAMHD1-mediated HIV-1 restriction in non-proliferating macrophages. PMID:27541004

  5. Immune-enhancing effect of nano-DNA vaccine encoding a gene of the prME protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and BALB/c mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Yongzhen; Zhou, Yan; Li, Ximei; Feng, Guohe

    2015-07-01

    Plasmid-encoded granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM‑CSF) is an adjuvant for genetic vaccines; however, how GM-CSF enhances immunogenicity remains to be elucidated. In the present study, it was demonstrated that injection of a plasmid encoding the premembrane (prM) and envelope (E) protein of Japanese encephalitis virus and mouse GM-CSF (pJME/GM-CSF) into mouse muscle recruited large and multifocal conglomerates of macrophages and granulocytes, predominantly neutrophils. During the peak of the infiltration, an appreciable number of immature dendritic cells (DCs) appeared, although no T and B-cells was detected. pJME/GM-CSF increased the number of splenic DCs and the expression of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) on splenic DC, and enhanced the antigenic capture, processing and presentation functions of splenic DCs, and the cell-mediated immunity induced by the vaccine. These findings suggested that the immune-enhancing effect by pJME/GM-CSF was associated with infiltrate size and the appearance of integrin αx (CD11c)+cells. Chitosan-pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles, prepared by coacervation via intramuscular injection, outperformed standard pJME/GM-CSF administrations in DC recruitment, antigen processing and presentation, and vaccine enhancement. This revealed that muscular injection of chitosan‑pJME/GM-CSF nanoparticles may enhance the immunoadjuvant properties of GM-CSF.

  6. Modification as a propositional act

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkhoff, Jan

    2014-01-01

    A complete functional theory of grammar should be able to specify the communicative function of each constituent in a sentence (or rather ‘Discourse Act’). Whereas predicating and referring have been given due attention in functional approaches to grammar, the modifying function of linguistic...... material in a Discourse Act has been largely ignored. This chapter argues (i) that modifying is no less actional than predicating or referring in the process of verbal communication and (ii) that the modifying function of linguistic material should be specified at the highest level of representation...

  7. Fast-acting valve actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nakwon

    1980-01-01

    A fast-acting valve actuator utilizes a spring driven pneumatically loaded piston to drive a valve gate. Rapid exhaust of pressurized gas from the pneumatically loaded side of the piston facilitates an extremely rapid piston stroke. A flexible selector diaphragm opens and closes an exhaust port in response to pressure differentials created by energizing and de-energizing a solenoid which controls the pneumatic input to the actuator as well as selectively providing a venting action to one side of the selector diaphragm.

  8. The European Model Company Act

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleff, Evelyne Beatrix

    2011-01-01

    European Company Law regulation is currently undergoing a reform. These reforms raise a number of regulatory questions, such as what should be the aims of companies' legislation, and how these aims should best be met by regulation. Many of the reforms and discussions (both on EU and national level...... an increasing influence on the framing of company legislation, such as the choice between mandatory or default rules. This article introduces the project 'European Company Law and the choice of Regulatory Method' which is carried out in collaboration with the 'European Model Company Act Group'. The project aims...

  9. 77 FR 39749 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-05

    ... advertising in securities offerings conducted pursuant to Rule 506 of Regulation D under the Securities Act... Startups Act. At times, changes in Commission priorities require alterations in the scheduling of meeting...

  10. 75 FR 11565 - Sunshine Act Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-11

    ... NATIONAL COUNCIL ON DISABILITY Sunshine Act Meetings Type: Quarterly Meeting. Dates and Times.... Agenda: Public Comment Sessions; Emergency Management; Developmental Disabilities and Bill of Rights Act, International Development, National Summit on Disability Policy 2010, United States Marine Corps Research...

  11. Clean Water Act Section 404 and Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) and EPA have longstanding programs to promote water quality and broader environmental goals identified in both the Agriculture Act of 2014 and the Clean Water Act.

  12. 7 CFR 1209.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MUSHROOM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION ORDER Mushroom Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1209.1 Act. Act...

  13. 7 CFR 1215.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE POPCORN PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Popcorn Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1215.1 Act. Act means...

  14. 7 CFR 1230.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PORK PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND CONSUMER INFORMATION Pork Promotion, Research, and Consumer Information Order Definitions § 1230.1 Act. Act means the...

  15. 34 CFR 5.1 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Act. 5.1 Section 5.1 Education Office of the Secretary...-10) Definitions § 5.1 Act. As used in this part, Act means section 552 of title 5, United States Code, as amended by Pub. L. 90-23, codifying the Act of July 4, 1966, sometimes referred to as the “Freedom...

  16. 7 CFR 1205.10 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Act. 1205.10 Section 1205.10 Agriculture Regulations... for Conduct of Sign-up Period Definitions § 1205.10 Act. The term Act means the Cotton Research and Promotion Act, as amended [7 U.S.C 2101-2118; Public Law 89-502, 80 Stat 279, as amended]. ...

  17. 12 CFR 268.203 - Rehabilitation Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rehabilitation Act. 268.203 Section 268.203... Rehabilitation Act. (a) Model employer. The Board shall be a model employer of individuals with disabilities. The... Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (29 U.S.C. 791), has been violated in a complaint alleging nonaffirmative...

  18. 29 CFR 1614.203 - Rehabilitation Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rehabilitation Act. 1614.203 Section 1614.203 Labor... EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY Provisions Applicable to Particular Complaints § 1614.203 Rehabilitation Act. (a... Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended (29 U.S.C. 791), has been violated in a complaint alleging nonaffirmative...

  19. 12 CFR 619.9000 - The Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The Act. 619.9000 Section 619.9000 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT ADMINISTRATION FARM CREDIT SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 619.9000 The Act. The Farm Credit Act of 1971; Pub. L. 92-181 and amendments. ...

  20. 7 CFR 29.13 - The act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The act. 29.13 Section 29.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Regulations Definitions § 29.13 The act. The Tobacco Inspection Act, approved August 23, 1935. (7...

  1. 3 CFR - The Endangered Species Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false The Endangered Species Act Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of March 3, 2009 The Endangered Species Act Memorandum for the Heads of Executive Departments and Agencies The Endangered Species Act (ESA), 16 U.S.C. 1531 et seq...

  2. Allegheny County Clean Indoor Air Act Exemptions

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — List and location of all the businesses and social clubs who have received an exemption from the Pennsylvania Clean Indoor Air Act. “The Clean Indoor Air Act, Act...

  3. 76 FR 77558 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-13

    ... LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION Sunshine Act Meeting; Notice DATES: Date and Time: The Legal Services Corporation's Operations & Regulations Committee will meet December 16, 2011. The meeting will commence at 4 p... Bylaws necessitated by the DC Nonprofit Corporation Act of 2010. 3. Public comment. 4. Consider and act...

  4. 31 CFR 0.216 - Privacy Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Privacy Act. 0.216 Section 0.216... RULES OF CONDUCT Rules of Conduct § 0.216 Privacy Act. Employees involved in the design, development, operation, or maintenance of any system of records or in maintaining records subject to the Privacy Act of...

  5. Review of the nuclear liability act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    There has always been concern that nuclear materials have the potential to cause injury and property damage. For this reason, nuclear operators have always been required by national regulatory authorities to exercise special precautions in the operation of their facilities. Federal legislation was drafted in Canada as the Nuclear Liability Act in 1970. The Act ensures that funds are available from all operators of nuclear facilities to provide financial compensation to third parties for injuries or damages suffered as a result of a nuclear incident; at the same time the Act provides protection to the operators by limiting their related liability. The Act also protects persons other than operators. The review of the Act has progressed in stages. The first stage was conducted by the staff of the Atomic Energy Control Board and catalogued previously identified difficulties with the Act. The second stage was a preliminary examination of the Act by an Interdepartmental Working Group. 2 figs

  6. Learning activism, acting with phronesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yew-Jin

    2015-12-01

    The article "Socio-political development of private school children mobilising for disadvantaged others" by Darren Hoeg, Natalie Lemelin, and Lawrence Bencze described a language-learning curriculum that drew on elements of Socioscientific issues and Science, Technology, Society and Environment. Results showed that with a number of enabling factors acting in concert, learning about and engagement in practical action for social justice and equity are possible. An alternative but highly compatible framework is now introduced—phronetic social research—as an action-oriented, wisdom-seeking research stance for the social sciences. By so doing, it is hoped that forms of phronetic social research can gain wider currency among those that promote activism as one of many valued outcomes of an education in science.

  7. Lithuania’s Balancing Act

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šlekys Deividas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Since regaining independence in 1990 and creating its regular armed forces, Lithuania has had to do a balancing act. It has had to balance between different approaches of state defence, military structure, collective and national defence. Due to events in Ukraine Lithuania had to reconfigure this balance. The Russian threat forced to emphasize strategy of territorial defence, which altogether required tying up forces and enlarging its numbers by bringing back conscription, substantially increased defence budget, followed by higher tempo and scale in procurement and training. However, Lithuania has managed to maintain its activity and participation in international military operations and political initiatives. Its recent contributions have led to an assumption that its participation in various military missions in the future will not diminish, quite the opposite. Increasing the framework of cooperation in terms of defence and security initiatives will involve Lithuania more deeply and will require further contributions.

  8. Personal Information as Communicative Acts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mai, Jens-Erik

    2016-01-01

    The paper extends previous accounts of informational privacy as a contextual notion. Where previous accounts have focused on interpretations of the privacy context itself as being contextual and open for negotiation and interpretation, this paper extends those analyses and shows that personal...... information itself is in fact best understood as contextual and situational—and as such open for interpretation. The paper reviews the notion of information as it has been applied in informational privacy and philosophy of information, and suggests that personal information ought to be regarded...... as communicative acts. The paper suggests a reconceptualization of informational privacy from having its focus on controlling, limiting, and restricting access to material carriers of information to a focus on a regulation of the use, analysis, and interpretation of personal information....

  9. ACT Reporting Category Interpretation Guide: Version 1.0. ACT Working Paper 2016 (05)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Sonya; Li, Dongmei; Suh, Hongwook; Harris, Deborah J.

    2016-01-01

    ACT reporting categories and ACT Readiness Ranges are new features added to the ACT score reports starting in fall 2016. For each reporting category, the number correct score, the maximum points possible, the percent correct, and the ACT Readiness Range, along with an indicator of whether the reporting category score falls within the Readiness…

  10. 77 FR 15555 - Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... Freedom of Information Act and Privacy Act Procedures AGENCY: Special Inspector General for Afghanistan... Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and the Privacy Act of 1974. These procedures will facilitate public..., Freedom of information, Privacy. Authority and Issuance For the reasons set forth above, SIGAR establishes...

  11. 75 FR 36535 - Freedom of Information Act, Privacy Act of 1974; Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of the Secretary 31 CFR Part 1 Freedom of Information Act... Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) and its regulations concerning the Privacy Act of 1974 (Privacy Act). It... correct those errors. List of Subjects in 31 CFR Part 1 Freedom of Information; Privacy. 0 Accordingly...

  12. 13 CFR 107.115 - 1940 Act and 1980 Act Companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false 1940 Act and 1980 Act Companies. 107.115 Section 107.115 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION SMALL BUSINESS... Companies. A 1940 Act or 1980 Act Company is eligible to apply for an SBIC license, and an existing Licensee...

  13. 75 FR 81205 - Privacy Act: Revision of Privacy Act Systems of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Office of the Secretary Privacy Act: Revision of Privacy Act Systems of Records AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, USDA. ACTION: Notice to Revise Privacy Act Systems of Records... two Privacy Act Systems of Records entitled ``Information on Persons Disqualified from the...

  14. 76 FR 67763 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-02

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (11-109)] Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act... proposed revisions to an existing Privacy Act system of records. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is issuing public...

  15. 76 FR 64114 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (11-093)] Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act... proposed revisions to an existing Privacy Act system of records. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is issuing public...

  16. 76 FR 64112 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-17

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice (11-091)] Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act...: Revisions of NASA Appendices to Privacy Act System of Records. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given that NASA is... Privacy Act of 1974. This notice publishes those amendments as set forth below under the caption...

  17. 78 FR 40515 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-05

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 13-071] Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ACTION: Notice of Privacy Act system of records. SUMMARY: Each Federal agency is required by the Privacy Act of 1974 to publish...

  18. 78 FR 77503 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 13-149] Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act... proposed revisions to existing Privacy Act systems of records. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is issuing public...

  19. 77 FR 69898 - Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act System of Records

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-21

    ... NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION [Notice 12-100] Privacy Act of 1974; Privacy Act... proposed revisions to an existing Privacy Act system of records. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 552a), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is issuing public...

  20. Acting Antarctica: science on stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciceri, Piera; Tizzoni, Paola; Pierro, Luigia

    2016-04-01

    Key-words: Polar science, Earth science, Theatre, Hands on activities The legendary Antarctic Expedition of sir E. Shackleton and his crew of 27 aboard the Endurance (1914/16) trapped in the Antarctic ice has become the starting point to learn about Polar Science and Climate Change. While the students were involved into this incredible adventure by the astonishing images of the Australian photographer Frank Hurley (who joined the crew), they discovered the world in which this story happened. Students were then involved in hands-on activities and role plays and have become the writers of the play "Uomini a scienza ai confini del mondo". They act the story of Shackelton's expedition and they tell at the same time to the audience about ice pack, ice cores and their role in understanding the past of the climate, physical and geographical characteristic of polar regions, thermal phenomena related to adaptations of polar animals, solar radiation at different latitude, day/night duration. The theater was the place to "stage" some scientific experiments and to explain the current research carried out in polar regions and their importance in climate change studies and to stress some similarities between Antarctica and space. The project was carried out from teachers of science, letters and geography and was born in collaboration with the "Piccolo Teatro di Milano" and the association "Science Under 18" with the support of a professional actor and director and was played for other schools at "EXPO 2015" in Milano (Italy). In our opinion drama activities improve reading comprehension, and both verbal and non-verbal communication skills. To be able to write and to act, students need a deep understanding of contents. Arts, including theatre, are a good key to involve emotionally students. To have an audience different from their own teachers and classmates offers a real task and the opportunity to play and let grow real skills.

  1. A European multicentre survey of impulse control behaviours in Parkinson's disease patients treated with short- and long-acting dopamine agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizos, A; Sauerbier, A; Antonini, A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD) are associated primarily with dopamine agonist (DA) use. Comparative surveys of clinical occurrence of impulse control behaviours on longer acting/transdermal DA therapy across age ranges are lacking. The aim...... release PPX (PPX-IR) (19.0%; P controlling...

  2. Clinical phase I/II trial to investigate neoadjuvant intensity-modulated short term radiation therapy (5 × 5 gy) and intraoperative radiation therapy (15 gy) in patients with primarily resectable pancreatic cancer - NEOPANC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roeder, Falk; Debus, Juergen; Huber, Peter E; Werner, Jens; Timke, Carmen; Saleh-Ebrahimi, Ladan; Schneider, Lutz; Hackert, Thilo; Hartwig, Werner; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Hensley, Frank W; Buechler, Markus W

    2012-01-01

    The current standard treatment, at least in Europe, for patients with primarily resectable tumors, consists of surgery followed by adjuvant chemotherapy. But even in this prognostic favourable group, long term survival is disappointing because of high local and distant failure rates. Postoperative chemoradiation has shown improved local control and overalls survival compared to surgery alone but the value of additional radiation has been questioned in case of adjuvant chemotherapy. However, there remains a strong rationale for the addition of radiation therapy considering the high rates of microscopically incomplete resections after surgery. As postoperative administration of radiation therapy has some general disadvantages, neoadjuvant and intraoperative approaches theoretically offer benefits in terms of dose escalation, reduction of toxicity and patients comfort especially if hypofractionated regimens with highly conformal techniques like intensity-modulated radiation therapy are considered. The NEOPANC trial is a prospective, one armed, single center phase I/II study investigating a combination of neoadjuvant short course intensity-modulated radiation therapy (5 × 5 Gy) in combination with surgery and intraoperative radiation therapy (15 Gy), followed by adjuvant chemotherapy according to the german treatment guidelines, in patients with primarily resectable pancreatic cancer. The aim of accrual is 46 patients. The primary objectives of the NEOPANC trial are to evaluate the general feasibility of this approach and the local recurrence rate after one year. Secondary endpoints are progression-free survival, overall survival, acute and late toxicity, postoperative morbidity and mortality and quality of life. http://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01372735

  3. The activation of p38 MAPK primarily contributes to UV-induced RhoB expression by recruiting the c-Jun and p300 to the distal CCAAT box of the RhoB promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Jiwon; Choi, Jeong-Hae; Won, Misun; Kang, Chang-Mo; Gyun, Mi-Rang; Park, Hee-Moon; Kim, Chun-Ho; Chung, Kyung-Sook

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Regulation of transcriptional activation of RhoB is still unclear. → We examine the effect of p38 MAPK inhibition, and c-Jun and RhoB depletion on UV-induced RhoB expression and apoptosis. → We identify the regions of RhoB promoter necessary to confer UV responsiveness using pRhoB-luciferase reporter assays. → c-Jun, ATF2 and p300 are dominantly associated with NF-Y on the distal CCAAT box. → The activation of p38 MAPK primarily contribute to UV-induced RhoB expression by recruiting the c-Jun and p300 proteins on distal CCAAT box of RhoB promoter. -- Abstract: The Ras-related small GTP-binding protein RhoB is rapidly induced in response to genotoxic stresses caused by ionizing radiation. It is known that UV-induced RhoB expression results from the binding of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) via NF-Y to the inverted CCAAT box (-23) of the RhoB promoter. Here, we show that the association of c-Jun with the distal CCAAT box (-72) is primarily involved in UV-induced RhoB expression and p38 MAPK regulated RhoB induction through the distal CCAAT box. UV-induced RhoB expression and apoptosis were markedly attenuated by pretreatment with the p38 MAPK inhibitor. siRNA knockdown of RhoB, ATF2 and c-Jun resulted in decreased RhoB expression and eventually restored the growth of UV-irradiated Jurkat cells. In the reporter assay using luciferase under the RhoB promoter, inhibition of RhoB promoter activity by the p38 inhibitor and knockdown of c-Jun using siRNA occurred through the distal CCAAT box. Immunoprecipitation and DNA affinity protein binding assays revealed the association of c-Jun and p300 via NF-YA and the dissociation of histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1) via c-Jun recruitment to the CCAAT boxes of the RhoB promoter. These results suggest that the activation of p38 MAPK primarily contributes to UV-induced RhoB expression by recruiting the c-Jun and p300 proteins to the distal CCAAT box of the RhoB promoter in Jurkat cells.

  4. Radioactive Substances Act, 1957, No 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Act as amended regulates the possession, sale and use of radioactive materials and irradiating apparatus. It sets up a Radiological Advisory Council to advise the competent authorities on questions within the scope of the Act, also with a view to radiation protection. The Council's rules of procedure are laid down. The Act also provides that, subject to prescribed exemptions, no person may hold, use or sell radioactive materials without a licence. (NEA) [fr

  5. New electricity act brings in private sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Opening up the State's electricity industry, previously the domain of the former Queensland Electricity Commission (QEC), is part of an overall restructuring of the industry under the new Queensland Electricity Act. Under this Act, the QEC was split into generating and transmission and supply corporations. The Act provides for the regulation of the electricity industry and the regulation of the use of electricity and safety in relation to the supply and use of electricity.(Author). 6 photos

  6. Radiological Protection Miscellaneous Provisions Act 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irish Legislation

    2014-07-01

    This Act provides for the dissolution of the Radiological Protection Institute of Ireland and the transfer of all its functions, assets, liabilities and staff to the Environmental Protection Agency, to give effect to the Amendment to the Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material done at Vienna on 8 July 2005, to amend the Radiological Protection Act 1991, the Environmental Protection Agency Act 1992 and certain other enactments, and to provide for matters connected therewith

  7. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Information (RCRAInfo) system contains information reported to the state environmental programs on activities and cleanup...

  8. BBG 2009 Freedom of Information Act Repot

    Data.gov (United States)

    Broadcasting Board of Governors — The Broadcasting Board of Governors' annual Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) report includes detailed statistics on the number and disposition of FOIA requests,...

  9. BBG 2008 Freedom of Information Act Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Broadcasting Board of Governors — The Broadcasting Board of Governors' annual Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) report includes detailed statistics on the number and disposition of FOIA requests,...

  10. Motivating administrative acts - doctrinal and jurisprudential issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Cristian APOSTOLACHE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article approaches the topic of administrative acts motivation, analyzed from the doctrinal and jurisprudential perspective. If at first, motivation was considered merely a formal condition of the administrative act, as a result of the national and European, doctrinal and jurisprudential evolution, motivation is now regarded as one of the most important conditions of validity for the administrative act. Motivating administrative acts represents also a manifestation of the right to information, sealed by the Romanian Constitution, and a dimension of the right to a good administration, as stipulated in the Charter of Fundamental Rights of the European Union.

  11. Federal Technology Transfer Act Success Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Successful Federal Technology Transfer Act (FTTA) partnerships demonstrate the many advantages of technology transfer and collaboration. EPA and partner organizations create valuable and applicable technologies for the marketplace.

  12. 76 FR 70131 - Sunshine Act Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-10

    ... Age Under the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, and 3. Overcoming Barriers to the Employment of... EEOC provides sign language interpretation and Communication Access Realtime Translation (CART...

  13. The Education Act (Ontario) 1980: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodder, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    Ontario has provided special education legislation through the Education Amendment Act, 1980. Issues related to teacher preparation for special education and program planning and implementation are reviewed. (DF)

  14. Atomic Energy Amendment Act 1978, No. 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This Act amends certain Sections of the Atomic Energy Act 1953. The principal modifications concern the definitions of atomic energy, prescribed substances, the provision and supply of uranium in relation to the functions of the Atomic Energy Commission, compliance with the agreement with the IAEA on the application of safeguards under the Non-Proliferation Treaty as well as with any agreement with any other international organization or another country. The Act also amends the 1953 Act in respect of the control of prescribed substances and repeals the section concerning jurisdiction of courts. (NEA) [fr

  15. An empirical test of the information-motivation-behavioral skills model of ART adherence in a sample of HIV-positive persons primarily in out-of-HIV-care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Keith J; Smolenski, Derek; Amico, K Rivet

    2014-02-01

    The current body of evidence supporting the Information-Motivation-Behavioral Skills (IMB) model of antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence rests exclusively on data collected from people living with HIV (PLWH) at point-of-HIV-care services. The aims of this study were to: (1) determine if the IMB model is a useful predictive model of ART adherence among PLWH who were primarily recruited in out-of-HIV-care settings; and (2) assess whether the theorized associations between IMB model constructs and adherence persist in the presence of depression and current drug use. PLWH (n = 312) responding to a one-time online survey completed the Life Windows IMB-ART-Adherence Questionnaire, and demographic, depression (CES-D 10), and drug use items. Path models were used to assess the fit of a saturated versus fully mediated IMB model of adherence and examined for moderating effects of depression and current drug use. Participants were on average 43 years of age, had been living with HIV for 9 or more years, and mostly male (84.0%), Caucasian (68.8%), and gay-identified (74.8%). The a priori measurement models for information and behavioral skills did not have acceptable fit to the data and were modified accordingly. Using the revised IMB scales, IMB constructs were associated with adherence as predicted by the theory in all but one model (i.e., the IMB model operated as predicted among nondrug users and those with and without depression). Among drug users, information exerted a direct effect on adherence but was not significantly associated with behavioral skills. Results of this study suggest that the fully or partially mediated IMB model is supported for use with samples of PLWH recruited primarily out-of-HIV-care service settings and is robust in the presence of depression and drug use.

  16. Influenza A H3N2 subtype virus NS1 protein targets into the nucleus and binds primarily via its C-terminal NLS2/NoLS to nucleolin and fibrillarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Influenza A virus non-structural protein 1 (NS1) is a virulence factor, which is targeted into the cell cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus. NS1 is a multi-functional protein that inhibits host cell pre-mRNA processing and counteracts host cell antiviral responses. Previously, we have shown that the NS1 protein of the H3N2 subtype influenza viruses possesses a C-terminal nuclear localization signal (NLS) that also functions as a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS) and targets the protein into the nucleolus. Results Here, we show that the NS1 protein of the human H3N2 virus subtype interacts in vitro primarily via its C-terminal NLS2/NoLS and to a minor extent via its N-terminal NLS1 with the nucleolar proteins, nucleolin and fibrillarin. Using chimeric green fluorescence protein (GFP)-NS1 fusion constructs, we show that the nucleolar retention of the NS1 protein is determined by its C-terminal NLS2/NoLS in vivo. Confocal laser microscopy analysis shows that the NS1 protein colocalizes with nucleolin in nucleoplasm and nucleolus and with B23 and fibrillarin in the nucleolus of influenza A/Udorn/72 virus-infected A549 cells. Since some viral proteins contain NoLSs, it is likely that viruses have evolved specific nucleolar functions. Conclusion NS1 protein of the human H3N2 virus interacts primarily via the C-terminal NLS2/NoLS and to a minor extent via the N-terminal NLS1 with the main nucleolar proteins, nucleolin, B23 and fibrillarin. PMID:22909121

  17. DANGEROUS AND HYPNOTIC DRUG ACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, William M.

    1961-01-01

    It is unprofessional conduct within the meaning of the Medical Practice Act to prescribe a dangerous drug without either a medical examination by a physician or other medical indications. Dangerous and hypnotic drugs are specifically defined by both state and federal law and distribution is strictly regulated. A physician may administer to his own patients such amounts of dangerous drugs as are necessary for the immediate needs of the patient. The physician may obtain such needed amounts of these drugs by an order placed with a pharmacist marked “for administration to immediate needs of patients.” A licensed physician may also prescribe dangerous and hypnotic drugs for patients and such prescriptions may be refilled on the specific authorization of the physician. A physician who dispenses dangerous and hypnotic drugs to patients must obtain a hypnotic drug license; he must use specific purchase orders when purchasing; the drugs must be labeled in the manner provided by law; and all records of sale shall be open to inspection by authorized officers of the law and kept for three years. By the Principles of Medical Ethics physicians are bound to limit the source of their professional income to medical services actually rendered. Recent decisions of the Judicial Council answer questions concerning a physician's interest in a corporation which purchases, packages and sells medicines under a corporate name. Also answered are questions as to the measures that exist to prevent physicians from abusing the privilege of owning a pharmacy, and whether a physician can ethically rent space in a building owned by him to a pharmacist with a percentage of the income of the pharmacy as rental. The public welfare of California and the nation as determined by legislation strictly regulates the distribution of dangerous drugs. It is in the best interest of the medical profession and its patients that these laws be understood and carefully observed. PMID:13784776

  18. Role of Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Production by T Cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothchild, Alissa C; Stowell, Britni; Goyal, Girija; Nunes-Alves, Cláudio; Yang, Qianting; Papavinasasundaram, Kadamba; Sassetti, Christopher M; Dranoff, Glenn; Chen, Xinchun; Lee, Jinhee; Behar, Samuel M

    2017-10-24

    Mice deficient for granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF -/- ) are highly susceptible to infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis , and clinical data have shown that anti-GM-CSF neutralizing antibodies can lead to increased susceptibility to tuberculosis in otherwise healthy people. GM-CSF activates human and murine macrophages to inhibit intracellular M. tuberculosis growth. We have previously shown that GM-CSF produced by iNKT cells inhibits growth of M. tuberculosis However, the more general role of T cell-derived GM-CSF during infection has not been defined and how GM-CSF activates macrophages to inhibit bacterial growth is unknown. Here we demonstrate that, in addition to nonconventional T cells, conventional T cells also produce GM-CSF during M. tuberculosis infection. Early during infection, nonconventional iNKT cells and γδ T cells are the main source of GM-CSF, a role subsequently assumed by conventional CD4 + T cells as the infection progresses. M. tuberculosis -specific T cells producing GM-CSF are also detected in the peripheral blood of infected people. Under conditions where nonhematopoietic production of GM-CSF is deficient, T cell production of GM-CSF is protective and required for control of M. tuberculosis infection. However, GM-CSF is not required for T cell-mediated protection in settings where GM-CSF is produced by other cell types. Finally, using an in vitro macrophage infection model, we demonstrate that GM-CSF inhibition of M. tuberculosis growth requires the expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ). Thus, we identified GM-CSF production as a novel T cell effector function. These findings suggest that a strategy augmenting T cell production of GM-CSF could enhance host resistance against M. tuberculosis IMPORTANCE Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the bacterium that causes tuberculosis, the leading cause of death by any infection worldwide. T cells are critical components of the immune

  19. The unity of Luke-Acts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Verheyden

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available The article contains a summary of contributions delivered at he 47th Colloquium Biblicum Lovaniense (1998 held at the Catholic University, Leuven on the subject: "The unity of Luke-Acts". The opening address was delivered by J Verheyden (Leuven on "The Unity of Luke and Acts: What are we up to?". The contributors were: J Kremer (Vienna - "Die dreifache Wiedergabe des Damaskuserlebnis Pauli in der Apostelgeschichte: Eine Hilfe für das rechte Verständnis der lukanischen Osterevangelien"; D Marguerat (Lausanne -"Jusqu' où faut-il parler d'une "unité". Luc-Actes? Continuity et ruptures dans I'ævre de Luc"; JDelobel (Leuven - "The text of Luke-Acts: A confrontation of recent theories"; R L Brawley (Chicago - "Abrahamic covenant traditions and the characterization of God in Luke-Acts"; F W Horn (Mainz - "Die Haltung des Lukas zum römischen Staat im Evangelium und in der Apostelgeschichte"; J A Fitzmyer (Washington - "The role of theSpirit in Luke-Acts"; M Rese (Munster - "The Jews in Luke-Acts: Some secondthoughts"; J Taylor (Jerusalem - "La fraction du pain en Luc-Actes"; W Radl (Augs-burg - "Die Beziehungen der Vorgeschichte zur Apostelgeschichte, dargestellt an Lk 2:22-39; F Neirynck (Leuven - "Luke 4:16-30 and the unity of Luke-Acts"; C M Tuckett (Oxford - "The Christology of Luke-Acts"; O Mainville (Montreal - "Le messianisme de Jésus: Le rapport announce/accomplissement entre Lc 1,35 et Ac 2,33"; A Lindemann (Bethel-Bielefeld - "Form und Funktion von Reden und Wundererzählungen im Lukas-evangelium und in der Apostelgeschichte", A Denaux - The theme of divine visits and human (inhospitability in Luke-Acts and its Old Testament and Graeco-Roman antecedents.

  20. Recovery act : states' use of highway infrastructure funds and compliance with the act's requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) included more than $48 billion for the Department of Transportations (DOT) investment in transportation infrastructure, including highways, rail, and transit. This testimonybased...

  1. Atomic Energy Authority (Weapons Group) Act 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    This Act, which came into force on 6th March 1973 and modified Section 2 of the Atomic Energy Authority Act 1954 in respect of the Authority's power to do work on explosive nuclear devices, made provision for the transfer to the Secretary of State for Defence of the Weapons Group of the Atomic Energy Authority. (NEA) [fr

  2. Homosexual Cohabitees Act, 18 June 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this Act is to place homosexual cohabitees in the same legal position as heterosexual cohabitees. It provides that if 2 persons are living together in a homosexual relationship, the following legal provisions relating to cohabitation shall apply to them: 1) the Cohabitees (Joint Homes) Act (1987:232), 2) the Inheritance Code, 3) the Real Property Code, 4) Chapter 10, section 9, of the Code of Judicial Procedure, 5) Chapter 4, section 19, 1st paragraph, of the Code of Execution, 6) section 19, 1st paragraph, section 35, subsection 4, and point 2a, 7th paragraph, of the regulations relating to Section 36 of the Municipal Tax Act (1928:370), 7) the Inheritance and Gift Taxes Act (1941:416), 8) Section 6 of the Court Procedures (Miscellaneous Business) Act (1946:807), 9) the Tenant Owner Act (1971:479), 10) section 10 of the Legal Aid Act (1972:429), and 11) the Notice to Unknown Creditors Act (1981:131).

  3. 76 FR 53702 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ... concept release and request public comment on a wide range of issues under the Investment Company Act raised by the use of derivatives by investment companies regulated under that Act. Item 2: The Commission... of investment company. The second release is a concept release to solicit public comment on...

  4. 77 FR 1095 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-09

    ... provisions of the Government in the Sunshine Act, Public Law 94-409, that the Securities and Exchange... 2012 budget of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board and will consider the related annual accounting support fee for the Board under Section 109 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Commissioner...

  5. Environmental Politics and the Endangered Species Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahr, David

    2000-01-01

    Explores the controversial issue of the Endangered Species Act (ESA) discussing the Act and the scope of the extinction problem. Reviews the arguments for and against the ESA, addresses the tactics that have been used in the political struggle over the ESA, and highlights the future of the ESA. Includes teaching activities. (CMK)

  6. 75 FR 17167 - Sunshine Act Meetings; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... NATIONAL COUNCIL ON DISABILITY Sunshine Act Meetings; Correction AGENCY: National Council on Disability. ACTION: Notice; correction. Type: Quarterly meeting. SUMMARY: NCD published a Sunshine Act Meeting Notice in the Federal Register on March 11, 2010, notifying the public of a quarterly meeting in...

  7. 7 CFR 926.2 - Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DATA COLLECTION, REPORTING AND RECORDKEEPING REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO CRANBERRIES NOT SUBJECT TO THE CRANBERRY MARKETING ORDER § 926.2 Act. Act means...

  8. Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) – metodebeskrivelse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Lars; Kirkedal Nielsen, Ian; Møller, mikkel Stamp

    2017-01-01

    arbejde med ACT-metoden over for en målgruppe med psykiske vanskeligheder og samtidigt misbrug i en dansk kommunal kontekst. Denne manual beskriver således vigtige elementer i Assertive Community Treatment (ACT) metoden henvendt til personer med psykiske vanskeligheder og samtidigt misbrug, som det har...

  9. 76 FR 31790 - Federal Seed Act Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... improvements in the noxious-weed seed tolerances using modern statistical applications. The AOSA has already... the introductory text. 0 B. Removing the word ``act'' and adding in its place the word ``Act'', and by...'' in paragraph (c)(2) introductory text. Sec. 201.41 [Amended] 0 6. In Sec. 201.41, paragraph (a), the...

  10. Equationally Compact Acts : Coproducts / Peeter Normak

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Normak, Peeter

    1998-01-01

    In this article equational compactness of acts and its generalizations are discussed. As equational compactness does not carry over to coproducts a slight generalization of c-equational campactness is introduced. It is proved that a coproduct of acts is c-equationally compact if and only if all components are c-equationally campact

  11. TANZANIA'S 2002 RECORDS AND ARCHIVES MANAGEMENT ACT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, some critical areas that need serious revisiting include supporting the Act with adequate resources, training, provisions on electronic records and records created by Union Government. The paper recommends facilitation of ample resources, training on the Act, reduction of power of director of the Records and ...

  12. The Compensation Act 2006 and School Trips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter-Jones, John

    2006-01-01

    The Compensation Act 2006 received its Royal Assent on 25 July 2006. The Act allows the courts to have regard to the social utility of "desirable activities", including school trips, in considering negligence claims. The article reviews the law of negligence as it affects teachers of the very young and considers the possible impact of…

  13. 76 FR 22939 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-25

    ... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the provisions of the Government in the Sunshine Act, Public Law 94-409, that the Securities and Exchange... Swap,'' ``Security-Based Swap Agreement,'' the regulation of mixed swaps, and books and records...

  14. 75 FR 66811 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Law 111-203, to prohibit fraud, manipulation, and deception in connection with security-based swaps. 3... SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Sunshine Act Meeting Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the provisions of the Government in the Sunshine Act, Public Law 94-409, that the Securities and Exchange...

  15. 75 FR 64306 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-19

    ... Transmission System. Hydro H-1 P-12107-005 Granite County, Montana. H-2 P-2496-222 Eugene Water and Electric... DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Sunshine Act Meeting Notice October 14... Sunshine Act (Pub. L. 94-409), 5 U.S.C. 552b: Agency Holding Meeting: Federal Energy Regulatory Commission...

  16. 78 FR 73210 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-05

    ... Institutional Advancement Committee will meet telephonically on December 10, 2013. The meeting will commence at... will be made of the closed session meeting of the Institutional Advancement Committee. The transcript... Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act. Upon request, meeting...

  17. 78 FR 45568 - Sunshine Act Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... Corporation's Institutional Advancement Committee will meet telephonically on August 6, 2013. The meeting will... transcript will be made of the closed session meeting of the Institutional Advancement Committee. The... Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act. Upon request, meeting notices and materials...

  18. 78 FR 53480 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-29

    ... Institutional Advancement Committee will meet telephonically on September 3, 2013. The meeting will commence at... session meeting of the Institutional Advancement Committee. The transcript of any portion of the closed... Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act. Upon request, meeting notices and materials...

  19. 78 FR 36602 - Sunshine Act Meeting; Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-18

    ... Corporation's Institutional Advancement Committee will meet telephonically on June 25, 2013. The meeting will... session meeting of the Institutional Advancement Committee. The transcript of any portion of the closed... complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act. Upon...

  20. 78 FR 14839 - Sunshine Act Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-07

    ... Institutional Advancement Committee will meet telephonically on March 12, 2013 and March 26, 2013. Each meeting... session meeting of the Institutional Advancement Committee. The transcript of any portion of the closed... Act and Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act. Upon request, meeting notices and materials will...