WorldWideScience

Sample records for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate ferredoxin oxidoreductase

  1. Functional consequences of piceatannol binding to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerszon, Joanna; Serafin, Eligiusz; Buczkowski, Adam; Michlewska, Sylwia; Bielnicki, Jakub Antoni; Rodacka, Aleksandra

    2018-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is one of the key redox-sensitive proteins whose activity is largely affected by oxidative modifications at its highly reactive cysteine residue in the enzyme's active site (Cys149). Prolonged exposure to oxidative stress may cause, inter alia, the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds leading to accumulation of GAPDH aggregates and ultimately to cell death. Recently these anomalies have been linked with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Novel evidences indicate that low molecular compounds may be effective inhibitors potentially preventing the GAPDH translocation to the nucleus, and inhibiting or slowing down its aggregation and oligomerization. Therefore, we decided to establish the ability of naturally occurring compound, piceatannol, to interact with GAPDH and to reveal its effect on functional properties and selected parameters of the dehydrogenase structure. The obtained data revealed that piceatannol binds to GAPDH. The ITC analysis indicated that one molecule of the tetrameric enzyme may bind up to 8 molecules of polyphenol (7.3 ± 0.9). Potential binding sites of piceatannol to the GAPDH molecule were analyzed using the Ligand Fit algorithm. Conducted analysis detected 11 ligand binding positions. We indicated that piceatannol decreases GAPDH activity. Detailed analysis allowed us to presume that this effect is due to piceatannol ability to assemble a covalent binding with nucleophilic cysteine residue (Cys149) which is directly involved in the catalytic reaction. Consequently, our studies strongly indicate that piceatannol would be an exceptional inhibitor thanks to its ability to break the aforementioned pathologic disulfide linkage, and therefore to inhibit GAPDH aggregation. We demonstrated that by binding with GAPDH piceatannol blocks cysteine residue and counteracts its oxidative modifications, that induce oligomerization and GAPDH aggregation.

  2. Functional consequences of piceatannol binding to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Gerszon

    Full Text Available Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH is one of the key redox-sensitive proteins whose activity is largely affected by oxidative modifications at its highly reactive cysteine residue in the enzyme's active site (Cys149. Prolonged exposure to oxidative stress may cause, inter alia, the formation of intermolecular disulfide bonds leading to accumulation of GAPDH aggregates and ultimately to cell death. Recently these anomalies have been linked with the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Novel evidences indicate that low molecular compounds may be effective inhibitors potentially preventing the GAPDH translocation to the nucleus, and inhibiting or slowing down its aggregation and oligomerization. Therefore, we decided to establish the ability of naturally occurring compound, piceatannol, to interact with GAPDH and to reveal its effect on functional properties and selected parameters of the dehydrogenase structure. The obtained data revealed that piceatannol binds to GAPDH. The ITC analysis indicated that one molecule of the tetrameric enzyme may bind up to 8 molecules of polyphenol (7.3 ± 0.9. Potential binding sites of piceatannol to the GAPDH molecule were analyzed using the Ligand Fit algorithm. Conducted analysis detected 11 ligand binding positions. We indicated that piceatannol decreases GAPDH activity. Detailed analysis allowed us to presume that this effect is due to piceatannol ability to assemble a covalent binding with nucleophilic cysteine residue (Cys149 which is directly involved in the catalytic reaction. Consequently, our studies strongly indicate that piceatannol would be an exceptional inhibitor thanks to its ability to break the aforementioned pathologic disulfide linkage, and therefore to inhibit GAPDH aggregation. We demonstrated that by binding with GAPDH piceatannol blocks cysteine residue and counteracts its oxidative modifications, that induce oligomerization and GAPDH aggregation.

  3. Oxidatively modified glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and Alzheimer's disease: many pathways to neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butterfield, D Allan; Hardas, Sarita S; Lange, Miranda L Bader

    2010-01-01

    Recently, the oxidoreductase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), has become a subject of interest as more and more studies reveal a surfeit of diverse GAPDH functions, extending beyond traditional aerobic metabolism of glucose. As a result of multiple isoforms and cellular locales, GAPDH is able to come in contact with a variety of small molecules, proteins, membranes, etc., that play important roles in normal and pathologic cell function. Specifically, GAPDH has been shown to interact with neurodegenerative disease-associated proteins, including the amyloid-beta protein precursor (AbetaPP). Studies from our laboratory have shown significant inhibition of GAPDH dehydrogenase activity in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain due to oxidative modification. Although oxidative stress and damage is a common phenomenon in the AD brain, it would seem that inhibition of glycolytic enzyme activity is merely one avenue in which AD pathology affects neuronal cell development and survival, as oxidative modification can also impart a toxic gain-of-function to many proteins, including GAPDH. In this review, we examine the many functions of GAPDH with respect to AD brain; in particular, the apparent role(s) of GAPDH in AD-related apoptotic cell death is emphasized.

  4. Control of Glycolysis by Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Streptococcus cremoris and Streptococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    POOLMAN, B; BOSMAN, B; KONINGS, WN

    1987-01-01

    The decreased response of the energy metabolism of lactose-starved Streptococcus cremoris upon readdition of lactose is caused by a decrease of the glycolytic activity. The decrease in glycolysis is accompanied by a decrease in the activities of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and

  5. Improved purification, crystallization and primary structure of pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase from Halobacterium halobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaga, W; Lottspeich, F; Oesterhelt, D

    1992-04-01

    An improved purification procedure, including nickel chelate affinity chromatography, is reported which resulted in a crystallizable pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase preparation from Halobacterium halobium. Crystals of the enzyme were obtained using potassium citrate as the precipitant. The genes coding for pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase were cloned and their nucleotide sequences determined. The genes of both subunits were adjacent to one another on the halobacterial genome. The derived amino acid sequences were confirmed by partial primary structure analysis of the purified protein. The structural motif of thiamin-diphosphate-binding enzymes was unequivocally located in the deduced amino acid sequence of the small subunit.

  6. Adhesion activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in a Chinese Streptococcus suis type 2 strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaicheng; Lu, Chengping

    2007-01-01

    A total of 36 streptococcal strains, including seven S. equi ssp.zooepidemicus, two S. suis type 1 (SS1), 24 SS2, two SS9, and one SS7, were tested for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (gapdh). Except from non-virulent SS2 strain T1 5, all strains harboured gapdh. The gapdh of Chinese Sichuan SS2 isolate ZY05719 and Jiangsu SS2 isolate HA9801 were sequenced and then compared with published sequences in the GenBank. The comparison revealed a 99.9 % and 99.8 % similarity of ZY05719 and HA9801, respectively, with the published sequence. Adherence assay data demonstrated a significant ((p<0.05)) reduction in adhesion of SS2 in HEp-2 cells pre-incubated with purified GAPDH compared to non pre-incubated controls, suggesting the GAPDH mediates SS2 bacterial adhesion to host cells.

  7. THE CYTOSOLIC AND GLYCOSOMAL GLYCERALDEHYDE-3-PHOSPHATE DEHYDROGENASE FROM TRYPANOSOMA-BRUCEI - KINETIC-PROPERTIES AND COMPARISON WITH HOMOLOGOUS ENZYMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LAMBEIR, AM; LOISEAU, AM; KUNTZ, DA; VELLIEUX, FM; MICHELS, PAM; OPPERDOES, FR

    1991-01-01

    The protozoan haemoflagellate Trypanosoma brucei has two NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoenzymes, each with a different localization within the cell. One isoenzyme is found in the cytosol, as in other eukaryotes, while the other is found in the glycosome, a microbody-like

  8. The Multiple Localized Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Contributes to the Attenuation of the Francisella tularensis dsbA Deletion Mutant

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavkova, I.; Kopečková, M.; Klimentová, J.; Schmidt, M.; Sheshko, V.; Sobol, Margaryta; Žáková, J.; Hozák, Pavel; Stulík, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, zima (2017), č. článku 503. ISSN 2235-2988 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : DsbA * SILAC * glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase * Francisella tularensis * moonlighting Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 4.300, year: 2016

  9. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) Is Pyruvylated during 3-Bromopyruvate Mediated Cancer Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram; Geschwind, Jean-Francois H.; Kunjithapatham, Rani; Buijs, Manon; Vossen, Josephina A.; Tchernyshyov, Irina; Cole, Robert N.; Syed, Labiq H.; Rao, Pramod P.; Ota, Shinichi; Vali, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    Background The pyruvic acid analog 3-bromopyruvate (3BrPA) is an alkylating agent known to induce cancer cell death by blocking glycolysis. The anti-glycolytic effect of 3BrPA is considered to be the inactivation of glycolytic enzymes. Yet, there is a lack of experimental documentation on the direct interaction of 3BrPA with any of the suggested targets during its anticancer effect. Methods and Results In the current study, using radiolabeled (14C) 3BrPA in multiple cancer cell lines, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was identified as the primary intracellular target of 3BrPA, based on two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoretic autoradiography, mass spectrometry and immunoprecipitation. Furthermore, in vitro enzyme kinetic studies established that 3BrPA has marked affinity to GAPDH. Finally, Annexin V staining and active caspase-3 immunoblotting demonstrated that apoptosis was induced by 3BrPA. Conclusion GAPDH pyruvylation by 3BrPA affects its enzymatic function and is the primary intracellular target in 3BrPA mediated cancer cell death. PMID:20044597

  10. The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and the small GTPase Rab 2 are crucial for Brucella replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie Fugier

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The intracellular pathogen Brucella abortus survives and replicates inside host cells within an endoplasmic reticulum (ER-derived replicative organelle named the "Brucella-containing vacuole" (BCV. Here, we developed a subcellular fractionation method to isolate BCVs and characterize for the first time the protein composition of its replicative niche. After identification of BCV membrane proteins by 2 dimensional (2D gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry, we focused on two eukaryotic proteins: the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and the small GTPase Rab 2 recruited to the vacuolar membrane of Brucella. These proteins were previously described to localize on vesicular and tubular clusters (VTC and to regulate the VTC membrane traffic between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and the Golgi. Inhibition of either GAPDH or Rab 2 expression by small interfering RNA strongly inhibited B. abortus replication. Consistent with this result, inhibition of other partners of GAPDH and Rab 2, such as COPI and PKC iota, reduced B. abortus replication. Furthermore, blockage of Rab 2 GTPase in a GDP-locked form also inhibited B. abortus replication. Bacteria did not fuse with the ER and instead remained in lysosomal-associated membrane vacuoles. These results reveal an essential role for GAPDH and the small GTPase Rab 2 in B. abortus virulence within host cells.

  11. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Chironomidae showed differential activity towards metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Isaac K W; Ho, Wing S

    2013-09-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is known to interact with different biomolecules and was implicated in many novel cellular activities including programmed cell death, nuclear RNA transport unrelated to the commonly known carbohydrate metabolism. We reported here the purification of GAPDH from Chironomidae larvae (Insecta, Diptera) that showed different biologic activity towards heavy metals. It was inhibited by copper, cobalt nickel, iron and lead but was activated by zinc. The GAPDH was purified by ammonium sulphate fractionation and Chelating Sepharose CL-6B chromatography followed by Blue Sepharose CL-6B chromatography. The 150-kDa tetrameric GAPDH showed optimal activity at pH 8.5 and 37°C. The multiple alignment of sequence of the Chironomidae GAPDH with other known species showed 78 - 88% identity to the conserved regions of the GADPH. Bioinformatic analysis unveils substantial N-terminal sequence similarity of GAPDH of Chironomidae larvae to mammalian GADPHs. However, the GADPH of Chironomidae larvae showed different biologic activities and cytotoxicity towards heavy metals. The GAPDH enzyme would undergo adaptive molecular changes through binding at the active site leading to higher tolerance to heavy metals.

  12. Comparative molecular analysis of evolutionarily distant glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Sardina pilchardus and Octopus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baibai, Tarik; Oukhattar, Laila; Mountassif, Driss; Assobhei, Omar; Serrano, Aurelio; Soukri, Abdelaziz

    2010-12-01

    The NAD(+)-dependent cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, EC 1.2.1.12), which is recognized as a key to central carbon metabolism in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis and as an important allozymic polymorphic biomarker, was purified from muscles of two marine species: the skeletal muscle of Sardina pilchardus Walbaum (Teleost, Clupeida) and the incompressible arm muscle of Octopus vulgaris (Mollusca, Cephalopoda). Comparative biochemical studies have revealed that they differ in their subunit molecular masses and in pI values. Partial cDNA sequences corresponding to an internal region of the GapC genes from Sardina and Octopus were obtained by polymerase chain reaction using degenerate primers designed from highly conserved protein motifs. Alignments of the deduced amino acid sequences were used to establish the 3D structures of the active site of two enzymes as well as the phylogenetic relationships of the sardine and octopus enzymes. These two enzymes are the first two GAPDHs characterized so far from teleost fish and cephalopod, respectively. Interestingly, phylogenetic analyses indicated that the sardina GAPDH is in a cluster with the archetypical enzymes from other vertebrates, while the octopus GAPDH comes together with other molluscan sequences in a distant basal assembly closer to bacterial and fungal orthologs, thus suggesting their different evolutionary scenarios.

  13. Lactobacillus reuteri glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase functions in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-Ming; Wang, Hai-Feng; Gao, Kan; Wang, Cong; Liu, Li; Liu, Jian-Xin

    2015-05-01

    This study was aimed to identify key surface proteins mediating the adhesion of lactobacilli to intestinal epithelial cells. By using Caco-2 and IPEC-J2 cells labeled with sulfo-NHS-biotin in the western blotting, a protein band of an approximately 37 kDa was detected on the surface layer of Lactobacillus reuteri strains ZJ616, ZJ617, ZJ621, and ZJ623 and Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Mass spectrometry analysis using the adhesion-related protein from L. reuteri ZJ617 showed that it was 100% homologous to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) of L. reuteri JCM 1112 (GenBank: YP_001841377). The ability of L. reuteri ZJ617 to adhere to epithelial cells decreased significantly by treatment with LiCl or by blocking with an anti-GAPDH antibody, in comparison with the untreated strain (p reuteri ZJ617. The results indicated that the GAPDH protein of L. reuteri ZJ617 acts as an adhesion component that plays an important role in binding to the intestinal epithelial cells.

  14. Identification of some ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes by PCR amplification of their gpd (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreuzinger, N; Podeu, R; Gruber, F; Göbl, F; Kubicek, C P

    1996-01-01

    Degenerated oligonucleotide primers designed to flank an approximately 1.2-kb fragment of the gene encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) from ascomycetes and basidiomycetes were used to amplify the corresponding gpd fragments from several species of the ectomycorrhizal fungal taxa Boletus, Amanita, and Lactarius. Those from B. edulis, A. muscaria, and L. deterrimus were cloned and sequenced. The respective nucleotide sequences of these gene fragments showed a moderate degree of similarity (72 to 76%) in the protein-encoding regions and only a low degree of similarity in the introns (56 to 66%). Introns, where present, occurred at conserved positions, but the respective positions and numbers of introns in a given taxon varied. The amplified fragment from a given taxon could be distinguished from that of others by both restriction nuclease cleavage analysis and Southern hybridization. A procedure for labeling DNA probes with fluorescein-12-dUTP by PCR was developed. These probes were used in a nonradioactive hybridization assay, with which the gene could be detected in 2 ng of chromosomal DNA of L. deterrimus on slot blots. Taxon-specific amplification was achieved by the design of specific oligonucleotide primers. The application of the gpd gene for the identification of mycorrhizal fungi under field conditions was demonstrated, with Picea abies (spruce) mycorrhizal roots harvested from a northern alpine forest area as well as from a plant-breeding nursery. The interference by inhibitory substances, which sometimes occurred in the DNA extracted from the root-fungus mixture, could be overcome by using very diluted concentrations of template DNA for a first round of PCR amplification followed by a second round with nested oligonucleotide primers. We conclude that gpd can be used to detect ectomycorrhizal fungi during symbiotic interaction. PMID:8795234

  15. Characterization and possible function of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-spermatogenic protein GAPDHS in mammalian sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaryan, Hasmik; Dorosh, Andriy; Capkova, Jana; Manaskova-Postlerova, Pavla; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Hozak, Pavel; Peknicova, Jana

    2015-03-08

    Sperm proteins are important for the sperm cell function in fertilization. Some of them are involved in the binding of sperm to the egg. We characterized the acrosomal sperm protein detected by a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (Hs-8) that was prepared in our laboratory by immunization of BALB/c mice with human ejaculated sperms and we tested the possible role of this protein in the binding assay. Indirect immunofluorescence and immunogold labelling, gel electrophoresis, Western blotting and protein sequencing were used for Hs-8 antigen characterization. Functional analysis of GAPDHS from the sperm acrosome was performed in the boar model using sperm/zona pellucida binding assay. Monoclonal antibody Hs-8 is an anti-human sperm antibody that cross-reacts with the Hs-8-related protein in spermatozoa of other mammalian species (boar, mouse). In the immunofluorescence test, Hs-8 antibody recognized the protein localized in the acrosomal part of the sperm head and in the principal piece of the sperm flagellum. In immunoblotting test, MoAb Hs-8 labelled a protein of 45 kDa in the extract of human sperm. Sequence analysis identified protein Hs-8 as GAPDHS (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrohenase-spermatogenic). For this reason, commercial mouse anti-GAPDHS MoAb was applied in control tests. Both antibodies showed similar staining patterns in immunofluorescence tests, in electron microscopy and in immunoblot analysis. Moreover, both Hs-8 and anti-GAPDHS antibodies blocked sperm/zona pellucida binding. GAPDHS is a sperm-specific glycolytic enzyme involved in energy production during spermatogenesis and sperm motility; its role in the sperm head is unknown. In this study, we identified the antigen with Hs8 antibody and confirmed its localization in the apical part of the sperm head in addition to the principal piece of the flagellum. In an indirect binding assay, we confirmed the potential role of GAPDHS as a binding protein that is involved in the secondary sperm

  16. Prokaryotic Expression and Serodiagnostic Potential of Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase and Thioredoxin Peroxidase from Baylisascaris schroederi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Baylisascaris schroederi, a roundworm parasite of giant pandas, badly affects the health of its hosts. Diagnosis of this disease currently depends mainly on sedimentation floatation and Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR methods to detect the eggs. However, neither of these methods is suitable for diagnosis of early-stage panda baylisascariasis and no information on early diagnosis of this disease is available so far. Therefore, to develop an effective serologic diagnostic method, this study produced recombinant glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH and thioredoxin peroxidase (Tpx proteins from B. schroederi using a prokaryotic expression system. We determined the immunological characteristics of these proteins and their location in the parasite. Indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs were established to detect B. schroederi infection in giant pandas based on GAPDH and Tpx respectively. The open reading frame of the GAPDH gene (1083 bp encoded a 39 kDa protein, while the predicted molecular weight of Tpx (588 bp was 21.6 kDa. Western-blotting analysis revealed that both recombinant proteins could be recognized with positive serum of pandas infected with B. schroederi. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the endogenous GAPDH of B. schroederi was widely distributed in the worm while Tpx was mainly localized in the muscle, eggs, gut wall, uterus wall and hypodermis. Serological tests showed that the GAPDH-based indirect ELISA had a sensitivity of 95.83% and specificity of 100%, while the test using Tpx as the antigen had sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 91.7%. Thus, B. schroederi Tpx is unsuitable as a diagnostic antigen for baylisascariasis, but B. schroederi GAPDH is a good candidate diagnostic antigen for B. schroederi in pandas.

  17. Two functionally distinct NADP+-dependent ferredoxin oxidoreductases maintain the primary redox balance of Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Diep M N; Schut, Gerrit J; Zadvornyy, Oleg A; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Poudel, Saroj; Lipscomb, Gina L; Adams, Leslie A; Dinsmore, Jessica T; Nixon, William J; Boyd, Eric S; Bothner, Brian; Peters, John W; Adams, Michael W W

    2017-09-01

    Electron bifurcation has recently gained acceptance as the third mechanism of energy conservation in which energy is conserved through the coupling of exergonic and endergonic reactions. A structure-based mechanism of bifurcation has been elucidated recently for the flavin-based enzyme NADH-dependent ferredoxin NADP + oxidoreductase I (NfnI) from the hyperthermophillic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. NfnI is thought to be involved in maintaining the cellular redox balance, producing NADPH for biosynthesis by recycling the two other primary redox carriers, NADH and ferredoxin. The P. furiosus genome encodes an NfnI paralog termed NfnII, and the two are differentially expressed, depending on the growth conditions. In this study, we show that deletion of the genes encoding either NfnI or NfnII affects the cellular concentrations of NAD(P)H and particularly NADPH. This results in a moderate to severe growth phenotype in deletion mutants, demonstrating a key role for each enzyme in maintaining redox homeostasis. Despite their similarity in primary sequence and cofactor content, crystallographic, kinetic, and mass spectrometry analyses reveal that there are fundamental structural differences between the two enzymes, and NfnII does not catalyze the NfnI bifurcating reaction. Instead, it exhibits non-bifurcating ferredoxin NADP oxidoreductase-type activity. NfnII is therefore proposed to be a bifunctional enzyme and also to catalyze a bifurcating reaction, although its third substrate, in addition to ferredoxin and NADP(H), is as yet unknown. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Molecular and functional characterization of ferredoxin NADP(H oxidoreductase from Gracilaria chilensis and its complex with ferredoxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Alejandra Vorphal

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgroud Ferredoxin NADP(H oxidoreductases (EC 1.18.1.2 (FNR are flavoenzymes present in photosynthetic organisms; they are relevant for the production of reduced donors to redox reactions, i.e. in photosynthesis, the reduction of NADP+ to NADPH using the electrons provided by Ferredoxin (Fd, a small FeS soluble protein acceptor of electrons from PSI in chloroplasts. In rhodophyta no information about this system has been reported, this work is a contribution to the molecular and functional characterization of FNR from Gracilaria chilensis, also providing a structural analysis of the complex FNR/Fd. Methods The biochemical and kinetic characterization of FNR was performed from the enzyme purified from phycobilisomes enriched fractions. The sequence of the gene that codifies for the enzyme, was obtained using primers designed by comparison with sequences of Synechocystis and EST from Gracilaria. 5′RACE was used to confirm the absence of a CpcD domain in FNRPBS of Gracilaria chilensis. A three dimensional model for FNR and Fd, was built by comparative modeling and a model for the complex FNR: Fd by docking. Results The kinetic analysis shows KMNADPH of 12.5 M and a kcat of 86 s−1, data consistent with the parameters determined for the enzyme purified from a soluble extract. The sequence for FNR was obtained and translated to a protein of 33646 Da. A FAD and a NADP+ binding domain were clearly identified by sequence analysis as well as a chloroplast signal sequence. Phycobilisome binding domain, present in some cyanobacteria was absent. Transcriptome analysis of Gch revealed the presence of two Fd; FdL and FdS, sharing the motif CX5CX2CX29X. The analysis indicated that the most probable partner for FNR is FdS. Conclusion The interaction model produced, was consistent with functional properties reported for FNR in plants leaves, and opens the possibilities for research in other rhodophyta of commercial interest.

  19. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Paul R.; Evans, Daniel; Greenwood, Jacqueline A.; Moody, Peter C. E., E-mail: pcem1@leicester.ac.uk [Henry Wellcome Laboratories for Structural Biology, Department of Biochemistry, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 9HN (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase A has been cloned, expressed and purified. Apoprotein crystals have been grown which diffracted to 1.75 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}; holo crystals were grown in the presence of NADP, diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3{sub 2}. The classical glycolytic pathway contains an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, with NADP-dependent forms reserved for photosynthetic organisms and archaea. Here, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori is reported; crystals of the protein were grown both in the presence and the absence of NADP.

  20. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, Paul R.; Evans, Daniel; Greenwood, Jacqueline A.; Moody, Peter C. E.

    2008-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase A has been cloned, expressed and purified. Apoprotein crystals have been grown which diffracted to 1.75 Å resolution and belonged to space group P2 1 ; holo crystals were grown in the presence of NADP, diffracted to 2.6 Å resolution and belonged to space group P3 2 . The classical glycolytic pathway contains an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, with NADP-dependent forms reserved for photosynthetic organisms and archaea. Here, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori is reported; crystals of the protein were grown both in the presence and the absence of NADP

  1. The End of the Line: Can Ferredoxin and Ferredoxin NADP(H) Oxidoreductase Determine the Fate of Photosynthetic Electrons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Tatjana; Hanke, Guy

    2014-01-01

    At the end of the linear photosynthetic electron transfer (PET) chain, the small soluble protein ferredoxin (Fd) transfers electrons to Fd:NADP(H) oxidoreductase (FNR), which can then reduce NADP+ to support C assimilation. In addition to this linear electron flow (LEF), Fd is also thought to mediate electron flow back to the membrane complexes by different cyclic electron flow (CEF) pathways: either antimycin A sensitive, NAD(P)H complex dependent, or through FNR located at the cytochrome b6f complex. Both Fd and FNR are present in higher plant genomes as multiple gene copies, and it is now known that specific Fd iso-proteins can promote CEF. In addition, FNR iso-proteins vary in their ability to dynamically interact with thylakoid membrane complexes, and it has been suggested that this may also play a role in CEF. We will highlight work on the different Fd-isoproteins and FNR-membrane association found in the bundle sheath (BSC) and mesophyll (MC) cell chloroplasts of the C4 plant maize. These two cell types perform predominantly CEF and LEF, and the properties and activities of Fd and FNR in the BSC and MC are therefore specialized for CEF and LEF respectively. A diversity of Fd isoproteins and dynamic FNR location has also been recorded in C3 plants, algae and cyanobacteria. This indicates that the principles learned from the extreme electron transport situations in the BSC and MC of maize might be usefully applied to understanding the dynamic transition between these states in other systems. PMID:24678667

  2. Identification of Electronic and Structural Descriptors of Adenosine Analogues Related to Inhibition of Leishmanial Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norka B. H. Lozano

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative structure–activity relationship (QSAR studies were performed in order to identify molecular features responsible for the antileishmanial activity of 61 adenosine analogues acting as inhibitors of the enzyme glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Leishmania mexicana (LmGAPDH. Density functional theory (DFT was employed to calculate quantum-chemical descriptors, while several structural descriptors were generated with Dragon 5.4. Variable selection was undertaken with the ordered predictor selection (OPS algorithm, which provided a set with the most relevant descriptors to perform PLS, PCR and MLR regressions. Reliable and predictive models were obtained, as attested by their high correlation coefficients, as well as the agreement between predicted and experimental values for an external test set. Additional validation procedures were carried out, demonstrating that robust models were developed, providing helpful tools for the optimization of the antileishmanial activity of adenosine compounds.

  3. Sequence of the non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia and phylogenetic origin of the gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habenicht, A; Quesada, A; Cerff, R

    1997-10-01

    A cDNA-library has been constructed from Nicotiana plumbaginifolia seedlings, and the non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapN, EC 1.2.1.9) was isolated by plaque hybridization using the cDNA from pea as a heterologous probe. The cDNA comprises the entire GapN coding region. A putative polyadenylation signal is identified. Phylogenetic analysis based on the deduced amino acid sequences revealed that the GapN gene family represents a separate ancient branch within the aldehyde dehydrogenase superfamily. It can be shown that the GapN gene family and other distinct branches of the superfamily have its phylogenetic origin before the separation of primary life-forms. This further demonstrates that already very early in evolution, a broad diversification of the aldehyde dehydrogenases led to the formation of the superfamily.

  4. Expression profiles of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Clonorchis sinensis: a glycolytic enzyme with plasminogen binding capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yue; Zhang, Erhong; Huang, Lisi; Li, Wenfang; Liang, Pei; Wang, Xiaoyun; Xu, Jin; Huang, Yan; Yu, Xinbing

    2014-12-01

    Globally, 15-20 million people are infected with Clonorchis sinensis (C. sinensis) which results in clonorchiasis. In China, clonorchiasis is considered to be one of the fastest-growing food-borne parasitic diseases. That more key molecules of C. sinensis are characterized will be helpful to understand biology and pathogenesis of the carcinogenic liver fluke. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDHs) from many species have functions other than their catalytic role in glycolysis. In the present study, we analyzed the sequence and structure of GAPDH from C. sinensis (CsGAPDH) by using bioinformatics tools and obtained its recombinant protein by prokaryotic expression system, to learn its expression profiles and molecular property. CsGAPDH could bind to human intrahepatic biliary epithelial cell in vivo and in vitro by the method of immunofluorescence assays. CsGAPDH also disturbed in lumen of biliary tract near to the parasite in the liver of infected rat. Western blotting analysis together with immunofluorescence assay indicated that CsGAPDH was a component of excretory/secretory proteins (CsESPs) and a surface-localized protein of C. sinensis. Quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) and Western blotting demonstrated that CsGAPDHs are expressed at the life stages of adult worm, metacercaria, and egg, but the expression levels were different from each other. Recombinant CsGAPDH (rCsGAPDH) was confirmed to have the capacity to catalyze the conversion of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to D-glycerate 1,3-bisphosphate which was inhibited by AMP in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, rCsGAPDH was able to interact with human plasminogen in a dose-dependent manner by ELISA. The interaction could be inhibited by lysine. The plasminogen binding capacity of rCsGAPDH along with the distribution of CsGAPDH in vivo and in the liver of C. sinensis-infected rat hinted that surface-localized CsGAPDH might play an important role in host invasion of the worm besides its glycolytic

  5. Human and pneumococcal cell surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) proteins are both ligands of human C1q protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-12-14

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (K(D) = 0.34-2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response.

  6. Human and Pneumococcal Cell Surface Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) Proteins Are Both Ligands of Human C1q Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrasse, Rémi; Tacnet-Delorme, Pascale; Moriscot, Christine; Pérard, Julien; Schoehn, Guy; Vernet, Thierry; Thielens, Nicole M.; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie; Frachet, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    C1q, a key component of the classical complement pathway, is a major player in the response to microbial infection and has been shown to detect noxious altered-self substances such as apoptotic cells. In this work, using complementary experimental approaches, we identified the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a C1q partner when exposed at the surface of human pathogenic bacteria Streptococcus pneumoniae and human apoptotic cells. The membrane-associated GAPDH on HeLa cells bound the globular regions of C1q as demonstrated by pulldown and cell surface co-localization experiments. Pneumococcal strains deficient in surface-exposed GAPDH harbored a decreased level of C1q recognition when compared with the wild-type strains. Both recombinant human and pneumococcal GAPDHs interacted avidly with C1q as measured by surface plasmon resonance experiments (KD = 0.34–2.17 nm). In addition, GAPDH-C1q complexes were observed by transmission electron microscopy after cross-linking. The purified pneumococcal GAPDH protein activated C1 in an in vitro assay unlike the human form. Deposition of C1q, C3b, and C4b from human serum at the surface of pneumococcal cells was dependent on the presence of surface-exposed GAPDH. This ability of C1q to sense both human and bacterial GAPDHs sheds new insights on the role of this important defense collagen molecule in modulating the immune response. PMID:23086952

  7. In Silico Identification and in Vitro Activity of Novel Natural Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian C. Herrmann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available As part of our ongoing efforts to identify natural products with activity against pathogens causing neglected tropical diseases, we are currently performing an extensive screening of natural product (NP databases against a multitude of protozoan parasite proteins. Within this project, we screened a database of NPs from a commercial supplier, AnalytiCon Discovery (Potsdam, Germany, against Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH, a glycolytic enzyme whose inhibition deprives the parasite of energy supply. NPs acting as potential inhibitors of the mentioned enzyme were identified using a pharmacophore-based virtual screening and subsequent docking of the identified hits into the active site of interest. In a set of 700 structures chosen for the screening, 13 (1.9% were predicted to possess significant affinity towards the enzyme and were therefore tested in an in vitro enzyme assay using recombinant TbGAPDH. Nine of these in silico hits (69% showed significant inhibitory activity at 50 µM, of which two geranylated benzophenone derivatives proved to be particularly active with IC50 values below 10 µM. These compounds also showed moderate in vitro activity against T. brucei rhodesiense and may thus represent interesting starting points for further optimization.

  8. In Silico Identification and in Vitro Activity of Novel Natural Inhibitors of Trypanosoma brucei Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Fabian C; Lenz, Mairin; Jose, Joachim; Kaiser, Marcel; Brun, Reto; Schmidt, Thomas J

    2015-09-03

    As part of our ongoing efforts to identify natural products with activity against pathogens causing neglected tropical diseases, we are currently performing an extensive screening of natural product (NP) databases against a multitude of protozoan parasite proteins. Within this project, we screened a database of NPs from a commercial supplier, AnalytiCon Discovery (Potsdam, Germany), against Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (TbGAPDH), a glycolytic enzyme whose inhibition deprives the parasite of energy supply. NPs acting as potential inhibitors of the mentioned enzyme were identified using a pharmacophore-based virtual screening and subsequent docking of the identified hits into the active site of interest. In a set of 700 structures chosen for the screening, 13 (1.9%) were predicted to possess significant affinity towards the enzyme and were therefore tested in an in vitro enzyme assay using recombinant TbGAPDH. Nine of these in silico hits (69%) showed significant inhibitory activity at 50 µM, of which two geranylated benzophenone derivatives proved to be particularly active with IC50 values below 10 µM. These compounds also showed moderate in vitro activity against T. brucei rhodesiense and may thus represent interesting starting points for further optimization.

  9. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase aggregation inhibitor peptide: A potential therapeutic strategy against oxidative stress-induced cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itakura, Masanori; Nakajima, Hidemitsu; Semi, Yuko; Higashida, Shusaku; Azuma, Yasu-Taka; Takeuchi, Tadayoshi

    2015-11-13

    The glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has multiple functions, including mediating oxidative stress-induced neuronal cell death. This process is associated with disulfide-bonded GAPDH aggregation. Some reports suggest a link between GAPDH and the pathogenesis of several oxidative stress-related diseases. However, the pathological significance of GAPDH aggregation in disease pathogenesis remains unclear due to the lack of an effective GAPDH aggregation inhibitor. In this study, we identified a GAPDH aggregation inhibitor (GAI) peptide and evaluated its biological profile. The decapeptide GAI specifically inhibited GAPDH aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, the GAI peptide did not affect GAPDH glycolytic activity or cell viability. The GAI peptide also exerted a protective effect against oxidative stress-induced cell death in SH-SY5Y cells. This peptide could potentially serve as a tool to investigate GAPDH aggregation-related neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders and as a possible therapy for diseases associated with oxidative stress-induced cell death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Participation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the regulation of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate level in erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokina, K V; Yazykova, M Y; Danshina, P V; Schmalhausen, E V; Muronetz, V I

    2000-04-01

    Data are presented concerning the possible participation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in regulation of the glycolytic pathway and the level of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in erythrocytes. Experimental support has been obtained for the hypothesis according to which a mild oxidation of GAPDH must result in acceleration of glycolysis and in decrease in the level of 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate due to the acyl phosphatase activity of the mildly oxidized enzyme. Incubation of erythrocytes in the presence of 1 mM hydrogen peroxide decreases 2,3-diphosphoglycerate concentration and causes accumulation of 3-phosphoglycerate. It is assumed that the acceleration of glycolysis in the presence of oxidative agents described previously by a number of authors could be attributed to the acyl phosphatase activity of GAPDH. A pH-dependent complexing of GAPDH and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase or 2, 3-diphosphoglycerate mutase is found to determine the fate of 1,3-diphosphoglycerate that serves as a substrate for the synthesis of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate as well as for the 3-phosphoglycerate kinase reaction in glycolysis. A withdrawal of the two-enzyme complexes from the erythrocyte lysates using Sepharose-bound anti-GAPDH antibodies prevents the pH-dependent accumulation of the metabolites. The role of GAPDH in the regulation of glycolysis and the level of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in erythrocytes is discussed.

  11. SIRT1 interacts with and protects glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) from nuclear translocation: Implications for cell survival after irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joo, Hyun-Yoo; Woo, Seon Rang; Shen, Yan-Nan; Yun, Mi Yong; Shin, Hyun-Jin; Park, Eun-Ran; Kim, Su-Hyeon; Park, Jeong-Eun; Ju, Yeun-Jin; Hong, Sung Hee; Hwang, Sang-Gu; Cho, Myung-Haing; Kim, Joon; Lee, Kee-Ho

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► SIRT1 serves to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, preventing GAPDH nuclear translocation. ► When SIRT1 is depleted, GAPDH translocation occurs even in the absence of stress. ► Upon irradiation, SIRT1 interacts with GAPDH. ► SIRT1 prevents irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH. ► SIRT1 presence rather than activity is essential for inhibiting GAPDH translocation. -- Abstract: Upon apoptotic stimulation, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a cytosolic enzyme normally active in glycolysis, translocates into the nucleus and activates an apoptotic cascade therein. In the present work, we show that SIRT1 prevents nuclear translocation of GAPDH via interaction with GAPDH. SIRT1 depletion triggered nuclear translocation of cytosolic GAPDH even in the absence of apoptotic stress. Such translocation was not, however, observed when SIRT1 enzymatic activity was inhibited, indicating that SIRT1 protein per se, rather than the deacetylase activity of the protein, is required to inhibit GAPDH translocation. Upon irradiation, SIRT1 prevented irradiation-induced nuclear translocation of GAPDH, accompanied by interaction of SIRT1 and GAPDH. Thus, SIRT1 functions to retain GAPDH in the cytosol, protecting the enzyme from nuclear translocation via interaction with these two proteins. This serves as a mechanism whereby SIRT1 regulates cell survival upon induction of apoptotic stress by means that include irradiation.

  12. Influence of 120 kDa Pyruvate:Ferredoxin Oxidoreductase on Pathogenicity of Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyun-Ouk

    2016-02-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is a flagellate protozoan parasite and commonly infected the lower genital tract in women and men. Iron is a known nutrient for growth of various pathogens, and also reported to be involved in establishment of trichomoniasis. However, the exact mechanism was not clarified. In this study, the author investigated whether the 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis may be involved in pathogenicity of trichomonads. Antibodies against 120 kDa protein of T. vaginalis, which was identified as pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) by peptide analysis of MALDI-TOF-MS, were prepared in rabbits. Pretreatment of T. vaginalis with anti-120 kDa Ab decreased the proliferation and adherence to vaginal epithelial cells (MS74) of T. vaginalis. Subcutaneous tissue abscess in anti-120 kDa Ab-treated T. vaginalis-injected mice was smaller in size than that of untreated T. vaginalis-infected mice. Collectively, the 120 kDa protein expressed by iron may be involved in proliferation, adhesion to host cells, and abscess formation, thereby may influence on the pathogenicity of T. vaginalis.

  13. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Helicobacter pylori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Paul R.; Mohammad, Shabaz; Melrose, Helen J.; Moody, Peter C. E., E-mail: pcem1@leicester.ac.uk [Henry Wellcome Laboratories for Structural Biology, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 9HN (United Kingdom)

    2008-08-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase B from H. pylori has been cloned, expressed, purified and crystallized in the presence of NAD. Crystals of GAPDHB diffracted to 2.8 Å resolution and belonged to space group P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 166.1, c = 253.1 Å. Helicobacter pylori is a dangerous human pathogen that resides in the upper gastrointestinal tract. Little is known about its metabolism and with the onset of antibiotic resistance new treatments are required. In this study, the expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction of an NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from H. pylori are reported.

  14. An operon encoding three glycolytic enzymes in Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase and triosephosphate isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branny, P; de la Torre, F; Garel, J R

    1998-04-01

    The structural genes gap, pgk and tpi encoding three glycolytic enzymes, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) and triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), respectively, have been cloned and sequenced from Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus (L. bulgaricus). The genes were isolated after screening genomic sublibraries with specific gap and pgk probes obtained by PCR amplification of chromosomal DNA with degenerate primers corresponding to amino acid sequences highly conserved in GAPDHs and PGKs. Nucleotide sequencing revealed that the three genes were organized in the order gap-pgk-tpi. The translation start codons of the three genes were identified by alignment of the N-terminal sequences. These genes predicted polypeptide chains of 338, 403 and 252 amino acids for GAPDH, PGK and TPI, respectively, and they were separated by 96 bp between gap and pgk, and by only 18 bp between pgk and tpi. The codon usage in gap, pgk, tpi and three other glycolytic genes from L. bulgaricus differed, noticeably from that in other chromosomal genes. The site of transcriptional initiation was located by primer extension, and a probable promoter was identified for the gap-pgk-tpi operon. Northern hybridization of total RNA with specific probes showed two transcripts, an mRNA of 1.4 kb corresponding to the gap gene, and a less abundant mRNA of 3.4 kb corresponding to the gap-pgk-tpi cluster. The absence of a visible terminator in the 3'-end of the shorter transcript and the location of this 3'-end inside the pgk gene indicated that this shorter transcript was produced by degradation of the longer one, rather than by an early termination of transcription after the gap gene.

  15. The Multiple Localized Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Contributes to the Attenuation of the Francisella tularensis dsbA Deletion Mutant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivona Pavkova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The DsbA homolog of Francisella tularensis was previously demonstrated to be required for intracellular replication and animal death. Disruption of the dsbA gene leads to a pleiotropic phenotype that could indirectly affect a number of different cellular pathways. To reveal the broad effects of DsbA, we compared fractions enriched in membrane proteins of the wild-type FSC200 strain with the dsbA deletion strain using a SILAC-based quantitative proteomic analysis. This analysis enabled identification of 63 proteins with significantly altered amounts in the dsbA mutant strain compared to the wild-type strain. These proteins comprise a quite heterogeneous group including hypothetical proteins, proteins associated with membrane structures, and potential secreted proteins. Many of them are known to be associated with F. tularensis virulence. Several proteins were selected for further studies focused on their potential role in tularemia's pathogenesis. Of them, only the gene encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, an enzyme of glycolytic pathway, was found to be important for full virulence manifestations both in vivo and in vitro. We next created a viable mutant strain with deleted gapA gene and analyzed its phenotype. The gapA mutant is characterized by reduced virulence in mice, defective replication inside macrophages, and its ability to induce a protective immune response against systemic challenge with parental wild-type strain. We also demonstrate the multiple localization sites of this protein: In addition to within the cytosol, it was found on the cell surface, outside the cells, and in the culture medium. Recombinant GapA was successfully obtained, and it was shown that it binds host extracellular serum proteins like plasminogen, fibrinogen, and fibronectin.

  16. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of wild-type and of an active-site mutant of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase from Campylobacter jejuni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tourigny, David S.; Elliott, Paul R.; Edgell, Louise J.; Hudson, Gregg M.; Moody, Peter C. E.

    2010-01-01

    The cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of wild-type and of an active-site mutant of C. jejuni glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is reported. The genome of the enteric pathogen Campylobacter jejuni encodes a single glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that can utilize either NADP + or NAD + as coenzymes for the oxidative phosphorylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate to 1,3-diphosphoglycerate. Here, the cloning, expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of both the wild type and an active-site mutant of the enzyme are presented. Preliminary X-ray analysis revealed that in both cases the crystals diffracted to beyond 1.9 Å resolution. The space group is shown to be I4 1 22, with unit-cell parameters a = 90.75, b = 90.75, c = 225.48 Å, α = 90.46, β = 90.46, γ = 222.79°; each asymmetric unit contains only one subunit of the tetrameric enzyme

  17. Pre-steady-state kinetic studies of redox reactions catalysed by Bacillus subtilis ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase with NADP(+)/NADPH and ferredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Daisuke; Soeta, Takahiro; Sakurai, Hidehiro; Sétif, Pierre; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase ([EC1.18.1.2], FNR) from Bacillus subtilis (BsFNR) is a homodimeric flavoprotein sharing structural homology with bacterial NADPH-thioredoxin reductase. Pre-steady-state kinetics of the reactions of BsFNR with NADP(+), NADPH, NADPD (deuterated form) and B. subtilis ferredoxin (BsFd) using stopped-flow spectrophotometry were studied. Mixing BsFNR with NADP(+) and NADPH yielded two types of charge-transfer (CT) complexes, oxidized FNR (FNR(ox))-NADPH and reduced FNR (FNR(red))-NADP(+), both having CT absorption bands centered at approximately 600n m. After mixing BsFNR(ox) with about a 10-fold molar excess of NADPH (forward reaction), BsFNR was almost completely reduced at equilibrium. When BsFNR(red) was mixed with NADP(+), the amount of BsFNR(ox) increased with increasing NADP(+) concentration, but BsFNR(red) remained as the major species at equilibrium even with about 50-fold molar excess NADP(+). In both directions, the hydride-transfer was the rate-determining step, where the forward direction rate constant (~500 s(-1)) was much higher than the reverse one (reaction. The characteristics of the BsFNR reactions with NADP(+)/NADPH were compared with those of other types of FNRs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The Catalytic Bias of 2-Oxoacid:ferredoxin Oxidoreductase in CO_2: evolution and reduction through a ferredoxin-mediated electrocatalytic assay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Bin; Elliott, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes from the 2-oxoacid: ferredoxin oxidoreductase (OFOR) family engage in both CO_2 evolution and reduction in nature, depending on their physiological roles. Two enzymes and their redox partner ferredoxins (Fds) from Hydrogenobacter thermophilus and Desulfovibrio africanus were examined to investigate the basis of the catalytic bias. The Fd1 from H. thermophilus demonstrated a potential of ∼ −485 mV at room temperature, the lowest for known single [4Fe-4S] cluster Fds. It suggests a low potential electron donor may be the key factor in overcoming the large thermodynamic barrier of CO_2 reduction. The Fd-mediated electrocatalytic experiments further demonstrated the impact of Fd’s potential on the direction of the OFOR reaction: as OFOR enzymes could essentially catalyze both CO_2 evolution and reduction in vitro, the difference in their physiological roles is associated with the reduction potential of the redox partner Fd. The electrocatalytic assay could study both CO_2 evolution and reduction in one setup and is a good tool to probe Fds’ reactivity that arise from their reduction potentials.

  19. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is largely unresponsive to low regulatory levels of hydrogen peroxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sousa-Lopes Ana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The reversible oxidation of protein SH groups has been considered to be the basis of redox regulation by which changes in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 concentrations may control protein function. Several proteins become S-glutathionylated following exposure to H2O2 in a variety of cellular systems. In yeast, when using a high initial H2O2 dose, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH was identified as the major target of S-glutathionylation which leads to reversible inactivation of the enzyme. GAPDH inactivation by H2O2 functions to reroute carbohydrate flux to produce NADPH. Here we report the effect of low regulatory H2O2 doses on GAPDH activity and expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results A calibrated and controlled method of H2O2 delivery - the steady-state titration - in which cells are exposed to constant, low, and known H2O2 concentrations, was used in this study. This technique, contrary to the common bolus addition, allows determining which H2O2 concentrations trigger specific biological responses. This work shows that both in exponential- and stationary-phase cells, low regulatory H2O2 concentrations induce a large upregulation of catalase, a fingerprint of the cellular oxidative stress response, but GAPDH oxidation and the ensuing activity decrease are only observed at death-inducing high H2O2 doses. GAPDH activity is constant upon incubation with sub-lethal H2O2 doses, but in stationary-phase cells there is a differential response in the expression of the three GAPDH isoenzymes: Tdh1p is strongly upregulated while Tdh2p/Tdh3p are slightly downregulated. Conclusions In yeast GAPDH activity is largely unresponsive to low to moderate H2O2 doses. This points to a scenario where (a cellular redoxins efficiently cope with levels of GAPDH oxidation induced by a vast range of sub-lethal H2O2 concentrations, (b inactivation of GAPDH cannot be considered a sensitive biomarker of H2O2-induced oxidation in vivo

  20. The role of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapA-1 in Neisseria meningitidis adherence to human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wooldridge Karl G

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenases (GAPDHs are cytoplasmic glycolytic enzymes, which although lacking identifiable secretion signals, have also been found localized to the surface of several bacteria (and some eukaryotic organisms; where in some cases they have been shown to contribute to the colonization and invasion of host tissues. Neisseria meningitidis is an obligate human nasopharyngeal commensal which can cause life-threatening infections including septicaemia and meningitis. N. meningitidis has two genes, gapA-1 and gapA-2, encoding GAPDH enzymes. GapA-1 has previously been shown to be up-regulated on bacterial contact with host epithelial cells and is accessible to antibodies on the surface of capsule-permeabilized meningococcal cells. The aims of this study were: 1 to determine whether GapA-1 was expressed across different strains of N. meningitidis; 2 to determine whether GapA-1 surface accessibility to antibodies was dependant on the presence of capsule; 3 to determine whether GapA-1 can influence the interaction of meningococci and host cells, particularly in the key stages of adhesion and invasion. Results In this study, expression of GapA-1 was shown to be well conserved across diverse isolates of Neisseria species. Flow cytometry confirmed that GapA-1 could be detected on the cell surface, but only in a siaD-knockout (capsule-deficient background, suggesting that GapA-1 is inaccessible to antibody in in vitro-grown encapsulated meningococci. The role of GapA-1 in meningococcal pathogenesis was addressed by mutational analysis and functional complementation. Loss of GapA-1 did not affect the growth of the bacterium in vitro. However, a GapA-1 deficient mutant showed a significant reduction in adhesion to human epithelial and endothelial cells compared to the wild-type and complemented mutant. A similar reduction in adhesion levels was also apparent between a siaD-deficient meningococcal strain and an

  1. Thioredoxin, thioredoxin reductase, and alpha-crystallin revive inactivated glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase in human aged and cataract lens extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Hong; Lou, Marjorie F; Fernando, M Rohan; Harding, John J

    2006-10-02

    To investigate whether mammalian thioredoxin (Trx) and thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), with or without alpha-crystallin can revive inactivated glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) in both the cortex and nucleus of human aged clear and cataract lenses. The lens cortex (including capsule-epithelium) and the nucleus were separated from human aged clear and cataract lenses (grade II and grade IV) with similar average age. The activity of GAPDH in the water-soluble fraction after incubation with or without Trx or/and TrxR for 60 min at 30 degrees C was measured spectrophotometrically. In addition, the effect of a combination of Trx/TrxR and bovine lens alpha-crystallin was investigated. GAPDH activity was lower in the nucleus of clear lenses than in the cortex, and considerably diminished in the cataractous lenses, particularly in the nucleus of cataract lenses grade IV. Trx and TrxR were able to revive the activity of GAPDH markedly in both the cortex and nucleus of the clear and cataract lenses. The percentage increase of activity in the cortex of the clear lenses was less than that of the nucleus in the presence of Trx and TrxR, whereas it was opposite in the cataract lenses. The revival of activity in both the cortex and nucleus from the cataract lenses grade II was higher than that of the grade IV. Moreover, Trx alone, but not TrxR, efficiently enhanced GAPDH activity. The combination of Trx and TrxR had greater effect than that of either alone. In addition, alpha(L)-crystallin enhanced the activity in the cortex of cataract grade II with Trx and TrxR present. However, it failed to provide a statistically significant increase of activity in the nucleus. This is the first evidence to show that mammalian Trx and TrxR are able to revive inactivated GAPDH in human aged clear and cataract lenses, and alpha-crystallin helped this effect. The inactivation of GAPDH during aging and cataract development must be caused in part by disulphide formation and in part by

  2. Molecular association of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase and pyruvate kinase M2 with glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Mahua R.; Bag, Arup K.; Saha, Shekhar; Ghosh, Alok; Dey, Sumit K.; Das, Provas; Mandal, Chitra; Ray, Subhankar; Chakrabarti, Saikat; Ray, Manju; Jana, Siddhartha S.

    2016-01-01

    For a long time cancer cells are known for increased uptake of glucose and its metabolization through glycolysis. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a key regulatory enzyme of this pathway and can produce ATP through oxidative level of phosphorylation. Previously, we reported that GAPDH purified from a variety of malignant tissues, but not from normal tissues, was strongly inactivated by a normal metabolite, methylglyoxal (MG). Molecular mechanism behind MG mediated GAPDH inhibition in cancer cells is not well understood. GAPDH was purified from Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells based on its enzymatic activity. GAPDH associated proteins in EAC cells and 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) induced mouse tumor tissue were detected by mass spectrometry analysis and immunoprecipitation (IP) experiment, respectively. Interacting domains of GAPDH and its associated proteins were assessed by in silico molecular docking analysis. Mechanism of MG mediated GAPDH inactivation in cancer cells was evaluated by measuring enzyme activity, Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, IP and mass spectrometry analyses. Here, we report that GAPDH is associated with glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) and pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC) cells and also in 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC) induced mouse tumor tissue. Molecular docking analyses suggest C-terminal domain preference for the interaction between GAPDH and GPI. However, both C and N termini of PKM2 might be interacting with the C terminal domain of GAPDH. Expression of both PKM2 and GPI is increased in 3MC induced tumor compared with the normal tissue. In presence of 1 mM MG, association of GAPDH with PKM2 or GPI is not perturbed, but the enzymatic activity of GAPDH is reduced to 26.8 ± 5 % in 3MC induced tumor and 57.8 ± 2.3 % in EAC cells. Treatment of MG to purified GAPDH complex leads to glycation at R399 residue of PKM2 only, and changes the secondary structure of the protein complex. PKM2

  3. Yeast Tdh3 (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase is a Sir2-interacting factor that regulates transcriptional silencing and rDNA recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E Ringel

    Full Text Available Sir2 is an NAD(+-dependent histone deacetylase required to mediate transcriptional silencing and suppress rDNA recombination in budding yeast. We previously identified Tdh3, a glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, as a high expression suppressor of the lethality caused by Sir2 overexpression in yeast cells. Here we show that Tdh3 interacts with Sir2, localizes to silent chromatin in a Sir2-dependent manner, and promotes normal silencing at the telomere and rDNA. Characterization of specific TDH3 alleles suggests that Tdh3's influence on silencing requires nuclear localization but does not correlate with its catalytic activity. Interestingly, a genetic assay suggests that Tdh3, an NAD(+-binding protein, influences nuclear NAD(+ levels; we speculate that Tdh3 links nuclear Sir2 with NAD(+ from the cytoplasm.

  4. Replacing Escherichia coli NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) with a NADP-dependent enzyme from Clostridium acetobutylicum facilitates NADPH dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Irene; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Lin, Henry; Bennett, George N; San, Ka-Yiu

    2008-11-01

    Reactions requiring reducing equivalents, NAD(P)H, are of enormous importance for the synthesis of industrially valuable compounds such as carotenoids, polymers, antibiotics and chiral alcohols among others. The use of whole-cell biocatalysis can reduce process cost by acting as catalyst and cofactor regenerator at the same time; however, product yields might be limited by cofactor availability within the cell. Thus, our study focussed on the genetic manipulation of a whole-cell system by modifying metabolic pathways and enzymes to improve the overall production process. In the present work, we genetically engineered an Escherichia coli strain to increase NADPH availability to improve the productivity of products that require NADPH in its biosynthesis. The approach involved an alteration of the glycolysis step where glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) is oxidized to 1,3 bisphophoglycerate (1,3-BPG). This reaction is catalyzed by NAD-dependent endogenous glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) encoded by the gapA gene. We constructed a recombinant E. coli strain by replacing the native NAD-dependent gapA gene with a NADP-dependent GAPDH from Clostridium acetobutylicum, encoded by the gene gapC. The beauty of this approach is that the recombinant E. coli strain produces 2 mol of NADPH, instead of NADH, per mole of glucose consumed. Metabolic flux analysis showed that the flux through the pentose phosphate (PP) pathway, one of the main pathways that produce NADPH, was reduced significantly in the recombinant strain when compared to that of the parent strain. The effectiveness of the NADPH enhancing system was tested using the production of lycopene and epsilon-caprolactone as model systems using two different background strains. The recombinant strains, with increased NADPH availability, consistently showed significant higher productivity than the parent strains.

  5. The primary structures of two yeast enolase genes. Homology between the 5' noncoding flanking regions of yeast enolase and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, M J; Holland, J P; Thill, G P; Jackson, K A

    1981-02-10

    Segments of yeast genomic DNA containing two enolase structural genes have been isolated by subculture cloning procedures using a cDNA hybridization probe synthesized from purified yeast enolase mRNA. Based on restriction endonuclease and transcriptional maps of these two segments of yeast DNA, each hybrid plasmid contains a region of extensive nucleotide sequence homology which forms hybrids with the cDNA probe. The DNA sequences which flank this homologous region in the two hybrid plasmids are nonhomologous indicating that these sequences are nontandemly repeated in the yeast genome. The complete nucleotide sequence of the coding as well as the flanking noncoding regions of these genes has been determined. The amino acid sequence predicted from one reading frame of both structural genes is extremely similar to that determined for yeast enolase (Chin, C. C. Q., Brewer, J. M., Eckard, E., and Wold, F. (1981) J. Biol. Chem. 256, 1370-1376), confirming that these isolated structural genes encode yeast enolase. The nucleotide sequences of the coding regions of the genes are approximately 95% homologous, and neither gene contains an intervening sequence. Codon utilization in the enolase genes follows the same biased pattern previously described for two yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase structural genes (Holland, J. P., and Holland, M. J. (1980) J. Biol. Chem. 255, 2596-2605). DNA blotting analysis confirmed that the isolated segments of yeast DNA are colinear with yeast genomic DNA and that there are two nontandemly repeated enolase genes per haploid yeast genome. The noncoding portions of the two enolase genes adjacent to the initiation and termination codons are approximately 70% homologous and contain sequences thought to be involved in the synthesis and processing messenger RNA. Finally there are regions of extensive homology between the two enolase structural genes and two yeast glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase structural genes within the 5

  6. High-resolution crystal structures of the photoreceptor glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) with three and four-bound NAD molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Bo Y; Shi, Wuxian; Wang, Benlian; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2014-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) catalyzes the oxidative phosphorylation of d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (G3P) into 1,3-diphosphoglycerate (BGP) in the presence of the NAD cofactor. GAPDH is an important drug target because of its central role in glycolysis, and nonglycolytic processes such as nuclear RNA transport, DNA replication/repair, membrane fusion and cellular apoptosis. Recent studies found that GAPDH participates in the development of diabetic retinopathy and its progression after the cessation of hyperglycemia. Here, we report two structures for native bovine photoreceptor GAPDH as a homotetramer with differing occupancy by NAD, bGAPDH(NAD)4, and bGAPDH(NAD)3. The bGAPDH(NAD)4 was solved at 1.52 Å, the highest resolution for GAPDH. Structural comparison of the bGAPDH(NAD)4 and bGAPDH(NAD)3 models revealed novel details of conformational changes induced by cofactor binding, including a loop region (residues 54–56). Structure analysis of bGAPDH confirmed the importance of Phe34 in NAD binding, and demonstrated that Phe34 was stabilized in the presence of NAD but displayed greater mobility in its absence. The oxidative state of the active site Cys149 residue is regulated by NAD binding, because this residue was found oxidized in the absence of dinucleotide. The distance between Cys149 and His176 decreased upon NAD binding and Cys149 remained in a reduced state when NAD was bound. These findings provide an important structural step for understanding the mechanism of GAPDH activity in vision and its pathological role in retinopathies. PMID:25176140

  7. Arabidopsis Root-Type Ferredoxin:NADP(H) Oxidoreductase 2 is Involved in Detoxification of Nitrite in Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachiya, Takushi; Ueda, Nanae; Kitagawa, Munenori; Hanke, Guy; Suzuki, Akira; Hase, Toshiharu; Sakakibara, Hitoshi

    2016-11-01

    Ferredoxin:NADP(H) oxidoreductase (FNR) plays a key role in redox metabolism in plastids. Whereas leaf FNR (LFNR) is required for photosynthesis, root FNR (RFNR) is believed to provide electrons to ferredoxin (Fd)-dependent enzymes, including nitrite reductase (NiR) and Fd-glutamine-oxoglutarate aminotransferase (Fd-GOGAT) in non-photosynthetic conditions. In some herbal species, however, most nitrate reductase activity is located in photosynthetic organs, and ammonium in roots is assimilated mainly by Fd-independent NADH-GOGAT. Therefore, RFNR might have a limited impact on N assimilation in roots grown with nitrate or ammonium nitrogen sources. AtRFNR genes are rapidly induced by application of toxic nitrite. Thus, we tested the hypothesis that RFNR could contribute to nitrite reduction in roots by comparing Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings of the wild type with loss-of-function mutants of RFNR2 When these seedlings were grown under nitrate, nitrite or ammonium, only nitrite nutrition caused impaired growth and nitrite accumulation in roots of rfnr2 Supplementation of nitrite with nitrate or ammonium as N sources did not restore the root growth in rfnr2 Also, a scavenger for nitric oxide (NO) could not effectively rescue the growth impairment. Thus, nitrite toxicity, rather than N depletion or nitrite-dependent NO production, probably causes the rfnr2 root growth defect. Our results strongly suggest that RFNR2 has a major role in reduction of toxic nitrite in roots. A specific set of genes related to nitrite reduction and the supply of reducing power responded to nitrite concomitantly, suggesting that the products of these genes act co-operatively with RFNR2 to reduce nitrite in roots. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. A de novo NADPH generation pathway for improving lysine production of Corynebacterium glutamicum by rational design of the coenzyme specificity of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommareddy, Rajesh Reddy; Chen, Zhen; Rappert, Sugima; Zeng, An-Ping

    2014-09-01

    Engineering the cofactor availability is a common strategy of metabolic engineering to improve the production of many industrially important compounds. In this work, a de novo NADPH generation pathway is proposed by altering the coenzyme specificity of a native NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) to NADP, which consequently has the potential to produce additional NADPH in the glycolytic pathway. Specifically, the coenzyme specificity of GAPDH of Corynebacterium glutamicum is systematically manipulated by rational protein design and the effect of the manipulation for cellular metabolism and lysine production is evaluated. By a combinatorial modification of four key residues within the coenzyme binding sites, different GAPDH mutants with varied coenzyme specificity were constructed. While increasing the catalytic efficiency of GAPDH towards NADP enhanced lysine production in all of the tested mutants, the most significant improvement of lysine production (~60%) was achieved with the mutant showing similar preference towards both NAD and NADP. Metabolic flux analysis with (13)C isotope studies confirmed that there was no significant change of flux towards the pentose phosphate pathway and the increased lysine yield was mainly attributed to the NADPH generated by the mutated GAPDH. The present study highlights the importance of protein engineering as a key strategy in de novo pathway design and overproduction of desired products. Copyright © 2014 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH interaction with 3' ends of Japanese encephalitis virus RNA and colocalization with the viral NS5 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou Shih-Jie

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Replication of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV genome depends on host factors for successfully completing their life cycles; to do this, host factors have been recruited and/or relocated to the site of viral replication. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, a cellular metabolic protein, was found to colocalize with viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (NS5 in JEV-infected cells. Subcellular fractionation further indicated that GAPDH remained relatively constant in the cytosol, while increasing at 12 to 24 hours postinfection (hpi and decreasing at 36 hpi in the nuclear fraction of infected cells. In contrast, the redistribution patterns of GAPDH were not observed in the uninfected cells. Co-immunoprecipitation of GAPDH and JEV NS5 protein revealed no direct protein-protein interaction; instead, GAPDH binds to the 3' termini of plus- and minus-strand RNAs of JEV by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Accordingly, GAPDH binds to the minus strand more efficiently than to the plus strand of JEV RNAs. This study highlights the findings that infection of JEV changes subcellular localization of GAPDH suggesting that this metabolic enzyme may play a role in JEV replication.

  10. Proteome analysis of a Lactococcus lactis strain overexpressing gapA suggests that the gene product is an auxiliary glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willemoes, Martin; Kilstrup, Mogens; Roepstorff, P.

    2002-01-01

    revealed two neighbouring protein spots, GapBI and GapBII, with amino terminal sequences identical to the product of gapA from the L. lactis subspecies cremoris strain LM0230 and that of the two IL1403 sequences. In order to assign the two protein spots to their respective genes we constructed an L. lactis...... was specific for NAD. No NADP dependent activity was detected. Proteome analysis of the gapA overexpressing strain revealed two new protein spots, GapAI and GapAII, not previously detected in proteome analysis of MG1363. Results from mass spectrometry analysis of GapA and GapB and comparison with the deduced......The sequence of the genome from the Lactococcus lactis subspecies lactis strain IL1403 shows the presence of two reading frames, gapA and gapB, putatively encoding glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Previous proteomic analysis of the L. lactis subspecies cremoris strain MG1363 has...

  11. Cloning and molecular characterization of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding gene and cDNA from the plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, M D; Rikkerink, E H; Solon, S L; Crowhurst, R N

    1992-12-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (gpdA) has been identified from a genomic DNA library prepared from the plant pathogenic fungus Glomerella cingulata. Nucleotide sequence data revealed that this gene codes for a putative 338-amino-acid protein encoded by two exons of 129 and 885 bp, separated by an intron 216 bp long. The 5' leader sequence is also spliced by an intron of 156 bp. A cDNA clone was prepared using the polymerase chain reaction, the sequence of which was used to confirm the presence of the intron in the coding sequence and the splicing of the 5' leader sequence. The transcriptional start point (tsp) was mapped at -253 nt from the site of the initiation of translation by primer extension and is adjacent to a 42-bp pyrimidine-rich region. The general structure of the 5' flanking region shows similarities to gpdA from Aspergillus nidulans. The putative protein product is 71-86% identical at the aa level to GPDs from Aspergillus nidulans, Cryphonectria parasitica, Curvularia lunata, Podospora anserina and Ustilago maydis.

  12. Pleurocidin Peptide Enhances Grouper Anti-Vibrio harveyi Immunity Elicited by Poly(lactide-co-glycolide)-Encapsulated Recombinant Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Shu-Chun; Huang, Wan-Ling; Kau, Sau-Wei; Yang, Yun-Pei; Yang, Chung-Da

    2014-05-14

    Outer membrane proteins, such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), are considered immunodominant antigens for eliciting protective immunity against Vibrio harveyi, the main etiological agent of vibriosis in fish. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs), such as pleurocidin (PLE), play important roles in activating and recruiting immune cells, thereby contributing to subsequent innate and adaptive immune responses. In the present study, we aimed to use PLE peptide as a potent adjuvant to improve the immunogenicity of V. harveyi recombinant GAPDH (rGAPDH). In order to prepare a controlled-release vaccine, PLE peptide and rGAPDH protein were simultaneously encapsulated into polymeric microparticles made from the biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLG) polymer. The resulting PLG-encapsulated PLE plus rGAPDH (PLG-PLE/rGAPDH) microparticles, 3.21-6.27 μm in diameter, showed 72%-83% entrapment efficiency and durably released both PLE and rGAPDH for a long 30-day period. Following peritoneal immunization in grouper (Epinephelus coioides), PLG-PLE/rGAPDH microparticles resulted in significantly higher (p PLE/rGAPDH microparticles conferred a high survival rate (85%), which was significantly higher (p PLE peptide exhibits an efficacious adjuvant effect to elicit not only improved immunity, but also enhanced protection against V. harveyi in grouper induced by rGAPDH protein encapsulated in PLG microparticles.

  13. Aromatic hydrocarbons upregulate glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and induce changes in actin cytoskeleton. Role of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyes-Hernandez, O.D.; Mejia-Garcia, A.; Sanchez-Ocampo, E.M.; Castro-Munozledo, F.; Hernandez-Munoz, R.; Elizondo, G.

    2009-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a multifunctional enzyme involved in several cellular functions including glycolysis, membrane transport, microtubule assembly, DNA replication and repair, nuclear RNA export, apoptosis, and the detection of nitric oxide stress. Therefore, modifications in the regulatory ability and function of GAPDH may alter cellular homeostasis. We report here that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and β-naphthoflavone, which are well-known ligands for the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), increase GAPDH mRNA levels in vivo and in vitro, respectively. These compounds fail to induce GAPDH transcription in an AhR-null mouse model, suggesting that the increase in GAPDH level is dependent upon AhR activation. To analyse the consequences of AhR ligands on GAPDH function, mice were treated with TCDD and the level of liver activity of GAPDH was determined. The results showed that TCDD treatment increased GAPDH activity. On the other hand, treatment of Hepa-1 cells with β-naphthoflavone leads to an increase in microfilament density when compared to untreated cultures. Collectively, these results suggest that AhR ligands, such as polycyclic hydrocarbons, can modify GAPDH expression and, therefore, have the potential to alter the multiple functions of this enzyme.

  14. Cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases play crucial roles in controlling cold-induced sweetening and apical dominance of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tengfei; Fang, Hui; Liu, Jun; Reid, Stephen; Hou, Juan; Zhou, Tingting; Tian, Zhendong; Song, Botao; Xie, Conghua

    2017-12-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is an important enzyme that functions in producing energy and supplying intermediates for cellular metabolism. Recent researches indicate that GAPDHs have multiple functions beside glycolysis. However, little information is available for functions of GAPDHs in potato. Here, we identified 4 putative cytosolic GAPDH genes in potato genome and demonstrated that the StGAPC1, StGAPC2, and StGAPC3, which are constitutively expressed in potato tissues and cold inducible in tubers, encode active cytosolic GAPDHs. Cosuppression of these 3 GAPC genes resulted in low tuber GAPDH activity, consequently the accumulation of reducing sugars in cold stored tubers by altering the tuber metabolite pool sizes favoring the sucrose pathway. Furthermore, GAPCs-silenced tubers exhibited a loss of apical dominance dependent on cell death of tuber apical bud meristem (TAB-meristem). It was also confirmed that StGAPC1, StGAPC2, and StGAPC3 interacted with the autophagy-related protein 3 (ATG3), implying that the occurrence of cell death in TAB-meristem could be induced by ATG3 associated events. Collectively, the present research evidences first that the GAPC genes play crucial roles in diverse physiological and developmental processes in potato tubers. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Pleurocidin Peptide Enhances Grouper Anti-Vibrio harveyi Immunity Elicited by Poly(lactide-co-glycolide-Encapsulated Recombinant Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate Dehydrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chun Chuang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Outer membrane proteins, such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, are considered immunodominant antigens for eliciting protective immunity against Vibrio harveyi, the main etiological agent of vibriosis in fish. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, such as pleurocidin (PLE, play important roles in activating and recruiting immune cells, thereby contributing to subsequent innate and adaptive immune responses. In the present study, we aimed to use PLE peptide as a potent adjuvant to improve the immunogenicity of V. harveyi recombinant GAPDH (rGAPDH. In order to prepare a controlled-release vaccine, PLE peptide and rGAPDH protein were simultaneously encapsulated into polymeric microparticles made from the biodegradable poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLG polymer. The resulting PLG-encapsulated PLE plus rGAPDH (PLG-PLE/rGAPDH microparticles, 3.21–6.27 μm in diameter, showed 72%–83% entrapment efficiency and durably released both PLE and rGAPDH for a long 30-day period. Following peritoneal immunization in grouper (Epinephelus coioides, PLG-PLE/rGAPDH microparticles resulted in significantly higher (p < 0.05, nested design long-lasting GAPDH-specific immunity (serum titers and lymphocyte proliferation than PLG-encapsulated rGAPDH (PLG-rGAPDH microparticles. After an experimental challenge of V. harveyi, PLG-PLE/rGAPDH microparticles conferred a high survival rate (85%, which was significantly higher (p < 0.05, chi-square test than that induced by PLG-rGAPDH microparticles (67%. In conclusion, PLE peptide exhibits an efficacious adjuvant effect to elicit not only improved immunity, but also enhanced protection against V. harveyi in grouper induced by rGAPDH protein encapsulated in PLG microparticles.

  16. Calcium- and Nitric Oxide-Dependent Nuclear Accumulation of Cytosolic Glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase in Response to Long Chain Bases in Tobacco BY-2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Testard, Ambroise; Da Silva, Daniel; Ormancey, Mélanie; Pichereaux, Carole; Pouzet, Cécile; Jauneau, Alain; Grat, Sabine; Robe, Eugénie; Brière, Christian; Cotelle, Valérie; Mazars, Christian; Thuleau, Patrice

    2016-10-01

    Sphinganine or dihydrosphingosine (d18:0, DHS), one of the most abundant free sphingoid long chain bases (LCBs) in plants, is known to induce a calcium-dependent programmed cell death (PCD) in plants. In addition, in tobacco BY-2 cells, it has been shown that DHS triggers a rapid production of H 2 O 2 and nitric oxide (NO). Recently, in analogy to what is known in the animal field, plant cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPC), a ubiquitous enzyme involved in glycolysis, has been suggested to fulfill other functions associated with its oxidative post-translational modifications such as S-nitrosylation on cysteine residues. In particular, in mammals, stress signals inducing NO production promote S-nitrosylation of GAPC and its subsequent translocation into the nucleus where the protein participates in the establishment of apoptosis. In the present study, we investigated the behavior of GAPC in tobacco BY-2 cells treated with DHS. We found that upon DHS treatment, an S-nitrosylated form of GAPC accumulated in the nucleus. This accumulation was dependent on NO production. Two genes encoding GAPCs, namely Nt(BY-2)GAPC1 and Nt(BY-2)GAPC2, were cloned. Transient overexpression of Nt(BY-2)GAPC-green fluorescent protein (GFP) chimeric constructs indicated that both proteins localized in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus. Mutating into serine the two cysteine residues thought to be S-nitrosylated in response to DHS did not modify the localization of the proteins, suggesting that S-nitrosylation of GAPCs was probably not necessary for their nuclear relocalization. Interestingly, using Förster resonance energy transfer experiments, we showed that Nt(BY-2)GAPCs interact with nucleic acids in the nucleus. When GAPCs were mutated on their cysteine residues, their interaction with nucleic acids was abolished, suggesting a role for GAPCs in the protection of nucleic acids against oxidative stress. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on

  17. Identification of Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH as a binding protein for a 68-kDa Bacillus thuringiensis parasporal protein cytotoxic against leukaemic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadarajah Vishna

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt, an ubiquitous gram-positive spore-forming bacterium forms parasporal proteins during the stationary phase of its growth. Recent findings of selective human cancer cell-killing activity in non-insecticidal Bt isolates resulted in a new category of Bt parasporal protein called parasporin. However, little is known about the receptor molecules that bind parasporins and the mechanism of anti-cancer activity. A Malaysian Bt isolate, designated Bt18 produces parasporal protein that exhibit preferential cytotoxic activity for human leukaemic T cells (CEM-SS but is non-cytotoxic to normal T cells or other cancer cell lines such as human cervical cancer (HeLa, human breast cancer (MCF-7 and colon cancer (HT-29 suggesting properties similar to parasporin. In this study we aim to identify the binding protein for Bt18 in human leukaemic T cells. Methods Bt18 parasporal protein was separated using Mono Q anion exchange column attached to a HPLC system and antibody was raised against the purified 68-kDa parasporal protein. Receptor binding assay was used to detect the binding protein for Bt18 parasporal protein in CEM-SS cells and the identified protein was sent for N-terminal sequencing. NCBI protein BLAST was used to analyse the protein sequence. Double immunofluorescence staining techniques was applied to localise Bt18 and binding protein on CEM-SS cell. Results Anion exchange separation of Bt18 parasporal protein yielded a 68-kDa parasporal protein with specific cytotoxic activity. Polyclonal IgG (anti-Bt18 for the 68-kDa parasporal protein was successfully raised and purified. Receptor binding assay showed that Bt18 parasporal protein bound to a 36-kDa protein from the CEM-SS cells lysate. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the 36-kDa protein was GKVKVGVNGFGRIGG. NCBI protein BLAST revealed that the binding protein was Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH. Double immunofluorescence staining showed

  18. Protective immune responses against Schistosoma mansoni infection by immunization with functionally active gut-derived cysteine peptidases alone and in combination with glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatem Tallima

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Schistosomiasis, a severe disease caused by parasites of the genus Schistosoma, is prevalent in 74 countries, affecting more than 250 million people, particularly children. We have previously shown that the Schistosoma mansoni gut-derived cysteine peptidase, cathepsin B1 (SmCB1, administered without adjuvant, elicits protection (>60% against challenge infection of S. mansoni or S. haematobium in outbred, CD-1 mice. Here we compare the immunogenicity and protective potential of another gut-derived cysteine peptidase, S. mansoni cathepsin L3 (SmCL3, alone, and in combination with SmCB1. We also examined whether protective responses could be boosted by including a third non-peptidase schistosome secreted molecule, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (SG3PDH, with the two peptidases.While adjuvant-free SmCB1 and SmCL3 induced type 2 polarized responses in CD-1 outbred mice those elicited by SmCL3 were far weaker than those induced by SmCB1. Nevertheless, both cysteine peptidases evoked highly significant (P < 0.005 reduction in challenge worm burden (54-65% as well as worm egg counts and viability. A combination of SmCL3 and SmCB1 did not induce significantly stronger immune responses or higher protection than that achieved using each peptidase alone. However, when the two peptidases were combined with SG3PDH the levels of protection against challenge S. mansoni infection reached 70-76% and were accompanied by highly significant (P < 0.005 decreases in worm egg counts and viability. Similarly, high levels of protection were achieved in hamsters immunized with the cysteine peptidase/SG3PDH-based vaccine.Gut-derived cysteine peptidases are highly protective against schistosome challenge infection when administered subcutaneously without adjuvant to outbred CD-1 mice and hamsters, and can also act to enhance the efficacy of other schistosome antigens, such as SG3PDH. This cysteine peptidase-based vaccine should now be advanced to experiments in

  19. Antitrypanosomal compounds from the essential oil and extracts of Keetia leucantha leaves with inhibitor activity on Trypanosoma brucei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bero, J; Beaufay, C; Hannaert, V; Hérent, M-F; Michels, P A; Quetin-Leclercq, J

    2013-02-15

    Keetia leucantha is a West African tree used in traditional medicine to treat several diseases among which parasitic infections. The dichloromethane extract of leaves was previously shown to possess growth-inhibitory activities on Plasmodium falciparum, Trypanosoma brucei brucei and Leishmania mexicana mexicana with low or no cytotoxicity (>100 μg/ml on human normal fibroblasts) (Bero et al. 2009, 2011). In continuation of our investigations on the antitrypanosomal compounds from this dichloromethane extract, we analyzed by GC-FID and GC-MS the essential oil of its leaves obtained by hydrodistillation and the major triterpenic acids in this extract by LC-MS. Twenty-seven compounds were identified in the oil whose percentages were calculated using the normalization method. The essential oil, seven of its constituents and the three triterpenic acids were evaluated for their antitrypanosomal activity on Trypanosoma brucei brucei bloodstream forms (Tbb BSF) and procyclic forms (Tbb PF) to identify an activity on the glycolytic process of trypanosomes. The oil showed an IC(50) of 20.9 μg/ml on Tbb BSF and no activity was observed on Tbb PF. The best antitrypanosomal activity was observed for ursolic acid with IC(50) of 2.5 and 6.5 μg/ml respectively on Tbb BSF and Tbb PF. The inhibitory activity on a glycolytic enzyme of T. brucei, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), was also evaluated for betulinic acid, olenaolic acid, ursolic acid, phytol, α-ionone and β-ionone. The three triterpenic acids and β-ionone showed inhibitory activities on GAPDH with oleanolic acid being the most active with an inhibition of 72.63% at 20 μg/ml. This paper reports for the first time the composition and antitrypanosomal activity of the essential oil of Keetia leucantha. Several of its constituents and three triterpenic acids present in the dichloromethane leaves extract showed a higher antitrypanosomal activity on bloodstream forms of Tbb as compared to procyclic forms

  20. An unexpected phosphate binding site in Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Crystal structures of apo, holo and ternary complex of Cryptosporidium parvum enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Debasish

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The structure, function and reaction mechanism of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH have been extensively studied. Based on these studies, three anion binding sites have been identified, one 'Ps' site (for binding the C-3 phosphate of the substrate and two sites, 'Pi' and 'new Pi', for inorganic phosphate. According to the original flip-flop model, the substrate phosphate group switches from the 'Pi' to the 'Ps' site during the multistep reaction. In light of the discovery of the 'new Pi' site, a modified flip-flop mechanism, in which the C-3 phosphate of the substrate binds to the 'new Pi' site and flips to the 'Ps' site before the hydride transfer, was proposed. An alternative model based on a number of structures of B. stearothermophilus GAPDH ternary complexes (non-covalent and thioacyl intermediate proposes that in the ternary Michaelis complex the C-3 phosphate binds to the 'Ps' site and flips from the 'Ps' to the 'new Pi' site during or after the redox step. Results We determined the crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum GAPDH in the apo and holo (enzyme + NAD state and the structure of the ternary enzyme-cofactor-substrate complex using an active site mutant enzyme. The C. parvum GAPDH complex was prepared by pre-incubating the enzyme with substrate and cofactor, thereby allowing free movement of the protein structure and substrate molecules during their initial encounter. Sulfate and phosphate ions were excluded from purification and crystallization steps. The quality of the electron density map at 2Å resolution allowed unambiguous positioning of the substrate. In three subunits of the homotetramer the C-3 phosphate group of the non-covalently bound substrate is in the 'new Pi' site. A concomitant movement of the phosphate binding loop is observed in these three subunits. In the fourth subunit the C-3 phosphate occupies an unexpected site not seen before and the phosphate binding loop remains in

  1. An unexpected phosphate binding site in Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase: Crystal structures of apo, holo and ternary complex of Cryptosporidium parvum enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, William J; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish; (UAB)

    2009-06-08

    The structure, function and reaction mechanism of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) have been extensively studied. Based on these studies, three anion binding sites have been identified, one 'Ps' site (for binding the C-3 phosphate of the substrate) and two sites, 'Pi' and 'new Pi', for inorganic phosphate. According to the original flip-flop model, the substrate phosphate group switches from the 'Pi' to the 'Ps' site during the multistep reaction. In light of the discovery of the 'new Pi' site, a modified flip-flop mechanism, in which the C-3 phosphate of the substrate binds to the 'new Pi' site and flips to the 'Ps' site before the hydride transfer, was proposed. An alternative model based on a number of structures of B. stearothermophilus GAPDH ternary complexes (non-covalent and thioacyl intermediate) proposes that in the ternary Michaelis complex the C-3 phosphate binds to the 'Ps' site and flips from the 'Ps' to the 'new Pi' site during or after the redox step. We determined the crystal structure of Cryptosporidium parvum GAPDH in the apo and holo (enzyme + NAD) state and the structure of the ternary enzyme-cofactor-substrate complex using an active site mutant enzyme. The C. parvum GAPDH complex was prepared by pre-incubating the enzyme with substrate and cofactor, thereby allowing free movement of the protein structure and substrate molecules during their initial encounter. Sulfate and phosphate ions were excluded from purification and crystallization steps. The quality of the electron density map at 2{angstrom} resolution allowed unambiguous positioning of the substrate. In three subunits of the homotetramer the C-3 phosphate group of the non-covalently bound substrate is in the 'new Pi' site. A concomitant movement of the phosphate binding loop is observed in these three subunits. In the fourth subunit the C-3 phosphate

  2. Kinetic studies of the acylation of pig muscle–d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase by 1,3-diphosphoglycerate and of proton uptake and release in the overall enzyme mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, P. J.; Trentham, D. R.

    1973-01-01

    In the presence of NAD+ the acylation by 1,3-diphosphoglycerate of the four active sites of pig muscle d-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase can be monitored at 365nm by the disappearance of the absorption band present in the binary complex of NAD+ and the enzyme. A non-specific salt effect decreased the acylation rate 25-fold when the ionic strength was increased from 0.10 to 1.0. This caused acylation to be the rate-limiting process in the enzyme-catalysed reductive dephosphorylation of 1,3-diphosphoglycerate at high ionic strength at pH8. The salt effect permitted investigation of the acylation over a wide range of conditions. Variation of pH from 5.4 to 8.6 produced at most a two-fold change in the acylation rate. One proton was taken up per site acylated at pH8.0. By using a chromophoric H+ indicator the rate of proton uptake could be monitored during the acylation and was also almost invariant in the pH range 5.5–8.5. Transient kinetic studies of the overall enzyme-catalysed reaction indicated that acylation was the process involving proton uptake at pH8.0. The enzyme mechanism is discussed in the light of these results. PMID:4360248

  3. Small-angle X-ray scattering studies on the X-ray induced aggregation of ribonnuclease, lactate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and serum albumin. A comparison with malate synthase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zipper, P.; Gatterer, H.G.; Schutz, J.; Durchschlag, H.

    1980-01-01

    The X-ray induced aggregation of ribonuclease, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and serum albumin in aqueous solution was monitored in situ by means of small-angle X-ray scattering. Measurements carried out with ribonuclease, LDH and serum albumin in the absence of dithiothreitol (DTT) and with GAPDH in the presence of 0.2mM DTT established the following series for the rates of aggregation of the proteins under these conditions: ribonuclease >LDH> >GAPDH> serum albumin. Within six hours from the beginning of irradiation (i.e. about the time required for the exposure of one complete scattering curve under the conditions of our experiments) the following increases of R tilde resulted: ribonuclease 9%, LDH 7%, GAPDH 4%, serum albumin <1%. Changes of R tilde exceeding 1% are, of course, too high to be tolerated in conventional scattering experiments. Measurements carried out with LDH and GAPDH in the presence of 2mM DTT established a strong protective effect of DTT against the X-ray induced aggregation of these enzymes. The initial increase of R tilde upon irradiation of LDH and GAPDH in the presence of 2mM DTT was found to be even lower than the increase of R tilde observed when serum albumin was irradiated in the absence of DTT. However, the observed decrease of anti x of LDH and GAPDH at the early stages of irradiation suggested the occurrence of fragmentation of the enzymes as another consequence of radiation damage. This finding is discussed in context with the results from previous scattering experiments and electrophoretic studies on malate synthase. (author)

  4. Ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP reductase from photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic tissues of tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, L. S.; Yee, B. C.; Buchanan, B. B.; Kamide, K.; Sanada, Y.; Wada, K.

    1991-01-01

    Ferredoxin and ferredoxin-NADP+ oxidoreductase (FNR) were purified from leaves, roots, and red and green pericarp of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum, cv VFNT and cv Momotaro). Four different ferredoxins were identified on the basis of N-terminal amino acid sequence and charge. Ferredoxins I and II were the most prevalent forms in leaves and green pericarp, and ferredoxin III was the most prevalent in roots. Red pericarp of the VFNT cv yielded variable amounts of ferredoxins II and III plus a unique form, ferredoxin IV. Red pericarp of the Momotaro cv contained ferredoxins I, II, and IV. This represents the first demonstration of ferredoxin in a chromoplast-containing tissue. There were no major differences among the tomato ferredoxins in absorption spectrum or cytochrome c reduction activity. Two forms of FNR were present in tomato as judged by anion exchange chromatography and by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. FNR II had a lower apparent relative molecular weight, a slightly altered absorption spectrum, and a lower specific activity for cytochrome c reduction than FNR I. FNR II could be a partially degraded form of FNR I. The FNRs from the different tissues of tomato plants all showed diaphorase activity, with FNR II being more active than FNR I. The presence of ferredoxin and FNR in heterotrophic tissues of tomato is consistent with the existence of a nonphotosynthetic ferredoxin/FNR redox pathway to support the function of ferredoxin-dependent enzymes.

  5. Aldonolactone oxidoreductases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, N.G.H.; Berkel, van W.J.H.

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C is a widely used vitamin. Here we review the occurrence and properties of aldonolactone oxidoreductases, an important group of flavoenzymes responsible for the ultimate production of vitamin C and its analogs in animals, plants, and single-cell organisms.

  6. X-ray structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, Elena J.; Elsen, Nathaniel L.; Seder, Kory D.; McCoy, Jason G.; Fox, Brian G.; Phillips Jr, George N.

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of a soluble Rieske ferredoxin from M. musculus was solved at 2.07 Å resolution, revealing an iron–sulfur cluster-binding domain with similar architecture to the Rieske-type domains of bacterial aromatic dioxygenases. The ferredoxin was also shown to be capable of accepting electrons from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic oxidoreductases. The 2.07 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a soluble Rieske-type ferredoxin from Mus musculus encoded by the gene Mm.266515 is reported. Although they are present as covalent domains in eukaryotic membrane oxidase complexes, soluble Rieske-type ferredoxins have not previously been observed in eukaryotes. The overall structure of the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin is typical of this class of iron–sulfur proteins and consists of a larger partial β-barrel domain and a smaller domain containing Cys57, His59, Cys80 and His83 that binds the [2Fe–2S] cluster. The S atoms of the cluster are hydrogen-bonded by six backbone amide N atoms in a pattern typical of membrane-bound high-potential eukaryotic respiratory Rieske ferredoxins. However, phylogenetic analysis suggested that the mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was more closely related to bacterial Rieske-type ferredoxins. Correspondingly, the structure revealed an extended loop most similar to that seen in Rieske-type ferredoxin subunits of bacterial aromatic dioxygenases, including the positioning of an aromatic side chain (Tyr85) between this loop and the [2Fe–2S] cluster. The mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was shown to be capable of accepting electrons from both eukaryotic and prokaryotic oxidoreductases, although it was unable to serve as an electron donor for a bacterial monooxygenase complex. The human homolog of mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin was also cloned and purified. It behaved identically to mouse Rieske-type ferredoxin in all biochemical characterizations but did not crystallize. Based on its high sequence identity, the structure of the

  7. A new bianthron glycoside as inhibitor of Trypanosoma cruzi glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macedo, Edangelo M.S. de; Silva, Maria G.V.; Wiggers, Helton J.; Montanari, Carlos A.; Braz-Filho, Raimundo; Andricopulo, Adriano D.

    2009-01-01

    A phytochemical investigation of the ethanolic extract of stalks of Senna martiana Benth. (Leguminoseae), native specie of northeast Brazil, resulted in the isolation and spectroscopic characterization of a new bianthrone glycoside, martianine 1 (10,10'-il-chrysophanol-10-oxi- 10,10'-bi-glucosyl). Its identification was established by HRMS, IR and 2D NMR experiments. The evaluation of martianine trypanocidal activity was carried out against gliceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme from Trypanosoma cruzi. Its inhibitory constant (K i ) is in the low micromolar concentration and it was determined by isothermal titration calorimetry to be 27.3 +-2.47 μmol L -1 . The non-competitive mechanism is asserted to be putative of the mode of action martianine displays against T. cruzi GAPDH. Results show that martianine has a great potential to become new lead molecule by inhibiting this key enzyme and for the development of new drugs against Chagas disease. (author)

  8. Regulation of plant cytosolic glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoforms by thiol modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgrefe, Simone; Gohlke, Jochen; Starmann, Julia; Druce, Samantha; Klocke, Susanne; Altmann, Bianca; Wojtera, Joanna; Lindermayr, Christian; Scheibe, Renate

    2008-06-01

    Cytosolic NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde 3-P dehydrogenase (GAPDH; GapC; EC 1.2.1.12) catalyzes the oxidation of triose phosphates during glycolysis in all organisms, but additional functions of the protein has been put forward. Because of its reactive cysteine residue in the active site, it is susceptible to protein modification and oxidation. The addition of GSSG, and much more efficiently of S-nitrosoglutathione, was shown to inactivate the enzymes from Arabidopsis thaliana (isoforms GapC1 and 2), spinach, yeast and rabbit muscle. Inactivation was fully or at least partially reversible upon addition of DTT. The incorporation of glutathione upon formation of a mixed disulfide could be shown using biotinylated glutathione ethyl ester. Furthermore, using the biotin-switch assay, nitrosylated thiol groups could be shown to occur after treatment with nitric oxide donors. Using mass spectrometry and mutant proteins with one cysteine lacking, both cysteines (Cys-155 and Cys-159) were found to occur as glutathionylated and as nitrosylated forms. In preliminary experiments, it was shown that both GapC1 and GapC2 can bind to a partial gene sequence of the NADP-dependent malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.37; At5g58330). Transiently expressed GapC-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins were localized to the nucleus in A. thaliana protoplasts. As nuclear localization and DNA binding of GAPDH had been shown in numerous systems to occur upon stress, we assume that such mechanism might be part of the signaling pathway to induce increased malate-valve capacity and possibly other protective systems upon overreduction and initial formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species as well as to decrease and protect metabolism at the same time by modification of essential cysteine residues.

  9. Disparate sequence characteristics of the Erysiphe graminis f.sp. hordei glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, S.K.; Justesen, A.F.; Giese, H.

    1997-01-01

    to be similar for all four genes. The results of the codon-usage analysis suggest that Egh is more flexible than other fungi in the choice of nucleotides at the wobble position. Codon-usage preferences in Egh and barley genes indicate a level of difference which may be exploited to discriminate between fungal...

  10. Characterization and possible function of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-spermatogenic protein GAPDHS in mammalian sperm

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Margaryan, Hasmik; Dorosh, Andriy; Čapková, Jana; Maňásková-Postlerová, Pavla; Philimonenko, Anatoly; Hozák, Pavel; Pěknicová, Jana

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 15 (2015) ISSN 1477-7827 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA ČR(CZ) GAP503/12/1834 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : monoclonal antibodies * spermatozoa * GAPDHS * immunolabeling * transmission electron microscopy * in vitro sperm/zona pellucida binding assay Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UMG-J) Impact factor: 2.147, year: 2015

  11. FdC1 and Leaf-Type Ferredoxins Channel Electrons From Photosystem I to Different Downstream Electron Acceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiaoqian; Chen, Shuai; Voon, Chia Pao; Wong, Kam-Bo; Tikkanen, Mikko; Lim, Boon L

    2018-01-01

    Plant-type ferredoxins in Arabidopsis transfer electrons from the photosystem I to multiple redox-driven enzymes involved in the assimilation of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur. Leaf-type ferredoxins also modulate the switch between the linear and cyclic electron routes of the photosystems. Recently, two novel ferredoxin homologs with extra C-termini were identified in the Arabidopsis genome (AtFdC1, AT4G14890; AtFdC2, AT1G32550). FdC1 was considered as an alternative electron acceptor of PSI under extreme ferredoxin-deficient conditions. Here, we showed that FdC1 could interact with some, but not all, electron acceptors of leaf-type Fds, including the ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR), sulfite reductase (SiR), and nitrite reductase (NiR). Photoreduction assay on cytochrome c and enzyme assays confirmed its capability to receive electrons from PSI and donate electrons to the Fd-dependent SiR and NiR but not to the ferredoxin-NADP + oxidoreductase (FNR). Hence, FdC1 and leaf-type Fds may play differential roles by channeling electrons from photosystem I to different downstream electron acceptors in photosynthetic tissues. In addition, the median redox potential of FdC1 may allow it to receive electrons from FNR in non-photosynthetic plastids.

  12. Coupled Ferredoxin and Crotonyl Coenzyme A (CoA) Reduction with NADH Catalyzed by the Butyryl-CoA Dehydrogenase/Etf Complex from Clostridium kluyveri▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuli; Hinderberger, Julia; Seedorf, Henning; Zhang, Jin; Buckel, Wolfgang; Thauer, Rudolf K.

    2008-01-01

    Cell extracts of butyrate-forming clostridia have been shown to catalyze acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA)- and ferredoxin-dependent formation of H2 from NADH. It has been proposed that these bacteria contain an NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase which is allosterically regulated by acetyl-CoA. We report here that ferredoxin reduction with NADH in cell extracts from Clostridium kluyveri is catalyzed by the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase/Etf complex and that the acetyl-CoA dependence previously observed is due to the fact that the cell extracts catalyze the reduction of acetyl-CoA with NADH via crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA. The cytoplasmic butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase complex was purified and is shown to couple the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin (E0′ = −410 mV) with NADH (E0′ = −320 mV) to the exergonic reduction of crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA (E0′ = −10 mV) with NADH. The stoichiometry of the fully coupled reaction is extrapolated to be as follows: 2 NADH + 1 oxidized ferredoxin + 1 crotonyl-CoA = 2 NAD+ + 1 ferredoxin reduced by two electrons + 1 butyryl-CoA. The implications of this finding for the energy metabolism of butyrate-forming anaerobes are discussed in the accompanying paper. PMID:17993531

  13. Coupled ferredoxin and crotonyl coenzyme A (CoA) reduction with NADH catalyzed by the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase/Etf complex from Clostridium kluyveri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuli; Hinderberger, Julia; Seedorf, Henning; Zhang, Jin; Buckel, Wolfgang; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2008-02-01

    Cell extracts of butyrate-forming clostridia have been shown to catalyze acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA)- and ferredoxin-dependent formation of H2 from NADH. It has been proposed that these bacteria contain an NADH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase which is allosterically regulated by acetyl-CoA. We report here that ferredoxin reduction with NADH in cell extracts from Clostridium kluyveri is catalyzed by the butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase/Etf complex and that the acetyl-CoA dependence previously observed is due to the fact that the cell extracts catalyze the reduction of acetyl-CoA with NADH via crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA. The cytoplasmic butyryl-CoA dehydrogenase complex was purified and is shown to couple the endergonic reduction of ferredoxin (E0' = -410 mV) with NADH (E0' = -320 mV) to the exergonic reduction of crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA (E0' = -10 mV) with NADH. The stoichiometry of the fully coupled reaction is extrapolated to be as follows: 2 NADH + 1 oxidized ferredoxin + 1 crotonyl-CoA = 2 NAD+ + 1 ferredoxin reduced by two electrons + 1 butyryl-CoA. The implications of this finding for the energy metabolism of butyrate-forming anaerobes are discussed in the accompanying paper.

  14. Energetic selection of topology in ferredoxins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Dongun Kim

    Full Text Available Models of early protein evolution posit the existence of short peptides that bound metals and ions and served as transporters, membranes or catalysts. The Cys-X-X-Cys-X-X-Cys heptapeptide located within bacterial ferredoxins, enclosing an Fe₄S₄ metal center, is an attractive candidate for such an early peptide. Ferredoxins are ancient proteins and the simple α+β fold is found alone or as a domain in larger proteins throughout all three kingdoms of life. Previous analyses of the heptapeptide conformation in experimentally determined ferredoxin structures revealed a pervasive right-handed topology, despite the fact that the Fe₄S₄ cluster is achiral. Conformational enumeration of a model CGGCGGC heptapeptide bound to a cubane iron-sulfur cluster indicates both left-handed and right-handed folds could exist and have comparable stabilities. However, only the natural ferredoxin topology provides a significant network of backbone-to-cluster hydrogen bonds that would stabilize the metal-peptide complex. The optimal peptide configuration (alternating α(L,α(R is that of an α-sheet, providing an additional mechanism where oligomerization could stabilize the peptide and facilitate iron-sulfur cluster binding.

  15. Protective Efficacy of Coccidial Common Antigen Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH) against Challenge with Three Eimeria Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lu; Li, Wenyu; Huang, Xinmei; Tian, Di; Liu, Jianhua; Yang, Xinchao; Liu, Lianrui; Yan, Ruofeng; Xu, Lixin; Li, Xiangrui; Song, Xiaokai

    2017-01-01

    Coccidiosis is an intestinal disorder of poultry and often caused by simultaneous infections of several Eimeria species. GAPDH is one of the immunogenic common antigens among Eimeria tenella, E. acervulina, and E. maxima identified in our previous study. The present study was performed to further evaluate its immunogenicity and protective efficacy. The genes of GAPDH cloned from E. acervulina and E. maxima were named as EaGAPDH and EmGAPDH, respectively. The immunogenicity of recombinant proteins of EaGAPDH and EmGAPDH were analyzed by Western blot. The transcription and expression of pVAX-EaGAPDH and pVAX-EmGAPDH in the injected muscles were detected by reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) and Western blot, respectively. GAPDH-induced changes of T lymphocytes subpopulation, cytokines production, and antibody were determined using flow cytometry, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), and ELISA, respectively. Finally, the protective efficacies of pVAX-EaGAPDH and pVAX-EmGAPDH were evaluated by vaccination and challenge experiments. The results revealed that the recombinant GAPDH proteins reacted with the corresponding chicken antisera. The EaGAPDH genes were successfully transcribed and expressed in the injected muscles. Vaccination with pVAX-EaGAPDH and pVAX-EmGAPDH significantly increased the proportion of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, the cytokines productions of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 et al., and IgG antibody levels compared to controls. The vaccination increased the weight gains, decreased the oocyst outputs, alleviate the enteric lesions compared to controls, and induced moderate anti-coccidial index (ACI). In conclusion, the coccidial common antigen of GAPDH induced significant humoral and cellular immune response and effective protection against E. tenella, E. acervulina, E. maxima, and mixed infection of the three Eimeria species. PMID:28769877

  16. Effects of organic solvents on the enzyme activity of Trypanosoma cruzi glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in calorimetric assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiggers, Henrik; Cheleski, J; Zottis, A

    2007-01-01

    .0% for MeOH and up to 7.5% for DMSO. The results show that when GAPDH is assayed in the presence of DMSO (5%, v/v) using the ITC experiment, the enzyme exhibits approximately twofold higher activity than that of GAPDH with no cosolvent added. When MeOH (5%, v/v) is the cosolvent, the GAPDH activity......In drug discovery programs, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a standard solvent widely used in biochemical assays. Despite the extensive use and study of enzymes in the presence of organic solvents, for some enzymes the effect of organic solvent is unknown. Macromolecular targets may be affected...... by the presence of different solvents in such a way that conformational changes perturb their active site structure accompanied by dramatic variations in activity when performing biochemical screenings. To address this issue, in this work we studied the effects of two organic solvents, DMSO and methanol (Me...

  17. Ferredoxin Gene Mutation in Iranian Trichomonas Vaginalis Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soudabeh Heidari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trichomonas vaginalis causes trichomoniasis and metronidazole is its chosen drug for treatment. Ferredoxin has role in electron transport and carbohydrate metabolism and the conversion of an inactive form of metronidazole (CO to its active form (CPR. Ferredoxin gene mutations reduce gene expression and increase its resistance to metronidazole. In this study, the frequency of ferredoxin gene mutations in clinical isolates of T.vaginalis in Tehran has been studied.Methods: Forty six clinical T. vaginalis isolates of vaginal secretions and urine sediment were collected from Tehran Province since 2011 till 2012. DNA was extracted and ferredoxin gene was amplified by PCR technique. The ferredoxin gene PCR products were sequenced to determine gene mutations.Results: In four isolates (8.69% point mutation at nucleotide position -239 (the translation start codon of the ferredoxin gene were detected in which adenosine were converted to thymine.Conclusion: Mutation at nucleotide -239 ferredoxin gene reduces translational regulatory protein’s binding affinity which concludes reduction of ferredoxin expression. For this reduction, decrease in activity and decrease in metronidazole drug delivery into the cells occur. Mutations in these four isolates may lead to resistance of them to metronidazole.

  18. 1H NMR spectra of vertebrate [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins. Hyperfine resonances suggest different electron delocalization patterns from plant ferredoxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjeldal, L.; Markley, J.L.; Coghlan, V.M.; Vickery, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The authors report the observation of paramagnetically shifted (hyperfine) proton resonances from vertebrate mitochondrial [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins. The hyperfine signals of human, bovine, and chick [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins are described and compared with those of Anabena 7120 vegetative ferredoxin, a plant-type [2Fe-2S] ferredoxin studied previously. The hyperfine resonances of the three vertebrate ferredoxins were very similar to one another both in the oxidized state and in the reduced state, and slow (on the NMR scale) electron self-exchange was observed in partially reduced samples. For the oxidized vertebrate ferredoxins, hyperfine signals were observed downfield of the diamagnetic envelope from +13 to +50 ppm, and the general pattern of peaks and their anti-Curie temperature dependence are similar to those observed for the oxidized plant-type ferredoxins. For the reduced vertebrate ferredoxins, hyperfine signals were observed for the oxidized plant-type ferredoxins. For the reduced vertebrate ferredoxins, hyperfine signals were observed both upfield (-2 to -18 ppm) and downfield (+15 to +45 ppm), and all were found to exhibit Curie-type temperature dependence. These results indicate that the contact-shifted resonances in the reduced vertebrate ferredoxins detect different spin magnetization from those in the reduced plant ferredoxins and suggest that plant and vertebrate ferredoxins have fundamentally different patterns of electron delocalization in the reduced [2Fe-2S] center

  19. Ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase: a catalytically active dithiol group links photoreduced ferredoxin to thioredoxin functional in photosynthetic enzyme regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Droux, M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.; Crawford, N.A.; Kosower, N.S.; Buchanan, B.B.

    1987-01-01

    The mechanism by which the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system activates the target enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, was investigated by analyzing the sulfhydryl status of individual protein components with [ 14 C]iodoacetate and monobromobimane. The data indicate that ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)--an iron-sulfur enzyme present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms--is the first member of a thiol chain that links light to enzyme regulation. FTR possesses a catalytically active dithiol group localized on the 13 kDa (similar) subunit, that occurs in all species investigated and accepts reducing equivalents from photoreduced ferredoxin and transfers them stoichiometrically to the disulfide form of thioredoxin m. The reduced thioredoxin m, in turn, reduces NADP-malate dehydrogenase, thereby converting it from an inactive (S-S) to an active (SH) form. The means by which FTR is able to combine electrons (from photoreduced ferredoxin) with protons (from the medium) to reduce its active disulfide group remains to be determined

  20. H/D exchange mass spectrometry and statistical coupling analysis reveal a role for allostery in a ferredoxin-dependent bifurcating transhydrogenase catalytic cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Luke; Poudel, Saroj; Tokmina-Lukaszewska, Monika; Colman, Daniel R; Nguyen, Diep M N; Schut, Gerrit J; Adams, Michael W W; Peters, John W; Boyd, Eric S; Bothner, Brian

    2018-01-01

    Recent investigations into ferredoxin-dependent transhydrogenases, a class of enzymes responsible for electron transport, have highlighted the biological importance of flavin-based electron bifurcation (FBEB). FBEB generates biomolecules with very low reduction potential by coupling the oxidation of an electron donor with intermediate potential to the reduction of high and low potential molecules. Bifurcating systems can generate biomolecules with very low reduction potentials, such as reduced ferredoxin (Fd), from species such as NADPH. Metabolic systems that use bifurcation are more efficient and confer a competitive advantage for the organisms that harbor them. Structural models are now available for two NADH-dependent ferredoxin-NADP + oxidoreductase (Nfn) complexes. These models, together with spectroscopic studies, have provided considerable insight into the catalytic process of FBEB. However, much about the mechanism and regulation of these multi-subunit proteins remains unclear. Using hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) and statistical coupling analysis (SCA), we identified specific pathways of communication within the model FBEB system, Nfn from Pyrococus furiosus, under conditions at each step of the catalytic cycle. HDX-MS revealed evidence for allosteric coupling across protein subunits upon nucleotide and ferredoxin binding. SCA uncovered a network of co-evolving residues that can provide connectivity across the complex. Together, the HDX-MS and SCA data show that protein allostery occurs across the ensemble of iron‑sulfur cofactors and ligand binding sites using specific pathways that connect domains allowing them to function as dynamically coordinated units. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase: a catalytically active dithiol group links photoreduced ferredoxin to thioredoxin functional in photosynthetic enzyme regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droux, M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.; Crawford, N.A.; Kosower, N.S.; Buchanan, B.B.

    1987-07-01

    The mechanism by which the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system activates the target enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, was investigated by analyzing the sulfhydryl status of individual protein components with (/sup 14/C)iodoacetate and monobromobimane. The data indicate that ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)--an iron-sulfur enzyme present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms--is the first member of a thiol chain that links light to enzyme regulation. FTR possesses a catalytically active dithiol group localized on the 13 kDa (similar) subunit, that occurs in all species investigated and accepts reducing equivalents from photoreduced ferredoxin and transfers them stoichiometrically to the disulfide form of thioredoxin m. The reduced thioredoxin m, in turn, reduces NADP-malate dehydrogenase, thereby converting it from an inactive (S-S) to an active (SH) form. The means by which FTR is able to combine electrons (from photoreduced ferredoxin) with protons (from the medium) to reduce its active disulfide group remains to be determined.

  2. Oxidoreductases on their way to industrial biotransformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Camarero, Susana; Serrano, Ana; Linde, Dolores; Lund, Henrik; Vind, Jesper; Tovborg, Morten; Herold-Majumdar, Owik M.; Hofrichter, Martin; Liers, Christiane; Berkel, van Willem J.H.

    2017-01-01

    Fungi produce heme-containing peroxidases and peroxygenases, flavin-containing oxidases and dehydrogenases, and different copper-containing oxidoreductases involved in the biodegradation of lignin and other recalcitrant compounds. Heme peroxidases comprise the classical ligninolytic peroxidases and

  3. Oxidoreductases on their way to industrial biotransformations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martínez, Angel T.; Ruiz-Dueñas, Francisco J.; Camarero, Susana; Serrano, Ana; Linde, Dolores; Lund, Henrik; Vind, Jesper; Tovborg, Morten; Herold-Majumdar, Owik M.; Hofrichter, Martin; Liers, Christiane; Ullrich, René; Scheibner, Katrin; Sannia, Giovanni; Piscitelli, Alessandra; Pezzella, Cinzia; Sener, Mehmet E.; Kılıç, Sibel; van Berkel, Willem J.H.; Guallar, Victor; Lucas, Maria Fátima; Zuhse, Ralf; Ludwig, Roland; Hollmann, F.; Fernandez Fueyo, E.; Record, Eric; Faulds, Craig B.; Tortajada, Marta; Winckelmann, Ib; Rasmussen, Jo Anne; Gelo-Pujic, Mirjana; Gutiérrez, Ana; del Río, José C.; Rencoret, Jorge; Alcalde, Miguel

    2017-01-01

    Fungi produce heme-containing peroxidases and peroxygenases, flavin-containing oxidases and dehydrogenases, and different copper-containing oxidoreductases involved in the biodegradation of lignin and other recalcitrant compounds. Heme peroxidases comprise the classical ligninolytic peroxidases

  4. Expression of human ferredoxin and assembly of the [2Fe-2S] center in Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coghlan, V.M.; Vickery, L.E.

    1989-01-01

    A cDNA fragment encoding human ferredoxin, a mitochondrial [2Fe-2S] protein, was introduced into Escherichia coli by using an expression vector based on the approach of Nagai and Thogersen. Expression was under control of the λP L promoter and resulted in production of ferredoxin as a cleavable fusion protein with an amino-terminal fragment derived from bacteriophage λcII protein. The fusion protein was isolated from the soluble fraction of induced cells and was specifically cleaved to yield mature recombinant ferredoxin. The recombinant protein was shown to be identical in size to ferredoxin isolated from human placenta (13,546 Da) by NaDodSO 4 /PAGE and partial amino acid sequencing. E. coli cells expressing human ferredoxin were brown in color, and absorbance and electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of the purified recombinant protein established that the [2Fe-2S]center was assembled and incorporated into ferredoxin in vivo. Recombinant ferredoxin was active in steroid hydroxylations when reconstituted with cytochromes P-450 sec and P-450 11β and exhibited rates comparable to those observed for ferredoxin isolated from human placenta. This expression system should be useful in production of native and structurally altered forms of human ferredoxin for studies of ferredoxin structure and function

  5. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase versus toluidine blue as a marker for infarct volume estimation following permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Bettina Hjelm; Lambertsen, Kate Lykke; Finsen, Bente

    2006-01-01

    Infarct size is a good predictor of the neurological outcome following stroke. Estimation of infarct size in the early phase following experimental stroke depends on the availability of reliable techniques that can distinguish ischemic from nonischemic tissue. The objective of this study was to p......Infarct size is a good predictor of the neurological outcome following stroke. Estimation of infarct size in the early phase following experimental stroke depends on the availability of reliable techniques that can distinguish ischemic from nonischemic tissue. The objective of this study...... was to provide a simple and robust method for reliable delineation of the ischemic infarct area in fresh frozen cryosections from mice subjected to focal cerebral ischemia. Mice were subjected to permanent middle cerebral artery (MCA) occlusion and euthanised after 30 min, 1, 2, 4, 6, 12 and 24 h. The size......RNA in areas prone to undergo degeneration 30 min to 1 h after MCA occlusion, thereby preceding visible pycnosis in TB-stained sections. The results showed that in situ hybridization for GAPDH mRNA was a reliable method and superior to TB staining for precise infarct delineation prior to 6 h of permanent MCA...

  6. Study of the interaction of cytochrome c and ferredoxine with the double membrane of chloroplast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuburger, M.; Joyard, J.; Douce, R.

    1975-01-01

    The adsorption of two 59 Fe-labelled proteins on the chloroplast envelope was studied. The former molecule used was ferredoxine extracted from spinach leaves, the latter was cytochrome c, extracted from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae D 261). The chloroplast envelope is thought to be involved in the transport of some proteins such as ferredoxine synthetized in the cytoplasm [fr

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2006-01-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP + reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP + reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source

  8. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil); Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A. [Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Molecular Biology Division, Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Suipacha 531, S2002LRK Rosario (Argentina); Polikarpov, Igor, E-mail: ipolikarpov@if.sc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source.

  9. Ferredoxin-linked chloreplast enzymes. Progress report, August 15, 1990--August 14, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    Progress has clearly been made on all of the goals set forth in the original proposal. Although the monoclonal antibodies raised against FNR turned out no to be useful for mapping the FNR/ferredoxin or FNR/NADP+ interaction domains, good progress has been made on mapping the FNR/ferredoxin interaction domains by an alternative technique, differential chemical modification. Furthermore, the techniques developed for differential chemical modifications of these two proteins - taurine modification of aspartate and glutamate residues and biotin modification of lysine residues - should be useful for mapping the interaction domains of many proteins that associate through electrostatic interactions. Finally, progress has also been made with respect to another ferredoxin-dependent enzyme involved in the earliest steps of plant nitrogen metabolism - nitrite reductase. Questions concerning the subunit composition and heme content of the enzyme have been resolved and evidence demonstrating the involvement of lysine and arginine residues in binding ferredoxin has been obtained for the first time.

  10. Function and Regulation of Ferredoxins in the Cyanobacterium, Synechocystis PCC6803: Recent Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Chauvat, Franck

    2014-11-07

    Ferredoxins (Fed), occurring in most organisms, are small proteins that use their iron-sulfur cluster to distribute electrons to various metabolic pathways, likely including hydrogen production. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on ferredoxins in cyanobacteria, the prokaryotes regarded as important producers of the oxygenic atmosphere and biomass for the food chain, as well as promising cell factories for biofuel production. Most studies of ferredoxins were performed in the model strain, Synechocystis PCC6803, which possesses nine highly-conserved ferredoxins encoded by monocistronic or operonic genes, some of which are localized in conserved genome regions. Fed1, encoded by a light-inducible gene, is a highly abundant protein essential to photosynthesis. Fed2-Fed9, encoded by genes differently regulated by trophic conditions, are low-abundant proteins that play prominent roles in the tolerance to environmental stresses. Concerning the selectivity/redundancy of ferredoxin, we report that Fed1, Fed7 and Fed9 belong to ferredoxin-glutaredoxin-thioredoxin crosstalk pathways operating in the protection against oxidative and metal stresses. Furthermore, Fed7 specifically interacts with a DnaJ-like protein, an interaction that has been conserved in photosynthetic eukaryotes in the form of a composite protein comprising DnaJ- and Fed7-like domains. Fed9 specifically interacts with the Flv3 flavodiiron protein acting in the photoreduction of O2 to H2O.

  11. Function and Regulation of Ferredoxins in the Cyanobacterium, Synechocystis PCC6803: Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Cassier-Chauvat

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ferredoxins (Fed, occurring in most organisms, are small proteins that use their iron-sulfur cluster to distribute electrons to various metabolic pathways, likely including hydrogen production. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on ferredoxins in cyanobacteria, the prokaryotes regarded as important producers of the oxygenic atmosphere and biomass for the food chain, as well as promising cell factories for biofuel production. Most studies of ferredoxins were performed in the model strain, Synechocystis PCC6803, which possesses nine highly-conserved ferredoxins encoded by monocistronic or operonic genes, some of which are localized in conserved genome regions. Fed1, encoded by a light-inducible gene, is a highly abundant protein essential to photosynthesis. Fed2-Fed9, encoded by genes differently regulated by trophic conditions, are low-abundant proteins that play prominent roles in the tolerance to environmental stresses. Concerning the selectivity/redundancy of ferredoxin, we report that Fed1, Fed7 and Fed9 belong to ferredoxin-glutaredoxin-thioredoxin crosstalk pathways operating in the protection against oxidative and metal stresses. Furthermore, Fed7 specifically interacts with a DnaJ-like protein, an interaction that has been conserved in photosynthetic eukaryotes in the form of a composite protein comprising DnaJ- and Fed7-like domains. Fed9 specifically interacts with the Flv3 flavodiiron protein acting in the photoreduction of O2 to H2O.

  12. Soapwort oxidoreductase is involved in trinitrotoluene detoxification

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podlipná, Radka; Nepovím, Aleš; Soudek, Petr; Vágner, Martin; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2007), s. 367-371 ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P05OC042; GA MŠk 1P05ME730 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje ; V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : flavoprotein * Old Yellow Enzyme * oxidoreductase Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.259, year: 2007

  13. The crystal structure of FdxA, a 7Fe ferredoxin from Mycobacterium smegmatis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ricagno, Stefano; De Rosa, Matteo; Aliverti, Alessandro; Zanetti, Giuliana; Bolognesi, Martino

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium smegmatis ferredoxin FdxA, which has an orthologue ferredoxin in Mycobacterium tuberculosis, FdxC, contains both one [3Fe-4S] and one [4Fe-4S] cluster. M. smegmatis FdxA has been shown to be a preferred ferredoxin substrate of FprA [F. Fischer, D. Raimondi, A. Aliverti, G. Zanetti, Mycobacterium tuberculosis FprA, a novel bacterial NADPH-ferredoxin reductase, Eur. J. Biochem. 269 (2002) 3005-3013], an adrenodoxin reductase-like flavoprotein of M. tuberculosis, suggesting that M. tuberculosis FdxC could be the physiological partner of the enzyme in providing reducing power to the cytochromes P450. We report here the crystal structure of FdxA at 1.6 A resolution (R factor 16.5%, R free 20.2%). Besides providing an insight on protein architecture for this 106-residue ferredoxin, our crystallographic investigation highlights lability of the [4Fe-4S] center, which is shown to loose a Fe atom during crystal growth. Due to their high similarity (87% sequence identity), the structure here reported can be considered a valuable model for M. tuberculosis FdxC, thus representing a step forward in the study of the complex mycobacterial redox pathways

  14. Stearoyl-Acyl Carrier Protein and Unusual Acyl-Acyl Carrier Protein Desaturase Activities Are Differentially Influenced by Ferredoxin1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, David J.; Suh, Mi Chung; Ohlrogge, John B.

    2000-01-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases function to position a single double bond into an acyl-ACP substrate and are best represented by the ubiquitous Δ9 18:0-ACP desaturase. Several variant acyl-ACP desaturases have also been identified from species that produce unusual monoenoic fatty acids. All known acyl-ACP desaturase enzymes use ferredoxin as the electron-donating cofactor, and in almost all previous studies the photosynthetic form of ferredoxin rather than the non-photosynthetic form has been used to assess activity. We have examined the influence of different forms of ferredoxin on acyl-ACP desaturases. Using combinations of in vitro acyl-ACP desaturase assays and [14C]malonyl-coenzyme A labeling studies, we have determined that heterotrophic ferredoxin isoforms support up to 20-fold higher unusual acyl-ACP desaturase activity in coriander (Coriandrum sativum), Thunbergia alata, and garden geranium (Pelargonium × hortorum) when compared with photosynthetic ferredoxin isoforms. Heterotrophic ferredoxin also increases activity of the ubiquitous Δ9 18:0-ACP desaturase 1.5- to 3.0-fold in both seed and leaf extracts. These results suggest that ferredoxin isoforms may specifically interact with acyl-ACP desaturases to achieve optimal enzyme activity and that heterotrophic isoforms of ferredoxin may be the in vivo electron donor for this reaction. PMID:11027717

  15. Stearoyl-acyl carrier protein and unusual acyl-acyl carrier protein desaturase activities are differentially influenced by ferredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, D J; Suh, M C; Ohlrogge, J B

    2000-10-01

    Acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) desaturases function to position a single double bond into an acyl-ACP substrate and are best represented by the ubiquitous Delta9 18:0-ACP desaturase. Several variant acyl-ACP desaturases have also been identified from species that produce unusual monoenoic fatty acids. All known acyl-ACP desaturase enzymes use ferredoxin as the electron-donating cofactor, and in almost all previous studies the photosynthetic form of ferredoxin rather than the non-photosynthetic form has been used to assess activity. We have examined the influence of different forms of ferredoxin on acyl-ACP desaturases. Using combinations of in vitro acyl-ACP desaturase assays and [(14)C]malonyl-coenzyme A labeling studies, we have determined that heterotrophic ferredoxin isoforms support up to 20-fold higher unusual acyl-ACP desaturase activity in coriander (Coriandrum sativum), Thunbergia alata, and garden geranium (Pelargonium x hortorum) when compared with photosynthetic ferredoxin isoforms. Heterotrophic ferredoxin also increases activity of the ubiquitous Delta9 18:0-ACP desaturase 1.5- to 3.0-fold in both seed and leaf extracts. These results suggest that ferredoxin isoforms may specifically interact with acyl-ACP desaturases to achieve optimal enzyme activity and that heterotrophic isoforms of ferredoxin may be the in vivo electron donor for this reaction.

  16. Crystallization of [Fe4S3]-ferredoxin from the hyperthermophile archaeon pyrococcus furiosus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Ericsson Skovbo; Harris, Pernille; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2003-01-01

    Recombinant Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin with a [Fe3S4]-cluster was crystallized through steps of optimization and X-ray diffraction data were collected from several crystal forms. Flat plate-like crystals were grown by hanging-drop vapour diffusion. The precipitant used was 30% PEG 400; the p...

  17. Development of an ELISA approach for the determination of flavodoxin and ferredoxin as markers of iron deficiency in phytoplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inda, Luis A; Luisa Peleato, M

    2003-06-01

    Quantification of the iron-nutritional status of phytoplankton is of great interest not only for the study of oceans but also for fresh waters. Flavodoxin is a small flavoprotein proposed as a marker for iron deficiency, since it is induced as a consequence of iron deprivation, replacing the iron-sulphur protein ferredoxin. Flavodoxin and ferredoxin have been frequently used as markers for determination of iron deficiency in phytoplankton. Using purified flavodoxin and ferredoxin from Scenedesmus vacuolatus and polyclonal antibodies against both proteins, individual ELISA tests have been developed. The assays have a linear response in the range of 30-600 ng/ml of protein.

  18. Induction of the gap-pgk operon encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase of Xanthobacter flavus requires the LysR-type transcriptional activator CbbR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, W.G; van den Bergh, E.R E; Smith, L.M

    In a previous study, a gene (pgk) encoding phosphoglycerate kinase was isolated from a genomic labrid of Xanthobacter flavus. Although this gene is essential for autotrophic growth, it is not located within the cbb operon encoding other Calvin cycle enzymes. An analysis of the nucleotide sequence

  19. Structural Analysis of Quinoline 2-Oxidoreductase from Pseudomonas putida 86

    OpenAIRE

    Bonin, Irena

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of the Quinoline 2-Oxidoreductase (Qor), a member of the molybdenum hydroxylase family, was solved at 1.8 Å resolution. Still controversial for molybdenum hydroxylases is the nature of the molybdenum apical ligand. In Qor the sulfido-ligand was found in the equatorial position while the oxo-ligand occupied the apical position. In addition, structural studies were carried out on two Nus family proteins. These resulted in the crystal structures of the transcription factors...

  20. Xanthine oxidoreductase in cancer: more than a differentiation marker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battelli, Maria Giulia; Polito, Letizia; Bortolotti, Massimo; Bolognesi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Human xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) catalyzes the last two steps of purine catabolism and is present in two interconvertible forms, which may utilize O 2 or NAD + as electron acceptors. In addition to uric acid, XOR products may comprise reactive oxygen and nitrogen species that have many biologic effects, including inflammation, endothelial dysfunction, and cytotoxicity, as well as mutagenesis and induction of proliferation. XOR is strictly modulated at the transcriptional and post-translational levels, and its expression and activity are highly variable in cancer. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) expression has been negatively associated with a high malignity grade and a worse prognosis in neoplasms of the breast, liver, gastrointestinal tract, and kidney, which normally express a high level of XOR protein. However, the level of XOR expression may be associated with a worse outcome in cancer of low XOR-expressing cells, in relation to the inflammatory response elicited through the tissue damage induced by tumor growth. Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) has been implicated in the process of oncogenesis either directly because it is able to catalyze the metabolic activation of carcinogenic substances or indirectly through the action of XOR-derived reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. The role of uric acid is characterized by both oxidant and antioxidant action; thus, it is still debatable whether control of uricemia may be helpful to improve the outcomes of tumor illness

  1. A New Type of YumC-Like Ferredoxin (Flavodoxin) Reductase Is Involved in Ribonucleotide Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jun; Shen, Jing; Solem, Christian

    2015-01-01

    . subtilis but that the addition of deoxynucleosides cannot compensate for the lethal phenotype displayed by the B. subtilis yumC knockout mutant. Ferredoxin (flavodoxin) reductase (FdR) is involved in many important reactions in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes, such as photosynthesis, nitrate reduction, etc. The recently...... ribonucleotide reductase, which represents the workhorse for the bioconversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides in many prokaryotes and eukaryotic pathogens under aerobic conditions. As the partner of the flavodoxin (NrdI), the key FdR is missing in the current model describing the class Ib system...

  2. A STD-NMR Study of the Interaction of the Anabaena Ferredoxin-NADP+ Reductase with the Coenzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lara V. Antonini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR catalyzes the electron transfer from ferredoxin to NADP+ via its flavin FAD cofactor. To get further insights in the architecture of the transient complexes produced during the hydride transfer event between the enzyme and the NADP+ coenzyme we have applied NMR spectroscopy using Saturation Transfer Difference (STD techniques to analyze the interaction between FNRox and the oxidized state of its NADP+ coenzyme. We have found that STD NMR, together with the use of selected mutations on FNR and of the non-FNR reacting coenzyme analogue NAD+, are appropriate tools to provide further information about the the interaction epitope.

  3. Synthesis, Purification and Characterization of Ferredoxins with Re-Designed Active Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jytte

    is not incorporated into the ferredoxin by self-assem¬bly. Instead the molybdenum-sulfur ana¬lo¬gue was synthesized by addition of pre-prepared [Mo4S4(H2O)12]Cl5 to the apo-ferredoxin which was stabilized by sulfonation. The purification of the molyb¬denum-sulfur ana¬lo¬gue revealed two closely related species...... and that the ratio between the two species depended on the experimental conditions. The two purified species were subjected to EPR moni¬tored redox titration and the obtained EPR spectra were compared to the spectra of [Mo4S4(H2O)12]5+. The results confirmed the incor¬poration of the intact [Mo4S4] cluster and sug...... after oxidative titration suggested oxidative break down of the [Mo4S4] cluster. It is not possible to identify the ligands on the cluster based on these studies, however, the spectra suggest that the difference between the two species in variations in the ligand environment. These studies have given...

  4. Accurate Computation of Reduction Potentials of 4Fe−4S Clusters Indicates a Carboxylate Shift in Pyrococcus furiosus Ferredoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kepp, Kasper Planeta; Ooi, Bee Lean; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager

    2007-01-01

    This work describes the computation and accurate reproduction of subtle shifts in reduction potentials for two mutants of the iron-sulfur protein Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin. The computational models involved only first-sphere ligands and differed with respect to one ligand, either acetate (as...

  5. High levels of xanthine oxidoreductase in rat endothelial, epithelial and connective tissue cells. A relation between localization and function?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, A.; Bosch, K. S.; Frederiks, W. M.; van Noorden, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    The localization of xanthine oxidoreductase activity was investigated in unfixed cryostat sections of various rat tissues by an enzyme histochemical method which specifically demonstrates both the dehydrogenase and oxidase forms of xanthine oxidoreductase. High activity was found in epithelial cells

  6. CRYSTAL STRUCTURE ANALYSIS OF A PUTATIVE OXIDOREDUCTASE FROM KLEBSIELLA PNEUMONIAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baig, M.; Brown, A.; Eswaramoorthy, S.; Swaminathan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae, a gram-negative enteric bacterium, is found in nosocomial infections which are acquired during hospital stays for about 10% of hospital patients in the United States. The crystal structure of a putative oxidoreductase from K. pneumoniae has been determined. The structural information of this K. pneumoniae protein was used to understand its function. Crystals of the putative oxidoreductase enzyme were obtained by the sitting drop vapor diffusion method using Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 3350, Bis-Tris buffer, pH 5.5 as precipitant. These crystals were used to collect X-ray data at beam line X12C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The crystal structure was determined using the SHELX program and refi ned with CNS 1.1. This protein, which is involved in the catalysis of an oxidation-reduction (redox) reaction, has an alpha/beta structure. It utilizes nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP) or nicotine adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to perform its function. This structure could be used to determine the active and co-factor binding sites of the protein, information that could help pharmaceutical companies in drug design and in determining the protein’s relationship to disease treatment such as that for pneumonia and other related pathologies.

  7. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Trichomonas vaginalis Ferredoxin Show a Loop-Cap Transition.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weksberg, Tiffany E; Lynch, Gillian C; Krause, Kurt; Pettitt, Bernard M

    2007-05-01

    The crystal structure of the oxidized Trichomonas vaginalis ferredoxin (Tvfd) showed a unique crevice that exposed the redox center. Here we have examined the dynamics and solvation of the active site of Tvfd using molecular dynamics simulations of both the reduced and oxidized states. The oxidized simulation stays true to the crystal form with a heavy atom root mean-squared deviation of 2Å. However, within the reduced simulation of Tvfd a profound loop-cap transition into the redox center occurred within 6-ns of the start of the simulation and remained open throughout the rest of the 20-ns simulation. This large opening seen in the simulations supports the hypothesis that the exceptionally fast electron transfer rate between Tvfd and the drug metronidazole is due to the increased access of the antibiotic to the redox center of the protein and not due to the reduction potential.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Trichomonas vaginalis Ferredoxin Show a Loop-Cap Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weksberg, Tiffany E; Lynch, Gillian C; Krause, Kurt; Pettitt, Bernard M

    2007-05-01

    The crystal structure of the oxidized Trichomonas vaginalis ferredoxin (Tvfd) showed a unique crevice that exposed the redox center. Here we have examined the dynamics and solvation of the active site of Tvfd using molecular dynamics simulations of both the reduced and oxidized states. The oxidized simulation stays true to the crystal form with a heavy atom root mean-squared deviation of 2Å . However, within the reduced simulation of Tvfd a profound loop-cap transition into the redox center occurred within 6-ns of the start of the simulation and remained open throughout the rest of the 20-ns simulation. This large opening seen in the simulations supports the hypothesis that the exceptionally fast electron transfer rate between Tvfd and the drug metronidazole is due to the increased access of the antibiotic to the redox center of the protein and not due to the reduction potential.

  9. Concentration-dependent oligomerization of cross-linked complexes between ferredoxin and ferredoxin–NADP+ reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimata-Ariga, Yoko; Kubota-Kawai, Hisako; Lee, Young-Ho; Muraki, Norifumi; Ikegami, Takahisa; Kurisu, Genji; Hase, Toshiharu

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Cross-linked complexes of ferredoxin (Fd) and Fd–NADP + reductase form oligomers. •In the crystal structures, Fd- and FNR moieties swap across the molecules. •The complexes exhibit concentration-dependent oligomerization at sub-milimolar order. -- Abstract: Ferredoxin–NADP + reductase (FNR) forms a 1:1 complex with ferredoxin (Fd), and catalyzes the electron transfer between Fd and NADP + . In our previous study, we prepared a series of site-specifically cross-linked complexes of Fd and FNR, which showed diverse electron transfer properties. Here, we show that X-ray crystal structures of the two different Fd–FNR cross-linked complexes form oligomers by swapping Fd and FNR moieties across the molecules; one complex is a dimer from, and the other is a successive multimeric form. In order to verify whether these oligomeric structures are formed only in crystal, we investigated the possibility of the oligomerization of these complexes in solution. The mean values of the particle size of these cross-linked complexes were shown to increase with the rise of protein concentration at sub-milimolar order, whereas the size of dissociable wild-type Fd:FNR complex was unchanged as analyzed by dynamic light scattering measurement. The oligomerization products were detected by SDS–PAGE after chemical cross-linking of these complexes at the sub-milimolar concentrations. The extent and concentration-dependent profile of the oligomerizaion were differentiated between the two cross-linked complexes. These results show that these Fd–FNR cross-linked complexes exhibit concentration-dependent oligomerization, possibly through swapping of Fd and FNR moieties also in solution. These findings lead to the possibility that some native multi-domain proteins may present similar phenomenon in vivo

  10. Differentially regulated NADPH: cytochrome p450 oxidoreductases in parsely

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koopmann, E.; Hahlbrock, K.

    1997-01-01

    Two NADPH:cytochrome P450 oxidoreductases (CPRs) from parsley (Petroselinum crispum) were cloned, and the complete proteins were expressed and functionally identified in yeast. The two enzymes, designated CPR1 and CPR2, are 80% identical in amino acid sequence with one another and about 75% identical with CPRs from several other plant species. The mRNA accumulation patterns for CPR1 and CPR2 in fungal elicitor-treated or UV-irradiated cultured parsley cells and in developing or infected parsley plants were compared with those for cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), one of the most abundant CPR-dependent P450 enzymes in plants. All treatments strongly induced the mRNAs for C4H and CPR1 but not for CPR2, suggesting distinct metabolic roles of CPR1 and CPR2 and a functional relationship between CPR1 and C4H

  11. An oxidoreductase from ‘Alphonso’ mango catalyzing biosynthesis of furaneol and reduction of reactive carbonyls

    OpenAIRE

    Kulkarni, R.; Chidley, H.; Deshpande, A.; Schmidt, A.; Pujari, K.; Giri, A.; Gershenzon, J.; Gupta, V.

    2013-01-01

    Two furanones, furaneol (4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone) and mesifuran (2,5-dimethyl-4-methoxy-3(2H)-furanone), are important constituents of flavor of the Alphonso cultivar of mango (Mangifera indica). To get insights into the biosynthesis of these furanones, we isolated an enone oxidoreductase gene from the Alphonso mango. It has high sequence similarity to an alkenal/one oxidoreductase from cucumber (79% identity) and enone oxidoreductases from tomato (73% identity) and strawberry (...

  12. A model for the catabolism of rhizopine in Rhizobium leguminosarum involves a ferredoxin oxygenase complex and the inositol degradative pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahar, M; de Majnik, J; Wexler, M; Fry, J; Poole, P S; Murphy, P J

    1998-11-01

    Rhizopines are nodule-specific compounds that confer an intraspecies competitive nodulation advantage to strains that can catabolize them. The rhizopine (3-O-methyl-scyllo-inosamine, 3-O-MSI) catabolic moc gene cluster mocCABRDE(F) in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae strain 1a is located on the Sym plasmid. MocCABR are homologous to the mocCABR gene products from Sinorhizobium meliloti. MocD and MocE contain motifs corresponding to a TOL-like oxygenase and a [2Fe-2S] Rieske-like ferredoxin, respectively. The mocF gene encodes a ferredoxin reductase that would complete the oxygenase system, but is not essential for rhizopine catabolism. We propose a rhizopine catabolic model whereby MocB transports rhizopine into the cell and MocDE and MocF (or a similar protein elsewhere in the genome), under the regulation of MocR, act in concert to form a ferredoxin oxygenase system that demethylates 3-O-MSI to form scyllo-inosamine (SI). MocA, an NAD(H)-dependent dehydrogenase, and MocC continue the catabolic process. Compounds formed then enter the inositol catabolic pathway.

  13. Clinical, genetic, and enzymatic characterization of P450 oxidoreductase deficiency in four patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sahakitrungruang, Taninee

    2009-12-01

    P450 oxidoreductase (POR) deficiency causes disordered steroidogenesis; severe mutations cause genital ambiguity in both sexes plus the Antley-Bixler skeletal malformation syndrome, whereas mild mutations can cause adult infertility.

  14. Biodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene in Escherichia coli is enhanced by expression of a Vibrio harveyi oxidoreductase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichmuth, D.S.; Hittle, J.L.; Blanch, H.W.; Keasling, J.D.

    2000-01-05

    One possible alternative to current fuel hydrodesulfurization methods is the use of microorganisms to remove sulfur compounds. Biodesulfurization requires much milder processing conditions, gives higher specificity, and does not require molecular hydrogen. In the present work the authors have produced two compatible plasmids: pDSR3, which allows Escherichia coli to convert dibenzothiophene (DBT) to hydroxybiphenyl (HBP), and pDSR2, which produces a Vibrio harveyi flavin oxidoreductase. The authors show that the flavin oxidoreductase enhances the rate of DBT removal when co-expressed in vivo with the desulfurization enzymes. The plasmids pDSR2 and pDSR3 were co-expressed in growing cultures. The expression of oxidoreductase caused an increase in the rate of DBT removal but a decrease in the rate of HBP production. The maximum rate of DBT removal was 8 mg/h {center{underscore}dot} g dry cell weight. Experiments were also conducted using resting cells with the addition of various carbon sources. It was found that the addition of glucose or glycerol to cultures with oxidoreductase expression produced the highest DBT removal rate. The culture with acetate and no oxidoreductase expression had the highest level of HBP production. For all carbon sources, the DBT removal rate was faster and the HBP generation rate slower with the expression of the oxidoreductase. Analysis of desulfurization intermediates indicates that the last enzyme in the pathway may be limiting.

  15. Biodesulfurization of dibenzothiophene in Escherichia coli is enhanced by expression of a Vibrio harveyi oxidoreductase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichmuth, D S; Hittle, J L; Blanch, H W; Keasling, J D

    2000-01-05

    One possible alternative to current fuel hydrodesulfurization methods is the use of microorganisms to remove sulfur compounds. Biodesulfurization requires much milder processing conditions, gives higher specificity, and does not require molecular hydrogen. In the present work we have produced two compatible plasmids: pDSR3, which allows Escherichia coli to convert dibenzothiophene (DBT) to hydroxybiphenyl (HBP), and pDSR2, which produces a Vibrio harveyi flavin oxidoreductase. We show that the flavin oxidoreductase enhances the rate of DBT removal when co-expressed in vivo with the desulfurization enzymes. The plasmids pDSR2 and pDSR3 were co-expressed in growing cultures. The expression of oxidoreductase caused an increase in the rate of DBT removal but a decrease in the rate of HBP production. The maximum rate of DBT removal was 8 mg/h. g dry cell weight. Experiments were also conducted using resting cells with the addition of various carbon sources. It was found that the addition of glucose or glycerol to cultures with oxidoreductase expression produced the highest DBT removal rate (51 mg/h. g dry cell weight). The culture with acetate and no oxidoreductase expression had the highest level of HBP production. For all carbon sources, the DBT removal rate was faster and the HBP generation rate slower with the expression of the oxidoreductase. Analysis of desulfurization intermediates indicates that the last enzyme in the pathway may be limiting. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Photosynthetic and Heterotrophic Ferredoxin Isoproteins Are Colocalized in Fruit Plastids of Tomato1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Koh; Yamamoto, Miyuki; Wada, Keishiro

    1998-01-01

    Fruit tissues of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) contain both photosynthetic and heterotrophic ferredoxin (FdA and FdE, respectively) isoproteins, irrespective of their photosynthetic competence, but we did not previously determine whether these proteins were colocalized in the same plastids. In isolated fruit chloroplasts and chromoplasts, both FdA and FdE were detected by immunoblotting. Colocalization of FdA and FdE in the same plastids was demonstrated using double-staining immunofluorescence microscopy. We also found that FdA and FdE were colocalized in fruit chloroplasts and chloroamyloplasts irrespective of sink status of the plastid. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that FdA and FdE were randomly distributed within the plastid stroma. To investigate the significance of the heterotrophic Fd in fruit plastids, Glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity was measured in isolated fruit and leaf plastids. Fruit chloroplasts and chromoplasts showed much higher G6PDH activity than did leaf chloroplasts, suggesting that high G6PDH activity is linked with FdE to maintain nonphotosynthetic production of reducing power. This result suggested that, despite their morphological resemblance, fruit chloroplasts are functionally different from their leaf counterparts. PMID:9765529

  17. Regulation of NAD(P)H:quininone oxidoreductase by glucocorticoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinaire, J.A.; Xiao, G.-H.; Falkner, K.C.; Prough, R.A.

    2004-01-01

    Previous studies in neonatal and adolescent rats as well as adrenalectomized rats have demonstrated that glucocorticoids regulate the expression of the rat NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase gene (QOR). We used primary cultures of rat adult hepatocytes to document that added glucorticoids repress both the basal and 1,2-benzanthracene-induced expression of QOR mRNA by 65-70%. QOR enzyme activity and protein were concomitantly suppressed as well. The monotonic concentration response for repression of QOR gene products up to 100 μM DEX concentration demonstrated that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) was most likely involved in this process. The lack of effect at higher concentration rules out a role for the Pregnane X receptor in this regulation by DEX. In addition, the anti-glucorticoid RU38486 blocked this negative regulation and the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide had no effect on this repression process. Similar results of GR dependence were observed using a luciferase reporter construct containing the 5'-flanking region of the human QOR gene using HepG2 cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that GR must directly participate in the negative regulation of QOR gene expression by dexamethasone and other glucocorticoids in vivo

  18. Xanthine oxidoreductase and its inhibitors: relevance for gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Richard O; Kamel, Bishoy; Kannangara, Diluk R W; Williams, Kenneth M; Graham, Garry G

    2016-12-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) is the rate-limiting enzyme in purine catabolism and converts hypoxanthine to xanthine, and xanthine into uric acid. When concentrations of uric acid exceed its biochemical saturation point, crystals of uric acid, in the form of monosodium urate, emerge and can predispose an individual to gout, the commonest form of inflammatory arthritis in men aged over 40 years. XOR inhibitors are primarily used in the treatment of gout, reducing the formation of uric acid and thereby, preventing the formation of monosodium urate crystals. Allopurinol is established as first-line therapy for gout; a newer alternative, febuxostat, is used in patients unable to tolerate allopurinol. This review provides an overview of gout, a detailed analysis of the structure and function of XOR, discussion on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of XOR inhibitors-allopurinol and febuxostat, and the relevance of XOR in common comorbidities of gout. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  19. Characterization of apoptosis-related oxidoreductases from Neurospora crassa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Carneiro

    Full Text Available The genome from Neurospora crassa presented three open reading frames homologous to the genes coding for human AIF and AMID proteins, which are flavoproteins with oxidoreductase activities implicated in caspase-independent apoptosis. To investigate the role of these proteins, namely within the mitochondrial respiratory chain, we studied their cellular localization and characterized the respective null mutant strains. Efficiency of the respiratory chain was analyzed by oxygen consumption studies and supramolecular organization of the OXPHOS system was assessed through BN-PAGE analysis in the respective null mutant strains. The results demonstrate that, unlike in mammalian systems, disruption of AIF in Neurospora does not affect either complex I assembly or function. Furthermore, the mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes of the mutant strains display a similar supramolecular organization to that observed in the wild type strain. Further characterization revealed that N. crassa AIF appears localized to both the mitochondria and the cytoplasm, whereas AMID was found exclusively in the cytoplasm. AMID2 was detected in both mitochondria and cytoplasm of the amid mutant strain, but was barely discernible in wild type extracts, suggesting overlapping functions for the two proteins.

  20. Expression analysis of the fpr (ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase) gene in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yunho; Pena-Llopis, Samuel; Kang, Yoon-Suk; Shin, Hyeon-Dong; Demple, Bruce; Madsen, Eugene L.; Jeon, Che Ok; Park, Woojun

    2006-01-01

    The ferredoxin-NADP + reductase (fpr) participates in cellular defense against oxidative damage. The fpr expression in Pseudomonas putida KT2440 is induced by oxidative and osmotic stresses. FinR, a LysR-type transcriptional factor near the fpr gene in the P. putida KT2440 genome, is required for induction of the fpr under both conditions. We have shown that the fpr and finR gene products can counteract the effects of oxidative and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, FinR-independent expression occurs either during a long period of incubation with paraquat or with high concentrations of oxidative stress agent. This result indicates that there may be additional regulators present in the P. putida KT2440 genome. In contrast to in vivo expression kinetics of fpr from the plant pathogen, Pseudomonas syringae, the fpr gene from P. putida KT2440 exhibited unusually prolonged expression after oxidative stress. Transcriptional fusion and Northern blot analysis studies indicated that the FinR is negatively autoregulated. Expression of the fpr promoter was higher in minimal media than in rich media during exponential phase growth. Consistent with this result, the fpr and finR mutants had a long lag phase in minimal media in contrast to wild-type growth characteristics. Antioxidants such as ascorbate could increase the growth rate of all tested strains in minimal media. This result confirmed that P. putida KT2440 experienced more oxidative stress during exponential growth in minimal media than in rich media. Endogenous promoter activity of the fpr gene is much higher during exponential growth than during stationary growth. These findings demonstrate new relationships between fpr, finR, and the physiology of oxidative stress in P. putida KT2440

  1. Combinatorial application of two aldehyde oxidoreductases on isobutanol production in the presence of furfural.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyung-Min; Jeon, Jong-Min; Lee, Ju Hee; Song, Hun-Suk; Joo, Han-Byul; Park, Sung-Hee; Choi, Kwon-Young; Kim, Yong Hyun; Park, Kyungmoon; Ahn, Jungoh; Lee, Hongweon; Yang, Yung-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Furfural is a toxic by-product formulated from pretreatment processes of lignocellulosic biomass. In order to utilize the lignocellulosic biomass on isobutanol production, inhibitory effect of the furfural on isobutanol production was investigated and combinatorial application of two oxidoreductases, FucO and YqhD, was suggested as an alternative strategy. Furfural decreased cell growth and isobutanol production when only YqhD or FucO was employed as an isobutyraldehyde oxidoreductase. However, combinatorial overexpression of FucO and YqhD could overcome the inhibitory effect of furfural giving higher isobutanol production by 110% compared with overexpression of YqhD. The combinatorial oxidoreductases increased furfural detoxification rate 2.1-fold and also accelerated glucose consumption 1.4-fold. When it compares to another known system increasing furfural tolerance, membrane-bound transhydrogenase (pntAB), the combinatorial aldehyde oxidoreductases were better on cell growth and production. Thus, to control oxidoreductases is important to produce isobutanol using furfural-containing biomass and the combinatorial overexpression of FucO and YqhD can be an alternative strategy.

  2. The function and properties of the iron-sulfur center in spinach ferredoxin: Thioredoxin reductase: A new biological role for iron-sulfur clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staples, C.R.; Ameyibor, E.; Fu, Weiguang; Johnson, M.K. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)] [and others

    1996-09-03

    Thioredoxin reduction in chloroplasts in catalyzed by a unique class of disulfide reductases which use a [2Fe-2S]{sup 2+/+} ferredoxin as the electron donor and contain an Fe-S cluster as the sole prosthetic group in addition to the active-site disulfide. The nature, properties, and function of the Fe-S cluster in spinach ferredoxin: thioredoxin reductase (FTR) have been investigated by the combination of UV/visible absorption, variable-temperature magnetic circular dichroism (MCD), EPR, and resonance Raman (RR) spectroscopies. 66 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. 40 CFR 174.524 - Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 in all plants; exemption from the requirement of a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.524 Glyphosate... Glyphosate Oxidoreductase GOX or GOXv247 enzyme in all plants are exempt from the requirement of a tolerance...

  4. Optimizing Cofactor Specificity of Oxidoreductase Enzymes for the Generation of Microbial Production Strains—OptSwap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, Zachary A.; Feist, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Central oxidoreductase enzymes (eg, dehydrogenases, reductases) in microbial metabolism often have preferential binding specificity for one of the two major currency metabolites NAD(H) and NADP(H). These enzyme specificities result in a division of the metabolic functionality of the currency...... specificities of oxidoreductase enzyme and complementary reaction knockouts. Using the Escherichia coli genome-scale metabolic model iJO1366, OptSwap predicted eight growth-coupled production designs with significantly greater product yields or substrate-specific productivities than designs predicted with gene...

  5. Response of Chloroplast NAD(PH Dehydrogenase-Mediated Cyclic Electron Flow to a Shortage or Lack in Ferredoxin-Quinone Oxidoreductase-Dependent Pathway in Rice Following Short-Term Heat Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemaa eEssemine

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic electron flow around PSI can protect photosynthetic electron carriers under conditions of stromal over-reduction. The goal of the research reported in this paper was to investigate the responses of both PSI and PSII to a short-term heat stress in two rice lines with different capacities of cyclic electron transfer, i.e. Q4149 with a high capacity (hcef and C4023 with a low capacity (lcef. The absorbance change at 820 nm (ΔA820 was used here to assess the charge separation in the photosystem I (PSI reaction center (P700. The results obtained show that short-term heat stress abolishes the FQR-dependent CEF in rice and accelerates the initial rate of P700+ re-reduction. The P700+ amplitude was slightly increased at a moderate heat-stress (35°C because of a partial restriction of FQR but it was decreased following high heat-stress (42°C. Assessment of PSI and PSII activities shows that PSI is more susceptible to heat stress than photosystem II (PSII. Under high temperature, FQR-dependent CEF was completely removed and NDH-dependent CEF was up-regulated and strengthened to a higher extent in C4023 than in Q4149. Specifically, under normal growth temperature, hcef (Q4149 was characterized by higher FQR- and NDH-dependent CEF rates than lcef (C4023. Following thermal stress, the activation of NDH-pathway was 130% and 10% for C4023 and Q4149, respectively. Thus, the NDH-dependent CEF may constitute the second layer of plant protection and defence against heat stress after the main route, i.e. FQR-dependent CEF, reaches its capacity. We discuss the possibility that under high heat stress, the NDH pathway serves as a safety valve to dissipate excess energy by cyclic photophosphorylation and overcome the stroma over-reduction following inhibition of CO2 assimilation and any shortage or lack in the FQR pathway. The potential role of the NDH-dependent pathway during the evolution of C4 photosynthesis is briefly discussed.

  6. An oxidoreductase from 'Alphonso' mango catalyzing biosynthesis of furaneol and reduction of reactive carbonyls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Ram; Chidley, Hemangi; Deshpande, Ashish; Schmidt, Axel; Pujari, Keshav; Giri, Ashok; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Gupta, Vidya

    2013-01-01

    Two furanones, furaneol (4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone) and mesifuran (2,5-dimethyl-4-methoxy-3(2H)-furanone), are important constituents of flavor of the Alphonso cultivar of mango (Mangifera indica). To get insights into the biosynthesis of these furanones, we isolated an enone oxidoreductase gene from the Alphonso mango. It has high sequence similarity to an alkenal/one oxidoreductase from cucumber (79% identity) and enone oxidoreductases from tomato (73% identity) and strawberry (72% identity). The complete open reading frame was expressed in E. coli and the (his)6-tagged recombinant protein was purified by affinity chromatography. The purified protein assayed with NADH as a reducing agent converted D-fructose-1,6-diphosphate into furaneol, the immediate precursor of mesifuran. The enzyme was also able to convert two highly reactive carbonyls, 3-buten-2-one and 1-penten-3-one, produced by lipid peroxidation in plants, into their saturated derivatives. Expression profiling in various ripening stages of Alphonso fruits depicted an expression maxima at 10 days after harvest stage, shortly before the appearance of the maximum amount of furanones (completely ripe stage, 15 days after harvest). Although no furanones were detected at the 0 day after harvest stage, significant expression of this gene was detected in the fruits at this stage. Overall, the results suggest that this oxidoreductase plays important roles in Alphonso mango fruits.

  7. WrbA bridges bacterial flavonoids and eukaryotic NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carey, J.; Brynda, Jiří; Wolfová, Julie; Grandori, R.; Gustavsson, T.; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Kutá-Smatanová, Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 10 (2007), s. 2301-2305 ISSN 0961-8368 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514; CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : WrbA * crystal structure * Nqo1 * oxidoreductases Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.135, year: 2007

  8. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER Chaperones and Oxidoreductases: Critical Regulators of Tumor Cell Survival and Immunorecognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas eSimmen

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER chaperones and oxidoreductases are abundant enzymes that mediate the production of fully folded secretory and transmembrane proteins. Resisting the Golgi and plasma membrane-directed bulk flow, ER chaperones and oxidoreductases enter retrograde trafficking whenever they are pulled outside of the ER. However, solid tumors are characterized by the increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, combined with reduced blood flow that leads to low oxygen supply and ER stress. Under these conditions, hypoxia and the unfolded protein response (UPR upregulate ER chaperones and oxidoreductases. When this occurs, ER oxidoreductases and chaperones become important regulators of tumor growth. However, under these conditions, these proteins not only promote the production of proteins, but also alter the properties of the plasma membrane and hence modulate tumor immune recognition. For instance, high levels of calreticulin serve as an eat-me signal on the surface of tumor cells. Conversely, both intracellular and surface BiP/GRP78 promotes tumor growth. Other ER folding assistants able to modulate the properties of tumor tissue include protein disulfide isomerase (PDI, Ero1α and GRP94. Understanding the roles and mechanisms of ER chaperones in regulating tumor cell functions and immunorecognition will lead to important insight for the development of novel cancer therapies.

  9. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a Broad Substrate Terpenoid Oxidoreductase from Artemisia annua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryden, Anna-Margareta; Ruyter-Spira, Carolien; Litjens, Ralph; Takahashi, Shunji; Quax, Wim; Osada, Hiroyuki; Bouwmeester, Harro; Kayser, Oliver

    From Artemisia annua L., a new oxidoreductase (Red 1) was cloned, sequenced and functionally characterized. Through bioinformatics, heterologous protein expression and enzyme substrate conversion assays, the elucidation of the enzymatic capacities of Red1 was achieved. Red1 acts on monoterpenoids,

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of a broad substrate terpenoid oxidoreductase from Artemisia annua.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryden, A.M.; Ruyter-Spira, C.P.; Litjens, R.; Takahashi, S.; Quax, W.J.; Osada, H.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Kayser, O.

    2010-01-01

    From Artemisia annua L., a new oxidoreductase (Red 1) was cloned, sequenced and functionally characterized. Through bioinformatics, heterologous protein expression, and enzyme substrate conversion assays, the elucidation of the enzymatic capacities of Red1 was achieved. Red1 acts on monoterpenoids,

  11. Structural Basis of a Thiol-Disulfide Oxidoreductase in the Hedgehog-Forming Actinobacterium Corynebacterium matruchotii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luong, Truc Thanh; Tirgar, Reyhaneh; Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Ton-That, Hung

    2018-05-01

    The actinobacterium Corynebacterium matruchotii has been implicated in nucleation of oral microbial consortia leading to biofilm formation. Due to the lack of genetic tools, little is known about basic cellular processes, including protein secretion and folding, in this organism. We report here a survey of the C. matruchotii genome, which encodes a large number of exported proteins containing paired cysteine residues, and identified an oxidoreductase that is highly homologous to the Corynebacterium diphtheriae thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase MdbA (MdbA Cd ). Crystallization studies uncovered that the 1.2-Å resolution structure of C. matruchotii MdbA (MdbA Cm ) possesses two conserved features found in actinobacterial MdbA enzymes, a thioredoxin-like fold and an extended α-helical domain. By reconstituting the disulfide bond-forming machine in vitro , we demonstrated that MdbA Cm catalyzes disulfide bond formation within the actinobacterial pilin FimA. A new gene deletion method supported that mdbA is essential in C. matruchotii Remarkably, heterologous expression of MdbA Cm in the C. diphtheriae Δ mdbA mutant rescued its known defects in cell growth and morphology, toxin production, and pilus assembly, and this thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase activity required the catalytic motif CXXC. Altogether, the results suggest that MdbA Cm is a major thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase, which likely mediates posttranslocational protein folding in C. matruchotii by a mechanism that is conserved in Actinobacteria IMPORTANCE The actinobacterium Corynebacterium matruchotii has been implicated in the development of oral biofilms or dental plaque; however, little is known about the basic cellular processes in this organism. We report here a high-resolution structure of a C. matruchotii oxidoreductase that is highly homologous to the Corynebacterium diphtheriae thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase MdbA. By biochemical analysis, we demonstrated that C. matruchotii MdbA catalyzes disulfide

  12. Site-directed mutagenesis of Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I: [Fe-S] cluster-driven protein rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, A.E.; Burgess, B.K.; Stout, C.D.; Cash, V.L.; Dean, D.R.; Jensen, G.M.; Stephens, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I is a small protein that contains one [4Fe-4S] cluster and one [3Fe-4S] cluster. Recently the x-ray crystal structure has been redetermined and the fdxA gene, which encodes the protein, has been cloned and sequenced. Here the authors report the site-directed mutation of Cys-20, which is a ligand of the [4Fe-4S] cluster in the native protein, to alanine and the characterization of the protein product by x-ray crystallographic and spectroscopic methods. The data show that the mutant protein again contains one [4Fe-4S] cluster and one [3Fe-4S] cluster. The new [4Fe-4S] cluster obtains its fourth ligand from Cys-24, a free cysteine in the native structure. The formation of this [4Fe-4S] cluster drives rearrangement of the protein structure

  13. Electronic, Magnetic, and Redox Properties of [MFe(3)S(4)] Clusters (M = Cd, Cu, Cr) in Pyrococcus furiosus Ferredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Christopher R.; Dhawan, Ish K.; Finnegan, Michael G.; Dwinell, Derek A.; Zhou, Zhi Hao; Huang, Heshu; Verhagen, Marc F. J. M.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Johnson, Michael K.

    1997-12-03

    The ground- and excited-state properties of heterometallic [CuFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), [CdFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), and [CrFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) cubane clusters assembled in Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin have been investigated by the combination of EPR and variable-temperature/variable-field magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) studies. The results indicate Cd(2+) incorporation into [Fe(3)S(4)](0,-) cluster fragments to yield S = 2 [CdFe(3)S(4)](2+) and S = (5)/(2) [CdFe(3)S(4)](+) clusters and Cu(+) incorporation into [Fe(3)S(4)](+,0) cluster fragments to yield S = (1)/(2) [CuFe(3)S(4)](2+) and S = 2 [CuFe(3)S(4)](+) clusters. This is the first report of the preparation of cubane type [CrFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) clusters, and the combination of EPR and MCD results indicates S = 0 and S = (3)/(2) ground states for the oxidized and reduced forms, respectively. Midpoint potentials for the [CdFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), [CrFe(3)S(4)](2+,+), and [CuFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) couples, E(m) = -470 +/- 15, -440 +/- 10, and +190 +/- 10 mV (vs NHE), respectively, were determined by EPR-monitored redox titrations or direct electrochemistry at a glassy carbon electrode. The trends in redox potential, ground-state spin, and electron delocalization of [MFe(3)S(4)](2+,+) clusters in P. furiosus ferredoxin are discussed as a function of heterometal (M = Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Tl).

  14. Localization of xanthine oxidoreductase activity using the tissue protectant polyvinyl alcohol and final electron acceptor Tetranitro BT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kooij, A.; Frederiks, W. M.; Gossrau, R.; van Noorden, C. J.

    1991-01-01

    We have detected xanthine oxidoreductase activity in unfixed cryostat sections of rat and chicken liver, rat duodenum, and bovine mammary gland using the tissue protectant polyvinyl alcohol, the electron carrier 1-methoxyphenazine methosulfate, the final electron acceptor Tetranitro BT, and

  15. Lactic acid-producing yeast cells having nonfunctional L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome C oxidoreductase cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew [Boston, MA; Suominen, Pirkko [Maple Grove, MN; Aristidou, Aristos [Highland Ranch, CO; Hause, Benjamin Matthew [Currie, MN; Van Hoek, Pim [Camarillo, CA; Dundon, Catherine Asleson [Minneapolis, MN

    2012-03-20

    Yeast cells having an exogenous lactate dehydrogenase gene ae modified by reducing L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity in the cell. This leads to reduced consumption of lactate by the cell and can increase overall lactate yields in a fermentation process. Cells having the reduced L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity can be screened for by resistance to organic acids such as lactic or glycolic acid.

  16. Inhibitors of type II NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductase represent a class of antitubercular drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Edward A.; Yano, Takahiro; Li, Lin-Sheng; Avarbock, David; Avarbock, Andrew; Helm, Douglas; McColm, Andrew A.; Duncan, Ken; Lonsdale, John T.; Rubin, Harvey

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an obligate aerobe that is capable of long-term persistence under conditions of low oxygen tension. Analysis of the Mtb genome predicts the existence of a branched aerobic respiratory chain terminating in a cytochrome bd system and a cytochrome aa3 system. Both chains can be initiated with type II NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductase. We present a detailed biochemical characterization of the aerobic respiratory chains from Mtb and show that phenothiazine analogs specifically inhibit NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductase activity. The emergence of drug-resistant strains of Mtb has prompted a search for antimycobacterial agents. Several phenothiazines analogs are highly tuberculocidal in vitro, suppress Mtb growth in a mouse model of acute infection, and represent lead compounds that may give rise to a class of selective antibiotics. PMID:15767566

  17. Preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yanfei; Cherney, Maia M.; Solomonson, Matthew; Liu, Jianshe; James, Michael N. G.; Weiner, Joel H.

    2009-01-01

    The sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase from A. ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 was overexpressed in E. coli and purified. Crystallization and preliminarily X-ray crystallographic analysis were performed for the recombinant enzyme. The gene product of open reading frame AFE-1293 from Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 23270 is annotated as encoding a sulfide:quinone oxidoreductase, an enzyme that catalyses electron transfer from sulfide to quinone. Following overexpression in Escherichia coli, the enzyme was purified and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The native crystals belonged to the tetragonal space group P4 2 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 131.7, c = 208.8 Å, and diffracted to 2.3 Å resolution. Preliminary crystallographic analysis indicated the presence of a dimer in the asymmetric unit, with an extreme value of the Matthews coefficient (V M ) of 4.53 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 72.9%

  18. Enzymatic coupling of 2,4-dichlorophenol to stream fulvic acid in the presence of oxidoreductases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarkar, J.M.; Malcolm, R.L.; Bollag, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    The coupling 14 C-ring-labelled 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) to stream fulvic acid was investigated in the presence of several oxidoreductases including tyrosinase, peroxidase, and laccases of Rhizoctonia praticola and Trametes vesicolor. During 12-h incubation of the oxidoreductases with 14 C-2, 4-DCP and stream fulvic acid, a substantial amount of the radioactivity was incorporated into fulvic acid. Chromatographic analysis indicated that although a large portion of the radioactivity remained in solution, no unbound 14 C-2,4-DCP was present in the supernatant. The effects of pH, temperature, concentration of fulvic acid, and concentration of enzyme on the coupling processes were studied. The results of this research provide evidence that the enzymatic coupling of certain xenobiotic pollutants to humic substances is an important natural process which must be considered in studies of the fate, reactivity, and persistence of these organic compounds in soils and stream waters

  19. Oxidoreductases from Trametes spp. in Biotechnology: A Wealth of Catalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gibson S. Nyanhongo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Those oxidoreductases that are part of the ligninolytic complex of basidiomycete and ascomycete fungi have played an increasingly important role in biotechnological applications during the last decade. The stability of these extracellular enzymes, their good solubility, and a multitude of catalyzed reactions contribute to this trend. This review focuses on a single genus of white-rot basidiomycetes, Trametes, to highlight the numerous possibilities for the application of this microorganism as well as three of its enzymes: laccase, cellobiose dehydrogenase, and pyranose 2-oxidase. Whereas laccase is without doubt a major player in biotechnology, the two other enzymes are less well known, but represent emerging biocatalysts with potential. Both cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose 2-oxidase are presumed to participate in lignin breakdown and will be used to exemplify the potential of less prominent oxidoreductases from this genus.

  20. Inhibitors of type II NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductase represent a class of antitubercular drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Weinstein, Edward A.; Yano, Takahiro; Li, Lin-Sheng; Avarbock, David; Avarbock, Andrew; Helm, Douglas; McColm, Andrew A.; Duncan, Ken; Lonsdale, John T.; Rubin, Harvey

    2005-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is an obligate aerobe that is capable of long-term persistence under conditions of low oxygen tension. Analysis of the Mtb genome predicts the existence of a branched aerobic respiratory chain terminating in a cytochrome bd system and a cytochrome aa3 system. Both chains can be initiated with type II NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductase. We present a detailed biochemical characterization of the aerobic respiratory chains from Mtb and show that phenothiazine analogs...

  1. Evolution of NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductases (POR) in Apiales - POR 1 is missing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Trine Bundgaard; Hansen, Niels Bjørn; Laursen, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    The NADPH-dependent cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the obligate electron donor to eukaryotic microsomal cytochromes P450 enzymes. The number of PORs within plant species is limited to one to four isoforms, with the most common being two PORs per plant. These enzymes provide electrons to ...... (available from the SRA at NCBI). All three genes were shown to be functional upon reconstitution into nanodiscs, confirming that none of the isoforms are pseudogenes....

  2. Protein Engineering for Nicotinamide Coenzyme Specificity in Oxidoreductases: Attempts and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chánique, Andrea M; Parra, Loreto P

    2018-01-01

    Oxidoreductases are ubiquitous enzymes that catalyze an extensive range of chemical reactions with great specificity, efficiency, and selectivity. Most oxidoreductases are nicotinamide cofactor-dependent enzymes with a strong preference for NADP or NAD. Because these coenzymes differ in stability, bioavailability and costs, the enzyme preference for a specific coenzyme is an important issue for practical applications. Different approaches for the manipulation of coenzyme specificity have been reported, with different degrees of success. Here we present various attempts for the switching of nicotinamide coenzyme preference in oxidoreductases by protein engineering. This review covers 103 enzyme engineering studies from 82 articles and evaluates the accomplishments in terms of coenzyme specificity and catalytic efficiency compared to wild type enzymes of different classes. We analyzed different protein engineering strategies and related them with the degree of success in inverting the cofactor specificity. In general, catalytic activity is compromised when coenzyme specificity is reversed, however when switching from NAD to NADP, better results are obtained. In most of the cases, rational strategies were used, predominantly with loop exchange generating the best results. In general, the tendency of removing acidic residues and incorporating basic residues is the strategy of choice when trying to change specificity from NAD to NADP, and vice versa . Computational strategies and algorithms are also covered as helpful tools to guide protein engineering strategies. This mini review aims to give a general introduction to the topic, giving an overview of tools and information to work in protein engineering for the reversal of coenzyme specificity.

  3. In situ STM imaging and direct electrochemistry of Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin assembled on thiolate-modified Au(111) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingdong; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager; Ooi, Bee Lean

    2004-01-01

    We have addressed here electron transfer (ET) of Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin (PfFd, 7.5 kDa) in both homogeneous solution using edge plane graphite (EPG) electrodes and in the adsorbed state by electrochemistry on surface-modified single-crystal Au(111) electrodes, This has been supported...... by surface microscopic structures of PfFd monolayers, as revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy under potential control (in situ STM). Direct ET between PfFd in phosphate buffer solution, pH 7.9, and EPG electrodes is observed in the presence of promoters. Neomycin gives rise to a pair of redox peaks...... with a formal potential of ca -430 mV (vs SCE), corresponding to [3Fe-4S](1+/0). The presence of an additional promoter, which can be propionic acid, alanine, or cysteine, induces a second pair of redox peaks at similar to-900 mV (vs SCE) arising from [3Fe-4S](0/1-). A robust neomycin-PfFd complex was detected...

  4. Evaluation of the participation of ferredoxin in oxygen reduction in the photosynthetic electron transport chain of isolated pea thylakoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuleva, Marina A; Ivanov, Boris N

    2010-07-01

    The contribution to reduction of oxygen by ferredoxin (Fd) to the overall reduction of oxygen in isolated pea thylakoids was studied in the presence of Fd versus Fd + NADP(+). The overall rate of electron transport was measured using a determination of Photosystem II quantum yield from chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, and the rate of oxidation of Fd was measured from the light-induced redox changes of Fd. At low light intensity, increasing Fd concentration from 5 to 30 microM in the absence of NADP(+) increased the proportion of oxygen reduction by Fd from 25-35 to 40-60% in different experiments. This proportion decreased with increasing light intensity. When NADP(+) was added in the presence of 15 microM Fd, which was optimal for the NADP(+) reduction rate, the participation of Fd in the reduction of oxygen was low, no more than 10%, and it also decreased with increasing light intensity. At high light intensity, the overall oxygen reduction rates in the presence of Fd + NADP(+) and in the presence of Fd alone were comparable. The significance of reduction of dioxygen either by water-soluble Fd or by the membrane-bound carriers of the photosynthetic electron transport chain for redox signaling under different light intensities is discussed.

  5. Cellular Assays for Ferredoxins: A Strategy for Understanding Electron Flow through Protein Carriers That Link Metabolic Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Joshua T; Campbell, Ian; Bennett, George N; Silberg, Jonathan J

    2016-12-27

    The ferredoxin (Fd) protein family is a structurally diverse group of iron-sulfur proteins that function as electron carriers, linking biochemical pathways important for energy transduction, nutrient assimilation, and primary metabolism. While considerable biochemical information about individual Fd protein electron carriers and their reactions has been acquired, we cannot yet anticipate the proportion of electrons shuttled between different Fd-partner proteins within cells using biochemical parameters that govern electron flow, such as holo-Fd concentration, midpoint potential (driving force), molecular interactions (affinity and kinetics), conformational changes (allostery), and off-pathway electron leakage (chemical oxidation). Herein, we describe functional and structural gaps in our Fd knowledge within the context of a sequence similarity network and phylogenetic tree, and we propose a strategy for improving our understanding of Fd sequence-function relationships. We suggest comparing the functions of divergent Fds within cells whose growth, or other measurable output, requires electron transfer between defined electron donor and acceptor proteins. By comparing Fd-mediated electron transfer with biochemical parameters that govern electron flow, we posit that models that anticipate energy flow across Fd interactomes can be built. This approach is expected to transform our ability to anticipate Fd control over electron flow in cellular settings, an obstacle to the construction of synthetic electron transfer pathways and rational optimization of existing energy-conserving pathways.

  6. Enhancement of naphthalene tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the ferredoxin-like protein (ADI1) from rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao-Yan; Zhu, Bo; Han, Hong-Juan; Zhao, Wei; Tian, Yong-Sheng; Peng, Ri-He; Yao, Quan-Hong

    2016-01-01

    The ADI1 Arabidopsis plants enhanced tolerance and degradation efficiency to naphthalene and had great potential for phytoremediation of naphthalene in the plant material before composting or harvesting and removal. Naphthalene is a global environmental concern, because this substance is assumed to contribute considerably to human cancer risk. Cleaning up naphthalene contamination in the environment is crucial. Phytoremediation is an efficient technology to clean up contaminants. However, no gene that can efficiently degrade exogenous recalcitrant naphthalene in plants has yet been discovered. Ferredoxin (Fd) is a key player of biological electron transfer reaction in the PAH degradation process. The biochemical pathway for bacterial degradation of naphthalene has been well investigated. In this study, a rice gene, ADI1, which codes for a putative photosynthetic-type Fd, has been transformed into Arabidopsis thaliana. The transgenic Arabidopsis plants enhanced tolerance and degradation efficiency of naphthalene. Compared with wild-type plants, transgenic plants assimilated naphthalene from the culture media faster and removed more of this substance. When taken together, our findings suggest that breeding plants with overexpressed ADI1 gene is an effective strategy to degrade naphthalene in the environment.

  7. Mass Transfer in Amperometric Biosensors Based on Nanocomposite Thin Films of Redox Polymers and Oxidoreductases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandr L. Simonian

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available Mass transfer in nanocomposite hydrogel thin films consisting of alternating layers of an organometallic redox polymer (RP and oxidoreductase enzymes was investigated. Multilayer nanostructures were fabricated on gold surfaces by the deposition of an anionic self-assembled monolayer of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid, followed by the electrostatic binding of a cationic redox polymer, poly[vinylpyridine Os(bis-bipyridine2Clco-allylamine], and an anionic oxidoreductase. Surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared external reflection spectroscopy (FTIR-ERS, ellipsometry and electrochemistry were employed to characterize the assembly of these nanocomposite films. Simultaneous SPR/electrochemistry enabled real time observation of the assembly of sensing components, changes in film structure with electrode potential, and the immediate, in situ electrochemical verification of substrate-dependent current upon the addition of enzyme to the multilayer structure. SPR and FTIR-ERS studies also showed no desorption of polymer or enzyme from the nanocomposite structure when stored in aqueous environment occurred over the period of three weeks, suggesting that decreasing in substrate sensitivity were due to loss of enzymatic activity rather than loss of film compounds from the nanostructure.

  8. Oxidoreductases provide a more generic response to metallic stressors (Cu and Cd) than hydrolases in soil fungi: new ecotoxicological insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrun, Jérémie D; Demont-Caulet, Nathalie; Cheviron, Nathalie; Laval, Karine; Trinsoutrot-Gattin, Isabelle; Mougin, Christian

    2016-02-01

    The present study investigates the effect of metals on the secretion of enzymes from 12 fungal strains maintained in liquid cultures. Hydrolases (acid phosphatase, β-glucosidase, β-galactosidase, and N-acetyl-β-glucosaminidase) and ligninolytic oxidoreductases (laccase, Mn, and lignin peroxidases) activities, as well as biomass production, were measured in culture fluids from fungi exposed to Cu or Cd. Our results showed that all fungi secreted most of the selected hydrolases and that about 50% of them produced a partial oxidative system in the absence of metals. Then, exposure of fungi to metals led to the decrease in biomass production. At the enzymatic level, Cu and Cd modified the secretion profiles of soil fungi. The response of hydrolases to metals was contrasted and complex and depended on metal, enzyme, and fungal strain considered. By contrast, the metals always stimulated the activity of ligninolytic oxidoreductases in fungal strains. In some of them, oxidoreductases were specifically produced following metal exposure. Fungal oxidoreductases provide a more generic response than hydrolases, constituting thus a physiological basis for their use as biomarkers of metal exposure in soils.

  9. A quantitative and direct PCR assay for the subspecies-specific detection of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis based on a ferredoxin reductase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Min Seok; Lee, Jang Ha; Her, Nam Han; Kim, Changkug; Seol, Young-Joo; Hahn, Jang Ho; Baeg, Ji Hyoun; Kim, Hong Gi; Park, Dong Suk

    2012-06-01

    The Gram-positive bacterium Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis is the causal agent of canker disease in tomato. Because it is very important to control newly introduced inoculum sources from commercial materials, the specific detection of this pathogen in seeds and seedlings is essential for effective disease control. In this study, a novel and efficient assay for the detection and quantitation of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis in symptomless tomato and red pepper seeds was developed. A pair of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers (Cmm141F/R) was designed to amplify a specific 141 bp fragment on the basis of a ferredoxin reductase gene of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis NCPPB 382. The specificity of the primer set was evaluated using purified DNA from 16 isolates of five C. michiganensis subspecies, one other Clavibacter species, and 17 other reference bacteria. The primer set amplified a single band of expected size from the genomic DNA obtained from the C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis strains but not from the other C. michiganensis subspecies or from other Clavibacter species. The detection limit was a single cloned copy of the ferredoxin reductase gene of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis. In conclusion, this quantitative direct PCR assay can be applied as a practical diagnostic method for epidemiological research and the sanitary management of seeds and seedlings with a low level or latent infection of C. michiganensis subsp. michiganensis.

  10. Crystal structures of the all-cysteinyl-coordinated D14C variant of Pyrococcus furiosus ferredoxin: [4Fe–4S] ↔ [3Fe–4S] cluster conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Løvgreen, Monika Nøhr; Martic, Maja; Windahl, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The structure of the all-cysteinyl-coordinated D14C variant of [4Fe–4S] ferredoxin from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has been determined to 1.7 Å resolution from a crystal belonging to space group C2221 with two types of molecules, A and B, in the asymmetric unit. A and B...... molecules have different crystal packing and intramolecular disulfide bond conformation. The crystal packing reveals a β-sheet interaction between A molecules in adjacent asymmetric units, whereas B molecules are packed as monomers in a less rigid position next to the A–A extended β-sheet dimers...... and purification are carried out at pH 5.8, only the monomer is obtained. The crystal structure of D14C [3Fe–4S] P. furiosus ferredoxin monomer was determined to 2.8 Å resolution from a crystal belonging to space group P212121 with two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The molecules resemble molecule A of D14C [4...

  11. Nitric oxide is an obligate bacterial nitrification intermediate produced by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caranto, Jonathan D; Lancaster, Kyle M

    2017-08-01

    Ammonia (NH 3 )-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) emit substantial amounts of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N 2 O), both of which contribute to the harmful environmental side effects of large-scale agriculture. The currently accepted model for AOB metabolism involves NH 3 oxidation to nitrite (NO 2 - ) via a single obligate intermediate, hydroxylamine (NH 2 OH). Within this model, the multiheme enzyme hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) catalyzes the four-electron oxidation of NH 2 OH to NO 2 - We provide evidence that HAO oxidizes NH 2 OH by only three electrons to NO under both anaerobic and aerobic conditions. NO 2 - observed in HAO activity assays is a nonenzymatic product resulting from the oxidation of NO by O 2 under aerobic conditions. Our present study implies that aerobic NH 3 oxidation by AOB occurs via two obligate intermediates, NH 2 OH and NO, necessitating a mediator of the third enzymatic step.

  12. NADPH: Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase-Structure, Catalytic Function, and Role in Prolamellar Body Formation and Morphogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timko, Michael P

    2013-02-01

    The biosynthesis of chlorophyll is a critical biochemical step in the development of photosynthetic vascular plants and green algae. From photosynthetic bacteria (cyanobacteria) to algae, non-vascular plants, gymnosperms and vascular plants, mechanisms have evolved for protochlorophyllide reduction a key step in chlorophyll synthesis. Protochlorophyllide reduction is carried out by both a light-dependent (POR) and light-independent (LIPOR) mechanisms. NADPH: protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (EC 1.3.1.33, abbreviated POR) catalyzes the light-dependent reduction of protochlorophyllide (PChlide) to chlorophyllide (Chlide). In contrast, a light-independent protochlorophyllide reductase (LIPOR) involves three plastid gene products (chlL, chlN, and chlB) and several nuclear factors. Our work focused on characterization of both the POR and LIPOR catalyzed processes.

  13. Differentially regulated NADPH:cytochrome P450 oxidoreductases in parsley

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopmann, Edda; Hahlbrock, Klaus

    1997-01-01

    Two NADPH:cytochrome P450 oxidoreductases (CPRs) from parsley (Petroselinum crispum) were cloned, and the complete proteins were expressed and functionally identified in yeast. The two enzymes, designated CPR1 and CPR2, are 80% identical in amino acid sequence with one another and about 75% identical with CPRs from several other plant species. The mRNA accumulation patterns for CPR1 and CPR2 in fungal elicitor-treated or UV-irradiated cultured parsley cells and in developing or infected parsley plants were compared with those for cinnamate 4-hydroxylase (C4H), one of the most abundant CPR-dependent P450 enzymes in plants. All treatments strongly induced the mRNAs for C4H and CPR1 but not for CPR2, suggesting distinct metabolic roles of CPR1 and CPR2 and a functional relationship between CPR1 and C4H. PMID:9405720

  14. Enantiocomplementary Yarrowia lipolytica Oxidoreductases: Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 and Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margit Winkler

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes of the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica seem to be tailor-made for the conversion of lipophilic substrates. Herein, we cloned and overexpressed the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase ADH2 from Yarrowia lipolytica in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was characterized in vitro. The substrate scope for YlADH2 mediated oxidation and reduction was investigated spectrophotometrically and the enzyme showed a broader substrate range than its homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A preference for secondary compared to primary alcohols in oxidation direction was observed for YlADH2. 2-Octanone was investigated in reduction mode in detail. Remarkably, YlADH2 displays perfect (S-selectivity and together with a highly (R-selective short chain dehydrogenase/ reductase from Yarrowia lipolytica it is possible to access both enantiomers of 2-octanol in >99% ee with Yarrowia lipolytica oxidoreductases.

  15. Enantiocomplementary Yarrowia lipolytica Oxidoreductases: Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 and Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napora-Wijata, Kamila; Strohmeier, Gernot A; Sonavane, Manoj N; Avi, Manuela; Robins, Karen; Winkler, Margit

    2013-08-12

    Enzymes of the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica seem to be tailor-made for the conversion of lipophilic substrates. Herein, we cloned and overexpressed the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase ADH2 from Yarrowia lipolytica in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was characterized in vitro. The substrate scope for YlADH2 mediated oxidation and reduction was investigated spectrophotometrically and the enzyme showed a broader substrate range than its homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A preference for secondary compared to primary alcohols in oxidation direction was observed for YlADH2. 2-Octanone was investigated in reduction mode in detail. Remarkably, YlADH2 displays perfect (S)-selectivity and together with a highly (R)-selective short chain dehydrogenase/ reductase from Yarrowia lipolytica it is possible to access both enantiomers of 2-octanol in >99% ee with Yarrowia lipolytica oxidoreductases.

  16. Regulation of gap junction function and Connexin 43 expression by cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polusani, Srikanth R.; Kar, Rekha; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Masters, Bettie Sue; Panda, Satya P.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Humans with severe forms of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) mutations show bone defects as observed in Antley-Bixler Syndrome. → First report showing knockdown of CYPOR in osteoblasts decreased Connexin 43 (Cx43) protein levels. Cx43 is known to play an important role in bone modeling. → Knockdown of CYPOR decreased Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and hemichannel activity. → Knockdown of CYPOR decreased Cx43 in mouse primary calvarial osteoblasts. → Decreased Cx43 expression was observed at the transcriptional level. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) is a microsomal electron-transferring enzyme containing both FAD and FMN as co-factors, which provides the reducing equivalents to various redox partners, such as cytochromes P450 (CYPs), heme oxygenase (HO), cytochrome b 5 and squalene monooxygenase. Human patients with severe forms of CYPOR mutation show bone defects such as cranio- and humeroradial synostoses and long bone fractures, known as Antley-Bixler-like Syndrome (ABS). To elucidate the role of CYPOR in bone, we knocked-down CYPOR in multiple osteoblast cell lines using RNAi technology. In this study, knock-down of CYPOR decreased the expression of Connexin 43 (Cx43), known to play a critical role in bone formation, modeling, and remodeling. Knock-down of CYPOR also decreased Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) and hemichannel activity. Promoter luciferase assays revealed that the decrease in expression of Cx43 in CYPOR knock-down cells was due to transcriptional repression. Primary osteoblasts isolated from bone specific Por knock-down mice calvariae confirmed the findings in the cell lines. Taken together, our study provides novel insights into the regulation of gap junction function by CYPOR and suggests that Cx43 may play an important role(s) in CYPOR-mediated bone defects seen in patients.

  17. Regulation of gap junction function and Connexin 43 expression by cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polusani, Srikanth R.; Kar, Rekha; Riquelme, Manuel A.; Masters, Bettie Sue [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Biochemistry, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States); Panda, Satya P., E-mail: panda@uthscsa.edu [The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, Department of Biochemistry, San Antonio, TX 78229 (United States)

    2011-08-05

    Highlights: {yields} Humans with severe forms of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) mutations show bone defects as observed in Antley-Bixler Syndrome. {yields} First report showing knockdown of CYPOR in osteoblasts decreased Connexin 43 (Cx43) protein levels. Cx43 is known to play an important role in bone modeling. {yields} Knockdown of CYPOR decreased Gap Junctional Intercellular Communication and hemichannel activity. {yields} Knockdown of CYPOR decreased Cx43 in mouse primary calvarial osteoblasts. {yields} Decreased Cx43 expression was observed at the transcriptional level. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) is a microsomal electron-transferring enzyme containing both FAD and FMN as co-factors, which provides the reducing equivalents to various redox partners, such as cytochromes P450 (CYPs), heme oxygenase (HO), cytochrome b{sub 5} and squalene monooxygenase. Human patients with severe forms of CYPOR mutation show bone defects such as cranio- and humeroradial synostoses and long bone fractures, known as Antley-Bixler-like Syndrome (ABS). To elucidate the role of CYPOR in bone, we knocked-down CYPOR in multiple osteoblast cell lines using RNAi technology. In this study, knock-down of CYPOR decreased the expression of Connexin 43 (Cx43), known to play a critical role in bone formation, modeling, and remodeling. Knock-down of CYPOR also decreased Gap Junction Intercellular Communication (GJIC) and hemichannel activity. Promoter luciferase assays revealed that the decrease in expression of Cx43 in CYPOR knock-down cells was due to transcriptional repression. Primary osteoblasts isolated from bone specific Por knock-down mice calvariae confirmed the findings in the cell lines. Taken together, our study provides novel insights into the regulation of gap junction function by CYPOR and suggests that Cx43 may play an important role(s) in CYPOR-mediated bone defects seen in patients.

  18. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Yadav, Pramod K.; Ballou, David P.; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be −123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. PMID:26318450

  19. Transient Kinetic Analysis of Hydrogen Sulfide Oxidation Catalyzed by Human Sulfide Quinone Oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishanina, Tatiana V; Yadav, Pramod K; Ballou, David P; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-10-09

    The first step in the mitochondrial sulfide oxidation pathway is catalyzed by sulfide quinone oxidoreductase (SQR), which belongs to the family of flavoprotein disulfide oxidoreductases. During the catalytic cycle, the flavin cofactor is intermittently reduced by sulfide and oxidized by ubiquinone, linking H2S oxidation to the electron transfer chain and to energy metabolism. Human SQR can use multiple thiophilic acceptors, including sulfide, sulfite, and glutathione, to form as products, hydrodisulfide, thiosulfate, and glutathione persulfide, respectively. In this study, we have used transient kinetics to examine the mechanism of the flavin reductive half-reaction and have determined the redox potential of the bound flavin to be -123 ± 7 mV. We observe formation of an unusually intense charge-transfer (CT) complex when the enzyme is exposed to sulfide and unexpectedly, when it is exposed to sulfite. In the canonical reaction, sulfide serves as the sulfur donor and sulfite serves as the acceptor, forming thiosulfate. We show that thiosulfate is also formed when sulfide is added to the sulfite-induced CT intermediate, representing a new mechanism for thiosulfate formation. The CT complex is formed at a kinetically competent rate by reaction with sulfide but not with sulfite. Our study indicates that sulfide addition to the active site disulfide is preferred under normal turnover conditions. However, under pathological conditions when sulfite concentrations are high, sulfite could compete with sulfide for addition to the active site disulfide, leading to attenuation of SQR activity and to an alternate route for thiosulfate formation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. Role of Nitrogenase and Ferredoxin in the Mechanism of Bioelectrocatalytic Nitrogen Fixation by the Cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis SA-1 Mutant Immobilized on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knoche, Krysti L.; Aoyama, Erika; Hasan, Kamrul; Minteer, Shelley D.

    2017-01-01

    Current ammonia production methods are costly and environmentally detrimental. Biological nitrogen fixation has implications for low cost, environmentally friendly ammonia production. It has been shown that electrochemical stimulation increases the ammonia output of the cyanobacteria SA-1 mutant of Anabaena variabilis, but the mechanism of bioelectrocatalysis has been unknown. Here, the mechanism of electrostimulated biological ammonia production is investigated by immobilization of the cyanobacteria with polyvinylamine on indium tin oxide (ITO) coated polyethylene. Cyclic voltammetry is performed in the absence and presence of various substrates and with nitrogenase repressed and nitrogenase derepressed cells to study mechanism, and cyclic voltammetry and UV–vis spectroscopy are used to identify redox moieties in the spent electrolyte. A bioelectrocatalytic signal is observed for nitrogenase derepressed A. variabilis SA-1 in the presence of N_2 and light. Results indicate that the redox protein ferredoxin mediates electron transfer between nitrogenase and the electrode to stimulate ammonia production.

  1. Increased Furfural Tolerance Due to Overexpression of NADH-Dependent Oxidoreductase FucO in Escherichia coli Strains Engineered for the Production of Ethanol and Lactate▿

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, X.; Miller, E. N.; Yomano, L. P.; Zhang, X.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, L. O.

    2011-01-01

    Furfural is an important fermentation inhibitor in hemicellulose sugar syrups derived from woody biomass. The metabolism of furfural by NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases, such as YqhD (low Km for NADPH), is proposed to inhibit the growth and fermentation of xylose in Escherichia coli by competing with biosynthesis for NADPH. The discovery that the NADH-dependent propanediol oxidoreductase (FucO) can reduce furfural provided a new approach to improve furfural tolerance. Strains that produced eth...

  2. Over-expression of a putative oxidoreductase (UcpA) for increasing furfural or 5-hydroxymethylfurfural tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Miller, Elliot N.; Yomano, Lorraine P.; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    2016-05-24

    The subject invention pertains to overexpression of a putative oxidoreductase (ucpA) for increasing furfural tolerance in genetically modified microorganisms. Genetically modified microorganisms capable of overexpressing UcpA are also provided. Increased expression of ucpA was shown to increase furfural tolerance by 50%, and to permit the fermentation of sugars to products in the presence of 15 mM furfural.

  3. Over-expression of NADH-dependent oxidoreductase (fucO) for increasing furfural or 5-hydroxymethylfurfural tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Elliot N.; Zhang, Xueli; Yomano, Lorraine P.; Wang, Xuan; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T.; Ingram, Lonnie O'Neal

    2015-10-13

    The subject invention pertains to the discovery that the NADH-dependent propanediol oxidoreductase (FucO) can reduce furfural. This allows for a new approach to improve furfural tolerance in bacterial and/or yeast cells used to produce desired products. Thus, novel biocatalysts (bacterial, fungal or yeast cells) exhibiting increased tolerance to furfural and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF) are provided as are methods of making and using such biocatalysts for the production of a desired product.

  4. Reaction of electron-transfer flavoprotein with electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckmann, J.D.; Frerman, F.E.

    1985-01-01

    The oxidative half-reaction of electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF), electron transfer from ETF to electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO), is dependent on complementary surface charges on the two proteins. ETF is the positively charged member of the redox pair. The evidence is based on the pH and ionic strength dependencies of the comproportionation of oxidized ETF and ETF hydroquinone catalyzed by ETF-QO and on the effects of chemical modification of ETF on the comproportionation reaction. Acetylation of one and five epsilon-amino groups of lysyl residues results in 3- and 13-fold increases, respectively, in the K/sub m/ of ETF-QO for ETF but no change in V/sub max/. Amidination, which maintains positive charge at modified loci, has no effect on steady-state kinetic constants. These chemical modifications have no effect on the equilibrium constant for equilibration of ETF redox states. The K/sub m/ of ETF-QO for ETF is pH dependent above pH 8.5, suggesting titration of lysyl residues. The ionic strength dependence of TN/KmETF for the reaction follows the limiting Bronsted equation. The ETF-QO-catalyzed comproportionation reaction exhibits a primary deuterium isotope effect in D 2 O, perhaps indicating the participation of solvent water in the electron-transfer reaction

  5. Reduction of nitric oxide catalyzed by hydroxylamine oxidoreductase from an anammox bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irisa, Tatsuya; Hira, Daisuke; Furukawa, Kenji; Fujii, Takao

    2014-12-01

    The hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) from the anammox bacterium, Candidatus Kuenenia stuttgartiensis has been reported to catalyze the oxidation of hydroxylamine (NH2OH) to nitric oxide (NO) by using bovine cytochrome c as an oxidant. In contrast, we investigated whether the HAO from anammox bacterium strain KSU-1 could catalyze the reduction of NO with reduced benzyl viologen (BVred) and the NO-releasing reagent, NOC 7. The reduction proceeded, resulting in the formation of NH2OH as a product. The oxidation rate of BVred was proportional to the concentration of BVred itself for a short period in each experiment, a situation that was termed quasi-steady state. The analyses of the states at various concentrations of HAO allowed us to determine the rate constant for the catalytic reaction, (2.85 ± 0.19) × 10(5) M(-1) s(-1), governing NO reduction by BVred and HAO, which was comparable to that reported for the HAO from the ammonium oxidizer, Nitrosomonas with reduced methyl viologen. These results suggest that the anammox HAO functions to adjust anammox by inter-conversion of NO and NH2OH depending on the redox potential of the physiological electron transfer protein in anammox bacteria. Copyright © 2014 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mutations Associated with Functional Disorder of Xanthine Oxidoreductase and Hereditary Xanthinuria in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Nishino

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR catalyzes the conversion of hypoxanthine to xanthine and xanthine to uric acid with concomitant reduction of either NAD+ or O2. The enzyme is a target of drugs to treat hyperuricemia, gout and reactive oxygen-related diseases. Human diseases associated with genetically determined dysfunction of XOR are termed xanthinuria, because of the excretion of xanthine in urine. Xanthinuria is classified into two subtypes, type I and type II. Type I xanthinuria involves XOR deficiency due to genetic defect of XOR, whereas type II xanthinuria involves dual deficiency of XOR and aldehyde oxidase (AO, a molybdoflavo enzyme similar to XOR due to genetic defect in the molybdenum cofactor sulfurase. Molybdenum cofactor deficiency is associated with triple deficiency of XOR, AO and sulfite oxidase, due to defective synthesis of molybdopterin, which is a precursor of molybdenum cofactor for all three enzymes. The present review focuses on mutation or chemical modification studies of mammalian XOR, as well as on XOR mutations identified in humans, aimed at understanding the reaction mechanism of XOR and the relevance of mutated XORs as models to estimate the possible side effects of clinical application of XOR inhibitors.

  7. Stoichiometry of ATP hydrolysis and chlorophyllide formation of dark-operative protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase from Rhodobacter capsulatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomata, Jiro [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601 (Japan); Terauchi, Kazuki [Department of Life Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga, 525-8577 (Japan); Fujita, Yuichi, E-mail: fujita@agr.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601 (Japan)

    2016-02-12

    Dark-operative protochlorophyllide (Pchlide) oxidoreductase (DPOR) is a nitrogenase-like enzyme catalyzing a reduction of the C17 = C18 double bond of Pchlide to form chlorophyllide a (Chlide) in bacteriochlorophyll biosynthesis. DPOR consists of an ATP-dependent reductase component, L-protein (a BchL dimer), and a catalytic component, NB-protein (a BchN–BchB heterotetramer). The L-protein transfers electrons to the NB-protein to reduce Pchlide, which is coupled with ATP hydrolysis. Here we determined the stoichiometry of ATP hydrolysis and the Chlide formation of DPOR. The minimal ratio of ATP to Chlide (ATP/2e{sup –}) was 4, which coincides with that of nitrogenase. The ratio increases with increasing molar ratio of L-protein to NB-protein. This profile differs from that of nitrogenase. These results suggest that DPOR has a specific intrinsic property, while retaining the common features shared with nitrogenase. - Highlights: • The stoichiometry of nitrogenase-like protochlorophyllide reductase was determined. • The minimal ATP/2e{sup –} ratio was 4, which coincides with that of nitrogenase. • The ATP/2e{sup –} ratio increases with increasing L-protein/NB-protein molar ratio. • DPOR has an intrinsic property, but retains features shared with nitrogenase.

  8. Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Oxidoreductase NmDsbA3 from Neisseria meningitidis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vivian, Julian P.; Scoullar, Jessica; Robertson, Amy L.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Horne, James; Chin, Yanni; Wielens, Jerome; Thompson, Philip E.; Velkov, Tony; Piek, Susannah; Byres, Emma; Beddoe, Travis; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Kahler, Charlene M.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Scanlon, Martin J. (UWA); (Monash)

    2009-09-02

    DsbA is an enzyme found in the periplasm of Gram-negative bacteria that catalyzes the formation of disulfide bonds in a diverse array of protein substrates, many of which are involved in bacterial pathogenesis. Although most bacteria possess only a single essential DsbA, Neisseria meningitidis is unusual in that it possesses three DsbAs, although the reason for this additional redundancy is unclear. Two of these N. meningitidis enzymes (NmDsbA1 and NmDsbA2) play an important role in meningococcal attachment to human epithelial cells, whereas NmDsbA3 is considered to have a narrow substrate repertoire. To begin to address the role of DsbAs in the pathogenesis of N. meningitidis, we have determined the structure of NmDsbA3 to 2.3-{angstrom} resolution. Although the sequence identity between NmDsbA3 and other DsbAs is low, the NmDsbA3 structure adopted a DsbA-like fold. Consistent with this finding, we demonstrated that NmDsbA3 acts as a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase in vitro and is reoxidized by Escherichia coli DsbB (EcDsbB). However, pronounced differences in the structures between DsbA3 and EcDsbA, which are clustered around the active site of the enzyme, suggested a structural basis for the unusual substrate specificity that is observed for NmDsbA3.

  9. NADPH–Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase: Roles in Physiology, Pharmacology, and Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Xinxin; Wolf, C. Roland; Porter, Todd D.; Pandey, Amit V.; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Gu, Jun; Finn, Robert D.; Ronseaux, Sebastien; McLaughlin, Lesley A.; Henderson, Colin J.; Zou, Ling; Flück, Christa E.

    2013-01-01

    This is a report on a symposium sponsored by the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and held at the Experimental Biology 2012 meeting in San Diego, California, on April 25, 2012. The symposium speakers summarized and critically evaluated our current understanding of the physiologic, pharmacological, and toxicological roles of NADPH–cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR), a flavoprotein involved in electron transfer to microsomal cytochromes P450 (P450), cytochrome b5, squalene mono-oxygenase, and heme oxygenase. Considerable insight has been derived from the development and characterization of mouse models with conditional Por deletion in particular tissues or partial suppression of POR expression in all tissues. Additional mouse models with global or conditional hepatic deletion of cytochrome b5 are helping to clarify the P450 isoform- and substrate-specific influences of cytochrome b5 on P450 electron transfer and catalytic function. This symposium also considered studies using siRNA to suppress POR expression in a hepatoma cell–culture model to explore the basis of the hepatic lipidosis phenotype observed in mice with conditional deletion of Por in liver. The symposium concluded with a strong translational perspective, relating the basic science of human POR structure and function to the impacts of POR genetic variation on human drug and steroid metabolism. PMID:23086197

  10. Heterometallic [AgFe3S4] ferredoxin variants: synthesis, characterization, and the first crystal structure of an engineered heterometallic iron–sulfur protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martic, Maja; Simon, Ida Noemi; Haahr, Lærke Tvedebrink

    2013-01-01

    of the [AgFe3S4] wild type and D14H variants convert to the [Fe3S4] ferredoxin form. The monovalent d 10 silver(I) ion stabilizes the [Fe3S4]+/0 cluster fragment, as opposed to divalent d 10 metal ions, resulting in more than 0.4 V difference in reduction potentials between the silver(I) and, e.g., zinc...

  11. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the electron-transfer complex between the terminal oxygenase component and ferredoxin in the Rieske non-haem iron oxygenase system carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashikawa, Yuji; Fujimoto, Zui; Noguchi, Haruko; Habe, Hiroshi; Omori, Toshio; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    The electron-transfer complex between the terminal oxygenase and ferredoxin of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 1.90 Å resolution. Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase, which consists of an oxygenase component (CARDO-O) and the electron-transport components ferredoxin (CARDO-F) and ferredoxin reductase (CARDO-R), catalyzes dihydroxylation at the C1 and C9a positions of carbazole. The electron-transport complex between CARDO-O and CARDO-F crystallizes at 293 K using hanging-drop vapour diffusion with the precipitant PEG MME 2000 (type I crystals) or PEG 3350 (type II). Blossom-shaped crystals form from a pile of triangular plate-shaped crystals. The type I crystal diffracts to a maximum resolution of 1.90 Å and belongs to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 97.1, b = 89.8, c = 104.9 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 103.8°. Diffraction data for the type I crystal gave an overall R merge of 8.0% and a completeness of 100%. Its V M value is 2.63 Å 3 Da −1 , indicating a solvent content of 53.2%

  12. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the electron-transfer complex between the terminal oxygenase component and ferredoxin in the Rieske non-haem iron oxygenase system carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashikawa, Yuji [Biotechnology Research Center, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Fujimoto, Zui [Department of Biochemistry, National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, 2-1-2 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Noguchi, Haruko; Habe, Hiroshi; Omori, Toshio; Yamane, Hisakazu; Nojiri, Hideaki, E-mail: anojiri@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Biotechnology Research Center, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2005-06-01

    The electron-transfer complex between the terminal oxygenase and ferredoxin of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to 1.90 Å resolution. Carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase, which consists of an oxygenase component (CARDO-O) and the electron-transport components ferredoxin (CARDO-F) and ferredoxin reductase (CARDO-R), catalyzes dihydroxylation at the C1 and C9a positions of carbazole. The electron-transport complex between CARDO-O and CARDO-F crystallizes at 293 K using hanging-drop vapour diffusion with the precipitant PEG MME 2000 (type I crystals) or PEG 3350 (type II). Blossom-shaped crystals form from a pile of triangular plate-shaped crystals. The type I crystal diffracts to a maximum resolution of 1.90 Å and belongs to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 97.1, b = 89.8, c = 104.9 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 103.8°. Diffraction data for the type I crystal gave an overall R{sub merge} of 8.0% and a completeness of 100%. Its V{sub M} value is 2.63 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, indicating a solvent content of 53.2%.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analyses of the redox-controlled complex of terminal oxygenase and ferredoxin components in the Rieske nonhaem iron oxygenase carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuzawa, Jun; Aikawa, Hiroki; Umeda, Takashi [The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Ashikawa, Yuji [The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Waseda University, 3-4-1 Okubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Suzuki-Minakuchi, Chiho [The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Kawano, Yoshiaki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, RIKEN Harima Branch, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Fujimoto, Zui [National Institute of Agrobiological Sciences, 2-1-2 Kannondai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8602 (Japan); Okada, Kazunori [The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Yamane, Hisakazu [Teikyo University, 1-1 Toyosatodai, Utsunomiya, Tochigi 320-0003 (Japan); Nojiri, Hideaki, E-mail: anojiri@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan)

    2014-09-25

    A crystal was obtained of the complex between reduced terminal oxygenase and oxidized ferredoxin components of carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase. The crystal belonged to space group P2{sub 1} and diffracted to 2.25 Å resolution. The initial reaction in bacterial carbazole degradation is catalyzed by carbazole 1,9a-dioxygenase, which consists of terminal oxygenase (Oxy), ferredoxin (Fd) and ferredoxin reductase components. The electron-transfer complex between reduced Oxy and oxidized Fd was crystallized at 293 K using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with PEG 3350 as the precipitant under anaerobic conditions. The crystal diffracted to a maximum resolution of 2.25 Å and belonged to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 97.3, b = 81.6, c = 116.2 Å, α = γ = 90, β = 100.1°. The V{sub M} value is 2.85 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1}, indicating a solvent content of 56.8%.

  14. Identification of a lactate-quinone oxidoreductase (Lqo in staphylococcus aureus that is essential for virulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James R Fuller

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen commonly infecting nearly every host tissue. The ability of S. aureus to resist innate immunity is critical to its success as a pathogen, including its propensity to grow in the presence of host nitric oxide (NO·. Upon exogenous NO· exposure, S. aureus immediately excretes copious amounts of L-lactate to maintain redox balance. However, after prolonged NO·-exposure, S. aureus reassimilates L-lactate specifically and in this work, we identify the enzyme responsible for this L-lactate consumption as a L-lactate-quinone oxidoreductase (Lqo, SACOL2623. Originally annotated as Mqo2 and thought to oxidize malate, we show that this enzyme exhibits no affinity for malate but reacts specifically with L-lactate (KM = ~330 µM. In addition to its requirement for reassimilation of L-lactate during NO·-stress, Lqo is also critical to respiratory growth on L-lactate as a sole carbon source. Moreover, ∆lqo mutants exhibit attenuation in a murine model of sepsis, particularly in their ability to cause myocarditis. Interestingly, this cardiac-specific attenuation is completely abrogated in mice unable to synthesize inflammatory NO· (iNOS-/-. We demonstrate that S. aureus NO·-resistance is highly dependent on the availability of a glycolytic carbon sources. However, S. aureus can utilize the combination of peptides and L-lactate as carbon sources during NO·-stress in an Lqo-dependent fashion. Murine cardiac tissue has markedly high levels of L-lactate in comparison to renal or hepatic tissue consistent with the NO·-dependent requirement for Lqo in S. aureus myocarditis. Thus, Lqo provides S. aureus with yet another means of replicating in the presence of host NO·.

  15. Mechanistic reappraisal of early stage photochemistry in the light-driven enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derren J Heyes

    Full Text Available The light-driven enzyme protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (POR catalyzes the reduction of protochlorophyllide (Pchlide to chlorophyllide (Chlide. This reaction is a key step in the biosynthesis of chlorophyll. Ultrafast photochemical processes within the Pchlide molecule are required for catalysis and previous studies have suggested that a short-lived excited-state species, known as I675*, is the first catalytic intermediate in the reaction and is essential for capturing excitation energy to drive subsequent hydride and proton transfers. The chemical nature of the I675* excited state species and its role in catalysis are not known. Here, we report time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy measurements to study the involvement of the I675* intermediate in POR photochemistry. We show that I675* is not unique to the POR-catalyzed photoreduction of Pchlide as it is also formed in the absence of the POR enzyme. The I675* species is only produced in samples that contain both Pchlide substrate and Chlide product and its formation is dependent on the pump excitation wavelength. The rate of formation and the quantum yield is maximized in 50∶50 mixtures of the two pigments (Pchlide and Chlide and is caused by direct energy transfer between Pchlide and neighboring Chlide molecules, which is inhibited in the polar solvent methanol. Consequently, we have re-evaluated the mechanism for early stage photochemistry in the light-driven reduction of Pchlide and propose that I675* represents an excited state species formed in Pchlide-Chlide dimers, possibly an excimer. Contrary to previous reports, we conclude that this excited state species has no direct mechanistic relevance to the POR-catalyzed reduction of Pchlide.

  16. Relationship between plasma xanthine oxidoreductase activity and left ventricular ejection fraction and hypertrophy among cardiac patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Fujimura

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR, which catalyzes purine catabolism, has two interconvertible forms, xanthine dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase, the latter of which produces superoxide during uric acid (UA synthesis. An association between plasma XOR activity and cardiovascular and renal outcomes has been previously suggested. We investigated the potential association between cardiac parameters and plasma XOR activity among cardiology patients.Plasma XOR activity was measured by [13C2,15N2]xanthine coupled with liquid chromatography/triplequadrupole mass spectrometry. Among 270 patients who were not taking UA-lowering drugs, XOR activity was associated with body mass index (BMI, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, HbA1c and renal function. Although XOR activity was not associated with serum UA overall, patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD, those with higher XOR activity had higher serum UA among patients without CKD. Compared with patients with the lowest XOR activity quartile, those with higher three XOR activity quartiles more frequently had left ventricular hypertrophy. In addition, plasma XOR activity showed a U-shaped association with low left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and increased plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP levels, and these associations were independent of age, gender, BMI, ALT, HbA1C, serum UA, and CKD stages.Among cardiac patients, left ventricular hypertrophy, low LVEF, and increased BNP were significantly associated with plasma XOR activity independent of various confounding factors. Whether pharmaceutical modification of plasma XOR activity might inhibit cardiac remodeling and improve cardiovascular outcome should be investigated in future studies.

  17. P450 oxidoreductase deficiency: a disorder of steroidogenesis with multiple clinical manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Walter L

    2012-10-23

    Cytochrome P450 enzymes catalyze the biosynthesis of steroid hormones and metabolize drugs. There are seven human type I P450 enzymes in mitochondria and 50 type II enzymes in endoplasmic reticulum. Type II enzymes, including both drug-metabolizing and some steroidogenic enzymes, require electron donation from a two-flavin protein, P450 oxidoreductase (POR). Although knockout of the POR gene causes embryonic lethality in mice, we discovered human POR deficiency as a disorder of steroidogenesis associated with the Antley-Bixler skeletal malformation syndrome and found mild POR mutations in phenotypically normal adults with infertility. Assay results of mutant forms of POR using the traditional but nonphysiologic assay (reduction of cytochrome c) did not correlate with patient phenotypes; assays based on the 17,20 lyase activity of P450c17 (CYP17) correlated with clinical phenotypes. The POR sequence in 842 normal individuals revealed many polymorphisms; amino acid sequence variant A503V is encoded by ~28% of human alleles. POR A503V has about 60% of wild-type activity in assays with CYP17, CYP2D6, and CYP3A4, but nearly wild-type activity with P450c21, CYP1A2, and CYP2C19. Activity of a particular POR variant with one P450 enzyme will not predict its activity with another P450 enzyme: Each POR-P450 combination must be studied individually. Human POR transcription, initiated from an untranslated exon, is regulated by Smad3/4, thyroid receptors, and the transcription factor AP-2. A promoter polymorphism reduces transcription to 60% in liver cells and to 35% in adrenal cells. POR deficiency is a newly described disorder of steroidogenesis, and POR variants may account for some genetic variation in drug metabolism.

  18. Role of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 in clofibrate-mediated hepatoprotection from acetaminophen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moffit, Jeffrey S.; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Kardas, Michael J.; Slitt, Angela L.; Klaassen, Curtis D.; Manautou, Jose E.

    2007-01-01

    Mice pretreated with the peroxisome proliferator clofibrate (CFB) are resistant to acetaminophen (APAP) hepatotoxicity. Whereas the mechanism of protection is not entirely known, CFB decreases protein adducts formed by the reactive metabolite of APAP, N-acetyl-p-benzoquinone imine (NAPQI). NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) is an enzyme with antioxidant properties that is responsible for the reduction of cellular quinones. We hypothesized that CFB increases NQO1 activity, which in turn enhances the conversion of NAPQI back to the parent APAP. This could explain the decreases in APAP covalent binding and glutathione depletion produced by CFB without affecting APAP bioactivation to NAPQI. Administration of CFB (500 mg/kg, i.p.) to male CD-1 mice for 5 or 10 days increased NQO1 protein and activity levels. To evaluate the capacity of NQO1 to reduce NAPQI back to APAP, we utilized a microsomal activating system. Cytochrome P450 enzymes present in microsomes bioactivate APAP to NAPQI, which binds the electrophile trapping agent, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC). We analyzed the formation of APAP-NAC metabolite in the presence of human recombinant NQO1. Results indicate that NQO1 is capable of reducing NAPQI. The capacity of NQO1 to amelioriate APAP toxicity was then evaluated in primary hepatocytes. Primary hepatocytes isolated from mice dosed with CFB are resistant to APAP toxicity. These hepatocytes were also exposed to ES936, a high affinity, and irreversible inhibitor of NQO1 in the presence of APAP. Concentrations of ES936 that resulted in over 94% inhibition of NQO1 activity did not increase the susceptibility of hepatocytes from CFB treated mice to APAP. Whereas NQO1 is mechanistically capable of reducing NAPQI, CFB-mediated hepatoprotection does not appear to be dependent upon enhanced expression of NQO1

  19. Modulatory role of allopurinol on xanthine oxidoreductase system and antioxidant status in irradiated rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahran, A.M.; Azab, Kh.Sh.; Abbady, M.I.

    2006-01-01

    Allopurinol is a xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitor, used for management of hyperuricaema. It acts on purine catabolism without disrupting the biosynthesis of purine. The present work was conducted to examine the role of xanthine oxidase inhibitor (allopurinol) in minimizing radiation injuries in male albino rats. Allopurinol was given to rats via intraperitoneal (i.p) injection at a dose of 30 mg/kg body wt/day for 7 successive days before starting irradiation and 14 successive days during and in between exposure to gamma radiation. Rats were exposed to whole body gamma radiation, delivered as 1 Gy every other day up to total dose 8 Gy. Results demonstrate that treatment with allopurinol by the regime assumed in the present study minimized significantly the amount of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS), product of lipid peroxidation, in liver, intestine and plasma. This effect was associated with significant amelioration in xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) system as observed on the 1st and 7th days post last radiation fraction. The severity of changes in antioxidant parameters namely: superoxide dismutase (SOD), Catalase (CAT) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were less manifested in liver, intestine and blood as compared to irradiated rats. The levels of nitric oxide (NO) were significantly improved in plasma and the two investigated tissues as compared to irradiated rats. A significant decrease in plasma uric acid concentration was recorded on the 1st and 7th days post last allopurinol dose. However, significant amelioration was recorded in the plasma uric acid of rats treated with allopurinol before and during radiation exposure as compared to irradiated rats. Accordingly, it could be concluded that XO inhibitor (allopurinol) play a significant role in minimizing the tissue damages upon exposure to ionizing radiation via preventing the over production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in irradiated cells through the XOR system of irradiation rats

  20. Structural basis for human NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Chuanwu; Panda, Satya P.; Marohnic, Christopher C.; Martásek, Pavel; Masters, Bettie Sue; Kim, Jung-Ja P. (MCW); (Charles U); (UTSMC)

    2012-03-15

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYPOR) is essential for electron donation to microsomal cytochrome P450-mediated monooxygenation in such diverse physiological processes as drug metabolism (approximately 85-90% of therapeutic drugs), steroid biosynthesis, and bioactive metabolite production (vitamin D and retinoic acid metabolites). Expressed by a single gene, CYPOR's role with these multiple redox partners renders it a model for understanding protein-protein interactions at the structural level. Polymorphisms in human CYPOR have been shown to lead to defects in bone development and steroidogenesis, resulting in sexual dimorphisms, the severity of which differs significantly depending on the degree of CYPOR impairment. The atomic structure of human CYPOR is presented, with structures of two naturally occurring missense mutations, V492E and R457H. The overall structures of these CYPOR variants are similar to wild type. However, in both variants, local disruption of H bonding and salt bridging, involving the FAD pyrophosphate moiety, leads to weaker FAD binding, unstable protein, and loss of catalytic activity, which can be rescued by cofactor addition. The modes of polypeptide unfolding in these two variants differ significantly, as revealed by limited trypsin digestion: V492E is less stable but unfolds locally and gradually, whereas R457H is more stable but unfolds globally. FAD addition to either variant prevents trypsin digestion, supporting the role of the cofactor in conferring stability to CYPOR structure. Thus, CYPOR dysfunction in patients harboring these particular mutations may possibly be prevented by riboflavin therapy in utero, if predicted prenatally, or rescued postnatally in less severe cases.

  1. NAD(P)H-dependent quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYP450OR) differentially regulate menadione-mediated alterations in redox status, survival and metabolism in pancreatic β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joshua P; Karandrea, Shpetim; Burgos, Delaine Zayasbazan; Jaiswal, Anil A; Heart, Emma A

    2016-11-16

    NQO1 (NAD(P)H-quinone oxidoreductase 1) reduces quinones and xenobiotics to less-reactive compounds via 2-electron reduction, one feature responsible for the role of NQO1 in antioxidant defense in several tissues. In contrast, NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYP450OR), catalyzes the 1-electron reduction of quinones and xenobiotics, resulting in enhanced superoxide formation. However, to date, the roles of NQO1 and CYP450OR in pancreatic β-cell metabolism under basal conditions and oxidant challenge have not been characterized. Using NQO1 inhibition, over-expression and knock out, we have demonstrated that, in addition to protection of β-cells from toxic concentrations of the redox cycling quinone menadione, NQO1 also regulates the basal level of reduced-to-oxidized nucleotides, suggesting other role(s) beside that of an antioxidant enzyme. In contrast, over-expression of NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CYP450OR) resulted in enhanced redox cycling activity and decreased cellular viability, consistent with the enhanced generation of superoxide and H 2 O 2 . Basal expression of NQO1 and CYP450OR was comparable in isolated islets and liver. However, NQO1, but not CYP450OR, was strongly induced in β-cells exposed to menadione. NQO1 and CYP450OR exhibited a reciprocal preference for reducing equivalents in β-cells: while CYP450OR preferentially utilized NADPH, NQO1 primarily utilized NADH. Together, these results demonstrate that NQO1 and CYP450OR reciprocally regulate oxidant metabolism in pancreatic β-cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Binding of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Apo-Bacterioferritin Associated Ferredoxin to Bacterioferritin B Promotes Heme Mediation of Electron Delivery and Mobilization of Core Mineral Iron†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeratunga, Saroja K.; Gee, Casey E.; Lovell, Scott; Zeng, Yuhong; Woodin, Carrie L.; Rivera, Mario

    2009-01-01

    The bfrB gene from Pseudomonas aeruginosa was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The resultant protein (BfrB), which assembles into a 445.3 kDa complex0020from 24 identical subunits, binds 12 molecules of heme axially coordinated by two Met residues. BfrB, isolated with 5–10 iron atoms per protein molecule, was reconstituted with ferrous ions to prepare samples with a core mineral containing 600 ± 40 ferric ions per BfrB molecule and approximately one phosphate molecule per iron atom. In the presence of sodium dithionite or in the presence of P. aeruginosa ferredoxin NADP reductase (FPR) and NADPH the heme in BfrB remains oxidized and the core iron mineral is mobilized sluggishly. In stark contrast, addition of NADPH to a solution containing BfrB, FPR and the apo-form of P. aeruginosa bacterioferritin associated ferredoxin (apo-Bfd) results in rapid reduction of the heme in BfrB and in the efficient mobilization of the core iron mineral. Results from additional experimentation indicate that Bfd must bind to BfrB to promote heme mediation of electrons from the surface to the core to support the efficient mobilization of ferrous ions from BfrB. In this context, the thus far mysterious role of heme in bacterioferritins has been brought to the front by reconstituting BfrB with its physiological partner, apo-Bfd. These findings are discussed in the context of a model for the utilization of stored iron in which the significant upregulation of the bfd gene under low-iron conditions [Ochsner, U.A., Wilderman, P.J., Vasil, A.I., and Vasil, M.L. (2002) Mol. Microbiol. 45, 1277–1287] ensures sufficient concentrations of apo-Bfd to bind BfrB and unlock the iron stored in its core. Although these findings are in contrast to previous speculations suggesting redox mediation of electron transfer by holo-Bfd, the ability of apo-Bfd to promote iron mobilization is an economical strategy used by the cell because it obviates the need to further deplete cellular iron levels to

  3. A Ferredoxin- and F420H2-Dependent, Electron-Bifurcating, Heterodisulfide Reductase with Homologs in the Domains Bacteria and Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Yan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Heterodisulfide reductases (Hdr of the HdrABC class are ancient enzymes and a component of the anaerobic core belonging to the prokaryotic common ancestor. The ancient origin is consistent with the widespread occurrence of genes encoding putative HdrABC homologs in metabolically diverse prokaryotes predicting diverse physiological functions; however, only one HdrABC has been characterized and that was from a narrow metabolic group of obligate CO2-reducing methanogenic anaerobes (methanogens from the domain Archaea. Here we report the biochemical characterization of an HdrABC homolog (HdrA2B2C2 from the acetate-utilizing methanogen Methanosarcina acetivorans with unusual properties structurally and functionally distinct from the only other HdrABC characterized. Homologs of the HdrA2B2C2 archetype are present in phylogenetically and metabolically diverse species from the domains Bacteria and Archaea. The expression of the individual HdrA2, HdrB2, and HdrB2C2 enzymes in Escherichia coli, and reconstitution of an active HdrA2B2C2 complex, revealed an intersubunit electron transport pathway dependent on ferredoxin or coenzyme F420 (F420H2 as an electron donor. Remarkably, HdrA2B2C2 couples the previously unknown endergonic oxidation of F420H2 and reduction of ferredoxin with the exergonic oxidation of F420H2 and reduction of the heterodisulfide of coenzyme M and coenzyme B (CoMS-SCoB. The unique electron bifurcation predicts a role for HdrA2B2C2 in Fe(III-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (ANME by M. acetivorans and uncultured species from ANME environments. HdrA2B2C2, ubiquitous in acetotrophic methanogens, was shown to participate in electron transfer during acetotrophic growth of M. acetivorans and proposed to be essential for growth in the environment when acetate is limiting.

  4. Glutaric acidemia type II: gene structure and mutations of the electron transfer flavoprotein:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Stephen I; Binard, Robert J; Woontner, Michael R; Frerman, Frank E

    2002-01-01

    Glutaric acidemia type II is a human inborn error of metabolism which can be due to defects in either subunit of electron transfer flavoprotein (ETF) or in ETF:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF:QO), but few disease-causing mutations have been described. The ETF:QO gene is located on 4q33, and contains 13 exons. Primers to amplify these exons are presented, together with mutations identified by molecular analysis of 20 ETF:QO-deficient patients. Twenty-one different disease-causing mutations were identified on 36 of the 40 chromosomes.

  5. Mutational analysis of the multicopy hao gene coding for hydroxylamine oxidoreductase in Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamagata, A; Hirota, R; Kato, J; Kuroda, A; Ikeda, T; Takiguchi, N; Ohtake, H

    2000-08-01

    The ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11 contains three copies of the hao gene (hao1, hao2, and hao3) coding for hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO). Three single mutants (hao1::kan, hao2::kan, or hao3::kan) had 68 to 75% of the wild-type growth rate and 58 to 89% of the wild-type HAO activity when grown under the same conditions. A double mutant (hao1::kan and hao3::amp) also had 68% of the wild-type growth and 37% of the wild-type HAO activity.

  6. Application of nanodisc technology for direct electrochemical investigation of plant cytochrome P450s and their NADPH P450 oxidoreductase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavishi, Krutika; Laursen, Tomas; Martinez, Karen Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Direct electrochemistry of cytochrome P450 containing systems has primarily focused on investigating enzymes from microbes and animals for bio-sensing applications. Plant P450s receive electrons from NADPH P450 oxidoreductase (POR) to orchestrate the bio-synthesis of a plethora of commercially...... was electro-catalytically active while the P450s generated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). These nanodisc-based investigations lay the prospects and guidelines for construction of a simplified platform to perform mediator-free, direct electrochemistry of non-engineered cytochromes P450 under native-like conditions...

  7. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of formate oxidase, an enzyme of the glucose–methanol–choline oxidoreductase family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Yoshifumi; Doubayashi, Daiju; Ootake, Takumi; Oki, Masaya; Mikami, Bunzo; Uchida, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Formate oxidase from A. oryzae RIB40 was crystallized and diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å. Formate oxidase (FOD), which catalyzes the oxidation of formate to yield carbon dioxide and hydrogen peroxide, belongs to the glucose–methanol–choline oxidoreductase (GMCO) family. FOD from Aspergillus oryzae RIB40, which has a modified FAD as a cofactor, was crystallized at 293 K by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystal was orthorhombic and belonged to space group C222 1 . Diffraction data were collected from a single crystal to 2.4 Å resolution

  8. Deconvolution of ferredoxin, plastocyanin, and P700 transmittance changes in intact leaves with a new type of kinetic LED array spectrophotometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klughammer, Christof; Schreiber, Ulrich

    2016-05-01

    A newly developed compact measuring system for assessment of transmittance changes in the near-infrared spectral region is described; it allows deconvolution of redox changes due to ferredoxin (Fd), P700, and plastocyanin (PC) in intact leaves. In addition, it can also simultaneously measure chlorophyll fluorescence. The major opto-electronic components as well as the principles of data acquisition and signal deconvolution are outlined. Four original pulse-modulated dual-wavelength difference signals are measured (785-840 nm, 810-870 nm, 870-970 nm, and 795-970 nm). Deconvolution is based on specific spectral information presented graphically in the form of 'Differential Model Plots' (DMP) of Fd, P700, and PC that are derived empirically from selective changes of these three components under appropriately chosen physiological conditions. Whereas information on maximal changes of Fd is obtained upon illumination after dark-acclimation, maximal changes of P700 and PC can be readily induced by saturating light pulses in the presence of far-red light. Using the information of DMP and maximal changes, the new measuring system enables on-line deconvolution of Fd, P700, and PC. The performance of the new device is demonstrated by some examples of practical applications, including fast measurements of flash relaxation kinetics and of the Fd, P700, and PC changes paralleling the polyphasic fluorescence rise upon application of a 300-ms pulse of saturating light.

  9. A novel plant ferredoxin-like protein and the regulator Hor are quorum-sensing targets in the plant pathogen Erwinia carotovora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöblom, Solveig; Harjunpää, Heidi; Brader, Günter; Palva, E Tapio

    2008-07-01

    Quorum sensing (QS), a population-density-sensing mechanism, controls the production of the main virulence determinants, the plant cell-wall-degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) of the soft-rot phytopathogen Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora. In this study, we used random transposon mutagenesis with a gusA reporter construct to identify two new QS-controlled genes encoding the regulator Hor and a plant ferredoxin-like protein, FerE. The QS control of the identified genes was executed by the QS regulators ExpR1 and ExpR2 and mediated by the global repressor RsmA. Hor was shown to contribute to bacterial virulence at least partly through its control of PCWDE production. Our results showed that FerE contributes to oxidative stress tolerance and in planta fitness of the bacteria and suggest that QS could be central to control of oxidative stress tolerance. The presence of the FerE protein appears to be rather unique in heterotrophic bacteria and suggests an acquisition of the corresponding gene from plant host by horizontal gene transfer.

  10. The involvement of the nif-associated ferredoxin-like genes fdxA and fdxN of Herbaspirillum seropedicae in nitrogen fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, André L F; Invitti, Adriana L; Rego, Fabiane G M; Monteiro, Rose A; Klassen, Giseli; Souza, Emanuel M; Chubatsu, Leda S; Pedrosa, Fábio O; Rigo, Liu U

    2010-02-01

    The pathway of electron transport to nitrogenase in the endophytic beta-Proteobacterium Herbaspirillum seropedicae has not been characterized. We have generated mutants in two nif-associated genes encoding putative ferredoxins, fdxA and fdxN. The fdxA gene is part of the operon nifHDKENXorf1orf2fdxAnifQmodABC and is transcribed from the nifH promoter, as revealed by lacZ gene fusion. The fdxN gene is probably cotranscribed with the nifB gene. Mutational analysis suggests that the FdxA protein is essential for maximum nitrogenase activity, since the nitrogenase activity of the fdxA mutant strain was reduced to about 30% of that of the wild-type strain. In addition, the fdxA mutation had no effect on the nitrogenase switch-off in response to ammonium. Nitrogenase activity of a mutant strain lacking the fdxN gene was completely abolished. This phenotype was reverted by complementation with fdxN expressed under lacZ promoter control. The results suggest that the products of both the fdxA and fdxN genes are probably involved in electron transfer during nitrogen fixation.

  11. Regulation of P450 oxidoreductase by gonadotropins in rat ovary and its effect on estrogen production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uesaka Miki

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background P450 oxidoreductase (POR catalyzes electron transfer to microsomal P450 enzymes. Its deficiency causes Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS, and about half the patients with ABS have ambiguous genitalia and/or impaired steroidogenesis. POR mRNA expression is up-regulated when mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs differentiate into steroidogenic cells, suggesting that the regulation of POR gene expression is important for steroidogenesis. In this context we examined the regulation of POR expression in ovarian granulosa cells by gonadotropins, and its possible role in steroidogenesis. Methods Changes in gene expression in MSCs during differentiation into steroidogenic cells were examined by DNA microarray analysis. Changes in mRNA and protein expression of POR in the rat ovary or in granulosa cells induced by gonadotropin treatment were examined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. Effects of transient expression of wild-type or mutant (R457H or V492E POR proteins on the production of estrone in COS-7 cells were examined in vitro. Effects of POR knockdown were also examined in estrogen producing cell-line, KGN cells. Results POR mRNA was induced in MSCs following transduction with the SF-1 retrovirus, and was further increased by cAMP treatment. Expression of POR mRNA, as well as Cyp19 mRNA, in the rat ovary were induced by equine chorionic gonadotropin and human chorionic gonadotropin. POR mRNA and protein were also induced by follicle stimulating hormone in primary cultured rat granulosa cells, and the induction pattern was similar to that for aromatase. Transient expression of POR in COS-7 cells, which expressed a constant amount of aromatase protein, greatly increased the rate of conversion of androstenedione to estrone, in a dose-dependent manner. The expression of mutant POR proteins (R457H or V492E, such as those found in ABS patients, had much less effect on aromatase activity than expression of wild

  12. Role of xanthine oxidoreductase in the anti-thrombotic effects of nitrite in rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramkowski, K; Leszczynska, A; Przyborowski, K; Kaminski, T; Rykaczewska, U; Sitek, B; Zakrzewska, A; Proniewski, B; Smolenski, R T; Chabielska, E; Buczko, W; Chlopicki, S

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying nitrite-induced effects on thrombosis and hemostasis in vivo are not clear. The goal of the work described here was to investigate the role of xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) in the anti-platelet and anti-thrombotic activities of nitrite in rats in vivo. Arterial thrombosis was induced electrically in rats with renovascular hypertension by partial ligation of the left renal artery. Sodium nitrite (NaNO2, 0.17 mmol/kg twice daily for 3 days, p.o) was administered with or without one of the XOR-inhibitors: allopurinol (ALLO) and febuxostat (FEB) (100 and 5 mg/kg, p.o., for 3 days). Nitrite treatment (0.17 mmol/kg), which was associated with a significant increase in NOHb, nitrite/nitrate plasma concentration, resulted in a substantial decrease in thrombus weight (TW) (0.48 ± 0.03 mg vs. vehicle [VEH] 0.88 ± 0.08 mg, p < 0.001) without a significant hypotensive effect. The anti-thrombotic effect of nitrite was partially reversed by FEB (TW = 0.63 ± 0.06 mg, p < 0.05 vs. nitrites), but not by ALLO (TW = 0.43 ± 0.02 mg). In turn, profound anti-platelet effect of nitrite measured ex vivo using collagen-induced whole-blood platelet aggregation (70.5 ± 7.1% vs. VEH 100 ± 4.5%, p < 0.05) and dynamic thromboxaneB2 generation was fully reversed by both XOR-inhibitors. In addition, nitrite decreased plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 concentration (0.47 ± 0.13 ng/ml vs. VEH 0.62 ± 0.04 ng/ml, p < 0.05) and FEB/ALLO reversed this effect. In vitro the anti-platelet effect of nitrite (1 mM) was reversed by FEB (0.1 mM) under hypoxia (0.5%O2) and normoxia (20%O2). Nitrite treatment had no effect on coagulation parameters. In conclusion, the nitrite-induced anti-platelet effect in rats in vivo is mediated by XOR, but XOR does not fully account for the anti-thrombotic effects of nitrite.

  13. Purification and characterization of a novel cytosolic NADP(H)-dependent retinol oxidoreductase from rabbit liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, D Y; Ichikawa, Y

    1997-03-07

    Rabbit liver cytosol exhibits very high retinol dehydrogenase activity. At least two retinol dehydrogenases were demonstrated to exist in rabbit liver cytosol, and the major one, a cytosolic NADP(H)-dependent retinol dehydrogenase (systematic name: retinol oxidoreductase) was purified about 1795-fold to electrophoretic and column chromatographic homogeneity by a procedure involving column chromatography on AF-Red Toyopearl twice and then hydroxyapatite. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 34 kDa by SDS-PAGE, and 144 kDa by HPLC gel filtration, suggesting that it is a homo-tetramer. The enzyme uses free retinol and retinal, and their complexes with CRBP as substrates in vitro. The optimum pH values for retinol oxidation of free retinol and CRBP-retinol were 8.8-9.2 and 8.0-9.0, respectively, and those for retinal reduction of free retinal and retinal-CRBP were the same, 7.0-7.6. Km for free retinol and Vmax for retinal formation were 2.8 microM and 2893 nmol/min per mg protein at 37 degrees C (pH 9.0) and the corresponding values with retinol-CRBP as a substrate were 2.5 microM and 2428 nmol/min per mg protein at 37 degrees C (pH 8.6); Km for free retinal and Vmax for retinol formation were 6.5 microM and 4108 nmol/min per mg protein, and the corresponding values with retinal-CRBP as a substrate were 5.1 microM and 3067 nmol/min per mg protein at 37 degrees C, pH 7.4. NAD(H) was not effective as a cofactor. 4-Methylpyrazole was a weak inhibitor (IC50 = 28 mM) of the enzyme, and ethanol was neither a substrate nor an inhibitor of the enzyme. This enzyme exhibits relatively broad aldehyde reductase activity and some ketone reductase activity, the activity for aromatic substitutive aldehydes being especially high and effective. Whereas, except in the case of retinol, oxidative activity toward the corresponding alcohols was not detected. This novel cytosolic enzyme may play an important role in vivo in maintaining the homeostasis of retinal, the substrate of retinoic

  14. Transcriptional analysis of the multicopy hao gene coding for hydroxylamine oxidoreductase in Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Ryuichi; Kuroda, Akio; Ikeda, Tsukasa; Takiguchi, Noboru; Ohtake, Hisao; Kato, Junichi

    2006-08-01

    The nitrifying bacterium Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11 has three copies of the gene encoding hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (hao(1), hao(2), and hao(3)) on its genome. Broad-host-range reporter plasmids containing transcriptional fusion genes between hao copies and lacZ were constructed to analyze the expression of each hydroxylamine oxidoreductase gene (hao) copy individually and quantitatively. beta-Galactosidase assays of ENI-11 harboring reporter plasmids revealed that all hao copies were transcribed in the wild-type strain. Promoter analysis of hao copies revealed that transcription of hao(3) was highest among the hao copies. Expression levels of hao(1) and hao(2) were 40% and 62% of that of hao(3) respectively. Transcription of hao(1) was negatively regulated, whereas a portion of hao(3) transcription was read through transcription from the rpsT promoter. When energy-depleted cells were incubated in the growth medium, only hao(3) expression increased. This result suggests that it is hao(3) that is responsible for recovery from energy-depleted conditions in Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of a new crystal form of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase from Nitrosomonas europaea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cedervall, Peder E.; Hooper, Alan B.; Wilmot, Carrie M.

    2009-01-01

    A new crystal form of N. europaea hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (space group P2 1 2 1 2) diffracted to 2.25 Å resolution at a third-generation synchrotron X-ray source. Hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (HAO) from Nitrosomonas europaea is a homotrimeric protein that catalyzes the oxidation of hydroxylamine to nitrite. Each monomer, with a molecular weight of 67.1 kDa, contains seven c-type hemes and one heme P460, the porphyrin ring of which is covalently linked to a tyrosine residue from an adjacent subunit. HAO was first crystallized and structurally characterized at a resolution of 2.8 Å in 1997. The structure was solved in space group P6 3 and suffered from merohedral twinning. Here, a crystallization procedure is presented that yielded untwinned crystals belonging to space group P2 1 2 1 2, which diffracted to 2.25 Å resolution and contained one trimer in the asymmetric unit. The unit-cell parameters were a = 140.7, b = 142.6, c = 107.4 Å

  16. Comprehensively Characterizing the Thioredoxin Interactome In Vivo Highlights the Central Role Played by This Ubiquitous Oxidoreductase in Redox Control*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arts, Isabelle S.; Vertommen, Didier; Baldin, Francesca; Laloux, Géraldine; Collet, Jean-François

    2016-01-01

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase maintaining protein-bound cysteine residues in the reduced thiol state. Here, we combined a well-established method to trap Trx substrates with the power of bacterial genetics to comprehensively characterize the in vivo Trx redox interactome in the model bacterium Escherichia coli. Using strains engineered to optimize trapping, we report the identification of a total 268 Trx substrates, including 201 that had never been reported to depend on Trx for reduction. The newly identified Trx substrates are involved in a variety of cellular processes, ranging from energy metabolism to amino acid synthesis and transcription. The interaction between Trx and two of its newly identified substrates, a protein required for the import of most carbohydrates, PtsI, and the bacterial actin homolog MreB was studied in detail. We provide direct evidence that PtsI and MreB contain cysteine residues that are susceptible to oxidation and that participate in the formation of an intermolecular disulfide with Trx. By considerably expanding the number of Trx targets, our work highlights the role played by this major oxidoreductase in a variety of cellular processes. Moreover, as the dependence on Trx for reduction is often conserved across species, it also provides insightful information on the interactome of Trx in organisms other than E. coli. PMID:27081212

  17. Effects of lindane on the photosynthetic apparatus of the cyanobacterium Anabaena: fluorescence induction studies and immunolocalization of ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Marta; Fillat, Maria F; Strasser, Reto J; Maldonado-Rodriguez, Ronald; Marina, Nerea; Smienk, Henry; Gómez-Moreno, Carlos; Barja, Francisco

    2004-01-01

    Cyanobacteria have the natural ability to degrade moderate amounts of organic pollutants. However, when pollutant concentration exceeds the level of tolerance, bleaching of the cells and death occur within 24 hours. Under stress conditions, cyanobacterial response includes the short-term adaptation of the photosynthetic apparatus to light quality, named state transitions. Moreover, prolonged stresses produce changes in the functional organization of phycobilisomes and in the core-complexes of both photosystems, which can result in large changes in the PS II fluorescence yield. The localization of ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase (FNR) at the ends of some peripheral rods of the cyanobacterial phycobilisomes, makes this protein a useful marker to check phycobilisome integrity. The goal of this work is to improve the knowledge of the mechanism of action of a very potent pesticide, lindane (gamma-hexaclorociclohexane), in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp., which can be considered a potential candidate for bioremediation of pesticides. We have studied the effect of lindane on the photosynthetic apparatus of Anabaena using fluorescence induction studies. As ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase plays a key role in the response to oxidative stress in several systems, changes in synthesis, degradation and activity of FNR were analyzed. Immunolocalization of this enzyme was used as a marker of phycobilisome integrity. The knowledge of the changes caused by lindane in the photosynthetic apparatus is essential for rational further design of genetically-modified cyanobacteria with improved biorremediation abilities. Polyphasic chlorophyll a fluorescence rise measurements (OJIP) have been used to evaluate the vitality and stress adaptation of the nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7119 in the presence of increasing concentrations of lindane. Effects of the pesticide on the ultrastructure have been investigated by electron microscopy, and FNR has been used as a marker of phycobilisome

  18. A Ferredoxin- and F420H2-Dependent, Electron-Bifurcating, Heterodisulfide Reductase with Homologs in the Domains Bacteria and Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhen; Wang, Mingyu; Ferry, James G

    2017-02-07

    Heterodisulfide reductases (Hdr) of the HdrABC class are ancient enzymes and a component of the anaerobic core belonging to the prokaryotic common ancestor. The ancient origin is consistent with the widespread occurrence of genes encoding putative HdrABC homologs in metabolically diverse prokaryotes predicting diverse physiological functions; however, only one HdrABC has been characterized and that was from a narrow metabolic group of obligate CO 2 -reducing methanogenic anaerobes (methanogens) from the domain Archaea Here we report the biochemical characterization of an HdrABC homolog (HdrA2B2C2) from the acetate-utilizing methanogen Methanosarcina acetivorans with unusual properties structurally and functionally distinct from the only other HdrABC characterized. Homologs of the HdrA2B2C2 archetype are present in phylogenetically and metabolically diverse species from the domains Bacteria and Archaea The expression of the individual HdrA2, HdrB2, and HdrB2C2 enzymes in Escherichia coli, and reconstitution of an active HdrA2B2C2 complex, revealed an intersubunit electron transport pathway dependent on ferredoxin or coenzyme F 420 (F 420 H 2 ) as an electron donor. Remarkably, HdrA2B2C2 couples the previously unknown endergonic oxidation of F 420 H 2 and reduction of ferredoxin with the exergonic oxidation of F 420 H 2 and reduction of the heterodisulfide of coenzyme M and coenzyme B (CoMS-SCoB). The unique electron bifurcation predicts a role for HdrA2B2C2 in Fe(III)-dependent anaerobic methane oxidation (ANME) by M. acetivorans and uncultured species from ANME environments. HdrA2B2C2, ubiquitous in acetotrophic methanogens, was shown to participate in electron transfer during acetotrophic growth of M. acetivorans and proposed to be essential for growth in the environment when acetate is limiting. Discovery of the archetype HdrA2B2C2 heterodisulfide reductase with categorically unique properties extends the understanding of this ancient family beyond CO 2

  19. Assignment of electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) to human chromosome 4q33 by fluorescence in situ hybridization and somatic cell hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, E B; Seltzer, W K; Goodman, S I

    1999-08-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is a nuclear-encoded protein located in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Inherited defects of ETF-QO cause glutaric acidemia type II. We here describe the localization of the ETF-QO gene to human chromosome 4q33 by somatic cell hybridization and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  20. In vivo relevance of two critical levels for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)-mediated cellular protection against electrophile toxicity found in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de L.H.J.; Pot, G.K.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Alink, G.M.

    2006-01-01

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)-mediated detoxification of quinones is suggested to be involved in cancer prevention. In the present study, using transfected CHO cells, it was demonstrated that the relation between NQO1 activity and the resulting protection against the cytotoxicity of

  1. A physiological threshold for protection against menadione toxicity by human NAD(P)H : quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de L.H.J.; Boerboom, A.M.J.F.; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Capelle, van D.; Ruijter, de A.J.M.; Jaiswal, A.K.; Aarts, J.M.M.J.G.

    2002-01-01

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) has often been suggested to be involved in cancer prevention by means of detoxification of electrophilic quinones. In the present study, a series of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines expressing various elevated levels of human NQO1 were generated by

  2. The reaction of NADPH with bovine mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase revisited: II. Comparison of the proposed working hypothesis with literature data.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albracht, S.P.J.

    2010-01-01

    The first purification of bovine NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) was reported nearly half a century ago (Hatefi et al. J Biol Chem 237:1676-1680, 1962). The pathway of electron-transfer through the enzyme is still under debate. A major obstacle is the assignment of EPR signals to the

  3. The reaction of NADPH with bovine mitochondrial NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase revisited: I. Proposed consequences for electron transfer in the enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albracht, S.P.J.

    2010-01-01

    Bovine NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) is the first complex in the mitochondrial respiratory chain. It has long been assumed that it contained only one FMN group. However, as demonstrated in 2003, the intact enzyme contains two FMN groups. The second FMN was proposed to be located in a

  4. Influence of UV-A or UV-B light and of the nitrogen source on the induction of ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase in etiolated tomato cotyledons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Migge, A.; Carrayol, E.; Hirel, B.; Lohmann, M.; Meya, G.; Becker, T.W.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of ultraviolet A (UV-A) or B (UV-B) light and of the nitrogen source on the induction of ferredoxin-dependent glutamate synthase (Fd-GOGAT, EC 1.4.7.1) was examined in etiolated cotyledons of tomato (Lycopersicon escu- lentum L.). The Fd-GOGAT activity increased upon illumination of etiolated tomato cotyledons with UV-A or UV-B light. This stimulation of Fd-GOGAT activity was correlated with an increase in both the Fd-GOGAT transcript level and the Fd-GOGAT protein abundance. These results suggest that UV-A or UV-B light stimulates the de novo synthesis of Fd-GOGAT in etiolated tomato cotyledons. Both UV-A and UV-B light failed to influence the activity of NADH-GOGAT (EC 1.4.1.14) in etiolated tomato cotyledons. Taken together, our data indicate that the tomato genes encoding Fd- or NADH-dependent glutamate synthase are regulated differently by UV-A or UV-B light. No difference with respect to both the Fd-GOGAT transcript and protein abundance was found between cotyledons of tomato seedlings grown with either nitrate or ammonium as the sole N-source in the dark or in white light. In addition, the increase in the Fd-GOGAT protein pool induced by white light in etiolated nitrate-grown tomato seedling cotyledons was similar to that induced by white light in etiolated ammonium-grown tomato seedling cotyledons. These results show that the tomato Fd-GOGAT protein level does not depend strongly on the nature of the nitrogen source and that there appears to be no major stimulatory effect on the Fd-GOGAT protein pool produced by nitrate during the illumination of etiolated tomato cotyledons

  5. Metabolic engineering of an ATP-neutral Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway in Corynebacterium glutamicum: growth restoration by an adaptive point mutation in NADH dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komati Reddy, Gajendar; Lindner, Steffen N; Wendisch, Volker F

    2015-03-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum uses the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway of glycolysis and gains 2 mol of ATP per mol of glucose by substrate-level phosphorylation (SLP). To engineer glycolysis without net ATP formation by SLP, endogenous phosphorylating NAD-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was replaced by nonphosphorylating NADP-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GapN) from Clostridium acetobutylicum, which irreversibly converts glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (GAP) to 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PG) without generating ATP. As shown recently (S. Takeno, R. Murata, R. Kobayashi, S. Mitsuhashi, and M. Ikeda, Appl Environ Microbiol 76:7154-7160, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.01464-10), this ATP-neutral, NADPH-generating glycolytic pathway did not allow for the growth of Corynebacterium glutamicum with glucose as the sole carbon source unless hitherto unknown suppressor mutations occurred; however, these mutations were not disclosed. In the present study, a suppressor mutation was identified, and it was shown that heterologous expression of udhA encoding soluble transhydrogenase from Escherichia coli partly restored growth, suggesting that growth was inhibited by NADPH accumulation. Moreover, genome sequence analysis of second-site suppressor mutants that were able to grow faster with glucose revealed a single point mutation in the gene of non-proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-II) leading to the amino acid change D213G, which was shared by these suppressor mutants. Since related NDH-II enzymes accepting NADPH as the substrate possess asparagine or glutamine residues at this position, D213G, D213N, and D213Q variants of C. glutamicum NDH-II were constructed and were shown to oxidize NADPH in addition to NADH. Taking these findings together, ATP-neutral glycolysis by the replacement of endogenous NAD-dependent GAPDH with NADP-dependent GapN became possible via oxidation of NADPH formed in this pathway by mutant NADPH

  6. Application of L-lactate-cytochrome c-oxidoreductase for development of amperometric biosensor for L-lactate determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzyadevych S. V.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Development of amperometric biosensor based on L-lactate-cytochrome c-oxidoreductase (flavocytochrome b2, FC b2 for lactate determination. Methods. All experiments were performed using the amperometric method of detection. The methods of electrochemical polymerization and immobilization in glutaraldehyde vapors were used for FC b2 immobilization on the surface of electrodes. Results. The FC b2 preparation, which demonstrated the best operational characteristics after immobilization in poly (3,4-ethylen dioxythiophene, was selected. The selectivity, operational and storage stability, and pH-optimum for operation of the created biosensor were determined. The analysis of L-lactate in the model solutions and wine samples was carried outusing the developed biosensor. Conclusion. The FC b2-based biosensor due to its high stability can be effectively used for lactate determination in blood and other liquids containing no ethanol. After the selectivity optimization, the devise can be also applied for wine analysis.

  7. Regulation of expression of Na+ -translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase genes in Vibrio harveyi and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadeeva, Maria S; Yakovtseva, Evgenia A; Belevich, Galina A; Bertsova, Yulia V; Bogachev, Alexander V

    2007-10-01

    The expression of genes encoding sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na(+)-NQR) was studied in the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi and in the enterobacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae. It has been shown that such parameters as NaCl concentration, pH value, and presence of an uncoupler in the growth media do not influence significantly the level of nqr expression. However, nqr expression depends on the growth substrates used by these bacteria. Na(+)-NQR is highly repressed in V. harveyi during anaerobic growth, and nqr expression is modulated by electron acceptors and values of their redox potentials. The latter effect was shown to be independent of the ArcAB regulatory system.

  8. Mechanism of porcine liver xanthine oxidoreductase mediated N-oxide reduction of cyadox as revealed by docking and mutagenesis studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chigang Chen

    Full Text Available Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR is a cytoplasmic molybdenum-containing oxidoreductase, catalyzing both endogenous purines and exogenous compounds. It is suggested that XOR in porcine hepatocytes catalyzes the N-oxide reduction of quinoxaline 1,4-di-N-oxides (QdNOs. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying this metabolism, the cDNA of porcine XOR was cloned and heterologously expressed in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells. The bovine XOR, showing sequence identity of 91% to porcine XOR, was employed as template for homology modeling. By docking cyadox, a representative compound of QdNOs, into porcine XOR model, eight amino acid residues, Gly47, Asn352, Ser360, Arg427, Asp430, Asp431, Ser1227 and Lys1230, were located at distances of less than 4Å to cyadox. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to analyze their catalytic functions. Compared with wild type porcine XOR, G47A, S360P, D431A, S1227A, and K1230A displayed altered kinetic parameters in cyadox reduction, similarly to that in xanthine oxidation, indicating these mutations influenced electron-donating process of xanthine before subsequent electron transfer to cyadox to fulfill the N-oxide reduction. Differently, R427E and D430H, both located in the 424-434 loop, exhibited a much lower K(m and a decreased V(max respectively in cyadox reduction. Arg427 may be related to the substrate binding of porcine XOR to cyadox, and Asp430 is suggested to be involved in the transfer of electron to cyadox. This study initially reveals the possible catalytic mechanism of porcine XOR in cyadox metabolism, providing with novel insights into the structure-function relationship of XOR in the reduction of exogenous di-N-oxides.

  9. Electron Transport in a Dioxygenase-Ferredoxin Complex: Long Range Charge Coupling between the Rieske and Non-Heme Iron Center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne K Dawson

    Full Text Available Dioxygenase (dOx utilizes stereospecific oxidation on aromatic molecules; consequently, dOx has potential applications in bioremediation and stereospecific oxidation synthesis. The reactive components of dOx comprise a Rieske structure Cys2[2Fe-2S]His2 and a non-heme reactive oxygen center (ROC. Between the Rieske structure and the ROC, a universally conserved Asp residue appears to bridge the two structures forming a Rieske-Asp-ROC triad, where the Asp is known to be essential for electron transfer processes. The Rieske and ROC share hydrogen bonds with Asp through their His ligands; suggesting an ideal network for electron transfer via the carboxyl side chain of Asp. Associated with the dOx is an itinerant charge carrying protein Ferredoxin (Fdx. Depending on the specific cognate, Fdx may also possess either the Rieske structure or a related structure known as 4-Cys-[2Fe-2S] (4-Cys. In this study, we extensively explore, at different levels of theory, the behavior of the individual components (Rieske and ROC and their interaction together via the Asp using a variety of density function methods, basis sets, and a method known as Generalized Ionic Fragment Approach (GIFA that permits setting up spin configurations manually. We also report results on the 4-Cys structure for comparison. The individual optimized structures are compared with observed spectroscopic data from the Rieske, 4-Cys and ROC structures (where information is available. The separate pieces are then combined together into a large Rieske-Asp-ROC (donor/bridge/acceptor complex to estimate the overall coupling between individual components, based on changes to the partial charges. The results suggest that the partial charges are significantly altered when Asp bridges the Rieske and the ROC; hence, long range coupling through hydrogen bonding effects via the intercalated Asp bridge can drastically affect the partial charge distributions compared to the individual isolated

  10. Electron Microscopic Analysis and Structural Characterization of Novel NADP(H)-Containing Methanol : N,N'-Dimethyl-4-Nitrosoaniline Oxidoreductases from the Gram-Positive Methylotrophic Bacteria Amycolatopsis methanolica and Mycobacterium gastri MB19

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrykh, Leonid V.; Vonck, Janet; Bruggen, Ernst F.J. van; Beeumen, Jozef van; Samyn, Bart; Govorukhina, Natalya I.; Arfman, Nico; Duine, Johannis A.; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert

    The quaternary protein structure of two methanol:N,N'-dimethyl-4-nitrosoaniline (NDMA) oxidoreductases purified from Amycolatopsis methanolica and Mycobacterium gastri MB19 was analyzed by electron microscopy and image processing. The enzymes are decameric proteins (displaying fivefold symmetry)

  11. The Ferredoxin-Like Proteins HydN and YsaA Enhance Redox Dye-Linked Activity of the Formate Dehydrogenase H Component of the Formate Hydrogenlyase Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinske, Constanze

    2018-01-01

    Formate dehydrogenase H (FDH-H) and [NiFe]-hydrogenase 3 (Hyd-3) form the catalytic components of the hydrogen-producing formate hydrogenlyase (FHL) complex, which disproportionates formate to H 2 and CO 2 during mixed acid fermentation in enterobacteria. FHL comprises minimally seven proteins and little is understood about how this complex is assembled. Early studies identified a ferredoxin-like protein, HydN, as being involved in FDH-H assembly into the FHL complex. In order to understand how FDH-H and its small subunit HycB, which is also a ferredoxin-like protein, attach to the FHL complex, the possible roles of HydN and its paralogue, YsaA, in FHL complex stability and assembly were investigated. Deletion of the hycB gene reduced redox dye-mediated FDH-H activity to approximately 10%, abolished FHL-dependent H 2 -production, and reduced Hyd-3 activity. These data are consistent with HycB being an essential electron transfer component of the FHL complex. The FDH-H activity of the hydN and the ysaA deletion strains was reduced to 59 and 57% of the parental, while the double deletion reduced activity of FDH-H to 28% and the triple deletion with hycB to 1%. Remarkably, and in contrast to the hycB deletion, the absence of HydN and YsaA was without significant effect on FHL-dependent H 2 -production or total Hyd-3 activity; FDH-H protein levels were also unaltered. This is the first description of a phenotype for the E. coli ysaA deletion strain and identifies it as a novel factor required for optimal redox dye-linked FDH-H activity. A ysaA deletion strain could be complemented for FDH-H activity by hydN and ysaA , but the hydN deletion strain could not be complemented. Introduction of these plasmids did not affect H 2 production. Bacterial two-hybrid interactions showed that YsaA, HydN, and HycB interact with each other and with the FDH-H protein. Further novel anaerobic cross-interactions of 10 ferredoxin-like proteins in E. coli were also discovered and described

  12. Dicumarol inhibition of NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase induces growth inhibition of pancreatic cancer via a superoxide-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Joseph J; Hinkhouse, Marilyn M; Grady, Matthew; Gaut, Andrew W; Liu, Jingru; Zhang, Yu Ping; Weydert, Christine J Darby; Domann, Frederick E; Oberley, Larry W

    2003-09-01

    NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO(1)), a homodimeric, ubiquitous, flavoprotein, catalyzes the two-electron reduction of quinones to hydroquinones. This reaction prevents the one-electron reduction of quinones by cytochrome P450 reductase and other flavoproteins that would result in oxidative cycling with generation of superoxide (O(2)(.-)). NQO(1) gene regulation may be up-regulated in some tumors to accommodate the needs of rapidly metabolizing cells to regenerate NAD(+). We hypothesized that pancreatic cancer cells would exhibit high levels of this enzyme, and inhibiting it would suppress the malignant phenotype. Reverse transcription-PCR, Western blots, and activity assays demonstrated that NQO(1) was up-regulated in the pancreatic cancer cell lines tested but present in very low amounts in the normal human pancreas. To determine whether inhibition of NQO(1) would alter the malignant phenotype, MIA PaCa-2 pancreatic cancer cells were treated with a selective inhibitor of NQO(1), dicumarol. Dicumarol increased intracellular production of O(2)(.-), as measured by hydroethidine staining, and inhibited cell growth. Both of these effects were blunted with infection of an adenoviral vector containing the cDNA for manganese superoxide dismutase. Dicumarol also inhibited cell growth, plating efficiency, and growth in soft agar. We conclude that inhibition of NQO(1) increases intracellular O(2)(.-) production and inhibits the in vitro malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer. These mechanisms suggest that altering the intracellular redox environment of pancreatic cancer cells may inhibit growth and delineate a potential strategy directed against pancreatic cancer.

  13. Crystallization of the NADH-oxidizing domain of the Na+-translocating NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Minli; Türk, Karin; Diez, Joachim; Grütter, Markus G.; Fritz, Günter; Steuber, Julia

    2006-01-01

    The FAD domain of the NqrF subunit from the Na + -translocating NADH dehydrogenase from V. cholerae has been purified and crystallized. A complete data set was recorded at 3.1 Å. The Na + -translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (Na + -NQR) from pathogenic and marine bacteria is a respiratory complex that couples the exergonic oxidation of NADH by quinone to the transport of Na + across the membrane. The NqrF subunit oxidizes NADH and transfers the electrons to other redox cofactors in the enzyme. The FAD-containing domain of NqrF has been expressed, purified and crystallized. The purified NqrF FAD domain exhibited high rates of NADH oxidation and contained stoichiometric amounts of the FAD cofactor. Initial crystallization of the flavin domain was achieved by the sitting-drop technique using a Cartesian MicroSys4000 robot. Optimization of the crystallization conditions yielded yellow hexagonal crystals with dimensions of 30 × 30 × 70 µm. The protein mainly crystallizes in long hexagonal needles with a diameter of up to 30 µm. Crystals diffract to 2.8 Å and belong to space group P622, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 145.3, c = 90.2 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°

  14. Isolation and characterization of a Chinese hamster ovary cell line deficient in fatty alcohol:NAD+ oxidoreductase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, P.F.; Lee, J.; Rizzo, W.B.; Zoeller, R.A.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have isolated a mutant Chinese hamster ovary cell line that is defective in long-chain fatty alcohol oxidation. The ability of the mutant cells to convert labeled hexadecanol to the corresponding fatty acid in vivo was reduced to 5% of the parent strain. Whole-cell homogenates from the mutant strain, FAA.1, were deficient in long-chain fatty alcohol:NAD + oxidoreductase activity, which catalyzes the oxidation of hexadecanol to hexadecanoic acid, although the intermediate fatty aldehyde was formed normally. A direct measurement of fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase showed that the FAA.1, strain was defective in this component of FAO activity. FAA.1 is a two-stage mutant that was selected from a previously described parent strain, ZR-82, which is defective in ether lipid biosynthesis and peroxisome assembly. Because of combined defects in ether lipid biosynthesis and fatty alcohol oxidation, the ability of the FAA.1 cells to incorporate hexadecanol into complex lipids was greatly impaired, resulting in a 60-fold increase in cellular fatty alcohol levels. As the FAO deficiency in FAA.1 cells appears to be identical to the defect associated with the human genetic disorder Sjoegren-Larsson syndrome, the FAA.1 cell line may be useful in studying this disease

  15. Effects of the deletion of the Escherichia coli frataxin homologue CyaY on the respiratory NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grauman Peter L

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Frataxin is discussed as involved in the biogenesis of iron-sulfur clusters. Recently it was discovered that a frataxin homologue is a structural component of the respiratory NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I in Thermus thermophilus. It was not clear whether frataxin is in general a component of complex I from bacteria. The Escherichia coli homologue of frataxin is coined CyaY. Results We report that complex I is completely assembled to a stable and active enzyme complex equipped with all known iron-sulfur clusters in a cyaY mutant of E. coli. However, the amount of complex I is reduced by one third compared to the parental strain. Western blot analysis and live cell imaging of CyaY engineered with a GFP demonstrated that CyaY is located in the cytoplasm and not attached to the membrane as to be expected if it were a component of complex I. Conclusion CyaY plays a non-essential role in the assembly of complex I in E. coli. It is not a structural component but may transiently interact with the complex.

  16. NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 inhibits the proteasomal degradation of homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, Tomoji, E-mail: t-maeda@nichiyaku.ac.jp [Department of Neuroscience, School of Pharmacy, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba-Cho, Shiwagun, Iwate, 028-3603 (Japan); Tanabe-Fujimura, Chiaki; Fujita, Yu; Abe, Chihiro; Nanakida, Yoshino; Zou, Kun; Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu [Department of Neuroscience, School of Pharmacy, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba-Cho, Shiwagun, Iwate, 028-3603 (Japan); Nakajima, Toshihiro [Institute of Medical Science, Tokyo Medical University, 6-1-1 Shinjyuku, Shinjyuku, Tokyo, Tokyo, 160-8402 (Japan); Komano, Hiroto, E-mail: hkomano@iwate-med.ac.jp [Department of Neuroscience, School of Pharmacy, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba-Cho, Shiwagun, Iwate, 028-3603 (Japan)

    2016-05-13

    Homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein (Herp) is an ER stress-inducible key regulatory component of ER-associated degradation (ERAD) that has been implicated in insulin hypersecretion in diabetic mouse models. Herp expression is tightly regulated. Additionally, Herp is a highly labile protein and interacts with various proteins, which are characteristic features of ubiquitinated protein. Previously, we reported that ubiquitination is not required for Herp degradation. In addition, we found that the lysine residues of Herp (which are ubiquitinated by E3 ubiquitin ligase) are not sufficient for regulation of Herp degradation. In this study, we found that NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1)-mediated targeting of Herp to the proteasome was involved in Herp degradation. In addition, we found that Herp protein levels were markedly elevated in synoviolin-null cells. The E3 ubiquitin ligase synoviolin is a central component of ERAD and is involved in the degradation of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), which regulates cellular reactive oxygen species. Additionally, NQO1 is a target of Nrf2. Thus, our findings indicated that NQO1 could stabilize Herp protein expression via indirect regulation of synoviolin. -- Highlights: •Herp interacts with NQO1. •NQO1 regulates Herp degradation.

  17. Hybrid neural network model for simulating sorbitol synthesis by glucose-fructose oxidoreductase in Zymomonas mobilis CP4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bravo S.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A hybrid neural network model for simulating the process of enzymatic reduction of fructose to sorbitol process catalyzed by glucose-fructose oxidoreductase in Zymomonas mobilis CP4 is presented. Data used to derive and validate the model was obtained from experiments carried out under different conditions of pH, temperature and concentrations of both substrates (glucose and fructose involved in the reaction. Sonicated and lyophilized cells were used as source of the enzyme. The optimal pH for sorbitol synthesis at 30º C is 6.5. For a value of pH of 6, the optimal temperature is 35º C. The neural network in the model computes the value of the kinetic relationship. The hybrid neural network model is able to simulate changes in the substrates and product concentrations during sorbitol synthesis under pH and temperature conditions ranging between 5 and 7.5 and 25 and 40º C, respectively. Under these conditions the rate of sorbitol synthesis shows important differences. Values computed using the hybrid neural network model have an average error of 1.7·10-3 mole.

  18. Preliminary crystallographic data of the three homologues of the thiol–disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA in Neisseria meningitidis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafaye, Céline [Laboratoire des Protéines Membranaires, Institut de Biologie Structurale, CEA/CNRS/Université Joseph Fourier, 41 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble CEDEX 01 (France); Iwena, Thomas; Ferrer, Jean-Luc [Laboratoire de Cristallogénèse et Cristallisation des Protéines, Institut de Biologie Structurale, CEA/CNRS/Université Joseph Fourier, 41 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble CEDEX 01 (France); Kroll, J. Simon [Department of Paediatrics, Imperial College London, St Mary’s Hospital Campus, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG (United Kingdom); Griat, Mickael; Serre, Laurence, E-mail: laurence.serre@ibs.fr [Laboratoire des Protéines Membranaires, Institut de Biologie Structurale, CEA/CNRS/Université Joseph Fourier, 41 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38027 Grenoble CEDEX 01 (France)

    2008-02-01

    The Neisseria meningitidis genome possesses three genes encoding active DsbAs. To throw light on the reason for this genetic multiplicity, the three enzymes have been purified and crystallized. Bacterial virulence depends on the correct folding of surface-exposed proteins, a process that is catalyzed by the thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase DsbA, which facilitates the synthesis of disulfide bonds in Gram-negative bacteria. Uniquely among bacteria, the Neisseria meningitidis genome possesses three genes encoding active DsbAs: DsbA1, DsbA2 and DsbA3. DsbA1 and DsbA2 have been characterized as lipoproteins involved in natural competence and in host-interactive biology, while the function of DsbA3 remains unknown. In an attempt to shed light on the reason for this multiplicity of dsbA genes, the three enzymes from N. meningitidis have been purified and crystallized in the presence of high concentrations of ammonium sulfate. The best crystals were obtained using DsbA1 and DsbA3; they belong to the orthorhombic and tetragonal systems and diffract to 1.5 and 2.7 Å resolution, respectively.

  19. The Crystal Structure and Mechanism of an Unusual Oxidoreductase, GilR, Involved in Gilvocarcin V Biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Bosserman, Mary A.; Schickli, M. Alexandra; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Kharel, Madan K.; Pahari, Pallab; Buchanan, Susan K.; Rohr, Jürgen (NIH); (Kentucky)

    2012-11-26

    GilR is a recently identified oxidoreductase that catalyzes the terminal step of gilvocarcin V biosynthesis and is a unique enzyme that establishes the lactone core of the polyketide-derived gilvocarcin chromophore. Gilvocarcin-type compounds form a small distinct family of anticancer agents that are involved in both photo-activated DNA-alkylation and histone H3 cross-linking. High resolution crystal structures of apoGilR and GilR in complex with its substrate pregilvocarcin V reveals that GilR belongs to the small group of a relatively new type of the vanillyl-alcohol oxidase flavoprotein family characterized by bicovalently tethered cofactors. GilR was found as a dimer, with the bicovalently attached FAD cofactor mediated through His-65 and Cys-125. Subsequent mutagenesis and functional assays indicate that Tyr-445 may be involved in reaction catalysis and in mediating the covalent attachment of FAD, whereas Tyr-448 serves as an essential residue initiating the catalysis by swinging away from the active site to accommodate binding of the 6R-configured substrate and consequently abstracting the proton of the hydroxyl residue of the substrate hemiacetal 6-OH group. These studies lay the groundwork for future enzyme engineering to broaden the substrate specificity of this bottleneck enzyme of the gilvocarcin biosynthetic pathway for the development of novel anti-cancer therapeutics.

  20. NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 inhibits the proteasomal degradation of homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Tomoji; Tanabe-Fujimura, Chiaki; Fujita, Yu; Abe, Chihiro; Nanakida, Yoshino; Zou, Kun; Liu, Junjun; Liu, Shuyu; Nakajima, Toshihiro; Komano, Hiroto

    2016-01-01

    Homocysteine-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein (Herp) is an ER stress-inducible key regulatory component of ER-associated degradation (ERAD) that has been implicated in insulin hypersecretion in diabetic mouse models. Herp expression is tightly regulated. Additionally, Herp is a highly labile protein and interacts with various proteins, which are characteristic features of ubiquitinated protein. Previously, we reported that ubiquitination is not required for Herp degradation. In addition, we found that the lysine residues of Herp (which are ubiquitinated by E3 ubiquitin ligase) are not sufficient for regulation of Herp degradation. In this study, we found that NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1)-mediated targeting of Herp to the proteasome was involved in Herp degradation. In addition, we found that Herp protein levels were markedly elevated in synoviolin-null cells. The E3 ubiquitin ligase synoviolin is a central component of ERAD and is involved in the degradation of nuclear factor E2-related factor-2 (Nrf2), which regulates cellular reactive oxygen species. Additionally, NQO1 is a target of Nrf2. Thus, our findings indicated that NQO1 could stabilize Herp protein expression via indirect regulation of synoviolin. -- Highlights: •Herp interacts with NQO1. •NQO1 regulates Herp degradation.

  1. Ferredoxin Dependent Plant Metabolic Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knaff, David [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States); Mussakaz, Hirasawa [Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock, TX (United States)

    2007-09-15

    Due to the death of the original principle investigator, Dr David Knaff in 2016 the final year was dedicated to completing his work and ensuring the scientific community benefited from his research even after his passing. During the last year of the project the Knaff group completed the work to ensure five research articles could be published in the coming months. The lab was closed for the final time April 2016. The papers that have resulted from this work have been outlined below. Of the five one has been accepted and two are currently in review, the final two manuscripts will be submitted in the coming months. A summary of the work presented in those manuscripts is outlined below.

  2. The CrIIL reduction of [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins and site of attachment of CrIII using 1H NMR and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, S C; Worrall, J A; Liu, G; Aliverti, A; Zanetti, G; Luchinat, C; Bertini, I; Sykes, A G

    2000-04-17

    with the formation of FeIIFeII...CrIIIL. However, the spinach Glu92Ala (site B) variant undergoes only the first stage of reduction, and it appears that Glu-92 is required for the second stage of reduction to occur. A sample of CrIIIL-modified parsley FeIIIFeIII Fd is fully active as an electron carrier in the NADPH-cytochrome c reductase reaction catalyzed by ferredoxin-NADP+ reductase.

  3. Electron spin relaxation enhancement measurements of interspin distances in human, porcine, and Rhodobacter electron transfer flavoprotein ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF QO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Alistair J.; Usselman, Robert J.; Watmough, Nicholas; Simkovic, Martin; Frerman, Frank E.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2008-02-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is a membrane-bound electron transfer protein that links primary flavoprotein dehydrogenases with the main respiratory chain. Human, porcine, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO each contain a single [4Fe-4S] 2+,1+ cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated enzyme and become paramagnetic on reduction with the enzymatic electron donor or with dithionite. The anionic flavin semiquinone can be reduced further to diamagnetic hydroquinone. The redox potentials for the three redox couples are so similar that it is not possible to poise the proteins in a state where both the [4Fe-4S] + cluster and the flavoquinone are fully in the paramagnetic form. Inversion recovery was used to measure the electron spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S] + between 8 and 18 K and for semiquinone between 25 and 65 K. At higher temperatures the spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S] + were calculated from the temperature-dependent contributions to the continuous wave linewidths. Although mixtures of the redox states are present, it was possible to analyze the enhancement of the electron spin relaxation of the FAD semiquinone signal due to dipolar interaction with the more rapidly relaxing [4Fe-4S] + and obtain point-dipole interspin distances of 18.6 ± 1 Å for the three proteins. The point-dipole distances are within experimental uncertainty of the value calculated based on the crystal structure of porcine ETF-QO when spin delocalization is taken into account. The results demonstrate that electron spin relaxation enhancement can be used to measure distances in redox poised proteins even when several redox states are present.

  4. Dispelling dogma and misconceptions regarding the most pharmacologically targetable source of reactive species in inflammatory disease, xanthine oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Eric E

    2015-08-01

    Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR), the molybdoflavin enzyme responsible for the terminal steps of purine degradation in humans, is also recognized as a significant source of reactive species contributory to inflammatory disease. In animal models and clinical studies, inhibition of XOR has resulted in diminution of symptoms and enhancement of function in a number of pathologies including heart failure, diabetes, sickle cell anemia, hypertension and ischemia-reperfusion injury. For decades, XOR involvement in pathologic processes has been established by salutary outcomes attained from treatment with the XOR inhibitor allopurinol. This has served to frame a working dogma that elevation of XOR-specific activity is associated with enhanced rates of reactive species generation that mediate negative outcomes. While adherence to this narrowly focused practice of designating elevated XOR activity to be "bad" has produced some benefit, it has also led to significant underdevelopment of the processes mediating XOR regulation, identification of alternative reactants and products as well as micro-environmental factors that alter enzymatic activity. This is exemplified by recent reports: (1) identifying XOR as a nitrite reductase and thus a source of beneficial nitric oxide ((•)NO) under in vivo conditions similar to those where XOR inhibition has been assumed an optimal treatment choice, (2) describing XOR-derived uric acid (UA) as a critical pro-inflammatory mediator in vascular and metabolic disease and (3) ascribing an antioxidant/protective role for XOR-derived UA. When taken together, these proposed and countervailing functions of XOR affirm the need for a more comprehensive evaluation of product formation as well as the factors that govern product identity. As such, this review will critically evaluate XOR-catalyzed oxidant, (•)NO and UA formation as well as identify factors that mediate their production, inhibition and the resultant impact on inflammatory disease.

  5. Cooperation of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases reduces menadione cytotoxicity in HEK293 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Takahito; Izawa, Tadashi; Usami, Mami; Ohnuma, Tomokazu; Ogura, Kenichiro; Hiratsuka, Akira

    2010-04-09

    Previous studies have shown that NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) plays an important role in the detoxification of menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, also known as vitamin K3). However, menadiol (2-methyl-1,4-naphthalenediol) formed from menadione by NQO1-mediated reduction continues to be an unstable substance, which undergoes the reformation of menadione with concomitant formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Hence, we focused on the roles of phase II enzymes, with particular attention to UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs), in the detoxification process of menadione. In this study, we established an HEK293 cell line stably expressing NQO1 (HEK293/NQO1) and HEK293/NQO1 cell lines with doxycycline (DOX)-regulated expression of UGT1A6 (HEK293/NQO1/UGT1A6) and UGT1A10 (HEK293/NQO1/UGT1A10), and evaluated the role of NQO1 and UGTs against menadione-induced cytotoxicity. Our results differed from those of previous studies. HEK293/NQO1 was the most sensitive cell line to menadione cytotoxicity among cell lines established in this study. These phenomena were also observed in HEK293/NQO1/UGT1A6 and HEK293/NQO1/UGT1A10 cells in which the expression of UGT was suppressed by DOX treatment. On the contrary, HEK293/NQO1/UGT1A6 and HEK293/NQO1/UGT1A10 cells without DOX treatment were resistant to menadione-induced cytotoxicity. These results demonstrated that NQO1 is not a detoxification enzyme for menadione and that UGT-mediated glucuronidation of menadiol is the most important detoxification process. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Deletion of P399{sub E}401 in NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase results in partial mixed oxidase deficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flueck, Christa E., E-mail: christa.flueck@dkf.unibe.ch [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, University Children' s Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Mallet, Delphine [Service d' Endocrinologie Moleculaire et Maladies Rares, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Bron (France); Hofer, Gaby [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, University Children' s Hospital, Bern (Switzerland); Samara-Boustani, Dinane [Hopital Necker-Enfants malades, Paris (France); Leger, Juliane [Hopital Robert Debre, Paris (France); Polak, Michel [Hopital Necker-Enfants malades, Paris (France); Morel, Yves [Service d' Endocrinologie Moleculaire et Maladies Rares, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Bron (France); Pandey, Amit V., E-mail: amit@pandeylab.org [Pediatric Endocrinology, Diabetology and Metabolism, University Children' s Hospital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia. {yields} We are reporting a novel 3 amino acid deletion mutation in POR P399{sub E}401del. {yields} POR mutation P399{sub E}401del decreased P450 activities by 60-85%. {yields} Impairment of steroid metabolism may be caused by multiple hits. {yields} Severity of aromatase inhibition is related to degree of in utero virilization. -- Abstract: P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the electron donor for all microsomal P450s including steroidogenic enzymes CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP21A2. We found a novel POR mutation P399{sub E}401del in two unrelated Turkish patients with 46,XX disorder of sexual development. Recombinant POR proteins were produced in yeast and tested for their ability to support steroid metabolizing P450 activities. In comparison to wild-type POR, the P399{sub E}401del protein was found to decrease catalytic efficiency of 21-hydroxylation of progesterone by 68%, 17{alpha}-hydroxylation of progesterone by 76%, 17,20-lyase action on 17OH-pregnenolone by 69%, aromatization of androstenedione by 85% and cytochrome c reduction activity by 80%. Protein structure analysis of the three amino acid deletion P399{sub E}401 revealed reduced stability and flexibility of the mutant. In conclusion, P399{sub E}401del is a novel mutation in POR that provides valuable genotype-phenotype and structure-function correlation for mutations in a different region of POR compared to previous studies. Characterization of P399{sub E}401del provides further insight into specificity of different P450s for interaction with POR as well as nature of metabolic disruptions caused by more pronounced effect on specific P450s like CYP17A1 and aromatase.

  7. Deletion of P399E401 in NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase results in partial mixed oxidase deficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flueck, Christa E.; Mallet, Delphine; Hofer, Gaby; Samara-Boustani, Dinane; Leger, Juliane; Polak, Michel; Morel, Yves; Pandey, Amit V.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia. → We are reporting a novel 3 amino acid deletion mutation in POR P399 E 401del. → POR mutation P399 E 401del decreased P450 activities by 60-85%. → Impairment of steroid metabolism may be caused by multiple hits. → Severity of aromatase inhibition is related to degree of in utero virilization. -- Abstract: P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is the electron donor for all microsomal P450s including steroidogenic enzymes CYP17A1, CYP19A1 and CYP21A2. We found a novel POR mutation P399 E 401del in two unrelated Turkish patients with 46,XX disorder of sexual development. Recombinant POR proteins were produced in yeast and tested for their ability to support steroid metabolizing P450 activities. In comparison to wild-type POR, the P399 E 401del protein was found to decrease catalytic efficiency of 21-hydroxylation of progesterone by 68%, 17α-hydroxylation of progesterone by 76%, 17,20-lyase action on 17OH-pregnenolone by 69%, aromatization of androstenedione by 85% and cytochrome c reduction activity by 80%. Protein structure analysis of the three amino acid deletion P399 E 401 revealed reduced stability and flexibility of the mutant. In conclusion, P399 E 401del is a novel mutation in POR that provides valuable genotype-phenotype and structure-function correlation for mutations in a different region of POR compared to previous studies. Characterization of P399 E 401del provides further insight into specificity of different P450s for interaction with POR as well as nature of metabolic disruptions caused by more pronounced effect on specific P450s like CYP17A1 and aromatase.

  8. FaQR, required for the biosynthesis of the strawberry flavor compound 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, encodes an enone oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raab, Thomas; López-Ráez, Juan Antonio; Klein, Dorothée; Caballero, Jose Luis; Moyano, Enriqueta; Schwab, Wilfried; Muñoz-Blanco, Juan

    2006-04-01

    The flavor of strawberry (Fragaria x ananassa) fruit is dominated by an uncommon group of aroma compounds with a 2,5-dimethyl-3(H)-furanone structure. We report the characterization of an enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (HDMF; Furaneol), the key flavor compound in strawberries. Protein extracts were partially purified, and the observed distribution of enzymatic activity correlated with the presence of a single polypeptide of approximately 37 kD. Sequence analysis of two peptide fragments showed total identity with the protein sequence of a strongly ripening-induced, auxin-dependent putative quinone oxidoreductase, Fragaria x ananassa quinone oxidoreductase (FaQR). The open reading frame of the FaQR cDNA consists of 969 bp encoding a 322-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 34.3 kD. Laser capture microdissection followed by RNA extraction and amplification demonstrated the presence of FaQR mRNA in parenchyma tissue of the strawberry fruit. The FaQR protein was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli, and the monomer catalyzed the formation of HDMF. After chemical synthesis and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, 4-hydroxy-5-methyl-2-methylene-3(2H)-furanone was confirmed as a substrate of FaQR and the natural precursor of HDMF. This study demonstrates the function of the FaQR enzyme in the biosynthesis of HDMF as enone oxidoreductase and provides a foundation for the improvement of strawberry flavor and the biotechnological production of HDMF.

  9. Mössbauer and X-ray investigation of model compounds for the P460 center of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase from nitrosomonas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, E.; Gismelseed, A.; Laroque, D.; Trautwein, A. X.; Nasri, H.; Fischer, J.; Weiss, R.

    1988-02-01

    The divalent high-spin iron in the P460 center of hydroxylamine oxidoreductase and in three possible “picket fence” heme models exhibit extremely large quadrupole splittings (˜4 mms-1). Their isomer shifts of about 1 mms-1 are consistent with the X-ray results of two of the models, i.e. that Fe(II) is pentacoordinated. The coordination geometry of iron deviates considerably from the common fourfold symmetry of the “picket fence” porphyrin due to a CH3CO{2/-} ligand. This feature is also reflected by the significant anisotropies of g-factors, A tensor and rhombicity E/D.

  10. Nitrate decreases xanthine oxidoreductase-mediated nitrite reductase activity and attenuates vascular and blood pressure responses to nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damacena-Angelis, Célio; Oliveira-Paula, Gustavo H; Pinheiro, Lucas C; Crevelin, Eduardo J; Portella, Rafael L; Moraes, Luiz Alberto B; Tanus-Santos, Jose E

    2017-08-01

    Nitrite and nitrate restore deficient endogenous nitric oxide (NO) production as they are converted back to NO, and therefore complement the classic enzymatic NO synthesis. Circulating nitrate and nitrite must cross membrane barriers to produce their effects and increased nitrate concentrations may attenuate the nitrite influx into cells, decreasing NO generation from nitrite. Moreover, xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) mediates NO formation from nitrite and nitrate. However, no study has examined whether nitrate attenuates XOR-mediated NO generation from nitrite. We hypothesized that nitrate attenuates the vascular and blood pressure responses to nitrite either by interfering with nitrite influx into vascular tissue, or by competing with nitrite for XOR, thus inhibiting XOR-mediated NO generation. We used two independent vascular function assays in rats (aortic ring preparations and isolated mesenteric arterial bed perfusion) to examine the effects of sodium nitrate on the concentration-dependent responses to sodium nitrite. Both assays showed that nitrate attenuated the vascular responses to nitrite. Conversely, the aortic responses to the NO donor DETANONOate were not affected by sodium nitrate. Further confirming these results, we found that nitrate attenuated the acute blood pressure lowering effects of increasing doses of nitrite infused intravenously in freely moving rats. The possibility that nitrate could compete with nitrite and decrease nitrite influx into cells was tested by measuring the accumulation of nitrogen-15-labeled nitrite ( 15 N-nitrite) by aortic rings using ultra-performance liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Nitrate exerted no effect on aortic accumulation of 15 N-nitrite. Next, we used chemiluminescence-based NO detection to examine whether nitrate attenuates XOR-mediated nitrite reductase activity. Nitrate significantly shifted the Michaelis Menten saturation curve to the right, with a 3-fold increase in the

  11. Structural and functional insights into the catalytic inactivity of the major fraction of buffalo milk xanthine oxidoreductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaustubh S Gadave

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR existing in two interconvertible forms, xanthine dehydrogenase (XDH and xanthine oxidase (XO, catabolises xanthine to uric acid that is further broken down to antioxidative agent allantoin. XOR also produces free radicals serving as second messenger and microbicidal agent. Large variation in the XO activity has been observed among various species. Both hypo and hyper activity of XOR leads to pathophysiological conditions. Given the important nutritional role of buffalo milk in human health especially in south Asia, it is crucial to understand the functional properties of buffalo XOR and the underlying structural basis of variations in comparison to other species. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Buffalo XO activity of 0.75 U/mg was almost half of cattle XO activity. Enzymatic efficiency (k cat/K m of 0.11 sec(-1 µM(-1 of buffalo XO was 8-10 times smaller than that of cattle XO. Buffalo XOR also showed lower antibacterial activity than cattle XOR. A CD value (Δε430 nm of 46,000 M(-1 cm(-1 suggested occupancy of 77.4% at Fe/S I centre. Buffalo XOR contained 0.31 molybdenum atom/subunit of which 48% existed in active sulfo form. The active form of XO in buffalo was only 16% in comparison to ∼30% in cattle. Sequencing revealed 97.4% similarity between buffalo and cattle XOR. FAD domain was least conserved, while metal binding domains (Fe/S and Molybdenum were highly conserved. Homology modelling of buffalo XOR showed several variations occurring in clusters, especially close to FAD binding pocket which could affect NAD(+ entry in the FAD centre. The difference in XO activity seems to be originating from cofactor deficiency, especially molybdenum. CONCLUSION: A major fraction of buffalo milk XOR exists in a catalytically inactive form due to high content of demolybdo and desulfo forms. Lower Fe/S content and structural factors might be contributing to lower enzymatic efficiency of buffalo XOR in a minor way.

  12. The drug ornidazole inhibits photosynthesis in a different mechanism described for protozoa and anaerobic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Yehouda; Tal, Noam; Ronen, Mordechai; Carmieli, Raanan; Gurevitz, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Ornidazole of the 5-nitroimidazole drug family is used to treat protozoan and anaerobic bacterial infections via a mechanism that involves preactivation by reduction of the nitro group, and production of toxic derivatives and radicals. Metronidazole, another drug family member, has been suggested to affect photosynthesis by draining electrons from the electron carrier ferredoxin, thus inhibiting NADP + reduction and stimulating radical and peroxide production. Here we show, however, that ornidazole inhibits photosynthesis via a different mechanism. While having a minute effect on the photosynthetic electron transport and oxygen photoreduction, ornidazole hinders the activity of two Calvin cycle enzymes, triose-phosphate isomerase (TPI) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Modeling of ornidazole's interaction with ferredoxin of the protozoan Trichomonas suggests efficient electron tunneling from the iron-sulfur cluster to the nitro group of the drug. A similar docking site of ornidazole at the plant-type ferredoxin does not exist, and the best simulated alternative does not support such efficient tunneling. Notably, TPI was inhibited by ornidazole in the dark or when electron transport was blocked by dichloromethyl diphenylurea, indicating that this inhibition was unrelated to the electron transport machinery. Although TPI and GAPDH isoenzymes are involved in glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, ornidazole's effect on respiration of photoautotrophs is moderate, thus raising its value as an efficient inhibitor of photosynthesis. The scarcity of Calvin cycle inhibitors capable of penetrating cell membranes emphasizes on the value of ornidazole for studying the regulation of this cycle. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  13. Independently recruited oxidases from the glucose-methanol-choline oxidoreductase family enabled chemical defences in leaf beetle larvae (subtribe Chrysomelina) to evolve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahfeld, Peter; Kirsch, Roy; Kugel, Susann; Wielsch, Natalie; Stock, Magdalena; Groth, Marco; Boland, Wilhelm; Burse, Antje

    2014-01-01

    Larvae of the leaf beetle subtribe Chrysomelina sensu stricto repel their enemies by displaying glandular secretions that contain defensive compounds. These repellents can be produced either de novo (iridoids) or by using plant-derived precursors (e.g. salicylaldehyde). The autonomous production of iridoids, as in Phaedon cochleariae, is the ancestral chrysomeline chemical defence and predates the evolution of salicylaldehyde-based defence. Both biosynthesis strategies include an oxidative step of an alcohol intermediate. In salicylaldehyde-producing species, this step is catalysed by salicyl alcohol oxidases (SAOs) of the glucose-methanol-choline (GMC) oxidoreductase superfamily, but the enzyme oxidizing the iridoid precursor is unknown. Here, we show by in vitro as well as in vivo experiments that P. cochleariae also uses an oxidase from the GMC superfamily for defensive purposes. However, our phylogenetic analysis of chrysomeline GMC oxidoreductases revealed that the oxidase of the iridoid pathway originated from a GMC clade different from that of the SAOs. Thus, the evolution of a host-independent chemical defence followed by a shift to a host-dependent chemical defence in chrysomeline beetles coincided with the utilization of genes from different GMC subfamilies. These findings illustrate the importance of the GMC multi-gene family for adaptive processes in plant–insect interactions. PMID:24943369

  14. A thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase of the Gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae is essential for viability, pilus assembly, toxin production and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon-Robinson, Melissa E; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Jooya, Neda; Chang, Chungyu; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Das, Asis; Ton-That, Hung

    2015-12-01

    The Gram-positive pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae exports through the Sec apparatus many extracellular proteins that include the key virulence factors diphtheria toxin and the adhesive pili. How these proteins attain their native conformations after translocation as unfolded precursors remains elusive. The fact that the majority of these exported proteins contain multiple cysteine residues and that several membrane-bound oxidoreductases are encoded in the corynebacterial genome suggests the existence of an oxidative protein-folding pathway in this organism. Here we show that the shaft pilin SpaA harbors a disulfide bond in vivo and alanine substitution of these cysteines abrogates SpaA polymerization and leads to the secretion of degraded SpaA peptides. We then identified a thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase (MdbA), whose structure exhibits a conserved thioredoxin-like domain with a CPHC active site. Remarkably, deletion of mdbA results in a severe temperature-sensitive cell division phenotype. This mutant also fails to assemble pilus structures and is greatly defective in toxin production. Consistent with these defects, the ΔmdbA mutant is attenuated in a guinea pig model of diphtheritic toxemia. Given its diverse cellular functions in cell division, pilus assembly and toxin production, we propose that MdbA is a component of the general oxidative folding machine in C. diphtheriae. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Increased furfural tolerance due to overexpression of NADH-dependent oxidoreductase FucO in Escherichia coli strains engineered for the production of ethanol and lactate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Miller, E N; Yomano, L P; Zhang, X; Shanmugam, K T; Ingram, L O

    2011-08-01

    Furfural is an important fermentation inhibitor in hemicellulose sugar syrups derived from woody biomass. The metabolism of furfural by NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases, such as YqhD (low K(m) for NADPH), is proposed to inhibit the growth and fermentation of xylose in Escherichia coli by competing with biosynthesis for NADPH. The discovery that the NADH-dependent propanediol oxidoreductase (FucO) can reduce furfural provided a new approach to improve furfural tolerance. Strains that produced ethanol or lactate efficiently as primary products from xylose were developed. These strains included chromosomal mutations in yqhD expression that permitted the fermentation of xylose broths containing up to 10 mM furfural. Expression of fucO from plasmids was shown to increase furfural tolerance by 50% and to permit the fermentation of 15 mM furfural. Product yields with 15 mM furfural were equivalent to those of control strains without added furfural (85% to 90% of the theoretical maximum). These two defined genetic traits can be readily transferred to enteric biocatalysts designed to produce other products. A similar strategy that minimizes the depletion of NADPH pools by native detoxification enzymes may be generally useful for other inhibitory compounds in lignocellulosic sugar streams and with other organisms.

  16. Increased Furfural Tolerance Due to Overexpression of NADH-Dependent Oxidoreductase FucO in Escherichia coli Strains Engineered for the Production of Ethanol and Lactate▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Miller, E. N.; Yomano, L. P.; Zhang, X.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, L. O.

    2011-01-01

    Furfural is an important fermentation inhibitor in hemicellulose sugar syrups derived from woody biomass. The metabolism of furfural by NADPH-dependent oxidoreductases, such as YqhD (low Km for NADPH), is proposed to inhibit the growth and fermentation of xylose in Escherichia coli by competing with biosynthesis for NADPH. The discovery that the NADH-dependent propanediol oxidoreductase (FucO) can reduce furfural provided a new approach to improve furfural tolerance. Strains that produced ethanol or lactate efficiently as primary products from xylose were developed. These strains included chromosomal mutations in yqhD expression that permitted the fermentation of xylose broths containing up to 10 mM furfural. Expression of fucO from plasmids was shown to increase furfural tolerance by 50% and to permit the fermentation of 15 mM furfural. Product yields with 15 mM furfural were equivalent to those of control strains without added furfural (85% to 90% of the theoretical maximum). These two defined genetic traits can be readily transferred to enteric biocatalysts designed to produce other products. A similar strategy that minimizes the depletion of NADPH pools by native detoxification enzymes may be generally useful for other inhibitory compounds in lignocellulosic sugar streams and with other organisms. PMID:21685167

  17. Progesterone Exerts a Neuromodulatory Effect on Turning Behavior of Hemiparkinsonian Male Rats: Expression of 3α-Hydroxysteroid Oxidoreductase and Allopregnanolone as Suggestive of GABAA Receptors Involvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Yunes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing amount of evidence for a neuroprotective role of progesterone and its neuroactive metabolite, allopregnanolone, in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. By using a model of hemiparkinsonism in male rats, injection of the neurotoxic 6-OHDA in left striatum, we studied progesterone’s effects on rotational behavior induced by amphetamine or apomorphine. Also, in order to find potential explanatory mechanisms, we studied expression and activity of nigrostriatal 3α-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase, the enzyme that catalyzes progesterone to its active metabolite allopregnanolone. Coherently, we tested allopregnanolone for a possible neuromodulatory effect on rotational behavior. Also, since allopregnanolone is known as a GABAA modulator, we finally examined the action of GABAA antagonist bicuculline. We found that progesterone, in addition to an apparent neuroprotective effect, also increased ipsilateral expression and activity of 3α-hydroxysteroid oxidoreductase. It was interesting to note that ipsilateral administration of allopregnanolone reversed a clear sign of motor neurodegeneration, that is, contralateral rotational behavior. A possible GABAA involvement modulated by allopregnanolone was shown by the blocking effect of bicuculline. Our results suggest that early administration of progesterone possibly activates genomic mechanisms that promote neuroprotection subchronically. This, in turn, could be partially mediated by fast, nongenomic, actions of allopregnanolone acting as an acute modulator of GABAergic transmission.

  18. 阴道毛滴虫与人型支原体共生对铁氧还蛋白基因影响%Effects of the Symbiosis of Trichomonas Vaginalis with Mycoplasma Hominis on Ferredoxin Gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘晓东; 温雯静; 薛长贵

    2011-01-01

    We isolated 30 Trichomonas vaginalis for the PCR detection from the gynecological outpatients in the Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University using the specific 16s rDNA primers of Mycoplasma hominis. The results showed that there were 25 cases of Mycoplasma hominis infection, with the infection rate of 83. 33%. This gave a clew that the symbiosis of Trichomonas vaginalis with Mycoplasma hominis may be of certain generality in China. We sequenced the ferredoxin gene of 10 Trichomonas vaginalis where 5 Mycoplasma hominis were positive and five negative, and found that the ferredoxin (Fd) gene of the 10 Trichomonas vaginalis were exactly the same. But compared to the genes in the GenBank. A comparative analysis of the gene revealed that there were 3 more ctg bases at the 200th position of encoding leucine, but this did not lead to changes in reading frame. The gene homology was 99%.%采用人型支原体16s rDNA的特异引物,对从郑州大学附属医院妇科门诊患者分离到的30株阴道毛滴虫进行PCR检测,结果有25株感染人型支原体,感染率为83.33%,这显示了阴道毛滴虫和人型支原体之间的共生关系在中国具有普遍性.并对10株阴道毛滴虫(5株人型支原体阳性和5株人型支原体阴性)的铁氧还蛋白(Fd)基因进行测序,探讨人型支原体对Fd基因的影响,结果发现10株阴道毛滴虫的Fd基因完全相同,但与GenBank中的基因进行比较分析,在第200位多出ctg三个碱基,编码亮氨酸,但并未导致读码框架改变.基因同源性为99%.

  19. Ferredoxin-dependent and antimycin A-sensitive reduction of cytochrome b-559 by far-red light in maize [Zea mays] thylakoids; participation of a meladiol-reducible cytochrome b-559 in cyclic electron flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyake, C.; Schreiber, U.; Asada, K.

    1995-01-01

    Thylakoids from mesophyll cells of maize showed a high rate of the ferredoxin (Fd)-dependent and antimycin A (AntiA)-sensitive cyclic electron flow as determined by the quenching of 9-aminoacridine fluorescence which indicates the formation of ΔpH across the membranes. Spectrophotometric survey of the thylakoids showed the reduction of a Cyt having an α-peak at 559 nm [Cyt b-559(Fd)] by far-red light, which depended on Fd and was sensitive to AntiA. Dose dependencies of Fd and AntiA on the photoreduction of Cyt b-559(Fd) were the same as those of the formation of ΔpH. Cyt b-559(Fd) occurred in an oxidized form even in the presence of ascorbate and was reduced by far-red light. In darkness, it was reduced only by menadiol (E m,7 = –10mV). Thus, Cyt b-559(Fd) was distinguished from Cyt b-559 in the PSII complex by its low redox potential. The present results indicate that Cyt b-559(Fd) mediates electron transfer from Fd to plastoquinone during Fd-dependent cyclic electron flow around PSI. (author)

  20. Neutral complexes as oxidants for the reduced form of parsley (Petroselinum crispum) [2Fe--2S] ferredoxin. Evidence for partial blocking by redox-inactive Cr(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adzamli, I K; Kim, H O; Sykes, A G

    1982-01-01

    The 1 : 1 reactions of three neutral Co(III) oxidants, Co(acac)3, Co(NH3)3(NO2)3 and Co(acac)2(NH3)(NO2), with reduced parsley (Petroselinum crispum) [2Fe--2S] ferredoxin (which carries a substantial negative charge), have been studied at 25 degrees C, pH 8.0 (Tris/HCl), I0.10 (NaCl). Whereas it has previously been demonstrated that with Co(NH3)6+ as oxidant the reaction if completely blocked by redox-inactive Cr(NH3)63+, the neutral oxidants are only partially blocked by this same complex. The effects of three Cr(III) complexes, Cr(NH3)63+%, Cr(en)33+ and (en)2Cr . mu(OH,O2CCH3) . CR(en)24+ have been investigated. Kinetic data for the response of 3+, neutral, as well as 1--oxidants to the presence of 3+ (and 4+) Cr(III) complexes can now be rationalized in terms of a single functional site on the protein for electron transfer. Electrostatics have a significant influence on association at this site. PMID:7115307

  1. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of FoxE from Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2, an FeII oxidoreductase involved in photoferrotrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, L.; Saraiva, I. H.; Coelho, R.; Newman, D. K.; Louro, R. O.; Frazão, C.

    2012-01-01

    Crystals of the R. ferrooxidans SW2 iron oxidoreductase FoxE were obtained and the phase problem was solved by Fe SAD at 2.44 Å resolution. FoxE is a protein encoded by the foxEYZ operon of Rhodobacter ferrooxidans SW2 that is involved in Fe II -based anoxygenic photosynthesis (‘photoferrotrophy’). It is thought to reside in the periplasm, where it stimulates light-dependent Fe II oxidation. It contains 259 residues, including two haem c-binding motifs. As no three-dimensional model is available and there is no structure with a similar sequence, crystals of FoxE were produced. They diffracted to 2.44 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at the Fe edge. The phase problem was solved by SAD using SHELXC/D/E and the experimental maps confirmed the presence of two haems per molecule

  2. Improved production of 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid by overexpression of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural oxidase and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural/furfural oxidoreductase in Raoultella ornithinolytica BF60.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Haibo; Li, Jianghua; Shin, Hyun-Dong; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian; Shi, Zhongping; Liu, Long

    2018-01-01

    2,5-Furandicarboxylic acid (FDCA) is a promising bio-based building block and can be produced by biotransformation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). To improve the FDCA production, two genes-one encoding HMF oxidase (HMFO; from Methylovorus sp. strain MP688) and another encoding for HMF/Furfural oxidoreductase (HmfH; from Cupriavidus basilensis HMF14)-were introduced into Raoultella ornithinolytica BF60. The FDCA production in the engineered whole-cell biocatalyst increased from 51.0 to 93.6mM, and the molar conversion ratio of HMF to FDCA increased from 51.0 to 93.6%. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cranberry extract-enriched diets increase NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase and catalase activities in obese but not in nonobese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boušová, Iva; Bártíková, Hana; Matoušková, Petra; Lněničková, Kateřina; Zappe, Lukáš; Valentová, Kateřina; Szotáková, Barbora; Martin, Jan; Skálová, Lenka

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of antioxidant-enriched diets is 1 method of addressing obesity, which is associated with chronic oxidative stress and changes in the activity/expression of various enzymes. In this study, we hypothesized that the modulation of antioxidant enzymes and redox status through a cranberry extract (CBE)-enriched diet would differ between obese and nonobese mice. The CBE used in this study was obtained from the American cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon, Ericaceae), a popular constituent of dietary supplements that is a particularly rich source of (poly)phenols and has strong antioxidant properties. The present study was designed to test and compare the in vivo effects of 28-day consumption of a CBE-enriched diet (2%) on the antioxidant status of nonobese mice and mice with monosodium glutamate-induced obesity. Plasma, erythrocytes, liver, and small intestine were studied concurrently to obtain more complex information. The specific activities, protein, and messenger RNA expression levels of antioxidant enzymes as well as the levels of malondialdehyde and thiol (SH) groups were analyzed. Cranberry extract treatment increased the SH group content in plasma and the glutathione S-transferase activity in the erythrocytes of the obese and nonobese mice. In addition, in the obese animals, the CBE treatment reduced the malondialdehyde content in erythrocytes and increased quinone oxidoreductase (liver) and catalase (erythrocytes and small intestine) activities. The elevation of hepatic quinone oxidoreductase activity was accompanied by an increase in the corresponding messenger RNA levels. The effects of CBE on the activity of antioxidant enzymes and redox status were more pronounced in the obese mice compared with the nonobese mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lambda Red-mediated mutagenesis and efficient large scale affinity purification of the Escherichia coli NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Thomas; Uhlmann, Mareike; Kaufenstein, Miriam; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2007-09-18

    The proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, the respiratory complex I, couples the transfer of electrons from NADH to ubiquinone with the translocation of protons across the membrane. The Escherichia coli complex I consists of 13 different subunits named NuoA-N (from NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase), that are coded by the genes of the nuo-operon. Genetic manipulation of the operon is difficult due to its enormous size. The enzymatic activity of variants is obscured by an alternative NADH dehydrogenase, and purification of the variants is hampered by their instability. To overcome these problems the entire E. coli nuo-operon was cloned and placed under control of the l-arabinose inducible promoter ParaBAD. The exposed N-terminus of subunit NuoF was chosen for engineering the complex with a hexahistidine-tag by lambda-Red-mediated recombineering. Overproduction of the complex from this construct in a strain which is devoid of any membrane-bound NADH dehydrogenase led to the assembly of a catalytically active complex causing the entire NADH oxidase activity of the cytoplasmic membranes. After solubilization with dodecyl maltoside the engineered complex binds to a Ni2+-iminodiacetic acid matrix allowing the purification of approximately 11 mg of complex I from 25 g of cells. The preparation is pure and monodisperse and comprises all known subunits and cofactors. It contains more lipids than earlier preparations due to the gentle and fast purification procedure. After reconstitution in proteoliposomes it couples the electron transfer with proton translocation in an inhibitor sensitive manner, thus meeting all prerequisites for structural and functional studies.

  5. Roles of the redox-active disulfide and histidine residues forming a catalytic dyad in reactions catalyzed by 2-ketopropyl coenzyme M oxidoreductase/carboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, Melissa A; Wampler, David A; Pandey, Arti S; Peters, John W; Ensign, Scott A

    2011-09-01

    NADPH:2-ketopropyl-coenzyme M oxidoreductase/carboxylase (2-KPCC), an atypical member of the disulfide oxidoreductase (DSOR) family of enzymes, catalyzes the reductive cleavage and carboxylation of 2-ketopropyl-coenzyme M [2-(2-ketopropylthio)ethanesulfonate; 2-KPC] to form acetoacetate and coenzyme M (CoM) in the bacterial pathway of propylene metabolism. Structural studies of 2-KPCC from Xanthobacter autotrophicus strain Py2 have revealed a distinctive active-site architecture that includes a putative catalytic triad consisting of two histidine residues that are hydrogen bonded to an ordered water molecule proposed to stabilize enolacetone formed from dithiol-mediated 2-KPC thioether bond cleavage. Site-directed mutants of 2-KPCC were constructed to test the tenets of the mechanism proposed from studies of the native enzyme. Mutagenesis of the interchange thiol of 2-KPCC (C82A) abolished all redox-dependent reactions of 2-KPCC (2-KPC carboxylation or protonation). The air-oxidized C82A mutant, as well as wild-type 2-KPCC, exhibited the characteristic charge transfer absorbance seen in site-directed variants of other DSOR enzymes but with a pK(a) value for C87 (8.8) four units higher (i.e., four orders of magnitude less acidic) than that for the flavin thiol of canonical DSOR enzymes. The same higher pK(a) value was observed in native 2-KPCC when the interchange thiol was alkylated by the CoM analog 2-bromoethanesulfonate. Mutagenesis of the flavin thiol (C87A) also resulted in an inactive enzyme for steady-state redox-dependent reactions, but this variant catalyzed a single-turnover reaction producing a 0.8:1 ratio of product to enzyme. Mutagenesis of the histidine proximal to the ordered water (H137A) led to nearly complete loss of redox-dependent 2-KPCC reactions, while mutagenesis of the distal histidine (H84A) reduced these activities by 58 to 76%. A redox-independent reaction of 2-KPCC (acetoacetate decarboxylation) was not decreased for any of the

  6. An NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme responsive nanocarrier based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles for tumor targeted drug delivery in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayam, Srivardhan Reddy; Venkatesan, Parthiban; Sung, Yi-Ming; Sung, Shuo-Yuan; Hu, Shang-Hsiu; Hsu, Hsin-Yun; Wu, Shu-Pao

    2016-06-01

    The synthesis and characterization of an NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme responsive nanocarrier based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) for on-command delivery applications has been described in this paper. Gatekeeping of MSNPs is achieved by the integration of mechanically interlocked rotaxane nanovalves on the surface of MSNPs. The rotaxane nanovalve system is composed of a linear stalk anchoring on the surface of MSNPs, an α-cyclodextrin ring that encircles it and locks the payload ``cargo'' molecules in the mesopores, and a benzoquinone stopper incorporated at the end of the stalk. The gate opening and controlled release of the cargo are triggered by cleavage of the benzoquinone stopper using an endogenous NQO1 enzyme. In addition to having efficient drug loading and controlled release mechanisms, this smart biocompatible carrier system showed obvious uptake and consequent release of the drug in tumor cells, could selectively induce the tumor cell death and enhance the capability of inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. The controlled drug delivery system demonstrated its use as a potential theranostic material.The synthesis and characterization of an NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) enzyme responsive nanocarrier based on mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNPs) for on-command delivery applications has been described in this paper. Gatekeeping of MSNPs is achieved by the integration of mechanically interlocked rotaxane nanovalves on the surface of MSNPs. The rotaxane nanovalve system is composed of a linear stalk anchoring on the surface of MSNPs, an α-cyclodextrin ring that encircles it and locks the payload ``cargo'' molecules in the mesopores, and a benzoquinone stopper incorporated at the end of the stalk. The gate opening and controlled release of the cargo are triggered by cleavage of the benzoquinone stopper using an endogenous NQO1 enzyme. In addition to having efficient drug loading and controlled release mechanisms, this

  7. A novel aldose-aldose oxidoreductase for co-production of D-xylonate and xylitol from D-xylose with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, Marilyn G; Nygård, Yvonne; Oja, Merja; Andberg, Martina; Ruohonen, Laura; Koivula, Anu; Penttilä, Merja; Toivari, Mervi

    2015-11-01

    An open reading frame CC1225 from the Caulobacter crescentus CB15 genome sequence belongs to the Gfo/Idh/MocA protein family and has 47 % amino acid sequence identity with the glucose-fructose oxidoreductase from Zymomonas mobilis (Zm GFOR). We expressed the ORF CC1225 in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and used a yeast strain expressing the gene coding for Zm GFOR as a reference. Cell extracts of strains overexpressing CC1225 (renamed as Cc aaor) showed some Zm GFOR type of activity, producing D-gluconate and D-sorbitol when a mixture of D-glucose and D-fructose was used as substrate. However, the activity in Cc aaor expressing strain was >100-fold lower compared to strains expressing Zm gfor. Interestingly, C. crescentus AAOR was clearly more efficient than the Zm GFOR in converting in vitro a single sugar substrate D-xylose (10 mM) to xylitol without an added cofactor, whereas this type of activity was very low with Zm GFOR. Furthermore, when cultured in the presence of D-xylose, the S. cerevisiae strain expressing Cc aaor produced nearly equal concentrations of D-xylonate and xylitol (12.5 g D-xylonate l(-1) and 11.5 g D-xylitol l(-1) from 26 g D-xylose l(-1)), whereas the control strain and strain expressing Zm gfor produced only D-xylitol (5 g l(-1)). Deletion of the gene encoding the major aldose reductase, Gre3p, did not affect xylitol production in the strain expressing Cc aaor, but decreased xylitol production in the strain expressing Zm gfor. In addition, expression of Cc aaor together with the D-xylonolactone lactonase encoding the gene xylC from C. crescentus slightly increased the final concentration and initial volumetric production rate of both D-xylonate and D-xylitol. These results suggest that C. crescentus AAOR is a novel type of oxidoreductase able to convert the single aldose substrate D-xylose to both its oxidized and reduced product.

  8. Hypoxia-induced tumor cell resistance is overcome by synergistic GAPDH-siRNA and chemotherapy co-delivered by long-circulating and cationic-interior liposomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guan, J.; Sun, J.; Sun, F.; Lou, B.; Zhang, D.; Mashayekhi, V.; Sadeghi, N.; Storm, G.; Mastrobattista, E.; He, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Chemotherapeutic drug resistance of tumor cells under hypoxic conditions is caused by the inhibition of apoptosis by autophagy and drug efflux via adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-dependent transporter activation, among other factors. Here, we demonstrate that disrupting glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate

  9. Simultaneous overexpression of enzymes of the lower part of glycolysis can enhance the fermentative capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smits, H. P.; Hauf, J.; Muller, S.

    2000-01-01

    Recombinant S. cerevisiae strains, with elevated levels of the enzymes of lower glycolysis (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate mutase, phosphoglycerate kinase, enolase, pyruvate kinase, pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase) were physiologically characterized...

  10. Improved production of fatty acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae through screening a cDNA library from the oleaginous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Shuobo; Ji, Haichuan; Siewers, Verena

    2016-01-01

    , malate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, FA hydroxylase, farnesyltransferase, anoctamin, dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase and phosphatidylethanolamine-binding protein. The best enzyme resulted in a 2.5-fold improvement in production of free FAs. Our findings not only provide a novel...

  11. A molecular analysis of the Gelechiidae (Lepidoptera, Gelechioidea) with an interpretative grouping of its taxa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karsholt, Ole; Mutanen, Marko; Lee, Sangmi

    2013-01-01

    , Isocitrate dehydrogenase, Cytosolic malate dehydrogenase, Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and Carbamoylphosphate synthase domain protein). Fifty-two taxa representing nearly all established subfamilies and tribes of Gelechiidae, and about 10% of described gelechiid genera, in addition to five...

  12. Fulltext PDF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2010-04-30

    deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate; DXR, DXP reductoisomerase; FPP, farnesyl diphosphate; FPPS, FPP synthase; GA-3P, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate; GGPP, geranyl geranyl diphosphate;. GGPPS, GGPP synthase; GPP, geranyl ...

  13. Responses of mRNA expression of PepT1 in small intestine to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-05-04

    May 4, 2009 ... 2National Key Laboratory of Animal Nutrition, Beijing, 100193, China. 3College ... porters are present in tissues of sheep, cows, pigs and .... PepT1; Peptide transporter, GAPDH; Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

  14. Evolution and host specificity in the ectomycorrhizal genus Leccinum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, den H.C.; Zuccarello, G.C.; Kuyper, T.W.; Noordeloos, M.E.

    2004-01-01

    Species of the ectomycorrhizal genus Leccinum are generally considered to be host specialists. We determined the phylogenetic relationships between species of Leccinum from Europe and North America based on second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase

  15. Physical map location of the multicopy genes coding for ammonia monooxygenase and hydroxylamine oxidoreductase in the ammonia-oxidizing bacterium Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, R; Yamagata, A; Kato, J; Kuroda, A; Ikeda, T; Takiguchi, N; Ohtake, H

    2000-02-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis of PmeI digests of the Nitrosomonas sp. strain ENI-11 chromosome produced four bands ranging from 1,200 to 480 kb in size. Southern hybridizations suggested that a 487-kb PmeI fragment contained two copies of the amoCAB genes, coding for ammonia monooxygenase (designated amoCAB(1) and amoCAB(2)), and three copies of the hao gene, coding for hydroxylamine oxidoreductase (hao(1), hao(2), and hao(3)). In this DNA fragment, amoCAB(1) and amoCAB(2) were about 390 kb apart, while hao(1), hao(2), and hao(3) were separated by at least about 100 kb from each other. Interestingly, hao(1) and hao(2) were located relatively close to amoCAB(1) and amoCAB(2), respectively. DNA sequence analysis revealed that hao(1) and hao(2) shared 160 identical nucleotides immediately upstream of each translation initiation codon. However, hao(3) showed only 30% nucleotide identity in the 160-bp corresponding region.

  16. Structural Data on the Periplasmic Aldehyde Oxidoreductase PaoABC from Escherichia coli: SAXS and Preliminary X-ray Crystallography Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Rita Otrelo-Cardoso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The periplasmic aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC from Escherichia coli is a molybdenum enzyme involved in detoxification of aldehydes in the cell. It is an example of an αβγ heterotrimeric enzyme of the xanthine oxidase family of enzymes which does not dimerize via its molybdenum cofactor binding domain. In order to structurally characterize PaoABC, X-ray crystallography and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS have been carried out. The protein crystallizes in the presence of 20% (w/v polyethylene glycol 3350 using the hanging-drop vapour diffusion method. Although crystals were initially twinned, several experiments were done to overcome twinning and lowering the crystallization temperature (293 K to 277 K was the solution to the problem. The non-twinned crystals used to solve the structure diffract X-rays to beyond 1.80 Å and belong to the C2 space group, with cell parameters a = 109.42 Å, b = 78.08 Å, c = 151.77 Å, β = 99.77°, and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. A molecular replacement solution was found for each subunit separately, using several proteins as search models. SAXS data of PaoABC were also collected showing that, in solution, the protein is also an αβγ heterotrimer.

  17. The MoxR ATPase RavA and its cofactor ViaA interact with the NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase I in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith S Wong

    Full Text Available MoxR ATPases are widespread throughout bacteria and archaea. The experimental evidence to date suggests that these proteins have chaperone-like roles in facilitating the maturation of dedicated protein complexes that are functionally diverse. In Escherichia coli, the MoxR ATPase RavA and its putative cofactor ViaA are found to exist in early stationary-phase cells at 37 °C at low levels of about 350 and 90 molecules per cell, respectively. Both proteins are predominantly localized to the cytoplasm, but ViaA was also unexpectedly found to localize to the cell membrane. Whole genome microarrays and synthetic lethality studies both indicated that RavA-ViaA are genetically linked to Fe-S cluster assembly and specific respiratory pathways. Systematic analysis of mutant strains of ravA and viaA indicated that RavA-ViaA sensitizes cells to sublethal concentrations of aminoglycosides. Furthermore, this effect was dependent on RavA's ATPase activity, and on the presence of specific subunits of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase I (Nuo Complex, or Complex I. Importantly, both RavA and ViaA were found to physically interact with specific Nuo subunits. We propose that RavA-ViaA facilitate the maturation of the Nuo complex.

  18. Mutation of the Streptococcus gordonii Thiol-Disulfide Oxidoreductase SdbA Leads to Enhanced Biofilm Formation Mediated by the CiaRH Two-Component Signaling System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Davey

    Full Text Available Streptococcus gordonii is a commensal inhabitant of human oral biofilms. Previously, we identified an enzyme called SdbA that played an important role in biofilm formation by S. gordonii. SdbA is thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase that catalyzes disulfide bonds in secreted proteins. Surprisingly, inactivation of SdbA results in enhanced biofilm formation. In this study we investigated the basis for biofilm formation by the ΔsdbA mutant. The results revealed that biofilm formation was mediated by the interaction between the CiaRH and ComDE two-component signalling systems. Although it did not affect biofilm formation by the S. gordonii parent strain, CiaRH was upregulated in the ΔsdbA mutant and it was essential for the enhanced biofilm phenotype. The biofilm phenotype was reversed by inactivation of CiaRH or by the addition of competence stimulating peptide, the production of which is blocked by CiaRH activity. Competition assays showed that the enhanced biofilm phenotype also corresponded to increased oral colonization in mice. Thus, the interaction between SdbA, CiaRH and ComDE affects biofilm formation both in vitro and in vivo.

  19. In vivo relevance of two critical levels for NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)-mediated cellular protection against electrophile toxicity found in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Laura H J; Pot, Gerda K; Aarts, Jac M M J G; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Alink, Gerrit M

    2006-08-01

    NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)-mediated detoxification of quinones is suggested to be involved in cancer prevention. In the present study, using transfected CHO cells, it was demonstrated that the relation between NQO1 activity and the resulting protection against the cytotoxicity of menadione shows a steep dose-response curve revealing a 'lower protection threshold' of 0.5mumol DCPIP/min/mg protein and an 'upper protection threshold' at 1mumol DCPIP/min/mg protein. In an additional in vivo experiment it was investigated how both in vitro critical activity levels of NQO1, relate to NQO1 activities in mice and man, either without or upon induction of the enzyme by butylated hydroxyanisol (BHA) or indole-3-carbinol (I(3)C). Data from an experiment with CD1 mice revealed that base-line NQO1 levels in liver, kidney, small intestine, colon and lung are generally below the observed 'lower protection threshold' in vitro, this also holds for most human tissue S-9 samples. To achieve NQO1 levels above this 'lower protection threshold' will require 5-20 fold NQO1 induction. Discussion focuses on the relevance of the in vitro NQO1 activity thresholds for the in vivo situation. We conclude that increased protection against menadione toxicity can probably not be achieved by NQO1 induction but should be achieved by other mechanisms. Whether this conclusion also holds for other electrophiles and the in vivo situation awaits further definition of their NQO1 protection thresholds.

  20. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D; Knox, B; Jackson, D; Hruban, R; Olson, J; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-09-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the least in kidney mitochondria. Enzymatic assays on isolated mitochondria ruled out defects in complexes II, III, and IV of the respiratory chain. Further studies showed that the defect was localized in the inner membrane mitochondrial NADH-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I). When ferricyanide was used as an artificial electron acceptor, complex I activity was normal, indicating that electrons from NADH could reduce the flavin mononucleotide cofactor. However, electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy performed on liver submitochondrial particles showed an almost total loss of the iron-sulfur clusters characteristic of complex I, whereas normal signals were noted for other mitochondrial iron-sulfur clusters. This infant is presented as the first reported case of congenital lactic acidosis caused by a deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of complex I of the mitochondrial electron transport chain.

  1. Biomimicry enhances sequential reactions of tethered glycolytic enzymes, TPI and GAPDHS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinatsu Mukai

    Full Text Available Maintaining activity of enzymes tethered to solid interfaces remains a major challenge in developing hybrid organic-inorganic devices. In nature, mammalian spermatozoa have overcome this design challenge by having glycolytic enzymes with specialized targeting domains that enable them to function while tethered to a cytoskeletal element. As a step toward designing a hybrid organic-inorganic ATP-generating system, we implemented a biomimetic site-specific immobilization strategy to tether two glycolytic enzymes representing different functional enzyme families: triose phosphoisomerase (TPI; an isomerase and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS; an oxidoreductase. We then evaluated the activities of these enzymes in comparison to when they were tethered via classical carboxyl-amine crosslinking. Both enzymes show similar surface binding regardless of immobilization method. Remarkably, specific activities for both enzymes were significantly higher when tethered using the biomimetic, site-specific immobilization approach. Using this biomimetic approach, we tethered both enzymes to a single surface and demonstrated their function in series in both forward and reverse directions. Again, the activities in series were significantly higher in both directions when the enzymes were coupled using this biomimetic approach versus carboxyl-amine binding. Our results suggest that biomimetic, site-specific immobilization can provide important functional advantages over chemically specific, but non-oriented attachment, an important strategic insight given the growing interest in recapitulating entire biological pathways on hybrid organic-inorganic devices.

  2. Biomimicry enhances sequential reactions of tethered glycolytic enzymes, TPI and GAPDHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Chinatsu; Gao, Lizeng; Bergkvist, Magnus; Nelson, Jacquelyn L; Hinchman, Meleana M; Travis, Alexander J

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining activity of enzymes tethered to solid interfaces remains a major challenge in developing hybrid organic-inorganic devices. In nature, mammalian spermatozoa have overcome this design challenge by having glycolytic enzymes with specialized targeting domains that enable them to function while tethered to a cytoskeletal element. As a step toward designing a hybrid organic-inorganic ATP-generating system, we implemented a biomimetic site-specific immobilization strategy to tether two glycolytic enzymes representing different functional enzyme families: triose phosphoisomerase (TPI; an isomerase) and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDHS; an oxidoreductase). We then evaluated the activities of these enzymes in comparison to when they were tethered via classical carboxyl-amine crosslinking. Both enzymes show similar surface binding regardless of immobilization method. Remarkably, specific activities for both enzymes were significantly higher when tethered using the biomimetic, site-specific immobilization approach. Using this biomimetic approach, we tethered both enzymes to a single surface and demonstrated their function in series in both forward and reverse directions. Again, the activities in series were significantly higher in both directions when the enzymes were coupled using this biomimetic approach versus carboxyl-amine binding. Our results suggest that biomimetic, site-specific immobilization can provide important functional advantages over chemically specific, but non-oriented attachment, an important strategic insight given the growing interest in recapitulating entire biological pathways on hybrid organic-inorganic devices.

  3. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra; Serafin, Eligiusz; Puchala, Mieczyslaw

    2010-01-01

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as · OH and ONOO - . In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  4. Efficiency of superoxide anions in the inactivation of selected dehydrogenases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodacka, Aleksandra, E-mail: olakow@biol.uni.lodz.p [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Serafin, Eligiusz, E-mail: serafin@biol.uni.lodz.p [Laboratory of Computer and Analytical Techniques, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland); Puchala, Mieczyslaw, E-mail: puchala@biol.uni.lodz.p [Department of Molecular Biophysics, University of Lodz, Banacha 12/16, 90-237 Lodz (Poland)

    2010-09-15

    The most ubiquitous of the primary reactive oxygen species, formed in all aerobes, is the superoxide free radical. It is believed that the superoxide anion radical shows low reactivity and in oxidative stress it is regarded mainly as an initiator of more reactive species such as {sup {center_dot}}OH and ONOO{sup -}. In this paper, the effectiveness of inactivation of selected enzymes by radiation-generated superoxide radicals in comparison with the effectiveness of the other products of water radiolysis is examined. We investigate three enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). We show that the direct contribution of the superoxide anion radical to GAPDH and ADH inactivation is significant. The effectiveness of the superoxide anion in the inactivation of GAPDH and ADG was only 2.4 and 2.8 times smaller, respectively, in comparison with hydroxyl radical. LDH was practically not inactivated by the superoxide anion. Despite the fact that the studied dehydrogenases belong to the same class of enzymes (oxidoreductases), all have a similar molecular weight and are tetramers, their susceptibility to free-radical damage varies. The differences in the radiosensitivity of the enzymes are not determined by the basic structural parameters analyzed. A significant role in inactivation susceptibility is played by the type of amino acid residues and their localization within enzyme molecules.

  5. Genetic engineering of Lactobacillus diolivorans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflügl, Stefan; Marx, Hans; Mattanovich, Diethard; Sauer, Michael

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we developed a toolbox for genetic manipulation of Lactobacillus diolivorans, a promising production organism for 1,3-propanediol from glycerol. Two major findings play a key role for successful transformation of this organism: (1) the absence of a native plasmid, because a native plasmid is a major obstacle for transformation of L. diolivorans, and (2) the absence of DNA methylation. A suitable expression plasmid, pSHM, for homologous and heterologous protein expression in L. diolivorans was constructed. This plasmid is based on the replication origin repA of L. diolivorans. The native glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter is used for constitutive expression of the genes of interest. Functional expression of genes in L. diolivorans was shown with two examples: production of green fluorescent protein resulted in a 40- to 60-fold higher fluorescence of the obtained clones compared with the wild-type strain. Finally, the homologous overexpression of a putatively NADPH-dependent 1,3-propanediol oxidoreductase improved 1,3-propanediol production by 20% in batch cultures. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of Cytokine Synthesis in Human Whole Blood by Enzyme Linked Immunoassay (ELISA), Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR), and Flow Cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-05-08

    deoxynucleotide triphosphates, from Sigma. Sequences for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase ( G3PDH ), IL-8,and TNF-a were amplified with primer...This was accomplished by normalizing all samples to the mRNA for the moderately expressed housekeeping function glyceraldehyde-3 -phosphate...without and with isolation of cells before reverse transcription and PCR. G3PDH mRNA target amplifies at 983 base pairs. The 630 base pair band is the

  7. Electron spin relaxation enhancement measurements of interspin distances in human, porcine, and Rhodobacter electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fielding, Alistair J; Usselman, Robert J; Watmough, Nicholas; Simkovic, Martin; Frerman, Frank E; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2008-02-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is a membrane-bound electron transfer protein that links primary flavoprotein dehydrogenases with the main respiratory chain. Human, porcine, and Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO each contain a single [4Fe-4S](2+,1+) cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated enzyme and become paramagnetic on reduction with the enzymatic electron donor or with dithionite. The anionic flavin semiquinone can be reduced further to diamagnetic hydroquinone. The redox potentials for the three redox couples are so similar that it is not possible to poise the proteins in a state where both the [4Fe-4S](+) cluster and the flavoquinone are fully in the paramagnetic form. Inversion recovery was used to measure the electron spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S](+) between 8 and 18K and for semiquinone between 25 and 65K. At higher temperatures the spin-lattice relaxation rates for the [4Fe-4S](+) were calculated from the temperature-dependent contributions to the continuous wave linewidths. Although mixtures of the redox states are present, it was possible to analyze the enhancement of the electron spin relaxation of the FAD semiquinone signal due to dipolar interaction with the more rapidly relaxing [4Fe-4S](+) and obtain point-dipole interspin distances of 18.6+/-1A for the three proteins. The point-dipole distances are within experimental uncertainty of the value calculated based on the crystal structure of porcine ETF-QO when spin delocalization is taken into account. The results demonstrate that electron spin relaxation enhancement can be used to measure distances in redox poised proteins even when several redox states are present.

  8. Apoptosis-inducing Factor (AIF) and Its Family Member Protein, AMID, Are Rotenone-sensitive NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductases (NDH-2)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elguindy, Mahmoud M.; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death) are flavoproteins. Although AIF was originally discovered as a caspase-independent cell death effector, bioenergetic roles of AIF, particularly relating to complex I functions, have since emerged. However, the role of AIF in mitochondrial respiration and redox metabolism has remained unknown. Here, we investigated the redox properties of human AIF and AMID by comparing them with yeast Ndi1, a type 2 NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-2) regarded as alternative complex I. Isolated AIF and AMID containing naturally incorporated FAD displayed no NADH oxidase activities. However, after reconstituting isolated AIF or AMID into bacterial or mitochondrial membranes, N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID displayed substantial NADH:O2 activities and supported NADH-linked proton pumping activities in the host membranes almost as efficiently as Ndi1. NADH:ubiquinone-1 activities in the reconstituted membranes were highly sensitive to 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (IC50 = ∼1 μm), a quinone-binding inhibitor. Overexpressing N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID enhanced the growth of a double knock-out Escherichia coli strain lacking complex I and NDH-2. In contrast, C-terminally tagged AIF and NADH-binding site mutants of N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID failed to show both NADH:O2 activity and the growth-enhancing effect. The disease mutant AIFΔR201 showed decreased NADH:O2 activity and growth-enhancing effect. Furthermore, we surprisingly found that the redox activities of N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID were sensitive to rotenone, a well known complex I inhibitor. We propose that AIF and AMID are previously unidentified mammalian NDH-2 enzymes, whose bioenergetic function could be supplemental NADH oxidation in cells. PMID:26063804

  9. Apoptosis-inducing Factor (AIF) and Its Family Member Protein, AMID, Are Rotenone-sensitive NADH:Ubiquinone Oxidoreductases (NDH-2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elguindy, Mahmoud M; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko

    2015-08-21

    Apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and AMID (AIF-homologous mitochondrion-associated inducer of death) are flavoproteins. Although AIF was originally discovered as a caspase-independent cell death effector, bioenergetic roles of AIF, particularly relating to complex I functions, have since emerged. However, the role of AIF in mitochondrial respiration and redox metabolism has remained unknown. Here, we investigated the redox properties of human AIF and AMID by comparing them with yeast Ndi1, a type 2 NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (NDH-2) regarded as alternative complex I. Isolated AIF and AMID containing naturally incorporated FAD displayed no NADH oxidase activities. However, after reconstituting isolated AIF or AMID into bacterial or mitochondrial membranes, N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID displayed substantial NADH:O₂ activities and supported NADH-linked proton pumping activities in the host membranes almost as efficiently as Ndi1. NADH:ubiquinone-1 activities in the reconstituted membranes were highly sensitive to 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (IC₅₀ = ∼1 μm), a quinone-binding inhibitor. Overexpressing N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID enhanced the growth of a double knock-out Escherichia coli strain lacking complex I and NDH-2. In contrast, C-terminally tagged AIF and NADH-binding site mutants of N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID failed to show both NADH:O₂ activity and the growth-enhancing effect. The disease mutant AIFΔR201 showed decreased NADH:O₂ activity and growth-enhancing effect. Furthermore, we surprisingly found that the redox activities of N-terminally tagged AIF and AMID were sensitive to rotenone, a well known complex I inhibitor. We propose that AIF and AMID are previously unidentified mammalian NDH-2 enzymes, whose bioenergetic function could be supplemental NADH oxidation in cells. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Silencing of NADPH-Dependent Oxidoreductase Genes (yqhD and dkgA) in Furfural-Resistant Ethanologenic Escherichia coli▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, E. N.; Jarboe, L. R.; Yomano, L. P.; York, S. W.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Ingram, L. O.

    2009-01-01

    Low concentrations of furfural are formed as a side product during the dilute acid hydrolysis of hemicellulose. Growth is inhibited by exposure to furfural but resumes after the complete reduction of furfural to the less toxic furfuryl alcohol. Growth-based selection was used to isolate a furfural-resistant mutant of ethanologenic Escherichia coli LY180, designated strain EMFR9. Based on mRNA expression levels in the parent and mutant in response to furfural challenge, genes encoding 12 oxidoreductases were found to vary by more than twofold (eight were higher in EMFR9; four were higher in the parent). All 12 genes were cloned. When expressed from plasmids, none of the eight genes in the first group increased furfural tolerance in the parent (LY180). Expression of three of the silenced genes (yqhD, dkgA, and yqfA) in EMFR9 was found to decrease furfural tolerance compared to that in the parent. Purified enzymes encoded by yqhD and dkgA were shown to have NADPH-dependent furfural reductase activity. Both exhibited low Km values for NADPH (8 μM and 23 μM, respectively), similar to those of biosynthetic reactions. Furfural reductase activity was not associated with yqfA. Deleting yqhD and dkgA in the parent (LY180) increased furfural tolerance, but not to the same extent observed in the mutant EMFR9. Together, these results suggest that the process of reducing furfural by using an enzyme with a low Km for NADPH rather than a direct inhibitory action is the primary cause for growth inhibition by low concentrations of furfural. PMID:19429550

  11. Compounds from the Fruits of the Popular European Medicinal Plant Vitex agnus-castus in Chemoprevention via NADP(H):Quinone Oxidoreductase Type 1 Induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenghong; Qiu, Shengxiang; Yao, Ping; Sun, Handong; Fong, Harry H S; Zhang, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    As part of our continuing efforts in the search for potential biologically active compounds from medicinal plants, we have isolated 18 compounds including two novel nitrogen containing diterpenes from extracts of the fruits of Vitex agnus-castus. These isolates, along with our previously obtained novel compound vitexlactam A (1), were evaluated for potential biological effects, including cancer chemoprevention. Chemically, the nitrogenous isolates were found to be two labdane diterpene alkaloids, each containing an α , β -unsaturated γ -lactam moiety. Structurally, they were elucidated to be 9 α -hydroxy-13(14)-labden-16,15-amide (2) and 6 β -acetoxy-9 α -hydroxy-13(14)-labden-15,16-amide (3), which were named vitexlactams B and C, respectively. The 15 known isolates were identified as vitexilactone (4), rotundifuran (5), 8-epi-manoyl oxide (6), vitetrifolin D (7), spathulenol (8), cis-dihydro-dehydro-diconiferylalcohol-9-O- β -D-glucoside (9), luteolin-7-O-glucoside (10), 5-hydroxy-3,6,7,4'-tetramethoxyflavone (11), casticin (12), artemetin (13), aucubin (14), agnuside (15), β -sitosterol (16), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (17), and p-hydroxybenzoic acid glucose ester (18). All compound structures were determined/identified on the basis of 1D and/or 2D NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. Compounds 6, 8, 9, and 18 were reported from a Vitex spieces for the first time. The cancer chemopreventive potentials of these isolates were evaluated for NADP(H):quinone oxidoreductase type 1 (QR1) induction activity. Compound 7 demonstrated promising QR1 induction effect, while the new compound vitexlactam (3) was only slightly active.

  12. Participation of the endoplasmic reticulum protein chaperone thio-oxidoreductase in gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor expression at the plasma membrane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Lucca-Junior

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Chaperone members of the protein disulfide isomerase family can catalyze the thiol-disulfide exchange reaction with pairs of cysteines. There are 14 protein disulfide isomerase family members, but the ability to catalyze a thiol disulfide exchange reaction has not been demonstrated for all of them. Human endoplasmic reticulum protein chaperone thio-oxidoreductase (ERp18 shows partial oxidative activity as a protein disulfide isomerase. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the participation of ERp18 in gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (GnRHR expression at the plasma membrane. Cos-7 cells were cultured, plated, and transfected with 25 ng (unless indicated wild-type human GnRHR (hGnRHR or mutant GnRHR (Cys14Ala and Cys200Ala and pcDNA3.1 without insert (empty vector or ERp18 cDNA (75 ng/well, pre-loaded for 18 h with 1 µCi myo-[2-3H(N]-inositol in 0.25 mL DMEM and treated for 2 h with buserelin. We observed a decrease in maximal inositol phosphate (IP production in response to buserelin in the cells co-transfected with hGnRHR, and a decrease from 20 to 75 ng of ERp18 compared with cells co-transfected with hGnRHR and empty vector. The decrease in maximal IP was proportional to the amount of ERp18 DNA over the range examined. Mutants (Cys14Ala and Cys200Ala that could not form the Cys14-Cys200 bridge essential for plasma membrane routing of the hGnRHR did not modify maximal IP production when they were co-transfected with ERp18. These results suggest that ERp18 has a reduction role on disulfide bonds in wild-type hGnRHR folding.

  13. Electrical Wiring of the Aldehyde Oxidoreductase PaoABC with a Polymer Containing Osmium Redox Centers: Biosensors for Benzaldehyde and GABA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artavazd Badalyan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors for the detection of benzaldehyde and g-aminobutyric acid (GABA are reported using aldehyde oxidoreductase PaoABC from Escherichia coli immobilized in a polymer containing bound low potential osmium redox complexes. The electrically connected enzyme already electrooxidizes benzaldehyde at potentials below −0.15 V (vs. Ag|AgCl, 1 M KCl. The pH-dependence of benzaldehyde oxidation can be strongly influenced by the ionic strength. The effect is similar with the soluble osmium redox complex and therefore indicates a clear electrostatic effect on the bioelectrocatalytic efficiency of PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer. At lower ionic strength, the pH-optimum is high and can be switched to low pH-values at high ionic strength. This offers biosensing at high and low pH-values. A “reagentless” biosensor has been formed with enzyme wired onto a screen-printed electrode in a flow cell device. The response time to addition of benzaldehyde is 30 s, and the measuring range is between 10–150 µM and the detection limit of 5 µM (signal to noise ratio 3:1 of benzaldehyde. The relative standard deviation in a series (n = 13 for 200 µM benzaldehyde is 1.9%. For the biosensor, a response to succinic semialdehyde was also identified. Based on this response and the ability to work at high pH a biosensor for GABA is proposed by coimmobilizing GABA-aminotransferase (GABA-T and PaoABC in the osmium containing redox polymer.

  14. Cell-specific expression of tryptophan decarboxylase and 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase, key genes involved in camptothecin biosynthesis in Camptotheca acuminata Decne (Nyssaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santamaria Anna

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Camptotheca acuminata is a major natural source of the terpenoid indole alkaloid camptothecin (CPT. At present, little is known about the cellular distribution of the biosynthesis of CPT, which would be useful knowledge for developing new strategies and technologies for improving alkaloid production. Results The pattern of CPT accumulation was compared with the expression pattern of some genes involved in CPT biosynthesis in C. acuminata [i.e., Ca-TDC1 and Ca-TDC2 (encoding for tryptophan decarboxylase and Ca-HGO (encoding for 10-hydroxygeraniol oxidoreductase]. Both CPT accumulation and gene expression were investigated in plants at different degrees of development and in plantlets subjected to drought-stress. In all organs, CPT accumulation was detected in epidermal idioblasts, in some glandular trichomes, and in groups of idioblast cells localized in parenchyma tissues. Drought-stress caused an increase in CPT accumulation and in the number of glandular trichomes containing CPT, whereas no increase in epidermal or parenchymatous idioblasts was observed. In the leaf, Ca-TDC1 expression was detected in some epidermal cells and in groups of mesophyll cells but not in glandular trichomes; in the stem, it was observed in parenchyma cells of the vascular tissue; in the root, no expression was detected. Ca-TDC2 expression was observed exclusively in leaves of plantlets subjected to drought-stress, in the same sites described for Ca-TDC1. In the leaf, Ca-HGO was detected in all chlorenchyma cells; in the stem, it was observed in the same sites described for Ca-TDC1; in the root, no expression was detected. Conclusions The finding that the sites of CPT accumulation are not consistently the same as those in which the studied genes are expressed demonstrates an organ-to-organ and cell-to-cell translocation of CPT or its precursors.

  15. Structural and functional investigation of flavin binding center of the NqrC subunit of sodium-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio harveyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Borshchevskiy

    Full Text Available Na+-translocating NADH:quinone oxidoreductase (NQR is a redox-driven sodium pump operating in the respiratory chain of various bacteria, including pathogenic species. The enzyme has a unique set of redox active prosthetic groups, which includes two covalently bound flavin mononucleotide (FMN residues attached to threonine residues in subunits NqrB and NqrC. The reason of FMN covalent bonding in the subunits has not been established yet. In the current work, binding of free FMN to the apo-form of NqrC from Vibrio harveyi was studied showing very low affinity of NqrC to FMN in the absence of its covalent bonding. To study structural aspects of flavin binding in NqrC, its holo-form was crystallized and its 3D structure was solved at 1.56 Å resolution. It was found that the isoalloxazine moiety of the FMN residue is buried in a hydrophobic cavity and that its pyrimidine ring is squeezed between hydrophobic amino acid residues while its benzene ring is extended from the protein surroundings. This structure of the flavin-binding pocket appears to provide flexibility of the benzene ring, which can help the FMN residue to take the bended conformation and thus to stabilize the one-electron reduced form of the prosthetic group. These properties may also lead to relatively weak noncovalent binding of the flavin. This fact along with periplasmic location of the FMN-binding domains in the vast majority of NqrC-like proteins may explain the necessity of the covalent bonding of this prosthetic group to prevent its loss to the external medium.

  16. Compounds from the Fruits of the Popular European Medicinal Plant Vitex agnus-castus in Chemoprevention via NADP(H:Quinone Oxidoreductase Type 1 Induction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shenghong Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As part of our continuing efforts in the search for potential biologically active compounds from medicinal plants, we have isolated 18 compounds including two novel nitrogen containing diterpenes from extracts of the fruits of Vitex agnus-castus. These isolates, along with our previously obtained novel compound vitexlactam A (1, were evaluated for potential biological effects, including cancer chemoprevention. Chemically, the nitrogenous isolates were found to be two labdane diterpene alkaloids, each containing an α, β-unsaturated γ-lactam moiety. Structurally, they were elucidated to be 9α-hydroxy-13(14-labden-16,15-amide (2 and 6β-acetoxy-9α-hydroxy-13(14-labden-15,16-amide (3, which were named vitexlactams B and C, respectively. The 15 known isolates were identified as vitexilactone (4, rotundifuran (5, 8-epi-manoyl oxide (6, vitetrifolin D (7, spathulenol (8, cis-dihydro-dehydro-diconiferylalcohol-9-O-β-D-glucoside (9, luteolin-7-O-glucoside (10, 5-hydroxy-3,6,7,4′-tetramethoxyflavone (11, casticin (12, artemetin (13, aucubin (14, agnuside (15, β-sitosterol (16, p-hydroxybenzoic acid (17, and p-hydroxybenzoic acid glucose ester (18. All compound structures were determined/identified on the basis of 1D and/or 2D NMR and mass spectrometry techniques. Compounds 6, 8, 9, and 18 were reported from a Vitex spieces for the first time. The cancer chemopreventive potentials of these isolates were evaluated for NADP(H:quinone oxidoreductase type 1 (QR1 induction activity. Compound 7 demonstrated promising QR1 induction effect, while the new compound vitexlactam (3 was only slightly active.

  17. Resolution of NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase from bovine heart mitochondria into two subcomplexes, one of which contains the redox centers of the enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finel, M; Skehel, J M; Albracht, S P; Fearnley, I M; Walker, J E

    1992-11-24

    NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) was purified from bovine heart mitochondria by solubilization with n-dodecyl beta-D-maltoside (lauryl maltoside), ammonium sulfate fractionation, and chromatography on Mono Q in the presence of the detergent. Its subunit composition was very similar to complex I purified by conventional means. Complex I was dissociated in the presence of N,N-dimethyldodecylamine N-oxide and beta-mercaptoethanol, and two subcomplexes, I alpha and I beta, were isolated by chromatography. Subcomplex I alpha catalyzes electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone-1. It is composed of about 22 different and mostly hydrophilic subunits and contains 2.0 nmol of FMN/mg of protein. Among its subunits is the 51-kDa subunit, which binds FMN and NADH and probably contains a [4Fe-4S] cluster also. Three other potential Fe-S proteins, the 75- and 24-kDa subunits and a 23-kDa subunit (N-terminal sequence TYKY), are also present. All of the Fe-S clusters detectable by EPR in complex I, including cluster 2, are found in subcomplex I alpha. The line shapes of the EPR spectra of the Fe-S clusters are slightly broadened relative to spectra measured on complex I purified by conventional means, and the quinone reductase activity is insensitive to rotenone. Similar changes were found in samples of the intact chromatographically purified complex I, or in complex I prepared by the conventional method and then subjected to chromatography in the presence of lauryl maltoside. Subcomplex I beta contains about 15 different subunits. The sequences of many of them contain hydrophobic segments that could be membrane spanning, including at least two mitochondrial gene products, ND4 and ND5. The role of subcomplex I beta in the intact complex remains to be elucidated.

  18. Unique regional distribution of delta 4-3-ketosteroid-5 alpha-oxidoreductase and associated epididymal morphology in the marsupial, Didelphis virginiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelce, W R; Krause, W J; Ganjam, V K

    1987-09-01

    The epididymal epithelial ultrastructure has been described in the adult male North American opossum, Didelphis virginiana. Morphological results have suggested that absorptive activity is prominent in the proximal epididymal region by virtue of numerous microvilli, an endocytotic complex, dense granules, and multivesicular bodies in the apical cytoplasm. In contrast, the middle and distal epididymal regions exhibit ultrastructural features indicative of protein synthesis such as large invaginated euchromatic nuclei, large nucleoli, and increased amounts of granular endoplasmic reticulum. It is in the middle and distal epididymal regions where sperm head rotation and sperm pairing take place. Epididymal delta 4-3-ketosteroid-5 alpha-oxidoreductase (5 alpha-reductase) activity also has been measured. It has been found that the level of enzyme activity differs significantly (p less than 0.01) between the proximal, middle, and distal epididymal regions. Enzyme-specific activity has been found to be highest in the middle region (47.6 +/- 5.4 picomoles 5 alpha-reduced androgens formed/b/mg protein), lower in the distal region (18.3 +/- 0.7 picomoles 5 alpha-reduced androgens formed/b/mg protein), with little activity (2.4 +/- 1.2 picomoles 5 alpha-reduced androgens formed/h/mg protein) found in the proximal epididymal region. This regional distribution of enzyme activity differs markedly from that reported for eutherian mammals. Both the suggested epididymal protein synthetic and secretory activity and the level of epididymal 5 alpha-reductase activity appear to correlate regionally with the morphological changes that occur in the opossum spermatozoa as they transit the epididymis.

  19. Lack of association between NADPH quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 gene C609T polymorphism and lung cancer: a case-control study and a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shujie Guo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The association between NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 gene C609T polymorphism (rs1800566 and lung cancer has been widely evaluated, and a definitive answer so far is lacking. We first conducted a case-control study to assess this association in northeastern Han Chinese, and then performed a meta-analysis to further address this issue. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This case-control study involved 684 patients clinically diagnosed as lung cancer and 602 age-matched cancer-free controls from Harbin city, Heilongjiang province, China. Genotyping was conducted using the PCR-LDR (ligase detection reactions method. Meta-analysis was managed by STATA software. Data and study quality were assessed in duplicate. Our case-control association study indicated no significant difference in the genotype and allele distributions of C609T polymorphism between lung cancer patients and controls, consistent with the results of the further meta-analysis involving 7286 patients and 9167 controls under both allelic (odds ratio (OR = 0.99; 95% confidence interval (CI: 0.92-1.06; P = 0.692 and dominant (OR = 0.98; 95% CI: 0.89-1.08; P = 0.637 models. However, there was moderate evidence of between-study heterogeneity and low probability of publication bias. Further subgroup analyses by ethnicity, source of controls and sample size detected no positive associations in this meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Our study in northeastern Han Chinese, along with the meta-analysis, failed to confirm the association of NQO1 gene C609T polymorphism with lung cancer risk, even across different ethnic populations.

  20. LEDGF/p75 Overexpression Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Necrosis and Upregulates the Oxidoreductase ERP57/PDIA3/GRP58 in Prostate Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika Basu

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer (PCa mortality is driven by highly aggressive tumors characterized by metastasis and resistance to therapy, and this aggressiveness is mediated by numerous factors, including activation of stress survival pathways in the pro-inflammatory tumor microenvironment. LEDGF/p75, also known as the DFS70 autoantigen, is a stress transcription co-activator implicated in cancer, HIV-AIDS, and autoimmunity. This protein is targeted by autoantibodies in certain subsets of patients with PCa and inflammatory conditions, as well as in some apparently healthy individuals. LEDGF/p75 is overexpressed in PCa and other cancers, and promotes resistance to chemotherapy-induced cell death via the transactivation of survival proteins. We report in this study that overexpression of LEDGF/p75 in PCa cells attenuates oxidative stress-induced necrosis but not staurosporine-induced apoptosis. This finding was consistent with the observation that while LEDGF/p75 was robustly cleaved in apoptotic cells into a p65 fragment that lacks stress survival activity, it remained relatively intact in necrotic cells. Overexpression of LEDGF/p75 in PCa cells led to the upregulation of transcript and protein levels of the thiol-oxidoreductase ERp57 (also known as GRP58 and PDIA3, whereas its depletion led to ERp57 transcript downregulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcription reporter assays showed LEDGF/p75 binding to and transactivating the ERp57 promoter, respectively. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed significantly elevated co-expression of these two proteins in clinical prostate tumor tissues. Our results suggest that LEDGF/p75 is not an inhibitor of apoptosis but rather an antagonist of oxidative stress-induced necrosis, and that its overexpression in PCa leads to ERp57 upregulation. These findings are of significance in clarifying the role of the LEDGF/p75 stress survival pathway in PCa.

  1. Role of the NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase NQR and the cytochrome b AIR12 in controlling superoxide generation at the plasma membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biniek, Catherine; Heyno, Eiri; Kruk, Jerzy; Sparla, Francesca; Trost, Paolo; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja

    2017-04-01

    The quinone reductase NQR and the b-type cytochrome AIR12 of the plasma membrane are important for the control of reactive oxygen species in the apoplast. AIR12 and NQR are two proteins attached to the plant plasma membrane which may be important for generating and controlling levels of reactive oxygen species in the apoplast. AIR12 (Auxin Induced in Root culture) is a single gene of Arabidopsis that codes for a mono-heme cytochrome b. The NADPH quinone oxidoreductase NQR is a two-electron-transferring flavoenzyme that contributes to the generation of O 2 •- in isolated plasma membranes. A. thaliana double knockout plants of both NQR and AIR12 generated more O 2 •- and germinated faster than the single mutant affected in AIR12. To test whether NQR and AIR12 are able to interact functionally, recombinant purified proteins were added to plasma membranes isolated from soybean hypocotyls. In vitro NADH-dependent O 2 •- production at the plasma membrane in the presence of NQR was reduced upon addition of AIR12. Electron donation from semi-reduced menadione to AIR12 was shown to take place. Biochemical analysis showed that purified plasma membrane from soybean hypocotyls or roots contained phylloquinone and menaquinone-4 as redox carriers. This is the first report on the occurrence of menaquinone-4 in eukaryotic photosynthetic organisms. We propose that NQR and AIR12 interact via the quinone, allowing an electron transfer from cytosolic NAD(P)H to apoplastic monodehydroascorbate and control thereby the level of reactive oxygen production and the redox state of the apoplast.

  2. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a-knockout and CYP1A-humanized mouse lines and its effect on bioactivation of the carcinogen aristolochic acid I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levova, Katerina; Moserova, Michaela [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic); Nebert, Daniel W. [Department of Environmental Health, University of Cincinnati Medical Center, Cincinnati (United States); Phillips, David H. [Analytical and Environmental Sciences Division, MRC-HPA Centre for Environment and Health, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Frei, Eva [Division of Preventive Oncology, National Center for Tumor Diseases, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schmeiser, Heinz H. [Research Group Genetic Alterations in Carcinogenesis, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Arlt, Volker M. [Analytical and Environmental Sciences Division, MRC-HPA Centre for Environment and Health, King' s College London, London (United Kingdom); Stiborova, Marie, E-mail: stiborov@natur.cuni.cz [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Charles University, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-12-15

    Aristolochic acid causes a specific nephropathy (AAN), Balkan endemic nephropathy, and urothelial malignancies. Using Western blotting suitable to determine protein expression, we investigated in several transgenic mouse lines expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)—the most efficient cytosolic enzyme that reductively activates aristolochic acid I (AAI). The mouse tissues used were from previous studies [Arlt et al., Chem. Res. Toxicol. 24 (2011) 1710; Stiborova et al., Toxicol. Sci. 125 (2012) 345], in which the role of microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in AAI metabolism in vivo had been determined. We found that NQO1 levels in liver, kidney and lung of Cyp1a1(−/−), Cyp1a2(−/−) and Cyp1a1/1a2(−/−) knockout mouse lines, as well as in two CYP1A-humanized mouse lines harboring functional human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1/1a2 orthologs, differed from NQO1 levels in wild-type mice. NQO1 protein and enzymic activity were induced in hepatic and renal cytosolic fractions isolated from AAI-pretreated mice, compared with those in untreated mice. Furthermore, this increase in hepatic NQO1 enzyme activity was associated with bioactivation of AAI and elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels in ex vivo incubations of cytosolic fractions with DNA and AAI. In conclusion, AAI appears to increase its own metabolic activation by inducing NQO1, thereby enhancing its own genotoxic potential. Highlights: ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a knockout and humanized CYP1A mice ► Reductive activation of the nephrotoxic and carcinogenic aristolochic acid I (AAI) ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase is induced in mice treated with AAI. ► Induced hepatic enzyme activity resulted in elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels.

  3. NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a-knockout and CYP1A-humanized mouse lines and its effect on bioactivation of the carcinogen aristolochic acid I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levova, Katerina; Moserova, Michaela; Nebert, Daniel W.; Phillips, David H.; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Arlt, Volker M.; Stiborova, Marie

    2012-01-01

    Aristolochic acid causes a specific nephropathy (AAN), Balkan endemic nephropathy, and urothelial malignancies. Using Western blotting suitable to determine protein expression, we investigated in several transgenic mouse lines expression of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1)—the most efficient cytosolic enzyme that reductively activates aristolochic acid I (AAI). The mouse tissues used were from previous studies [Arlt et al., Chem. Res. Toxicol. 24 (2011) 1710; Stiborova et al., Toxicol. Sci. 125 (2012) 345], in which the role of microsomal cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in AAI metabolism in vivo had been determined. We found that NQO1 levels in liver, kidney and lung of Cyp1a1(−/−), Cyp1a2(−/−) and Cyp1a1/1a2(−/−) knockout mouse lines, as well as in two CYP1A-humanized mouse lines harboring functional human CYP1A1 and CYP1A2 and lacking the mouse Cyp1a1/1a2 orthologs, differed from NQO1 levels in wild-type mice. NQO1 protein and enzymic activity were induced in hepatic and renal cytosolic fractions isolated from AAI-pretreated mice, compared with those in untreated mice. Furthermore, this increase in hepatic NQO1 enzyme activity was associated with bioactivation of AAI and elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels in ex vivo incubations of cytosolic fractions with DNA and AAI. In conclusion, AAI appears to increase its own metabolic activation by inducing NQO1, thereby enhancing its own genotoxic potential. Highlights: ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase expression in Cyp1a knockout and humanized CYP1A mice ► Reductive activation of the nephrotoxic and carcinogenic aristolochic acid I (AAI) ► NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase is induced in mice treated with AAI. ► Induced hepatic enzyme activity resulted in elevated AAI-DNA adduct levels.

  4. The Iron-Sulfur Cluster of Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is the Electron Acceptor for Electron Transfer Flavoprotein†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Michael A.; Usselman, Robert J.; Frerman, Frank E.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) accepts electrons from electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and reduces ubiquinone from the ubiquinone-pool. It contains one [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ and one FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated oxidized enzyme and can be reduced to paramagnetic forms by enzymatic donors or dithionite. In the porcine protein, threonine 367 is hydrogen bonded to N1 and O2 of the flavin ring of the FAD. The analogous site in Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO is asparagine 338. Mutations N338T and N338A were introduced into the R. sphaeroides protein by site-directed mutagenesis to determine the impact of hydrogen bonding at this site on redox potentials and activity. The mutations did not alter the optical spectra, EPR g-values, spin-lattice relaxation rates, or the [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ to FAD point-dipole interspin distances. The mutations had no impact on the reduction potential for the iron-sulfur cluster, which was monitored by changes in the continuous wave EPR signals of the [4Fe-4S]+ at 15 K. For the FAD semiquinone, significantly different potentials were obtained by monitoring the titration at 100 or 293 K. Based on spectra at 293 K the N338T mutation shifted the first and second midpoint potentials for the FAD from +47 mV and −30 mV for wild type to −11 mV and −19 mV, respectively. The N338A mutation decreased the potentials to −37 mV and −49 mV. Lowering the midpoint potentials resulted in a decrease in the quinone reductase activity and negligible impact on disproportionation of ETF1e− catalyzed by ETF-QO. These observations indicate that the FAD is involved in electron transfer to ubiquinone, but not in electron transfer from ETF to ETF-QO. Therefore the iron-sulfur cluster is the immediate acceptor from ETF. PMID:18672901

  5. Effects of aqueous extract of Ruta graveolens and its ingredients on cytochrome P450, uridine diphosphate (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate (NAD(PH-quinone oxidoreductase in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yune-Fang Ueng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Ruta graveolens (the common rue has been used for various therapeutic purposes, including relief of rheumatism and treatment of circulatory disorder. To elucidate the effects of rue on main drug-metabolizing enzymes, effects of an aqueous extract of the aerial part of rue and its ingredients on cytochrome P450 (P450/CYP, uridine diphosphate (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate (NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase were studied in C57BL/6JNarl mice. Oral administration of rue extract to males increased hepatic Cyp1a and Cyp2b activities in a dose-dependent manner. Under a 7-day treatment regimen, rue extract (0.5 g/kg induced hepatic Cyp1a and Cyp2b activities and protein levels in males and females. This treatment increased hepatic UDP-glucuronosyltransferase activity only in males. However, NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase activity remained unchanged. Based on the contents of rutin and furanocoumarins of mouse dose of rue extract, rutin increased hepatic Cyp1a activity and the mixture of furanocoumarins (Fmix increased Cyp2b activities in males. The mixture of rutin and Fmix increased Cyp1a and Cyp2b activities. These results revealed that rutin and Fmix contributed at least in part to the P450 induction by rue.

  6. Both human ferredoxins equally efficiently rescue ferredoxin deficiency in Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Changmai, Piya; Horáková, Eva; Long, Shaojun; Černotíková, Eva; McDonald, Lindsay M.; Bontempi, Esteban J.; Lukeš, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 89, č. 1 (2013), s. 135-151 ISSN 0950-382X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP305/11/2179; GA MŠk LH12104 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : IRON-SULFUR CLUSTERS * CYTOCHROME-C-OXIDASE * BLOOD-STREAM FORM Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.026, year: 2013

  7. Effects of Parsley (Petroselinum crispum) and its Flavonol Constituents, Kaempferol and Quercetin, on Serum Uric Acid Levels, Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress and Liver Xanthine Oxidoreductase Aactivity inOxonate-Induced Hyperuricemic Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidari, Fatemeh; Keshavarz, Seid Ali; Mohammad Shahi, Majid; Mahboob, Soltan-Ali; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2011-01-01

    Increased serum uric acid is known to be a major risk related to the development of several oxidative stress diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of parsley, quercetin and kaempferol on serum uric acid levels, liver xanthine oxidoreductase activity and two non-invasive biomarkers of oxidative stress (total antioxidant capacity and malondialdehyde concentration) in normal and oxonate-induced hyperuricemic rats. A total of 60 male Wistar rats were randomly divided into ten equal groups; including 5 normal groups (vehicle, parsley, quercetin, kaempferol and allopurinol) and 5 hyperuricemic groups (vehicle, parsley, quercetin, kaempferol and allopurinol). Parsley (5 g/Kg), quercetin (5 mg/Kg), kaempferol (5 mg/Kg) and allopurinol (5 mg/Kg) were administrated to the corresponding groups by oral gavage once a day for 2 weeks. The results showed that parsley and its flavonol did not cause any significant reduction in the serum uric acid levels in normal rats, but significantly reduced the serum uric acid levels of hyperuricemic rats in a time-dependent manner. All treatments significantly inhibited liver xanthine oxidoreductase activity. Parsley, kaempferol and quercetin treatment led also to a significant increase in total antioxidant capacity and decrease in malondialdehyde concentration in hyperuricemic rats. Although the hypouricemic effect of allopurinol was much higher than that of parsley and its flavonol constituents, it could not significantly change oxidative stress biomarkers. These features of parsley and its flavonols make them as a possible alternative for allopurinol, or at least in combination therapy to minimize the side effects of allopurinol to treat hyperuricemia and oxidative stress diseases.

  8. The nairovirus nairobi sheep disease virus/ganjam virus induces the translocation of protein disulphide isomerase-like oxidoreductases from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface and the extracellular space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasecka, Lidia; Baron, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) of the genus Nairovirus causes a haemorrhagic gastroenteritis in sheep and goats with mortality up to 90%; the virus is found in East and Central Africa, and in India, where the virus is called Ganjam virus. NSDV is closely related to the human pathogen Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, which also causes a haemorrhagic disease. As with other nairoviruses, replication of NSDV takes place in the cytoplasm and the new virus particles bud into the Golgi apparatus; however, the effect of viral replication on cellular compartments has not been studied extensively. We have found that the overall structure of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment and the Golgi were unaffected by infection with NSDV. However, we observed that NSDV infection led to the loss of protein disulphide isomerase (PDI), an oxidoreductase present in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and which assists during protein folding, from the ER. Further investigation showed that NSDV-infected cells have high levels of PDI at their surface, and PDI is also secreted into the culture medium of infected cells. Another chaperone from the PDI family, ERp57, was found to be similarly affected. Analysis of infected cells and expression of individual viral glycoproteins indicated that the NSDV PreGn glycoprotein is involved in redistribution of these soluble ER oxidoreductases. It has been suggested that extracellular PDI can activate integrins and tissue factor, which are involved respectively in pro-inflammatory responses and disseminated intravascular coagulation, both of which manifest in many viral haemorrhagic fevers. The discovery of enhanced PDI secretion from NSDV-infected cells may be an important finding for understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of haemorrhagic nairoviruses.

  9. The nairovirus nairobi sheep disease virus/ganjam virus induces the translocation of protein disulphide isomerase-like oxidoreductases from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cell surface and the extracellular space.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia Lasecka

    Full Text Available Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV of the genus Nairovirus causes a haemorrhagic gastroenteritis in sheep and goats with mortality up to 90%; the virus is found in East and Central Africa, and in India, where the virus is called Ganjam virus. NSDV is closely related to the human pathogen Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, which also causes a haemorrhagic disease. As with other nairoviruses, replication of NSDV takes place in the cytoplasm and the new virus particles bud into the Golgi apparatus; however, the effect of viral replication on cellular compartments has not been studied extensively. We have found that the overall structure of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER, the ER-Golgi intermediate compartment and the Golgi were unaffected by infection with NSDV. However, we observed that NSDV infection led to the loss of protein disulphide isomerase (PDI, an oxidoreductase present in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER and which assists during protein folding, from the ER. Further investigation showed that NSDV-infected cells have high levels of PDI at their surface, and PDI is also secreted into the culture medium of infected cells. Another chaperone from the PDI family, ERp57, was found to be similarly affected. Analysis of infected cells and expression of individual viral glycoproteins indicated that the NSDV PreGn glycoprotein is involved in redistribution of these soluble ER oxidoreductases. It has been suggested that extracellular PDI can activate integrins and tissue factor, which are involved respectively in pro-inflammatory responses and disseminated intravascular coagulation, both of which manifest in many viral haemorrhagic fevers. The discovery of enhanced PDI secretion from NSDV-infected cells may be an important finding for understanding the mechanisms underlying the pathogenicity of haemorrhagic nairoviruses.

  10. Omeprazole induces NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 via aryl hydrocarbon receptor-independent mechanisms: Role of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Shaojie; Patel, Ananddeep; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Shivanna, Binoy, E-mail: shivanna@bcm.edu

    2015-11-13

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) transcriptionally induces phase I (cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1) and phase II (NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) detoxifying enzymes. The effects of the classical and nonclassical AhR ligands on phase I and II enzymes are well studied in human hepatocytes. Additionally, we observed that the proton pump inhibitor, omeprazole (OM), transcriptionally induces CYP1A1 in the human adenocarcinoma cell line, H441 cells via AhR. Whether OM activates AhR and induces the phase II enzyme, NAD(P)H quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1), in fetal primary human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMEC) is unknown. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that OM will induce NQO1 in HPMEC via the AhR. The concentrations of OM used in our experiments did not result in cytotoxicity. OM activated AhR as evident by increased CYP1A1 mRNA expression. However, contrary to our hypothesis, OM increased NQO1 mRNA and protein via an AhR-independent mechanism as AhR knockdown failed to abrogate OM-mediated increase in NQO1 expression. Interestingly, OM activated Nrf2 as evident by increased phosphoNrf2 (S40) expression in OM-treated compared to vehicle-treated cells. Furthermore, Nrf2 knockdown abrogated OM-mediated increase in NQO1 expression. In conclusion, we provide evidence that OM induces NQO1 via AhR-independent, but Nrf2-dependent mechanisms. - Highlights: • We investigated whether omeprazole induces NQO1 in human fetal lung cells. • Omeprazole induces the phase II enzyme, NQO1, in human fetal lung cells. • AhR deficiency fails to abrogate omeprazole-mediated induction of NQO1. • Omeprazole increases phosphoNrf2 (S40) protein expression in human fetal lung cells. • Nrf2 knockdown abrogates the induction of NQO1 by omeprazole in human lung cells.

  11. Well-known surface and extracellular antigens of pathogenic microorganisms among the immunodominant proteins of the infectious microalgae Prototheca zopfii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irrgang, Alexandra; Murugaiyan, Jayaseelan; Weise, Christoph; Azab, Walid; Roesler, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae of the genus Prototheca (P.) are associated with rare but severe infections (protothecosis) and represent a potential zoonotic risk. Genotype (GT) 2 of P. zopfii has been established as pathogenic agent for humans, dogs, and cattle, whereas GT1 is considered to be non-pathogenic. Since pathogenesis is poorly understood, the aim of this study was to determine immunogenic proteins and potential virulence factors of P. zopfii GT2. Therefore, 2D western blot analyses with sera and isolates of two dogs naturally infected with P. zopfii GT2 have been performed. Cross-reactivity was determined by including the type strains of P. zopfii GT2, P. zopfii GT1, and P. blaschkeae, a close relative of P. zopfii, which is known to cause subclinical forms of bovine mastitis. The sera showed a high strain-, genotype-, and species-cross-reactivity. A total of 198 immunogenic proteins have been analyzed via MALDI-TOF MS. The majority of the 86 identified proteins are intracellularly located (e.g., malate dehydrogenase, oxidoreductase, 3-dehydroquinate synthase) but some antigens and potential virulence factors, known from other pathogens, have been found (e.g., phosphomannomutase, triosephosphate isomerase). One genotype-specific antigen could be identified as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), a well-known antigen of eukaryotic pathogens with immunological importance when located extracellularly. Both sera were reactive to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase of all investigated strains. This house-keeping enzyme is found to be located on the surface of several pathogens as virulence factor. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed its presence on the surface of P. blaschkeae.

  12. Well-known surface and extracellular antigens of pathogenic microorganisms among the immunodominant proteins of the infectious microalgae Prototheca zopfii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra eIrrgang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microalgae of the genus Prototheca (P. are associated with rare but severe infections (protothecosis and represent a potential zoonotic risk. Genotype (GT 2 of P. zopfii has been established as pathogenic agent for humans, dogs and cattle, whereas GT1 is considered to be non-pathogenic. Since pathogenesis is poorly understood, the aim of this study was to determine immunogenic proteins and potential virulence factors of P. zopfii GT2. Therefore, 2D western blot analyses with sera and isolates of two dogs naturally infected with P. zopfii GT2 have been performed. Cross-reactivity was determined by including the type strains of P. zopfii GT2, P. zopfii GT1 and P. blaschkeae, a close relative of P. zopfii, which is known to cause subclinical forms of bovine mastitis. The sera showed a high strain-, genotype-, and species-cross-reactivity. A total of 198 immunogenic proteins have been analysed via MALDI- TOF MS. The majority of the 86 identified proteins are intracellularly located (e.g. malate dehydrogenase, oxidoreductase, 3-dehydroquinate synthase but some antigens and potential virulence factors, known from other pathogens, have been found (e.g. phosphomannomutase, triosephosphate isomerase. One genotype-specific antigen could be identified as heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70, a well-known antigen of eukaryotic pathogens with immunological importance when located extracellularly. Both sera were reactive to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase of all investigated strains. This house-keeping enzyme is found to be located on the surface of several pathogens as virulence factor. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed its presence on the surface of P. blaschkeae.

  13. Catalytic effects by thioltransferase on the transfer of methylmercury and p-mercuribenzoate from macromolecules to low molecular weight thiol compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, S.; Svenson, A.

    1978-01-01

    Thiol agarose and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were blocked with methylmercury or p-mercuribenzoate. The exchange of mercurials between the thiol-containing polymers and glutathione or dithioerythritol was investigated. The activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was inhibited by blocking thiol-groups with the mercury compounds. Inhibition was reversible when a short period of inactivation was used. Inactivation for longer periods resulted in reduced regain of enzyme activity. The activity was in part regained when either of the 2 thiol compounds was added. Thioltransferase, known to catalyze thiol-disulfide exchange reactions, increased the regain of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity to nearly the original value. Here, thioltransferase is proposed to catalyze the transfer of organomercurial from one thiol complex to another. Some consequences of the observations in vivo are discussed.

  14. Indigofera suffruticosa Mill extracts up-regulate the expression of the π class of glutathione S-transferase and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 in rat Clone 9 liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chieh; Liu, Chin-San; Li, Chien-Chun; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Yao, Hsien-Tsung; Liu, Te-Chung; Chen, Haw-Wen; Chen, Pei-Yin; Wu, Yu-Ling; Lii, Chong-Kuei; Liu, Kai-Li

    2013-09-01

    Because induction of phase II detoxification enzyme is important for chemoprevention, we study the effects of Indigofera suffruticosa Mill, a medicinal herb, on the expression of π class of glutathione S-transferase (GSTP) and NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) in rat Clone 9 liver cells. Both water and ethanolic extracts of I. suffruticosa significantly increased the expression and enzyme activities of GSTP and NQO1. I. suffruticosa extracts up-regulated GSTP promoter activity and the binding affinity of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) with the GSTP enhancer I oligonucleotide. Moreover, I. suffruticosa extracts increased nuclear Nrf2 accumulation as well as ARE transcriptional activity. The level of phospho-ERK was augmented by I. suffruticosa extracts, and the ERK inhibitor PD98059 abolished the I. suffruticosa extract-induced ERK activation and GSTP and NQO-1 expression. Moreover, I. suffruticosa extracts, especially the ethanolic extract increased the glutathione level in mouse liver and red blood cells as well as Clone 9 liver cells. The efficacy of I. suffruticosa extracts in induction of phase II detoxification enzymes and glutathione content implies that I. suffruticosa could be considered as a potential chemopreventive agent. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Aspartic acid 397 in subunit B of the Na+-pumping NADH:quinone oxidoreductase from Vibrio cholerae forms part of a sodium-binding site, is involved in cation selectivity, and affects cation-binding site cooperativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shea, Michael E; Juárez, Oscar; Cho, Jonathan; Barquera, Blanca

    2013-10-25

    The Na(+)-pumping NADH:quinone complex is found in Vibrio cholerae and other marine and pathogenic bacteria. NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase oxidizes NADH and reduces ubiquinone, using the free energy released by this reaction to pump sodium ions across the cell membrane. In a previous report, a conserved aspartic acid residue in the NqrB subunit at position 397, located in the cytosolic face of this protein, was proposed to be involved in the capture of sodium. Here, we studied the role of this residue through the characterization of mutant enzymes in which this aspartic acid was substituted by other residues that change charge and size, such as arginine, serine, lysine, glutamic acid, and cysteine. Our results indicate that NqrB-Asp-397 forms part of one of the at least two sodium-binding sites and that both size and charge at this position are critical for the function of the enzyme. Moreover, we demonstrate that this residue is involved in cation selectivity, has a critical role in the communication between sodium-binding sites, by promoting cooperativity, and controls the electron transfer step involved in sodium uptake (2Fe-2S → FMNC).

  16. Impact of mutations on the midpoint potential of the [4Fe-4S]+1,+2 cluster and on catalytic activity in electron transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Robert J; Fielding, Alistair J; Frerman, Frank E; Watmough, Nicholas J; Eaton, Gareth R; Eaton, Sandra S

    2008-01-08

    Electron-transfer flavoprotein-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that accepts electrons from electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and reduces ubiquinone from the Q-pool. ETF-QO contains a single [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated oxidized enzyme and can be reduced to paramagnetic forms by enzymatic donors or dithionite. Mutations were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in the vicinity of the iron-sulfur cluster of Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO. Y501 and T525 are equivalent to Y533 and T558 in the porcine ETF-QO. In the porcine protein, these residues are within hydrogen-bonding distance of the Sgamma of the cysteine ligands to the iron-sulfur cluster. Y501F, T525A, and Y501F/T525A substitutions were made to determine the effects on midpoint potential, activity, and EPR spectral properties of the cluster. The integrity of the mutated proteins was confirmed by optical spectra, EPR g-values, and spin-lattice relaxation rates, and the cluster to flavin point-dipole distance was determined by relaxation enhancement. Potentiometric titrations were monitored by changes in the CW EPR signals of the cluster and semiquinone. Single mutations decreased the midpoint potentials of the iron-sulfur cluster from +37 mV for wild type to -60 mV for Y501F and T525A and to -128 mV for Y501F/T525A. Lowering the midpoint potential resulted in a decrease in steady-state ubiquinone reductase activity and in ETF semiquinone disproportionation. The decrease in activity demonstrates that reduction of the iron-sulfur cluster is required for activity. There was no detectable effect of the mutations on the flavin midpoint potentials.

  17. Impact of Mutations on the Midpoint Potential of the [4Fe-4S]+1,+2 Cluster and on Catalytic Activity in Electron Transfer Flavoprotein-ubiquinone Oxidoreductase (ETF-QO)†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Fielding, Alistair J.; Frerman, Frank E.; Watmough, Nicholas J.; Eaton, Gareth R.; Eaton, Sandra S.

    2011-01-01

    Electron transfer flavoprotein - ubiquinone oxidoreductase (ETF-QO) is an iron-sulfur flavoprotein that accepts electrons from electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF) and reduces ubiquinone from the Q-pool. ETF-QO contains a single [4Fe-4S]2+,1+ cluster and one equivalent of FAD, which are diamagnetic in the isolated oxidized enzyme and can be reduced to paramagnetic forms by enzymatic donors or dithionite. Mutations were introduced by site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in the vicinity of the iron-sulfur cluster of Rhodobacter sphaeroides ETF-QO. Y501 and T525 are equivalent to Y533 and T558 in the porcine ETF-QO. In the porcine protein, these residues are within hydrogen bonding distance of the Sγ of the cysteine ligands to the iron-sulfur cluster. Y501F, T525A, and Y501F/T525A substitutions were made to determine the effects on midpoint potential, activity, and EPR spectral properties of the cluster. The integrity of the mutated proteins was confirmed by optical spectra, EPR g-values, and spin-lattice relaxation rates, and the cluster to flavin point-dipole distance was determined by relaxation enhancement. Potentiometric titrations were monitored by changes in the CW EPR signals of the cluster and semiquinone. Single mutations decreased the mid-point potentials of the iron-sulfur cluster from +37 mV for wild type to −60 mV for Y501F and T525A and to −128 mV for Y501F/T525A. Lowering the midpoint potential resulted in a decrease in steady-state ubiquinone reductase activity and in ETF semiquinone disproportionation. The decrease in activity demonstrates that reduction of the iron-sulfur cluster is required for activity. There was no detectable effect of the mutations on the flavin midpoint potentials. PMID:18069858

  18. The environmental pollutant and carcinogen 3-nitrobenzanthrone induces cytochrome P450 1A1 and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase in rat lung and kidney, thereby enhancing its own genotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiborova, Marie; Dracinska, Helena; Mizerovska, Jana; Frei, Eva; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Hudecek, Jiri; Hodek, Petr; Phillips, David H.; Arlt, Volker M.

    2008-01-01

    3-Nitrobenzanthrone (3-NBA) is a carcinogen occurring in diesel exhaust and air pollution. Using the 32 P-postlabelling method, we found that 3-NBA and its human metabolite, 3-aminobenzanthrone (3-ABA), are activated to species forming DNA adducts by cytosols and/or microsomes isolated from rat lung, the target organ for 3-NBA carcinogenicity, and kidney. Each compound generated identical five DNA adducts. We have demonstrated the importance of pulmonary and renal NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1) to reduce 3-NBA to species that are further activated by N,O-acetyltransferases and sulfotransferases. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A1 is the essential enzyme for oxidative activation of 3-ABA in microsomes of both organs, while cyclooxygenase plays a minor role. 3-NBA was also investigated for its ability to induce NQO1 and CYP1A1 in lungs and kidneys, and for the influence of such induction on DNA adduct formation by 3-NBA and 3-ABA. When cytosols from rats treated i.p. with 40 mg/kg bw of 3-NBA were incubated with 3-NBA, DNA adduct formation was up to 2.1-fold higher than in incubations with cytosols from control animals. This increase corresponded to an increase in protein level and enzymatic activity of NQO1. Incubations of 3-ABA with microsomes of 3-NBA-treated rats led to up to a fivefold increase in DNA adduct formation relative to controls. The stimulation of DNA adduct formation correlated with the potential of 3-NBA to induce protein expression and activity of CYP1A1. These results demonstrate that 3-NBA is capable to induce NQO1 and CYP1A1 in lungs and kidney of rats thereby enhancing its own genotoxic and carcinogenic potential

  19. Absolute quantification of NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 in human tumor cell lines and tissues by liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry using both isotopic and non-isotopic internal standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Zhiyuan; Wu, Mengqiu; Li, Yingchun; Zheng, Xiao; Liu, Huiying; Cheng, Xuefang [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Key Lab of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Xu, Lin [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Jiangsu Cancer Hospital, Nanjing 210009 (China); Wang, Guangji, E-mail: guangjiwang@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Key Lab of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Hao, Haiping, E-mail: hhp_770505@yahoo.com.cn [State Key Laboratory of Natural Medicines, Key Lab of Drug Metabolism and Pharmacokinetics, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ► The peptide fingerprint map of NQO1 has been defined by using TripleTOF. ► Signature peptide of NQO1 can be quickly quantified within 10 min. ► Analysis is performed with non-isotopic analog and compared with isotopic method. ► This method is adequate for NQO1 quantitation from human cancer cells and tissues. -- Abstract: NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1, DT-diaphorase) is a prognostic biomarker and a potential therapeutic target for various tumors. Therefore, it is of significance to develop a robust method for the absolute quantification of NQO1. This study aimed to develop and validate a LC–MS/MS based method and to test the appropriateness of using non-isotopic analog peptide as the internal standard (IS) by comparing with a stable isotope labeled (SIL) peptide. The chromatographic performance and mass spectra between the selected signature peptide of NQO1 and the non-isotopic peptide were observed to be very similar. The use of the two internal standards was validated appropriate for the absolute quantification of NQO1, as evidenced by satisfactory validation results over a concentration range of 1.62–162 fmol μL{sup −1}. This method has been successfully applied to the absolute quantification of NQO1 expression in various tumor cell lines and tissues. NQO1 expression in human tumor tissues is much higher than that in the neighboring normal tissues in both the cases of lung and colon cancer. The quantitative results obtained from the isotopic and non-isotopic methods are quite similar, further supporting that the use of non-isotopic analog peptide as internal standard is appropriate and feasible for the quantification of NQO1. By comparing with a classical isotopic IS, the present study indicates that the use of a non-isotopic peptide analog to the proteotypic peptide as the internal standard can get equal accuracy and preciseness in measuring NQO1. The universal applicability of the non-isotopic IS approach for the

  20. Hypoxia inducible factor-1 is activated by transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) versus WWdomain-containing oxidoreductase (WWOX) in hypoxic microenvironment of bone metastasis from breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendinelli, Paola; Maroni, Paola; Matteucci, Emanuela; Luzzati, Alessandro; Perrucchini, Giuseppe; Desiderio, Maria Alfonsina

    2013-07-01

    The hypoxic microenvironment of bone marrow favours the bone metastasis process. Hypoxia inducible factor (HIF)-1α is hallmark for hypoxia, correlating with poor prognosis and radio/chemotherapy resistance of primary-breast carcinoma. For bone metastasis, the molecular mechanisms involved in HIF-1α expression and HIF-1 (α/β heterodimer)-transcription factor activity are scarcely known. We studied the role played by HIF-1 in the cross-talk between neoplastic and supportive-microenvironmental cells. Also, WWdomain-containing oxidoreductase (Wwox) and transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) were taken into consideration evaluating whether these Hippo-pathway effectors affect bone-metastatic phenotype through HIF-1 activity. Considering bone-metastasis specimens, nuclear HIF-1α-TAZ co-localisation occurred in neoplastic and supportive cells, such as fibroblasts and endotheliocytes. Based on these data, the functional importance was verified using 1833-bone metastatic clone under hypoxia: nuclear HIF-1α and TAZ expression increased and co-immunoprecipitated, activating HIF-1-DNA binding and transactivation. In contrast, Wwox localised at perinuclear level in neoplastic cells of bone metastasis, being almost absent in supportive cells, and Wwox-protein expression diminished in hypoxic-1833 cells. Thus, TAZ regulation of HIF-1 activity might be important for bone-secondary growth, participating in metastasis-stroma cross-talk. Further, TAZ and HIF-1α-protein levels seemed correlated. In fact, blocking cyclooxygenase-2 with NS398 in hypoxic-1833 cells, not only HIF-1α decreased but also molecular-mechanism(s) upstream of the Hippo pathway were triggered: LATS-dependent TAZ phosphorylation seemed responsible for TAZ nucleus/cytoplasm translocation and degradation. In the 1833-xenograft model, NS398 largely prevented the outgrowth of bone-metastatic cells, probably related to remarkable-extracellular matrix assembly. We gained clinical insight into

  1. Cytochrome b5 and epoxide hydrolase contribute to benzo[a]pyrene-DNA adduct formation catalyzed by cytochrome P450 1A1 under low NADPH:P450 oxidoreductase conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiborová, Marie; Moserová, Michaela; Černá, Věra; Indra, Radek; Dračínský, Martin; Šulc, Miroslav; Henderson, Colin J.; Wolf, C. Roland; Schmeiser, Heinz H.; Phillips, David H.; Frei, Eva; Arlt, Volker M.

    2014-01-01

    In previous studies we had administered benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) to genetically engineered mice (HRN) which do not express NADPH:cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) in hepatocytes and observed higher DNA adduct levels in livers of these mice than in wild-type mice. To elucidate the reason for this unexpected finding we have used two different settings for in vitro incubations; hepatic microsomes from control and BaP-pretreated HRN mice and reconstituted systems with cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1), POR, cytochrome b 5 , and epoxide hydrolase (mEH) in different ratios. In microsomes from BaP-pretreated mice, in which Cyp1a1 was induced, higher levels of BaP metabolites were formed, mainly of BaP-7,8-dihydrodiol. At a low POR:CYP1A1 ratio of 0.05:1 in the reconstituted system, the amounts of BaP diones and BaP-9-ol formed were essentially the same as at an equimolar ratio, but formation of BaP-3-ol was ∼1.6-fold higher. Only after addition of mEH were BaP dihydrodiols found. Two BaP-DNA adducts were formed in the presence of mEH, but only one when CYP1A1 and POR were present alone. At a ratio of POR:CYP1A1 of 0.05:1, addition of cytochrome b 5 increased CYP1A1-mediated BaP oxidation to most of its metabolites indicating that cytochrome b 5 participates in the electron transfer from NADPH to CYP1A1 required for enzyme activity of this CYP. BaP-9-ol was formed even by CYP1A1 reconstituted with cytochrome b 5 without POR. Our results suggest that in livers of HRN mice Cyp1a1, cytochrome b 5 and mEH can effectively activate BaP to DNA binding species, even in the presence of very low amounts of POR

  2. The ascent of man(made oxidoreductases).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grayson, Katie J; Anderson, Jl Ross

    2018-05-10

    Though established 40 years ago, the field of de novo protein design has recently come of age, with new designs exhibiting an unprecedented level of sophistication in structure and function. With respect to catalysis, de novo enzymes promise to revolutionise the industrial production of useful chemicals and materials, while providing new biomolecules as plug-and-play components in the metabolic pathways of living cells. To this end, there are now de novo metalloenzymes that are assembled in vivo, including the recently reported C45 maquette, which can catalyse a variety of substrate oxidations with efficiencies rivalling those of closely related natural enzymes. Here we explore the successful design of this de novo enzyme, which was designed to minimise the undesirable complexity of natural proteins using a minimalistic bottom-up approach. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Uterine-Specific Knockout of Tsc-2: A Mouse Model for Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Burlingame, Califor- nia ), anti-phospho-S6 (Ser 235/236), anti-S6 and 1:5000 anti- glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH; Cell Sig- naling...Olson S, Nguyen TA. Hydronephrosis and urine retention in estrogen-implanted athymic nude mice. Vet Pathol. 2009;46(3): 505 –508. 40. Leavitt WW, Takeda

  4. Characterisation of the Mucor circinelloides regulated promoter gpd1P

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, G.G.; Appel, K.F.; Wolff, A.M.

    2004-01-01

    The promoter of the Mucor circinelloides gpd1 gene encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd1P) was recently cloned and used for the production of recombinant proteins, such as the Aspergillus niger glucose oxidase 1 (GOX). This represents the first example of the application...

  5. Bioenergetics of Stromal Cells as a Predictor of Aggressive Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    complex tissue preparations (human prostate and prostatic adenoma) and rat ventral prostate cells it was reported to exhibit high aerobic glycolysis [19...pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase), 2DG (inhibitor of hexokinase), or metformin (inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I) [41] as a therapeutic approach to... cyanide 4-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone; GAPDH, Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase; GlyST, Glycolytic stress test; HPV, human papilloma virus

  6. Bipolaris oryzae, a novel fungal opportunist causing keratitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Hatmi, Abdullah

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of mycotic keratitis caused by Bipolaris oryzae with predisposing trauma from a foreign body. The fungus was identified by sequencing the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, translation elongation factor 1α (TEF1) gene and partial glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase

  7. Identification of proteins ınvolved in excess boron stress response in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aylin Eşiz Dereboylu

    2011-11-07

    Nov 7, 2011 ... in growth medium stimulated expression and synthesis of proteins role in plant defence mechanism. Key words: ... Drought, cold and freezing, heat, salinity, nutrient deficiency, toxic ... conditions through signalling networks by linking ... kDa), rabbit muscle glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase.

  8. Microbial production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A yeast cell havinga reduced level of activity of NAD dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has at least one exogenous gene encoding NADP dependent GAPDH and/or has up-regulation of at least one endogenous gene expressing NADP dependent GAPDH, wherein combined expression of t...

  9. New species and records of Bipolaris and Curvularia from Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marin-Felix, Yasmina; Senwanna, C; Cheewangkoon, Ratchadawan; Crous, P.W.

    2017-01-01

    Several Bipolaris and Curvularia spp. were collected from different disease symptoms of Poaceae in Thailand. Phylogenetic analyses based on DNA sequence data of the internal transcribed spacer region and intervening 5.8S nrRNA gene, and partial fragments of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate

  10. Lecithin:retinol acyltransferase in ARPE-19

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-05

    analyses. (A) Microarray analysis was performed on RNA extracted from ARPE 19. Both LRAT (white), and housekeeping gene G3PDH (shaded) were detected...about one third of the house keeping gene glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase ( G3PDH ) 663G66. Western analyses with tLRAT antibody showed that LRAT

  11. Cell type and transfection reagent-dependent effects on viability, cell content, cell cycle and inflammation of RNAi in human primary mesenchymal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Hsiao Yin; Vonk, Lucienne A.; Licht, Ruud

    2014-01-01

    % amidation), for siRNA delivery into primary mesenchymal cells including nucleus pulposus cells, articular chondrocytes and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was used as an endogenous model gene to evaluate the extent of silencing by 20 nM or 200 nM siRNA at day...

  12. A novel glucose dehydrogenase from the white-rot fungus Pycnoporus cinnabarinus: production in Aspergillus niger and physicochemical characterization of the recombinant enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piumi, François; Levasseur, Anthony; Navarro, David; Zhou, Simeng; Mathieu, Yann; Ropartz, David; Ludwig, Roland; Faulds, Craig B; Record, Eric

    2014-12-01

    Data on glucose dehydrogenases (GDHs) are scarce and availability of these enzymes for application purposes is limited. This paper describes a new GDH from the fungus Pycnoporus cinnabarinus CIRM BRFM 137 that is the first reported GDH from a white-rot fungus belonging to the Basidiomycota. The enzyme was recombinantly produced in Aspergillus niger, a well-known fungal host producing an array of homologous or heterologous enzymes for industrial applications. The full-length gene that encodes GDH from P. cinnabarinus (PcGDH) consists of 2,425 bp and codes for a deduced protein of 620 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 62.5 kDa. The corresponding complementary DNA was cloned and placed under the control of the strong and constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter. The signal peptide of the glucoamylase prepro sequence of A. niger was used to target PcGDH secretion into the culture medium, achieving a yield of 640 mg L(-1), which is tenfold higher than any other reported value. The recombinant PcGDH was purified twofold to homogeneity in a one-step procedure with a 41 % recovery using a Ni Sepharose column. The identity of the recombinant protein was further confirmed by immunodetection using western blot analysis and N-terminal sequencing. The molecular mass of the native PcGDH was 130 kDa, suggesting a homodimeric form. Optimal pH and temperature were found to be similar (5.5 and 60 °C, respectively) to those determined for the previously characterized GDH, i.e., from Glomerella cingulata. However PcGDH exhibits a lower catalytic efficiency of 67 M(-1) s(-1) toward glucose. This substrate is by far the preferred substrate, which constitutes an advantage over other sugar oxidases in the case of blood glucose monitoring. The substrate-binding domain of PcGDH turns out to be conserved as compared to other glucose-methanol-choline (GMCs) oxidoreductases. In addition, the ability of PcGDH to reduce oxidized quinones or radical

  13. EST Table: AV399395 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available AV399395 NV120168 10/09/28 100 %/139 aa ref|NP_001037386.1| glyceraldehyde-3-phosph...ate dehydrogenase [Bombyx mori] gb|ABA43638.2| glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase [Bombyx mori] 10/08/28 81 %/139...id:CAA88697.1 10/09/10 89 %/142 aa AGAP009623-PA Protein|3R:37154051:37155049:1|gene:AGAP009623 10/09/10 79 %/139... aa gnl|Amel|GB14798-PA 10/09/10 84 %/139 aa gi|91088023|ref|XP_974181.1| PREDICTED: similar to glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase [Tribolium castaneum] DN237090 NV12 ...

  14. Benfotiamine blocks three major pathways of hyperglycemic damage and prevents experimental diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammes, Hans-Peter; Du, Xueliang; Edelstein, Diane; Taguchi, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Takeshi; Ju, Qida; Lin, Jihong; Bierhaus, Angelika; Nawroth, Peter; Hannak, Dieter; Neumaier, Michael; Bergfeld, Regine; Giardino, Ida; Brownlee, Michael

    2003-03-01

    Three of the major biochemical pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia induced vascular damage (the hexosamine pathway, the advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation pathway and the diacylglycerol (DAG)-protein kinase C (PKC) pathway) are activated by increased availability of the glycolytic metabolites glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate. We have discovered that the lipid-soluble thiamine derivative benfotiamine can inhibit these three pathways, as well as hyperglycemia-associated NF-kappaB activation, by activating the pentose phosphate pathway enzyme transketolase, which converts glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate into pentose-5-phosphates and other sugars. In retinas of diabetic animals, benfotiamine treatment inhibited these three pathways and NF-kappaB activation by activating transketolase, and also prevented experimental diabetic retinopathy. The ability of benfotiamine to inhibit three major pathways simultaneously might be clinically useful in preventing the development and progression of diabetic complications.

  15. New Pathway for Nonphosphorylated Degradation of Gluconate by Aspergillus niger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elzainy, T. A.; Hassan, M. M.; Allam, A. M.

    1973-01-01

    A new nonphosphorylative pathway for gluconate degradation was found in extracts of a strain of Aspergillus niger. The findings indicate that gluconate is dehydrated into 2-keto-3-deoxy-gluconate (KDG), which then is cleaved into glyceraldehyde and pyruvate. 6-Phosphogluconate was not degraded under the same conditions. In addition, KDG was formed from glyceraldehyde and pyruvate. Very weak activity was obtained when glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate replaced glyceraldehyde in this reaction. PMID:4698214

  16. A Reduction in Age-Enhanced Gluconeogenesis Extends Lifespan

    OpenAIRE

    Hachinohe, Mayumi; Yamane, Midori; Akazawa, Daiki; Ohsawa, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Mayumi; Terashita, Yuzu; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of energy metabolism, such as calorie restriction (CR), is a major determinant of cellular longevity. Although augmented gluconeogenesis is known to occur in aged yeast cells, the role of enhanced gluconeogenesis in aged cells remains undefined. Here, we show that age-enhanced gluconeogenesis is suppressed by the deletion of the tdh2 gene, which encodes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a protein that is involved in both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in yeast c...

  17. Housekeeping Genes as Internal Standards: Use and Limits

    OpenAIRE

    Thellin, Olivier; Zorzi, Willy; Lakaye, Bernard; De Borman, B.; Coumans, Bernard; Hennen, Georges; Grisar, Thierry; Igout, Ahmed; Heinen, Ernst

    1999-01-01

    Quantitative studies are commonly realised in the biomedical research to compare RNA expression in different experimental or clinical conditions. These quantifications are performed through their comparison to the expression of the housekeeping gene transcripts like glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), albumin, actins, tubulins, cyclophilin, hypoxantine phsophoribosyltransferase (HRPT), L32. 28S, and 18S rRNAs are also used as internal standards. In this paper, it is recalled tha...

  18. Protein-based nanotoxicology assessment strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elnegaard, Marlene Pedersen; List, Markus; Christiansen, Helle

    2017-01-01

    to improve selection of primary hits for subsequent analysis. As nanodrug mimics, we analyzed the effect of transiently transfected siRNAs in MCF7 breast cancer cells and normal MCF12A breast cells, resembling a differential screen. As a measure of cytotoxicity, we determined cell viability as well...... as protein expression of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, transferrin receptor, and the proliferation marker Ki67. The evaluation of cell lethality and protein expression unraveled cellular effects overseen by one method alone....

  19. The genetic basis of energy conservation in the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morgan N Price

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sulfate-reducing bacteria play major roles in the global carbon and sulfur cycles, but it remains unclear how reducing sulfate yields energy. To determine the genetic basis of energy conservation, we measured the fitness of thousands of pooled mutants of Desulfovibrio alaskensis G20 during growth in 12 different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. We show that ion pumping by the ferredoxin:NADH oxidoreductase Rnf is required whenever substrate-level phosphorylation is not possible. The uncharacterized complex Hdr/flox-1 (Dde_1207:13 is sometimes important alongside Rnf and may perform an electron bifurcation to generate more reduced ferredoxin from NADH to allow further ion pumping. Similarly, during the oxidation of malate or fumarate, the electron-bifurcating transhydrogenase NfnAB-2 (Dde_1250:1 is important and may generate reduced ferredoxin to allow additional ion pumping by Rnf. During formate oxidation, the periplasmic [NiFeSe] hydrogenase HysAB is required, which suggests that hydrogen forms in the periplasm, diffuses to the cytoplasm, and is used to reduce ferredoxin, thus providing a substrate for Rnf. During hydrogen utilization, the transmembrane electron transport complex Tmc is important and may move electrons from the periplasm into the cytoplasmic sulfite reduction pathway. Finally, mutants of many other putative electron carriers have no clear phenotype, which suggests that they are not important under our growth conditions, although we cannot rule out genetic redundancy.

  20. On the role of GAPDH isoenzymes during pentose fermentation in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linck, Annabell; Vu, Xuan-Khang; Essl, Christine; Hiesl, Charlotte; Boles, Eckhard; Oreb, Mislav

    2014-05-01

    In the metabolic network of the cell, many intermediary products are shared between different pathways. d-Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, a glycolytic intermediate, is a substrate of GAPDH but is also utilized by transaldolase and transketolase in the scrambling reactions of the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway. Recent efforts to engineer baker's yeast strains capable of utilizing pentose sugars present in plant biomass rely on increasing the carbon flux through this pathway. However, the competition between transaldolase and GAPDH for d-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate produced in the first transketolase reaction compromises the carbon balance of the pathway, thereby limiting the product yield. Guided by the hypothesis that reduction in GAPDH activity would increase the availability of d-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate for transaldolase and thereby improve ethanol production during fermentation of pentoses, we performed a comprehensive characterization of the three GAPDH isoenzymes in baker's yeast, Tdh1, Tdh2, and Tdh3 and analyzed the effect of their deletion on xylose utilization by engineered strains. Our data suggest that overexpression of transaldolase is a more promising strategy than reduction in GAPDH activity to increase the flux through the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... testosterone and estrogen, which are essential for normal sexual development and reproduction; corticosteroids, which are involved in the ... as testosterone and estrogen lead to problems with sexual development before birth and at puberty. In a woman ...

  2. Effect of tungstate on acetate and ethanol production by the electrosynthetic bacterium Sporomusa ovata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammam, Fariza; Tremblay, Pier-Luc; Lizak, Dawid Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    successfully converted to their corresponding alcohols 1-propanol and 1-butanol by S. ovata during gas fermentation. Increasing tungstate concentration enhanced conversion efficiency for both propionate and butyrate. Gene expression analysis suggested that tungsten-containing aldehyde ferredoxin...... oxidoreductases (AORs) and a tungsten-containing formate dehydrogenase (FDH) were involved in the improved biosynthesis of acetate, ethanol, 1-propanol, and 1-butanol. AORs and FDH contribute to the fatty acids re-assimilation pathway and the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, respectively. This study presented here shows...

  3. Enzymatic synthesis of 11C-pyruvic acid and 11C-L-lactic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.B.; Spolter, L.; Chang, C.C.; Cook, J.S.; Macdonald, N.S.

    1980-01-01

    L-Lactic acid is formed as the end product of glycolysis under anaerobic conditions in all cells, but this reaction is of special significance in the myocardium. L-Lactic acid is reversibly formed from and is in equilibrium with myocardial pyruvic acid, which is its sole metabolic pathway. 11 C-Pyruvic acid is synthesized from 11 C carbon dioxide using pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase and coenzymes. The 11 C-pyruvic acid is then converted to 11 -L-lactic acid by lactic acid dehydrogenase. The availability of 11 C-pyruvic acid and 11 C-L-lactic acid will permit the in vivo investigation of lactate metabolism. (author)

  4. Structure of the bacterial plant-ferredoxin receptor FusA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grinter, Rhys; Josts, Inokentijs; Mosbahi, Khedidja; Roszak, Aleksander W.; Cogdell, Richard J.; Bonvin, Alexandre M J J; Milner, Joel J.; Kelly, Sharon M.; Byron, Olwyn; Smith, Brian O.; Walker, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Iron is a limiting nutrient in bacterial infection putting it at the centre of an evolutionary arms race between host and pathogen. Gram-negative bacteria utilize TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors to obtain iron during infection. These receptors acquire iron either in concert with soluble

  5. Magnetic resonance studies of isotopically labeled paramagnetic proteins: (2FE-2S) ferredoxins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, H.; Xia, B.; Chae, Y.K.; Westler, W.M.; Markley, J.L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Recent developments in NMR spectroscopy, especially multidimensional, multinuclear NMR techniques, have made NMR the most versatile tool available for studying protein structure and function in solution. Unlike diamagnetic proteins, paramagnetic proteins contain centers with unpaired electrons. These unpaired electrons interact with magnetic nuclei either through chemical bonds by a contact mechanism or through space by a pseudocontact mechanism. Such interactions make the acquisition and analysis of NMR spectra of paramagnetic proteins more challenging than those of diamagnetic proteins. Some NMR signals from paramagnetic proteins are shifted outside the chemical shift region characteristic of diamagnetic proteins; these {open_quotes}hyperfine-shifted{close_quotes} resonances originate from nuclei that interact with unpaired electrons from the paramagnetic center. The large chemical shift dispersion in spectra of paramagnetic proteins makes it difficult to excite the entire spectral window and leads to distortions in the baseline. Interactions with paramagnetic centers shorten T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} relaxation times of nuclei; the consequences are line broadening and lower spectral sensitivity. Scalar (through bond) and dipolar (through space) interactions between pairs of nuclei are what give rise to crosspeak signals in multi-dimensional NMR spectra of small diamagnetic proteins. When such interactions involve a nucleus that is strongly relaxed by interaction with a paramagnetic center, specialized methods may be needed for its detection or it may be completely undetectable by present nD NMR methods.

  6. Identification of weak points prone for mutation in ferredoxin of Trichomonas vaginalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiwanitkit V

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichomonas vaginalis , the causative agent for human trichomoniasis, is a problematic sexually transmitted disease mainly in women. At present, metronidazole-resistant trichomoniasis is an infrequent but challenging problem with no universally successful treatment. Genetic mutation is believed to be an important factor leading to increasing drug resistance. Understanding the mutation status will help to design accurate strategies of therapy against mutant strains of T. vaginalis . The author performed a bioinformatic analysis to determine positions that tend to comply peptide motifs in the amino acid sequence of ferridoxin of T. vaginalis . Based on this study, the weak linkages in the studied protein can be identified and can be useful information for prediction of possible new mutations that can lead to drug resistance. In addition, the results from this study can be good information for further research on the diagnosis for mutants and new effective drug development.

  7. Binding Thermodynamics of Ferredoxin:NADP+ Reductase: Two Different Protein Substrates and One Energetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Júlvez, Marta; Medina, Milagros; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The thermodynamics of the formation of binary and ternary complexes between Anabaena PCC 7119 FNR and its substrates, NADP+ and Fd, or Fld, has been studied by ITC. Despite structural dissimilarities, the main difference between Fd and Fld binding to FNR relates to hydrophobicity, reflected in different binding heat capacity and number of water molecules released from the interface. At pH 8, the formation of the binary complexes is both enthalpically and entropically driven, accompanied by the protonation of at least one ionizable group. His299 FNR has been identified as the main responsible for the proton exchange observed. However, at pH 10, where no protonation occurs and intrinsic binding parameters can be obtained, the formation of the binary complexes is entropically driven, with negligible enthalpic contribution. Absence of the FMN cofactor in Fld does not alter significantly the strength of the interaction, but considerably modifies the enthalpic and entropic contributions, suggesting a different binding mode. Ternary complexes show negative cooperativity (6-fold and 11-fold reduction in binding affinity, respectively), and an increase in the enthalpic contribution (more favorable) and a decrease in the entropic contribution (less favorable), with regard to the binary complexes energetics. PMID:19527656

  8. Iron effect on the fermentative metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 using cheese whey as substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Rosalía Durán-Padilla

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Butanol is considered a superior liquid fuel that can replace gasoline in internal combustion engines. It is produced by acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE fermentation using various species of solventogenic clostridia. Performance of ABE fermentation process is severely limited mostly by high cost of substrate, substrate inhibition and low solvent tolerance; leading to low product concentrations, low productivity, low yield, and difficulty in controlling culture metabolism. In order to decrease the cost per substrate and exploit a waste generated by dairy industry, this study proposes using cheese whey as substrate for ABE fermentation. It was observed that the addition of an iron source was strictly necessary for the cheese whey to be a viable substrate because this metal is needed to produce ferredoxin, a key protein in the fermentative metabolism of Clostridium acetobutylicum serving as a temporary electron acceptor. Lack of iron in the cheese whey impedes ferredoxin synthesis and therefore, restricts pyruvate-ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity leading to the production of lactic acid instead of acetone, butanol and ethanol. Moreover, the addition of FeSO4 notably improved ABE production performance by increasing butanol content (7.13 ± 1.53 g/L by 65% compared to that of FeCl3 (4.32 ± 0.94 g/L under the same fermentation conditions.

  9. Reaction engineering analysis of the autotrophic energy metabolism of Clostridium aceticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Alexander; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2017-12-01

    Acetogenesis with CO2:H2 or CO via the reductive acetyl-CoA pathway does not provide any net ATP formation in homoacetogenic bacteria. Autotrophic energy conservation is coupled to the generation of chemiosmotic H+ or Na+ gradients across the cytoplasm membrane using either a ferredoxin:NAD+ oxidoreductase (Rnf), a ferredoxin:H+ oxidoreductase (Ech) or substrate-level phosphorylation via cytochromes. The first isolated acetogenic bacterium Clostridium aceticum shows both cytochromes and Rnf complex, putting it into an outstanding position. Autotrophic batch processes with continuous gas supply were performed in fully controlled stirred-tank bioreactors to elucidate energy metabolism of C. aceticum. Varying the initial Na+ concentration in the medium showed sodium-dependent growth of C. aceticum with a growth optimum between 60 and 90 mM Na+. The addition of the Na+-selective ionophore ETH2120 or the protonophore CCCP or the H+/cation-antiporter monensin revealed that an H+ gradient is used as primary energy conservation mechanism, which strengthens the exceptional position of C. aceticum as acetogenic bacterium showing an H+-dependent energy conservation mechanism as well as Na+-dependent growth. © FEMS 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The biochemical diversity of life near and above 100°C in marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M W

    1998-12-01

    Hyperthermophilic micro-organisms grow at temperatures above 90 °C with a current upper limit of 113 °C. They are a recent discovery in the microbial world and have been isolated mainly from marine geothermal environments, which include both shallow and deep sea hydrothermal vents. By 16S rRNA analyses they are the most slowly evolving of all extant life forms, and all but two of the nearly 20 known genera are classified as Archaea (formerly Archaebacteria). Almost all hyperthermophiles are strict anaerobes. They include species of methanogens, iron-oxidizers and sulphate reducers, but the majority are obligate heterotrophs that depend upon the reduction of elemental sulphur (S°) to hydrogen sulphide for significant growth. The heterotrophs utilize proteinaceous materials as carbon and energy sources, although a few species are also saccharolytic. A scheme for electron flow during the oxidation of carbohydrates and peptides and the reduction of S° has been proposed. Two S°-reducing enzymes have been purified from the cytoplasm of one hyperthermophile (T(opt) 100 °C) that is able to grow either with and without S°. However, the mechanisms by which S° reduction is coupled to energy conservation in this organism and in obligate S°-reducing hyperthermophiles is not known. In the heterotrophs, sugar fermentation is achieved by a novel glycolytic pathway involving unusual ADP-dependent kinases and ATP synthetases, and novel oxidoreductases that are ferredoxin- rather than NAD(P)-linked. Similarly, peptide fermentation involves several unusual ferredoxin-linked oxidoreductases not found in mesophilic organisms. Several of these oxido-reductases contain tungsten, an element that is rarely used in biological systems. Tungsten is present in exceedingly low concentrations in normal sea water, but hydrothermal systems contain much higher tungsten concentrations, more than sufficient to support hyperthermophilic life. 1998 Society of Applied Microbiology.

  11. Preparation and evaluation of a coumarin library towards the inhibitory activity of the enzyme gGAPDH from Trypanosoma cruzi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvim Junior, Joel; Dias, Ricardo L.A.; Correa, Arlene G. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica]. E-mail: agcorrea@power.ufscar.br; Castilho, Marcelo S.; Oliva, Glaucius [Sao Paulo Univ., Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2005-07-15

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in 15 countries in Latin America. In this work a library of 38 coumarins was prepared in solution phase and evaluated against T. cruzi glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (gGAPDH). The synthetic route was based on the Knoevenagel condensation of different 2-hydroxybenzaldehydes with Meldrum's acid or diethyl malonate, followed by O-alkylation and/or transesterification reactions. Among the prepared coumarins, the best values obtained to inhibit 50% of the enzymatic activity range from 80 to 130 {mu}M. (author)

  12. Preparation and evaluation of a coumarin library towards the inhibitory activity of the enzyme gGAPDH from Trypanosoma cruzi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvim Junior, Joel; Dias, Ricardo L.A.; Correa, Arlene G.; Castilho, Marcelo S.; Oliva, Glaucius

    2005-01-01

    Chagas' disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, is endemic in 15 countries in Latin America. In this work a library of 38 coumarins was prepared in solution phase and evaluated against T. cruzi glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase (gGAPDH). The synthetic route was based on the Knoevenagel condensation of different 2-hydroxybenzaldehydes with Meldrum's acid or diethyl malonate, followed by O-alkylation and/or transesterification reactions. Among the prepared coumarins, the best values obtained to inhibit 50% of the enzymatic activity range from 80 to 130 μM. (author)

  13. Pregnancy Vaccination with Gold Glyco-Nanoparticles Carrying Listeria monocytogenes Peptides Protects against Listeriosis and Brain- and Cutaneous-Associated Morbidities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Calderón-Gonzalez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Listeriosis is a fatal infection for fetuses and newborns with two clinical main morbidities in the neonatal period, meningitis and diffused cutaneous lesions. In this study, we vaccinated pregnant females with two gold glyconanoparticles (GNP loaded with two peptides, listeriolysin peptide 91–99 (LLO91–99 or glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1–22 peptide (GAPDH1–22. Neonates born to vaccinated mothers were free of bacteria and healthy, while non-vaccinated mice presented clear brain affections and cutaneous diminishment of melanocytes. Therefore, these nanoparticle vaccines are effective measures to offer pregnant mothers at high risk of listeriosis interesting therapies that cross the placenta.

  14. Pregnancy Vaccination with Gold Glyco-Nanoparticles Carrying Listeria monocytogenes Peptides Protects against Listeriosis and Brain- and Cutaneous-Associated Morbidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Gonzalez, Ricardo; Terán-Navarro, Héctor; Frande-Cabanes, Elisabet; Ferrández-Fernández, Eva; Freire, Javier; Penadés, Soledad; Marradi, Marco; García, Isabel; Gomez-Román, Javier; Yañez-Díaz, Sonsoles; Álvarez-Domínguez, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Listeriosis is a fatal infection for fetuses and newborns with two clinical main morbidities in the neonatal period, meningitis and diffused cutaneous lesions. In this study, we vaccinated pregnant females with two gold glyconanoparticles (GNP) loaded with two peptides, listeriolysin peptide 91–99 (LLO91–99) or glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase 1–22 peptide (GAPDH1–22). Neonates born to vaccinated mothers were free of bacteria and healthy, while non-vaccinated mice presented clear brain affections and cutaneous diminishment of melanocytes. Therefore, these nanoparticle vaccines are effective measures to offer pregnant mothers at high risk of listeriosis interesting therapies that cross the placenta. PMID:28335280

  15. Experimental determination of control of glycolysis in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Købmann, Brian Jensen; Andersen, Heidi Winterberg; Solem, Christian

    2002-01-01

    ), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), pyruvate kinase (PYK) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) are shown to have no significant control on the glycolytic flux in exponentially growing cells of L. lactis MG1363. Introduction of an uncoupled ATPase activity results in uncoupling of glycolysis from biomass...... production. With MG1363 growing in defined medium supplemented with glucose, the ATP demanding processes do not have a significant control on the glycolytic flux; it appears that glycolysis is running at maximal rate. It is likely that the flux control is distributed over many enzymes in L. lactis...

  16. Cloning, sequencing and variability analysis of the gap gene from Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Tina; Jacobsen, Iben Søgaard; Melkova, Renata

    2000-01-01

    The gap gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The gene was cloned and sequenced from the Mycoplasma hominis type strain PG21(T). The intraspecies variability was investigated by inspection of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns...... after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the gap gene from 15 strains and furthermore by sequencing of part of the gene in eight strains. The M. hominis gap gene was found to vary more than the Escherichia coli counterpart, but the variation at nucleotide level gave rise to only a few...

  17. Targeting Androgen Receptor in Breast Cancer: Enzalutamide as a Novel Breast Cancer Therapeutic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Acad Sci U S A 2011; 108: 11878-83. 5. Kabos P, Finlay-Schultz J, Li C, Kline E, Finlayson C, Wisell J, Manuel CA, Edgerton SM, Harrell JC, Elias A...Dakocytomation, Carpinteria, CA, USA), cleaved caspase 3 (Cell Signaling Technology, Danvers, MA, USA), Ki67 (sc-15402; Santa Cruz , Dallas, TX, USA) and...San Francisco, CA USA), glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (1:20,000 dilution; Sigma, St. Louis, MO USA), Topo 1 (C-21, 1:100 dilution; Santa Cruz

  18. Human triose-phosphate isomerase deficiency: a single amino acid substitution results in a thermolabile enzyme.

    OpenAIRE

    Daar, I O; Artymiuk, P J; Phillips, D C; Maquat, L E

    1986-01-01

    Triose-phosphate isomerase (TPI; D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate ketol-isomerase, EC 5.3.1.1) deficiency is a recessive disorder that results in hemolytic anemia and neuromuscular dysfunction. To determine the molecular basis of this disorder, a TPI allele from two unrelated patients homozygous for TPI deficiency was compared with an allele from a normal individual. Each disease-associated sequence harbors a G X C----C X G transversion in the codon for amino acid-104 and specifies a structurally...

  19. Physiologic Aging of Mature Porcine Erythrocytes: Effects of Various Metabolites, Antimetabolites, and Physical Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    Amino-L-tvrosine to the level of the 4 C control. 1.49 ma’i 45 C 550 126 4 45 1 100 id of a 1:30 dilution of RBC < 24 hours after collection that had...glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate; C4 = ery-throse; C7 = sedoheptulose: 2,3DPG = 2.3- diphosphoglycerate : 3PG = nonlabeled cells treated with base was 5...0.007 vs 0.243 - 0.004; P < 0.005, un- diphosphoglycerate and adenosine triphosphate.’ Both paired, 2-tailed Student’s t test). metabolites are required

  20. Control analysis of the role of triosephosphate isomerase in glucose metabolism in Lactococcus lactis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solem, Christian; Købmann, Brian Jensen; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal

    2008-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase (TPI), which catalyses the conversion of dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) to glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P), was studied for its control on glycolysis and mixed acid production in L. lactis subspecies lactis IL1403 and L. lactis subspecies cremoris MG1363. Strains...... metabolites glucose-6-phosphate, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and DHAP in the IL1403 derivatives were essentially unchanged for TPI activities from 26% to 225%. At a TPI activity of 3%, the level of DHAP increased four times. The finding that an increased level of DHAP coincides with an increase in formate...

  1. Selection of reference genes for gene expression studies in pig tissues using SYBR green qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, Ann-Britt Nygaard; Jørgensen, Claus Bøttcher; Cirera, Susanna

    2007-01-01

    -microglobulin (B2M), glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS), hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase I (HPRT I), ribosomal protein L4 (RPL4), succinate dehydrogenase complex subunit A (SDHA), TATA box binding protein (TPB) and tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5......-monooxygenase activation protein zeta polypeptide (YWHAZ). The stability of these reference genes in different pig tissues was investigated using the geNorm application. The range of expression stability in the genes analysed was (from the most stable to the least stable): ACTB/RPL4, TBP, HPRT, HMBS, YWHAZ...

  2. Drug Targets and Mechanisms of Resistance in the Anaerobic Protozoa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.

    2001-01-01

    The anaerobic protozoa Giardia duodenalis, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Entamoeba histolytica infect up to a billion people each year. G. duodenalis and E. histolytica are primarily pathogens of the intestinal tract, although E. histolytica can form abscesses and invade other organs, where it can be fatal if left untreated. T. vaginalis infection is a sexually transmitted infection causing vaginitis and acute inflammatory disease of the genital mucosa. T. vaginalis has also been reported in the urinary tract, fallopian tubes, and pelvis and can cause pneumonia, bronchitis, and oral lesions. Respiratory infections can be acquired perinatally. T. vaginalis infections have been associated with preterm delivery, low birth weight, and increased mortality as well as predisposing to human immunodeficiency virus infection, AIDS, and cervical cancer. All three organisms lack mitochondria and are susceptible to the nitroimidazole metronidazole because of similar low-redox-potential anaerobic metabolic pathways. Resistance to metronidazole and other drugs has been observed clinically and in the laboratory. Laboratory studies have identified the enzyme that activates metronidazole, pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, to its nitroso form and distinct mechanisms of decreasing drug susceptibility that are induced in each organism. Although the nitroimidazoles have been the drug family of choice for treating the anaerobic protozoa, G. duodenalis is less susceptible to other antiparasitic drugs, such as furazolidone, albendazole, and quinacrine. Resistance has been demonstrated for each agent, and the mechanism of resistance has been investigated. Metronidazole resistance in T. vaginalis is well documented, and the principal mechanisms have been defined. Bypass metabolism, such as alternative oxidoreductases, have been discovered in both organisms. Aerobic versus anaerobic resistance in T. vaginalis is discussed. Mechanisms of metronidazole resistance in E. histolytica have recently

  3. Saccharomyces cerevisiae KNU5377 stress response during high-temperature ethanol fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il-Sup; Kim, Young-Saeng; Kim, Hyun; Jin, Ingnyol; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2013-03-01

    Fuel ethanol production is far more costly to produce than fossil fuels. There are a number of approaches to cost-effective fuel ethanol production from biomass. We characterized stress response of thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae KNU5377 during glucose-based batch fermentation at high temperature (40°C). S. cerevisiae KNU5377 (KNU5377) transcription factors (Hsf1, Msn2/4, and Yap1), metabolic enzymes (hexokinase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and alcohol dehydrogenase), antioxidant enzymes (thioredoxin 3, thioredoxin reductase, and porin), and molecular chaperones and its cofactors (Hsp104, Hsp82, Hsp60, Hsp42, Hsp30, Hsp26, Cpr1, Sti1, and Zpr1) are upregulated during fermentation, in comparison to S. cerevisiae S288C (S288C). Expression of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase increased significantly in KNU5377 cells. In addition, cellular hydroperoxide and protein oxidation, particularly lipid peroxidation of triosephosphate isomerase, was lower in KNU5377 than in S288C. Thus, KNU5377 activates various cell rescue proteins through transcription activators, improving tolerance and increasing alcohol yield by rapidly responding to fermentation stress through redox homeostasis and proteostasis.

  4. Modification of synthesis nucleotides [γ-32P] ATP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wira Y Rahman; Endang Sarmini; Herlina; Triyanto; Hambali; Abdul Mutalib; Santi Nurbaiti

    2013-01-01

    In molecular biology, radionuclides in the form of radiolabeled compounds have been widely used as deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) / ribonucleic acid (RNA) tracer in order to explore a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. One of such compounds is [γ- 32 P]-adenosine triphosphate {[γ- 32 P]-ATP} [γ- 32 P]-ATP which has been widely used in the biotechnology research. In order to support the biotechnology research in Indonesia in this project, [γ- 32 P]- ATP had been synthesized by enzymatic reactions with modifying the method of synthesis using the precursor DL-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, nucleotides Adenosine Diphosphate (ADP) and H 3 32 PO 4 and enzymes glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, 3-phosphoroglyceric phosphokinase and lactate dehydrogenase. The purification of the synthesized [γ- 32 P]-ATP, by using DEAE Sephadex column chromatography. The synthesis and purification process that had been performed were able in producing of [γ- 32 P]-ATP with radioactivity of 1,175 mCi and radiochemical purity of 99,49%.. Having successfully prepared the [γ- 32 P]-ATP and application, in the near future the Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals Centre is expected to be able in providing the above-mentioned radiolabeled nucleotide for biotechnology research in Indonesia. (author)

  5. Light-regulation of enzyme activity in anacystis nidulans (Richt.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, J X; Anderson, L E

    1975-01-01

    The effect of light on the levels of activity of six enzymes which are light-modulated in higher plants was examined in the photosynthetic procaryot Anacystis nidulans. Ribulose-5-phosphate kinase (EC 2.7.1.19) was found to be light-activated in vivo and dithiothreitol-activated in vitro while glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.49) was light-inactivated and dithiothreitol-inactivated. The enzymes fructose-1,6-diphosphate phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11), sedoheptulose-1,7-diphosphate phosphatase, NAD- and NADP-linked glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.12; EC 1.2.1.13) were not affected by light treatment of the intact algae, but sedoheptulose-diphosphate phosphatase and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenases were dithiothreitol-activated in crude extracts. Light apparently controls the activity of the reductive and oxidative pentose phosphate pathway in this photosynthetic procaryot as in higher plants, through a process which probably involves reductive modulation of enzyme activity.

  6. Carbohydrate metabolism of Xylella fastidiosa: Detection of glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathway enzymes and cloning and expression of the enolase gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Facincani Agda Paula

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to assess the functionality of the glycolytic pathways in the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa. To this effect, the enzymes phosphoglucose isomerase, aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase of the glycolytic pathway, and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway were studied, followed by cloning and expression studies of the enolase gene and determination of its activity. These studies showed that X. fastidiosa does not use the glycolytic pathway to metabolize carbohydrates, which explains the increased duplication time of this phytopatogen. Recombinant enolase was expressed as inclusion bodies and solubilized with urea (most efficient extractor, Triton X-100, and TCA. Enolase extracted from X. fastidiosa and from chicken muscle and liver is irreversibly inactivated by urea. The purification of enolase was partial and resulted in a low yield. No enzymatic activity was detected for either recombinant and native enolases, aldolase, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, suggesting that X. fastidiosa uses the Entner-Doudoroff pathway to produce pyruvate. Evidence is presented supporting the idea that the regulation of genes and the presence of isoforms with regulation patterns might make it difficult to understand the metabolism of carbohydrates in X. fastidiosa.

  7. New insights into the reduction systems of plastidial thioredoxins point out the unique properties of thioredoxin z from Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohrer, Anne-Sophie; Massot, Vincent; Innocenti, Gilles; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Vanacker, Hélène

    2012-11-01

    In plants, thioredoxins (TRX) constitute a large protein disulphide oxidoreductase family comprising 10 plastidial members in Arabidopsis thaliana and subdivided in five types. The f- and m-types regulate enzymes involved mainly in carbon metabolism whereas the x, y, and z types have an antioxidant function. The reduction of TRXm and f in chloroplasts is performed in the light by ferredoxin:thioredoxin reductase (FTR) that uses photosynthetically reduced ferredoxin (Fd) as a reductant. The reduction system of Arabidopsis TRXx, y, and z has never been demonstrated. Recently, a gene encoding an atypical plastidial NADPH-dependent TRX reductase (NTRC) was found. In the present study, gene expression analysis revealed that both reductases are expressed in all organs of Arabidopsis and could potentially serve as electron donors to plastidial TRX. This ability was tested in vitro either with purified NTRC in presence of NADPH or with a light-driven reconstituted system comprising thylakoids and purified Fd and FTR. The results demonstrate that FTR reduces the x and y TRX isoforms but not the recently identified TRXz. Moreover, the results show that NTRC cannot be an efficient alternative reducing system, neither for TRXz nor for the other plastidial TRX. The data reveal that TRXf, m, x, and y, known as redox regulators in the chloroplast, have also the ability to reduce TRXz in vitro. Overall, the present study points out the unique properties of TRXz among plastidial TRX.

  8. Potential of bisbenzimidazole-analogs toward metronidazole-resistant Trichomonas vaginalis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korosh, Travis; Bujans, Emmanuel; Morada, Mary; Karaalioglu, Canan; Vanden Eynde, Jean Jacques; Mayence, Annie; Huang, Tien L; Yarlett, Nigel

    2017-10-01

    A bisoxyphenylene-bisbenzimidazole series with increasing aliphatic chain length (CH 2 to C 10 H 20 ) containing a meta- (m) or para (p)-benzimidazole linkage to the phenylene ring was tested for ability to inhibit the growth of metronidazole-susceptible (C1) and metronidazole-refractory (085) Trichomonas vaginalis isolates under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Compound 3m, 2,2'-[α,ω-propanediylbis(oxy-1,3-phenylene)]bis-1H-benzimidazole, displayed a 5.5-fold lower minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) toward T. vaginalis isolate 085 than metronidazole under aerobic growth conditions, (26 μm compared to 145 μm). A dose of 25 mg/kg per day for four days of compound 3m cured a subcutaneous mouse model infection using T. vaginalis isolates 286 (metronidazole susceptible) and 085 (metronidazole refractory). Compound 3m was weakly reduced by pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, but unlike metronidazole was not dependent upon added ferredoxin. It is concluded from structure-activity relationships that there was no obvious trend based on the length of the central aliphatic chain, or the steric position of the bisbenzimidazole enabling prediction of biological activity. The compounds generally fulfill Lipinski's rile of five, indicating their potential as drug leads. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. The effect of iron on metronidazole activity against Trichomonas vaginalis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwakil, Hala Salah; Tawfik, Rania Ayman; Alam-Eldin, Yosra Hussein; Nassar, Doaa Ashraf

    2017-11-01

    Metronidazole is administered in an inactive form then activated to its cytotoxic form within the hydrogenosome of trichomonads. Two hydrogenosomal proteins, pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) and ferredoxin, play a critical role in the reductive activation of metronidazole. The expression of these proteins and other hydrogenosomal proteins are likewise positively regulated by iron. In the present study, the effect of iron on minimal lethal concentration (MLC) of metronidazole on in vitro cultured Trichomonas vaginalis(T. vaginalis) isolates was investigated. Interestingly, Addition of Ferrous ammonium sulphate (FAS) to T. vaginalis culture led to decrease in the MLC of metronidazole. On using aerobic assay, MLC of metronidazole on untreated T. vaginalis of both isolates was 12.5 μg/ml that decreased to 0.38 μg/ml on FAS treated trichomonads. Also anaerobic assay revealed that MLC on untreated parasites was 3.12 μg/ml that decreased to 0.097 μg/ml and 0.19 μg/ml for isolate 1 and isolate 2 respectively after iron addition. It was concluded that, addition of iron to in vitro cultured T. vaginalis decreases metronidazole MLC that was detected by both aerobic and anaerobic assays. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. In vitro and in vivo interplay between NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 and flavonoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee-Hilz, Y.Y.

    2007-01-01

    Flavonoids are naturally occurring, health-promoting, bioactive compounds, omnipresent in the human diet. The protective effect of these phytochemicals is accomplished for an important part by modulating the activity of enzyme systems responsible for deactivation of chemical carcinogens, such as

  11. A General Tool for Engineering the NAD/NADP Cofactor Preference of Oxidoreductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahn, Jackson K B; Werlang, Caroline A; Baumschlager, Armin; Brinkmann-Chen, Sabine; Mayo, Stephen L; Arnold, Frances H

    2017-02-17

    The ability to control enzymatic nicotinamide cofactor utilization is critical for engineering efficient metabolic pathways. However, the complex interactions that determine cofactor-binding preference render this engineering particularly challenging. Physics-based models have been insufficiently accurate and blind directed evolution methods too inefficient to be widely adopted. Building on a comprehensive survey of previous studies and our own prior engineering successes, we present a structure-guided, semirational strategy for reversing enzymatic nicotinamide cofactor specificity. This heuristic-based approach leverages the diversity and sensitivity of catalytically productive cofactor binding geometries to limit the problem to an experimentally tractable scale. We demonstrate the efficacy of this strategy by inverting the cofactor specificity of four structurally diverse NADP-dependent enzymes: glyoxylate reductase, cinnamyl alcohol dehydrogenase, xylose reductase, and iron-containing alcohol dehydrogenase. The analytical components of this approach have been fully automated and are available in the form of an easy-to-use web tool: Cofactor Specificity Reversal-Structural Analysis and Library Design (CSR-SALAD).

  12. Effect of egg composition and oxidoreductase on adaptation of Tibetan chicken to high altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, C L; He, L J; Li, P C; Liu, H Y; Wei, Z H

    2016-07-01

    Tibetan chickens have good adaptation to hypoxic conditions, which can be reflected by higher hatchability than lowland breeds when incubated at high altitude. The objective of this trial was to study changes in egg composition and metabolism with regards the adaptation of Tibetan chickens to high altitude. We measured the dry weight of chicken embryos, egg yolk, and egg albumen, and the activity of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) in breast muscle, heart, and liver from embryos of Tibetan chicken and Dwarf chicken (lowland breed) incubated at high (2,900 m) and low (100 m) altitude. We found that growth of chicken embryos was restricted at high altitude, especially for Dwarf chicken embryos. In Tibetan chicken, the egg weight was lighter, but the dry weight of egg yolk was heavier than that of Dwarf chicken. The LDH activities of the three tissues from the high altitude groups were respectively higher than those of the lowland groups from d 15 to hatching, except for breast muscle of Tibetan chicken embryos on d 15. In addition, under the high altitude environment, the heart tissue from Tibetan chicken had lower LDH activity than that from Dwarf chicken at d 15 and 18. The lactic acid content of blood from Tibetan chicken embryos was lower than that of Dwarf chicken at d 12 and 15 of incubation at high altitude. There was no difference in SDH activity in the three tissues between the high altitude groups and the lowland groups except in three tissues of hatchlings and at d 15 of incubation in breast muscle, nor between the two breeds at high altitude except in the heart of hatchlings. Consequently, the adaptation of Tibetan chicken to high altitude may be associated with higher quantities of yolk in the egg and a low metabolic oxygen demand in tissue, which illuminate the reasons that the Tibetan chicken have higher hatchability with lower oxygen transport ability. © 2016 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  13. Inflammatory Role of Macrophage Xanthine Oxidoreductase in Pulmonary Hypertension: Implications for Novel Therapeutic Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    for analysis of inflammatory disorders that are routinely performed on adult mice. Therefore, germline XOR knockout has been of limited value for...perivascular fibrosis and cardiac hypertrophy , whereas XORfl/fl//LysmCre+ mice are protected (demonstrate attenuated fibrosis in pulmonary...according to our approved EXEMPT COMIRB application. • What opportunities for training and professional development did the project provide

  14. Enantiocomplementary Yarrowia lipolytica Oxidoreductases: Alcohol Dehydrogenase 2 and Short Chain Dehydrogenase/Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Napora-Wijata, Kamila; Strohmeier, Gernot A.; Sonavane, Manoj N.; Avi, Manuela; Robins, Karen; Winkler, Margit

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes of the non-conventional yeast Yarrowia lipolytica seem to be tailor-made for the conversion of lipophilic substrates. Herein, we cloned and overexpressed the Zn-dependent alcohol dehydrogenase ADH2 from Yarrowia lipolytica in Escherichia coli. The purified enzyme was characterized in vitro. The substrate scope for YlADH2 mediated oxidation and reduction was investigated spectrophotometrically and the enzyme showed a broader substrate range than its homolog from Saccharomyces cerevisia...

  15. Vitamin E--a selective inhibitor of the NADPH oxidoreductase enzyme system in human granulocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butterick, C.J.; Baehner, R.L.; Boxer, L.A.; Jersild, R.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The cellular sites of H 2 O 2 formation in phagocytizing granulocytes have been identified with cerium chloride. A precipitate was visible in phagosomes and on plasma membranes from intact normal cells in the presence of either 0.71 mM NADH or NADPH. X-ray microanalysis permitted identification of cerium deposition within the phagosomes even in the absence of reduced pyridine nucleotides. Catalase ablated the formation of the reaction product. Intact granulocytes obtained from subjects receiving 1600 units of vitamin E daily for 2 weeks exhibited reaction product in the presence of NADH but not NADPH. Intact cells from subjects treated with vitamin E demonstrated diminished numbers of phagocytic vesicles containing reaction product. During phagocytosis the granulocytes treated with vitamin E consumed oxygen but exhibited significantly reduced rates of hydrogen-peroxide-dependent glucose-1- 14 C oxidation to 14 CO 2 . Isolated phagocytic vesicles obtained from granulocytes after ingestion of opsonized lipopolysaccharide-paraffin oil droplets contained reaction product when exposed to 0.71 mM NADPH. No reaction product was evident at 0.71 mM NADH but was evident at 2.0 mM NADH. Isolated phagocytic vesicles from the granulocytes of subjects receiving vitamin E exhibited reaction product only in the presence of NADH. These observations suggest that vitamin E interferes with the electron transport chain apparently required for the oxidation of NADPH to form H 2 O 2 in the phagocytizing granulocyte

  16. Oxidoreductases and cellulases in lichens: possible roles in lichen biology and soil organic matter turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Richard P; Zavarzina, Anna G; Liers, Christiane

    2013-06-01

    Lichens are symbiotic associations of a fungus (usually an Ascomycete) with green algae and/or a cyanobacterium. They dominate on 8 % of the world's land surface, mainly in Arctic and Antarctic regions, tundra, high mountain elevations and as components of dryland crusts. In many ecosystems, lichens are the pioneers on the bare rock or soil following disturbance, presumably because of their tolerance to desiccation and high temperature. Lichens have long been recognized as agents of mineral weathering and fine-earth stabilization. Being dominant biomass producers in extreme environments they contribute to primary accumulation of soil organic matter. However, biochemical role of lichens in soil processes is unknown. Our recent research has demonstrated that Peltigeralean lichens contain redox enzymes which in free-living fungi participate in lignocellulose degradation and humification. Thus lichen enzymes may catalyse formation and degradation of soil organic matter, particularly in high-stress communities dominated by lower plants. In the present review we synthesize recently published data on lichen phenol oxidases, peroxidases, and cellulases and discuss their possible roles in lichen physiology and soil organic matter transformations. Copyright © 2013 The British Mycological Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Copper radical oxidases and related extracellular oxidoreductases of wood-decay Agaricomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phil Kersten; Dan Cullen

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular peroxide generation, a key component of oxidative lignocellulose degradation, has been attributed to various enzymes including the copper radical oxidases. Encoded by a family of structurally related sequences, the genes are widely distributed among wood decay fungi including three recently completed polypore genomes. In all cases, core catalytic residues...

  18. Cloning, sequencing and variability analysis of the gap gene from Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mygind, Tina; Jacobsen, Iben Søgaard; Melkova, Renata

    2000-01-01

    The gap gene encodes the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). The gene was cloned and sequenced from the Mycoplasma hominis type strain PG21(T). The intraspecies variability was investigated by inspection of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns...... after polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of the gap gene from 15 strains and furthermore by sequencing of part of the gene in eight strains. The M. hominis gap gene was found to vary more than the Escherichia coli counterpart, but the variation at nucleotide level gave rise to only a few...... amino acid substitutions. To verify that the gene was expressed in M. hominis, a polyclonal antibody was produced and tested against whole cell protein from 15 strains. The enzyme was expressed in all strains investigated as a 36-kDa protein. All strains except type strain PG21(T) showed reaction...

  19. Changes in cod muscle proteins during frozen storage revealed by proteome analysis and multivariate data analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærsgård, Inger Vibeke Holst; Nørrelykke, M.R.; Jessen, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    Multivariate data analysis has been combined with proteomics to enhance the recovery of information from 2-DE of cod muscle proteins during different storage conditions. Proteins were extracted according to 11 different storage conditions and samples were resolved by 2-DE. Data generated by 2-DE...... was subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and discriminant partial least squares regression (DPLSR). Applying PCA to 2-DE data revealed the samples to form groups according to frozen storage time, whereas differences due to different storage temperatures or chilled storage in modified atmosphere...... light chain 1, 2 and 3, triose-phosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, aldolase A and two ?-actin fragments, and a nuclease diphosphate kinase B fragment to change in concentration, during frozen storage. Application of proteomics, multivariate data analysis and MS/MS to analyse...

  20. Survival strategy of the salt-tolerant lactic acid bacterium, Tetragenococcus halophilus, to counteract koji mold, Aspergillus oryzae, in soy sauce brewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Ikuko; Shinohara, Yasutomo; Oguma, Tetsuya; Koyama, Yasuji

    2018-04-08

    In soy sauce brewing, the results of the fermentation of lactic acid greatly affect the quality of soy sauce. The soy sauce moromi produced with Aspergillus oryzae RIB40 allows the growth of Tetragenococcus halophilus NBRC 12172 but not T. halophilus D10. We isolated and identified heptelidic acid (HA), an inhibitor of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), produced by A. oryzae RIB40 as the growth inhibitor of the salt-tolerant lactic acid bacteria. The growth inhibition of T. halophilus D10 by HA was suggested to be associated with the direct inhibition of GAPDH activity under high salt environment. The difference in the susceptibility to HA among various strains of T. halophilus was caused by the mutations in the gene encoding GAPDH.

  1. Shikonin, vitamin K3 and vitamin K5 inhibit multiple glycolytic enzymes in MCF-7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Hu, Xun; Cui, Jingjie

    2018-05-01

    Glycolysis is the most important source of energy for the production of anabolic building blocks in cancer cells. Therefore, glycolytic enzymes are regarded as potential targets for cancer treatment. Previously, naphthaquinones, including shikonin, vitamin K 3 and vitamin K 5 , have been proven to decrease the rate of glycolysis in cancer cells, which is partly due to suppressed pyruvate kinase activity. In the present study, enzymatic assays were performed using MCF-7 cell lysate in order to screen the profile of glycolytic enzymes in cancer cells inhibited by shikonin, vitamin K 3 and vitamin K 5 , in addition to pyruvate kinase. Results revealed that hexokinase, phosphofructokinase-1, fructose bisphosphate aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate kinase produced in the process of glycolysis were inhibited by shikonin, vitamin K 3 and vitamin K 5 . The results indicated that shikonin, vitamin K 3 and vitamin K 5 are chemical inhibitors of glycolytic enzymes in cancer cells and have potential uses in translational medical applications.

  2. NK sensitivity of neuroblastoma cells determined by a highly sensitive coupled luminescent method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogbomo, Henry; Hahn, Anke; Geiler, Janina; Michaelis, Martin; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Cinatl, Jindrich

    2006-01-01

    The measurement of natural killer (NK) cells toxicity against tumor or virus-infected cells especially in cases with small blood samples requires highly sensitive methods. Here, a coupled luminescent method (CLM) based on glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase release from injured target cells was used to evaluate the cytotoxicity of interleukin-2 activated NK cells against neuroblastoma cell lines. In contrast to most other methods, CLM does not require the pretreatment of target cells with labeling substances which could be toxic or radioactive. The effective killing of tumor cells was achieved by low effector/target ratios ranging from 0.5:1 to 4:1. CLM provides highly sensitive, safe, and fast procedure for measurement of NK cell activity with small blood samples such as those obtained from pediatric patients

  3. Complete inhibition of creatine kinase in isolated perfused rat hearts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fossel, E.T.; Hoefeler, H.

    1987-01-01

    Transient exposure of an isolated isovolumic perfused rat heart to low concentrations (0.5 mM) of perfusate-born iodoacetamide resulted in complete inhibition of creatine kinase and partial inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in the heart. At low levels of developed pressure, hearts maintained mechanical function, ATP, and creatine phosphate levels at control values. However, iodoacetamide-inhibited hearts were unable to maintain control values of end diastolic pressure or peak systolic pressure as work load increased. Global ischemia resulted in loss of all ATP without loss of creatine phosphate, indicating lack of active creatine kinase. These results indicate that isovolumic perfused rat hearts are able to maintain normal function and normal levels of high-energy phosphates without active creatine kinase at low levels of developed pressure. 31 P-NMR of the heart was carried out

  4. Cellular targets of the myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) and its role in the inhibition of glycolysis in macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Love, D; Barrett, T.J.; White, M.Y.

    2016-01-01

    the cellular targets of HOSCN in macrophages (J774A.1). We report that multiple thiol-containing proteins involved in metabolism and glycolysis; fructose bisphosphate aldolase, triosephosphate isomerase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and creatine kinase, together with a number of chaperone......, antioxidant and structural proteins, were modified in a reversible manner in macrophages treated with HOSCN. The modification of the metabolic enzymes was associated with a decrease in basal glycolysis, glycolytic reserve, glycolytic capacity and lactate release, which was only partly reversible on further...... incubation in the absence of HOSCN. Inhibition of glycolysis preceded cell death and was seen in cells exposed to low concentrations (r25 mM) of HOSCN. The ability of HOSCN to inhibit glycolysis and perturb energy production is likely to contribute to the cell death seen in macrophages on further incubation...

  5. Terpenoids and Their Biosynthesis in Cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagmi Pattanaik

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Terpenoids, or isoprenoids, are a family of compounds with great structural diversity which are essential for all living organisms. In cyanobacteria, they are synthesized from the methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP pathway, using glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and pyruvate produced by photosynthesis as substrates. The products of the MEP pathway are the isomeric five-carbon compounds isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, which in turn form the basic building blocks for formation of all terpenoids. Many terpenoid compounds have useful properties and are of interest in the fields of pharmaceuticals and nutrition, and even potentially as future biofuels. The MEP pathway, its function and regulation, and the subsequent formation of terpenoids have not been fully elucidated in cyanobacteria, despite its relevance for biotechnological applications. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge about cyanobacterial terpenoid biosynthesis, both regarding the native metabolism and regarding metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria for heterologous production of non-native terpenoids.

  6. Terpenoids and Their Biosynthesis in Cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanaik, Bagmi; Lindberg, Pia

    2015-01-01

    Terpenoids, or isoprenoids, are a family of compounds with great structural diversity which are essential for all living organisms. In cyanobacteria, they are synthesized from the methylerythritol-phosphate (MEP) pathway, using glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and pyruvate produced by photosynthesis as substrates. The products of the MEP pathway are the isomeric five-carbon compounds isopentenyl diphosphate and dimethylallyl diphosphate, which in turn form the basic building blocks for formation of all terpenoids. Many terpenoid compounds have useful properties and are of interest in the fields of pharmaceuticals and nutrition, and even potentially as future biofuels. The MEP pathway, its function and regulation, and the subsequent formation of terpenoids have not been fully elucidated in cyanobacteria, despite its relevance for biotechnological applications. In this review, we summarize the present knowledge about cyanobacterial terpenoid biosynthesis, both regarding the native metabolism and regarding metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria for heterologous production of non-native terpenoids. PMID:25615610

  7. Antidepressant action of ketamine via mTOR is mediated by inhibition of nitrergic Rheb degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harraz, M M; Tyagi, R; Cortés, P; Snyder, S H

    2016-03-01

    As traditional antidepressants act only after weeks/months, the discovery that ketamine, an antagonist of glutamate/N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, elicits antidepressant actions in hours has been transformative. Its mechanism of action has been elusive, though enhanced mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is a major feature. We report a novel signaling pathway wherein NMDA receptor activation stimulates generation of nitric oxide (NO), which S-nitrosylates glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Nitrosylated GAPDH complexes with the ubiquitin-E3-ligase Siah1 and Rheb, a small G protein that activates mTOR. Siah1 degrades Rheb leading to reduced mTOR signaling, while ketamine, conversely, stabilizes Rheb that enhances mTOR signaling. Drugs selectively targeting components of this pathway may offer novel approaches to the treatment of depression.

  8. Thermophilic ethanol fermentation from lignocellulose hydrolysate by genetically engineered Moorella thermoacetica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahayu, Farida; Kawai, Yuto; Iwasaki, Yuki; Yoshida, Koichiro; Kita, Akihisa; Tajima, Takahisa; Kato, Junichi; Murakami, Katsuji; Hoshino, Tamotsu; Nakashimada, Yutaka

    2017-12-01

    A transformant of Moorella thermoacetica was constructed for thermophilic ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass by deleting two phosphotransacetylase genes, pdul1 and pdul2, and introducing the native aldehyde dehydrogenase gene (aldh) controlled by the promoter from glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The transformant showed tolerance to 540mM and fermented sugars including fructose, glucose, galactose and xylose to mainly ethanol. In a mixed-sugar medium of glucose and xylose, all of the sugars were consumed to produce ethanol at the yield of 1.9mol/mol-sugar. The transformant successfully fermented sugars in hydrolysate prepared through the acid hydrolysis of lignocellulose to ethanol, suggesting that this transformant can be used to ferment the sugars in lignocellulosic biomass for ethanol production. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Determination of recombination in Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Iben Søgaard; Boesen, Thomas; Mygind, Tina

    2002-01-01

    disequilibrium and distance between the segregating sites, by the homoplasy ratio (H ratio), and by compatibility matrices. The gap gene showed well-supported evidence for high levels of recombination, whereas recombination was less frequent and not significant within the other genes. The analysis revealed......B-hitL, excinuclease ABC subunit A (uvrA) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gap) genes. The level of variability of these M. hominis genes was low compared with the housekeeping genes from Helicobacter pylori and Neisseria meningitidis, but only few M. hominis isolates had identical sequences in all genes...... intergenic and intragenic recombination in M. hominis and this may explain the high intraspecies variability. The results obtained in the present study may be of importance for future population studies of Mycoplasma species....

  10. PHENOTYPIC AND GENOTYPIC ANALYSIS OF AN ARCANOBACTERIUM PLURANIMALIUM ISOLATED FROM A MUSKOX (OVIBOS MOSCHATUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Gusti Ningrum

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to characterize an Arcanobacterium pluranimalium strain isolated from a muskox (Ovibos moschatus phenotypically, by MALDI-TOF MS analysis and genotypically using various molecular targets. The phenotypic properties, the MALDI-TOF MS analysis and sequencing the 16S rRNA gene, the β subunit of bacterial RNA polymerase encoding gene rpoB, the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase encoding gene gap, the elongation factor tu encoding gene tuf and the pluranimaliumlysin encoding gene pla allowed a successful identification of the isolated strain as A. pluranimalium. Gene pla could also be detected by a previously described loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assay. This is first report on the isolation and characterization of A. pluranimalium originated from a Muskox.

  11. A reduction in age-enhanced gluconeogenesis extends lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachinohe, Mayumi; Yamane, Midori; Akazawa, Daiki; Ohsawa, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Mayumi; Terashita, Yuzu; Masumoto, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of energy metabolism, such as calorie restriction (CR), is a major determinant of cellular longevity. Although augmented gluconeogenesis is known to occur in aged yeast cells, the role of enhanced gluconeogenesis in aged cells remains undefined. Here, we show that age-enhanced gluconeogenesis is suppressed by the deletion of the tdh2 gene, which encodes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), a protein that is involved in both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in yeast cells. The deletion of TDH2 restores the chronological lifespan of cells with deletions of both the HST3 and HST4 genes, which encode yeast sirtuins, and represses the activation of gluconeogenesis. Furthermore, the tdh2 gene deletion can extend the replicative lifespan in a CR pathway-dependent manner. These findings demonstrate that the repression of enhanced gluconeogenesis effectively extends the cellular lifespan.

  12. A reduction in age-enhanced gluconeogenesis extends lifespan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayumi Hachinohe

    Full Text Available The regulation of energy metabolism, such as calorie restriction (CR, is a major determinant of cellular longevity. Although augmented gluconeogenesis is known to occur in aged yeast cells, the role of enhanced gluconeogenesis in aged cells remains undefined. Here, we show that age-enhanced gluconeogenesis is suppressed by the deletion of the tdh2 gene, which encodes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, a protein that is involved in both glycolysis and gluconeogenesis in yeast cells. The deletion of TDH2 restores the chronological lifespan of cells with deletions of both the HST3 and HST4 genes, which encode yeast sirtuins, and represses the activation of gluconeogenesis. Furthermore, the tdh2 gene deletion can extend the replicative lifespan in a CR pathway-dependent manner. These findings demonstrate that the repression of enhanced gluconeogenesis effectively extends the cellular lifespan.

  13. Exploring substrate binding and discrimination in fructose1, 6-bisphosphate and tagatose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zgiby, S M; Thomson, G J; Qamar, S; Berry, A

    2000-03-01

    Fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase catalyses the reversible condensation of glycerone-P and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate into fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. A recent structure of the Escherichia coli Class II fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase [Hall, D.R., Leonard, G.A., Reed, C.D., Watt, C.I., Berry, A. & Hunter, W.N. (1999) J. Mol. Biol. 287, 383-394] in the presence of the transition state analogue phosphoglycolohydroxamate delineated the roles of individual amino acids in binding glycerone-P and in the initial proton abstraction steps of the mechanism. The X-ray structure has now been used, together with sequence alignments, site-directed mutagenesis and steady-state enzyme kinetics to extend these studies to map important residues in the binding of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. From these studies three residues (Asn35, Ser61 and Lys325) have been identified as important in catalysis. We show that mutation of Ser61 to alanine increases the Km value for fructose 1, 6-bisphosphate 16-fold and product inhibition studies indicate that this effect is manifested most strongly in the glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate binding pocket of the active site, demonstrating that Ser61 is involved in binding glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. In contrast a S61T mutant had no effect on catalysis emphasizing the importance of an hydroxyl group for this role. Mutation of Asn35 (N35A) resulted in an enzyme with only 1.5% of the activity of the wild-type enzyme and different partial reactions indicate that this residue effects the binding of both triose substrates. Finally, mutation of Lys325 has a greater effect on catalysis than on binding, however, given the magnitude of the effects it is likely that it plays an indirect role in maintaining other critical residues in a catalytically competent conformation. Interestingly, despite its proximity to the active site and high sequence conservation, replacement of a fourth residue, Gln59 (Q59A) had no significant effect on the function of the enzyme. In a

  14. Separation of Binding Protein of Celangulin V from the Midgut of Mythimna separata Walker by Affinity Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Lu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Celangulin V, an insecticidal compound isolated from the root bark of Chinese bittersweet, can affect the digestive system of insects. However, the mechanism of how Celangulin V induces a series of symptoms is still unknown. In this study, affinity chromatography was conducted through coupling of Celangulin V-6-aminoacetic acid ester to the CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. SDS-PAGE was used to analyze the collected fraction eluted by Celangulin V. Eight binding proteins (Zinc finger protein, Thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx, Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, SUMO E3 ligase RanBP2, Transmembrane protein 1, Actin, APN and V-ATPase were obtained and identified by LC/Q-TOF-MS from the midgut of Mythimna separata larvae. The potential of these proteins to serve as target proteins involved in the insecticidal activity of Celangulin V is discussed.

  15. Effects of prebiotic oligosaccharides consumption on the growth and expression profile of cell surface-associated proteins of a potential probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus FSMM15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtini, Devi; Aryantini, Ni Putu Desy; Sujaya, I Nengah; Urashima, Tadasu; Fukuda, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    To investigate carbohydrate preference of a potential probiotic, Lactobacillus rhamnosus FSMM15, six prebiotics, including two milk-derived prebiotics, galactooligosaccharides and lacto-N-biose I, and four plant-origin prebiotics, beet oligosaccharide syrup, difructose anhydride III, fructooligosaccharides, and raffinose, were examined. The strain utilized the milk-derived prebiotics at similar levels to glucose but did not utilize the plant-origin ones in the same manner, reflecting their genetic background, which allows them to adapt to dairy ecological niches. These prebiotics had little influence on the expression pattern of cell surface-associated proteins in the strain; however, an ATP-binding cassette transporter substrate-binding protein and a glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were suggested to be upregulated in response to carbon starvation stress.

  16. Characterization and Pathogenicity of New Record of Anthracnose on Various Chili Varieties Caused by Colletotrichum scovillei in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oo, May Moe; Lim, GiTaek; Jang, Hyun A; Oh, Sang-Keun

    2017-09-01

    The anthracnose disease caused by Colletotrichum species is well-known as a major plant pathogen that primarily causes fruit rot in pepper and reduces its marketability. Thirty-five isolates representing species of Colletotrichum were obtained from chili fruits showing anthracnose disease symptoms in Chungcheongnam-do and Chungcheongbuk-do, South Korea. These 35 isolates were characterized according to morphological characteristics and nucleotide sequence data of internal transcribed spacer, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase, and β-tubulin. The combined dataset shows that all of these 35 isolates were identified as C. scovillei and morphological characteristics were directly correlated with the nucleotide sequence data. Notably, these isolates were recorded for the first time as the causes of anthracnose caused by C. scovillei on pepper in Korea. Forty cultivars were used to investigate the pathogenicity and to identify the possible source of resistance. The result reveals that all of chili cultivars used in this study are susceptible to C. scovillei .

  17. A radiometric method for the determination of NADH in subpicomole amounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, G.; Rosenthal, W.; Oberdisse, E.

    1988-01-01

    A radiometric method has been devised for the determination of small quantities of NADH formed in preceding dehydrogenase reactions. In a coupled enzymatic reaction, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) catalyzes the transfer of [/sup 32/P]orthophosphate from [gamma-/sup 32/P]ATP to 3-phosphoglycerate; the intermediate, 1,3-[1-/sup 32/P]diphosphoglycerate, is dephosphorylated by glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAP-DH). [/sup 32/P]Orthophosphate is released proportionally to NADH and can be measured after adsorption of [gamma-/sup 32/P]ATP to activated charcoal. With this method, 0.2 pmol of NADH are detectable in the presence of a 10/sup 4/-fold excess of NAD over NADH

  18. Analysis of the stability of housekeeping gene expression in the left cardiac ventricle of rats submitted to chronic intermittent hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Silva Julian

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA has been associated with oxidative stress and various cardiovascular consequences, such as increased cardiovascular disease risk. Quantitative real-time PCR is frequently employed to assess changes in gene expression in experimental models. In this study, we analyzed the effects of chronic intermittent hypoxia (an experimental model of OSA on housekeeping gene expression in the left cardiac ventricle of rats. Analyses via four different approaches-use of the geNorm, BestKeeper, and NormFinder algorithms; and 2−ΔCt (threshold cycle data analysis-produced similar results: all genes were found to be suitable for use, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 18S being classified as the most and the least stable, respectively. The use of more than one housekeeping gene is strongly advised.

  19. Properties of the reverse transcription reaction in mRNA quantification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ståhlberg, Anders; Håkansson, Joakim; Xian, Xiaojie

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In most measurements of gene expression, mRNA is first reverse-transcribed into cDNA. We studied the reverse transcription reaction and its consequences for quantitative measurements of gene expression. METHODS: We used SYBR green I-based quantitative real-time PCR (QPCR) to measure...... the properties of reverse transcription reaction for the beta-tubulin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, Glut2, CaV1D, and insulin II genes, using random hexamers, oligo(dT), and gene-specific reverse transcription primers. RESULTS: Experimental variation in reverse transcription-QPCR (RT......-QPCR) was mainly attributable to the reverse transcription step. Reverse transcription efficiency depended on priming strategy, and the dependence was different for the five genes studied. Reverse transcription yields also depended on total RNA concentration. CONCLUSIONS: RT-QPCR gene expression measurements...

  20. Up-regulation of the G3PDH 'housekeeping' gene by estrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galal, Nadia; El-Beialy, Waleed; Deyama, Yoshiaki; Yoshimura, Yoshitaka; Tei, Kanchu; Suzuki, Kuniaki; Totsuka, Yasunori

    2010-01-01

    Proteomic and genomic studies commonly involve the assessment of mRNA levels using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR. An internal standard RNA is fundamentally analyzed along with the investigated mRNA to document the specificity of the effect(s) on mRNA and to correct for inter-sample variations. In our studies implementing estrogen treatments on different cell lines, we initially used glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) as an internal standard. However, the results of PCR amplification demonstrated that 17β-estradiol enhanced the expression of the G3PDH gene, rendering it impossible to use G3PDH as an unbiased comparative control.

  1. Housekeeping genes as internal standards: use and limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thellin, O; Zorzi, W; Lakaye, B; De Borman, B; Coumans, B; Hennen, G; Grisar, T; Igout, A; Heinen, E

    1999-10-08

    Quantitative studies are commonly realised in the biomedical research to compare RNA expression in different experimental or clinical conditions. These quantifications are performed through their comparison to the expression of the housekeeping gene transcripts like glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), albumin, actins, tubulins, cyclophilin, hypoxantine phsophoribosyltransferase (HRPT), L32. 28S, and 18S rRNAs are also used as internal standards. In this paper, it is recalled that the commonly used internal standards can quantitatively vary in response to various factors. Possible variations are illustrated using three experimental examples. Preferred types of internal standards are then proposed for each of these samples and thereafter the general procedure concerning the choice of an internal standard and the way to manage its uses are discussed.

  2. Description of a taxonomically undefined Sclerotiniaceae strain from withered rotten-grapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzini, Marilinda; Zapparoli, Giacomo

    2016-02-01

    A necrotrophic member of the Sclerotiniaceae family (herewith named strain C10) isolated from withered rotten-grapes, is described. Interestingly, the fungus has no defined taxonomic position since it has been impossible to attribute it to an existing genus. Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH), heat shock protein 60 (HSP60) and DNA-directed RNA polymerase II subunit (RPB2), revealed that strain C10 is distantly related to Amphobotrys and Botrytis. This evidence clearly distinguishes this new Sclerotiniaceae member from other taxa of the family. Moreover, its morphological characteristics did not match those of Amphobotrys and Botrytis. Infectivity assays demonstrated that strain C10 could be a potential postharvest pathogen of withered grapes. This study revealed the taxonomic importance of this strain suggesting the existence of a possible new genus, a theory that requires further investigation.

  3. Development of real-time PCR for detection of Mycoplasma hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baczynska, A.; Svenstrup, Helle Friis; Fedder, J.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mycoplasma hominis is associated with pelvic inflammatory disease, bacterial vaginosis, post partum fever, sepsis and infections of the central nervous system often leading to serious conditions. Association with development of female infertility has also been suggested, but different....... Information on bacterial load in genital swabs can be obtained. The assay allowed detection of M. hominis in a closed system reducing the risk of contamination by amplicon carry-over......., glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gap), as a target. RESULTS: Real-time PCR was optimized to detect 10 copies of M. hominis PG21 genomic DNA. A fluorescence signal was measured for all 20 other M. hominis isolates, and melting curves analysis showed variations in the melting temperature in agreement...

  4. Engineering a functional 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirby, James; Dietzel, Kevin L.; Wichmann, Gale

    2016-01-01

    Isoprenoids are used in many commercial applications and much work has gone into engineering microbial hosts for their production. Isoprenoids are produced either from acetyl-CoA via the mevalonate pathway or from pyruvate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate via the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP......) pathway. Saccharomyces cerevisiae exclusively utilizes the mevalonate pathway to synthesize native isoprenoids and in fact the alternative DXP pathway has never been found or successfully reconstructed in the eukaryotic cytosol. There are, however, several advantages to isoprenoid synthesis via the DXP...... time, functional expression of the DXP pathway in S. cerevisiae. Under low aeration conditions, an engineered strain relying solely on the DXP pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis achieved an endpoint biomass 80% of that of the same strain using the mevalonate pathway....

  5. Construction of an Unmarked Zymomonas mobilis Mutant Using a Site-Specific FLP Recombinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao-Lan Zou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Flippase expression was carried out in Zymomonas mobilis strain ZM4. The FRT-flanked selection marker gene was first integrated into the ZM4 chromosome by homologous recombination. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae flp gene was then introduced under the control of the ZM4 gap gene promoter (Pgap, encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase or the λ bacteriophage cI857-pR contained in the broad-host-range cloning vector pBBR1-MCS-2. This study demonstrated that flp was expressed and that the deletion frequency of the FRT-flanked marker gene was very high (approx. 100 %. In addition, the flp gene expression vector could be conveniently removed from the resulting unmarked Z. mobilis mutants by serially transferring the cells three times into antibiotic-free medium, thereby establishing an efficient method for constructing unmarked Z. mobilis mutants.

  6. GAPDH and β-actin protein decreases with aging, making Stain-Free technology a superior loading control in Western blotting of human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vigelsø Hansen, Andreas; Dybboe, Rie; Hansen, Christina Neigaard

    2015-01-01

    SF and RP was measured in relation to ageing, muscle atrophy, and different muscle fiber type composition, respectively. A stronger linearity of SF and β-actin compared with GAPDH and α-tubulin was observed. The methodological variation was relatively low in all four methods (4-11%). Protein level...... [β-actin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and α-tubulin], as well as TP loaded measured by Stain-Free technology (SF) as normalization tool were tested. This was done using skeletal muscle samples from men subjected to physiological conditions often investigated in applied...... physiology where the intervention has been suggested to impede normalization (ageing, muscle atrophy, and different muscle fiber type composition). The linearity of signal and the methodological variation coefficient was obtained. Furthermore, the inter- and intraindividual variation in signals obtained from...

  7. Effects of High-Pressure Treatment on the Muscle Proteome of Hake by Bottom-Up Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrera, Mónica; Fidalgo, Liliana G; Saraiva, Jorge A; Aubourg, Santiago P

    2018-05-02

    A bottom-up proteomics approach was applied for the study of the effects of high-pressure (HP) treatment on the muscle proteome of fish. The performance of the approach was established for a previous HP treatment (150-450 MPa for 2 min) on frozen (up to 5 months at -10 °C) European hake ( Merluccius merluccius). Concerning possible protein biomarkers of quality changes, a significant degradation after applying a pressure ≥430 MPa could be observed for phosphoglycerate mutase-1, enolase, creatine kinase, fructose bisphosphate aldolase, triosephosphate isomerase, and nucleoside diphosphate kinase; contrary, electrophoretic bands assigned to tropomyosin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and beta parvalbumin increased their intensity after applying a pressure ≥430 MPa. This repository of potential protein biomarkers may be very useful for further HP investigations related to fish quality.

  8. Overexpression of pyruvate decarboxylase in the yeast Hansenula polymorpha results in increased ethanol yield in high-temperature fermentation of xylose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishchuk, Olena P; Voronovsky, Andriy Y; Stasyk, Oleh V; Gayda, Galina Z; Gonchar, Mykhailo V; Abbas, Charles A; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2008-11-01

    Improvement of xylose fermentation is of great importance to the fuel ethanol industry. The nonconventional thermotolerant yeast Hansenula polymorpha naturally ferments xylose to ethanol at high temperatures (48-50 degrees C). Introduction of a mutation that impairs ethanol reutilization in H. polymorpha led to an increase in ethanol yield from xylose. The native and heterologous (Kluyveromyces lactis) PDC1 genes coding for pyruvate decarboxylase were expressed at high levels in H. polymorpha under the control of the strong constitutive promoter of the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (GAPDH). This resulted in increased pyruvate decarboxylase activity and improved ethanol production from xylose. The introduction of multiple copies of the H. polymorpha PDC1 gene driven by the strong constitutive promoter led to a 20-fold increase in pyruvate decarboxylase activity and up to a threefold elevation of ethanol production.

  9. Inactivation of cellular enzymes by carbonyls and protein-bound glycation/glycoxidation products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Philip E; Dean, Roger T; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2002-01-01

    products. In this study, we have examined the effect of glucose and carbonyl compounds (methylglyoxal, glyoxal, glycolaldehyde, and hydroxyacetone), and glycation products arising from reaction of these materials with model proteins, on the activity of three key cellular enzymes: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate...... dehydrogenase (GAPDH), glutathione reductase, and lactate dehydrogenase, both in isolation and in cell lysates. In contrast to glucose (1M, both fresh and aged for 8 weeks), which had no effect, marked inhibition of all three enzymes was observed with methylglyoxal and glyoxal. GAPDH was also inhibited...... by glycolaldehyde and hydroxyacetone. Incubation of these enzymes with proteins that had been preglycated with methylglyoxal, but not glucose, also resulted in significant time- and concentration-dependent inhibition with both isolated enzymes and cell lysates. This inhibition was not metal ion, oxygen, superoxide...

  10. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα mRNA expression in human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue and non-cancerous liver tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurokawa Tsuyoshi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα regulates lipid metabolism in the liver. It is unclear, however, how this receptor changes in liver cancer tissue. On the other hand, mouse carcinogenicity studies showed that PPARα is necessary for the development of liver cancer induced by peroxisome proliferators, and the relationship between PPARα and the development of liver cancer have been the focus of considerable attention. There have been no reports, however, demonstrating that PPARα is involved in the development of human liver cancer. Methods The subjects were 10 patients who underwent hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma. We assessed the expression of PPARα mRNA in human hepatocellular carcinoma tissue and non-cancerous tissue, as well as the expression of target genes of PPARα, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A and cyclin D1 mRNAs. We also evaluated glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a key enzyme in the glycolytic system. Results The amounts of PPARα, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase mRNA in cancerous sections were significantly increased compared to those in non-cancerous sections. The level of cyclin D1 mRNA tends to be higher in cancerous than non-cancerous sections. Although there was a significant correlation between the levels of PPARα mRNA and cyclin D1 mRNA in both sections, however the correlation was higher in cancerous sections. Conclusion The present investigation indicated increased expression of PPARα mRNA and mRNAs for PPARα target genes in human hepatocellular carcinoma. These results might be associated with its carcinogenesis and characteristic features of energy production.

  11. Primary Metabolism during Biosynthesis of Secondary Wall Polymers of Protoxylem Vessel Elements1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morisaki, Keiko; Sawada, Yuji; Sano, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Atsushi; Kurata, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Shiro; Matsuda, Mami; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2016-01-01

    Xylem vessels, the water-conducting cells in vascular plants, undergo characteristic secondary wall deposition and programmed cell death. These processes are regulated by the VASCULAR-RELATED NAC-DOMAIN (VND) transcription factors. Here, to identify changes in metabolism that occur during protoxylem vessel element differentiation, we subjected tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) BY-2 suspension culture cells carrying an inducible VND7 system to liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based wide-target metabolome analysis and transcriptome analysis. Time-course data for 128 metabolites showed dynamic changes in metabolites related to amino acid biosynthesis. The concentration of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, an important intermediate of the glycolysis pathway, immediately decreased in the initial stages of cell differentiation. As cell differentiation progressed, specific amino acids accumulated, including the shikimate-related amino acids and the translocatable nitrogen-rich amino acid arginine. Transcriptome data indicated that cell differentiation involved the active up-regulation of genes encoding the enzymes catalyzing fructose 6-phosphate biosynthesis from glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, phosphoenolpyruvate biosynthesis from oxaloacetate, and phenylalanine biosynthesis, which includes shikimate pathway enzymes. Concomitantly, active changes in the amount of fructose 6-phosphate and phosphoenolpyruvate were detected during cell differentiation. Taken together, our results show that protoxylem vessel element differentiation is associated with changes in primary metabolism, which could facilitate the production of polysaccharides and lignin monomers and, thus, promote the formation of the secondary cell wall. Also, these metabolic shifts correlate with the active transcriptional regulation of specific enzyme genes. Therefore, our observations indicate that primary metabolism is actively regulated during protoxylem vessel element differentiation to alter the cell’s metabolic

  12. Accelerated cellular senescence phenotype of GAPDH-depleted human lung carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phadke, Manali; Krynetskaia, Natalia [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Mishra, Anurag [Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Krynetskiy, Evgeny, E-mail: ekrynets@temple.edu [Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States); Jayne Haines Center for Pharmacogenomics, Temple University School of Pharmacy, Philadelphia, PA 19140 (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} We examined the effect of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate (GAPDH) depletion on proliferation of human carcinoma A549 cells. {yields} GAPDH depletion induces accelerated senescence in tumor cells via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. {yields} Metabolic and genetic rescue experiments indicate that GAPDH has regulatory functions linking energy metabolism and cell cycle. {yields} Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation. -- Abstract: Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a pivotal glycolytic enzyme, and a signaling molecule which acts at the interface between stress factors and the cellular apoptotic machinery. Earlier, we found that knockdown of GAPDH in human carcinoma cell lines resulted in cell proliferation arrest and chemoresistance to S phase-specific cytotoxic agents. To elucidate the mechanism by which GAPDH depletion arrests cell proliferation, we examined the effect of GAPDH knockdown on human carcinoma cells A549. Our results show that GAPDH-depleted cells establish senescence phenotype, as revealed by proliferation arrest, changes in morphology, SA-{beta}-galactosidase staining, and more than 2-fold up-regulation of senescence-associated genes DEC1 and GLB1. Accelerated senescence following GAPDH depletion results from compromised glycolysis and energy crisis leading to the sustained AMPK activation via phosphorylation of {alpha} subunit at Thr172. Our findings demonstrate that GAPDH depletion switches human tumor cells to senescent phenotype via AMPK network, in the absence of DNA damage. Rescue experiments using metabolic and genetic models confirmed that GAPDH has important regulatory functions linking the energy metabolism and the cell cycle networks. Induction of senescence in LKB1-deficient non-small cell lung cancer cells via GAPDH depletion suggests a novel strategy to control tumor cell proliferation.

  13. Comparative proteomic analysis of Listeria monocytogenes exposed to enterocin AS-48 in planktonic and sessile states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero Gómez, Natacha; Abriouel, Hikmate; Ennahar, Said; Gálvez, Antonio

    2013-10-15

    Enterocin AS-48 is a cyclic peptide of great interest for application in food preservation and sanitation. In the present study, the proteome response of Listeria monocytogenes to purified enterocin AS-48 was studied under two different conditions: planktonic cells and sessile cells grown on polystyrene plates. Ten different proteins were differentially expressed in planktonic L. monocytogenes cells treated with 0.1 μg/ml enterocin AS-48 compared to the untreated controls. Overexpressed proteins were related to stress response (DnaK) or carbohydrate transport and metabolism, while underexpressed and unexpressed proteins were related to metabolism (such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate oxidase, glutamate dehydrogenase or glutamate decarboxylase) or stress (GroEL). In the sessile state, L. monocytogenes cells tolerated up to 10 μg/ml bacteriocin, and the treated biofilm cells overexpressed a set of 11 proteins, some of which could be related to stress response (DnaK, GroEL), protein synthesis and carbohydrate metabolism, while glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was the only unexpressed protein. Some of the overexpressed proteins (such as elongation factor Tu and GroEL) could also be implicated in cell adhesion. These results suggest different cell responses of L. monocytogenes to enterocin AS-48 in the planktonic and in the sessile state, including stress response and cell metabolism proteins. While in the planktonic state the bacterium may tend to compensate for the cytoplasmic cell permeability changes induced by AS-48 by reinforcing carbohydrate transport and metabolism, sessile cells seem to respond by shifting carbohydrate metabolism and reinforcing protein synthesis. Stress response proteins also seem to be important in the response to AS-48, but the stress response seems to be different in planktonic and in sessile cells. © 2013.

  14. Cloning and heterologous expression of a hydrophobin gene Ltr.hyd from the tiger milk mushroom Lentinus tuber-regium in yeast-like cells of Tremella fuciformis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongmei Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydrophobins are small proteins secreted by filamentous fungi, which show a highly surface activity. Because of the signally self-assembling abilities and surface activities, hydrophobins were considered as candidates in many aspects, for example, stabilizing foams and emulsions in food products. Lentinus tuber-regium, known as tiger milk mushroom, is both an edible and medicinal sclerotium-producing mushroom. Up to now, the hydrophobins of L. tuber-regium have not been identified. Results: In this paper, a Class I hydrophobin gene, Ltr.hyd, was cloned from L. tuber-regium and expressed in the yeast-like cells of Tremella fuciformis mediated by Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The expression vector pGEH-GH was under the control of T. fuciformis glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene (gpd promoter. The integration of Ltr.hyd into the genome of T. fuciformis was confirmed by PCR, Southern blot, fluorescence observation and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE demonstrated that recombinant hydrophobin rLtr.HYD with an expected molecular mass of 13 kDa was extracted. The yield of rLtr.HYD was 0.66 mg/g dry weight. The emulsifying activity of rLtr.HYD was better than the typical food emulsifiers sodium caseinate and Tween 20. Conclusions: We evaluated the emulsifying property of hydrophobin Ltr.HYD, which can be potentially used as a food emulsifier. Keywords: Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Emulsifier, Expression vector, Filamentous fungi, Gel electrophoresis, Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, Heterogenous expression, Hydrophobin, Quantitative real-time PCR, Southern blot, Surface activity

  15. Molecular identification, immunolocalization, and characterization of Clonorchis sinensis triosephosphate isomerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Juanjuan; Liao, Hua; Li, Shan; Zhou, Chenhui; Huang, Yan; Li, Xuerong; Liang, Chi; Yu, Xinbing

    2015-08-01

    Clonorchis sinensis triosephosphate isomerase (CsTIM) is a key regulatory enzyme of glycolysis and gluconeogenesis, which catalyzes the interconversion of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate to dihydroxyacetone phosphate. In this study, the biochemical characterizations of CsTIM have been examined. A full-length complementary DNA (cDNA; Cs105350) sequence encoding CsTIM was obtained from our C. sinensis cDNA library. The open reading frame of CsTIM contains 759 bp which encodes 252 amino acids. The amino acid sequence of CsTIM shares 60-65% identity with other species. Western blot analysis displayed that recombinant CsTIM (rCsTIM) can be probed by anti-rCsTIM rat serum and anti-C. sinensis excretory/secretory products (anti-CsESPs) rat serum. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and western blotting analysis revealed that CsTIM messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein were differentially expressed in development cycle stages of the parasite, including adult worm, metacercaria, excysted metacercaria, and egg. In addition, immunolocalization assay showed that CsTIM was located in the seminal vesicle, eggs, and testicle. Moreover, rCsTIM exhibited active enzyme activity in catalytic reactions. The Michaelis constant (K m) of rCsTIM was 0.33 mM, when using glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate as the substrate. The optimal temperature and pH of CsTIM were 37 °C and 7.5-9.5, respectively. Collectively, these results suggest that CsTIM is an important protein involved in glycometabolism, and CsTIM possibly take part in many biological functions in the growth and development of C. sinensis.

  16. Overexpression of Genes Encoding Glycolytic Enzymes in Corynebacterium glutamicum Enhances Glucose Metabolism and Alanine Production under Oxygen Deprivation Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shogo; Gunji, Wataru; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Toda, Hiroshi; Suda, Masako; Jojima, Toru; Inui, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that Corynebacterium glutamicum strain ΔldhAΔppc+alaD+gapA, overexpressing glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-encoding gapA, shows significantly improved glucose consumption and alanine formation under oxygen deprivation conditions (T. Jojima, M. Fujii, E. Mori, M. Inui, and H. Yukawa, Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 87:159–165, 2010). In this study, we employ stepwise overexpression and chromosomal integration of a total of four genes encoding glycolytic enzymes (herein referred to as glycolytic genes) to demonstrate further successive improvements in C. glutamicum glucose metabolism under oxygen deprivation. In addition to gapA, overexpressing pyruvate kinase-encoding pyk and phosphofructokinase-encoding pfk enabled strain GLY2/pCRD500 to realize respective 13% and 20% improved rates of glucose consumption and alanine formation compared to GLY1/pCRD500. Subsequent overexpression of glucose-6-phosphate isomerase-encoding gpi in strain GLY3/pCRD500 further improved its glucose metabolism. Notably, both alanine productivity and yield increased after each overexpression step. After 48 h of incubation, GLY3/pCRD500 produced 2,430 mM alanine at a yield of 91.8%. This was 6.4-fold higher productivity than that of the wild-type strain. Intracellular metabolite analysis showed that gapA overexpression led to a decreased concentration of metabolites upstream of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, suggesting that the overexpression resolved a bottleneck in glycolysis. Changing ratios of the extracellular metabolites by overexpression of glycolytic genes resulted in reduction of the intracellular NADH/NAD+ ratio, which also plays an important role on the improvement of glucose consumption. Enhanced alanine dehydrogenase activity using a high-copy-number plasmid further accelerated the overall alanine productivity. Increase in glycolytic enzyme activities is a promising approach to make drastic progress in growth-arrested bioprocesses. PMID

  17. Identification of the iron-sulfur center of spinach ferredoxin-nitrite reductase as a tetranuclear center, and preliminary EPR studies of mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, J R; Vega, J M; Kamin, H; Orme-Johnson, N R; Orme-Johnson, W H; Krueger, R J; Siegel, L M

    1979-02-25

    EPR spectroscopic and chemical analyses of spinach nitrite reductase show that the enzyme contains one reducible iron-sulfur center, and one site for binding either cyanide or nitrite, per siroheme. The heme is nearly all in the high spin ferric state in the enzyme as isolated. The extinction coefficient of the enzyme has been revised to E386 = 7.6 X 10(4) cm-1 (M heme)-1. The iron-sulfur center is reduced with difficulty by agents such as reduced methyl viologen (equilibrated with 1 atm of H2 at pH 7.7 in the presence of hydrogenase) or dithionite. Complexation of the enzyme with CO (a known ligand for nitrite reductase heme) markedly increases the reducibility of the iron-sulfur center. New chemical analyses and reinterpretation of previous data show that the enzyme contains 6 mol of iron and 4 mol of acid-labile S2-/mol of siroheme. The EPR spectrum of reduced nitrite reductase in 80% dimethyl sulfoxide establishes clearly that the enzyme contains a tetranuclear iron-sulfur (Fe4S4) center. The ferriheme and Fe4S4 centers are reduced at similar rates (k = 3 to 4 s-1) by dithionite. The dithionite-reduced Fe4S4 center is rapidly (k = 100 s-1) reoxidized by nitrite. These results indicate a role for the Fe4S4 center in catalysis.

  18. Interactions of iron-bound frataxin with ISCU and ferredoxin on the cysteine desulfurase complex leading to Fe-S cluster assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Kai; Frederick, Ronnie O; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L

    2018-06-01

    Frataxin (FXN) is involved in mitochondrial iron‑sulfur (Fe-S) cluster biogenesis and serves to accelerate Fe-S cluster formation. FXN deficiency is associated with Friedreich ataxia, a neurodegenerative disease. We have used a combination of isothermal titration calorimetry and multinuclear NMR spectroscopy to investigate interactions among the components of the biological machine that carries out the assembly of iron‑sulfur clusters in human mitochondria. Our results show that FXN tightly binds a single Fe 2+ but not Fe 3+ . While FXN (with or without bound Fe 2+ ) does not bind the scaffold protein ISCU directly, the two proteins interact mutually when each is bound to the cysteine desulfurase complex ([NFS1] 2 :[ISD11] 2 :[Acp] 2 ), abbreviated as (NIA) 2 , where "N" represents the cysteine desulfurase (NFS1), "I" represents the accessory protein (ISD11), and "A" represents acyl carrier protein (Acp). FXN binds (NIA) 2 weakly in the absence of ISCU but more strongly in its presence. Fe 2+ -FXN binds to the (NIA) 2 -ISCU 2 complex without release of iron. However, upon the addition of both l-cysteine and a reductant (either reduced FDX2 or DTT), Fe 2+ is released from FXN as consistent with Fe 2+ -FXN being the proximal source of iron for Fe-S cluster assembly. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Pyruvate:Quinone Oxidoreductase in Corynebacterium glutamicum: Molecular Analysis of the pqo Gene, Significance of the Enzyme, and Phylogenetic Aspects

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schreiner, M. E.; Riedel, Ch.; Holátko, Jiří; Pátek, Miroslav; Eikmanns, B. J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 188, č. 4 (2006), s. 1341-1350 ISSN 0021-9193 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA525/04/0548 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : corynebacterium glutamicum * pqo * molecular analysis Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.993, year: 2006

  20. HiPIP oxido-reductase activity in membranes from aerobically grown cells of the facultative phototroph Rhodoferax fermentans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hochkoeppler, Alejandro; Kofod, Pauli; Zannoni, Davide

    1995-01-01

    The role of the periplasmically located, water-soluble, HiPIP (high-potential iron-sulfur protein) in the respiratory chain of the facultative phototroph Rhodoferax fermentans has been examined. The oxidized HiPIP is reduced by succinate-dependent respiration via the bc 1 complex, this reaction...... being inhibited by myxothiazol and/or stigmatellin. The reduced HiPIP can be oxidized by the membrane-bound cytochrome oxidase, this reaction being inhibited by 0.1 mM cyanide. We conclude that aerobically grown Rf. fermentans contains a redox chain in which HiPIP mediates electron transfer between...... the bc 1 complex and the cb-type cytochrome oxidase....

  1. Environmentally Robust Rhodamine Reporters for Probe-based Cellular Detection of the Cancer-linked Oxidoreductase hNQO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Quinn A; Johnson, Amanda E; Prasai, Bijeta; Rouillere, Alexandra; McCarley, Robin L

    2016-01-15

    We successfully synthesized a fluorescent probe capable of detecting the cancer-associated quinoneoxidoreductase isozyme-1 within human cells, based on results from an investigation of the stability of various rhodamines and seminaphthorhodamines toward the biological reductant NADH, present at ∼100-200 μM within cells. While rhodamines are generally known for their chemical stability, we observe that NADH causes significant and sometimes rapid modification of numerous rhodamine analogues, including those oftentimes used in imaging applications. Results from mechanistic studies lead us to rule out a radical-based reduction pathway, suggesting rhodamine reduction by NADH proceeds by a hydride transfer process to yield the reduced leuco form of the rhodamine and oxidized NAD(+). A relationship between the structural features of the rhodamines and their reactivity with NADH is observed. Rhodamines with increased alkylation on the N3- and N6-nitrogens, as well as the xanthene core, react the least with NADH; whereas, nonalkylated variants or analogues with electron-withdrawing substituents have the fastest rates of reaction. These outcomes allowed us to judiciously construct a seminaphthorhodamine-based, turn-on fluorescent probe that is capable of selectively detecting the cancer-associated, NADH-dependent enzyme quinoneoxidoreductase isozyme-1 in human cancer cells, without the issue of NADH-induced deactivation of the seminaphthorhodamine reporter.

  2. The Escherichia coli thioredoxin homolog YbbN/Trxsc is a chaperone and a weak protein oxidoreductase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldas, Thérèse; Malki, Abderrahim; Kern, Renée; Abdallah, Jad; Richarme, Gilbert

    2006-05-12

    Escherichia coli contains two thioredoxins, Trx1 and Trx2, and a thioredoxin-like protein, YbbN, which presents a strong homology in its N-terminal part with thioredoxin 1 and 2. YbbN, however, does not possess the canonical Cys-x-x-Cys active site of thioredoxins, but instead a Ser-x-x-Cys site. In addition to Cys-38, located in the SxxC site, it contains a second cysteine, Cys-63, close to Cys-38 in the 3D model. Cys-38 and Cys-63 undergo an oxidoreduction process, suggesting that YbbN functions with two redox cysteines. Accordingly, YbbN catalyzes the oxidation of reduced RNase and the isomerization of scrambled RNase. Moreover, upon oxidation, its oligomeric state changes from dimers to tetramers and higher oligomers. YbbN also possesses chaperone properties, promoting protein folding after urea denaturation and forming complexes with unfolded proteins. This is the first biochemical characterization of a member of the YbbN class of bacterial thioredoxin-like proteins, and in vivo experiments will allow to determine the importance of its redox and chaperone properties in the cellular physiology.

  3. The Escherichia coli thioredoxin homolog YbbN/Trxsc is a chaperone and a weak protein oxidoreductase.

    OpenAIRE

    Caldas , Thérèse; Malki , Abderrahim; Kern , Renée; Abdallah , Jad; Richarme , Gilbert

    2006-01-01

    Escherichia coli contains two thioredoxins, Trx1 and Trx2, and a thioredoxin-like protein, YbbN, which presents a strong homology in its N-terminal part with thioredoxin 1 and 2. YbbN, however, does not possess the canonical Cys-x-x-Cys active site of thioredoxins, but instead a Ser-x-x-Cys site. In addition to Cys-38, located in the SxxC site, it contains a second cysteine, Cys-63, close to Cys-38 in the 3D model. Cys-38 and Cys-63 undergo an oxidoreduction process, suggesting that YbbN func...

  4. Determination of hydride transfer stereospecificity of NADH-dependent alcohol-aldehyde/ketone oxidoreductase from Sulfolobus solfataricus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trincone, A; Lama, L; Rella, R; D'Auria, S; Raia, C A; Nicolaus, B

    1990-10-18

    This paper describes the determination of stereospecificity of hydride transfer reaction of an alcohol dehydrogenase isolated from the archaebacterium Sulfolobus solfataricus. The 1H-NMR and EI-MS data indicate that the enzyme transfers the pro-R hydrogen from coenzyme to substrate and is therefore an A-specific dehydrogenase.

  5. Density functional theory based QSAR study of ruthenium (II) antitumor drugs and their interactions with xanthine oxidoreductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondal, Paritosh; Das, Dharitri

    2013-01-01

    Transition metal containing drugs have been used intensely for their potential anticancer activities. Platinum drugs have been used successfully for the treatment of cancer. However, these drugs have severe drawbacks including unwanted side effects, drug resistance and ineffectiveness towards some of cancers. Therefore scientists are searching for new drugs to solve these problems, and Ruthenium coordination compounds have been found effective alternatives to platinum coordination drugs

  6. [Response of soil hydrolase and oxidoreductase activities to free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (FACE) under rice-wheat rotation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulan; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Lijun; Wu, Zhijie

    2004-06-01

    This paper studied the response of soil urease, phosphatase, arylsulphatase and dehydrogenase to 200 micromol x mol(-1) CO2 elevation under rice-wheat rotation. The results showed that under CO2 elevation, the urease activity in 0-10 cm soil layer was decreased at the early growth stages of wheat but increased at its booting stage; the activity increased at the early growth stages of rice but decreased at its ripening stage. Phosphatase activity was increased during the whole growth period of wheat; the activity increased at the tillering stage of rice but decreased at its later growth stages. Arylsulphatase activity was decreased at the over-wintering and booting stages of wheat but increased at its tillering and ripening stages. Dehydrogenase activity was decreased at the early growth stages of wheat and rice, but increased at their late growth stages.

  7. NAD(P)H:Quinone Oxidoreductase-1 Expression Sensitizes Malignant Melanoma Cells to the HSP90 Inhibitor 17-AAG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Shuya; Arakawa, Nobuyuki; Okubo, Ayaka; Shigeeda, Wataru; Yasuhira, Shinji; Masuda, Tomoyuki; Akasaka, Toshihide; Shibazaki, Masahiko; Maesawa, Chihaya

    2016-01-01

    The KEAP1-NRF2 pathway regulates cellular redox homeostasis by transcriptional induction of genes associated with antioxidant synthesis and detoxification in response to oxidative stress. Previously, we reported that KEAP1 mutation elicits constitutive NRF2 activation and resistance to cisplatin (CDDP) and dacarbazine (DTIC) in human melanomas. The present study was conducted to clarify whether an HSP90 inhibitor, 17-AAG, efficiently eliminates melanoma with KEAP1 mutation, as the NRF2 target gene, NQO1, is a key enzyme in 17-AAG bioactivation. In melanoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines with or without KEAP1 mutations, NQO1 expression and 17-AAG sensitivity are inversely correlated. NQO1 is highly expressed in normal melanocytes and in several melanoma cell lines despite the presence of wild-type KEAP1, and the NQO1 expression is dependent on NRF2 activation. Because either CDDP or DTIC produces reactive oxygen species that activate NRF2, we determined whether these agents would sensitize NQO1-low melanoma cells to 17-AAG. Synergistic cytotoxicity of the 17-AAG and CDDP combination was detected in four out of five NQO1-low cell lines, but not in the cell line with KEAP1 mutation. These data indicate that 17-AAG could be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for melanoma with KEAP1 mutation or NQO1 expression.

  8. Complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is active in but non-essential for procyclic Trypanosoma brucei

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Verner, Zdeněk; Čermáková, P.; Škodová, Ingrid; Kriegová, Eva; Horváth, A.; Lukeš, Julius

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 175, č. 2 (2011), s. 196-200 ISSN 0166-6851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA204/09/1667; GA ČR GD206/09/H026; GA MŠk 2B06129; GA MŠk LC07032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Trypanosoma * Mitochondrion * Respiration * Complex I Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.551, year: 2011

  9. Single molecule activity measurements of cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase reveal the existence of two discrete functional states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Tomas; Singha, Aparajita; Rantzau, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    450 enzymes. Measurements and statistical analy-sis of individual catalytic turnover cycles shows POR to sample at least two major functional states. This phenotype may underlie regulatory interactions with different cytochromes P450 but to date remained masked in bulk kinetics. To ensure that we...

  10. A new hypothesis on the simultaneous direct and indirect proton pump mechanisms in NADH-quinone oxidoreductase (complex I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Tomoko; Nakamaru-Ogiso, Eiko; Ohnishi, S Tsuyoshi

    2010-10-08

    Recently, Sazanov's group reported the X-ray structure of whole complex I [Nature, 465, 441 (2010)], which presented a strong clue for a "piston-like" structure as a key element in an "indirect" proton pump. We have studied the NuoL subunit which has a high sequence similarity to Na(+)/H(+) antiporters, as do the NuoM and N subunits. We constructed 27 site-directed NuoL mutants. Our data suggest that the H(+)/e(-) stoichiometry seems to have decreased from (4H(+)/2e(-)) in the wild-type to approximately (3H(+)/2e(-)) in NuoL mutants. We propose a revised hypothesis that each of the "direct" and the "indirect" proton pumps transports 2H(+) per 2e(-). Copyright © 2010 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The NADH: Ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complec I) of the mammalian respiratory chain and the cAMP cascade

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Papa, S.; Sardanelli, A. M.; Scacco, S.; Petruzzella, V.; Dobrová, Zuzana; Vergari, R.; Signorile, A.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 1 (2002), s. 1-10 ISSN 0145-479X Grant - others:Italian Research Council(CNR) Rome(IT) 99/03622/PF49; travel grant from CNR(IT) Z.T-D Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5020903 Keywords : protein * phosphorylation * mitochondria Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.920, year: 2002

  12. Modulation of Thiol-Disulfide Oxidoreductases for Increased Production of Disulfide-Bond-Containing Proteins in Bacillus subtilis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwen, Thijs R. H. M.; Dubois, Jean-Yves F.; Freudl, Roland; Quax, Wim J.; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2008-01-01

    Disulfide bonds are important for the correct folding, structural integrity, and activity of many biotechnologically relevant proteins. For synthesis and subsequent secretion of these proteins in bacteria, such as the well-known "cell factory" Bacillus subtilis, it is often the correct formation of

  13. Microbial production of xylitol from xylose and L-arabinose: conversion of L-arabitol to xylitol using bacterial oxidoreductases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial production of xylitol, using hemicellulosic biomass such as agricultural residues, is becoming more attractive for reducing its manufacturing cost. L-arabitol is a particular problem to xylitol production from hemicellulosic hydrolyzates that contain both xylose and L-arabinose because it...

  14. Biphasic Kinetic Behavior of E. coli WrbA, an FMNDependent NAD(P)H. Quinone Oxidoreductase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kishko, Iryna; Harish, B.; Zayats, Vasilina; Řeha, David; Tenner, B.; Beri, D.; Gustavsson, T.; Ettrich, Rüdiger; Carey, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 8 (2012), s. 1-10 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP207/10/1934 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Escheria-coli * DT-diaphorase * dehydrogense * mechanism * enzyme * flavoprotein * flavodoxin * reduction Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  15. Redox-dependent substrate-cofactor interactions in the Michaelis-complex of a flavin-dependent oxidoreductase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werther, Tobias; Wahlefeld, Stefan; Salewski, Johannes; Kuhlmann, Uwe; Zebger, Ingo; Hildebrandt, Peter; Dobbek, Holger

    2017-07-01

    How an enzyme activates its substrate for turnover is fundamental for catalysis but incompletely understood on a structural level. With redox enzymes one typically analyses structures of enzyme-substrate complexes in the unreactive oxidation state of the cofactor, assuming that the interaction between enzyme and substrate is independent of the cofactors oxidation state. Here, we investigate the Michaelis complex of the flavoenzyme xenobiotic reductase A with the reactive reduced cofactor bound to its substrates by X-ray crystallography and resonance Raman spectroscopy and compare it to the non-reactive oxidized Michaelis complex mimics. We find that substrates bind in different orientations to the oxidized and reduced flavin, in both cases flattening its structure. But only authentic Michaelis complexes display an unexpected rich vibrational band pattern uncovering a strong donor-acceptor complex between reduced flavin and substrate. This interaction likely activates the catalytic ground state of the reduced flavin, accelerating the reaction within a compressed cofactor-substrate complex.

  16. Catalase as a sulfide-sulfur oxido-reductase: An ancient (and modern?) regulator of reactive sulfur species (RSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Kenneth R; Gao, Yan; DeLeon, Eric R; Arif, Maaz; Arif, Faihaan; Arora, Nitin; Straub, Karl D

    2017-08-01

    Catalase is well-known as an antioxidant dismutating H 2 O 2 to O 2 and H 2 O. However, catalases evolved when metabolism was largely sulfur-based, long before O 2 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) became abundant, suggesting catalase metabolizes reactive sulfide species (RSS). Here we examine catalase metabolism of H 2 S n , the sulfur analog of H 2 O 2 , hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) and other sulfur-bearing molecules using H 2 S-specific amperometric electrodes and fluorophores to measure polysulfides (H 2 S n ; SSP4) and ROS (dichlorofluorescein, DCF). Catalase eliminated H 2 S n , but did not anaerobically generate H 2 S, the expected product of dismutation. Instead, catalase concentration- and oxygen-dependently metabolized H 2 S and in so doing acted as a sulfide oxidase with a P 50 of 20mmHg. H 2 O 2 had little effect on catalase-mediated H 2 S metabolism but in the presence of the catalase inhibitor, sodium azide (Az), H 2 O 2 rapidly and efficiently expedited H 2 S metabolism in both normoxia and hypoxia suggesting H 2 O 2 is an effective electron acceptor in this reaction. Unexpectedly, catalase concentration-dependently generated H 2 S from dithiothreitol (DTT) in both normoxia and hypoxia, concomitantly oxidizing H 2 S in the presence of O 2 . H 2 S production from DTT was inhibited by carbon monoxide and augmented by NADPH suggesting that catalase heme-iron is the catalytic site and that NADPH provides reducing equivalents. Catalase also generated H 2 S from garlic oil, diallyltrisulfide, thioredoxin and sulfur dioxide, but not from sulfite, metabisulfite, carbonyl sulfide, cysteine, cystine, glutathione or oxidized glutathione. Oxidase activity was also present in catalase from Aspergillus niger. These results show that catalase can act as either a sulfide oxidase or sulfur reductase and they suggest that these activities likely played a prominent role in sulfur metabolism during evolution and may continue do so in modern cells as well. This also appears to be the first observation of catalase reductase activity independent of peroxide dismutation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Increased availability of NADH in metabolically engineered baker's yeast improves transaminase-oxidoreductase coupled asymmetric whole-cell bioconversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Hägglöf, Cecilia; Weber, Nora

    2016-01-01

    yeast for transamination-reduction coupled asymmetric one-pot conversion was investigated. RESULTS: A series of active whole-cell biocatalysts were constructed by over-expressing the (S)-selective ω-transaminase (VAMT) from Capsicum chinense together with the NADH-dependent (S)-selective alcohol...

  18. Characterization of the type 2 NADH:menaquinone oxidoreductases from Staphylococcus aureus and the bactericidal action of phenothiazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurig-Briccio, Lici A; Yano, Takahiro; Rubin, Harvey; Gennis, Robert B

    2014-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is currently one of the principal multiple drug resistant bacterial pathogens causing serious infections, many of which are life-threatening. Consequently, new therapeutic targets are required to combat such infections. In the current work, we explore the type 2 Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide reduced form (NADH) dehydrogenases (NDH-2s) as possible drug targets and look at the effects of phenothiazines, known to inhibit NDH-2 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. NDH-2s are monotopic membrane proteins that catalyze the transfer of electrons from NADH via flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) to the quinone pool. They are required for maintaining the NADH/Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) redox balance and contribute indirectly to the generation of proton motive force. NDH-2s are not present in mammals, but are the only form of respiratory NADH dehydrogenase in several pathogens, including S. aureus. In this work, the two putative ndh genes present in the S. aureus genome were identified, cloned and expressed, and the proteins were purified and characterized. Phenothiazines were shown to inhibit both of the S. aureus NDH-2s with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values as low as 8μM. However, evaluating the effects of phenothiazines on whole cells of S. aureus was complicated by the fact that they are also acting as uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 18th European Bioenergetic Conference. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Two-stage gene regulation of the superoxide stress response soxRS system in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunoshiba, T

    1996-01-01

    All organisms have adapted to environmental changes by acquiring various functions controlled by gene regulation. In bacteria, a number of specific responses have been found to confer cell survival in various nutrient-limited conditions, and under physiological stresses such as high or low temperature, extreme pH, radiation, and oxidation (for review, see Neidhardt et al., 1987). In this article, I introduce an Escherichia coli (E. coli) global response induced by superoxide stress, the soxRS regulon. The functions controlled by this system consist of a wide variety of enzymes such as manganese-containing SOD (Mn-SOD); glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), the DNA repair enzyme endonuclease IV, fumarase C, NADPH:ferredoxin oxidoreductase, and aconitase. This response is positively regulated by a two-stage control system in which SoxR iron-sulfur protein senses exposure to superoxide and nitric oxide, and then activates transcription of the soxS gene, whose product stimulates the expression of the regulon genes. Our recent finding indicates that soxS transcription is initiated in a manner dependent on the rpoS gene encoding RNA polymerase sigma factor, theta s, in response to entering the stationary phase of growth. With this information, mechanisms for prokaryotic coordinating gene expression in response to superoxide stress and in stationary phase are discussed.

  20. The molecular architecture of the chloroplast thylakoid membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefansson, H.

    1996-08-01

    Non-detergent procedure for isolation of sub-thylakoid vesicle populations derived from different structural domains of the chloroplast thylakoid membrane has been developed. Sub-thylakoid vesicles representing the grana, grana core, stroma lamellae, and the grana margins have been isolated and their protein composition has been investigated. Furthermore a novel non-detergent procedure for investigating the pigment composition of photosynthetic complexes located in the different structural domains has been developed. This procedure circumvents selective extractions, an perturbing effect often combined with detergent isolations of membrane bound protein complexes. The fractionation experiments show that the NADPH dehydrogenase, suggested to operate as NADPH or ferredoxin-plastoquinone oxidoreductase in cyclic electron transport around photosystem I, is stoichiometrically depleted on photosystem I basis in the grana domain. The fractionation studies are consistent with the model of the thylakoid membrane where the photosystems in the grana are operating in a linear electron transport whereas the site of cyclic electron transport is in the stroma lamellae. It is suggested that partial destacking of grana, as a result of light-induced protein phosphorylation, may promote the exposure of the granal photosystem I centers to the chloroplast stroma and thereby enhance their participation in cyclic electron transport activity. 146 refs, 18 figs

  1. Computational and experimental analysis of redundancy in the central metabolism of Geobacter sulfurreducens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Segura

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Previous model-based analysis of the metabolic network of Geobacter sulfurreducens suggested the existence of several redundant pathways. Here, we identified eight sets of redundant pathways that included redundancy for the assimilation of acetate, and for the conversion of pyruvate into acetyl-CoA. These equivalent pathways and two other sub-optimal pathways were studied using 5 single-gene deletion mutants in those pathways for the evaluation of the predictive capacity of the model. The growth phenotypes of these mutants were studied under 12 different conditions of electron donor and acceptor availability. The comparison of the model predictions with the resulting experimental phenotypes indicated that pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase is the only activity able to convert pyruvate into acetyl-CoA. However, the results and the modeling showed that the two acetate activation pathways present are not only active, but needed due to the additional role of the acetyl-CoA transferase in the TCA cycle, probably reflecting the adaptation of these bacteria to acetate utilization. In other cases, the data reconciliation suggested additional capacity constraints that were confirmed with biochemical assays. The results demonstrate the need to experimentally verify the activity of key enzymes when developing in silico models of microbial physiology based on sequence-based reconstruction of metabolic networks.

  2. A difference gel electrophoresis study on thylakoids isolated from poplar leaves reveals a negative impact of ozone exposure on membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohler, Sacha; Sergeant, Kjell; Hoffmann, Lucien; Dizengremel, Pierre; Hausman, Jean-Francois; Renaut, Jenny; Jolivet, Yves

    2011-07-01

    Populus tremula L. x P. alba L. (Populus x canescens (Aiton) Smith), clone INRA 717-1-B4, saplings were subjected to 120 ppb ozone exposure for 28 days. Chloroplasts were isolated, and the membrane proteins, solubilized using the detergent 1,2-diheptanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC), were analyzed in a difference gel electrophoresis (DiGE) experiment comparing control versus ozone-exposed plants. Extrinsic photosystem (PS) proteins and adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) subunits were detected to vary in abundance. The general trend was a decrease in abundance, except for ferredoxin-NADP(+) oxidoreductase (FNR), which increased after the first 7 days of exposure. The up-regulation of FNR would increase NAPDH production for reducing power and detoxification inside and outside of the chloroplast. Later on, FNR and a number of PS and ATPase subunits decrease in abundance. This could be the result of oxidative processes on chloroplast proteins but could also be a way to down-regulate photochemical reactions in response to an inhibition in Calvin cycle activity.

  3. Amixicile, a novel strategy for targeting oral anaerobic pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutcherson, Justin A; Sinclair, Kathryn M; Belvin, Benjamin R; Gui, Qin; Hoffman, Paul S; Lewis, Janina P

    2017-09-05

    The oral microflora is composed of both health-promoting as well as disease-initiating bacteria. Many of the disease-initiating bacteria are anaerobic and include organisms such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Tannerella forsythia. Here we investigated a novel therapeutic, amixicile, that targets pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR), a major metabolic enzyme involved in energy generation through oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate. PFOR is present in these anaerobic pathogenic bacteria and thus we hypothesized that amixicile would effectively inhibit their growth. In general, PFOR is present in all obligate anaerobic bacteria, while oral commensal aerobes, including aerotolerant ones, such as Streptococcus gordonii, use pyruvate dehydrogenase to decarboxylate pyruvate. Accordingly, we observed that growth of the PFOR-containing anaerobic periodontal pathogens, grown in both monospecies as well as multispecies broth cultures was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner while that of S. gordonii was unaffected. Furthermore, we also show that amixicile is effective against these pathogens grown as monospecies and multispecies biofilms. Finally, amixicile is the first selective therapeutic agent active against bacteria internalized by host cells. Together, the results show that amixicile is an effective inhibitor of oral anaerobic bacteria and as such, is a good candidate for treatment of periodontal diseases.

  4. Single gene insertion drives bioalcohol production by a thermophilic archaeon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basen, M; Schut, GJ; Nguyen, DM; Lipscomb, GL; Benn, RA; Prybol, CJ; Vaccaro, BJ; Poole, FL; Kelly, RM; Adams, MWW

    2014-12-09

    Bioethanol production is achieved by only two metabolic pathways and only at moderate temperatures. Herein a fundamentally different synthetic pathway for bioalcohol production at 70 degrees C was constructed by insertion of the gene for bacterial alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhA) into the archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus. The engineered strain converted glucose to ethanol via acetate and acetaldehyde, catalyzed by the host-encoded aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and heterologously expressed AdhA, in an energy-conserving, redox-balanced pathway. Furthermore, the AOR/AdhA pathway also converted exogenously added aliphatic and aromatic carboxylic acids to the corresponding alcohol using glucose, pyruvate, and/or hydrogen as the source of reductant. By heterologous coexpression of a membrane-bound carbon monoxide dehydrogenase, CO was used as a reductant for converting carboxylic acids to alcohols. Redirecting the fermentative metabolism of P. furiosus through strategic insertion of foreign genes creates unprecedented opportunities for thermophilic bioalcohol production. Moreover, the AOR/AdhA pathway is a potentially game-changing strategy for syngas fermentation, especially in combination with carbon chain elongation pathways.

  5. Metabolic engineering of Clostridium autoethanogenum for selective alcohol production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, Fungmin; Henstra, Anne M; Kӧpke, Michael; Winzer, Klaus; Simpson, Sean D; Minton, Nigel P

    2017-03-01

    Gas fermentation using acetogenic bacteria such as Clostridium autoethanogenum offers an attractive route for production of fuel ethanol from industrial waste gases. Acetate reduction to acetaldehyde and further to ethanol via an aldehyde: ferredoxin oxidoreductase (AOR) and alcohol dehydrogenase has been postulated alongside the classic pathway of ethanol formation via a bi-functional aldehyde/alcohol dehydrogenase (AdhE). Here we demonstrate that AOR is critical to ethanol formation in acetogens and inactivation of AdhE led to consistently enhanced autotrophic ethanol production (up to 180%). Using ClosTron and allelic exchange mutagenesis, which was demonstrated for the first time in an acetogen, we generated single mutants as well as double mutants for both aor and adhE isoforms to confirm the role of each gene. The aor1+2 double knockout strain lost the ability to convert exogenous acetate, propionate and butyrate into the corresponding alcohols, further highlighting the role of these enzymes in catalyzing the thermodynamically unfavourable reduction of carboxylic acids into alcohols. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evidence for the bacterial origin of genes encoding fermentation enzymes of the amitochondriate protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, B; Mai, Z; Caplivski, D; Ghosh, S; de la Vega, H; Graf, T; Samuelson, J

    1997-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is an amitochondriate protozoan parasite with numerous bacterium-like fermentation enzymes including the pyruvate:ferredoxin oxidoreductase (POR), ferredoxin (FD), and alcohol dehydrogenase E (ADHE). The goal of this study was to determine whether the genes encoding these cytosolic E. histolytica fermentation enzymes might derive from a bacterium by horizontal transfer, as has previously been suggested for E. histolytica genes encoding heat shock protein 60, nicotinamide nucleotide transhydrogenase, and superoxide dismutase. In this study, the E. histolytica por gene and the adhE gene of a second amitochondriate protozoan parasite, Giardia lamblia, were sequenced, and their phylogenetic positions were estimated in relation to POR, ADHE, and FD cloned from eukaryotic and eubacterial organisms. The E. histolytica por gene encodes a 1,620-amino-acid peptide that contained conserved iron-sulfur- and thiamine pyrophosphate-binding sites. The predicted E. histolytica POR showed fewer positional identities to the POR of G. lamblia (34%) than to the POR of the enterobacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae (49%), the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. (44%), and the protozoan Trichomonas vaginalis (46%), which targets its POR to anaerobic organelles called hydrogenosomes. Maximum-likelihood, neighbor-joining, and parsimony analyses also suggested as less likely E. histolytica POR sharing more recent common ancestry with G. lamblia POR than with POR of bacteria and the T. vaginalis hydrogenosome. The G. lamblia adhE encodes an 888-amino-acid fusion peptide with an aldehyde dehydrogenase at its amino half and an iron-dependent (class 3) ADH at its carboxy half. The predicted G. lamblia ADHE showed extensive positional identities to ADHE of Escherichia coli (49%), Clostridium acetobutylicum (44%), and E. histolytica (43%) and lesser identities to the class 3 ADH of eubacteria and yeast (19 to 36%). Phylogenetic analyses inferred a closer relationship of the E

  7. Reduction in hepatic drug metabolizing CYP3A4 activities caused by P450 oxidoreductase mutations identified in patients with disordered steroid metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flueck, Christa E.; Mullis, Primus E.; Pandey, Amit V.

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), metabolizes 50% of drugs in clinical use and requires NADPH-P450 reductase (POR). → Mutations in human POR cause congenital adrenal hyperplasia from diminished activities of steroid metabolizing P450s. → We are reporting that mutations in POR may reduce CYP3A4 activity. → POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X lost 99%, while A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 60-85% CYP3A4 activity. → Reduction of CYP3A4 activity may cause increased risk of drug toxicities/adverse drug reactions in patients with POR mutations. -- Abstract: Cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4), the major P450 present in human liver metabolizes approximately half the drugs in clinical use and requires electrons supplied from NADPH through NADPH-P450 reductase (POR, CPR). Mutations in human POR cause a rare form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia from diminished activities of steroid metabolizing P450s. In this study we examined the effect of mutations in POR on CYP3A4 activity. We used purified preparations of wild type and mutant human POR and in vitro reconstitution with purified CYP3A4 to perform kinetic studies. We are reporting that mutations in POR identified in patients with disordered steroidogenesis/Antley-Bixler syndrome (ABS) may reduce CYP3A4 activity, potentially affecting drug metabolism in individuals carrying mutant POR alleles. POR mutants Y181D, A457H, Y459H, V492E and R616X had more than 99% loss of CYP3A4 activity, while POR mutations A287P, C569Y and V608F lost 60-85% activity. Loss of CYP3A4 activity may result in increased risk of drug toxicities and adverse drug reactions in patients with POR mutations.

  8. Genetic polymorphism 609C>T in NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 enhances the risk of proximal colon cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freriksen, J.J.; Salomon, J.; Roelofs, H.M.; Morsche, R.H. te; Stappen, J.W. van der; Dura, P.; Witteman, B.J.; Lacko, M.; Peters, W.H.

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal (GI) cancer is responsible for the majority of deaths among all types of cancer. Lifestyle factors may not only be the main risk factor for GI cancer but reactive oxygen species (ROS) may also be involved. The single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) 609C>T (rs1800566) and 465C>T

  9. Investigation of protein FTT1103 electroactivity using carbon and mercury electrodes. Surface-inhibition approach for disulfide oxidoreductases using silver amalgam powder

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Večerková, R.; Hernychová, L.; Dobeš, P.; Vrba, J.; Josypčuk, Bohdan; Bartošík, M.; Vacek, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 830, JUN 2014 (2014), s. 23-32 ISSN 0003-2670 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Disulfide bond forming protein * Electrochemical sensing * Membrane proteins Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.513, year: 2014

  10. Flavonolignan 2,3-dehydrosilydianin activates Nrf2 and upregulates NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 in Hepa1c1c7 cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Roubalová, L.; Dinkova-Kostova, A.T.; Biedermann, David; Křen, Vladimír; Ulrichová, J.; Vrba, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 119, Jun 2017 (2017), s. 115-120 ISSN 0367-326X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-03037S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1304; GA MŠk(CZ) LD15081 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Silybum marianum * Silymarin * Flavonolignans Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry OBOR OECD: Biochemistry and molecular biology Impact factor: 2.698, year: 2016

  11. H2O2 production rate in Lactobacillus johnsonii is modulated via the interplay of a heterodimeric flavin oxidoreductase with a soluble 28 Kd PAS domain containing protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, Ricardo B; Graves, Christina; Wright, Kaitlyn; Gardner, Christopher L; Lorca, Graciela L; Gonzalez, Claudio F

    2015-01-01

    Host and commensals crosstalk, mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS), has triggered a growing scientific interest to understand the mechanisms governing such interaction. However, the majority of the scientific studies published do not evaluate the ROS production by commensals bacteria. In this context we recently showed that Lactobacillus johnsonii N6.2, a strain of probiotic value, modulates the activity of the critical enzymes 2,3-indoleamine dioxygenase via H2O2 production. L. johnsonii N6.2 by decreasing IDO activity, is able to modify the tryptophan/kynurenine ratio in the host blood with further systemic consequences. Understanding the mechanisms of H2O2 production is critical to predict the probiotic value of these strains and to optimize bacterial biomass production in industrial processes. We performed a transcriptome analysis to identify genes differentially expressed in L. johnsonii N6.2 cells collected from cultures grown under different aeration conditions. Herein we described the biochemical characteristics of a heterodimeric FMN reductase (FRedA/B) whose in vitro activity is controlled by LjPAS protein with a typical Per-Arnst-Sim (PAS) sensor domain. Interestingly, LjPAS is fused to the FMN reductase domains in other lactobacillaceae. In L. johnsonii, LjPAS is encoded by an independent gene which expression is repressed under anaerobic conditions (>3 fold). Purified LjPAS was able to slow down the FRedA/B initial activity rate when the holoenzyme precursors (FredA, FredB, and FMN) were mixed in vitro. Altogether the results obtained suggest that LjPAS module regulates the H2O2 production helping the cells to minimize oxidative stress in response to environmental conditions.

  12. Crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction studies of the flavoenzyme NAD(P)H:(acceptor) oxidoreductase (FerB) from the soil bacterium Paracoccus denitrificans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klumpler, Tomáš; Sedláček, Vojtěch; Marek, Jaromír; Wimmerová, Michaela; Kučera, Igor

    2010-01-01

    The flavin-dependent enzyme FerB from P. denitrificans has been purified and both native and SeMet-substituted FerB have been crystallized. The two variants crystallized in two different crystallographic forms belonging to the monoclinic space group P2 1 and the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2, respectively. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 1.75 Å resolution for both forms. The flavin-dependent enzyme FerB from Paracoccus denitrificans reduces a broad range of compounds, including ferric complexes, chromate and most notably quinones, at the expense of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide cofactors NADH or NADPH. Recombinant unmodified and SeMet-substituted FerB were crystallized under similar conditions by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method with microseeding using PEG 4000 as the precipitant. FerB crystallized in several different crystal forms, some of which diffracted to approximately 1.8 Å resolution. The crystals of native FerB belonged to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 61.6, b = 110.1, c = 65.2 Å, β = 118.2° and four protein molecules in the asymmetric unit, whilst the SeMet-substituted form crystallized in space group P2 1 2 1 2, with unit-cell parameters a = 61.2, b = 89.2, c = 71.5 Å and two protein molecules in the asymmetric unit. Structure determination by the three-wavelength MAD/MRSAD method is now in progress

  13. Differences in activities of antioxidant superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase and prooxidant xanthine oxidoreductase/xanthine oxidase in the normal corneal epithelium of various mammalia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Andonova, Janetta; Pláteník, J.; Vejražka, M.; Štípek, S.; Ardan, Taras; Čejka, Čestmír; Midelfart, A.; Čejková, Jitka

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 1 (2007), s. 105-112 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/06/1379 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Mammalia * Cornea * Epithelium Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 1.505, year: 2007

  14. [Mitochondrial disease due to the deficit of Q-cytochrome C oxidoreductase coenzyme in the respiratory chain. Report of a new case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, S; Lluch, M D; Navarro Quesada, F J; Hevia, A

    1995-01-01

    Reference has been made in the literature of the variability in the clinical presentation of deficiency of complex III of the respiratory chain, identifying up to the moment, four groups, the first of which is characterized by hipotonia and wearness starting at variable ages. We report a new case of mitochondrial myopathy due to deficiency of this complex and included within this first group, and consider the importance of defining the clinical and histochemical characteristics of this polymorphous entity.

  15. Study on radiation-induced deactivation and post-deactivation of some oxidoreductases in dilute aqueous solution and protective effect: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yiqing; Ha Hongfei

    1993-01-01

    In this work the radiation-induced deactivation of catalase in dilute aqueous solution was reported. The effects of irradiation atmosphere, temperature and original concentration of catalase in dilute aqueous solutions on the deactivation of catalase were investigated. The protective effect by some additives (CH 3 CH 2 OH, HCOONa and EDTA) to radiation deactivation in dilute aqueous solutions was also studied. Remarkable protective effect by those additives was observed. The mechanism of radiation deactivation and protective effect have been discussed

  16. Deficiency of the iron-sulfur clusters of mitochondrial reduced nicotinamide-adenine dinucleotide-ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex I) in an infant with congenital lactic acidosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Moreadith, R W; Batshaw, M L; Ohnishi, T; Kerr, D; Knox, B; Jackson, D; Hruban, R; Olson, J; Reynafarje, B; Lehninger, A L

    1984-01-01

    We report the case of an infant with hypoglycemia, progressive lactic acidosis, an increased serum lactate/pyruvate ratio, and elevated plasma alanine, who had a moderate to profound decrease in the ability of mitochondria from four organs to oxidize pyruvate, malate plus glutamate, citrate, and other NAD+-linked respiratory substrates. The capacity to oxidize the flavin adenine dinucleotide-linked substrate, succinate, was normal. The most pronounced deficiency was in skeletal muscle, the le...

  17. Age-related changes in superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, catalase and xanthine oxidoreductase/xanthine oxidase activities in the rabbit cornea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čejková, Jitka; Vejražka, M.; Pláteník, J.; Štípek, S.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 39, - (2004), s. 1537-1543 ISSN 0531-5565 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/03/0419 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:AV0Z5008914 Keywords : aging * cornea Subject RIV: FF - HEENT, Dentistry Impact factor: 2.880, year: 2004

  18. H2O2 production rate in Lactobacillus johnsonii is modulated via the interplay of a heterodimeric flavin oxidoreductase with a soluble 28 Kd PAS domain containing protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo B Valladares

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Host and commensals crosstalk, mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS, has triggered a growing scientific interest to understand the mechanisms governing such interaction. However, the majority of the scientific studies published do not evaluate the ROS production by commensals bacteria. In this context we recently showed that Lactobacillus johnsonii N6.2, a strain of probiotic value, modulates the activity of the critical enzymes 2,3-indoleamine dioxygenase via H2O2 production. L. johnsonii N6.2 by decreasing IDO activity, is able to modify the tryptophan/kynurenine ratio in the host blood with further systemic consequences. Understanding the mechanisms of H2O2 production is critical to predict the probiotic value of these strains and to optimize bacterial biomass production in industrial processes. We performed a transcriptome analysis to identify genes differentially expressed in L. johnsonii N6.2 cells collected from cultures grown under different aeration conditions. Herein we described the biochemical characteristics of a heterodimeric FMN reductase (FRedA/B whose in vitro activity is controlled by LjPAS protein with a typical Per-Arnst-Sim (PAS sensor domain. Interestingly, LjPAS is fused to the FMN reductase domains in other lactobacillaceae. In L. johnsonii, LjPAS is encoded by an independent gene which expression is repressed under anaerobic conditions (>3 fold. Purified LjPAS was able to slow down the FRedA/B initial activity rate when the holoenzyme precursors (FredA, FredB and FMN were mixed in vitro. Altogether the results obtained suggest that LjPAS module regulates the H2O2 production helping the cells to minimize oxidative stress in response to environmental conditions.

  19. The weathervane model, a functional and structural organization of the two-component alkanesulfonate oxidoreductase SsuD from Xanthomonas citri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pegos, V.R.; Oliveira, P.S.L.; Balan, A.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: In Xanthomonas citri, the phytopathogen responsible for the canker citrus disease, we identified in the ssuABCDE operon, genes encoding the alkanesulfonate ABC transporter as well as the two enzymes responsible for oxido reduction of the respective substrates. SsuD and SsuE proteins represent a two-component system that can be assigned to the group of FMNH 2 -dependent monooxygenases. How- ever, despite of the biochemical information about SsuD and SsuE orthologs from Escherichia coli, there is no structural information of how the two proteins work together. In this work, we used ultracentrifugation, SAXS data and molecular modeling to construct a structural/functional model, which consists of eight molecules organized in a weathervane shape. Through this model, SsuD ligand-binding site for NADPH 2 and FMN substrates is clearly exposed, in a way that might allow the protein-protein interactions with SsuE. Moreover, based on molecular dynamics simulations of SsuD in apo state, docked with NADPH 2 , FMN or both substrates, we characterized the residues of the pocket, the mechanism of substrate interaction and transfer of electrons from NADPH 2 to FMN. This is the first report that links functional and biochemical data with structural analyses. (author)

  20. Effect of GAPDH-derived antimicrobial peptides on sensitive yeasts cells: membrane permeability, intracellular pH and H+-influx/-efflux rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Patrícia; Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils; Prista, Catarina

    2018-05-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae secretes antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) derived from glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), which induce the death of several non-Saccharomyces yeasts. Previously, we demonstrated that the naturally secreted GAPDH-derived AMPs (i.e. saccharomycin) caused a loss of culturability and decreased the intracellular pH (pHi) of Hanseniaspora guilliermondii cells. In this study, we show that chemically synthesised analogues of saccharomycin also induce a pHi drop and loss of culturability in H. guilliermondii, although to a lesser extent than saccharomycin. To assess the underlying causes of the pHi drop, we evaluated the membrane permeability to H+ cations of H. guilliermondii cells, after being exposed to saccharomycin or its synthetic analogues. Results showed that the H+-efflux decreased by 75.6% and the H+-influx increased by 66.5% in cells exposed to saccharomycin at pH 3.5. Since H+-efflux via H+-ATPase is energy dependent, reduced glucose consumption would decrease ATP production and consequently H+-ATPase activity. However, glucose uptake rates were not affected, suggesting that the AMPs rather than affecting glucose transporters may affect directly the plasma membrane H+-ATPase or increase ATP leakage due to cell membrane disturbance. Thus, our study revealed that both saccharomycin and its synthetic analogues induced cell death of H. guilliermondii by increasing the proton influx and inhibiting the proton efflux.

  1. DNA sequence analysis of herbarium specimens facilitates the revival of Botrytis mali, a postharvest pathogen of apple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Gorman, Daniel T; Sholberg, Peter L; Stokes, Sarah C; Ginns, J

    2008-01-01

    The fungus Botrytis cinerea has been widely accepted as the species responsible for causing gray mold decay of apple, although a second species causing apple decay, B. mali, was reported in 1931. Botrytis mali was validly published in 1931, nevertheless it has always been considered a doubtful species. To study the relationship of Botrytis isolates causing gray mold on apple, DNA sequence analysis was employed. Twenty-eight Botrytis isolates consisting of 10 species were sampled, including two B. mali herbarium specimens from apple originally deposited in 1932. The DNA sequence analysis of the beta-tubulin and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) genes placed the isolates into groupings with defined species boundaries that generally reflected the morphologically based model for Botrytis classification. The B. cinerea isolates from apple and other host plants were placed in a single clade. The B. mali herbarium specimens however always fell well outside that clade. The DNA sequence analysis reported in this study support the initial work by Ruehle (1931) describing the apple pathogen B. mali as a unique species.

  2. Sex determination using free fetal DNA in early pregnancy: With the approach to sex linked recessive disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Monfaredan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prenatal diagnosis is testing for detection of diseases or conditions in a fetus or embryo before it is born. Most of prenatal diagnostic (PD techniques are invasive and done in late stages of pregnancy. Using fetal DNA in maternal blood for fetal sex determination in early pregnancy might help in management of X-linked genetic diseases. This study aimed to investigate the accuracy of sex determination using fetal DNA in maternal blood at 8-12 weeks of gestation. Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 30 pregnant women at 8-12 weeks of gestation were enrolled. The sex-determining region Y (SRY gene expression with the internal control (IC glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH was investigated with quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR using specific primers and probes. Results: Accuracy of sex determination with SRY gene expression in 8-12 weeks of pregnancy were 85%, 85%, 90% and 100% respectively. Conclusion: It seems that fetal sex determining using fetal DNA in maternal blood is a reliable method for early stage of pregnancy.

  3. Thioredoxin 1 regulation of protein S-desulfhydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngjun Ju

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The importance of H2S in biology and medicine has been widely recognized in recent years, and protein S-sulfhydration is proposed to mediate the direct actions of H2S bioactivity in the body. Thioredoxin 1 (Trx1 is an important reducing enzyme that cleaves disulfides in proteins and acts as an S-denitrosylase. The regulation of Trx1 on protein S-sulfhydration is unclear. Here we showed that Trx1 facilitates protein S-desulfhydration. Overexpression of Trx1 attenuated the basal level and H2S-induced protein S-sulfhydration by direct interaction with S-sulfhydrated proteins, i.e., glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase. In contrast, knockdown of Trx1 mRNA expression by short interfering RNA or blockage of Trx1 redox activity with PX12 or 2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene enhanced protein S-sulfhydration. Mutation of cysteine-32 but not cysteine-35 in the Trp–Cys32–Gly–Pro–Cys35 motif eliminated the binding of Trx1 with S-sulfhydrated proteins and abolished the S-desulfhydrating effect of Trx1. All these data suggest that Trx1 acts as an S-desulfhydrase.

  4. Effects of repeated 9 and 30-day exposure to extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on social recognition behavior and estrogen receptors expression in olfactory bulb of Wistar female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Mondragón, C; Arriaga-Avila, V; Martínez-Abundis, E; Barrera-Mera, B; Mercado-Gómez, O; Guevara-Guzmán, R

    2017-02-01

    We investigated the short- and long-term effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) on social recognition behavior and expression of α- and β-estrogen receptors (ER). Rats were exposed to 60-Hz electromagnetic fields for 9 or 30 days and tested for social recognition behavior. Immunohistochemistry and western blot assays were performed to evaluate α- and β-ER expression in the olfactory bulb of intact, ovariectomized (OVX), and ovariectomized+estradiol (E2) replacement (OVX+E2). Ovariectomization showed impairment of social recognition after 9 days of EMF exposure and a complete recovery after E2 replacement and so did those after 30 days. Short EMF exposure increased expression of β-ER in intact, but not in the others. Longer exposure produced a decrease in intact but an increase in OVX and OVX+E2. Our findings suggest a significant role for β-estrogen receptors and a lack of effect for α-estrogen receptors on a social recognition task. EMF: extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields; ERs: estrogen receptors; OB: olfactory bulb; OVX: ovariectomized; OVX + E 2 : ovariectomized + estradiol replacement; IEI: interexposure interval; β-ER: beta estrogen receptor; E 2 : replacement of estradiol; GAPDH: glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; WB: Western blot; PBS: phosphate-buffer saline; PB: phosphate-buffer.

  5. Pneumococcal DNA-binding proteins released through autolysis induce the production of proinflammatory cytokines via toll-like receptor 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Kosuke; Domon, Hisanori; Maekawa, Tomoki; Oda, Masataka; Hiyoshi, Takumi; Tamura, Hikaru; Yonezawa, Daisuke; Arai, Yoshiaki; Yokoji, Mai; Tabeta, Koichi; Habuka, Rie; Saitoh, Akihiko; Yamaguchi, Masaya; Kawabata, Shigetada; Terao, Yutaka

    2018-03-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia. Our previous study suggested that S. pneumoniae autolysis-dependently releases intracellular pneumolysin, which subsequently leads to lung injury. In this study, we hypothesized that pneumococcal autolysis induces the leakage of additional intracellular molecules that could increase the pathogenicity of S. pneumoniae. Liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry analysis identified that chaperone protein DnaK, elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) were released with pneumococcal DNA by autolysis. We demonstrated that recombinant (r) DnaK, rEF-Tu, and rGAPDH induced significantly higher levels of interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor production in peritoneal macrophages and THP-1-derived macrophage-like cells via toll-like receptor 4. Furthermore, the DNA-binding activity of these proteins was confirmed by surface plasmon resonance assay. We demonstrated that pneumococcal DnaK, EF-Tu, and GAPDH induced the production of proinflammatory cytokines in macrophages, and might cause host tissue damage and affect the development of pneumococcal diseases. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Transport of 3-bromopyruvate across the human erythrocyte membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowska-Bartosz, Izabela; Soszyński, Mirosław; Ułaszewski, Stanisław; Ko, Young; Bartosz, Grzegorz

    2014-06-01

    3-Bromopyruvic acid (3-BP) is a promising anticancer compound because it is a strong inhibitor of glycolytic enzymes, especially glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The Warburg effect means that malignant cells are much more dependent on glycolysis than normal cells. Potential complications of anticancer therapy with 3-BP are side effects due to its interaction with normal cells, especially erythrocytes. Transport into cells is critical for 3-BP to have intracellular effects. The aim of our study was the kinetic characterization of 3-BP transport into human erythrocytes. 3-BP uptake by erythrocytes was linear within the first 3 min and pH-dependent. The transport rate decreased with increasing pH in the range of 6.0-8.0. The Km and Vm values for 3-BP transport were 0.89 mM and 0.94 mmol/(l cells x min), respectively. The transport was inhibited competitively by pyruvate and significantly inhibited by DIDS, SITS, and 1-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid. Flavonoids also inhibited 3-BP transport: the most potent inhibition was found for luteolin and quercetin.

  7. Over-expression of GAPDH in human colorectal carcinoma as a preferred target of 3-bromopyruvate propyl ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhenjie; Yuan, Shuqiang; Hu, Yumin; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Wenjing; Zeng, Zhaolei; Yang, Jing; Yun, Jingping; Xu, Ruihua; Huang, Peng

    2012-02-01

    It has long been observed that many cancer cells exhibit increased aerobic glycolysis and rely more on this pathway to generate ATP and metabolic intermediates for cell proliferation. Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a key enzyme in glycolysis and has been known as a housekeeping molecule. In the present study, we found that GAPDH expression was significantly up-regulated in human colorectal carcinoma tissues compared to the adjacent normal tissues, and also increased in colon cancer cell lines compared to the non-tumor colon mucosa cells in culture. The expression of GAPDH was further elevated in the liver metastatic tissues compared to the original colon cancer tissue of the same patients, suggesting that high expression of GAPDH might play an important role in colon cancer development and metastasis. Importantly, we found that 3-bromopyruvate propyl ester (3-BrOP) preferentially inhibited GAPDH and exhibited potent activity in inducing colon cancer cell death by causing severe depletion of ATP. 3-BrOP at low concentrations (1-10 μM) inhibited GAPDH and a much higher concentration (300 μM) was required to inhibit hexokinase-2. The cytotoxic effect of 3-BrOP was associated with its inhibition of GAPDH, and colon cancer cells with loss of p53 were more sensitive to this compound. Our study suggests that GAPDH may be a potential target for colon cancer therapy.

  8. 3-Bromopyruvate as a potential pharmaceutical in the light of experimental data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczuka, Izabela; Gamian, Andrzej; Terlecki, Grzegorz

    2017-12-08

    3-Bromopyruvate (3-BrPA) is an halogenated analogue of pyruvic acid known for over four decades as an alkylating agent reacting with thiol groups of many proteins. It enters animal cells like a lactate: via monocarboxylic acid transporters. Increasing interest in this compound, in recent times, is mainly due to hopes associated with its anticancer action. It is based on the impairment of energy metabolism of tumor cells by inhibiting enzymes in the glycolysis pathway (hexokinase II, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, phosphoglycerate kinase) and the oxidative phosphorylation (succinate dehydrogenase). Two cases of clinical application of this compound in the treatment of advanced cancers were reported. By using 3-BrPA, rheumatoid arthritis in SKG mice has been reduced. This compound has also antiparasitic activity: lowers cell viability of Trypanosoma brucei, decreases intracellular proliferation of Toxoplasma gondii and reduces the metabolic activity of Schistosoma mansoni. It also has antifungal properties; particularly it acts strongly on Cryptococcus neoformans, as well as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An inhibitory effect on bacterial enzymes was also described on: isocitrate lyase from Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Pseudomonas indigofera and 2-methylisocitrate lyase, succinate dehydrogenase and acetohydroxylic acid synthase from Escherichia coli. Wherever undesirable (cancer, parasitic) cells differ from normal by more intense glycolysis and higher energy needs, there is a good chance of successful 3-BrPA use. However, this compound acts on all cells and it, therefore, seems that its future as a pharmaceutical is dependent upon the development of appropriate methods for its effective and safe application.

  9. Anticancer efficacy of the metabolic blocker 3-bromopyruvate: specific molecular targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy-Kanniappan, Shanmugasundaram; Kunjithapatham, Rani; Geschwind, Jean-Francois

    2013-01-01

    The anticancer efficacy of the pyruvate analog 3-bromopyruvate has been demonstrated in multiple tumor models. The chief principle underlying the antitumor effects of 3-bromopyruvate is its ability to effectively target the energy metabolism of cancer cells. Biochemically, the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) has been identified as the primary target of 3-bromopyruvate. Its inhibition results in the depletion of intracellular ATP, causing cell death. Several reports have also demonstrated that in addition to GAPDH inhibition, the induction of cellular stress also contributes to 3-bromopyruvate treatment-dependent apoptosis. Furthermore, recent evidence shows that 3-bromopyruvate is taken up selectively by tumor cells via the monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs) that are frequently overexpressed in cancer cells (for the export of lactate produced during aerobic glycolysis). The preferential uptake of 3-bromopyruvate via MCTs facilitates selective targeting of tumor cells while leaving healthy and non-malignant tissue untouched. Taken together, the specificity of molecular (GAPDH) targeting and selective uptake by tumor cells, underscore the potential of 3-bromopyruvate as a potent and promising anticancer agent. In this review, we highlight the mechanistic characteristics of 3-bromopyruvate and discuss its potential for translation into the clinic.

  10. 3-bromopyruvate inhibits glycolysis, depletes cellular glutathione, and compromises the viability of cultured primary rat astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrke, Eric; Arend, Christian; Dringen, Ralf

    2015-07-01

    The pyruvate analogue 3-bromopyruvate (3-BP) is an electrophilic alkylator that is considered a promising anticancer drug because it has been shown to kill cancer cells efficiently while having little toxic effect on nontumor cells. To test for potential adverse effects of 3-BP on brain cells, we exposed cultured primary rat astrocytes to 3-BP and investigated the effects of this compound on cell viability, glucose metabolism, and glutathione (GSH) content. The presence of 3-BP severely compromised cell viability and slowed cellular glucose consumption and lactate production in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximal effects observed at about 100 µM 3-BP after 4 hr of incubation. The cellular hexokinase activity was not affected in 3-BP-treated astrocytes, whereas within 30 min after application of 3-BP the activity of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) was inhibited, and cellular GSH content was depleted in a concentration-dependent manner, with half-maximal effects observed at about 30 µM 3-BP. The depletion of cellular GSH after exposure to 100 µM 3-BP was not prevented by the presence of 10 mM of the monocarboxylates lactate or pyruvate, suggesting that 3-BP is not taken up into astrocytes predominantly by monocarboxylate transporters. The data suggest that inhibition of glycolysis by inactivation of GAPDH and GSH depletion contributes to the toxicity that was observed for 3-BP-treated cultured astrocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Carbohydrate metabolism in erythrocytes of copper deficient rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S P J; Cockell, K A; Dawson, B A; Ratnayake, W M N; Lampi, B J; Belonje, B; Black, D B; Plouffe, L J

    2003-11-01

    Dietary copper deficiency is known to adversely affect the circulatory system of fructose-fed rats. Part of the problem may lie in the effect of copper deficiency on intermediary metabolism. To test this, weanling male Long-Evans rats were fed for 4 or 8 weeks on sucrose-based diets containing low or adequate copper content. Copper deficient rats had significantly lower plasma and tissue copper as well as lower plasma copper, zinc-superoxide dismutase activity. Copper deficient rats also had a significantly higher heart:body weight ratio when compared to pair-fed controls. Direct measurement of glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway flux in erythrocytes using (13)C NMR showed no differences in carbon flux from glucose or fructose to pyruvate but a significantly higher flux through the lactate dehydrogenase locus in copper deficient rats (approximately 1.3 times, average of glucose and glucose + fructose measurements). Copper-deficient animals had significantly higher erythrocyte concentrations of glucose, fructose, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and NAD(+). Liver metabolite levels were also affected by copper deficiency being elevated in glycogen and fructose 1-phosphate content. The results show small changes in carbohydrate metabolism of copper deficient rats.

  12. Sida rhomboidea. Roxb leaf extract down-regulates expression of PPARγ2 and leptin genes in high fat diet fed C57BL/6J Mice and retards in vitro 3T3L1 pre-adipocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thounaojam, Menaka C; Jadeja, Ravirajsinh N; Ramani, Umed V; Devkar, Ranjitsinh V; Ramachandran, A V

    2011-01-01

    Sida rhomboidea. Roxb leaf extract (SRLE) is being used by the populace of North-East India to alleviate symptoms of diabetes and obesity. We have previously reported its hypolipidemic and anti-diabetic properties. In this study, we report the effect of SRLE on (i) in vivo modulation of genes controlling high fat diet (HFD) induced obesity and (ii) in vitro 3T3L1 pre-adipocyte differentiation and leptin release. Supplementation with SRLE significantly prevented HFD induced increment in bodyweight, plasma lipids and leptin, visceral adiposity and adipocyte hypertrophy. Also, SRLE supplementation reduced food intake, down regulated PPARγ2, SREBP1c, FAS and LEP expressions and up-regulated CPT-1 in epididymal adipose tissue compared to obese mice. In vitro adipogenesis of 3T3L1 pre-adipocytes was significantly retarded in the presence of SRLE extract. Also decreased triglyceride accumulation, leptin release and glyceraldehyde-3-Phosphate dehydrogenase activity along with higher glycerol release without significant alteration of viability of 3T3L1 pre-adipocytes, was recorded. Our findings suggest that prevention of HFD induced visceral adiposity is primarily by down regulation of PPARγ2 and leptin gene expression coupled with attenuation of food intake in C57BL/6J mice. SRLE induced prevention of pre-adipocytes differentiation, and leptin release further substantiated these findings and scientifically validates the potential application of SRLE as a therapeutic agent against obesity.

  13. Effective mRNA Inhibition in PANC-1 Cells in Vitro Mediated via an mPEG-SeSe-PEI Delivery System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuefeng; Yang, Bin; Liu, Yajie; Qin, Wenjie; Li, Chao; Wang, Lantian; Zheng, Wen; Wu, Yulian

    2016-05-01

    RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene therapy is a promising approach to cure various diseases. However, developing an effective, safe, specific RNAi delivery system remains a major challenge. In this study, a novel redox-responsive polyetherimide (PEI)-based nanovector, mPEG-SeSe-PEI, was developed and its efficacy evaluated. We prepared three mPEG-SeSe-PEI vector candidates for small interfering glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (siGADPH) and determined their physiochemical properties and transfection efficiency using flow cytometry and PEG11.6-SeSe-PEI polymer. We investigated the silencing efficacy of GADPH mRNA expression in PANC-1 cells and observed that PEG11.6-SeSe-PEI/siGADPH (N/P ratio=10) polyplexes possessed the appropriate size and zeta-potential and exhibited excellent in vitro gene silencing effects with the least cytotoxicity in PANC-1 cells. In conclusion, we present PEG11.6-SeSe-PEI as a potential therapeutic gene delivery system for small interfering RNA (siRNA).

  14. Validation of Suitable Reference Genes for RT-qPCR Data in Achyranthes bidentata Blume under Different Experimental Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinting Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR is a sensitive technique for gene expression studies. However, choosing the appropriate reference gene is essential to obtain reliable results for RT-qPCR assays. In the present work, the expression of eight candidate reference genes, EF1-α (elongation factor 1-α, GAPDH (glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, UBC (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, UBQ (polyubiquitin, ACT (actin, β-TUB (β-tubulin, APT1 (adenine phosphoribosyltransferase 1, and 18S rRNA (18S ribosomal RNA, was evaluated in Achyranthes bidentata samples using two algorithms, geNorm and NormFinder. The samples were classified into groups according to developmental stages, various tissues, stresses (cold, heat, drought, NaCl, and hormone treatments (MeJA, IBA, SA. Suitable combination of reference genes for RT-qPCR normalization should be applied according to different experimental conditions. In this study, EF1-α, UBC, and ACT genes were verified as the suitable reference genes across all tested samples. To validate the suitability of the reference genes, we evaluated the relative expression of CAS, which is a gene that may be involved in phytosterol synthesis. Our results provide the foundation for gene expression analysis in A. bidentata and other species of Amaranthaceae.

  15. Drugs in development for Parkinson's disease: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Tom H; Brotchie, Jonathan M

    2006-01-01

    The current development of emerging pharmacological treatments for Parkinson's disease (PD), front preclinical to launch, is summarized. Advances over the past year are highlighted, including the significant progress of several drugs through various stages of development. Several agents have been discontinued from development, either because of adverse effects or lack of clinical efficacy. The methyl-esterified form of L-DOPA (melevodopa) and the monoamine oxidase type B inhibitor rasagiline have both been launched. With regard to the monoamine re-uptake inhibitors, many changes have been witnessed, with new agents reaching preclinical development and pre-existing ones being discontinued or having no development reported. Of the dopamine agonists, many continue to progress successfully through clinical trials. Others have struggled to demonstrate a significant advantage over currently available treatments and have been discontinued. The field of non-dopaminergic treatments remains dynamic. The alpha2 adrenergic receptor antagonists and the adenosine A2A receptor antagonists remain in clinical trials. Trials of the neuronal' synchronization modulator levetiracetam are at an advanced stage, and there has also been a new addition to the class (ie, seletracetam). There has been a change in the landscape of neuroprotective agents that modulate disease progression. Candidates from the classes of growth factors and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase inhibitors have been discontinued, or no development has been reported, and the mixed lineage kinase inhibitor CEP-1347 has been discontinued for PD treatment. Other drugs in this field, such as neuroimmunophilins, estrogens and alpha-synuclein oligomerization inhibitors, remain in development.

  16. An efficient Agrobacterium-mediated transformation method for the edible mushroom Hypsizygus marmoreus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin jing; Shi, Liang; Chen, Hui; Sun, Yun qi; Zhao, Ming wen; Ren, Ang; Chen, Ming jie; Wang, Hong; Feng, Zhi yong

    2014-01-01

    Hypsizygus marmoreus is one of the major edible mushrooms in East Asia. As no efficient transformation method, the molecular and genetics studies were hindered. The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) gene of H. marmoreus was isolated and its promoter was used to drive the hygromycin B phosphotransferase (HPH) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) in H. marmoreus. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was successfully applied in H. marmoreus. The transformation parameters were optimized, and it was found that co-cultivation of bacteria with protoplast at a ratio of 1000:1 at a temperature of 26 °C in medium containing 0.3 mM acetosyringone resulted in the highest transformation efficiency for Agrobacterium strain. Besides, three plasmids, each carrying a different promoter (from H. marmoreus, Ganoderma lucidum and Lentinula edodes) driving the expression of an antibiotic resistance marker, were also tested. The construct carrying the H. marmoreus gpd promoter produced more transformants than other constructs. Our analysis showed that over 85% of the transformants tested remained mitotically stable even after five successive rounds of subculturing. Putative transformants were analyzed for the presence of hph gene by PCR and Southern blot. Meanwhile, the expression of EGFP in H. marmoreus transformants was detected by fluorescence imaging. This ATMT system increases the transformation efficiency of H. marmoreus and may represent a useful tool for molecular genetic studies in this mushroom species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  17. Differential responses of the coral host and their algal symbiont to thermal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Leggat

    Full Text Available The success of any symbiosis under stress conditions is dependent upon the responses of both partners to that stress. The coral symbiosis is particularly susceptible to small increases of temperature above the long term summer maxima, which leads to the phenomenon known as coral bleaching, where the intracellular dinoflagellate symbionts are expelled. Here we for the first time used quantitative PCR to simultaneously examine the gene expression response of orthologs of the coral Acropora aspera and their dinoflagellate symbiont Symbiodinium. During an experimental bleaching event significant up-regulation of genes involved in stress response (HSP90 and HSP70 and carbon metabolism (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase from the coral host were observed. In contrast in the symbiont, HSP90 expression decreased, while HSP70 levels were increased on only one day, and only the α-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase expression levels were found to increase. In addition the changes seen in expression patterns of the coral host were much larger, up to 10.5 fold, compared to the symbiont response, which in all cases was less than 2-fold. This targeted study of the expression of key metabolic and stress genes demonstrates that the response of the coral and their symbiont vary significantly, also a response in the host transcriptome was observed prior to what has previously been thought to be the temperatures at which thermal stress events occur.

  18. A Multi-scale Computational Platform to Mechanistically Assess the Effect of Genetic Variation on Drug Responses in Human Erythrocyte Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mih, Nathan; Brunk, Elizabeth; Bordbar, Aarash; Palsson, Bernhard O

    2016-07-01

    Progress in systems medicine brings promise to addressing patient heterogeneity and individualized therapies. Recently, genome-scale models of metabolism have been shown to provide insight into the mechanistic link between drug therapies and systems-level off-target effects while being expanded to explicitly include the three-dimensional structure of proteins. The integration of these molecular-level details, such as the physical, structural, and dynamical properties of proteins, notably expands the computational description of biochemical network-level properties and the possibility of understanding and predicting whole cell phenotypes. In this study, we present a multi-scale modeling framework that describes biological processes which range in scale from atomistic details to an entire metabolic network. Using this approach, we can understand how genetic variation, which impacts the structure and reactivity of a protein, influences both native and drug-induced metabolic states. As a proof-of-concept, we study three enzymes (catechol-O-methyltransferase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) and their respective genetic variants which have clinically relevant associations. Using all-atom molecular dynamic simulations enables the sampling of long timescale conformational dynamics of the proteins (and their mutant variants) in complex with their respective native metabolites or drug molecules. We find that changes in a protein's structure due to a mutation influences protein binding affinity to metabolites and/or drug molecules, and inflicts large-scale changes in metabolism.

  19. Vitamin C selectively kills KRAS and BRAF mutant colorectal cancer cells by targeting GAPDH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jihye; Mullarky, Edouard; Lu, Changyuan; Bosch, Kaitlyn N; Kavalier, Adam; Rivera, Keith; Roper, Jatin; Chio, Iok In Christine; Giannopoulou, Eugenia G; Rago, Carlo; Muley, Ashlesha; Asara, John M; Paik, Jihye; Elemento, Olivier; Chen, Zhengming; Pappin, Darryl J; Dow, Lukas E; Papadopoulos, Nickolas; Gross, Steven S; Cantley, Lewis C

    2015-12-11

    More than half of human colorectal cancers (CRCs) carry either KRAS or BRAF mutations and are often refractory to approved targeted therapies. We found that cultured human CRC cells harboring KRAS or BRAF mutations are selectively killed when exposed to high levels of vitamin C. This effect is due to increased uptake of the oxidized form of vitamin C, dehydroascorbate (DHA), via the GLUT1 glucose transporter. Increased DHA uptake causes oxidative stress as intracellular DHA is reduced to vitamin C, depleting glutathione. Thus, reactive oxygen species accumulate and inactivate glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Inhibition of GAPDH in highly glycolytic KRAS or BRAF mutant cells leads to an energetic crisis and cell death not seen in KRAS and BRAF wild-type cells. High-dose vitamin C impairs tumor growth in Apc/Kras(G12D) mutant mice. These results provide a mechanistic rationale for exploring the therapeutic use of vitamin C for CRCs with KRAS or BRAF mutations. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Identification of Proteins Involved in Carbohydrate Metabolism and Energy Metabolism Pathways and Their Regulation of Cytoplasmic Male Sterility in Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingxia Geng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS where no functional pollen is produced has important roles in wheat breeding. The anther is a unique organ for male gametogenesis and its abnormal development can cause male sterility. However, the mechanisms and regulatory networks related to plant male sterility are poorly understood. In this study, we conducted comparative analyses using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ of the pollen proteins in a CMS line and its wheat maintainer. Differentially abundant proteins (DAPs were analyzed based on Gene Ontology classifications, metabolic pathways and transcriptional regulation networks using Blast2GO. We identified 5570 proteins based on 23,277 peptides, which matched with 73,688 spectra, including proteins in key pathways such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, pyruvate kinase and 6-phosphofructokinase 1 in the glycolysis pathway, isocitrate dehydrogenase and citrate synthase in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH-dehydrogenase and adenosine-triphosphate (ATP synthases in the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. These proteins may comprise a network that regulates male sterility in wheat. Quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR analysis, ATP assays and total sugar assays validated the iTRAQ results. These DAPs could be associated with abnormal pollen grain formation and male sterility. Our findings provide insights into the molecular mechanism related to male sterility in wheat.

  1. Proteomic Investigation of Protein Profile Changes and Amino Acid Residue Level Modification in Cooked Lamb Meat: The Effect of Boiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tzer-Yang; Morton, James D; Clerens, Stefan; Dyer, Jolon M

    2015-10-21

    Hydrothermal treatment (heating in water) is a common method of general food processing and preparation. For red-meat-based foods, boiling is common; however, how the molecular level effects of this treatment correlate to the overall food properties is not yet well-understood. The effects of differing boiling times on lamb meat and the resultant cooking water were here examined through proteomic evaluation. The longer boiling time was found to result in increased protein aggregation involving particularly proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, as well as truncation in proteins such as in α-actinin-2. Heat-induced protein backbone cleavage was observed adjacent to aspartic acid and asparagine residues. Side-chain modifications of amino acid residues resulting from the heating, including oxidation of phenylalanine and formation of carboxyethyllysine, were characterized in the cooked samples. Actin and myoglobin bands from the cooked meat per se remained visible on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, even after significant cooking time. These proteins were also found to be the major source of observed heat-induced modifications. This study provides new insights into molecular-level modifications occurring in lamb meat proteins during boiling and a protein chemistry basis for better understanding the effect of this common treatment on the nutritional and functional properties of red-meat-based foods.

  2. Photosynthetic carbon fixation characteristics of fruiting structures of Brassica campestris L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singal, H.R.; Sheoran, I.S.; Singh, R.

    1987-01-01

    Activities of key enzymes of the Calvin cycle and C 4 metabolism, rates of CO 2 fixation, and the initial products of photosynthetic 14 CO 2 fixation were determined in the podwall, seed coat (fruiting structures), and the subtending leaf (leaf below a receme) of Brassica campestris L. cv Toria. Compared to activities of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase and other Calvin cycle enzymes, e.g. NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase, the activities of phosphoenol pyruvate carboxylase and other enzymes of C 4 metabolism, viz. NADP-malate dehydrogenase, NADP-malic enzyme, glutamate pyruvate transaminase, and glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase, were generally much higher in seed than in podwall and leaf. Podwall and leaf were comparable to each other. Pulse-chase experiments showed that in seed the major product of 14 CO 2 assimilation was malate (in short time), whereas in podwall and leaf, the label initially appeared in 3-PGA. With time, the label moved to sucrose. In contrast to legumes, Brassica pods were able to fix net CO 2 during light. However, respiratory losses were very high during the dark period

  3. Proteomic evaluation of myofibrillar carbonylation in chilled fish mince and its inhibition by catechin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Manuel; Maestre, Rodrigo; Gallardo, José M; Medina, Isabel

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the susceptibility of individual myofibrillar proteins from mackerel (Scomber scombrus) mince to undergo carbonylation reactions during chilled storage, and the antioxidant capacity of (+)-catechin to prevent oxidative processes of proteins. The carbonylation of each particular protein was quantified by combining the labelling of protein carbonyls by fluorescein-5-thiosemicarbazide (FTSC) with 1-D or 2-D gel electrophoresis. Alpha skeletal actin, glycogen phosphorylase, unnamed protein product (UNP) similar to enolase, pyruvate kinase, isoforms of creatine kinase, aldolase A and an isoform of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) showed elevated oxidation in chilled non-supplemented mince. Myosin heavy chain (MHC) was not carbonylated in chilled muscle, but an extensive MHC degradation was observed in those samples. The supplementation of catechin reduced protein oxidation and lipid oxidation in a concentration-dependent manner: control>25>100≈200ppm. Therefore, the highest catechin concentrations (100 and 200ppm) exhibited the strongest antioxidant activity. Catechin (200ppm) reduced significantly carbonylation of protein spots identified as glycogen phosphorylase, pyruvate kinase muscle isozyme, isoforms of creatine kinase. Conversely, catechin was ineffective to inhibit the oxidation of actin and UNP similar to enolase. These results draw attention to the inefficiency of catechin to prevent actin oxidation, in contrast to the extremely high efficiency of catechin in inhibiting oxidation of lipids and other proteins. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Identification of proteins in hyperglycemia and stroke animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jin-Hee; Shah, Fawad-Ali; Gim, Sang-Ah; Koh, Phil-Ok

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is a major cause of disability and death in adults. Diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that strongly increases the risk of severe vascular diseases. This study compared changes in proteins of the cerebral cortex during ischemic brain injury between nondiabetic and diabetic animals. Adult male rats were injected with streptozotocin (40 mg/kg) via the intraperitoneal route to induce diabetes and underwent surgical middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) 4 wk after streptozotocin treatment. Cerebral cortex tissues were collected 24 h after MCAO and cerebral cortex proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Several proteins were identified as differentially expressed between nondiabetic and diabetic animals. Among the identified proteins, we focused on the following metabolism-related enzymes: isocitrate dehydrogenase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, adenosylhomocysteinase, pyruvate kinase, and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (neuroleukin). Expression of these proteins was decreased in animals that underwent MCAO. Moreover, protein expression was reduced to a greater extent in diabetic animals than in nondiabetic animals. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed that the diabetic condition exacerbates the decrease in expression of metabolism-related proteins after MCAO. These results suggest that the diabetic condition may exacerbate brain damage during focal cerebral ischemia through the downregulation of metabolism-related proteins. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification of proteins regulated by ferulic acid in a middle cerebral artery occlusion animal model-a proteomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Jin-Hee; Cho, Eun-Hae; Cho, Jae-Hyeon; Won, Chung-Kil; Kim, Myeong-Ok; Koh, Phil-Ok

    2012-11-01

    Ferulic acid plays a neuroprotective role in cerebral ischemia. The aim of this study was to identify the proteins that are differentially expressed following ferulic acid treatment during ischemic brain injury using a proteomics technique. Middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was performed to induce a focal cerebral ischemic injury in adult male rats, and ferulic acid (100 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered immediately after MCAO. Brain tissues were collected 24 hr after MCAO. The proteins in the cerebral cortex were separated using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and were identified by mass spectrometry. We detected differentially expressed proteins between vehicle- and ferulic acid-treated animals. Adenosylhomocysteinase, isocitrate dehydrogenase [NAD(+)], mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1 and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were decreased in the vehicle-treated group, and ferulic acid prevented the injury-induced decreases in these proteins. However, pyridoxal phosphate phosphatase and heat shock protein 60 were increased in the vehicle-treated group, while ferulic acid prevented the injury-induced increase in these proteins. It is accepted that these enzymes are involved in cellular metabolism and differentiation. Thus, these findings suggest evidence that ferulic acid plays a neuroprotective role against focal cerebral ischemia through the up- and down-modulation of specific enzymes.

  6. Salt stress induces changes in the proteomic profile of micropropagated sugarcane shoots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Ricardo S.; Heringer, Angelo S.; Rangel, Patricia L.; Santa-Catarina, Claudete; Grativol, Clícia; Veiga, Carlos F. M.; Souza-Filho, Gonçalo A.

    2017-01-01

    Salt stress is one of the most common stresses in agricultural regions worldwide. In particular, sugarcane is affected by salt stress conditions, and no sugarcane cultivar presently show high productivity accompanied by a tolerance to salt stress. Proteomic analysis allows elucidation of the important pathways involved in responses to various abiotic stresses at the biochemical and molecular levels. Thus, this study aimed to analyse the proteomic effects of salt stress in micropropagated shoots of two sugarcane cultivars (CB38-22 and RB855536) using a label-free proteomic approach. The mass spectrometry proteomics data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD006075. The RB855536 cultivar is more tolerant to salt stress than CB38-22. A quantitative label-free shotgun proteomic analysis identified 1172 non-redundant proteins, and 1160 of these were observed in both cultivars in the presence or absence of NaCl. Compared with CB38-22, the RB855536 cultivar showed a greater abundance of proteins involved in non-enzymatic antioxidant mechanisms, ion transport, and photosynthesis. Some proteins, such as calcium-dependent protein kinase, photosystem I, phospholipase D, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, were more abundant in the RB855536 cultivar under salt stress. Our results provide new insights into the response of sugarcane to salt stress, and the changes in the abundance of these proteins might be important for the acquisition of ionic and osmotic homeostasis during exposure to salt stress. PMID:28419154

  7. High CO2 Primes Plant Biotic Stress Defences through Redox-Linked Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhamdi, Amna; Noctor, Graham

    2016-10-01

    Industrial activities have caused tropospheric CO 2 concentrations to increase over the last two centuries, a trend that is predicted to continue for at least the next several decades. Here, we report that growth of plants in a CO 2 -enriched environment activates responses that are central to defense against pathogenic attack. Salicylic acid accumulation was triggered by high-growth CO 2 in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and other plants such as bean (Phaseolus vulgaris). A detailed analysis in Arabidopsis revealed that elevated CO 2 primes multiple defense pathways, leading to increased resistance to bacterial and fungal challenge. Analysis of gene-specific mutants provided no evidence that activation of plant defense pathways by high CO 2 was caused by stomatal closure. Rather, the activation is partly linked to metabolic effects involving redox signaling. In support of this, genetic modification of redox components (glutathione contents and NADPH-generating enzymes) prevents full priming of the salicylic acid pathway and associated resistance by high CO 2 The data point to a particularly influential role for the nonphosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a cytosolic enzyme whose role in plants remains unclear. Our observations add new information on relationships between high CO 2 and oxidative signaling and provide novel insight into plant stress responses in conditions of increased CO 2 . © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Computational identification of miRNAs, their targets and functions in three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Anurag; Raeymaekers, Joost A M; Volckaert, Filip A M

    2014-07-01

    An intriguing question in biology is how the evolution of gene regulation is shaped by natural selection in natural populations. Among the many known regulatory mechanisms, regulation of gene expression by microRNAs (miRNAs) is of critical importance. However, our understanding of their evolution in natural populations is limited. Studying the role of miRNAs in three-spined stickleback, an important natural model for speciation research, may provide new insights into adaptive polymorphisms. However, lack of annotation of miRNA genes in its genome is a bottleneck. To fill this research gap, we used the genome of three-spined stickleback to predict miRNAs and their targets. We predicted 1486 mature miRNAs using the homology-based miRNA prediction approach. We then performed functional annotation and enrichment analysis of these targets, which identified over-represented motifs. Further, a database resource (GAmiRdb) has been developed for dynamically searching miRNAs and their targets exclusively in three-spined stickleback. Finally, the database was used in two case studies focusing on freshwater adaptation in natural populations. In the first study, we found 44 genomic regions overlapping with predicted miRNA targets. In the second study, we identified two SNPs altering the MRE seed site of sperm-specific glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate gene. These findings highlight the importance of the GAmiRdb knowledge base in understanding adaptive evolution. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Characterization and Pathogenicity of Alternaria burnsii from Seeds of Cucurbita maxima (Cucurbitaceae) in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Narayan Chandra; Deng, Jian Xin; Lee, Hyang Burm; Yu, Seung-Hun

    2015-12-01

    In the course of survey of endophytic fungi from Bangladesh pumpkin seeds in 2011~2012, two strains (CNU111042 and CNU111043) with similar colony characteristics were isolated and characterized by their morphology and by molecular phylogenetic analysis of the internal transcribed spacer, glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd), and Alternaria allergen a1 (Alt a1) sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of all three sequences and their combined dataset revealed that the fungus formed a subclade within the A. alternata clade, matching A. burnsi and showing differences with its other closely related Alternaria species, such as A. longipes, A. tomato, and A. tomaticola. Long ellipsoid, obclavate or ovoid beakless conidia, shorter and thinner conidial size (16~60 [90] × 6.5~14 [~16] µm) distinguish this fungus from other related species. These isolates showed more transverse septation (2~11) and less longitudinal septation (0~3) than did other related species. Moreover, the isolate did not produce any diffusible pigment on media. Therefore, our results reveal that the newly recorded fungus from a new host, Cucurbita maxima, is Alternaria burnsii Uppal, Patel & Kamat.

  10. Engineering a functional 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, James [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). California Institute of Quantitative Biosciences (QB3); Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Dietzel, Kevin L. [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Wichmann, Gale [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Chan, Rossana [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). California Institute of Quantitative Biosciences (QB3); Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Antipov, Eugene [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Moss, Nathan [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Baidoo, Edward E. K. [Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Jackson, Peter [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Gaucher, Sara P. [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Gottlieb, Shayin [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); LaBarge, Jeremy [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Mahatdejkul, Tina [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Hawkins, Kristy M. [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Muley, Sheela [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Newman, Jack D. [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States); Liu, Pinghua [Boston Univ., MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Keasling, Jay D. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). California Institute of Quantitative Biosciences (QB3); Joint BioEnergy Inst. (JBEI), Emeryville, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Depts. of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering and Bioengineering; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Biological Systems & Engineering Div.; Technical Univ. of Denmark, Hoesholm (Denmark). Novo Nodisk Foundation Center for Biosustainability; Zhao, Lishan [Amyris, inc., Emeryville, CA (United States)

    2016-10-27

    Isoprenoids are made by all free-living organisms and range from essential metabolites like sterols and quinones to more complex compounds like pinene and rubber. They are used in many commercial applications and much work has gone into engineering microbial hosts for their production. Isoprenoids are produced either from acetyl-CoA via the mevalonate pathway or from pyruvate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate via the 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) pathway. Saccharomyces cerevisiae exclusively utilizes the mevalonate pathway to synthesize native isoprenoids and in fact the alternative DXP pathway has never been found or successfully reconstructed in the eukaryotic cytosol. There are, however, several advantages to isoprenoid synthesis via the DXP pathway, such as a higher theoretical yield, and it has long been a goal to transplant the pathway into yeast. In this work, we investigate and address barriers to DXP pathway functionality in S. cerevisiae using a combination of synthetic biology, biochemistry and metabolomics. We report, for the first time, functional expression of the DXP pathway in S. cerevisiae. Under low aeration conditions, an engineered strain relying solely on the DXP pathway for isoprenoid biosynthesis achieved an endpoint biomass 80% of that of the same strain using the mevalonate pathway.

  11. Alt a 1 allergen homologs from Alternaria and related taxa: analysis of phylogenetic content and secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Soon Gyu; Cramer, Robert A; Lawrence, Christopher B; Pryor, Barry M

    2005-02-01

    A gene for the Alternaria major allergen, Alt a 1, was amplified from 52 species of Alternaria and related genera, and sequence information was used for phylogenetic study. Alt a 1 gene sequences evolved 3.8 times faster and contained 3.5 times more parsimony-informative sites than glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (gpd) sequences. Analyses of Alt a 1 gene and gpd exon sequences strongly supported grouping of Alternaria spp. and related taxa into several species-groups described in previous studies, especially the infectoria, alternata, porri, brassicicola, and radicina species-groups and the Embellisia group. The sonchi species-group was newly suggested in this study. Monophyly of the Nimbya group was moderately supported, and monophyly of the Ulocladium group was weakly supported. Relationships among species-groups and among closely related species of the same species-group were not fully resolved. However, higher resolution could be obtained using Alt a 1 sequences or a combined dataset than using gpd sequences alone. Despite high levels of variation in amino acid sequences, results of in silico prediction of protein secondary structure for Alt a 1 demonstrated a high degree of structural similarity for most of the species suggesting a conservation of function.

  12. Pyruvate remediation of cell stress and genotoxicity induced by haloacetic acid drinking water disinfection by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dad, Azra; Jeong, Clara H; Pals, Justin A; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Monohaloacetic acids (monoHAAs) are a major class of drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) and are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. We propose a model of toxic action based on monoHAA-mediated inhibition of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) as a target cytosolic enzyme. This model predicts that GAPDH inhibition by the monoHAAs will lead to a severe reduction of cellular ATP levels and repress the generation of pyruvate. A loss of pyruvate will lead to mitochondrial stress and genomic DNA damage. We found a concentration-dependent reduction of ATP in Chinese hamster ovary cells after monoHAA treatment. ATP reduction per pmol monoHAA followed the pattern of iodoacetic acid (IAA) > bromoacetic acid (BAA) > chloroacetic acid (CAA), which is the pattern of potency observed with many toxicological endpoints. Exogenous supplementation with pyruvate enhanced ATP levels and attenuated monoHAA-induced genomic DNA damage as measured with single cell gel electrophoresis. These data were highly correlated with the SN 2 alkylating potentials of the monoHAAs and with the induction of toxicity. The results from this study strongly support the hypothesis that GAPDH inhibition and the possible subsequent generation of reactive oxygen species is linked with the cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, teratogenicity, and neurotoxicity of these DBPs. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Development and validation of quantitative PCR assays to measure cytokine transcript levels in the Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Jason; Hunter, Margaret; Wellehan, James F.X.

    2018-01-01

    Cytokines have important roles in the mammalian response to viral and bacterial infections, trauma, and wound healing. Because of early cytokine production after physiologic stresses, the regulation of messenger RNA (mRNA) transcripts can be used to assess immunologic responses before changes in protein production. To detect and assess early immune changes in endangered Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris), we developed and validated a panel of quantitative PCR assays to measure mRNA transcription levels for the cytokines interferon (IFN)-γ; interleukin (IL)-2, -6, and -10; tumor necrosis factor-α, and the housekeeping genes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and β-actin (reference genes). Assays were successfully validated using blood samples from free-ranging, apparently healthy manatees from the east and west coasts of central Florida. No cytokine or housekeeping gene transcription levels were significantly different among age classes or sexes. However, the transcription levels for GAPDH, IL-2, IL-6, and IFN-γ were significantly higher (Puse as a reference gene in future studies. Our assays can aid in the investigation of manatee immune response to physical trauma and novel or ongoing environmental stressors.

  14. Effect of crude oil petroleum hydrocarbons on protein expression of the prawn Macrobrachium borellii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquevich, M Y; Dreon, M S; Gutierrez Rivera, J N; Vázquez Boucard, C; Heras, H

    2013-05-01

    Hydrocarbon pollution is a major environmental threat to ecosystems in marine and freshwater environments, but its toxicological effect on aquatic organisms remains little studied. A proteomic approach was used to analyze the effect of a freshwater oil spill on the prawn Macrobrachium borellii. To this aim, proteins were extracted from midgut gland (hepatopancreas) of male and female prawns exposed 7 days to a sublethal concentration (0.6 ppm) of water-soluble fraction of crude oil (WSF). Exposure to WSF induced responses at the protein expression level. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) revealed 10 protein spots that were differentially expressed by WSF exposure. Seven proteins were identified using MS/MS and de novo sequencing. Nm23 oncoprotein, arginine methyltransferase, fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase and glutathione S-transferase were down-regulated, whereas two glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase isoforms and a lipocalin-like crustacyanin (CTC) were up-regulated after WSF exposure. CTC mRNA levels were further analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR showing an increased expression after WSF exposure. The proteins identified are involved in carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, detoxification, transport of hydrophobic molecules and cellular homeostasis among others. These results provide evidence for better understanding the toxic mechanisms of hydrocarbons. Moreover, some of these differentially expressed proteins would be employed as potential novel biomarkers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Heterogenic expression of genes encoding secreted proteins at the periphery of Aspergillus niger colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinck, Arman; de Bekker, Charissa; Ossin, Adam; Ohm, Robin A; de Vries, Ronald P; Wösten, Han A B

    2011-01-01

    Colonization of a substrate by fungi starts with the invasion of exploring hyphae. These hyphae secrete enzymes that degrade the organic material into small molecules that can be taken up by the fungus to serve as nutrients. We previously showed that only part of the exploring hyphae of Aspergillus niger highly express the glucoamylase gene glaA. This was an unexpected finding since all exploring hyphae are exposed to the same environmental conditions. Using GFP as a reporter, we here demonstrate that the acid amylase gene aamA, the α-glucuronidase gene aguA, and the feruloyl esterase gene faeA of A. niger are also subject to heterogenic expression within the exploring mycelium. Coexpression studies using GFP and dTomato as reporters showed that hyphae that highly express one of these genes also highly express the other genes encoding secreted proteins. Moreover, these hyphae also highly express the amylolytic regulatory gene amyR, and the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene gpdA. In situ hybridization demonstrated that the high expressers are characterized by a high 18S rRNA content. Taken together, it is concluded that two subpopulations of hyphae can be distinguished within the exploring mycelium of A. niger. The experimental data indicate that these subpopulations differ in their transcriptional and translational activity. © 2010 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Proteome map of Aspergillus nidulans during osmoadaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yonghyun; Nandakumar, M P; Marten, Mark R

    2007-09-01

    The model filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans, when grown in a moderate level of osmolyte (+0.6M KCl), was previously found to have a significantly reduced cell wall elasticity (Biotech Prog, 21:292, 2005). In this study, comparative proteomic analysis via two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2de) and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry was used to assess molecular level events associated with this phenomenon. Thirty of 90 differentially expressed proteins were identified. Sequence homology and conserved domains were used to assign probable function to twenty-one proteins currently annotated as "hypothetical." In osmoadapted cells, there was an increased expression of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and aldehyde dehydrogenase, as well as a decreased expression of enolase, suggesting an increased glycerol biosynthesis and decreased use of the TCA cycle. There also was an increased expression of heat shock proteins and Shp1-like protein degradation protein, implicating increased protein turnover. Five novel osmoadaptation proteins of unknown functions were also identified.

  17. Genetic transformation of the white-rot fungus Dichomitus squalens using a new commercial protoplasting cocktail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Paul; Slaghek, Gillian G; Casado López, Sara; Wiebenga, Ad; Hilden, Kristiina S; de Vries, Ronald P; Mäkelä, Miia R

    2017-12-01

    D. squalens, a white-rot fungus that efficiently degrades lignocellulose in nature, can be used in various biotechnological applications and has several strains with sequenced and annotated genomes. Here we present a method for the transformation of this basidiomycete fungus, using a recently introduced commercial ascomycete protoplasting enzyme cocktail, Protoplast F. In protoplasting of D. squalens mycelia, Protoplast F outperformed two other cocktails while releasing similar amounts of protoplasts to a third cocktail. The protoplasts released using Protoplast F had a regeneration rate of 12.5% (±6 SE). Using Protoplast F, the D. squalens monokaryon CBS464.89 was conferred with resistance to the antibiotics hygromycin and G418 via polyethylene glycol mediated protoplast transformation with resistance cassettes expressing the hygromycin phosphotransferase (hph) and neomycin phosphotransferase (nptII) genes, respectively. The hph gene was expressed in D. squalens using heterologous promoters from genes encoding β-tubulin or glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase. A Southern blot confirmed integration of a resistance cassette into the D. squalens genome. An average of six transformants (±2 SE) were obtained when at least several million protoplasts were used (a transformation efficiency of 0.8 (±0.3 SE) transformants per μg DNA). Transformation of D. squalens demonstrates the suitability of the Protoplast F cocktail for basidiomycete transformation and furthermore can facilitate understanding of basidiomycete gene function and development of improved strains for biotechnological applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. FRET analysis of CP12 structural interplay by GAPDH and PRK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moparthi, Satish Babu; Thieulin-Pardo, Gabriel; de Torres, Juan; Ghenuche, Petru; Gontero, Brigitte; Wenger, Jérôme

    2015-03-13

    CP12 is an intrinsically disordered protein playing a key role in the regulation of the Benson-Calvin cycle. Due to the high intrinsic flexibility of CP12, it is essential to consider its structural modulation induced upon binding to the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK) enzymes. Here, we report for the first time detailed structural modulation about the wild-type CP12 and its site-specific N-terminal and C-terminal disulfide bridge mutants upon interaction with GAPDH and PRK by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Our results indicate an increase in CP12 compactness when the complex is formed with GAPDH or PRK. In addition, the distributions in FRET histograms show the elasticity and conformational flexibility of CP12 in all supra molecular complexes. Contrarily to previous beliefs, our FRET results importantly reveal that both N-terminal and C-terminal site-specific CP12 mutants are able to form the monomeric (GAPDH-CP12-PRK) complex. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Unravelling the shape and structural assembly of the photosynthetic GAPDH-CP12-PRK complex from Arabidopsis thaliana by small-angle X-ray scattering analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, Alessandra; Pavel, Nicolae Viorel; Galantini, Luciano; Falini, Giuseppe; Trost, Paolo; Fermani, Simona; Sparla, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Oxygenic photosynthetic organisms produce sugars through the Calvin-Benson cycle, a metabolism that is tightly linked to the light reactions of photosynthesis and is regulated by different mechanisms, including the formation of protein complexes. Two enzymes of the cycle, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and phosphoribulokinase (PRK), form a supramolecular complex with the regulatory protein CP12 with the formula (GAPDH-CP122-PRK)2, in which both enzyme activities are transiently inhibited during the night. Small-angle X-ray scattering analysis performed on both the GAPDH-CP12-PRK complex and its components, GAPDH-CP12 and PRK, from Arabidopsis thaliana showed that (i) PRK has an elongated, bent and screwed shape, (ii) the oxidized N-terminal region of CP12 that is not embedded in the GAPDH-CP12 complex prefers a compact conformation and (iii) the interaction of PRK with the N-terminal region of CP12 favours the approach of two GAPDH tetramers. The interaction between the GAPDH tetramers may contribute to the overall stabilization of the GAPDH-CP12-PRK complex, the structure of which is presented here for the first time.

  20. A feeding protocol for delivery of agents to assess development in Varroa mites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana R Cabrera

    Full Text Available A novel feeding protocol for delivery of bio-active agents to Varroa mites was developed by providing mites with honey bee larva hemolymph supplemented with cultured insect cells and selected materials delivered on a fibrous cotton substrate. Mites were starved, fed on treated hemolymph to deliver selected agents and then returned to bee larvae. Transcript levels of two reference genes, actin and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, as well as for nine selected genes involved in reproductive processes showed that the starvation and feeding protocol periods did not pose a high level of stress to the mites as transcript levels remained comparable between phoretic mites and those completing the protocol. The feeding protocol was used to deliver molecules such as hormone analogs or plasmids. Mites fed with Tebufenozide, an ecdysone analog, had higher transcript levels of shade than untreated or solvent treated mites. In order to extend this feeding protocol, cultured insect cells were incorporated to a final ratio of 1 part cells and 2 parts hemolymph. Although supplementation with Bombyx mori Bm5 cells increased the amount of hemolymph consumed per mite, there was a significant decrease in the percentage of mites that fed and survived. On the other hand, Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells reduced significantly the percentage of mites that fed and survived as well as the amount of hemolymph consumed. The feeding protocol provides a dynamic platform with which to challenge the Varroa mite to establish efficacy of control agents for this devastating honey bee pest.

  1. Synthesis and Chemical and Biological Comparison of Nitroxyl and Nitric Oxide Releasing Diazeniumdiolate-based Aspirin Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basudhar, Debashree; Bharadwaj, Gaurav; Cheng, Robert Y.; Jain, Sarthak; Shi, Sa; Heinecke, Julie L.; Holland, Ryan J.; Ridnour, Lisa A.; Caceres, Viviane M.; Spadari-Bratfisch, Regina C.; Paolocci, Nazareno; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A.; Wink, David A.; Miranda, Katrina M.

    2013-01-01

    Structural modifications of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have successfully reduced the side effect of gastrointestinal ulceration without affecting anti-inflammatory activity, but may increase risk of myocardial infarction with chronic use. That nitroxyl (HNO) reduces platelet aggregation, preconditions against myocardial infarction and enhances contractility led us to synthesize a diazeniumdiolate-based HNO releasing aspirin and to compare it to an NO-releasing analogue. Here, the decomposition mechanisms are described for these compounds. In addition to protection against stomach ulceration, these prodrugs also exhibited significantly enhanced cytotoxcity compared to either aspirin or the parent diazeniumdiolate toward non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549) but were not appreciably toxic toward endothelial cells (HUVECs). The HNO-NSAID prodrug inhibited cylcooxgenase-2 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase activity and triggered significant sarcomere shortening compared to control on murine ventricular myocytes. Together, these anti-inflammatory, anti-neoplasic and contractile properties suggest the potential of HNO-NSAIDs in the treatment of inflammation, cancer or heart failure. PMID:24102516

  2. Distribution and phylogenies of enzymes of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway from archaea and hyperthermophilic bacteria support a gluconeogenic origin of metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ron S. Ronimus

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes of the gluconeogenic/glycolytic pathway (the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP pathway, the reductive tricarboxylic acid cycle, the reductive pentose phosphate cycle and the Entner-Doudoroff pathway are widely distributed and are often considered to be central to the origins of metabolism. In particular, several enzymes of the lower portion of the EMP pathway (the so-called trunk pathway, including triosephosphate isomerase (TPI; EC 5.3.1.1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH; EC 1.2.1.12/13, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK; EC 2.7.2.3 and enolase (EC 4.2.1.11, are extremely well conserved and universally distributed among the three domains of life. In this paper, the distribution of enzymes of gluconeogenesis/glycolysis in hyperthermophiles—microorganisms that many believe represent the least evolved organisms on the planet—is reviewed. In addition, the phylogenies of the trunk pathway enzymes (TPIs, GAPDHs, PGKs and enolases are examined. The enzymes catalyzing each of the six-carbon transformations in the upper portion of the EMP pathway, with the possible exception of aldolase, are all derived from multiple gene sequence families. In contrast, single sequence families can account for the archaeal and hyperthermophilic bacterial enzyme activities of the lower portion of the EMP pathway. The universal distribution of the trunk pathway enzymes, in combination with their phylogenies, supports the notion that the EMP pathway evolved in the direction of gluconeogenesis, i.e., from the bottom up.

  3. Nonenzymatic gluconeogenesis-like formation of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messner, Christoph B; Driscoll, Paul C; Piedrafita, Gabriel; De Volder, Michael F L; Ralser, Markus

    2017-07-11

    The evolutionary origins of metabolism, in particular the emergence of the sugar phosphates that constitute glycolysis, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the RNA and DNA backbone, are largely unknown. In cells, a major source of glucose and the large sugar phosphates is gluconeogenesis. This ancient anabolic pathway (re-)builds carbon bonds as cleaved in glycolysis in an aldol condensation of the unstable catabolites glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate, forming the much more stable fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. We here report the discovery of a nonenzymatic counterpart to this reaction. The in-ice nonenzymatic aldol addition leads to the continuous accumulation of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in a permanently frozen solution as followed over months. Moreover, the in-ice reaction is accelerated by simple amino acids, in particular glycine and lysine. Revealing that gluconeogenesis may be of nonenzymatic origin, our results shed light on how glucose anabolism could have emerged in early life forms. Furthermore, the amino acid acceleration of a key cellular anabolic reaction may indicate a link between prebiotic chemistry and the nature of the first metabolic enzymes.

  4. Resistance of Botrytis cinerea to fungicides controlling gray mold on strawberry in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ueder Pedro Lopes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the resistance of Botrytis cinerea to the fungicides currently used for its control in Brazil. Isolates of the fungus were collected from different strawberry-producing fields in the states of Espírito Santo, Minas Gerais, and São Paulo, Brazil. First, a total of 183 isolates were identified at the species level using specific primers for the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH gene. The isolates were grown on potato dextrose agar (PDA containing the fungicides procymidone, iprodione, and thiophanate-methyl in different concentrations: 0.0 (control, 0.1; 1.0; 10.0; 100.0 and 1,000.0 μg∙mL−1. The percentage of mycelial growth inhibition was used to determine the effective concentration of the fungicide that was able to inhibit colony growth by 50% (EC50. Approximately 25.7% of the isolates were resistant to iprodione, 53.0% were resistant to procymidone, and 93.0% were resistant to thiophanate-methyl. Moreover, crossresistance and multiple resistance were verified, with 19.7% of the isolates showing resistance to 3 fungicides simultaneously. This finding explains the ineffectiveness of fungicides application to control gray mold in strawberry fields in Brazil and highlights the need for new strategies to manage this disease in the culture.

  5. Candidate genes and molecular markers associated with heat tolerance in colonial Bentgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespersen, David; Belanger, Faith C; Huang, Bingru

    2017-01-01

    Elevated temperature is a major abiotic stress limiting the growth of cool-season grasses during the summer months. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic variation in the expression patterns of selected genes involved in several major metabolic pathways regulating heat tolerance for two genotypes contrasting in heat tolerance to confirm their status as potential candidate genes, and to identify PCR-based markers associated with candidate genes related to heat tolerance in a colonial (Agrostis capillaris L.) x creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L.) hybrid backcross population. Plants were subjected to heat stress in controlled-environmental growth chambers for phenotypic evaluation and determination of genetic variation in candidate gene expression. Molecular markers were developed for genes involved in protein degradation (cysteine protease), antioxidant defense (catalase and glutathione-S-transferase), energy metabolism (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), cell expansion (expansin), and stress protection (heat shock proteins HSP26, HSP70, and HSP101). Kruskal-Wallis analysis, a commonly used non-parametric test used to compare population individuals with or without the gene marker, found the physiological traits of chlorophyll content, electrolyte leakage, normalized difference vegetative index, and turf quality were associated with all candidate gene markers with the exception of HSP101. Differential gene expression was frequently found for the tested candidate genes. The development of candidate gene markers for important heat tolerance genes may allow for the development of new cultivars with increased abiotic stress tolerance using marker-assisted selection.

  6. Candidate genes and molecular markers associated with heat tolerance in colonial Bentgrass.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jespersen

    Full Text Available Elevated temperature is a major abiotic stress limiting the growth of cool-season grasses during the summer months. The objectives of this study were to determine the genetic variation in the expression patterns of selected genes involved in several major metabolic pathways regulating heat tolerance for two genotypes contrasting in heat tolerance to confirm their status as potential candidate genes, and to identify PCR-based markers associated with candidate genes related to heat tolerance in a colonial (Agrostis capillaris L. x creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera L. hybrid backcross population. Plants were subjected to heat stress in controlled-environmental growth chambers for phenotypic evaluation and determination of genetic variation in candidate gene expression. Molecular markers were developed for genes involved in protein degradation (cysteine protease, antioxidant defense (catalase and glutathione-S-transferase, energy metabolism (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, cell expansion (expansin, and stress protection (heat shock proteins HSP26, HSP70, and HSP101. Kruskal-Wallis analysis, a commonly used non-parametric test used to compare population individuals with or without the gene marker, found the physiological traits of chlorophyll content, electrolyte leakage, normalized difference vegetative index, and turf quality were associated with all candidate gene markers with the exception of HSP101. Differential gene expression was frequently found for the tested candidate genes. The development of candidate gene markers for important heat tolerance genes may allow for the development of new cultivars with increased abiotic stress tolerance using marker-assisted selection.

  7. NleB/SseK effectors from Citrobacter rodentium, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella enterica display distinct differences in host substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Qaidi, Samir; Chen, Kangming; Halim, Adnan

    2017-01-01

    proteins with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine to inhibit antibacterial and inflammatory host responses. NleB is conserved among the attaching/effacing pathogens enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and Citrobacter rodentium. Moreover, Salmonella enterica strains encode up to three Nle......B orthologs named SseK1, SseK2, and SseK3. However, there are conflicting reports regarding the activities and host protein targets among the NleB/SseK orthologs. Therefore, here we performed in vitro glycosylation assays and cell culture experiments to compare the activities and substrate specificities...... of these effectors. SseK1, SseK3, EHEC NleB1, EPEC NleB1, and C. rodentium NleB blocked TNF-mediated NF-κB pathway activation, whereas SseK2 and NleB2 did not. C. rodentium NleB, EHEC NleB1, and SseK1 glycosylated host glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). C. rodentium NleB, EHEC NleB1, EPEC NleB1...

  8. Multi-sample immunoassay inside optical fiber capillary enabled by evanescent wave detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Wang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A novel evanescent wave-based (EW microfluidic capillary fiber-optic biosensor (MCFOB has been developed using capillaries as a transducer embedded in a multichannel device to enhance the collection efficiency of the fluorescence signal. The capillary serves dual roles as a waveguide and a container, enabling more straightforward, consistent, and compact biosensor packaging compared to conventional optical fiber biosensors and microfluidic systems. In order to detect multiple samples in one device, the biosensor incorporates a polydimethysiloxane (PDMS multi-channel device, which also serves as cladding for the biosensor. In addition, this biosensor only consumes 10 μl of a sample and does not require hydrofluoric acid etching in the fabrication process. The orientation for signal collection is optimized by comparing the lateral and normal signal directions for detected glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH. C-reactive protein (CRP is used to validate the MCFOB, and the limit of detection (LOD for CRP in the MCFOB is 1.94 ng/ml (74 pM. Moreover, the real-time measurement is demonstrated to verify that the evanescent wave is the only exciting light source in the MCFOB, which gives the potential for real-time measurement applications. Keywords: C-reactive protein, Capillary, Fiber-optic, Microfluidic, Evanescent wave, Immunoassay

  9. [Development of indel markers for molecular authentication of Panax ginseng and P. quinquefolius].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong-Bo; Tian, Hui-Li; Wang, Hong-Tao; Li, Gui-Sheng

    2018-04-01

    Panax ginseng and P. quinquefolius are two kinds of important medicinal herbs. They are morphologically similar but have different pharmacological effects. Therefore, botanical origin authentication of these two ginsengs is of great importance for ensuring pharmaceutical efficacy and food safety. Based on the fact that intron position in orthologous genes is highly conserved across plant species, intron length polymorphisms were exploited from unigenes of ginseng. Specific primers were respectively designed for these two species based on their insertion/deletion sequences of cytochrome P450 and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, and multiplex PCR was conducted for molecular authentication of P.ginseng and P. quinquefolius. The results showed that the developed multiplex PCR assay was effective for molecular authentication of P.ginseng and P. quinquefolius without strict PCR condition and the optimization of reaction system.This study provides a preferred ideal marker system for molecular authentication of ginseng,and the presented method can be employed in origin authentication of other herbal preparations. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  10. Proteomic analysis in nitrogen-deprived Isochrysis galbana during lipid accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pingping Song

    Full Text Available The differentially co-expressed proteins in N-deprived and N-enriched I. galbana were comparatively analyzed by using two dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight/time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS with the aim of better understanding lipid metabolism in this oleaginous microalga. Forty-five of the 900 protein spots showed dramatic changes in N-deprived I. galbana compared with the N-enriched cells. Of these, 36 protein spots were analyzed and 27 proteins were successfully identified. The identified proteins were classified into seven groups by their molecular functions, including the proteins related to energy production and transformation, substance metabolism, signal transduction, molecular chaperone, transcription and translation, immune defense and cytoskeleton. These altered proteins slowed cell growth and photosynthesis of I. galbana directly or indirectly, but at the same time increased lipid accumulation. Eight key enzymes involved in lipid metabolism via different pathways were identified as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK, enolase, aspartate aminotransferase (AST, fumarate hydratase (FH, citrate synthase (CS, O-acetyl-serine lyase (OAS-L and ATP sulfurylase (ATPS. The results suggested that the glycolytic pathway and citrate transport system might be the main routes for lipid anabolism in N-deprived I. galbana, and that the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, glyoxylate cycle and sulfur assimilation system might be the major pathways involved in lipid catabolism.

  11. Overexpression of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattanovich Diethard

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High cell density cultures of Pichia pastoris grown on methanol tend to develop yellow colored supernatants, attributed to the release of free flavins. The potential of P. pastoris for flavin overproduction is therefore given, but not pronounced when the yeast is grown on glucose. The aim of this study is to characterize the relative regulatory impact of each riboflavin synthesis gene. Deeper insight into pathway control and the potential of deregulation is established by overexpression of the single genes as well as a combined deregulation of up to all six riboflavin synthesis genes. Results Overexpression of the first gene of the riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (RIB1 is already sufficient to obtain yellow colonies and the accumulation of riboflavin in the supernatant of shake flask cultures growing on glucose. Sequential deregulation of all the genes, by exchange of their native promoter with the strong and constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase promoter (PGAP increases the riboflavin accumulation significantly. Conclusion The regulation of the pathway is distributed over more than one gene. High cell density cultivations of a P. pastoris strain overexpressing all six RIB genes allow the accumulation of 175 mg/L riboflavin in the supernatant. The basis for rational engineering of riboflavin production in P. pastoris has thus been established.

  12. Proteomics analysis of antimalarial targets of Garcinia mangostana Linn.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wanna; Chaijaroenkul; Artitiya; Thiengsusuk; Kanchana; Rungsihirunrat; Stephen; Andrew; Ward; Kesara; Na-Bangchang

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate possible protein targets for antimalarial activity of Garcina mangostana Linn.(G.mangostana)(pericarp)in 3D7 Plasmodium falciparum clone using 2-dimensional electrophoresis and liquid chromatography mass-spectrometry(LC/MS/MS).Methods:3D7 Plasmodium falciparum was exposed to the crude ethanolic extract of G.mangostana Linn.(pericarp)at the concentrations of 12μg/mL(1C50level:concentration that inhibits parasite growth by 50%)and 30μg/mL(1C90level:concentration that inhibits parasite growth by 90%)for 12 h.Parasite proteins were separated by 2-dimensional electrophoresis and identified by LC/MS/MS.Results:At the IC50concentration,about 82%of the expressed parasite proteins were matched with the control(non-exposed),while at the IC90concentration,only 15%matched proteins were found.The selected protein spots from parasite exposed to the plant extract at the concentration of 12μg/mL were identified as eneymes that play role in glycolysis pathway,i.e.,phosphoglyeerate mutase putative,L-lactate dehydrogenase/glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase,and fruetose-bisphosphate aldolase/phosphoglyeerate kinase.The proteosome was found in parasite exposed to 30μg/mL of the extract.Conclusions:Results suggest that proteins involved in the glycolysis pathway may be the targets for antimalarial activity of G.mangostana Linn.(pericarp).

  13. A Multi-scale Computational Platform to Mechanistically Assess the Effect of Genetic Variation on Drug Responses in Human Erythrocyte Metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan Mih

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Progress in systems medicine brings promise to addressing patient heterogeneity and individualized therapies. Recently, genome-scale models of metabolism have been shown to provide insight into the mechanistic link between drug therapies and systems-level off-target effects while being expanded to explicitly include the three-dimensional structure of proteins. The integration of these molecular-level details, such as the physical, structural, and dynamical properties of proteins, notably expands the computational description of biochemical network-level properties and the possibility of understanding and predicting whole cell phenotypes. In this study, we present a multi-scale modeling framework that describes biological processes which range in scale from atomistic details to an entire metabolic network. Using this approach, we can understand how genetic variation, which impacts the structure and reactivity of a protein, influences both native and drug-induced metabolic states. As a proof-of-concept, we study three enzymes (catechol-O-methyltransferase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and their respective genetic variants which have clinically relevant associations. Using all-atom molecular dynamic simulations enables the sampling of long timescale conformational dynamics of the proteins (and their mutant variants in complex with their respective native metabolites or drug molecules. We find that changes in a protein's structure due to a mutation influences protein binding affinity to metabolites and/or drug molecules, and inflicts large-scale changes in metabolism.

  14. Near-UV radiation acts as a beneficial factor for physiological responses in cucumber plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani-Sano, Makiko; Tezuka, Takafumi

    2013-11-05

    Effects of near-UV radiation on the growth and physiological activity of cucumber plants were investigated morphologically, physiologically and biochemically using 3-week-old seedlings grown under polyvinyl chloride films featuring transmission either above 290 nm or above 400 nm in growth chambers. The hypocotyl length and leaf area of cucumber seedlings were reduced but the thickness of leaves was enhanced by near-UV radiation, due to increased upper/lower epidermis thickness, palisade parenchyma thickness and volume of palisade parenchyma cells. Photosynthetic and respiratory activities were also promoted by near-UV radiation, associated with general enhancement of physiological/biochemical responses. Particularly, metabolic activities in the photosynthetic system of chloroplasts and the respiratory system of mitochondria were analyzed under the conditions of visible light with and without near-UV radiation. For example, the activities of NAD(P)-dependent enzymes such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (G3PDH) in chloroplasts and isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) in mitochondria were elevated, along with levels of pyridine nucleotides (nicotinamide coenzymes) [NAD(H) and NADP(H)] and activity of NAD kinase (NADP forming enzyme). Taken together, these data suggest that promotion of cucumber plant growth by near-UV radiation involves activation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in plants. The findings of this research showed that near-UV radiation reaching the Earth's surface is a beneficial factor for plant growth. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Immunoreactive proteins of Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum CCM 7952 and Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum CCDM 372 identified by gnotobiotic mono-colonized mice sera, immune rabbit sera and nonimmune human sera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabina Górska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Bifidobacteria show great diversity in the cell surface architecture which may influence the physicochemical properties of the bacterial cell and strain specific properties. The immunomodulatory role of bifidobacteria has been extensively studied, however studies on the immunoreactivity of their protein molecules are very limited. Here, we compared six different methods of protein isolation and purification and we report identification of immunogenic and immunoreactive protein of two human Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum strains. We evaluated potential immunoreactive properties of proteins employing polyclonal sera obtained from germ free mouse, rabbit and human. The protein yield was isolation method-dependent and the reactivity of proteins detected by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting was heterogeneous and varied between different serum samples. The proteins with the highest immunoreactivity were isolated, purified and have them sequenced. Among the immunoreactive proteins we identified enolase, aspartokinase, pyruvate kinase, DnaK (B. longum ssp. longum CCM 7952 and sugar ABC transporter ATP-binding protein, phosphoglycerate kinase, peptidoglycan synthethase penicillin-binding protein 3, transaldolase, ribosomal proteins and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (B. longum ssp. longum CCDM 372.

  16. Endogenous protein "barcode" for data validation and normalization in quantitative MS analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wooram; Lazar, Iulia M

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative proteomic experiments with mass spectrometry detection are typically conducted by using stable isotope labeling and label-free quantitation approaches. Proteins with housekeeping functions and stable expression level such actin, tubulin, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase are frequently used as endogenous controls. Recent studies have shown that the expression level of such common housekeeping proteins is, in fact, dependent on various factors such as cell type, cell cycle, or disease status and can change in response to a biochemical stimulation. The interference of such phenomena can, therefore, substantially compromise their use for data validation, alter the interpretation of results, and lead to erroneous conclusions. In this work, we advance the concept of a protein "barcode" for data normalization and validation in quantitative proteomic experiments. The barcode comprises a novel set of proteins that was generated from cell cycle experiments performed with MCF7, an estrogen receptor positive breast cancer cell line, and MCF10A, a nontumorigenic immortalized breast cell line. The protein set was selected from a list of ~3700 proteins identified in different cellular subfractions and cell cycle stages of MCF7/MCF10A cells, based on the stability of spectral count data generated with an LTQ ion trap mass spectrometer. A total of 11 proteins qualified as endogenous standards for the nuclear and 62 for the cytoplasmic barcode, respectively. The validation of the protein sets was performed with a complementary SKBR3/Her2+ cell line.

  17. Protein Recognition in Drug-Induced DNA Alkylation: When the Moonlight Protein GAPDH Meets S23906-1/DNA Minor Groove Adducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savreux-Lenglet, Gaëlle; Depauw, Sabine; David-Cordonnier, Marie-Hélène

    2015-11-05

    DNA alkylating drugs have been used in clinics for more than seventy years. The diversity of their mechanism of action (major/minor groove; mono-/bis-alkylation; intra-/inter-strand crosslinks; DNA stabilization/destabilization, etc.) has undoubtedly major consequences on the cellular response to treatment. The aim of this review is to highlight the variety of established protein recognition of DNA adducts to then particularly focus on glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) function in DNA adduct interaction with illustration using original experiments performed with S23906-1/DNA adduct. The introduction of this review is a state of the art of protein/DNA adducts recognition, depending on the major or minor groove orientation of the DNA bonding as well as on the molecular consequences in terms of double-stranded DNA maintenance. It reviews the implication of proteins from both DNA repair, transcription, replication and chromatin maintenance in selective DNA adduct recognition. The main section of the manuscript is focusing on the implication of the moonlighting protein GAPDH in DNA adduct recognition with the model of the peculiar DNA minor groove alkylating and destabilizing drug S23906-1. The mechanism of action of S23906-1 alkylating drug and the large variety of GAPDH cellular functions are presented prior to focus on GAPDH direct binding to S23906-1 adducts.

  18. Peptides reproducibly released by in vivo digestion of beef meat and trout flesh in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauchart, Caroline; Morzel, Martine; Chambon, Christophe; Mirand, Philippe Patureau; Reynès, Christelle; Buffière, Caroline; Rémond, Didier

    2007-12-01

    Characterisation and identification of peptides (800 to 5000 Da) generated by intestinal digestion of fish or meat were performed using MS analyses (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation time of flight and nano-liquid chromatography electrospray-ionisation ion trap MS/MS). Four pigs fitted with cannulas at the duodenum and jejunum received a meal exclusively made of cooked Pectoralis profundus beef meat or cooked trout fillets. A protein-free meal, made of free amino acids, starch and fat, was used to identify peptides of endogenous origin. Peptides reproducibly detected in digesta (i.e. from at least three pigs) were evidenced predominantly in the first 3 h after the meal. In the duodenum, most of the fish- and meat-derived peptides were characteristic of a peptic digestion. In the jejunum, the majority of peptides appeared to result from digestion by chymotrypsin and trypsin. Despite slight differences in gastric emptying kinetics and overall peptide production, possibly in relation to food structure and texture, six and four similar peptides were released after ingestion of fish or meat in the duodenum and jejunum. A total of twenty-six different peptides were identified in digesta. All were fragments of major structural (actin, myosin) or sarcoplasmic (creatine kinase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and myoglobin) muscle proteins. Peptides were short ( digestion, some of them can be reproducibly observed in intestinal digesta.

  19. Structure of fructose bisphosphate aldolase from Bartonella henselae bound to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gardberg, Anna; Abendroth, Jan; Bhandari, Janhavi; Sankaran, Banumathi; Staker, Bart

    2011-01-01

    While other aldolases crystallize readily in the apo form, diffraction-quality crystals of B. henselae aldolase could only be obtained in the presence of the native substrate. The quaternary structure is tetrameric, as is typical of aldolases. Fructose bisphosphate aldolase (FBPA) enzymes have been found in a broad range of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms. FBPA catalyses the cleavage of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate into glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate and dihydroxyacetone phosphate. The SSGCID has reported several FBPA structures from pathogenic sources, including the bacterium Brucella melitensis and the protozoan Babesia bovis. Bioinformatic analysis of the Bartonella henselae genome revealed an FBPA homolog. The B. henselae FBPA enzyme was recombinantly expressed and purified for X-ray crystallographic studies. The purified enzyme crystallized in the apo form but failed to diffract; however, well diffracting crystals could be obtained by cocrystallization in the presence of the native substrate fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. A data set to 2.35 Å resolution was collected from a single crystal at 100 K. The crystal belonged to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 72.39, b = 127.71, c = 157.63 Å. The structure was refined to a final free R factor of 22.2%. The structure shares the typical barrel tertiary structure and tetrameric quaternary structure reported for previous FBPA structures and exhibits the same Schiff base in the active site

  20. Investigation on the Metabolic Regulation of pgi gene knockout Escherichia coli by Enzyme Activities and Intracellular Metabolite Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor ‘Aini, A. R.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available An integrated analysis of the cell growth characteristics, enzyme activities, intracellular metabolite concentrations was made to investigate the metabolic regulation of pgi gene knockout Escherichia coli based on batch culture and continuous culture which was performed at the dilution rate of 0.2h-1. The enzymatic study identified that pathways of pentose phosphate, ED pathway and glyoxylate shunt were all active in pgi mutant. The glycolysis enzymes i.e glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose diphosphatase, pyruvate kinase, triose phosphate isomerase were down regulated implying that the inactivation of pgi gene reduced the carbon flux through glycolytic pathway. Meanwhile, the pentose phosphate pathway was active as a major route for intermediary carbohydrate metabolism instead of glycolysis. The pentose phosphate pathway generates most of the major reducing co-factor NADPH as shown by the increased of NADPH/NADP+ ratio in the mutant when compared with the parent strain. The fermentative enzymes such as acetate kinase and lactate dehydrogenase were down regulated in the mutant. Knockout of pgi gene results in the significant increase in the intracellular concentration of glucose-6-phosphate and decrease in the concentration of oxaloacetate. The slow growth rate of the mutant was assumed to be affected by the accumulation of glucose-6-phosphate and imbalance of NADPH reoxidation.