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Sample records for glycemic hba1c hemoglobin

  1. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

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    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/hemoglobina1chba1ctest.html Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test? A hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) test measures ...

  2. Genome-wide association study identifies common loci influencing circulating glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in non-diabetic subjects

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    An, Ping; Miljkovic, Iva; Thyagarajan, Bharat

    2014-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a stable index of chronic glycemic status and hyperglycemia associated with progressive development of insulin resistance and frank diabetes. It is also associated with premature aging and increased mortality. To uncover novel loci for HbA1c that are associated with...

  3. Ethnic dependent differences in diagnostic accuracy of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in Canadian adults.

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    Booth, Ronald A; Jiang, Ying; Morrison, Howard; Orpana, Heather; Rogers Van Katwyk, Susan; Lemieux, Chantal

    2018-02-01

    Previous studies have shown varying sensitivity and specificity of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) to identify diabetes and prediabetes, compared to 2-h oral glucose tolerance testing (OGTT) and fasting plasma glucose (FPG), in different ethnic groups. Within the Canadian population, the ability of HbA1c to identify prediabetes and diabetes in First Nations, Métis and Inuit, East and South Asian ethnic groups has yet to be determined. We collected demographic, lifestyle information, biochemical results of glycemic status (FPG, OGTT, and HbA1c) from an ethnically diverse Canadian population sample, which included a purposeful sampling of First Nations, Métis, Inuit, South Asian and East Asian participants. Sensitivity and specificity using Canadian Diabetes Association (CDA) recommended cut-points varied between ethnic groups, with greater variability for identification of prediabetes than diabetes. Dysglycemia (prediabetes and diabetes) was identified with a sensitivity and specificity ranging from 47.1% to 87.5%, respectively in Caucasians to 24.1% and 88.8% in Inuit. Optimal HbA1c ethnic-specific cut-points for dysglycemia and diabetes were determined by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. Our sample showed broad differences in the ability of HbA1c to identify dysglycemia or diabetes in different ethnic groups. Optimal cut-points for dysglycemia or diabetes in all ethnic groups were substantially lower than CDA recommendations. Utilization of HbA1c as the sole biochemical diagnostic marker may produce varying degrees of false negative results depending on the ethnicity of screened individuals. Further research is necessary to identify and validate optimal ethnic specific cut-points used for diabetic screening in the Canadian population. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. HbA1c levels in individuals heterozygous for hemoglobin variants.

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    Tavares, Ricardo Silva; Souza, Fábio Oliveira de; Francescantonio, Isabel Cristina Carvalho Medeiros; Soares, Weslley Carvalho; Mesquita, Mauro Meira

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in patients heterozygous for hemoglobin variants and compare the results of this test with those of a control group. This was an experimental study based on the comparison of HbA1c tests in two different populations, with a test group represented by individuals heterozygous for hemoglobin variants (AS and AC) and a control group consisting of people with electrophoretic profile AA. The two populations were required to meet the following inclusion criteria: Normal levels of fasting glucose, hemoglobin, urea and triglycerides, bilirubin > 20 mg/dL and non-use of acetylsalicylic acid. 50 heterozygous subjects and 50 controls were evaluated between August 2013 and May 2014. The comparison of HbA1c levels between heterozygous individuals and control subjects was performed based on standard deviation, mean and G-Test. The study assessed a test group and a control group, both with 39 adults and 11 children. The mean among heterozygous adults for HbA1c was 5.0%, while the control group showed a rate of 5.74%. Heterozygous children presented mean HbA1c at 5.11%, while the controls were at 5.78%. G-Test yielded p=0.93 for children and p=0.89 for adults. Our study evaluated HbA1c using ion exchange chromatography resins, and the patients heterozygous for hemoglobin variants showed no significant difference from the control group.

  5. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) changes over time among adolescent and young adult participants in the T1D exchange clinic registry.

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    Clements, Mark A; Foster, Nicole C; Maahs, David M; Schatz, Desmond A; Olson, Beth A; Tsalikian, Eva; Lee, Joyce M; Burt-Solorzano, Christine M; Tamborlane, William V; Chen, Vincent; Miller, Kellee M; Beck, Roy W

    2016-08-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels among individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) influence the longitudinal risk for diabetes-related complications. Few studies have examined HbA1c trends across time in children, adolescents, and young adults with T1D. This study examines changes in glycemic control across the specific transition periods of pre-adolescence-to-adolescence and adolescence-to-young adulthood, and the demographic and clinical factors associated with these changes. Available HbA1c lab results for up to 10 yr were collected from medical records at 67 T1D Exchange clinics. Two retrospective cohorts were evaluated: the pre-adolescent-to-adolescent cohort consisting of 85 016 HbA1c measurements from 6574 participants collected when the participants were 8-18 yr old and the adolescent-to-young adult cohort, 2200 participants who were 16-26 yr old at the time of 17 279 HbA1c measurements. HbA1c in the 8-18 cohort increased over time after age 10 yr until ages 16-17; followed by a plateau. HbA1c levels in the 16-26 cohort remained steady from 16-18, and then gradually declined. For both cohorts, race/ethnicity, income, health insurance, and pump use were all significant in explaining individual variations in age-centered HbA1c (p HbA1c trajectory. Glycemic control among patients 8-18 yr old worsens over time, through age 16. Elevated HbA1c levels observed in 18 yr-olds begin a steady improvement into early adulthood. Focused interventions to prevent deterioration in glucose control in pre-adolescence, adolescence, and early adulthood are needed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The Fallacy of Average: How Using HbA1c Alone to Assess Glycemic Control Can Be Misleading.

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    Beck, Roy W; Connor, Crystal G; Mullen, Deborah M; Wesley, David M; Bergenstal, Richard M

    2017-08-01

    HbA 1c is a v aluable metric for comparing treatment groups in a randomized trial, for assessing glycemic trends in a population over time, or for cross-sectional comparisons of glycemic control in different populations. However, what is not widely appreciated is that HbA 1c may not be a good indicator of an individual patient's glycemic control because of the wide range of mean glucose concentrations and glucose profiles that can be associated with a given HbA 1c level. To illustrate this point, we plotted mean glucose measured with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) versus central laboratory-measured HbA 1c in 387 participants in three randomized trials, showing that not infrequently HbA 1c may underestimate or overestimate mean glucose, sometimes substantially. Thus, if HbA 1c is to be used to assess glycemic control, it is imperative to know the patient's actual mean glucose to understand how well HbA 1c is an indicator of the patient's glycemic control. With knowledge of the mean glucose, an estimated HbA 1c (eA1C) can be calculated with the formula provided in this article to compare with the measured HbA 1c . Estimating glycemic control from HbA 1c alone is in essence applying a population average to an individual, which can be misleading. Thus, a patient's CGM glucose profile has considerable value for optimizing his or her diabetes management. In this era of personalized, precision medicine, there are few better examples with respect to the fallacy of applying a population average to a specific patient rather than using specific information about the patient to determine the optimal approach to treatment. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  7. Beyond HbA1c and glucose: the role of nontraditional glycemic markers in diabetes diagnosis, prognosis, and management

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    Parrinello, Christina M.; Selvin, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Fasting glucose and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) are the standard measures for diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes. There has been recent interest in nontraditional markers of hyperglycemia, including fructosamine, glycated albumin and 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG), as alternatives or adjuncts to standard measures. There is a growing literature linking these nontraditional markers with microvascular and macrovascular complications. Fructosamine and glycated albumin have also been shown to improve identification of persons with diabetes. However, long-term prospective studies with clinical outcomes are lacking. Some modern laboratory assays for fructosamine, glycated albumin and 1,5-AG have excellent performance. Expanded use of these tests has the potential to improve diabetes care as these measures may overcome limitations of HbA1c in certain patients, complement traditional measures by providing additional information on shorter-term glycemic control, and improve risk stratification for diabetes and its complications. Nonetheless, studies are needed to demonstrate if their routine use will benefit patients and improve outcomes. PMID:25249070

  8. Drugs affecting HbA1c levels

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    Ranjit Unnikrishnan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c is an important indicator of glycemic control in diabetes mellitus, based on which important diagnostic and therapeutic decisions are routinely made. However, there are several situations in which the level of HbA1c may not faithfully reflect the glycemic control in a given patient. Important among these is the use of certain non-diabetic medications, which can affect the HbA1c levels in different ways. This review focuses on the non-diabetic medications which can inappropriately raise or lower the HbA1c levels, and the postulated mechanisms for the same.

  9. Revaluation of biological variation of glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) using an accurately designed protocol and an assay traceable to the IFCC reference system.

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    Braga, Federica; Dolci, Alberto; Montagnana, Martina; Pagani, Franca; Paleari, Renata; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Mosca, Andrea; Panteghini, Mauro

    2011-07-15

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) has a key role for diagnosing diabetes and monitoring glycemic state. As recently reviewed, available data on HbA(1c) biological variation show marked heterogeneity. Here we experimentally revaluated these data using a well designed protocol. We took five EDTA whole blood specimens from 18 apparently healthy subjects on the same day, every two weeks for two months. Samples were stored at -80°C until analysis and assayed in duplicate in a single run by Roche Tina-quant® Gen.2 immunoassay. Data were analyzed by the ANOVA. To assess the assay traceability to the IFCC reference method, we preliminarily carried out a correlation experiment. The bias (mean±SD) of the Roche immunoassay was 0.3%±0.7%, confirming the traceability of the employed assay. No difference was found in HbA(1c) values between men and women. Within- and between-subject CV were 2.5% and 7.1%, respectively. Derived desirable analytical goals for imprecision, bias, and total error resulted 1.3%, 1.9%, and 3.9%, respectively. HbA(1c) had marked individuality, limiting the use of population-based reference limits for test interpretation. The estimated critical difference was ~10%. For the first time we defined biological variation and derived indices for the clinical application of HbA(1c) measurements using an accurately designed protocol and an assay standardized according to the IFCC. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Glycated hemoglobin HbA1c, waist circumference, and waist-to-height ratio in overweight and obese adolescents

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    Elysa Nur Safrida

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Central obesity has been associated with a high risk of insulin resistance. Waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio are anthropometric indices for determining central obesity and have been associated with increased blood pressure, cholesterol, and insulin levels. In adults, fat distribution around the waist is a valid predictor of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1clevels, and is currently recommended by experts as a diagnostic tool for diabetes. Central obesity measurement has advantages over fasting blood glucose and oral glucose tolerance tests, as it is simple and inexpensive to perform. Objective To assess for correlations between HbA1c level and waist circumference as well as waist-to-height ratio and to assess factors potentially associated with HbA1c levels in overweight and obese adolescents. Methods This cross-sectional study was done in four junior high schools in Yogyakarta, which were obtained by cluster sampling. Overweight and obese students who were generally healthy were included in the study. Subjects underwent waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio measurements, as well as blood tests for HbA1clevels. Results Sixty-seven children participated in the study, with 48 girls (71.6% and 19 boys (28.4%. Waist circumference and HbA1c levels were not significantly associated (r=0.178; P=0.15. However, waist-to-height ratio and HbA1c levels had a weak positive correlation (r=0.21; P=0.04. Linear regression analysis revealed that waist-to-height ratio had a significant association with HbA1c level (P=0.02, but age, sex, and nutritional status did not. Conclusion Waist-to-height ratio is correlated with HbA1c levels in overweight and obese adolescents.

  11. A study assessing the association of glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) associated variants with HbA1C, chronic kidney disease and diabetic retinopathy in populations of Asian ancestry.

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    Chen, Peng; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Tay, Wan-Ting; Sim, Xueling; Ali, Mohammad; Xu, Haiyan; Suo, Chen; Liu, Jianjun; Chia, Kee-Seng; Vithana, Eranga; Young, Terri L; Aung, Tin; Lim, Wei-Yen; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien-Yin; Teo, Yik-Ying; Tai, E-Shyong

    2013-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) level is used as a diagnostic marker for diabetes mellitus and a predictor of diabetes associated complications. Genome-wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with HbA1C level. Most of these studies have been conducted in populations of European ancestry. Here we report the findings from a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of HbA1C levels in 6,682 non-diabetic subjects of Chinese, Malay and South Asian ancestries. We also sought to examine the associations between HbA1C associated SNPs and microvascular complications associated with diabetes mellitus, namely chronic kidney disease and retinopathy. A cluster of 6 SNPs on chromosome 17 showed an association with HbA1C which achieved genome-wide significance in the Malays but not in Chinese and Asian Indians. No other variants achieved genome-wide significance in the individual studies or in the meta-analysis. When we investigated the reproducibility of the findings that emerged from the European studies, six loci out of fifteen were found to be associated with HbA1C with effect sizes similar to those reported in the populations of European ancestry and P-value ≤ 0.05. No convincing associations with chronic kidney disease and retinopathy were identified in this study.

  12. A study assessing the association of glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C associated variants with HbA1C, chronic kidney disease and diabetic retinopathy in populations of Asian ancestry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Chen

    Full Text Available Glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C level is used as a diagnostic marker for diabetes mellitus and a predictor of diabetes associated complications. Genome-wide association studies have identified genetic variants associated with HbA1C level. Most of these studies have been conducted in populations of European ancestry. Here we report the findings from a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies of HbA1C levels in 6,682 non-diabetic subjects of Chinese, Malay and South Asian ancestries. We also sought to examine the associations between HbA1C associated SNPs and microvascular complications associated with diabetes mellitus, namely chronic kidney disease and retinopathy. A cluster of 6 SNPs on chromosome 17 showed an association with HbA1C which achieved genome-wide significance in the Malays but not in Chinese and Asian Indians. No other variants achieved genome-wide significance in the individual studies or in the meta-analysis. When we investigated the reproducibility of the findings that emerged from the European studies, six loci out of fifteen were found to be associated with HbA1C with effect sizes similar to those reported in the populations of European ancestry and P-value ≤ 0.05. No convincing associations with chronic kidney disease and retinopathy were identified in this study.

  13. Association between effort-reward imbalance and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among Chinese workers: results from SHISO study.

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    Xu, Weixian; Hang, Juan; Gao, Wei; Zhao, Yiming; Li, Weihong; Wang, Xinyu; Li, Zhaoping; Guo, Lijun

    2012-02-01

    The studies focusing on effort-reward imbalance and diabetes mellitus (DM)/glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) are rare. We sought to examine the association between job stress evaluated by effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model and HbA1c in a Chinese population. We analyzed 680 subjects (465 men and 215 women) without DM or impaired glucose tolerance from the stress and health in Shenzhen workers (SHISO) study. Job stress was evaluated by effort-reward imbalance (ERI) model. HbA1c was measured by an automatic analyzer by means of high-performance liquid chromatography. The association between job stress and HbA1c was explored by variance analysis, partial correlations and multiple linear regression analysis. For women, effort, and ERI were positively associated with HbA1c (r = 0.22, p = 0,003; r = 0.21, p = 0.006, respectively), in contrast, reward was negatively associated with HbA1c (r = -0.17, p = 0.021), after controlling age, BMI and physical exercise in the partial correlation analysis; the similar results were confirmed in the multiple linear regression. No significant correlations between job stress and HbA1c were found for men. Effort and ERI are positively associated with HbA1c, and reward is inversely related to HbA1c among Chinese women. The association is not accounted for by age, BMI, and physical exercise. More efforts should be made to improve the job stress status of Chinese working women for the purpose of DM prevention.

  14. The Glycated Albumin (GA) to HbA1c Ratio Reflects Shorter-Term Glycemic Control than GA: Analysis of Patients with Fulminant Type 1 Diabetes.

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    Koga, Masafumi; Inada, Shinya; Nakao, Taisei; Kawamori, Ryuzo; Kasayama, Soji

    2017-01-01

    Glycated albumin (GA) reflects shorter-term glycemic control than HbA1c. We have reported that HbA1c is paradoxically increased in diabetic patients whose glycemic control deteriorated before ameliorating. In this study, we analyzed paradoxical increases of glycemic control indicators after treatment in patients with fulminant type 1 diabetes (FT1D). We also investigated whether the GA/HbA1c ratio may reflect shorter-term glycemic control than GA. Five FT1D patients whose post-treatment HbA1c and GA levels were measured were enrolled. We also used a formula to estimate HbA1c and GA from the fictitious models of changes in plasma glucose in FT1D patients. In this model, the periods during which HbA1c, GA, and the GA/HbA1c ratio were higher than at the first visit were compared. In addition, the half-life for the GA/HbA1c ratio was calculated in accordance with the half-lives for HbA1c and GA (36 and 14 days, respectively). In all FT1D patients, HbA1c levels 2-4 weeks after treatment were increased, with three patients (60%) experiencing an increase of GA levels. In contrast, an increase of the GA/HbA1c ratio was observed in only one patient. In all of the different models of changes in plasma glucose in FT1D patients, the length of time during which the values were higher than at the first visit was in the order of HbA1c > GA > GA/HbA1c ratio. The half-life for the GA/HbA1c ratio was 9 days, shorter than GA. These findings suggest that the GA/HbA1c ratio reflects shorter-term glycemic control than GA. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Glycemic excursions are positively associated with HbA1c reduction from baseline after treatment with acarbose in patients with type 2 diabetes on metformin monotherapy.

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    Wang, Jun-Sing; Lee, I-Te; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lin, Shi-Dou; Su, Shih-Li; Tu, Shih-Te; Tseng, Yao-Hsien; Lin, Shih-Yi; Sheu, Wayne Huey-Herng

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the association between glycemic excursions before treatment and HbA1c reduction after treatment intensification with acarbose or glibenclamide in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). Patients receiving single or dual oral antidiabetic drug treatment with an HbA1c of 7.0-11.0 % (53-97 mmol/mol) were switched to metformin monotherapy (500 mg, t.i.d.) for 8 weeks, followed by randomization to either acarbose (100 mg, t.i.d.) or glibenclamide (5 mg, t.i.d.) as add-on treatment for 16 weeks. Glycemic excursions were assessed as mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (MAGE) with 72-h ambulatory continuous glucose monitoring. Treatment efficacy was evaluated as relative HbA1c reduction (%), calculated as (baseline HbA1c - post-treatment HbA1c)/baseline HbA1c × 100. Fifty patients (mean [±SD] age 53.5 ± 8.2 years, 48 % men, mean baseline HbA1c 8.4 ± 1.2 %) were analyzed. Baseline MAGE was positively correlated with relative HbA1c reduction from baseline in patients treated with acarbose (r = 0.421, P = 0.029) but not glibenclamide (r = 0.052, P = 0.813). Linear regression analysis revealed that the association between baseline MAGE and relative HbA1c reduction from baseline (β = 0.125, P = 0.029) in patients treated with acarbose remained significant after adjustment for several confounders (P HbA1c reduction from baseline after treatment with acarbose, but not glibenclamide. These findings highlight the importance of glycemic excursions in individualized treatment for patients with T2D. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai JiaoTong University School of Medicine (SJTU), Chinese Society of Endocrinology and Chinese Endocrinologist Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Regional variations in frequency of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) monitoring in Korea: A multilevel analysis of nationwide data.

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    Yoo, Kyoung-Hun; Shin, Dong-Wook; Cho, Mi-Hee; Kim, Sang-Hyuck; Bahk, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Shin-Hye; Jeong, Su-Min; Yun, Jae-Moon; Park, Jin-Ho; Kim, Heesun; Cho, BeLong

    2017-09-01

    Suboptimal frequency of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) monitoring is associated with poor diabetes control. We aimed to analyze compliance to HbA1c testing guidelines and explore associated individual and area-level determinants, focusing on regional variation. This cross-sectional study between the period of 2012-2013 was conducted by using the Korean National Health Insurance Research Database, and included 45,634 patients diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, who were prescribed any anti-diabetic medications, including insulin. We calculated the proportion of each HbA1c testing frequency (≥1, ≥2, or ≥4 times per year) stratified by 17 administrative regions. Multilevel and multivariate logistic analyses were performed with regional (proportion of farmer population) and individual characteristics (age, sex, income level, duration of diabetes, and most visited medical institution). Overall, 67.3% of the patients received≥1 HbA1c test per year; 37.8% and 6.1% received ≥2 and ≥4 tests per year, respectively. Those managed in secondary-level hospitals or clinics and those living in rural areas were less likely to receive HbA1c testing. Even after adjusting for individual and regional level characteristics, significant area level variation was observed (variance participant coefficients were 7.91%, 9.58%, and 14.43% for testing frequencies of ≥1, ≥2, and ≥4 times a year, respectively). The frequency of HbA1c monitoring is suboptimal in Korea, especially in rural areas. Moreover, significant regional variation was observed, implying a contextual effect. This suggests the need for developing policy actions to improve HbA1c monitoring. In particular, access to HbA1c testing in rural primary care clinics must be improved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evaluation of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c for diagnosing type 2 diabetes and prediabetes among Palestinian Arab population.

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    Akram T Kharroubi

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study is to compare the potential of HbA1c to diagnose diabetes among Palestinian Arabs compared to fasting plasma glucose (FPG. A cross-sectional sample of 1370 Palestinian men (468 and women (902 without known diabetes and above the age of 30 years were recruited. Whole blood was used to estimate HbA(1c and plasma for FPG and total lipid profile. Fasting plasma glucose was used as a reference to diagnose diabetes (≥ 126 mg/dL and prediabetes (100-125 mg/dL. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC for HbA(1c was 81.9% to diagnose diabetes and 63.9% for prediabetes. The agreement between HbA(1c and diabetes as diagnosed by FPG was moderate (ĸ  =  0.498 and low with prediabetes (ĸ = 0.142. The optimal cut-off value for HbA1c to diagnose diabetes was ≥ 6.3% (45 mmol/mol. The sensitivity, specificity and the discriminant ability were 65.6% (53.1-76.3%, 94.5% (93.1-95.6%, 80.0% (72.8-87.3%, respectively. However, using cut-off value of ≥ 6.5% (48 mmol/mol improved specificity. At this cut-off value, the sensitivity, specificity and the discriminant ability were 57.4% (44.9-69.0%, 97.1% (96.0-97.9% and 77.3% (71.0-83.5%. For diagnosing prediabetes with HbA1c between 5.7-6.4% (39-46 mmol/mol, the sensitivity, specificity and the discriminant ability were 62.7% (57.1-67.9%, 56.3% (53.1-59.4% and 59.5% (56.3-62.5%, respectively. HbA(1c at cut-off value of ≥ 6.5% (48 mmol/mol by itself diagnosed 5.3% and 48.3% as having diabetes and prediabetes compared to 4.5% and 24.2% using FPG, respectively. Mean HbA(1c and FPG increase significantly with increasing body mass index. In conclusion, the ROC curves showed HbA1c could be used for diagnosing diabetes when compared to FPG but not for prediabetes in Palestinians Arabs even though only about 50% of the diabetic subjects were identified by the both HbA1c and FPG.

  18. Effects of common hemoglobin variants on HbA1c measurements in China: results for α- and β-globin variants measured by six methods.

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    Xu, Anping; Chen, Weidong; Xia, Yong; Zhou, Yu; Ji, Ling

    2018-04-07

    HbA1c is a widely used biomarker for diabetes mellitus management. Here, we evaluated the accuracy of six methods for determining HbA1c values in Chinese patients with common α- and β-globin chains variants in China. Blood samples from normal subjects and individuals exhibiting hemoglobin variants were analyzed for HbA1c, using Sebia Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing (C2FP), Bio-Rad Variant II Turbo 2.0, Tosoh HLC-723 G8 (ver. 5.24), Arkray ADAMS A1c HA-8180V fast mode, Cobas c501 and Trinity Ultra2 systems. DNA sequencing revealed five common β-globin chain variants and three common α-globin chain variants. The most common variant was Hb E, followed by Hb New York, Hb J-Bangkok, Hb G-Coushatta, Hb Q-Thailand, Hb G-Honolulu, Hb Ube-2 and Hb G-Taipei. Variant II Turbo 2.0, Ultra2 and Cobas c501 showed good agreement with C2FP for most samples with variants. HLC-723 G8 yielded no HbA1c values for Hb J-Bangkok, Hb Q-Thailand and Hb G-Honolulu. Samples with Hb E, Hb G-Coushatta, Hb G-Taipei and Hb Ube-2 produced significant negative biases for HLC-723 G8. HA-8180V showed statistically significant differences for Hb E, Hb G-Coushatta, Hb G-Taipei, Hb Q-Thailand and Hb G-Honolulu. HA-8180V yielded no HbA1c values for Hb J-Bangkok. All methods showed good agreement for samples with Hb New York. Some common hemoglobin variants can interfere with HbA1c determination by the most popular methods in China.

  19. Beyond HbA1c.

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    Bloomgarden, Zachary

    2017-12-01

    It can scarcely be denied that the supreme goal of all theory is to make the irreducible basic elements as simple and as few as possible without having to surrender the adequate representation of a single datum of experience. The diaTribe Foundation convened a meeting on the topic of glycemic outcomes beyond HbA1c on 21 July 2017, in Bethesda (MD, USA), focusing on potential uses of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Understanding patterns of glycemia in people with diabetes has long been a focus of approaches to improving treatment, and over the past few years this has become an available modality for clinical practice. Glucose levels are not the only biologic parameters affecting HbA1c levels; HbA1c changes with anemia or, more subtly, with changes in rates of erythrocyte turnover not reflected in hemoglobin levels outside the normal range. Renal disease often is associated with lower HbA1c than would be predicted based on an individual's glycemic levels. Furthermore, HbA1c levels tend to increase with age and are higher in some ethnic groups; for example, people of African ethnicity have higher HbA1c levels than people of Northern European descent. Indeed, we have argued that even as a measure of mean glycemia HbA1c is inherently imprecise. Overall, for some 20% of people with diabetes, HbA1c levels are substantially higher, or substantially lower, than those that would be predicted from mean blood glucose levels. If one recognizes that HbA1c is, at best, a partial measure of mean glycemic exposure, one must surely accept that HbA1c does not reflect variability within a day, from day to day, and from period to period. Many glucose-lowering medicines, particularly the sulfonylureas and insulin, cause hypoglycemia, with consequent negative effects on quality of life and patient-reported outcomes, as well as association with weight gain and adverse macrovascular outcome; hypoglycemia will, of course, not be captured by HbA1c measurement. Based on these

  20. Current Status of HbA1c Biosensors

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    Lin, Hua; Yi, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is formed via non-enzymatic glycosylation reactions at the α–amino group of βVal1 residues in the tetrameric Hb, and it can reflect the ambient glycemic level over the past two to three months. A variety of HbA1c detection methods, including chromatography, immunoassay, enzymatic measurement, electrochemical sensor and capillary electrophoresis have been developed and used in research laboratories and in clinics as well. In this review, we summarize the current status of HbA1c biosensors based on the recognition of the sugar moiety on the protein and also their applications in the whole blood sample measurements. PMID:28777351

  1. Study on the relationship between blood levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and micro-vascular nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes

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    Luo Rong; Li Zhuocheng; Yan Dewen

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between blood levels of glycated hemoglobin and microvascular nephropathy in patients with type diabetes. Methods: Blood Glycosylated hemoglobin levels were determined with affinity chromatography and 24 hour urinary microalbumin (m-Alb), β 2 microglobin (β 2 -m) quantified with RIA in 76 patients and 30 controls. Results: With glycated hemoglobin within normal range, there were no differences between the amounts of patients' urinary protein contents and those in controls (P>0.05). With higher blood glycated hemoglobin levels, significant differences could be observed (P 2 microglobin. Differences among the 24 hour urinary quantities of mAlb and β 2 -m in the three groups of patients (divided according to the HbA1c levels, namely 9.0%) were also significant (P 2 microglobin is very important for early detection of diabetic nephropathy

  2. Increased glycemic variability and decrease of the postprandial glucose contribution to HbA1c in obese subjects across the glycemic continuum from normal glycemia to first time diagnosed diabetes.

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    Fysekidis, Marinos; Cosson, Emmanuel; Banu, Isabela; Duteil, Régine; Cyrille, Chantal; Valensi, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The contribution of postprandial glycemia (PPG) to hyperglycemia has been shown to decrease as HbA1c increased in type 2 diabetic patients. This study aimed at examining, in a series of overweight/obese patients without known glycemic disorder, the contribution of PPG to a "relative" hyperglycemia (glucose values≥5.5 mmol/L) and the presence of glycemic variability according to HbA1c levels. Seventy overweight/obese inpatients (body mass index 35.2±6.8 kg/m2) without known glycemic disorder were included. Participants were classified according to an oral glucose tolerance test (according to the American Diabetes Association criteria) as patients with normoglycemia (n=33), with intermediate hyperglycemia (n=24) or diabetes (n=13). They were separated into HbA1c quartiles (Q1 to Q4). A 24 hour continuous glucose monitoring was used under a 1800 kcal diet and minimal physical activity. We assessed PPG contribution (3 hour period after each meal) to the "relative" 24 hour hyperglycemia (glucose values ≥5.5 mmol/L); the remaining time was considered as the fasting/post-absorptive period. HbA1c range was from 5.1% to 7.4% (32 to 57 mmol/mmol). From the lowest to the highest HbA1c quartile, the area under the curve (AUC) for the "relative" hyperglycemia presented a 17-fold increase for the fasting/post-absorptive (pAUC-3 h AUC for a constant 5.5 mmol/L glycemia)/(total 24 h AUC-24 h AUC for constant 5. 5 mmol/L glycemia)] and decreased from Q1 to Q4 of HbA1c (81.2%, 66%, 65.8%, 57%; pblood glucose level (pglucose variability indices, including mean amplitude of glycemic excursions (p<0.01). In overweight/obese patients, HbA1c was associated with lower PPG contribution to "relative" hyperglycemia and greater glycemic variability. The present findings support the importance of postprandial period in glycemic exposure even before the appearance of diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C levels in patients with chronic periodontitis and healthy controls

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    Padma Rajan

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Chronic periodontitis is associated with a slight elevation in glycosylated hemoglobin (lab and chair side kit and that the clinical significance of this difference remains to be determined. This preliminary finding is consistent with earlier reports that chronic periodontitis is associated with elevated blood glucose in adults without diabetes and may increase one′s risk for type-2 diabetes.

  4. Hb Melusine and Hb Athens-Georgia: potentially underreported in the Belgian population? Four cases demonstrating the lack of detection using common CE-HPLC methods either for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) analysis or Hb variant screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Bart; Brandt, Inger; Desmet, Koenraad; Harteveld, Cornelis L; Kieffer, Davy

    2016-12-01

    Suspected hemoglobin (Hb) variants, detected during HbA 1C measurements should be further investigated, determining the extent of the interference with each method. This is the first report of Hb Melusine and Hb Athens-Georgia in Caucasian Belgian patients. Intervention & Technique: Since common CE-HPLC methods for HbA 1C analysis or Hb variant screening are apparently unable to detect these Hb variants, their presence might be underestimated. HbA 1C analysis using CZE, however, alerted for their presence. Moreover, in case of Hb Melusine, even Hb variant screening using CZE was unsuccessful in its detection. Fortunately, carriage of Hb Melusine or Hb Athens-Georgia variants has no clinical implications and, as shown in this report, no apparent difference in HbA 1C should be expected.

  5. Common Hemoglobin Variants in Southern Taiwan and Their Effect on the Determination of HbA1c by Ion-exchange High-performance Liquid Chromatography

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    Chih-Hsun Chu

    2009-07-01

    Conclusion: The existence of Hb variants may result in false HbA1c measurement. The possible presence of spuriously low HbA1c levels or abnormal HPLC chromatograms by using ion-exchange methods should be kept in mind.

  6. Early Glycemic Control and Magnitude of HbA1c Reduction Predict Cardiovascular Events and Mortality: Population-Based Cohort Study of 24,752 Metformin Initiators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, Elisabeth; Baggesen, Lisbeth M; Johnsen, Søren P; Pedersen, Lars; Nørrelund, Helene; Buhl, Esben S; Haase, Christiane L; Thomsen, Reimar W

    2017-06-01

    We investigated the association of early achieved HbA 1c level and magnitude of HbA 1c reduction with subsequent risk of cardiovascular events or death in patients with type 2 diabetes who initiate metformin. This was a population-based cohort study including all metformin initiators with HbA 1c tests in Northern Denmark, 2000-2012. Six months after metformin initiation, we classified patients by HbA 1c achieved (<6.5% or higher) and by magnitude of HbA 1c change from the pretreatment baseline. We used Cox regression to examine subsequent rates of acute myocardial infarction, stroke, or death, controlling for baseline HbA 1c and other confounding factors. We included 24,752 metformin initiators (median age 62.5 years, 55% males) with a median follow-up of 2.6 years. The risk of a combined outcome event gradually increased with rising levels of HbA 1c achieved compared with a target HbA 1c of <6.5%: adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 1.18 (95% CI 1.07-1.30) for 6.5-6.99%, HR 1.23 (1.09-1.40) for 7.0-7.49%, HR 1.34 (1.14-1.57) for 7.5-7.99%, and HR 1.59 (1.37-1.84) for ≥8%. Results were consistent for individual outcome events and robust by age-group and other patient characteristics. A large absolute HbA 1c reduction from baseline also predicted outcome: adjusted HR 0.80 (0.65-0.97) for Δ = -4, HR 0.98 (0.80-1.20) for Δ = -3, HR 0.92 (0.78-1.08) for Δ = -2, and HR 0.99 (0.89-1.10) for Δ = -1 compared with no HbA 1c change (Δ = 0). A large initial HbA 1c reduction and achievement of low HbA 1c levels within 6 months after metformin initiation are associated with a lower risk of cardiovascular events and death in patients with type 2 diabetes. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  7. Single-Use Disposable Electrochemical Label-Free Immunosensor for Detection of Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c) Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molazemhosseini, Alireza; Magagnin, Luca; Vena, Pasquale; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2016-07-01

    A single-use disposable in vitro electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of HbA1c in undiluted human serum using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was developed. A three-electrode configuration electrochemical biosensor consisted of 10-nm-thin gold film working and counter electrodes and a thick-film printed Ag/AgCl reference electrode was fabricated on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate. Micro-fabrication techniques including sputtering vapor deposition and thick-film printing were used to fabricate the biosensor. This was a roll-to-roll cost-effective manufacturing process making the single-use disposable in vitro HbA1c biosensor a reality. Self-assembled monolayers of 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were employed to covalently immobilize anti-HbA1c on the surface of gold electrodes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed the excellent coverage of MPA-SAM and the upward orientation of carboxylic groups. The hindering effect of HbA1c on the ferricyanide/ferrocyanide electron transfer reaction was exploited as the HbA1c detection mechanism. The biosensor showed a linear range of 7.5-20 µg/mL of HbA1c in 0.1 M PBS. Using undiluted human serum as the test medium, the biosensor presented an excellent linear behavior (R² = 0.999) in the range of 0.1-0.25 mg/mL of HbA1c. The potential application of this biosensor for in vitro measurement of HbA1c for diabetic management was demonstrated.

  8. Estimation of biological variation and reference change value of glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) when two analytical methods are used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Fatma; Erden, Gonul; Ginis, Zeynep; Ozturk, Gulfer; Sezer, Sevilay; Gurler, Mukaddes; Guneyk, Ahmet

    2013-10-01

    Available data on biological variation of HbA1c revealed marked heterogeneity. We therefore investigated and estimated the components of biological variation for HbA1c in a group of healthy individuals by applying a recommended and strictly designed study protocol using two different assay methods. Each month, samples were derived on the same day, for three months. Four EDTA whole blood samples were collected from each individual (20 women, 9 men; 20-45 years of age) and stored at -80°C until analysis. HbA1c values were measured by both high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (Shimadzu, Prominence, Japan) and boronate affinity chromatography methods (Trinity Biotech, Premier Hb9210, Ireland). All samples were assayed in duplicate in a single batch for each assay method. Estimations were calculated according to the formulas described by Fraser and Harris. The within subject (CV(I))-between subject (CV(G)) biological variations were 1.17% and 5.58%, respectively for HPLC. The calculated CV(I) and CV(G) were 2.15% and 4.03%, respectively for boronate affinity chromatography. Reference change value (RCV) for HPLC and boronate affinity chromatography was 5.4% and 10.4% respectively and individuality index of HbA(1c) was 0.35 and 0.93 respectively. This study for the first time described the components of biological variation for HbA1c in healthy individuals by two different assay methods. Obtained findings showed that the difference between CV(A) values of the methods might considerably affect RCV. These data regarding biological variation of HbA(1c) could be useful for a better evaluation of HbA(1c) test results in clinical interpretation. Copyright © 2013 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Single-Use Disposable Electrochemical Label-Free Immunosensor for Detection of Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c Using Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Molazemhosseini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A single-use disposable in vitro electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of HbA1c in undiluted human serum using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV was developed. A three-electrode configuration electrochemical biosensor consisted of 10-nm-thin gold film working and counter electrodes and a thick-film printed Ag/AgCl reference electrode was fabricated on a polyethylene terephthalate (PET substrate. Micro-fabrication techniques including sputtering vapor deposition and thick-film printing were used to fabricate the biosensor. This was a roll-to-roll cost-effective manufacturing process making the single-use disposable in vitro HbA1c biosensor a reality. Self-assembled monolayers of 3-Mercaptopropionic acid (MPA were employed to covalently immobilize anti-HbA1c on the surface of gold electrodes. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS confirmed the excellent coverage of MPA-SAM and the upward orientation of carboxylic groups. The hindering effect of HbA1c on the ferricyanide/ferrocyanide electron transfer reaction was exploited as the HbA1c detection mechanism. The biosensor showed a linear range of 7.5–20 µg/mL of HbA1c in 0.1 M PBS. Using undiluted human serum as the test medium, the biosensor presented an excellent linear behavior (R2 = 0.999 in the range of 0.1–0.25 mg/mL of HbA1c. The potential application of this biosensor for in vitro measurement of HbA1c for diabetic management was demonstrated.

  10. Erroneous HbA1c results in a patient with elevated HbC and HbF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adekanmbi, Joy; Higgins, Trefor; Rodriguez-Capote, Karina; Thomas, Dylan; Winterstein, Jeffrey; Dixon, Tara; Gifford, Jessica L; Krause, Richard; Venner, Allison A; Clarke, Gwen; Estey, Mathew P

    2016-11-01

    HbA1c is used in the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes mellitus (DM). Interference from hemoglobin variants is a well-described phenomenon, particularly with HPLC-based methods. While immunoassays may generate more reliable HbA1c results in the presence of some variants, these methods are susceptible to negative interference from high concentrations of HbF. We report a case where an accurate HbA1c result could not be obtained by any available method due to the presence of a compound hemoglobinopathy. HbA1c was measured by HPLC, immunoassay, and capillary electrophoresis. Hemoglobinopathy investigation consisted of a CBC, hemoglobin fractionation by HPLC and electrophoresis, and molecular analysis. HbA1c analysis by HPLC and capillary electrophoresis gave no result. Analysis by immunoassay yielded HbA1c results of 5.9% (Siemens DCA 2000+) and 5.1% (Roche Integra), which were inconsistent with other markers of glycemic control. Hemoglobinopathy investigation showed HbC with the hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin-2 Ghana deletion. Reliable HbA1c results may be unobtainable in the presence of some hemoglobinopathies. HPLC and capillary electrophoresis alerted the laboratory to the presence of an unusual hemoglobinopathy. Immunoassays generated falsely low results without warning, which could lead to missed diagnoses and under treatment of patients with DM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Validation and determination of a reference interval for canine HbA1c using an immunoturbidimetric assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goemans, Anne F; Spence, Susanna J; Ramsey, Ian K

    2017-06-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) provides a reliable measure of glycemic control over 2-3 months in human diabetes mellitus. In dogs, presence of HbA1c has been demonstrated, but there are no validated commercial assays. The purpose of the study was to validate a commercially available automated immunoturbidimetric assay for canine HbA1c and determine an RI in a hospital population. The specificity of the assay was assessed by inducing glycosylation in vitro using isolated canine hemoglobin, repeatability by measuring canine samples 5 times in succession, long term inter-assay imprecision by measuring supplied control materials, stability using samples stored at 4°C over 5 days and -20°C over 8 weeks, linearity by mixing samples of known HbA1c in differing proportions, and the effect of anticoagulants with paired samples. An RI was determined using EDTA-anticoagulated blood samples from 60 nondiabetic hospitalized animals of various ages and breeds. Hemoglobin A1c was also measured in 10 diabetic dogs. The concentration of HbA1c increased proportionally with glucose concentration in vitro. For repeat measurements, the CV was 4.08% (range 1.16-6.10%). Samples were stable for 5 days at 4°C. The assay was linear within the assessed range. Heparin- and EDTA-anticoagulated blood provided comparable results. The RI for HbA1c was 9-18.5 mmol/mol. There was no apparent effect of age or breed on HbA1c. In diabetic dogs, HbA1c ranged from 14 to 48 mmol/mol. The assay provides a reliable method for canine HbA1c measurement with good analytic performance. © 2017 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  12. Change in Sedentary Time, Physical Activity, Bodyweight, and HbA1c in High-Risk Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Matthew; Edwardson, Charlotte L; Davies, Melanie J; Henson, Joseph; Gray, Laura; Khunti, Kamlesh; Yates, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    In recent years, there has been a migration toward the use of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in determining glycemic control. This study aimed to quantify the associations between changes in body weight, sedentary time, and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) time with HbA1c levels for a 3-yr period among adults at high risk of type 2 diabetes. This study reports baseline and 3-yr follow-up data from the Walking Away from Type 2 Diabetes study. ActiGraph GT3X accelerometers captured sedentary time and MVPA. Linear regression examined the independent associations of changes in sedentary time, MVPA, and body weight with HbA1c between baseline and 3-yr follow-up. The sample composed of 489 participants (mean age = 64.2 ± 7.3 yr, body mass index = 31.7 ± 5.1, 63.4% male) with valid baseline and follow-up accelerometer, body weight, and HbA1c data. After adjustment for known confounders, an increase in MVPA time (per 30 min·d) was associated with a decrease in HbA1c percentage (β = -0.11 [-0.18 to -0.05], P = 0.001), and an increase in body weight (per 6 kg) was associated with an increase in HbA1c percentage (β = 0.08 [0.04-0.12], P HbA1c ≥ 6.0%) strengthened these associations (P HbA1c after adjustment for change in MVPA time. Increases in MVPA and body weight were associated with a reduction and increase in HbA1c, respectively, particularly in those with dysglycemia. Quantifying the effect that health behavior changes have on HbA1c can be used to inform prevention programs.

  13. Changes in HbA1c and Weight Following Transition to Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion Therapy in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sanjeev N; Andersen, Henrik Ullits; Abrahamson, Martin J; Wolpert, Howard A; Hommel, Eva E; McMullen, William; Ridderstråle, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Historically, intensive insulin therapy for type 1 diabetes (T1D) has improved glycemic control at the risk of adverse weight gain. The impact of continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy (CSII) on weight in the current era remains unknown. We assessed changes in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and weight in adults with T1D transitioning to CSII at 2 diabetes centers in Denmark and the United States. Patients with T1D, aged ≥18 years, managed with multiple daily injections (MDI) who transitioned to CSII between 2002 and 2013 were identified using electronic health record data from the Steno Diabetes Center (n = 600) and Joslin Diabetes Center (n = 658). Changes in HbA1c and weight after 1 year was assessed overall and by baseline HbA1c cut points. Multivariate regression assessed correlates of HbA1c reduction. In adults with T1D transitioning to CSII, clinically significant HbA1c reductions were found in patients with baseline HbA1c 8.0-8.9% (Steno, -0.7%; Joslin, -0.4%) and baseline HbA1c ≥9.0% (Steno, -1.1%; Joslin, -0.9%) ( P HbA1c ≥9% at Steno (1.1 ± 0.3 kg, P HbA1c reduction was associated with higher HbA1c, older age, female sex at Steno ( R 2 = .28, P HbA1c at Joslin ( R 2 = .19, P HbA1c without a negative impact on weight 1 year after transitioning from MDI to CSII.

  14. Do Mobile Phone Applications Improve Glycemic Control (HbA1c) in the Self-management of Diabetes? A Systematic Review, Meta-analysis, and GRADE of 14 Randomized Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Can; Carter, Ben; Hewitt, Jonathan; Francisa, Trevor; Mayor, Sharon

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the effect of mobile phone applications (apps) on glycemic control (HbA 1c ) in the self-management of diabetes. Relevant studies that were published between 1 January 1996 and 1 June 2015 were searched from five databases: Medline, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, and Embase. Randomized controlled trials that evaluated diabetes apps were included. We conducted a systematic review with meta-analysis and GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) of the evidence. Participants from 14 studies (n = 1,360) were included and quality assessed. Although there may have been clinical diversity, all type 2 diabetes studies reported a reduction in HbA 1c . The mean reduction in participants using an app compared with control was 0.49% (95% Cl 0.30, 0.68; I 2 = 10%), with a moderate GRADE of evidence. Subgroup analyses indicated that younger patients were more likely to benefit from the use of diabetes apps, and the effect size was enhanced with health care professional feedback. There was inadequate data to describe the effectiveness of apps for type 1 diabetes. Apps may be an effective component to help control HbA 1c and could be considered as an adjuvant intervention to the standard self-management for patients with type 2 diabetes. Given the reported clinical effect, access, and nominal cost of this technology, it is likely to be effective at the population level. The functionality and use of this technology need to be standardized, but policy and guidance are anticipated to improve diabetes self-management care. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  15. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

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    Sultan Ayoub Meo

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Installation of mobile phone base stations in residential areas has initiated public debate about possible adverse effects on human health. This study aimed to determine the association of exposure to radio frequency electromagnetic field radiation (RF-EMFR generated by mobile phone base stations with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c and occurrence of type 2 diabetes mellitus. For this study, two different elementary schools (school-1 and school-2 were selected. We recruited 159 students in total; 96 male students from school-1, with age range 12–16 years, and 63 male students with age range 12–17 years from school-2. Mobile phone base stations with towers existed about 200 m away from the school buildings. RF-EMFR was measured inside both schools. In school-1, RF-EMFR was 9.601 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz, and students had been exposed to RF-EMFR for a duration of 6 h daily, five days in a week. In school-2, RF-EMFR was 1.909 nW/cm2 at frequency of 925 MHz and students had been exposed for 6 h daily, five days in a week. 5–6 mL blood was collected from all the students and HbA1c was measured by using a Dimension Xpand Plus Integrated Chemistry System, Siemens. The mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR was significantly higher (5.44 ± 0.22 than the mean HbA1c for the students who were exposed to low RF-EMFR (5.32 ± 0.34 (p = 0.007. Moreover, students who were exposed to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS had a significantly higher risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (p = 0.016 relative to their counterparts who were exposed to low RF-EMFR. It is concluded that exposure to high RF-EMFR generated by MPBS is associated with elevated levels of HbA1c and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  16. Patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics

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    Arunpreet Singh Kahlon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : Till now estimation of blood glucose is the highly effective method for diagnosing diabetes mellitus but it provides a short-term picture of control. More evidence is required to prove that plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels together gives a better estimate of glycemic control and compliance with treatment. Indian diabetes risk score (IDRS is a simplified screening tool for identifying undiagnosed diabetic subjects, requires minimum time, and effort and can help to considerably reduce the costs of screening. Objective : To study patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. To find out correlation between levels of plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics and to calculate IDRS of the study population. Materials and Methods : A cross sectional study was conducted among 300 known diabetic patients attending outpatient department of a rural medical college in Haryana, India. Following standard procedures and protocols FPG and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured to find out a pattern of glycemic control in them after taking their written and informed consent. A correlation between the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose was also calculated. These patients were made to fill a performa and their demographic and clinical risk factors were noted and based on this, their IDRS was calculated. This was done to validate the IDRS in Indian rural population. Results : Fifty-two percent of the population had fasting plasma glucose level between 125-150 mg/dl, 21% had this level between 151-175 mg/dl. Thirteen percent of the study subjects had HbA1C between 6.5-7.5, more than half (57.3% had this value between 7.5-8.5, 12% and 18% had values between 8.5-9.5 and 9.5-10.5, respectively. Twelve percent of the participants had HbA1C level higher than 10.5. Correlation of fasting plasma glucose level and HbA1C was also studied and found that correlation coefficient came

  17. Patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, Arunpreet Singh; Pathak, Rambha

    2011-07-01

    Till now estimation of blood glucose is the highly effective method for diagnosing diabetes mellitus but it provides a short-term picture of control. More evidence is required to prove that plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin levels together gives a better estimate of glycemic control and compliance with treatment. Indian diabetes risk score (IDRS) is a simplified screening tool for identifying undiagnosed diabetic subjects, requires minimum time, and effort and can help to considerably reduce the costs of screening. To study patterns of glycemic control using glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetic patients. To find out correlation between levels of plasma glucose and glycosylated hemoglobin in diabetics and to calculate IDRS of the study population. A cross sectional study was conducted among 300 known diabetic patients attending outpatient department of a rural medical college in Haryana, India. Following standard procedures and protocols FPG and glycosylated hemoglobin were measured to find out a pattern of glycemic control in them after taking their written and informed consent. A correlation between the levels of glycosylated hemoglobin and fasting blood glucose was also calculated. These patients were made to fill a performa and their demographic and clinical risk factors were noted and based on this, their IDRS was calculated. This was done to validate the IDRS in Indian rural population. Fifty-two percent of the population had fasting plasma glucose level between 125-150 mg/dl, 21% had this level between 151-175 mg/dl. Thirteen percent of the study subjects had HbA1C between 6.5-7.5, more than half (57.3%) had this value between 7.5-8.5, 12% and 18% had values between 8.5-9.5 and 9.5-10.5, respectively. Twelve percent of the participants had HbA1C level higher than 10.5. Correlation of fasting plasma glucose level and HbA1C was also studied and found that correlation coefficient came out to be .311. This correlation was found to be statistically

  18. Can glycated hemoglobin act as a reliable glycemic indicator in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease? evidence from the Northeast of Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Sojib Bin Zaman; Naznin Hossain; Ahmed E. Rahman; Sheikh M.S. Islam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Chronic kidney diseases (CKD) is a common microvascular complication in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM) which requires adequate glycemic control. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a conventional biomarker to estimate glycemic status, but its role in diabetic CKD patients is unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to determine whether patients with high HbA1c are associated to develop diabetic CKD.Methods: Data were obtained from a clinical registry of diabetic patients who were tre...

  19. Hba1c, Blood Pressure, and Lipid Control in People with Diabetes: Japan Epidemiology Collaboration on Occupational Health Study.

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    Huanhuan Hu

    Full Text Available The control of blood glucose levels, blood pressure (BP, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C levels reduces the risk of diabetes complications; however, data are scarce on control status of these factors among workers with diabetes. The present study aimed to estimate the prevalence of participants with diabetes who meet glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, BP, and LDL-C recommendations, and to investigate correlates of poor glycemic control in a large working population in Japan.The Japan Epidemiology Collaboration on Occupational Health (J-ECOH Study is an ongoing cohort investigation, consisting mainly of employees in large manufacturing companies. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 3,070 employees with diabetes (2,854 men and 216 women aged 20-69 years who attended periodic health examinations. BP was measured and recorded using different company protocols. Risk factor targets were defined using both American Diabetes Association (ADA guidelines (HbA1c < 7.0%, BP < 140/90 mmHg, and LDL-C < 100 mg/dL and Japan Diabetes Society (JDS guidelines (HbA1c < 7.0%, BP < 130/80 mmHg, and LDL-C < 120 mg/dL. Logistic regression models were used to explore correlates of poor glycemic control (defined as HbA1c ≥ 8.0%.The percentages of participants who met ADA (and JDS targets were 44.9% (44.9% for HbA1c, 76.6% (36.3% for BP, 27.1% (56.2% for LDL-C, and 11.2% (10.8% for simultaneous control of all three risk factors. Younger age, obesity, smoking, and uncontrolled dyslipidemia were associated with poor glycemic control. The adjusted odds ratio of poor glycemic control was 0.58 (95% confidence interval, 0.46-0.73 for participants with treated but uncontrolled hypertension, and 0.47 (0.33-0.66 for participants with treated and controlled hypertension, as compared with participants without hypertension. There was no significant difference in HbA1c levels between participants with treated but uncontrolled hypertension and those with treated and

  20. The Long and Winding Road to Optimal HbA1c Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Randie R.; Rohlfing, Curt

    2016-01-01

    The importance of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as an indicator of mean glycemia and risks for complications in patients with diabetes mellitus was established by the results of long-term clinical trials, most notably the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS), published in 1993 and 1998 respectively. However, clinical application of recommended HbA1c targets that were based on these studies was difficult due to lack of comparability of HbA1c results among assay methods and laboratories. Thus, the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP) was initiated in 1996 with the goal of standardizing HbA1c results to those of the DCCT/UKPDS. HbA1c standardization efforts have been highly successful; however, a number of issues have emerged on the “long and winding road” to better HbA1c, including the development of a higher-order HbA1c reference method by the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC), recommendations to use HbA1c to diagnose as well as monitor diabetes, and point-of-care (POC) HbA1c testing. Here, we review the past, present and future of HbA1c standardization and describe the current status of HbA1c testing, including limitations that healthcare providers need to be aware of when interpreting HbA1c results. PMID:23318564

  1. HbA1c Levels among Primary Healthcare Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Oman

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    Jawad A Al-Lawati

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate whether younger patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus have higher glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels compared to older patients, and to determine the factors associated with higher HbA1c levels.Methods: Data from 1,266 patients from all over Oman were used to obtain the mean HbA1c level, odds ratios (OR, and 95% confidence intervals (CI from multiple logistic regression models with age groups, sex, duration of diabetes, diabetes treatment, body mass index, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, tobacco use, and healthcare index as predictors of good (HbA1c <7% vs.poor (≥7% glycemic control.Results: Mean HbA1c levels were 8.9, 8.3, and 7.8 in the age groups 20-39, 40-59 and 60+ years, respectively. After controlling for all other covariates, the OR of good glycemic control increased with age, 40-59 years old (OR=1.7; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.6 and 60+ year (OR=2.5; 95% CI 1.6 to 4.0, female gender (OR=1.5; 95% CI 1.2 to 2.0 and in patients with eGFR ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m2 (OR=1.9; 95% CI 1.1 to 3.3. Longer duration of diabetes (≥5years and treatment with oral agents or insulin were inversely related to good glycemic control.Conclusion: Younger Omani adults exhibit worse glycemic levels compared to older adults posing a formidable challenge to diabetes care teams.

  2. Relationship of HbA1c variability, absolute changes in HbA1c, and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skriver, Mette Vinther; Sandbæk, Annelli; Kristensen, Jette Kolding

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We assessed the relationship of mortality with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) variability and with absolute change in HbA1c. DESIGN: A population-based prospective observational study with a median follow-up time of 6 years. METHODS: Based on a validated algorithm, 11 205 Danish individua...

  3. HbA1c in relation to incident diabetes and diabetes-related complications in non-diabetic adults at baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Patricia Anne; Kyle, Cam; Kenealy, Tim; Jackson, Rod T

    2017-05-01

    We compared the utility of glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ) and oral glucose tolerance (oGTT) in non-diabetic patients for identifying incident diabetes; all-cause mortality; cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality; CVD, coronary heart disease (CHD), and ischemic stroke events; and diabetes microvascular complications. Data from a New Zealand community setting were prospectively linked to hospitalization, mortality, pharmaceutical and laboratory test results data. After applying exclusion criteria (prior laboratory diagnosis or history of drug treatment for diabetes or hospitalization for diabetes or CVD event), there were 31,148 adults who had an HbA 1c and 2-h 75g oGTT. HbA 1c was measured by ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, and glucose using a commercial enzymatic method. We compared glycemic measures and outcomes using multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression. The median follow-up time was 4years (range 0 to 13). The mean age was 57·6years and 53·0% were male. After adjusting for other glycemic measures (fasting glucose, 2-h glucose and/or HbA 1c where relevant) in addition to age, sex, ethnicity and smoking habit, the hazard ratios for incident diabetes and diabetes complications of retinopathy and nephropathy were highest for 2-h glucose levels, followed by HbA 1c and lastly by fasting glucose. However, all-cause mortality and CHD were significantly associated with HbA 1c concentrations only, and ischemic stroke and CVD events with 2-h glucose only. Circulatory complications showed a stronger association with HbA 1c . Apart from neuropathy, HbA 1c showed stronger associations with outcomes compared to fasting glucose and provides a convenient alternative to an oGTT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. How does CKD affect HbA1c?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomgarden, Zachary; Handelsman, Yehuda

    2018-04-01

    HOW DOES CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE AFFECT HBA1C?: A number of factors determine HbA1c other than the level of glucose exposure alone. In an subset analysis of the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study of 941 diabetic people with varying degrees of chronic kidney disease (CKD), as well as 724 who did not have CKD, and mean age in the eighth decade, Jung et al. ask whether HbA1c is reliable as an indicator of glycemia in people with kidney disease (CKD) to the same degree as in those not having kidney disease, and, if not, whether measures of glycated serum proteins may be more useful. The only available measure of glycemia for comparison was a single fasting glucose level, and the authors acknowledge that this gives an incomplete measure, particularly in people with relatively mild diabetes, whose mean HbA1c was 6.4%, with most having levels of 7.5% or lower. In patients of this sort, postprandial glucose levels may better explain variations in mean HbA1c. Recognizing that the dataset may be limited, Jung et al. nevertheless give an intriguingly negative answer to the first question, of the reliability of HbA1c with kidney disease. Using Deming regression analysis, Jung et al. showed that the correlation between HbA1c and fasting glucose weakens as renal function worsens, and, moreover, that this appears particularly to be the case in people with anemia (hemoglobin men and women, respectively), confirming earlier observations. Among those diabetic people with neither anemia nor CKD, the correlation coefficient between HbA1c and fasting glucose was r = 0.70, compared with r = 0.35 among those with both anemia and very severe CKD (estimated glomerular filtration rate [eGFR] perform SMBG to more adequately interpret HbA1c results. © 2017 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Possible discrepancy of HbA1c values and its assessment among patients with chronic renal failure, hemodialysis and other diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kaori; Goto, Atsushi; Kishimoto, Miyako; Tsujimoto, Tetsuro; Yamamoto-Honda, Ritsuko; Noto, Hiroshi; Kajio, Hiroshi; Terauchi, Yasuo; Noda, Mitsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and glycated albumin (GA) are frequently used as glycemic control markers. However, these markers are influenced by alterations in hemoglobin and albumin metabolism. Thus, conditions such as anemia, chronic renal failure, hypersplenism, chronic liver diseases, hyperthyroidism, hypoalbuminemia, and pregnancy need to be considered when interpreting HbA1c or GA values. Using data from patients with normal albumin and hemoglobin metabolism, we previously established a linear regression equation describing the GA value versus the HbA1c value to calculate an extrapolated HbA1c (eHbA1c) value for the accurate evaluation of glycemic control. In this study, we investigated the difference between the measured HbA1c and the eHbA1c values for patients with various conditions. Data sets for a total of 2461 occasions were obtained from 731 patients whose HbA1c and GA values were simultaneously measured. We excluded patients with missing data or changeable HbA1c levels, and patients who had received transfusions or steroids within the previous 3 months. Finally, we included 44 patients with chronic renal failure (CRF), 10 patients who were undergoing hemodialysis (HD), 7 patients with hematological malignancies and a hemoglobin level of less than 10 g/dL (HM), and 12 patients with chronic liver diseases (CLD). In all the groups, the eHbA1c values were significantly higher than the measured HbA1c values. The median difference was 0.75 % (95 % CI 0.40-1.10 %, P for the difference is <0.001) in the CRF group, 0.80 % (95 % CI 0.30-1.65 %, P for the difference is 0.041) in the HD group, 0.90 % (95 % CI 0.90-1.30 %, P for the difference is 0.028) in the HM group, and 0.85 % (95 % CI 0.40-1.50 %, P for the difference is 0.009) in the CLD group. We found that the measured HbA1c values were lower than the eHbA1c values in each of the groups.

  6. Visit-to-Visit Variations in Fasting Plasma Glucose and HbA1c Associated With an Increased Risk of Alzheimer Disease: Taiwan Diabetes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tsai-Chung; Yang, Chun-Pai; Tseng, Shih-Ting; Li, Chia-Ing; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Hwang, Kai-Lin; Yang, Sing-Yu; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2017-09-01

    The relationship between glycemic variability and the incidence of Alzheimer disease (AD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is unclear. The aim of this study was to examine visit-to-visit variations in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ) represented by the coefficient of variation (CV) and to determine whether they were independently associated with AD, irrespective of HbA 1c and other traditional risk factors in such patients. Patients with T2DM enrolled in the National Diabetes Care Management Program, age ≥60 years, and without diagnosis of AD ( n = 16,706) were included in the study. Potential risk factors were analyzed using extended Cox proportional hazards regression models for competing risk of mortality on AD incidence. During a median follow-up of 8.88 years, 831 incident cases of AD were identified, with a crude incidence rate of 3.5/1,000 person-years. After adjustment for sociodemographic factors, lifestyle behaviors, diabetes-related variables, FPG and HbA 1c , drug-related variables, and comorbidities, both FPG CV and HbA 1c CV were found to be significant predictors of AD, with corresponding hazard ratios of 1.27 (95% CI 1.06-1.52) for the third tertile in FPG CV and 1.32 (95% CI 1.11-1.58) for the third tertile in HbA 1c CV. FPG CV and HbA 1c CV are independently associated with AD. The associations between glycemic variability and AD demonstrated in this study suggest a linked pathophysiological mechanism, which is worthy of further investigation. Further research is required to confirm our results and to evaluate whether FPG CV and HbA 1c CV can be valuable therapeutic targets for patients with T2DM at risk. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  7. HbA1c Outcomes in Patients Treated With Canagliflozin Versus Sitagliptin in US Health Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thayer, Sarah; Aguilar, Richard; Korrer, Stephanie; Chow, Wing

    2017-10-01

    Clinical trial evidence supports greater glycemic control with canagliflozin than with sitagliptin. The objective of this study was to provide real-world evidence comparing outcomes in routine clinical practice among patients initiating each medication. With the use of a health care administrative database, patients initiating canagliflozin were compared with patients initiating sitagliptin (first prescription fill as index date). Baseline (6 months before index date) demographic and clinical (eg, comorbidities and diabetes-related complications) characteristics were compared, and propensity score matching was used to control for baseline differences between cohorts. Outcomes included change in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ) and persistence with medication over a 9-month period after index date. Before matching, the canagliflozin cohort (N = 3993) was younger than the sitagliptin cohort (N = 12,153) and was composed of fewer women and Medicare Advantage enrollees, with lower mean baseline comorbidity scores (all p < 0.001). Before matching, the canagliflozin cohort (valid n = 1482) had a significantly (p < 0.001) higher baseline HbA 1c (8.60) than the sitagliptin cohort (valid n = 3697; HbA 1c , 8.32). After matching (n = 1472 per cohort), patients were well balanced on baseline characteristics, and HbA 1c values were not significantly different (p = 0.634) between the cohorts. Patients initiating canagliflozin had greater reductions in HbA 1c than patients in the sitagliptin cohort (-0.93% versus -0.57%, respectively; p = 0.004), with similar mean (median) time from index date to follow-up HbA 1c of 185.4 (199.0) and 184.3 (190.5) days, respectively (p = 0.802). Only 29.8% of canagliflozin patients discontinued during follow-up compared with 41.5% of sitagliptin patients (p < 0.001); the average days of persistence on index therapy was longer for canagliflozin patients (152 days) than for sitagliptin patients (139 days; p < 0.001). In this observational study

  8. The changing relationship between HbA1c and FPG according to different FPG ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, X; Zheng, L; Sun, G; Guo, X; Li, Y; Song, H; Tian, F; Sun, Y

    2016-05-01

    Since the American Diabetes Association included hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) in the diagnostic criteria for diabetes in 2010, the clinical use of HbA1c has remained controversial. We explored the use of HbA1c for diagnosing diabetes and intermediate hyperglycemia in comparison with fasting plasma glucose (FPG). We screened 3710 adult subjects (mean age = 55.24 years) comprising 1704 males and 2006 females. We drew an receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve to evaluate the ability of HbA1c to diagnose diabetes and intermediate hyperglycemia according to FPG. We used Kappa coefficient and Pearson's correlation coefficient to evaluate the relationship between HbA1c and FPG in different FPG ranges. The areas under ROC curve to diagnose diabetes and intermediate hyperglycemia were 0.859 (95 % CI 0.827-0.892) and 0.633 (95 % CI 0.615-0.651). The kappa coefficients between FPG and HbA1c for diagnosis of diabetes and intermediate hyperglycemia were 0.601 (P HbA1c was 0.640 (P HbA1c and FPG changed according to the different FPG ranges. When FPG was higher, the relationship was stronger. HbA1c and FPG were highly consistent in diagnosing diabetes, but they were not in predicting intermediate hyperglycemia.

  9. Recent Progress in Electrochemical HbA1c Sensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baozhen Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent progress made in the development of electrochemical glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c sensors for the diagnosis and management of diabetes mellitus. Electrochemical HbA1c sensors are divided into two categories based on the detection protocol of the sensors. The first type of sensor directly detects HbA1c by binding HbA1c on the surface of an electrode through bio-affinity of antibody and boronic acids, followed by an appropriate mode of signal transduction. In the second type of sensor, HbA1c is indirectly determined by detecting a digestion product of HbA1c, fructosyl valine (FV. Thus, the former sensors rely on the selective binding of HbA1c to the surface of the electrodes followed by electrochemical signaling in amperometric, voltammetric, impedometric, or potentiometric mode. Redox active markers, such as ferrocene derivatives and ferricyanide/ferrocyanide ions, are often used for electrochemical signaling. For the latter sensors, HbA1c must be digested in advance by proteolytic enzymes to produce the FV fragment. FV is electrochemically detected through catalytic oxidation by fructosyl amine oxidase or by selective binding to imprinted polymers. The performance characteristics of HbA1c sensors are discussed in relation to their use in the diagnosis and control of diabetic mellitus.

  10. Glycemic control in diabetes in three Danish counties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Lone G M; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Heickendorff, Lene; Møller, Holger Jon; Hendel, Jørn; Christensen, Cramer; Schmitz, Anita; Reinholdt, Birgitte; Lund, Erik D; Christensen, Niels J; Hansen, Erik Kjaersgaard; Hastrup, Jens; Skjødt, Hanne; Eriksen, Ebbe Wendel; Brandslund, Ivan

    2005-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a proxy measure for glycemic control in diabetes. We investigated the trend for glycemic control in patients from three Danish counties using HbA1c measurements. We studied 2454 patients from a population of 807,000 inhabitants for whom routine monitoring of diabetes using HbA1c-DCCT aligned was initiated in 2001. We estimated the incidence of monitored patients in the population. The progress in patients with originally diabetic HbA1c levels was investigated by cumulative probability plots, and the individual trend in clinical outcome was investigated by a modified difference plot. The age-standardized incidence of monitored patients was or=6.62% HbA1c) showed on average 15% improved glycemic control in the first year. Further improvement was limited. The overall percentage above the treatment target (>or=6.62% HbA1c) was 51% in 2003 compared to 59% in 2001, and the percentage with poor glycemic control (>or=10.0% HbA1c) was reduced from 19% to 4%. Of patients with originally diabetic HbA1c levels, 15% showed progress in glycemic control, and 28% reached treatment targets. In patients with originally normal HbA1c, 75% showed an upward trend in HbA1c levels, which reached diabetic concentrations in 17%. Patients with diabetic first HbA1c concentrations (>or=6.62% HbA1c) showed on average 15% improved glycemic control in the first year. Further improvement was limited. In individual patients, 75% with originally diabetic HbA1c levels showed improved glycemic control after 3 years, while 78% with originally normal concentrations showed an upward trend in HbA1c levels.

  11. Mitochondrial Haplogroups Modify the Effect of Diabetes Duration and HbA1c on Proliferative Diabetic Retinopathy Risk in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Sabrina L; Neininger, Abigail C; Bruce, Carleigh N; Chocron, Isaac M; Bregman, Jana A; Estopinal, Christopher B; Muhammad, Ayesha; Umfress, Allison C; Jarrell, Kelli L; Warden, Cassandra; Harlow, Paula A; Wellons, Melissa; Samuels, David C; Brantley, Milam A

    2017-12-01

    We previously demonstrated an association between European mitochondrial haplogroups and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR). The purpose of this study was to determine how the relationship between these haplogroups and both diabetes duration and hyperglycemia, two major risk factors for diabetic retinopathy (DR), affect PDR prevalence. Our population consisted of patients with type 2 diabetes with (n = 377) and without (n = 480) DR. A Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare diabetes duration and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) among mitochondrial haplogroups. Logistic regressions were performed to investigate diabetes duration and HbA1c as risk factors for PDR in the context of European mitochondrial haplogroups. Neither diabetes duration nor HbA1c differed among mitochondrial haplogroups. Among DR patients from haplogroup H, longer diabetes duration and increasing HbA1c were significant risk factors for PDR (P = 0.0001 and P = 0.011, respectively). Neither diabetes duration nor HbA1c was a significant risk factor for PDR in DR patients from haplogroup UK. European mitochondrial haplogroups modify the effects of diabetes duration and HbA1c on PDR risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. In our patient population, longer diabetes duration and higher HbA1c increased PDR risk in patients from haplogroup H, but did not affect PDR risk in patients from haplogroup UK. This relationship has not been previously demonstrated and may explain, in part, why some patients with nonproliferative DR develop PDR and others do not, despite similar diabetes duration and glycemic control.

  12. One Drop | Mobile on iPhone and Apple Watch: An Evaluation of HbA1c Improvement Associated With Tracking Self-Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborn, Chandra Y; van Ginkel, Joost R; Marrero, David G; Rodbard, David; Huddleston, Brian; Dachis, Jeff

    2017-11-29

    The One Drop | Mobile app supports manual and passive (via HealthKit and One Drop's glucose meter) tracking of self-care and glycated hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ). We assessed the HbA 1c change of a sample of people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) or type 2 diabetes (T2D) using the One Drop | Mobile app on iPhone and Apple Watch, and tested relationships between self-care tracking with the app and HbA 1c change. In June 2017, we identified people with diabetes using the One Drop | Mobile app on iPhone and Apple Watch who entered two HbA 1c measurements in the app 60 to 365 days apart. We assessed the relationship between using the app and HbA 1c change. Users had T1D (n=65) or T2D (n=191), were 22.7% (58/219) female, with diabetes for a mean 8.34 (SD 8.79) years, and tracked a mean 2176.35 (SD 3430.23) self-care activities between HbA 1c entries. There was a significant 1.36% or 14.9 mmol/mol HbA 1c reduction (F=62.60, PApple Watch may favorably impact glycemic control. ©Chandra Y Osborn, Joost R van Ginkel, David G Marrero, David Rodbard, Brian Huddleston, Jeff Dachis. Originally published in JMIR Mhealth and Uhealth (http://mhealth.jmir.org), 29.11.2017.

  13. Screening and correlates of depression and HbA1 C in United Arab Emirates (UAE) women with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawamdeh, Sana; Almakhzoomy, Ibtihal; Hayajneh, Yaseen

    2013-10-01

    The aim was to identify the relationship between socio-demographic characteristics of United Arab Emirates (UAE) women with diabetes and depression and to explore any differences between depressed and nondepressed patients in relation to glycemic control. One hundred eighty-two subjects completed the Beck Depression Inventory-II and a socio-demographic questionnaire (i.e., age, national status, economic status, level of education, and employment status). Glycemic control was assessed by glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C ). Ninety-two subjects were diagnosed with diabetes mellitus. A statistically significant higher incidence of depression was found in the subject group with diagnosed diabetes mellitus than in the nondiabetic subject group. A statistically significant relationship was found between depression status and type of diabetes (Type 1). A positive relationship between poor glycemic control and higher levels of depression was identified. A positively significant relationship was found between national status and level of depression among the diabetic sample, among whom at least half showed poor glycemic control (HbA1C levels > 7.5). Early detection of depression among women with diabetes is crucial to enhance treatment regimen adherence and glycemic control. As the UAE diabetic women are at even greater risk than other diabetic women, they need to be very carefully screened and evaluated for depression. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Comments on Meo et al. Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health, 2015, 12, 14519–14528

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Alireza Mortazavi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available With great interest and enthusiasm, we have read the article by Meo et al. entitled “Association of Exposure to Radio-Frequency Electromagnetic Field Radiation (RF-EMFR Generated by Mobile Phone Base Stations with Glycated Hemoglobin (HbA1c and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus” that is published in the latest issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health [1].[...

  15. Analysis of HbA1c on an automated multicapillary zone electrophoresis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollborn, Niclas; Åkerfeldt, Torbjörn; Nordin, Gunnar; Xu, Xiao Yan; Mandic-Havelka, Aleksandra; Hansson, Lars-Olof; Larsson, Anders

    2017-02-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is a frequently requested laboratory test and there is thus a need for high throughput instruments for this assay. We evaluated a new automated multicapillary zone electrophoresis instrument (Capillarys 3 Tera, Sebia, Lisses, France) for analysis of HbA1c in venous samples. Routine requested HbA1c samples were analyzed immunologically on a Roche c6000 instrument (n = 142) and then with the Capillarys 3 Tera instrument. The Capillarys 3 Tera instrument performed approximately 70 HbA1c tests/hour. There was a strong linear correlation between Capillarys 3 Tera and Roche Tina-Quant HbA1c Gen 3 assay (y = 1.003x - 0.3246 R 2  = .996). The total CV for the 12 capillaries varied between 0.8 and 2.2% and there was a good agreement between duplicate samples (R 2  = .997). In conclusion, the Capillarys 3 Tera instrument has a high assay capacity for HbA1c. It has a good precision and agreement with the Roche Tina-Quant HbA1c method and is well suited for high volume testing of HbA1c.

  16. HBA1C AND MEAN GLUCOSE DERIVED FROM SHORT-TERM CONTINUOUS GLUCOSE MONITORING ASSESSMENT DO NOT CORRELATE IN PATIENTS WITH HBA1C >8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Eijiro; Okada, Shuichi; Nakajima, Yasuyo; Bastie, Claire C; Vatish, Manu; Tagaya, Yuko; Osaki, Aya; Shimoda, Yoko; Shibusawa, Ryo; Saito, Tsugumichi; Okamura, Takashi; Ozawa, Atsushi; Yamada, Masanobu

    2017-01-01

    Optimum therapy for patients with diabetes depends on both acute and long-term changes in plasma glucose, generally assessed by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. However, the correlation between HbA1c and circulating glucose has not been fully determined. Therefore, we carefully examined this correlation when glucose levels were assessed by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Fifty-one patients (70% female, 30% male) were examined; among them were 28 with type 1 diabetes and 23 with type 2 diabetes. Clinically determined HbA1c levels were compared with blood glucose determined by CGM during a short time period. Changes in HbA1c levels up to 8.0% showed a clear and statistically strong correlation (R = 0.6713; PHbA1c and CGM-assessed glucose levels in our patient population when HbA1c was >8.0%. Short-term CGM appears to be a good clinical indicator of long-term glucose control (HbA1c levels); however, cautions should be taken while interpreting CGM data from patients with HbA1c levels >8.0%. Over- or underestimation of the actual mean glucose from CGM data could potentially increase the risks of inappropriate treatment. As such, our results indicate that a more accurate analysis of CGM data might be useful to adequately tailor clinical treatments. ADAG = A1c-Derived Average Glucose CGM = continuous glucose monitoring %CV = percent coefficient of variation HbA1c = glycated hemoglobin.

  17. Association of fibrinogen with HbA1C in diabetic foot ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pase, M. A.; Gatot, D.; Lindarto, D.

    2018-03-01

    Fibrinogen is one of the inflammatory markers of vascular changes and endothelial dysfunction in diabetic patients. The aim of this study to associate serum fibrinogen levels with HbA1C in diabetic foot ulcer (DFU). This study was cross-sectional and retrospective in DFU patients from January to July 2017 in Haji Adam Malik Central General Hospital. The patients enrolled in the study were T2DM with DFU as a complication. The grading of DFU was evaluated according to the Wagner’s Classification. Serum fibrinogen level, HbA1C and ankle-brachial index (ABI) were carried out directly in the patients. Fibrinogen serum levels were found significantly with HbA1C (P=0.001, r=0.387) and ABI (P=0.008, r=-0.454). Fibrinogen serum levels in DFU patients were positively correlated with HbA1C and significantly higher in patients with poor glycemic control.

  18. Diabetes distress is more strongly associated with HbA1c than depressive symptoms in adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagger, Virginia; Hendrieckx, Christel; Cameron, Fergus

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is higher during adolescence than at any other life stage. Some research among adolescents indicates that depressive symptoms are associated with suboptimal HbA1c. However, research among adults suggests diabetes distress is a stronger predictor of HbA1c th...

  19. Is insulin the preferred treatment for HbA1c >9%?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomgarden, Zachary

    2017-09-01

    approaches are more effective than monotherapy, with a combination regimen the HbA1c reduction will not be directly additive, because the expected reduction decreases at lower baseline HbA1c levels. As an example of this, administration of canagliflozin 300 mg daily to patients with baseline HbA1c >9% reduced levels from 9.6% by 1.8%, whereas at a baseline HbA1c of 10% either canagliflozin 300 mg or metformin 2 g/day reduced HbA1c by 2%; the addition of both agents led to an HbA1c reduction by somewhat less than 3%, which appears concordant with a reduction by the second agent from approximately 8% (10% to 2%). Similar less-than-additive effects of the addition of exenatide QW to dapagliflozin have been reported, with HbA1c reduction from a baseline of 10.0%-10.1% of 1.9% and 1.6% with the individual agents, respectively, and a reduction of 2.2% with their combination. However, one may consider these approaches inferior to the expected HbA1c reduction with insulin, suggesting that insulin should, indeed, be the preferred treatment for people with T2D and HbA1c >9%. Rather, studies comparing basal insulin directly with glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists (RA) suggest that the latter agents may offer superior benefit. The Diabetes Therapy Utilization: Researching Changes in HBA1C, Weight, and Other Factors Through Intervention with Exenatide Once Weekly (DURATION)-3 and Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes (LEAD)-5 studies compared exenatide QW and liraglutide, respectively, with insulin glargine. Those study participants in the highest quartile of baseline HbA1c had levels ≥9.0% and ≥8.9%, with the GLP-1RA leading to 0.3% and 0.2% greater reductions in HbA1c, respectively, than insulin glargine. Another study comparing T2D patients receiving oral agents given liraglutide with those given insulin glargine showed that those in the highest baseline HbA1c quartile (mean 10.6%) had an HbA1c reduction of 3.1% with either agent. In the exenatide QW study

  20. Significance of HbA1c and its measurement in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus: US experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Deborah Taira; Demaris, Kendra M; Goo, Roy; Mnatzaganian, Christina Louise; Wong Smith, Helen

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 American Diabetes Association guidelines denote four means of diagnosing diabetes. The first of these is a glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) >6.5%. This literature review summarizes studies (n=47) in the USA examining the significance, strengths, and limitations of using HbA1c as a diagnostic tool for diabetes, relative to other available means. Due to the relatively recent adoption of HbA1c as a diabetes mellitus diagnostic tool, a hybrid systematic, truncated review of the literature was implemented. Based on these studies, we conclude that HbA1c screening for diabetes has been found to be convenient and effective in diagnosing diabetes. HbA1c screening is particularly helpful in community-based and acute care settings where tests requiring fasting are not practical. Using HbA1c to diagnose diabetes also has some limitations. For instance, HbA1c testing may underestimate the prevalence of diabetes, particularly among whites. Because this bias differs by racial group, prevalence and resulting estimates of health disparities based on HbA1c screening differ from those based on other methods of diagnosis. In addition, existing evidence suggests that HbA1c screening may not be valid in certain subgroups, such as children, women with gestational diabetes, patients with human immunodeficiency virus, and those with prediabetes. Further guidelines are needed to clarify the appropriate use of HbA1c screening in these populations.

  1. Trajectories of HbA1c Levels in Children and Youth with Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinhas-Hamiel, Orit; Hamiel, Uri; Boyko, Valentina; Graph-Barel, Chana; Reichman, Brian; Lerner-Geva, Liat

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To illustrate the distribution of Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels according to age and gender among children, adolescents and youth with type 1 diabetes (T1DM). Methods Consecutive HbA1c measurements of 349 patients, aged 2 to 30 years with T1DM were obtained from 1995 through 2010. Measurement from patients diagnosed with celiac disease (n = 20), eating disorders (n = 41) and hemoglobinopathy (n = 1) were excluded. The study sample comprised 4815 measurements of HbA1c from 287 patients. Regression percentiles of HbA1c were calculated as a function of age and gender by the quantile regression method using the SAS procedure QUANTREG. Results Crude percentiles of HbA1c as a function of age and gender, and the modeled curves produced using quantile regression showed good concordance. The curves show a decline in HbA1c levels from age 2 to 4 years at each percentile. Thereafter, there is a gradual increase during the prepubertal years with a peak at ages 12 to 14 years. HbA1c levels subsequently decline to the lowest values in the third decade. Curves of females and males followed closely, with females having HbA1c levels about 0.1% (1.1 mmol/mol) higher in the 25th 50th and 75th percentiles. Conclusion We constructed age-specific distribution curves for HbA1c levels for patients with T1DM. These percentiles may be used to demonstrate the individual patient's measurements longitudinally compared with age-matched patients. PMID:25275650

  2. Changes in HbA1c levels and body mass index after successful decompression surgery in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and lumbar spinal stenosis: results of a 2-year follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Cho, Dae-Chul; Sung, Joo-Kyung; Kim, Chi Heon; Kang, Hyun; Kim, Du Hwan

    2017-02-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) can hinder a patient's physical activity, which in turn can impair glucose tolerance and body weight regulation in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM-2). Therefore, successful lumbar surgery could facilitate glycemic control and body weight regulation. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of postoperative improvement in physical activity on body mass index (BMI) and hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) level in patients with LSS and DM-2 over a 2-year follow-up period. Prospective longitudinal observational study. Patients with LSS and DM-2. Visual analogue scale (VAS) scores for back pain and leg pain, Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) scores, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ) sections, BMI, and blood analysis for HbA 1c were carried out. A total of 119 patients were enrolled for analysis of the effect of successful decompression surgery on changes in HbA 1c levels and BMI. The VAS score, ODI score, JOA score, JOABPEQ, BMI, HbA 1c were reassessed at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after surgery. Additionally, correlations between changes in HbA 1c and changes in the ODI, JOA, JOABPEQs, and BMI were analyzed. The overall values of HbA1c before and at 6 months, 1 year, and 2 years after the surgery were 7.08±0.94%, 6.58±0.87%, 6.59±0.79%, and 6.59±0.79%, respectively (p-values; 6 months: .024; 1 year: .021; 2 years: .038). In the not well-controlled sugar (non-WCS) group (preoperative HbA 1c >6.5%), the difference between pre- and postoperative HbA 1c was highly statistically significant (p25) patients with DM-2 and LSS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. New diagnostic criteria for diabetes: is the change from glucose to HbA1c possible in all populations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Bjerregaard, Peter; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2010-01-01

    Recently, a change of the diagnostic tool for diabetes from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) has been suggested. The aim of the study was to assess whether ethnicity modified the association between glucose levels and HbA1c and to compare diabetes prevalence accordi...

  4. New diagnostic criteria for diabetes: is the change from glucose to HbA1c possible in all populations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Marit Eika; Bjerregaard, Peter; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2010-01-01

    Recently, a change of the diagnostic tool for diabetes from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) to hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) has been suggested. The aim of the study was to assess whether ethnicity modified the association between glucose levels and HbA1c and to compare diabetes prevalence according...

  5. Dietary fiber intake is associated with HbA1c level among prevalent patients with type 2 diabetes in Pudong New Area of Shanghai, China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyi Jiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dietary factors play an important role in glycemic control in diabetic patients. However, little is known about their effects among Chinese diabetic patients, whose diets are typically abundant in fiber and high in glycemic index (GI values. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: 934 patients with type 2 diabetes and 918 healthy volunteers from Pudong New Area, Shanghai, China, were interviewed during the period of Oct-Dec, 2006 to elicit demographic characteristics and lifestyle factors. Dietary habits were assessed using a validated food frequency questionnaire. Anthropometric measurements, bio-specimen collection and biochemical assays were conducted at the interview according to a standard protocol. In this population, diabetic patients consumed lower levels of energy and macronutrients but had higher levels of fasting plasma glucose (FPG, glycolated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, triglyceride and body mass index than healthy adults. While the average consumption levels of the nutrients among diabetic patients did not vary along duration of the disease, the average levels of FPG and HbA1c increased with increasing duration. Regardless of diabetes duration, HbA1c level was observed lower in patients having a higher fiber or lower GI intake. Compared with those with the lowest tertile intake of fiber, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs for poor glycemic control reduced from 0.75 (95%CI: 0.54-1.06 to 0.51 (95%CI: 0.34-0.75 with increasing tertile intake (P for trend <0.001. CONCLUSIONS: Dietary fiber may play an important role in reducing HbA1c level. Increasing fiber intake may be an effective approach to improve glycemic control among Chinese diabetic patients.

  6. One-Hour Postload Hyperglycemia Confers Higher Risk of Hepatic Steatosis to HbA1c-Defined Prediabetic Subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorentino, Teresa Vanessa; Andreozzi, Francesco; Mannino, Gaia Chiara; Pedace, Elisabetta; Perticone, Maria; Sciacqua, Angela; Perticone, Francesco; Sesti, Giorgio

    2016-11-01

    Individuals with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c)-defined prediabetes (HbA1c value of 5.7-6.4%) and 1-hour plasma glucose ≥155 mg/dL during an oral glucose tolerance test have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. To evaluate the degree to which HbA1c-defined prediabetes and 1-hour postload glucose ≥155 mg/dL individually and jointly associate with hepatic steatosis and related biomarkers. A cross-sectional analysis was performed on 1108 White individuals. Ambulatory care. Anthropometric and metabolic characteristics including hepatic steatosis assessed by ultrasonography. Compared with the normal group (HbA1c prediabetic and diabetic individuals exhibit higher values of fasting, 1-hour, and 2-hour postload glucose; fasting and 2-hour postload insulin; triglycerides; uric acid; homeostasis model of assessment for insulin resistance; liver insulin resistance index; liver enzymes; and inflammatory biomarkers; and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and IGF-1. Prediabetic and diabetic subjects have increased risk of hepatic steatosis (1.5- and 2.46-fold, respectively). Stratifying participants according to HbA1c and 1-hour postload glucose, we found that individuals with HbA1c-defined prediabetes and 1-hour postload glucose ≥155 mg/dL have significantly higher risk of hepatic steatosis as compared with individuals with HbA1c-defined prediabetes but 1-hour postload glucose prediabetes and 1-hour postload glucose ≥155 mg/dL exhibit higher values of liver enzymes; fasting, 1-hour, and 2-hour postload glucose; insulin; triglycerides; uric acid; and inflammatory biomarkers; and lower levels of high-density lipoprotein and IGF-1. These data suggest that a value of 1-hour postload glucose ≥155 mg/dL may be helpful to identify a subset of individuals within HbA1c-defined glycemic categories at higher risk of hepatic steatosis.

  7. Evaluation of the DCA Vantage analyzer for HbA 1c assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymezak, Jean; Leroy, Nathalie; Lavalard, Emmanuelle; Gillery, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Measurement of HbA 1c is key in monitoring diabetic patients in both laboratories and clinical units, where HbA 1c results are used as part of patient education. We have evaluated the DCA Vantage, a new device for immunological assay of HbA 1c. HbA 1c results obtained were evaluated in terms of precision, linearity, specificity and practicability, and were compared with results obtained by a Variant II HPLC method. The method exhibited intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation lower than 2.6% and 4.0%, respectively, and good correlation with the comparison HPLC method (r2=0.9776). No interference was noted in the presence of labile HbA 1c or carbamylated hemoglobin. The new device exhibited improved practicability characteristics and allowed better sample identification, better management of quality control routines and greater connectivity possibilities compared to the previous DCA 2000 analyzer. This new analyzer exhibited analytical and practical characteristics very suitable for HbA 1c assay for laboratory or point-of-care use according to good laboratory practice.

  8. Comparison of the Current Diagnostic Criterion of HbA1c with Fasting and 2-Hour Plasma Glucose Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnchanasorn, Rudruidee; Huang, Jean; Feng, Wei; Chuang, Lee-Ming

    2016-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥ 6.5% in diagnosing diabetes compared to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) ≥ 126 mg/dL and 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) ≥ 200 mg/dL in a previously undiagnosed diabetic cohort, we included 5,764 adult subjects without established diabetes for whom HbA1c, FPG, 2hPG, and BMI measurements were collected. Compared to the FPG criterion, the sensitivity of HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was only 43.3% (106 subjects). Compared to the 2hPG criterion, the sensitivity of HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was only 28.1% (110 subjects). Patients who were diabetic using 2hPG criterion but had HbA1c HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. The diagnostic agreement in the clinical setting revealed the current HbA1c ≥ 6.5% is less likely to detect diabetes than those defined by FPG and 2hPG. HbA1c ≥ 6.5% detects less than 50% of diabetic patients defined by FPG and less than 30% of diabetic patients defined by 2hPG. When the diagnosis of diabetes is in doubt by HbA1c, FPG and/or 2hPG should be obtained. PMID:27597979

  9. Can glycated hemoglobin act as a reliable glycemic indicator in patients with diabetic chronic kidney disease? evidence from the Northeast of Thailand

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    Sojib Bin Zaman

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Chronic kidney diseases (CKD is a common microvascular complication in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM which requires adequate glycemic control. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c is a conventional biomarker to estimate glycemic status, but its role in diabetic CKD patients is unclear. Therefore, this study aimed to determine whether patients with high HbA1c are associated to develop diabetic CKD.Methods: Data were obtained from a clinical registry of diabetic patients who were treated in a district hospital in the Northeast of Thailand. CKD was defined according to the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m2. Anthropometric and biochemical measurements of the patient were taken by review of medical records. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to determine the likelihood of the association between HbA1c and CKD.Results: Among 4,050 participants, 1,027 (25.3% developed diabetic CKD. Older age (adjusted odds ratio (AOR: 4.88, 95% confidence interval (CI: 3.71–6.42, p<0.05, female (AOR: 1.38, 95% CI: 1.05–1.73, p<0.05, and hypertension (AOR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.21–1.91, p<0.05 were found as the risk factors of diabetic CKD. However, patients with high HbA1c (>6.5% were negatively associated with diabetic CKD (AOR: 0.66, 95% CI: 0.51–0.86, p<0.05.Conclusion: This study found patients with higher HbA1c level were not associated with diabetic CKD. Therefore, using the conventional cut-off values of HbA1c in diabetic CKD patients may be problematic in the clinical settings. Enhanced detection of glycemic status in patients with diabetic CKD is warranted to improve the outcome.

  10. Benchmarking by HbA1c in a national diabetes quality register--does measurement bias matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Siri; Thue, Geir; Cooper, John Graham; Røraas, Thomas; Gøransson, Lasse Gunnar; Løvaas, Karianne; Sandberg, Sverre

    2015-08-01

    Bias in HbA1c measurement could give a wrong impression of the standard of care when benchmarking diabetes care. The aim of this study was to evaluate how measurement bias in HbA1c results may influence the benchmarking process performed by a national diabetes register. Using data from 2012 from the Norwegian Diabetes Register for Adults, we included HbA1c results from 3584 patients with type 1 diabetes attending 13 hospital clinics, and 1366 patients with type 2 diabetes attending 18 GP offices. Correction factors for HbA1c were obtained by comparing the results of the hospital laboratories'/GP offices' external quality assurance scheme with the target value from a reference method. Compared with the uncorrected yearly median HbA1c values for hospital clinics and GP offices, EQA corrected HbA1c values were within ±0.2% (2 mmol/mol) for all but one hospital clinic whose value was reduced by 0.4% (4 mmol/mol). Three hospital clinics reduced the proportion of patients with poor glycemic control, one by 9% and two by 4%. For most participants in our study, correcting for measurement bias had little effect on the yearly median HbA1c value or the percentage of patients achieving glycemic goals. However, at three hospital clinics correcting for measurement bias had an important effect on HbA1c benchmarking results especially with regard to percentages of patients achieving glycemic targets. The analytical quality of HbA1c should be taken into account when comparing benchmarking results.

  11. HbA1c monitoring interval in patients on treatment for stable type 2 diabetes. A ten-year retrospective, open cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohde, Sachiko; Deshpande, Gautam A; Yokomichi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Osamu; Fukui, Tsuguya; Yamagata, Zentaro

    2018-01-01

    [Aims] This study aims to suggest an informative interval for HbA1c in DM patients with stable glycemic control, based on test characteristics of the HbA1C assay using the signal-to-noise ratio method. [Methods] This was a retrospective, open cohort study. Data were collected between January 2005 to December 2014 at a tertiary-level community hospital in Japan. All adult patients aged under 75 years, with stable glycemic control on a first pharmaceutical regimen for Type II diabetes, and at least two HbA1c measurements after they achieved glycemic stability, were included in the analysis. We defined stable glycemic control as HbA1c HbA1c. The screening interval for HbA1c was defined as informative when the signal-to-noise ratio exceeded 1. [Results] Among 1066 adults with diabetes, 639 patients (18.5%) were identified as achieving stable glycemic control (511 male (67.3%)), with a mean HbA1c (SD) of 6.4 (0.4)% (46 mmol/mol). Patients with stable glycemic control increase their HbA1c 0.27% (3 mmol/mol) every year while HbA1c has 0.32% (3.5 mmol/mol) noise, as testing characteristics. Signal exceeds noise after 1.2 years (95%CI: 0.9-1.6). [Conclusion] Once patients achieve stable glycemic control at their HbA1c goal, an informative interval for HbA1c monitoring is once every year. Current guidelines, which suggest testing every six months, may contribute to substantial over-testing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Prevalence of Diabetes and Prediabetes according to Fasting Plasma Glucose and HbA1c

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Ja Young; Ko, Seung-Hyun; Kwon, Hyuk-Sang; Kim, Nan Hee; Kim, Jae Hyeon; Kim, Chul Sik; Song, Kee-Ho; Won, Jong Chul; Lim, Soo; Choi, Sung Hee; Jang, Myoung-jin; Kim, Yuna; Oh, Kyungwon

    2013-01-01

    Background Due to the inconvenience of performing oral glucose tolerance tests and day to day variability in glucose level, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) has been recommended by the American Diabetes Association as a method to diagnose diabetes. In addition, the Korean Diabetes Association has also recommended the use of HbA1c as a diagnostic test for diabetes. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of diabetes according to fasting plasma glucose (FPG) level only or the combination of FPG and HbA1c tests. Methods Data from the 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) were analyzed. Among 5,811 subjects aged 30 years or older, 5,020 were selected after excluding the data of fasting time <8 hours, missing values from fasting glucose or HbA1c level, previous diagnosis of diabetes made by physicians, or current use of antidiabetic medications. Diabetes was defined as FPG ≥126 mg/dL, previous diagnosis of diabetes made by a medical doctor, current use of antidiabetic medications, and/or HbA1c ≥6.5%. Prediabetes was defined as FPG of 100 to 125 mg/dL and/or HbA1c of 5.7% to 6.4%. Results When we used FPG only, the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes were 10.5% (men, 12.6%; women, 8.5%) and 19.3% (men, 23.8%; women, 14.9%), respectively. When HbA1c was included as a diagnostic test, the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes increased to 12.4% (men, 14.5%; women, 10.4%) and 38.3% (men, 41%; women, 35.7%), respectively. Participants with HbA1c ≥6.5% and fasting glucose level <126 mg/dL were older and had lower estimated glomerular filtration rate. Conclusion We concluded that using fasting glucose level only may result in an underestimation of diabetes and prediabetes. HbA1c is an acceptable complementary diagnostic test for diabetes in Korean patients. However, national standardization is needed to order to use HbA1c as a diagnostic method of diabetes and prediabetes. PMID:24199164

  13. Prevalence of Diabetes and Prediabetes according to Fasting Plasma Glucose and HbA1c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ja Young Jeon

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundDue to the inconvenience of performing oral glucose tolerance tests and day to day variability in glucose level, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c has been recommended by the American Diabetes Association as a method to diagnose diabetes. In addition, the Korean Diabetes Association has also recommended the use of HbA1c as a diagnostic test for diabetes. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of diabetes according to fasting plasma glucose (FPG level only or the combination of FPG and HbA1c tests.MethodsData from the 2011 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES were analyzed. Among 5,811 subjects aged 30 years or older, 5,020 were selected after excluding the data of fasting time <8 hours, missing values from fasting glucose or HbA1c level, previous diagnosis of diabetes made by physicians, or current use of antidiabetic medications. Diabetes was defined as FPG ≥126 mg/dL, previous diagnosis of diabetes made by a medical doctor, current use of antidiabetic medications, and/or HbA1c ≥6.5%. Prediabetes was defined as FPG of 100 to 125 mg/dL and/or HbA1c of 5.7% to 6.4%.ResultsWhen we used FPG only, the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes were 10.5% (men, 12.6%; women, 8.5% and 19.3% (men, 23.8%; women, 14.9%, respectively. When HbA1c was included as a diagnostic test, the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes increased to 12.4% (men, 14.5%; women, 10.4% and 38.3% (men, 41%; women, 35.7%, respectively. Participants with HbA1c ≥6.5% and fasting glucose level <126 mg/dL were older and had lower estimated glomerular filtration rate.ConclusionWe concluded that using fasting glucose level only may result in an underestimation of diabetes and prediabetes. HbA1c is an acceptable complementary diagnostic test for diabetes in Korean patients. However, national standardization is needed to order to use HbA1c as a diagnostic method of diabetes and prediabetes.

  14. HbA1c Identifies Subjects With Prediabetes and Subclinical Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Pino, Antonino; Mangiafico, Sarah; Urbano, Francesca; Scicali, Roberto; Scandura, Salvatore; D'Agate, Veronica; Piro, Salvatore; Tamburino, Corrado; Purrello, Francesco; Rabuazzo, Agata Maria

    2017-10-01

    Prediabetes is associated with subclinical cardiac changes associated with heart failure development. We investigated diastolic function and its association with markers of glycation and inflammation related to cardiovascular disease in patients with prediabetes. We focused on individuals with prediabetes identified only by glycated hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c; 5.7% to 6.4% and normal fasting glucose (NFG) and normal glucose tolerance (NGT) after an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)]. Cross-sectional study. Departments of Clinical and Experimental Medicine and Cardiology, University of Catania, Catania, Italy. HbA1c, OGTT, Doppler echocardiography, soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGEs), and endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE) were evaluated. We recruited 167 subjects with NFG/NGT who were stratified according to HbA1c level: controls (HbA1c prediabetes (HbA1c 5.7% to 6.4%). Patients with HbA1c prediabetes (n = 106) showed a lower peak mitral inflow in early diastole (E wave) to late diastolic atrial filling velocity (A wave) ratio (E/A ratio) than controls (n = 61) (1.10 ± 0.24 vs 1.18 ± 0.23; P prediabetes exhibited subclinical cardiac alterations associated with sRAGE, esRAGE, and HbA1c. These subjects would not have been classified as having prediabetes on the basis of fasting glycemia or post-OGTT values. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  15. Distinct HbA1c trajectories in a type 2 diabetes cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walraven, I.; Mast, M.R.; Hoekstra, T.; Jansen, A.P.D.; van der Heijden, A.A.W.A.; Rauh, S.P.; Rutters, F.; van 't Riet, E.; Elders, P.J.M.; Moll, A.C.; Polak, B.C.P.; Dekker, J.M.; Nijpels, G.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aim of this study was to identify subgroups of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with distinct hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) trajectories. Subgroup characteristics were determined and the prevalence of microvascular complications over time was investigated. Study design and setting: Data from a

  16. Significance of HbA1c and its measurement in the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus: US experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juarez DT

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Deborah Taira Juarez, Kendra M Demaris, Roy Goo, Christina Louise Mnatzaganian, Helen Wong SmithDaniel K Inouye College of Pharmacy, University of Hawaii at Hilo, Honolulu, HI, USAAbstract: The 2014 American Diabetes Association guidelines denote four means of diagnosing diabetes. The first of these is a glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c >6.5%. This literature review summarizes studies (n=47 in the USA examining the significance, strengths, and limitations of using HbA1c as a diagnostic tool for diabetes, relative to other available means. Due to the relatively recent adoption of HbA1c as a diabetes mellitus diagnostic tool, a hybrid systematic, truncated review of the literature was implemented. Based on these studies, we conclude that HbA1c screening for diabetes has been found to be convenient and effective in diagnosing diabetes. HbA1c screening is particularly helpful in community-based and acute care settings where tests requiring fasting are not practical. Using HbA1c to diagnose diabetes also has some limitations. For instance, HbA1c testing may underestimate the prevalence of diabetes, particularly among whites. Because this bias differs by racial group, prevalence and resulting estimates of health disparities based on HbA1c screening differ from those based on other methods of diagnosis. In addition, existing evidence suggests that HbA1c screening may not be valid in certain subgroups, such as children, women with gestational diabetes, patients with human immunodeficiency virus, and those with prediabetes. Further guidelines are needed to clarify the appropriate use of HbA1c screening in these populations.Keywords: diabetes mellitus, diagnosis, glycosylated hemoglobin, USA

  17. [Assays of HbA1c and Amadori products in human biology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillery, P

    2014-09-01

    Different Amadori products, formed during the early steps of the non-enzymatic glycation of proteins, may be assayed in current practice in human biology. The most important marker is HbA1c, resulting from the binding of glucose to the N-terminal extremity of HbA beta chains. HbA1c may be evaluated by various techniques (ion exchange or affinity high performance liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis, immunoassay, enzymatic technique) and is considered the best marker of diabetic patient survey. Due to its irreversible and cumulative formation, it provides a retrospective information on the glycemic balance over the four to eight weeks preceding blood collection. It benefits from an international standardization, based on a reference method using liquid chromatography coupled to capillary electrophoresis or mass spectrometry, maintained by an international network of reference laboratories. When HbA1c assay cannot be used (anemia, hemolysis, hemoglobinopathy) or when a shorter period of glycemic equilibrium must be evaluated (child and adolescent, pregnancy, therapeutic changes), other Amadori products may be assayed, like plasma fructosamine (all plasma glycated proteins) or glycated albumin. Nevertheless, these assays are less used in practice, because their semiological value has been less evidenced. Besides, fructosamine assay lacks specificity, and glycated albumin assay has been described recently. An expanding use of HbA1c assay is expected, especially for the diagnosis of diabetes mellitus and the evaluation of other risks, especially cardiovascular ones. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. C-Peptide Level in Fasting Plasma and Pooled Urine Predicts HbA1c after Hospitalization in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

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    Remi Sonoda

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigate how measures of insulin secretion and other clinical information affect long-term glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Between October 2012 and June 2014, we monitored 202 diabetes patients who were admitted to the hospital of Asahi Life Foundation for glycemic control, as well as for training and education in diabetes management. We measured glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c six months after discharge to assess disease management. In univariate analysis, fasting plasma C-peptide immunoreactivity (F-CPR and pooled urine CPR (U-CPR were significantly associated with HbA1c, in contrast to ΔCPR and C-peptide index (CPI. This association was strongly independent of most other patient variables. In exploratory factor analysis, five underlying factors, namely insulin resistance, aging, sex differences, insulin secretion, and glycemic control, represented patient characteristics. In particular, insulin secretion and resistance strongly influenced F-CPR, while insulin secretion affected U-CPR. In conclusion, the data indicate that among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, F-CPR and U-CPR may predict improved glycemic control six months after hospitalization.

  19. HbA1c and the Prediction of Type 2 Diabetes in Children and Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Pavithra; Nelson, Robert G; Hanson, Robert L; Knowler, William C; Sinha, Madhumita

    2017-01-01

    Long-term data validating glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ) in assessing the risk of type 2 diabetes in children are limited. HbA 1c , fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and 2-h postload plasma glucose (2hPG) concentrations were measured in a longitudinal study of American Indians to determine their utility in predicting incident diabetes, all of which is thought to be type 2 in this population. Incident diabetes (FPG ≥126 mg/dL [7.0 mmol/L], 2hPG ≥200 mg/dL [11.1 mmol/L], HbA 1c ≥6.5% [8 mmol/mol], or clinical diagnosis) was determined in 2,095 children without diabetes ages 10-19 years monitored through age 39, and in 2,005 adults ages 20-39 monitored through age 59. Areas under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for HbA 1c , FPG, and 2hPG in predicting diabetes within 10 years were compared. During long-term follow-up of children and adolescents who did not initially have diabetes, the incidence rate of subsequent diabetes was fourfold (in boys) as high and more than sevenfold (in girls) as high in those with HbA 1c ≥5.7% as in those with HbA 1c ≤5.3%-greater rate ratios than experienced by adults in the same HbA 1c categories. Analyses of ROCs revealed no significant differences between HbA 1c , FPG, and 2hPG in sensitivity and specificity for identifying children and adolescents who later developed diabetes. HbA 1c is a useful predictor of diabetes risk in children and can be used to identify prediabetes in children with other type 2 diabetes risk factors with the same predictive value as FPG and 2hPG. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  20. [About the HbA1c in the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farcet, Anaïs; Delalande, Géraldine; Oliver, Charles; Retornaz, Frédérique

    2016-03-01

    HbA1c product of non enzymatic glycation of HbA increases in relation with the mean blood glucose level during the former 2-3 months. HbA1c levels are correlated with the development of diabetic complications and HbA1c assessment is now the gold standard for evaluation of diabetes control. HbA1c level should not be higher than 7% to avoid these complications. However, in aged peoples, the objectives of diabetes control vary according to their health status. It must be good with HbA1c lower than 7-7.5% in healthy subjects and more relax in subjects with symptoms of frailty and risks of non perceived and self corrected hypoglycemia. Under these conditions, HbA1c values lower than 8 to 9% are advised. Nevertheless, hypoglycemia episodes may occur in patients with high HbA1c and capillary glucose follow-up is necessary for detection of such complications.

  1. Hb variants in Korea: effect on HbA1c using five routine methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yeo-Min; Ji, Misuk; Ko, Dae-Hyun; Chun, Sail; Kwon, Gye Cheol; Lee, Kyunghoon; Song, Sang Hoon; Seong, Moon Woo; Park, Sung Sup; Song, Junghan

    2017-07-26

    Quantification of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is a challenge in patients with hemoglobin (Hb) variants. We evaluated the impact of various Hb variants on five routine HbA1c assays by comparing with the IFCC reference measurement procedure (RMP). Whole blood samples showing warning flags or no results on routine HPLC HbA1c assays were confirmed for Hb variants and were submitted to HbA1c quantification using Sebia Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing, Roche Tina-quant HbA1c Gen. 2, Bio-Rad Variant II Turbo 2.0, ADAMS HA-8180, Tosoh G8 standard mode, and IFCC RMP using LC-MS. Among 114 samples, the most common variants were Hb G-Coushatta (n=47), Queens (n=41), Ube-4 (n=11), Chad (n=4), Yamagata (n=4), G-His-Tsou (n=2), G-Taipei (n=1), Fort de France (n=1), Hoshida (n=1), and two novel variants (Hb α-globin, HBA 52 Gly>Cys and Hb β-globin, HBB 146 His>Asn). In terms of control samples, all the result of HbA1c were "acceptable", within the criteria of ±7% compared to IFCC RMP target values. However, percentage of "unacceptable" results of samples with Hb variants were 16% for Capillarys 2, 7% for Tina-quant, 51% for Variant II Turbo 2.0, 95% for G8 standard mode, and 89% for HA-8180. The Capillarys 2 and HA-8180 assay did not provide the results in 5 and 40 samples with Hb variants, respectively. HbA1c results from five routine assays in patients with relatively common Hb variants in Korea showed various degrees of bias compared to those of IFCC RMP. Therefore, laboratories should be aware of the limitation of their methods with respect to interference from Hb variants found commonly in their local population and suggest an alternative HbA1c quantification method.

  2. Anesthesia Preoperative Clinic Referral for Elevated Hba1c Reduces Complication Rate in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Total Joint Arthroplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Kallio, Peter J.; Nolan, Jenea; Olsen, Amy C.; Breakwell, Susan; Topp, Richard; Pagel, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Diabetes mellitus (DM) is risk factor for complications after orthopedic surgery. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that anesthesia preoperative clinic (APC) referral for elevated glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduces complication rate after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Patients and Methods: Patients (n = 203) with and without DM were chosen from 1,237 patients undergoing TJA during 2006 - 12. Patients evaluated in the APC had surgery in 2006 - 8 regardless of HbA1c (uncon...

  3. HbA1c values calculated from blood glucose levels using truncated Fourier series and implementation in standard SQL database language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temsch, W; Luger, A; Riedl, M

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a mathematical model to calculate HbA1c values based on self-measured blood glucose and past HbA1c levels, thereby enabling patients to monitor diabetes therapy between scheduled checkups. This method could help physicians to make treatment decisions if implemented in a system where glucose data are transferred to a remote server. The method, however, cannot replace HbA1c measurements; past HbA1c values are needed to gauge the method. The mathematical model of HbA1c formation was developed based on biochemical principles. Unlike an existing HbA1c formula, the new model respects the decreasing contribution of older glucose levels to current HbA1c values. About 12 standard SQL statements embedded in a php program were used to perform Fourier transform. Regression analysis was used to gauge results with previous HbA1c values. The method can be readily implemented in any SQL database. The predicted HbA1c values thus obtained were in accordance with measured values. They also matched the results of the HbA1c formula in the elevated range. By contrast, the formula was too "optimistic" in the range of better glycemic control. Individual analysis of two subjects improved the accuracy of values and reflected the bias introduced by different glucometers and individual measurement habits.

  4. Alternate site testing for HbA1c using the Primus CLC330 GHb analyzer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillipov, G; Charles, P; Beng, C; Phillips, P J

    1997-04-01

    To determine whether the Primus high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) is suited to alternate site testing (AST) for HbA1c in a hospital diabetes outpatient clinic. Patients were attending the clinic for routine management of their diabetes. A number of diabetic patients with uremia (n = 11) were also investigated. HbA1c levels were measured in the outpatient setting by the Primus HPLC and in a more limited study the DCA-2000 instrument using the new 6-min assay cartridge. HbA1c measurements were also performed with Pierce affinity minicolumns and a Bio-Rad Variant HPLC. The Primus HPLC assay had low imprecision of 2.3, 1.6, and 1.0% for HbA1c levels of 4.7, 7.3, and 11.1%, respectively, and was not prone to interference by carbamylated hemoglobin as found for the ion-exchange Variant HPLC method. Method comparison studies showed that the bias and proportional error between the Pierce affinity minicolumn procedure (standardized with respect to an external quality control program) and the Primus HPLC (Y) was -0.4 and 1.2% respectively (n = 32). Similarly the bias and proportional error between the Primus and DCA-2000 methods was 0.7 and -2.5%. The Primus was shown to give falsely elevated HbA1c concentrations if the time between sequential injections was > 28 min. The Primus HPLC has a decided advantage over specialty AST instruments, like the DCA-2000, in not only meeting AST requirements but also allowing rapid automated batch processing of all laboratory HbA1c samples.

  5. Anesthesia Preoperative Clinic Referral for Elevated Hba1c Reduces Complication Rate in Diabetic Patients Undergoing Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallio, Peter J; Nolan, Jenea; Olsen, Amy C; Breakwell, Susan; Topp, Richard; Pagel, Paul S

    2015-06-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is risk factor for complications after orthopedic surgery. We tested the hypothesis that anesthesia preoperative clinic (APC) referral for elevated glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduces complication rate after total joint arthroplasty (TJA). Patients (n = 203) with and without DM were chosen from 1,237 patients undergoing TJA during 2006 - 12. Patients evaluated in the APC had surgery in 2006 - 8 regardless of HbA1c (uncontrolled). Those evaluated between in subsequent two-year intervals were referred to primary care for HbA1c ≥ 10% and ≥ 8%, respectively, to improve DM control before surgery. Complications and mortality were quantified postoperatively and at three, six, and twelve months. Length of stay (LOS) and patients requiring a prolonged LOS (> 5 days) were recorded. Patients (197 men, 6 women) underwent 71, 131, and 1 total hip, knee, and shoulder replacements, respectively. Patients undergoing TJA with uncontrolled HbA1c and those with HbA1c patients without DM. An increase in complication rate was observed in DM patients with uncontrolled HbA1c versus patients without DM (P patients with preoperative HbA1c that was uncontrolled or ≥ 10% required prolonged LOS versus those without DM (P diabetics undergoing TJA.

  6. Common Variants at 10 Genomic Loci Influence Hemoglobin A(1C) Levels via Glycemic and Nonglycemic Pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soranzo, Nicole; Sanna, Serena; Wheeler, Eleanor; Gieger, Christian; Radke, Doerte; Dupuis, Josee; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Langenberg, Claudia; Prokopenko, Inga; Stolerman, Elliot; Sandhu, Manjinder S.; Heeney, Matthew M.; Devaney, Joseph M.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Ricketts, Sally L.; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Willenborg, Christina; Wright, Benjamin; Altshuler, David; Arking, Dan; Balkau, Beverley; Barnes, Daniel; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boehm, Bernhard; Bonnefond, Amelie; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Boinstein, Stefan R.; Boettcher, Yvonne; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Burnett-Miller, Mary Susan; Campbell, Harry; Cao, Antonio; Chambers, John; Clark, Robert; Collins, Francis S.; Coresh, Josef; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Dei, Mariano; Deloukas, Panos; Doering, Angela; Egan, Josephine M.; Elosua, Roberto; Ferrucci, Luigi; Forouhi, Nita; Fox, Caroline S.; Franklin, Christopher; Zhao, Jing Hua; van der Hout, Annemarie

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE-Glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)), used to monitor and diagnose diabetes, is influenced by average glycemia over a 2- to 3-month period. Genetic factors affecting expression, turnover, and abnormal glycation of hemoglobin could also be associated with increased levels of HbA(1c). We aimed to

  7. Canagliflozin provides greater attainment of both HbA1c and body weight reduction versus sitagliptin in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schernthaner, Guntram; Lavalle-González, Fernando J; Davidson, Jaime A; Jodon, Holly; Vijapurkar, Ujjwala; Qiu, Rong; Canovatchel, William

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the proportion of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) achieving reductions in both glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and body weight with canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor, versus sitagliptin over 52 weeks. Data were pooled from two, randomized, Phase 3 studies of canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg versus sitagliptin 100 mg as add-on to metformin, and canagliflozin 300 mg versus sitagliptin 100 mg as add-on to metformin plus sulfonylurea (N = 1856). The composite end points of change from baseline in both HbA1c HbA1c HbA1c and body weight over 52 weeks versus sitagliptin. A greater proportion of patients had both HbA1c and body weight reductions with canagliflozin 100 and 300 mg versus sitagliptin 100 mg (67.7%, 72.6%, and 44.1%, respectively). Among patients with HbA1c and body weight reductions, more patients achieved the composite end point of HbA1c HbA1c and body weight, and more patients with HbA1c and body weight reductions achieved HbA1c <7.0% and body weight reduction ≥5% with canagliflozin versus sitagliptin over 52 weeks. www.ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers are NCT01106677; NCT01137812.

  8. Association between high risk foot, retinopathy and HBA1c in Saudi diabetic population

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehmood, K.; Aziz, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: One of the important complications of diabetes is diabetic-foot-ulcer, also reported in Saudi Arabia, like other countries. Similarly, the complications, like retinopathy and nephropathy are also occurring in diabetic patients of this region. Apart from the care and monitoring of these patients, it is important to find out association between these complications and their relation with common factors, like HbA1c levels. Such relation is not yet reported in literature. Objective: Therefore, this study was planned to find out association between neuropathy (leading to high risk foot) and retinopathy by the estimation of HbA1c levels in Saudi population. Methods: After exclusion of the cases of gestational diabetes and children with type-1 diabetes, 333 Patients having age 21 to 97 years were examined in the Diabetology Clinic of Diabetes Centre, Aseer Central Hospital, Abha. All patients were screened for neuropathy (High risk of the foot) and retinopathy (by Fundus Photography). HbA1c levels were determined, using standardised procedure. The obtained data was analysed statistically by SPSS-12 for Windows. Results: HbA1c levels of less than or equal to have been found to be associated with neuropathy, high risk foot, and as well as non- proliferative and proliferative retinopathy. Pearson chi square test has demonstrated association between progressive retinopathy and development of high risk foot. Conclusion: The observed data indicate poor glycemic or diabetes control on the basis of higher HbA1c levels and strong association between high risk foot and the development of progressive retinopathy. (author)

  9. K2-EDTA and K3-EDTA Greiner Tubes for HbA1c Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrtaric, Alen; Filipi, Petra; Hemar, Marina; Nikolac, Nora; Simundic, Ana-Maria

    2016-02-01

    To determine whether K2-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and K3-EDTA Greiner tubes could be used interchangeably for glycosylated hemoglobin, type A1C (HbA1c) measurement via the Abbott Laboratories ARCHITECT chemiluminescent microparticle HbA1c assay on the ARCHITECT i2000SR immunoanalyzer at our university hospital. We drew blood from a total of 45 outpatients into plastic Greiner Vacuette tubes, some of which were lined with K2-EDTA and others with K3-EDTA anticoagulant. Data are presented as median and interquartile range values. We used the Wilcoxon test and Passing-Bablok regression for tube comparison. For K2-EDTA tubes median HbA1c concentration was 54 mmol/mol (41 to 71 mmol/mol) and for K3-EDTA tubes 56 mmol/mol (43 to 69 mmol/mol). There was no statistically significant difference between K2-EDTA and K3-EDTA (bias= -1.29 mmol/mol; P = 0.24). Passing-Bablok regression showed that there is no constant and proportional error: y = -0.23 (95% CI[-3.52 to 0.69]) + 1.00( 95% CI[0.98 to 1.06]) x. In this study, we provide evidence for the lack of any clinically and statistically significant bias between K2-EDTA and K3-EDTA HbA1c measurements. Thus, Greiner tubes lined with K2-EDTA and those lined with K3-EDTA can safely be used interchangeably to measure HbA1c via the Abbott Laboratories ARCHITECT assay. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Impact of common genetic determinants of Hemoglobin A1c on type 2 diabetes risk and diagnosis in ancestrally diverse populations : A transethnic genome-wide meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wheeler, Eleanor; Leong, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Hivert, Marie-France; Strawbridge, Rona J; Podmore, Clara; Li, Man; Yao, Jie; Sim, Xueling; Hong, Jaeyoung; Chu, Audrey Y; Zhang, Weihua; Wang, Xu; Chen, Peng; Maruthur, Nisa M; Porneala, Bianca C; Sharp, Stephen J; Jia, Yucheng; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Wei-Min; Elks, Cathy E; Evans, Daniel S; Fan, Qiao; Giulianini, Franco; Go, Min Jin; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hu, Yao; Jackson, Anne U; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kim, Young Jin; Kleber, Marcus E; Ladenvall, Claes; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lim, Sing-Hui; Lu, Yingchang; Mahajan, Anubha; Marzi, Carola; Nalls, Mike A; Navarro, Pau; Nolte, Ilja M; Sanna, Serena; van der Most, Peter J; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Hartman, Catharina A; Swertz, Morris; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Snieder, Harold; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R

    2017-01-01

    Background Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is used to diagnose type 2 diabetes (T2D) and assess glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 18 HbA1c-associated genetic variants. These variants proved to be classifiable by their likely

  11. Impact of common genetic determinants of Hemoglobin A1c on type 2 diabetes risk and diagnosis in ancestrally diverse populations : A transethnic genome-wide meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wheeler, Eleanor; Leong, Aaron; Liu, Ching Ti; Hivert, Marie France; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Podmore, Clara; Li, Man; Yao, Jie; Sim, Xueling; Hong, Jaeyoung; Chu, Audrey Y.; Zhang, Weihua; Wang, Xu; Chen, Peng; Maruthur, Nisa M.; Porneala, Bianca C.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Jia, Yucheng; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Chang, Li Ching; Chen, Wei Min; Elks, Cathy E.; Evans, Daniel S.; Fan, Qiao; Giulianini, Franco; Go, Min Jin; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Hu, Yao; Jackson, Anne U.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kim, Young Jin; Kleber, Marcus E.; Ladenvall, Claes; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lim, Sing Hui; Lu, Yingchang; Mahajan, Anubha; Marzi, Carola; Nalls, Mike A.; Navarro, Pau; Nolte, Ilja M.; Rose, Lynda M.; Rybin, Denis V.; Sanna, Serena; Shi, Yuan; Stram, Daniel O.; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tan, Shu Pei; van der Most, Peter J.; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Wong, Andrew; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Wanting; Goel, Anuj; Martinez Larrad, Maria Teresa; Radke, Dörte; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Afaq, Saima; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Bertoni, Alain G.; Bonnefond, Amelie; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Campbell, Harry; Carlson, Olga D.; Chen, Chien Hsiun; Cho, Yoon Shin; Garvey, W. Timothy; Gieger, Christian; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grallert, Harald; Hamsten, Anders; Hartman, Catharina A.; Herder, Christian; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Huang, Jie; Igase, Michiya; Isono, Masato; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Kiess, Wieland; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Kovacs, Peter; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Wen Jane; Lehne, Benjamin; Li, Huaixing; Liu, Jianjun; Lobbens, Stephane; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Meitinger, Thomas; Miki, Tetsuro; Miljkovic, Iva; Moon, Sanghoon; Mulas, Antonella; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Nauck, Matthias; Pankow, James S.; Polasek, Ozren; Prokopenko, Inga; Ramos, Paula S.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rich, Stephen S.; Robertson, Neil R.; Roden, Michael; Roussel, Ronan; Rudan, Igor; Scott, Robert A.; Scott, William R.; Sennblad, Bengt; Siscovick, David S.; Strauch, Konstantin; Sun, Liang; Swertz, Morris; Tajuddin, Salman M.; Taylor, Kent D.; Teo, Yik Ying; Tham, Yih Chung; Tönjes, Anke; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Egan, Josephine; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hovingh, G. Kees; Jula, Antti; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Njølstad, Inger; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Serrano Ríos, Manuel; Stumvoll, Michael; Watkins, Hugh; Aung, Tin; Blüher, Matthias; Boehnke, Michael; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Chambers, John C.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chen, Yii Der Ida; Chen, Yduan Tsong; Cheng, Ching Yu; Cucca, Francesco; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Deloukas, Panos; Evans, Michele K.; Fornage, Myriam; Friedlander, Yechiel; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif; Gross, Myron D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Heng, Chew Kiat; Ingelsson, Erik; Kato, Norihiro; Kim, Bong Jo; Koh, Woon Puay; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Körner, Antje; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lin, Xu; Liu, Yongmei; Loos, Ruth J.F.; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ong, Ken K.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pereira, Mark A.; Peters, Annette; Ridker, Paul M.; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Sale, Michele; Saleheen, Danish; Saltevo, Juha; Schwarz, Peter E.H.; Sheu, Wayne H.H.; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Tabara, Yasuharu; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van Dam, Rob M.; Wilson, James G.; Wilson, James F.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Wong, Tien Yin; Wu, Jer Yuarn; Yuan, Jian Min; Zonderman, Alan B.; Soranzo, Nicole; Guo, Xiuqing; Roberts, David J.; Florez, Jose C.; Sladek, Robert; Dupuis, Josée; Morris, Andrew P.; Tai, E. Shyong; Selvin, Elizabeth; Rotter, Jerome I.; Langenberg, Claudia; Barroso, Inês; Meigs, James B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is used to diagnose type 2 diabetes (T2D) and assess glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 18 HbA1c-associated genetic variants. These variants proved to be classifiable by their likely

  12. Impact of common genetic determinants of Hemoglobin A1c on type 2 diabetes risk and diagnosis in ancestrally diverse populations: A transethnic genome-wide meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wheeler, Eleanor; Leong, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Hivert, Marie-France; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Podmore, Clara; Li, Man; Yao, Jie; Sim, Xueling; Hong, Jaeyoung; Chu, Audrey Y.; Zhang, Weihua; Wang, Xu; Chen, Peng; Maruthur, Nisa M.; Porneala, Bianca C.; Sharp, Stephen J.; Jia, Yucheng; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Wei-Min; Elks, Cathy E.; Evans, Daniel S.; Fan, Qiao; Giulianini, Franco; Go, Min Jin; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hu, Yao; Jackson, Anne U.; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kim, Young Jin; Kleber, Marcus E.; Ladenvall, Claes; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lim, Sing-Hui; Lu, Yingchang; Mahajan, Anubha; Marzi, Carola; Nalls, Mike A.; Navarro, Pau; Nolte, Ilja M.; Rose, Lynda M.; Rybin, Denis V.; Sanna, Serena; Shi, Yuan; Stram, Daniel O.; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tan, Shu Pei; van der Most, Peter J.; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Wong, Andrew; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Wanting; Goel, Anuj; Martinez Larrad, Maria Teresa; Radke, Dorte; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Iperen, Erik P. A.; Abecasis, Goncalo; Afaq, Saima; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z.; Bertoni, Alain G.; Bonnefond, Amelie; Bottcher, Yvonne; Bottinger, Erwin P.; Campbell, Harry; Carlson, Olga D.; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Cho, Yoon Shin; Garvey, W. Timothy; Gieger, Christian; Goodarzi, Mark O.; Grallert, Harald; Hamsten, Anders; Hartman, Catharina A.; Herder, Christian; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Huang, Jie; Igase, Michiya; Isono, Masato; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kiess, Wieland; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Kovacs, Peter; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lehne, Benjamin; Li, Huaixing; Liu, Jianjun; Lobbens, Stephane; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Meitinger, Thomas; Miki, Tetsuro; Miljkovic, Iva; Moon, Sanghoon; Mulas, Antonella; Muller, Gabriele; Muller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Nauck, Matthias; Pankow, James S.; Polasek, Ozren; Prokopenko, Inga; Ramos, Paula S.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rich, Stephen S.; Robertson, Neil R.; Roden, Michael; Roussel, Ronan; Rudan, Igor; Scott, Robert A.; Scott, William R.; Sennblad, Bengt; Siscovick, David S.; Strauch, Konstantin; Sun, Liang; Swertz, Morris; Tajuddin, Salman M.; Taylor, Kent D.; teo, Yik-Ying; Tham, Yih Chung; Tonjes, Anke; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Egan, Josephine; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hovingh, G. Kees; Jula, Antti; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Njolstad, Inger; Palmer, Colin N. A.; Serrano Rios, Manuel; Stumvoll, Michael; Watkins, Hugh; Aung, Tin; Bluher, Matthias; Boehnke, Michael; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Chambers, John C.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Yduan-Tsong; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cucca, Francesco; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deloukas, Panos; Evans, Michele K.; Fornage, Myriam; Friedlander, Yechiel; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif; Gross, Myron D.; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Ingelsson, Erik; Kato, Norihiro; Kim, Bong-Jo; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kooner, Jaspal S.; Korner, Antje; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lin, Xu; Liu, Yongmei; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Marz, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Ong, Ken K.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pereira, Mark A.; Peters, Annette; Ridker, Paul M.; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Sale, Michele; Saleheen, Danish; Saltevo, Juha; Schwarz, Peter Eh; Sheu, Wayne H. H.; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D.; Tabara, Yasuharu; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van Dam, Rob M.; Wilson, James G.; Wilson, James F.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Wong, Tien Yin; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zonderman, Alan B.; Soranzo, Nicole; Guo, Xiuqing; Roberts, David J.; Florez, Jose C.; Sladek, Robert; Dupuis, Josee; Morris, Andrew P.; Tai, E.-Shyong; Selvin, Elizabeth; Rotter, Jerome I.; Langenberg, Claudia; Barroso, Ines; Meigs, James B.

    2017-01-01

    Background Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is used to diagnose type 2 diabetes (T2D) and assess glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 18 HbA1c-associated genetic variants. These variants proved to be classifiable by their likely

  13. Impact of common genetic determinants of Hemoglobin A1c on type 2 diabetes risk and diagnosis in ancestrally diverse populations : A transethnic genome-wide meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wheeler, Eleanor; Leong, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Hivert, Marie-France; Strawbridge, Rona J; Podmore, Clara; Li, Man; Yao, Jie; Sim, Xueling; Hong, Jaeyoung; Chu, Audrey Y; Zhang, Weihua; Wang, Xu; Chen, Peng; Maruthur, Nisa M; Porneala, Bianca C; Sharp, Stephen J; Jia, Yucheng; Kabagambe, Edmond K; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Wei-Min; Elks, Cathy E; Evans, Daniel S; Fan, Qiao; Giulianini, Franco; Go, Min Jin; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Hu, Yao; Jackson, Anne U; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kim, Young Jin; Kleber, Marcus E; Ladenvall, Claes; Lecoeur, Cecile; Lim, Sing-Hui; Lu, Yingchang; Mahajan, Anubha; Marzi, Carola; Nalls, Mike A; Navarro, Pau; Nolte, Ilja M; Rose, Lynda M; Rybin, Denis V; Sanna, Serena; Shi, Yuan; Stram, Daniel O; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Tan, Shu Pei; van der Most, Peter J; van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Wong, Andrew; Yengo, Loic; Zhao, Wanting; Goel, Anuj; Martinez Larrad, Maria Teresa; Radke, Dörte; Salo, Perttu; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Iperen, Erik P A; Abecasis, Goncalo; Afaq, Saima; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Bertoni, Alain G; Bonnefond, Amelie; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bottinger, Erwin P; Campbell, Harry; Carlson, Olga D; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Cho, Yoon Shin; Garvey, W Timothy; Gieger, Christian; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grallert, Harald; Hamsten, Anders; Hartman, Catharina A; Herder, Christian; Hsiung, Chao Agnes; Huang, Jie; Igase, Michiya; Isono, Masato; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kiess, Wieland; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Kovacs, Peter; Lee, Juyoung; Lee, Wen-Jane; Lehne, Benjamin; Li, Huaixing; Liu, Jianjun; Lobbens, Stephane; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Meitinger, Thomas; Miki, Tetsuro; Miljkovic, Iva; Moon, Sanghoon; Mulas, Antonella; Müller, Gabriele; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Nauck, Matthias; Pankow, James S; Polasek, Ozren; Prokopenko, Inga; Ramos, Paula S; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Rich, Stephen S; Robertson, Neil R; Roden, Michael; Roussel, Ronan; Rudan, Igor; Scott, Robert A; Scott, William R; Sennblad, Bengt; Siscovick, David S; Strauch, Konstantin; Sun, Shan-Liang; Swertz, Morris a.; Tajuddin, Salman M; Taylor, Kent D; Teo, Yik-Ying; Tham, Yih Chung; Tönjes, Anke; Wareham, Nicholas J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilsgaard, Tom; Hingorani, Aroon D; Egan, Josephine; Ferrucci, Luigi; Hovingh, G. Kees; Jula, Antti; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Njølstad, Inger; Palmer, Colin N A; Serrano Ríos, Manuel; Stumvoll, Michael; Watkins, Hugh; Aung, Tin; Blüher, Matthias; Boehnke, Michael; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bornstein, Stefan R; Chambers, John C; Chasman, Daniel I; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chen, Yduan-Tsong; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cucca, Francesco; de Geus, Eco J C; Deloukas, Panos; Evans, Michele K; Fornage, Myriam; Friedlander, Yechiel; Froguel, Philippe; Groop, Leif; Gross, Myron D; Harris, Tamara B; Hayward, Caroline; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Ingelsson, Erik; Kato, Norihiro; Kim, Bong-Jo; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kooner, Jaspal S; Körner, Antje; Kuh, Diana; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Lin, Xu; Liu, YongMei; Loos, Ruth J F; Magnusson, Patrik K E; März, Winfried; McCarthy, Mark I; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Ong, Ken K; Pedersen, Nancy L; Pereira, Mark A; Peters, Annette; Ridker, Paul M; Sabanayagam, Charumathi; Sale, Michele; Saleheen, Danish; Saltevo, Juha; Schwarz, Peter Eh; Sheu, Wayne H H; Snieder, Harold; Spector, Timothy D; Tabara, Yasuharu; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van Dam, Rob M; Wilson, James G; Wilson, James F; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wong, Tien Yin; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zonderman, Alan B; Soranzo, Nicole; Guo, Xiuqing; Roberts, David J; Florez, Jose C; Sladek, Robert; Dupuis, Josée; Morris, Andrew P; Tai, E Shyong; Selvin, Elizabeth; Rotter, Jerome I; Langenberg, Claudia; Barroso, Inês; Meigs, James B

    BACKGROUND: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is used to diagnose type 2 diabetes (T2D) and assess glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 18 HbA1c-associated genetic variants. These variants proved to be classifiable by their likely

  14. Role of HbA1c in the Screening of Diabetes Mellitus in a Korean Rural Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Hyun Kim

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRecently, the measurement of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c was recommended as an alternative to fasting plasma glucose or oral glucose tolerance tests for diagnosing diabetes mellitus (DM. In this study, we analyzed HbA1c levels for diabetes mellitus screening in a Korean rural population.MethodsWe analyzed data from 10,111 subjects from a Korean Rural Genomic Cohort study and generated a receiver operating characteristic curve to determine an appropriate HbA1c cutoff value for diabetes.ResultsThe mean age of the subjects was 56.3±8.1 years. Fasting plasma glucose and 2-hour plasma glucose after 75 g oral glucose tolerance tests were 97.5±25.6 and 138.3±67.1 mg/dL, respectively. The mean HbA1c level of the subjects was 5.7±0.9%. There were 8,809 non-DM patients (87.1% and 1,302 DM patients (12.9%. A positive relationship between HbA1c and plasma glucose levels and between HbA1c and 2-hour plasma glucose levels after oral glucose tolerance tests was found in a scatter plot of the data. Using Youden's index, the proper cutoff level of HbA1c for diabetes mellitus screening was 5.95% (sensitivity, 77%; specificity, 89.4%.ConclusionOur results suggest that the optimal HbA1c level for DM screening is 5.95%.

  15. Can HbA1c be Used to Screen for Glucose Abnormalities Among Adults with Severe Mental Illness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romain, A J; Letendre, E; Akrass, Z; Avignon, A; Karelis, A D; Sultan, A; Abdel-Baki, A

    2017-04-01

    Aim: Prediabetes and type 2 diabetes are highly prevalent among individuals with serious mental illness and increased by antipsychotic medication. Although widely recommended, many obstacles prevent these patients from obtaining a proper screening for dysglycemia. Currently, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting glucose, and 2-hour glucose levels from the oral glucose tolerance test are used for screening prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. The objective of this study was to investigate if HbA1c could be used as the only screening test among individuals with serious mental illness. Methods: Cross sectional study comparing the sensitivity of HbA1c, fasting glucose, and 2-h oral glucose tolerance test to detect dysglycemias in serious mental illness participants referred for metabolic complications. Results: A total of 84 participants (43 female; aged: 38.5±12.8 years; BMI: 35.0±6.8 kg/m²) was included. Regarding prediabetes, 44, 44 and 76% were identified by HbA1c, fasting glucose, and 2 h- oral glucose tolerance test respectively and for type 2 diabetes, 60, 53 and 66% were identified by HbA1c, fasting glucose and 2 h-oral glucose tolerance test. The overlap between the 3 markers was low (8% of participants for prediabetes and 26% for Type 2 diabetes). Sensitivity of HbA1c were moderate (range 40-62.5%), while its specificity was excellent (92-93%). Conclusion: The present study indicates a low agreement between HbA1c, fasting glucose and 2-h oral glucose tolerance test. It appears that these markers do not identify the same participants. Thus, HbA1c may not be used alone to detect all glucose abnormalities among individuals with serious mental illness. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. HbA1c and Glycated Albumin Levels Are High in Gastrectomized Subjects with Iron-Deficiency Anemia.

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    Inada, Shinya; Koga, Masafumi

    2017-01-01

    We report that glycated albumin (GA) is higher relative to HbA1c in non-diabetic, gastrectomized subjects without anemia, and thus is a sign of oxyhyperglycemia. It is known that gastrectomized subjects are prone to iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), and that the HbA1c levels of subjects with IDA are falsely high. In the present study, the HbA1c and GA levels of gastrectomized subjects with IDA were compared with gastrectomized subjects without anemia. Seven non-diabetic gastrectomized subjects with IDA were enrolled in the present study. Twenty-eight non-diabetic gastrectomized subjects without anemia matched with the subjects with IDA in terms of age, gender, and body mass index were used as the controls. Although there were no significant differences in fasting plasma glucose and OGTT 2-hour plasma glucose (2-h PG) between the two groups, the HbA1c and GA levels in gastrectomized subjects with IDA were significantly higher than the controls. For all of the gastrectomized subjects (n=35), ferritin exhibited a significant negative correlation with HbA1c and GA, and a significant positive correlation with 2-h PG. In addition, the HbA1c and GA levels exhibited a significant negative correlation with the mean corpuscular hemoglobin and hemoglobin. The HbA1c and GA levels in gastrectomized subjects with IDA were significantly higher than those in controls. The high GA levels are attributed to a tendency in which patients with total gastrectomy, who are prone to IDA, are susceptible to postprandial hyperglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia, which in turn leads to large fluctuations in plasma glucose. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  17. "SERUM FERRITIN IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH HbA1c"

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    F. Sharifi Sh. Sazandeh

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus (DM type 2 is one of the most common endocrine disorders affecting more than 135 million people in the world. The etiology of the disease is not fully understood, but recently subclinical hemochromatosis has been considered as one of the probable causes of DM. This study was carried out to examine the relationship between serum ferritin as a marker of iron overload with DM and HbA1c. This study was conducted on 97 patients with type 2 DM who were referred to Zanjan Diabetes Clinic. Ninety-four normal age-matched individuals were included in the study as the control group. Ferritin, hemoglobin, HbA1c, and fasting blood sugar were measured in blood samples. Exclusion criteria included anemia, or any other disease or drug that could affect ferritin levels. Results were analyzed statistically by Chi-square test, t-test and Pearson regression coefficient test. One hundred ninety-one cases including 97 diabetics (37 males and 60 females and 94 normal individuals were studied. There were no significant differences between the two groups regarding age, hemoglobin and body mass index. Mean serum ferritin was significantly higher in diabetics than in the control group (101±73 mg/ml vs. 43.5+42 mg/ml, p<0.001. There was no correlation between serum ferritin and HbA1c in diabetic patients of either sex. Ferritin levels in patients with DM is high, but not related to levels of HbA1c and blood glucose control.

  18. Heterozygote Hemoglobin G-Coushatta as the Cause of a Falsely Decreased Hemoglobin A1C in an Ion-Exchange HPLC Method

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    Kurtoğlu Ayşegül Uğur

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c is used for the assessment of glycemic control in patients with diabetes. The presence of genetic variants of hemoglobin can profoundly affect the accuracy of HbA1c measurement. Here, we report two cases of Hemoglobin G-Coushatta (HBB:c.68A>C variant that interferes in the measurement of HbA1c by a cation-exchange HPLC (CE-HPLC method. HbA1c was measured by a CE-HPLC method in a Tosoh HLC-723 G7 instrument. The HbA1c levels were 2.9% and 4%. These results alerted us to a possible presence of hemoglobinopathy. In the hemoglobin variant analysis, HbA2 levels were detected as 78.3% and 40.7% by HPLC using the short program for the Biorad Variant II. HbA1c levels were measured by an immunoturbidimetric assay in a Siemens Dimension instrument. HbA1c levels were reported as 5.5% and 5.3%. DNA mutation analysis was performed to detect the abnormal hemoglobin variant. Presence of Hemoglobin G-Coushatta variant was detected in the patients. The Hb G-Coushatta variants have an impact on the determination of glycated hemoglobin levels using CEHPLC resulting in a false low value. Therefore, it is necessary to use another measurement method.

  19. In vitro determination of hemoglobin A1c for diabetes diagnosis and management: technology update

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    English E

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Emma English,1 Elise T Milosevich,1 W Garry John2 1School of Medicine, University of Nottingham, Royal Derby Hospital, Derby, United Kingdom; 2Department of Clinical Biochemistry, Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, Norwich, United Kingdom Abstract: It is fascinating to consider the analytical improvements that have occurred since glycated hemoglobin was first used in routine clinical laboratories for diabetes monitoring around 1977; at that time methods displayed poor precision, there were no calibrators or material with assayed values for quality control purposes. This review outlines the major improvements in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c measurement that have occurred since its introduction, and reflects on the increased importance of this hemoglobin fraction in the monitoring of glycemic control. The use of HbA1c as a diagnostic tool is discussed in addition to its use in monitoring the patient with diabetes; the biochemistry of HbA1c formation is described, and how these changes to the hemoglobin molecule have been used to develop methods to measure this fraction. Standardization of HbA1c is described in detail; the development of the IFCC Reference Measurement Procedure for HbA1c has enabled global standardization to be achieved which has allowed global targets to be set for glycemic control and diagnosis. The importance of factors that may interfere in the measurement of HbA1c are highlighted. Keywords: glycated hemoglobin, HbA1c, IFCC

  20. GLUCOSE CONTROL IN RWANDAN YOUTH WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES FOLLOWING ESTABLISHMENT OF SYSTEMATIC, HBA1C BASED, CARE AND EDUCATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Sara L.; Edidin, Deborah; Arena, Vincent C.; Becker, Dorothy J.; Bunker, Clareann H.; Gishoma, Crispin; Gishoma, Francois; LaPorte, Ronald E.; Kaberuka, Vedaste; Ogle, Graham; Sibomana, Laurien; Orchard, Trevor J.

    2014-01-01

    AIMS To assess change in glycemic control concurrent with increased clinic visits, HbA1c testing, and education. Rates of complications were also examined. METHODS A 1–2 year follow-up of 214 members of the Rwanda Life for a Child program (aged < 26 years) with a first HbA1c between June 2009 and November 2010 was conducted. Data were analyzed for the entire cohort and by age (< 18 years, ≥ 18 years). Trajectory analysis was performed to identify trends in HbA1c. RESULTS Mean overall HbA1c decreased significantly from baseline (11.2±2.7%; 99±30 mmol/mol) to one- (10.2±2.6%; 88±28 mmol/mol) and two- (9.8±26%; 84±25 mmol/mol) year follow up visits. The prevalence of microalbuminuria did not significantly change (21.0%, 18.8%, and 19.6%), nor did nephropathy (4.7%, 7.8%, and 5.4%). However, rates of hypertension (31.8%, 44.9%, and 40.3%) were higher than expected. Five HbA1c groups were identified by trajectory analysis, and those with the worst control monitored their glucose significantly fewer times per week. CONCLUSIONS The establishment of regular care, HbA1c testing, and increased education is associated with significant improvements in glycemic control in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in sub-Saharan Africa, but the high prevalence of hypertension is of concern. PMID:25458328

  1. The Effect of Prolonged Glucosamine Usage on HbA1c Levels and New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus in Overweight and Obese Middle-Aged Women.

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    Gommans, Yvonne M M; Runhaar, Jos; Jacobs, Marloes L; Bierma-Zeinstra, Sita M A

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a 2.5-year glucosamine sulfate intervention on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels and the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus over 6.5 years in middle-aged women with a body mass index ≥27 kg/m 2 . In total, 407 women were randomized into either oral crystalline glucosamine sulfate or placebo. At baseline, 1 year, 2.5 years, and 6.5 years, a blood sample for the HbA1c level was drawn and questionnaires were taken. After 6.5 years there were missing data for some variables, therefore, multiple imputation was used. With the imputed data, a generalized estimating equation was performed to analyze the effect of glucosamine sulfate usage over 6.5 years. Finally, these analyses were rerun for the 2 subgroups of participants with and without high HbA1c level (≥42 mmol/mol) at baseline. There was no significant effect of a 2.5-year glucosamine sulfate intervention on mean HbA1c level or on obtaining a high HbA1c level or new-onset diabetes mellitus over 6.5 years. The subgroup analyses of participants with and without high HbA1c level at baseline were also not statistically significant. However, participants with a high HbA1c level at baseline had higher odds ratios compared with the participants with a normal HbA1c at baseline. There was no effect of glucosamine sulfate on mean HbA1c level nor on obtaining a high HbA1c level or new-onset diabetes mellitus over 6.5 years, especially in participants with a normal HbA1c level at baseline. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Baseline HbA1c to Identify High-Risk Gestational Diabetes: Utility in Early vs Standard Gestational Diabetes.

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    Sweeting, Arianne N; Ross, Glynis P; Hyett, Jon; Molyneaux, Lynda; Tan, Kris; Constantino, Maria; Harding, Anna Jane; Wong, Jencia

    2017-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) necessitates risk stratification directing limited antenatal resources to those at greatest risk. Recent evidence demonstrates that an early pregnancy glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c ≥5.9% (41 mmol/mol) predicts adverse pregnancy outcomes. To determine the optimal HbA1c threshold for adverse pregnancy outcomes in GDM in a treated multiethnic cohort and whether this differs in women diagnosed HbA1c (single-laboratory) measurement at the time of GDM diagnosis. Maternal clinical and pregnancy outcome data were collected prospectively. The association between baseline HbA1c and adverse pregnancy outcomes in early vs standard GDM. HbA1c was measured at a median of 17.6 ± 3.3 weeks' gestation in early GDM (n = 844) and 29.4 ± 2.6 weeks' gestation in standard GDM (n = 2254). In standard GDM, HbA1c >5.9% (41 mmol/mol) was associated with the greatest risk of large-for-gestational-age (odds ratio [95% confidence interval] = 2.7 [1.5-4.9]), macrosomia (3.5 [1.4-8.6]), cesarean section (3.6 [2.1-6.2]), and hypertensive disorders (2.6 [1.1-5.8]). In early GDM, similar HbA1c associations were seen; however, lower HbA1c correlated with the greatest risk of small-for-gestational-age (P trend = 0.004) and prevalence of neonatal hypoglycemia. Baseline HbA1c >5.9% (41 mmol/mol) identifies an increased risk of large-for-gestational-age, macrosomia, cesarean section, and hypertensive disorders in standard GDM. Although similar associations are seen in early GDM, higher HbA1c levels do not adequately capture risk-limiting utility as a triage tool in this cohort. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society

  3. The Impact of HbA1c Testing on Total Annual Healthcare Expenditures Among Newly Diagnosed Patients with Diabetes.

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    Bhounsule, Prajakta; Peterson, Andrew M

    2015-09-01

    In 2010, diabetes was the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes also imposes a huge financial burden on the US economy. In 2009, the American Diabetes Association International Expert Committee recommended the use of the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) test as a uniform diagnostic measure to identify patients with diabetes. Although HbA1c is a convenient diagnostic test, it is also more expensive than older tests and could, therefore, have an impact on patients' healthcare expenditures. To determine if HbA1c testing has an impact on total annual healthcare expenditures among newly diagnosed patients with diabetes and to analyze the factors that are associated with the total healthcare expenditures among diabetic patients before and after HbA1c was implemented as a standard diagnostic factor. This was an observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study. The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Household Component 2009 and 2011 databases were used to form the study cohort of patients with diabetes. The total mean healthcare expenditures among patients with diabetes formed the dependent variable. A proxy variable representing a diagnosis of diabetes with and without the use of HbA1c testing in 2009 and in 2011, respectively, formed the main independent variable along with demographic factors, comorbidities, and healthcare services utilization in both years. A generalized linear regression was conducted to determine the association of HbA1c testing with total diabetes-related healthcare expenditures. The mean total healthcare expenditure decreased in 2011 compared with 2009. The HbA1c test did not show an association with the total healthcare expenditures versus earlier diabetes-related diagnostic factors. The total expenditures were associated with private insurance, the incidence of a previous heart attack, prescription drug refills, inpatient hospital stays, home care, hospital discharges, and visits to outpatient providers and physicians in both

  4. Correlation of MMP-9, GA, HbA1c, and adipokines levels with DR

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    Cheng Qian

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the correlation of matrix metalloproteinase -9(MMP-9, glycated albumin(GA, glycosylated hemoglobin(HbA1cand adipokines(including visfatin, resistin and leptinwith diabetic retinopathy(DR. METHODS: From March 2015 to March 2017, 74 patients with DR were treated in our hospital, including 40 patients(80 eyeswith non proliferative diabetic retinopathy(NPDRand 34 patients(68 eyeswith proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDR, and diabetes mellitus 40 patients(80 eyeswith non DR(NDRand 40 healthy volunteers(80 eyeswere selected as controls, the levels of MMP-9, GA, HbA1c, visfatin, resistin and leptin in each group were detected. RESULTS: PDR group visfatin was 4.41±0.82ng/mL, was significantly lower than the NPDR group, NDR group and control group(PPPPrs=0.523, 0.461 and 0.414, Prs=-0.433, Prs=0.401 and 0.460, PCONCLUSION: MMP-9, GA, HbA1c, and adipokines may play a role in the development and progression of DR, in which MMP-9 is associated with adipokines, both are not significantly related to the levels of GA and HbA1c.

  5. Does the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus with the DPP-4 inhibitor vildagliptin reduce HbA1c to a greater extent in Japanese patients than in Caucasian patients?

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    Foley JE

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available James E Foley,1 Vaishali Bhosekar,2 Ryuzo Kawamori3 1Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA; 2Novartis Healthcare Pvt Ltd, Hyderabad, Telangana, India; 3Sportology Center, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Juntendo University, Tokyo, Japan Background: Previous work suggests that Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM may respond more favorably to a DPP-4 (dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor than Caucasians. We aimed to compare the efficacy of the DPP-4 inhibitor vildagliptin (50 mg twice daily [bid] between Japanese and Caucasian populations. Methods: This analysis pooled data from 19 studies of drug-naïve patients with T2DM who were treated for 12 weeks with vildagliptin 50 mg bid as monotherapy. The pool comprised Japanese patients (n=338 who had been treated in Japan and Caucasian patients (n=1,275 who were treated elsewhere. Change from baseline (Δ in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c at 12 weeks (in millimoles per mole versus baseline HbA1c (both in percentage National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program units [NGSP%] and millimoles per mole for each population was reported. Universal HbA1c in millimoles per mole was calculated from either the Japanese Diabetes Society or the NGSP% HbA1c standards. Results: At baseline, mean values for Japanese and Caucasian patients, respectively, were as follows: age, 59 years and 56 years; % male, 69% and 57%. The average HbA1c was reduced from 7.90% to 6.96% (Japanese Diabetes Society and from 8.57% to 7.50% (United States National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program, while HbA1c was reduced from 63 mmol/mol to 53 mmol/mol and from 70 mmol/mol to 58 mmol/mol in Japanese and Caucasians, respectively. ΔHbA1c increased with increasing baseline in both populations. The slopes were the same (0.41, r2=0.36; and 0.41, r2=0.15, and the intercepts were 15.4 mmol/mol and 17.2 mmol/mol, respectively. In Japanese patients, mean ΔHbA1c was greater by 1.7 mmol

  6. Measurement of HbA1c in Gingival Crevicular Blood Using a High Pressure Liquid Chromatography Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce, Michael A.; Strauss, Shiela M.; Rosedale, Mary; Netterwald, Jane; Wang, Hangli

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To validate an ion exchange high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in gingival crevicular blood (GCB) spotted on filter paper, for use in screening dental patients for diabetes. Methods We collected the GCB specimens for this study from the oral cavities of patients during dental visits, using rigorous strategies to obtain GCB that was as free of debris as possible. The analytical performance of the HPLC method was determined by measuring the precision, linearity, carryover, stability of HbA1c in GCB, and correlation of HbA1c results in GCB specimens with finger-stick blood (FSB) specimens spotted on filter paper. Results The coefficients of variation (CVs) for the inter- and intrarun precision of the method were less than 2.0%. Linearity ranged between 4.2% and 12.4%; carryover was less than 2.0%, and the stability of the specimen was 6 days at 4°C and as many as 14 days at −70°C. Linear regression analysis comparing the HbA1c results in GCB with FSB yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.993, a slope of 0.981, and an intercept of 0.13. The Bland-Altman plot showed no difference in the HbA1c results from the GCB and FSB specimens at normal, prediabetes, and diabetes HbA1c levels. Conclusion We validated an HPLC method for measuring HbA1c in GCB; this method can be used to screen dental patients for diabetes. PMID:26489673

  7. Use of HbA1c to diagnose type 2 diabetes mellitus among high risk Sri Lankan adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herath, H M M; Weerarathna, T P; Dahanayake, M U; Weerasinghe, N P

    Even though, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) was found to be effective in predicting diabetes especially in Caucasians there is limited evidence of its diagnostic utility in high risk Sri Lankan adults. This study aimed to determine the optimal HbA1c cut-off points for detecting diabetes in a high risk population in Sri Lanka. This community based study consisted of 254 previously healthy adults with history of diabetes in one or more first-degree relatives. Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) , glucose tolerance test (GTT) and HbA1c were measured in all and GTT was used as a reference to diagnose diabetes. Receiver operating characteristic curve was created to find the optimum HbA1c cut-off value to predict diabetes. Prevalence of diabetes was 12.2% (n=31) with FPG and 16.1% (n=41) with GTT. Prevalence rose to 27.6% (PHbA1c with cut-off of ≥6.5% was used as the diagnostic test. The ROC curves showed the HbA1c threshold of 6.3% provided the optimum balance between sensitivity (80.5%) and specificity (79%). In compared to GTT, FPG had only a modest sensitivity (65%) in diagnosing diabetes in this high risk population. Our study showed that optimum HbA1C cut-off for detecting diabetes was 6.3% and it had better sensitivity, but lower specificity than FPG. This study further showed that the prevalence of diabetes would become double if HbA1c is used over FPG to screen this high risk population. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Biological variability of glycated hemoglobin.

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    Braga, Federica; Dolci, Alberto; Mosca, Andrea; Panteghini, Mauro

    2010-11-11

    The measurement of glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) has a pivotal role in monitoring glycemic state in diabetic patients. Furthermore, the American Diabetes Association has recently recommended the use of HbA(1c) for diabetes diagnosis, but a clear definition of the clinically allowable measurement error is still lacking. Information on biological variability of the analyte can be used to achieve this goal. We systematically reviewed the published studies on the biological variation of HbA(1c) to check consistency of available data in order to accurately define analytical goals. The nine recruited studies were limited by choice of analytic methodology, population selection, protocol application and statistical analyses. There is an urgent need to determine biological variability of HbA(1c) using a specific and traceable assay, appropriate protocol and appropriate statistical evaluation of data. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Heterogeneous behavior of lipids according to HbA1c levels undermines the plausibility of metabolic syndrome in type 1 diabetes: data from a nationwide multicenter survey

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    Giuffrida Fernando MA

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular risk factors (CVRF may cluster in type 1 diabetes, analogously to the metabolic syndrome described in type 2 diabetes. The threshold of HbA1c above which lipid variables start changing behavior is unclear. This study aims to 1 assess the behavior of dyslipidemia according to HbA1c values; 2 detect a threshold of HbA1c beyond which lipids start to change and 3 compare the clustering of lipids and other non-lipid CVRF among strata of HbA1c individuals with type 1 diabetes. Methods Effects of HbA1c quintiles (1st: ≤7.4%; 2nd: 7.5-8.5%; 3rd: 8.6-9.6%; 4th: 9.7-11.3%; and 5th: >11.5% and covariates (gender, BMI, blood pressure, insulin daily dose, lipids, statin use, diabetes duration on dyslipidemia were studied in 1275 individuals from the Brazilian multi-centre type 1 diabetes study and 171 normal controls. Results Body size and blood pressure were not correlated to lipids and glycemic control. OR (99% CI for high-LDL were 2.07 (1.21-3.54 and 2.51 (1.46-4.31, in the 4th and 5th HbA1c quintiles, respectively. Hypertriglyceridemia increased in the 5th quintile of HbA1c, OR 2.76 (1.20-6.37. OR of low-HDL-cholesterol were 0.48 (0.24-0.98 and 0.41 (0.19-0.85 in the 3rd and 4th HbA1c quintiles, respectively. HDL-cholesterol correlated positively (0.437 with HbA1c in the 3rd quintile. HDL-cholesterol and insulin dose correlated inversely in all levels of glycemic control. Conclusions Correlation of serum lipids with HbA1c is heterogeneous across the spectrum of glycemic control in type 1 diabetes individuals. LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides worsened alongside HbA1c with distinct thresholds. Association of lower HDL-cholesterol with higher daily insulin dose is consistent and it points out to a role of exogenous hyperinsulinemia in the pathophysiology of the CVRF clustering. These data suggest diverse pathophysiological processes depending on HbA1c, refuting a unified explanation for cardiovascular risk in type 1

  10. Knowledge and Outcome Measure of HbA1c Testing in Asian Indian Patients with Type 2 Diabetes from a Tertiary Care Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumpatla, Satyavani; Medempudi, Srikanth; Manoharan, Deepa; Viswanathan, Vijay

    2010-01-01

    Aim: HbA1c test is considered to be the reliable measure for evaluating long-term glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether knowledge about HbA1c test is associated with a better glycemic control. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 480 (M:F; 287:193) adults with type 2 diabetes attending a tertiary care center during a period of four months. Baseline demographic and clinical data of all the subjects was obtained. Subject’s knowledge about HbA1c test and their target goal was assessed using a questionnaire. Recent HbA1c results were obtained from medical records. Results: Seventy four per cent of the subjects had awareness about HbA1c test and about 43% of those who knew HbA1c test also knew their target goal. 33% remember their last HbA1c result. The mean A1C of Group A was significantly lower when compared with Group B (8.1 ± 1.7 vs 9.2 ± 1.9, P<0.0001). Group C had lower A1C levels compared to Group D (7.7 ± 1.4 vs 8.5 ± 1.9, p<0.0001). Patients who kept their HbA1c less than 7% were significantly higher in Group C than in Group D. (37.8 vs 12.7%, p<0.00001). Subjects had good glycemic control with increasing levels of awareness about HbA1c. Conclusion: Majority of the diabetic patients who attended the tertiary care center for diabetes care knew HbA1c test and half of them were aware about their target goal. Awareness about HbA1c had a positive impact on maintenance of better glycemic control. PMID:20922109

  11. Comparison of 1,5-anhydroglucitol, HbA1c, and fructosamine for detection of diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanouchi, T; Akanuma, Y; Toyota, T; Kuzuya, T; Kawai, T; Kawazu, S; Yoshioka, S; Kanazawa, Y; Ohta, M; Baba, S

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate the use of serum 1,5-anhydroglucitol (AG) levels in screening for diabetes mellitus, we compared the sensitivity and specificity of HbA1c, fructosamine (FA), and AG in 1620 randomly selected subjects in 11 institutions throughout Japan. Most individuals were receiving diet and/or drug therapy for diabetes. Subjects were separated into four groups based on World Health Organization criteria: nondiabetic control subjects, subjects with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), patients with diabetes, and patients with other disorders without IGT. The overlap of AG values between each group was less than that of HbA1c or FA values. AG levels were significantly correlated with fasting plasma glucose (r = -0.627), HbA1c (r = -0.629), and FA (r = -0.590) levels. If we took 14 micrograms/ml as the normal lower limit, AG level was highly specific (93.1%), and a decreased AG level indicated diabetes mellitus (84.2% sensitivity). According to the selectivity index (sensitivity value times specificity value), AG determinations were superior to both HbA1c and FA measurements for diabetes screening. When combinations of these tests were used, only AG and HbA1c together were slightly better than AG alone. Thus, together with other advantages of AG, e.g., its wide variance with relatively fair glycemic control and the negligible influence of the sampling conditions, AG level has more potential than HbA1c or FA level as a screening criterion for diabetes.

  12. Oxidized LDL but not total LDL is associated with HbA1c in individuals without diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spessatto, Débora; Brum, Liz Marina Bueno Dos Passos; Camargo, Joíza Lins

    2017-08-01

    This study investigates the association between HbA1c, LDL and oxi-LDL in individuals without diabetes (DM). One hundred and ninety-six individuals, without DM, were enrolled and divided into three groups according to HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose values. HbA1c, oxi-LDL, LDL, and other biochemical measurements of lipid profile were also carried out. oxi-LDL levels showed significant differences among all groups and group 3 presented higher values [34U/L (27-46); 44U/L (37-70); and 86U/L (49-136); pHbA1c showed moderate positive associations with oxi-LDL (r=0.431; pHbA1c and TC (r=0.142; p=0.048), triglycerides (r=0.155; p=0.030), LDL (r=0.148; p=0.039), non-HDL (r=0.192; p=0.007) and Apo B (r=0.171, pHbA1c and oxi-LDL, oxi-LDL/HDL and oxi-LDL/LDL ratios remained significant even after adjustment by multiple linear regression analysis for the variables alcohol consumption, use of medicine, BMI, and age. oxi-LDL levels are significantly associated with HbA1c in non-diabetic individuals. However, the levels of traditional atherogenic lipids only showed a weak association with HbA1c levels. Those at high risk of developing DM or cardiovascular disease have higher levels of oxi-LDL. These data favor to the use of HbA1c as a biomarker to identify individuals at risk of developing complications even in non-diabetic glycemic levels. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effect of iron deficiency anemia and iron supplementation on HbA1c levels - Implications for diagnosis of prediabetes and diabetes mellitus in Asian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhu, S V; Raj, Abhishek; Gupta, Stuti; Giri, S; Rusia, Usha

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the effect of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) on levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and to compare its levels before and after iron supplementations. Age and sex matched subjects were enrolled and clustered in 2 groups: IDA (n=62) and healthy controls (HC; n=60). HbA1c levels were estimated by HPLC. Hemogram were estimated by hematology analyser. Serum ferritin (ELISA) and other parameters of iron profile were measured by standard guidelines of ICSH. HbA1c values and iron studies were repeated after 3months of iron supplementation to determine the effect of iron therapy on HbA1c levels. Significantly higher HbA1c levels were observed in IDA subjects compared to HC (5.51±0.696 v/s 4.85±0.461%, pHbA1c and hemoglobin, hematocrit, RBC count, MCH, MCHC and serum ferritin in IDA subjects (r=-0.632, -0.652, -0.384, -0.236, -0.192 and -0.441). Significant decline was noticed in HbA1c levels in IDA subjects after iron supplementation (5.51±0.696 before treatment v/s 5.044±0.603 post-treatment; pHbA1c in pre-diabetes range normalised to normal glucose tolerance (NGT) range and out of 6 patients with pre-treatment HbA1c in diabetes range, 5 reverted to pre-diabetes range while 1 of them reverted to the NGT range. Caution must be exercised in interpreting the results of HbA1c in patients of IDA and iron deficiency must be corrected before diagnosing diabetes and pre-diabetes solely on the basis of HbA1c criteria. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Safety and Efficacy of D-Tagatose in Glycemic Control in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Ensor, Mark; Banfield, Amy B.; Smith, Rebecca R.; Williams, Jarrod; Lodder, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate the treatment effect of D-tagatose on glycemic control, determined by a statistically significant decrease in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and safety profile of D-tagatose compared to placebo. The secondary objectives were to evaluate the treatment effects on fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipid profiles, changes in BMI, and the proportion of subjects achieving HbA1c targets of

  15. DPP-4 inhibitor treatment: β-cell response but not HbA1c reduction is dependent on the duration of diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozlovski P

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Plamen Kozlovski,1 Vaishali Bhosekar,2 James E Foley3 1Novartis Pharma AG, Basel, Switzerland; 2Novartis Healthcare Private Limited, Hyderabad, India; 3Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, East Hanover, NJ, USA Introduction: Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors reduce hyperglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM by enhancing insulin and suppressing glucagon secretion. Since T2DM is associated with progressive loss of β-cell function, we hypothesized that the DPP-4 inhibitor action to improve β-cell function would be attenuated with longer duration of T2DM.Methods: Data from six randomized, placebo-controlled trials of 24 weeks duration, where β-cell response to vildagliptin 50 mg twice daily was assessed, were pooled. In each study, the insulin secretory rate relative to glucose (ISR/G 0–2h during glucose load (standard meal or oral glucose tolerance test was assessed at baseline and end of study. The mean placebo-subtracted difference (PSD in the change in ISR/G 0–2h from baseline for each study was evaluated as a function of age, duration of T2DM, baseline ISR/G 0–2h, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose, body mass index, and mean PSD in the change in HbA1c from baseline, using univariate model.Results: There was a strong negative association between the PSD in the change from baseline in ISR/G 0–2h and duration of T2DM (r= −0.89, p<0.02. However, there was no association between the PSD in the change from baseline in ISR/G 0–2h and the PSD in the change from baseline in HbA1c (r=0.33, p=0.52. None of the other characteristics were significantly associated with mean PSD change in ISR/G 0–2h.Conclusion: These findings indicate that the response of the β-cell, but not the HbA1c reduction, with vildagliptin is dependent on duration of T2DM. Further, it can be speculated that glucagon suppression may become the predominant mechanism via which glycemic control is improved when treatment with a

  16. One Drop | Mobile on iPhone and Apple Watch : An Evaluation of HbA1c Improvement Associated With Tracking Self-Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osborn, Y C.; Van, Ginkel J.R.; Marrero, D.G.; Rodbard, D.; Huddleston, B.; Dachis, J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The One Drop vertical bar Mobile app supports manual and passive (via HealthKit and One Drop's glucose meter) tracking of self-care and glycated hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)). Objective: We assessed the HbA(1c) change of a sample of people with type 1 diabetes (T1D) or type 2 diabetes (T2D)

  17. HbA1c as a Screening tool for Ketosis in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Bing; Bu, Le; Zhang, Manna; Gusdon, Aaron M.; Zheng, Liang; Rampersad, Sharvan; Li, Jue; Qu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    Ketosis in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is overlooked due to atypical symptoms. The objective of this study is to evaluate the value of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as a screening tool for ketosis in T2DM patients. This retrospective study consisted of 253 T2DM patients with ketosis at Shanghai 10th People’s Hospital during a period from January 1, 2011 to June 30, 2015. A control group consisted of 221 T2DM patients without ketosis randomly selected from inpatients during the same period. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis was used to examine the sensitivity and specificity of HbA1c as an indicator for ketosis. Higher HbA1c levels were correlated with ketosis. In patients with newly diagnosed T2DM, the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.832, with 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.754–0.911. The optimal threshold was 10.1% (87 mmol/mol). In patients with previously diagnosed T2DM, the AUC was 0.811 (95% CI: 0.767–0.856), with an optimal threshold of 8.6% (70 mmol/mol). HbA1c is a potential screening tool for ketosis in patients with T2DM. Ketosis is much more likely with HbA1c values at ≥10.1% in patients with newly diagnosed T2DM and HbA1c values at ≥8.6% in patients with previously diagnosed T2DM. PMID:28009017

  18. Determining the Threshold for HbA1c as a Predictor for Adverse Outcomes After Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Multicenter, Retrospective Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarabichi, Majd; Shohat, Noam; Kheir, Michael M; Adelani, Muyibat; Brigati, David; Kearns, Sean M; Patel, Pankajkumar; Clohisy, John C; Higuera, Carlos A; Levine, Brett R; Schwarzkopf, Ran; Parvizi, Javad; Jiranek, William A

    2017-09-01

    Although HbA1c is commonly used for assessing glycemic control before surgery, there is no consensus regarding its role and the appropriate threshold in predicting adverse outcomes. This study was designed to evaluate the potential link between HbA1c and subsequent periprosthetic joint infection (PJI), with the intention of determining the optimal threshold for HbA1c. This is a multicenter retrospective study, which identified 1645 diabetic patients who underwent primary total joint arthroplasty (1004 knees and 641 hips) between 2001 and 2015. All patients had an HbA1c measured within 3 months of surgery. The primary outcome of interest was a PJI at 1 year based on the Musculoskeletal Infection Society criteria. Secondary outcomes included orthopedic (wound and mechanical complications) and nonorthopedic complications (sepsis, thromboembolism, genitourinary, and cardiovascular complications). A regression analysis was performed to determine the independent influence of HbA1c for predicting PJI. Overall 22 cases of PJI occurred at 1 year (1.3%). HbA1c at a threshold of 7.7 was distinct for predicting PJI (area under the curve, 0.65; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.78). Using this threshold, PJI rates increased from 0.8% (11 of 1441) to 5.4% (11 of 204). In the stepwise logistic regression analysis, PJI remained the only variable associated with higher HbA1c (odds ratio, 1.5; confidence interval, 1.2-2.0; P = .0001). There was no association between high HbA1c levels and other complications assessed. High HbA1c levels are associated with an increased risk for PJI. A threshold of 7.7% seems to be more indicative of infection than the commonly used 7% and should perhaps be the goal in preoperative patient optimization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Visceral fat area is associated with HbA1c but not dialysate-related glucose load in nondiabetic PD patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Li-Chun; Yen, Chung-Jen; Chao, Chia-Ter; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Huang, Jenq-Wen; Hung, Kuan-Yu

    2015-08-01

    Factors associated with increased visceral fat area (VFA) have been well documented in the general population but rarely explored in nondiabetic individuals on peritoneal dialysis (PD). As glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is positively correlated with VFA in diabetic patients, we hypothesized that the same correlation would exist in nondiabetic PD patients. We enrolled 105 nondiabetic patients who had undergone chronic PD for more than 3 months. Each subject underwent an abdominal computed tomography (CT) scan, and the umbilicus cut was analyzed for VFA. VFA values, corrected for body mass index and subjected to natural logarithm transformations, were examined to determine whether they were correlated with HbA1c and other parameters. PD dialysates prescribed at the time of enrollment were recorded to calculate glucose load. We found that when 105 nondiabetic PD patients were classified according to tertiles of HbA1c, higher HbA1c was associated with larger VFA. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed that HbA1c was an independent determinant of VFA, while glucose load and other PD-specific factors were not. In summary, HbA1c, but not PD-related glucose load, was positively correlated with VFA in nondiabetic PD patients, suggesting clinical utility of HbA1c in the PD population.

  20. HbA1c Variability as an Independent Correlate of Nephropathy, but Not Retinopathy, in Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penno, Giuseppe; Solini, Anna; Bonora, Enzo; Fondelli, Cecilia; Orsi, Emanuela; Zerbini, Gianpaolo; Morano, Susanna; Cavalot, Franco; Lamacchia, Olga; Laviola, Luigi; Nicolucci, Antonio; Pugliese, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine the association of hemoglobin (Hb) A1c variability with microvascular complications in the large cohort of subjects with type 2 diabetes from the Renal Insufficiency And Cardiovascular Events (RIACE) Italian Multicenter Study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Serial (3–5) HbA1c values collected in a 2-year period before enrollment were available from 8,260 subjects from 9 centers (of 15,773 patients from 19 centers). HbA1c variability was measured as the intraindividual SD of 4.52 ± 0.76 values. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was assessed by dilated funduscopy. Chronic kidney disease (CKD) was defined based on albuminuria, as measured by immunonephelometry or immunoturbidimetry, and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was calculated from serum creatinine. RESULTS Median and interquartile range of average HbA1c (HbA1c-MEAN) and HbA1c-SD were 7.57% (6.86–8.38) and 0.46% (0.29–0.74), respectively. The highest prevalence of microalbuminuria, macroalbuminuria, reduced eGFR, albuminuric CKD phenotypes, and advanced DR was observed when both HbA1c parameters were above the median and the lowest when both were below the median. Logistic regression analyses showed that HbA1c-SD adds to HbA1c-MEAN as an independent correlate of microalbuminuria and stages 1–2 CKD and is an independent predictor of macroalbuminuria, reduced eGFR, and stages 3–5 albuminuric CKD, whereas HbA1c-MEAN is not. The opposite was found for DR, whereas neither HbA1c-MEAN nor HbA1c-SD affected nonalbuminuric CKD. CONCLUSIONS In patients with type 2 diabetes, HbA1c variability affects (albuminuric) CKD more than average HbA1c, whereas only the latter parameter affects DR, thus suggesting a variable effect of these measures on microvascular complications. PMID:23491522

  1. Are There Clinical Implications of Racial Differences in HbA1c? A Difference, to Be a Difference, Must Make a Difference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selvin, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Studies that have compared HbA1c levels by race have consistently demonstrated higher HbA1c levels in African Americans than in whites. These racial differences in HbA1c have not been explained by measured differences in glycemia, sociodemographic factors, clinical factors, access to care, or quality of care. Recently, a number of nonglycemic factors and several genetic polymorphisms that operate through nonglycemic mechanisms have been associated with HbA1c. Their distributions across racial groups and their impact on hemoglobin glycation need to be systematically explored. Thus, on the basis of evidence for racial differences in HbA1c, current clinical guidelines from the American Diabetes Association state: “It is important to take…race/ethnicity…into consideration when using the A1C to diagnose diabetes.” However, it is not clear from the guidelines how this recommendation might be actualized. So, the critical question is not whether racial differences in HbA1c exist between African Americans and whites; the important question is whether the observed differences in HbA1c level are clinically meaningful. Therefore, given the current controversy, we provide a Point-Counterpoint debate on this issue. In the preceding point narrative, Dr. Herman provides his argument that the failure to acknowledge that HbA1c might be a biased measure of average glycemia and an unwillingness to rigorously investigate this hypothesis will slow scientific progress and has the potential to do great harm. In the counterpoint narrative below, Dr. Selvin argues that there is no compelling evidence for racial differences in the validity of HbA1c as a measure of hyperglycemia and that race is a poor surrogate for differences in underlying causes of disease risk. —William T. Cefalu Editor in Chief, Diabetes Care PMID:27457637

  2. HbA1c measurements from dried blood spots : validation and patient satisfaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fokkema, Margaretha; Bakker, Andries J; de Boer, Fokje; Kooistra, Jeltsje; de Vries, Sifra; Wolthuis, Albert

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study evaluates HbA1c measurements from dried blood spots collected on filter paper and compares HbA1c from filter paper (capillary blood) with HbA1c measured in venous blood. Methods: Patient satisfaction was evaluated using a questionnaire. The performance with the filter paper

  3. The influence of glycemic control on the oral health of children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Vera Lúcia; Fraiz, Fabian Calixto; Ferreira, Fernanda de Morais; Pintarelli, Tatiana Pegoretti; Oliveira, Ana Cristina Borges; Boguszewski, Margaret Cristina da Silva

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the influence of disease control, expressed by the mean values of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), in the oral health of children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus type 1 (T1DM). A cross sectional study involving 87 children and adolescents (59 girls), 10 ± 2.6 years old. The participants were divided into three groups: HbA1c ≤ 8%, 8% 10%. The duration of the disease, age and average HbA1c were obtained from their medical records. Oral health was evaluated according to the following indexes: Simplified Oral Hygiene Index (OHI-S); Community Periodontal Index (CPI); Decayed, Missing or Filled Teeth Index (DMFT/dmft) for permanent and deciduous teeth; and the stimulated salivary flow rate (SSFR). The median SSFR was 1.1 mL/min in the group with HbA1c ≤ 8%, 0.7 mL/min in the intermediary group and 0.6 mL/min in the HbA1c > 10% group. A significant decrease in salivary flow was observed with an increase in HbA1c (p = 0.007). The DMFT/dmft and CPI indexes were higher in individuals with higher HbA1c values. More caries-free individuals were found in the group with HbA1c ≤ 8% compared to those with HbA1c > 10%. The group with HbA1c > 10% exhibited more caries and bleeding gums than the other groups. HbA1c values in girls were higher than in boys. Children and adolescents with unsatisfactory glycemic control, represented by higher HbA1c concentrations, exhibited a higher frequency of caries and gingivitis, and a reduction in salivary flow.

  4. Glycemic control and all-cause mortality risk in type 1 diabetes patients: the EURODIAB prospective complications study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoenaker, D.A.J.M.; Simon, D.; Chaturvedi, N.; Fuller, J.H.; Soedamah-Muthu, S.S.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Glycemic targets and the benefit of intensive glucose control are currently under debate because intensive glycemic control has been suggested to have negative effects on mortality risk in type 2 diabetes patients. Objective: We examined the association between glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c)

  5. Relationship Between HbA1c and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome in Stroke Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between glycosylated hemoglobin A (HbA1c) and complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) in stroke patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods A retrospective chart review was performed of stroke patients from January 2012 to December 2013. We reviewed 331 patients and included 200 in the analysis. We divided them into CRPS and non-CRPS groups and compared them by age, gender, stroke lesion, cause of stroke, duration of T2DM, HbA1c (%), National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score, affected shoulder flexor muscle strength, Fugl-Meyer Assessment score, motricity index, Functional Independence Measure, Korean version of Modified Barthel Index, blood glucose level on admission day, duration from stroke onset to HbA1c check, and duration from stroke onset to three-phase bone scan for CRPS diagnosis. Thereafter, we classified the patients into five groups by HbA1c level (group 1, 5.0%–5.9%; group 2, 6.0%–6.9%; group 3, 7.0%–7.9%; group 4, 8.0%–8.9%; and group 5, 9.0%–9.9%) and we investigated the difference in CRPS prevalence between the two groups. Results Of the 200 patients, 108 were in the CRPS group and 92 were in the non-CRPS group. There were significant differences in HbA1c (pCRPS prevalence (pCRPS prevalence and thus that uncontrolled blood glucose can affect CRPS occurrence in stroke patients with diabetes. PMID:27847707

  6. Evaluating new HbA1c methods for adoption by the IFCC and NGSP reference networks using international quality targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenters-Westra, Erna; English, Emma

    2017-08-28

    As a reference laboratory for HbA1c, it is essential to have accurate and precise HbA1c methods covering a range of measurement principles. We report an evaluation of the Abbott Enzymatic (Architect c4000), Roche Gen.3 HbA1c (Cobas c513) and Tosoh G11 using different quality targets. The effect of hemoglobin variants, other potential interferences and the performance in comparison to both the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) and the National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program (NGSP) reference systems was assessed using certified evaluation protocols. Each of the evaluated HbA1c methods had CVs HbA1c. Partly based on the result of this study, the Abbott Enzymatic method on the Architect c4000 and the Roche Gen.3 HbA1c on the Cobas c513 are now official, certified IFCC and NGSP SRMPs in the IFCC and NGSP networks. Sigma metrics quality criteria presented in a graph distinguish between good and excellent performance.

  7. Correlation of same-visit HbA1c test with laboratory-based measurements: A MetroNet study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    West Patricia A

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c results vary by analytical method. Use of same-visit HbA1c testing methodology holds the promise of more efficient patient care, and improved diabetes management. Our objective was to test the feasibility of introducing a same-visit HbA1c methodology into busy family practice centers (FPC and to calculate the correlation between the same-visit HbA1c test and the laboratory method that the clinical site was currently using for HbA1c testing. Methods Consecutive diabetic patients 18 years of age and older having blood samples drawn for routine laboratory analysis of HbA1c were asked to provide a capillary blood sample for same-visit testing with the BIO-RAD Micromat II. We compared the results of the same-visit test to three different laboratory methods (one FPC used two different laboratories. Results 147 paired samples were available for analysis (73 from one FPC; 74 from the other. The Pearson correlation of Micromat II and ion-exchange HPLC was 0.713 (p Conclusion For each of the laboratory methods, the correlation coefficient was lower than the 0.96 reported by the manufacturer. This might be due to variability introduced by the multiple users of the Micromat II machine. The mean HbA1c results were also consistently lower than those obtained from laboratory analysis. Additionally, the amount of dedicated time required to perform the assay may limit its usefulness in a busy clinical practice. Before introducing a same-visit HbA1c methodology, clinicians should compare the rapid results to their current method of analysis.

  8. Low Self-Confidence and Diabetes Mismanagement in Youth with Type 1 Diabetes Mediate the Relationship between Behavioral Problems and Elevated HbA1c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eilander, Minke M. A.; de Wit, Maartje; Rotteveel, Joost; Snoek, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies indicated an association between behavior problems (internalizing, externalizing) and glycemic control (HbA1c) in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D). The aim of this study is to examine if this association is mediated by self-confidence and mismanagement of diabetes. Problem behavior

  9. Comparison of Enzymatic Assay for HBA1C Measurement (Abbott Architect) With Capillary Electrophoresis (Sebia Minicap Flex Piercing Analyser).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesija Kuna, Andrea; Dukic, Kristina; Nikolac Gabaj, Nora; Miler, Marijana; Vukasovic, Ines; Langer, Sanja; Simundic, Ana-Maria; Vrkic, Nada

    2018-03-08

    To compare the analytical performances of the enzymatic method (EM) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) for hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) measurement. Imprecision, carryover, stability, linearity, method comparison, and interferences were evaluated for HbA1c via EM (Abbott Laboratories, Inc) and CE (Sebia). Both methods have shown overall within-laboratory imprecision of less than 3% for International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (IFCC) units (<2% National Glycohemoglobin Standardization Program [NGSP] units). Carryover effects were within acceptable criteria. The linearity of both methods has proven to be excellent (R2 = 0.999). Significant proportional and constant difference were found for EM, compared with CE, but were not clinically relevant (<5 mmol/mol; NGSP <0.5%). At the clinically relevant HbA1c concentration, stability observed with both methods was acceptable (bias, <3%). Triglyceride levels of 8.11 mmol per L or greater showed to interfere with EM and fetal hemoglobin (HbF) of 10.6% or greater with CE. The enzymatic method proved to be comparable to the CE method in analytical performances; however, certain interferences can influence the measurements of each method.

  10. HbA1c, systolic blood pressure variability and diabetic retinopathy in Asian type 2 diabetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foo, Valencia; Quah, Joanne; Cheung, Gemmy; Tan, Ngiap Chun; Ma Zar, Kyi Lin; Chan, Choi Mun; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Tien Yin, Wong; Tan, Gavin; Sabanayagam, Charumathi

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the association between variability in HbA1c or systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diabetes-specific moderate retinopathy in Asians with type 2 diabetes (T2D). A retrospective study was conducted of 172 cases of moderate diabetic retinopathy (DR) cases and 226 controls without DR, matched for age, sex, and ethnicity. Serial HbA1c and SBP (range 3-6 readings) over the 2 years prior to photographic screening of DR were collected. Intrapersonal mean and SD values for HbA1c (iM-HbA1c and iSD-HbA1c) and SBP (iM-SBP and iSD-SBP) were derived. Moderate DR was assessed from digital retinal photographs and defined as levels >43 using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale. Cases of moderate DR had higher iM-HbA1c (8.2 % vs 7.3 %; P = 0.001), iSD-HbA1c (1.22 vs 0.64; P = 0.001), iM-SBP (136.8 vs 129.6 mmHg; P = 0.001) and iSD-SBP (13.3 vs 11.1; P = 0.002) than controls. In the multivariate regression model adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, duration of diabetes, SBP, and HbA1c, iM-HbA1c and iM-SBP were significantly associated with moderate DR (odds ratio [OR] 1.80, 95 % confidence interval [CI] 1.37-2.36; and OR 1.03, 95 % CI 1.01-1.05, respectively). Neither iSD-HbA1c nor iSD-SBP were associated with moderate DR. When stratified by HbA1c HbA1c levels and SBP, but not their variability, were associated with moderate DR. Among those with good glycemic control, wider variability of SBP is associated with moderate DR. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Use of Fructosyl Peptide Oxidase for HbA1c Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yonehara, Satoshi; Inamura, Norio; Fukuda, Miho; Sugiyama, Koji

    2015-01-01

    ARKRAY, Inc developed the world’s first automatic glycohemoglobin analyzer based on HPLC (1981). After that, ARKRAY developed enzymatic HbA1c assay “CinQ HbA1c” with the spread and diversification of HbA1c measurement (2007). CinQ HbA1c is the kit of Clinical Chemistry Analyzer, which uses fructosyl peptide oxidase (FPOX) for a measurement reaction. This report mainly indicates the developmental background, measurement principle, and future of the enzymatic method HbA1c reagent. PMID:25633966

  12. Effect of Education of Self-care Behaviors on HbA1C level in Diabetic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmadi Zakieh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The successful glycemic control in diabetic patients is very important. Since the poor self-care is reported as the most important causes of mortality and complications, therefore these patients require self-care knowledge. This study aimed to determine the effect of education of self-care behaviors on HbA1C level in diabetic patients. Materials and Method: In this clinical trial, 80 diabetic patients referred to the diabetes clinic in Bandar Abbas were selected through random sampling and then were randomly allocated into two groups of intervention and control based on stratified random sampling. Designed educational program was implemented in 9 sessions (60 minutes, once a week for 12 weeks for patients in the intervention group. Patients in the control group were received usual care of clinic. Data were collected through using demographic information form and HbA1c test. Data were collected at the beginning of the study and 12 weeks after the intervention. Data were analyzed by SPSS software (version 18 using independent T- test, paired T-test, Mann-Whitney U and chi-square. Results: Before the intervention, the HbA1c average in the intervention and control groups was 8.18 ± 1.66 and 8.41 ± 2.10, respectively and after the intervention these values were changed to 7.78 ± 1.48 and 8.82 ± 2.11 in the intervention and control groups respectively (p = 0.01. Conclusion: Implementation of educational program of self-care behaviors was effective in reducing HbA1C and it can be used as an appropriate educational method by nurses and other health care team in controlling of diabetes in patients.

  13. Real-world Clinical Outcomes Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Receiving Canagliflozin at a Specialty Diabetes Clinic: Subgroup Analysis by Baseline HbA1c and Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, June Felice; Parsa, Rahul; Bailey, Robert A

    2017-06-01

    Canagliflozin, a sodium glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitor developed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), has demonstrated effectiveness in patients with T2DM receiving care at a specialty diabetes clinic. We report the outcomes in these patients in subgroups classified by baseline hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) and age. This subgroup analysis was based on a review of data from the electronic health records of adults with T2DM who were prescribed canagliflozin at a specialty diabetes clinic and who returned for ≥1 follow-up office visit. Mean changes from baseline to the first and second follow-up office visits in HbA 1c , body weight, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) were calculated in each subgroup classified by baseline HbA 1c (≥7.0%, ≥8.0%, and >9.0%) and age (baseline HbA 1c ≥7.0%, ≥8.0%, and >9.0%, respectively; 396 and 66 patients were aged baseline HbA 1c and age experienced clinically and statistically significant reductions from baseline in HbA 1c , body weight, and systolic BP that were sustained over 2 office visits; diastolic BP was also reduced across baseline HbA 1c and age subgroups. Greater reductions in HbA 1c were seen among the canagliflozin-treated patients with higher baseline HbA 1c and among younger versus older patients. These findings from clinical practice demonstrate real-world effectiveness of canagliflozin in lowering HbA 1c , body weight, and systolic BP among patients with T2DM, regardless of baseline HbA 1c levels or age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. HbA1c as a Predictor of Diabetes and as an Outcome in the Diabetes Prevention Program: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), a standard measure of chronic glycemia for managing diabetes, has been proposed to diagnose diabetes and identify people at risk. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) was a 3.2-year randomized clinical trial of preventing type 2 diabetes with a 10-year follow-up study, the DPP Outcomes Study (DPPOS). We evaluated baseline HbA1c as a predictor of diabetes and determined the effects of treatments on diabetes defined by an HbA1c ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We randomized 3,234 nondiabetic adults at high risk of diabetes to placebo, metformin, or intensive lifestyle intervention and followed them for the development of diabetes as diagnosed by fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-h postload glucose (2hPG) concentrations (1997 American Diabetes Association [ADA] criteria). HbA1c was measured but not used for study eligibility or outcomes. We now evaluate treatment effects in the 2,765 participants who did not have diabetes at baseline according to FPG, 2hPG, or HbA1c (2010 ADA criteria). RESULTS Baseline HbA1c predicted incident diabetes in all treatment groups. Diabetes incidence defined by HbA1c ≥6.5% was reduced by 44% by metformin and 49% by lifestyle during the DPP and by 38% by metformin and 29% by lifestyle throughout follow-up. Unlike the primary DPP and DPPOS findings based on glucose criteria, metformin and lifestyle were similarly effective in preventing diabetes defined by HbA1c. CONCLUSIONS HbA1c predicted incident diabetes. In contrast to the superiority of the lifestyle intervention on glucose-defined diabetes, metformin and lifestyle interventions had similar effects in preventing HbA1c-defined diabetes. The long-term implications for other health outcomes remain to be determined. PMID:25336746

  15. Should Studies of Diabetes Treatment Stratification Correct for Baseline HbA1c?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Angus G.; Lonergan, Mike; Henley, William E.; Pearson, Ewan R.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Shields, Beverley M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims Baseline HbA1c is a major predictor of response to glucose lowering therapy and therefore a potential confounder in studies aiming to identify other predictors. However, baseline adjustment may introduce error if the association between baseline HbA1c and response is substantially due to measurement error and regression to the mean. We aimed to determine whether studies of predictors of response should adjust for baseline HbA1c. Methods We assessed the relationship between baseline HbA1c and glycaemic response in 257 participants treated with GLP-1R agonists and assessed whether it reflected measurement error and regression to the mean using duplicate ‘pre-baseline’ HbA1c measurements not included in the response variable. In this cohort and an additional 2659 participants treated with sulfonylureas we assessed the relationship between covariates associated with baseline HbA1c and treatment response with and without baseline adjustment, and with a bias correction using pre-baseline HbA1c to adjust for the effects of error in baseline HbA1c. Results Baseline HbA1c was a major predictor of response (R2 = 0.19,β = -0.44,pHbA1c were associated with response, however these associations were weak or absent after adjustment for baseline HbA1c. Bias correction did not substantially alter associations. Conclusions Adjustment for the baseline HbA1c measurement is a simple and effective way to reduce bias in studies of predictors of response to glucose lowering therapy. PMID:27050911

  16. Dietary patterns associated with HbA1c and LDL cholesterol among individuals with type 1 diabetes in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaacks, Lindsay M.; Crandell, Jamie; Mendez, Michelle A.; Lamichhane, Archana P.; Liu, Wei; Ji, Linong; Du, Shufa; Rosamond, Wayne; Popkin, Barry M.; Mayer-Davis, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    Aims To identify dietary patterns that influence cardiometabolic risk among individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in China. Methods Data are from a cross-sectional study of T1D in China (n=99). Dietary intake was assessed using three 24-hour recalls. Reduced rank regression was used to identify dietary patterns from a set of 20 food groups that maximized the explained variation in glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Results Dietary pattern 1 was characterized by low intakes of wheat products and high-fat cakes, and high intakes of beans and pickled vegetables. Dietary pattern 2 was characterized by low intakes of high-fat cakes, nuts/seeds, fish/shellfish, and teas/coffee, and high intakes of rice and eggs. Participants in the highest tertile of dietary pattern 1 had significantly (pfor age and household income. Dietary pattern 2 was not associated with HbA1c or LDL cholesterol. Conclusions We identified a dietary pattern that is significantly related to HbA1c and LDL cholesterol. These findings provide support for behavioral strategies to prevent complications in individuals with T1D in China. PMID:25630525

  17. Structured education using Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) reduces long-term HbA1c and HbA1c variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, G S; Chen, J Y; Hopkinson, H; Sainsbury, C A R; Jones, G C

    2018-06-01

    Previous evidence has demonstrated that participation in the Dose Adjustment for Normal Eating (DAFNE) education programme can reduce HbA 1c and severe hypoglycaemia in people with Type 1 diabetes. In a number of studies, increased HbA 1c variability has been associated with higher diabetic morbidity and mortality. No studies have examined the impact of structured education on HbA 1c variability in Type 1 diabetes. People with Type 1 diabetes who had attended DAFNE were identified for inclusion from the Scottish Care Information-Diabetes dataset. HbA 1c median and variability, expressed as coefficient of variation (CV) before and after DAFNE was calculated. Some 1061 individuals participated in DAFNE education and 687 met the inclusion criteria. A significant median reduction in HbA 1c [-3.5 mmol/mol (-0.3%)] was seen at 12 months with a significant reduction [-1.5 mmol/mol (-0.1%)] still seen at 60 months of follow-up. HbA 1c variability as measured by CV was significantly lower during the post-DAFNE period: 0.08 (IQR 0.05-0.12) reduced to 0.07 (IQR 0.05-0.10); P = 0.002. The data confirm that DAFNE participation improves glycaemic control in Type 1 diabetes with benefits being sustained for 5 years. This study is the first to demonstrate reduced HbA 1c variability after completion of structured education. This is new evidence of the beneficial impact of DAFNE on glycaemic profile. © 2018 Diabetes UK.

  18. The Effect of Prolonged Glucosamine Usage on HbA1c Levels and New-Onset Diabetes Mellitus in Overweight and Obese Middle-Aged Women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Y.M.M. Gommans (Yvonne); J. Runhaar (Jos); M.L. Jacobs (Marloes); S.M. Bierma-Zeinstra (Sita)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstract__Objective:__ The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of a 2.5-year glucosamine sulfate intervention on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels and the incidence of new-onset diabetes mellitus over 6.5 years in middle-aged women with a body mass index ≥27 kg/m2.

  19. Pediatric diabetes consortium type 1 diabetes new onset (NeOn) study: Factors associated with HbA1c levels one year after diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    To identify determinants of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels 1 yr after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D) in participants in the Pediatric Diabetes Consortium (PDC) T1D New Onset (NeOn) Study. Diabetes-specific as well as socioeconomic factors during the first year following diagnosis were analyze...

  20. Relative contributions of preprandial and postprandial glucose exposures, glycemic variability, and non-glycemic factors to HbA in individuals with and without diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Færch, Kristine; Alssema, Marjan; Mela, David J

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: There is substantial interest in dietary approaches to reducing postprandial glucose (PPG) responses, but the quantitative contribution of PPG to longer-term glycemic control (reflected in glycated hemoglobin, HbA1c) in the general population is not known. This study quantif...

  1. Changing from glucose to HbA1c for diabetes diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Aneta Aleksandra; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Green, Anders

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In Denmark, the use of HbA1c in the diagnosis of diabetes was adopted from March 2012. We evaluated the change in the number of diabetes cases diagnosed by haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) versus fasting venous plasma glucose (FPG), and estimated the influence of analytical variation and bias ...

  2. High maternal HbA1c is associated with overweight in neonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Maria R.; Nielsen, Sigrid Bruun; Stage, E

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) not obtaining HbA1c within the normal range (= 5.6%) before delivery and to examine whether elevated HbA1c values are associated with an increased risk of large for gestational age (LGA) infa...

  3. Physical Activity Throughout Adolescence and Hba1c in Early Adulthood: Birth Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Priscila M; Mielke, Grégore I; Horta, Bernardo L; Assunção, Maria Cecília; Gonçalves, Helen; Menezes, Ana M B; Barros, Fernando C; Ekelund, Ulf; Brage, Soren; Wehrmeister, Fernando C; Oliveira, Isabel O; Hallal, Pedro C

    2017-05-01

    Physical inactivity is responsible for 7% of diabetes deaths worldwide, but little is known whether low levels of physical activity (PA) during adolescence increase the risk of diabetes in early adulthood. We evaluated the cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between PA throughout adolescence and HbA1c concentration in early adulthood. HbA1c was measured by high performance liquid chromatography. PA was assessed by self-report at the ages of 11, 15, and 18 years and by accelerometry at the ages of 13 (subsample) and 18 years. The loss percentages of follow up were 12.5% at 11 years, 14.4% at 15 years, and 18.7% at 18 years. At 18 years, boys showed higher HbA1c than girls. At age 18 years, accelerometrybased PA at 18 years was inversely related to HbA1c levels in boys. Self-reported leisure-time PA at ages 11, 15, and 18 were unrelated to HbA1c in both genders. PA at 13 years of age was unrelated to HbA1c among both genders. In trajectory analysis, PA and accelerometer PA trajectories were not associated with later HbA1c. Objectively measured PA at 18 years was cross-sectionally inversely associated with HbA1c in boys only. No prospective associations were identified.

  4. Application of Six Sigma Model to Evaluate the Analytical Quality of Four HbA1c Analyzers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maesa, Jos Eacute M; Fern Aacute Ndez-Riejos, Patricia; S Aacute Nchez-Mora, Catalina; Toro-Crespo, Mar Iacute A De; Gonz Aacute Lez-Rodriguez, Concepci Oacute N

    2017-01-01

    The Six Sigma Model is a global quality management system applicable to the determination of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). In addition, this model can ensure the three characteristics influencing the patient risk: the correct performance of the analytical method with low inaccuracy and bias, the quality control strategy used by the laboratory, and the necessary quality of the analyte. The aim of this study is to use the Six Sigma Model for evaluating quality criteria in the determination of glycated hemoglobin HbA1c and its application to assess four different HbA1c analyzers. Four HbA1c analyzers were evaluated: HA-8180V®, D-100®, G8®, and Variant II Turbo®. For 20 consecutive days, two levels of quality control (high and low) provided by the manufacturers were measured in each of the instruments. Imprecision (CV), bias, and Sigma values (σ) were calculated with the data obtained and a method decision chart was developed considering a range of quality requirements (allowable total error, TEa). For a TEa = 3%, HA-8180V = 1.54 σ, D-100 = 1.63 σ, G8 = 2.20 σ, and Variant II Turbo = -0.08 σ. For a TEa = 4%, HA-8180V = 2.34 σ, D-100 = 2.32 σ, G8 = 3.74 σ, and Variant II Turbo = 0.16 σ. For a TEa = 10%, HA8180V = 7.12 σ, D-100 = 6.46 σ, G8 = 13.0 σ, and Variant II Turbo = 1.56 σ. Applying the Stockholm consensus and its subsequent Milan review to the results: the maximum level in quality requirements for HbA1c is an allowable total error (TEa) = 3%, G8 is located in region 2 σ (2.20), which is a poor result, and HA-8180V and D-100 are both in region 1 σ (1.54 and 1.63, respectively), which is an unacceptable analytical performance.

  5. Effect of age on the diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c for diabetes in a Chinese middle-aged and elderly population: The Shanghai Changfeng Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wu

    Full Text Available Glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c ≥6.5% (or 48mmol/mol has been recommended as a new diagnostic criterion for diabetes; however, limited literature is available regarding the effect of age on the HbA1c for diagnosing diabetes and the causes for this age effect remain unknown. In this study, we investigated whether and why age affects the diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c for diabetes in a community-based Chinese population.In total, 4325 participants without previously known diabetes were enrolled in this study. Participants were stratified by age. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC was plotted for each age group and the area under the curve (AUC represented the diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c for diabetes defined by the plasma glucose criteria. The area under the ROC curve in each one-year age group was defined as AUCage. Multiple regression analyses were performed to identify factors inducing the association between age and AUCage based on the changes in the β and P values of age.The current threshold of HbA1c (≥6.5% or 48mmol/mol showed low sensitivity (35.6% and high specificity (98.9% in diagnosing diabetes. ROC curve analyses showed that the diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c in the ≥75 years age group was significantly lower than that in the 45-54 years age group (AUC: 0.755 vs. 0.878; P<0.001. Pearson correlation analysis showed that the AUCage of HbA1c was negatively correlated with age (r = -0.557, P = 0.001. When adjusting the red blood cell (RBC count in the multiple regression model, the negative association between age and AUCage disappeared, with the regression coefficient of age reversed to 0.001 and the P value increased to 0.856.The diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c for diabetes decreased with aging, and this age effect was induced by the decreasing RBC count with age. HbA1c is unsuitable for diagnosing diabetes in elderly individuals because of their physiologically decreased RBC count.

  6. A two-step screening, measurement of HbA1c in association with FPG, may be useful in predicting diabetes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Nomura

    Full Text Available BACKGROUNDS: We compared the usefulness of fasting plasma glucose (FPG, or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c, or both in predicting type 2 diabetes. METHODS: This retrospective cohort study investigated 9,322 Japanese adults (4,786 men and 4,536 women, aged 19-69 yrs, free of diabetes at baseline. Usefulness was assessed by predictive values (PV, sensitivity, specificity, and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC maximised under the best cut-off point. RESULTS: During the average 6 years of follow-up, 221 men (4.6% and 92 women (2% developed diabetes. The best cut-off points for FPG (i.e., 5.67 mmol/l for men and 5.5 mmol/l for women gave excellent AUROC, and the highest positive PV (13% for men and 9% for women in predicting diabetes. In high risk subjects with FPG 6.1-6.9 mmol/l, 119 men (26.8% and 39 women (28.3% developed diabetes. Under the best cut-off points of FPG 6.39 mmol/l and A1c 5.8, AUROC and positive PV for FPG slightly decreased indicating FPG became less useful and were statistically indistinguishable from those for HbA1c in men. In fact, HbA1c was the most useful in women: HbA1c of 6.0% gave the highest positive likelihood ratio of 2.74 and larger AUROC than did FPG. Although AUROC for HbA1c was acceptable and indistinguishable from that for the combined use, HbA1c had higher specificity and positive LR than did the combined use. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrated that FPG was the most useful to predict diabetes in the general population. However, in subjects with FPG 6.1-6.9 mmol/l, FPG became less useful and diagnostic performance of FPG was indistinguishable from that of HbA1c in men whereas HbA1c was the most useful in women. Thus, a two-step screening, measurement of HbA1c in association with FPG, may be useful in predicting diabetes.

  7. The efficacy of black cumin seed (Nigella sativa) oil and hypoglycemic drug combination to reduce HbA1c level in patients with metabolic syndrome risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachman, P. N. R.; Akrom; Darmawan, E.

    2017-11-01

    Metabolic syndrome is a conditions caused by metabolic abnormalities include central obesity, atherogenic dyslipidemia, hypertension, and insulin resistance. HbA1c examination is required to study the long-term glycemic status and to prevent diabetic complications of metabolic syndrome. The purpose of this study is to determine the efficacy of black cumin seed (Nigella sativa) oil and hypoglycemic drug combination to reduce HbA1c level in patients with metabolic syndrome risk. This research performed using an experimental randomized single - blind controlled trial design. A total of 99 outpatients at the Jetis I Public Health Center, Yogyakarta, Indonesia with metabolic syndrome risk were divided into three groups: The control group received placebo and two treatment groups received black seed oil orally at dose of 1.5 mL/day and 3 mL/day, respectively, for 20 days. The clinical conditions such as blood pressure, pulse rate, BMI, blood glucose serum and HbA1c levels were examined on day 0 and 21. The results obtained were analyzed with one-way ANOVA test. The mean of HbA1c levels of all groups before treatment was higher than the normal values and there was no significant difference in HbA1c value on day 0. Administration of 1.5 and 3 mL/day of black seed oil for 20 days decreased (padministration of black cumin seed oil and hypoglycemic drug combination for 20 days in patients at risk of metabolic syndrome may reduce to HbA1c levels.

  8. Predictors of HbA1c levels in patients initiating metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martono, Doti P; Hak, Eelko; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo; Wilffert, Bob; Denig, Petra

    2016-12-01

    The aim was to assess demographic and clinical factors as predictors of short (6 months) and long term (18 months) HbA1c levels in diabetes patients initiating metformin treatment. We conducted a cohort study including type 2 diabetes patients who received their first metformin prescription between 2007 and 2013 in the Groningen Initiative to Analyze Type 2 Diabetes Treatment (GIANTT) database. The primary outcome was HbA1c level at follow-up adjusted for baseline HbA1c; the secondary outcome was failing to achieve the target HbA1c level of 53 mmol/mol. Associations were analyzed by linear and logistic regression. Multiple imputation was used for missing data. Additional analyses stratified by dose and adherence level were conducted. The cohort included 6050 patients initiating metformin. Baseline HbA1c at target consistently predicted better HbA1c outcomes. Longer diabetes duration and lower total cholesterol level at baseline were predictors for higher HbA1c levels at 6 months. At 18 months, cholesterol level was not a predictor. Longer diabetes duration was also associated with not achieving the target HbA1c at follow-up. The association for longer diabetes duration was especially seen in patients starting on low dose treatment. No consistent associations were found for comorbidity and comedication. Diabetes duration was a relevant predictor of HbA1c levels after 6 and 18 months of follow-up in patients initiating metformin treatment. Given the study design, no causal inference can be made. Our study suggests that prompt treatment intensification may be needed in patients who have a longer diabetes duration at treatment initiation.

  9. Diagnostic accuracy of HbA1c in diabetes between Eastern and Western.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Shuang; Liu, Siying; Zhao, Yashuang; Zhang, Wencui; Sun, Xiaohui; Li, Jianing; Jiang, Fuli; Ju, Jiaming; Lang, Ning; Zhang, Yingqi; Zhou, Weiyu; Li, Qiang

    2013-07-01

    In 2010, the American Diabetes Association recommended the use of HbA1c as a diagnostic criterion for diabetes. However, HbA1c is not an accepted diagnostic tool for diabetes in Eastern Asia, because genetic differences compromise the standardization of the diagnostic cut-off point. This study evaluated differences in the use of HbA1c for diagnosing diabetes in Eastern and Western populations and investigated whether HbA1c cut-off point of ≥ 6.5% is diagnostic of diabetes in patients from Eastern Asia. Literature was obtained from MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane databases. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of each HbA1c cut-off point were extracted and compared between Western and Eastern populations. Differences in the cut-off point for diagnosing diabetes in each region were compared by examining differences in the area under summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves. Twelve publications from Eastern countries (n = 59,735) and 13 from Western countries (n = 22,954) were included in the analysis. Areas under SROC curves in the Eastern and Western groups were 0.9331 and 0.9120, respectively (P = 0.98). The cut-off point of the highest Youden index was 6.0%. At the HbA1c cut-off point of 6.5%, the pooled sensitivity and specificity were 58.7% and 98.4% for Eastern countries and 65.5% and 98.1% for Western countries, respectively. HbA1c exhibits the same diagnostic value for diabetes in Eastern and Western populations. In both populations, HbA1c levels > 6.0% identify the population at high risk of diabetes, and HbA1c > 6.5% is diagnostic of clinically established diabetes. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Association between blood glucose level derived using the oral glucose tolerance test and glycated hemoglobin level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Joo; Kim, Young Geon; Park, Jin Soo; Ahn, Young Hwan; Ha, Kyoung Hwa; Kim, Dae Jung

    2016-05-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is widely used as a marker of glycemic control. Translation of the HbA1c level to an average blood glucose level is useful because the latter figure is easily understood by patients. We studied the association between blood glucose levels revealed by the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and HbA1c levels in a Korean population. A total of 1,000 subjects aged 30 to 64 years from the Cardiovascular and Metabolic Diseases Etiology Research Center cohort were included. Fasting glucose levels, post-load glucose levels at 30, 60, and 120 minutes into the OGTT, and HbA1c levels were measured. Linear regression of HbA1c with mean blood glucose levels derived using the OGTT revealed a significant correlation between these measures (predicted mean glucose [mg/dL] = 49.4 × HbA1c [%] - 149.6; R (2) = 0.54, p Glucose (ADAG) study and Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) cohort. Discrepancies between our results and those of the ADAG study and DCCT cohort may be attributable to differences in the test methods used and the extent of insulin secretion. More studies are needed to evaluate the association between HbA1c and self monitoring blood glucose levels.

  11. Impact of HbA1c Testing at Point of Care on Diabetes Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Oliver; Crocker, J. Benjamin; Weng, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is a highly prevalent disease also implicated in the development of several other serious complications like cardiovascular or renal disease. HbA1c testing is a vital step for effective diabetes management, however, given the low compliance to testing frequency and, commonly, a subsequent delay in the corresponding treatment modification, HbA1c at the point of care (POC) offers an opportunity for improvement of diabetes care. In this review, based on data from 1999 to 2016, we summarize the evidence supporting a further implementation of HbA1c testing at POC, discuss its limitations and propose recommendations for further development. PMID:27898388

  12. Hemoglobin A1c Targets for Glycemic Control With Pharmacologic Therapy for Nonpregnant Adults With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Guidance Statement Update From the American College of Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaseem, Amir; Wilt, Timothy J; Kansagara, Devan; Horwitch, Carrie; Barry, Michael J; Forciea, Mary Ann

    2018-04-17

    The American College of Physicians developed this guidance statement to guide clinicians in selecting targets for pharmacologic treatment of type 2 diabetes. The National Guideline Clearinghouse and the Guidelines International Network library were searched (May 2017) for national guidelines, published in English, that addressed hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) targets for treating type 2 diabetes in nonpregnant outpatient adults. The authors identified guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence and the Institute for Clinical Systems Improvement. In addition, 4 commonly used guidelines were reviewed, from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Endocrinology, the American Diabetes Association, the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network, and the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Department of Defense. The AGREE II (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II) instrument was used to evaluate the guidelines. Clinicians should personalize goals for glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes on the basis of a discussion of benefits and harms of pharmacotherapy, patients' preferences, patients' general health and life expectancy, treatment burden, and costs of care. Clinicians should aim to achieve an HbA1c level between 7% and 8% in most patients with type 2 diabetes. Clinicians should consider deintensifying pharmacologic therapy in patients with type 2 diabetes who achieve HbA1c levels less than 6.5%. Clinicians should treat patients with type 2 diabetes to minimize symptoms related to hyperglycemia and avoid targeting an HbA1c level in patients with a life expectancy less than 10 years due to advanced age (80 years or older), residence in a nursing home, or chronic conditions (such as dementia, cancer, end-stage kidney disease, or severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or congestive heart failure) because the harms outweigh the benefits in this population.

  13. Do eating behaviors in the general population account for country variance in glycemic control among adolescents with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due, Pernille; de Beaufort, Carine; Damsgaard, Mogens Trab

    2013-01-01

    . The frequency of intake of fruit, vegetables, sweets, sugary soft drinks, and daily breakfast was compared between the two groups. The glycemic control of the adolescents in the HSG cohort was determined by measuring glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). RESULTS: Across countries in the HSBC survey...

  14. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c), diabetes and trajectories of change in episodic memory performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Colleen; Andel, Ross; Infurna, Frank J; Seetharaman, Shyam

    2017-02-01

    As the ageing population grows, it is important to identify strategies to moderate cognitive ageing. We examined glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and diabetes in relation to level and change in episodic memory in older adults with and without diabetes. Data from 4419 older adults with (n=950) and without (n=3469) diabetes participating in a nationally representative longitudinal panel study (the Health and Retirement Study) were examined. Average baseline age was 72.66 years and 58% were women. HbA1c was measured in 2006 and episodic memory was measured using immediate and delayed list recall over 4 biennial waves between 2006 and 2012. Growth curve models were used to assess trajectories of episodic memory change. In growth curve models adjusted for age, sex, education, race, depressive symptoms and waist circumference, higher HbA1c levels and having diabetes were associated with poorer baseline episodic memory (p=0.036 and HbA1c on episodic memory decline was smaller than the effect of age. The results were stronger for women than men and were not modified by age or race. When the main analyses were estimated for those with and without diabetes separately, HbA1c was significantly linked to change in episodic memory only among those with diabetes. Higher HbA1c and diabetes were both associated with declines in episodic memory, with this relationship further exacerbated by having diabetes and elevated HbA1c. HbA1c appeared more important for episodic memory performance among women than men. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. Comparing risk profiles of individuals diagnosed with diabetes by OGTT and HbA1c

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, R.; Vistisen, D.; Witte, D.R.

    2010-01-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) has been proposed as an alternative to the oral glucose tolerance test for diagnosing diabetes. We compared the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals identified by these two alternative methods.......Glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) has been proposed as an alternative to the oral glucose tolerance test for diagnosing diabetes. We compared the cardiovascular risk profile of individuals identified by these two alternative methods....

  16. Stability study for magnetic reagent assaying Hb and HbA1c

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin [Actherm Inc., Hsinchu 200, Taiwan (China); Chieh, J.J.; Yang, C.C. [Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Yang, S.Y. [Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); MagQu Co., Ltd., Sindian Dist., New Taipei City 231, Taiwan (China); Chen, Po-Yu; Huang, Yu-Hao [Actherm Inc., Hsinchu 200, Taiwan (China); Hong, Y.W. [Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China); Horng, H.E., E-mail: phyfv001@ntnu.edu.tw [Institute of Electro-optical Science and Technology, National Taiwan Normal University, Taipei 116, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-15

    Reagents for magnetically labeled immunoassay on human Hb and human HbA1c have been synthesized. The reagents consist of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic particles biofunctionalized with antibodies against Hb and HbA1c. It has been demonstrated that the reagents can be applied to quantitatively detect Hb and HbA1c by using immunomagnetic reduction assay. In addition to characterizing the assay properties, such as the standard curve and the low-detection limit, the stability of reagents is investigated. To do this, the temporal dependence of particle sizes and the bio-activity of reagents are monitored. The results show that the reagents are highly stable when stored at 2-8 Degree-Sign C. This means that the reagents synthesized in this work are promising for practical applications. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The properties of assaying Hb and HbA1c using immunomagnetic reduction are studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The magnetic nanoparticles with antibodies are highly stable in solutions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No significant mutual interference between Hb and HbA1c in assays is observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer High-sensitivity assays on Hb and HbA1c using immunomagnetic reduction are achieved.

  17. Stability study for magnetic reagent assaying Hb and HbA1c

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Wen-Pin; Chieh, J.J.; Yang, C.C.; Yang, S.Y.; Chen, Po-Yu; Huang, Yu-Hao; Hong, Y.W.; Horng, H.E.

    2013-01-01

    Reagents for magnetically labeled immunoassay on human Hb and human HbA1c have been synthesized. The reagents consist of Fe 3 O 4 magnetic particles biofunctionalized with antibodies against Hb and HbA1c. It has been demonstrated that the reagents can be applied to quantitatively detect Hb and HbA1c by using immunomagnetic reduction assay. In addition to characterizing the assay properties, such as the standard curve and the low-detection limit, the stability of reagents is investigated. To do this, the temporal dependence of particle sizes and the bio-activity of reagents are monitored. The results show that the reagents are highly stable when stored at 2–8 °C. This means that the reagents synthesized in this work are promising for practical applications. - Highlights: ► The properties of assaying Hb and HbA1c using immunomagnetic reduction are studied. ► The magnetic nanoparticles with antibodies are highly stable in solutions. ► No significant mutual interference between Hb and HbA1c in assays is observed. ► High-sensitivity assays on Hb and HbA1c using immunomagnetic reduction are achieved.

  18. Association of plasma PCB levels and HbA1c concentration in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhari, Sahar; Aminian, Omid; Moinfar, Zeinab; Schettgen, Thomas; Kaifie, Andrea; Felten, Michael; Kraus, Thomas; Esser, André

    2018-01-01

    The rapid increase in prevalence of diabetes mellitus over the last decades warrants more attention to the effects of environmental and occupational exposures on glucose metabolism. Our study aimed to assess the association between the plasma levels of various congeners of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and the serum concentration of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c). Our study population consisted of 140 Iranian adults from seven different occupational groups and a group of non-occupationally exposed female participants. The plasma concentration of PCBs were determined at the laboratory of occupational toxicology at RWTH Aachen University, Germany. We considered an HbA1c concentration of 5.7% and more as indicating a disturbed glucose metabolism. Logistic regression was used to assess the association between quartiles of concentrations of PCB congeners and serum HbA1c. Participants with an increased HbA1c value had higher plasma levels of PCB 138, 153, 180 and the PCB sum, although this association was statistically not significant. There was no significant difference between the levels of PCB 138, 153, 180, the sum of these congeners, and PCB 118 in their quartiles when comparing with HbA1c concentrations. For our cohort, we could not demonstrate a significant association between PCB and HbA1c concentrations indicating a disturbance of glucose metabolism.

  19. HbA1c for diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. Is there an optimal cut point to assess high risk of diabetes complications, and how well does the 6.5% cutoff perform?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowall B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bernd Kowall, Wolfgang Rathmann Institute of Biometrics and Epidemiology, German Diabetes Center, Leibniz Center for Diabetes Research at Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf, Germany Abstract: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c has recently been recommended for the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM by leading diabetes organizations and by the World Health Organization. The most important reason to define T2DM is to identify subjects with high risk of diabetes complications who may benefit from treatment. This review addresses two questions: 1 to assess from existing studies whether there is an optimal HbA1c threshold to predict diabetes complications and 2 to assess how well the recommended 6.5% cutoff of HbA1c predicts diabetes complications. HbA1c cutoffs derived from predominantly cross-sectional studies on retinopathy differ widely from 5.2%–7.8%, and among other reasons, this is due to the heterogeneity of statistical methods and differences in the definition of retinopathy. From the few studies on other microvascular complications, HbA1c thresholds could not be identified. HbA1c cutoffs make less sense for the prediction of cardiovascular events (CVEs because CVE risks depend on various strong risk factors (eg, hypertension, smoking; subjects with low HbA1c levels but high values of CVE risk factors were shown to be at higher CVE risk than subjects with high HbA1c levels and low values of CVE risk factors. However, the recommended 6.5% threshold distinguishes well between subjects with and subjects without retinopathy, and this distinction is particularly strong in severe retinopathy. Thus, in existing studies, the prevalence of any retinopathy was 2.5 to 4.5 times as high in persons with HbA1c-defined T2DM as in subjects with HbA1c <6.5%. To conclude, from existing studies, a consistent optimal HbA1c threshold for diabetes complications cannot be derived, and the recommended 6.5% threshold has mainly been brought about

  20. Associations of mid-pregnancy HbA1c with gestational diabetes and risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in high-risk Taiwanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yi-Ran; Wang, Panchalli; Lu, Mei-Chun; Tseng, Shih-Ting; Yang, Chun-Pai; Yan, Yuan-Horng

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the associations among the mid-pregnancy glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level, gestational diabetes (GDM), and risk of adverse pregnancy outcomes in women without overt diabetes and with positive 50-g, 1-h glucose challenge test (GCT) results (140 mg/dL or greater). This prospective study enrolled 1,989 pregnant Taiwanese women. A two-step approach, including a 50-g, 1-h GCT and 100-g, 3-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), was employed for the diagnosis of GDM at weeks 23-32. The mid-pregnancy HbA1c level was measured at the time the OGTT was performed. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to determine the relationship between the mid-pregnancy HbA1c level and GDM. Multiple logistic regression models were implemented to assess the relationships between the mid-pregnancy HbA1c level and adverse pregnancy outcomes. An ROC curve demonstrated that the optimal mid-pregnancy HbA1c cut-off point to predict GDM, as diagnosed by the Carpenter-Coustan criteria using a two-step approach, was 5.7%. The area under the ROC curve of the mid-pregnancy HbA1c level for GDM was 0.70. Compared with the levels of 4.5-4.9%, higher mid-pregnancy HbA1c levels (5.0-5.4, 5.5-5.9, 6.0-6.4, 6.5-6.9, and >7.0%) were significantly associated with increased risks of gestational hypertension or preeclampsia, preterm delivery, admission to the neonatal intensive care unit, low birth weight, and macrosomia (the odds ratio [OR] ranges were 1.20-9.98, 1.31-5.16, 0.88-3.15, 0.89-4.10, and 2.22-27.86, respectively). The mid-pregnancy HbA1c level was associated with various adverse pregnancy outcomes in high-risk Taiwanese women. However, it lacked adequate sensitivity and specificity to replace the two-step approach in the diagnosis of GDM. The current study comprised a single-center prospective study; thus, additional, randomized control design studies are required.

  1. Influencing Pathways to Quality of Life and HbA1c in Patients With Diabetes: A Longitudinal Study That Inform Evidence-Based Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hui-Chun; Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Wang, Ruey-Hsia

    2018-04-01

    Determining possible associated factors and the influencing pathways to hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) levels and quality of life (QoL) will facilitate the development of effective interventions to improve the physical and psychosocial health of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). To test a hypothesized model that addressed the pathways among personal characteristics, social support, diabetes distress, and self-care behaviors to HbA1C and QoL. A total of 382 adults with T2DM were recruited. Self-reported questionnaires and medical records were used to collect data regarding personal characteristics, diabetes distress, and social support at baseline. The self-care behaviors characters were collected 6 months later, as well as QoL and HbA1C levels 1 year later. The 12-month QoL directly affected 12-month HbA1C levels. The 6-month self-care behaviors directly affected 12-month QoL, and indirectly affected 12-month HbA1C levels through 12-month QoL. Baseline diabetes distress directly affected 12-month QoL. Moreover, baseline diabetes distress indirectly affected 12-month HbA1C levels through 12-month QoL. Baseline social support directly affected baseline diabetes distress and 6-month self-care behaviors. In addition, baseline social support indirectly affected 12-month QoL through baseline diabetes distress. Baseline social support also indirectly affected 12-month QoL through 6-month self-care behaviors. Enhancing QoL is important to improve HbA1C levels. Enhancing self-care behaviors is essential to improve subsequent HbA1C control and QoL. Reducing diabetes distress is crucial to improve subsequent QoL. Improving social support is suggested a favorable strategy to reduce diabetes distress and enhance subsequent self-care behaviors in patients with T2DM. © 2018 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  2. Effect of age on the diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c for diabetes in a Chinese middle-aged and elderly population: The Shanghai Changfeng Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Li; Lin, Huandong; Gao, Jian; Li, Xiaoming; Xia, Mingfeng; Wang, Dan; Aleteng, Qiqige; Ma, Hui; Pan, Baishen; Gao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) ≥6.5% (or 48mmol/mol) has been recommended as a new diagnostic criterion for diabetes; however, limited literature is available regarding the effect of age on the HbA1c for diagnosing diabetes and the causes for this age effect remain unknown. In this study, we investigated whether and why age affects the diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c for diabetes in a community-based Chinese population. In total, 4325 participants without previously known diabetes were enrolled in this study. Participants were stratified by age. Receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) was plotted for each age group and the area under the curve (AUC) represented the diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c for diabetes defined by the plasma glucose criteria. The area under the ROC curve in each one-year age group was defined as AUCage. Multiple regression analyses were performed to identify factors inducing the association between age and AUCage based on the changes in the β and P values of age. The current threshold of HbA1c (≥6.5% or 48mmol/mol) showed low sensitivity (35.6%) and high specificity (98.9%) in diagnosing diabetes. ROC curve analyses showed that the diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c in the ≥75 years age group was significantly lower than that in the 45-54 years age group (AUC: 0.755 vs. 0.878; PHbA1c was negatively correlated with age (r = -0.557, P = 0.001). When adjusting the red blood cell (RBC) count in the multiple regression model, the negative association between age and AUCage disappeared, with the regression coefficient of age reversed to 0.001 and the P value increased to 0.856. The diagnostic efficiency of HbA1c for diabetes decreased with aging, and this age effect was induced by the decreasing RBC count with age. HbA1c is unsuitable for diagnosing diabetes in elderly individuals because of their physiologically decreased RBC count.

  3. HbA1c for diagnosis and prognosis of gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Soon Sung; Kwon, Ja-Young; Park, Yong-Won; Kim, Young-Han; Lim, Jong-Baeck

    2015-10-01

    HbA1c is a widely used marker in diagnosing type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), but its clinical utility in diagnosing gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is not established. Here, we evaluated the clinical usefulness of HbA1c in diagnosing GDM and predicting the risk of future type 2 DM development among GDM patients. This retrospective, cross-sectional study included 321 subjects who underwent 100-g oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) during pregnancy. HbA1c and other variables were analyzed to evaluate their diagnostic performance for GDM. To evaluate the clinical usefulness of HbA1c in predicting future type 2 DM development, we classified GDM subjects who had more than 3 months of follow-up data into two subgroups: those who developed postpartum type 2 DM (PDM) and those who did not. HbA1c was significantly higher in the GDM group than in the normal control group. With the 100-g OGTT as reference, HbA1c showed 91.3% sensitivity and 62% specificity at a cut-off value of 5.05% (32 mmol/mol) for GDM diagnosis. At a cut-off value of 5.25% (34 mmol/mol), sensitivity was 73.6% and specificity was 77.2%. HbA1c levels during pregnancy were higher in those with PDM than in those without PDM (5.91 [41 mmol/mol] vs. 5.44% [36 mmol/mol], p<0.001). The prognostic value of HbA1c for PDM was evaluated by ROC curve analysis, with sensitivity of 78.6% and specificity of 72.5% at a cut-off value of 5.55% (37 mmol/mol). HbA1c showed high sensitivity with relatively low specificity for diagnosis of GDM in pregnant women and was a potential predictor of PDM. HbA1c may be able to be used as a simple and less invasive alternative screening test for OGTT in GDM patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. HbA1c Test as a Tool in the Diagnosis of Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Breitenbach Renz

    Full Text Available Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is a prevalent and potentially serious condition which may put both mothers and neonates at risk. The current recommendation for diagnosis is the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT. This study aimed to determine the usefulness of HbA1c test as a diagnostic tool for GDM as compared to the traditional criteria based on the OGTT.This was a diagnostic test accuracy study. We performed OGTT and HbA1c test in women attending prenatal visits at a tertiary hospital. GDM was defined according to WHO1999 or ADA/WHO 2013 criteria. ROC curve was used to evaluate the diagnostic performance of HbA1c. Sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios for different HbA1c cut-off points were calculated.Of the 262 women in the third trimester of gestation enrolled in the study, 86 (33% were diagnosed with GDM. Only five of these women presented HbA1c ≥48 mmol/mol (6.5%. This cut-off point presented 100% specificity but very low sensitivity (7%. Based on ROC curve, and considering OGTT as the reference criterion, HbA1c ≥40 mmol/mol (5.8% showed adequate specificity in diagnosing GDM (94.9% but low sensitivity (26.4%. Unlike, HbA1c values of 31 mmol/mol (5.0% presented adequate sensitivity (89.7% but low specificity (32.6% to detect GDM. For women with HbA1c ≥40 mmol/mol (5.8%, the positive and negative likelihood ratios were 5.14 (95%CI 2.49-10.63 and 0.78 (0.68-0.88, respectively. The post-test probability of GDM was about 40%, representing a 4.0-fold increase in the mean pre-test probability. This cut-off point could eliminate the need for the unpleasant and laborious OGTT tests in almost one third of cases, as 38% of patients with GDM may be diagnosable by HbA1c test alone.Our results show that combined HbA1c and OGTT measurements may be useful in diagnosing GDM.

  5. HbA1c levels as a function of emotional regulation and emotional intelligence in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccaro, Emil F; Drossos, Tina; Phillipson, Louis

    2016-10-01

    Understanding the role of emotion in glycemic control may be critical for the long-term treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this study we investigated the relationship between measures of emotional regulation and emotional intelligence and HbA1c levels in adult patients with T2 diabetes. 100 adult patients with T2 diabetes completed assessments of emotional regulation (i.e., affect intensity/lability) and emotional intelligence and were then correlated with HbA1c levels with several relevant covariates. HbA1c levels were significantly associated with affect intensity (AI: r=.24, p=.018) and with emotional intelligence (EI: r=-.29, p=.004), but not affect lability. These results were the same even after adding income, state depression scores, insulin-dependent status, serum cholesterol, diabetes literacy and self-care as covariates (AI: β=.33, p=.001; EI: β=-.31, p=.002). Diabetes self-care, but not diabetes literacy, was also associated with HbA1c levels (β=-.29, p=.003). These data suggest that aspects of emotional regulation and emotional intelligence play a role in glycemic control in adult patients with T2 diabetes and do so even in the context of several variables relevant to diabetes. If so, interventions that can reduce affect intensity and/or increase emotional intelligence may represent a new strategy in the glycemic control of adult patients with T2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. HbA1c as a predictor of diabetes after gestational diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claesson, Rickard; Ignell, Claes; Shaat, Nael; Berntorp, Kerstin

    2017-02-01

    We wanted to investigate third-trimester HbA1c as a predictor of diabetes after gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). Women with GDM were followed up prospectively for five years from pregnancy to detect the development of diabetes. The ability of HbA1c to predict diabetes was evaluated with receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves and logistic regression analysis. By five years, 73 of 196 women had been diagnosed with diabetes. An optimal cut-off point for HbA1c of 36mmol/mol (5.4%) could predict diabetes with 45% sensitivity and 92% specificity. For HbA1c ≥39mmol/mol (≥5.7%), sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value were 30%, 97%, and 91%, respectively. In logistic regression analysis, adjusting for the diagnostic glucose concentration during pregnancy, HbA1c levels in the upper quartile (≥36mmol/mol) were associated with a 5.5-fold increased risk of diabetes. Third-trimester HbA1c levels in the pre-diabetes range revealed women with post-partum diabetes with high specificity and high positive predictive value. HbA1c testing could be used as a strategy to select high-risk women for lifestyle interventions aimed at prevention of diabetes starting during pregnancy. The results should encourage further validation in other populations using new diagnostic criteria for GDM. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Role of HbA1c in predicting risk for congenital malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammouda, Sahar Ali Ibrahim; Hakeem, Rubina

    2015-12-01

    Association between conventionally identified hyperglycemias and rates of congenital abnormalities is known; however there is less information about role of HbA1c in determining gestational hyperglycemias and associated risks. This study tried to explore the association between HbA1c in women without known diabetes at first antenatal visit and risk of congenital malformations (CM) among Saudi women living at Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. Eleven hundred and eighty (1180), healthy, first-trimester pregnant Saudi females without known diabetes, were selected from various antenatal care clinics of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah city. General clinical and biochemical data was collected for this study by researchers at first visit and the time of delivery. Nearly one fifth (19.6%) of mothers had above normal HbA1c (>5.7) at first visit. Rates of CM had significant positive association with level of HbA1c. Rate of CM among those who had HbA1c in diabetes range, pre-diabetes range or normal range was 27.8%, 9.8% and 3.0%, respectively. The difference was significant between normal and pre-diabetes at the level P=0.000 and between pre-diabetes and diabetes at level P=0.038. In this study HbA1c is found to be a valuable predictor of risk of congenital malformations. This observation calls for further studies and establishment of policies for care of pregnant mothers having higher than normal HbA1c at first visit. Copyright © 2015 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Association between depression and glycemic control among type 2 diabetes patients in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispín-Trebejo, Brenda; Robles-Cuadros, María Cristina; Bernabé-Ortiz, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    There is limited and controversial information regarding the potential impact of depression on glycemic control. This study aims to evaluate the association between depression and poor glycemic control. In addition, the prevalence of depression and rates of poor glycemic control were determined. Cross-sectional study performed in the endocrinology unit of two hospitals of ESSALUD in Peru. The outcome of interest was poor glycemic control, evaluated by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c: diabetes patients. Our results suggest that early detection of depression might be important to facilitate appropriate glycemic control and avoid further metabolic complications. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  9. HBA1C CONTROL AND COST-EFFECTIVENESS IN PATIENTS WITH TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS INITIATED ON CANAGLIFLOZIN OR A GLUCAGON-LIKE PEPTIDE 1 RECEPTOR AGONIST IN A REAL-WORLD SETTING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wysham, Carol H; Pilon, Dominic; Ingham, Mike; Lafeuille, Marie-Hélène; Emond, Bruno; Kamstra, Rhiannon; Pfeifer, Michael; Lefebvre, Patrick

    2018-03-01

    To compare glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) control and medication costs between patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with canagliflozin 300 mg (CANA) or a glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor agonist (GLP-1 RA) in a real-world setting. Adults with T2DM newly initiated on CANA or a GLP-1 RA (index date) were identified from IQVIA ™ Real-World Data Electronic Medical Records U.S. database (March 29, 2012-April 30, 2016). Inverse probability of treatment weighting accounted for differences in baseline characteristics. HbA1c levels at 3-month intervals were compared using generalized estimating equations. Medication costs used wholesale acquisition costs. For both cohorts (CANA: n = 11,435; GLP-1 RA: n = 11,582), HbA1c levels decreased at 3 months postindex and remained lower through 30 months. Absolute changes in mean HbA1c from index to 3 months postindex for CANA and GLP-1 RA were -1.16% and -1.21% (patients with baseline HbA1c ≥7% [53 mmol/mol]); -1.54% and -1.51% (patients with baseline HbA1c ≥8% [64 mmol/mol]); and -2.13% and -1.99% (patients with baseline HbA1c ≥9% [75 mmol/mol]), respectively. Postindex, CANA patients with baseline HbA1c ≥7% had similar HbA1c levels at each interval versus GLP-1 RA patients, except 9 months (mean HbA1c, 7.75% [61 mmol/mol] vs. 7.86% [62 mmol/mol]; P = .0305). CANA patients with baseline HbA1c ≥8% and ≥9% had consistently lower HbA1c numerically versus GLP-1 RA patients and statistically lower HbA1c at 9 (baseline HbA1c ≥8% or ≥9%), 27, and 30 months (baseline HbA1c ≥9%). Continuous 12-month medication cost $3,326 less for CANA versus GLP-1 RA. This retrospective study demonstrated a similar evolution of HbA1c levels among CANA and GLP-1 RA patients in a real-world setting. Lower medication costs suggest CANA is economically dominant over GLP-1 RA (similar effectiveness, lower cost). AHA = antihyperglycemic agent BMI = body mass index CANA = canagliflozin 300 mg DCSI = diabetes complications severity

  10. Effects of α-Thalassemia on HbA1c Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Anping; Ji, Ling; Chen, Weidong; Xia, Yong; Zhou, Yu

    2016-11-01

    α-Thalassemia is a benign condition that is often present in patients with diabetes mellitus. Here, we evaluated the effects of different genotypes α-thalassemia on HbA 1c measurement. A total of 189 samples from nondiabetic patients were analyzed. HbA 1c analysis was performed by ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, boronate affinity HPLC, immunoassay, and capillary electrophoresis. Fasting glucose, fructosamin, and HbA 2 were also performed. All samples were confirmed by genotyping for thalassemia. In patients with two or three functional α-genes, HbA 1c values were not significantly different from those of controls (P > 0.05); however, in individuals with α-thalassemia with one functional α-gene (i.e., HbH disease), HbA 1c levels were significantly different from those of controls (P 0.05). In this study, HbA 1c values in samples from individuals with two or three functional α-genes basically reflected the normal mean blood glucose level, while those in samples from individuals with one functional α-gene did not. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Hb Nouakchott [α114(GH2)Pro→Leu; HBA1: c.344C>T], A Second and Third Case Described in Two Unrelated Dutch Families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pondman, Kirsten M.; Brinkman, Jacoline W.; van der Straaten, Hanneke M.; Stroobants, An K.; Harteveld, Cornelis L.

    2018-01-01

    We report two families, members of which are carriers of a hemoglobin (Hb) variant previously described as Hb Nouakchott [α114(GH2)Pro→Leu; HBA1: c.344C>T; p.Pro115Leu]. In the first family of Dutch origin, the proband, a 32-year-old male and his 65-year-old father, were both carriers of Hb

  12. Impact of Disease Management Programs on HbA1c Values in Type 2 Diabetes Patients in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostev, Karel; Rockel, Timo; Jacob, Louis

    2017-01-01

    The aim was to analyze the impact of disease management programs on HbA1c values in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients in Germany. This study included 9017 patients followed in disease management programs (DMPs) who started an antihyperglycemic treatment upon inclusion in a DMP. Standard care (SC) patients were included after individual matching (1:1) to DMP cases based on age, gender, physician (diabetologist versus nondiabetologist care), HbA1c values at baseline, and index year. The main outcome was the share of patients with HbA1c HbA1c level as a dependent variable and the potential predictor (DMP versus SC). The mean age was 64.3 years and 54.7% of the patients were men. The mean HbA1c level at baseline was equal to 8.7%. In diabetologist practices, 64.7% of DMP patients and 55.1% of SC patients had HbA1c levels HbA1c levels HbA1c levels HbA1c levels HbA1c levels lower than 7.5% or 6.5% after 6 months of therapy in both diabetologist and general care practices. The present study indicates that the enrollment of T2DM patients in DMPs has a positive impact on HbA1c values in Germany.

  13. Safety and Efficacy of D-Tagatose in Glycemic Control in Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensor, Mark; Banfield, Amy B; Smith, Rebecca R; Williams, Jarrod; Lodder, Robert A

    The primary objectives of this study were to evaluate the treatment effect of D-tagatose on glycemic control, determined by a statistically significant decrease in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), and safety profile of D-tagatose compared to placebo. The secondary objectives were to evaluate the treatment effects on fasting blood glucose, insulin, lipid profiles, changes in BMI, and the proportion of subjects achieving HbA1c targets of tagatose dissolved in 125-250 ml of water three times a day or placebo with meals. Reduction in HbA1c was statistically significant compared to placebo at all post-baseline time points in the ITT population. Additionally, secondary endpoints were achieved in the ITT population with regard to LDL, total cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, and proportion of subjects achieving HbA1c targets of tagatose was unable to lower triglycerides or raise HDL compared to placebo. A subgroup LOCF analysis on the ITT US population showed a greater and statistically significant LS mean reduction in HbA1c in the D-tagatose group at all post-baseline visits. Based on these results it is concluded that in the ITT population D-tagatose is an effective single agent at treating many of the therapy targets of type 2 diabetes including lowering fasting blood glucose and HbA1c, and lowering of LDL and total cholesterol.

  14. KADAR HbA1c DAN RASIO LIPID PADA WANITA DEWASA DENGAN OBESITAS SENTRAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Sudaryanto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Central obesity was accumulation of fat in the abdominal region. Many studies showed correlations between central obesity and cardiovascular diseases, e.g. diabetes and dyslipidemia.  This study was conducted to know the difference between HbA1c and lipid profil between the women with and without central obesity. This study was an analytic observational study with cross-sectional design. Subjects of 52 respondents were healthy adult women staff in campus I, II, III Sanata Dharma University in Yogyakarta and selected using purposive sampling technique. The data of waist circumference, pelvic/hip circumference, HbA1c and lipid profile were collected among the subjects and analyzed with computer with 95% confidence interval. The results of this study showed HbA1c levels and lipid profile were different between the women with and without central obesity, although the difference was not statistically significant.

  15. The prevalence of congenital malformations is still higher in pregnant women with pregestational diabetes despite near-normal HbA1c: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksen, Nina Bonne; Damm, Peter; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Ringholm, Lene

    2017-11-27

    We assessed the association between congenital malformations and maternal hyperglycemia in pregnant women with pregestational (type 1 or type 2) diabetes and investigated if the rate of congenital malformations was similar in women with near-normal glycemic control compared to the background population. We also assessed the association between congenital malformations and maternal hyperglycemia in pregnant women with pregestational diabetes with special focus on women with near-normal HbA1c in early pregnancy. This is a literature review based on an electronic literature search of the databases PubMed, Cochrane, Embase and Web of Science conducted in July 2017 using the search terms diabetes, pregnancy, HbA1c or glycemic control and congenital anomaly or congenital anomaly. We included original papers in English published after 1997 with data on congenital malformations and HbA1c in at least 250 women with pregestational diabetes. Nine papers with in total 6225 women with type 1 diabetes and 2334 women with type 2 diabetes were included. The prevalence of congenital malformations was 6.4% in women with type 1 diabetes and 4.3% in women with type 2 diabetes and for the combined group of women with pregestational diabetes, the relative risk compared to the background population was 3.2. In women with HbA1c congenital malformations was 4.3 and 3.7%, respectively, with a relative risk of 2.2 and 1.9, respectively. In pregnant women with pregestational diabetes the prevalence of congenital abnormalities was threefold higher in women with pregestational diabetes compared to the background population. However, HbA1c below 53 mmol/mol (7.0%) in early pregnancy was also associated with a two times increased risk of congenital malformations compared to the background population.

  16. HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose and the prediction of diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soulimane, Soraya; Simon, Dominique; Shaw, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    With diabetes defined by HbA1c≥6.5% and/or FPG≥7.0mmol/l and/or diabetes treatment, we investigated HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) thresholds/change-points above which the incidence of diabetes increases.......With diabetes defined by HbA1c≥6.5% and/or FPG≥7.0mmol/l and/or diabetes treatment, we investigated HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) thresholds/change-points above which the incidence of diabetes increases....

  17. Entsymaattisen Abbott Architect c8000 HbA1c -menetelmän validointi

    OpenAIRE

    Karjalainen, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Opinnäytetyö suoritettiin THL:n Tautiriskiyksikön analyyttisen biokemian laboratoriossa (TLAB). Työssä validoitiin uusi entsymaattinen Abbott Architect c8000 HbA1c -menetelmä, jota käytetään diabetekseen liittyvissä tutkimuksissa. Validoinnilla haluttiin varmistaa uuden mittaustekniikaltaan erilaisen menetelmän toimivuus. Menetelmävertailussa komparatiivisena menetelmänä oli laboratoriossa rutiinikäytössä ollut Abbottin immunoturbidimetrinen HbA1c-menetelmä. Uusi entsymaattinen menetelmä peru...

  18. Predictive ability of visit-to-visit variability in HbA1c and systolic blood pressure for the development of microalbuminuria and retinopathy in people with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takao, Toshiko; Suka, Machi; Yanagisawa, Hiroyuki; Matsuyama, Yutaka; Iwamoto, Yasuhiko

    2017-06-01

    We explored whether visit-to-visit variability in both glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) simultaneously predicted the development of microalbuminuria and retinopathy, and whether the predictive ability of these measurements changed according to mean HbA1c and SBP levels in people with type 2 diabetes. A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted on 243 type 2 diabetes patients with normoalbuminuria and 486 without retinopathy at the first visit and within 1year thereafter. The two cohorts were followed up from 1995 until 2012. Multivariate and stratified analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazard models. Microalbuminuria developed in 84 patients and retinopathy in 108. Hazard ratios (HRs) for the development of microalbuminuria associated with the coefficient of variation (CV) and variation independent of mean (VIM) of both HbA1c and SBP significantly increased. In participants with a mean SBP HbA1c were abruptly elevated and significant compared with those with a mean SBP ≥130mmHg. Visit-to-visit variability in both HbA1c and SBP simultaneously predict the development of microalbuminuria. HbA1c variability may predict the development of retinopathy when the mean SBP is normal (<130mmHg). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. An alternative approach to modelling HbA1c trajectories in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Phil; Bennett, Hayley; Qin, Lei; Bergenheim, Klas; Gordon, Jason; Evans, Marc

    2017-05-01

    Time-dependent HbA1c trajectories in health economic models of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are typically informed by the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS). However, this approach may not accurately predict HbA1c progression in patients who do not conform to the demographic profile of the original UKPDS cohort. This study aimed to develop an alternative mathematical model (MM) to simulate HbA1c progression in T2DM. A systematic literature review identified studies, published between 2005 and 2015, that reported HbA1c in adult T2DM patients over a minimum duration of 18 months. Pooled data from eligible studies were used to develop an alternative MM equation for HbA1c progression, which was then contrasted with the UKPDS 68 progression equation in illustrative scenarios. A total of 68 studies were eligible for data extraction (mean follow-up time 4.1 years). HbA1c progression was highly heterogeneous across studies, varying with baseline HbA1c, treatment group and patient age. The MM equation was fitted with parameters for mean baseline HbA1c (8.3%), initial change in HbA1c (-0.62%) and upper quartile of maximum observed HbA1c (9.3%). Differences in HbA1c trajectories between the MM and UKPDS approaches altered the timing of therapy escalation in illustrative scenarios. The MM represents an alternative approach to simulate HbA1c trajectories in T2DM models, as UKPDS data may not adequately reflect the heterogeneity of HbA1c profiles observed in clinical studies. However, the choice of approach should ultimately be determined by the characteristics of individual patients under consideration and the clinical face validity of the modelled trajectories. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Association Between Neighborhood Supermarket Presence and Glycated Hemoglobin Levels Among Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y Tara; Mujahid, Mahasin S; Laraia, Barbara A; Warton, E Margaret; Blanchard, Samuel D; Moffet, Howard H; Downing, Janelle; Karter, Andrew J

    2017-06-15

    We estimated associations between neighborhood supermarket gain or loss and glycemic control (assessed by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values) in patients from the Kaiser Permanente Northern California Diabetes Registry (n = 434,806 person-years; 2007-2010). Annual clinical measures were linked to metrics from a geographic information system for each patient's address of longest residence. We estimated the association between change in supermarket presence (gain, loss, or no change) and change in HbA1c value, adjusting for individual- and area-level attributes and according to baseline glycemic control (near normal, Supermarket loss was associated with worse HbA1c trajectories for those with good, moderate, and poor glycemic control at baseline, while supermarket gain was associated with marginally better HbA1c outcomes only among patients with near normal HbA1c values at baseline. Patients with the poorest baseline HbA1c values (≥9.0%) had the worst associated changes in glycemic control following either supermarket loss or gain. Differences were not clinically meaningful relative to no change in supermarket presence. For patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, gaining neighborhood supermarket presence did not benefit glycemic control in a substantive way. The significance of supermarket changes on health depends on a complex interaction of resident, neighborhood, and store characteristics. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Predictors of HbA1c levels in patients initiating metformin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martono, Doti P; Hak, Eelko; Lambers Heerspink, Hiddo; Wilffert, Bob; Denig, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to assess demographic and clinical factors as predictors of short (6 months) and long term (18 months) HbA1c levels in diabetes patients initiating metformin treatment. Research design and methods: We conducted a cohort study including type 2 diabetes patients who received

  2. (HbA1c) levels with Iinsulin resistance in obese children.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: We investigated the relationship between insulin resistance reflected by homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR) index and serum HbA1c levels of obese children. Material and Methods: This study included 70 obese and 60 normal weight healthy children between the ages of 3 and 15. Anthropometric ...

  3. Glycated Hemoglobin Levels in Patients with Decompensated Cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Nadelson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Aim of this study is to determine if HbA1c levels are a reliable predictor of glycemic control in patients with decompensated cirrhosis. Methods. 200 unique patients referred for liver transplantation at University of Tennessee/Methodist University Transplant Institute with a HbA1c result were included. Three glucose levels prior to the “measured” A1c (MA1c were input into an HbA1c calculator from the American Diabetes Association website to determine the “calculated” A1c (CA1c. The differences between MA1c and CA1c levels were computed. Patients were divided into three groups: group A, difference of 1.5. Results. 97 (49% patients had hemoglobin A1c of less than 5%. Discordance between calculated and measured HbA1c of >0.5% was seen in 47% (n=94. Higher level of discordance of greater than >1.5 was in 12% of patients (n=24. Hemoglobin was an independent predictor for higher discordance (odds ratio 0.77 95%, CI 0.60–0.99, and p value 0.04. HbA1c was an independent predictor of occurrence of HCC (OR 2.69 955, CI 1.38–5.43, and p value 0.008. Conclusion. HbA1c is not a reliable predictor of glycemic control in patients with decompensated cirrhosis, especially in those with severe anemia.

  4. Empirically establishing blood glucose targets to achieve HbA1c goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nancy; Zheng, Hui; Nathan, David M

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the average fasting, postprandial, and bedtime self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) concentrations associated with specified HbA1c levels using data from the A1c-Derived Average Glucose (ADAG) study. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The ADAG study was a multicenter observational study that used continuous glucose monitoring and SMBG testing to determine the relationship between mean average glucose and HbA1c. We used the SMBG data from 470 of the ADAG study participants (237 with type 1 diabetes and 147 with type 2 diabetes) to determine the average fasting, premeal, 90-min postmeal, and bedtime blood glucose (BG) for predefined target HbA1c groups between 5.5 and 8.5% (37-69 mmol/mol). t Tests were used to compare mean BG values between type 1 and type 2 diabetes groups. RESULTS The average fasting BG needed to achieve predefined HbA1c target levels of 5.5-6.49% (37-47 mmol/mol), 6.5-6.99% (48-52 mmol/mol), 7.0-7.49% (52-58 mmol/mol), 7.5-7.99% (58-64 mmol/mol), and 8.0-8.5% (64-69 mmol/mol) were 122 mg/dL with 95% CI 117-127, 142 mg/dL (135-150), 152 mg/dL (143-162), 167 mg/dL (157-177), and 178 mg/dL (164-192), respectively. Postmeal BG to achieve the HbA1c level of 6.5-6.99% (48-52 mmol/mol) and 7.0-7.49% (52-58 mmol/mol) were 139 mg/dL (134-144) and 152 mg/dL (147-157), respectively. Bedtime BG was 153 mg/dL (145-161) and 177 mg/dL (166-188), respectively. CONCLUSIONS We have determined the average BG at premeal, postmeal, and bedtime to achieve a variety of HbA1c targets. These results, based on empirical data, will help patients and providers set realistic day-to-day SMBG targets to achieve individualized HbA1c goals.

  5. Effect of once-weekly dulaglutide on glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and fasting blood glucose in patient subpopulations by gender, duration of diabetes and baseline HbA1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallwitz, Baptist; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Thieu, Vivian; Garcia-Perez, Luis-Emilio; Pavo, Imre; Yu, Maria; Robertson, Kenneth E; Zhang, Nan; Giorgino, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and safety of dulaglutide 1.5 and 0.75 mg in patients with type 2 diabetes by subgroups of gender, duration of diabetes and baseline glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in the dulaglutide clinical development programme (AWARD-1 to -6 and -8 clinical trials). Change in HbA1c was analysed by gender, duration of diabetes (baseline HbA1c (baseline in weight, hypoglycaemia and gastrointestinal adverse events were evaluated for individual trials. In the pooled analysis of patients treated with dulaglutide 1.5 mg at 6 months, the reductions in HbA1c from baseline were similar across gender (men: least squares [LS] mean -1.26% [95% confidence interval {CI} -1.36, -1.16]; women: LS mean -1.33% [95% CI -1.43, -1.24]) and among duration of diabetes subgroups (baseline HbA1c ≥8.5% had greater HbA1c reductions than patients with baseline HbA1c baseline HbA1c subgroups, respectively; women had a numerically greater weight loss or less weight gain than men with both dulaglutide doses. There was no clinically meaningful difference in hypoglycaemia trends by gender or duration of diabetes. Hypoglycaemia incidence and rate were generally lower in patients with baseline HbA1c ≥8.5% than in those with baseline HbA1c, with greater HbA1c and FBG reductions in patients with a higher baseline HbA1c. Dulaglutide was well tolerated, with a safety profile similar to other glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Chromium supplements for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes: limited evidence of effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Johanna T.; Bailey, Regan L.

    2016-01-01

    Some adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) believe that chromium-containing supplements will help control their disease, but the evidence is mixed. This narrative review examines the efficacy of chromium supplements for improving glycemic control as measured by decreases in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Using systematic search criteria, 20 randomized controlled trials of chromium supplementation in T2DM patients were identified. Clinically meaningful treatment goals were defined as an FPG of ≤7.2 mmol/dL, a decline in HbA1c to ≤7%, or a decrease of ≥0.5% in HbA1c. In only a few randomized controlled trials did FPG (5 of 20), HbA1c (3 of 14), or both (1 of 14) reach the treatment goals with chromium supplementation. HbA1c declined by ≥0.5% in 5 of 14 studies. On the basis of the low strength of existing evidence, chromium supplements have limited effectiveness, and there is little rationale to recommend their use for glycemic control in patients with existing T2DM. Future meta-analyses should include only high-quality studies with similar forms of chromium and comparable inclusion/exclusion criteria to provide scientifically sound recommendations for clinicians. PMID:27261273

  7. Serum Trace Elements and Electrolytes Are Associated with Fasting Plasma Glucose and HbA1c in Postmenopausal Women with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalnaya, Margarita G; Skalny, Anatoly V; Yurasov, Vasily V; Demidov, Vasily A; Grabeklis, Andrei R; Radysh, Ivan V; Tinkov, Alexey A

    2017-05-01

    The primary aim of the research was to assess the level of trace elements and electrolytes in serum of postmenopausal diabetic women. Sixty-four postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2) and 64 age- and body mass index-matched controls were examined. Serum trace elements were assessed using inductively coupled plasma dynamic reaction cell mass spectrometry (ICP-DRC-MS). Fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ) levels were evaluated using Randox kits. The obtained data demonstrate that DM2 patients were characterized by 42 and 34 % higher FPG and HbA 1c levels, respectively (p women was increased by 10 and 15 % in comparison to the respective control values (p = 0.002 and DM2 pathogenesis. Further studies are required to assess the intimate mechanisms of the observed differences.

  8. Impact of common genetic determinants of Hemoglobin A1c on type 2 diabetes risk and diagnosis in ancestrally diverse populations: A transethnic genome-wide meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eleanor Wheeler

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c is used to diagnose type 2 diabetes (T2D and assess glycemic control in patients with diabetes. Previous genome-wide association studies (GWAS have identified 18 HbA1c-associated genetic variants. These variants proved to be classifiable by their likely biological action as erythrocytic (also associated with erythrocyte traits or glycemic (associated with other glucose-related traits. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that, in a very large scale GWAS, we would identify more genetic variants associated with HbA1c and that HbA1c variants implicated in erythrocytic biology would affect the diagnostic accuracy of HbA1c. We therefore expanded the number of HbA1c-associated loci and tested the effect of genetic risk-scores comprised of erythrocytic or glycemic variants on incident diabetes prediction and on prevalent diabetes screening performance. Throughout this multiancestry study, we kept a focus on interancestry differences in HbA1c genetics performance that might influence race-ancestry differences in health outcomes.Using genome-wide association meta-analyses in up to 159,940 individuals from 82 cohorts of European, African, East Asian, and South Asian ancestry, we identified 60 common genetic variants associated with HbA1c. We classified variants as implicated in glycemic, erythrocytic, or unclassified biology and tested whether additive genetic scores of erythrocytic variants (GS-E or glycemic variants (GS-G were associated with higher T2D incidence in multiethnic longitudinal cohorts (N = 33,241. Nineteen glycemic and 22 erythrocytic variants were associated with HbA1c at genome-wide significance. GS-G was associated with higher T2D risk (incidence OR = 1.05, 95% CI 1.04-1.06, per HbA1c-raising allele, p = 3 × 10-29; whereas GS-E was not (OR = 1.00, 95% CI 0.99-1.01, p = 0.60. In Europeans and Asians, erythrocytic variants in aggregate had only modest effects on the diagnostic accuracy of HbA1c. Yet, in

  9. Red cell distribution width is associated with hemoglobin A1C elevation, but not glucose elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xue; Wan, Min; Gu, Yeqing; Song, Yanqi; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Li; Meng, Ge; Wu, Hongmei; Xia, Yang; Shi, HongBin; Su, Qian; Fang, Liyun; Yang, Huijun; Yu, Fei; Sun, Shaomei; Wang, Xing; Zhou, Ming; Jia, Qiyu; Song, Kun; Wang, Guolin; Yu, Ming; Niu, Kaijun

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the association between red cell distribution width (RDW) and elevation of glucose/glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). An analysis was conducted using data from a prospective cohort study of adults. People without prediabetes or diabetes (n=7,795) were followed for a mean of 2.90years (range: 1-7years, 95% confidence interval: 2.86-2.94years). Glucose elevation is defined as fasting glucose levels exceeding 5.6mmol/l, or 2-hour glucose values in the oral glucose tolerance test exceeding 7.8mmol/l. HbA1c elevation is defined as a HbA1c value exceeding a normal limit of 39mmol/mol (5.7%). Adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to assess the association between RDW quartiles and elevation of HbA1c/glucose. The multiple-adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of HbA1c elevation for increased quartiles of RDW were 1.00 (reference), 1.08 (0.89, 1.30), 1.28 (1.07, 1.54), and 1.54 (1.29, 1.85) (P for trend<0.0001). However, no significant association was observed between RDW and blood glucose (fasting and postprandial). Elevated RDW is independently related to future HbA1c elevation, but not to glucose elevation. This suggests that RDW may associate with HbA1c through a non-glycemic way, which should be taken into consideration when using HbA1c as a diagnostic criterion of prediabetes or diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Association of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels with Iinsulin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Material and Methods: This study included 70 obese and 60 normal weight healthy children between the ages of 3 and 15. ... Plasma glucose levels were measured by the glucose oxidase method. Plasma ... resistance, a condition that can cause diabetes mellitus ... resistance was estimated by using the homeostasis.

  11. Use of HbA1c for Diagnoses of Diabetes and Prediabetes: Comparison with Diagnoses Based on Fasting and 2-Hr Glucose Values and Effects of Gender, Race, and Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moellering, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) has been advocated for the diagnosis of diabetes and prediabetes. Its performance has been commonly assessed in corroboration with elevated fasting plasma glucose (FPG), but not the combination of FPG and 2-hr glucose values. This study assesses receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves of HbA1c pertaining to the diagnoses of prediabetes and diabetes by FPG and/or 2-hr glucose, and the effects of age, gender, and race. Methods: We assessed the utility of HbA1c for diagnosing diabetes and prediabetes among 5395 adults without known diabetes from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2005–2010. Results: Current cutoffs of HbA1c for diabetes (6.5%) or prediabetes (5.7%) exhibited low sensitivity (0.249 and 0.354, respectively) and high specificity in identifying patients diagnosed using both FPG and 2-hr glucose, resulting in large false-negative rates (75.1% and 64.9%). Misdiagnosis rates increased with age and in non-Hispanic whites and Mexican Americans. When HbA1c was combined with FPG for diagnoses, the false-negative rate remained high for diabetes (45.7%), but was reduced for prediabetes (9.2%). Conclusions: When assessed against diagnoses using both FPG and 2-hr glucose, HbA1c had low sensitivity and high specificity for identifying diabetes and prediabetes, which varied as a function of age and race. Regarding recently released American Diabetes Association (ADA) and joint European guidelines, it is important to consider that HbA1c values below 6.5% and 5.7% do not reliably exclude the presence of diabetes and prediabetes, respectively. Overall, the data argue for greater use of oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTTs) and both FPG and 2-hr glucose values for diagnosis of diabetes and prediabetes. PMID:24512556

  12. Exposure to Household Air Pollution from Biomass-Burning Cookstoves and HbA1c and Diabetic Status among Honduran Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Sarah; Clark, Maggie L; Young, Bonnie N; Benka-Coker, Megan L; Bachand, Annette M; Brook, Robert D; Nelson, Tracy L; Volckens, John; Reynolds, Stephen J; L'Orange, Christian; Good, Nicholas; Koehler, Kirsten; Africano, Sebastian; Osorto Pinel, Anibal B; Peel, Jennifer L

    2018-06-13

    Household air pollution from biomass cookstoves is estimated to be responsible for more than two and a half million premature deaths annually, primarily in low and middle-income countries where cardiometabolic disorders, such as Type II Diabetes, are increasing. Growing evidence supports a link between ambient air pollution and diabetes, but evidence for household air pollution is limited. This cross-sectional study of 142 women (72 with traditional stoves and 70 with cleaner-burning Justa stoves) in rural Honduras evaluated the association of exposure to household air pollution (stove type, 24-hour average kitchen and personal fine particulate matter [PM 2.5 ] mass and black carbon) with glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and diabetic status based on HbA1c levels. The prevalence ratio [PR] per interquartile range increase in pollution concentration indicated higher prevalence of prediabetes/diabetes (versus normal HbA1c) for all pollutant measures (e.g., PR per 84 μg/m 3 increase in personal PM 2.5 , 1.49; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.11 - 2.01). Results for HbA1c as a continuous variable were generally in the hypothesized direction. These results provide some evidence linking household air pollution with the prevalence of prediabetes/diabetes, and, if confirmed, suggest that the global public health impact of household air pollution may be broader than currently estimated. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparison of Serum Zinc Level in Patients with Diabetes Type 1 and 2 and Its' Relation to HbA1c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Dorreh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a major health care problem. The relationship between DM and zinc has frequently been reported in various research. The present study aims to investigate serum zinc level in patients with type 1 (IDDM and type 2 (NIDDM. Association between glyaceted hemoglobin and level of zinc is also evaluted. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 60 subjects with DM (Type l: N=30; Type 2: N=30 who met inclusion criteria of the study. Patients’ serum zinc level and HbA1c were measured. Data were analyzed using t-test and Mann-Withney U test. Results: Seventy five percent of the subjects were female. The average age of the IDDM was 15.36±5.28 years and that of NIDDM was 48.70±11.45 years. The average HbA1c of subjects was 8.06±1.64%. The average serum level of zinc in IDDM group was 95.82±14.51 μg/dl and that of NIDDM was 97.47±32.36 μg/dl, no significant difference was found between the two groups. Serum zinc difficiency was detected in 20% of the patients with NIDDM and 16.6% of the patients with IDDM. However, no significant correlation between HbA1c and serum level of zinc was detected in this study. Conclusion: Zinc deficiency was detected among a significant percentage of IDDM and NIDDM patients, but no significant correlation between serum zinc level and HbA1c was detected.

  14. Targeted quantification of N-1-(carboxymethyl) valine and N-1-(carboxyethyl) valine peptides of ?-hemoglobin for better diagnostics in diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G.; Batkulwar, Kedar B.; Meshram, Nishita N.; Tiwari, Shalbha; Korwar, Arvind M.; Unnikrishnan, Ambika G.; Kulkarni, Mahesh J.

    2016-01-01

    Background N-1-(Deoxyfructosyl) valine (DFV) ?-hemoglobin (?-Hb), commonly referred as HbA1c, is widely used diagnostic marker in diabetes, believed to provide glycemic status of preceding 90?120?days. However, the turnover of hemoglobin is about 120?days, the DFV-?-Hb, an early and reversible glycation product eventually may undergo irreversible advanced glycation modifications such as carboxymethylation or carboxyethylation. Hence quantification of N-1-(carboxymethyl) valine (CMV) and N-1-(...

  15. The relationship between breakfast skipping, chronotype, and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutrakul, Sirimon; Hood, Megan M; Crowley, Stephanie J; Morgan, Mary K; Teodori, Marsha; Knutson, Kristen L

    2014-02-01

    Breakfast skipping is associated with obesity and an increased risk of type 2 diabetes. Later chronotypes, individuals who have a preference for later bed and wake times, often skip breakfast. The aim of the study was to explore the relationships among breakfast skipping, chronotype, and glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients. We collected sleep timing and 24-h dietary recall from 194 non-shift-working type 2 diabetes patients who were being followed in outpatient clinics. Mid-sleep time on free days (MSF) was used as an indicator of chronotype. Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) values were obtained from medical records. Hierarchical linear regression analyses controlling for demographic, sleep, and dietary variables were computed to determine whether breakfast skipping was associated with HbA1C. Additional regression analyses were performed to test if this association was mediated by chronotype. There were 22 participants (11.3%) who self-reported missing breakfast. Breakfast skippers had significantly higher HbA1C levels, higher body mass indices (BMI), and later MSF than breakfast eaters. Breakfast skipping was significantly associated with higher HbA1C values (B = 0.108, p = 0.01), even after adjusting for age, sex, race, BMI, number of diabetes complications, insulin use, depressive symptoms, perceived sleep debt, and percentage of daily caloric intake at dinner. The relationship between breakfast skipping and HbA1C was partially mediated by chronotype. In summary, breakfast skipping is associated with a later chronotype. Later chronotype and breakfast skipping both contribute to poorer glycemic control, as indicated by higher HbA1C levels. Future studies are needed to confirm these findings and determine whether behavioral interventions targeting breakfast eating or sleep timing may improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  16. Role of HbA1c in post-partum screening of women with gestational diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rickard Claesson

    2015-03-01

    Conclusion: Proposed thresholds of HbA1c had low diagnostic sensitivity. Combined with a fasting glucose test, the performance was no better than with using a fasting glucose test alone. Combining a fasting glucose test with a lower HbA1c cut-point may be an alternative approach for selection of women for an OGTT.

  17. Efficacy of acarbose and metformin in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients stratified by HbA1c levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin-Ping; Wang, Na; Xing, Xiao-Yan; Yang, Zhao-Jun; Wang, Xin; Yang, Wen-Ying

    2016-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the therapeutic efficacy of acarbose and metformin is correlated with baseline HbA1c levels in Chinese patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Data for 711 subjects were retrieved from the MARCH (Metformin and AcaRbose in Chinese as initial Hypoglycemic treatment) trial database and reviewed retrospectively. Patients were grouped according to baseline HbA1c levels (8%) and the results for these three groups were compared between acarbose and metformin treatments. Acarbose and metformin treatment significantly improved T2DM-associated parameters (weight, fasting plasma glucose [FPG], postprandial glucose [PPG], glucagon-like peptide-1 [GLP-1], HOMA-IR, and total cholesterol) across all HbA1c levels. Acarbose decreased PPG and HOMA-β significantly more than metformin, but only in subjects with lower baseline HbA1c (PPG in the HbA1c levels (P HbA1c groups (all P HbA1c levels, whereas metformin induced greater reductions in FPG. These results may help guide selection of initial therapy based on baseline HbA1c. © 2015 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Translating HbA1c measurements into estimated average glucose values in pregnant women with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Law, Graham R; Gilthorpe, Mark S; Secher, Anna L

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: This study aimed to examine the relationship between average glucose levels, assessed by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), and HbA1c levels in pregnant women with diabetes to determine whether calculations of standard estimated average glucose (eAG) levels from HbA1c measureme...

  19. Effects of switching from prandial premixed insulin therapy to basal plus two times bolus insulin therapy on glycemic control and quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroyuki; Abe, Mariko; Antoku, Shinichi; Omoto, Takashi; Shinozaki, Masahiro; Nishio, Shinya; Mifune, Mizuo; Togane, Michiko

    2014-01-01

    The effects of switching from prandial premixed insulin therapy (PPT) injected three times a day to basal plus two times bolus insulin therapy (B2B) on glycemic control and quality of life were investigated in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The clinical course was prospectively observed during the first 16 weeks after switching to B2B (insulin glargine plus insulin glulisine before breakfast and dinner) in 27 subjects previously treated with PPT using 50/50 premixed insulin. The Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ) was administered at the start and end of the study. The glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level (8.3% ± 1.8% to 8.2% ± 1.1%) and the DTSQ score did not change between the start and end of the study. An improvement in HbA1c level was found in nine (33%) subjects. The change in HbA1c showed a significant negative correlation with baseline HbA1c, and was significantly better in patients with a baseline HbA1c >8.0% than in those with an HbA1c ≤ 8.0% (-0.9 ± 2.0 versus 0.3 ± 0.6, respectively, P = 0.02). The change in DTSQ score representing treatment satisfaction was significantly greater in patients whose HbA1c level was improved than in those in whom it was not (2.7 ± 3.6 versus -0.8 ± 3.5, P = 0.04). B2B was noninferior to PPT with regard to HbA1c levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. B2B should be considered particularly for subjects whose glycemic control is poor despite PPT.

  20. Race-ethnic differences in the association of genetic loci with HbA1c levels and mortality in U.S. adults: the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsby, Jonna L; Porneala, Bianca C; Vassy, Jason L; Yang, Quanhe; Florez, José C; Dupuis, Josée; Liu, Tiebin; Yesupriya, Ajay; Chang, Man-Huei; Ned, Renee M; Dowling, Nicole F; Khoury, Muin J; Meigs, James B

    2012-04-27

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels diagnose diabetes, predict mortality and are associated with ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in white individuals. Genetic associations in other race groups are not known. We tested the hypotheses that there is race-ethnic variation in 1) HbA1c-associated risk allele frequencies (RAFs) for SNPs near SPTA1, HFE, ANK1, HK1, ATP11A, FN3K, TMPRSS6, G6PC2, GCK, MTNR1B; 2) association of SNPs with HbA1c and 3) association of SNPs with mortality. We studied 3,041 non-diabetic individuals in the NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) III. We stratified the analysis by race/ethnicity (NHW: non-Hispanic white; NHB: non-Hispanic black; MA: Mexican American) to calculate RAF, calculated a genotype score by adding risk SNPs, and tested associations with SNPs and the genotype score using an additive genetic model, with type 1 error = 0.05. RAFs varied widely and at six loci race-ethnic differences in RAF were significant (p differed by race-ethnicity (NHW: 10.4, NHB: 11.0, MA: 10.7, p race-ethnic heterogeneity. The combined impact of common HbA1c-associated variants on HbA1c levels varied by race-ethnicity, but did not influence mortality.

  1. The preoperative HbA1c level is an independent prognostic factor for the postoperative survival after resection of non-small cell lung cancer in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motoishi, Makoto; Sawai, Satoru; Hori, Tetsuo; Yamashita, Naoki

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of a history of diabetes mellitus (DM) and the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) level on the survival in patients who underwent complete resection for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Of the patients who underwent complete resection for NSCLC between 2007 and 2015, 468 were classified into DM (who were currently taking medication for DM) and no DM groups as well as into high HbA1c (≥ 6.5) and normal HbA1c (HbA1c group than in the high-HbA1c group (5-year survival rate: 84.7 versus 37.2%, respectively, p HbA1c level were found to be independent risk factors for the OS. We revealed that a high preoperative HbA1c level was associated with a poor OS in elderly patients who underwent complete resection for NSCLC. This suggests that it is necessary to achieve diabetic control prior to complete resection in NSCLC patients.

  2. Preservation of renal function by intensive glycemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoya Toriu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 67-year-old Japanese woman with type 1 diabetes mellitus. At 47 years of age, her hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c was 10.0%, and she had overt nephropathy. The first renal biopsy yielded a diagnosis of diabetic nephropathy. Intensive glycemic control was initiated and her HbA1c improved to 6.0%. Renal dysfunction showed no progression for 15 years. At 62 years of age, a second renal biopsy was performed. Glomerular lesions did not show progression but tubulointerstitial fibrosis and vascular lesions showed progression compared with the first biopsy. Intensive glycemic control can prevent the progression of glomerular lesions, but might not be effective for interstitial and vascular lesions.

  3. Effect of periodontal therapy on type 2 diabetes mellitus patients with chronic periodontitis with the evaluation of HbA1c

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvi Chandra Agarwal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: In the recent years, a two-way correlation has been postulated between periodontitis and systemic conditions. One such condition is diabetes mellitus (DM. Several studies have demonstrated a close relationship between DM and chronic periodontitis. Aims: To assess the effect of periodontal therapy and scaling and root planing (SRP on the metabolic control in type 2 DM patients with chronic periodontitis based on the estimation of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c. Settings and Design: A prospective, comparative, clinical study was performed on 50 patients suffering from type 2 DM with moderate, generalized chronic periodontitis. The study period was 6 months. Type 2 moderately controlled diabetic patients with glycated hemoglobin values within the range of 6-8% were selected. Patients with major diabetic complications, history of any antibiotic intake or periodontal treatment within the last 4 months, and smoking habits were excluded. Materials and Methods: The parameters recorded were gingival index (GI, plaque index (PI, sulcus bleeding index (SBI, probing pocket depth (PPD, clinical attachment level (CAL, and glycated hemoglobin. The recordings were done at baseline and 6 months after scaling and root planing procedures. HbA1c was measured by NycoCard Reader. Statistical Analysis Used: Karl-Pearson coefficient test, Z-test, and paired t-test. Results: Reductions in all the clinical parameters were observed and were found to be statistically significant (P < 0.005. Conclusions: Scaling and root planing resulted in a statistically significant reduction in the clinical parameters and HbA1c. So, periodontal treatment should be included in the management of diabetic patients.

  4. Hemorheological and Glycemic Parameters and HDL Cholesterol for the Prediction of Cardiovascular Events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Sung Woo; Kim, Byung Gyu; Kim, Byung Ok; Byun, Young Sup; Goh, Choong Won; Rhee, Kun Joo; Kwon, Hyuck Moon; Lee, Byoung Kwon

    2016-01-01

    Hemorheological and glycemic parameters and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are used as biomarkers of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. To investigate the association and clinical relevance of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), fibrinogen, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and HDL cholesterol in the prediction of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and coronary heart disease (CHD) in an outpatient population. 708 stable patients who visited the outpatient department were enrolled and followed for a mean period of 28.5 months. Patients were divided into two groups, patients without MACE and patients with MACE, which included cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, newly diagnosed CHD, and cerebral vascular accident. We compared hemorheological and glycemic parameters and lipid profiles between the groups. Patients with MACE had significantly higher ESR, fibrinogen, fasting glucose, and HbA1c, while lower HDL cholesterol compared with patients without MACE. High ESR and fibrinogen and low HDL cholesterol significantly increased the risk of MACE in multivariate regression analysis. In patients with MACE, high fibrinogen and HbA1c levels increased the risk of multivessel CHD. Furthermore, ESR and fibrinogen were significantly positively correlated with HbA1c and negatively correlated with HDL cholesterol, however not correlated with fasting glucose. Hemorheological abnormalities, poor glycemic control, and low HDL cholesterol are correlated with each other and could serve as simple and useful surrogate markers and predictors for MACE and CHD in outpatients

  5. Hemorheological and Glycemic Parameters and HDL Cholesterol for the Prediction of Cardiovascular Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Sung Woo [Division of Cardiology - Department of Internal Medicine - Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Division of Cardiology - Department of Medicine - Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung Gyu; Kim, Byung Ok; Byun, Young Sup; Goh, Choong Won; Rhee, Kun Joo [Division of Cardiology - Department of Internal Medicine - Sanggye Paik Hospital, Inje University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Hyuck Moon; Lee, Byoung Kwon, E-mail: cardiobk@yuhs.ac [Division of Cardiology - Department of Internal Medicine - Gangnam Severance Hospital - Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    Hemorheological and glycemic parameters and high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol are used as biomarkers of atherosclerosis and thrombosis. To investigate the association and clinical relevance of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), fibrinogen, fasting glucose, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and HDL cholesterol in the prediction of major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) and coronary heart disease (CHD) in an outpatient population. 708 stable patients who visited the outpatient department were enrolled and followed for a mean period of 28.5 months. Patients were divided into two groups, patients without MACE and patients with MACE, which included cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, newly diagnosed CHD, and cerebral vascular accident. We compared hemorheological and glycemic parameters and lipid profiles between the groups. Patients with MACE had significantly higher ESR, fibrinogen, fasting glucose, and HbA1c, while lower HDL cholesterol compared with patients without MACE. High ESR and fibrinogen and low HDL cholesterol significantly increased the risk of MACE in multivariate regression analysis. In patients with MACE, high fibrinogen and HbA1c levels increased the risk of multivessel CHD. Furthermore, ESR and fibrinogen were significantly positively correlated with HbA1c and negatively correlated with HDL cholesterol, however not correlated with fasting glucose. Hemorheological abnormalities, poor glycemic control, and low HDL cholesterol are correlated with each other and could serve as simple and useful surrogate markers and predictors for MACE and CHD in outpatients.

  6. Analytical verification and quality assessment of the Tosoh HLC-723GX HbA1c analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Ris

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (IE-HPLC has long been used as a reproducible and versatile analytical tool for HbA1c measurement.In this study, we performed analytical verification and quality assessment of the recently introduced small IE-HPLC Tosoh HLC-723GX HbA1c analyzer, and a comparison of results to immunoassay (IA and capillary electrophoresis (CE. Design and methods: The total imprecision of Tosoh HLC-723GX was verified according to CLSI EP15-A2 protocol using commercial control materials (C-QC and pooled human whole blood samples (HWB. The Sigma metric was used for the evaluation of quality targets. HbA1c results were compared to automated CE (MiniCap Flex Piercing, Sebia, France and IA (Tina-quant HbA1c Gen 2, Cobas Integra 400+, Roche Diagnostics, USA procedures. Results: The total imprecision of Tosoh HLC-723GX-HbA1c for IFCC(mmol/mol and NGSP(% units was: 1.91/1.25% (HbA1c=31 mmol/mol/5.0% and 0.51/0.63% (HbA1c=84 mmol/mol/9.8% for C-QC, and 0.39/0.2% (HbA1c=47 mmol/mol/6.5% and 0.77/0.46% (HbA1c=94 mmol/mol/10.8% in HWB samples, respectively. Bland-Altman analysis did not reveal any deviation of the results between Tosoh HLC-723GX and CE: mean difference 0.0% (95%CI: −0.02927 to 0.02653%, while the mean HbA1c difference against IA was −0.07% (95%CI: −0.1039 to −0.02765. At the selected HbA1c clinical decision level (48 mmol/mol/6,5%, six sigma analysis gave σ value of 3.91, within a desirable classification of performance. Conclusion: The analytical performance of the Tosoh HLC-723GX complies with the rigorous quality criteria for clinical use of HbA1c, with the results comparable to the CE procedure. Tosoh HLC-723GX provides a plausible analytical choice for reliable HbA1c measurement in low-volume laboratories. Keywords: HbA1c, Quality targets, Six sigma, Tosoh HLC-723GX analyzer

  7. Elevated HbA1c and Fasting Plasma Glucose in Predicting Diabetes Incidence Among Older Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipska, Kasia J.; Inzucchi, Silvio E.; Van Ness, Peter H.; Gill, Thomas M.; Kanaya, Alka; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.; Koster, Annemarie; Johnson, Karen C.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Harris, Tamara; De Rekeneire, Nathalie

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine which measures—impaired fasting glucose (IFG), elevated HbA1c, or both—best predict incident diabetes in older adults. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS From the Health, Aging, and Body Composition study, we selected individuals without diabetes, and we defined IFG (100–125 mg/dL) and elevated HbA1c (5.7–6.4%) per American Diabetes Association guidelines. Incident diabetes was based on self-report, use of antihyperglycemic medicines, or HbA1c ≥6.5% during 7 years of follow-up. Logistic regression analyses were adjusted for age, sex, race, site, BMI, smoking, blood pressure, and physical activity. Discrimination and calibration were assessed for models with IFG and with both IFG and elevated HbA1c. RESULTS Among 1,690 adults (mean age 76.5, 46% men, 32% black), 183 (10.8%) developed diabetes over 7 years. Adjusted odds ratios of diabetes were 6.2 (95% CI 4.4–8.8) in those with IFG (versus those with fasting plasma glucose [FPG] HbA1c (versus those with HbA1c HbA1c were considered together, odds ratios were 3.5 (1.9–6.3) in those with IFG only, 8.0 (4.8–13.2) in those with elevated HbA1c only, and 26.2 (16.3–42.1) in those with both IFG and elevated HbA1c (versus those with normal FPG and HbA1c). Addition of elevated HbA1c to the model with IFG resulted in improved discrimination and calibration. CONCLUSIONS Older adults with both IFG and elevated HbA1c have a substantially increased odds of developing diabetes over 7 years. Combined screening with FPG and HbA1c may identify older adults at very high risk for diabetes. PMID:24135387

  8. Defining a glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level that predicts increased risk of penile implant infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habous, Mohamad; Tal, Raanan; Tealab, Alaa; Soliman, Tarek; Nassar, Mohammed; Mekawi, Zenhom; Mahmoud, Saad; Abdelwahab, Osama; Elkhouly, Mohamed; Kamr, Hatem; Remeah, Abdallah; Binsaleh, Saleh; Ralph, David; Mulhall, John

    2018-02-01

    To re-evaluate the role of diabetes mellitus (DM) as a risk factor for penile implant infection by exploring the association between glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and penile implant infection rates and to define a threshold value that predicts implant infection. We conducted a multicentre prospective study including all patients undergoing penile implant surgery between 2009 and 2015. Preoperative, perioperative and postoperative management were identical for the entire cohort. Univariate analysis was performed to define predictors of implant infection. The HbA1c levels were analysed as continuous variables and sequential analysis was conducted using 0.5% increments to define a threshold level predicting implant infection. Multivariable analysis was performed with the following factors entered in the model: DM, HbA1C level, patient age, implant type, number of vascular risk factors (VRFs), presence of Peyronie's disease (PD), body mass index (BMI), and surgeon volume. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was generated to define the optimal HbA1C threshold for infection prediction. In all, 902 implant procedures were performed over the study period. The mean patient age was 56.6 years. The mean HbA1c level was 8.0%, with 81% of men having a HbA1c level of >6%. In all, 685 (76%) implants were malleable and 217 (24%) were inflatable devices; 302 (33.5%) patients also had a diagnosis of PD. The overall infection rate was 8.9% (80/902). Patients who had implant infection had significantly higher mean HbA1c levels, 9.5% vs 7.8% (P HbA1c level, we found infection rates were: 1.3% with HbA1c level of 9.5% (P HbA1c level, whilst a high-volume surgeon had a protective effect and was associated with a reduced infection risk. Using ROC analysis, we determined that a HbA1c threshold level of 8.5% predicted infection with a sensitivity of 80% and a specificity of 65%. Uncontrolled DM is associated with increased risk of infection after penile implant surgery. The risk is directly related to the HbA1c level. A threshold HbA1c level of 8.5% is suggested for clinical use to identify patients at increased infection risk. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Decreases in Dietary Glycemic Index Are Related to Weight Loss among Individuals following Therapeutic Diets for Type 2 Diabetes1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M.; Jenkins, David J. A.; Barnard, Neal D.; Cohen, Joshua; Gloede, Lise; Green, Amber A.

    2011-01-01

    This study assessed the effect of changes in glycemic index (GI) and load (GL) on weight loss and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among individuals with type 2 diabetes beginning a vegan diet or diet following the 2003 American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendations. The study was a 22-wk, randomized trial of 99 participants with type 2 diabetes who were counseled to follow 1 of 2 diet treatments. GI and GL changes were assessed based on 3-d dietary records. The relationships between GI/GL and changes in weight and HbA1C were calculated. In an intention-to-treat analysis (n = 99), the vegan group reduced GI to a greater extent than the ADA group (P vegan group (P vegan or ADA diet in reducing body weight among people with type 2 diabetes. The reduction of body weight, in turn, was predictive of decreasing HbA1C. PMID:21653575

  10. Decreases in dietary glycemic index are related to weight loss among individuals following therapeutic diets for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle M; Jenkins, David J A; Barnard, Neal D; Cohen, Joshua; Gloede, Lise; Green, Amber A

    2011-08-01

    This study assessed the effect of changes in glycemic index (GI) and load (GL) on weight loss and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) among individuals with type 2 diabetes beginning a vegan diet or diet following the 2003 American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommendations. The study was a 22-wk, randomized trial of 99 participants with type 2 diabetes who were counseled to follow 1 of 2 diet treatments. GI and GL changes were assessed based on 3-d dietary records. The relationships between GI/GL and changes in weight and HbA1C were calculated. In an intention-to-treat analysis (n = 99), the vegan group reduced GI to a greater extent than the ADA group (P vegan group (P vegan or ADA diet in reducing body weight among people with type 2 diabetes. The reduction of body weight, in turn, was predictive of decreasing HbA1C.

  11. Measurement of HbA1c and HbA2 by Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing HbA1c programme for simultaneous management of diabetes and screening for thalassemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Peifeng; Liu, Jiawei; Chao, Yan; Wu, Xiaobin; Xiong, Yujuan; Lin, Li; Wan, Zemin; Wu, Xinzhong; Xu, Jianhua; Zhuang, Junhua; Huang, Xianzhang

    2017-10-01

    Thalassemia could interfere with some assays for haemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) measurement, therefore, it is useful to be able to screen for thalassemia while measuring HbA 1c . We used Capillarys 2 Flex Piercing (Capillarys 2FP) HbA 1c programme to simultaneously measure HbA 1c and screen for thalassemia. Samples from 498 normal controls and 175 thalassemia patients were analysed by Capillarys 2FP HbA 1c programme (Sebia, France). For method comparison, HbA 1c was quantified by Premier Hb9210 (Trinity Biotech, Ireland) in 98 thalassaemia patients samples. For verification, HbA 1c from eight thalassaemia patients was confirmed by IFCC reference method. Among 98 thalassaemia samples, Capillarys 2FP did not provide an HbA 1c result in three samples with HbH due to the overlapping of HbBart's with HbA 1c fraction; for the remaining 95 thalassaemia samples, Bland-Altman plot showed 0.00 ± 0.35% absolute bias between two systems, and a significant positive bias above 7% was observed only in two HbH samples. The HbA 1c values obtained by Capillarys 2FP were consistent with the IFCC targets (relative bias below ± 6%) in all of the eight samples tested by both methods. For screening samples with alpha (α-) thalassaemia silent/trait or beta (β-) thalassemia trait, the optimal HbA 2 cut-off values were ≤ 2.2% and > 2.8%, respectively. Our results demonstrated the Capillarys 2FP HbA 1c system could report an accurate HbA 1c value in thalassemia silent/trait, and HbA 2 value (≤ 2.2% for α-thalassaemia silent/trait and > 2.8% for β-thalassemia trait) and abnormal bands (HbH and/or HbBart's for HbH disease, HbF for β-thalassemia) may provide valuable information for screening.

  12. Alterations in HbA1c following minimal or enhanced non-surgical, non-antibiotic treatment of gingivitis or mild periodontitis in type 2 diabetic patients: a pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Theresa E; Herriges, Brock; Boyd, Linda D; Laughlin, Gayle; Chiodo, Gary; Rosenstein, David

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to determine and compare the effects of two protocols aimed at reducing periodontal inflammation, upon the metabolic control of the diabetic condition in subjects with elevated baseline glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Forty-two non-smoking type 2 diabetes subjects with mildly elevated HbA1c (>7 but 9%) were randomized to one of two non-surgical periodontal therapy protocols. Patients in the "minimal therapy" (MT) group received scaling, root planning, and oral hygiene instructions on two occasions six months apart. Participants randomized to the "frequent therapy" (FT) protocol received scaling, root planing, and oral hygiene instructions at two-month intervals and were provided a 0.12% chlorhexidine rinse for home use twice daily. Neither systemic nor local antibiotics were provided to either group. Subjects were asked to report any changes in diabetic medications, nutrition, and physical activity. Data analyses (ANOVA, t-test, Mann-Whitney) grouped subjects according to baseline HbA1c (>7 and 9%), treatment protocol (minimal or frequent), and +/- medication change. In both MT and FT groups the clinical attachment level (CAL) remained unchanged but the other measures [gingival index (GI) and pocket dept (PD)] of periodontal health improved. Mean reductions in plaque showed improvement but calculus was worse in the FT group, likely due to the use of chlorhexidine. At six months, the largest reduction of HbA1c was 3.7; experienced by a subject receiving FT but no changes in diabetic medication. Among the MT and no medication change subjects, the maximum reduction was 1.6. Overall mean reduction in HbA1c of 27 subjects with baseline HbA1c >9.0 and no medication change was 0.6 with no statistical difference between the MT and FT groups. Among the medication-change subjects with baseline HbA1c >9.0, mean reduction of 1.38 was seen with FT compared to 1.10 with MT. Overall, modest improvements in HbA1c were detected with a trend

  13. To establish trimester-specific reference ranges for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in pregnancy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, CM

    2011-09-01

    Background and aims: Diabetes in Pregnancy imposes additional risks to both mother and infant. These poor outcomes are considered to be primarily related to glycaemic control which is monitored longitudinally through pregnancy by means of HbA1c. The correlation between HbA1c levels with clinical outcomes emphasises the need to measure HbA1c accurately, precisely and for data interpretation comparison to appropriately defined reference intervals. From July 1st 2010, the HbA1c assay in Irish laboratories became fully metrologically traceable to the IFCC standard, permitting HbA1c to be reported in IFCC units (mmol\\/mol) and derived DCCT\\/NGSP units (%) using the IFCC-DCCT\\/NGSP master equation (DCCT = Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, NGSP = National Glycohemoglobin standardisation program). The aim of this project is to establish trimester-specific reference ranges in pregnancy for IFCC standardised HbA1c in non-diabetic Caucasian women. This will allow us to define the goal for HbA1c during pregnancy complicated by diabetes.\\r\

  14. Effect of ethnicity on HbA1c levels in individuals without diabetes: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Priscila Aparecida Correa; Gross, Jorge Luiz

    2017-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis Disparities in HbA1c levels have been observed among ethnic groups. Most studies were performed in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), which may interfere with results due to the high variability of glucose levels. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to investigate the effect of ethnicity on HbA1c levels in individuals without DM. Methods This is a systematic review with meta-analysis. We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE up to September 2016. Studies published after 1996, performed in adults without DM, reporting HbA1c results measured by certified/standardized methods were included. A random effects model was used and the effect size was presented as weighted HbA1c mean difference (95% CI) between different ethnicities as compared to White ethnicity. Results Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria, totalling data from 49,238 individuals. There were significant differences between HbA1c levels in Blacks [0.26% (2.8 mmol/mol); 95% CI 0.18 to 0.33 (2.0 to 3.6), p HbA1c values are higher in Blacks, Asians, and Latinos when compared to White persons. Although small, these differences might have impact on the use of a sole HbA1c point to diagnose DM in all ethnic populations. PMID:28192447

  15. Evaluation of the effect of self-care education based on Vark learning style on HbA1c and FBS in patients with type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleh Moghadam Amir Reza

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Patients with type two diabetes mostly struggle with increased fasting blood sugar (FBS and glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c, mainly associated with irrecoverable complications. Self-care education and considering different types of learning among patients are regarded as some of the most important issues in this regard. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of self-care education based on VARK learning style on HbA1c and FBS in patients with type two diabetes. Materials and Method: This clinical trial was conducted on patients with type two diabetes, referring to Parsian Clinic in Mashhad, Iran in 2015. In total, 72 samples were selected through randomized convenience sampling and divided into two control and intervention groups of 36 cases. Subjects of the intervention group were also divided into subgroups of visual, aural, read/write, and kinesthetic based on the results of VARK inventory. Self-care education was carried for the intervention group in two 60-minute session once every two weeks, tailored to learning styles of patients. Meanwhile, traditional lecture method was used for the control group. HbA1c and FBS were evaluated in all the participants before and a month and a half after the intervention to assess the self-care of patients. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 21 using Mann-Whitney U, Chi-square, independent t-test and Wilcoxon. Results: In this study, mean score of HbA1c was decreased from 7.7±0.8 to 7.0±5.7 (P<0.062, whereas mean score of FBS was alleviated from 176.1±33.5 to 147.7±32.8 (P<0.001, which was only significant regarding FBS levels (P=0.002. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, application of VARK learning style led to a reduction in HbA1c and FBS levels, contributing to improved self-care in patients with type 2 diabetes. Therefore, before initiation of training programs, determining learning style of patients is suggested using VARK learning

  16. Associations of Glycemic Control With Cardiovascular Outcomes Among US Hemodialysis Patients With Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Jinnie J; Zheng, Yuanchao; Montez-Rath, Maria E; Chang, Tara I; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C

    2017-06-07

    There is a lack of data on the relationship between glycemic control and cardiovascular end points in hemodialysis patients with diabetes mellitus. We included adult Medicare-insured patients with diabetes mellitus who initiated in-center hemodialysis treatment from 2006 to 2008 and survived for >90 days. Quarterly mean time-averaged glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ) values were categorized into diabetes mellitus. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  17. "SERUM FERRITIN IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND ITS RELATIONSHIP WITH HbA1c"

    OpenAIRE

    F. Sharifi Sh. Sazandeh

    2004-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) type 2 is one of the most common endocrine disorders affecting more than 135 million people in the world. The etiology of the disease is not fully understood, but recently subclinical hemochromatosis has been considered as one of the probable causes of DM. This study was carried out to examine the relationship between serum ferritin as a marker of iron overload with DM and HbA1c. This study was conducted on 97 patients with type 2 DM who were referred to Zanjan Diabetes...

  18. HbA1c, diabetes and cognitive decline: the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Fanfan; Yan, Li; Yang, Zhenchun; Zhong, Baoliang; Xie, Wuxiang

    2018-04-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate longitudinal associations between HbA 1c levels, diabetes status and subsequent cognitive decline over a 10 year follow-up period. Data from wave 2 (2004-2005) to wave 7 (2014-2015) of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) were analysed. Cognitive function was assessed at baseline (wave 2) and reassessed every 2 years at waves 3-7. Linear mixed models were used to evaluate longitudinal associations. The study comprised 5189 participants (55.1% women, mean age 65.6 ± 9.4 years) with baseline HbA 1c levels ranging from 15.9 to 126.3 mmol/mol (3.6-13.7%). The mean follow-up duration was 8.1 ± 2.8 years and the mean number of cognitive assessments was 4.9 ± 1.5. A 1 mmol/mol increment in HbA 1c was significantly associated with an increased rate of decline in global cognitive z scores (-0.0009 SD/year, 95% CI -0.0014, -0.0003), memory z scores (-0.0005 SD/year, 95% CI -0.0009, -0.0001) and executive function z scores (-0.0008 SD/year, 95% CI -0.0013, -0.0004) after adjustment for baseline age, sex, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerol, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, BMI, education, marital status, depressive symptoms, current smoking, alcohol consumption, hypertension, CHD, stroke, chronic lung disease and cancer. Compared with participants with normoglycaemia, the multivariable-adjusted rate of global cognitive decline associated with prediabetes and diabetes was increased by -0.012 SD/year (95% CI -0.022, -0.002) and -0.031 SD/year (95% CI -0.046, -0.015), respectively (p for trend cognitive decline with diabetes. Significant longitudinal associations between HbA 1c levels, diabetes status and long-term cognitive decline were observed in this study. Future studies are required to determine the effects of maintaining optimal glucose control on the rate of cognitive decline in people with diabetes.

  19. HbA1c Measured in Stored Erythrocytes Is Positively Linearly Associated with Mortality in Individuals with Diabetes Mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sluik, Diewertje; Boeing, Heiner; Montonen, Jukka; Kaaks, Rudolf; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Sandbaek, Annelli; Overvad, Kim; Arriola, Larraitz; Ardanaz, Eva; Saieva, Calogero; Grioni, Sara; Tumino, Rosario; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Mattiello, Amalia; Spijkerman, Annemieke M. W.; van der A, Daphne L.; Beulens, Joline W. J.; van Dieren, Susan; Nilsson, Peter M.; Groop, Leif C.; Franks, Paul W.; Rolandsson, Olov; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Nöthlings, Ute

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Observational studies have shown that glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is related to mortality, but the shape of the association is less clear. Furthermore, disease duration and medication may modify this association. This observational study explored the association between HbA1c measured in stored erythrocytes and mortality. Secondly, it was assessed whether disease duration and medication use influenced the estimates or were independently associated with mortality. Methods Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition a cohort was analysed of 4,345 individuals with a confirmed diagnosis of diabetes at enrolment. HbA1c was measured in blood samples stored up to 19 years. Multivariable Cox proportional hazard regression models for all-cause mortality investigated HbA1c in quartiles as well as per 1% increment, diabetes medication in seven categories of insulin and oral hypoglycaemic agents, and disease duration in quartiles. Results After a median follow-up of 9.3 years, 460 participants died. Higher HbA1c was associated with higher mortality: Hazard Ratio for 1%-increase was 1.11 (95% CI 1.06, 1.17). This association was linear (P-nonlinearity =0.15) and persistent across categories of medication use, disease duration, and co-morbidities. Compared with metformin, other medication types were not associated with mortality. Longer disease duration was associated with mortality, but not after adjustment for HbA1c and medication. Conclusion This prospective study showed that persons with lower HbA1c had better survival than those with higher HbA1c. The association was linear and independent of disease duration, type of medication use, and presence of co-morbidities. Any improvement of HbA1c appears to be associated with reduced mortality risk. PMID:22719972

  20. Discordance in the diagnosis of diabetes: Comparison between HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho-Pham, Lan T; Nguyen, Uyen D T; Tran, Truong X; Nguyen, Tuan V

    2017-01-01

    HbA1c has been introduced as a complementary diagnostic test for diabetes, but its impact on disease prevalence is unknown. This study evaluated the concordance between HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in the diagnosis of diabetes in the general population. The study was designed as a population based investigation, with participants being sampled from the Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Blood samples were collected after overnight fasting and analyzed within 4 hours after collection. HbA1c was measured with high pressure liquid chromatography (Arkray Adams, Japan). FPG was measured by the hexokinase method (Advia Autoanalyzer; Bayer Diagnostics, Germany). Diabetes was defined as HbA1c ≥ 6.5% or FPG ≥ 7.0 mmol/L. Prediabetes was classified as HbA1c between 5.7% and 6.4%. The study included 3523 individuals (2356 women) aged 30 years and above. Based on the HbA1c test, the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes was 9.7% (95%CI, 8.7-10.7%; n = 342) and 34.6% (33.0-36.2; n = 1219), respectively. Based on the FPG test, the prevalence of diabetes and prediabetes was 6.3% (95%CI, 5.5-7.2%; n = 223) and 12.1% (11.1-13.2; n = 427). Among the 427 individuals identified by FPG as "pre-diabetes", 28.6% were classified as diabetes by HbA1c test. The weighted kappa statistic of concordance between HbA1c and FPG was 0.55, with most of the discordance being in the prediabetes group. These data indicate that there is a significant discordance in the diagnosis of diabetes between FPG and HbA1c measurements, and the discordance could have significant impact on clinical practice. FPG appears to underestimate the burden of undiagnosed diabetes.

  1. Are late-night eating habits and sleep duration associated with glycemic control in adult type 1 diabetes patients treated with insulin pumps?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matejko, Bartlomiej; Kiec-Wilk, Beata; Szopa, Magdalena; Trznadel Morawska, Iwona; Malecki, Maciej T; Klupa, Tomasz

    2015-07-01

    Little is known about the impact of sleep duration and late-night snacking on glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes using insulin pumps. The aim of the present study was to examine whether late-night eating habits and short sleep duration are associated with glycemic control in continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion-treated type 1 diabetic patients. We included 148 consecutive adult type 1 diabetic subjects using an insulin pump (100 women and 48 men). Participants completed a questionnaire regarding sleep duration (classified as short if ≤6 h) and late-night snacking. Other sources of information included medical records and data from blood glucose meters. Glycemic control was assessed by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels and mean self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) readings. The mean age of patients was 26 years, mean type 1 diabetes duration was 13.4 years and mean HbA1c level was 7.2%. In a univariate regression analysis, sleep duration was a predictor of both HbA1c (β = 0.51, P = 0.01) and SMBG levels (β = 11.4, P = 0.02). Additionally, an association was found between frequent late-night snacking and higher SMBG readings (often snacking β = 18.1, P = 0.05), but not with increased HbA1c levels. In the multivariate linear regression, independent predictors for HbA1c and SMBG were sleep duration and patient age. In a univariate logistic regression, sleep duration and frequency of late-night snacking were not predictors of whether HbA1c target levels were achieved. Short sleep duration, but not late-night snacking, seems to be associated with poorer glycemic control in type 1 diabetic patients treated with continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion.

  2. Diabetes Distress and Glycemic Control: The Buffering Effect of Autonomy Support From Important Family Members and Friends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Aaron A; Piette, John D; Heisler, Michele; Rosland, Ann-Marie

    2018-06-01

    To examine whether autonomy support (defined as social support for an individual's personal agency) for diabetes management from informal health supporters (family/friends) reduces the detrimental effects of diabetes distress on glycemic control. Three hundred eight veterans with type 2 diabetes and one or more risk factors for diabetes complications completed a survey that included measures of diabetes distress and perceived autonomy support from their main informal health supporter. Hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) data from 12 months before and after the survey were extracted from electronic medical records. Linear mixed modeling examined the main effects and interaction of autonomy support and diabetes distress on repeated measures of HbA 1c over the 12 months after the survey, controlling for mean prior 12-month HbA 1c , time, insulin use, age, and race/ethnicity. Diabetes distress ( B = 0.12 [SE 0.05]; P = 0.023) was associated with higher and autonomy support ( B = -0.16 [SE 0.07]; P = 0.032) with lower subsequent HbA 1c levels. Autonomy support moderated the relationship between diabetes distress and HbA 1c ( B = -0.13 [SE 0.06]; P = 0.027). Greater diabetes distress was associated with higher HbA 1c at low ( B = 0.21 [SE 07]; P = 0.002) but not high ( B = 0.01 [SE 0.07]; P = 0.890) levels of autonomy support. Autonomy support from main health supporters may contribute to better glycemic control by ameliorating the effects of diabetes distress. Interventions that reduce diabetes distress and enhance the autonomy supportiveness of informal supporters may be effective approaches to improving glycemic control. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  3. Systematic Review of Efficacy and Safety of Newer Antidiabetic Drugs Approved from 2013 to 2017 in Controlling HbA1c in Diabetes Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivanandy Palanisamy

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM is the most common form of diabetes mellitus and accounts for about 95% of all diabetes cases. Many newer oral as well as parenteral antidiabetic drugs have been introduced in to the market in recent years to control hyperglycemic conditions in diabetes patients and many of these drugs produce potential side effects in diabetes patients. Hence, this systematic review was aimed to analyze and compare the efficacy and safety of oral antidiabetic agents in controlling HbA1c in T2DM patients, that were approved by the United States-Food and Drug Administration (US-FDA from 2013 to 2017. All randomized controlled, double-blind trials published in English during the search period involving the newer antidiabetic agents were selected. In the outcome assessment comparison, semaglutide demonstrated the highest efficacy in lowering HbA1c, with a 1.6% reduction (p < 0.0001 when given at a dose of 1.0 mg. The safety profile of all the agents as compared to placebo or control were similar, with no or slight increase in the occurrence of adverse events (AEs but no fatal reaction was reported. The most common AEs of all the antidiabetic agents were gastrointestinal in nature, with several cases of hypoglycemic events. However, among all these agents, semaglutide seems to be the most efficacious drug to improve glycemic control in terms of HbA1c. Alogliptin has the least overall frequency of AEs compared to other treatment groups.

  4. The effect of diabetes self-management education on HbA1c and quality of life in African-Americans: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Amy T; Crittendon, Denine R; White, Neva; Mills, Geoffrey D; Diaz, Victor; LaNoue, Marianna D

    2018-05-16

    Type 2 diabetes presents a major morbidity and mortality burden in the United States. Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is an intervention associated with improved hemoglobin A1c(HbA1c) and quality of life(QOL), and is recommended for all individuals with type 2 diabetes. African-Americans have disproportionate type 2 diabetes morbidity and mortality, yet no prior meta-analyses have examined DSME outcomes exclusively in this population. This systematic review and meta-analysis examined the impact of DSME on HbA1c and QOL in African-Americans compared to usual care. Randomized controlled trials, cluster-randomized trials, and quasi-experimental interventions were included. 352 citations were retrieved; 279 abstracts were reviewed, and 44 full-text articles were reviewed. Fourteen studies were eligible for systematic review and 8 for HbA1c meta-analysis; QOL measures were too heterogeneous to pool. Heterogeneity of HbA1c findings was assessed with Cochran's Q and I 2 . HbA1c weighted mean difference between intervention and usual care participants was not significant: - 0.08%[- 0.40-0.23];χ 2  = 84.79 (p < .001), I 2  = 92%, (n = 1630). Four of five studies measuring QOL reported significant improvements for intervention participants. Meta-analysis results showed non-significant effect of DSME on HbA1c in African-Americans. QOL did show improvement and is an important DSME outcome to measure in future trials. Further research is needed to understand effectiveness of DSME on HbA1c in this population. PROSPERO registration: CRD42017057282 .

  5. Associations between lower urinary tract dysfunction and glycemic control in women with type 2 diabetes: A cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Huai-Ching; Tai, Tong-Yuan; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Wang, Shin-Wei; Yu, Hong-Jeng

    2016-04-01

    Patients with diabetes are predisposed to develop a variety of complications, including lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction. We aimed to examine the associations between glycemic control and LUT dysfunction in women with type 2 diabetes (T2D). We included 400 women with T2D (age range, 48-75 years) in this cross-sectional analysis. The participants were divided into tertiles according to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) measurements. The mean HbA1c levels for tertiles 1, 2, and 3 were 6.2% (N=132), 7.1% (N=132), and 8.4% (N=136), respectively. We evaluated LUT dysfunction with the American Urological Association Symptom Index (AUA-SI) questionnaire, uroflowmetry (UFM), and post-void residual (PVR). No significant differences were found among HbA1c tertiles regarding storage, voiding and total AUA-SI scores, and prevalence of LUT symptoms. However, women in tertile 3 had higher prevalences of severe LUT symptoms (AUA-SI≥20) and clinically significant PVR (≥100mL) compared to women in the other tertiles. Multivariate analysis revealed that diabetic neuropathy, but not HbA1c, significantly predicted LUT symptoms in women with T2D after adjustment for age, body mass index (BMI) and hypertension. However, HbA1c was associated with an increased risk of developing clinically significant PVR. Our findings do not support significant associations between glycemic control and LUT symptoms in women with T2D. However, women with poor glycemic control are more likely to develop urinary retention than women with proper glycemic control. Clinicians should, therefore, be aware of and educate patients about the association between urinary retention and glycemic control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of Erythropoiesis-Stimulating Agents on HbA1c and Fructosamine in Patients with Haemodialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasche, Franz Maximilian; Ebert, Thomas; Beckmann, Julia; Busch, Volker; Barinka, Filip; Rasche, Wilma Gertrud; Lindner, Tom H; Schneider, Jochen G; Schiekofer, Stephan

    2017-06-01

    HbA1c is the most accepted laboratory parameter for the long term observation of glucose control. There is still much of a debate about the use of HbA1c as a metabolic indicator in diabetic patients (DM) on haemodialysis (HD) and erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA) therapy because of the altered erythrocyte turn over in patients with chronic kidney disease and haemodialysis (CKD5D). In 102 CKD5 patients with and without diabetes mellitus, we examined the dose dependent variability in HbA1c and fructosamine levels under haemodialysis and treated with epoetin α (n=48) and a new generation agent with continuous stimulation of methoxy polyethylene glycol epoetin beta (C.E.R.A.; n=54). HbA1c levels were affected by therapy with ESA treatments. ESA dose was inversely correlated with HbA1c and an escalation of 10.000 IU per week induced an estimated decrease of HbA1c of 0.6 percent. In addition, the increase of reticulocyte number as a marker for erythropoiesis was significantly inversely correlated with the increase of ΔHbA1c. ESA treatments had no such effect on the alternative metabolic parameter fructosamine. When compared, both therapeutic agents had comparable success in attaining haemoglobin (Hb) target values. C.E.R.A. showed better correlation and was more effective over a longer dose interval. Our results show that HbA1c levels in patients should be carefully interpreted based on interfering factors. Nevertheless, HbA1c is currently the most consistent parameter for use ascertaining metabolic status of patients suffering from diabetes mellitus. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. Associations between gestational diabetes mellitus and elevated HbA1c early postpartum in a multi-ethnic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waage, Christin; Jenum, Anne Karen; Mdala, Ibrahimu; Berg, Jens Petter; Richardsen, Kåre; Birkeland, Kåre

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence of elevated HbA 1c 14 weeks postpartum in different ethnic groups and in women with and without gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in the index pregnancy and to explore demographic and biological factors from early pregnancy associated with elevated HbA 1c (HbA 1c ≥5.7% (≥39mmol/mol)) postpartum. From a cohort study in Oslo, Norway, we included 570 pregnant women, examined in gestational week 15, 28, and 14 weeks postpartum. The association between elevated HbA 1c and demographic and biological factors were assessed by logistic regression analyses. The prevalence of elevated HbA 1c postpartum was 23% in the total population, 15% among Western Europeans and 28% among women with ethnic minority background (p<0.01). In ethnic minorities elevated HbA 1c was found in 39% of women with recent GDM diagnosed by the World Health Organization 2013 criteria and in 21% of women without GDM (p<0.01), compared to 22% and 13% in Western Europeans (p=0.11). We found independent associations between elevated HbA 1c and ethnic minority background (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.27, 3.18), and GDM (OR 2.04, 95% CI 1.35, 3.10) (p<0.01). The prevalence of elevated HbA 1c postpartum was 23%, and significantly higher among women with ethnic minority background irrespective of GDM. Copyright © 2016 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving access to HbA1c in sub-Saharan Africa (IA3) cohort: cohort profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balde, Naby; Camara, Alioune; Sobngwi-Tambekou, Joelle; Balti, Eric Vounsia; Tchatchoua, Alain; Fezeu, Leopold; Limen, Serge; Ngamani, Sylvie; Ngapout, Suzanne; Kengne, Andre Pascal; Sobngwi, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is the best surrogate of average blood glucose control in diabetic patients, and lowering HbA1c significantly reduces diabetes complications. Moreover, immediate feedback of HbA1c measurement to patients may improve control. However, HbA1c is unavailable in most parts of Africa, a continent with one of the highest burden of diabetes. To translate these evidences, we are conducting a multicentric project in 10 health care facilities in Guinea and Cameroon to evaluate the feasibility and one-year benefit of affordable HbA1c measurement with immediate feedback to patients on diabetes control and related outcomes. We consecutively enrolled patients with diabetes mellitus independently of the type of disease. We hypothesised an average 1%-decrease in HbA1c in a 1000-patient study population, with a 20% increase in the number of patients reaching treatment goals within 12 months of intervention and follow-up. A total of 1, 349 diabetic patients aged 56.2±12.6 years are enrolled (813 in Cameroon and 536 in Guinea) of whom 59.8% are women. The mean duration of diabetes is 7.4±6.3 years and baseline HbA1c is 9.7±2.6% in Guinea and 8.6±2.5% in Cameroon. To investigate whether the introduction of routine HbA1c measurement with immediate feedback to patients and provision of relevant education would improve diabetes control after one year. The impact of the intervention on diabetes associated-complications and mortality warrant further assessment in the long term.

  9. A STUDY TO CORRELATE HBA1C LEVELS AND LEFT VENTRICULAR DIASTOLIC DYSFUNCTION IN NEWLY DIAGNOSED TYPE II DIABETES MELLITUS

    OpenAIRE

    Vasanthi; Namitha; Jayanthi; Elangumanan; Mohamed; Uma Maheshwari; Pravin Selvam; Santhi

    2016-01-01

    AIM To assess the correlation of HBA1C levels with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in newly diagnosed Type 2 diabetic patient. This prospective study was done at Department of General Medicine, OPD, Medical Wards, Stanley Medical College and Hospital, Chennai. RESULT The mean HBA1C levels were meaningfully more in Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction (LVDD) positive group compared to the LVDD negative group by 1.33%. This significant difference of 15% increase in...

  10. Comparison of a point-of-care analyser for the determination of HbA1c with HPLC method

    OpenAIRE

    Grant, D.A.; Dunseath, G.J.; Churm, R.; Luzio, S.D.

    2017-01-01

    Aims: As the use of Point of Care Testing (POCT) devices for measurement of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) increases, it is imperative to determine how their performance compares to laboratory methods. This study compared the performance of the automated Quo-Test POCT device (EKF Diagnostics), which uses boronate fluorescence quenching technology, with a laboratory based High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) method (Biorad D10) for measurement of HbA1c. Methods: Whole blood EDTA samples...

  11. Trimester-specific reference intervals for haemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) in pregnancy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Catherine

    2011-11-26

    Abstract Background: Diabetes in pregnancy imposes additional risks to both mother and infant. These increased risks are considered to be primarily related to glycaemic control which is monitored by means of glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)). The correlation of HbA(1c) with clinical outcomes emphasises the need to measure HbA(1c) accurately, precisely and for correct interpretation, comparison to appropriately defined reference intervals. Since July 2010, the HbA(1c) assay in Irish laboratories is fully metrologically traceable to the IFCC standard. The objective was to establish trimester-specific reference intervals in pregnancy for IFCC standardised HbA(1c) in non-diabetic Caucasian women. Methods: The authors recruited 311 non-diabetic Caucasian pregnant (n=246) and non-pregnant women (n=65). A selective screening based on risk factors for gestational diabetes was employed. All subjects had a random plasma glucose <7.7 mmol\\/L and normal haemoglobin level. Pregnancy trimester was defined as trimester 1 (T1, n=40) up to 12 weeks +6 days, trimester 2 (T2, n=106) 13-27 weeks +6 days, trimester 3 (T3, n=100) >28 weeks to term. Results: The normal HbA(1c) reference interval for Caucasian non-pregnant women was 29-37 mmol\\/mol (Diabetes Control and Complications Trial; DCCT: 4.8%-5.5%), T1: 24-36 mmol\\/mol (DCCT: 4.3%-5.4%), T2: 25-35 mmol\\/mol (DCCT: 4.4%-5.4%) and T3: 28-39 mmol\\/mol (DCCT: 4.7%-5.7%). HbA(1c) was significantly decreased in trimesters 1 and 2 compared to non-pregnant women. Conclusions: HbA(1c) trimester-specific reference intervals are required to better inform the management of pregnancies complicated by diabetes.

  12. Effect of the systemic inflammatory response, as provoked by elective orthopaedic surgery, on HbA1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadburn, Andrew J; Garman, Elizabeth; Abbas, Raad; Modupe, Anu; Ford, Clare; Thomas, Osmond L; Chugh, Sanjiv; Deshpande, Shreeram; Gama, Rousseau

    2017-07-01

    Background In acutely ill patients with new onset hyperglycaemia, plasma glucose cannot reliably distinguish between stress hyperglycaemia and undiagnosed diabetes mellitus. We, therefore, investigated the diagnostic reliability of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in acute illness by prospectively evaluating the effect of the systemic inflammatory response, as provoked by elective orthopaedic surgery, on HbA 1c . Methods HbA 1c and serum C-reactive protein concentrations were compared before and two days after elective knee or hip surgery in 30 patients without diabetes. C-reactive protein was used to assess the systemic inflammatory response. Results The mean (standard deviation) serum C-reactive protein increased following surgery (4.8 [7.5] vs. 179.7 [61.9] mg/L; P<0.0001). HbA 1c was similar before and after surgery (39.2 [5.4] vs. 38.1 [5.1] mmol/moL, respectively; P = 0.4363). Conclusions HbA 1c is unaffected within two days of a systemic inflammatory response as provoked by elective orthopaedic surgery. This suggests that HbA 1c may be able to differentiate newly presenting type 2 diabetes mellitus from stress hyperglycaemia in acutely ill patients with new onset hyperglycaemia.

  13. Health Coaching Reduces HbA1c in Type 2 Diabetic Patients From a Lower-Socioeconomic Status Community: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Noah; Perez, Daniel F; Kaplan, David M; Ritvo, Paul

    2015-10-05

    Adoptions of health behaviors are crucial for maintaining good health after type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) diagnoses. However, adherence to glucoregulating behaviors like regular exercise and balanced diet can be challenging, especially for people living in lower-socioeconomic status (SES) communities. Providing cost-effective interventions that improve self-management is important for improving quality of life and the sustainability of health care systems. To evaluate a health coach intervention with and without the use of mobile phones to support health behavior change in patients with type 2 diabetes. In this noninferiority, pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT), patients from two primary care health centers in Toronto, Canada, with type 2 diabetes and a glycated hemoglobin/hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of ≥7.3% (56.3 mmol/mol) were randomized to receive 6 months of health coaching with or without mobile phone monitoring support. We hypothesized that both approaches would result in significant HbA1c reductions, although health coaching with mobile phone monitoring would result in significantly larger effects. Participants were evaluated at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The primary outcome was the change in HbA1c from baseline to 6 months (difference between and within groups). Other outcomes included weight, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), satisfaction with life, depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), positive and negative affect (Positive and Negative Affect Schedule [PANAS]), and quality of life (Short Form Health Survey-12 [SF-12]). A total of 138 patients were randomized and 7 were excluded for a substudy; of the remaining 131, 67 were allocated to the intervention group and 64 to the control group. Primary outcome data were available for 97 participants (74.0%). While both groups reduced their HbA1c levels, there were no significant between-group differences in change of HbA1c at 6 months using

  14. Health Coaching Reduces HbA1c in Type 2 Diabetic Patients From a Lower-Socioeconomic Status Community: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wayne, Noah; Perez, Daniel F; Kaplan, David M

    2015-01-01

    Background Adoptions of health behaviors are crucial for maintaining good health after type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) diagnoses. However, adherence to glucoregulating behaviors like regular exercise and balanced diet can be challenging, especially for people living in lower-socioeconomic status (SES) communities. Providing cost-effective interventions that improve self-management is important for improving quality of life and the sustainability of health care systems. Objective To evaluate a health coach intervention with and without the use of mobile phones to support health behavior change in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods In this noninferiority, pragmatic randomized controlled trial (RCT), patients from two primary care health centers in Toronto, Canada, with type 2 diabetes and a glycated hemoglobin/hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level of ≥7.3% (56.3 mmol/mol) were randomized to receive 6 months of health coaching with or without mobile phone monitoring support. We hypothesized that both approaches would result in significant HbA1c reductions, although health coaching with mobile phone monitoring would result in significantly larger effects. Participants were evaluated at baseline, 3 months, and 6 months. The primary outcome was the change in HbA1c from baseline to 6 months (difference between and within groups). Other outcomes included weight, waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), satisfaction with life, depression and anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale [HADS]), positive and negative affect (Positive and Negative Affect Schedule [PANAS]), and quality of life (Short Form Health Survey-12 [SF-12]). Results A total of 138 patients were randomized and 7 were excluded for a substudy; of the remaining 131, 67 were allocated to the intervention group and 64 to the control group. Primary outcome data were available for 97 participants (74.0%). While both groups reduced their HbA1c levels, there were no significant between-group differences in

  15. Shared Responsibility for Type 1 Diabetes Care Is Associated With Glycemic Variability and Risk of Glycemic Excursions in Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marker, Arwen M; Noser, Amy E; Clements, Mark A; Patton, Susana R

    2018-01-01

    We examined how parent and youth responsibility for type 1 diabetes (T1D) care is related to adherence and glycemic outcomes, namely, glycemic variability and risk of glycemic excursions. One hundred thirty-five parent-youth dyads (10-16 years old; diagnosed with T1D for at least 6 months) participated in this study. Percent responsibility of T1D care attributed to the youth, parent, or shared was measured using the Diabetes Family Responsibility Questionnaire. We collected youth's hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and glucometer downloads to examine relationships between responsibility and HbA1c, frequency of blood glucose monitoring (self-monitoring blood glucose, SMBG), risk of glycemic excursions, and actual glycemic variability using bivariate correlations and path analysis. Participants reported shared responsibility for almost half of T1D self-care tasks. Bivariate correlations showed shared responsibility was associated with less variability, whereas parent responsibility was associated with greater glycemic variability and risk for glycemic excursions. Youth responsibility was associated with lower frequency of SMBG. The path analyses confirmed our correlational findings (pshypothesis that shared T1D responsibility is associated with better diabetes outcomes in youth. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Diabetes, glycemic control, and urinary incontinence in women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Lefevre, Roger; Hacker, Michele R.; Golen, Toni H.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To estimate the association between urinary incontinence and glycemic control in women ages 20 to 85. METHODS We included 7,270 women from the 2005–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, stratified into three groups of glycemic control defined by hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c): i) those below the diagnostic threshold (HbA1c8.5%) to allow for a different relationship between glycemic control and urinary incontinence within each group. The primary outcomes were the presence of any, only stress, only urgency, and mixed urinary incontinence. We calculated adjusted risk ratios using Poisson regressions with robust variance estimates. RESULTS The survey-weighted prevalence was 52.9% for any, 27.2% for only stress, 9.9% for only urgency, and 15.8% for mixed urinary incontinence. Among women with relatively controlled diabetes, each one-unit increase in HbA1c was associated with a 13% (95% CI: 1.03–1.25) increase for any urinary incontinence and a 34% (95% CI 1.06–1.69) increase in risk for only stress incontinence but was not significantly associated with only urgency and mixed incontinence. Other risk factors included body mass index, hormone replacement therapy, smoking, and physical activity. CONCLUSIONS Worsening glycemic control is associated with an increased risk for stress incontinence for women with relatively controlled diabetes. For those either below the diagnostic threshold or with poorly controlled diabetes, the risk may be driven by other factors. Further prospective investigation of HbA1c as a modifiable risk factor may motivate measures to improve continence in women with diabetes. PMID:26313496

  17. Relationship between Hb and HbA1c in Japanese adults: an analysis of the 2009 Japan Society of Ningen Dock database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Eiko; Moriyama, Kengo; Yamakado, Minoru

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the effect of Hb on HbA1c levels in 265,427 Japanese individuals. The divergence between fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c levels increased with lower Hb, resulting in HbA1c levels that were higher in relation to than the FPG levels. Similarly, the correlation between FPG and HbA1c levels, stratified by Hb, weakened as Hb decreased. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Performance of HbA1c as an early diagnostic indicator of type 1 diabetes in children and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehik, Kendra; Cuthbertson, David; Boulware, David; Beam, Craig A; Rodriguez, Henry; Legault, Laurent; Hyytinen, Mila; Rewers, Marian J; Schatz, Desmond A; Krischer, Jeffrey P

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate HbA(1c) as an alternative criterion for impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) or type 1 diabetes (T1D) in high-risk subjects TrialNet Natural History (TrialNet) studies and had an HbA(1c) within 90 days of an OGTT with a 2-h plasma glucose (2-hPG) measure were included. An OGTT of 140-199 mg/dL defined IGT, and an OGTT with 2-hPG ≥200 mg/dL or fasting plasma glucose ≥126 mg/dL defined diabetes. HbA(1c) ≥5.7% defined IGT, and HbA(1c) ≥ 6.5% defined diabetes. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was used to assess diagnostic accuracy of HbA(1c) compared with OGTT. There were 587 subjects from DPT-1, 884 from TrialNet, 91 from TEDDY, and 420 from TRIGR. As an indicator for IGT, HbA(1c) sensitivity was very low across the studies (8-42%), and specificity was variable (64-95%). With HbA(1c) ≥6.5% threshold used for T1D diagnosis, the sensitivity was very low and specificity was high (sensitivity and specificity: DPT-1 24 and 98%, TrialNet 28 and 99%, TEDDY 34 and 98%, and TRIGR 33 and 99%, respectively). The positive predictive value of HbA(1c) ≥6.5% for the development of T1D was variable (50-94%) across the four studies. HbA(1c) ≥6.5% is a specific but not sensitive early indicator for T1D in high-risk subjects <21 years of age diagnosed by OGTT or asymptomatic hyperglycemia. Redefining the HbA(1c) threshold is recommended if used as an alternative criterion in diagnosing T1D.

  19. Prevalence and phenotype of diabetes and prediabetes using fasting glucose vs HbA1c in a Caribbean population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unwin, Nigel; Howitt, Christina; Rose, Angela Mc; Samuels, T Alafia; Hennis, Anselm Jm; Hambleton, Ian R

    2017-12-01

    Both fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and HbA1c are recommended for the diagnosis of diabetes and prediabetes by the American Diabetes Association (ADA), and for diabetes by the World Health Organization. The ADA guidance is influential on clinical practice in many developing countries, including in the Caribbean and Latin America. We aimed to compare the prevalence and characteristics of individuals identified as having diabetes and prediabetes by FPG and HbA1c in a predominantly African ancestry Caribbean population. A representative population-based sample of 1234 adults (≥25 years of age) resident in Barbados was recruited. Standard methods with appropriate quality control were used to collect data on height, weight, blood pressure, fasting lipids and history of diagnosed diabetes, and to measure fasting glucose and HbA1c. Those with previously diagnosed diabetes (n = 192) were excluded from the analyses. Diabetes was defined as: FPG ≥7.0 mmol/L or HbA1c ≥6.5%; prediabetes as: FPG ≥5.6 to prediabetes was higher by HbA1c compared to FPG: 41.7% (37.9, 45.6) vs 15.0% (12.8, 17.5). Overall 558 individuals had prediabetes by either measure, but only 107 on both. HbA1c, but not FPG, was significantly higher in women than men; and FPG, but not HbA1c, was significantly associated with raised triglycerides and low HDL cholesterol. The agreement between FPG and HbA1c defined hyperglycaemia is poor. In addition, there are some differences in the phenotype of those identified, and HbA1c gives a much higher prevalence of prediabetes. The routine use of HbA1c for screening and diagnosis in this population would have major implications for clinical and public health policies and resources. Given the lack of robust evidence, particularly for prediabetes, on whether intervention in the individuals identified would improve outcomes, this approach to screening and diagnosis cannot be currently recommended for this population.

  20. Statins are independently associated with increased HbA1c in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Magnus Thorsten; Andersen, Henrik Ullits; Rossing, Peter

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: Statin use has been associated with increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and with impaired glycemic control in T2DM patients. The association between statin use and glycemic control in type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is unknown. The association between use of statins and glycemic con...

  1. Adherence to A Diabetic Care Plan Provides Better Glycemic Control in Ambulatory Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Wen Chiu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Tight control of blood sugar improves the outcomes for diabetic patients, but it can only be achieved by adhering to a well-organized care plan. To evaluate the effect of a diabetes care plan with reinforcement of glycemic control in diabetic patients, 98 ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes who visited our diabetes clinic every 3–4 months and who completed four education courses given by certified diabetes educators within 3 months after the first visit, were defined as the Intervention group. A total of 82 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria for the Intervention group but who missed at least half of the diabetes education sessions were selected as controls. Both groups had comparable mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels at baseline, which decreased significantly at 3 months and were maintained at approximately constant levels at intervals for up to 1 year. The HbA1c decrement in the Intervention group was significantly greater than that in the Control group over the 1-year follow-up period (HbA1c change: −2.5 ± 1.8% vs. −1.1 ± 1.7%, p < 0.01. The maximal HbA1c decrement occurred during the first 3 months, and accounted for 95.6% and 94.6% of the total HbA1c decrements in the Intervention and Control groups, respectively. In the multiple regression model, after adjustment for age, body mass index, and duration of diabetes, the Intervention group may still have a 12.6% improvement in HbA1c from their original value to the end of 1 year treatment compared with the Control group (p < 0.05. Diabetes care, with reinforcement from certified diabetes educators, significantly improved and maintained the effects on glycemic control in ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes.

  2. A novel glycated hemoglobin A1c-lowering traditional Chinese medicinal formula, identified by translational medicine study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Yi Lo

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder that has a significant impact on the health care system. The reduction of glycated hemoglobin A1c is highly associated with the improvements of glycemic control and diabetic complications. In this study, we identified a traditional Chinese medicinal formula with a HbA1c-lowering potential from clinical evidences. By surveying 9,973 diabetic patients enrolled in Taiwan Diabetic Care Management Program, we found that Chu-Yeh-Shih-Kao-Tang (CYSKT significantly reduced HbA1c values in diabetic patients. CYSKT reduced the levels of HbA1c and fasting blood glucose, and stimulated the blood glucose clearance in type 2 diabetic mice. CYSKT affected the expressions of genes associated with insulin signaling pathway, increased the amount of phosphorylated insulin receptor in cells and tissues, and stimulated the translocation of glucose transporter 4. Moreover, CYSKT affected the expressions of genes related to diabetic complications, improved the levels of renal function indexes, and increased the survival rate of diabetic mice. In conclusion, this was a translational medicine study that applied a "bedside-to-bench" approach to identify a novel HbA1c-lowering formula. Our findings suggested that oral administration of CYSKT affected insulin signaling pathway, decreased HbA1c and blood glucose levels, and consequently reduced mortality rate in type 2 diabetic mice.

  3. Translating HbA1c measurements into estimated average glucose values in pregnant women with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Graham R; Gilthorpe, Mark S; Secher, Anna L; Temple, Rosemary; Bilous, Rudolf; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Murphy, Helen R; Scott, Eleanor M

    2017-04-01

    This study aimed to examine the relationship between average glucose levels, assessed by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), and HbA 1c levels in pregnant women with diabetes to determine whether calculations of standard estimated average glucose (eAG) levels from HbA 1c measurements are applicable to pregnant women with diabetes. CGM data from 117 pregnant women (89 women with type 1 diabetes; 28 women with type 2 diabetes) were analysed. Average glucose levels were calculated from 5-7 day CGM profiles (mean 1275 glucose values per profile) and paired with a corresponding (±1 week) HbA 1c measure. In total, 688 average glucose-HbA 1c pairs were obtained across pregnancy (mean six pairs per participant). Average glucose level was used as the dependent variable in a regression model. Covariates were gestational week, study centre and HbA 1c . There was a strong association between HbA 1c and average glucose values in pregnancy (coefficient 0.67 [95% CI 0.57, 0.78]), i.e. a 1% (11 mmol/mol) difference in HbA 1c corresponded to a 0.67 mmol/l difference in average glucose. The random effects model that included gestational week as a curvilinear (quadratic) covariate fitted best, allowing calculation of a pregnancy-specific eAG (PeAG). This showed that an HbA 1c of 8.0% (64 mmol/mol) gave a PeAG of 7.4-7.7 mmol/l (depending on gestational week), compared with a standard eAG of 10.2 mmol/l. The PeAG associated with maintaining an HbA 1c level of 6.0% (42 mmol/mol) during pregnancy was between 6.4 and 6.7 mmol/l, depending on gestational week. The HbA 1c -average glucose relationship is altered by pregnancy. Routinely generated standard eAG values do not account for this difference between pregnant and non-pregnant individuals and, thus, should not be used during pregnancy. Instead, the PeAG values deduced in the current study are recommended for antenatal clinical care.

  4. Energy balance and macronutrient distribution in relation to C-reactive protein and HbA1c levels among patients with type 2 diabetes

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    Hiba Bawadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recently growing evidence indicates that obesity and diabetes are states of inflammation associated with elevated circulation of inflammatory mediators. Excess adiposity and oxidative stress, induced by feeding, may also lead to a state of low-grade inflammation. Objective: This study aimed at investigating energy balance and distribution in relation to low-grade inflammation among patients with type 2 diabetes. Design: A cross-sectional study included 198 male and female patients with type 2 diabetes. Patients’ weight, height, waist circumference, total body fat and truncal fat percent, energy, and macronutrient intake were measured. Venous blood specimens were collected, and levels of HbA1c and serum levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP were determined. Results: After adjusting for covariates (body mass index, total body fat, and truncal fat, energy balance was positively correlated with hs-CRP and HbA1c. A positive energy balance was also associated with increased waist circumference and truncal fat percent (p<0.05. Total energy intake, percent energy from fat (p=0.04, and percent energy from proteins (p=0.03, but not percent energy from carbohydrates (p=0.12, were also correlated with higher hs-CRP levels among poorly glycemic-controlled patients. Conclusion: Positive energy balance is associated with elevations in hs-CRP. Increased energy intake and increased percentages of energy from fat and protein are associated with elevated hs-CRP among patients with poor glycemic control.

  5. Relationship of Glucose Variability With Glycated Hemoglobin and Daily Mean Glucose: A Post Hoc Analysis of Data From 5 Phase 3 Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Junxiang; Qu, Yongming; Zhang, Qianyi; Chang, Annette M; Jacober, Scott J

    2018-03-01

    The association of glucose variability (GV) with other glycemic measures is emerging as a topic of interest. The aim of this analysis is to study the correlation between GV and measures of glycemic control, such as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and daily mean glucose (DMG). Data from 5 phase 3 trials were pooled into 3 analysis groups: type 2 diabetes (T2D) treated with basal insulin only, T2D treated with basal-bolus therapy, and type 1 diabetes (T1D). A generalized boosted model was used post hoc to assess the relationship of the following variables with glycemic control parameters (HbA1c and DMG): within-day GV, between-day GV (calculated using self-monitored blood glucose and fasting blood glucose [FBG]), hypoglycemia rate, and certain baseline characteristics. Within-day GV (calculated using standard deviation [SD]) was found to have a significant influence on endpoints HbA1c and DMG in all 3 patient groups. Between-day GV from FBG (calculated using SD), within-day GV (calculated using coefficient of variation), and hypoglycemia rate were found to significantly influence the endpoint HbA1c in the T2D basal-only group. Lower within-day GV was significantly associated with improvement in DMG and HbA1c. This finding suggests that GV could be a marker in the early phases of new antihyperglycemic therapy development for predicting clinical outcomes in terms of HbA1c and DMG.

  6. Total energy intake may be more associated with glycemic control compared to each proportion of macronutrients in the korean diabetic population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye Mi; Kim, Dong-Jun

    2012-08-01

    Major macronutrients for energy intake vary among countries and cultures. Carbohydrates, including rice, are the major component of daily energy intake in Korea. The aim of this study was to examine the association of daily energy intake or each proportion of macronutrients, especially carbohydrates, with glycemic control in diabetic Koreans. A total of 334 individuals with diabetes (175 men, age 57.4±0.8 years; 159 women, age 60.9±0.9 years) who participated in the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were examined. Glycemic control was categorized based on concentration of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c; HbA1c ≤6.5%; 6.6% to 8.0%; ≥8.1%). Dietary intake was assessed by using a 24-recall item questionnaire. High total energy intake was associated with poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≤6.5%, 1,824±75 kcal; 6.6% to 8.0%, 1,990±57 kcal; ≥8.1%, 2,144±73 kcal; P value for trend=0.002). Each proportion of protein, fat, or carbohydrate was not associated with glycemic control. Even after adjusting for several parameters, the association of daily energy intake with glycemic control still persisted. Total energy intake may be more closely related to glycemic control than each proportionof macronutrients in Korean diabetics.

  7. Total Energy Intake May Be More Associated with Glycemic Control Compared to Each Proportion of Macronutrients in the Korean Diabetic Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye Mi Kang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundMajor macronutrients for energy intake vary among countries and cultures. Carbohydrates, including rice, are the major component of daily energy intake in Korea. The aim of this study was to examine the association of daily energy intake or each proportion of macronutrients, especially carbohydrates, with glycemic control in diabetic Koreans.MethodsA total of 334 individuals with diabetes (175 men, age 57.4±0.8 years; 159 women, age 60.9±0.9 years who participated in the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were examined. Glycemic control was categorized based on concentration of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c; HbA1c ≤6.5%; 6.6% to 8.0%; ≥8.1%. Dietary intake was assessed by using a 24-recall item questionnaire.ResultsHigh total energy intake was associated with poor glycemic control (HbA1c ≤6.5%, 1,824±75 kcal; 6.6% to 8.0%, 1,990±57 kcal; ≥8.1%, 2,144±73 kcal; P value for trend=0.002. Each proportion of protein, fat, or carbohydrate was not associated with glycemic control. Even after adjusting for several parameters, the association of daily energy intake with glycemic control still persisted.ConclusionTotal energy intake may be more closely related to glycemic control than each proportionof macronutrients in Korean diabetics.

  8. Correlation Between Glycated Hemoglobin and Homa Indices in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Prediction of Beta-Cell Function from Glycated Hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hakeim, Hussein Kadhem; Abdulzahra, Mohammed Saied

    2015-04-01

    The present study aimed to determine the most efficient insulin resistance function related to glycemic control expressed as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients (T2DM). The other aim is to derive equations for the prediction of beta cell functions containing HbA1c as a parameter in addition to fasting glucose and insulin. T2DM Patients were grouped according to the following: (1) degree of control (good, fair, and poor control) and (2) insulin resistance as observed in obtained data and significant differences revealed by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA) of related parameters (insulin resistance = HOMA2IR, beta-cell function = HOMA%B, and insulin sensitivity = HOMA%S) among groups. Correlations and forecasting regression analysis were calculated. HbA1c was found to be correlated with insulin resistance parameters in T2DM subgroups. This correlation was also significantly correlated with HOMA%B and the quantitative insulin sensitivity check index (QUICKI) in fair and poor control groups. Regression analysis was used to predict the forecasting equations for HOMA%B. The best applicable equations were derived for healthy control (HOMA2%B=-1.76*FBG+5.00*Insulin+4.69*HbA1c+189.84) and poor control groups (HOMA2%B=0.001* FBG+0.5*Insulin-8.67*HbA1c+101.96). These equations could be used to predict β-cell function (HOMA%B) after FBG, insulin and HbA1c values were obtained for healthy and poor control groups. In the good and fair control groups, the applicability of the HOMA model fails to yield appropriate results. Beta-cell function is correlated with QUICKI and HbA1c and could be predicted properly from HbA1c, insulin, and glucose in the healthy and poor control groups. New regression equations were established that involve HbA1c.

  9. Body mass index standard deviation score and obesity in children with type 1 diabetes in the Nordic countries. HbA1c and other predictors of increasing BMISDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkebaek, N H; Kahlert, J; Bjarnason, R; Drivvoll, A K; Johansen, A; Konradsdottir, E; Pundziute-Lyckå, A; Samuelsson, U; Skrivarhaug, T; Svensson, J

    2018-05-21

    Intensified insulin therapy may increase body weight and cause obesity. This study compared body mass index standard deviation score (BMISDS) and obesity rate in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in Denmark, Iceland, Norway and Sweden, and uncovered predictors for increasing BMISDS. Data registered in the Nordic national childhood diabetes databases during the period 2008-2012 on children below 15 years with T1D for more than 3 months were compiled, including information on gender, age, diabetes duration, hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ), insulin dose, severe hypoglycemia (SH), treatment modality, height and weight. The Swedish reference chart for BMI was used for calculating BMISDS. Totally, 11 025 children (48% females) (30 994 registrations) were included. Medians by the last recorded examination were: age, 13.5 years; diabetes duration, 4.3 years; HbA 1c , 7.9% (63 mmol/mol); insulin dose, 0.8 IU/kg/d and BMISDS, 0.70. Obesity rate was 18.5%. Adjusted mean BMISDS (BMISDS adj) was inversely related to HbA 1c and directly to diabetes duration. Higher BMISDS adj was found in those with an insulin dose above 0.6 IU/kg/d, and in girls above 10 years. Pump users had higher BMISDS adj than pen users, and patients with registered SH had higher BMISDS adj than patients without SH (both P < .001). Obesity rate in children with T1D in the Nordic countries is high, however, with country differences. Low HbA 1c , long diabetes duration, higher insulin dose, pump treatment and experiencing a SH predicted higher BMISDS. Diabetes caregivers should balance the risk of obesity and the benefit of a very low HbA 1c. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Alcohol consumption reduces HbA1c and glycated albumin concentrations but not 1,5-anhydroglucitol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inada, Shinya; Koga, Masafumi

    2017-11-01

    Background The effect of alcohol consumption on glycaemic control indicators is not well known. In this study, we studied the effect of alcohol consumption on the plasma glucose and glycaemic control indicators in non-diabetic men. Methods The study enrolled 300 non-diabetic men who received a complete medical checkup (age: 52.8 ± 6.5 years, body mass index: 24.4 ± 2.8 kg/m 2 ). The subjects were divided into four groups by the amount of alcohol consumed, and the plasma glucose, HbA1c, glycated albumin (GA) and 1,5-anhydroglucitol (1,5-AG) concentrations of the groups were compared. Results As the level of alcohol consumption increased, significantly high concentrations of fasting plasma glucose (FPG) were observed, and the oral glucose tolerance test 2-h plasma glucose concentrations tended to rise. While no significant effect of alcohol consumption on HbA1c, 1,5-AG, and the 1,5-AG/FPG ratio was observed, the HbA1c/FPG ratio, GA and the GA/FPG ratio exhibited significantly low values as the level of alcohol consumption increased. In stepwise multivariate regression analysis, alcohol consumption was a significant negative independent variable for HbA1c and GA, but not for 1,5-AG. Conclusions As the level of alcohol consumption increased, the plasma glucose concentrations rose, but the HbA1c and GA concentrations were lower compared with the plasma glucose concentrations. These findings suggest that alcohol consumption may reduce HbA1c and GA concentrations, but not 1,5-AG.

  11. Impact of demographics and disease progression on the relationship between glucose and HbA1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claussen, Anetta; Møller, Jonas B; Kristensen, Niels R; Klim, Søren; Kjellsson, Maria C; Ingwersen, Steen H; Karlsson, Mats O

    2017-06-15

    Several studies have shown that the relationship between mean plasma glucose (MPG) and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) may vary across populations. Especially race has previously been referred to shift the regression line that links MPG to HbA1c at steady-state (Herman & Cohen, 2012). To assess the influence of demographic and disease progression-related covariates on the intercept of the estimated linear MPG-HbA1c relationship in a longitudinal model. Longitudinal patient-level data from 16 late-phase trials in type 2 diabetes with a total of 8927 subjects was used to study covariates for the relationship between MPG and HbA1c. The analysed covariates included age group, BMI, gender, race, diabetes duration, and pre-trial treatment. Differences between trials were taken into account by estimating a trial-to-trial variability component. Participants included 47% females and 20% above 65years. 77% were Caucasian, 9% were Asian, 5% were Black and the remaining 9% were analysed together as other races. Estimates of the change in the intercept of the MPG-HbA1c relationship due to the mentioned covariates were determined using a longitudinal model. The analysis showed that pre-trial treatment with insulin had the most pronounced impact associated with a 0.34% higher HbA1c at a given MPG. However, race, diabetes duration and age group also had an impact on the MPG-HbA1c relationship. Our analysis shows that the relationship between MPG and HbA1c is relatively insensitive to covariates, but shows small variations across populations, which may be relevant to take into account when predicting HbA1c response based on MPG measurements in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. HbA1c and Gestational Weight Gain Are Factors that Influence Neonatal Outcome in Mothers with Gestational Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barquiel, Beatriz; Herranz, Lucrecia; Hillman, Natalia; Burgos, Ma Ángeles; Grande, Cristina; Tukia, Keleni M; Bartha, José Luis; Pallardo, Luis Felipe

    2016-06-01

    Maternal glucose and weight gain are related to neonatal outcome in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). The aim of this study was to explore the influence of average third-trimester HbA1c and excess gestational weight gain on GDM neonatal complications. This observational study included 2037 Spanish singleton pregnant women with GDM followed in our Diabetes and Pregnancy Unit. The maternal HbA1c level was measured monthly from GDM diagnosis to delivery. Women were compared by average HbA1c level and weight gain categorized into ≤ or > the current Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations for body mass index. The differential effects of these factors on large-for-gestational-age birth weight and a composite of neonatal complications were assessed. Women with an average third-trimester HbA1c ≥5.0% (n = 1319) gave birth to 7.3% versus 3.8% (p = 0.005) of large-for-gestational-age neonates and 22.0% versus 16.0% (p = 0.006) of neonates with complications. Women with excess gestational weight gain (n = 299) delivered 12.5% versus 5.2% (p gestational-age neonates and 24.7% versus 19.0% (p = 0.022) of neonates with complications. In an adjusted multiple logistic regression analysis among mothers exposed to the respective risk factors, ∼47% and 52% of large-for-gestational-age neonates and 32% and 37% of neonatal complications were potentially preventable by attaining an average third-trimester HbA1c level gestational weight gain. Average third-trimester HbA1c level ≥5% and gestational weight gain above the IOM recommendation are relevant risk factors for neonatal complications in mothers with gestational diabetes.

  13. The change points of HbA(1C) for detection of retinopathy in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jia-Ning; Bi, Yu-Fang; Xu, Min; Huang, Yun; Li, Xiao-Ying; Wang, Wei-Qing; Chen, Yu-Hong; Ning, Guang

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the change points of HbA(1C) for detection of retinopathy in Chinese type 2 diabetic patients. This cross-sectional investigation included 992 diagnosed type 2 diabetic patients, who received non-mydriatic digital fundus photography examination. Joinpoint regression software was adopted to identify the change points of HbA(1C) in association with retinopathy prevalence. The mean age of all patients was 59.1 ± 8.4 years and the duration of diabetes was 5.5 (95% CI: 5.2-5.9) years. The prevalence of retinopathy was 10.3% in total, and 4.1%, 7.4% and 19.6% in patients with different diabetes duration of ≤ 5 years, 5-10 years and >10 years, respectively. The change point of HbA(1C) was 6.5% (95%CI 5.8-7.5%), at which retinopathy prevalence began to rise sharply. Furthermore, in subjects with diabetes duration ≤ 5 years, 5-10 years and >10 years, the change points of HbA(1C) were 8.1% (95%CI 7.9-8.3%), 6.1% (95%CI 5.7-6.8%), 5.6% (95%CI 5.1-8.1%) for detection of retinopathy, respectively. The steepest increase in retinopathy prevalence occurred when HbA(1C) reached 6.5%. However, the duration of diabetes should be taken into concern, when using the change points of HbA(1C) for detection of retinopathy in diabetic patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effect of improved glycemic control on health care costs and utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, E H; Sandhu, N; Newton, K M; McCulloch, D K; Ramsey, S D; Grothaus, L C

    2001-01-10

    Because of the additional costs associated with improving diabetes management, there is interest in whether improved glycemic control leads to reductions in health care costs, and, if so, when such cost savings occur. To determine whether sustained improvements in hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) levels among diabetic patients are followed by reductions in health care utilization and costs. Historical cohort study conducted in 1992-1997 in a staff-model health maintenance organization (HMO) in western Washington State. All diabetic patients aged 18 years or older who were continuously enrolled between January 1992 and March 1996 and had HbA(1c) measured at least once per year in 1992-1994 (n = 4744). Patients whose HbA(1c) decreased 1% or more between 1992 and 1993 and sustained the decline through 1994 were considered to be improved (n = 732). All others were classified as unimproved (n = 4012). Total health care costs, percentage hospitalized, and number of primary care and specialty visits among the improved vs unimproved cohorts in 1992-1997. Diabetic patients whose HbA(1c) measurements improved were similar demographically to those whose levels did not improve but had higher baseline HbA(1c) measurements (10.0% vs 7.7%; Pcosts were $685 to $950 less each year in the improved cohort for 1994 (P =.09), 1995 (P =.003), 1996 (P =.002), and 1997 (P =.01). Cost savings in the improved cohort were statistically significant only among those with the highest baseline HbA(1c) levels (>/=10%) for these years but appeared to be unaffected by presence of complications at baseline. Beginning in the year following improvement (1994), utilization was consistently lower in the improved cohort, reaching statistical significance for primary care visits in 1994 (P =.001), 1995 (Pcost savings within 1 to 2 years of improvement.

  15. Race-ethnic differences in the association of genetic loci with HbA1c levels and mortality in U.S. adults: the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grimsby Jonna L

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels diagnose diabetes, predict mortality and are associated with ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in white individuals. Genetic associations in other race groups are not known. We tested the hypotheses that there is race-ethnic variation in 1 HbA1c-associated risk allele frequencies (RAFs for SNPs near SPTA1, HFE, ANK1, HK1, ATP11A, FN3K, TMPRSS6, G6PC2, GCK, MTNR1B; 2 association of SNPs with HbA1c and 3 association of SNPs with mortality. Methods We studied 3,041 non-diabetic individuals in the NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III. We stratified the analysis by race/ethnicity (NHW: non-Hispanic white; NHB: non-Hispanic black; MA: Mexican American to calculate RAF, calculated a genotype score by adding risk SNPs, and tested associations with SNPs and the genotype score using an additive genetic model, with type 1 error = 0.05. Results RAFs varied widely and at six loci race-ethnic differences in RAF were significant (p ATP11A, the SNP RAF was 54% in NHB, 18% in MA and 14% in NHW (p 1c in NHW (β = 0.012 HbA1c increase per risk allele, p = 0.04 and MA (β = 0.021, p = 0.005 but not NHB (β = 0.007, p = 0.39. The genotype score was not associated with mortality in any group (NHW: OR (per risk allele increase in mortality = 1.07, p = 0.09; NHB: OR = 1.04, p = 0.39; MA: OR = 1.03, p = 0.71. Conclusion At many HbA1c loci in NHANES III there is substantial RAF race-ethnic heterogeneity. The combined impact of common HbA1c-associated variants on HbA1c levels varied by race-ethnicity, but did not influence mortality.

  16. Race-ethnic differences in the association of genetic loci with HbA1c levels and mortality in U.S. adults: the third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels diagnose diabetes, predict mortality and are associated with ten single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in white individuals. Genetic associations in other race groups are not known. We tested the hypotheses that there is race-ethnic variation in 1) HbA1c-associated risk allele frequencies (RAFs) for SNPs near SPTA1, HFE, ANK1, HK1, ATP11A, FN3K, TMPRSS6, G6PC2, GCK, MTNR1B; 2) association of SNPs with HbA1c and 3) association of SNPs with mortality. Methods We studied 3,041 non-diabetic individuals in the NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey) III. We stratified the analysis by race/ethnicity (NHW: non-Hispanic white; NHB: non-Hispanic black; MA: Mexican American) to calculate RAF, calculated a genotype score by adding risk SNPs, and tested associations with SNPs and the genotype score using an additive genetic model, with type 1 error = 0.05. Results RAFs varied widely and at six loci race-ethnic differences in RAF were significant (p HbA1c in NHW (β = 0.012 HbA1c increase per risk allele, p = 0.04) and MA (β = 0.021, p = 0.005) but not NHB (β = 0.007, p = 0.39). The genotype score was not associated with mortality in any group (NHW: OR (per risk allele increase in mortality) = 1.07, p = 0.09; NHB: OR = 1.04, p = 0.39; MA: OR = 1.03, p = 0.71). Conclusion At many HbA1c loci in NHANES III there is substantial RAF race-ethnic heterogeneity. The combined impact of common HbA1c-associated variants on HbA1c levels varied by race-ethnicity, but did not influence mortality. PMID:22540250

  17. Hemorheological alterations in adults with prediabetes identified by hemoglobin A1c levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marini, M A; Fiorentino, T V; Andreozzi, F; Mannino, G C; Succurro, E; Sciacqua, A; Perticone, F; Sesti, G

    2017-07-01

    A link between increased blood viscosity and type 2 diabetes has been previously reported. Herein, we investigated the association of blood viscosity with prediabetes, identified by glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) according to the new American Diabetes Association criteria, and subclinical atherosclerosis. The study cohort includes 1136 non-diabetic adults submitted to anthropometrical evaluation, an oral glucose tolerance test and ultrasound measurement of carotid intima-media thickness (IMT). Whole blood viscosity was estimated using a validated formula based on hematocrit and total plasma proteins. After adjusting for age, and gender, individuals with HbA1c-defined prediabetes (HbA1c 5.7-6.4% [39-47 mmol/mol]) exhibited significantly higher values of hematocrit, and predicted blood viscosity as compared with controls. Increased levels of IMT were observed in subjects with HbA1c-defined prediabetes in comparison to controls. Predicted blood viscosity was positively correlated with age, waist circumference, blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, fibrinogen, white blood cell, HbA1c, fasting and 2-h post-load glucose levels, fasting insulin, IMT and inversely correlated with HDL and Matsuda index of insulin sensitivity. Of the three glycemic parameters, i.e. HbA1c, fasting and 2-h post-load glucose, only HbA1c showed a significant correlation with predicted blood viscosity (β = 0.054, P = 0.04) in a multivariate regression analysis model including multiple atherosclerosis risk factors. The study shows that individuals with HbA1c-defined prediabetes have increased predicted blood viscosity and IMT. The HbA1c criterion may be helpful to capture individuals with an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease who may benefit from an intensive lifestyle intervention. Copyright © 2017 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical

  18. Hb Nouakchott [α114(GH2)Pro→Leu; HBA1: c.344C>T], A Second and Third Case Described in Two Unrelated Dutch Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pondman, Kirsten M; Brinkman, Jacoline W; van der Straaten, Hanneke M; Stroobants, An K; Harteveld, Cornelis L

    2018-01-01

    We report two families, members of which are carriers of a hemoglobin (Hb) variant previously described as Hb Nouakchott [α114(GH2)Pro→Leu; HBA1: c.344C>T; p.Pro115Leu]. In the first family of Dutch origin, the proband, a 32-year-old male and his 65-year-old father, were both carriers of Hb Nouakchott. Of the second family we tested, only the proband, a 56-year-old Dutch female was a Hb Nouakchott carrier. Hematological analyses of these cases showed the anomaly behaves as a silent Hb variant without clinical consequences. The Hb variant remained unnoticed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), while an additional peak was detected by capillary electrophoresis (CE). These independent findings of Hb Nouakchott indicate that this Hb variant might not be very rare, but simply remains under diagnosed depending on the Hb separation technique used.

  19. Complex Interaction of Hb Q-Thailand (HBA1: c.223G>C) with β-Thalassemia/Hb E (HBB: c.79G>A) Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panyasai, Sitthichai; Satthakarn, Surada; Pornprasert, Sakorn

    2018-01-01

    Hb Q-Thailand [α74(EF3)Asp→His (α1), GAC>CAC, HBA1: c.223G>C] is an abnormal hemoglobin (Hb) frequently found in Thailand and Southeast Asian countries. The association of the α Q-Thailand allele with other globin gene disorders has important implications in diagnosis. Here, we report how to diagnose the coinheritance of Hb Q-Thailand with β-thalassemia (β-thal)/Hb E disease in four Thai samples from high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and capillary electrophoresis (CE) testing results. Understanding of the HPLC chromatogram and CE electropherogram patterns of this complex mutation is important for interpretation of testing results and providing genetic counseling.

  20. Impact of Hemoglobin A1c Levels on Residual Platelet Reactivity and Outcomes After Insertion of Coronary Drug-Eluting Stents (from the ADAPT-DES Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schoos, Mikkel M.; Dangas, George D.; Mehran, Roxana

    2016-01-01

    An increasing hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) level portends an adverse cardiovascular prognosis; however, the association between glycemic control, platelet reactivity, and outcomes after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents (DES) is unknown. We sought to investigate whether Hb...... With Drug Eluting Stents registry, HbA1c levels were measured as clinically indicated in 1,145 of 8,582 patients, stratified by HbA1c 8.5% (n = 171, 14.9%). HPR on clopidogrel and aspirin was defined after PCI as P2Y12 reaction units (PRU) >208...... >208 (42.5%, 50.2%, and 62.3%, p definite or probable stent thrombosis (ST; 0.9%, 2.7%, and 4.2%, p = 0.02) increased progressively with HbA1c groups. Clinically relevant bleeding was greatest in the intermediate HbA1c group (8.2% vs 13.1% vs 9.5%, p = 0.04). In adjusted models...

  1. Taking a low glycemic index multi-nutrient supplement as breakfast improves glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Di; Zhang, Peiwen; Guo, Honghui; Ling, Wenhua

    2014-12-10

    Dietary therapy is the mainstay of treatment for diabetes. This study examined the effect of a low glycemic index (GI) multi-nutrient supplement, consumed in place of breakfast, on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). A total of 71 participants were randomized at a 2:1 ratio into either a breakfast replacement group or a normal breakfast group for a 12-week interventional study. The primary outcome measure was change in hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Nutrition status and somatometry were studied as secondary outcomes. The breakfast replacement group displayed a -0.2% absolute reduction in HbA1c (95% CI (confidence interval), -0.38% to -0.07%, p = 0.004), while the HbA1c of the control group increased 0.3% (95% CI, 0.1% to 0.5%, p = 0.005). The baseline Mini Nutritional Assessment score for both groups was 26.0 and no significant changes occurred following intervention. However, there was a statistically significant difference in body mass index between the treatment and control groups (p = 0.032) due to the weight gain in the control group (increased 0.5 kg, 95% CI was 0.2 to 0.9, p = 0.007). These data suggest that breakfast replacement with a low GI multi-nutrient supplement can improve glycemic and weight control in T2DM.

  2. Factors associated with reaching or not reaching target HbA1c after initiation of basal or premixed insulin in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J; Schmitt, H; Jiang, H H; Ivanyi, T

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate factors associated with reaching or not reaching target glycated haemoglobin (HbA 1c ) levels by analysing the respective contributions of fasting hyperglycaemia (FHG), also referred to as basal hyperglycaemia, vs postprandial hyperglycaemia (PHG) before and after initiation of a basal or premixed insulin regimen in patients with type 2 diabetes. This post-hoc analysis of insulin-naïve patients in the DURABLE study randomised to receive either insulin glargine or insulin lispro mix 25 evaluated the percentages of patients achieving a target HbA 1c of <7.0% (<53mmol/mol) per baseline HbA 1c quartiles, and the effect of each insulin regimen on the relative contributions of PHG and FHG to overall hyperglycaemia. Patients had comparable demographic characteristics and similar HbA 1c and FHG values at baseline in each HbA 1c quartile regardless of whether they reached the target HbA 1c . The higher the HbA 1c quartile, the greater was the decrease in HbA 1c , but also the smaller the percentage of patients achieving the target HbA 1c . HbA 1c and FHG decreased more in patients reaching the target, resulting in significantly lower values at endpoint in all baseline HbA 1c quartiles with either insulin treatment. Patients not achieving the target HbA 1c had slightly higher insulin doses, but lower total hypoglycaemia rates. Smaller decreases in FHG were associated with not reaching the target HbA 1c , suggesting a need to increase basal or premixed insulin doses to achieve targeted fasting plasma glucose and improve patient response before introducing more intensive prandial insulin regimens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. National Survey on Internal Quality Control for HbA(1c) Analytical Instruments in 331 Hospital Laboratories of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Rong; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Haijian; Fei, Yang; Wang, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The narrow gap of HbA1 value of mass fraction between "normal" (control of inter-assay standardization, assay precision, and trueness. This survey was initiated to obtain knowledge of the current situation of internal quality control (IQC) practice for HbA(1c) in China and find out the most appropriate quality specifications. Data of IQC for HbA(1c) in 331 institutions participating in the national proficiency testing (PT) programs in China were evaluated using four levels of quality specifications, and the percentages of laboratories meeting the quality requirement were calculated to find out the most appropriate quality specifications for control materials of HbA(1c) in China. The IQC data varied vastly among 331 clinical laboratories in China. The measurement of control materials covered a wide range from 4.52% to 12.24% (inter-quartile range) and there were significant differences among the CVs of different methods, including LPLC, CE-HPLC, AC-HPLC, immunoturbidimetry, and others. Among the four main methods, CE-HPLC and AC-HPLC achieved a better precision. As we can see, the performance of laboratories for HbA(1c) has yet to be improved. Clinical laboratories in China should improve their performance with a stricter imprecision criteria.

  4. The relationship between HbA(1c) and fasting plasma glucose in patients with increased plasma liver enzyme measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, R; Rasmussen, L Melholt; Nybo, H

    2012-01-01

    levels of increased liver enzyme concentrations. Methods:  Data from 10 065 patients with simultaneous measurement of HbA(1c) , venous fasting plasma glucose, alanine aminotransferase and γ-glutamyl transferase were extracted from our laboratory database. Correlations were investigated in four patient...

  5. Variation in Point-of-Care Testing of HbA1c in Diabetes Care in General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Troels; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Nexøe, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Background: Point-of-care testing (POCT) of HbA1c may result in improved diabetic control, better patient outcomes, and enhanced clinical efficiency with fewer patient visits and subsequent reductions in costs. In 2008, the Danish regulators created a framework agreement regarding a new fee-for-s...

  6. Dose-response relationship between periodontal inflamed surface area and HbA1c in type 2 Diabetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nesse, Willem; Linde, Annemiek; Abbas, Frank; Spijkervet, Frederik Karst Lucien; Dijkstra, Pieter Ubele; de Brabander, Eric Carl; Gerstenbluth, Izzy; Vissink, Arjan

    Nesse W, Linde A, Abbas F, Spijkervet FKL, Dijkstra PU, de Brabander EC, Gerstenbluth I, Vissink A. Dose-response relationship between periodontal inflamed surface area and HbA1c in type 2 diabetics. J Clin Periodontol 2009; 36: 295-300. doi: 10.1111/j.1600-051X.2009.01377.x. A dose-response

  7. Point-of-care testing of HbA1c in diabetes care and preventable hospital admissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Troels; Rose Olsen, Kim; Skovsgaard, Christian

    Background: Point-of-care testing (POCT) of HbA1c may result in improved diabetic control, better patient outcomes and enhanced clinical efficiency with fewer patient visits and subsequent reductions in hospitalizations and costs. In 2008, the Danish regulators agreed to create a new tariff for t...

  8. Variation in point-of-care testing of HbA1c in diabetes care general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Troels

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims Point-of-care testing (POCT) for HbA1c may result in improved diabetic control, better patient outcomes and enhanced clinical efficiency with fewer patient visits and subsequent reductions in costs. In 2008, the Danish regulators agreed to create a new fee for the remuneration...

  9. Association between HbA1c and carotid atherosclerosis among elderly Koreans with normal fasting glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Won Lee

    Full Text Available We examined whether glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c is associated to carotid atherosclerosis in an elderly Korean population with normal fasting glucose.Using data from the Korean Urban Rural Elderly study, we conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 1,133 participants (335 men and 798 women with a mean age of 71.8 years. All participants had fasting blood glucose less than 100mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L and HbA1c level below 6.5% (48 mmol/mol. They were also free from a history of cardiovascular disease, known type 2 diabetes mellitus or use of anti-diabetes medications. Carotid atherosclerosis was assessed by intima-media thickness (IMT using ultrasonography. The association between HbA1c and carotid IMT was investigated using multivariable linear regression analysis.HbA1c levels were independently and positively associated with carotid IMT (β = 0.020, p = 0.045 after adjusting for sex, age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, triglyceride, LDL cholesterol, smoking and alcohol intake. However, fasting insulin and glucose levels were not associated with carotid IMT.HbA1c levels were positively associated with carotid atherosclerosis, as assessed by carotid IMT, in an elderly population with normoglycemia. Our study suggested that higher HbA1c level is an effective and informative marker of carotid atherosclerosis in an elderly population.

  10. Glycated Hemoglobin, Fasting Insulin and the Metabolic Syndrome in Males. Cross-Sectional Analyses of the Aragon Workers' Health Study Baseline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saravia, Gabriela; Civeira, Fernando; Hurtado-Roca, Yamilee; Andres, Eva; Leon, Montserrat; Pocovi, Miguel; Ordovas, Jose; Guallar, Eliseo; Fernandez-Ortiz, Antonio; Casasnovas, Jose Antonio; Laclaustra, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) is currently used to diagnose diabetes mellitus, while insulin has been relegated to research. Both, however, may help understanding the metabolic syndrome and profiling patients. We examined the association of HbA1c and fasting insulin with clustering of metabolic syndrome criteria and insulin resistance as two essential characteristics of the metabolic syndrome. We used baseline data from 3200 non-diabetic male participants in the Aragon Workers' Health Study. We conducted analysis to estimate age-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) across tertiles of HbA1c and insulin. Fasting glucose and Homeostatic model assessment - Insulin Resistance were used as reference. Here we report the uppermost-to-lowest tertile ORs (95%CI). Mean age (SD) was 48.5 (8.8) years and 23% of participants had metabolic syndrome. The ORs for metabolic syndrome criteria tended to be higher across HbA1c than across glucose, except for high blood pressure. Insulin was associated with the criteria more strongly than HbA1c and similarly to Homeostatic model assessment - Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR). For metabolic syndrome, the OR of HbA1c was 2.68, of insulin, 11.36, of glucose, 7.03, and of HOMA-IR, 14.40. For the clustering of 2 or more non-glycemic criteria, the OR of HbA1c was 2.10, of insulin, 8.94, of glucose, 1.73, and of HOMA-IR, 7.83. All ORs were statistically significant. The areas under the receiver operating characteristics curves for metabolic syndrome were 0.670 (across HbA1c values) and 0.770 (across insulin values), and, for insulin resistance, 0.647 (HbA1c) and 0.995 (insulin). Among non-metabolic syndrome patients, a small insulin elevation identified risk factor clustering. HbA1c and specially insulin levels were associated with metabolic syndrome criteria, their clustering, and insulin resistance. Insulin could provide early information in subjects prone to develop metabolic syndrome.

  11. Prevalence of high HbA1c levels in Brazilian adolescents: The Study of Cardiovascular Risk in Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Cássia Lima Fernandes, Rita; Teló, Gabriela H; Cureau, Felipe V; Barufaldi, Laura A; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina C; Schaan, Beatriz D; Szklo, Moyses; Bloch, Katia V

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of elevated glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in a population of adolescents participating in the Study of Cardiovascular Risk in Adolescents. This is a school-based cross-sectional study based on a complex sample of adolescents 12-17years old representative at the national and macro-regional levels and for each Brazilian state capital. Blood was collected in schools and then evaluated in a single laboratory. HbA1c levels were considered elevated if ⩾5.7% (39mmol/mol) and were analyzed according to sex, age, macro-region, type of school, skin color, and nutritional status. Data from 37,804 adolescents were analyzed. The mean level of HbA1c was 5.4% (95%CI 5.4-5.4) (36mmol/mol [95%CI 36-36]), and 20.5% (95%CI 19.1-22.0) of adolescents presented values ⩾5.7% (⩾39mmol/mol). Among males, 23.6% (95%CI 21.8-25.6) showed elevated HbA1c levels compared to 17.5% (95%CI 15.9-19.2) observed in females. The prevalence of elevated levels of HbA1c was higher in adolescents with black skin color (27.6%; 95%CI 23.2-32.4) vs. white skin color (16.9%; 95%CI 15.4-18.5), and higher in those who studied in public schools (21.6%; 95%CI 20.0-23.4) vs. private schools (16.7%; 95%CI 14.7-19.0). Among obese adolescents, 29.7% (95%CI 25.4-34.3) had elevated levels of HbA1c, compared to 19.3% (95%CI 18.0-20.7) in normal weight students and 19.7% (95%CI 17.1-22.6) in overweight adolescents. Obese male adolescents of lower socioeconomic status had a higher prevalence of elevated HbA1c levels. Our findings highlight the importance of focusing on this high risk group for interventions to prevent diabetes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. CORRELATION OF HBA1C WITH SIGHT-THREATENING DIABETIC RETINOPATHY (STDR IN TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS

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    Ranjini Kotancher

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetic retinopathy is a major cause of blindness in the world with India being set to emerge as the diabetic capital of the world. Visual disability from diabetes is a significant health problem, but its morbidity is largely preventable and treatable. HbA1c (glycosylated haemoglobin is the best indicator of glycaemic control. It has long been known to predict the incidence and progression of diabetic retinopathy. Our aim is to evaluate the correlation of STDR in type 2 diabetes mellitus with HbA1c levels. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was carried out in the Department of Ophthalmology, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, among 250 randomly selected type 2 Diabetes Mellitus patients and they were grouped into STDR, non-STDR and no diabetic retinopathy based on ophthalmoscopy. HbA1c level was estimated and its correlation was analysed using SPSS software version 17.0. Association of STDR with duration of diabetes and Body Mass Index (BMI were also studied. RESULTS Out of 250 patients studied, mean age was 58.98 with 126 males and 124 females and there was increased incidence of STDR in males. 104 patients with STDR had HbA1c value of more than 8, high incidence of STDR were noted with increasing levels of HbA1c and the correlation was statistically significant (p = 0.02. 74.1% of patients had STDR in the group with duration of diabetes 11 to 15 years, 90.90% in more than 21 years group compared to 43% in the 5 years group. Increase in duration of diabetes was found to be significantly associated with higher incidence of STDR (p = 0.01. Incidence of STDR were more in patients with normal BMI (p = 0.03. CONCLUSION Poor diabetic control as noted by high HbA1c level and longer duration of diabetes were significantly associated with sightthreatening diabetic retinopathy. Patients with STDR and high HbA1c levels have to be referred for appropriate evaluation and treatment at the earliest to prevent blindness.

  13. Comparison of a point-of-care analyser for the determination of HbA1c with HPLC method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.A. Grant

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aims: As the use of Point of Care Testing (POCT devices for measurement of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c increases, it is imperative to determine how their performance compares to laboratory methods. This study compared the performance of the automated Quo-Test POCT device (EKF Diagnostics, which uses boronate fluorescence quenching technology, with a laboratory based High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC method (Biorad D10 for measurement of HbA1c. Methods: Whole blood EDTA samples from subjects (n=100 with and without diabetes were assayed using a BioRad D10 and a Quo-Test analyser. Intra-assay variation was determined by measuring six HbA1c samples in triplicate and inter-assay variation was determined by assaying four samples on 4 days. Stability was determined by assaying three samples stored at −20 °C for 14 and 28 days post collection. Results: Median (IQR HbA1c was 60 (44.0–71.2 mmol/mol (7.6 (6.17–8.66 % and 62 (45.0–69.0 mmol/mol (7.8 (6.27–8.46 % for D10 and Quo-Test, respectively, with very good agreement (R2=0.969, P<0.0001. Mean (range intra- and inter-assay variation was 1.2% (0.0–2.7% and 1.6% (0.0–2.7% for the D10 and 3.5% (0.0–6.7% and 2.7% (0.7–5.1% for the Quo-Test. Mean change in HbA1c after 28 days storage at −20 °C was −0.7% and +0.3% for D10 and Quo-Test respectively. Compared to the D10, Quo-Test showed 98% agreement for diagnosis of glucose intolerance (IGT and T2DM and 100% for diagnosis of T2DM. Conclusion: Good agreement between the D10 and Quo-Test was seen across a wide HbA1c range. The Quo-Test POCT device provided similar performance to a laboratory based HPLC method. Keywords: Point of care testing, HbA1c measurement

  14. The 1-hour post-load glucose level is more effective than HbA1c for screening dysglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannathan, Ram; Sevick, Mary Ann; Fink, Dorothy; Dankner, Rachel; Chetrit, Angela; Roth, Jesse; Buysschaert, Martin; Bergman, Michael

    2016-08-01

    To assess the performance of HbA1c and the 1-h plasma glucose (PG ≥ 155 mg/dl; 8.6 mmol/l) in identifying dysglycemia based on the oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) from a real-world clinical care setting. This was a diagnostic test accuracy study. For this analysis, we tested the HbA1c diagnostic criteria advocated by the American Diabetes Association (ADA 5.7-6.4 %) and International Expert Committee (IEC 6.0-6.4 %) against conventional OGTT criteria. We also tested the utility of 1-h PG ≥ mg/dl; 8.6 mmol/l. Prediabetes was defined according to ADA-OGTT guidelines. Spearman correlation tests were used to determine the relationships between HbA1c, 1-h PG with fasting, 2-h PG and indices of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function. The levels of agreement between diagnostic methods were ascertained using Cohen's kappa coefficient (Κ). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was used to analyze the performance of the HbA1c and 1-h PG test in identifying prediabetes considering OGTT as reference diagnostic criteria. The diagnostic properties of different HbA1c thresholds were contrasted by determining sensitivity, specificity and likelihood ratios (LR). Of the 212 high-risk individuals, 70 (33 %) were identified with prediabetes, and 1-h PG showed a stronger association with 2-h PG, insulin sensitivity index, and β-cell function than HbA1c (P HbA1c criteria 0.1[0.03-0.16] and IEC criteria (0.17[0.04-0.30]). The ROC (AUC[95 % CI]) for HbA1c and 1-h PG were 0.65[0.57-0.73] and 0.79[0.72-0.85], respectively. Importantly, 1-h PG ≥ 155 mg/dl (8.6 mmol/l) showed good sensitivity (74.3 % [62.4-84.0]) and specificity 69.7 % [61.5-77.1]) with a LR of 2.45. The ability of 1-h PG to discriminate prediabetes was better than that of HbA1c (∆AUC: -0.14; Z value: 2.5683; P = 0.01022). In a real-world clinical practice setting, the 1-h PG ≥ 155 mg/dl (8.6 mmol/l) is superior for detecting high-risk individuals compared with HbA1c. Furthermore, HbA1c is a less precise correlate of insulin sensitivity and β-cell function than the 1-h PG and correlates poorly with the 2-h PG during the OGTT.

  15. The Impact of Antidepressant Therapy on Glycemic Control in Canadian Primary Care Patients With Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Gagnon

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Context: Depression is common in people with diabetes and is associated with poor glycemic control. Evidence suggests that certain antidepressants (AD increase the risk of poor control. Few population-based studies have examined the impact of individual ADs on glycemic control. This study's objective is to measure the impact of Citalopram, Amitriptyline, Venlafaxine, Trazodone and Escitalopram on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c in Canadian primary care patients with diabetes.Methods: A retrospective study of electronic medical records (EMR from 115 primary care practices across Canada was undertaken. Data were obtained from the Canadian Primary Care Sentinel Surveillance Network (CPCSSN. The sample population comprised 1,084 diabetic patients with 1,127 prescriptions of one of the five selected ADs and with baseline and post-exposure HbA1c measurements. Generalized linear mixed models were computed to estimate the effect of the ADs on HbA1c.Results: Mean HbA1c ratios for Amitriptyline, Venlafaxine, Trazodone and Escitalopram were all numerically lower than Citalopram. The confidence intervals included the minimum detectable effect, however the differences were not statistically significant. The lowest clinically relevant HbA1c ratios, relative to Citalopram, were found in patients prescribed Trazodone and Escitalopram. Accounting for the prescription of Trazodone for indications other than depression, this research suggests that Escitalopram may be safer than Citalopram for people with diabetes and depression, in terms of its effect on blood glucose.Conclusion: This study can inform future research examining the relationship between ADs and blood glucose and provides insight into the limitations pertaining to the use of health data in health research. Future research should seek to control for, across multiple time points: depression symptoms, depression severity, depression duration, weight, diabetes medication, tobacco and alcohol consumption and

  16. A1c Gear: Laboratory quality HbA1c measurement at the point of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ejilemele, Adetoun; Unabia, Jamie; Ju, Hyunsu; Petersen, John R

    2015-05-20

    HbA1c is an important part of assessing the diabetic control and since the use of point-of-care devices for monitoring HbA1c is increasing, it is important to determine how these devices compare to the central laboratory. One hundred and twenty patient samples were analyzed on the Bio-Rad Variant™II and one POC analyzer (Sakae A1c Gear). Three patient sample pools containing ~5%, ~7%, and ~10% HbA1c levels were run over 20 days. Three reagent lots and three instruments were evaluated for the A1c Gear. The 120 patient samples showed strong correlation (R(2)>0.989) when compared to the Variant™II with means=8.06% and 7.81%, for Variant IIand A1c Gear, respectively. Changing reagent lots or instruments had no impact for the A1c Gear. The ~5%, ~7%, and ~10% pools within-run and between-run imprecision was between 0.87-1.33% and 1.03-1.32%, and 1.41-2.35% and 1.24-1.89% with total imprecision of 1.67-2.35% and 1.61-2.31% for the A1c Gear and Variant II, respectively. The A1c Gear showed a small negative bias (0.25% HbA1c) across HbA1c measurement ranges of Gear meets the criteria of total CV Gear can give results as precise as the laboratory at the POC. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Comparison of a point-of-care analyser for the determination of HbA1c with HPLC method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, D A; Dunseath, G J; Churm, R; Luzio, S D

    2017-08-01

    As the use of Point of Care Testing (POCT) devices for measurement of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) increases, it is imperative to determine how their performance compares to laboratory methods. This study compared the performance of the automated Quo-Test POCT device (EKF Diagnostics), which uses boronate fluorescence quenching technology, with a laboratory based High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) method (Biorad D10) for measurement of HbA1c. Whole blood EDTA samples from subjects (n=100) with and without diabetes were assayed using a BioRad D10 and a Quo-Test analyser. Intra-assay variation was determined by measuring six HbA1c samples in triplicate and inter-assay variation was determined by assaying four samples on 4 days. Stability was determined by assaying three samples stored at -20 °C for 14 and 28 days post collection. Median (IQR) HbA1c was 60 (44.0-71.2) mmol/mol (7.6 (6.17-8.66) %) and 62 (45.0-69.0) mmol/mol (7.8 (6.27-8.46) %) for D10 and Quo-Test, respectively, with very good agreement (R 2 =0.969, Pglucose intolerance (IGT and T2DM) and 100% for diagnosis of T2DM. Good agreement between the D10 and Quo-Test was seen across a wide HbA1c range. The Quo-Test POCT device provided similar performance to a laboratory based HPLC method.

  18. Correlation between Glycated Hemoglobin and Triglyceride Level in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, Syeda; Naveed, Shabnam; Ali, Zeeshan; Ahmad, Syed Masroor; Asadullah Khan, Raad; Raj, Honey; Shariff, Shoaib; Rupareliya, Chintan; Zahra, Fatima; Khan, Saba

    2017-06-13

    Dyslipidemia is quite prevalent in non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Maintaining tight glycemic along with lipid control plays an essential role in preventing micro- and macro-vascular complications associated with diabetes. The main purpose of the study was to highlight the relationship between glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and triglyceride levels. This may in turn help in predicting the triglyceride status of type 2 diabetics and therefore identifying patients at increased risk from cardiovascular events. Hypertriglyceridemia is one of the common risk factors for coronary artery disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM). Careful monitoring of the blood glucose level can be used to predict lipid status and can prevent most of the complications associated with the disease. This is a cross-sectional study using data collected from the outpatient diabetic clinic of Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC) Karachi, Pakistan. Patients of age 18 years and above were recruited from the clinic. A total of consenting 509 patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus were enrolled over a period of 11 months.  For statistical analysis, SPSS Statistics for Windows, Version 17.0 ( IBM Corp, Armonk, New York) was used and Chi-square and Pearson's correlation coefficient was used to find the association between triglyceride and HbA1c. The HbA1c was dichotomized into four groups on the basis of cut-off. Chi-square was used for association between HbA1c with various cut-off values and high triglyceride levels. Odds-ratio and its 95% confidence interval were calculated to estimate the level of risk between high triglyceride levels and HbA1c groups. The p-value triglyceride was evaluated in four different groups of HbA1c, with a cut-off seven, eight, nine and 10 respectively. With HbA1c cut-off value of 7%, 74% patients had high triglycerides and showed a significant association with high triglyceride levels at p index, lifestyle) and health status factors (blood pressure

  19. Glycemic control and periodontal disease in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients: A cross-sectional study

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    Vaibhav Tandon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus (DM is a chronic, noncommunicable disease with concomitant oral manifestations that impact on dental care. Aim: To determine the correlation between glycemic control and periodontitis among 35-45 years aged patients with DM type 2 (DM2. Materials and Methods: A convenient sample of 40 subjects aged 35-45 years with DM2 on oral medication were recruited for the study. Glycosylated, hemoglobin(HbA1c, probing pocket depth (PPD, gingival index (GI, plaque index (PI, and the relevant drug history were recorded. The data were analyzed using unpaired student t-test to compare the means of PPD, GI, PI between different HbA1c levels, gender, and duration of drug, and the Pearson correlation was used to find correlation between HbA1c and PPD, GI, PI, duration of drug. Results: With the increase in HbA1c values there was a significant rise in PPD, PI scores, and GI scores (P < 0.001. Diabetic males had a higher PPD, PI, and GI score as compared to females. With the increase in duration of the drug, there was an increase in PPD, which was found to be statistically nonsignificant. Conclusion: Patients are having poor glycemic level had more severe periodontitis as compared to patients having a fair glycemic level.

  20. Glycemic control paradox: Poor glycemic control associated with higher one-year and eight-year risks of all-cause hospitalization but lower one-year risk of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tsai-Chung; Kardia, Sharon L R; Li, Chia-Ing; Chen, Ching-Chu; Liu, Chiu-Shong; Yang, Sing-Yu; Muo, Chin-Shin; Peyser, Patricia A; Lin, Cheng-Chieh

    2015-09-01

    The relationship between glycemic control and adverse outcomes found in a population with diabetes has seldom been evaluated in patients with type 2 diabetes. We explored the association between hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and hospitalization risks within one-year and eight-year follow-up periods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study on 57,061 patients with type 2 diabetes from National Diabetes Case Management Program during 2002-2004 in Taiwan. HbA1c at baseline and in-hospital mortality, all-cause and cause-specific hospitalization over one year and eight years were analyzed. After multivariate adjustment, one-year risk was higher for cases with HbA1c level risk of hypoglycemia hospitalization (0.81, 95% CI: 0.74-0.88). For eight-year risk, subjects with HbA1c level risks of all-cause and diabetes-related hospitalization (1.04, 1.03-1.05, and 1.15, 1.14-1.17, respectively). Higher HbA1c level correlated with lower one-year risk due to hypoglycemia hospitalization but increased one-year and eight-year risks due to all-cause and diabetes-specific hospitalization among Chinese people with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan. Future study must ascertain how to meet HbA1c targets and improve outcome without risk to this population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparing incident diabetes as defined by fasting plasma glucose or by HbA(1c). The AusDiab, Inter99 and DESIR studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soulimane, S.; Simon, D.; Shaw, J. E.

    2011-01-01

    by the corresponding criteria. Despite Diabetes Control and Complications Trial-alignment of the three HbA(1c) assays, there was a large difference in the HbA(1c) distributions between these studies, conducted some 10 years ago. Thus, it is difficult to compare absolute values of diabetes prevalence and incidence...... based on HbA(1c) measurements from that time....

  2. [Association between smoking/smoking cessation and glycemic control in male patients with type 2 diabetes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, J; Qin, Y; Shen, C; Gao, Y; Pan, E C; Pan, X Q; Tao, R; Zhang, Y Q; Wu, M

    2017-11-10

    Objective: To explore the association of smoking and smoking cessation with glycemic control in male patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: From December 2013 to January 2014, a total of 7 763 male patients with type 2 diabetes, who received national basic public health service in Changshu county of Suzhou city, Huai'an and Qinghe districts of Huai'an city, Jiangsu province, were recruited by cluster sampling. Questionnaire survey and anthropometric measurements were conducted, and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels were measured. Multiple linear regression model was used to evaluate the association of smoking and smoking cessation with glycemic control. Results: The prevalence of current smoking was 45.5% in male patients with type 2 diabetes. The levels of FPG and HbA1c increased with number of cigarettes smoked per day compared with non-smokers ( P smoking duration ≥30 years and smoking index ≥40 pack-years were 0.27% (95 %CI : 0.05%-0.49%) and 0.38% (95 %CI : 0.23%-0.53%), respectively. FPG and HbA1c level decreased obviously with smoking cessation years among former smokers ( P smoking duration, smoking cessation years and levels of FPG and HbA1c. Conclusion: Cigarette smoking was negatively related with glycemic control in male type 2 diabetes patients, especially in patients with drug treatment. Smoking cessation may be beneficial for glycemic control. Smoking cessation should be encouraged for diabetes patients as early as possible.

  3. Effects of aerobic training on FBS, HbA1C, Fructosamine and plasma lipid profile in male with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Ghalavand

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Regular exercise represents an effective strategy to prevent and treat type 2 Diabetes.The present study examined the effects of aerobic exercise on glycemic control and serum lipid profile in men with type 2 diabetes.20 men with type 2 diabetes (age:45.05 ± 3.8 were randomly div ided into aerobic exercise group (n=10 and control group(n=10. Exercise Group participated in aerobic training program at 50 -70 % HRR for 8 weeks and 3 sessions per week. Fasting blood sugar (FBS,Fructosamine, HbA1C, Triglyceride (TG, cholesterol (TC, high density lipoproteins (HDL, low density lipoproteins (LDL and very low density lipoprotein(VLDL were measured before and after 8 weeks. Paired and independent t tests were used for data analysis ( P0.05.Also there was a significant difference in FBS (p=0.03 and HDL levels (p=0.04 between 2 groups.Aerobic trainings effectively improve lipid profile and lead to better glycemic control in men with type 2 diabetes.

  4. Peri-conceptional HbA1c and risk of serious adverse pregnancy outcome in 933 women with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Dorte M; Korsholm, Lars; Ovesen, Per

    2009-01-01

    Objectives : To study the association between peri-conceptional HbA1c and serious adverse pregnancy outcome (congenital malformations and perinatal mortality). Methods: Prospective data collection in 933 singleton pregnancies complicated by type 1 diabetes. Results: The risk of serious adverse ou...... malformation rate increased significantly at HbA1c above 10.4% whereas perinatal mortality was increased even at Hba1c below 6.9%. Conclusions: These results support recent guidelines of pre-conceptional HbA1c levels below 7% in women with type 1 diabetes....

  5. Evaluation of Bio-Rad D-100 HbA1c analyzer against Tosoh G8 and Menarini HA-8180V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José María Maesa

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the Bio-Rad D-100®, an HPLC analyzer for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c determination, and to compare its performance with the Menarini HA-8180V® and Sysmex G8®. Methods: Method comparison was performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI EP9-A2 guidelines. We selected 100 samples from the routine laboratory workload and analyzed them in duplicate with the three analyzers. The imprecision study was performed according to CLSI EP5-A2 guidelines for both inter-assay and intra-assay variability. Bias was assessed with external quality control material. To establish linearity, CLSI EP6-A protocol was followed. Results: Method comparison (95% confidence intervals in parentheses: D-100 vs G8: Passing-Bablok regression; y=0.973(0.963–0.983×−0.07(−0.07−0.069; r=0.9989. Bland-Altman mean difference: −0.229%HbA1c (−0.256: −0.202; Relative bias plot: D-100/G8 vs D100-G8 mean ratio=0.971(0.967−0.975. D-100 vs HA-8180V: Passing-Bablok regression; y=0.944(0.932–0.958×−0.078(0.024−0.173; r=0.9989. Bland-Altman mean difference: −0.363%HbA1c (−0.401: −0.325; Relative bias plot D-100/HA-8180V vs D100-HA-8180V mean ratio=0.955(0.952−0.958. Inter-assay coefficient of variation (CV: 0.81%. Intra-assay CV: 1.04% (low level, and 0.78% (high level. Bias against target value=2.332%. Linearity: r2=0.998 in the concentration range 4.4−13.9%HbA1c. Carry-over: 0.0024%. Conclusions: The Bio-Rad D-100 shows good correlation with G8 and HA-8180V. There is a small proportional systematic difference (2.7% and 5.6%, respectively in both comparisons. Inter and intra-assay CVs are both lower than the lowest CV obtained in studies performed with D-100 and other instruments. Keywords: Glycated hemoglobin, High performance liquid chromatography, Analyzer, Intra-assay variability, Inter-assay variability

  6. Hemoglobin glycation index as a useful predictor of therapeutic responses to dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors in patients with type 2 diabetes.

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    Yu-Wei Chen

    Full Text Available A high hemoglobin glycation index (HGI and glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c level are associated with greater inflammatory status, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4 inhibitors can suppress inflammation. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between HGI and the therapeutic effect of DPP-4 inhibitors.This retrospective cohort study followed 468 patients with type 2 diabetes receiving DPP-4 inhibitor treatment for 1 year. Estimated HbA1c was calculated using a linear regression equation derived from another 2969 randomly extracted patients with type 2 diabetes based on fasting plasma glucose (FPG level. The subjects were divided into two groups based on HGI (HGI = observed HbA1c - estimated HbA1c. Mixed model repeated measures were used to compare the treatment efficacy after 1 year in patients with a low (HGI<0, n = 199 and high HGI (HGI≧0, n = 269.There were no significant group differences in mean changes of FPG after 1 year (-12.8 and -13.4 mg/dL in the low and high HGI groups, respectively. However, the patients with a high HGI had a significantly greater reduction in HbA1c from baseline compared to those with a low HGI (-1.9 versus -0.3% [-20.8 versus -3.3 mmol/mol]. Improvements in glycemic control were statistically significantly associated with the tested DPP-4 inhibitors in the high HGI group (-2.4, -1.4, -1.2 and -2.2% [-26.2, -15.3, -13.1 and -24.0 mmol/mol] for vildagliptin, linagliptin, saxagliptin and sitagliptin, respectively but not in the low HGI group.The HGI index derived from FPG and HbA1c may be able to identify who will have a better response to DPP-4 inhibitors.

  7. The SWITCH study (sensing with insulin pump therapy to control HbA(1c))

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conget, Ignacio; Battelino, Tadej; Giménez, Marga

    2011-01-01

    studies investigating the effect of real-time continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) combined with pump therapy on glycemic outcomes in type 1 diabetes are increasing. Pump therapy is well established as a "gold standard" for insulin delivery, offering improvements over multiple daily insulin...

  8. Evaluation of glycated albumin (GA) and GA/HbA1c ratio for diagnosis of diabetes and glycemic control: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdanpanah, Sara; Rabiee, Mohammad; Tahriri, Mohammadreza; Abdolrahim, Mojgan; Rajab, Asadollah; Jazayeri, Hossein E; Tayebi, Lobat

    2017-06-01

    Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by chronic high blood glucose concentrations (hyperglycemia). When it is left untreated or improperly managed, it can lead to acute complications including diabetic ketoacidosis and non-ketotic hyperosmolar coma. In addition, possible long-term complications include impotence, nerve damage, stroke, chronic kidney failure, cardiovascular disease, foot ulcers, and retinopathy. Historically, universal methods to measure glycemic control for the diagnosis of diabetes included fasting plasma glucose level (FPG), 2-h plasma glucose (2HP), and random plasma glucose. However, these measurements did not provide information about glycemic control over a long period of time. To address this problem, there has been a switch in the past decade to diagnosing diabetes and its severity through measurement of blood glycated proteins such as Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and glycated albumin (GA). Diagnosis and evaluation of diabetes using glycated proteins has many advantages including high accuracy of glycemic control over a period of time. Currently, common laboratory methods used to measure glycated proteins are high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), immunoassay, and electrophoresis. HbA1c is one of the most important diagnostic factors for diabetes. However, some reports indicate that HbA1c is not a suitable marker to determine glycemic control in all diabetic patients. GA, which is not influenced by changes in the lifespan of erythrocytes, is thought to be a good alternative indicator of glycemic control in diabetic patients. Here, we review the literature that has investigated the suitability of HbA1c, GA and GA:HbA1c as indicators of long-term glycemic control and demonstrate the importance of selecting the appropriate glycated protein based on the patient's health status in order to provide useful and modern point-of-care monitoring and treatment.

  9. Advanced glycation end products, measured in skin, vs. HbA1c in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banser, Alena; Naafs, Jolanda C; Hoorweg-Nijman, Jantine Jg; van de Garde, Ewoudt Mw; van der Vorst, Marja Mj

    2016-09-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are considered major contributors to microvascular and macrovascular complications in adult patients with diabetes mellitus. AGEs can be measured non-invasively with skin autofluorescence (sAF). The primary aim was to determine sAF values in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and to study correlations between sAF values and HbA1c and mean HbA1c over the year prior to measurement In children with type 1 diabetes mellitus, sAF values were measured using the AGE Reader®. Laboratory and anthropometric values were extracted from medical charts. Correlations were studied using Pearson's correlation coefficient. Multivariable linear regression analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of multiple study parameters on sAF values. The mean sAF value was 1.33 ± 0.36 arbitrary units (AU) in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (n = 144). sAF values correlated positively with HbA1c measured at the same time (r = 0.485; p 1), mean HbA1c over the year prior to measurement (r = 0.578; p 1), age (r = 0.337; p 1), duration of type 1 diabetes mellitus (r = 0.277; p = 0.001), serum triglycerides (r = 0.399; p 1), and total cholesterol (r = 0.352; p = 0.001). sAF values were significantly higher in patients with non-white skin (1.56 vs. 1.27 AU, respectively, p = 0.001). In children with type 1 diabetes, sAF values correlate strongly with single HbA1c and mean HbA1c, making the non-invasive sAF measurement an interesting alternative to provide information about cumulative hyperglycemic states. To determine the value of sAF measurement in predicting long-term microvascular and macrovascular complications, further prospective follow-up studies are needed. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Variation in Point-of-Care Testing of HbA1c in Diabetes Care in General Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, Troels; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Nexøe, Jørgen; Skovsgaard, Christian Volmar; Olsen, Kim Rose

    2017-11-09

    Background: Point-of-care testing (POCT) of HbA1c may result in improved diabetic control, better patient outcomes, and enhanced clinical efficiency with fewer patient visits and subsequent reductions in costs. In 2008, the Danish regulators created a framework agreement regarding a new fee-for-service fee for the remuneration of POCT of HbA1c in general practice. According to secondary research, only the Capital Region of Denmark has allowed GPs to use this new incentive for POCT. The aim of this study is to use patient data to characterize patients with diabetes who have received POCT of HbA1c and analyze the variation in the use of POCT of HbA1c among patients with diabetes in Danish general practice. Methods: We use register data from the Danish Drug Register, the Danish Health Service Register and the National Patient Register from the year 2011 to define a population of 44,981 patients with diabetes (type 1 and type 2 but not patients with gestational diabetes) from the Capital Region. The POCT fee is used to measure the amount of POCT of HbA1c among patients with diabetes. Next, we apply descriptive statistics and multilevel logistic regression to analyze variation in the prevalence of POCT at the patient and clinic level. We include patient characteristics such as gender, age, socioeconomic markers, health care utilization, case mix markers, and municipality classifications. Results: The proportion of patients who received POCT was 14.1% and the proportion of clinics which were "POCT clinics" was 26.9%. There were variations in the use of POCT across clinics and patients. A part of the described variation can be explained by patient characteristics. Male gender, age differences (older age), short education, and other ethnicity imply significantly higher odds for POCT. High patient costs in general practice and other parts of primary care also imply higher odds for POCT. In contrast, high patient costs for drugs and/or morbidity in terms of the Charlson Comorbidity index mean lower odds for POCT. The frequency of patients with diabetes per 1000 patients was larger in POCT clinics than Non-POCT clinics. A total of 22.5% of the unexplained variability was related to GP clinics. Conclusions: This study demonstrates variation in the use of POCT which can be explained by patient characteristics such as demographic, socioeconomic, and case mix markers. However, it appears relevant to reassess the system for POCT. Further studies are warranted in order to assess the impacts of POCT of HbA1c on health care outcomes.

  11. Intake of Vitamin and Mineral Supplements and Longitudinal Association with HbA1c Levels in the General Non-Diabetic Population--Results from the MONICA/KORA S3/F3 Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Schwab

    Full Text Available Lower levels of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c are associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular complications in diabetic and non-diabetic individuals. The aim of the study was to longitudinally investigate the association between the use of 11 vitamins and minerals (vitamins E, C, D, B1, folic acid, carotenoids, calcium, magnesium, zinc, iron, and selenium and change in HbA1c levels over 10 years in non-diabetic individuals drawn from the general population.Baseline data were available from 4447 subjects included in the population-based "Monitoring of Trends and Determinants in Cardiovascular Diseases" (MONICA Augsburg S3 survey (1994/95. Follow-up data were derived from 2774 participants in the follow-up survey named "Cooperative Health Research in the Region of Augsburg" (KORA F3 (2004/05. Vitamin/mineral intake from supplements and medications was assessed in a personal interview, where participants were asked to bring product packages of preparations that had been ingested during the last 7 days prior to the examination. Associations between regular vitamin/mineral intake amounts and HbA1c levels measured at baseline and follow-up were investigated using generalized estimating equation models. For carotenoids, analyses were stratified by smoking status.None of the investigated nutrients except for carotenoids was significantly associated with changes in HbA1c levels after 10 years. Regular intake of carotenoids from supplements and medications in amounts > 6.8 mg/d (upper tertile was associated with an absolute -0.26% (95% CI: -0.43 to -0.08 lower increase in HbA1c levels compared with no intake of carotenoids. An inverse association was observed in those who never smoked but not in (former smokers.Larger prospective and intervention studies in non-diabetic/non-smoking individuals are needed to confirm the results and to assess whether the observed associations between carotenoid intake and change in HbA1c levels are causal. If our results are

  12. The Effect of Group Counseling on Physiological Aspect of Self-care and HbA1C Level of Patients with Diabetes Type II

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    Seyedreza Mazlom

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most important underlying cause of death in diabetic patients is poor self-care. The effect of education on self-care promotion has been widely investigated; however, the advisory role and impact of the treatment team have been scarcely investigated.  Aim: Determining the effect of group counseling on the psychological aspect of self-care and level of glycosylated hemoglobin in the patients with diabetes type II. Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 73 patients with type II diabetes mellitus, who had been referred to Parsian Diabetes clinic of Mashhad in 2014, were divided into two groups of intervention and control. The group counseling program was performed in five 1.5-hour sessions with 3-day intervals, and each groups consisted of 8 to 10 people. The content of the meetings was problems in nutrition, exercise, diabetes mellitus disease, diabetes-related mental health problems, diabetes medications, and self-control of blood glucose. Researcher-made diabetes care questionnaire was filled and HbA1c test was measured before and two months after the intervention. Data were analyzed by SPSS version 11.5 using paired sample and independent t-tests. Results: In this study,27.3 percent of the subjects were male and 72.7 were female with the mean age of 49.1 ± 8.3. The scores of physiological aspect of self-care and HbA1C of the diabetic patients before the intervention was not significantly different between the groups; but in the post-intervention phase, the self-care in intervention group (49.1±5.8 significantly increased compared to the control group (31.8±12.2 (p

  13. Do Cinnamon Supplements Have a Role in Glycemic Control in Type 2 Diabetes – A Narrative Review?

    OpenAIRE

    Costello, Rebecca B.; Dwyer, Johanna T.; Saldanha, Leila; Bailey, Regan L.; Merkel, Joyce; Wambogo, Edwina

    2016-01-01

    Cinnamon (Cinnamomum sp.) has been suggested to help patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) achieve better glycemic control although conclusions from meta-analyses are mixed. To evaluate whether the use of cinnamon dietary supplements by adults with T2DM had clinically meaningful effects on glycemic control, as measured by changes in fasting plasma glucose (FPG) or hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), a comprehensive PubMed literature search was performed. Eleven RCTs were identified meeting our in...

  14. Hemoglobin A1c as a tool for the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in 208 premenopausal women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Line Velling; Mumm, Hanne; Andersen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    To study hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as a tool for diagnosing diabetes and to study HbA1c as a cardiovascular risk marker in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS).......To study hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) as a tool for diagnosing diabetes and to study HbA1c as a cardiovascular risk marker in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)....

  15. Serum glycated albumin as a new glycemic marker in pediatric diabetes

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    Ji Woo Lee

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available PurposeSerum glycated albumin (GA has been recently used as another glycemic marker that reflects shorter term glycemic control than glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c. Insulin secretory function and glycemic fluctuation might be correlated with the ratio of GA to HbA1c (GA/HbA1c in diabetic adult patients. This study investigated the association of GA and GA/HbA1c ratio with the levels of fasting C-peptide, fasting plasma glucose in type 1 and type 2 pediatric diabetes.MethodsTotal 50 cases from 42 patients were included. The subjects were classified into type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM (n=30 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM (n=20 group. The associations among HbA1c, GA, and GA/HbA1c ratio were examined. The relationship between the three glycemic indices and fasting glucose, fasting C-peptide were analyzed.ResultsMean values of GA, the GA/HbA1c ratio were significantly higher in T1DM than T2DM. GA (r=0.532, P=0.001, HbA1c (r=0.519, P=0.002 and the GA/HbA1c ratio (r=0.409, P=0.016 were correlated with the fasting plasma glucose. Fasting C-peptide level arranged 4.22±3.22 ng/mL in T2DM, which was significantly above the values in T1DM (0.26±0.49 ng/mL. There were no significant correlation between HbA1c and fasting C-peptide level. However, GA and the GA/HbA1c ratio exhibited inverse correlations with fasting C-peptide level (r=-0.214, P=0.002; r=-0.516, P<0.001.ConclusionGA seems to more accurately reflects fasting plasma glucose level than HbA1c. GA, GA/HbA1c ratio appear to reflect insulin secretory function.

  16. A review of variant hemoglobins interfering with hemoglobin A1c measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Randie R; Roberts, William L

    2009-05-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) is used routinely to monitor long-term glycemic control in people with diabetes mellitus, as HbA1c is related directly to risks for diabetic complications. The accuracy of HbA1c methods can be affected adversely by the presence of hemoglobin (Hb) variants or elevated levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF). The effect of each variant or elevated HbF must be examined with each specific method. The most common Hb variants worldwide are HbS, HbE, HbC, and HbD. All of these Hb variants have single amino acid substitutions in the Hb beta chain. HbF is the major hemoglobin during intrauterine life; by the end of the first year, HbF falls to values close to adult levels of approximately 1%. However, elevated HbF levels can occur in certain pathologic conditions or with hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin. In a series of publications over the past several years, the effects of these four most common Hb variants and elevated HbF have been described. There are clinically significant interferences with some methods for each of these variants. A summary is given showing which methods are affected by the presence of the heterozygous variants S, E, C, and D and elevated HbF. Methods are divided by type (immunoassay, ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography, boronate affinity, other) with an indication of whether the result is artificially increased or decreased by the presence of a Hb variant. Laboratorians should be aware of the limitations of their method with respect to these interferences. 2009 Diabetes Technology Society.

  17. Significant association of serum creatinine with HbA1C in impaired glucose tolerant Pakistani subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farasat, Tasnim; Sharif, Saima; Naz, Shagufta; Fazal, Sabiha

    2015-01-01

    The present study was conducted to assess the serum concentration of creatinine and determine its relationship with potential risk factors of diabetes in Impaired Glucose tolerance subjects. This cross sectional study was conducted on 100 IGT patients who attended Amin Hayat diabetic center in Lahore from January 2011- June 2011. Patients with age group 34-67 years, (both sexes) were included in the study. Different demographic parameters as age, BMI, WHR, B.P, personal history and socioeconomic status were recorded. Oral Glucose Tolerance Test was performed. The biochemical parameters including HbA1c, lipid profile, urea, uric acid, creatinine and bilirubin level were measured by chemistry analyzer. A strong correlation between creatinine and HbA1c was observed. The level of creatinine was also significantly associated with age in IGT subjects. Creatinine is non-significantly correlated with Cholesterol, LDL-Chol and TG while negatively significantly associated with BMI, fasting blood glucose and HDL-Chol. The present study concluded significant association of serum creatinine with HbA1c, BMI and HDL cholesterol.

  18. Trend of glycated hemoglobin testing in diabetic patients: to assess compliance with clinical practice guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghayur, S.; Tariq, H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine appropriate use of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) testing in accordance with current recommended guidelines. Study Design: Descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Chemical Pathology Department Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad from Oct 2011 to Oct 2012. Material and Methods: We randomly selected 170 known diabetic patients' data from our Laboratory Information System (LIS) who were retrospective analyzed for HbA1c to check for intervals and test frequency for each patient in one year. Patients with follow-up for at least one year at Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad and having their routine investigations in our chemical pathology laboratory were included. The concentrations of HbA1c for all the specimens were measured immunoturbidimetrically using a microparticle agglutination inhibition method. Four guidelines namely World Health Organization (WHO), American Diabetic Association (ADA), Canadian Diabetic Association (CDA) and National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) about HbA1c testing were utilized for data interpretation. All tests ordered within a 2 months period or more than 6 months following the previous order were labeled as inappropriate. Results: Only 35.8% of the patients were being properly monitored as per guidelines. Out of 64% patients who were inappropriately monitored, 12.9% had repeat orders within 2 months while 51.1% of patients were being monitored at longer interval against recommended guidelines. Conclusions: Glycated hemoglobin is a useful tool to objectively assess the prior glycemic control of patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The study highlights that in large proportion of diabetic patients, HbA1c is not utilized properly as a tool to assess the risk of diabetic complications but in a small proportion is also tested unnecessarily which adds to avoidable health expenditure. (author)

  19. The effectiveness of theory- and model-based lifestyle interventions on HbA1c among patients with type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshmangir, P; Jahangiry, L; Farhangi, M A; Doshmangir, L; Faraji, L

    2018-02-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes is rising rapidly around the world. A number of systematic reviews have provided evidence for the effectiveness of lifestyle interventions on diabetic patients. The effectiveness of theory- and model-based education-lifestyle interventions for diabetic patients are unclear. The systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to evaluate and quantify the impact of theory-based lifestyle interventions on type 2 diabetes. A literature search of authentic electronic resources including PubMed, Scopus, and Cochrane collaboration was performed to identify published papers between January 2002 and July 2016. The PICOs (participants, intervention, comparison, and outcomes) elements were used for the selection of studies to meet the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Mean differences and standard deviations of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c [mmol/mol]) level in baseline and follow-up measures of studies in intervention and control groups were considered for data synthesis. A random-effects model was used for estimating pooled effect sizes. To investigate the source of heterogeneity, predefined subgroup analyses were performed using trial duration, baseline HbA1c (mmol/mol) level, and the age of participants. Meta-regression was performed to examine the contribution of trial duration, baseline HbA1c (mmol/mol) level, the age of participants, and mean differences of HbA1c (mmol/mol) level. The significant level was considered P HbA1c (mmol/mol) -5.35% (95% confidence interval = -6.3, -4.40; P HbA1c (mmol/mol) indices in patients with type 2 diabetes. Health education theories have been applied as a useful tool for lifestyle change among people with type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Adherence to a diabetic care plan provides better glycemic control in ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Yi-Wen; Chang, Jer-Ming; Lin, Li-Ing; Chang, Pi-Yu; Lo, Wan-Ching; Wu, Ling-Chu; Chen, Tun-Chieh; Hwang, Shang-Jyh

    2009-04-01

    Tight control of blood sugar improves the outcomes for diabetic patients, but it can only be achieved by adhering to a well-organized care plan. To evaluate the effect of a diabetes care plan with reinforcement of glycemic control in diabetic patients, 98 ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes who visited our diabetes clinic every 3-4 months and who completed four education courses given by certified diabetes educators within 3 months after the first visit, were defined as the Intervention group. A total of 82 patients fulfilling the inclusion criteria for the Intervention group but who missed at least half of the diabetes education sessions were selected as controls. Both groups had comparable mean hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels at baseline, which decreased significantly at 3 months and were maintained at approximately constant levels at intervals for up to 1 year. The HbA1c decrement in the Intervention group was significantly greater than that in the Control group over the 1-year follow-up period (HbA1c change: -2.5 +/- 1.8% vs. -1.1 +/- 1.7%, p decrement occurred during the first 3 months, and accounted for 95.6% and 94.6% of the total HbA1c decrements in the Intervention and Control groups, respectively. In the multiple regression model, after adjustment for age, body mass index, and duration of diabetes, the Intervention group may still have a 12.6% improvement in HbA1c from their original value to the end of 1 year treatment compared with the Control group (p < 0.05). Diabetes care, with reinforcement from certified diabetes educators, significantly improved and maintained the effects on glycemic control in ambulatory patients with type 2 diabetes.

  1. Determinants of Long-Term Durable Glycemic Control in New-Onset Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Jin Kim

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundLong-term durable glycemic control is a difficult goal in the management of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. We evaluated the factors associated with durable glycemic control in a real clinical setting.MethodsWe retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 194 new-onset, drug-naïve patients with T2DM who were diagnosed between January 2011 and March 2013, and were followed up for >2 years. Glycemic durability was defined as the maintenance of optimal glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] <7.0% for 2 years without substitution or adding other glucose-lowering agents. Clinical factors and glycemic markers associated with glycemic durability were compared between two groups: a durability group and a non-durability group.ResultsPatients in the durability group had a higher baseline body mass index (26.1 kg/m2 vs. 24.9 kg/m2 and lower HbA1c (8.6% vs. 9.7% than the non-durability group. The initial choice of glucose-lowering agents was similar in both groups, except for insulin and sulfonylureas, which were more frequently prescribed in the non-durability group. In multiple logistic regression analyses, higher levels of education, physical activity, and homeostasis model assessment of β-cell function (HOMA-β were associated with glycemic durability. Notably, lower HbA1c (<7.0% at baseline and first follow-up were significantly associated with glycemic durability (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 7.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.51 to 22.3 (adjusted OR, 9.27; 95% CI, 1.62 to 53.1, respectively, after adjusting for confounding variables including the types of glucose-lowering agents.ConclusionEarly achievement of HbA1c level within the glycemic target was a determinant of long-term glycemic durability in new-onset T2DM, as were higher levels of education, physical activity, and HOMA-β.

  2. HbA(1c) levels in non-diabetic Dutch children aged 8-9 years : the PIAMA birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, H.; Wijga, A. H.; Smit, H. A.; Scholtens, S.; Kerkhof, M.; Koppelman, G. H.; de Jongste, J. C.; Stolk, R. P.

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA(1c)) is considered the best index of glycaemic control in established diabetes. It may also be useful in the diagnosis of diabetes and as a screening tool. Little is known about the distribution of HbA(1c) in healthy children and its predictors. The aim of this study is to

  3. Modelling the Relative Contribution of Fasting and Post-Prandial Plasma Glucose to HbA1c in Healthy and Type 2 Diabetic Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollerton, Richard L.; Luzio, Steven D.; Owens, David R.

    2004-01-01

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is regarded as the gold standard of glucose homeostasis assessment in diabetes. There has been much discussion in recent medical literature of experimental results concerning the relative contribution of fasting and post-prandial glucose levels to the value of HbA1c. A mathematical model of haemoglobin glycation is…

  4. Continuous glucose monitoring adds information beyond HbA1c in well-controlled diabetes patients with early cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleischer, Jesper; Laugesen, Esben; Cichosz, Simon Lebech

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: Hyperglycemia as evaluated by HbA1c is a risk factor for the development of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) may add information beyond HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes and CAN. METHO...

  5. Preoperative Hba1c level in prediction of short-term morbidity and mortality outcomes following coronary artery bypass grafting surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ümit Arslan

    2015-05-01

    Conclusion ― We concluded that in those diabetic patients that elective coronart artery bypass graft is applied, highly reactive HbA1c levels (HbA1c ≥7, may indicate morbitity in the early stages of post operation.

  6. Self-knowledge of HbA1c in people with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and its association with glycaemic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trivedi, Hina; Gray, Laura J.; Seidu, Samuel; Davies, Melanie J.; Charpentier, Guillaume; Lindblad, Ulf; Kellner, Christiane; Nolan, John J.; Pazderska, Agnieszka; Rutten, Guy; Trento, Marina; Khunti, Kamlesh

    2017-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of accurate self-knowledge of a patient's own HbA1c level (HbA1cSK), as a component of structural education (University Hospital's of Leicester (UHL), 2013) and its association with glycaemic control. Methods Data from the GUIDANCE

  7. The Stricter the Better? The Relationship between Targeted HbA1c Values and Metabolic Control of Pediatric Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Marcin; Tomasik, Bartlomiej; Wrona, Ewa; Fendler, Wojciech; Jarosz-Chobot, Przemyslawa; Szadkowska, Agnieszka; Zmysłowska, Agnieszka; Wilson, Jayne; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2016-01-01

    It remains unclear how HbA1c recommendations influence metabolic control of paediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus. To evaluate this we compared reported HbA1c with guideline thresholds. We searched systematically MEDLINE and EMBASE for studies reporting on HbA1c in children with T1DM and grouped them according to targeted HbA1c obtained from regional guidelines. We assessed the discrepancies in the metabolic control between these groups by comparing mean HbA1c extracted from each study and the differences between actual and targeted HbA1c. We included 105 from 1365 searched studies. The median (IQR) HbA1c for the study population was 8.30% (8.00%-8.70%) and was lower in "6.5%" than in "7.5%" as targeted HbA1c level (8.20% (7.85%-8.57%) versus 8.40% (8.20%-8.80%); p = 0.028). Median difference between actual and targeted HbA1c was 1.20% (0.80%-1.70%) and was higher in "6.5%" than in "7.5%" (1.70% (1.30%-2.07%) versus 0.90% (0.70%-1.30%), resp.; p HbA1c levels being closer to the therapeutic goal, but the actual values are still higher than those observed in the "6.5%" group. A meta-analysis of raw data from national registries or a prospective study comparing both approaches is warranted as the next step to examine this subject further.

  8. Risk assessment and HbA1c measurement in Norwegian community pharmacies to identify people with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes – A feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjome, Reidun Lisbet Skeide; Sandberg, Sverre; Sølvik, Una Ørvim

    2018-01-01

    Objectives Determine the feasibility of using a diabetes risk assessment tool followed by HbA1c-measurement in a community-pharmacy setting in Norway. Methods In this longitudinal study two pharmacists in each of three community pharmacies were trained to perform risk assessments, HbA1c-measurements and counselling. Pharmacy customers who were > 18 years old and could understand and speak Norwegian or English were recruited in the pharmacies during a two-months-period. Information about the service was presented in local newspapers, social media, leaflets and posters at the pharmacy. Customers wishing to participate contacted the pharmacy staff. Participants completed a validated diabetes risk test and a background questionnaire including a validated instrument for self-rated health. A HbA1c measurement was performed for individuals with a moderate to high risk of developing diabetes. If HbA1c ≥ 6.5% they were recommended to visit their general practitioner for follow-up. The pharmacies performed internal and external quality control of the HbA1c instrument. Results Of the 211 included participants 97 (46%) were > 50 years old. HbA1c was measured for the 47 participants (22%) with high risk. Thirty-two (15%) had HbA1c values internal and external quality control for HbA1c were within set limits. Conclusion The pharmacists were able to perform the risk assessment and measurement of HbA1c, and pharmacy customers were willing to participate. The HbA1c measurements fulfilled the requirements for analytical quality. Thus, it is feasible to implement this service in community pharmacies in Norway. In a large-scale study the inclusion criteria should be increased to 45 years in accordance with the population the risk test has been validated for. PMID:29474501

  9. Cutoff value of HbA1c for predicting diabetes and prediabetes in a Chinese high risk population aged over 45.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruyi; Wang, Jiao; Luo, Jinhua; Yang, Xiaoyan; Yang, Rui; Cai, Dehong; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the cutoff value of HbA1c for predicting diabetes and prediabetes in a Chinese high risk population aged over 45. A total of 619 people aged over 45 without diabetes were randomly recruited to complete Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) questionnaire. 208 high-risk individuals (defined by Diabetes Risk Score >=9) had OGTT and HbA1c determined at the same time. In a Chinese population aged over 45, the best cutoff value of HbA1c for detecting diabetes and prediabetes was 5.8% and 5.4% respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) curve of HbA1c for detecting diabetes was 0.85 (95% CI: 0.80-0.90) and prediabetes was 0.62 (95% CI: 0.54-0.70). The combined use of HbA1c and fasting blood glucose (FPG) had larger AUROC than HbA1c alone (0.88, 95%CI: 0.83-0.92 in detecting diabetes vs 0.75, 95% CI: 0.67-0.82 in prediabetes), and had a higher sensitivity in predicting diabetes and higher specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) in predicting prediabetes. However, the AUROC between HbA1c alone and combined use in predicting diabetes was not significantly different (p=0.173). FINDRISC is feasible tool to screen people who are at high risk of diabetes. The cutoff values of HbA1c to diagnose diabetes and prediabetes in a Chinese high risk population aged over 45 were 5.8% and 5.4%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of HbA1c for detecting diabetes and prediabetes was relatively low, so that the combined use of HbA1c and FPG may be more effective in prediction.

  10. Improvement of Glycosylated Hemoglobin in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus under Insulin Treatment by Reimbursement for Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Shin Song

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIn Korea, the costs associated with self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM under insulin treatment have been reimbursed since November 2015. We investigated whether this new reimbursement program for SMBG has improved the glycemic control in the beneficiaries of this policy.MethodsAmong all adult T2DM patients with ≥3 months of reimbursement (n=854, subjects without any changes in anti-hyperglycemic agents during the study period were selected. The improvement of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c was defined as an absolute reduction in HbA1c ≥0.6% or an HbA1c level at follow-up <7%.ResultsHbA1c levels significantly decreased from 8.5%±1.3% to 8.2%±1.2% during the follow-up (P<0.001 in all the study subjects (n=409. Among them, 35.5% (n=145 showed a significant improvement in HbA1c. Subjects covered under the Medical Aid system showed a higher prevalence of improvement in HbA1c than those with medical insurance (52.2% vs. 33.3%, respectively, P=0.012. In the improvement group, the baseline HbA1c (P<0.001, fasting C-peptide (P=0.016, and daily dose of insulin/body weight (P=0.024 showed significant negative correlations with the degree of HbA1c change. Multivariate analysis showed that subjects in the Medical Aid system were about 2.5-fold more likely to improve in HbA1c compared to those with medical insurance (odds ratio, 2.459; 95% confidence interval, 1.138 to 5.314; P=0.022.ConclusionThe reimbursement for SMBG resulted in a significant improvement in HbA1c in T2DM subjects using insulin, which was more prominent in subjects with poor glucose control at baseline or covered under the Medical Aid system.

  11. Work-related psychosocial stress and glycemic control among working adults with diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annor, Francis B; Roblin, Douglas W; Okosun, Ike S; Goodman, Michael

    2015-01-01

    To examine the association between glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and four subscales of work-related psychosocial stress at study baseline and over time. We used survey data from a major HMO located in the Southeastern part of the US on health and healthy behaviors linked with patients' clinical, pharmacy and laboratory records for the period between 2005 and 2009. Study participants (n=537) consisted of working adults aged 25-59 years, diagnosed with diabetes mellitus (DM) but without advanced micro or macrovascular complications at the time of the survey. We estimated the baseline (2005) association between HbA1c and work-related psychosocial stress and their interactions using linear regression analysis. Using individual growth model approach, we estimated the association between HbA1c over time and work-related psychosocial stress. Each of the models controlled for socio-demographic variables, diet and physical activity factor, laboratory factor, physical examinations variables and medication use in a hierarchical fashion. After adjusting for all study covariates, we did not find a significant association between work-related psychosocial stress and glycemic control either at baseline or over time. Among fairly healthy middle aged working adults with DM, work-related psychosocial stress was not directly associated with glycemic control. Copyright © 2015 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Predictors of Glycemic Control in Adolescents of Various Age Groups With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shu-Li; Lo, Fu-Sung; Lee, Yann-Jinn; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Wang, Ruey-Hsia

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the predictors of glycemic control in adolescents of various age groups with type 1 diabetes (T1D) is crucial for nurses to cultivate developmental-specific interventions to improve glycemic control in this age group. However, research has rarely addressed this issue, particularly in the context of Asian populations. We explored the predictive influence of demographic characteristics, self-care behaviors, family conflict, and parental involvement on glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C) levels 6 months after the baseline measurement in adolescents of various age groups with T1D in Taiwan. A prospective survey design was applied. At baseline, adolescents with T1D completed a self-care behavior scale. Parents or guardians finished scales of parental involvement and family conflict. The HbA1C levels 6 months after baseline measurement were collected from medical records. Two hundred ten adolescent-parent/guardian pairs were enrolled as participants. Multiple stepwise regressions examined the significant predictors of HbA1C levels 6 months after the baseline measurement in the three adolescent age groups: 10-12, 13-15, and 16-18 years. Family conflict was a significant predictor of HbA1C level within the 10-12 years of age group 6 months after the baseline measurement. Self-care behaviors were a significant predictor of HbA1C level within the 13-15 years of age group 6 months after the baseline measurement. Being female and self-care behaviors were each significant predictors of HbA1C level in the 16-18 years of age group 6 months after the baseline measurement. Nurses should design specific interventions to improve glycemic control in adolescents of various age groups with T1D that are tailored to their developmental needs. For adolescents with T1D aged 10-12 years, nurses should actively assess family conflict and provide necessary interventions. For adolescents with T1D aged 13-18 years, nurses should exert special efforts to improve their self

  13. Alternative Assessment of Glycemic Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greven, W.L.

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease associated with development of microvascular and macrovascular complications. Optimal glycemic control, usually measured by HbA1c is the cornerstone for prevention of complications. In this thesis glycemic variability (which resembles actual glucose levels,

  14. Improvement of HbA1c and stable weight loss 2 years after an outpatient treatment and teaching program for patients with type 2 diabetes without insulin therapy based on urine glucose self-monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller N

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Nicolle Müller1, Daniela Stengel2, Christof Kloos1, Michael Ristow2, Gunter Wolf1, Ulrich A Müller11University Hospital of Jena, Department of Internal Medicine III, Jena, Germany; 2Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Institute of Nutrition, Department of Human Nutrition, Jena, GermanyObjective: Long-term outcomes after participation in a structured diabetes treatment and teaching program (DTTP for patients with diabetes without insulin use, primarily based upon postprandial urine glucose self-monitoring (UGSM.Methods: A total of 126 patients took part in the DTTP in a university outpatient department in 2004–2005. We re-evaluated 119 (94.4% at baseline and at 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c was DCCT adjusted.Results: HbA1c decreased significantly 6 months after education from 7.33% (±1.59% to 6.89% (±0.98%; P = 0.001 versus baseline and was maintained for up to 12 months (7.02% ± 1.07%; P = 0.017 versus baseline as well as up to 24 months (6.96% ± 1.06%; P = 0.005 versus baseline. Weight decreased from 92.5 kg at baseline to 90.3 kg at 24 months (P = 0.014. A total of 36.5% of patients not on insulin therapy preferred UGSM, whereas 23.5% preferred blood glucose monitoring, at 24 months. Glucose control was similar in both groups at 24 months (HbA1c UGSM 7.03 versus blood glucose monitoring 6.97%; P = 0.807.Conclusion: Participation in the DTTP resulted in long-term behavior modification. HbA1c of patients without insulin met the target 24 months after the DTTP, irrespective of the type of glucose self-monitoring.Keywords: diabetes mellitus type 2, treatment and teaching program, patient education, HbA1c, body weight

  15. Evaluation of the effect of self-care education based on VARK learning style on HbA1c and FBS levels in patients with type II diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir Reza Saleh Moghadam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients with type II diabetes mostly struggle with increased fasting blood sugar (FBS and glycosylated hemoglobin HbA1c, which are associated with irrecoverable complications. Self-care education and different types of learning among patients are regarded as some of the most important issues in this regard. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the effect of self-care education based on VARK learning style on HbA1c and FBS in patients with type II diabetes. Methods: This clinical trial was conducted on patients with type II diabetes referring to Parsian Clinic in Mashhad, Iran in 2015. In total, 72 samples were selected through randomized convenience sampling and divided into two control and intervention groups of 36 cases. Subjects of the intervention group were also divided into subgroups of visual, aural, read/write and kinesthetic based on the results of VARK questionnaire. Self-care education was carried out for the intervention group in two 60-minute sessions once every two weeks, tailored to learning styles of the patients. Meanwhile, routine conferences were held for the control group. HbA1c and FBS levels were evaluated in all the participants before and a month and a half after the intervention to assess the self-care of patients. Data analysis was performed in SPSS version 21 using Mann-Whitney U, Chi-square, independent t-test and Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: In this study, mean score of HbA1c level was decreased from 7.7±0.8 to 7.0±5.7 (P<0.062, whereas mean score of FBS level was alleviated from 176.1±33.5 to 147.7±32.8 (P<0.001, which was only significant regarding the level of FBS (P=0.002. Conclusion: According to the results of this study, application of VARK learning style led to a reduction in HbA1c and FBS levels, contributing to improved self-care in patients with type II diabetes. Therefore, it is suggested that learning style of patients be determined using VARK questionnaire before their

  16. Prevalence of diabetes in Malaysia and usefulness of HbA1c as a diagnostic criterion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan Nazaimoon, W M; Md Isa, S H; Wan Mohamad, W B; Khir, A S; Kamaruddin, N A; Kamarul, I M; Mustafa, N; Ismail, I S; Ali, O; Khalid, B A K

    2013-07-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus among Malaysians aged ≥ 30 years of age has increased by more than twofold over a 20-year period. This study aimed to determine the current status and to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of the HbA(1c) cut-off point of 48 mmol/mol (6.5%). Using a two-stage stratified sampling design, participants aged ≥ 18 years were recruited from five zones selected to represent Malaysia. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed on all those not known to have diabetes. A total of 4341 subjects were recruited. By World Health Organization criteria, the prevalence of diabetes mellitus was 22.9%; of that percentage, 10.8% was known diabetes and 12.1% was newly diagnosed diabetes. Diabetes was most prevalent amongst Indians (37.9%) and Malays (23.8%). Prevalence of new diabetes mellitus was only 5.5% (95% CI 4.9-6.3) when based on the HbA(1c) diagnostic criteria of 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) and, although the cut-off point was highly specific (98.1%), it was less sensitive (36.7%) compared with 45 mmol/mol (6.3%), which showed the optimal sum of sensitivity (42.5%) and specificity (97.4%) in identifying new diabetes mellitus. This study recorded an overall diabetes prevalence of 22.6%, almost a twofold increase from 11.6% reported in 2006. This was likely attributable to the higher prevalence of new diabetes (12.1%) diagnosed following an oral glucose tolerance test. An HbA(1c) of 45 mmol/mol (6.3%) was found to be a better predictive cut-off point for detecting new diabetes in our multi-ethnic population. © 2013 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2013 Diabetes UK.

  17. The effect of maternal gestational diabetes and HbA1c on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy of infants

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    Hoda Rezaie

    2017-09-01

    Methods: This case-control study was performed on 60 neonates born in Afzalipour Hospital (Kerman University of Medical Sciences from May to November 2014 in two groups of eligible infants using the convenience sampling method. Information about the age, sex, weight, gestational age, maternal age, obstetric history, gestational diabetes through the checklist were collected. Then Doppler echocardiography, M- Mode, Doppler tissue was conducted on two groups. Echocardiographic criteria including ventricular septal thickness and blood HbA1c mothers in both groups were compared. To compare quantitative and qualitative variables between the two groups’ Independent samples t‐test and Chi-square test was used. A significant level of 0.05 was considered in all of the statistical samples and SPSS software, ver. 20 (IBM, Armonk, NY, USA was used to analyze the data. Results: In this study, the birth weight of infants and the age of mothers did not differ between two groups (Respectively P=0.56, P=0.08 However, HbA1c was significantly higher in the infants of mothers with impaired glucose tolerance test (GTT (P<0.001. In infants of mothers with impaired GTT, ventricular septal thickness was significantly higher than the healthy controls (P=0.03, Also there was a significant difference between two groups in tissue Doppler criteria (Ea (P=0.04, In other echocardiographic criteria, no significant differences were reported (The LA/AO, LVPWT, LVEF, LVEF, LVFS, LVFS, LVEDd, LVESd, Sa and Aa, All P-values were ≥ 0.05. Conclusion: Diabetes mellitus of mothers causes several complications in their infants. The prevalence of cardiomyopathy hypertrophy is higher in babies whose mothers have higher levels of HbA1c and a sign of poor control of blodd glucose level during pregnancy.

  18. How can point-of-care HbA1c testing be integrated into UK primary care consultations? - A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, J A; Stevens, R J; Smith, I; James, T; Gudgin, B C; Farmer, A J

    2017-08-01

    Point-of-care (POC) HbA1c testing gives a rapid result, allowing testing and treatment decisions to take place in a single appointment. Trials of POC testing have not been shown to improve HbA1c, possibly because of how testing was implemented. This study aimed to identify key components of POC HbA1c testing and determine strategies to optimise implementation in UK primary care. This cohort feasibility study recruited thirty patients with type 2 diabetes and HbA1c>7.5% (58mmol/mol) into three primary care clinics. Patients' clinical care included two POC HbA1c tests over six months. Data were collected on appointment duration, clinical decisions, technical performance and patient behaviour. Fifty-three POC HbA1c consultations took place during the study; clinical decisions were made in 30 consultations. Five POC consultations with a family doctor lasted on average 11min and 48 consultations with nurses took on average 24min. Five POC study visits did not take place in one clinic. POC results were uploaded to hospital records from two clinics. In total, sixty-three POC tests were performed, and there were 11 cartridge failures. No changes in HbA1c or patient behaviour were observed. HbA1c measurement with POC devices can be effectively implemented in primary care. This work has identified when these technologies might work best, as well as potential challenges. The findings can be used to inform the design of a pragmatic trial to implement POC HbA1c testing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Associations of HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose with incident diabetes: Implications for pre-diabetes thresholds in a Japanese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagami, Tomoko; Tanaka, Yuki; Oya, Junko; Kurita, Moritoshi; Isago, Chisato; Hasegawa, Yukiko; Ito, Arata; Hirota, Naoki; Tsuzura, Reika; Uchigata, Yasuko

    2016-12-01

    This study assessed pre-diabetes (pre-DM) cutoffs for HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) that were associated with an increased risk of incident DM. We evaluated 2267 non-diabetic Japanese health-check examinees (HbA1c: HbA1c of ≥6.5% (≥48mmol/mol), FPG of ≥7.0mmol/L, or physician-diagnosed DM. During 11047 person-years, we identified 99 incident DM cases (4.3%). The incidence of DM increased with increasing baseline HbA1c or FPG levels, and the change points (95% confidence intervals) were 5.7% (5.6-5.7%; 39mmol/mol [38-39mmol/mol]) for HbA1c and 5.5mmol/L (5.5-5.6mmol/L) for FPG. The adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for incident DM per one standard deviation-increase in HbA1c and FPG were 5.5 (4.4-6.8) and 4.0 (3.2-4.8), respectively. The adjusted HRs for incident DM were significantly higher at HbA1c of 5.7-6.4% (39-46mmol/mol) or FPG of 5.5-6.9mmol/L, compared to HbA1c of HbA1c and 5.5mmol/L for FPG in this Japanese population. Copyright © 2016 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Depression among Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and its Association with Poor Glycemic Control in Patients Visiting Tertiary Care Hospital of Islamabad

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadiq, J.; Khan, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Depression among type 2 diabetes mellitus patient results in negative health outcomes. Objectives: To determine the association between depression and glycemic control in patients suffering from type 2 diabetes mellitus. Study design, settings and duration: This comparative cross-sectional study was conducted in the diabetic patients attending diabetic clinic of Capital Hospital, Islamabad which is a tertiary care hospital from 1st September 2015 to 30th November 2015. Patients and Methods: The serum glycosylated hemoglobin levels (HbA1c) were recorded from the medical records of patients while Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) was used to assess depression in these patients. Poor glycemic control was taken as value of HbA1c = 7 percent. Equal number of depressive and non-depressive type 2 diabetics were recruited. The data was analyzed using SPSS 20.0 and Chi-square was used to find out association between depression and glycemic control among type 2 diabetes mellitus patients. Results: A total of 250 type 2 diabetes patients were enrolled in the study. Their mean HbA1c level was 8.5% (S.D +- 2.15) and the PHQ-9 score was 9.0 (S.D +- 4.11). Almost 83.2 percent patients had poor glycemic control and were depressed while 57.6 percent had poor glycemic control but were non-depressed. Depression was strongly associated with poor glycemic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: Depression among type 2 diabetes patients was significantly associated with poor glycemic control. Policy message: Type 2 diabetic patients should be regularly monitored for their glycemic control and assessed for depression and treated accordingly.(author)

  1. Identifying the independent effect of HbA1c variability on adverse health outcomes in patients with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prentice, J C; Pizer, S D; Conlin, P R

    2016-12-01

    To characterize the relationship between HbA 1c variability and adverse health outcomes among US military veterans with Type 2 diabetes. This retrospective cohort study used Veterans Affairs and Medicare claims for veterans with Type 2 diabetes taking metformin who initiated a second diabetes medication (n = 50 861). The main exposure of interest was HbA 1c variability during a 3-year baseline period. HbA 1c variability, categorized into quartiles, was defined as standard deviation, coefficient of variation and adjusted standard deviation, which accounted for the number and mean number of days between HbA 1c tests. Cox proportional hazard models predicted mortality, hospitalization for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions, and myocardial infarction or stroke and were controlled for mean HbA 1c levels and the direction of change in HbA 1c levels during the baseline period. Over a mean 3.3 years of follow-up, all HbA 1c variability measures significantly predicted each outcome. Using the adjusted standard deviation measure for HbA 1c variability, the hazard ratios for the third and fourth quartile predicting mortality were 1.14 (95% CI 1.04, 1.25) and 1.42 (95% CI 1.28, 1.58), for myocardial infarction and stroke they were 1.25 (95% CI 1.10, 1.41) and 1.23 (95% CI 1.07, 1.42) and for ambulatory-care sensitive condition hospitalization they were 1.10 (95% CI 1.03, 1.18) and 1.11 (95% CI 1.03, 1.20). Higher baseline HbA 1c levels independently predicted the likelihood of each outcome. In veterans with Type 2 diabetes, greater HbA 1c variability was associated with an increased risk of adverse long-term outcomes, independently of HbA 1c levels and direction of change. Limiting HbA 1c fluctuations over time may reduce complications. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  2. Salivary function and glycemic control in older persons with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, E M; Taylor, G W; Borrell, L N; Ship, J A

    2000-03-01

    There is no consensus on the possible association between diabetes and salivary dysfunction in older persons with diabetes. This study's purpose was to investigate the effect of diabetes and glycemic control on salivary function in an older population. Twenty nine persons with type 2 diabetes and 23 nondiabetic control subjects participated (age range, 54-90 years). Diabetic status was determined by a glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) test and a 2-hour glucose tolerance test. Poor glycemic control was defined as HbA(1c) >9%. Unstimulated whole saliva, unstimulated parotid, and stimulated parotid flow rates were measured, and subjects completed a standardized xerostomia questionnaire. Persons with poorly controlled diabetes had lower (P =.01) stimulated parotid flow rates than persons with well-controlled diabetes and nondiabetic control subjects. There were no significant differences in xerostomic complaints based on diabetic or glycemic control status or salivary flow rates. These results provide some evidence that poorly controlled diabetes may be associated with salivary dysfunction in older adults who have no concomitant complaints of xerostomia.

  3. Effects of switching from prandial premixed insulin therapy to basal plus two times bolus insulin therapy on glycemic control and quality of life in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ito H

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Hiroyuki Ito, Mariko Abe, Shinichi Antoku, Takashi Omoto, Masahiro Shinozaki, Shinya Nishio, Mizuo Mifune, Michiko ToganeDepartment of Diabetes, Metabolism and Kidney Disease, Edogawa Hospital, Tokyo, JapanBackground: The effects of switching from prandial premixed insulin therapy (PPT injected three times a day to basal plus two times bolus insulin therapy (B2B on glycemic control and quality of life were investigated in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.Methods: The clinical course was prospectively observed during the first 16 weeks after switching to B2B (insulin glargine plus insulin glulisine before breakfast and dinner in 27 subjects previously treated with PPT using 50/50 premixed insulin. The Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ was administered at the start and end of the study.Results: The glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c level (8.3%±1.8% to 8.2%±1.1% and the DTSQ score did not change between the start and end of the study. An improvement in HbA1c level was found in nine (33% subjects. The change in HbA1c showed a significant negative correlation with baseline HbA1c, and was significantly better in patients with a baseline HbA1c >8.0% than in those with an HbA1c ≤8.0% (−0.9±2.0 versus 0.3±0.6, respectively, P=0.02. The change in DTSQ score representing treatment satisfaction was significantly greater in patients whose HbA1c level was improved than in those in whom it was not (2.7±3.6 versus −0.8±3.5, P=0.04.Conclusion: B2B was noninferior to PPT with regard to HbA1c levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. B2B should be considered particularly for subjects whose glycemic control is poor despite PPT.Keywords: type 2 diabetes mellitus, insulin therapy, basal plus two times bolus insulin therapy, prandial premixed insulin therapy, Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire

  4. Poor glycemic control of diabetes mellitus is associated with higher risk of prostate cancer detection in a biopsy population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhyun Park

    Full Text Available To evaluate the impact of glycemic control of diabetes mellitus (DM on prostate cancer detection in a biopsy population.We retrospectively reviewed the records of 1,368 men who underwent prostate biopsy at our institution. We divided our biopsy population into three groups according to their history of DM, and their Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c level: a no-DM (DM- group; a good glycemic control (DM+GC group (HbA1c <6.5%; and a poor glycemic control (DM+PC group (HbA1c ≥6.5%. For sub-analyses, the DM+PC group was divided into a moderately poor glycemic control (DM+mPC group (6.5≤ HbA1c <7.5% and a severely poor glycemic control (DM+sPC group (HbA1c ≥7.5%.Among 1,368 men, 338 (24.7% had a history of DM, and 393 (28.7% had a positive biopsy. There was a significant difference in prostatic specific antigen density (PSAD (P = 0.037 and the frequency of abnormal DRE findings (P = 0.031 among three groups. The occurrence rate of overall prostate cancer (P<0.001 and high-grade prostate cancer (P = 0.016 also presented with a significantly difference. In the multivariate analysis, the DM+PC group was significantly associated with a higher rate of overall prostate cancer detection in biopsy subjects compared to the DM- group (OR = 2.313, P = 0.001 but the DM+PC group was not associated with a higher rate of high-grade (Gleason score ≥7 diseases detected during the biopsy (OR = 1.297, P = 0.376. However, in subgroup analysis, DM+sPC group was significantly related to a higher risk of high-grade diseases compared to the DM- group (OR = 2.446, P = 0.048.Poor glycemic control of DM was associated with a higher risk of prostate cancer detection, including high-grade disease, in the biopsy population.

  5. HbA1c, fasting and 2 h plasma glucose in current, ex- and never-smokers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soulimane, Soraya; Simon, Dominique; Herman, William H

    2014-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The relationships between smoking and glycaemic variables have not been well explored. We compared HbA1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2 h plasma glucose (2H-PG) in current, ex- and never-smokers. METHODS: This meta-analysis used individual data from 16,886 men and 18,539 women......, there was no significant difference between current and never-smokers (-0.004 mmol/l [-0.03, 0.02]) but FPG was higher in ex-smokers (0.12 mmol/l [0.09, 0.14]). In comparison with never-smokers, 2H-PG was lower (-0.44 mmol/l [-0.52, -0.37]) in current smokers, with no difference for ex-smokers (0.02 mmol/l [-0.06, 0...... as screened by 2H-PG, in comparison with never-smokers. CONCLUSION/INTERPRETATION: Across this heterogeneous group of studies, current smokers had a higher HbA1c and lower 2H-PG than never-smokers. This will affect the chances of smokers being diagnosed with diabetes....

  6. Effect of Continuous Glucose Monitoring on Glycemic Control, Acute Admissions, and Quality of Life: A Real-World Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleer, Sara; Mathieu, Chantal; Nobels, Frank; De Block, Christophe; Radermecker, Regis P; Hermans, Michel P; Taes, Youri; Vercammen, Chris; T'Sjoen, Guy; Crenier, Laurent; Fieuws, Steffen; Keymeulen, Bart; Gillard, Pieter

    2018-03-01

    Randomized controlled trials evaluating real-time continuous glucose monitoring (RT-CGM) patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D) show improved glycemic control, but limited data are available on real-world use. To assess impact of RT-CGM in real-world settings on glycemic control, hospital admissions, work absenteeism, and quality of life (QOL). Prospective, observational, multicenter, cohort study. A total of 515 adults with T1D on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) therapy starting in the Belgian RT-CGM reimbursement program. Initiation of RT-CGM reimbursement. Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) evolution from baseline to 12 months. Between September 1, 2014, and December 31, 2016, 515 adults entered the reimbursement system. Over this period, 417 (81%) patients used RT-CGM for at least 12 months. Baseline HbA1c was 7.7 ± 0.9% (61 ± 9.8 mmol/mol) and decreased to 7.4 ± 0.8% (57 ± 8.7 mmol/mol) at 12 months (P < 0.0001). Subjects who started RT-CGM because of insufficient glycemic control showed stronger decrease in HbA1c at 4, 8, and 12 months compared with patients who started because of hypoglycemia or pregnancy. In the year preceding reimbursement, 16% of patients were hospitalized for severe hypoglycemia or ketoacidosis in contrast to 4% (P < 0.0005) the following year, with decrease in admission days from 54 to 18 per 100 patient years (P < 0.0005). In the same period, work absenteeism decreased and QOL improved significantly, with strong decline in fear of hypoglycemia. Sensor-augmented pump therapy in patients with T1D followed in specialized centers improves HbA1c, fear of hypoglycemia, and QOL, whereas work absenteeism and admissions for acute diabetes complications decreased.

  7. Recall of HbA1c and self-management behaviours, patient activation, perception of care and diabetes distress in Type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willaing, I; Rogvi, S-A; Bøgelund, M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate associations between HbA1c recall by patients with Type 2 diabetes and self-management behaviours, patient activation, perception of care and diabetes distress....

  8. Risk assessment and HbA1c measurement in Norwegian community pharmacies to identify people with undiagnosed type 2 diabetes - A feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risøy, Aslaug Johanne; Kjome, Reidun Lisbet Skeide; Sandberg, Sverre; Sølvik, Una Ørvim

    2018-01-01

    Determine the feasibility of using a diabetes risk assessment tool followed by HbA1c-measurement in a community-pharmacy setting in Norway. In this longitudinal study two pharmacists in each of three community pharmacies were trained to perform risk assessments, HbA1c-measurements and counselling. Pharmacy customers who were > 18 years old and could understand and speak Norwegian or English were recruited in the pharmacies during a two-months-period. Information about the service was presented in local newspapers, social media, leaflets and posters at the pharmacy. Customers wishing to participate contacted the pharmacy staff. Participants completed a validated diabetes risk test and a background questionnaire including a validated instrument for self-rated health. A HbA1c measurement was performed for individuals with a moderate to high risk of developing diabetes. If HbA1c ≥ 6.5% they were recommended to visit their general practitioner for follow-up. The pharmacies performed internal and external quality control of the HbA1c instrument. Of the 211 included participants 97 (46%) were > 50 years old. HbA1c was measured for the 47 participants (22%) with high risk. Thirty-two (15%) had HbA1c values HbA1c ≥ 6.5%. Two participants with HbA1 ≥ 6.5% were diagnosed with diabetes by their general practitioner. The third was lost to follow-up. Results from internal and external quality control for HbA1c were within set limits. The pharmacists were able to perform the risk assessment and measurement of HbA1c, and pharmacy customers were willing to participate. The HbA1c measurements fulfilled the requirements for analytical quality. Thus, it is feasible to implement this service in community pharmacies in Norway. In a large-scale study the inclusion criteria should be increased to 45 years in accordance with the population the risk test has been validated for.

  9. Contemporary risk estimates of three HbA1c variables in relation to heart failure following diagnosis of type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrtic, Stanko; Cabrera, Claudia; Olsson, Marita; Schnecke, Volker; Lind, Marcus

    2017-03-01

    We evaluated the association between glycaemic control and the risk of heart failure (HF) in a contemporary cohort of persons followed after diagnosis of type 2 diabetes (T2D). Persons with T2D diagnosed between 1998 and 2012 were retrieved from the Clinical Practice Research Data Link in the UK and followed from diagnosis until the event of HF, mortality, drop out from the database due to any other reason, or the end of the study on 1 July 2015. The association between each of three different haemoglobin A 1C (HbA 1c ) metrics and HF was estimated using adjusted proportional hazard models. In the overall cohort (n=94 332), the increased risk for HF per 1% (10 mmol/mol) increase in HbA 1c was 1.15 (95% CI 1.13 to 1.18) for updated mean HbA 1c , and 1.06 (1.04 to 1.07) and 1.06 (1.04 to 1.08) for baseline HbA 1c and updated latest HbA 1c , respectively. When categorised, the hazard risk (HR) for the updated mean HbA 1c in relation to HF became higher than for baseline and updated latest HbA 1c above HbA 1c levels of 9%, but did not differ at lower HbA 1c levels. The updated latest variable showed an increased risk for HbA 1c <6% (42 mmol/mol) of 1.16 (1.07 to 1.25), relative category 6-7%, while the HRs for updated mean and baseline HbA 1c showed no such J-shaped pattern. Hyperglycaemia is still a risk factor for HF in persons with T2D of similar magnitude as in earlier cohorts. Such a relationship exists for current glycaemic levels, at diagnosis and the overall level but the pattern differs for these variables. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  10. Nutritional intervention and impact of polyphenol on glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) in non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic subjects: Systematic review and nmeta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma-Duran, Susana A; Vlassopoulos, Antonis; Lean, Mike; Govan, Lindsay; Combet, Emilie

    2017-03-24

    Polyphenols have been extensively studied for their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Recently, their antiglycative actions by oxidative stress modulation have been linked to the prevention of diabetes and associated complications. This article assesses the evidence for polyphenol interventions on glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) in non-diabetic, pre-diabetic, and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) subjects. A systematic review of polyphenols' clinical trials on HbA1c in humans was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Thirty-six controlled randomized trials with HbA1c values were included. Polyphenols (extracts, supplements, and foods) were supplemented (28 mg to 1.5 g) for 0.7 to 12 months. Combining all subjects (n = 1954, mean baseline HbA1c = 7.03%, 53 mmol/mol), polyphenol supplementation significantly (P HbA1c% by -0.53 ± 0.12 units (-5.79 ± 0.13 mmol/mol). This reduction was significant (P HbA1c = 7.44%, 58 mmol/mol), with HbA1c% lowered by -0.21 ± 0.04 units (-2.29 ± 0.4 mmol/mol). Polyphenol supplementation had no significant effect (P > 0.21) in the non-diabetic (n = 258, mean baseline HbA1c = 5.47%, 36 mmol/mol) and the pre-diabetic subjects (n = 270, mean baseline HbA1c = 6.06%, 43 mmol/mol) strata: -0.39 ± 0.27 HbA1c% units (-4.3 ± 0.3 mmol/mol), and -0.38 ± 0.31 units (-4.2 ± 0.31 mmol/mol), respectively. In conclusion, polyphenols can successfully reduce HbA1c in T2DM without any intervention at glycemia, and could contribute to the prevention of diabetes complications.

  11. Correlation between glycemic control and peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness in Saudi type II diabetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmy RM

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Rania M Fahmy,1,2 Ramesa S Bhat,3 Manar Al-Mutairi,4 Feda S Aljaser,5 Afaf El-Ansary4 1Department of Optometry, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt; 3Biochemistry Department, College of Science, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Central Laboratory, Female Center for Medical Studies and Scientific Section, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 5Department of Clinical Laboratory Sciences, College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Objective: To evaluate the effect of diabetes mellitus (DM, diabetic retinopathy, and degree of glycemic control (glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] on peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFLT using optical coherence tomography.Methods: The study included 126 eyes of healthy controls (n=32 and diabetics patients (n=31, whose ages ranged from 40 to 70 years. The diabetic group was divided into: Subgroup 1: with HbA1c <7% and Subgroup 2: with HbA1c ≥7%. All patients underwent full ophthalmic examination. HbA1c level was obtained with the A1cNow+ system and the peripapillary RNFLT was measured using 3D-OCT 2000 Topcon (360-degree circular scan with 3.4 mm diameter centered on optic disc.Results: The obtained data demonstrates significant decrease in peripapillary RNFLT in superior and inferior quadrants of the right eye (p=0.000 and p=0.039, respectively, and in superior quadrant of the left eye (p=0.002 with impairment of glycemic control. Pearson’s correlation test showed significant negative correlation of RNFLT with HbA1c in the superior quadrant in both eyes.Conclusion: Impairment of glycemic control affects the peripapillary RNFLT mainly in the superior quadrant. This thickness also tends to decrease with long-standing DM, use of DM medications, and development of diabetic retinopathy. The measurement of peripapillary RNFLT

  12. HbA1c variability in type 2 diabetes is associated with the occurrence of new-onset albuminuria within three years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorajoo, Sreemanee Raaj; Ng, Joceline Shi Ling; Goh, Jessica Hui Fen; Lim, Su Chi; Yap, Chun Wei; Chan, Alexandre; Lee, Joyce Yu Chia

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the association between HbA1c coefficient of variation (HbA1c-CV) and 3-year new-onset albuminuria risk. A retrospective cohort study involving 716 normoalbuminuric type 2 diabetes patients was conducted between 2010 and 2014. HbA1c-CV was used to categorize patients into low, moderate or high variability groups. Multivariate logistic models were constructed and validated. Integrated discrimination (IDI) and net reclassification (NRI) improvement indices were used to quantify the added predictive value of HbA1c-CV. The mean age of our cohort was 56.1±12.9years with a baseline HbA1c of 8.3±1.3%. Over 3-years of follow-up, 35.2% (n=252) developed albuminuria. An incremental risk of albuminuria was observed with moderate (6.68-13.43%) and high (above 13.44%) HbA1c-CV categories demonstrating adjusted odds ratios of 1.63 (1.12-2.38) and 3.80 (2.10-6.97) for 3-year new-onset albuminuria, respectively. Including HbA1c-CV for 3-year new-onset albuminuria prediction improved model discrimination (IDI: 0.023, NRI: 0.293, pHbA1c-CV improves 3-year prediction of new-onset albuminuria. Together with mean HbA1c, baseline urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio and presence of hypertension, accurate 3-year new-onset albuminuria prediction may be possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Risk of progression to diabetes from prediabetes defined by HbA1c or fasting plasma glucose criteria in Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chul-Hee; Kim, Hong-Kyu; Kim, Eun-Hee; Bae, Sung-Jin; Choe, Jaewon; Park, Joong-Yeol

    2016-08-01

    To examine the abilities of HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) criteria predicting 5-year progression rate to diabetes in Korean adults with prediabetes. Participants included 17,971 Koreans (aged 20-79years) who underwent routine medical check-ups at a mean interval of 5.2years (3.1-6.7years). Prediabetes was defined as FPG 5.6-6.9mmol/l or HbA1c 5.7-6.4% (39-46mmol/mol). Incident diabetes was defined as FPG⩾7.0mmol/l, HbA1c⩾6.5% (48mmol/mol), or initiation of antidiabetic medications. At baseline, the prevalence of prediabetes was 30.6% (n=5495) by FPG and 20.4% (n=3664) by HbA1c criteria. The 5-year progression rate to diabetes was significantly higher in prediabetes identified by HbA1c than by FPG tests (14.7% vs. 10.4%, Pprediabetes by only one test, those by HbA1c alone had a higher risk of progression to diabetes than those diagnosed by FPG alone (6.0% vs. 3.9%, Pprediabetes identified by HbA1c (OR 9.91, 8.24-11.9) than by FPG (OR 7.29, 5.97-8.89) (P=0.026). Although fewer individuals with prediabetes were identified by HbA1c than by FPG criteria, the ability to predict progression to diabetes was stronger for HbA1c than for FPG in Koreans. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A pilot interventional study to evaluate the impact of cholecalciferol treatment on HbA1c in type 1 diabetes (T1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Perchard

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Higher 25(OHD3 levels are associated with lower HbA1c, but there are limited UK interventional trials assessing the effect of cholecalciferol on HbA1c. Aims: (1 To assess the baseline 25(OHD3 status in a Manchester cohort of children with type 1 diabetes (T1D. (2 To determine the effect of cholecalciferol administration on HbA1c. Methods: Children with T1D attending routine clinic appointments over three months in late winter/early spring had blood samples taken with consent. Participants with a 25(OHD3 level 10 years units. HbA1c levels before and after treatment were recorded. Results: Vitamin D levels were obtained from 51 children. 35 were Caucasian, 11 South Asian and 5 from other ethnic groups. 42 were vitamin D deficient, but 2 were excluded from the analysis. All South Asian children were vitamin D deficient, with mean 25(OHD3 of 28 nmol/L. In Caucasians, there was a negative relationship between baseline 25(OHD3 level and HbA1c (r = −0.484, P < 0.01. In treated participants, there was no significant difference in mean HbA1c at 3 months (t = 1.010, P = 0.328 or at 1 year (t = −1.173, P = 0.248 before and after treatment. One-way ANCOVA, controlling for age, gender, ethnicity, BMI and diabetes duration showed no difference in Δ HbA1c level. Conclusion: We report important findings at baseline, but in children treated with a stat dose of cholecalciferol, there was no effect on HbA1c. Further studies with larger sample sizes and using maintenance therapy are required.

  15. Multimedia education program and nutrition therapy improves HbA1c, weight, and lipid profile of patients with type 2 diabetes: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-López, Lubia; Muñoz-Torres, Abril Violeta; Medina-Bravo, Patricia; Vilchis-Gil, Jenny; Klϋnder-Klϋnder, Miguel; Escobedo-de la Peña, Jorge

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of a multimedia education program and nutrition therapy on metabolic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. What is the effect of a multimedia education program and nutritional therapy on metabolic control in type 2 diabetes? A randomized clinical trial was conducted in 351 patients randomly assigned to either an experimental group receiving a multimedia diabetes education program (MDE) and nutrition therapy (NT) (NT + MDE: n = 173), or to a control group who received nutrition therapy only (NT: n = 178). At baseline, 7, 14, and 21 months, the glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), glucose, cholesterol, triglycerides, LDL-cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol were measured. Weight, body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (WC), fat percentage, fat and lean mass, systolic blood pressure (SBP), and diastolic (DBP) were also recorded. Glycated hemoglobin decreased in both groups, although the group with NT + MDE had a greater reduction, with a difference of -0.76% (95%CI -1.33 to -0.19) at 7 months and -0.73% (95%CI -1.37 to -0.09) at 21 months. Only in the NT + MDE did the glucose decrease at 7 (-41.2 mg/dL; 95%CI -52.0 to -30.5), 14 (-27.8 mg/dL; 95%CI -32.6 to -23.1), and 21 months (-36.6 mg/dL; 95%CI -46.6 to -26.6). Triglycerides and the atherogenic index decreased in both groups at 7 and 14 months; while only in the NT + MDE group did it decrease at 21 months. (p Nutrition therapy and a multimedia diabetes education program have a favorable impact on achieving metabolic control goals in type 2 diabetes.

  16. Prevalence of anxiety and depression among diabetic African patients in Guinea: association with HbA1c levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camara, A; Baldé, N M; Enoru, S; Bangoura, J S; Sobngwi, E; Bonnet, F

    2015-02-01

    The prevalence and risk factors associated with symptoms of anxiety and depression were determined in African people with diabetes. This cross-sectional study involved 491 outpatients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) recruited from four diabetes clinics (Conakry, Labé, Boké and Kankan) in Guinea. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) was used to evaluate symptoms of anxiety and depression. Logistic regression analysis stratified by gender was performed to identify the associated risk factors. Anxiety and depression symptoms were present in 58.7% and 34.4%, respectively, of the 491 patients with T2D (62.7% women, mean±SD age: 57.9±10.2years). Odds ratios (95% CI) of risk factors independently associated with anxiety were urban residence [2.98 (1.81-4.89)] in women, and low socioeconomic status [0.19 (0.05-0.70)] and HbA1c≥9.0% [2.61 (1.0-6.39)] in men. Factors associated with depression were urban residence [2.13 (1.27-3.58)], older age [1.03 (1.01-1.06)], low socioeconomic status [2.21 (1.34-3.66)] and no previous measurement of HbA1c [12.45 (1.54-100.34)] in women, and insulin therapy [2.28 (1.05-4.92)] and HbA1c≥9.0% [3.85 (1.02-14.48)] in men. Anxiety and depression symptoms in people with type T2D are common in Guinea. Urban residence, low socioeconomic status and high levels of HbA1c were significantly associated with a greater risk of anxiety and depression, highlighting the psychological burden related to diabetes in Africa. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Selecting a Risk-Based SQC Procedure for a HbA1c Total QC Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westgard, Sten A; Bayat, Hassan; Westgard, James O

    2017-09-01

    Recent US practice guidelines and laboratory regulations for quality control (QC) emphasize the development of QC plans and the application of risk management principles. The US Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) now includes an option to comply with QC regulations by developing an individualized QC plan (IQCP) based on a risk assessment of the total testing process. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) has provided new practice guidelines for application of risk management to QC plans and statistical QC (SQC). We describe an alternative approach for developing a total QC plan (TQCP) that includes a risk-based SQC procedure. CLIA compliance is maintained by analyzing at least 2 levels of controls per day. A Sigma-Metric SQC Run Size nomogram provides a graphical tool to simplify the selection of risk-based SQC procedures. Current HbA1c method performance, as demonstrated by published method validation studies, is estimated to be 4-Sigma quality at best. Optimal SQC strategies require more QC than the CLIA minimum requirement of 2 levels per day. More complex control algorithms, more control measurements, and a bracketed mode of operation are needed to assure the intended quality of results. A total QC plan with a risk-based SQC procedure provides a simpler alternative to an individualized QC plan. A Sigma-Metric SQC Run Size nomogram provides a practical tool for selecting appropriate control rules, numbers of control measurements, and run size (or frequency of SQC). Applications demonstrate the need for continued improvement of analytical performance of HbA1c laboratory methods.

  18. Treatment intensification without improved HbA1c levels in children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sildorf, S M; Hertel, N T; Thomsen, J; Fredheim, S; Hastrup, H; Pipper, C; Hertz, B; Svensson, J

    2016-04-01

    To examine trends in diabetes treatment in Danish children and adolescents with Type 1 diabetes mellitus, comparing treatment intensity with metabolic outcomes in the population, and to describe the challenges of population-based registries in a clinical setting with rapidly changing treatment methods. This observational study is based on the Danish national population registry of childhood diabetes, which includes 99% of children diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes before the age of 15 years. We included 4527 people diagnosed between 2000 and 2012. Self-monitored blood glucose measurements, insulin injections/boluses, treatment method and metabolic control quantifications were analysed and adjusted for the effects of gender and ethnicity, the combined effect of age, visit year and duration, and for the random effects of individual and hospital settings. Treatment was intensified via an increasing number of self-monitored blood glucose measurements and injections/boluses. More than six injections/boluses and an increased number of self-monitored blood glucose measurements were significantly associated with lower metabolic control. No reduction, however, in the overall mean HbA1c concentration was observed between 2005 [66 mmol/mol (8.2%)] and 2012 [65 mmol/mol (8.1%)]. Changed registration practices in 2009 introduced artificial jumps in data. Intensifying treatment alone does not lead to improved metabolic control in the overall population despite the appearance of lower HbA1c in individuals with a greater number of self-monitored blood glucose measurements and injections/boluses. The contradictory results reflect difficulties in using observational studies to predict results of intervention in the individual. Data collected from population-based registries need to be adjusted continuously to reflect changes in care. © 2015 Diabetes UK.

  19. Determination of glycated hemoglobin in patients with advanced liver disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahousen, Theresa; Hegenbarth, Karin; Ille, Rottraut; Lipp, Rainer W.; Krause, Robert; Little, Randie R.; Schnedl, Wolfgang J.

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c) determination methods and to determine fructosamine in patients with chronic hepatitis, compensated cirrhosis and in patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin. METHODS: HbA1c values were determined in 15 patients with compensated liver cirrhosis and in 20 patients with chronic hepatitis using the ion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography and the immunoassay methods. Fructosamine was determined using nitroblue tetrazolium. RESULTS: Forty percent of patients with liver cirrhosis had HbA1c results below the non-diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method, while fructosamine results were either within the reference range or elevated. Twenty percent of patients with chronic hepatitis (hepatic fibrosis) had HbA1c results below the non -diabetic reference range by at least one HbA1c method. In patients with chronic hepatitis treated with ribavirin, 50% of HbA1c results were below the non-diabetic reference using at least one of the HbA1c methods. CONCLUSION: Only evaluated in context with all liver function parameters as well as a red blood count including reticulocytes, HbA 1c results should be used in patients with advanced liver disease. HbA 1c and fructosamine measurements should be used with caution when evaluating long-term glucose control in patients with hepatic cirrhosis or in patients with chronic hepatitis and ribavirin treatment. PMID:15259084

  20. Is there a role for HbA1c in predicting mortality and morbidity outcomes after coronary artery bypass graft surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennyson, Charlene; Lee, Rebecca; Attia, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    A best evidence topic in cardiac surgery was written according to a structured protocol. The question addressed was is there a role for HbA1c in predicting morbidity and mortality outcomes after coronary artery bypass surgery? Eleven studies presented the best evidence to answer the clinical question. The authors, journal, date and country of publication, patient group studied, study type, relevant outcomes and results of these papers are tabulated. The studies presented analyse the relationship between preoperative HbA1c levels and postoperative outcomes following coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) in diabetic, non-diabetic or mixed patient groups. Four studies found significant increases in early and late mortality at higher HbA1c levels, regardless of a preoperative diagnosis of diabetes. One study demonstrated that 30-day survival outcomes were significantly worse in patients with previously undiagnosed diabetes and elevated HbA1c compared with those with good control [HbA1c >6%; odds ratio 1.53, confidence interval (CI) (1.24–1.91); P = 0.0005]. However, four studies of early mortality outcomes in diabetic patients only showed no significant differences between patients with normal and those with deranged HbA1c levels (P = 0.99). There were mixed reports on morbidity outcomes. Three studies identified a significant increase in infectious complications in patients with poorly controlled HbA1c, two of which were irrespective of previous diabetic status [deep sternal wound infection (P = 0.014); superficial sternal wound infection (P = 0.007) and minor infections (P = 0.006) in poorly controlled diabetics only]. Four studies presented outcomes for total length of stay (LOS). Three of these papers looked specifically at diabetic patients, of which two found no significant differences in length of stay between good and poor preoperative glycaemic control [LOS: P = 0.59 and 0.86 vs P HbA1c vs normal HbA1c was associated with prolonged stay in hospital and in intensive care unit (ICU) in patients irrespective of previous diabetic status [total LOS (P HbA1c levels were also a significant predictor of reduced intraoperative insulin sensitivity in diabetic patients (R = −0.527; P HbA1c levels were associated with a reduced incidence of postoperative atrial fibrillation (P = 0.001). We conclude that elevated HbA1c is a strong predictor of mortality and morbidity irrespective of previous diabetic status. In particular, the mortality risk for CABG is quadrupled at HbA1c levels >8.6%. Some studies have called into question the predictive value of HbA1c on short-term outcomes in well-controlled diabetics; however, long-term outcomes in this population have not been reported. PMID:24021615

  1. Change in HbA1c levels between the age of 8 years and the age of 12 years in Dutch children without diabetes : The PIAMA birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Hanneke; Wijga, Alet H.; Scholtens, Salome; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Brunekreef, Bert; De Jongste, Johan C.; Smit, Henriëtte A.; Stolk, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: HbA1c is associated with cardiovascular risk in persons without diabetes and cardiovascular risk accumulates over the life course. Therefore, insight in factors determining HbA1c from childhood onwards is important. We investigated (lifestyle) determinants of HbA1c at age 12 years and the

  2. Change in HbA1c levels between the age of 8 years and the age of 12 years in Dutch children without diabetes : The PIAMA birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Jansen; A.H. Wijga (Alet); S. Scholtens (Salome); G.H. Koppelman (Gerard); D.S. Postma (Dirkje); B. Brunekreef (Bert); J.C. de Jongste (Johan); H.A. Smit (Henriëtte); R.P. Stolk (Ronald)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjective: HbA1c is associated with cardiovascular risk in persons without diabetes and cardiovascular risk accumulates over the life course. Therefore, insight in factors determining HbA1c from childhood onwards is important. We investigated (lifestyle) determinants of HbA1c at age 12

  3. Change in HbA1c levels between the age of 8 years and the age of 12 years in Dutch children without diabetes : the PIAMA birth cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Hanneke; Wijga, Alet H; Scholtens, Salome|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304834548; Koppelman, Gerard H; Postma, Dirkje S; Brunekreef, Bert|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/067548180; de Jongste, Johan C; Smit, Henriëtte A; Stolk, Ronald P

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: HbA1c is associated with cardiovascular risk in persons without diabetes and cardiovascular risk accumulates over the life course. Therefore, insight in factors determining HbA1c from childhood onwards is important. We investigated (lifestyle) determinants of HbA1c at age 12 years and the

  4. Change in HbA1c Levels between the Age of 8 Years and the Age of 12 Years in Dutch Children without Diabetes : The PIAMA Birth Cohort Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Hanneke; Wijga, Alet H.; Scholtens, Salome; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Brunekreef, Bert; de Jongste, Johan C.; Smit, Henriette A.; Stolk, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective HbA1c is associated with cardiovascular risk in persons without diabetes and cardiovascular risk accumulates over the life course. Therefore, insight in factors determining HbA1c from childhood onwards is important. We investigated (lifestyle) determinants of HbA1c at age 12 years and the

  5. IMPACT OF GLYCEMIC CONTROL ON OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ANTIOXIDANT STATUS IN DIABETIC NEUROPATHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpashree

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oxidative stress due to enhanced free - radical generation and/or a decrease in antioxidant defense mechanisms has been implicated in the pathogenesis of diabetic neuropathy. This study was conducted to study the impact of glycemic control on oxidative stress and antioxidant balance in diab etic neuropathy. METHOD S : fifty patients with diabetic neuropathy and fifty age matched healthy controls were included in the study. Glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c was estimated to assess the severity of diabetes and the glycemic control. Serum malondiaal dehyde (MDA levels were assessed as a marker of lipid peroxidation and hence oxidative stress. Superoxide Dismutase (SOD levels were assessed for antioxidant status. RESULTS: Significant positive correlation was found between serum MDA levels and hba1c ( r = 0.276, p < 0.0001 in patients with diabetic neuropathy. There was statistically significant reduction in the Glutathione peroxidase levels. Further, SOD levels were inversely correlated with HbA1c (r= - 0.603, p<0.0001 levels. CONCLUSION AND SUMMARY: oxidative stress is greatly increased in patients suffering from diabetic neuropathy and is inversely related to glycemic control. This may be due to depressed antioxidant enzyme levels and may also be responsible for further depletion of antioxidant enzym e GPx. This worsens the oxidative stress and creates a vicious cycle of imbalance of free radical generation and deficit of antioxidant status in these patients which may lead to nervous system damage causing diabetic neuropathy. A good glycemic control is essential for prevention of diabetic neuropathy.

  6. Evaluation of glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Chinese communities: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shan; Gu, Liubao; Lou, Qinglin; Ouyang, Xiaojun; Yu, Yun; Wu, Haidi; Bian, Rongwen

    2017-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the glycemic levels in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and to explore the factors related to the results of glycemic control. A total of 2454 T2DM patients from 11 communities were examined for glycosylated hemoglobin levels and glycemic control options. Potential factors related to the results of glycemic control were analyzed using logistic regression. Of all the patients, 55.3 % achieved the glycemic control target of HbA1c 1.345, 95 % CI 1.022-1.769; P = 0.034), higher levels of fasting blood glucose (OR 1.954, 95 % CI 1.778-2.147; P 1), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (OR 1.181, 95 % CI 1.020-1.367; P = 0.026) were significantly associated with poor glycemic control. The complexity of antidiabetics was also associated with poor glycemic control (P insulin injection was most strongly associated with poor glycemic control (OR 6.210, 95 % CI 4.054-9.514; P 1). Male patients with higher levels of total cholesterol, lower levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or longer diabetic durations showed poor glycemic control, which was not found in female patients. Glycemic control was not satisfactory in T2DM patients of Nanjing communities. Various factors are associated with poor results of glycemic control.

  7. National continuous surveys on internal quality control for HbA1c in 306 clinical laboratories of China from 2012 to 2016: Continual improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Haijian; He, Falin; Zhong, Kun; Yuan, Shuai; Wang, Zhiguo

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate whether the quality performance of clinical laboratories in China has been greatly improved and whether Internal Quality Control (IQC) practice of HbA1c has also been changed since National Center for Clinical Laboratories (NCCL) of China organized laboratories to report IQC data for HbA1c in 2012. Internal Quality Control information of 306 External Quality Assessment (EQA) participant laboratories which kept reporting IQC data in February from 2012 to 2016 were collected by Web-based EQA system. Then percentages of laboratories meeting four different imprecision specifications for current coefficient of variations (CVs) of HbA1c measurements were calculated. Finally, we comprehensively analyzed analytical systems and IQC practice of HbA1c measurements. The current CVs of HbA1c tests have decreased significantly from 2012 to 2016. And percentages of laboratories meeting four imprecision specifications for CVs all showed the increasing tendency year by year. As for analytical system, 52.1% (159/306) laboratories changed their systems with the change in principle of assay. And many laboratories began to use cation exchange high-performance liquid chromatography (CE-HPLC) instead of Immunoturbidimetry, because CE-HPLC owed a lower intra-laboratory CVs. The data of IQC practice, such as IQC rules and frequency, also showed significant variability among years with overall tendency of meeting requirements. The imprecision performance of HbA1c tests has been improved in these 5 years with the change in IQC practice, but it is still disappointing in China. Therefore, laboratories should actively find existing problems and take action to promote performance of HbA1c measurements. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Fasting and 2-hour plasma glucose, and HbA1c in pregnancy and the postpartum risk of diabetes among Chinese women with gestational diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huikun; Zhang, Shuang; Wang, Leishen; Leng, Junhong; Li, Weiqin; Li, Nan; Li, Min; Qiao, Yijuan; Tian, Huiguang; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Yang, Xilin; Yu, Zhijie; Hu, Gang

    2016-02-01

    Very few studies have assessed the association of fasting and 2h glucose, and HbA1c during pregnancy with postpartum diabetes risk among women with prior gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM). We assessed the association of fasting glucose, 2h glucose and HbA1c at 26-30 gestational weeks with postpartum diabetes risk among women with prior GDM. A cohort study in 1263 GDM women at 1-5 years after delivery was performed. Cox proportional hazards regression models were used to evaluate the association of fasting and 2h plasma glucose, and HbA1c at 26-30 gestational weeks with the risk of diabetes at postpartum. The multivariable-adjusted (age, pre-pregnancy body mass index, weight gain during pregnancy, current body mass index, family history of diabetes, marital status, education, family income, smoking status, passive smoking, leisure-time physical activity, alcohol drinking, and intake of energy, saturated fat, and dietary fiber) hazard ratios of postpartum diabetes were 1.61 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.36-1.91) for each 1 mmol/l increase in fasting glucose during pregnancy, 1.63 (95% CI: 1.45-1.84) for each 1 mmol/l increase in 2h glucose during pregnancy, 2.11 (95% CI: 1.50-2.97) for each 1 unit (%) increase in HbA1c during pregnancy. When fasting glucose, 2h glucose and HbA1c during pregnancy were entered multivariable-adjusted model simultaneously, 2h glucose and HbA1c but not fasting glucose remained to be significant and positive predictors for postpartum diabetes. For women with prior GDM, 2h plasma glucose and HbA1c during pregnancy are independent predictors of postpartum diabetes, but fasting plasma glucose during pregnancy is not. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Patterns of type 2 diabetes monitoring in rural towns: How does frequency of HbA1c and lipid testing compare with existing guidelines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Christine L; Piterman, Leon; Shaw, Jonathan E; Kirby, Catherine; Barker, Daniel; Robinson, Jennifer; Forshaw, Kristy L; Sikaris, Kenneth A; Bisquera, Alessandra; Sanson-Fisher, Robert W

    2016-12-01

    To indicate levels of monitoring of type 2 diabetes in rural and regional Australia by examining patterns of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and blood lipid testing. Retrospective analysis of pathology services data from twenty regional and rural towns in eastern Australia over 24 months. Of 13 105 individuals who had either a single HbA1c result ≥7.0% (53 mmol mol -1 ); or two or more HbA1c tests within the study period. Frequency of testing of HbA1c and blood lipids (cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and triglycerides) were compared with guideline recommendations. About 58.3% of patients did not have the recommended 6-monthly HbA1c tests and 30.6% did not have annual lipid testing. For those who did not receive tests at the recommended interval, the mean between-test interval was 10.5 months (95% CI = 7.5-13.5) rather than 6 months for HbA1c testing; and 15.7 (95% CI = 13.3-18.1) months rather than annually for blood lipids. For those with at least one out-of-range test result, 77% of patients failed to receive a follow-up HbA1c test and 86.5% failed to receive a follow-up blood lipid test within the recommended 3 months. Patients less than 50 years of age, living in a more remote area and with poor diabetes control were less likely to have testing at the recommended intervals (P < 0.0001). Although poor diabetes testing is not limited to rural areas, more intensive diabetes monitoring is likely to be needed for patients living in non-metropolitan areas, particularly for some subgroups. © 2016 National Rural Health Alliance Inc.

  10. Are Ethnic Disparities in HbA1c Levels Explained by Mental Wellbeing? Analysis of Population-Based Data from the Health Survey for England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, Kanayo

    2018-02-01

    It is unclear how ethnic differences in HbA 1c levels are affected by individual variations in mental wellbeing. Thus, the aim of this study was to assess the extent to which HbA 1c disparities between Caucasian and South Asian adults are mediated by various aspects of positive psychological functioning. Data from the 2014 Health Survey for England was analysed using bootstrapping methods. A total of 3894 UK residents with HbA 1c data were eligible to participate. Mental wellbeing was assessed using the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well-being Scale. To reduce bias BMI, blood pressure, diabetes status, and other factors were treated as covariates. Ethnicity directly predicted blood sugar control (unadjusted coefficient -2.15; 95% CI -3.64, -0.67), with Caucasians generating lower average HbA 1c levels (37.68 mmol/mol (5.6%)) compared to South Asians (39.87 mmol/mol (5.8%)). This association was mediated by positive mental wellbeing, specifically concerning perceived vigour (unadjusted effect 0.30; 95% CI 0.13, 0.58): South Asians felt more energetic than Caucasians (unadjusted coefficient -0.32; 95% CI -0.49, -0.16), and greater perceived energy predicted lower HbA 1c levels (unadjusted coefficient -0.92; 95% CI -1.29, -0.55). This mediator effect accounted for just over 14% of the HbA 1c variance and was negated after adjusting for BMI. Caucasian experience better HbA 1c levels compared with their South Asian counterparts. However, this association is partly confounded by individual differences in perceived energy levels, which is implicated in better glycaemic control, and appears to serve a protective function in South Asians.

  11. Feeding problems reported by parents of young children with type 1 diabetes on insulin pump therapy and their associations with children's glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, Susana R; Williams, Laura B; Dolan, Lawrence M; Chen, Ming; Powers, Scott W

    2009-11-01

    Previous research demonstrated high rates of perceived mealtime behavior problems in families of young children with type 1 diabetes who were managed with conventional therapy. Because of new insulin regimens that offer greater flexibility, reexamination of mealtime behaviors is required. We assessed parent-reported mealtime behaviors in a sample of young children using an insulin pump. An additional aim was to evaluate the associations of two measures of parental feeding behavior with children's glycemic control. Primary caregivers of 31 young children (mean age = 5.0 +/- 1.3 yr) completed the Child Feeding Questionnaire (CFQ) and the Behavioral Pediatric Feeding Assessment Scale (BPFAS). Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was used as a surrogate marker for children's glycemic control. Children had a mean HbA1c of 7.8 +/- 0.64%. Mean CFQ - Restriction and Pressure to Eat scores were 3.1 +/- 0.94 and 2.0 +/- 0.88, respectively (range = 1-5). Mean BPFAS - Parent and Child scores were 16.0 +/- 4.3 (range = 10-50) and 44.9 +/- 9.3 (range = 25-125), respectively. Positive correlations were found between children's HbA1c levels and caregivers' reporting of frequency of child mealtime behavior problems. Caregivers of young children on pump therapy report relatively low rates of mealtime behavior problems. However, correlations with children's HbA1c suggest that parent-child mealtime behaviors continue to relate to children's health outcomes. Research is needed to determine if changing mealtime interactions can improve children's glycemic control; items from the BPFAS and CFQ can offer targets to guide interventions.

  12. Hemoglobin A1c and Mortality in Older Adults With and Without Diabetes: Results From the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (1988-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palta, Priya; Huang, Elbert S; Kalyani, Rita R; Golden, Sherita H; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh

    2017-04-01

    Hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) level has been associated with increased mortality in middle-aged populations. The optimal intensity of glucose control in older adults with diabetes remains uncertain. We sought to estimate the risk of mortality by HbA 1c levels among older adults with and without diabetes. We analyzed data from adults aged ≥65 years ( n = 7,333) from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) (1998-1994) and Continuous NHANES (1999-2004) and their linked mortality data (through December 2011). Cox proportional hazards models were used to examine the relationship of HbA 1c with the risk of all-cause and cause-specific (cardiovascular disease [CVD], cancer, and non-CVD/noncancer) mortality, separately for adults with diabetes and without diabetes. Over a median follow-up of 8.9 years, 4,729 participants died (1,262 from CVD, 850 from cancer, and 2,617 from non-CVD/noncancer causes). Compared with those with diagnosed diabetes and an HbA 1c 8.0%. HRs were 1.6 (95% CI 1.02, 2.6) and 1.8 (95% CI 1.3, 2.6) for HbA 1c 8.0-8.9% and ≥9.0%, respectively ( P for trend 6.5% had a 1.3 (95% CI 1.03, 1.8) times greater risk of all-cause mortality compared with participants without diabetes and HbA 1c 5.0-5.6%. An HbA 1c >8.0% was associated with increased risk of all-cause and cause-specific mortality in older adults with diabetes. Our results support the idea that better glycemic control is important for reducing mortality; however, in light of the conflicting evidence base, there is also a need for individualized glycemic targets for older adults with diabetes depending on their demographics, duration of diabetes, and existing comorbidities. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  13. Longitudinal trends in HbA1c and associations with comorbidity and all-cause mortality in Asian patients with type 2 diabetes: A cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Miyang; Lim, Wei Yen; Tan, Chuen Seng; Ning, Yilin; Chia, Kee Seng; van Dam, Rob M; Tang, Wern Ee; Tan, Ngiap Chuan; Chen, Richard; Tai, E Shyong; Venkataraman, Kavita

    2017-11-01

    This study examined longitudinal trends in HbA1c in a multi-ethnic Asian cohort of diabetes patients, and the associations of these trends with future risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, end stage renal failure (ESRD) and all-cause mortality. 6079 participants with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Singapore were included. HbA1c measurements for the five years previous to recruitment were used to identify patterns of HbA1c trends. Outcomes were recorded through linkage with the National Disease Registry. The median follow-up for longitudinal trends in HbA1c was 4.1years and for outcomes was between 7.0 and 8.3years. HbA1c patterns were identified using latent class growth modeling, and associations with outcomes were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models. Four distinct HbA1c patterns were observed; "low-stable" (72·2%), "moderate-stable" (22·0%), "moderate-increase" (2·9%), and "high-decrease" (2·8%). The risk of comorbidities and death was significantly higher in moderate-increase and high-decrease groups compared to the low-stable group; the hazard ratios for stroke, ESRD, and death for moderate increase group were 3.22 (95%CI 1.27-8.15), 4.76 (95%CI 1.92-11.83), and 1.88 (95%CI 1.15-3.07), respectively, and for high-decrease group were 2.16 (95%CI 1.02-4.57), 3.05 (95%CI 1.54-6.07), and 2.79 (95%CI 1.97-3.95), respectively. Individuals in the moderate-increase group were significantly younger, with longer diabetes duration, and greater proportions of Malays and Indians. Deteriorating HbA1c pattern and extremely high initial HbA1c are associated with increased risk of long-term comorbidities and death. Therapeutic interventions to alter longitudinal HbA1c trends may be helpful in reducing this risk. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c ) and fasting plasma glucose relationships in sea-level and high-altitude settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazo-Alvarez, J C; Quispe, R; Pillay, T D; Bernabé-Ortiz, A; Smeeth, L; Checkley, W; Gilman, R H; Málaga, G; Miranda, J J

    2017-06-01

    Higher haemoglobin levels and differences in glucose metabolism have been reported among high-altitude residents, which may influence the diagnostic performance of HbA 1c . This study explores the relationship between HbA 1c and fasting plasma glucose (FPG) in populations living at sea level and at an altitude of > 3000 m. Data from 3613 Peruvian adults without a known diagnosis of diabetes from sea-level and high-altitude settings were evaluated. Linear, quadratic and cubic regression models were performed adjusting for potential confounders. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed and concordance between HbA 1c and FPG was assessed using a Kappa index. At sea level and high altitude, means were 13.5 and 16.7 g/dl (P > 0.05) for haemoglobin level; 41 and 40 mmol/mol (5.9% and 5.8%; P < 0.01) for HbA 1c ; and 5.8 and 5.1 mmol/l (105 and 91.3 mg/dl; P < 0.001) for FPG, respectively. The adjusted relationship between HbA 1c and FPG was quadratic at sea level and linear at high altitude. Adjusted models showed that, to predict an HbA 1c value of 48 mmol/mol (6.5%), the corresponding mean FPG values at sea level and high altitude were 6.6 and 14.8 mmol/l (120 and 266 mg/dl), respectively. An HbA 1c cut-off of 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) had a sensitivity for high FPG of 87.3% (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 76.5 to 94.4) at sea level and 40.9% (95% CI 20.7 to 63.6) at high altitude. The relationship between HbA 1c and FPG is less clear at high altitude than at sea level. Caution is warranted when using HbA 1c to diagnose diabetes mellitus in this setting. © 2017 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Diabetes UK.

  15. A pilot study of an HbA1c chairside screening protocol for diabetes in patients with chronic periodontitis: the dental hygienist's role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossart, M; Calley, K H; Gurenlian, J R; Mason, B; Ferguson, R E; Peterson, T

    2016-05-01

    To assess effectiveness, convenience and cost of point-of-care diabetes screenings performed by a dental hygienist for patients with periodontitis, using a diabetes risk questionnaire, periodontal findings and a glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) analyser. A purposive sample of 50 participants with periodontitis, never diagnosed with diabetes, reporting ≥one diabetes risk factor, were administered an HbA1c test. Spearman's correlation measured relationships between HbA1c and diabetes risk test scores, numbers of missing teeth, percentage of deep pockets ≥5 mm and percentage of bleeding sites (BOP). Cost and time were assessed. Analyses used 0.05 alpha levels. Thirty-two per cent (n = 16) of participants presented HbA1c values indicating prediabetes; one HbA1c value indicated type 2 diabetes, totalling 34% (N = 17). No relationships existed between HbA1c values and diabetes risk scores (rs = 0.153; P = 0.144), numbers of missing teeth (r = 0.190; P = 0.093), percentage of deep pockets (rs = -0.048; P = 0.370) or percentage of BOP sites (rs = 0.066, P = 0.324). Direct cost for each HbA1c was $9US, excluding follow-up medical diagnosis. Mean screening time including patient education was 14 min (SD = 6.2). Fifty-three per cent (n = 9 of 17) of participants with elevated HbA1c values contacted their primary healthcare provider within 2 weeks as recommended. Point-of-care HbA1c screenings by dental hygienists were effective and convenient for identifying undiagnosed prediabetes and provide opportunity for interprofessional patient care; cost or lack of dental insurance may inhibit implementation. Identification of patients at risk for diabetes requires further evaluation. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Temporal HbA1c patterns amongst patients with type 2 diabetes referred for specialist care: Data from the S4S-DINGO-Diabetes Informatics Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Teresa; Hoffman, David M; Cukier, Kimberly; Darnell, David; Greenfield, Jerry R; Harrison, Natalie; Hng, Tien-Ming; Morrow, Anthony F; Cheung, N Wah

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the achievement of HbA1c targets in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in specialist practice. This audit was undertaken by members of the S4S Diabetes Informatics Group (DINGO), a consortium of Australian endocrinologists in private practice who contribute de-identified data from their electronic medical record, Audit 4 (Software 4 Specialists, S4S, Australia & New Zealand) for audit purposes. Data from patients with type 2 diabetes was extracted. Inclusion criteria were: initial ageHbA1c>7% (53mmol/mol), with at least another HbA1c recorded in the next 2years, and a minimum of 2years follow-up. Data was analysed using a linear mixed effects model. Of the 4796 patients in the dataset with type 2 diabetes mellitus, 1379 patients fulfilled inclusion criteria. The median age at initial consultation was 57 (49-64)years. The median baseline HbA1c was 8.7 (7.8-9.8)% (72mmol/mol). There was a 1.0% reduction in HbA1c to 7.7 (7.1-8.6)% (61mmol/mol) (pHbA1c. Referral of patients with type 2 diabetes to an endocrinologist reduces HbA1c, and the effect is sustained over the medium term; however only a minority of patients reach targets. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pathways of empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors to glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yau-Jiunn; Shin, Shyi-Jang; Wang, Ruey-Hsia; Lin, Kun-Der; Lee, Yu-Li; Wang, Yi-Hsien

    2016-02-01

    To validate a hypothesized model exploring the influencing pathways of empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, and self-care behaviors to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Overall, 295 patients with T2DM were recruited from five endocrine clinics in Taiwan through convenience sampling. Data regarding personal characteristics, empowerment perceptions, health literacy, self-efficacy, self-care behaviors, and HbA1c levels were collected. A structural equation modeling was used to validate the hypothesized model. Significant direct pathways were determined from empowerment perceptions to health literacy, from health literacy to self-efficacy, from self-efficacy to self-care behaviors, and from self-care behaviors to HbA1c levels. The empowerment perceptions and health literacy relatively influenced self-efficacy and self-care behaviors. Self-efficacy and self-care behaviors relatively influenced glycemic control in patients with T2DM. Modifying self-care behaviors have been demonstrated to be the most essential for improving glycemic control. To improve self-care behaviors, healthcare providers should target improving self-efficacy, and enhancing health literacy can be considered to be a potential strategy for improving self-efficacy. To enhance health literacy, healthcare providers could use an empowerment approach rather than an authoritative approach that emphasizes patient compliance in managing patients with T2DM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Glycated Hemoglobin Measurement and Prediction of Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Gao, Pei; Khan, Hassan

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: The value of measuring levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) for the prediction of first cardiovascular events is uncertain. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether adding information on HbA1c values to conventional cardiovascular risk factors is associated with improvement in prediction of c...

  19. Prediction of Adolescents’ Glycemic Control 1 Year After Diabetes-Specific Family Conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E.; Guilfoyle, Shanna M.; Dolan, Lawrence M.; Hood, Korey K.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To test adherence to blood glucose monitoring (BGM) as a mediator between diabetes-specific family conflict and glycemic control (hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] levels) for 1 year. Design Three waves of prospective data spanning 1 year. Setting Diabetes clinic in a large tertiary care children’s hospital in the Midwestern United States. Participants One hundred forty-five dyads composed of an adolescent (aged 13–18 years) with type 1 diabetes mellitus and a parent. Main Exposures Adolescent- and parent-rated diabetes-specific family conflict and mean daily BGM frequency obtained through meter downloads. Main Outcome Measure Levels of HbA1c, abstracted from the medical record. Results In separate general linear models, higher adolescent-rated family conflict scores at baseline predicted less frequent BGM at 6 months (β=−0.08 [P=.01]) and higher HbA1c levels at 12 months (β=0.08 [P=.02]). In the multivariate model including baseline conflict and BGM as predictors of HbA1c levels, BGM was a significant predictor (β=−0.24 [P=.007]) and conflict was no longer significant (β=0.05 [P=.11]), supporting the mediation hypothesis. Post hoc probing showed that BGM explained 24% of the variance in the conflict-HbA1c link. The mediation between parent-reported conflict andHbA1c levels via BGM adherence was partially supported (conflict predicting HbA1c in the zero-order equation, β=−0.24 [P=.004]; multivariate equation, β=0.06 [P=.02]), and BGM frequency explained 16% of the conflict-HbA1c link. Conclusions Diabetes-specific family conflict in adolescence predicts deteriorations in BGM and subsequent glycemic control for at least 1 year. Results support ongoing intervention research designed to reduce family conflict and thus prevent a trajectory of declining adherence and glycemic control across adolescence. PMID:21727273

  20. Effects of thyroid status on glycated hemoglobin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Bhattacharjee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c can be altered in different conditions. We hypothesize that HbA1c levels may change due to altered thyroid status, possibly due to changes in red blood cell (RBC turnover. Objectives: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of altered thyroid status on HbA1c levels in individuals without diabetes, with overt hyper- and hypo-thyroidism, and if present, whether such changes in HbA1c are reversed after achieving euthyroid state. Methods: Euglycemic individuals with overt hypo- or hyper-thyroidism were selected. Age- and sex-matched controls were recruited. Baseline HbA1c and reticulocyte counts (for estimation of RBC turnover were estimated in all the patients and compared. Thereafter, stable euthyroidism was achieved in a randomly selected subgroup and HbA1c and reticulocyte count was reassessed. HbA1c values and reticulocyte counts were compared with baseline in both the groups. Results: Hb A1c in patients initially selected was found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid group. HbA1c values in hyperthyroid patients were not significantly different from controls. HbA1c reduction and rise in reticulocyte count were significant in hypothyroid group following treatment without significant change in glucose level. Hb A1c did not change significantly following treatment in hyperthyroid group. The reticulocyte count, however, decreased significantly. Conclusion: Baseline HbA1c levels were found to be significantly higher in hypothyroid patients, which reduced significantly after achievement of euthyroidism without any change in glucose levels. Significant baseline or posttreatment change was not observed in hyperthyroid patients. Our study suggests that we should be cautious while interpreting HbA1c data in patients with hypothyroidism.

  1. Does knowledge on diabetes management influence glycemic control? A nationwide study in patients with type 1 diabetes in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes MB

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Marilia Brito Gomes,1 Deborah Conte Santos,1 Marcela H Pizarro,1 Bianca Senger V Barros,1 Laura G Nunes de Melo,2 Carlos A Negrato3 1Department of Internal Medicine, Diabetes Unit, State University Hospital of Rio de Janeiro, 2Department of Ophthalmology, State University of Rio de Janeiro, Rio de Janeiro, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Bauru’s Diabetics Association, Bauru, São Paulo, Brazil Objective: The purpose of this study is to establish demographic and clinical data associated with the knowledge on diabetes management and its influence on glycemic control in patients with type 1 diabetes.Methods: This was a retrospective, observational, multicenter study conducted with 1,760 patients between August 2011 and August 2014 in 10 cities of Brazil.Results: Overall, 1,190 (67.6% patients knew what glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c means. These patients were older, had longer disease duration, longer follow-up in each center, reported lower frequency of self-reported hypoglycemia, and were more frequently Caucasians and at glycemic goal. Multivariate analysis showed that knowledge on what HbA1c means was related to more years of school attendance, self-reported ethnicity (Caucasians, severe hypoglycemia, economic status, follow-up time in each center, and participation on diabetes educational programs. Good glycemic control was related to older age, more years of school attendance, higher frequency of daily self-monitoring of blood glucose, higher adherence to diet, and knowledge on what HbA1c means.Conclusion: Patients with a knowledge on what HbA1c means had a better chance of reaching an adequate glycemic control that was not found in the majority of our patients. Diabetes care teams should rethink the approaches to patients and change them to more proactive schedules, reinforcing education, patients’ skills, and empowerment to have positive attitudes toward reaching and maintaining a better glycemic control. Finally, the glucocentric

  2. Effect of Ramadan fasting on glucose level, lipid profile, HbA1c and uric acid among medical students in Karachi, Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nazeer; Rasheed, Abdur; Ahmed, Hassaan; Aslam, Faiza; Kanwal, Fatima

    2017-06-14

    To assess the effect of Ramadan fasting on blood pressure, fasting glucose, lipid profile, uric acid, HbA1c, body mass index, body adiposity index and visceral adiposity index among fasting medical students, 35 students were recorded before, during and after Ramadan (August) 2011, for their blood pressure, anthropometric measurements, questionnaire response and blood sample. A blood sample was taken at each visit for glucose, lipid profile and HbA1c. Total physical activity, weight-to-height ratio, body adiposity index and visceral adiposity index were calculated for insulin sensitivity. Changes in anthropometric measurements were not statistically significant. However, physical activities increased significantly after Ramadan. Changes in blood pressure, fasting blood sugar, total cholesterol, HbA1c, uric acid and triglyceride were not statistically significant. Mean high density lipoprotein decreased significantly in Ramadan, while low density lipoprotein increased significantly.

  3. Periodontal inflamed surface area and C-reactive protein as predictors of HbA1c: a study in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susanto, Hendri; Nesse, Willem; Dijkstra, Pieter U; Hoedemaker, Evelien; van Reenen, Yvonne Huijser; Agustina, Dewi; Vissink, Arjan; Abbas, Frank

    2012-08-01

    Periodontitis may exert an infectious and inflammatory burden, evidenced by increased C-reactive protein (CRP). This burden may impair blood glucose control (HbA1c). The aim of our study was to analyze whether periodontitis severity as measured with the periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA) and CRP predict HbA1c levels in a group of healthy Indonesians and a group of Indonesians treated for type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). A full-mouth periodontal examination, including probing pocket depth, gingival recession, clinical attachment loss, plaque index and bleeding on probing, was performed in 132 healthy Indonesians and 101 Indonesians treated for DM2. Using these data, PISA was calculated. In addition, HbA1c and CRP were analyzed. A validated questionnaire was used to assess smoking, body mass index (BMI), education and medical conditions. In regression analyses, it was assessed whether periodontitis severity and CRP predict HbA1c, controlling for confounding and effect modification (i.e., age, sex, BMI, pack years, and education). In healthy Indonesians, PISA and CRP predicted HbA1c as did age, sex, and smoking. In Indonesians treated for DM2, PISA did not predict HbA1c. Periodontitis may impair blood glucose regulation in healthy Indonesians in conjunction with elevated CRP levels. The potential effect of periodontitis on glucose control in DM2 patients may be masked by DM2 treatment. periodontitis may impair blood glucose control through exerting an inflammatory and infectious burden evidenced by increased levels of CRP.

  4. Reduced endothelial activation after exercise is associated with improved HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrkjeland, Rune; Njerve, Ida U; Arnesen, Harald; Seljeflot, Ingebjørg; Solheim, Svein

    2017-03-01

    We have previously reported insignificant changes in HbA 1c after exercise in patients with both type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. In this study, we investigated the effect of exercise on endothelial function and possible associations between changes in endothelial function and HbA 1c . Patients with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease ( n = 137) were randomised to 12 months exercise or standard follow-up. Endothelial function was assessed by circulating biomarkers (E-selectin, intercellular adhesion molecule-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, von Willebrand factor, tissue plasminogen activator antigen, asymmetric dimethylarginine and L-arginine/asymmetric dimethylarginine ratio). Differences between the randomised groups were analysed by analysis of covariance and correlations by Spearman's rho or Pearson's correlation. No effect of exercise on endothelial function was demonstrated. The changes in HbA 1c in the exercise group correlated with changes in E-selectin ( r = 0.56, p < 0.001), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 ( r = 0.27, p = 0.052), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 ( r = 0.32, p = 0.022) and tissue plasminogen activator antigen ( r = 0.35, p =  0.011). HbA 1c decreased significantly more in patients with versus without a concomitant reduction in E-selectin ( p =  0.002), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 ( p =  0.011), vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 ( p =  0.028) and tissue plasminogen activator antigen ( p =  0.009). Exercise did not affect biomarkers of endothelial function in patients with both type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. However, changes in biomarkers of endothelial activation correlated with changes in HbA 1c , and reduced endothelial activation was associated with improved HbA 1c after exercise.

  5. Physical activity and change in fasting glucose and HbA1c: a quantitative meta-analysis of randomized trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boniol, Mathieu; Dragomir, Miruna; Autier, Philippe; Boyle, Peter

    2017-11-01

    A systematic review was conducted of randomized trials which evaluated the impact of physical activity on the change in fasting glucose and HbA1c. A literature search was conducted in PubMed until December 2015. Studies reporting glucose or HbA1c at baseline and at the end of study were included, and the change and its variance were estimated from studies with complete data. Mixed-effect random models were used to estimate the change of fasting glucose (mg/dl) and HbA1c (%) per additional minutes of physical activity per week. A total of 125 studies were included in the meta-analysis. Based on 105 studies, an increase of 100 min in physical activity per week was associated with an average change of -2.75 mg/dl of fasting glucose (95% CI -3.96; -1.55), although there was a high degree of heterogeneity (83.5%). When restricting the analysis on type 2 diabetes and prediabetes subjects (56 studies), the average change in fasting glucose was -4.71 mg/dl (95% CI -7.42; -2.01). For HbA1c, among 76 studies included, an increase of 100 min in physical activity per week was associated with an average change of -0.14% of HbA1c (95% CI -0.18; -0.09) with heterogeneity (73%). A large degree of publication bias was identified (Egger test p HbA1c was -0.16% (95% CI -0.21; -0.11). This analysis demonstrates that moderate increases in physical activity are associated with significant reductions in both fasting glucose and HbA1c.

  6. Exploring factors influencing HbA1c and psychosocial outcomes in people with type 1 diabetes after training in advanced carbohydrate counting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Signe; Vistisen, Dorte; Almdal, Thomas; Hommel, Eva; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this secondary analysis of the StenoABC Study was to identify determinants of the changes in HbA1c observed after training of people with type 1 diabetes in advanced carbohydrate counting (ACC) and automated bolus calculator (ABC) use, and further to investigate psychosocial effects of these insulin dosing approaches. Validated diabetes-specific questionnaires were used to assess diabetes treatment satisfaction, problem areas in diabetes, fear of hypoglycemia and diabetes dependent quality of life before and one year after the training. In addition, numeracy was tested (using a non-validated test developed specifically for this study) and behavioral measures (number of daily blood glucose measurements and self-reported use of ACC) were obtained. Associations between change in HbA1c and these measures plus sex, age, diabetes duration and BMI were tested. Numeracy was the only baseline predictor of yearly change in HbA1c identified. Higher levels of numeracy were associated with greater reductions in HbA1c (P=0.031). No associations between change in HbA1c and the behavioral measures investigated were found, nor were any clinically relevant associations between changes in HbA1c and questionnaire scores. Treatment satisfaction increased in all users of ACC (PHbA1c after training in ACC were inversely related to numeracy. Use of an ABC did not compensate for poor numeracy skills. However, device use reduced fear of hypoglycemia compared with ACC without ABC use. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The impact of ambient temperature on HbA1c in Taiwanese type 2 diabetic patients: The most vulnerable subgroup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Kai-Jen; Yang, Chwen-Yi; Weng, Shih-Feng; Liu, Su-Yen; Hsieh, Ming-Chia; Chou, Chien-Wen

    2016-05-01

    The relationship between temperature variability and HbA1c has been reported in Caucasians, but not for Asians of Taiwanese origin. This study investigated the impact of temperature on HbA1c in various groups of Taiwanese with type 2 diabetes in Taiwan. For this longitudinal follow-up study which started in 2006, we recruited a total of 4399 patients with type 2 diabetes who had been regularly followed up at Chi Mei Medical Center and obtained local temperature data for 2006 to 2011 from Taiwan's Central Weather Bureau. We used a generalized estimated equation (GEE) to analyze the HbA1c level and its change over time with temperature and temperature changes, respectively. We found a negative correlation between HbA1c and temperature (R = -0.475, p = 0.001). For every 1°C decrement in temperature, there was an increase in the risk of having a HbA1c level >7% [p HbA1c > 7% among those in the lowest quartile of temperatures than the highest quartile (p = 0.0038, adjusted OR: 1.13). Patients with diabetic patients were at higher risk of HbA1C > 7% in the winter and spring than those in the summer (adjusted OR: 1.13, p = 0.0027; adjusted OR: 1.14, p = 0.0022). After adjusting for various confounders, we found people who were younger than 65 years old, people who had diabetes for longer than 6 years, and people who had a body mass index (BMI) HbA1c levels in Taiwanese people with type 2 diabetes, especially in people under 65 years old, people with diabetes for longer than 6 years, and those with a BMI < 24. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. HOMA-S is associated with greater HbA1c reduction with a GLP-1 analogue in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heald, A H; Narayanan, R P; Lowes, D; Jarman, E; Onyekwelu, E; Qureshi, Z; Laing, I; Anderson, S G

    2012-07-01

    Exenatide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogue, is an effective glucoregulator for treating overweight individuals, not at target HbA1 c. This prospective study aimed to determine whether estimates of beta cell function (HOMA-B) and insulin sensitivity (HOMA-S) predict response to Exenatide treatment.Prospective data on 43 type 2 diabetes patients were collected for up to 2.8 years in UK primary care. HOMA-B and HOMA-S were estimated prior to initiating Exenatide, with monitoring of cardio-metabolic risk factors.Mean (SD) age and BMI pre-treatment were 54.1±10.5 years and 35.7±7.5 kg/m2 respectively. HbA1c decreased (mean reduction 0.9%, p=0.04; p for trend=0.01) in 61% of patients. In univariate analyses, HOMA-S as a measure of insulin sensitivity was inversely (β=- 0.41, p 0.009) related to change in HbA1c, with no relation for HOMA-B.In a random effects regression model that included age at baseline, weight, LDL-C, HDL-C and triglycerides, change in HbA1c (β= - 0.14, pHOMA-S were 45% more likely to have a fall in HbA1c with an odds ratio (OR) of 0.55 (95% CI 0.47-0.66) p<0.0001 (log likelihood ratio for the model χ2=71.6, p<0.0001).Patients with greater measured insulin sensitivity achieve greater reduction in HbA1c with Exenatide. Determination of insulin sensitivity may assist in guiding outcome expectation in overweight patients treated with GLP-1 analogues. © J. A. Barth Verlag in Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Use of HbA(1C) testing to diagnose pre-diabetes in high risk African American children: a comparison with fasting glucose and HOMA-IR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sushma; Fleming, Sharon E

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the discriminating power of HbA(1C) with other pre-diabetes diagnostic tests specifically in high-risk African American children. A cross-sectional analysis was performed on a sample of 172 children (70 boys and 102 girls) aged 9-11 years with BMI's above the 85th percentile. Fasting glucose, insulin and HbA(1C) were analyzed from the plasma samples. Of the 172 participants included in this analysis, 21 (12.2%) had HbA(1C) concentrations above the cutoff of 5.7 used to identify pre-diabetes. None (0%) of these 21 participants, however, were observed to have a glucose concentration above the pre-diabetes cutoff of 110 mg/dl, and only 13 of 21 participants had HOMA-IR above the pre-diabetes cutoff of 2.5. When compared to the previously identified glucose cutoff of 110 mg/dl and HOMA-IR cutoff of 2.5 for pre-diabetes, HbA(1C) showed high specificity (88 and 93%, respectively) but very low sensitivity (0 and 21%, respectively). Glucose, insulin and HOMA-IR were significantly interrelated, but HbA(1C) was not significantly correlated with these biochemical prediabetes assessment variables, nor with anthropometric (BMIz, WC) risk factors. Our results suggest that HbA(1C) had poor discrimination power to identify prediabetes in overweight and obese 9- to 11-year-old African American children. Future studies are recommended to compare the feasibility, sensitivity and predictive power of different screening tests currently recommended to avoid inadequacy when screening for prediabetes and diabetes. Copyright © 2012 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. HbA1c below 7% as the goal of glucose control fails to maximize the cardiovascular benefits: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pin; Huang, Rong; Lu, Sen; Xia, Wenqing; Sun, Haixia; Sun, Jie; Cai, Rongrong; Wang, Shaohua

    2015-09-22

    Whether lowering glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level below 7.0% improves macro-vascular outcomes in diabetes remains unclear. Here, we aimed to assess the effect of relatively tight glucose control resulting in a follow-up HbA1c level of less or more than 7.0% on cardiovascular outcomes in diabetic patients. We systematically searched Medline, Web of science and Cochrane Library for prospective randomized controlled trials published between Jan 1, 1996 and July 1, 2015 that recorded cardiovascular outcome trials of glucose-lowering drugs or strategies in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Data from 15 studies involving 88,266 diabetic patients with 4142 events of non-fatal myocardial infarction, 6997 of major cardiovascular events, 3517 of heart failure, 6849 of all-cause mortality, 2084 of non-fatal stroke, 3816 of cardiovascular death were included. A 7% reduction of major cardiovascular events was observed only when relatively tight glucose control resulted in a follow-up HbA1c level above 7.0% (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.88-0.98; I(2) = 33%), however, the patients can benefit from reduction incidence of non-fatal myocardial infarction only when the follow-up HbA1c value below 7.0% (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.74-0.96). Apart from the HbA1c value above 7.0% (OR 1.22, 95% CI 1.06-1.40), the application of thiazolidinediones (OR 1.39, 95% CI 1.14-1.69) also increased the risk of heart failure, while the gliptins shows neutral effects to heart failure (OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.97-1.34). Relatively tight glucose control has some cardiovascular benefits. HbA1c below 7.0% as the goal to maximize the cardiovascular benefits remains suspended.

  11. A importância da determinação da hemoglobina glicada no monitoramento das complicações crônicas do diabetes mellitus The importance of glycated hemoglobin determination in the management of chronic complications associated with diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreza Fabro de Bem

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available O diabetes é uma situação clínica muito freqüente que envolve cerca de 7% da população mundial. Por essa razão muitos esforços têm sido empregados na implementação de métodos de monitoramento e no desenvolvimento de terapias efetivas para o seu controle. A hemoglobina glicada (HbA1c é o teste mais indicado na quantificação do risco de complicações crônicas em pacientes diabéticos. O Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT e o United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS concluíram que o risco de complicações em pacientes diabéticos é diretamente proporcional ao controle glicêmico, determinado através dos níveis de HbA1c. A medida exata e precisa da HbA1c é uma questão importante para os laboratórios clínicos, sendo que vários fatores podem afetar as determinações, levando a resultados equivocados. O objetivo deste estudo é demonstrar os diferentes métodos para a quantificação da HbA1c, bem como discutir os problemas mais freqüentes de padronização dessa determinação.Diabetes is a widespread disease, involving about 7% of the entire world population. For this reason, many efforts have been devoted to the wide application of valid monitoring procedures and to the development of effective therapeutic approaches. Glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c is the pre-eminent factor for quantifying the risk of chronic complications in patients with diabetes. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT and United Kingdom Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS, demonstrated conclusively that risks for complications in patients with diabetes are directly related to glycemic control, as measured by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c. Accurate determination of HbA1c is an important issue for clinical laboratories and several factors may affect and lead to erroneous results. The main objective of this study is to show the different methods for glycated hemoglobin quantification and to discuss the most frequent problems of

  12. [Effects of applying behavior modification to improve HbA1C levels in a diabetic patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Chun; Huang, You-Rong; Lin, Chiu-Chu

    2010-04-01

    Diabetes is a chronic disease. To prevent and delay complications, diabetic patients must adjust their lifestyle as part of a comprehensive approach to disease control. Diabetic patients must be able to self-manage their disease and establish healthy habits in their daily routine. In this study, prior to intervention, the subject was unable to control her diet, do exercise, check sugars properly or integrate disease management effectively into her daily routine. By applying self-regulation theory through the keeping of a diary for sugar and daily activity self-monitoring, she became able to self-assess the causes of poor disease control. Such further facilitated her setting goals and developing strategies to link her habits with disease management. When failing to achieve goals even after execution, she could consider the factors contributing to the failure and modify her behaviors, goals and/or strategies accordingly. We helped this patient learn behavior modification methods in order to achieve her goal of better HbA(1)C control. This case example may help clinical nursing educators move beyond the confines of the traditional one-way educational model to guide diabetic patients to achieve good sugar control. We hope our findings help many chronic disease sufferers achieve self-management objectives in order to assume greater self-care responsibilities.

  13. Exploring factors influencing HbA1c and psychosocial outcomes in people with type 1 diabetes after training in advanced carbohydrate counting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Signe; Vistisen, Dorte; Almdal, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    was tested (using a non-validated test developed specifically for this study) and behavioral measures (number of daily blood glucose measurements and self-reported use of ACC) were obtained. Associations between change in HbA1c and these measures plus sex, age, diabetes duration and BMI were tested. RESULTS......AIMS: The purpose of this secondary analysis of the StenoABC Study was to identify determinants of the changes in HbA1c observed after training of people with type 1 diabetes in advanced carbohydrate counting (ACC) and automated bolus calculator (ABC) use, and further to investigate psychosocial...

  14. Diagnostic performance of HbA1c for diabetes in Arab vs. European populations: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertran, E A; Berlie, H D; Taylor, A; Divine, G; Jaber, L A

    2017-02-01

    To examine differences in the performance of HbA 1c for diagnosing diabetes in Arabs compared with Europeans. The PubMed, Embase and Cochrane library databases were searched for records published between 1998 and 2015. Estimates of sensitivity, specificity and log diagnostic odds ratios for an HbA 1c cut-point of 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) were compared between Arabs and Europeans, using a bivariate linear mixed-model approach. For studies reporting multiple cut-points, population-specific summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves were constructed. In addition, sensitivity, specificity and Youden Index were estimated for strata defined by HbA 1c cut-point and population type. Database searches yielded 1912 unique records; 618 full-text articles were reviewed. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria; hand-searching yielded three additional eligible studies. Three Arab (N = 2880) and 16 European populations (N = 49 127) were included in the analysis. Summary sensitivity and specificity for a HbA 1c cut-point of 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) in both populations were 42% (33-51%), and 97% (95-98%). There was no difference in area under SROC curves between Arab and European populations (0.844 vs. 0.847; P = 0.867), suggesting no difference in HbA 1c diagnostic accuracy between populations. Multiple cut-point summary estimates stratified by population suggest that Arabs have lower sensitivity and higher specificity at a HbA 1c cut-point of 44 mmol/mol (6.2%) compared with European populations. Estimates also suggest similar test performance at cut-points of 44 mmol/mol (6.2%) and 48 mmol/mol (6.5%) for Arabs. Given the low sensitivity of HbA 1c in the high-risk Arab American population, we recommend a combination of glucose-based and HbA 1c testing to ensure an accurate and timely diagnosis of diabetes. © 2016 Diabetes UK.

  15. Cross-sectional comparison of point-of-care with laboratory HbA1c in detecting diabetes in real-world remote Aboriginal settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marley, Julia V; Oh, May S; Hadgraft, Nyssa; Singleton, Sally; Isaacs, Kim; Atkinson, David

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine if point-of-care (POC) glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is sufficiently accurate in real-world remote settings to predict or exclude the diagnosis of diabetes based on laboratory HbA1c measurements. Design Cross-sectional study comparing POC capillary HbA1c results with corresponding venous HbA1c levels measured in a reference laboratory. Participants Aboriginal patients ≥15 years old who were due for diabetes screening at the participating clinics were invited to participate. Two hundred and fifty-five Aboriginal participants were enrolled and 241 were included in the analysis. Setting 6 primary healthcare sites in the remote Kimberley region of Western Australia from September 2011 to November 2013. Main outcome measures Concordance and mean differences between POC capillary blood HbA1c measurement and laboratory measurement of venous blood HbA1c level; POC capillary blood HbA1c equivalence value for screening for diabetes or a high risk of developing diabetes; sensitivity, specificity and positive-predictive value for diagnosing and screening for diabetes; barriers to conducting POC testing. Results Concordance between POC and laboratory results was good (ρ=0.88, pHbA1c measurements ≥6.5%, 48 mmol/mol had a specificity of 98.2% and sensitivity of 73.7% for laboratory measurements ≥6.5%. The POC equivalence value for screening for diabetes or a high risk of developing diabetes was ≥5.7%, 39 mmol/mol (sensitivity, 91%; specificity, 76.7% for laboratory measurements ≥6.0%, 42 mmol/mol). Staff trained by other clinic staff ‘on the job’ performed as well as people with formal accredited training. Staff reported difficulty in maintaining formal accreditation. Conclusions POC HbA1c testing is sufficiently accurate to be a useful component in screening for, and diagnosing, diabetes in remote communities. Limited local training is adequate to produce results comparable to laboratory results and accreditation processes need to reflect this. PMID:25765020

  16. Prevalence of comorbidity in primary care patients with type 2 diabetes and its association with elevated HbA1c: A cross-sectional study in Croatia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bralić Lang, Valerija; Bergman Marković, Biserka

    2016-01-01

    To the authors' knowledge, there are few valid data that describe the prevalence of comorbidity in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients seen in family practice. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of comorbidities and their association with elevated (≥ 7.0%) haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) using a large sample of T2DM patients from primary care practices. A cross-sectional study in which multivariate logistic regression was applied to explore the association of comorbidities with elevated HbA1c. Primary care practices in Croatia. Altogether, 10 264 patients with diabetes in 449 practices. Comorbidities and elevated HbA1c. In total 7979 (77.7%) participants had comorbidity. The mean number of comorbidities was 1.6 (SD 1.28). Diseases of the circulatory system were the most common (7157, 69.7%), followed by endocrine and metabolic diseases (3093, 30.1%), and diseases of the musculoskeletal system and connective tissue (1437, 14.0%). After adjustment for age and sex, the number of comorbidities was significantly associated with HbA1c. The higher the number of comorbidities, the lower the HbA1c. The prevalence of physicians' inertia was statistically significantly and negatively associated with the number of comorbidities (Mann-Whitney U test, Z = -12.34; p < 0.001; r = -0.12). There is a high prevalence of comorbidity among T2DM patients in primary care. A negative association of number of comorbidities and HbA1c is probably moderated by physicians' inertia in treatment of T2DM strictly according to guidelines. There is a high prevalence of comorbidity among T2DM patients in primary care. Patients with breast cancer, obese patients, and those with dyslipidaemia and ischaemic heart disease were more likely to have increased HbA1c. The higher the number of comorbidities, the lower the HbA1c.

  17. Association of Glycemic Status with Bone Turnover Markers in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Sweta Vilas; Meenatchi, Suruthi; Reeta, R; Ramesh, Ramasamy; Srinivasan, A R; Lenin, C

    2017-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus has profound implications on the skeleton. Even though bone mineral density is increased in type 2 diabetes mellitus patients, they are more prone for fractures. The weakening of bone tissue in type 2 diabetes mellitus can be due to uncontrolled blood sugar levels leading to high levels of bone turnover markers in blood. The aim of this study is to find the association between glycemic status and bone turnover markers in type 2 diabetes mellitus. This case-control study was carried out in a tertiary health care hospital. Fifty clinically diagnosed type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in the age group between 30 and 50 years were included as cases. Fifty age- and gender-matched healthy nondiabetics were included as controls. Patients with complications and chronic illness were excluded from the study. Depending on glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels, patients were grouped into uncontrolled (HbA1c >7%, n = 36) and controlled (HbA1c diabetics. Based on duration of diabetes, patients were grouped into newly diagnosed, 1-2 years, 3-5 years, and >5 years. Serum osteocalcin (OC), bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP), acid phosphatase (ACP), and HbA1c levels were estimated. OC/BAP and OC/ACP ratio was calculated. Student's t -test, analysis of variance, and Chi-square tests were used for analysis. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was done for OC/BAP and OC/ACP ratios. Serum OC, HbA1c, and OC/BAP ratio were increased in cases when compared to controls and were statistically significant ( P type 2 diabetes mellitus and was statistically significant ( P = 0.01). In patients with >5-year duration of diabetes, HbA1c level was high and was statistically significant ( P 2). BAP levels were high in uncontrolled diabetics but statistically not significant. ROC curve showed OC/BAP ratio better marker than OC/ACP ratio. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus affects bone tissue resulting in variations in bone turnover markers. Bone turnover

  18. Frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in an African diabetic population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kibirige D

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Davis Kibirige,1 George Patrick Akabwai,2 Leaticia Kampiire,3 Daniel Ssekikubo Kiggundu,4 William Lumu5 1Department of Medicine/Diabetic and Hypertension Clinics, Our Lady of Consolota Hospital, Kisubi, 2Baylor College of Medicine, Children’s Foundation, 3Infectious Diseases Research Collaboration, Kampala, 4Nephrology Unit, Mulago National Referral and Teaching Hospital, Kampala, 5Department of Medicine and Diabetes/Endocrine Unit, Mengo Hospital, Mengo, Uganda Background: Persistent suboptimal glycemic control is invariably associated with onset and progression of acute and chronic diabetic complications in diabetic patients. In Uganda, studies documenting the magnitude and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in adult ambulatory diabetic patients are limited. This study aimed at determining the frequency and predictors of suboptimal glycemic control in adult diabetic patients attending three urban outpatient diabetic clinics in Uganda. Methods: In this hospital-based cross-sectional study, eligible ambulatory adult diabetic patients attending outpatient diabetic clinics of three urban hospitals were consecutively enrolled over 11 months. Suboptimal glycemic control was defined as glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c level ≥7%. Multivariable analysis was applied to determine the predictors. Results: The mean age of the study participants was 52.2±14.4 years, and the majority of them were females (283, 66.9%. The median (interquartile range HbA1c level was 9% (6.8%–12.4%. Suboptimal glycemic control was noted in 311 study participants, accounting for 73.52% of the participants. HbA1c levels of 7%–8%, 8.1%–9.9%, and ≥10% were noted in 56 (13.24%, 76 (17.97%, and 179 (42.32% study participants, respectively. The documented predictors of suboptimal glycemic control were metformin monotherapy (odds ratio: 0.36, 95% confidence interval: 0.21–0.63, p<0.005 and insulin therapy (odds ratio: 2.41, 95% confidence interval: 1.41–4.12, p=0

  19. A global study of the unmet need for glycemic control and predictor factors among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus who have achieved optimal fasting plasma glucose control on basal insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raccah, Denis; Chou, Engels; Colagiuri, Stephen; Gaàl, Zsolt; Lavalle, Fernando; Mkrtumyan, Ashot; Nikonova, Elena; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Vidal, Josep; Davies, Melanie

    2017-03-01

    This study used data from different sources to identify the extent of the unmet need for postprandial glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) after the initiation of basal insulin therapy in Europe, Asia Pacific, the United States, and Latin America. Different levels of evidence were used as available for each country/region, with data extracted from seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs), three clinical trial registries (CTRs), and three electronic medical record (EMR) databases. Glycemic status was categorized as "well controlled" (glycated hemoglobin [HbA 1c ] at target [130/140 mg/dL, depending on country-specific recommendations]), or "uncontrolled" (both FPG and HbA 1c above target). Predictor factors were identified from the RCT data set using logistic regression analysis. RCT data showed that 16.9% to 28.0%, 42.7% to 54.4%, and 16.9% to 38.1% of patients with T2DM had well-controlled glycemia, residual hyperglycemia, and uncontrolled hyperglycemia, respectively. In CTRs, respective ranges were 21.8% to 33.6%, 31.5% to 35.6%, and 30.7% to 46.8%, and in EMR databases were 4.4% to 21.0%, 23.9% to 31.8%, and 53.6% to 63.8%. Significant predictor factors of residual hyperglycemia identified from RCT data included high baseline HbA 1c (all countries/regions except Brazil), high baseline FPG (United Kingdom/Japan), longer duration of diabetes (Brazil), and female sex (Europe/Latin America). Irrespective of intrinsic differences between data sources, 24% to 54% of patients with T2DM globally had residual hyperglycemia with HbA 1c not at target, despite achieving FPG control, indicating a significant unmet need for postprandial glycemic control. © 2016 The Authors. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Mother-father informant discrepancies regarding diabetes management: associations with diabetes-specific family conflict and glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Erica D; Pendley, Jennifer Shroff; Delamater, Alan M; Rohan, Jennifer M; Pulgaron, Elizabeth R; Drotar, Dennis

    2012-09-01

    To examine the relationship of mother-father informant discrepancies regarding diabetes management to diabetes-specific family conflict and glycemic control. One hundred thirty-six mothers and fathers of youth with Type 1 diabetes reported on the youth's diabetes management, diabetes-specific family conflict, and amount of paternal involvement in diabetes care. Glycosylated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) was used to measure glycemic control. As hypothesized, mother-father discrepancies regarding diabetes management were positively associated with frequency of diabetes-specific family conflict. Contrary to hypotheses, mother-father discrepancies regarding diabetes management predicted poorer glycemic control for youth with less involved fathers only. Results highlight the importance of caregivers being consistent about pediatric illness management and support the idea that informant discrepancies represent an important window into the functioning of the family system. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved.

  1. Fructosamine and Hemoglobin A1c Correlations in HIV-Infected Adults in Routine Clinical Care: Impact of Anemia and Albumin Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Duran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fructosamine is an alternative method to hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c for determining average glycemia. However, its use has not been extensively evaluated in persons living with HIV (PLWH. We examined the relationship between HbA1c and fructosamine values, specifically focusing on anemia (which can affect HbA1c and albumin as a marker of liver disease. We included 345 PLWH from two sites. We examined Spearman rank correlations between fructosamine and HbA1c and performed linear test for trends to compare fructosamine and HbA1c correlations by hemoglobin and albumin quartiles. We examined discrepant individuals with values elevated only on one test. We found a correlation of 0.70 between fructosamine and HbA1c levels. Trend tests for correlations between fructosamine and HbA1c were significant for both albumin (p=0.05 and hemoglobin (p=0.01 with the lowest correlations in the lowest hemoglobin quartile. We identified participants with unremarkable HbA1c values but elevated fructosamine values. These discrepant individuals had lower mean hemoglobin levels than those elevated by both tests. We demonstrated a large correlation between HbA1c and fructosamine across a range of hemoglobin and albumin levels. There were discrepant cases particularly among those with lower hemoglobin levels. Future studies are needed to clarify the use of fructosamine for diabetes management in PWLH.

  2. Java project on periodontal diseases: effect of vitamin C/calcium threonate/citrus flavonoids supplementation on periodontal pathogens, CRP and HbA1c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amaliya, A.; Laine, M.L.; Loos, B.G.; van der Velden, U.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess in a periodontally diseased rural population deprived from regular dental care and having poor dietary conditions, the effect of vitamin C/calcium threonate/citrus flavonoids (VitC/Ca/Fl) supplementation on subgingival microbiota and plasma levels of vitamin C, HbA1c and hsCRP.

  3. Two prospective studies found that elevated 2-hr glucose predicted male mortality independent of fasting glucose and HbA1c.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiao, Q.; Dekker, J.M.; Vegt, F. de; Nijpels, G.; Nissinen, A.; Stehouwer, C.D.A.; Bouter, L.M.; Heine, R.J.; Tuomilehto, J.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the relative contribution of elevated 2-hr glucose, fasting glucose (FPG), and HbA1c to all-cause mortality. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A joint analysis of two prospective studies with baseline glycemia measurements. RESULTS: The multivariate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs)

  4. Patients newly diagnosed with clinical type 2 diabetes mellitus but presenting with HbA1c within normal range: 19-year mortality and clinical outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veloso, A.G.; Siersma, V.; Heldgaard, P.E.

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate whether long-term mortality or clinical outcomes differed between patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and presenting with HbA1c within or above normal range at time of diagnosis. METHODS: Data were from a population-based sample of 1136 individuals with newly dia...

  5. Two prospective studies found that elevated 2-hr glucose predicted male mortality independent of fasting glucose and HbA1c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qiao, Qing; Dekker, Jacqueline M; de Vegt, Femmie; Nijpels, Giel; Nissinen, Aulikki; Stehouwer, Coen D A; Bouter, Lex M; Heine, Robert J; Tuomilehto, Jaakko

    OBJECTIVE: To quantify the relative contribution of elevated 2-hr glucose, fasting glucose (FPG), and HbA1c to all-cause mortality. STUDY DESIGN AND SETTING: A joint analysis of two prospective studies with baseline glycemia measurements. RESULTS: The multivariate adjusted hazard ratios (HRs)

  6. Prevalence of disturbed eating behaviour in girls with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, and the influence of disturbed eating behaviour on metabolic control (HbA1c)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lene Juel; Thastum, Mikael; Schnieber, Anette

    2008-01-01

    Girls with diabetes mellitus (DM) (N = 21, age 11-17 years) completed measures of objective overeating episodes (OOE) and objective bulimic episodes (OBE) from the EDE-Q. Data regarding metabolic control (HbA1c) were obtained through a national diabetes register. 41 % of the girls had one or more...

  7. The moderating effect of social cognitive factors on self-management activities and HbA1c in Thai adults with type-2 diabetes

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    Somsak Thojampa

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: The diabetes self-management activities were more strongly associated with HbA1c under conditions of high social support, self-efficacy and health beliefs with Buddhist values. Future interventions for T2DM self-management programs should incorporate mechanisms to measure and support these factors.

  8. Periodontal inflamed surface area and C-reactive protein as predictors of HbA1c : a study in Indonesia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Susanto, Hendri; Nesse, Willem; Dijkstra, Pieter U.; Hoedemaker, Evelien; van Reenen, Yvonne Huijser; Agustina, Dewi; Vissink, Arjan; Abbas, Frank

    Periodontitis may exert an infectious and inflammatory burden, evidenced by increased C-reactive protein (CRP). This burden may impair blood glucose control (HbA1c). The aim of our study was to analyze whether periodontitis severity as measured with the periodontal inflamed surface area (PISA) and

  9. The effect of nano-curcumin on HbA1c, fasting blood glucose, and lipid profile in diabetic subjects: a randomized clinical trial

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    Hamid Reza Rahimi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Diabetes mellitus is defined as a group of metabolic diseases characterized by hyperglycemia resulting from defects in insulin secretion, insulin action, or both or insulin resistance. Curcumin inhibits NF-κB signaling pathway. The aim of this study is evaluation of the effect of Nano-curcumin on HbA1C, fast blood glucose and lipid profile in diabetic patients. Materials and Methods: Seventy type-2 diabetic patients (fasting blood glucose (FBG ≥ 126 mg/dL or 2-hr postprandial blood glucose ≥200 mg/dl randomly receivedeither Curcumin (as nano-micelle 80 mg/day or placebo for 3 months in a double blind randomized clinical trial. Fasting blood glucose, HbA1C, and lipids profile were checked before and after the intervention. Data analyses, including parametric and nonparametric tests were done using the SPSS 11.5 software. A p value < 0.05 was regarded as statistically significant. (RCT registration code: IRCT2013081114330N1 Results: Mean age, BMI, FBG, total cholesterol (TC, triglyceride (TG, LDL, HDL, HbA1c , and  sex and had no significant difference at the baseline between the groups. In Nano-curcumin group, a significant decrease was found in HbA1C, FBG, TG, and BMI comparing results of each subject before and after the treatment (p

  10. Measurement of HbA1c in multicentre diabetes trials - should blood samples be tested locally or sent to a central laboratory: an agreement analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arch, Barbara N; Blair, Joanne; McKay, Andrew; Gregory, John W; Newland, Paul; Gamble, Carrol

    2016-10-24

    Glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) is an important outcome measure in diabetes clinical trials. For multicentre designs, HbA1c can be measured locally at participating centres or by sending blood samples to a central laboratory. This study analyses the agreement between local and central measurements, using 1-year follow-up data collected in a multicentre randomised controlled trial (RCT) of newly diagnosed children with type I diabetes. HbA1c measurements were routinely analysed both locally and centrally at baseline and then at 3, 6, 9 and 12 months and the data reported in mmol/mol. Agreement was assessed by calculating the bias and 95 % limits of agreement, using the Bland-Altman analysis method. A predetermined benchmark for clinically acceptable margin of error between measurements was subjectively set as ±10 % for HbA1c. The percentage of pairs of measurements that were classified as clinically acceptable was calculated. Descriptive statistics were used to examine the agreement within centres. Treatment group was not considered. Five hundred and ninety pairs of measurement, representing 255 children and 15 trial centres across four follow-up time points, were compared. There was no significant bias: local measurements were an average of 0.16 mmol/mol (SD = 4.5, 95 % CI -0.2 to 0.5) higher than central. The 95 % limits of agreement were -8.6 to 9.0 mmol/mol (local minus central). Eighty percent of local measurements were within ±10 % of corresponding central measurements. Some trial centres were more varied in the differences observed between local and central measurements: IQRs ranging from 3 to 9 mmol/mol; none indicated systematic bias. Variation in agreement between HbA1c measurements was greater than had been expected although no overall bias was detected and standard deviations were similar. Discrepancies were present across all participating centres. These findings have implications for the comparison of standards of clinical care between centres, the design of future multicentre RCTs and existing quality assurance processes for HbA1c measurements. We recommend that centralised HbA1c measurement is preferable in the multicentre clinical trial setting. Eudract No. 2010-023792-25 , registered on 4 November 2010.

  11. The Best Cut-Off Value for HbA1c as a Screening Tool in Iranian Women With Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

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    Seyedeh Neda Mousavi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM is a prevalent disorder which increases maternal and fetal complications. The oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT is a traditional, time -consuming and intensive test which is poorly tolerated by pregnant women. To date, increasing evidence considered HbA1c as a screening tool and reported various cut-off values in different populations. In alignment with existing literature, we determined for the first time, the optimal cut-off value for HbA1c in Iranian women with GDM.Materials and methods: This case-control study was conducted in Valie-Asr hospital between June 2015 and March 2016. A total of 200 pregnant women who were diagnosed with GDM were selected as study cases. For the control group, 200 healthy women were randomly selected. Fasting blood samples were taken for biochemical analysis, and OGTT was done in all participants. Demographic and anthropometric indexes were measured. Performance of the HbA1c test was analyzed by the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC curve, and the sensitivity and specificity for different HbA1c cut-off points were calculated subsequently.Results: Analysis showed that the mean age (p < 0.001 and BMI (p < 0.001 were significantly higher in the GDM group compared to those in non-GDM pregnant women. GDM participants reported positive family- and previous history of GDM more than healthy pregnant women (p = 0.04 and p < 0.001, respectively. All the markers for Lipid profile were significantly different between the two groups (p = <0.001 except for total cholesterol. The rate of Caesarean section and neonate’s Apgar score were not significantly different between the two groups. The best equilibrium between sensitivity (80% and specificity (76% for HbA1c was 5.05%.Conclusion: Our results suggest that pregnant women with HbA1c of ≥ 5.05% should proceed with an OGTT. Further investigations with larger sample size are needed to provide more robust evidence for the diagnostic and screening value of HbA1c in identifying pregnant women with GDM.

  12. Universal HbA1c Measurement in Early Pregnancy to Detect Type 2 Diabetes Reduces Ethnic Disparities in Antenatal Diabetes Screening: A Population-Based Observational Study.

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    R C E Hughes

    Full Text Available In response to the type 2 diabetes epidemic, measuring HbA1c with the first-antenatal blood screen was recently recommended in NZ. This would enable prompt treatment of women with unrecognised type 2 diabetes, who may otherwise go undetected until the gestational diabetes (GDM screen. We compare inter-ethnic antenatal screening practices to examine whether the HbA1c test would be accessed by ethnicities most at risk of diabetes, and we determined the prevalence of unrecognised type 2 diabetes and prediabetes in our pregnant population. This is an observational study of pregnancies in Christchurch NZ during 2008-2010. Utilising electronic databases, we matched maternal characteristics to first-antenatal bloods, HbA1c, and GDM screens (glucose challenge tests and oral glucose tolerance tests. Overall uptake of the first-antenatal bloods versus GDM screening was 83.1% and 53.8% respectively in 11,580 pregnancies. GDM screening was lowest in Māori 39.3%, incidence proportion ratio (IPR 0.77 (0.71, 0.84 compared with Europeans. By including HbA1c with the first-antenatal bloods, the number screened for diabetes increases by 28.5% in Europeans, 40.0% in Māori, 28.1% in Pacific People, and 26.7% in 'Others' (majority of Asian descent. The combined prevalence of unrecognised type 2 diabetes and prediabetes by NZ criteria, HbA1c ≥5.9% (41mmol/mol, was 2.1% in Europeans, Māori 4.7% IPR 2.59 (1.71, 3.93, Pacific People 9.5% IPR 4.76 (3.10, 7.30, and 'Others' 6.2% IPR 2.99 (2.19, 4.07. Applying these prevalence data to 2013 NZ national births data, routine antenatal HbA1c testing could have identified type 2 diabetes in 0.44% and prediabetes in 3.96% of women. Routine HbA1c measurement in early pregnancy is an ideal screening opportunity, particularly benefitting vulnerable groups, reducing ethnic disparities in antenatal diabetes screening. This approach is likely to have world-wide relevance and applicability. Further research is underway to establish whether, as for type 2 diabetes, prompt treatment of prediabetes improves pregnancy and neonatal outcomes.

  13. HbA1c level cannot predict the treatment outcome of smear-positive non-multi-drug-resistant HIV-negative pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Ken; Horita, Nobuyuki; Nagai, Kenjiro; Ikeda, Misako; Shinkai, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Masaki; Sato, Takashi; Hara, Yu; Nagakura, Hideyuki; Shibata, Yuji; Watanabe, Hiroki; Nakashima, Kentaro; Ushio, Ryota; Nagashima, Akimichi; Narita, Atsuya; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Kudo, Makoto; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    We conducted a single-center retrospective cohort study to evaluate whether the HbA1c level on admission could predict the in-hospital treatment outcome of smear-positive non-multi-drug-resistant HIV-negative culture-proven pulmonary tuberculosis inpatients. Our standard regimens under the direct observation were HRZE or HRE for the first two months followed by combination therapy with isoniazid and rifampicin. Our cohort consisted of consecutive 239 patients consisted of 147 men and 92 women with a median age of 73 years. The HbA1c level of patients whose HbA1c was above 7.0% on admission showed clear declining trends after admission. HbA1c on admission had no Spearman’s rank correlation with time to discharge alive (r = 0.17) and time to becoming non-infective (r = 0.17). By Kaplan-Meier curves and a log-rank trend test, HbA1c quartile subgroups showed no association with times to discharge alive (p = 0.431), becoming non-infective (p = 0.113), and in-hospital death (p = 0.427). Based on multi-variate Cox analysis, HbA1c on admission had no significant impact on time to discharge alive (hazard ratio = 1.03, 95% CI 0.89–1.20, p = 0.659), becoming non-infective (hazard ratio = 0.93, 95% CI 0.80–1.06, p = 0.277), and in-hospital death (hazard ratio = 0.68, 0.43–1.07, p = 0.097). In conclusion, the HbA1c level on admission did not seem to affect in-hospital tuberculosis treatment outcomes in Japanese cohort. PMID:28406247

  14. Utility of different glycemic control metrics for optimizing management of diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohnert, Klaus-Dieter; Heinke, Peter; Vogt, Lutz; Salzsieder, Eckhard

    2015-02-15

    The benchmark for assessing quality of long-term glycemic control and adjustment of therapy is currently glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Despite its importance as an indicator for the development of diabetic complications, recent studies have revealed that this metric has some limitations; it conveys a rather complex message, which has to be taken into consideration for diabetes screening and treatment. On the basis of recent clinical trials, the relationship between HbA1c and cardiovascular outcomes in long-standing diabetes has been called into question. It becomes obvious that other surrogate and biomarkers are needed to better predict cardiovascular diabetes complications and assess efficiency of therapy. Glycated albumin, fructosamin, and 1,5-anhydroglucitol have received growing interest as alternative markers of glycemic control. In addition to measures of hyperglycemia, advanced glucose monitoring methods became available. An indispensible adjunct to HbA1c in routine diabetes care is self-monitoring of blood glucose. This monitoring method is now widely used, as it provides immediate feedback to patients on short-term changes, involving fasting, preprandial, and postprandial glucose levels. Beyond the traditional metrics, glycemic variability has been identified as a predictor of hypoglycemia, and it might also be implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular diabetes complications. Assessment of glycemic variability is thus important, but exact quantification requires frequently sampled glucose measurements. In order to optimize diabetes treatment, there is a need for both key metrics of glycemic control on a day-to-day basis and for more advanced, user-friendly monitoring methods. In addition to traditional discontinuous glucose testing, continuous glucose sensing has become a useful tool to reveal insufficient glycemic management. This new technology is particularly effective in patients with complicated diabetes and provides the opportunity to characterize

  15. HBA1C AND LIPID PROFILE LEVELS IN THE KNOWN TYPE 2 DIABETIC GROUP IN THE RURAL REGION OF VIDARBHA, MAHARASHTRA, INDIA

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    Sarmistha Sarkar

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diabetes Mellitus (DM is a group of metabolic diseases in which there is high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period of time, and if early interventions are not taken, then it can cause many life-threatening complications like heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, damage to eyes, etc. Our aim is to determine HbA1c and Lipid profile level in the known type 2 diabetic group in the rural region of Vidarbha, Maharashtra, India, to see that as our study is a rural-based study and there is less pollution and stress factor compared to the cities whether it effects out study result or not. MATERIALS AND METHODS FBS, HbA1c, TC, HDL, LDL, VLDL, TG levels were evaluated. Total sample size 60 in between 30-40 years including males and females divided into two groups. 30 patients study group with known history of type 2 DM who attended the Medicine OPD and 30 age, sex matched healthy controls. Statistical analysis was done by using SPSS 17.0 version. RESULTS Results of serum lipid profile showed that mean values for TC, TG, HDL, LDL and VLDL in study group were 227.76±30.72, 152.23 ± 40.94, 40.5 ± 6.43, 153.30 ± 27.70 and 33.00 ± 9.94 mg/dL. FBS showed significant positive correlation with HbA1c (p<0.002. HDL has significant negative correlation with HbA1c (p<0.008. CONCLUSION Early detection in the abnormalities of serum lipid profile and HbA1c can minimise the risk for micro and macroangiopathies in the known type 2 diabetic patients.

  16. Effect of non-surgical periodontal treatment on HbA1c: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liew, A K C; Punnanithinont, N; Lee, Y-C; Yang, J

    2013-09-01

    A meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) was conducted to evaluate whether non-surgical periodontal treatment can reduce the HbA1c% level in type 2 diabetic patients. Recent accumulation of RCTs necessitates updating of the findings of previous reviews. A search of the literature on English publications was conducted in Cochrane CENTRAL, Medline and EMBASE (until 31 March 2012). An RCT was selected if the study population was type 2 diabetic patients (≥16 years old) diagnosed with periodontitis, and compared HbA1c% change with or without non-surgical periodontal treatment for at least three months of the study duration. Weighted mean differences for pooled data and antibiotic use strata were calculated. Heterogeneity and publication bias were explored. A total of 358 articles were identified but only six were suitable. Compared to the control group, the pooled analysis (n = 422) showed -0.41% (95% CI: -0.73% to -0.09%, p = 0.013) absolute difference in HbA1c% with treatment. Studies without adjunctive antibiotic had HbA1c% change of -0.64% (95% CI: -1.06% to -0.23%, p = 0.002), but we could not conclude on the effect of adjunctive antibiotic use (p = 0.734). Publication bias was significant with Egger's test (p = 0.014) but not with Begg's test (p = 0.06). The meta-analysis suggested that non-surgical periodontal treatment was associated with a reduction in HbA1c%. © 2013 Australian Dental Association.

  17. Implementation of HbA1c Point of Care Testing in 3 German Medical Practices: Impact on Workflow and Physician, Staff, and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patzer, Karl-Heinz; Ardjomand, Payam; Göhring, Katharina; Klempt, Guido; Patzelt, Andreas; Redzich, Markus; Zebrowski, Mathias; Emmerich, Susanne; Schnell, Oliver

    2018-05-01

    Medical practices face challenges of time and cost pressures with scarce resources. Point-of-care testing (POCT) has the potential to accelerate processes compared to central laboratory testing and can increase satisfaction of physicians, staff members, and patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of introducing HbA1c POCT in practices specialized in diabetes. Three German practices that manage 400, 550, and 950 diabetes patients per year participated in this evaluation. The workflow and required time before and after POCT implementation (device: Alere Afinion AS100 Analyzer) was evaluated in each practice. Physician (n = 5), staff (n = 9), and patient (n = 298) satisfaction was assessed with questionnaires and interviews. After POCT implementation the number of required visits scheduled was reduced by 80% (88% vs 17.6%, P < .0001), the number of venous blood collections by 75% (91% vs 23%, P < .0001). Of patients, 82% (vs 13% prior to POCT implementation) were able to discuss their HbA1c values with treating physicians immediately during their first visit ( P < .0001). In two of the practices the POCT process resulted in significant time savings of approximately 20 and 22 working days per 1000 patients per year (95% CI 2-46; 95% CI 10-44). All physicians indicated that POCT HbA1c implementation improved the practice workflow and all experienced a relief of burden for the office and the patients. All staff members indicated that they found the POCT measurement easy to perform and experienced a relief of burden. The majority (61.3%) of patients found the capillary blood collection more pleasant and 83% saw an advantage in the immediate availability of HbA1c results. The implementation of HbA1c POCT leads to an improved practice workflow and increases satisfaction of physicians, staff members and patients.

  18. Oral health and glycosylated hemoglobin among type 1 diabetes children in South India

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    K Vidya

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The study was an attempt to evaluate the relationship between oral health status and the level of glycemic control in type 1 diabetes patients. Methods: The study was carried out in 87 children with type 1 diabetes, aged 8–16 years, attending a diabetes specialty hospital. The oral health of these patients was measured using the WHO 1997 Oral Health Survey criteria for diagnosis of dental caries, gingival index, and plaque index. Samples were then divided into two groups as controlled (≤6.99% glycosylated hemoglobin [HbA1c] and uncontrolled (≥7% HbA1c diabetes as per the guidelines for glycemic control in diabetics given by the American Diabetes Association. The oral health between the groups was compared. Results: Data were statistically analyzed using student t-test. Results showed a significant difference in decayed, missing, and filled surface component (P = 0.043 and gingival index scores (P< 0.001 in the permanent dentition between controlled and uncontrolled groups but not in case of the primary dentition. Conclusions: The data findings suggest that metabolic control had an impact on caries prevalence and gingival health of these patients, in case of permanent dentition. As the glycemic control became poorer, the caries prevalence and gingival inflammation increased. When primary dentition was taken into consideration, the correlation was not significant.

  19. Ethnic differences in glycemic markers in patients with type 2 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H. R.; Herman, William H.; Gross, Jorge L.; Dharmalingam, Mala; Jiang, Honghua H.; Hardin, Dana S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Recent studies have reported hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) differences across ethnic groups that could limit its use in clinical practice. The authors of the A1C-Derived Average Glucose study have advocated to report HbA1c in estimated average glucose (AG) equivalents. The aim of this study was

  20. Effects of Sleep Disorders on Hemoglobin A1c Levels in Type 2 Diabetic Patients

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    Ahmet Keskin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Studies have reported the presence of sleep disorders in approximately 50-70% of diabetic patients, and these may contribute to poor glycemic control, diabetic neuropathy, and overnight hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of sleep disorders in diabetic patients, and to investigate possible relationships between scores of these sleep disorders and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS and diabetic parameters (fasting blood glucose, glycated hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c], and lipid levels. Methods: We used the Berlin questionnaire (BQ for OSAS, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS, and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI to determine the frequency of sleep disorders and their possible relationships with fasting blood glucose, HbA1c, and lipid levels. Results: The study included 585 type 2 diabetic patients admitted to family medicine clinics between October and December 2014. Sleep, sleep quality, and sleep scores were used as the dependent variables in the analysis. The ESS scores showed that 54.40% of patients experienced excessive daytime sleepiness, and according to the PSQI, 64.30% experienced poor-quality sleep. The BQ results indicated that 50.20% of patients were at high-risk of OSAS. HbA1c levels correlated significantly with the ESS and PSQI results (r = 0.23, P < 0.001 and r = 0.14, P = 0.001, respectively, and were significantly higher in those with high-risk of OSAS as defined by the BQ (P < 0.001. These results showed that HbA1c levels were related to sleep disorders. Conclusions: Sleep disorders are common in diabetic patients and negatively affect the control of diabetes. Conversely, poor diabetes control is an important factor disturbing sleep quality. Addressing sleep disturbances in patients who have difficulty controlling their blood glucose has dual benefits: Preventing diabetic complications caused by sleep disturbance and improving diabetes control.

  1. Evaluation of hemoglobin A1c measurement from filter paper using high-performance liquid chromatography and immunoturbidimetric assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yonghua; Yang, Xu; Wang, Haining; Li, Zhenrong; Wang, Tiancheng

    2017-04-01

    Glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ) measurement from whole blood (WB) samples is inconvenient for epidemic surveillance and self-monitoring of glycemic level. We evaluated HbA 1c measurement from WB blotted on filter paper (FP), which can be easily transported to central laboratories, with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and immunoturbidimetric assay (ITA). WB was applied to Whatman filter paper. By using HPLC and WB samples as reference methods, these FP samples were evaluated on HPLC and ITA. Inter- and intra-assay variation, WB vs. FP agreement and sample stability at 20-25 °C and -70 °C were assessed by statistical analysis. Results showed that the coefficient of variation (CV, %) of FP samples for HPLC and ITA were 0.44-1.02% and 1.47-2.72%, respectively (intra-assay); 2.13-3.56% and 3.21-4.82%, respectively (inter-assay). The correlation of WB HPLC with FP analyzed using HPLC and ITA are both significant (p < 0.001). Sample stability showed that FP method up to 5 days at 20-25 °C and 5 weeks at -70 °C is accurate and reproducible. In conclusion, FP samples analyzed by HPLC and ITA can both provide an alternative to WB for HbA 1c measurement, supporting the use of FP method in epidemic surveillance and healthcare units.

  2. Change in HbA1c Levels between the Age of 8 Years and the Age of 12 Years in Dutch Children without Diabetes: The PIAMA Birth Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Hanneke; Wijga, Alet H.; Scholtens, Salome; Koppelman, Gerard H.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Brunekreef, Bert; de Jongste, Johan C.; Smit, Henriëtte A.; Stolk, Ronald P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective HbA1c is associated with cardiovascular risk in persons without diabetes and cardiovascular risk accumulates over the life course. Therefore, insight in factors determining HbA1c from childhood onwards is important. We investigated (lifestyle) determinants of HbA1c at age 12 years and the effects of growth on change in HbA1c and the tracking of HbA1c between the age of 8 and 12 years. Study Design and Methods Anthropometric measurements were taken and HbA1c levels were assessed in 955 children without diabetes aged around 12 years participating in the PIAMA birth cohort study. In 363 of these children HbA1c was also measured at age 8 years. Data on parents and children were collected prospectively by questionnaires. Results We found no significant association between known risk factors for diabetes and HbA1c at age 12 years. Mean(SD) change in HbA1c between ages 8 and 12 years was 0.6(0.7) mmol/mol per year (or 0.1(0.1) %/yr). Anthropometric measures at age 8 and their change between age 8 and 12 years were not associated with the change in HbA1c. 68.9% of the children remained in the same quintile or had an HbA1c one quintile higher or lower at age 8 years compared to age 12 years. Conclusion The lack of association between known risk factors for diabetes and HbA1c suggest that HbA1c in children without diabetes is relatively unaffected by factors associated with glycaemia. HbA1c at age 8 years is by far the most important predictor of HbA1c at age 12. Therefore, the ranking of HbA1c levels appear to be fairly stable over time. PMID:25875773

  3. Interaction of sleep quality and sleep duration on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yunzhao; Meng, Lingling; Li, Daiqing; Yang, Min; Zhu, Yanjuan; Li, Chenguang; Jiang, Zhenhuan; Yu, Ping; Li, Zhu; Song, Hongna; Ni, Changlin

    2014-01-01

    Copious evidence from epidemiological and laboratory studies has revealed that sleep status is associated with glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, thus increasing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to reveal the interaction of sleep quality and sleep quantity on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. From May 2013 to May 2014, a total of 551 type 2 diabetes patients in Tianjin Metabolic Diseases Hospital were enrolled. Blood samples were taken to measure glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and all the patients completed the Chinese version of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) questionnaire to evaluate their sleep status. "Good sleep quality" was defined as PQSI quality" was defined as PQSI 6-8, and "poor sleep quality" was defined as PQSI >8. Poor glycemic control was defined as HbA1c ≥7%. Sleep quantity was categorized as 8 hours/night. Short sleep time was defined as sleep duration quality in poor glycemic control group was much greater than that in the average control group (χ(2) = 9.79, P = 0.007). After adjusted by gender, age, body mass index, and disease duration, the adjusted PSQI score's OR was 1.048 (95% CI 1.007-1.092, P = 0.023) for HbA1c level. The sleep duration's OR was 0.464 (95% CI 0.236-0.912, P = 0.026) for HbA1c level. One-way analysis of variance showed that the poor sleep quality group had the highest homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance (P quality and quantity, should be regarded as a plausible risk factor for glycemic control in type 2 diabetes. Poor sleep might bring much more serious insulin resistance and could be the reason for bad glycemic control. A good night's sleep should be seen as a critical health component tool in the prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. It is important for clinicians to target the root causes of short sleep duration and/or poor sleep quality.

  4. Study of Glycemic Variability Through Time Series Analyses (Detrended Fluctuation Analysis and Poincaré Plot) in Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Maset, Leonor; González, Lidia Blasco; Furquet, Gonzalo Llop; Suay, Francisco Montes; Marco, Roberto Hernández

    2016-11-01

    Time series analysis provides information on blood glucose dynamics that is unattainable with conventional glycemic variability (GV) indices. To date, no studies have been published on these parameters in pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes. Our aim is to evaluate the relationship between time series analysis and conventional GV indices, and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. This is a transversal study of 41 children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Glucose monitoring was carried out continuously for 72 h to study the following GV indices: standard deviation (SD) of glucose levels (mg/dL), coefficient of variation (%), interquartile range (IQR; mg/dL), mean amplitude of the largest glycemic excursions (MAGE), and continuous overlapping net glycemic action (CONGA). The time series analysis was conducted by means of detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and Poincaré plot. Time series parameters (DFA alpha coefficient and elements of the ellipse of the Poincaré plot) correlated well with the more conventional GV indices. Patients were grouped according to the terciles of these indices, to the terciles of eccentricity (1: 12.56-16.98, 2: 16.99-21.91, 3: 21.92-41.03), and to the value of the DFA alpha coefficient (> or ≤1.5). No differences were observed in the HbA1c of patients grouped by GV index criteria; however, significant differences were found in patients grouped by alpha coefficient and eccentricity, not only in terms of HbA1c, but also in SD glucose, IQR, and CONGA index. The loss of complexity in glycemic homeostasis is accompanied by an increase in variability.

  5. Association of prediabetes, defined by fasting glucose, HbA1c only, or combined criteria, with the risk of cardiovascular disease in Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong-Kyu; Lee, Jung Bok; Kim, Seon Ha; Jo, Min-Woo; Kim, Eun Hee; Hwang, Jenie Yoonoo; Bae, Sung Jin; Jung, Chang Hee; Lee, Woo Je; Park, Joong-Yeol; Park, Gyung-Min; Kim, Young-Hak; Choe, Jaewon

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the association between cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and prediabetes defined by either fasting plasma glucose (FPG), HbA1c, or their combination in a Korean population. In all, 76 434 South Koreans who voluntarily underwent a general health examination in the Health Screening & Promotion Center (Asan Medical Center) were analyzed after excluding patients with a previous history of CVD. Cardiovascular events and death due to CVD during a median follow-up period of 3.1 years (interquartile range 1.9-4.3 years) were identified from the Nationwide Health Insurance Claims Database and death certificates using ICD-10 codes. Age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratios (HRs) for overall CVD events were significantly greater for subjects with prediabetes defined by FPG only (HR 1.19; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.08-1.31), HbA1c only (HR 1.28; 95% CI 1.16-1.42), and combined criteria (HR 1.20; 95% CI 1.09-1.32) compared with the normoglycemic group. After adjusting for multiple conventional risk factors (e.g. hypertension, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, smoking status, family history of CVD, and BMI), the HRs for overall CVD were significantly increased only for participants with prediabetes defined by HbA1c. Age- and sex-adjusted HRs for major ischemic heart disease events were significantly increased for subjects with prediabetes defined either by HbA1c or combined criteria. Similarly, age- and sex-adjusted HRs for percutaneous coronary intervention were significantly higher for subjects with prediabetes defined by HbA1c only. For diabetes, the multivariate-adjusted HRs for all outcomes were significantly increased by all three criteria. Adding an HbA1c criterion when defining prediabetes in Koreans can help identify individuals with an increased risk of CVD. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Modelling incremental benefits on complications rates when targeting lower HbA1c levels in people with Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostafa, S A; Coleman, R L; Agbaje, O F; Gray, A M; Holman, R R; Bethel, M A

    2018-01-01

    Glucose-lowering interventions in Type 2 diabetes mellitus have demonstrated reductions in microvascular complications and modest reductions in macrovascular complications. However, the degree to which targeting different HbA 1c reductions might reduce risk is unclear. Participant-level data for Trial Evaluating Cardiovascular Outcomes with Sitagliptin (TECOS) participants with established cardiovascular disease were used in a Type 2 diabetes-specific simulation model to quantify the likely impact of different HbA 1c decrements on complication rates. Ten-year micro- and macrovascular rates were estimated with HbA 1c levels fixed at 86, 75, 64, 53 and 42 mmol/mol (10%, 9%, 8%, 7% and 6%) while holding other risk factors constant at their baseline levels. Cumulative relative risk reductions for each outcome were derived for each HbA 1c decrement. Of 5717 participants studied, 72.0% were men and 74.2% White European, with a mean (sd) age of 66.2 (7.9) years, systolic blood pressure 134 (16.9) mmHg, LDL-cholesterol 2.3 (0.9) mmol/l, HDL-cholesterol 1.13 (0.3) mmol/l and median Type 2 diabetes duration 9.6 (5.1-15.6) years. Ten-year cumulative relative risk reductions for modelled HbA 1c values of 75, 64, 53 and 42 mmol/mol, relative to 86 mmol/mol, were 4.6%, 9.3%, 15.1% and 20.2% for myocardial infarction; 6.0%, 12.8%, 19.6% and 25.8% for stroke; 14.4%, 26.6%, 37.1% and 46.4% for diabetes-related ulcer; 21.5%, 39.0%, 52.3% and 63.1% for amputation; and 13.6%, 25.4%, 36.0% and 44.7 for single-eye blindness. These simulated complication rates might help inform the degree to which complications might be reduced by targeting particular HbA 1c reductions in Type 2 diabetes. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  7. Color record in self-monitoring of blood glucose improves glycemic control by better self-management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Akiko; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Honda, Ikumi; Shimizu, Yoshiyuki; Harada, Norio; Nagashima, Kazuaki; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Hosoda, Kiminori; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2014-07-01

    Color affects emotions, feelings, and behaviors. We hypothesized that color used in self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is helpful for patients to recognize and act on their glucose levels to improve glycemic control. Here, two color-indication methods, color record (CR) and color display (CD), were independently compared for their effects on glycemic control in less frequently insulin-treated type 2 diabetes. One hundred twenty outpatients were randomly allocated to four groups with 2×2 factorial design: CR or non-CR and CD or non-CD. Blood glucose levels were recorded in red or blue pencil in the CR arm, and a red or blue indicator light on the SMBG meter was lit in the CD arm, under hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia, respectively. The primary end point was difference in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduction in 24 weeks. Secondary end points were self-management performance change and psychological state change. HbA1c levels at 24 weeks were significantly decreased in the CR arm by -0.28% but were increased by 0.03% in the non-CR arm (P=0.044). In addition, diet and exercise scores were significantly improved in the CR arm compared with the non-CR arm. The exercise score showed significant improvement in the CD arm compared with the non-CD arm but without a significant difference in HbA1c reduction. Changes in psychological states were not altered between the arms. CR has a favorable effect on self-management performance without any influence on psychological stress, resulting in improved glycemic control in type 2 diabetes patients using less frequent insulin injection. Thus, active but not passive usage of color-indication methods by patients is important in successful SMBG.

  8. Whole Blood Donation Affects the Interpretation of Hemoglobin A(1c)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Angelique; Lenters-Westra, Erna; de Kort, Wim; Bokhorst, Arlinke G.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Slingerland, Robbert J.; Vos, Michel J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Several factors, including changed dynamics of erythrocyte formation and degradation, can influence the degree of hemoglobin A(1c) (HbA(1c)) formation thereby affecting its use in monitoring diabetes. This study determines the influence of whole blood donation on HbA(1c) in both

  9. Whole Blood Donation Affects the Interpretation of Hemoglobin A1c

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, Angelique; Lenters-Westra, Erna; de Kort, Wim; Bokhorst, Arlinke G.; Bilo, Henk J. G.; Slingerland, Robbert J.; Vos, Michel J.

    2017-01-01

    Several factors, including changed dynamics of erythrocyte formation and degradation, can influence the degree of hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) formation thereby affecting its use in monitoring diabetes. This study determines the influence of whole blood donation on HbA1c in both non-diabetic blood donors

  10. Predictive Clinical Parameters and Glycemic Efficacy of Vildagliptin Treatment in Korean Subjects with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Sun Chang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe aims of this study are to investigate the glycemic efficacy and predictive parameters of vildagliptin therapy in Korean subjects with type 2 diabetes.MethodsIn this retrospective study, we retrieved data for subjects who were on twice-daily 50 mg vildagliptin for at least 6 months, and classified the subjects into five treatment groups. In three of the groups, we added vildagliptin to their existing medication regimen; in the other two groups, we replaced one of their existing medications with vildagliptin. We then analyzed the changes in glucose parameters and clinical characteristics.ResultsUltimately, 327 subjects were analyzed in this study. Vildagliptin significantly improved hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c levels over 6 months. The changes in HbA1c levels (ΔHbA1c at month 6 were -2.24% (P=0.000, -0.77% (P=0.000, -0.80% (P=0.001, -0.61% (P=0.000, and -0.34% (P=0.025 for groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, respectively, with significance. We also found significant decrements in fasting plasma glucose levels in groups 1, 2, 3, and 4 (P<0.05. Of the variables, initial HbA1c levels (P=0.032 and history of sulfonylurea use (P=0.026 were independently associated with responsiveness to vildagliptin treatment.ConclusionVildagliptin was effective when it was used in subjects with poor glycemic control. It controlled fasting plasma glucose levels as well as sulfonylurea treatment in Korean type 2 diabetic subjects.

  11. [Evaluation of DCA vantage for rapid in-clinic measurement of HbA1c on capillary blood in young type 1 diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Arabi, H; Willems, D; Mélot, C; Dorchy, H

    2013-01-01

    Rapid in clinic measurement of glycated hemoglogin (HbA1c) allows to determine the level of metabolic control within a few minutes on capillary blood. We have evaluated the new DCA Vantage (Siemens) based on an immunological technique, replacing the DCA 2000+ (Siemens). The study included 120 unselected young type 1 diabetic patients, with different degrees of metabolic control. The DCA Vantage was compared with the HPLC system (Menarini HA 8160) whose deviation from the DCCT was Vantage was -0.40%. The agreement limits (+/- 1.96 SD) were between 0.14% and -0.93%; this means +/- 0.53% around -0.40%. In conclusion, the DCA Vantage underestimates HbA1c levels; however it met the acceptance criteria of having a coefficient of variation < 3%.

  12. Effect of Ramadan fasting on glycemic control in patients with Type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norouzy, A; Mohajeri, S M R; Shakeri, S; Yari, F; Sabery, M; Philippou, E; Varasteh, A-R; Nematy, M

    2012-09-01

    Although Muslim patients with Type 2 diabetes may be exempt from fasting during Ramadan for medical reasons, a high proportion of them fast. To investigate the association between Ramadan fasting and glycemic control in patients with Type 2 diabetes. A prospective cohort clinical trial was designed. Eighty-eight patients with Type 2 diabetes (45 male, 43 female, age 51±10 yr) who opted to fast for at least 10 days during the month of Ramadan were recruited. Fasting blood samples were taken at the beginning and end of Ramadan, and 1 month after Ramadan, to assess fasting blood glucose (FBG), fasting insulin, full blood count, glycated hemoglobin (HbA(1c)) and fasting lipid profile. Insulin resistance was estimated using the homeostatic model assessment. Anthropometrics and blood pressure were also measured. There was a significant deterioration in FBG and HbA(1c) (p=0.002 and p≤0.001, respectively) and significant improvements in HDL and LDL cholesterol and body mass index after Ramadan (pRamadan (9.4±2% at the end of Ramadan vs 8.4±2.5% 1 month after Ramadan; pRamadan deteriorated the glycemic control in Type 2 diabetes patients. This was more evident in patients using oral hypoglycemic medication than diet- controlled patients. However, Ramadan fasting had small positive effects on lipid profile and body weight.

  13. Evaluation of Performance of Laboratories and Manufacturers Within the Framework of the IFCC model for Quality Targets of HbA1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weykamp, Cas; Siebelder, Carla

    2017-11-01

    HbA1c is a key parameter in diabetes management. For years the test has been used exclusively for monitoring of long-term diabetic control. However, due to improvement of the performance, HbA1c is considered more and more for diagnosis and screening. With this new application, quality demands further increase. A task force of the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine developed a model to set and evaluate quality targets for HbA1c. The model is based on the concept of total error and takes into account the major sources of analytical errors in the medical laboratory: bias and imprecision. Performance criteria are derived from sigma-metrics and biological variation. This review shows 2 examples of the application of the model: at the level of single laboratories, and at the level of a group of laboratories. In the first example data of 125 individual laboratories of a recent external quality assessment program in the Netherlands are evaluated. Differences between laboratories as well as their relation to method principles are shown. The second example uses recent and 3-year-old data of the proficiency test of the College of American Pathologists. The differences in performance between 26 manufacturer-related groups of laboratories are shown. Over time these differences are quite consistent although some manufacturers improved substantially either by better standardization or by replacing a test. The IFCC model serves all who are involved in HbA1c testing in the ongoing process of better performance and better patient care.

  14. A pilot service-evaluation examining change in HbA1c related to the prescription of internet-based education films for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, S; Cranch, H; Littlemore, K; Mortimer, J; Platts, J; Stephens, J W

    2017-06-01

    We undertook a pilot service-evaluation of prescribed internet-based patient education films for patients with type 2 diabetes. The uptake was 28% and film watching was associated with a relative mean difference in HbA1c of -9.0mmol/mol in the film watchers compared to non-watchers over a three-month period (P=0.0008). Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. A protein diet score, including plant and animal protein, investigating the association with HbA1c and eGFR - the PREVIEW project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Grith; Sluik, Diewertje; Ritz, Christian

    2017-01-01

    with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Analyses were based on three population studies included in the PREVIEW project (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World): NQplus, Lifelines, and the Young Finns.......02 ± 0.01 mmol/mol, p eGFR in Lifelines (slope 0.17 ± 0.02 mL/min/1.73 m², p

  16. SELF CARE MANAGEMENT-HOLISTIC PSYCHOSPIRITUAL CARE ON INDEPENDENCE, GLUCOSE LEVEL, AND HBA1C OF TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS PATIENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kusnanto Kusnanto

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Diabetes mellitus is a kind of incurable chronic disease that actually manageable. The global prevalence tends to increase due to less self management of the disease and the impact of it was health condition declines physically, psychologically, socially, and spiritually. There were so many interventions implemented but failed to give positive improvement in patient's holistic condition which is lead to complications. The purpose of this research was to improve patient independency in managing the disease and to explain changes in blood glucose and HbA1C levels through self care management-holistic psychospiritual care model. Method: Patient newly diagnose with type 2 diabetes mellitus at Public Health Centre Kebonsari was selected with purposive sampling and divided into two groups. Each group contains 25 patients. Intervention group was given self care management model development with self diabetes management module. The intervention was given  five times in three months. Before and after intervention patient was observed for blood glucose level of 2 hours before and after meal, and also HbA1C level. Questionnaire was given to patient. The data then analyzed using wilcoxon, mann whitney, and student-t test. Result: The result of this research showed patient with type 2 diabetes have independency improvement and lower blood glucose level of 2 hours before and after meal and also decreased HbA1C after intervention. Discussion: Self Care Management-Holistic Psychospiritual Care Model improves patient independency in managing their disease, lowering blood glucose and HbA1C levels.

  17. HbA1c of 6.5% to diagnose diabetes mellitus -- does it work for us? -- the Bellville South Africa study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalise E Zemlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HbA1c has been the gold standard for glycaemic control follow-up for decades. In 2009, a level of 6.5% (48 mmol/mol was proposed as diagnostic for diabetes. We test this cut-off in our community. METHODS: Participants (946 from a community-based study were screened for diabetes using either a fasting blood glucose or oral glucose tolerance test (OFTT. The HbA1c cut-off of 6.5% was tested for each group. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC curve for both groups was generated to establish an optimal cut-off. RESULTS: Our study included 224 (23.7% males and 722 (76.3% females. Using fasting blood glucose alone, 117 (14% were diagnosed with diabetes--50% had an HbA1c value of ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol. Using an OGTT, 147 (18% were diagnosed with diabetes--46% had an HbA1c value of ≥6.5% (48 mmol/mol. ROC curves found a level of 6.1% (43 mmol/mol to be optimal in both groups (AUC 0.85 and 0.82 respectively. The sensitivities were 80% and 75% and the specificities 77% and 78% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A cut off of 6.5% (48 mmol/mol is a good diagnostic tool with its high specificity; however the low sensitivity limits its use. We found a level of 6.1% (43 mmol/mol to be optimal. This emphasizes the need for evidenced based values to be established in various population groups.

  18. Serum leptin concentrations in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus: relationship to body mass index, insulin dose, and glycemic control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soliman, Ashraf T; Omar, Magdi; Assem, Hala M; Nasr, Ibrahim S; Rizk, Mohamed M; El Matary, Wael; El Alaily, Rania K

    2002-03-01

    Although obesity is a frequent feature of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), many patients with type 1 DM are prone to high body mass index (BMI). We measured serum leptin concentrations in a cohort of children (n = 55) with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM), as well as their anthropometric parameters including BMI, skin fold thickness at multiple sites, and midarm circumference. Glycemic control was assessed by blood glucose (BG) monitoring before meals, and measurement of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and insulin dose/kg/d was recorded. Dietary evaluation and assessment of caloric intake (kg/d) was performed by an expert dietitian. In the newly diagnosed children (n = 10) before initiation of insulin therapy, circulating leptin concentration was significantly lower (1.1 +/- 0.8 ng/dL) versus 5 days after insulin therapy (1.45 +/- 0.7 ng/dL). The decreased leptin level appears to be related to insulinopenia in these patients. In 45 children with type 1 DM on conventional therapy (2 doses of insulin mixture (NPH and regular) subcutaneous (SC) before breakfast and dinner for more than 2 years), serum leptin concentration was significantly higher (2.15 +/- 1 ng/dL) compared with age-matched normal children (1.3 +/- 1 ng/dL). Diabetic children were further divided into 2 groups according to their HbA1c level: group 1 with HbA1C less than 7.5% (less than 2 SD above the mean for normal population) (n = 29) and group 2 with HbA1c greater than 7.5%. (greater than 2 SD above the mean for normal population) (n = 16). Patients with a higher HbA1c level (group 2) had a higher leptin concentration (2.3 +/- 0.8 ng/dL), higher BMI (17.8 +/- 1.7), and were receiving higher insulin dose/kg (0.92 +/- 0.2 U/kg/d) compared with group 1 (lower HbA1c) (1.78 +/- 0.8 ng/dL, 16.7 +/- 1.5, and 0.59 +/- 0.2 U/kg/d, respectively). Group 2 patients had a higher incidence of late morning hypoglycemia (9/29) versus group 1 patients (2/16). Analysis of dietary intake showed that patients with a higher Hb

  19. Identifying Glucokinase Monogenic Diabetes in a Multiethnic Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Cohort: New Pregnancy Screening Criteria and Utility of HbA1c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudland, Victoria L; Hinchcliffe, Marcus; Pinner, Jason; Cole, Stuart; Mercorella, Belinda; Molyneaux, Lynda; Constantino, Maria; Yue, Dennis K; Ross, Glynis P; Wong, Jencia

    2016-01-01

    Glucokinase monogenic diabetes (GCK-maturity-onset diabetes of the young [MODY]) should be differentiated from gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) because management differs. New pregnancy-specific screening criteria (NSC) have been proposed to identify women who warrant GCK genetic testing. We tested NSC and HbA1c in a multiethnic GDM cohort and examined projected referrals for GCK testing. Using a GDM database, 63 of 776 women had a postpartum oral glucose tolerance test suggestive of GCK-MODY. Of these 63 women, 31 agreed to undergo GCK testing. NSC accuracy and HbA1c were examined. Projected referrals were calculated by applying the NSC to a larger GDM database (n = 4,415). Four of 31 women were confirmed as having GCK-MODY (prevalence ∼0.5-1/100 with GDM). The NSC identified all Anglo-Celtic women but did not identify one Indian woman. The NSC will refer 6.1% of GDM cases for GCK testing, with more Asian/Indian women referred despite lower disease prevalence. Antepartum HbA1c was not higher in those with GCK-MODY. The NSC performed well in Anglo-Celtic women. Ethnic-specific criteria should be explored. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  20. Is a home based video teleconcltation setup cost effective for lowering HBA1C for patients with type-2 diabetes over a six-month period?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sall Jensen, Morten; Rasmussen, Ole Winther

    OBJECTIVES: A RCT assessed the effectiveness and costs of a home based video teleconsultation (HVT) setup to lower HbA1c in patients with type-2 diabetes against usual out-patient treatment on the hospital. The HVT equipment was delivered to the patients by the hospital. This analysis shows...... the potential incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of using a HVT setup on six-months health care effects and costs. METHODS: The study effectiveness outcome was HbA1c level in mmol/l. The economic analysis was performed with a spreadsheet decision tree model with a Danish hospital payer’s direct cost...... perspective. Cost data were based on study measured time consumption pr. HVT, consultations at out-patient clinic, HVT-equipment, -subscription, -support costs, and hospital operating cost. Medicine costs weren’t included in the model. Model output included the cost of a 1 mmol/l point reduction of HbA1c...

  1. Comparative study of HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose vs the oral glucose tolerance test for diagnosis of diabetes in people with tuberculosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aftab, H.; Ambreen, A.; Jamil, M.

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To compare HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose assessment, with the 2-h oral glucose tolerance test as reference, in screening for diabetes in people with turberculosis. Methods: Individuals (N=268) with newly diagnosed smear-positive tuberculosis were screened for diabetes at a tertiary hospital...... in Lahore, Pakistan. Diabetes diagnosis was based on WHO criteria: thresholds were ≥48 mmol/mol (≥6.5%) for HbA1c and ≥7.0mmol/l for fasting plasma glucose. Results: The proportion of participants diagnosed with diabetes was 4.9% (n =13) by oral glucose tolerance test, while 11.9% (n =32) and 14.6% (n =39...... the two tests (P=0.07). Conclusions: HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose performed equally in terms of diagnosing new diabetes cases in individuals with tuberculosis, but the proportion of participants falsely classified as positive was higher for fasting plasma glucose. This may be explained by acute blood...

  2. Effect of Long-Term Dietary Arginyl-Fructose (AF on Hyperglycemia and HbA1c in Diabetic db/db Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-Hyoung Lee

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We have previously reported that Amadori compounds exert anti-diabetic effects by lowering sucrose-induced hyperglycemia in normal Sprague-Dawley rats. In the present study we extended our recent findings to evaluate whether α-glucosidase inhibitor arginyl-fructose (AF lowers blood glucose level in diabetic db/db mice, a genetic model for type 2 diabetes. The db/db mice were randomly assigned to high-carbohydrate diets (66.1% corn starch with and without AF (4% in the diet for 6 weeks. Changes in body weight, blood glucose level, and food intake were measured daily for 42 days. Dietary supplementation of AF resulted in a significant decrease of blood glucose level (p < 0.001 and body weight (p < 0.001. The level of HbA1c, a better indicator of plasma glucose concentration over prolonged periods of time, was also significantly decreased for 6-week period (p < 0.001. Dietary treatment of acarbose® (0.04% in diet, a positive control, also significantly alleviated the level of blood glucose, HbA1c, and body weight. These results indicate that AF Maillard reaction product improves postprandial hyperglycemia by suppressing glucose absorption as well as decreasing HbA1c level.

  3. Factors associated with poor Hemoglobin A1c control in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqudah, Salam; Jarab, Anan S; Alefishat, Eman A; Mayyas, Fadia; Khdour, Maher; Pinto, Sharrel

    2018-05-10

    Background The limited implementation of clinical pharmacy service programs and the lack of studies identifying barriers to achieve blood glucose control have all attributed to the increased proportion of type 2 diabetes patients who have poor glycemic control in Jordan. Objective To explore factors associated with higher HbA1c in patients with type 2 diabetes in Jordan. Method Variables including socio-demographics, disease and treatment factors were collected from171 patients with type2 diabetes at an outpatient diabetes clinic in Amman. Validated questionnaires were used to assess medication adherence, self-care activities, diabetes knowledge and health-related quality of life in addition to data collected from medical records. After the single-predictor analysis, stepwise linear regression was performed to develop a model with variables that best predicted hemoglobin A1c. Results Medication adherence was inversely associated with HbA1c values (β = -0.275; t = 2.666; P diabetes duration (β = 0.092; t = 1.339; P diabetes and those with multiple comorbid diseases should be strongly considered in future diabetes management programs implemented to improve glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. [Relationship between brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity and glycemic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in Beijing community population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ke-xin; Liu, Zhi-ke; Cao, Ya-ying; Juan, Juan; Xiang, Xiao; Yang, Cheng; Huang, Shao-ping; Liu, Xiao-fen; Li, Na; Tang, Xun; Li, Jin; Wu, Tao; Chen, Da-fang; Hu, Yong-hua

    2015-06-18

    To explore the correlation between glycemic control of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and brachial-ankle pulse velocity (baPWV). A community-based cross-sectional study was conducted in Beijing, China. Every subject underwent physical examinations, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood lipid and baPWV measurements and completed a standardized questionnaire. T2DM patients were divided into well controlled and poorly controlled groups according to HbA1c levels. The correlation between glycemic control of T2DM patients and baPWV was analyzed. In this study, 1 341 subjects were recruited, including 733 T2DM patients and 608 non-diabetes subjects. Compared with non-diabetes subjects, abnormal baPWV (baPWV≥1 700 cm/s) rate for T2DM patients was higher (40.8% vs. 26.8%, Pcontrol in T2DM patients, the abnormal baPWV rates for non-diabetes subjects, well controlled and poorly controlled T2DM patients were significantly different (non-diabetes vs. HbA1ccontrol status of T2DM patients was associated with abnormal baPWV. Compared with non-diabetes subjects, the ORs for abnormal baPWV in HbA1ccontrol status of T2DM patients from communities is significantly associated with baPWV. Poor glycemic control is a risk factor for abnormal baPWV. Keeping HbA1c under control might lower the risk of cardiovascular diseases in T2DM patients.

  5. Glycemic screening and recurrent carbohydrate metabolism disorders with endocrine pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.А. Lutsenko

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of glycated hemoglobin for diabetes mellitus (DM diagnosis is recommended by World Health Organization as of 2011. The level of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c ≥ 6.5 % is a diagnostic criterion for DM but HbA1c level of 6.0–6.4 % does not exclude diabetes mellitus diagnosis with hyperglycemia. Moreover, when diagnosing, evaluation of this criterion is a must, since decision about the nature and the scope of sugar-reducing therapy is based on the level of HbA1c. Counterregulatory hormones are glucagon, adre­nalin, somatotropin, glucocorticoids and thyroid hormones. Pathogenic mechanism of carbohydrate metabolism disorders with hypersecretion of counterregulatory hormones is caused by peripheral insulin resistance, decrease in insulin secretion, increase in gluconeogenesis and glycogenolysis in liver and increase in the absorption of intestinal glucose with insulin being the only hormone decreasing the blood glucose. So, the endocrine diseases (hypercorticism, acromegalia, pheochromocytoma, hyperparathyroidism and hyperthyroidism with excessive secretion of counterregulatory hormones suggest the necessity of secondary diabetes diagnosis. Screening tests with quite high sensitivity and specificity have been developed for early diagnosis of endocrynopathies. Screening tests for hypercorticism diagnosis are dexamethasone (1 mg suppression test, daily urinary cortisol excretion and nighttime salivary cortisol. Optimal test for screening acromegalia is considered to be insulin-like growth factor 1 which shows the secretion of somatotropic hormone during previous day and is not subject to significant fluctuations. One-time detection of increased insulin-like growth factor 1 level compared to referential values for specific sex and age is enough for confirmation of hypersomatotropinemia. Thyroid-stimulating hormone is recommended as a screening test for thyrotoxicosis diagnosis. When choosing this test, doctor should consider the parameter of

  6. Use of snacks in insulin-treated people with diabetes mellitus and association with HbA1c , weight and quality of life: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, T; Kloos, C; Keßler, D; Müller, N; Thierbach, R; Wolf, G; Müller, U A

    2015-03-01

    Insulin therapies with prandial injections offer the possibility to skip snacks or omit meals. It is unclear how many people with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus eat snacks and whether they snack for their own comfort or only on the recommendation of healthcare professionals. In 2004, 163 consecutive people with insulin-treated diabetes seen in a university outpatient department were interviewed regarding their diet and degree of satisfaction with their meals. Fifty-five had Type 1 diabetes [age 47 years; diabetes duration 18 years; BMI 27 kg/m(2) ; HbA1c 62 mmol/mol (7.8%)], 53 had Type 2 diabetes with biphasic insulin therapy [age 68 years; diabetes duration 17 years; BMI 31 kg/m(2) ; HbA1c 60 mmol/mol (7.6%)] and 55 had Type 2 diabetes with prandial insulin therapy [age 60 years; diabetes duration 16 years; BMI 33 kg/m(2) ; HbA1c 59 mmol/mol (7.6%)]. Eighty per cent of those with Type 1 diabetes ate snacks, together with 77% of the Type 2 diabetes/biphasic group and 62% of the Type 2 diabetes/prandial group. Most participants (91% Type 1 diabetes, 88% Type 2 diabetes/biphasic group, 82% Type 2 diabetes/prandial group) liked to have snacks. The time at which they ate snacks was the same for both diabetes types. There were no differences between participants with Type 1 diabetes who snacked and those who did not in terms of age (P = 0.350), BMI (P = 0.368), HbA1c (P = 0.257) and time since diagnosis (P = 0.846). Participants with Type 2 diabetes who ate snacks were older than those who did not (biphasic: P = 0.006; prandial: P = 0.008). There were no differences in terms of BMI (biphasic: P = 0.731; prandial: P = 0.393), HbA1c (biphasic: P = 0.747; prandial: P = 0.616) and time since diagnosis (biphasic: P = 0.06; prandial: P = 0.620). Most people with insulin-treated diabetes eat snacks voluntarily and not because of physicians' instructions. There were no correlations between the use of snacks and HbA1c , BMI and time since diagnosis, except that the participants with Type 2 diabetes who ate snacks were older. © 2014 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2014 Diabetes UK.

  7. Effect of combination therapy with alogliptin and lansoprazole on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takebayashi, Kohzo; Sakurai, Shintaro; Suzuki, Tatsuhiko; Hori, Kenichiro; Terasawa, Tomoko; Naruse, Rika; Hara, Kenji; Suetsugu, Mariko; Tsuchiya, Takafumi; Aoki, Hiromi; Hamasaki, Takashi; Shuutou, Hiroshi; Inukai, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of the current study was to investigate the effect of a combination of alogliptin [a dipeptydil peptidase (DPP)-4 inhibitor] and lansoprazole [a proton pump inhibitor (PPI)] compared with alogliptin mono-therapy on glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study was a multicenter randomized open-label study. One hundred type 2 diabetic patients were randomly assigned to either the alogliptin with lansoprazole group or the alogliptin mono-therapy group. After 3 months of treatment, the changes in hemoglobin (Hb)A1c, fasting plasma glucose (FPG), serum gastrin, homeostasis model assessment (HOMA)-β, and HOMA-insulin resistance (IR) were evaluated. A significant decrease in HbA1c and FPG, and a significant increase in HOMA-β were observed in both groups (all with P lansoprazole more effectively elevated serum gastrin levels compared with alogliptin mono-therapy, the effect of the combination therapy on glycemic control was equal to that of alogliptin mono-therapy during a 3-month study period.

  8. Medication Adherence Mediates the Association between Type D Personality and High HbA1c Level in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Six-Month Follow-Up Study

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    Xuemei Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To examine the association between Type D personality and HbA1c level and to explore the mediating role of medication adherence between them in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Methods. 330 patients went on to complete a self-report measure of medication adherence and the HbA1c tests. Chi-square test, T test, Ordinary Least Square Regression (OLS, and Recentered Influence Function Regression (RIF were employed. Results. Patients with Type D personality had significantly higher HbA1c value (P0.1. On the other hand, when Type D personality was operationalized as a continuous variable, only SI trait was associated with HbA1c level (P<0.01. When NA, SI, and NA×SI term together were entered into regression, only SI was not related to HbA1c level. Furthermore, medication adherence had a significant mediation effect between Type D personality and HbA1c, accounting for 54.43% of the total effect. Conclusion. Type D personality was associated with HbA1c in direct and indirect ways, and medication adherence acted as a mediator role.

  9. Fall in C-Peptide During First 4 Years From Diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes: Variable Relation to Age, HbA1c, and Insulin Dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Wei; Gitelman, Steven; DiMeglio, Linda A; Boulware, David; Greenbaum, Carla J

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to describe the natural history of residual insulin secretion in Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet participants over 4 years from diagnosis and relate this to previously reported alternative clinical measures reflecting β-cell secretory function. Data from 407 subjects from 5 TrialNet intervention studies were analyzed. All subjects had baseline stimulated C-peptide values of ≥0.2 nmol/L from mixed-meal tolerance tests (MMTTs). During semiannual visits, C-peptide values from MMTTs, HbA1c, and insulin doses were obtained. The percentage of individuals with stimulated C-peptide of ≥0.2 nmol/L or detectable C-peptide of ≥0.017 nmol/L continued to diminish over 4 years; this was markedly influenced by age. At 4 years, only 5% maintained their baseline C-peptide secretion. The expected inverse relationships between C-peptide and HbA1c or insulin doses varied over time and with age. Combined clinical variables, such as insulin-dose adjusted HbA1c (IDAA1C) and the relationship of IDAA1C to C-peptide, also were influenced by age and time from diagnosis. Models using these clinical measures did not fully predict C-peptide responses. IDAA1C ≤9 underestimated the number of individuals with stimulated C-peptide ≥0.2 nmol/L, especially in children. Current trials of disease-modifying therapy for type 1 diabetes should continue to use C-peptide as a primary end point of β-cell secretory function. Longer duration of follow-up is likely to provide stronger evidence of the effect of disease-modifying therapy on preservation of β-cell function. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  10. RELACIÓN DE LOS NIVELES DE HBA1C (% Y DE “FRUCTOSAMINA” (mg/dL EN SUJETOS SALUDABLES Y DIABÉTICOS TIPO 1

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    M. Guerra

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Es importante determinar y monitorear el mantenimiento del control metabólico en los pacientes diabéticos. Dado que las concentraciones de hemoglobina glicosilada (HbA1c y de proteínas glicadas diferentes a la hemoglobina, conocidas colectivamente como “fructosamina”, son indicadores del aumento sostenido de la glicemia durante un período de tiempo, se decidió estudiar estos parámetros sanguíneos en un grupo de pacientes diabéticos tipo I en Bogotá, y compararlos con un grupo de individuos saludables.El grupo control estuvo conformado por 25 estudiantes saludables de la Pontificia Universidad Javeriana, Bogotá, DC, seleccionados al azar, y el experimental, por 25 pacientes diabéticos tipo I contactados a través de la Asociación Colombiana de Diabetes, con edades comprendidas entre 15 a 25 años. Con los datos obtenidos se realizaron análisis de regresión y análisis de correlación lineal múltiple. Los resultados mostraron correlación alta (r=0,9 entre HbA1c y “fructosamina”. Se encontró diferencias significantes (p<0,05 entre los controles y los pacientes para ambos parámetros. Los valores de HbA1c y de “fructosamina” fueron independientes de la concentración de glucosa sanguínea durante el estudio.

  11. Continuous glucose monitoring and HbA1c in the evaluation of glucose metabolism in children at high risk for type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helminen, Olli; Pokka, Tytti; Tossavainen, Päivi; Ilonen, Jorma; Knip, Mikael; Veijola, Riitta

    2016-10-01

    Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) parameters, self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG), HbA1c and oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) were studied during preclinical type 1 diabetes mellitus. Ten asymptomatic children with multiple (⩾2) islet autoantibodies (cases) and 10 age and sex-matched autoantibody-negative controls from the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention (DIPP) Study were invited to 7-day CGM with Dexcom G4 Platinum Sensor. HbA1c and two daily SMBG values (morning and evening) were analyzed. Five-point OGTTs were performed and carbohydrate intake was assessed by food records. The matched pairs were compared with the paired sample t-test. The cases showed higher mean values and higher variation in glucose levels during CGM compared to the controls. The time spent ⩾7.8mmol/l was 5.8% in the cases compared to 0.4% in the controls (p=0.040). Postprandial CGM values were similar except after the dinner (6.6mmol/l in cases vs. 6.1mmol/l in controls; p=0.023). When analyzing the SMBG values higher mean level, higher evening levels, as well as higher variation were observed in the cases when compared to the controls. HbA1c was significantly higher in the cases [5.7% (39mmol/mol) vs. 5.3% (34mmol/mol); p=0.045]. No differences were observed in glucose or C-peptide levels during OGTT. Daily carbohydrate intake was slightly higher in the cases (254.2g vs. 217.7g; p=0.034). Glucose levels measured by CGM and SMBG are useful indicators of dysglycemia during preclinical type 1 diabetes mellitus. Increased evening glucose values seem to be common in children with preclinical type 1 diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Dietary pattern trajectories during 15 years of follow-up and HbA1c, insulin resistance and diabetes prevalence among Chinese adults.

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    Batis, Carolina; Mendez, Michelle A; Sotres-Alvarez, Daniela; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Popkin, Barry

    2014-08-01

    Most research on dietary patterns and health outcomes does not include longitudinal exposure data. We used an innovative technique to capture dietary pattern trajectories and their association with haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c), homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and prevalence of newly diagnosed diabetes. We included 4096 adults with 3-6 waves of diet data (1991-2006) and biomarkers measured in 2009 from the China Health and Nutrition Survey. Diet was assessed with three 24-h recalls and a household food inventory. We used a dietary pattern previously identified with reduced rank regression that positively predicted diabetes in 2006 (high in wheat products and soy milk and low in rice, legumes, poultry, eggs and fish). We estimated a score for this dietary pattern for each subject at each wave. Using latent class trajectory analysis, we grouped subjects with similar dietary pattern score trajectories over time into five classes. Three trajectory classes were stable over time, and in two classes the diet became unhealthier over time (upward trend in dietary pattern score). Among two classes with similar scores in 2006, the one with the lower (healthier) initial score had an HbA1c 1.64% lower (-1.64 (95% CI -3.17 to -0.11)) and non-significantly a HOMA-IR 6.47% lower (-6.47 (-17.37 to 4.42)) and lower odds of diabetes (0.86 (0.44 to 1.67)). Our findings suggest that dietary pattern trajectories with healthier scores longitudinally had a lower HbA1c compared with those with unhealthier scores, even when the trajectories had similar scores in the end point. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. Association of glycated albumin to HbA1c ratio with diabetic retinopathy but not diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umayahara, Yutaka; Fujita, Yohei; Watanabe, Hirotaka; Kasai, Noriko; Fujiki, Noritaka; Hatazaki, Masahiro; Koga, Masafumi

    2017-04-01

    The ratio of glycated albumin to HbA1c (GA/HbA1c ratio) is a known indicator that reflects fluctuations in plasma glucose. In this study, the association of the GA/HbA1c ratio to diabetic nephropathy and diabetic retinopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes was investigated. Among patients with type 2 diabetes, 613 patients (364 males and 249 females, aged 63.2±12.5, body mass index (BMI) 25.4±4.8kg/m 2 ) were enrolled. Patients with overt proteinuria, reduced renal function, or anemia were excluded. In a comparison between patients with and without diabetic nephropathy, significance was observed in insulin therapy, HbA1c, and GA. In addition, in a comparison between patients with and without diabetic retinopathy, the GA/HbA1c ratio along with insulin therapy, HbA1c, and GA showed significant differences. When the GA/HbA1c ratios were divided into three groups and compared, the rates of diabetic nephropathy did not show any significance, while the rate of diabetic retinopathy increased significantly as the GA/HbA1c ratio increased. In multivariable analyses, while insulin therapy and BMI were the significant independent variables for diabetic nephropathy, insulin therapy and the GA/HbA1c ratios were the significant independent variable for diabetic retinopathy. The GA/HbA1c ratio was associated with diabetic retinopathy, but not with diabetic nephropathy in patients with type 2 diabetes. These results suggest that the development and progression of diabetic retinopathy is associated with plasma glucose fluctuations. Copyright © 2016 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Size and shape of the associations of glucose, HbA1c, insulin and HOMA-IR with incident type 2 diabetes: the Hoorn Study.

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    Ruijgrok, Carolien; Dekker, Jacqueline M; Beulens, Joline W; Brouwer, Ingeborg A; Coupé, Veerle M H; Heymans, Martijn W; Sijtsma, Femke P C; Mela, David J; Zock, Peter L; Olthof, Margreet R; Alssema, Marjan

    2018-01-01

    Glycaemic markers and fasting insulin are frequently measured outcomes of intervention studies. To extrapolate accurately the impact of interventions on the risk of diabetes incidence, we investigated the size and shape of the associations of fasting plasma glucose (FPG), 2 h post-load glucose (2hPG), HbA 1c , fasting insulin and HOMA-IR with incident type 2 diabetes mellitus. The study population included 1349 participants aged 50-75 years without diabetes at baseline (1989) from a population-based cohort in Hoorn, the Netherlands. Incident type 2 diabetes was defined by the WHO 2011 criteria or known diabetes at follow-up. Logistic regression models were used to determine the associations of the glycaemic markers, fasting insulin and HOMA-IR with incident type 2 diabetes. Restricted cubic spline logistic regressions were conducted to investigate the shape of the associations. After a mean follow-up duration of 6.4 (SD 0.5) years, 152 participants developed diabetes (11.3%); the majority were screen detected by high FPG. In multivariate adjusted models, ORs (95% CI) for incident type 2 diabetes for the highest quintile in comparison with the lowest quintile were 9.0 (4.4, 18.5) for FPG, 6.1 (2.9, 12.7) for 2hPG, 3.8 (2.0, 7.2) for HbA 1c , 1.9 (0.9, 3.6) for fasting insulin and 2.8 (1.4, 5.6) for HOMA-IR. The associations of FPG and HbA 1c with incident diabetes were non-linear, rising more steeply at higher values. FPG was most strongly associated with incident diabetes, followed by 2hPG, HbA 1c , HOMA-IR and fasting insulin. The strong association with FPG is probably because FPG is the most frequent marker for diabetes diagnosis. Non-linearity of associations between glycaemic markers and incident type 2 diabetes should be taken into account when estimating future risk of type 2 diabetes based on glycaemic markers.

  15. The relationship between periapical lesions and the serum levels of glycosylated hemoglobin and C-reactive protein in type 2 diabetic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Zahrani, Mohammad S; Abozor, Basel M; Zawawi, Khalid H

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between the presence of periapical lesions (PL) and levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and C-reactive protein (CRP) in patients with type 2 diabetes.  Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Ibn Sina National College for Medical Studies, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between September 2013 and February 2015. Medical and dental history and Sociodemographic data were obtained from participants. Dental and periodontal examinations were conducted and blood samples were obtained to determine levels of HbA1c and CRP. The presence of PL was recorded from panoramic and periapical radiographs. Descriptive statistics and multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used for data analyses.  Results: One hundred patients were included; mean age was 48.9 ± 8.5 years. Of these patients, 14% had no PL, whereas 25% had one or 2 lesions, 32% had 3 or 4 lesions, and 29% had ≥5 PL. The mean HbA1c was 9.8% (± 2.5) mg/L and CRP was 6.9 mg/L (± 6.3). The presence of PL was significantly associated with a higher level of HbA1c independent of age, gender, probing depth, and plaque index (p=0.023). Individuals with PL were also more likely to have a high CRP level (greater than 3 mg/L) independent of the previous covariates (odds ratio: 1.19; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.41).  Conclusion: Periapical lesions are associated with a poorer glycemic control and a higher CRP level in type 2 diabetic patients.

  16. The relationship between periapical lesions and the serum levels of glycosylated hemoglobin and C-reactive protein in type 2 diabetic patients

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    Mohammad S. Al-Zahrani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the relationship between the presence of periapical lesions (PL and levels of glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c, and C-reactive protein (CRP in patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at Ibn Sina National College for Medical Studies, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, between September 2013 and February 2015. Medical and dental history and Sociodemographic data were obtained from participants. Dental and periodontal examinations were conducted and blood samples were obtained to determine levels of HbA1c and CRP. The presence of PL was recorded from panoramic and periapical radiographs. Descriptive statistics and multivariable linear and logistic regression models were used for data analyses. Results: One hundred patients were included; mean age was 48.9 ± 8.5 years. Of these patients, 14% had no PL, whereas 25% had one or 2 lesions, 32% had 3 or 4 lesions, and 29% had ≥5 PL. The mean HbA1c was 9.8% (± 2.5 mg/L and CRP was 6.9 mg/L (± 6.3. The presence of PL was significantly associated with a higher level of HbA1c independent of age, gender, probing depth, and plaque index (p=0.023. Individuals with PL were also more likely to have a high CRP level (>3 mg/L independent of the previous covariates (odds ratio: 1.19; 95% confidence interval: 1.01-1.41. Conclusion: Periapical lesions are associated with a poorer glycemic control and a higher CRP level in type 2 diabetic patients.

  17. Motivational interventions in the management of HbA1c levels: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Allan; Gladstone, Beryl Primrose; Lübeck, Marlene; Lindekilde, Nanna; Upton, Dominic; Vach, Werner

    2014-07-01

    To review the diabetes literature in order to examine the effect of motivational interventions on treatment outcome as measured by changes in glycated haemoglobin. Relevant databases were systematically searched for randomised controlled trials in which motivational interventions were examined in relation to treatment outcome in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The 13 studies identified for review included 1223 participants diagnosed with type 1 diabetes and 1895 participants diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The analysis showed a 0.17% (95% CI: -0.09, 0.43%) improvement in glycemic control in people who received a motivational intervention compared to a control group, however, the effect was not statistically significant. The impact of motivational interventions in the management of blood glucose levels appears to be limited. However, due to the small number of studies and issues of heterogeneity caution in interpreting the present findings is advised. Moreover, the unique contribution of motivational interventions may be better assessed by outcomes such as behaviour change and other intermediate outcomes. Further research examining the delivery and focus of motivational interventions in helping people manage their diabetes is recommended. The clinical implications of the present findings are therefore uncertain pending further research. Copyright © 2014 Primary Care Diabetes Europe. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Continuous Glucose Monitoring vs Conventional Therapy for Glycemic Control in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes Treated With Multiple Daily Insulin Injections: The GOLD Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Marcus; Polonsky, William; Hirsch, Irl B; Heise, Tim; Bolinder, Jan; Dahlqvist, Sofia; Schwarz, Erik; Ólafsdóttir, Arndís Finna; Frid, Anders; Wedel, Hans; Ahlén, Elsa; Nyström, Thomas; Hellman, Jarl

    2017-01-24

    The majority of individuals with type 1 diabetes do not meet recommended glycemic targets. To evaluate the effects of continuous glucose monitoring in adults with type 1 diabetes treated with multiple daily insulin injections. Open-label crossover randomized clinical trial conducted in 15 diabetes outpatient clinics in Sweden between February 24, 2014, and June 1, 2016 that included 161 individuals with type 1 diabetes and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) of at least 7.5% (58 mmol/mol) treated with multiple daily insulin injections. Participants were randomized to receive treatment using a continuous glucose monitoring system or conventional treatment for 26 weeks, separated by a washout period of 17 weeks. Difference in HbA1c between weeks 26 and 69 for the 2 treatments. Adverse events including severe hypoglycemia were also studied. Among 161 randomized participants, mean age was 43.7 years, 45.3% were women, and mean HbA1c was 8.6% (70 mmol/mol). A total of 142 participants had follow-up data in both treatment periods. Mean HbA1c was 7.92% (63 mmol/mol) during continuous glucose monitoring use and 8.35% (68 mmol/mol) during conventional treatment (mean difference, -0.43% [95% CI, -0.57% to -0.29%] or -4.7 [-6.3 to -3.1 mmol/mol]; P < .001). Of 19 secondary end points comprising psychosocial and various glycemic measures, 6 met the hierarchical testing criteria of statistical significance, favoring continuous glucose monitoring compared with conventional treatment. Five patients in the conventional treatment group and 1 patient in the continuous glucose monitoring group had severe hypoglycemia. During washout when patients used conventional therapy, 7 patients had severe hypoglycemia. Among patients with inadequately controlled type 1 diabetes treated with multiple daily insulin injections, the use of continuous glucose monitoring compared with conventional treatment for 26 weeks resulted in lower HbA1c. Further research is needed to assess clinical outcomes and longer

  19. [Effect of the Disease Management Program on HbA1c Value in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients: A Retrospective Comparison between Disease Management Programs and Standard Care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiefarn, Stefan; Kostev, Karel; Heumann, Christian; Rettelbach, Anja

    2017-10-01

    Background  This retrospective study aims to measure the effect of the disease management program (DMP) for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients on HbA 1c value within Germany. Methods  This study is based on patient data from the Disease Analyzer panel (IMS Health). An adequate control group was created using 2:1 propensity score matching. After matching, the analysis included 14 759 patients. Of these, 5875 participated in a DMP while 8884 received standard care. The DMP effect was estimated on the basis of the matched data, using an unpaired t-test. In addition, subgroups were considered from the perspective of personalized medicine. Results  The reduction in HbA 1c values in the DMP group amounted to an average of 1.0 percentage point (baseline HbA 1c  = 8.1 vs. final HbA 1c  = 7.1), while the SC group was able to achieve an average reduction in HbA 1c values of 0.9 percentage point (baseline HbA 1c  = 8.1 vs. final HbA 1c  = 7.2). The DMP group thus achieved an average reduction in HbA 1c values that exceeded that of the SC group by only 0.1 percentage point (95 % CI: 0.04 - 0.16). Descriptively, it also became apparent that patients from the DMP group received a greater average number of annual prescriptions and had more HbA 1c measurements. The subgroup analysis identified groups of patients who benefit more from DMPs than others. Thus, young patients or patients who are being treated by diabetologists are able to benefit most from a DMP. Furthermore, the baseline HbA 1c value has an influence on the DMP effect. Conclusion  T2DM patients in the DMP exhibit a significantly higher reduction in HbA 1c value. However, it is questionable whether this effect is clinically relevant. Certain groups of patients benefit more from DMPs than others. Nevertheless, further studies are needed in order to better understand the impact of the DMP on HbA 1c value and the reasons for the subgroup effects. Such studies should be carried out using a randomized controlled design. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  20. A nomogram to estimate the HbA1c response to different DPP-4 inhibitors in type 2 diabetes: a systematic review and meta-analysis of 98 trials with 24 163 patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Katherine; Chiodini, Paolo; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Capuano, Annalisa; Cozzolino, Domenico; Petrizzo, Michela; Bellastella, Giuseppe; Giugliano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To develop a nomogram for estimating the glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) response to different dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP-4) inhibitors in type 2 diabetes. Design A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of DPP-4 inhibitors (vildagliptin, sitagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin and alogliptin) on HbA1c were conducted. Electronic searches were carried out up to December 2013. Trials were included if they were carried out on participants with type 2 diabetes, lasted at least 12 weeks, included at least 30 participants and had a final assessment of HbA1c. A random effect model was used to pool data. A nomogram was used to represent results of the metaregression model. Participants Adults with type 2 diabetes. Interventions Any DPP-4 inhibitor (vildagliptin, sitagliptin, saxagliptin, linagliptin or alogliptin). Outcome measures The HbA1c response to each DPP-4 inhibitor within 1 year of therapy. Results We screened 928 citations and reviewed 98 articles reporting 98 RCTs with 100 arms in 24 163 participants. There were 26 arms with vildagliptin, 37 with sitagliptin, 13 with saxagliptin, 13 with linagliptin and 11 with alogliptin. For all 100 arms, the mean baseline HbA1c value was 8.05% (64 mmol/mol); the decrease of HbA1c from baseline was −0.77% (95% CI −0.82 to −0.72%), with high heterogeneity (I2=96%). Multivariable metaregression model that included baseline HbA1c, type of DPP-4 inhibitor and fasting glucose explained 58% of variance between studies, with no significant interaction between them. Other factors, including age, previous diabetes drugs and duration of treatment added low predictive power (HbA1c reduction from baseline using the type of DPP-4 inhibitor, baseline values of HbA1c and fasting glucose. Conclusions Baseline HbA1c level and fasting glucose explain most of the variance in HbA1c change in response to DPP-4 inhibitors: each increase of 1.0% units HbA1c provides a 0.4–0.5% units greater fall. PMID:25687897

  1. Both the frequency of HbA1c testing and the frequency of self-monitoring of blood glucose predict metabolic control: A multicentre analysis of 15 199 adult type 1 diabetes patients from Germany and Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, A; Best, F; Biester, T; Grünerbel, A; Kopp, F; Krakow, D; Laimer, M; Wagner, C; Holl, R W

    2017-10-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the association between metabolic control and frequency of haemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c ) measurements and of self-monitoring of blood glucose, as well as the interaction of both. Data of 15 199 adult type 1 diabetes patients registered in a standardized electronic health record (DPV) were included. To model the association between metabolic control and frequency of HbA 1c testing or of self-monitoring of blood glucose, multiple hierarchic regression models with adjustment for confounders were fitted. Tukey-Kramer test was used to adjust P values for multiple comparisons. Vuong test was used to compare non-nested models. The baseline variables of the study population were median age 19.9 [Q1; Q3: 18.4; 32.2] years and diabetes duration 10.4 [6.8; 15.7] years. Haemoglobin A 1c was 60.4 [51.5; 72.5] mmol/mol. Frequency of HbA 1c testing was 8.0 [5.0; 9.0] within 2 years, and daily self-monitoring of blood glucose frequency was 5.0 [4.0; 6.0]. After adjustment, a U-shaped association between metabolic control and frequency of HbA 1c testing was observed with lowest HbA 1c levels in the 3-monthly HbA 1c testing group. There was an inverse relationship between self-monitoring of blood glucose and HbA 1c with lower HbA 1c associated with highest frequency of testing (>6 daily measurements). Quarterly HbA 1c testing and frequent self-monitoring of blood glucose were associated with best metabolic control. The adjusted Vuong Z statistic suggests that metabolic control might be better explained by HbA 1c testing compared to self-monitoring of blood glucose (P < .0001). This research reveals the importance of quarterly clinical HbA 1c monitoring together with frequent self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes management to reach and maintain target HbA 1c . Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. The HbA1c and All-Cause Mortality Relationship in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes is J-Shaped: A Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Luke W.; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low blood glucose and HbA1c levels are recommended in the literature on management of diabetes. However, data have shown that low blood glucose is associated with serious adverse effects for the patients and the recommendation has been criticized. Therefore, this article revisits the relationship between HbA1c and all-cause mortality by a meta-analysis of observational studies. AIM: The aim of this study is to determine whether there is a J- or U-shaped non-linear relationship between HbA1c and all-cause mortality in type 2 diabetes patients, implying an increased risk to premature all-cause mortality at high and low levels of HbA1c. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was conducted using PubMed, Medline, and Cochrane Library databases with strict inclusion/exclusion criteria. The published adjusted hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals of all-cause mortality for each HbA1c category and per study were analyzed. Fractional polynomial regression was used with random effect modeling to assess the non-linear relationship of the HR trends between studies. Seven eligible observational studies with a total of 147,424 participants were included in the study. RESULTS: A significant J-shaped relationship was observed between HbA1c and all-cause mortality. Crude relative risk for all-cause mortality identified a decreased risk per 1% increase in HbA1c below 7.5% (58 mmol/mol) (0.90, CI 0.86-0.94) and an increased risk per 1% increase in HbA1c above 7.5% (58 mmol/mol) (1.04, CI 1.01-1.06). Observational studies revealed a J-shaped relationship between HbA1c and all-cause mortality, equivalent to an increased risk of mortality at high and low HbA1c levels. CONCLUSIONS: This increased mortality at high and low HbA1c levels has significant implications on investigating optimum clinical HbA1c targets as it suggests that there are upper and lower limits for creating a 'security zone' for diabetes management. PMID:25396402

  3. Relationships Between Glycemic Control and Cardiovascular Fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moxley, Elizabeth W; Smith, Donald; Quinn, Lauretta; Park, Chang

    2018-07-01

    Diabetes is a serious health problem affecting approximately 29.1 million individuals in the United States. Another 86 million have prediabetes. The development and implementation of lifestyle modifications such as physical activity for these persons are among the most effective methods for prevention and treatment. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between glycemic control (HbA1c) and cardiovascular fitness (peak maximal oxygen uptake [VO 2 peak] and ventilatory threshold [VT]) in overweight/obese subjects with and without type 2 diabetes (T2DM). In addition, the influences of body mass index (BMI) and insulin sensitivity (homeostasis model assessment [HOMA %S]) on the relationship between glycemic control and cardiovascular fitness were explored. Data were abstracted from a completed study that included 51 overweight or obese subjects with T2DM ( n = 18), impaired glucose tolerance ( n = 8), or normal glucose tolerance ( n = 25). Relationships between glycemic control (HbA1c) and cardiovascular fitness (VO 2 peak and VT) were determined using correlational analysis and multiple linear regression analyses. A statistically significant relationship was observed between HbA1c and cardiovascular fitness. However, BMI and HOMA %S did not influence the relationship between glycemic control and cardiovascular fitness. HbA1c contributes to VO 2 peak and VT in obese and overweight subjects across glucose tolerance categories. Significant results were achieved despite the fact that there was a limited range of HbA1c based on the study inclusion criteria. This finding suggests that even a mild decrease in glycemic control can negatively influence cardiovascular fitness.

  4. Poor glycemic control impacts linear and non-linear dynamics of heart rate in DM type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Bassi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: It is well known that type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM produces cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN, which may affect the cardiac autonomic modulation. However, it is unclear whether the lack of glycemic control in T2DM without CAN could impact negatively on cardiac autonomic modulation. Objective: To evaluate the relationship between glycemic control and cardiac autonomic modulation in individuals with T2DM without CAN. Descriptive, prospective and cross sectional study.METHODS: Forty-nine patients with T2DM (51±7 years were divided into two groups according to glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c: G1≤7% and G2>7.0%. Resting heart rate (HR and RR interval (RRi were obtained and calculated by linear (Mean iRR; Mean HR; rMSSD; STD RR; LF; HF; LF/HF, TINN and RR Tri, and non-linear (SD1; SD2; DFα1; DFα2, Shannon entropy; ApEn; SampEn and CD methods of heart rate variability (HRV. Insulin, HOMA-IR, fasting glucose and HbA1c were obtained by blood tests.RESULTS: G2 (HbA1c≤7% showed lower values for the mean of iRR; STD RR; RR Tri, TINN, SD2, CD and higher mean HR when compared with G1 (HbA1c > 7%. Additionally, HbA1c correlated negatively with mean RRi (r=0.28, p=0.044; STD RR (r=0.33, p=0.017; RR Tri (r=-0.35, p=0.013, SD2 (r=-0.39, p=0.004 and positively with mean HR (r=0.28, p=0.045. Finally, fasting glucose correlated negatively with STD RR (r=-0.36, p=0.010; RR Tri (r=-0.36, p=0.010; TINN (r=-0.33, p=0.019 and SD2 (r=-0.42, p=0.002.CONCLUSION: We concluded that poor glycemic control is related to cardiac autonomic modulation indices in individuals with T2DM even if they do not present cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy.

  5. Stigma and Its Association With Glycemic Control and Hypoglycemia in Adolescents and Young Adults With Type 1 Diabetes: Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazeau, Anne-Sophie; Nakhla, Meranda; Wright, Michael; Henderson, Mélanie; Panagiotopoulos, Constadina; Pacaud, Daniele; Kearns, Patricia; Rahme, Elham; Da Costa, Deborah; Dasgupta, Kaberi

    2018-04-20

    Qualitative studies in type 1 diabetes indicate that visibility of diabetes supplies, self-care, and hypoglycemia symptoms are associated with stigma and suboptimal management. This may be particularly salient in youth who face concurrent challenges such as establishing autonomy and making vocational choices. The aim of the study was to estimate stigma prevalence in youth (aged 14-24 years) with type 1 diabetes and its associations with glycemic control. Participants, recruited largely through social media, were asked to complete a Web-based survey and to send via mail capillary blood samples for glycated hemoglobin (HbA 1c ) measurement. The primary definition of stigma required endorsement of one or more of 3 stigma-specific items of the Barriers to Diabetes Adherence questionnaire. These addressed avoidance of diabetes management with friends present, difficulty telling others about diabetes diagnosis, and embarrassment in performing diabetes care with others present. Poor glycemic control was defined as HbA 1c >9% (ie, >75 mmol/mol; measured value when available, else self-report) and/or ≥1 severe hypoglycemic episode in the previous year (reported requiring assistance from someone else during the episode). Stigma prevalence was computed (95% CI), and associations with glycemic control were evaluated (multivariate logistic regression models). Among the 380 respondents, stigma prevalence was 65.5% (95% CI 60.7-70.3). Stigma was associated with a 2-fold higher odds of poor glycemic control overall (odds ratio [OR] 2.25, 95% CI 1.33-3.80; adjusted for age, sex, and type of treatment). There were specific associations with both HbA 1c >9% (75 mmol/mol; OR 3.05, 95% CI 1.36-6.86) and severe hypoglycemia in the previous year (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.05-3.31). There is a high prevalence of stigma in youth with type 1 diabetes that is associated with both elevated HbA 1c levels and severe hypoglycemia. Targeted strategies to address stigma are needed. Clinical

  6. Transient ischemic dilation ratio (TID) correlates with HbA1c in patients with diabetes type 2 with proven myocardial ischemia according to exercise myocardial SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamikova, A.; Rybka, J.; Bakala, J.; Bernatek, J.; Svacina, S.

    2006-01-01

    Abnormal values of the transient ischemic dilation ratio (TID) according to an exercise myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are linked to severe coronary artery disease. The authors investigated the relationship between TID and the levels of vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM), intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), E-selectin, microalbuminuria, intimamedia thickness and HbA 1c of diabetic subjects. We observed 38 subjects with diabetes type 2 (10 women, 28 men), of average age 56.08±8.24 years, with no past history of cardiovascular disease. All subjects were examined using an exercise myocardial SPECT. Transient ischemic dilation, summed stress score (SSS), summed rest score (SRS) and stress total severity score (STSS) were determined to quantify myocardial ischemia. The average IMT value was 1.05±0.31 mm. The TID value was 1.02±0.154, VCAM 795.24±163.25 mg/l, ICAM 516.55±164.07, E-selectin 63.82±38.89, HbA 1c 7.09±1.68%, microalbuminuria 68.01±55.21 mg/l. When ascertaining the relation of TID to the other factors we used Pearson's correlation at the level of significance p 1c (p=0.035); the other factors did not show any significant correlation. Diabetes and its long term unsatisfactory compensation can be one of the factors which affect left ventricular transient ischemic dilation. (author)

  7. Effect of Topical Tetracycline Gel with Non Surgical Periodontal Therapy on Hba1c and Lipid Profile in Type 2 Diabetic Patients: A Clinico- Biochemical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Haerian-Ardakani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The present study aimed to evaluate the Effect of topical tetracycline gel application with non surgical periodontal therapy on HbA1c and lipid profile in type 2 diabetic patients. Methods: A total of 30 type 2 diabetic patients were randomly divided into two groups. The first group received scaling and root planning, whereas the second group received scaling and root planning with topically applied tetracycline gel. Clinical factors such as GI, PI, PPD and biochemical factors such as HbA1c and lipid profile were assessed in beginning of study and 3 months later. Results: Comparing the clinical factors between the two groups revealed that periodontal pocket depth significantly reduced in tetracycline-received group. Regarding the biochemical factors, triglyceride levels decreased significantly in tetracycline-received group. No significant difference was observed between the two groups in regard with other clinical and biochemical factors. Conclusion: The study findings demonstrated that clinical and biochemical parameters have been improved after non surgical periodontal treatment in both groups. Although it seems that application of topical tetracycline gel combined with non-surgical periodontal therapy is effective in improvement of some clinical and biochemical factors like PPD and TG, it doesn’t offer any superiority in regard with other factors compared to mere non surgical periodontal therapy.

  8. Effects of a healthier snack on snacking habits and glycated Hb (HbA1c): a 6-week intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Mary R; Parsons, Andrew; Whalley, Gillian A; Rush, Elaine C

    2016-12-01

    Dietary behaviour modification may change eating habits and reduce the impact of poor nutrition. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of daily consumption of a healthier snack bar on snacking habits and glycated Hb (HbA1c) within a 6-week intervention. In all, twenty-eight participants were randomly allocated to two groups to either consume the bars as the main snack for 6 weeks (n 14) or receipt of the bars was delayed for 6 weeks (n 14) following a stepped-wedge design. All participants had HbA1c concentrations measured at weeks -1, 0, 4, 6, 10 and 12. A short dietary habits questionnaire was self-completed at weeks 0, 6 and 12. Participants consumed the bars they received instead of other snacks, and found that the healthier snack bar was acceptable as part of their daily dietary pattern. Over the 12 weeks, there was a significant reduction in intake of biscuits, cakes and pies (approximately 2 servings/week, Psnack intervention and a trend towards a favourable effect on glucose homoeostasis. Habitual snacking behaviour has the potential to be improved through changes in the food supply, and in the longer term may reduce the impact of poor nutrition on public health.

  9. SCREENING FOR TYPE 2 DIABETES MELLITUS AND PREDIABETES USING POINT-OF-CARE TESTING FOR HBA1C AMONG THAI DENTAL PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tantipoj, Chanita; Sakoolnamarka, Serena Siraratna; Supa-amornkul, Sirirak; Lohsoonthorn, Vitool; Deerochanawong, Chaicharn; Khovidhunkit, Siribangon Piboonniyom; Hiransuthikul, Narin

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM) is associated with oral diseases. Some studies indicated that patients who seek dental treatment could have undiagnosed hyperglycemic condition. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of undiagnosed hyperglycemia and selected associated factors among Thai dental patients. Dental patients without a history of hyperglycemia were recruited from the Special Clinic, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand and His Majesty the King’s Dental Service Unit, Thailand. The patients were randomly selected and a standardized questionnaire was used to collect demographic data from each patient. Blood pressure, body mass index (BMI), and waist circumference were recorded for each subject. The number of missing teeth, periodontal status, and salivary flow rate were also investigated. HbA1c was assessed using a finger prick blood sample and analyzed with a point-of-care testing machine. Hyperglycemia was defined as a HbA1c ≥5.7%. The prevalence of hyperglycemia among participants was calculated and multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors. A total of 724 participants were included in the study; 33.8% had hyperglycemia. On multiple logistic regression analysis, older age, family history of DM, being overweight (BMI ≥23 kg/m2), having central obesity and having severe periodontitis were significantly associated with hyperglycemia. The high prevalence of hyperglycemia in this study of dental patients suggests this setting may be appropriate to screen for patients with hyperglycemia.

  10. A Protein Diet Score, Including Plant and Animal Protein, Investigating the Association with HbA1c and eGFR—The PREVIEW Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikkilä, Vera; Raitakari, Olli T.; Hutri-Kähönen, Nina; Dragsted, Lars O.; Poppitt, Sally D.; Silvestre, Marta P.; Feskens, Edith J.M.

    2017-01-01

    Higher-protein diets have been advocated for body-weight regulation for the past few decades. However, the potential health risks of these diets are still uncertain. We aimed to develop a protein score based on the quantity and source of protein, and to examine the association of the score with glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). Analyses were based on three population studies included in the PREVIEW project (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World): NQplus, Lifelines, and the Young Finns Study. Cross-sectional data from food-frequency questionnaires (n = 76,777 subjects) were used to develop a protein score consisting of two components: 1) percentage of energy from total protein, and 2) plant to animal protein ratio. An inverse association between protein score and HbA1c (slope −0.02 ± 0.01 mmol/mol, p < 0.001) was seen in Lifelines. We found a positive association between the protein score and eGFR in Lifelines (slope 0.17 ± 0.02 mL/min/1.73 m2, p < 0.0001). Protein scoring might be a useful tool to assess both the effect of quantity and source of protein on health parameters. Further studies are needed to validate this newly developed protein score. PMID:28714926

  11. Status of glycemic control in patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.U.; Fakhr, A.; Khan, Z.A.; Nadeem, M.; Bangash, R.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the status of glycemic control in patients of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Design: Cross sectional descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical out-patient/ in -patient departments at Military Hospital Rawalpindi from January 2011 to December 2012. Methods: Six hundred and fifty patients of type 2 DM fulfilling the required criteria were included in the study. Glycemic control of these patients was determined by estimation of blood glucose (fasting and random) and glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c). The patients were grouped in three categories good, fair and poor diabetic control having their HbA1c values of being 6-7%, 7.1-8% and more than 8.1% respectively. Statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 15 was used for analysis. Results: Out of 650 patients 377 (58%) had poor glycemic control with mean HbA1c of 9.5% +- 0.95, 78 (12%) patients had fair control of glycemic control with mean HbA1c of 7.8 +- 0.25, and 195 (30%) patients had good glycemic control with mean HbA1c of 6.4 +- 0.17. Conclusion: Majority of patients had poor control of their glycemic status which is an important indicator and predictor of both micro and macrovascular complications. (author)

  12. Boronate-Modified Interdigitated Electrode Array for Selective Impedance-Based Sensing of Glycated Hemoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonyasit, Yuwadee; Laiwattanapaisal, Wanida; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2016-01-01

    An impedance-based label-free affinity sensor was developed for the recognition of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c). Interdigitated gold microelectrode arrays (IDA) were first modified with a self-assembled monolayer of cysteamine followed by cross-linking with glutaraldehyde and subsequent binding of 3......-aminophenylboronic acid (APBA), which selectively binds HbA1c via cis-diol interactions. Impedance sensing was demonstrated to be highly responsive to the clinically relevant HbA1c levels (0.1%-8.36%) with a detection limit of 0.024% (3σ). The specificity of the assay was evaluated with non-glycated hemoglobin (Hb...

  13. Weight Loss and Glycemic Control after Sleeve Gastrectomy: Results from a Middle Eastern Center of Excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khalifa, Khalid; Al Ansari, Ahmed; Showaiter, May

    2018-02-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic disorders are strongly linked to both morbidity and mortality. Sleeve gastrectomy (SG) has been established as an effective means of weight loss for obese patients as well as a treatment for type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study was designed to examine the short- and midterm outcomes of patients who underwent SG in a Middle Eastern Center of Excellence, a military training teaching hospital. The clinical outcomes of 59 patients with impaired glucose tolerance and T2DM who underwent SG between 2011 and 2014 with at least one and up to four years of follow-up were studied. Data were collected and compared, including the pre- and post-surgery measures of weight, body mass index, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and fasting blood glucose. Complete remission was defined as a fasting blood glucose level ≤100 mg/dL, an HbA1c ≤6 mg/dL, without use of antidiabetic medications. All patients showed significant reduction in body mass index following SG. Tight glycemic control was achieved among both diabetic and prediabetic patients. In this study, 88.14 per cent of all patients (diabetic and prediabetic) achieved complete resolution from their impaired glucose tolerance and T2DM and maintained normal blood glucose and HbA1C levels from one to four years postoperatively. SG is beneficial both in terms of short- and midterm weight loss and glucose control in both diabetic and prediabetic obese patients.

  14. The incidence of severe hypoglycaemia in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes mellitus can be reduced with unchanged HbA1c levels and pregnancy outcomes in a routine care setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringholm, Lene; Secher, A L; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U

    2013-01-01

    To investigate whether the incidence of severe hypoglycaemia in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes can be reduced without deteriorating HbA1c levels or pregnancy outcomes in a routine care setting....

  15. COMPARISON OF KNOWLEDGE AND OUTCOME MEASURE OF HBA1C TESTING IN INDIAN NIDDM PATIENTS OF A NORTH INDIAN CITY WITH THAT OF PATIENTS FROM A METROPOLIS IN SOUTH INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megha Luthra

    2012-03-01

    The mean age of study subjects was 58 years and mean duration of diabetes was 8.7 years. 56% of the subjects were males. 68% of the subjects know about HbA1c test and 32% were unaware of it. 37% of those who know about HbA1c know their goal also. 63% are aware about HbA1c test but they do not know their goal. Mean HbA1c % was significantly lower in those who know about the test and also in those who know about their goal. Retinal condition was significantly better in those who knew about the test and also in those who knew their target goal as compared to those subjects who were not aware of either.

  16. HbA1C variability and the risk of renal status progression in Diabetes Mellitus: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Cheng

    Full Text Available To explore the association between glycated hemoglobin (A1C variability and renal disease progression in patients with diabetes mellitus.A comprehensive search was performed using the PubMed and Embase databases (up to April 26, 2014. The hazard ratio (HR was pooled per unit increase in the standard deviation of A1C (A1C-SD to evaluate the dose-response relationship between A1C-SD and the risk of nephropathy.Eight studies with a total of 17,758 subjects provided the HR for A1C-SD and were included in the final meta-analysis. The pooled HR results demonstrated that A1C-SD was significantly associated with the progression of renal status (HR for both T1DM and T2DM 1.43, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.24-1.64; HR for T1DM 1.70, 95%CI 1.41-2.05; HR for T2DM 1.20, 95%CI 1.12-1.28. A1C-SD was significantly correlated with new-onset microalbuminuria (HR for T1DM 1.63, 95%CI 1.28-2.07; HR for T2DM 1.23, 95%CI 1.08-1.39. These outcomes were also supported in subgroup analyses. Furthermore, sensitivity analyses demonstrated that the results were robust.A1C variability is independently associated with the development of microalbuminuria and the progression of renal status in both type 1 and 2 diabetes patients. A standard method for measuring A1C variability is essential for further and deeper analyses. In addition, future studies should assess the effect of reducing A1C variability on nephropathy complication.

  17. The effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on hemoglobin A1c levels in persons with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, Steven P; Hyman, Leslie G; Michalowicz, Bryan S; Schoenfeld, Elinor R; Gelato, Marie C; Hou, Wei; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Reddy, Michael S; Lewis, Cora E; Oates, Thomas W; Tripathy, Devjit; Katancik, James A; Orlander, Philip R; Paquette, David W; Hanson, Naomi Q; Tsai, Michael Y

    2013-12-18

    Chronic periodontitis, a destructive inflammatory disorder of the supporting structures of the teeth, is prevalent in patients with diabetes. Limited evidence suggests that periodontal therapy may improve glycemic control. To determine if nonsurgical periodontal treatment reduces levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in persons with type 2 diabetes and moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis. The Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT), a 6-month, single-masked, multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Participants had type 2 diabetes, were taking stable doses of medications, had HbA1c levels between 7% and less than 9%, and untreated chronic periodontitis. Five hundred fourteen participants were enrolled between November 2009 and March 2012 from diabetes and dental clinics and communities affiliated with 5 academic medical centers. The treatment group (n = 257) received scaling and root planing plus chlorhexidine oral rinse at baseline and supportive periodontal therapy at 3 and 6 months. The control group (n = 257) received no treatment for 6 months. Difference in change in HbA1c level from baseline between groups at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in probing pocket depths, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, gingival index, fasting glucose level, and Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2) score. Enrollment was stopped early because of futility. At 6 months, mean HbA1c levels in the periodontal therapy group increased 0.17% (SD, 1.0), compared with 0.11% (SD, 1.0) in the control group, with no significant difference between groups based on a linear regression model adjusting for clinical site (mean difference, -0.05% [95% CI, -0.23% to 0.12%]; P = .55). Periodontal measures improved in the treatment group compared with the control group at 6 months, with adjusted between-group differences of 0.28 mm (95% CI, 0.18 to 0.37) for probing depth, 0.25 mm (95% CI, 0.14 to 0.36) for clinical attachment loss, 13.1% (95% CI, 8

  18. Extreme Levels of HbA1c Increase Incident ESRD Risk in Chinese Patients with Type 2 Diabetes: Competing Risk Analysis in National Cohort of Taiwan Diabetes Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chiu-Shong; Huang, Chiu-Ching; Lin, Wen-Yuan; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether HbA1c is a predictor of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in type 2 diabetes patients remains unclear. This study evaluated relationship between HbA1c and ESRD in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes. Methods Patients aged ≥ 30 years who were free of ESRD (n = 51 681) were included from National Diabetes Care Management Program from 2002–2003. Extended Cox proportional hazard model with competing risk of death served to evaluate association between HbA1c level and ESRD. Results A total of 2613 (5.06%) people developed ESRD during a follow-up period of 8.1 years. Overall incidence rate of ESRD was 6.26 per 1000 person-years. Patients with high levels of HbA1c had a high incidence rate of ESRD, from 4.29 for HbA1c of  6.0%–6.9% to 10.33 for HbA1c ≥ 10.0% per 1000 person-years. Patients with HbA1c HbA1c  of 6.0%–6.9%. A J-shaped relationship between HbA1c level and ESRD risk was observed. After adjustment, patients with HbA1c HbA1c of 6.0%–6.9%. Conclusions Diabetes care has focused on preventing hyperglycemia, but not hypoglycemia. Our study revealed that HbA1c level ≥ 7.0% was linked with increased ESRD risk in type 2 diabetes patients, and that HbA1c HbA1c targets and improve outcomes without increasing the risk to this population. Clinicians need to pay attention to HbA1c results on diabetic nephropathy. PMID:26098901

  19. Considerably decreased risk of cardiovascular disease with combined reductions in HbA1c, blood pressure and blood lipids in type 2 diabetes: Report from the Swedish National Diabetes Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eeg-Olofsson, Katarina; Zethelius, Björn; Gudbjörnsdottir, Soffia; Eliasson, Björn; Svensson, Ann-Marie; Cederholm, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Assess the effect of risk factors changes on risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes selected from the Swedish National Diabetes Register. Observational study of 13,477 females and males aged 30-75 years, with baseline HbA1c 41-67 mmol/mol, systolic blood pressure 122-154 mmHg and ratio non-HDL:HDL 1.7-4.1, followed for mean 6.5 years until 2012. Four groups were created: a reference group (n = 6757) with increasing final versus baseline HbA1c, systolic blood pressure and non-HDL:HDL cholesterol during the study period, and three groups with decreasing HbA1c (n = 1925), HbA1c and systolic blood pressure (n = 2050) or HbA1c and systolic blood pressure and non-HDL:HDL (n = 2745). Relative risk reduction for fatal/nonfatal cardiovascular disease was 35% with decrease in HbA1c only (mean 6 to final 49 mmol/mol), 56% with decrease in HbA1c and systolic blood pressure (mean 12 to final 128 mmHg) and 75% with combined decreases in HbA1c, systolic blood pressure and non-HDL:HDL (mean 0.8 to final 2.1), all p < 0.001 adjusting for clinical characteristics, other risk factors, treatments and previous cardiovascular disease. Similar risk reductions were found for fatal/nonfatal coronary heart disease, fatal cardiovascular disease, all-cause mortality and also in a subgroup of 3038 patients with albuminuria. Considerable risk reductions for cardiovascular disease and mortality were seen with combined long-term risk factor improvement. © The Author(s) 2016.

  20. Pretransplant HbA1c Is a Useful Predictor for the Development of New-Onset Diabetes in Renal Transplant Recipients Receiving No or Low-Dose Erythropoietin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuaki Tokodai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To evaluate the predictive power of pretransplant HbA1c for new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT in kidney transplant candidates, who had several predispositions for fluctuated HbA1c levels. Methods. We performed a retrospective study of 119 patients without diabetes who received kidney transplantation between March 2000 and January 2012. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to investigate the association of several parameters with NODAT. Predictive discrimination of HbA1c was assessed using a receiver-operating characteristic curve. Results. Seventeen patients (14.3% developed NODAT within 1 year of transplantation. Univariate logistic regression analysis revealed that recipient age, gender, and HbA1c were predictors of NODAT. In the multivariate analysis, the association between pretransplant HbA1c and NODAT development did not reach statistical significance (P=0.07. To avoid the strong influence of high-dose erythropoietin on HbA1c levels, we performed subgroup analyses on 85 patients receiving no or low-dose (≤6000 IU/week erythropoietin. HbA1c was again an independent predictor for NODAT. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis revealed a cut-off value of 5.2% with an optimal sensitivity of 64% and specificity of 78% for predicting NODAT. Conclusions. Our results reveal that the pretransplant HbA1c level is a useful predictor for NODAT in patients receiving no or low-dose erythropoietin.

  1. Probability of Achieving Glycemic Control with Basal Insulin in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes in Real-World Practice in the USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blonde, Lawrence; Meneghini, Luigi; Peng, Xuejun Victor; Boss, Anders; Rhee, Kyu; Shaunik, Alka; Kumar, Supriya; Balodi, Sidhartha; Brulle-Wohlhueter, Claire; McCrimmon, Rory J

    2018-06-01

    Basal insulin (BI) plays an important role in treating type 2 diabetes (T2D), especially when oral antidiabetic (OAD) medications are insufficient for glycemic control. We conducted a retrospective, observational study using electronic medical records (EMR) data from the IBM ® Explorys database to evaluate the probability of achieving glycemic control over 24 months after BI initiation in patients with T2D in the USA. A cohort of 6597 patients with T2D who started BI following OAD(s) and had at least one valid glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) result recorded both within 90 days before and 720 days after BI initiation were selected. We estimated the changes from baseline in HbA1c every 6 months, the quarterly conditional probabilities of reaching HbA1c < 7% if a patient had not achieved glycemic control prior to each quarter (Q), and the cumulative probability of reaching glycemic control over 24 months. Our cohort was representative of patients with T2D who initiated BI from OADs in the USA. The average HbA1c was 9.1% at BI initiation, and decreased robustly (1.5%) in the first 6 months after initiation with no further reductions thereafter. The conditional probability of reaching glycemic control decreased rapidly in the first year (26.6% in Q2; 17.6% in Q3; 8.6% in Q4), and then remained low (≤ 6.1%) for each quarter in the second year. Cumulatively, about 38% of patients reached HbA1c < 7% in the first year; only approximately 8% more did so in the second year. Our study of real-world data from a large US EMR database suggested that among patients with T2D who initiated BI after OADs, the likelihood of reaching glycemic control diminished over time, and remained low from 12 months onwards. Additional treatment options should be considered if patients do not reach glycemic control within 12 months of BI initiation. Sanofi Corporation.

  2. Does periodontal treatment improve glycemic control in diabetic patients? A meta-analysis of intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janket, S-J; Wightman, A; Baird, A E; Van Dyke, T E; Jones, J A

    2005-12-01

    Previous analyses regarding effects of periodontal treatment on glycemic control included studies where causal association might not be assumed, or the results were reported non-quantitatively. We initiated this meta-analysis of 10 intervention studies to quantify the effects of periodontal treatment on HbA1c level among diabetic patients, to explore possible causes for the discrepant reports, and to make recommendations for future studies. Data sources were MEDLINE (January, 1980, to January, 2005), the EBMR, Cochrane Register, and bibliographies of the published articles. Three investigators extracted data regarding intervention, outcomes, and effect size. A total of 456 patients was included in this analysis, with periodontal treatment as predictor and the actual change in hemoglobin A1c level as the outcome. The weighted average decrease in actual HbA1c level was 0.38% for all studies, 0.66% when restricted to type 2 diabetic patients, and 0.71% if antibiotics were given to them. However, none was statistically significant.

  3. Hemoglobin A1C: Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldasouqi, Saleh A.; Gossain, Ved V.

    2008-01-01

    Hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C) has been used for decades to monitor the controlof glycemia in diabetes. Although HbA1Cis currently undergoing a reassessmentand major developments have been underway in recent years, HbA1C is notrecommended at present for diabetes screening or diagnosis. The object ofthis review is to summarize the recent developments and to review a potentialdiagnostic role for HbA1C .Implementation of changes in HbA1C results andunits of measurements have been suggested for the purpose of teststandardization. These include lower reference ranges (by about 1.5-2 points)and measurement units expressed in percentage (%), as mg/dL (mmol/L) ormmol/mol (or a combination of these units). In diabetes screening anddiagnosis, the current diagnostic guidelines use measurement of plasmaglucose either fasting or after glucose load. These diagnostic methods haveshortcomings warranting a potential diagnostic role for HbA1C. While recentdevelopments in HbA1C methodologies are acknowledged, it is not yet knownwhich changes will be implemented and how soon. Given the recent literaturesupporting HbA1C diagnostic abilities and given the shortcomings of thecurrent guidelines, globally. Very recently, the first of suchrecommendations has been proposed by an expert panel as announced by the USEndocrine Society. (author)

  4. Hemoglobin A1c May Be an Inadequate Diagnostic Tool for Diabetes Mellitus in Anemic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Il Son

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundRecently, a hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c level of 6.5% has been determined to be a criterion for diabetes mellitus (DM, and it is a widely used marker for the diagnosis of DM. However, HbA1c may be influenced by a number of factors. Anemia is one of the most prevalent diseases with an influence on HbA1c; however, its effect on HbA1c varies based on the variable pathophysiology of anemia. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of anemia on HbA1c levels.MethodsAnemic subjects (n=112 and age- and sex-matched controls (n=217 who were drug naive and suspected of having DM were enrolled. The subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test and HbA1c simultaneously. We compared mean HbA1c and its sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing DM between each subgroup.ResultsClinical characteristics were found to be similar between each subgroup. Also, when glucose levels were within the normal range, the difference in mean HbA1c was not significant (P=0.580. However, when plasma glucose levels were above the diagnostic cutoff for prediabetes and DM, the mean HbA1c of the anemic subgroup was modestly higher than in the nonanemic group. The specificity of HbA1c for diagnosis of DM was significantly lower in the anemic subgroup (P<0.05.ConclusionThese results suggest that the diagnostic significance of HbA1c might be limited in anemic patients.

  5. Meal replacement reduces insulin requirement, HbA1c and weight long-term in type 2 diabetes patients with >100 U insulin per day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, K; Schloot, N C; Gärtner, B; Keil, R; Schadewaldt, P; Martin, S

    2014-04-01

    Despite high insulin doses, good glycaemic control is often lacking in type 2 diabetes patients and new therapeutic options are needed. In a proof of principle study, an energy-restricted, protein-rich meal replacement (PRMR) was examined as a means of reducing insulin requirement, HbA1C and body weight. Obese type 2 diabetes patients (n = 22) with >100 U insulin per day replaced, in week 1, the three main meals with 50 g of PRMR (Almased-Vitalkost) each (= 4903 kJ day(-1) ). In weeks 2-4, breakfast and dinner were replaced, and, in weeks 5-12, only dinner was replaced. Clinical parameters were determined at baseline, and after 4, 8 and 12 weeks, as well as after 1.5 years of follow-up. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for the intention-to-treat analysis and the Mann-Whitney U-test for subgroup analyses. The 12-week-programme was completed by 15 participants (68%). After 1 week, the mean insulin dose was reduced from 147 (75) U to 91 (55) U day(-1) (P = 0.0001), and to 65 (32) U (P fasting blood glucose, triglycerides and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol improved significantly. After 1.5 years, insulin requirement and weight remained significantly lower than baseline. Participants who continued PRMR further reduced their HbA1c, weight and insulin dose. Two patients were able to stop insulin therapy altogether. Energy-restricted PRMR was effective in reducing insulin requirement of type 2 diabetes patients with intensified insulin therapy accompanied by a reduction of HbA1c, weight and other cardiometabolic risk factors. With the continuous use of PRMR, glycaemic control might be improved in the long term. © 2013 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  6. Percentiles of fasting serum insulin, glucose, HbA1c and HOMA-IR in pre-pubertal normal weight European children from the IDEFICS cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peplies, J; Jiménez-Pavón, D; Savva, S C; Buck, C; Günther, K; Fraterman, A; Russo, P; Iacoviello, L; Veidebaum, T; Tornaritis, M; De Henauw, S; Mårild, S; Molnár, D; Moreno, L A; Ahrens, W

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to present age- and sex-specific reference values of insulin, glucose, glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) and the homeostasis model assessment to quantify insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) for pre-pubertal children. The reference population consists of 7074 normal weight 3- to 10.9-year-old pre-pubertal children from eight European countries who participated in at least one wave of the IDEFICS ('identification and prevention of dietary- and lifestyle-induced health effects in children and infants') surveys (2007-2010) and for whom standardised laboratory measurements were obtained. Percentile curves of insulin (measured by an electrochemiluminescence immunoassay), glucose, HbA1c and HOMA-IR were calculated as a function of age stratified by sex using the general additive model for location scale and shape (GAMLSS) method. Levels of insulin, fasting glucose and HOMA-IR continuously show an increasing trend with age, whereas HbA1c shows an upward trend only beyond the age of 8 years. Insulin and HOMA-IR values are higher in girls of all age groups, whereas glucose values are slightly higher in boys. Median serum levels of insulin range from 17.4 and 13.2 pmol l(-1) in 3-HOMA-IR, median values range from 0.5 and 0.4 in 3-<3.5-year-old girls and boys to 1.7 and 1.4 in 10.5-<11-year-old girls and boys, respectively. Our study provides the first standardised reference values for an international European children's population and provides the, up to now, largest data set of healthy pre-pubertal children to model reference percentiles for markers of insulin resistance. Our cohort shows higher values of Hb1Ac as compared with a single Swedish study while our percentiles for the other glucose metabolic markers are in good accordance with previous studies.

  7. Effect of scaling and root planing on serum interleukin-10 levels and glycemic control in chronic periodontitis and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirudh Balakrishna Acharya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Chronic periodontal disease (CPD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM share common pathogenic pathways involving the cytokine network resulting in increased susceptibility to both diseases, leading to increased inflammatory destruction, insulin resistance, and poor glycemic control. Periodontal treatment may improve glycemic control. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of scaling and root planing (SRP of T2DM patients with CPD on hyperglycemia and the levels of serum interleukin-10 (IL-10. Materials and Methods: Forty-five subjects were divided into three groups comprising 15 subjects each as Group 1 (healthy controls, Group 2 (CPD patients, and Group 3 (T2DM patients with CPD. Plaque index, gingival index (GI, probing pocket depths (PPD, clinical attachment loss (AL, bleeding on probing (BoP, random blood sugar, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1C, and serum IL-10 were measured at baseline; SRP was performed on Groups 2 and 3 and the selected parameters recorded again at 6 months. Results: Statistically significant (P < 0.05 differences were observed in the variables at baseline and 6 months after SRP between the three groups using one-way ANOVA. The paired samples t-test for PPD and AL in Group 3 was statistically significant. Group 3 revealed positive correlations between PPD and HbA1C, BoP and IL-10, respectively, at 6 months and a predictable association of HbA1C with PPD and GI, and IL-10 levels with BoP, respectively, at 6 months. Conclusion: Scaling and root planing is effective in reducing blood glucose levels in T2DM patient with pocket depths and effective in elevating systemic IL-10 levels in CPD patients and CPD patients with T2DM.

  8. Predictors of glycemic control in children with Type 1 diabetes mellitus in Assiut-Egypt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanaa A Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background : Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM may lead to severe long-term health consequences, such as renal failure, blindness, as well as heart and cerebrovascular disease. Although a direct relationship between blood glucose control and diabetes complications remains to be established beyond doubt, most diabetologists aim to achieve the best possible glucose control in their patients with T1DM. The aim of this study was to detect the predictors of glycemic control among children with T1DM in Assiut Governorate-Egypt. Materials and Methods : We enrolled 415 children aged 2 to 18 years with type 1 diabetes of >1-year duration. They were subjected to full history including demographic factors and disease-related factors. Examination was done with determination of the body mass index, and assessment of stage of maturity. Investigations included hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c and lipid profile. Patients with HbA1c above the recommended values for age by the American Diabetes Association were considered as poor glycemic control group. Results : Of the studied cases, 190 cases (45.8% were of poor glycemic control. Patients with poor control had significantly higher mean age (16.83 ± 3.3 vs 9.77 ± 3.7, P<0.000. Girls aged 15 years or more had significantly higher prevalence of poor glycemic control than males of the same age group. As regard the disease-related factors, patients with poor control had significantly longer duration of disease (7.94 ± 2.6 vs 2.40 ± 2.0, P<0.000 and were older in age at onset of disease. Insulin regimen which consists of basal bolus insulin plus three injections of regular insulin was associated with more frequency of good glycemic control than other regimens. Patients with poor control had significantly higher mean of cholesterol, triglyceride (TG, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol than patients with good control. Adjusting for other variables, age of the patients, duration of

  9. Relation of circulating concentrations of chemokine receptor CCR5 ligands to C-peptide, proinsulin and HbA1c and disease progression in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfleger, C.; Kaas, A.; Hansen, L.

    2008-01-01

    Th1 related chemokines CCL3 and CCL5 and Th2 related CCL4 as ligands of the receptor CCR5 contribute to disease development in animal models of type 1 diabetes. In humans, no data are available addressing the role of these chemokines regarding disease progression and remission. We investigated...... longitudinally circulating concentrations of CCR5 ligands of 256 newly diagnosed patients with type 1 diabetes. CCR5 ligands were differentially associated with beta-cell function and clinical remission. CCL5 was decreased in remitters and positively associated with HbA1c suggestive of a Th1 associated...... of CCR5 by therapeutic agents such as maraviroc may provide a new therapeutic target to ameliorate disease progression in type 1 diabetes. (C) 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved Udgivelsesdato: 2008/7...

  10. A Mediterranean diet improves HbA1c but not fasting blood glucose compared to alternative dietary strategies: a network meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, P; Achana, F; Troughton, J; Gray, L J; Khunti, K; Davies, M J

    2014-06-01

    Overweight or obese individuals with type 2 diabetes are encouraged to lose weight for optimal glucose management, yet many find this difficult. Determining whether alterations in dietary patterns irrespective of weight loss can aid glucose control has not been fully investigated. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis aiming to determine the effects of a Mediterranean diet compared to other dietary interventions on glycaemic control irrespect