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Sample records for glutaredoxin grx1p c30s

  1. Crystallization of mutant forms of glutaredoxin Grx1p from yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håkansson, Kjell Ove; Østergaard, Henrik; Winther, Jakob R.

    2006-01-01

    Glutaredoxin Grx1p from yeast was crystallized both as an independent protein and in a protein fusion with His-tagged yellow fluorescent protein (rxYFP). A glutathionylated C30S mutant of the 12 kDa Grx1p was crystallized in two different forms in PEG 4000 at low pH. These orthorhombic and monocl......Glutaredoxin Grx1p from yeast was crystallized both as an independent protein and in a protein fusion with His-tagged yellow fluorescent protein (rxYFP). A glutathionylated C30S mutant of the 12 kDa Grx1p was crystallized in two different forms in PEG 4000 at low pH. These orthorhombic...

  2. Mechanistic insight provided by glutaredoxin within a fusion to redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Østergaard, Henrik; Winther, Jakob R

    2006-01-01

    have generated a fusion of the two proteins, rxYFP-Grx1p. In comparison to isolated subunits, intramolecular transfer of reducing equivalents made the fusion protein kinetically superior in reactions with glutathione. The rate of GSSG oxidation was thus improved by a factor of 3300. The reaction......Redox-sensitive yellow fluorescent protein (rxYFP) contains a dithiol disulfide pair that is thermodynamically suitable for monitoring intracellular glutathione redox potential. Glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1p) from yeast is known to catalyze the redox equilibrium between rxYFP and glutathione, and here, we...... separately and in the fusion. This could not be ascribed to the lack of an unproductive side reaction to glutaredoxin disulfide. Instead, slower alkylation kinetics with iodoacetamide indicates a better leaving-group capability of the remaining cysteine residue, which can explain the increased activity....

  3. (Thioredoxin and glutaredoxin systems)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartman, F.C.

    1990-07-19

    This report describes the Jacques Monod Conference on Intracellular Redox Control in Animals, Plants and Microrganisms by Thioredoxin and Glutaredoxin Systems,'' which was held in Roscoff, France, on July 1--7, 1990. I was given the opportunity to lecture on my group's work concerning chemical characterization of phosphoribulokinase and its regulation by thioredoxin. I was also asked to chair a half-day session on thioredoxin reductases, a family of regulatory proteins that are involved in processes as diverse as DNA replication in mammals and carbon fluxes through the Calvin cycle in plants. As a major theme of the conference was structure/function relationships of proteins, most topics were of direct relevance to many research endeavors in the Biology Division of ORNL.

  4. Glutathione, Glutaredoxins, and Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berndt, Carsten; Lillig, Christopher Horst

    2017-11-20

    Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant cellular low-molecular-weight thiol in the majority of organisms in all kingdoms of life. Therefore, functions of GSH and disturbed regulation of its concentration are associated with numerous physiological and pathological situations. Recent Advances: The function of GSH as redox buffer or antioxidant is increasingly being questioned. New functions, especially functions connected to the cellular iron homeostasis, were elucidated. Via the formation of iron complexes, GSH is an important player in all aspects of iron metabolism: sensing and regulation of iron levels, iron trafficking, and biosynthesis of iron cofactors. The variety of GSH coordinated iron complexes and their functions with a special focus on FeS-glutaredoxins are summarized in this review. Interestingly, GSH analogues that function as major low-molecular-weight thiols in organisms lacking GSH resemble the functions in iron homeostasis. Since these iron-related functions are most likely also connected to thiol redox chemistry, it is difficult to distinguish between mechanisms related to either redox or iron metabolisms. The ability of GSH to coordinate iron in different complexes with or without proteins needs further investigation. The discovery of new Fe-GSH complexes and their physiological functions will significantly advance our understanding of cellular iron homeostasis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1235-1251.

  5. Localization and function of three monothiol glutaredoxins in Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2005-01-01

    The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe contains two dithiol glutaredoxins (Grx1 and Grx2) and genes for three putative monothiol glutaredoxins (grx3, 4, and 5). We investigated the expression, sub-cellular localization, and functions of the three monothiol glutaredoxins. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that Grx3 is targeted to nuclear rim and endoplasmic reticulum, Grx4 primarily to the nucleus, and Grx5 to mitochondria. Null mutation of grx3 did not significantly affect growth and resistance against various oxidants, whereas grx5 mutation caused slow growth and sensitivity toward oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide, paraquat, and diamide. The grx2grx5 double mutation, deficient in all mitochondrial glutaredoxins, caused further retardation in growth and severe sensitivity toward all the oxidants tested. The grx4 mutation was not viable, suggesting a critical role of Grx4 for the physiology of S. pombe. Overproduction of Grx3 and Grx5, but not the truncated form of Grx5 without mitochondrial target sequence, severely retarded growth as Grx2 did, supporting the idea that Grx2, 3, and 5 are targeted to organellar compartments. Our results propose a distinct role for each glutaredoxin to maintain thiol redox balance, and hence the growth and stress resistance, of the fission yeast

  6. Thiol-Disulfide Exchange between Glutaredoxin and Glutathione

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iversen, Rasmus; Andersen, Peter Anders; Jensen, Kristine Steen

    2010-01-01

    Glutaredoxins are ubiquitous thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases which catalyze the reduction of glutathione-protein mixed disulfides. Belonging to the thioredoxin family, they contain a conserved active site CXXC motif. The N-proximal active site cysteine can form a mixed disulfide with glutathione ...... has been replaced with serine. The exchange reaction between the reduced protein and oxidized glutathione leading to formation of the mixed disulfide could readily be monitored by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) due to the enthalpic contributions from the noncovalent interactions...... and the protonation of glutathione thiolate. An algorithm for the analysis of this type of reaction by ITC was developed and showed that the interaction is enthalpy driven with a large entropy penalty. The applicability of the method was verified by a mass spectrometry-based approach, which gave a standard reduction...

  7. Evolution based on domain combinations: the case of glutaredoxins

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    Herrero Enrique

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein domains represent the basic units in the evolution of proteins. Domain duplication and shuffling by recombination and fusion, followed by divergence are the most common mechanisms in this process. Such domain fusion and recombination events are predicted to occur only once for a given multidomain architecture. However, other scenarios may be relevant in the evolution of specific proteins, such as convergent evolution of multidomain architectures. With this in mind, we study glutaredoxin (GRX domains, because these domains of approximately one hundred amino acids are widespread in archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes and participate in fusion proteins. GRXs are responsible for the reduction of protein disulfides or glutathione-protein mixed disulfides and are involved in cellular redox regulation, although their specific roles and targets are often unclear. Results In this work we analyze the distribution and evolution of GRX proteins in archaea, bacteria and eukaryotes. We study over one thousand GRX proteins, each containing at least one GRX domain, from hundreds of different organisms and trace the origin and evolution of the GRX domain within the tree of life. Conclusion Our results suggest that single domain GRX proteins of the CGFS and CPYC classes have, each, evolved through duplication and divergence from one initial gene that was present in the last common ancestor of all organisms. Remarkably, we identify a case of convergent evolution in domain architecture that involves the GRX domain. Two independent recombination events of a TRX domain to a GRX domain are likely to have occurred, which is an exception to the dominant mechanism of domain architecture evolution.

  8. Origin and diversification of land plant CC-type glutaredoxins.

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    Ziemann, M; Bhave, M; Zachgo, S

    2009-07-31

    Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are ubiquitous glutathione-dependent oxidoreductase enzymes implicated in redox homeostasis, particularly oxidative stress response. Three major classes of GRX genes exist, the CPYC, CGFS classes are present in all pro- and eukaryote species, whereas the CC-type class GRXs are specific to land plants. In the basal land plant Physcomitrella patens, only two CC-type GRXs are present, compared with 21 in Arabidopsis. In contrast, sizes of the CPYC and CGFS classes remained rather similar throughout plant evolution, raising the interesting question as to when the CC-type GRXs first originated and how and why they expanded during land plant evolution. Recent evidence suggests that CC-type GRXs may have been recruited during evolution into diverse plant-specific functions of flower development (ROXY1, ROXY2) and pathogenesis response (ROXY19/GRX480). In the present study, GRX genes from the genomes of a range of green algae and evolutionarily diverse land plant species were identified; Ostreococcus, Micromonas, Volvox, Selaginella, Vitis, Sorghum, and Brachypodium. Previously identified sequences from Chlamydomonas, Physcomitrella, Oryza, Arabidopsis, and Populus were integrated to generate a more comprehensive understanding of the forces behind the evolution of various GRX classes. The analysis indicates that the CC-type GRXs probably arose by diversification from the CPYC class, at a time coinciding with colonization of land by plants. This strong differential expansion of the CC-type class occurred exclusively in the angiosperms, mainly through paleopolyploidy duplication events shortly after the monocot-eudicot split, and more recently through multiple tandem duplications that occurred independently in five investigated angiosperm lineages. The presented data suggest that following duplications, subfunctionalization, and subsequent neofunctionalization likely facilitated the sequestration of land plant-specific CC-type GRXs into novel functions

  9. Expression of a monothiol glutaredoxin, AtGRXS17, in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) enhances drought tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiotic stresses are a major factor limiting crop growth and productivity. Our previous studies revealed that Arabidopsis thaliana glutaredoxin S17 (AtGRXS17) has conserved functions in plant tolerance to heat and chilling stress in tomato. Here, we report that ectopic expression of AtGRXS17 in toma...

  10. Loss of glutaredoxin 3 impedes mammary lobuloalveolar development during pregnancy and lactation

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    Mammalian glutaredoxin 3 (Grx3) has been shown to be important for regulating cellular redox homeostasis in the cell. Our previous studies indicate that Grx3 is significantly overexpressed in various human cancers including breast cancer and demonstrate that Grx3 controls cancer cell growth and inva...

  11. Glutaredoxins in plant development, abiotic stress response, and iron homeostasis: From model organisms to crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant growth, development, and response to environmental stress require the judicious balance of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are a group of oxidoreductases that participate in the control of ROS and are traditionally defined as redox regulators. New studies suggest the member...

  12. Glutaredoxins are essential for stress adaptation in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

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    Ana M Sánchez-Riego

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxin are small redox proteins able to reduce disulfides and mixed disulfides between GSH and proteins. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 contains three genes coding for glutaredoxins: ssr2061 (grxA and slr1562 (grxB code for dithiolic glutaredoxins while slr1846 (grxC codes for a monothiolic glutaredoxin. We have analyzed the expression of these glutaredoxins in response to different stresses, such as high light, H2O2 and heat shock. Analysis of the mRNA levels showed that grxA is only induced by heat while grxC is repressed by heat shock and is induced by high light and H2O2. In contrast, grxB expression was maintained almost constant under all conditions. Analysis of GrxA and GrxC protein levels by western blot showed that GrxA increases in response to high light, heat or H2O2 while GrxC is only induced by high light and H2O2, in accordance with its mRNA levels. In addition, we have also generated mutants that have interrupted one, two or three glutaredoxin genes. These mutants were viable and did not show any different phenotype from the WT under standard growth conditions. Nevertheless, analysis of these mutants under several stress conditions revealed that single grxA mutants grow slower after H2O2, heat and high light treatments, while mutants in grxB are indistinguishable from WT. grxC mutants were hypersensitive to treatments with H2O2, heat, high light and metals. A double grxAgrxC mutant was found to be even more sensitive to H2O2 than each corresponding single mutants. Surprisingly a mutation in grxB suppressed totally or partially the phenotypes of grxA and grxC mutants except the H2O2 sensitivity of the grxC mutant. This suggests that grxA and grxC participate in independent pathways while grxA and grxB participate in a common pathway for H2O2 resistance. The data presented here show that glutaredoxins are essential for stress adaptation in cyanobacteria, although their targets and mechanism of action remain unidentified.

  13. A Rice CPYC-Type Glutaredoxin OsGRX20 in Protection against Bacterial Blight, Methyl Viologen and Salt Stresses

    OpenAIRE

    Xi Ning; Yao Sun; Changchun Wang; Weilin Zhang; Meihao Sun; Haitao Hu; Jianzhong Liu; Ling Yang

    2018-01-01

    Glutaredoxins (GRXs) belong to the antioxidants involved in the cellular stress responses. In spite of the identification 48 GRX genes in rice genomes, the biological functions of most of them remain unknown. Especially, the biological roles of members of GRX family in disease resistance are still lacking. Our proteomic analysis found that OsGRX20 increased by 2.7-fold after infection by bacterial blight. In this study, we isolated and characterized the full-length nucleotide sequences of the...

  14. Molecular characterization and serodiagnostic potential of a novel dithiol glutaredoxin 1 from Echinococcus granulosus.

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    Song, Xingju; Yan, Min; Hu, Dandan; Wang, Yu; Wang, Ning; Gu, Xiaobin; Peng, Xuerong; Yang, Guangyou

    2016-08-17

    The larval stage of Echinococcus granulosus is the etiological agent of cystic echinococcosis (CE), which causes serious morbidity and mortality in many areas. There is no reliable method to monitor sheep CE. Here, we characterize E. granulosus glutaredoxin 1 (Eg-Grx1) and report an improved immunodiagnostic method for CE. We cloned and expressed recombinant Eg-Grx1 and generated antibodies. We analyzed the location of the protein in different parasite stages by fluorescence immunohistochemistry, detected the immunogenicity of recombinant Eg-Grx1, and developed an indirect ELISA (iELISA) for CE serodiagnosis. Eg-Grx1 is a classic dithiol Grx with several GSH-binding motifs. Native Eg-Grx1 protein was distributed in the tegument of protoscoleces, the whole germinal layer, and the parenchymatous tissue of adult worms. Recombinant Eg-Grx1 exhibited good immunoreactivity to CE-infected sheep serum. An iELISA using this antigen showed specificity of 64.3 % (9/14) and sensitivity of 1:3200, and the diagnostic accordance rate was 97.9 % (47/48) compared with the results of necropsy. We characterized a novel Grx (Eg-Grx1) from a parasitic helminth and present a comprehensive analysis of the sequence and structure of this protein. The recombinant Eg-Grx1 protein showed good potential serodiagnostic performance, and we established an iELISA method, which may contribute to the surveillance of sheep CE in epidemic areas.

  15. Protein-Thiol Oxidation and Cell Death: Regulatory Role of Glutaredoxins

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    Allen, Erin M.G.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Glutaredoxin (Grx) is the primary enzyme responsible for catalysis of deglutathionylation of protein-mixed disulfides with glutathione (GSH) (protein-SSG). This reversible post-translational modification alters the activity and function of many proteins important in regulation of critical cellular processes. Aberrant regulation of protein glutathionylation/deglutathionylation reactions due to changes in Grx activity can disrupt both apoptotic and survival signaling pathways. Recent Advances: Grx is known to regulate the activity of many proteins through reversible glutathionylation, such as Ras, Fas, ASK1, NFκB, and procaspase-3, all of which play important roles in control of apoptosis. Reactive oxygen species and/or reactive nitrogen species mediate oxidative modifications of critical Cys residues on these apoptotic mediators, facilitating protein-SSG formation and thereby altering protein function and apoptotic signaling. Critical Issues: Much of what is known about the regulation of apoptotic mediators by Grx and reversible glutathionylation has been gleaned from in vitro studies of discrete apoptotic pathways. To relate these results to events in vivo it is important to examine changes in protein-SSG status in situ under natural cellular conditions, maintaining relevant GSH:GSSG ratios and using appropriate inducers of apoptosis. Future Directions: Apoptosis is a highly complex, tightly regulated process involving many different checks and balances. The influence of Grx activity on the interconnectivity among these various pathways remains unknown. Knowledge of the effects of Grx is essential for developing novel therapeutic approaches for treating diseases involving dysregulated apoptosis, such as cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases, where alterations in redox homeostasis are hallmarks for pathogenesis. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 17, 1748–1763. PMID:22530666

  16. Novel chloroacetamido compound CWR-J02 is an anti-inflammatory glutaredoxin-1 inhibitor.

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    Olga Gorelenkova Miller

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxin (Grx1 is a ubiquitously expressed thiol-disulfide oxidoreductase that specifically catalyzes reduction of S-glutathionylated substrates. Grx1 is known to be a key regulator of pro-inflammatory signaling, and Grx1 silencing inhibits inflammation in inflammatory disease models. Therefore, we anticipate that inhibition of Grx1 could be an anti-inflammatory therapeutic strategy. We used a rapid screening approach to test 504 novel electrophilic compounds for inhibition of Grx1, which has a highly reactive active-site cysteine residue (pKa 3.5. From this chemical library a chloroacetamido compound, CWR-J02, was identified as a potential lead compound to be characterized. CWR-J02 inhibited isolated Grx1 with an IC50 value of 32 μM in the presence of 1 mM glutathione. Mass spectrometric analysis documented preferential adduction of CWR-J02 to the active site Cys-22 of Grx1, and molecular dynamics simulation identified a potential non-covalent binding site. Treatment of the BV2 microglial cell line with CWR-J02 led to inhibition of intracellular Grx1 activity with an IC50 value (37 μM. CWR-J02 treatment decreased lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory gene transcription in the microglial cells in a parallel concentration-dependent manner, documenting the anti-inflammatory potential of CWR-J02. Exploiting the alkyne moiety of CWR-J02, we used click chemistry to link biotin azide to CWR-J02-adducted proteins, isolating them with streptavidin beads. Tandem mass spectrometric analysis identified many CWR-J02-reactive proteins, including Grx1 and several mediators of inflammatory activation. Taken together, these data identify CWR-J02 as an intracellularly effective Grx1 inhibitor that may elicit its anti-inflammatory action in a synergistic manner by also disabling other pro-inflammatory mediators. The CWR-J02 molecule provides a starting point for developing more selective Grx1 inhibitors and anti-inflammatory agents for therapeutic

  17. Expression of a rice glutaredoxin in aleurone layers of developing and mature seeds: subcellular localization and possible functions in antioxidant defense.

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    Morita, Shigeto; Yamashita, Yuki; Fujiki, Masayoshi; Todaka, Rie; Nishikawa, Yuri; Hosoki, Ayaka; Yabe, Chisato; Nakamura, Jun'ichi; Kawamura, Kazuyoshi; Suwastika, I Nengah; Sato, Masa H; Masumura, Takehiro; Ogihara, Yasunari; Tanaka, Kunisuke; Satoh, Shigeru

    2015-11-01

    A rice glutaredoxin isoform (OsGrxC2;2) with antioxidant capacity is expressed abundantly in seed tissues and is localized to storage vacuoles in aleurone layers in developing and mature seeds. Seed tissues undergo drastic water loss at the late stage of seed development, and thus need to tolerate oxidative injuries associated with desiccation. We previously found a rice glutaredoxin isoform, OsGrxC2;2, as a gene expressed abundantly in developing seeds. Since glutaredoxin is involved in antioxidant defense, in the present study we investigated the subcellular localization and expression profile of OsGrxC2;2 and whether OsGrxC2;2 has a role in the defense against reactive oxygen species. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry revealed that the OsGrxC2;2 protein accumulated at a high level in the embryo and aleurone layers of developing and mature seeds. The OsGrxC2;2 in developing seeds was particularly localized to aleurone grains, which are storage organelles derived from vacuoles. Overexpression of OsGrxC2;2 resulted in an enhanced tolerance to menadione in yeast and methyl viologen in green leaves of transgenic rice plants. These results suggest that OsGrxC2;2 participates in the defense against oxidative stress in developing and mature seeds.

  18. Glutaredoxin Desensitizes Lens to Oxidative Stress by Connecting and Integrating Specific Signaling and Transcriptional Regulation for Antioxidant Response

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    Qi Fan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Oxidative stress plays a critical role in the development of cataracts, and glutaredoxins (Grxs play a major protective role against oxidative stress in the lens. This study aimed to reveal the global regulatory network of Grx1. Methods: Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC was used in a proteome-wide quantitative approach to identify the Grx1 regulatory signaling cascades at a subcellular resolution in response to oxidative stress. Results: A total of 1,291 proteins were identified to be differentially expressed, which were further categorized into a variety of signaling cascades including redox regulation, apoptosis, cell cycle control, glucose metabolism, protein synthesis, DNA damage response, protein folding, proteasome and others. Thirteen key signaling node molecules representing each pathway were verified. Notably, the subunits of proteasome complexes, which play a pivotal role in preventing cytotoxicity via the degradation of oxidized proteins, were highly enriched by Grx1. By data-dependent network analysis, we found global functional links among these signaling pathways which elucidate how Grx1 integrates the operation of these regulatory networks in an interconnected way for H2O2-induced response. Conclusion: Our data provide a system-wide insight into the function of Grx1 and provide a basis for further mechanistic investigation of Grx1 in antioxidant responses in the lens.

  19. A dithiol glutaredoxin cDNA from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam): enzyme properties and kinetic studies.

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    Chi, X-W; Lin, C-T; Jiang, Y-C; Wen, L; Lin, C-T

    2012-07-01

    Glutaredoxins (Grx) play an important role in reduction of protein glutathione mixed disulphides. An IbGrx cDNA (561 bp, EF362614) encoding a putative dithiol Grx was cloned from sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas [L.] Lam). The deduced amino acid sequence is conserved among the reported dithiol Grx, having a CGYC dithiol motif at the active site. A 3-D structural model was created based on the known crystal structure of a poplar Grx (GrxC1). To characterise the IbGrx protein, the coding region was subcloned into an expression vector and transformed into Escherichia coli. The recombinant His(6) -tagged IbGrx was expressed and purified by metal affinity chromatography. The purified enzyme showed a monomeric band, as demonstrated with 15% SDS-PAGE. The Michaelis constant (K(M) ) for ß-hydroxyethyl disulphide (HED) was 0.50 ± 0.08 Mm. The enzyme retained 60% activity at 80 °C for 16 min. The enzyme was active over a broad pH range from 6.0 to 11.0, and in the presence of imidazole up to 0.4 M. The enzyme was susceptible to protease. © 2012 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  20. Glutaredoxins concomitant with optimal ROS activate AMPK through S-glutathionylation to improve glucose metabolism in type 2 diabetes.

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    Dong, Kelei; Wu, Meiling; Liu, Xiaomin; Huang, Yanjie; Zhang, Dongyang; Wang, Yiting; Yan, Liang-Jun; Shi, Dongyun

    2016-12-01

    AMPK dysregulation contributes to the onset and development of type 2 diabetes (T2DM). AMPK is known to be activated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant interference. However the mechanism by which redox state mediates such contradictory result remains largely unknown. Here we used streptozotocin-high fat diet (STZ-HFD) induced-type 2 diabetic rats and cells lines (L02 and HEK 293) to explore the mechanism of redox-mediated AMPK activation. We show glutaredoxins (Grxs) concomitant with optimal ROS act as an essential mediator for AMPK activation. ROS level results in different mechanisms for AMPK activation. Under low ROS microenvironment, Grxs-mediated S-glutathionylation on AMPK-α catalytic subunit activates AMPK to improve glucose transportation and degradation while inhibiting glycogen synthesis and keeping redox balance. While, under high ROS microenvironment, AMPK is activated by an AMP-dependent mechanism, however sustained high level ROS also causes loss of AMPK protein. This finding provides evidence for a new approach to diabetes treatment by individual doses of ROS or antioxidant calibrated against the actual redox level in vivo. Moreover, the novel function of Grxs in promoting glucose metabolism may provide new target for T2DM treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cloning, Expression, Purification, and Characterization of Glutaredoxin from Antarctic Sea-Ice Bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. AN178

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    Quanfu Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxins (Grxs are small ubiquitous redox enzymes that catalyze glutathione-dependent reactions to reduce protein disulfide. In this study, a full-length Grx gene (PsGrx with 270 nucleotides was isolated from Antarctic sea-ice bacterium Pseudoalteromonas sp. AN178. It encoded deduced 89 amino acid residues with the molecular weight 9.8 kDa. Sequence analysis of the amino acid sequence revealed the catalytic motif CPYC. Recombinant PsGrx (rPsGrx stably expressed in E. coli BL21 was purified to apparent homogeneity by Ni-affinity chromatography. rPsGrx exhibited optimal activity at 30°C and pH 8.0 and showed 25.5% of the activity at 0°C. It retained 65.0% of activity after incubation at 40°C for 20 min and still exhibited 37.0% activity in 1.0 M NaCl. These results indicated that rPsGrx was a typical cold active protein with low thermostability.

  2. Cysteine Specific Targeting of the Functionally Distinct Peroxiredoxin and Glutaredoxin Proteins by the Investigational Disulfide BNP7787

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    Aulma R. Parker

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxin (Grx, peroxiredoxin (Prx, and thioredoxin (Trx are redoxin family proteins that catalyze different types of chemical reactions that impact cell growth and survival through functionally distinct intracellular pathways. Much research is focused on understanding the roles of these redoxin proteins in the development and/or progression of human diseases. Grx and Prx are overexpressed in human cancers, including human lung cancers. BNP7787 is a novel investigational agent that has been evaluated in previous clinical studies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC studies. Herein, data from activity assays, mass spectrometry analyses, and X-ray crystallographic studies indicate that BNP7787 forms mixed disulfides with select cysteine residues on Grx and Prx and modulates their function. Studies of interactions between BNP7787 and Trx have been conducted and reported separately. Despite the fact that Trx, Grx, and Prx are functionally distinct proteins that impact oxidative stress, cell proliferation and disease processes through different intracellular pathways, BNP7787 can modify each protein and appears to modulate function through mechanisms that are unique to each target protein. Tumor cells are often genomically heterogeneous containing subpopulations of cancer cells that often express different tumor-promoting proteins or that have multiple dysregulated signaling pathways modulating cell proliferation and drug resistance. A multi-targeted agent that simultaneously modulates activity of proteins important in mediating cell proliferation by functionally distinct intracellular pathways could have many potentially useful therapeutic applications.

  3. Two isoforms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutaredoxin 2 are expressed in vivo and localize to different subcellular compartments.

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    Pedrajas, José R; Porras, Pablo; Martínez-Galisteo, Emilia; Padilla, C Alicia; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio; Bárcena, J Antonio

    2002-06-15

    Glutaredoxin (Grx)2 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a member of the two-cysteine (dithiol) subfamily of Grxs involved in the defence against oxidative stress in yeast. Recombinant yeast Grx2p, expressed in Escherichia coli, behaves as a 'classical' Grx that efficiently catalyses the reduction of hydroxyethyl disulphide by GSH. Grx2p also catalyses the reduction of GSSG by dihydrolipoamide with even higher efficiency. Western blot analysis of S. cerevisiae crude extracts identifies two isoforms of Grx2p of 15.9 and 11.9 kDa respectively. The levels of these two isoforms reach a peak during the exponential phase of growth in normal yeast extract/peptone/dextrose ('YPD') medium, with the long form predominating over the short one. From immunochemical analysis of subcellular fractions, it is shown that both isoforms are present in mitochondria, but only the short one is detected in the cytosolic fraction. On the other hand, only the long form is prominent in microsomes. Mitochondrial isoforms should represent the processed and unprocessed products of an open reading frame (YDR513W), with a putative start codon 99 bp upstream of the GRX2 start codon described thus far. These results indicate that GRX2 contains two in-frame start codons, and that translation from the first AUG results in a product that is targeted to mitochondria. The cytosolic form would result either by initiation from the second AUG, or by differential processing of one single translation product.

  4. Systemic remodeling of the redox regulatory network due to RNAi perturbations of glutaredoxin 1, thioredoxin 1, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase

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    Shukla Shreya

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular clearance of reactive oxygen species is dependent on a network of tightly coupled redox enzymes; this network rapidly adapts to oxidative conditions such as aging, viral entry, or inflammation. Current widespread use of shRNA as a means to perturb specific redox couples may be misinterpreted if the targeted effects are not monitored in the context of potential global remodeling of the redox enzyme network. Results Stable cell lines containing shRNA targets for glutaredoxin 1, thioredoxin 1, or glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase were generated in order to examine the changes in expression associated with altering cytosolic redox couples. A qRT PCR array revealed systemic off-target effects of altered antioxidant capacity and reactive oxygen species formation. Empty lentiviral particles generated numerous enzyme expression changes in comparison to uninfected cells, indicating an alteration in antioxidant capacity irrespective of a shRNA target. Of the three redox couples perturbed, glutaredoxin 1, attenuation produced the most numerous off-target effects with 10/28 genes assayed showing statistically significant changes. A multivariate analysis extracted strong co-variance between glutaredoxin 1 and peroxiredoxin 2 which was subsequently experimentally verified. Computational modeling of the peroxide clearance dynamics associated with the remodeling of the redox network indicated that the compromised antioxidant capacity compared across the knockdown cell lines was unequally affected by the changes in expression of off-target proteins. Conclusions Our results suggest that targeted reduction of redox enzyme expression leads to widespread changes in off-target protein expression, changes that are well-insulated between sub-cellular compartments, but compensatory in both the production of and protection against intracellular reactive oxygen species. Our observations suggest that the use of lentivirus can in itself have off

  5. Mutation of the gene encoding monothiol glutaredoxin (GrxD) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa increases its susceptibility to polymyxins.

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    Romsang, Adisak; Leesukon, Panithi; Duangnkern, Jintana; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2015-03-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent cause of hospital-acquired infections that have a high mortality rate because of its innate drug resistance. Polymyxins are recognised as the last-line antibiotics for the treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) P. aeruginosa. In this study, the link between monothiol glutaredoxin (GrxD), which catalyses the reduction of disulphide bonds of various substrates in P. aeruginosa, and antibiotic resistance was examined. A P. aeruginosa ΔgrxD mutant strain was constructed. The ΔgrxD mutant showed significantly increased susceptibility to polymyxin B (PMB) compared with the wild-type P. aeruginosa PAO1. Site-directed mutagenesis was performed to generate amino acid substitutions in GrxD, and the ability of mutated grxD genes to confer resistance to PMB in the ΔgrxD mutant was tested. The results indicated that residue C29 at the active site of GrxD is important for protection against polymyxin killing in the mutant. Polymyxin killing of PAO1 and the ΔgrxD mutant did not appear to involve hydroxyl radicals generated by antibiotic treatment because increased susceptibility of the mutant to PMB was also observed under anaerobic growth as well as aerobically in the presence of the iron chelator 2,2'-dipyridyl. Thus, GrxD could be a target for the development of agents that enhance the effectiveness of PMB in treating clinically important MDR P. aeruginosa infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  6. The E. coli monothiol glutaredoxin GrxD forms homodimeric and heterodimeric FeS cluster containing complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, N; Gold, B; Liu, N L; Prathapam, R; Sterling, H J; Willams, E R; Butland, G

    2011-10-18

    Monothiol glutaredoxins (mono-Grx) represent a highly evolutionarily conserved class of proteins present in organisms ranging from prokaryotes to humans. Mono-Grxs have been implicated in iron sulfur (FeS) cluster biosynthesis as potential scaffold proteins and in iron homeostasis via an FeS-containing complex with Fra2p (homologue of E. coli BolA) in yeast and are linked to signal transduction in mammalian systems. However, the function of the mono-Grx in prokaryotes and the nature of an interaction with BolA-like proteins have not been established. Recent genome-wide screens for E. coli genetic interactions reported the synthetic lethality (combination of mutations leading to cell death; mutation of only one of these genes does not) of a grxD mutation when combined with strains defective in FeS cluster biosynthesis (isc operon) functions [Butland, G., et al. (2008) Nature Methods 5, 789-795]. These data connected the only E. coli mono-Grx, GrxD to a potential role in FeS cluster biosynthesis. We investigated GrxD to uncover the molecular basis of this synthetic lethality and observed that GrxD can form FeS-bound homodimeric and BolA containing heterodimeric complexes. These complexes display substantially different spectroscopic and functional properties, including the ability to act as scaffold proteins for intact FeS cluster transfer to the model [2Fe-2S] acceptor protein E. coli apo-ferredoxin (Fdx), with the homodimer being significantly more efficient. In this work, we functionally dissect the potential cellular roles of GrxD as a component of both homodimeric and heterodimeric complexes to ultimately uncover if either of these complexes performs functions linked to FeS cluster biosynthesis. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  7. A glutaredoxin in the mitochondrial intermembrane space has stage-specific functions in the thermo-tolerance and proliferation of African trypanosomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Ebersoll

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosoma brucei glutaredoxin 2 (Grx2 is a dithiol glutaredoxin that is specifically located in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Bloodstream form parasites lacking Grx2 or both, Grx2 and the cytosolic Grx1, are viable in vitro and infectious to mice suggesting that neither oxidoreductase is needed for survival or infectivity to mammals. A 37 °C to 39 °C shift changes the cellular redox milieu of bloodstream cells to more oxidizing conditions and induces a significantly stronger growth arrest in wildtype parasites compared to the mutant cells. Grx2-deficient cells ectopically expressing the wildtype form of Grx2 with its C31QFC34 active site, but not the C34S mutant, regain the sensitivity of the parental strain, indicating that the physiological role of Grx2 requires both active site cysteines. In the procyclic insect stage of the parasite, Grx2 is essential. Both alleles can be replaced if procyclic cells ectopically express authentic or C34S, but not C31S/C34S Grx2, pointing to a redox role that relies on a monothiol mechanism. RNA-interference against Grx2 causes a virtually irreversible proliferation defect. The cells adopt an elongated morphology but do not show any significant alteration in the cell cycle. The growth retardation is attenuated by high glucose concentrations. Under these conditions, procyclic cells obtain ATP by substrate level phosphorylation suggesting that Grx2 might regulate a respiratory chain component.

  8. A Rice CPYC-Type Glutaredoxin OsGRX20 in Protection against Bacterial Blight, Methyl Viologen and Salt Stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Ning

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Glutaredoxins (GRXs belong to the antioxidants involved in the cellular stress responses. In spite of the identification 48 GRX genes in rice genomes, the biological functions of most of them remain unknown. Especially, the biological roles of members of GRX family in disease resistance are still lacking. Our proteomic analysis found that OsGRX20 increased by 2.7-fold after infection by bacterial blight. In this study, we isolated and characterized the full-length nucleotide sequences of the rice OsGRX20 gene, which encodes a GRX family protein with CPFC active site of CPYC-type class. OsGRX20 protein was localized in nucleus and cytosol, and its transcripts were expressed predominantly in leaves. Several stress- and hormone-related motifs putatively acting as regulatory elements were found in the OsGRX20 promoter. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis indicated that OsGRX20 was expressed at a significantly higher level in leaves of a resistant or tolerant rice genotype, Yongjing 50A, than in a sensitive genotype, Xiushui 11, exposed to bacterial blight, methyl viologen, heat, and cold. Its expression could be induced by salt, PEG-6000, 2,4-D, salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, and abscisic acid treatments in Yongjing 50A. Overexpression of OsGRX20 in rice Xiushui 11 significantly enhanced its resistance to bacterial blight attack, and tolerance to methyl viologen and salt stresses. In contrast, interference of OsGRX20 in Yongjing 50A led to increased susceptibility to bacterial blight, methyl viologen and salt stresses. OsGRX20 restrained accumulation of superoxide radicals in aerial tissue during methyl viologen treatment. Consistently, alterations in OsGRX20 expression affect the ascorbate/dehydroascorbate ratio and the abundance of transcripts encoding four reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes after methyl viologen-induced stress. Our results demonstrate that OsGRX20 functioned as a positive regulator in rice tolerance to multiple stresses

  9. Characterization of Three New Glutaredoxin Genes in the Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus Rhizophagus irregularis: Putative Role of RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 in Iron Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Elisabeth; Benabdellah, Karim; Ferrol, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Glutaredoxins (GRXs) are small ubiquitous oxidoreductases involved in the regulation of the redox state in living cells. In an attempt to identify the full complement of GRXs in the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis, three additional GRX homologs, besides the formerly characterized GintGRX1 (renamed here as RiGRX1), were identified. The three new GRXs (RiGRX4, RiGRX5 and RiGRX6) contain the CXXS domain of monothiol GRXs, but whereas RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 belong to class II GRXs, RiGRX6 belongs to class I together with RiGRX1. By using a yeast expression system, we observed that the newly identified homologs partially reverted sensitivity of the GRX deletion yeast strains to external oxidants. Furthermore, our results indicated that RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 play a role in iron homeostasis in yeast. Gene expression analyses revealed that RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 were more highly expressed in the intraradical (IRM) than in the extraradical mycelium (ERM). Exposure of the ERM to hydrogen peroxide induced up-regulation of RiGRX1, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5 gene expression. RiGRX4 expression was also up-regulated in the ERM when the fungus was grown in media supplemented with a high iron concentration. These data indicate the two monothiol class II GRXs, RiGRX4 and RiGRX5, might be involved in oxidative stress protection and in the regulation of fungal iron homeostasis. Increased expression of RiGRX1 and RiGRX6 in the IRM suggests that these GRXs should play a key role in oxidative stress protection of R. irregularis during its in planta phase. PMID:26900849

  10. Monothiol glutaredoxin Grx5 interacts with Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2 and supports Fe-S assembly and DNA integrity in mitochondria of fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Chung, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Chang; Roe, Jung-Hye

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial monothiol glutaredoxins that bind Fe-S cluster are known to participate in Fe-S cluster assembly. However, their precise role has not been well understood. Among three monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3, 4, and 5) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe only Grx5 resides in mitochondria. The Δgrx5 mutant requires cysteine on minimal media, and does not grow on non-fermentable carbon source such as glycerol. We found that the mutant is low in the activity of Fe-S enzymes in mitochondria as well as in the cytoplasm. Screening of multi-copy suppressor of growth defects of the mutant identified isa1 + gene encoding a putative A-type Fe-S scaffold, in addition to mas5 + and hsc1 + genes encoding putative chaperones for Fe-S assembly process. Examination of other scaffold and chaperone genes revealed that isa2 + , but not isu1 + and ssc1 + , complemented the growth phenotype of Δgrx5 mutant as isa1 + did, partly through restoration of Fe-S enzyme activities. The mutant also showed a significant decrease in the amount of mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that Grx5 interacts in vivo with Isa1 and Isa2 proteins in mitochondria by observing bimolecular fluorescence complementation. These results indicate that Grx5 plays a central role in Fe-S assembly process through interaction with A-type Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2, each of which is an essential protein in S. pombe, and supports mitochondrial genome integrity as well as Fe-S assembly.

  11. Monothiol glutaredoxin Grx5 interacts with Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2 and supports Fe-S assembly and DNA integrity in mitochondria of fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Chung, Woo-Hyun; Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kyung-Chang [Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Roe, Jung-Hye, E-mail: jhroe@snu.ac.kr [Laboratory of Molecular Microbiology, School of Biological Sciences, Institute of Microbiology, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-12

    Mitochondrial monothiol glutaredoxins that bind Fe-S cluster are known to participate in Fe-S cluster assembly. However, their precise role has not been well understood. Among three monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3, 4, and 5) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe only Grx5 resides in mitochondria. The {Delta}grx5 mutant requires cysteine on minimal media, and does not grow on non-fermentable carbon source such as glycerol. We found that the mutant is low in the activity of Fe-S enzymes in mitochondria as well as in the cytoplasm. Screening of multi-copy suppressor of growth defects of the mutant identified isa1{sup +} gene encoding a putative A-type Fe-S scaffold, in addition to mas5{sup +} and hsc1{sup +} genes encoding putative chaperones for Fe-S assembly process. Examination of other scaffold and chaperone genes revealed that isa2{sup +}, but not isu1{sup +} and ssc1{sup +}, complemented the growth phenotype of {Delta}grx5 mutant as isa1{sup +} did, partly through restoration of Fe-S enzyme activities. The mutant also showed a significant decrease in the amount of mitochondrial DNA. We demonstrated that Grx5 interacts in vivo with Isa1 and Isa2 proteins in mitochondria by observing bimolecular fluorescence complementation. These results indicate that Grx5 plays a central role in Fe-S assembly process through interaction with A-type Fe-S scaffold proteins Isa1 and Isa2, each of which is an essential protein in S. pombe, and supports mitochondrial genome integrity as well as Fe-S assembly.

  12. Role of glutaredoxin 3 in iron homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron is an essential mineral nutrient that is tightly regulated through mechanisms involving iron regulatory genes, intracellular storage, and iron recycling. Dysregulation of these mechanisms often results in either excess tissue iron accumulation (overload) or iron deficiency (anemia). Many bioche...

  13. Neuronal Damage Induced by Perinatal Asphyxia Is Attenuated by Postinjury Glutaredoxin-2 Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Ignacio Romero

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The general disruption of redox signaling following an ischemia-reperfusion episode has been proposed as a crucial component in neuronal death and consequently brain damage. Thioredoxin (Trx family proteins control redox reactions and ensure protein regulation via specific, oxidative posttranslational modifications as part of cellular signaling processes. Trx proteins function in the manifestation, progression, and recovery following hypoxic/ischemic damage. Here, we analyzed the neuroprotective effects of postinjury, exogenous administration of Grx2 and Trx1 in a neonatal hypoxia/ischemia model. P7 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to right common carotid ligation or sham surgery, followed by an exposure to nitrogen. 1 h later, animals were injected i.p. with saline solution, 10 mg/kg recombinant Grx2 or Trx1, and euthanized 72 h postinjury. Results showed that Grx2 administration, and to some extent Trx1, attenuated part of the neuronal damage associated with a perinatal hypoxic/ischemic damage, such as glutamate excitotoxicity, axonal integrity, and astrogliosis. Moreover, these treatments also prevented some of the consequences of the induced neural injury, such as the delay of neurobehavioral development. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating neuroprotective effects of recombinant Trx proteins on the outcome of neonatal hypoxia/ischemia, implying clinical potential as neuroprotective agents that might counteract neonatal hypoxia/ischemia injury.

  14. Neuronal Damage Induced by Perinatal Asphyxia Is Attenuated by Postinjury Glutaredoxin-2 Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Juan Ignacio; Holubiec, Mariana Inés; Tornatore, Tamara Logica; Rivière, Stéphanie; Hanschmann, Eva-Maria; Kölliker-Frers, Rodolfo Alberto; Tau, Julia; Blanco, Eduardo; Galeano, Pablo; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Lillig, Christopher Horst; Capani, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    The general disruption of redox signaling following an ischemia-reperfusion episode has been proposed as a crucial component in neuronal death and consequently brain damage. Thioredoxin (Trx) family proteins control redox reactions and ensure protein regulation via specific, oxidative posttranslational modifications as part of cellular signaling processes. Trx proteins function in the manifestation, progression, and recovery following hypoxic/ischemic damage. Here, we analyzed the neuroprotective effects of postinjury, exogenous administration of Grx2 and Trx1 in a neonatal hypoxia/ischemia model. P7 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to right common carotid ligation or sham surgery, followed by an exposure to nitrogen. 1 h later, animals were injected i.p. with saline solution, 10 mg/kg recombinant Grx2 or Trx1, and euthanized 72 h postinjury. Results showed that Grx2 administration, and to some extent Trx1, attenuated part of the neuronal damage associated with a perinatal hypoxic/ischemic damage, such as glutamate excitotoxicity, axonal integrity, and astrogliosis. Moreover, these treatments also prevented some of the consequences of the induced neural injury, such as the delay of neurobehavioral development. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating neuroprotective effects of recombinant Trx proteins on the outcome of neonatal hypoxia/ischemia, implying clinical potential as neuroprotective agents that might counteract neonatal hypoxia/ischemia injury.

  15. Cardiac-specific ablation of glutaredoxin 3 leads to cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experimental and clinical investigations have demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is increased during cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. Excess ROS can directly impair cardiac contraction through modification of Ca2+ handling proteins or activate multiple effectors and sig...

  16. Neuronal Damage Induced by Perinatal Asphyxia Is Attenuated by Postinjury Glutaredoxin-2 Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holubiec, Mariana Inés; Tornatore, Tamara Logica; Rivière, Stéphanie; Kölliker-Frers, Rodolfo Alberto; Tau, Julia; Blanco, Eduardo; Galeano, Pablo; Lillig, Christopher Horst

    2017-01-01

    The general disruption of redox signaling following an ischemia-reperfusion episode has been proposed as a crucial component in neuronal death and consequently brain damage. Thioredoxin (Trx) family proteins control redox reactions and ensure protein regulation via specific, oxidative posttranslational modifications as part of cellular signaling processes. Trx proteins function in the manifestation, progression, and recovery following hypoxic/ischemic damage. Here, we analyzed the neuroprotective effects of postinjury, exogenous administration of Grx2 and Trx1 in a neonatal hypoxia/ischemia model. P7 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to right common carotid ligation or sham surgery, followed by an exposure to nitrogen. 1 h later, animals were injected i.p. with saline solution, 10 mg/kg recombinant Grx2 or Trx1, and euthanized 72 h postinjury. Results showed that Grx2 administration, and to some extent Trx1, attenuated part of the neuronal damage associated with a perinatal hypoxic/ischemic damage, such as glutamate excitotoxicity, axonal integrity, and astrogliosis. Moreover, these treatments also prevented some of the consequences of the induced neural injury, such as the delay of neurobehavioral development. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating neuroprotective effects of recombinant Trx proteins on the outcome of neonatal hypoxia/ischemia, implying clinical potential as neuroprotective agents that might counteract neonatal hypoxia/ischemia injury. PMID:28706574

  17. Redox Regulation Of Metabolic And Signaling Pathways By Thioredoxin And Glutaredoxin In Nitric Oxide Treated Hepatoblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Alicia Padilla Peña

    2015-08-01

    Conclusions: Trx1 and Grx1 exert contradictory influences on HepG2 cells. They are required for proliferation but they also contribute to antiproliferative effect of NO, associated to Akt1 redox changes.

  18. Caracterización y análisis funcional de una familia de glutaredoxinas monotiólicas en la levadura

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Manzaneque Martínez, María Teresa

    2002-01-01

    Les glutaredoxines són enzims que intervenen en reaccions redox i que la sevafunció principal consisteix en protegir les cèl·lules contra estrès oxidatiu mitjançant elmanteniment de l'estat redox adequat dels grups sulfidril de les proteïnes cel·lulars.Treballs anteriors han descrit l'existència de dues glutaredoxines en el llevatSaccharomyces cerevisiae, Grx1 i Grx2, que contenen dues cisteïnes en el seu centreactiu les quals són essencials per a mantenir la seva funció. Aquestes duesglutare...

  19. Atomic Sulfur: An Element for Adaptation to an Oxidative Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noryuki Nagahara

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available During the period of rising oxygen concentration in the Earth’s atmosphere (Figure 1, sulfur atoms were incorporated into proteins as redox-active cysteine residues [1] and antioxidant molecules such as thioredoxin, glutathione, and glutaredoxin appeared [...

  20. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of the arsenate reductase from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Caifang; Xia, Bin; Jin, Changwen

    2011-04-01

    Arsenate reductases (ArsC) are a group of enzymes that play essential roles in biological arsenic detoxification pathways by catalyzing the intracellular reduction of arsenate to arsenite, which is subsequently extruded from the cells by specific transport systems. The ArsC protein from cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 (SynArsC) is related to the thioredoxin-dependent ArsC family, but uses the glutathione/glutaredoxin system for arsenate reduction. Therefore, it is classified to a novel thioredoxin/glutaredoxin hybrid arsenate reductase family. Herein we report the chemical shift assignments of (1)H, (13)C and (15)N atoms for the reduced form of SynArsC, which provides a starting point for further structural analysis and elucidation of its enzymatic mechanism.

  1. In-situ microfibrillar PP–PA6 composites: rheological, morphological ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-08-23

    Aug 23, 2017 ... L grade as the reinforced phase, melting point = 220. ◦. C), PP. (grade C30S Maroon Petrochemicals as the matrix, melt flow index (MFI) = 6 g/10 min), Irganox powder (produced by the ..... be inferred that the average diameter of microfibrillar com- posites increases with an increase in the reinforced phase.

  2. Low glutathione regulates gene expression and the redox potentials of the nucleus and cytosol in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnaubelt, Daniel; Queval, Guillaume; Dong, Yingping; Diaz-Vivancos, Pedro; Makgopa, Matome Eugene; Howell, Gareth; De Simone, Ambra; Bai, Juan; Hannah, Matthew A; Foyer, Christine H

    2015-02-01

    Reduced glutathione (GSH) is considered to exert a strong influence on cellular redox homeostasis and to regulate gene expression, but these processes remain poorly characterized. Severe GSH depletion specifically inhibited root meristem development, while low root GSH levels decreased lateral root densities. The redox potential of the nucleus and cytosol of Arabidopsis thaliana roots determined using roGFP probes was between -300 and -320 mV. Growth in the presence of the GSH-synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) increased the nuclear and cytosolic redox potentials to approximately -260 mV. GSH-responsive genes including transcription factors (SPATULA, MYB15, MYB75), proteins involved in cell division, redox regulation (glutaredoxinS17, thioredoxins, ACHT5 and TH8) and auxin signalling (HECATE), were identified in the GSH-deficient root meristemless 1-1 (rml1-1) mutant, and in other GSH-synthesis mutants (rax1-1, cad2-1, pad2-1) as well as in the wild type following the addition of BSO. Inhibition of auxin transport had no effect on organ GSH levels, but exogenous auxin decreased the root GSH pool. We conclude that GSH depletion significantly increases the redox potentials of the nucleus and cytosol, and causes arrest of the cell cycle in roots but not shoots, with accompanying transcript changes linked to altered hormone responses, but not oxidative stress. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Evidence for the dimerization-mediated catalysis of methionine sulfoxide reductase A from Clostridium oremlandii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun Hye; Lee, Kitaik; Kwak, Geun-Hee; Park, Yeon Seung; Lee, Kong-Joo; Hwang, Kwang Yeon; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium oremlandii MsrA (CoMsrA) is a natively selenocysteine-containing methionine-S-sulfoxide reductase and classified into a 1-Cys type MsrA. CoMsrA exists as a monomer in solution. Herein, we report evidence that CoMsrA can undergo homodimerization during catalysis. The monomeric CoMsrA dimerizes in the presence of its substrate methionine sulfoxide via an intermolecular disulfide bond between catalytic Cys16 residues. The dimeric CoMsrA is resolved by the reductant glutaredoxin, suggesting the relevance of dimerization in catalysis. The dimerization reaction occurs in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. In addition, the occurrence of homodimer formation in the native selenoprotein CoMsrA is confirmed. We also determine the crystal structure of the dimeric CoMsrA, having the dimer interface around the two catalytic Cys16 residues. A central cone-shaped hole is present in the surface model of dimeric structure, and the two Cys16 residues constitute the base of the hole. Collectively, our biochemical and structural analyses suggest a novel dimerization-mediated mechanism for CoMsrA catalysis that is additionally involved in CoMsrA regeneration by glutaredoxin.

  4. Protein S-thiolation by Glutathionylspermidine (Gsp): the role of Escherichia coli Gsp synthetASE/amidase in redox regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Bing-Yu; Chen, Tzu-Chieh; Pai, Chien-Hua; Chou, Chi-Chi; Chen, Hsuan-He; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Chang, Chun-Yang; Wu, Whei-Fen; Wang, Andrew H-J; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2010-08-13

    Certain bacteria synthesize glutathionylspermidine (Gsp), from GSH and spermidine. Escherichia coli Gsp synthetase/amidase (GspSA) catalyzes both the synthesis and hydrolysis of Gsp. Prior to the work reported herein, the physiological role(s) of Gsp or how the two opposing GspSA activities are regulated had not been elucidated. We report that Gsp-modified proteins from E. coli contain mixed disulfides of Gsp and protein thiols, representing a new type of post-translational modification formerly undocumented. The level of these proteins is increased by oxidative stress. We attribute the accumulation of such proteins to the selective inactivation of GspSA amidase activity. X-ray crystallography and a chemical modification study indicated that the catalytic cysteine thiol of the GspSA amidase domain is transiently inactivated by H(2)O(2) oxidation to sulfenic acid, which is stabilized by a very short hydrogen bond with a water molecule. We propose a set of reactions that explains how the levels of Gsp and Gsp S-thiolated proteins are modulated in response to oxidative stress. The hypersensitivities of GspSA and GspSA/glutaredoxin null mutants to H(2)O(2) support the idea that GspSA and glutaredoxin act synergistically to regulate the redox environment of E. coli.

  5. Protein S-Thiolation by Glutathionylspermidine (Gsp)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Bing-Yu; Chen, Tzu-Chieh; Pai, Chien-Hua; Chou, Chi-Chi; Chen, Hsuan-He; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Hsu, Wen-Hung; Chang, Chun-Yang; Wu, Whei-Fen; Wang, Andrew H.-J.; Lin, Chun-Hung

    2010-01-01

    Certain bacteria synthesize glutathionylspermidine (Gsp), from GSH and spermidine. Escherichia coli Gsp synthetase/amidase (GspSA) catalyzes both the synthesis and hydrolysis of Gsp. Prior to the work reported herein, the physiological role(s) of Gsp or how the two opposing GspSA activities are regulated had not been elucidated. We report that Gsp-modified proteins from E. coli contain mixed disulfides of Gsp and protein thiols, representing a new type of post-translational modification formerly undocumented. The level of these proteins is increased by oxidative stress. We attribute the accumulation of such proteins to the selective inactivation of GspSA amidase activity. X-ray crystallography and a chemical modification study indicated that the catalytic cysteine thiol of the GspSA amidase domain is transiently inactivated by H2O2 oxidation to sulfenic acid, which is stabilized by a very short hydrogen bond with a water molecule. We propose a set of reactions that explains how the levels of Gsp and Gsp S-thiolated proteins are modulated in response to oxidative stress. The hypersensitivities of GspSA and GspSA/glutaredoxin null mutants to H2O2 support the idea that GspSA and glutaredoxin act synergistically to regulate the redox environment of E. coli. PMID:20530482

  6. The Lactococcus lactis Thioredoxin System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efler, Petr

    -dependent thioredoxin reductase (NTR) in order to complete its catalytic cycle. Glutathione-dependent glutaredoxin complements Trx in many organisms. This thesis focuses on disulfide reduction pathways in Lactococcus lactis, an important industrial microorganism used traditionally for cheese and buttermilk production....... L. lactis lacks glutathione and glutaredoxin, but it a contains Trx system consisting of an NTR (LlTrxB), a classical Trx (LlTrxA) containing the conserved WCGPC active site motif, a Trx-like protein (LlTrxD) containing a WCGDC active site motif and a redoxin (LlNrdH) providing electrons to class Ib...... ribonucleotide reductase (NrdEF). Physiological functions of LlTrxA and LlTrxD were studied using ΔtrxA, ΔtrxD and ΔtrxAΔtrxD mutant strains of L. lactis ssp. cremoris MG1363 exposed to various stress conditions and comparing them to the wild type (wt) strain. These experiments revealed that the ΔtrxA genotype...

  7. Molecular basis for the redox control of nuclear transport of the structural chromatin protein Hmgb1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoppe, George; Talcott, Katherine E.; Bhattacharya, Sanjoy K.; Crabb, John W.; Sears, Jonathan E.

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress can induce a covalent disulfide bond between protein and peptide thiols that is reversible through enzymatic catalysis. This process provides a post-translational mechanism for control of protein function and may also protect thiol groups from irreversible oxidation. High mobility group protein B1 (Hmgb1), a DNA-binding structural chromosomal protein and transcriptional co-activator was identified as a substrate of glutaredoxin. Hmgb1 contains 3 cysteines, Cys23, 45, and 106. In mild oxidative conditions, Cys23 and Cys45 readily form an intramolecular disulfide bridge, whereas Cys106 remains in the reduced form. The disulfide bond between Cys23 and Cys45 is a target of glutathione-dependent reduction by glutaredoxin. Endogenous Hmgb1 as well as GFP-tagged wild-type Hmgb1 co-localize in the nucleus of CHO cells. While replacement of Hmgb1 Cys23 and/or 45 with serines did not affect the nuclear distribution of the mutant proteins, Cys106-to-Ser and triple cysteine mutations impaired nuclear localization of Hmgb1. Our cysteine targeted mutational analysis suggests that Cys23 and 45 induce conformational changes in response to oxidative stress, whereas Cys106 appears to be critical for the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Hmgb1

  8. Redox regulation of ischemic limb neovascularization – What we have learned from animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko Matsui

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mouse hindlimb ischemia has been widely used as a model to study peripheral artery disease. Genetic modulation of the enzymatic source of oxidants or components of the antioxidant system reveal that physiological levels of oxidants are essential to promote the process of arteriogenesis and angiogenesis after femoral artery occlusion, although mice with diabetes or atherosclerosis may have higher deleterious levels of oxidants. Therefore, fine control of oxidants is required to stimulate vascularization in the limb muscle. Oxidants transduce cellular signaling through oxidative modifications of redox sensitive cysteine thiols. Of particular importance, the reversible modification with abundant glutathione, called S-glutathionylation (or GSH adducts, is relatively stable and alters protein function including signaling, transcription, and cytoskeletal arrangement. Glutaredoxin-1 (Glrx is an enzyme which catalyzes reversal of GSH adducts, and does not scavenge oxidants itself. Glrx may control redox signaling under fluctuation of oxidants levels. In ischemic muscle increased GSH adducts through Glrx deletion improves in vivo limb revascularization, indicating endogenous Glrx has anti-angiogenic roles. In accordance, Glrx overexpression attenuates VEGF signaling in vitro and ischemic vascularization in vivo. There are several Glrx targets including HIF-1α which may contribute to inhibition of vascularization by reducing GSH adducts. These animal studies provide a caution that excess antioxidants may be counter-productive for treatment of ischemic limbs, and highlights Glrx as a potential therapeutic target to improve ischemic limb vascularization. Keywords: Ischemic limb, Angiogenesis, Oxidants, GSH adducts, Glutaredoxin

  9. An NMR-Guided Screening Method for Selective Fragment Docking and Synthesis of a Warhead Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram B. Khattri

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Selective hits for the glutaredoxin ortholog of Brucella melitensis are determined using STD NMR and verified by trNOE and 15N-HSQC titration. The most promising hit, RK207, was docked into the target molecule using a scoring function to compare simulated poses to experimental data. After elucidating possible poses, the hit was further optimized into the lead compound by extension with an electrophilic acrylamide warhead. We believe that focusing on selectivity in this early stage of drug discovery will limit cross-reactivity that might occur with the human ortholog as the lead compound is optimized. Kinetics studies revealed that lead compound 5 modified with an ester group results in higher reactivity than an acrylamide control; however, after modification this compound shows little selectivity for bacterial protein versus the human ortholog. In contrast, hydrolysis of compound 5 to the acid form results in a decrease in the activity of the compound. Together these results suggest that more optimization is warranted for this simple chemical scaffold, and opens the door for discovery of drugs targeted against glutaredoxin proteins—a heretofore untapped reservoir for antibiotic agents.

  10. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L.; Beaudoin, Jessica N.; Hanafin, William P.; DiLiberto, Stephen J.; Kenis, Paul J.A.; Rex Gaskins, H.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition

  11. Transient light-induced intracellular oxidation revealed by redox biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolossov, Vladimir L., E-mail: viadimer@illinois.edu [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Beaudoin, Jessica N. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Hanafin, William P. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); DiLiberto, Stephen J. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Kenis, Paul J.A. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 S. Mathews Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rex Gaskins, H. [Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1207 W. Gregory Drive, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Department of Pathobiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 2001 S. Lincoln Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 905 S. Goodwin Avenue, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Time-resolved live cell imaging revealed light-induced oxidation. •Only the roGFP probe fused with glutaredoxin reveals photooxidation. •The transient oxidation is rapidly reduced by the cytosolic antioxidant system. •Intracellular photooxidation is media-dependent. •Oxidation is triggered exclusively by exposure to short wavelength excitation. -- Abstract: We have implemented a ratiometric, genetically encoded redox-sensitive green fluorescent protein fused to human glutaredoxin (Grx1-roGFP2) to monitor real time intracellular glutathione redox potentials of mammalian cells. This probe enabled detection of media-dependent oxidation of the cytosol triggered by short wavelength excitation. The transient nature of light-induced oxidation was revealed by time-lapse live cell imaging when time intervals of less than 30 s were implemented. In contrast, transient ROS generation was not observed with the parental roGFP2 probe without Grx1, which exhibits slower thiol-disulfide exchange. These data demonstrate that the enhanced sensitivity of the Grx1-roGFP2 fusion protein enables the detection of short-lived ROS in living cells. The superior sensitivity of Grx1-roGFP2, however, also enhances responsiveness to environmental cues introducing a greater likelihood of false positive results during image acquisition.

  12. Plant redox proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Navrot, Nicolas; Finnie, Christine; Svensson, Birte

    2011-01-01

    In common with other aerobic organisms, plants are exposed to reactive oxygen species resulting in formation of post-translational modifications related to protein oxidoreduction (redox PTMs) that may inflict oxidative protein damage. Accumulating evidence also underscores the importance of redox...... PTMs in regulating enzymatic activities and controlling biological processes in plants. Notably, proteins controlling the cellular redox state, e.g. thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, appear to play dual roles to maintain oxidative stress resistance and regulate signal transduction pathways via redox PTMs....... To get a comprehensive overview of these types of redox-regulated pathways there is therefore an emerging interest to monitor changes in redox PTMs on a proteome scale. Compared to some other PTMs, e.g. protein phosphorylation, redox PTMs have received less attention in plant proteome analysis, possibly...

  13. Lactococcus lactis TrxD represents a subgroup of thioredoxins prevalent in Gram-positive bacteria containing WCXDC active site motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björnberg, Olof; Efler, Petr; Epie, Denis Ebong

    2014-01-01

    capacity to reduce insulin disulfides and their exposed active site thiol is alkylated at a similar rate at pH 7.0. LlTrxD on the other hand, is alkylated by iodoacetamide at almost 100 fold higher rate and shows no activity towards insulin disulfides. LlTrxA, LlTrxD and L1NrdH are all efficiently reduced...... on protein-protein equilibria LlTrxA (E01 = -259 mV) and LlNrdH (E01 = -238 my) show approximately 10 mV higher standard state redox potentials than the corresponding E. coil homologues, while E 01 of LlTrxD is -243 mV, more similar to glutaredoxin than "classical" thioredoxin. EcTrx1 and LlTrxA have high...

  14. A cascade of iron-containing proteins governs the genetic iron starvation response to promote iron uptake and inhibit iron storage in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Encinar del Dedo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential cofactor, but it is also toxic at high levels. In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the sensor glutaredoxin Grx4 guides the activity of the repressors Php4 and Fep1 to mediate a complex transcriptional response to iron deprivation: activation of Php4 and inactivation of Fep1 leads to inhibition of iron usage/storage, and to promotion of iron import, respectively. However, the molecular events ruling the activity of this double-branched pathway remained elusive. We show here that Grx4 incorporates a glutathione-containing iron-sulfur cluster, alone or forming a heterodimer with the BolA-like protein Fra2. Our genetic study demonstrates that Grx4-Fra2, but not Fep1 nor Php4, participates not only in iron starvation signaling but also in iron-related aerobic metabolism. Iron-containing Grx4 binds and inactivates the Php4 repressor; upon iron deprivation, the cluster in Grx4 is probably disassembled, the proteins dissociate, and Php4 accumulates at the nucleus and represses iron consumption genes. Fep1 is also an iron-containing protein, and the tightly bound iron is required for transcriptional repression. Our data suggest that the cluster-containing Grx4-Fra2 heterodimer constitutively binds to Fep1, and upon iron deprivation the disassembly of the iron cluster between Grx4 and Fra2 promotes reverse metal transfer from Fep1 to Grx4-Fra2, and de-repression of iron-import genes. Our genetic and biochemical study demonstrates that the glutaredoxin Grx4 independently governs the Php4 and Fep1 repressors through metal transfer. Whereas iron loss from Grx4 seems to be sufficient to release Php4 and allow its nuclear accumulation, total or partial disassembly of the Grx4-Fra2 cluster actively participates in iron-containing Fep1 activation by sequestering its iron and decreasing its interaction with promoters.

  15. The Escherichia coli BolA Protein IbaG Forms a Histidine-Ligated [2Fe-2S]-Bridged Complex with Grx4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlouhy, Adrienne C; Li, Haoran; Albetel, Angela-Nadia; Zhang, Bo; Mapolelo, Daphne T; Randeniya, Sajini; Holland, Ashley A; Johnson, Michael K; Outten, Caryn E

    2016-12-13

    Two ubiquitous protein families have emerged as key players in iron metabolism, the CGFS-type monothiol glutaredoxins (Grxs) and the BolA proteins. Monothiol Grxs and BolA proteins form heterocomplexes that have been implicated in Fe-S cluster assembly and trafficking. The Escherichia coli genome encodes members of both of these proteins families, namely, the monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4 and two BolA family proteins, BolA and IbaG. Previous work has demonstrated that E. coli Grx4 and BolA interact as both apo and [2Fe-2S]-bridged heterodimers that are spectroscopically distinct from [2Fe-2S]-bridged Grx4 homodimers. However, the physical and functional interactions between Grx4 and IbaG are uncharacterized. Here we show that co-expression of Grx4 with IbaG yields a [2Fe-2S]-bridged Grx4-IbaG heterodimer. In vitro interaction studies indicate that IbaG binds the [2Fe-2S] Grx4 homodimer to form apo Grx4-IbaG heterodimer as well as the [2Fe-2S] Grx4-IbaG heterodimer, altering the cluster stability and coordination environment. Additionally, spectroscopic and mutagenesis studies provide evidence that IbaG ligates the Fe-S cluster via the conserved histidine that is present in all BolA proteins and by a second conserved histidine that is present in the H/C loop of two of the four classes of BolA proteins. These results suggest that IbaG may function in Fe-S cluster assembly and trafficking in E. coli as demonstrated for other BolA homologues that interact with monothiol Grxs.

  16. Involvement of thiol-based mechanisms in plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhier, Nicolas; Cerveau, Delphine; Couturier, Jérémy; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Rey, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    Increasing knowledge has been recently gained regarding the redox regulation of plant developmental stages. The current state of knowledge concerning the involvement of glutathione, glutaredoxins and thioredoxins in plant development is reviewed. The control of the thiol redox status is mainly ensured by glutathione (GSH), a cysteine-containing tripeptide and by reductases sharing redox-active cysteines, glutaredoxins (GRXs) and thioredoxins (TRXs). Indeed, thiol groups present in many regulatory proteins and metabolic enzymes are prone to oxidation, ultimately leading to post-translational modifications such as disulfide bond formation or glutathionylation. This review focuses on the involvement of GSH, GRXs and TRXs in plant development. Recent studies showed that the proper functioning of root and shoot apical meristems depends on glutathione content and redox status, which regulate, among others, cell cycle and hormone-related processes. A critical role of GRXs in the formation of floral organs has been uncovered, likely through the redox regulation of TGA transcription factor activity. TRXs fulfill many functions in plant development via the regulation of embryo formation, the control of cell-to-cell communication, the mobilization of seed reserves, the biogenesis of chloroplastic structures, the metabolism of carbon and the maintenance of cell redox homeostasis. This review also highlights the tight relationships between thiols, hormones and carbon metabolism, allowing a proper development of plants in relation with the varying environment and the energy availability. GSH, GRXs and TRXs play key roles during the whole plant developmental cycle via their antioxidant functions and the redox-regulation of signaling pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Redox regulation of differentiation and de-differentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Growth hormone alters the glutathione S-transferase and mitochondrial thioredoxin systems in long-living Ames dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojanathammanee, Lalida; Rakoczy, Sharlene; Brown-Borg, Holly M

    2014-10-01

    Ames dwarf mice are deficient in growth hormone (GH), prolactin, and thyroid-stimulating hormone and live significantly longer than their wild-type (WT) siblings. The lack of GH is associated with stress resistance and increased longevity. However, the mechanism underlying GH's actions on cellular stress defense have yet to be elucidated. In this study, WT or Ames dwarf mice were treated with saline or GH (WT saline, Dwarf saline, and Dwarf GH) two times daily for 7 days. The body and liver weights of Ames dwarf mice were significantly increased after 7 days of GH administration. Mitochondrial protein levels of the glutathione S-transferase (GST) isozymes, K1 and M4 (GSTK1 and GSTM4), were significantly higher in dwarf mice (Dwarf saline) when compared with WT mice (WT saline). GH administration downregulated the expression of GSTK1 proteins in dwarf mice. We further investigated GST activity from liver lysates using different substrates. Substrate-specific GST activity (bromosulfophthalein, dichloronitrobenzene, and 4-hydrox-ynonenal) was significantly reduced in GH-treated dwarf mice. In addition, GH treatment attenuated the activity of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin in liver mitochondria of Ames mice. Importantly, GH treatment suppressed Trx2 and TrxR2 mRNA expression. These data indicate that GH has a role in stress resistance by altering the functional capacity of the GST system through the regulation of specific GST family members in long-living Ames dwarf mice. It also affects the regulation of thioredoxin and glutaredoxin, factors that regulate posttranslational modification of proteins and redox balance, thereby further influencing stress resistance. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. The role of mitochondria in cellular iron-sulfur protein biogenesis and iron metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lill, Roland; Hoffmann, Bastian; Molik, Sabine; Pierik, Antonio J; Rietzschel, Nicole; Stehling, Oliver; Uzarska, Marta A; Webert, Holger; Wilbrecht, Claudia; Mühlenhoff, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Mitochondria play a key role in iron metabolism in that they synthesize heme, assemble iron-sulfur (Fe/S) proteins, and participate in cellular iron regulation. Here, we review the latter two topics and their intimate connection. The mitochondrial Fe/S cluster (ISC) assembly machinery consists of 17 proteins that operate in three major steps of the maturation process. First, the cysteine desulfurase complex Nfs1-Isd11 as the sulfur donor cooperates with ferredoxin-ferredoxin reductase acting as an electron transfer chain, and frataxin to synthesize an [2Fe-2S] cluster on the scaffold protein Isu1. Second, the cluster is released from Isu1 and transferred toward apoproteins with the help of a dedicated Hsp70 chaperone system and the glutaredoxin Grx5. Finally, various specialized ISC components assist in the generation of [4Fe-4S] clusters and cluster insertion into specific target apoproteins. Functional defects of the core ISC assembly machinery are signaled to cytosolic or nuclear iron regulatory systems resulting in increased cellular iron acquisition and mitochondrial iron accumulation. In fungi, regulation is achieved by iron-responsive transcription factors controlling the expression of genes involved in iron uptake and intracellular distribution. They are assisted by cytosolic multidomain glutaredoxins which use a bound Fe/S cluster as iron sensor and additionally perform an essential role in intracellular iron delivery to target metalloproteins. In mammalian cells, the iron regulatory proteins IRP1, an Fe/S protein, and IRP2 act in a post-transcriptional fashion to adjust the cellular needs for iron. Thus, Fe/S protein biogenesis and cellular iron metabolism are tightly linked to coordinate iron supply and utilization. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cell Biology of Metals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Thermal-Stability and Reconstitution Ability of Listeria Phages P100 and A511

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanie Ahmadi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study evaluated the thermal-stability of Listeria phages P100 and A511 at temperatures simulating the preparation of ready-to-eat meats. The phage infectivity after heating to 71°C and holding for a minimum of 30 s, before eventually cooling to 4°C were examined. Higher temperatures of 75, 80, and 85°C were also tested to evaluate their effect on phages thermal-stability. This study found that despite minor differences in the amino acid sequences of their structural proteins, the two phages responded differently to high temperatures. P100 activity declined at least 10 log (PFU mL-1 with exposure to 71°C (30 s and falling below the limit of detection (1 log PFU mL-1 while, A511 dropped from 108 to 105 PFU mL-1. Cooling resulted in partial reconstitution of P100 phage particles to 103 PFU mL-1. Exposure to 75°C (30 s abolished A511 activity (8 log PFU mL-1 and both phages showed reconstitution during cooling phase after exposure to 75°C. P100 exhibited reconstitution after treatment at 80°C (30 s, conversely A511 showed no reconstitution activity. Heating P100 to 85°C abolished the reconstitution potential. Substantial differences were found in thermal-stability and reconstitution of the examined phages showing A511 to be more thermo-stable than P100, while P100 exhibited reconstitution during cooling after treatment at 80°C which was absent in A511. The differences in predicted melting temperatures of structural proteins of P100 and A511 were consistent with the observed differences in thermal stability and morphological changes observed with transmission electron microscopy.

  20. Census of U.S. Civil Aircraft for Calendar Year 1984.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-31

    1 TOTAL 0 1 1 SIREN EDELWEISS C.30.S. 1 10 0 0 1 1 GLIDER NO ENGINE 10 0 1 1 TOTAL 0 1 1 SLINGSBY KIRBY KITE 1 10 0 0 1 1 TYPE 43 SERIES 1 10 0 0 1 1...1 1 AIR- RUNNER 100 3 41 1 0 1 1 AIRCAMPER 1 41 1 0 7 7 AIRCAMPER A 2 41 1 0 1 1 AIRCAMPER BLI 2 41 1 0 1 1 AIRCAMPER GN-1 2 41 1 0 2 2 AIRCAMPER*PH-i

  1. Instant infusion pasteurisation of bovine milk. II. Effects on indigenous milk enzymes activity and whey protein denaturation

    OpenAIRE

    Hammershøj, M.; Hougaard, A.B.; Vestergaard, J.S.; Poulsen, O.; Ipsen, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Direct heat treatment of two milk types, skimmed and non-standardised, was performed by instant steam infusion and compared with indirect heating. Infusion conditions were temperatures of 72-120°C combined with holding times of 100-700 ms, and indirect heat conditions were 72°C/15s and 85°C/30 s. The activity of indigenous enzymes; alkaline phosphatase, lactoperoxidase, xanthine oxidase and -glutamyl transpeptidase was evaluated. Mainly the infusion temperature was determinant for inactivati...

  2. Cysteine-based redox regulation and signalling in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémy eCouturier

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms are subjected to oxidative stress conditions which are characterized by the production of reactive oxygen (ROS, nitrogen (RNS and sulfur (RSS species. In plants as in other organisms, many of these compounds have a dual function as they damage different types of macromolecules but they also likely fulfil an important role as secondary messengers. Owing to the reactivity of their thiol groups, some protein cysteine residues are particularly prone to oxidation by these molecules. In the past years, besides their recognized catalytic and regulatory functions, the modification of cysteine thiol group was increasingly viewed as either protective or redox signalling mechanisms. The most physiologically relevant reversible redox post-translational modifications (PTMs are disulfide bonds, sulfenic acids, S-glutathionylated adducts, S-nitrosothiols and to a lesser extent S-sulfenylamides, thiosulfinates and S-persulfides. These redox PTMs are mostly controlled by two oxidoreductase families, thioredoxins and glutaredoxins. This review focuses on recent advances highlighting the variety and physiological roles of these PTMs and the proteomic strategies used for their detection.

  3. Protein S-glutathionylation induced by hypoxia increases hypoxia-inducible factor-1α in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Daun; Park, Heon Joo; Kim, Hong Seok

    2018-01-01

    Hypoxia is a common characteristic of many types of solid tumors. Intratumoral hypoxia selects for tumor cells that survive in a low oxygen environment, undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transition, are more motile and invasive, and show gene expression changes driven by hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. Therefore, targeting HIF-1α is an attractive strategy for disrupting multiple pathways crucial for tumor growth. In the present study, we demonstrated that hypoxia increases the S-glutathionylation of HIF-1α and its protein levels in colon cancer cells. This effect is significantly prevented by decreasing oxidized glutathione as well as glutathione depletion, indicating that S-glutathionylation and the formation of protein-glutathione mixed disulfides is related to HIF-1α protein levels. Moreover, colon cancer cells expressing glutaredoxin 1 are resistant to inducing HIF-1α and expressing hypoxia-responsive genes under hypoxic conditions. Therefore, S-glutathionylation of HIF-1α induced by tumor hypoxia may be a novel therapeutic target for the development of new drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Mechanisms of iron sensing and regulation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa; Perea-García, Ana; Puig, Sergi

    2017-04-01

    Iron is a redox active element that functions as an essential cofactor in multiple metabolic pathways, including respiration, DNA synthesis and translation. While indispensable for eukaryotic life, excess iron can lead to oxidative damage of macromolecules. Therefore, living organisms have developed sophisticated strategies to optimally regulate iron acquisition, storage and utilization in response to fluctuations in environmental iron bioavailability. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, transcription factors Aft1/Aft2 and Yap5 regulate iron metabolism in response to low and high iron levels, respectively. In addition to producing and assembling iron cofactors, mitochondrial iron-sulfur (Fe/S) cluster biogenesis has emerged as a central player in iron sensing. A mitochondrial signal derived from Fe/S synthesis is exported and converted into an Fe/S cluster that interacts directly with Aft1/Aft2 and Yap5 proteins to regulate their transcriptional function. Various conserved proteins, such as ABC mitochondrial transporter Atm1 and, for Aft1/Aft2, monothiol glutaredoxins Grx3 and Grx4 are implicated in this iron-signaling pathway. The analysis of a wide range of S. cerevisiae strains of different geographical origins and sources has shown that yeast strains adapted to high iron display growth defects under iron-deficient conditions, and highlighted connections that exist in the response to both opposite conditions. Changes in iron accumulation and gene expression profiles suggest differences in the regulation of iron homeostasis genes.

  5. Efficient site-specific integration in Plasmodium falciparum chromosomes mediated by mycobacteriophage Bxb1 integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, Louis J; Muhle, Rebecca A; Moura, Pedro A; Ghosh, Pallavi; Hatfull, Graham F; Jacobs, William R; Fidock, David A

    2006-08-01

    Here we report an efficient, site-specific system of genetic integration into Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasite chromosomes. This is mediated by mycobacteriophage Bxb1 integrase, which catalyzes recombination between an incoming attP and a chromosomal attB site. We developed P. falciparum lines with the attB site integrated into the glutaredoxin-like cg6 gene. Transfection of these attB(+) lines with a dual-plasmid system, expressing a transgene on an attP-containing plasmid together with a drug resistance gene and the integrase on a separate plasmid, produced recombinant parasites within 2 to 4 weeks that were genetically uniform for single-copy plasmid integration. Integrase-mediated recombination resulted in proper targeting of parasite proteins to intra-erythrocytic compartments, including the apicoplast, a plastid-like organelle. Recombinant attB x attP parasites were genetically stable in the absence of drug and were phenotypically homogeneous. This system can be exploited for rapid genetic integration and complementation analyses at any stage of the P. falciparum life cycle, and it illustrates the utility of Bxb1-based integrative recombination for genetic studies of intracellular eukaryotic organisms.

  6. Role of protein and mRNA oxidation in seed dormancy and germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Maarouf-Bouteau, Hayat; Meimoun, Patrice; Job, Claudette; Job, Dominique; Bailly, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key players in the regulation of seed germination and dormancy. Although their regulated accumulation is a prerequisite for germination, the cellular basis of their action remains unknown, but very challenging to elucidate due to the lack of specificity of these compounds that can potentially react with all biomolecules. Among these, nucleic acids and proteins are very prone to oxidative damage. RNA is highly sensitive to oxidation because of its single-stranded structure and the absence of a repair system. Oxidation of mRNAs induces their decay through processing bodies or results in the synthesis of aberrant proteins through altered translation. Depending on the oxidized amino acid, ROS damage of proteins can be irreversible (i.e., carbonylation) thus triggering the degradation of the oxidized proteins by the cytosolic 20S proteasome or can be reversed through the action of thioredoxins, peroxiredoxins, or glutaredoxins (cysteine oxidation) or by methionine sulfoxide reductase (methionine oxidation). Seed dormancy alleviation in the dry state, referred to as after-ripening, requires both selective mRNA oxidation and protein carbonylation. Similarly, seed imbibition of non-dormant seeds is associated with targeted oxidation of a subset of proteins. Altogether, these specific features testify that such oxidative modifications play important role in commitment of the cellular functioning toward germination completion. PMID:23579315

  7. Redox regulation of plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Considine, Michael J; Foyer, Christine H

    2014-09-20

    We provide a conceptual framework for the interactions between the cellular redox signaling hub and the phytohormone signaling network that controls plant growth and development to maximize plant productivity under stress-free situations, while limiting growth and altering development on exposure to stress. Enhanced cellular oxidation plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and stress responses. Oxidative signals or cycles of oxidation and reduction are crucial for the alleviation of dormancy and quiescence, activating the cell cycle and triggering genetic and epigenetic control that underpin growth and differentiation responses to changing environmental conditions. The redox signaling hub interfaces directly with the phytohormone network in the synergistic control of growth and its modulation in response to environmental stress, but a few components have been identified. Accumulating evidence points to a complex interplay of phytohormone and redox controls that operate at multiple levels. For simplicity, we focus here on redox-dependent processes that control root growth and development and bud burst. The multiple roles of reactive oxygen species in the control of plant growth and development have been identified, but increasing emphasis should now be placed on the functions of redox-regulated proteins, along with the central roles of reductants such as NAD(P)H, thioredoxins, glutathione, glutaredoxins, peroxiredoxins, ascorbate, and reduced ferredoxin in the regulation of the genetic and epigenetic factors that modulate the growth and vigor of crop plants, particularly within an agricultural context.

  8. Oncogenic STAT5 signaling promotes oxidative stress in chronic myeloid leukemia cells by repressing antioxidant defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeais, Jerome; Ishac, Nicole; Medrzycki, Magdalena; Brachet-Botineau, Marie; Desbourdes, Laura; Gouilleux-Gruart, Valerie; Pecnard, Emmanuel; Rouleux-Bonnin, Florence; Gyan, Emmanuel; Domenech, Jorge; Mazurier, Frederic; Moriggl, Richard; Bunting, Kevin D; Herault, Olivier; Gouilleux, Fabrice

    2017-06-27

    STAT5 transcription factors are frequently activated in hematopoietic neoplasms and are targets of various tyrosine kinase oncogenes. Evidences for a crosstalk between STAT5 and reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism have recently emerged but mechanisms involved in STAT5-mediated regulation of ROS still remain elusive. We demonstrate that sustained activation of STAT5 induced by Bcr-Abl in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cells promotes ROS production by repressing expression of two antioxidant enzymes, catalase and glutaredoxin-1(Glrx1). Downregulation of catalase and Glrx1 expression was also observed in primary cells from CML patients. Catalase was shown not only to reduce ROS levels but also, to induce quiescence in Bcr-Abl-positive leukemia cells. Furthermore, reduction of STAT5 phosphorylation and upregulation of catalase and Glrx1 were also evidenced in leukemia cells co-cultured with bone marrow stromal cells to mimic a leukemic niche. This caused downregulation of ROS levels and enhancement of leukemic cell quiescence. These data support a role of persistent STAT5 signaling in the regulation of ROS production in myeloid leukemias and highlight the repression of antioxidant defenses as an important regulatory mechanism.

  9. Ca(v)1.2 calcium channel is glutathionylated during oxidative stress in guinea pig and ischemic human heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Helen; Viola, Helena M; Filipovska, Aleksandra; Hool, Livia C

    2011-10-15

    Glutathionylation as a posttranslational modification of proteins is becoming increasingly recognized, but its role in many diseases has not been demonstrated. Oxidative stress and alterations in calcium homeostasis are associated with the development of cardiac hypertrophy. Because the cardiac L-type Ca(2+) channel can be persistently activated after exposure to H(2)O(2), the aim of this study was to determine whether alterations in channel function were associated with glutathionylation of the α(1C) subunit (Ca(v)1.2) channel protein. Immunoblot analysis indicated that Ca(v)1.2 protein is significantly glutathionylated after exposure to H(2)O(2) and glutathione in vitro and after ischemia-reperfusion injury. L-type Ca(2+) channel macroscopic current and intracellular calcium were significantly increased in myocytes after exposure to oxidized glutathione and reversed by glutaredoxin. The increase in current correlated with an increase in open probability of the channel assessed as changes in single-channel activity after exposing the human long N-terminal Ca(v)1.2 to H(2)O(2) or oxidized glutathione. We also demonstrate that the Ca(v)1.2 channel is significantly glutathionylated in ischemic human heart. We conclude that oxidative stress is associated with an increase in glutathionylation of the Ca(v)1.2 channel protein. We suggest that the associated constitutive activity contributes to the development of pathology in ischemic heart disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Correlation between Low Temperature Adaptation and Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estéfani García-Rios

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many factors, such as must composition, juice clarification, fermentation temperature or inoculated yeast strain, strongly affect the alcoholic fermentation and aromatic profile of wine. As fermentation temperature is effectively controlled by the wine industry, low-temperature fermentation (10-15 ºC is becoming more prevalent in order to produce white and rosé wines with more pronounced aromatic profiles. Elucidating the response to cold in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is of paramount importance for the selection or genetic improvement of wine strains. Previous research has shown the strong implication of oxidative stress response in adaptation to low temperature during the fermentation process. Here we aimed first to quantify the correlation between recovery after shock with different oxidants and cold, and then to detect the key genes involved in cold adaptation that belong to sulfur assimilation, peroxiredoxins, glutathione-glutaredoxins and thioredoxins pathways. To do so, we analyzed the growth of knockouts from the EUROSCARF collection S. cerevisiae BY4743 strain at low and optimal temperatures. The growth rate of these knockouts, compared with the control, enabled us to identify the genes involved, which were also deleted and validated as key genes in the background of two commercial wine strains with a divergent phenotype in their low-temperature growth. We identified three genes, AHP1, MUP1 and URM1, whose deletion strongly impaired low-temperature growth.

  11. Sulforaphane improves oxidative status without attenuating the inflammatory response or cardiac impairment induced by ischemia-reperfusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonetto, Jéssica Hellen Poletto; Fernandes, Rafael Oliveira; Seolin, Bruna Gazzi de Lima; Müller, Dalvana Daneliza; Teixeira, Rayane Brinck; Araujo, Alex Sander; Vassallo, Dalton; Schenkel, Paulo Cavalheiro; Belló-Klein, Adriane

    2016-05-01

    Sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate, demonstrates cardioprotection associated with its capacity to stimulate endogenous antioxidants and to inhibit inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether sulforaphane is capable of attenuating oxidative stress and inflammatory responses through the TLR4/MyD88/NFκB pathway, and thereby could modulate post-ischemic ventricular function in isolated rat hearts submitted to ischemia and reperfusion. Male Wistar rats received sulforaphane (10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) or vehicle i.p. for 3 days. Global ischemia was performed using isolated hearts, 24 h after the last injection, by interruption of the perfusion flow. The protocol included a 20 min pre-ischemic period followed by 20 min of ischemia and a 20 min reperfusion. Although no changes in mechanical function were observed, sulforaphane induced a significant increase in superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase-1 expression (both 66%) and significantly reduced reactive oxygen species levels (7%). No differences were observed for catalase and glutathione peroxidase expression or their activities, nor for thioredoxin reductase, glutaredoxin reductase and glutathione-S-transferase. No differences were found in lipid peroxidation or TLR4, MyD88, and NF-κB expression. In conclusion, although sulforaphane was able to stimulate endogenous antioxidants modestly, this result did not impact inflammatory signaling or cardiac function of hearts submitted to ischemia and reperfusion.

  12. Molecular Mechanisms of Enhanced Bacterial Growth on Hexadecane with Red Clay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Jaejoon; Jang, In-Ae; Ahn, Sungeun; Shin, Bora; Kim, Jisun; Park, Chulwoo; Jee, Seung Cheol; Sung, Jung-Suk; Park, Woojun

    2015-11-01

    Red clay was previously used to enhance bioremediation of diesel-contaminated soil. It was speculated that the enhanced degradation of diesel was due to increased bacterial growth. In this study, we selected Acinetobacter oleivorans DR1, a soil-borne degrader of diesel and alkanes, as a model bacterium and performed transcriptional analysis using RNA sequencing to investigate the cellular response during hexadecane utilization and the mechanism by which red clay promotes hexadecane degradation. We confirmed that red clay promotes the growth of A. oleivorans DR1 on hexadecane, a major component of diesel, as a sole carbon source. Addition of red clay to hexadecane-utilizing DR1 cells highly upregulated β-oxidation, while genes related to alkane oxidation were highly expressed with and without red clay. Red clay also upregulated genes related to oxidative stress defense, such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutaredoxin genes, suggesting that red clay supports the response of DR1 cells to oxidative stress generated during hexadecane utilization. Increased membrane fluidity in the presence of red clay was confirmed by fatty acid methyl ester analysis at different growth phases, suggesting that enhanced growth on hexadecane could be due to increased uptake of hexadecane coupled with upregulation of downstream metabolism and oxidative stress defense. The monitoring of the bacterial community in soil with red clay for a year revealed that red clay stabilized the community structure.

  13. Investigation of glutathione-derived electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding interactions and their role in defining Grx5 [2Fe-2S] cluster optical spectra and transfer chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Sambuddha; Bonfio, Claudia; Mansy, Sheref S; Cowan, J A

    2018-03-01

    Human glutaredoxin 5 (Grx5) is one of the core components of the Isc (iron-sulfur cluster) assembly and trafficking machinery, and serves as an intermediary cluster carrier, putatively delivering cluster from the Isu scaffold protein to target proteins. The tripeptide glutathione is intimately involved in this role, providing cysteinyl coordination to the iron center of the Grx5-bound [2Fe-2S] cluster. Grx5 has a well-defined glutathione-binding pocket with protein amino acid residues providing many ionic and hydrogen binding contacts to the bound glutathione. In this report, we investigated the importance of these interactions in cluster chirality and exchange reactivity by systematically perturbing the crucial contacts by use of natural and non-natural amino acid substitutions to disrupt the binding contacts from both the protein and glutathione. Native Grx5 could be reconstituted with all of the glutathione analogs used, as well as other thiol ligands, such as DTT or L-cysteine, by in vitro chemical reconstitution, and the holo proteins were found to transfer [2Fe-2S] cluster to apo ferredoxin 1 at comparable rates. However, the circular dichroism spectra of these derivatives displayed prominent differences that reflect perturbations in local cluster chirality. These studies provided a detailed molecular understanding of glutathione-protein interactions in holo Grx5 that define both cluster spectroscopy and exchange chemistry.

  14. Targeting the Thioredoxin Reductase-Thioredoxin System from Staphylococcus aureus by Silver Ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Xiangwen; Yang, Fang; Li, Hongyan; So, Pui-Kin; Yao, Zhongping; Xia, Wei; Sun, Hongzhe

    2017-12-18

    The thioredoxin system, which is composed of NADPH, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), and thioredoxin (Trx), is one of the major disulfide reductase systems used by bacteria against oxidative stress. In particular, this reductase system is crucial for the survival of the pathogenic bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, which lacks a natural glutathione/glutaredoxin (Grx) system. Although silver ions and silver-containing materials have been used as antibacterial agents for centuries, the antibacterial mechanism of silver is not well-understood. Herein, we demonstrate that silver ions bind to the active sites of S. aureus TrxR and Trx with dissociation constants of 1.4 ± 0.1 μM and 15.0 ± 5.0 μM and stoichiometries of 1 and 2 Ag + ions per protein, respectively. Importantly, silver ion binding leads to oligomerization and functional disruption of TrxR as well as Trx. Silver also depleted intracellular thiol levels in S. aureus, disrupting bacterial thiol-redox homeostasis. Our study provides new insights into the antibacterial mechanism of silver ions. Moreover, the Trx and TrxR system might serve as a feasible target for the design of antibacterial drugs.

  15. Function and Regulation of Ferredoxins in the Cyanobacterium, Synechocystis PCC6803: Recent Advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Chauvat, Franck

    2014-11-07

    Ferredoxins (Fed), occurring in most organisms, are small proteins that use their iron-sulfur cluster to distribute electrons to various metabolic pathways, likely including hydrogen production. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on ferredoxins in cyanobacteria, the prokaryotes regarded as important producers of the oxygenic atmosphere and biomass for the food chain, as well as promising cell factories for biofuel production. Most studies of ferredoxins were performed in the model strain, Synechocystis PCC6803, which possesses nine highly-conserved ferredoxins encoded by monocistronic or operonic genes, some of which are localized in conserved genome regions. Fed1, encoded by a light-inducible gene, is a highly abundant protein essential to photosynthesis. Fed2-Fed9, encoded by genes differently regulated by trophic conditions, are low-abundant proteins that play prominent roles in the tolerance to environmental stresses. Concerning the selectivity/redundancy of ferredoxin, we report that Fed1, Fed7 and Fed9 belong to ferredoxin-glutaredoxin-thioredoxin crosstalk pathways operating in the protection against oxidative and metal stresses. Furthermore, Fed7 specifically interacts with a DnaJ-like protein, an interaction that has been conserved in photosynthetic eukaryotes in the form of a composite protein comprising DnaJ- and Fed7-like domains. Fed9 specifically interacts with the Flv3 flavodiiron protein acting in the photoreduction of O2 to H2O.

  16. Function and Regulation of Ferredoxins in the Cyanobacterium, Synechocystis PCC6803: Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corinne Cassier-Chauvat

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Ferredoxins (Fed, occurring in most organisms, are small proteins that use their iron-sulfur cluster to distribute electrons to various metabolic pathways, likely including hydrogen production. Here, we summarize the current knowledge on ferredoxins in cyanobacteria, the prokaryotes regarded as important producers of the oxygenic atmosphere and biomass for the food chain, as well as promising cell factories for biofuel production. Most studies of ferredoxins were performed in the model strain, Synechocystis PCC6803, which possesses nine highly-conserved ferredoxins encoded by monocistronic or operonic genes, some of which are localized in conserved genome regions. Fed1, encoded by a light-inducible gene, is a highly abundant protein essential to photosynthesis. Fed2-Fed9, encoded by genes differently regulated by trophic conditions, are low-abundant proteins that play prominent roles in the tolerance to environmental stresses. Concerning the selectivity/redundancy of ferredoxin, we report that Fed1, Fed7 and Fed9 belong to ferredoxin-glutaredoxin-thioredoxin crosstalk pathways operating in the protection against oxidative and metal stresses. Furthermore, Fed7 specifically interacts with a DnaJ-like protein, an interaction that has been conserved in photosynthetic eukaryotes in the form of a composite protein comprising DnaJ- and Fed7-like domains. Fed9 specifically interacts with the Flv3 flavodiiron protein acting in the photoreduction of O2 to H2O.

  17. Melatonin Reduces Oxidative Stress Damage Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Vázquez

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, which is synthesized from tryptophan, is formed during alcoholic fermentation, though its role in yeast is unknown. This study employed Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an eukaryote model to evaluate the possible effects of melatonin supplementation on endogenous cellular defense systems by measuring its effects on various cellular targets. Cell viability, intracellular reduced and oxidized glutathione levels (GSH and GSSG, respectively, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and expression of genes related to antioxidant defense in yeast, such as the glutathione system, catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutaredoxin, and thioredoxin, were assessed. Melatonin alone decreased GSH, increased GSSG, and activated antioxidant defense system genes, which reached maximum levels in the stationary phase. These results indicate that melatonin supplementation enables cells to resist better the stress generated in the stationary phase. However, when cells were subjected to oxidative stress induced by H2O2, melatonin was able to partially mitigate cell damage by decreasing ROS accumulation and GSH and increasing GSSG; this was followed by enhanced cell viability after stress exposure, mostly when occurring in the early stationary phase. Additionally, under such conditions, most genes related to endogenous antioxidant defense continued to be up-regulated with melatonin supplementation. The findings demonstrate that melatonin can act as antioxidant in S. cerevisiae.

  18. Compartmentation of redox metabolism in malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Kehr

    Full Text Available Malaria, caused by the apicomplexan parasite Plasmodium, still represents a major threat to human health and welfare and leads to about one million human deaths annually. Plasmodium is a rapidly multiplying unicellular organism undergoing a complex developmental cycle in man and mosquito - a life style that requires rapid adaptation to various environments. In order to deal with high fluxes of reactive oxygen species and maintain redox regulatory processes and pathogenicity, Plasmodium depends upon an adequate redox balance. By systematically studying the subcellular localization of the major antioxidant and redox regulatory proteins, we obtained the first complete map of redox compartmentation in Plasmodium falciparum. We demonstrate the targeting of two plasmodial peroxiredoxins and a putative glyoxalase system to the apicoplast, a non-photosynthetic plastid. We furthermore obtained a complete picture of the compartmentation of thioredoxin- and glutaredoxin-like proteins. Notably, for the two major antioxidant redox-enzymes--glutathione reductase and thioredoxin reductase--Plasmodium makes use of alternative-translation-initiation (ATI to achieve differential targeting. Dual localization of proteins effected by ATI is likely to occur also in other Apicomplexa and might open new avenues for therapeutic intervention.

  19. Hereditary sideroblastic anemias: pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camaschella, Clara

    2009-10-01

    Inherited sideroblastic anemia comprises several rare anemias due to heterogeneous genetic lesions, all characterized by the presence of ringed sideroblasts in the bone marrow. This morphological aspect reflects abnormal mitochondrial iron utilization by the erythroid precursors. The most common X-linked sideroblastic anemia (XLSA), due to mutations of the first enzyme of the heme synthetic pathway, delta-aminolevulinic acid synthase 2 (ALAS2), has linked heme deficiency to mitochondrial iron accumulation. The identification of other genes, such as adenosine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette B7 (ABCB7) and glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5), has strengthened the role of iron sulfur cluster biogenesis in sideroblast formation and revealed a complex interplay between pathways of mitochondrial iron utilization and cytosolic iron sensing by the iron-regulatory proteins (IRPs). As recently occurred with the discovery of the SLC25A38-related sideroblastic anemia, the identification of the genes responsible for as yet uncharacterized forms will provide further insights into mitochondrial iron metabolism of erythroid cells and the pathophysiology of sideroblastic anemia.

  20. Decreased cell proliferation and higher oxidative stress in fibroblasts from Down Syndrome fetuses. Preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno, Amparo; García-Giménez, José Luis; Audí, Laura; Toran, Nuria; Andaluz, Pilar; Dasí, Francisco; Viña, José; Pallardó, Federico V

    2014-01-01

    Down Syndrome is the most common chromosomal disease and is also known for its decreased incidence of solid tumors and its progeroid phenotype. Cellular and systemic oxidative stress has been considered as one of the Down Syndrome phenotype causes. We correlated, in a preliminary study, the fibroblast proliferation rate and different cell proliferation key regulators, like Rcan1 and the telomere length from Down Syndrome fetuses, with their oxidative stress profile and the Ribonucleic acid and protein expression of the main antioxidant enzymes together with their activity. Increased oxidized glutathione/glutathione ratio and high peroxide production were found in our cell model. These results correlated with a distorted antioxidant shield. The messenger RNA (SOD1) and protein levels of copper/zinc superoxide dismutase were increased together with a decreased mRNA expression and protein levels of glutathione peroxidase (GPx). As a consequence the [Cu/ZnSOD/(catalase+GPx)] activity ratio increases which explains the oxidative stress generated in the cell model. In addition, the expression of thioredoxin 1 and glutaredoxin 1 is decreased. The results obtained show a decreased antioxidant phenotype that correlates with increased levels of Regulator of calcineurin 1 and attrition of telomeres, both related to oxidative stress and cell cycle impairment. Our preliminary results may explain the proneness to a progeroid phenotype. © 2013.

  1. Chemistry and Redox Biology of Mycothiol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Aníbal M; Pedre, Brandán; De Armas, María Inés; Tossounian, Maria-Armineh; Radi, Rafael; Messens, Joris; Trujillo, Madia

    2018-02-20

    Mycothiol (MSH, AcCys-GlcN-Ins) is the main low-molecular weight (LMW) thiol of most Actinomycetes, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis that affects millions of people worldwide. Strains with decreased MSH content show increased susceptibilities to hydroperoxides and electrophilic compounds. In M. tuberculosis, MSH modulates the response to several antituberculosis drugs. Enzymatic routes involving MSH could provide clues for specific drug design. Recent Advances: Physicochemical data argue against a rapid, nonenzymatic reaction of MSH with oxidants, disulfides, or electrophiles. Moreover, exposure of the bacteria to high concentrations of two-electron oxidants resulted in protein mycothiolation. The recently described glutaredoxin-like protein mycoredoxin-1 (Mrx-1) provides a route for catalytic reduction of mycothiolated proteins, protecting critical cysteines from irreversible oxidation. The description of MSH/Mrx-1-dependent activities of peroxidases helped to explain the higher susceptibility to oxidants observed in Actinomycetes lacking MSH. Moreover, the first mycothiol-S-transferase, member of the DinB superfamily of proteins, was described. In Corynebacterium, both the MSH/Mrx-1 and the thioredoxin pathways reduce methionine sulfoxide reductase A. A novel tool for in vivo imaging of the MSH/mycothiol disulfide (MSSM) status allows following changes in the mycothiol redox state during macrophage infection and its relationship with antibiotic sensitivity. Redundancy of MSH with other LMW thiols is starting to be unraveled and could help to rationalize the differences in the reported importance of MSH synthesis observed in vitro versus in animal infection models. Future work should be directed to establish the structural bases of the specificity of MSH-dependent enzymes, thus facilitating drug developments. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 28, 487-504.

  2. The Yeast Iron Regulatory Proteins Grx3/4 and Fra2 Form Heterodimeric Complexes Containing a [2Fe-2S] Cluster with Cysteinyl and Histidyl Ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, H.; Mapolelo, D; Dingra, N; Naik, S; Lees, N; Hoffman, B; Riggs-Gelasco, P; Huynh, B; Johnson, M; Outten, C

    2009-01-01

    The transcription of iron uptake and storage genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is primarily regulated by the transcription factor Aft1. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of Aft1 is dependent upon mitochondrial Fe-S cluster biosynthesis via a signaling pathway that includes the cytosolic monothiol glutaredoxins (Grx3 and Grx4) and the BolA homologue Fra2. However, the interactions between these proteins and the iron-dependent mechanism by which they control Aft1 localization are unclear. To reconstitute and characterize components of this signaling pathway in vitro, we have overexpressed yeast Fra2 and Grx3/4 in Escherichia coli. We have shown that coexpression of recombinant Fra2 with Grx3 or Grx4 allows purification of a stable [2Fe-2S]{sup 2+} cluster-containing Fra2-Grx3 or Fra2-Grx4 heterodimeric complex. Reconstitution of a [2Fe-2S] cluster on Grx3 or Grx4 without Fra2 produces a [2Fe-2S]-bridged homodimer. UV?visible absorption and CD, resonance Raman, EPR, ENDOR, M{umlt o}ssbauer, and EXAFS studies of [2Fe-2S] Grx3/4 homodimers and the [2Fe-2S] Fra2-Grx3/4 heterodimers indicate that inclusion of Fra2 in the Grx3/4 Fe-S complex causes a change in the cluster stability and coordination environment. Taken together, our analytical, spectroscopic, and mutagenesis data indicate that Grx3/4 and Fra2 form a Fe-S-bridged heterodimeric complex with Fe ligands provided by the active site cysteine of Grx3/4, glutathione, and a histidine residue. Overall, these results suggest that the ability of the Fra2-Grx3/4 complex to assemble a [2Fe-2S] cluster may act as a signal to control the iron regulon in response to cellular iron status in yeast.

  3. Proline metabolism increases katG expression and oxidative stress resistance in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Alfano, James R; Becker, Donald F

    2015-02-01

    The oxidation of l-proline to glutamate in Gram-negative bacteria is catalyzed by the proline utilization A (PutA) flavoenzyme, which contains proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate (P5C) dehydrogenase domains in a single polypeptide. Previous studies have suggested that aside from providing energy, proline metabolism influences oxidative stress resistance in different organisms. To explore this potential role and the mechanism, we characterized the oxidative stress resistance of wild-type and putA mutant strains of Escherichia coli. Initial stress assays revealed that the putA mutant strain was significantly more sensitive to oxidative stress than the parental wild-type strain. Expression of PutA in the putA mutant strain restored oxidative stress resistance, confirming that depletion of PutA was responsible for the oxidative stress phenotype. Treatment of wild-type cells with proline significantly increased hydroperoxidase I (encoded by katG) expression and activity. Furthermore, the ΔkatG strain failed to respond to proline, indicating a critical role for hydroperoxidase I in the mechanism of proline protection. The global regulator OxyR activates the expression of katG along with several other genes involved in oxidative stress defense. In addition to katG, proline increased the expression of grxA (glutaredoxin 1) and trxC (thioredoxin 2) of the OxyR regulon, implicating OxyR in proline protection. Proline oxidative metabolism was shown to generate hydrogen peroxide, indicating that proline increases oxidative stress tolerance in E. coli via a preadaptive effect involving endogenous hydrogen peroxide production and enhanced catalase-peroxidase activity. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Transcriptomic and hormone analyses reveal mechanisms underlying petal elongation in Chrysanthemum morifolium 'Jinba'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Haibin; Ding, Lian; Song, Aiping; Shen, Feng; Jiang, Jiafu; Chen, Sumei; Chen, Fadi

    2017-04-01

    Auxin regulates chrysanthemum petal elongation by promoting cell elongation. Transcriptomic analysis shows that auxin signal transduction may connect with other transcription factors by TCPs to regulate chrysanthemum petal elongation. As an ornamental species, Chrysanthemum morifolium has high ornamental and economic value. Petal size is the primary factor that influences the ornamental value of chrysanthemum, but the mechanism underlying the development of C. morifolium petals remains unclear. In our study, we tracked the growth of petals and found that the basal region of 'Jinba' petals showed a higher elongation rate, exhibiting rapid cell elongation during petal growth. During petal elongation growth, auxin was demonstrated to promote cell elongation and an increase in cell numbers in the petal basal region. To further study the molecular mechanisms underlying petal growth, the RNA-seq (high-throughput cDNA sequencing) technique was employed. Four cDNA libraries were assembled from petals in the budding, bud breaking, early blooming and full blooming stages of 'Jinba' flower development. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) showed that auxin was the most important regulator in controlling petal growth. The TEOSINTEBRANCHED 1, CYCLOIDEA and PCF transcription factor genes (TCPs), basic helix-loop-helix-encoding gene (bHLH), glutaredoxin-C (GRXC) and other zinc finger protein genes exhibited obvious up-regulation and might have significant effects on the growth of 'Jinba' petals. Given the interaction between these genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we speculated that auxin signal transduction might exhibit a close relationship with transcription factors through TCPs. In summary, we present the first comprehensive transcriptomic and hormone analyses of C. morifolium petals. The results offer direction in identifying the mechanism underlying the development of chrysanthemum petals in the elongated phase and have great significance in improving the

  5. The redox mechanism for vascular barrier dysfunction associated with metabolic disorders: Glutathionylation of Rac1 in endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jingyan; Weisbrod, Robert M; Shao, Di; Watanabe, Yosuke; Yin, Xiaoyan; Bachschmid, Markus M; Seta, Francesca; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M W; Matsui, Reiko; Zang, Mengwei; Hamburg, Naomi M; Cohen, Richard A

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in increased vascular permeability associated with metabolic disorders, but the underlying redox mechanism is poorly defined. S-glutathionylation, a stable adduct of glutathione with protein sulfhydryl, is a reversible oxidative modification of protein and is emerging as an important redox signaling paradigm in cardiovascular physiopathology. The present study determines the role of protein S-glutathionylation in metabolic stress-induced endothelial cell permeability. In endothelial cells isolated from patients with type-2 diabetes mellitus, protein S-glutathionylation level was increased. This change was also observed in aortic endothelium in ApoE deficient (ApoE -/- ) mice fed on Western diet. Metabolic stress-induced protein S-glutathionylation in human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) was positively correlated with elevated endothelial cell permeability, as reflected by disassembly of cell-cell adherens junctions and cortical actin structures. These impairments were reversed by adenoviral overexpression of a specific de-glutathionylation enzyme, glutaredoxin-1 in cultured HAECs. Consistently, transgenic overexpression of human Glrx-1 in ApoE -/- mice fed the Western diet attenuated endothelial protein S-glutathionylation, actin cytoskeletal disorganization, and vascular permeability in the aorta. Mechanistically, glutathionylation and inactivation of Rac1, a small RhoGPase, were associated with endothelial hyperpermeability caused by metabolic stress. Glutathionylation of Rac1 on cysteine 81 and 157 located adjacent to guanine nucleotide binding site was required for the metabolic stress to inhibit Rac1 activity and promote endothelial hyperpermeability. Glutathionylation and inactivation of Rac1 in endothelial cells represent a novel redox mechanism of vascular barrier dysfunction associated with metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Enzymatic and Structural Basis for Inhibition of Echinococcus granulosus Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase by Gold(I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salinas, Gustavo [Worm Biology Lab, Institut Pasteur de Montevideo, Montevideo, Uruguay.; Cátedra de Inmunología, Facultad de Química, Instituto de Higiene, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay.; Gao, Wei [Department of Biomedical Research, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado.; Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.; School of Science, Beijing Forestry University, Beijing, China.; Wang, Yang [Department of Biomedical Research, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado.; Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.; Bonilla, Mariana [Cátedra de Inmunología, Facultad de Química, Instituto de Higiene, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay.; Redox Biology of Trypanosomes, Institut Pasteur de Montevideo, Uruguay.; Yu, Long [Department of Biomedical Research, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado.; Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.; Novikov, Andrey [Department of Biomedical Research, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado.; Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.; Virginio, Veridiana G. [Laboratório de Genômica Estrutural e Funcional, Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.; Ferreira, Henrique B. [Laboratório de Genômica Estrutural e Funcional, Centro de Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil.; Vieites, Marisol [Cátedra de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay.; Gladyshev, Vadim N. [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.; Gambino, Dinorah [Cátedra de Química Inorgánica, Facultad de Química, Universidad de la República, Montevideo, Uruguay.; Dai, Shaodong [Department of Biomedical Research, National Jewish Health, Denver, Colorado.; Department of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Colorado Denver, School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado.

    2017-12-20

    Aims: New drugs are needed to treat flatworm infections that cause severe human diseases such as schistosomiasis. The unique flatworm enzyme thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR), structurally different from the human enzyme, is a key drug target. Structural studies of the flatworm Echinococcus granulosus TGR, free and complexed with AuI-MPO, a novel gold inhibitor, together with inhibition assays were performed. Results: AuI-MPO is a potent TGR inhibitor that achieves 75% inhibition at a 1:1 TGR:Au ratio and efficiently kills E. granulosus in vitro. The structures revealed salient insights: (i) unique monomer–monomer interactions, (ii) distinct binding sites for thioredoxin and the glutaredoxin (Grx) domain, (iii) a single glutathione disulfide reduction site in the Grx domain, (iv) rotation of the Grx domain toward the Sec-containing redox active site, and (v) a single gold atom bound to Cys519 and Cys573 in the AuI-TGR complex. Structural modeling suggests that these residues are involved in the stabilization of the Sec-containing C-terminus. Consistently, Cys→Ser mutations in these residues decreased TGR activities. Mass spectroscopy confirmed these cysteines are the primary binding site. Innovation: The identification of a primary site for gold binding and the structural model provide a basis for gold compound optimization through scaffold adjustments. Conclusions: The structural study revealed that TGR functions are achieved not only through a mobile Sec-containing redox center but also by rotation of the Grx domain and distinct binding sites for Grx domain and thioredoxin. The conserved Cys519 and Cys573 residues targeted by gold assist catalysis through stabilization of the Sec-containing redox center. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1491–1504.

  7. Plant cytoplasmic GAPDH: redox post-translational modifications and moonlighting properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko eZaffagnini

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH is a ubiquitous enzyme involved in glycolysis and shown, particularly in animal cells, to play additional roles in several unrelated non-metabolic processes such as control of gene expression and apoptosis. This functional versatility is regulated, in part at least, by redox post-translational modifications that alter GAPDH catalytic activity and influence the subcellular localization of the enzyme. In spite of the well established moonlighting (multifunctional properties of animal GAPDH, little is known about non-metabolic roles of GAPDH in plants. Plant cells contain several GAPDH isoforms with different catalytic and regulatory properties, located both in the cytoplasm and in plastids, and participating in glycolysis and the Calvin-Benson cycle. A general feature of all GAPDH proteins is the presence of an acidic catalytic cysteine in the active site that is overly sensitive to oxidative modifications, including glutathionylation and S-nitrosylation. In Arabidopsis, oxidatively-modified cytoplasmic GAPDH has been successfully used as a tool to investigate the role of reduced glutathione, thioredoxins and glutaredoxins in the control of different types of redox post-translational modifications. Oxidative modifications inhibit GAPDH activity, but might enable additional functions in plant cells. Mounting evidence support the concept that plant cytoplasmic GAPDH may fulfill alternative, non-metabolic functions that are triggered by redox post-translational modifications of the protein under stress conditions. The aim of this review is to detail the molecular mechanisms underlying the redox regulation of plant cytoplasmic GAPDH in the light of its crystal structure, and to provide a brief inventory of the well known redox-dependent multi-facetted properties of animal GAPDH, together with the emerging roles of oxidatively-modified GAPDH in stress signaling pathways in plants.

  8. Phloem sap proteins from Cucurbita maxima and Ricinus communis have the capacity to traffic cell to cell through plasmodesmata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Suchandra; Xiang, Yu; Schobert, Christian; Thompson, Gary A.; Lucas, William J.

    1997-01-01

    In angiosperms, the functional enucleate sieve tube system of the phloem appears to be maintained by the surrounding companion cells. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that polypeptides present within the phloem sap traffic cell to cell from the companion cells, where they are synthesized, into the sieve tube via plasmodesmata. Coinjection of fluorescently labeled dextrans along with size-fractionated Cucurbita maxima phloem proteins, ranging in size from 10 to 200 kDa, as well as injection of individual fluorescently labeled phloem proteins, provided unambiguous evidence that these proteins have the capacity to interact with mesophyll plasmodesmata in cucurbit cotyledons to induce an increase in size exclusion limit and traffic cell to cell. Plasmodesmal size exclusion limit increased to greater than 20 kDa, but less than 40 kDa, irrespective of the size of the injected protein, indicating that partial protein unfolding may be a requirement for transport. A threshold concentration in the 20–100 nM range was required for cell-to-cell transport indicating that phloem proteins have a high affinity for the mesophyll plasmodesmal binding site(s). Parallel experiments with glutaredoxin and cystatin, phloem sap proteins from Ricinus communis, established that these proteins can also traffic through cucurbit mesophyll plasmodesmata. These results are discussed in terms of the requirements for regulated protein trafficking between companion cells and the sieve tube system. As the threshold value for plasmodesmal transport of phloem sap proteins falls within the same range as many plant hormones, the possibility is discussed that some of these proteins may act as long-distance signaling molecules. PMID:9391168

  9. Phloem sap proteins from Cucurbita maxima and Ricinus communis have the capacity to traffic cell to cell through plasmodesmata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, S; Xiang, Y; Schobert, C; Thompson, G A; Lucas, W J

    1997-12-09

    In angiosperms, the functional enucleate sieve tube system of the phloem appears to be maintained by the surrounding companion cells. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that polypeptides present within the phloem sap traffic cell to cell from the companion cells, where they are synthesized, into the sieve tube via plasmodesmata. Coinjection of fluorescently labeled dextrans along with size-fractionated Cucurbita maxima phloem proteins, ranging in size from 10 to 200 kDa, as well as injection of individual fluorescently labeled phloem proteins, provided unambiguous evidence that these proteins have the capacity to interact with mesophyll plasmodesmata in cucurbit cotyledons to induce an increase in size exclusion limit and traffic cell to cell. Plasmodesmal size exclusion limit increased to greater than 20 kDa, but less than 40 kDa, irrespective of the size of the injected protein, indicating that partial protein unfolding may be a requirement for transport. A threshold concentration in the 20-100 nM range was required for cell-to-cell transport indicating that phloem proteins have a high affinity for the mesophyll plasmodesmal binding site(s). Parallel experiments with glutaredoxin and cystatin, phloem sap proteins from Ricinus communis, established that these proteins can also traffic through cucurbit mesophyll plasmodesmata. These results are discussed in terms of the requirements for regulated protein trafficking between companion cells and the sieve tube system. As the threshold value for plasmodesmal transport of phloem sap proteins falls within the same range as many plant hormones, the possibility is discussed that some of these proteins may act as long-distance signaling molecules.

  10. Thiol-based redox signaling in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis

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    Pierre eFrendo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In nitrogen poor soils legumes establish a symbiotic interaction with rhizobia that results in the formation of root nodules. These are unique plant organs where bacteria differentiate into bacteroids, which express the nitrogenase enzyme complex that reduces atmospheric N2 to ammonia. Nodule metabolism requires a tight control of the concentrations of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS so that they can perform useful signaling roles while avoiding nitro-oxidative damage. In nodules a thiol-dependent regulatory network that senses, transmits and responds to redox changes is starting to be elucidated. A combination of enzymatic, immunological, pharmacological and molecular analyses has allowed to conclude that glutathione and its legume-specific homolog, homoglutathione, are abundant in meristematic and infected cells, their spatio-temporally distribution is correlated with the corresponding (homoglutathione synthetase activities, and are crucial for nodule development and function. Glutathione is at high concentrations in the bacteroids and at moderate amounts in the mitochondria, cytosol and nuclei. Less information is available on other components of the network. The expression of multiple isoforms of glutathione peroxidases, peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, glutaredoxins and NADPH-thioredoxin reductases has been detected in nodule cells using antibodies and proteomics. Peroxiredoxins and thioredoxins are essential to regulate and in some cases to detoxify RONS in nodules. Further research is necessary to clarify the regulation of the expression and activity of thiol redox-active proteins in response to abiotic, biotic and developmental cues, their interactions with downstream targets by disulfide-exchange reactions, and their participation in signaling cascades. The availability of mutants and transgenic lines will be crucial to facilitate systematic investigations into the function of the various proteins in the legume

  11. Identification of cytokinin-responsive genes using microarray meta-analysis and RNA-Seq in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Apurva; Clabaugh, Ivory; To, Jenn P; Maxwell, Bridey B; Chiang, Yi-Hsuan; Schaller, G Eric; Loraine, Ann; Kieber, Joseph J

    2013-05-01

    Cytokinins are N(6)-substituted adenine derivatives that play diverse roles in plant growth and development. We sought to define a robust set of genes regulated by cytokinin as well as to query the response of genes not represented on microarrays. To this end, we performed a meta-analysis of microarray data from a variety of cytokinin-treated samples and used RNA-seq to examine cytokinin-regulated gene expression in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). Microarray meta-analysis using 13 microarray experiments combined with empirically defined filtering criteria identified a set of 226 genes differentially regulated by cytokinin, a subset of which has previously been validated by other methods. RNA-seq validated about 73% of the up-regulated genes identified by this meta-analysis. In silico promoter analysis indicated an overrepresentation of type-B Arabidopsis response regulator binding elements, consistent with the role of type-B Arabidopsis response regulators as primary mediators of cytokinin-responsive gene expression. RNA-seq analysis identified 73 cytokinin-regulated genes that were not represented on the ATH1 microarray. Representative genes were verified using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and NanoString analysis. Analysis of the genes identified reveals a substantial effect of cytokinin on genes encoding proteins involved in secondary metabolism, particularly those acting in flavonoid and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, as well as in the regulation of redox state of the cell, particularly a set of glutaredoxin genes. Novel splicing events were found in members of some gene families that are known to play a role in cytokinin signaling or metabolism. The genes identified in this analysis represent a robust set of cytokinin-responsive genes that are useful in the analysis of cytokinin function in plants.

  12. Protein oxidative damage and redox imbalance induced by ionising radiation in CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietraforte, Donatella; Paulicelli, Eleonora; Patrono, Clarice; Gambardella, Lucrezia; Scorza, Giuseppe; Testa, Antonella; Fattibene, Paola

    2018-03-16

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important mediators of the cytotoxicity induced by the direct reaction of ionising radiation (IR) with all critical cellular components, such as proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. The derived oxidative damage may propagate in exposed tissues in a dose- and spatiotemporal dependent manner to other cell compartments, affecting intracellular signalling, and cell fate. To understand how cell damage is induced, we studied the oxidative events occurring immediately after cell irradiation by analysing the fate of IR-derived ROS, the intracellular oxidative damage, and the modification of redox environment accumulating in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) within 1 h after cell irradiation (dose range 0-10 Gy). By using the immuno-spin trapping technique (IST), spectrophotometric methods, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, we showed that IR-derived ROS (i) induced an IST-detectable, antioxidant-inhibitable one-electron oxidation of specific intracellular proteins; (ii) altered the glutathione (GSH) content (which was found to increase below 2 Gy, and decrease at higher doses, leading to a redox imbalance); (iii) decreased glutathione peroxidase and glutaredoxin activity; (iv) modified neither glutathione reductase nor thioredoxin reductase activity; (v) were detected by spin trapping technique, but adduct intensity decreased due to cell competition for ROS; and (vi) induced no EPR-detectable radicals assignable to oxidised cellular components. In conclusion, our results showed that IR generated an early high oxidising potential (protein radical intermediates, redox imbalance, modified redox enzyme activity) in irradiated cells potentially able to propagate the damage and induce oxidative modification of secondary targets.

  13. Reduction of oxidative cellular damage by overexpression of the thioredoxin TRX2 gene improves yield and quality of wine yeast dry active biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ros Joaquim

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, adapted to anaerobic must fermentations, suffer oxidative stress when they are grown under aerobic conditions for biomass propagation in the industrial process of active dry yeast production. Oxidative metabolism of sugars favors high biomass yields but also causes increased oxidation damage of cell components. The overexpression of the TRX2 gene, coding for a thioredoxin, enhances oxidative stress resistance in a wine yeast strain model. The thioredoxin and also the glutathione/glutaredoxin system constitute the most important defense against oxidation. Trx2p is also involved in the regulation of Yap1p-driven transcriptional response against some reactive oxygen species. Results Laboratory scale simulations of the industrial active dry biomass production process demonstrate that TRX2 overexpression increases the wine yeast final biomass yield and also its fermentative capacity both after the batch and fed-batch phases. Microvinifications carried out with the modified strain show a fast start phenotype derived from its enhanced fermentative capacity and also increased content of beneficial aroma compounds. The modified strain displays an increased transcriptional response of Yap1p regulated genes and other oxidative stress related genes. Activities of antioxidant enzymes like Sod1p, Sod2p and catalase are also enhanced. Consequently, diminished oxidation of lipids and proteins is observed in the modified strain, which can explain the improved performance of the thioredoxin overexpressing strain. Conclusions We report several beneficial effects of overexpressing the thioredoxin gene TRX2 in a wine yeast strain. We show that this strain presents an enhanced redox defense. Increased yield of biomass production process in TRX2 overexpressing strain can be of special interest for several industrial applications.

  14. Distribution of microbial arsenic reduction, oxidation and extrusion genes along a wide range of environmental arsenic concentrations.

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    Lorena V Escudero

    Full Text Available The presence of the arsenic oxidation, reduction, and extrusion genes arsC, arrA, aioA, and acr3 was explored in a range of natural environments in northern Chile, with arsenic concentrations spanning six orders of magnitude. A combination of primers from the literature and newly designed primers were used to explore the presence of the arsC gene, coding for the reduction of As (V to As (III in one of the most common detoxification mechanisms. Enterobacterial related arsC genes appeared only in the environments with the lowest As concentration, while Firmicutes-like genes were present throughout the range of As concentrations. The arrA gene, involved in anaerobic respiration using As (V as electron acceptor, was found in all the systems studied. The As (III oxidation gene aioA and the As (III transport gene acr3 were tracked with two primer sets each and they were also found to be spread through the As concentration gradient. Sediment samples had a higher number of arsenic related genes than water samples. Considering the results of the bacterial community composition available for these samples, the higher microbial phylogenetic diversity of microbes inhabiting the sediments may explain the increased number of genetic resources found to cope with arsenic. Overall, the environmental distribution of arsenic related genes suggests that the occurrence of different ArsC families provides different degrees of protection against arsenic as previously described in laboratory strains, and that the glutaredoxin (Grx-linked arsenate reductases related to Enterobacteria do not confer enough arsenic resistance to live above certain levels of As concentrations.

  15. Cadmium-induced glutathionylation of actin occurs through a ROS-independent mechanism: Implications for cytoskeletal integrity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choong, Grace; Liu, Ying; Xiao, Weiqun; Templeton, Douglas M.

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in rat mesangial cells, and we have previously shown that this involves a complex interplay involving activation of kinase signaling, protein translocation, and disruption of focal adhesions. Here we investigate the role that glutathionylation of actin plays in Cd 2+ -associated cytoskeletal reorganization. Low concentrations of Cd 2+ (0.5–2 μM) caused an increase in actin glutathionylation by 6 h, whereas at higher concentrations glutathionylation remained at basal levels. Although oxidation with diamide increased glutathionylation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were not involved in the Cd 2+ -dependent effect, as only Cd 2+ concentrations above 2 μM were sufficient to increase ROS. However, low [Cd 2+ ] increased total glutathione levels without affecting the ratio of reduced/oxidized glutathione, and inhibition of glutathione synthesis suppressed actin glutathionylation. Cadmium increased the activity of the enzyme glutaredoxin, which influences the equilibrium between glutathionylated and deglutathionylated proteins and thus may influence levels of glutathionylated actin. Together these observations show that cadmium-dependent effects on actin glutathionylation are affected by glutathione metabolism and not by direct effects of ROS on thiol chemistry. In vitro polymerization assays with glutathionylated actin show a decreased rate of polymerization. In contrast, immunofluorescence of cytoskeletal structure in intact cells suggests that increases in actin glutathionylation accompanying increased glutathione levels occurring under low Cd 2+ exposure are protective in vivo, with cytoskeletal disruption ensuing only when higher Cd 2+ concentrations increase ROS levels and prevent an increase in actin–glutathione conjugates. - Highlights: • Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in mesangial cells. • Cadmium induces glutathionylation of actin at low concentrations. • Glutathionylation requires glutathione

  16. Systematic molecular genetic analysis of congenital sideroblastic anemia: evidence for genetic heterogeneity and identification of novel mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Anke K; Campagna, Dean R; McLoughlin, Erin M; Agarwal, Suneet; Fleming, Mark D; Bottomley, Sylvia S; Neufeld, Ellis J

    2010-02-01

    Sideroblastic anemias are heterogeneous congenital and acquired bone marrow disorders characterized by pathologic iron deposits in mitochondria of erythroid precursors. Among the congenital sideroblastic anemias (CSAs), the most common form is X-linked sideroblastic anemia, due to mutations in 5-aminolevulinate synthase (ALAS2). A novel autosomal recessive CSA, caused by mutations in the erythroid specific mitochondrial transporter SLC25A38, was recently defined. Other known etiologies include mutations in genes encoding the thiamine transporter SLC19A2, the RNA-modifying enzyme pseudouridine synthase 1 (PUS1), a mitochondrial ATP-binding cassette transporter (ABCB7), glutaredoxin 5 (GLRX5), as well as mitochondrial DNA deletions. Despite these known diverse causes, in a substantial portion of CSA cases a presumed genetic defect remains unknown. In the context of the recent discovery of SLC25A38 as a major novel cause, we systematically analyzed a large cohort of previously unreported CSA patients. Sixty CSA probands (28 females, 32 males) were examined for ALAS2, SLC25A38, PUS1, GLRX5, and ABCB7 mutations. SLC19A2 and mitochondrial DNA were only analyzed if characteristic syndromic features were apparent. Twelve probands had biallelic mutations in SLC25A38. Seven ALAS2 mutations were detected in eight sporadic CSA cases, two being novel. We also identified a novel homozygous null PUS1 mutation and novel mitochondrial DNA deletions in two patients with Pearson syndrome. No mutations were encountered in GLRX5, ABCB7, or SLC19A2. The remaining undefined probands (43%) can be grouped according to gender, family, and clinical characteristics, suggesting novel X-linked and autosomal recessive forms of CSA. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Haemophilus influenzae OxyR: characterization of its regulation, regulon and role in fitness.

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    Paul W Whitby

    Full Text Available To prevent damage by reactive oxygen species, many bacteria have evolved rapid detection and response systems, including the OxyR regulon. The OxyR system detects reactive oxygen and coordinates the expression of numerous defensive antioxidants. In many bacterial species the coordinated OxyR-regulated response is crucial for in vivo survival. Regulation of the OxyR regulon of Haemophilus influenzae was examined in vitro, and significant variation in the regulated genes of the OxyR regulon among strains of H. influenzae was observed. Quantitative PCR studies demonstrated a role for the OxyR-regulated peroxiredoxin/glutaredoxin as a mediator of the OxyR response, and also indicated OxyR self-regulation through a negative feedback loop. Analysis of transcript levels in H. influenzae samples derived from an animal model of otitis media demonstrated that the members of the OxyR regulon were actively upregulated within the chinchilla middle ear. H. influenzae mutants lacking the oxyR gene exhibited increased sensitivity to challenge with various peroxides. The impact of mutations in oxyR was assessed in various animal models of H. influenzae disease. In paired comparisons with the corresponding wild-type strains, the oxyR mutants were unaffected in both the chinchilla model of otitis media and an infant model of bacteremia. However, in weanling rats the oxyR mutant was significantly impaired compared to the wild-type strain. In contrast, in all three animal models when infected with a mixture of equal numbers of both wild-type and mutant strains the mutant strain was significantly out competed by the wild-type strain. These findings clearly establish a crucial role for OxyR in bacterial fitness.

  18. The iron uptake repressor Fep1 in the fission yeast binds Fe-S cluster through conserved cysteines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyo-Jin; Lee, Kang-Lok; Kim, Kyoung-Dong; Roe, Jung-Hye, E-mail: jhroe@snu.ac.kr

    2016-09-09

    Iron homeostasis is tightly regulated since iron is an essential but toxic element in the cell. The GATA-type transcription factor Fep1 and its orthologs contribute to iron homeostasis in many fungi by repressing genes for iron uptake when intracellular iron is high. Even though the function and interaction partners of Fep1 have been elucidated extensively In Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the mechanism behind iron-sensing by Fep1 remains elusive. It has been reported that Fep1 interacts with Fe-S-containing monothiol glutaredoxin Grx4 and Grx4-Fra2 complex. In this study, we demonstrate that Fep1 also binds iron, in the form of Fe-S cluster. Spectroscopic and biochemical analyses of as isolated and reconstituted Fep1 suggest that the dimeric Fep1 binds Fe-S clusters. The mutation study revealed that the cluster-binding depended on the conserved cysteines located between the two zinc fingers in the DNA binding domain. EPR analyses revealed [Fe-S]-specific peaks indicative of mixed presence of [2Fe-2S], [3Fe-4S], or [4Fe-4S]. The finding that Fep1 is an Fe-S protein fits nicely with the model that the Fe-S-trafficking Grx4 senses intracellular iron environment and modulates the activity of Fep1. - Highlights: • Fep1, a prototype fungal iron uptake regulator, was isolated stably from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. • Fep1 exhibits UV–visible absorption spectrum, characteristic of [Fe-S] proteins. • The iron and sulfide contents in purified or reconstituted Fep1 also support [Fe-S]. • The conserved cysteines are critical for [Fe-S]-binding. • EPR spectra at 5 K and 123 K suggest a mixed population of [Fe-S].

  19. Aging-dependent changes in rat heart mitochondrial glutaredoxins—Implications for redox regulation

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    Xing-Huang Gao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clinical and animal studies have documented that hearts of the elderly are more susceptible to ischemia/reperfusion damage compared to young adults. Recently we found that aging-dependent increase in susceptibility of cardiomyocytes to apoptosis was attributable to decrease in cytosolic glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1 and concomitant decrease in NF-κB-mediated expression of anti-apoptotic proteins. Besides primary localization in the cytosol, Grx1 also exists in the mitochondrial intermembrane space (IMS. In contrast, Grx2 is confined to the mitochondrial matrix. Here we report that Grx1 is decreased by 50–60% in the IMS, but Grx2 is increased by 1.4–2.6 fold in the matrix of heart mitochondria from elderly rats. Determination of in situ activities of the Grx isozymes from both subsarcolemmal (SSM and interfibrillar (IFM mitochondria revealed that Grx1 was fully active in the IMS. However, Grx2 was mostly in an inactive form in the matrix, consistent with reversible sequestration of the active-site cysteines of two Grx2 molecules in complex with an iron–sulfur cluster. Our quantitative evaluations of the active/inactive ratio for Grx2 suggest that levels of dimeric Grx2 complex with iron–sulfur clusters are increased in SSM and IFM in the hearts of elderly rats. We found that the inactive Grx2 can be fully reactivated by sodium dithionite or exogenous superoxide production mediated by xanthine oxidase. However, treatment with rotenone, which generates intramitochondrial superoxide through inhibition of mitochondrial respiratory chain Complex I, did not lead to Grx2 activation. These findings suggest that insufficient ROS accumulates in the vicinity of dimeric Grx2 to activate it in situ.

  20. Characterization of a Phanerochaete chrysosporium glutathione transferase reveals a novel structural and functional class with ligandin properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Yann; Prosper, Pascalita; Buée, Marc; Dumarçay, Stéphane; Favier, Frédérique; Gelhaye, Eric; Gérardin, Philippe; Harvengt, Luc; Jacquot, Jean-Pierre; Lamant, Tiphaine; Meux, Edgar; Mathiot, Sandrine; Didierjean, Claude; Morel, Mélanie

    2012-11-09

    Glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) form a superfamily of multifunctional proteins with essential roles in cellular detoxification processes. A new fungal specific class of GST has been highlighted by genomic approaches. The biochemical and structural characterization of one isoform of this class in Phanerochaete chrysosporium revealed original properties. The three-dimensional structure showed a new dimerization mode and specific features by comparison with the canonical GST structure. An additional β-hairpin motif in the N-terminal domain prevents the formation of the regular GST dimer and acts as a lid, which closes upon glutathione binding. Moreover, this isoform is the first described GST that contains all secondary structural elements, including helix α4' in the C-terminal domain, of the presumed common ancestor of cytosolic GSTs (i.e. glutaredoxin 2). A sulfate binding site has been identified close to the glutathione binding site and allows the binding of 8-anilino-1-naphtalene sulfonic acid. Competition experiments between 8-anilino-1-naphtalene sulfonic acid, which has fluorescent properties, and various molecules showed that this GST binds glutathionylated and sulfated compounds but also wood extractive molecules, such as vanillin, chloronitrobenzoic acid, hydroxyacetophenone, catechins, and aldehydes, in the glutathione pocket. This enzyme could thus function as a classical GST through the addition of glutathione mainly to phenethyl isothiocyanate, but alternatively and in a competitive way, it could also act as a ligandin of wood extractive compounds. These new structural and functional properties lead us to propose that this GST belongs to a new class that we name GSTFuA, for fungal specific GST class A.

  1. Real-Time Imaging of the Bacillithiol Redox Potential in the Human Pathogen Staphylococcus aureus Using a Genetically Encoded Bacilliredoxin-Fused Redox Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Vu Van; Harms, Manuela; Müller, Marret; Huyen, Nguyen Thi Thu; Hamilton, Chris J; Hochgräfe, Falko; Pané-Farré, Jan; Antelmann, Haike

    2017-05-20

    Bacillithiol (BSH) is utilized as a major thiol-redox buffer in the human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus. Under oxidative stress, BSH forms mixed disulfides with proteins, termed as S-bacillithiolation, which can be reversed by bacilliredoxins (Brx). In eukaryotes, glutaredoxin-fused roGFP2 biosensors have been applied for dynamic live imaging of the glutathione redox potential. Here, we have constructed a genetically encoded bacilliredoxin-fused redox biosensor (Brx-roGFP2) to monitor dynamic changes in the BSH redox potential in S. aureus. The Brx-roGFP2 biosensor showed a specific and rapid response to low levels of bacillithiol disulfide (BSSB) in vitro that required the active-site Cys of Brx. Dynamic live imaging in two methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) USA300 and COL strains revealed fast and dynamic responses of the Brx-roGFP2 biosensor under hypochlorite and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) stress and constitutive oxidation of the probe in different BSH-deficient mutants. Furthermore, we found that the Brx-roGFP2 expression level and the dynamic range are higher in S. aureus COL compared with the USA300 strain. In phagocytosis assays with THP-1 macrophages, the biosensor was 87% oxidized in S. aureus COL. However, no changes in the BSH redox potential were measured after treatment with different antibiotics classes, indicating that antibiotics do not cause oxidative stress in S. aureus. Conclusion and Innovation: This Brx-roGFP2 biosensor catalyzes specific equilibration between the BSH and roGFP2 redox couples and can be applied for dynamic live imaging of redox changes in S. aureus and other BSH-producing Firmicutes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 835-848.

  2. Cadmium-induced glutathionylation of actin occurs through a ROS-independent mechanism: Implications for cytoskeletal integrity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choong, Grace; Liu, Ying; Xiao, Weiqun; Templeton, Douglas M., E-mail: doug.templeton@utoronto.ca

    2013-10-15

    Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in rat mesangial cells, and we have previously shown that this involves a complex interplay involving activation of kinase signaling, protein translocation, and disruption of focal adhesions. Here we investigate the role that glutathionylation of actin plays in Cd{sup 2+}-associated cytoskeletal reorganization. Low concentrations of Cd{sup 2+} (0.5–2 μM) caused an increase in actin glutathionylation by 6 h, whereas at higher concentrations glutathionylation remained at basal levels. Although oxidation with diamide increased glutathionylation, reactive oxygen species (ROS) were not involved in the Cd{sup 2+}-dependent effect, as only Cd{sup 2+} concentrations above 2 μM were sufficient to increase ROS. However, low [Cd{sup 2+}] increased total glutathione levels without affecting the ratio of reduced/oxidized glutathione, and inhibition of glutathione synthesis suppressed actin glutathionylation. Cadmium increased the activity of the enzyme glutaredoxin, which influences the equilibrium between glutathionylated and deglutathionylated proteins and thus may influence levels of glutathionylated actin. Together these observations show that cadmium-dependent effects on actin glutathionylation are affected by glutathione metabolism and not by direct effects of ROS on thiol chemistry. In vitro polymerization assays with glutathionylated actin show a decreased rate of polymerization. In contrast, immunofluorescence of cytoskeletal structure in intact cells suggests that increases in actin glutathionylation accompanying increased glutathione levels occurring under low Cd{sup 2+} exposure are protective in vivo, with cytoskeletal disruption ensuing only when higher Cd{sup 2+} concentrations increase ROS levels and prevent an increase in actin–glutathione conjugates. - Highlights: • Cadmium disrupts the actin cytoskeleton in mesangial cells. • Cadmium induces glutathionylation of actin at low concentrations.

  3. Docosahexaenoic (DHA modulates phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (Gpx4 gene expression to ensure self-protection from oxidative damage in hippocampal cells

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    Veronica eCasañas-Sanchez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3 is a unique polyunsaturated fatty acid particularly abundant in nerve cell membrane phospholipids. DHA is a pleiotropic molecule that, not only modulates the physicochemical properties and architecture of neuronal plasma membrane, but it is also involved in multiple facets of neuronal biology, from regulation of synaptic function to neuroprotection and modulation of gene expression. As a highly unsaturated fatty acid due to the presence of six double bonds, DHA is susceptible for oxidation, especially in the highly pro-oxidant environment of brain parenchyma. We have recently reported the ability of DHA to regulate the transcriptional program controlling neuronal antioxidant defenses in a hippocampal cell line, especially the glutathione/glutaredoxin system. Within this antioxidant system, DHA was particularly efficient in triggering the upregulation of Gpx4 gene, which encodes for the nuclear, cytosolic and mitochondrial isoforms of phospholipid-hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PH-GPx/GPx4, the main enzyme protecting cell membranes against lipid peroxidation and capable to reduce oxidized phospholipids in situ. We show here that this novel property of DHA is also significant in the hippocampus of wild-type mice and APP/PS1 transgenic mice, a familial model of Alzheimer’s disease. By doing this, DHA stimulates a mechanism to self-protect from oxidative damage even in the neuronal scenario of high aerobic metabolism and in the presence of elevated levels of transition metals, which inevitably favor the generation of reactive oxygen species. Noticeably, DHA also upregulated a novel Gpx4 splicing variant, harboring part of the first intronic region, which according to the ‘sentinel RNA hypothesis’ would expand the ability of Gpx4 (and DHA to provide neuronal antioxidant defense independently of conventional nuclear splicing in cellular compartments, like dendritic zones, located away from nuclear

  4. Plant cytoplasmic GAPDH: redox post-translational modifications and moonlighting properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffagnini, Mirko; Fermani, Simona; Costa, Alex; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Trost, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) is a ubiquitous enzyme involved in glycolysis and shown, particularly in animal cells, to play additional roles in several unrelated non-metabolic processes such as control of gene expression and apoptosis. This functional versatility is regulated, in part at least, by redox post-translational modifications that alter GAPDH catalytic activity and influence the subcellular localization of the enzyme. In spite of the well established moonlighting (multifunctional) properties of animal GAPDH, little is known about non-metabolic roles of GAPDH in plants. Plant cells contain several GAPDH isoforms with different catalytic and regulatory properties, located both in the cytoplasm and in plastids, and participating in glycolysis and the Calvin-Benson cycle. A general feature of all GAPDH proteins is the presence of an acidic catalytic cysteine in the active site that is overly sensitive to oxidative modifications, including glutathionylation and S-nitrosylation. In Arabidopsis, oxidatively modified cytoplasmic GAPDH has been successfully used as a tool to investigate the role of reduced glutathione, thioredoxins and glutaredoxins in the control of different types of redox post-translational modifications. Oxidative modifications inhibit GAPDH activity, but might enable additional functions in plant cells. Mounting evidence support the concept that plant cytoplasmic GAPDH may fulfill alternative, non-metabolic functions that are triggered by redox post-translational modifications of the protein under stress conditions. The aim of this review is to detail the molecular mechanisms underlying the redox regulation of plant cytoplasmic GAPDH in the light of its crystal structure, and to provide a brief inventory of the well known redox-dependent multi-facetted properties of animal GAPDH, together with the emerging roles of oxidatively modified GAPDH in stress signaling pathways in plants. PMID:24282406

  5. How salicylic acid takes transcriptional control over jasmonic acid signaling

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    Lotte eCaarls

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional regulation is a central process in plant immunity. The induction or repression of defense genes is orchestrated by signaling networks that are directed by plant hormones of which salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA are the major players. Extensive cross-communication between the hormone signaling pathways allows for fine tuning of transcriptional programs, determining resistance to invaders and trade-offs with plant development. Here, we give an overview of how SA can control transcriptional reprogramming of JA-induced genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. SA can influence activity and/or localization of transcriptional regulators by post-translational modifications of transcription factors and co-regulators. SA-induced redox changes, mediated by thioredoxins and glutaredoxins, modify transcriptional regulators that are involved in suppression of JA-dependent genes, such as NPR1 and TGA transcription factors, which affects their localization or DNA binding activity. Furthermore, SA can mediate sequestering of JA-responsive transcription factors away from their target genes by stalling them in the cytosol or in complexes with repressor proteins in the nucleus. SA also affects JA-induced transcription by inducing degradation of transcription factors with an activating role in JA signaling, as was shown for the ERF transcription factor ORA59. Additionally, SA can induce negative regulators, among which WRKY transcription factors, that can directly or indirectly inhibit JA-responsive gene expression. Finally, at the DNA level, modification of histones by SA-dependent factors can result in repression of JA-responsive genes. These diverse and complex regulatory mechanisms affect important signaling hubs in the integration of hormone signaling networks. Some pathogens have evolved effectors that highjack hormone crosstalk mechanisms for their own good, which are described in this review as well.

  6. β3-Adrenoceptor activation relieves oxidative inhibition of the cardiac Na+-K+ pump in hyperglycemia induced by insulin receptor blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A; Hamilton, Elisha J; Figtree, Gemma A; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2015-09-01

    Dysregulated nitric oxide (NO)- and superoxide (O2 (·-))-dependent signaling contributes to the pathobiology of diabetes-induced cardiovascular complications. We examined if stimulation of β3-adrenergic receptors (β3-ARs), coupled to endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) activation, relieves oxidative inhibition of eNOS and the Na(+)-K(+) pump induced by hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia was established in male New Zealand White rabbits by infusion of the insulin receptor antagonist S961 for 7 days. Hyperglycemia increased tissue and blood indexes of oxidative stress. It induced glutathionylation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump β1-subunit in cardiac myocytes, an oxidative modification causing pump inhibition, and reduced the electrogenic pump current in voltage-clamped myocytes. Hyperglycemia also increased glutathionylation of eNOS, which causes its uncoupling, and increased coimmunoprecipitation of cytosolic p47(phox) and membranous p22(phox) NADPH oxidase subunits, consistent with NADPH oxidase activation. Blocking translocation of p47(phox) to p22(phox) with the gp91ds-tat peptide in cardiac myocytes ex vivo abolished the hyperglycemia-induced increase in glutathionylation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump β1-subunit and decrease in pump current. In vivo treatment with the β3-AR agonist CL316243 for 3 days eliminated the increase in indexes of oxidative stress, decreased coimmunoprecipitation of p22(phox) with p47(phox), abolished the hyperglycemia-induced increase in glutathionylation of eNOS and the Na(+)-K(+) pump β1-subunit, and abolished the decrease in pump current. CL316243 also increased coimmunoprecipitation of glutaredoxin-1 with the Na(+)-K(+) pump β1-subunit, which may reflect facilitation of deglutathionylation. In vivo β3-AR activation relieves oxidative inhibition of key cardiac myocyte proteins in hyperglycemia and may be effective in targeting the deleterious cardiac effects of diabetes. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Protein kinase-dependent oxidative regulation of the cardiac Na+-K+ pump: evidence from in vivo and in vitro modulation of cell signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A S; Hamilton, Elisha J; Rasmussen, Helge H; Figtree, Gemma A

    2013-06-15

    The widely reported stimulation of the cardiac Na(+)-K(+) pump by protein kinase A (PKA) should oppose other effects of PKA to increase contractility of the normal heart. It should also reduce harmful raised myocyte Na(+) levels in heart failure, yet blockade of the β1 adrenergic receptor (AR), coupled to PKA signalling, is beneficial. We treated rabbits with the β1 AR antagonist metoprolol to modulate PKA activity and studied cardiac myocytes ex vivo. Metoprolol increased electrogenic pump current (Ip) in voltage clamped myocytes and reduced glutathionylation of the β1 pump subunit, an oxidative modification causally related to pump inhibition. Activation of adenylyl cyclase with forskolin to enhance cAMP synthesis or inclusion of the catalytic subunit of PKA in patch pipette solutions abolished the increase in Ip in voltage clamped myocytes induced by treatment with metoprolol, supporting cAMP/PKA-mediated pump inhibition. Metoprolol reduced myocardial PKA and protein kinase C (PKC) activities, reduced coimmunoprecipitation of cytosolic p47(phox) and membranous p22(phox) NADPH oxidase subunits and reduced myocardial O2(•-)-sensitive dihydroethidium fluorescence. Treatment also enhanced coimmunoprecipitation of the β1 pump subunit with glutaredoxin 1 that catalyses de-glutathionylation. Since angiotensin II induces PKC-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase, we examined the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition with captopril. This treatment had no effect on PKA activity but reduced the activity of PKC, reduced β1 subunit glutathionylation and increased Ip. The PKA-induced Na(+)-K(+) pump inhibition we report should act with other mechanisms that enhance contractility of the normal heart but accentuate the harmful effects of raised cytosolic Na(+) in the failing heart. This scheme is consistent with the efficacy of β1 AR blockade in the treatment of heart failure.

  8. Reversible oxidative modification: a key mechanism of Na+-K+ pump regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figtree, Gemma A; Liu, Chia-Chi; Bibert, Stephanie; Hamilton, Elisha J; Garcia, Alvaro; White, Caroline N; Chia, Karin K M; Cornelius, Flemming; Geering, Kaethi; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2009-07-17

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) inhibits the cardiac sarcolemmal Na(+)-K(+) pump via protein kinase (PK)C-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase. We examined whether this is mediated by oxidative modification of the pump subunits. We detected glutathionylation of beta(1), but not alpha(1), subunits in rabbit ventricular myocytes at baseline. beta(1) Subunit glutathionylation was increased by peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)), paraquat, or activation of NADPH oxidase by Ang II. Increased glutathionylation was associated with decreased alpha(1)/beta(1) subunit coimmunoprecipitation. Glutathionylation was reversed after addition of superoxide dismutase. Glutaredoxin 1, which catalyzes deglutathionylation, coimmunoprecipitated with beta(1) subunit and, when included in patch pipette solutions, abolished paraquat-induced inhibition of myocyte Na(+)-K(+) pump current (I(p)). Cysteine (Cys46) of the beta(1) subunit was the likely candidate for glutathionylation. We expressed Na(+)-K(+) pump alpha(1) subunits with wild-type or Cys46-mutated beta(1) subunits in Xenopus oocytes. ONOO(-) induced glutathionylation of beta(1) subunit and a decrease in Na(+)-K(+) pump turnover number. This was eliminated by mutation of Cys46. ONOO(-) also induced glutathionylation of the Na(+)-K(+) ATPase beta(1) subunit from pig kidney. This was associated with a approximately 2-fold decrease in the rate-limiting E(2)-->E(1) conformational change of the pump, as determined by RH421 fluorescence. We propose that kinase-dependent regulation of the Na(+)-K(+) pump occurs via glutathionylation of its beta(1) subunit at Cys46. These findings have implications for pathophysiological conditions characterized by neurohormonal dysregulation, myocardial oxidative stress and raised myocyte Na(+) levels.

  9. Glutathionylation-Dependence of Na+-K+-Pump Currents Can Mimic Reduced Subsarcolemmal Na+ Diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alvaro; Liu, Chia-Chi; Cornelius, Flemming; Clarke, Ronald J.; Rasmussen, Helge H.

    2016-01-01

    The existence of a subsarcolemmal space with restricted diffusion for Na+ in cardiac myocytes has been inferred from a transient peak electrogenic Na+-K+ pump current beyond steady state on reexposure of myocytes to K+ after a period of exposure to K+-free extracellular solution. The transient peak current is attributed to enhanced electrogenic pumping of Na+ that accumulated in the diffusion-restricted space during pump inhibition in K+-free extracellular solution. However, there are no known physical barriers that account for such restricted Na+ diffusion, and we examined if changes of activity of the Na+-K+ pump itself cause the transient peak current. Reexposure to K+ reproduced a transient current beyond steady state in voltage-clamped ventricular myocytes as reported by others. Persistence of it when the Na+ concentration in patch pipette solutions perfusing the intracellular compartment was high and elimination of it with K+-free pipette solution could not be reconciled with restricted subsarcolemmal Na+ diffusion. The pattern of the transient current early after pump activation was dependent on transmembrane Na+- and K+ concentration gradients suggesting the currents were related to the conformational poise imposed on the pump. We examined if the currents might be accounted for by changes in glutathionylation of the β1 Na+-K+ pump subunit, a reversible oxidative modification that inhibits the pump. Susceptibility of the β1 subunit to glutathionylation depends on the conformational poise of the Na+-K+ pump, and glutathionylation with the pump stabilized in conformations equivalent to those expected to be imposed on voltage-clamped myocytes supported this hypothesis. So did elimination of the transient K+-induced peak Na+-K+ pump current when we included glutaredoxin 1 in patch pipette solutions to reverse glutathionylation. We conclude that transient K+-induced peak Na+-K+ pump current reflects the effect of conformation-dependent β1 pump subunit

  10. Protein kinase-dependent oxidative regulation of the cardiac Na+–K+ pump: evidence from in vivo and in vitro modulation of cell signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galougahi, Keyvan Karimi; Liu, Chia-Chi; Garcia, Alvaro; Fry, Natasha A S; Hamilton, Elisha J; Rasmussen, Helge H; Figtree, Gemma A

    2013-01-01

    The widely reported stimulation of the cardiac Na+–K+ pump by protein kinase A (PKA) should oppose other effects of PKA to increase contractility of the normal heart. It should also reduce harmful raised myocyte Na+ levels in heart failure, yet blockade of the β1 adrenergic receptor (AR), coupled to PKA signalling, is beneficial. We treated rabbits with the β1 AR antagonist metoprolol to modulate PKA activity and studied cardiac myocytes ex vivo. Metoprolol increased electrogenic pump current (Ip) in voltage clamped myocytes and reduced glutathionylation of the β1 pump subunit, an oxidative modification causally related to pump inhibition. Activation of adenylyl cyclase with forskolin to enhance cAMP synthesis or inclusion of the catalytic subunit of PKA in patch pipette solutions abolished the increase in Ip in voltage clamped myocytes induced by treatment with metoprolol, supporting cAMP/PKA-mediated pump inhibition. Metoprolol reduced myocardial PKA and protein kinase C (PKC) activities, reduced coimmunoprecipitation of cytosolic p47phox and membranous p22phox NADPH oxidase subunits and reduced myocardial O2•−-sensitive dihydroethidium fluorescence. Treatment also enhanced coimmunoprecipitation of the β1 pump subunit with glutaredoxin 1 that catalyses de-glutathionylation. Since angiotensin II induces PKC-dependent activation of NADPH oxidase, we examined the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition with captopril. This treatment had no effect on PKA activity but reduced the activity of PKC, reduced β1 subunit glutathionylation and increased Ip. The PKA-induced Na+–K+ pump inhibition we report should act with other mechanisms that enhance contractility of the normal heart but accentuate the harmful effects of raised cytosolic Na+ in the failing heart. This scheme is consistent with the efficacy of β1 AR blockade in the treatment of heart failure. PMID:23587884

  11. Thiol-based redox regulation in sexual plant reproduction: new insights and perspectives

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    Jose A Traverso

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The success of sexual reproduction in plants involves (i the proper formation of the plant gametophytes (pollen and embryo sac containing the gametes, (ii the accomplishment of specific interactions between pollen grains and the stigma, which subsequently lead to (iii the fusion of the gametes and eventually to (iv the seed setting. Owing to the lack of mobility, plants have developed specific regulatory mechanisms to control all developmental events underlying the sexual plant reproduction according to environmental challenges. Over the last decade, redox regulation and signaling have come into sight as crucial mechanisms able to manage critical stages during sexual plant reproduction. This regulation involves a complex redox network which includes reactive oxygen species (ROS, reactive nitrogen species (RNS, glutathione and other classic buffer molecules or antioxidant proteins, and some thiol/disulphide-containing proteins belonging to the thioredoxin superfamily, like glutaredoxins (GRXs or thioredoxins (TRXs. These proteins participate as critical elements not only in the switch between the mitotic to the meiotic cycle but also at further developmental stages of microsporogenesis. They are also implicated in the regulation of pollen rejection as the result of self incompatibility. In addition, they display precise space-temporal patterns of expression and are present in specific localizations like the stigmatic papillae or the mature pollen, although their functions and subcellular localizations are not clear yet. In this review we summarize insights and perspectives about the presence of thiol/disulphide-containing proteins in plant reproduction, taking into account the general context of the cell redox network.

  12. The Enzymatic and Structural Basis for Inhibition of Echinococcus granulosus Thioredoxin Glutathione Reductase by Gold(I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Gustavo; Gao, Wei; Wang, Yang; Bonilla, Mariana; Yu, Long; Novikov, Andrey; Virginio, Veridiana G; Ferreira, Henrique B; Vieites, Marisol; Gladyshev, Vadim N; Gambino, Dinorah; Dai, Shaodong

    2017-12-20

    New drugs are needed to treat flatworm infections that cause severe human diseases such as schistosomiasis. The unique flatworm enzyme thioredoxin glutathione reductase (TGR), structurally different from the human enzyme, is a key drug target. Structural studies of the flatworm Echinococcus granulosus TGR, free and complexed with Au I -MPO, a novel gold inhibitor, together with inhibition assays were performed. Au I -MPO is a potent TGR inhibitor that achieves 75% inhibition at a 1:1 TGR:Au ratio and efficiently kills E. granulosus in vitro. The structures revealed salient insights: (i) unique monomer-monomer interactions, (ii) distinct binding sites for thioredoxin and the glutaredoxin (Grx) domain, (iii) a single glutathione disulfide reduction site in the Grx domain, (iv) rotation of the Grx domain toward the Sec-containing redox active site, and (v) a single gold atom bound to Cys 519 and Cys 573 in the Au I -TGR complex. Structural modeling suggests that these residues are involved in the stabilization of the Sec-containing C-terminus. Consistently, Cys→Ser mutations in these residues decreased TGR activities. Mass spectroscopy confirmed these cysteines are the primary binding site. The identification of a primary site for gold binding and the structural model provide a basis for gold compound optimization through scaffold adjustments. The structural study revealed that TGR functions are achieved not only through a mobile Sec-containing redox center but also by rotation of the Grx domain and distinct binding sites for Grx domain and thioredoxin. The conserved Cys 519 and Cys 573 residues targeted by gold assist catalysis through stabilization of the Sec-containing redox center. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1491-1504.

  13. Monoisotopic mass determination algorithm for selenocysteine-containing polypeptides from mass spectrometric data based on theoretical modeling of isotopic peak intensity ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Wook; Lee, Sunho; Park, Kunsoo; Na, Seungjin; Paek, Eunok; Park, Hyung Seo; Park, Heejin; Lee, Kong-Joo; Jeong, Jaeho; Kim, Hwa-Young

    2012-09-07

    Selenoproteins, containing selenocysteine (Sec, U) as the 21st amino acid in the genetic code, are well conserved from bacteria to human, except yeast and higher plants that miss the Sec insertion machinery. Determination of Sec association is important to find substrates and to understand redox action of selenoproteins. While mass spectrometry (MS) has become a common and powerful tool to determine an amino acid sequence of a protein, identification of a protein sequence containing Sec was not easy using MS because of the limited stability of Sec in selenoproteins. Se has six naturally occurring isotopes, ⁷⁴Se, ⁷⁶Se, ⁷⁷Se, ⁷⁸Se, ⁸⁰Se, and ⁸²Se, and ⁸⁰Se is the most abundant isotope. These characteristics provide a good indicator for selenopeptides but make it difficult to detect selenopeptides using software analysis tools developed for common peptides. Thus, previous reports verified MS scans of selenopeptides by manual inspection. None of the fully automated algorithms have taken into account the isotopes of Se, leading to the wrong interpretation for selenopeptides. In this paper, we present an algorithm to determine monoisotopic masses of selenocysteine-containing polypeptides. Our algorithm is based on a theoretical model for an isotopic distribution of a selenopeptide, which regards peak intensities in an isotopic distribution as the natural abundances of C, H, N, O, S, and Se. Our algorithm uses two kinds of isotopic peak intensity ratios: one for two adjacent peaks and another for two distant peaks. It is shown that our algorithm for selenopeptides performs accurately, which was demonstrated with two LC-MS/MS data sets. Using this algorithm, we have successfully identified the Sec-Cys and Sec-Sec cross-linking of glutaredoxin 1 (GRX1) from mass spectra obtained by UPLC-ESI-q-TOF instrument.

  14. Copper accumulation in senescent cells: Interplay between copper transporters and impaired autophagy

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    Shashank Masaldan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence is characterized by irreversible growth arrest incurred through either replicative exhaustion or by pro-oncogenic cellular stressors (radioactivity, oxidative stress, oncogenic activation. The enrichment of senescent cells in tissues with age has been associated with tissue dyshomeostasis and age-related pathologies including cancers, neurodegenerative disorders (e.g. Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, etc. and metabolic disorders (e.g. diabetes. We identified copper accumulation as being a universal feature of senescent cells [mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF, human prostate epithelial cells and human diploid fibroblasts] in vitro. Elevated copper in senescent MEFs was accompanied by elevated levels of high-affinity copper uptake protein 1 (Ctr1, diminished levels of copper-transporting ATPase 1 (Atp7a (copper export and enhanced antioxidant defence reflected by elevated levels of glutathione (GSH, superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1 and glutaredoxin 1 (Grx1. The levels of intracellular copper were further increased in senescent MEFs cultured in copper supplemented medium and in senescent Mottled Brindled (Mobr MEFs lacking functional Atp7a. Finally, we demonstrated that the restoration/preservation of autophagic-lysosomal degradation in senescent MEFs following rapamycin treatment correlated with attenuation of copper accumulation in these cells despite a further decrease in Atp7a levels. This study for the first time establishes a link between Atp7a and the autophagic-lysosomal pathway, and a requirement for both to effect efficient copper export. Such a connection between cellular autophagy and copper homeostasis is significant, as both have emerged as important facets of age-associated degenerative disease. Keywords: Senescence, Copper, Ageing, Homeostasis, Autophagy

  15. The nitrogen-fixation island insertion site is conserved in diazotrophic Pseudomonas stutzeri and Pseudomonas sp. isolated from distal and close geographical regions.

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    Anastasia Venieraki

    Full Text Available The presence of nitrogen fixers within the genus Pseudomonas has been established and so far most isolated strains are phylogenetically affiliated to Pseudomonas stutzeri. A gene ortholog neighborhood analysis of the nitrogen fixation island (NFI in four diazotrophic P. stutzeri strains and Pseudomonas azotifigens revealed that all are flanked by genes coding for cobalamin synthase (cobS and glutathione peroxidise (gshP. The putative NFIs lack all the features characterizing a mobilizable genomic island. Nevertheless, bioinformatic analysis P. stutzeri DSM 4166 NFI demonstrated the presence of short inverted and/or direct repeats within both flanking regions. The other P. stutzeri strains carry only one set of repeats. The genetic diversity of eleven diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates was also investigated. Multilocus sequence typing grouped nine isolates along with P. stutzeri and two isolates are grouped in a separate clade. A Rep-PCR fingerprinting analysis grouped the eleven isolates into four distinct genotypes. We also provided evidence that the putative NFI in our diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates is flanked by cobS and gshP genes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the putative NFI of Pseudomonas sp. Gr65 is flanked by inverted repeats identical to those found in P. stutzeri DSM 4166 and while the other P. stutzeri isolates harbor the repeats located in the intergenic region between cobS and glutaredoxin genes as in the case of P. stutzeri A1501. Taken together these data suggest that all putative NFIs of diazotrophic Pseudomonas isolates are anchored in an intergenic region between cobS and gshP genes and their flanking regions are designated by distinct repeats patterns. Moreover, the presence of almost identical NFIs in diazotrophic Pseudomonas strains isolated from distal geographical locations around the world suggested that this horizontal gene transfer event may have taken place early in the evolution.

  16. Genome-Wide Expression Analysis of Reactive Oxygen Species Gene Network in Mizuna Plants Grown in Long-Term Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Manabu; Gusev, Oleg; Wheeler, Raymond; Levinskikh, Margarita; Sychev, Vladimir; Bingham, Gail; Hummerick, Mary; Oono, Youko; Matsumoto, Takashi; Yazawa, Takayuki

    We have developed a plant growth system, namely Lada, which was installed in ISS to study and grow plants, including vegetables in a spaceflight environment. We have succeeded in cultivating Mizuna, tomato, pea, radish, wheat, rice, and barley in long-term spaceflight. Transcription levels of superoxide dismutase, glutamyl transferase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase were increased in the barley germinated and grown for 26 days in Lada, though the whole-plant growth and development of the barley in spaceflight were the same as in the ground control barley. In this study, we investigated the response of the ROS gene network in Mizuna, Brassica rapa var. nipposinica, cultivated under spaceflight condition. Seeds of Mizuna were sown in the root module of LADA aboard the Zvezda module of ISS and the seedlings were grown under 24h lighting in the leaf chamber. After 27 days of cultivation, the plants were harvested and stored at -80(°) C in MELFI aboard the Destiny module, and were transported to the ground at < -20(°) C in GLACIER aboard Space Shuttle. Ground control cultivation was carried out under the same conditions in LADA. Total RNA isolated from leaves was subjected to mRNA-Seq using next generation sequencing (NGS) technology. A total of 20 in 32 ROS oxidative marker genes were up-regulated, including high expression of four hallmarks, and preferentially expressed genes associated with ROS-scavenging including thioredoxin, glutaredoxin, and alternative oxidase genes. In the transcription factors of the ROS gene network, MEKK1-MKK4-MPK3, OXI1-MKK4-MPK3, and OXI1-MPK3 of MAP cascades, induction of WRKY22 by MEKK1-MKK4-MPK3 cascade, induction of WRKY25 and repression of Zat7 by Zat12 were suggested. These results revealed that the spaceflight environment induced oxidative stress and the ROS gene network activation in the space-grown Mizuna.

  17. Efeito do tratamento térmico na concentração de carotenóides, compostos fenólicos, ácido ascórbico e capacidade antioxidante do suco de tangerina murcote Effect of thermal treatment on the carotenoid, phenolic compound and ascorbic acid concentrations, and the antioxidant capacity of murcott tangerine juice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André de Souza Dutra

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Neste estudo, avaliou-se o efeito do tratamento térmico do suco de tangerina murcote em relação ao teor de carotenóides totais, ao perfil de carotenóides (luteína, zeaxantina, β-criptoxantina e β-caroteno, aos compostos fenólicos totais, ao ácido ascórbico e à capacidade antioxidante. No processo, utilizou-se um trocador de calor tubular, sendo avaliados 11 tratamentos seguindo um ensaio fatorial completo 2² com três repetições no ponto central, com quatro pontos axiais e uma região de observação de 88 a 100 ºC e 16 a 44 s. O teor de caratenóides totais decresceu de forma significativa em quase todos os tratamentos aplicados, se comparado ao valor encontrado para o suco in natura. A maioria dos tratamentos não reduziu de forma significativa os teores dos caratenóides luteína, zeaxantina e β-criptoxantina. Além disso, o teor de β-caroteno não sofreu alterações significativas em todos os tratamentos avaliados. A análise de variância mostrou que, para os caratenóides, não ocorreram interações significativas entre as variáveis temperatura e tempo. Os teores de ácido ascórbico e compostos fenólicos totais apresentaram reduções em seis condições avaliadas, ao passo que, em quatro, observou-se um aumento dos teores de compostos fenólicos totais, causado provavelmente pela evaporação da água presente no suco. A maior redução do teor de ácido ascórbico e o maior aumento para compostos fenólicos totais foi observado para o binômio 100 ºC/30 s. O teor de ácido ascórbico sofreu de forma significativa a influência da temperatura e esse processo de degradação pode ser descrito por meio de um modelo quadrático. Todos os tratamentos utilizados reduziram a capacidade antioxidante do suco, sendo mais intensa para o binômio 100 ºC/30 s. As variações observadas não alteraram de maneira considerável as características nutricionais do suco e os tratamentos térmicos realizados a 94 ºC por 16 a 44 s

  18. Cryoprotection effectiveness of low concentrations of natural and lyophilized LDL (low density lipoproteins on canine spermatozoa

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    M.M. Neves

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of low concentrations of natural and lyophilized low density lipoprotein (LDL from hen's egg yolk for cryopreservation of canine semen. Different ammonium sulphate concentrations were tested to extract LDL from egg yolk. The yolk was centrifuged, and LDL was isolated using 10, 20, 40, 45, or 50% ammonium sulphate solution (ASS. The LDL-rich floating fraction was collected for chemical characterization. Dry matter content was lowest (P<0.05 in the LDL extracted with the 50% ASS. The purification of LDL increased in association with increasing ammonium sulphate concentrations. SDS-PAGE showed that the 50% ASS solution yielded a purer fraction of LDL from egg yolk. For semen cryopreservation, TRIS extender was used replacing 20% egg yolk (control by natural or lyophilized LDL using 1, 2, and 3% (w/v. Semen was centrifuged (755Xg for 7 min, diluted with one of the extenders, packed into 0.5mL straws (100x106 sperm/mL, and placed in a programmable cryopreservation machine. Thawed semen (37°C/ 30s was analyzed for sperm motility, morphology, and by the hypoosmotic and epifluorescence tests (CFDA/ PI. Natural LDL extracted with 50% ASS was as effective as whole egg yolk to preserve canine frozen sperm when using low concentrations. The lyophilized LDL, mainly in the two higher concentrations tested (2 and 3%, was unsuitable to maintain the effectiveness of the LDL cryoprotective effect on dog sperm.

  19. Vitamin E (Trolox) addition to Tris-egg yolk extender preserves ram spermatozoon structure and kinematics after cryopreservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Sildivane Valcácia; Soares, Adriana Trindade; Batista, André Mariano; Almeida, Felipe Costa; Nunes, José Ferreira; Peixoto, Christina Alves; Guerra, Maria Madalena Pessoa

    2013-02-01

    Several studies reveal that vitamin E acts as a cellular stabilizer of unsaturated lipids against oxidative deterioration, thus maintaining structural and functional integrity at the subcellular level. The objective of this study was to evaluate Vitamin E (Trolox) addition to freezing extender for ram spermatozoa. Semen samples were diluted in Tris-yolk egg medium without antioxidant (control group) and with Trolox in different concentrations (30, 60 and 120μM). After thawing (37°C/30s), samples were subjected to analysis for plasma membrane integrity (PMi), acrosome integrity (Aci), mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), sperm kinematics, and ultrastructural integrity. The Trolox 60 and 120μM groups showed higher percentages of iPMs (Pspermatozoon head plasma membranes, while for the spermatozoon tail, plasma membrane preservation at 60μM was higher (P<0.05) than the other groups. The Trolox 60 and 120μM groups presented more mitochondrial ultrastructural preservation than the other groups (P<0.05). These results indicate that Trolox addition to Tris-egg yolk at 60 and 120μM provides greater structural integrity (plasma membrane and mitochondria) and kinematics for ram spermatozoa after cryopreservation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Functional and integrative analysis of the proteomic profile of radish root under Pb exposure

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    Yan Wang

    2016-12-01

    alteration of some metabolites including glucose, citrate, and malate. Meanwhile, a series of other defense responses including ascorbate (ASA–glutathione (GSH cycle for ROS scavenging and Pb-defense protein species (glutaredoxin, aldose 1-epimerase malate dehydrogenase and thioredoxin, were triggered to cope with Pb-induced injuries. The results would be helpful for further dissecting molecular mechanism underlying plant response to HM stresses, and facilitate effective management of HM contamination in vegetable crops by genetic manipulation.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide scavenging is not a virulence determinant in the pathogenesis of Haemophilus influenzae type b strain Eagan

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    Van Beeumen Jozef J

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A potentially lethal flux of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is continuously generated during aerobic metabolism. It follows that aerobic organisms have equipped themselves with specific H2O2 dismutases and H2O2 reductases, of which catalase and the alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpR are the best-studied prokaryotic members. The sequenced Haemophilus influenzae Rd genome reveals one catalase, designated HktE, and no AhpR. However, Haemophilus influenzae type b strain Eagan (Hib, a causative agent of bacterial sepsis and meningitis in young children, disrupted in its hktE gene is not attenuated in virulence, and retains the ability to rapidly scavenge H2O2. This redundancy in H2O2-scavenging is accounted for by peroxidatic activity which specifically uses glutathione as the reducing substrate. Results We show here that inside acatalasaemic H. influenzae all of the residual peroxidatic activity is catalyzed by PGdx, a hybrid peroxiredoxin-glutaredoxin glutathione-dependent peroxidase. In vitro kinetic assays on crude hktE- pgdx- H. influenzae Rd extracts revealed the presence of NAD(PH:peroxide oxidoreductase activity, which, however, appears to be physiologically insignificant because of its low affinity for H2O2 (Km = 1.1 mM. Hydroperoxidase-deficient hktE- pgdx- H. influenzae Rd showed a slightly affected aerobic growth phenotype in rich broth, while, in chemically defined medium, growth was completely inhibited by aerobic conditions, unless the medium contained an amino acid/vitamin supplement. To study the role of PGdx in virulence and to assess the requirement of H2O2-scavenging during the course of infection, both a pgdx single mutant and a pgdx/hktE double mutant of Hib were assayed for virulence in an infant rat model. The ability of both mutant strains to cause bacteremia was unaffected. Conclusion Catalase (HktE and a sole peroxidase (PGdx account for the majority of scavenging of metabolically generated H2O2 in the H

  2. Application of genetically encoded redox biosensors to measure dynamic changes in the glutathione, bacillithiol and mycothiol redox potentials in pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Quach Ngoc; Linzner, Nico; Loi, Vu Van; Antelmann, Haike

    2018-02-15

    Gram-negative bacteria utilize glutathione (GSH) as their major LMW thiol. However, most Gram-positive bacteria do not encode enzymes for GSH biosynthesis and produce instead alternative LMW thiols, such as bacillithiol (BSH) and mycothiol (MSH). BSH is utilized by Firmicutes and MSH is the major LMW thiol of Actinomycetes. LMW thiols are required to maintain the reduced state of the cytoplasm, but are also involved in virulence mechanisms in human pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Salmonella enterica subsp. Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes. Infection conditions often cause perturbations of the intrabacterial redox balance in pathogens, which is further affected under antibiotics treatments. During the last years, novel glutaredoxin-fused roGFP2 biosensors have been engineered in many eukaryotic organisms, including parasites, yeast, plants and human cells for dynamic live-imaging of the GSH redox potential in different compartments. Likewise bacterial roGFP2-based biosensors are now available to measure the dynamic changes in the GSH, BSH and MSH redox potentials in model and pathogenic Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. In this review, we present an overview of novel functions of the bacterial LMW thiols GSH, MSH and BSH in pathogenic bacteria in virulence regulation. Moreover, recent results about the application of genetically encoded redox biosensors are summarized to study the mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions, persistence and antibiotics resistance. In particularly, we highlight recent biosensor results on the redox changes in the intracellular food-borne pathogen Salmonella Typhimurium as well as in the Gram-positive pathogens S. aureus and M. tuberculosis during infection conditions and under antibiotics treatments. These studies established a link between ROS and antibiotics resistance with the intracellular LMW thiol-redox potential. Future applications should be directed

  3. 17β-Estradiol up-regulates Nrf2 via PI3K/AKT and estrogen receptor signaling pathways to suppress light-induced degeneration in rat retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C; Wang, S; Wang, B; Du, F; Hu, C; Li, H; Feng, Y; Zhu, R; Mo, M; Cao, Y; Li, A; Yu, X

    2015-09-24

    Human age-related retinal diseases, such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), are intimately associated with decreased tissue oxygenation and hypoxia. Different antioxidants have been investigated to reverse AMD. In the present study, we describe the antioxidant 17β-estradiol (βE2) and investigate its protective effects on retinal neurons. Fourteen days after ovariectomy, adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 8000-lux light for 12h to induce retinal degeneration. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were assessed by confocal fluorescence microscopy using 2,7-dichlorofluorescein diacetate. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and antioxidant enzyme mRNA expression were detected by real-time PCR. Western blotting was used to evaluate NRF2 activation. NRF2 translocation was determined by immunohistochemistry, with morphological changes monitored by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Following light exposure, βE2 significantly reduced ROS production. βE2 also up-regulated NRF2 mRNA and protein levels, with maximal expression at 4 and 12h post-exposure, respectively. Interestingly, following βE2 administration, NRF2 was translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, primarily in the outer nuclear layer. βE2 also up-regulated NRF2, which triggered phase-2 antioxidant enzyme expression (superoxide dismutases 1 and 2, catalase, glutaredoxins 1 and 2, and thioredoxins 1 and 2), reduced ROS production, and ameliorated retinal damage. However, the beneficial effects of βE2 were markedly suppressed by pretreatment with LY294002 or ICI182780, specific inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-Akt (PI3K/AKT), and estrogen receptor (ER) signaling pathways, respectively. Taken together, these observations suggest that βE2 exerts antioxidative effects following light-induced retinal degeneration potentially via NRF2 activation. This protective mechanism may depend on two pathways: a rapid, non-genomic-type PI3K/AKT response, and a genomic-type ER

  4. Glutathionylation-Dependence of Na(+)-K(+)-Pump Currents Can Mimic Reduced Subsarcolemmal Na(+) Diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alvaro; Liu, Chia-Chi; Cornelius, Flemming; Clarke, Ronald J; Rasmussen, Helge H

    2016-03-08

    The existence of a subsarcolemmal space with restricted diffusion for Na(+) in cardiac myocytes has been inferred from a transient peak electrogenic Na(+)-K(+) pump current beyond steady state on reexposure of myocytes to K(+) after a period of exposure to K(+)-free extracellular solution. The transient peak current is attributed to enhanced electrogenic pumping of Na(+) that accumulated in the diffusion-restricted space during pump inhibition in K(+)-free extracellular solution. However, there are no known physical barriers that account for such restricted Na(+) diffusion, and we examined if changes of activity of the Na(+)-K(+) pump itself cause the transient peak current. Reexposure to K(+) reproduced a transient current beyond steady state in voltage-clamped ventricular myocytes as reported by others. Persistence of it when the Na(+) concentration in patch pipette solutions perfusing the intracellular compartment was high and elimination of it with K(+)-free pipette solution could not be reconciled with restricted subsarcolemmal Na(+) diffusion. The pattern of the transient current early after pump activation was dependent on transmembrane Na(+)- and K(+) concentration gradients suggesting the currents were related to the conformational poise imposed on the pump. We examined if the currents might be accounted for by changes in glutathionylation of the β1 Na(+)-K(+) pump subunit, a reversible oxidative modification that inhibits the pump. Susceptibility of the β1 subunit to glutathionylation depends on the conformational poise of the Na(+)-K(+) pump, and glutathionylation with the pump stabilized in conformations equivalent to those expected to be imposed on voltage-clamped myocytes supported this hypothesis. So did elimination of the transient K(+)-induced peak Na(+)-K(+) pump current when we included glutaredoxin 1 in patch pipette solutions to reverse glutathionylation. We conclude that transient K(+)-induced peak Na(+)-K(+) pump current reflects the effect

  5. The effects of arsenic or the combination of arsenic and radiation exposure is enhanced through the overexpression of the GSTO family member p28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giri, U.; Story, M.D.; Terry, N.H.A.; Giri, D.K.; Calkins, P.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: p28 is a member of the GST omega superfamily and has dehydroascorbate reductase, GST, and glutaredoxin activities. Furthermore, p28 is the rate-limiting enzyme in the bio-transformation of arsenic. The monomethyl arsenous reducatase activity of p28 produces dimethylarseniate, the most toxic form of arsenic. We investigated how p28 modulated arsenic cellular sensitivity in two mammalian models: 1) in LY-ar and LY-as cells where p28 is over-expressed and not expressed, respectively; and 2) in stably transfected A549 cells where p28 is over-expressed via a CMV promoter. The LY-ar mouse lymphoma cell line is radio and chemo-resistant and apoptosis refractory, whereas the parental cell line, LY-as, is radiosensitive and apoptotically permissive. In addition, we studied the effect of arsenic as a radiosensitizer in both cell systems. In LY-ar cells arsenic induced a dose- and time- dependent increase in apoptosis, which is comparable to that seen in LY-as cells. Arsenic plus 2.5Gy radiation induced apoptosis in LY-ar cells, which was more than additive. Survival in LY-ar cells was reduced to that of LY-as cells as well as p28 overexpression induced G2/M arrest in A549 cells and the combination of radiation with arsenic decreased the clonogenic survival of both the A549 and A549-p28 cells but the effect is more pronounced in the A549-P28 cell line. A549 and A549-p28 cells did not show a differential response to Taxol, which induces G2/M arrest and cell death via an inhibition of tubulin depolarization. Arsenic modulated the level of reduced GSH in both cell systems in a dose- and time- dependent manner, which correlated with survival outcome. This study illustrated that arsenic acts as a radiosensitizer and p28 augmented the potential of arsenic in inducing apoptosis, G2/M arrest, and radiosensitization. Further studies are underway to examine the bio-chemical pathways involved in arsenic-mediated cell death and the role of p28 therein

  6. Rethinking mercury: the role of selenium in the pathophysiology of mercury toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiller, Henry A

    2018-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that the pathophysiological target of mercury is in fact selenium, rather than the covalent binding of mercury to sulfur in the body's ubiquitous sulfhydryl groups. The role of selenium in mercury poisoning is multifaceted, bidirectional, and central to understanding the target organ toxicity of mercury. An initial search was performed using Medline/PubMed, Toxline, Google Scholar, and Google for published work on mercury and selenium. These searches yielded 2018 citations. Publications that did not evaluate selenium status or evaluated environmental status (e.g., lake or ocean sediment) were excluded, leaving approximately 500 citations. This initial selection was scrutinized carefully and 117 of the most relevant and representative references were selected for use in this review. Binding of mercury to thiol/sulfhydryl groups: Mercury has a lower affinity for thiol groups and higher affinity for selenium containing groups by several orders of magnitude, allowing for binding in a multifaceted way. The established binding of mercury to thiol moieties appears to primarily involve the transport across membranes, tissue distribution, and enhanced excretion, but does not explain the oxidative stress, calcium dyshomeostasis, or specific organ injury seen with mercury. Effects of mercury on selenium and the role this plays in the pathophysiology of mercury toxicity: Mercury impairs control of intracellular redox homeostasis with subsequent increased intracellular oxidative stress. Recent work has provided convincing evidence that the primary cellular targets are the selenoproteins of the thioredoxin system (thioredoxin reductase 1 and thioredoxin reductase 2) and the glutathione-glutaredoxin system (glutathione peroxidase). Mercury binds to the selenium site on these proteins and permanently inhibits their function, disrupting the intracellular redox environment. A number of other important possible target selenoproteins have been identified

  7. Study of thermocycling effect on the bond strength between an aluminous ceramic and a resin cement Estudo do efeito da ciclagem térmica na resistência da união adesiva entre uma cerâmica aluminizada e um cimento resinoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Daniel Andreatta Filho

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of thermocycling on the bond strength between Procera AllCeram (Nobel-Biocare and a resin cement (Panavia F, Kuraray CO. Nine ceramic blocks with dimensions of 5x6x6mm were conditioned at one face with Rocatec System (Espe. After, they were luted with Panavia F to composite resin blocks (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray CO. The nine groups formed by ceramic, cement and composite resin were split up obtaining 75 samples with dimensions of 12x1x1mm and adhesive surface presenting 1mm²±0.1mm² of area. The samples were divided into 3 groups (n=25: G1 - 14 days in distilled water at 37ºC; G2 - 6,000 cycles in water (5ºC - 55ºC - 30s; G3 - 12,000 cycles in water (5ºC - 55ºC - 30s. The samples were tested in a universal testing machine (EMIC at a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey tests. The results indicated that mean values of rupture tension (MPa of G1 (10.71 ± 3.54 did not differ statistically (p Este trabalho avaliou o efeito da ciclagem térmica sobre a resistência adesiva entre a cerâmica aluminizada (Procera AllCeram, Nobel-Biocare e um cimento resinoso (Panavia F, Kuraray CO. Nove blocos de cerâmica, com dimensões de 5x6x6mm, foram condicionados em uma de suas faces com o Sistema Rocatec (ESPE. A seguir foram cimentados a blocos de resina composta (Clearfil AP-X, Kuraray CO. Os conjuntos cerâmica-cimento-resina foram cortados em 75 corpos-de-prova com formato retangular com dimensões de 12x1x1mm e superfície adesiva apresentando 1mm² ± 0,1mm². Os corpos-de-prova foram divididos em três grupos (n=25: G1 - 14 dias em água destilada a 37ºC, G2 - 6000 ciclos em água (5ºC e 55ºC e G3 - 12000 ciclos em água (5ºC e 55ºC. Os corpos-de-prova foram ensaiados sob velocidade de 1mm/min em máquina de ensaio universal (EMIC. Os dados foram tratados estatisticamente com os testes de Anova e Tukey e indicaram que os valores médios de tensão de rupturas (MPa de G1 (10,71 ± 3

  8. Alterações na cutícula de maçãs ‘Fuji’ e ‘Gala’ em função do tratamento térmico e da armazenagem refrigerada = Changes on ‘Fuji’ and ‘Gala’ apple cuticle as a result of heat treatment and cold storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândida Raquel Scherrer Montero

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available As doenças de pós-colheita são fatores limitantes para estocagem de produtos colhidos. É crescente o interesse por métodos alternativos para o controle de podridão em póscolheita. A termoterapia pré-estocagem parece ser um método promissor podendo ser aliado aoutros métodos alternativos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi verificar os efeitos do tratamento térmico por aspersão e imersão na cutícula de maçãs (Malus domestica Borkh. Fuji e Gala após tratamento e período curto de armazenagem. Foram realizados seis tratamentos, com três repetições de três frutos: testemunha, imersão em água quente a 58ºC-30 s, 1 e 2 min., aspersão em água quente a 58ºC-30 s; imersão em clorofórmio 30 segundos. Foram retiradas amostras para visualização em microscopia eletrônica de varredura na instalação e três semanas de armazenamento a 0ºC. Durante a armazenagem, as rachaduras da cutícula aumentam em largura, sendo esta uma característica importante na pós-colheita, pois estas propiciam maior perda de água e podem tornar-se sítios de penetração de patógenos. O calor derrete os cristaloides de cera da cutícula para formar um padrão de recobrimento mais homogêneo na superfície e a oclusão defraturas, podendo atuar como barreira física para evitar a entrada de patógenos nas maçãs bem como reduzir a perda de massa fresca.Postharvest diseases are limiting factors to the storage of many crops. There is a growing interest in alternative methods to control postharvest diseases. Pre-storage heat treatment seems to be one of the most promising rot control methods, associated with other alternative methods. The objective of this work was to verify the effects of immersion and spraying heat treatment on the cuticle of Fuji and Gala apples (Malus domestica Borkh. right after treatment and a short storage period. This experiment consisted of six treatments, three replications of three fruits each: no treatment; hot water

  9. Microleakage of silorane- and methacrylate-based class V composite restorations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krifka, Stephanie; Federlin, Marianne; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Schmalz, Gottfried

    2012-08-01

    The marginal integrity of class V restorations in a silorane- and a group of methacrylate-based composite resins with varying viscosities was tested in the present study. Different adhesives (OptiBond FL, KerrHawe; AdheSE One, Vivadent; or Silorane System Adhesive, 3M ESPE) were applied to 168 standardized class V cavities. The cavities (n = 12) were filled with a wide range of different viscous composite resins: Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE; els and els flow, Saremco; Tetric EvoCeram and Tetric EvoFlow, Vivadent; Grandio, Voco; and Ultraseal XT Plus, Ultradent. Microleakage of the restoration was assessed by dye penetration (silver staining) on multiple sections with and without thermocycling and mechanical loading (TCML: 5,000 × 5-55°C; 30 s/cycle; 500,000 × 72.5 N, 1.6 Hz). Data were statistically analyzed with the Mann-Whitney U test and the Error Rates Method (ERM). The silorane-based composite resin yielded the lowest dye penetration after TCML. Microleakage of methacrylate-based composite restorations, in general (ERM), was statistically significantly influenced by the adhesive system, Moreover, dye penetration at enamel margins was significantly lower than dye penetration at dentin margins. The chemical basis of composite resins and adjacent tooth substance seems to strongly influence marginal sealing of class V restorations for methacrylate-based materials. Moreover, the steps of dental adhesives used affected marginal integrity. The silorane-based composite resin evaluated in the present study exhibits the best marginal seal. The three-step adhesive yielded better marginal sealing than the one-step adhesive for methacrylate-based class V composite restorations.

  10. Effect of Municipal Solid Waste Compost and Sewage Sludge on yield and Yield Components of Black Cumin (Nigella sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Akbarnejad

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In order to investigate the effect of municipal solid waste compost (MSWC and sewage sludge (SS on yield and yield components of black cumin (Nigella sativa L. an experiment was conducted in greenhouse of Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. Municipal solid waste compost at 0, 15, 30 ton/ha (C0, C15 and C30 and sewage sludge at 0, 15, 30 ton/ha (S0, S15 and S30 were used in a factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with three replications. Results showed that municipal solid waste compost and sewage sludge and their interaction effects had significant effects on plant height, number of capsule per plant, number of seeds per capsule, number of seeds per plant, seed yield, biomass and 1000 seed weight. Increasing of sewage sludge amount from 15 to 30 ton/ha increased all measured parameters. But with increasing of municipal solid waste compost from 15 to 30 ton/ha, plant height, number of capsule per plant, number of seeds per capsule, number of seeds per plant, seed yield, biomass and 1000 seed weight were decreased. Interaction effects of municipal solid waste compost and sewage sludge showed that yield and yield components in all treatments were increased with the exception of treatment that contained 30 ton/ha municipal solid waste and 0 ton/ha sewage sludge (C30S0. Use of high amounts of municipal solid waste compost (>15 ton/ha had a detrimental effect on yield and yield components of black cumin. Keywords: Nigella sativa, Municipal solid waste compost, Sewage sludge, Yield and yield components

  11. Evaluation of five CAD/CAM materials by microstructural characterization and mechanical tests: a comparative in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Nesrin; Gultekin, Pinar; Turp, Volkan; Akgungor, Gokhan; Sen, Deniz; Mijiritsky, Eitan

    2018-01-08

    Polymer infiltrated ceramics and nano-ceramic resins are the new restorative materials which have been developed in order to enhance the adverse properties of glass-matrix ceramics and resin composites. The aim of the present in vitro study was to evaluate the characteristics of various CAD/CAM materials through mechanical, microstructural, and SEM analysis. Five test groups (n = 22) were formed by using the indicated CAD/CAM blocks: VITA Enamic (VITA Zahnfabrik), Lava Ultimate (3 M ESPE), IPS e.max CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent), IPS Empress CAD (Ivoclar Vivadent), and VITA Mark II (VITA Zahnfabrik). Two specimens from each test group were used for XRD and EDS analysis. Remaining samples were divided into two subgroups (n = 10). One subgroup specimens were thermocycled (5 °C to 55 °C, 30s, 10,000 cycles) whereas the other were not. All of the specimens were evaluated in terms of flexural strength, Vickers hardness, and fracture toughness. Results were statistically analyzed using two-way ANOVA, one-way ANOVA, Tukey's HSD, and Student's t tests (α = .05). Fractured specimens were evaluated using SEM. The highest Vickers microhardness value was found for VITA Mark II (p CAD was found to have the highest flexural strength (p CAD was also higher than other tested block materials (p CAD groups. It should be realised that simulated aging process seem to affect ceramic-polymer composite materials more significantly than glass ceramics.

  12. Influência da contaminação com saliva na microinfiltração de restaurações de resina composta = The effect of saliva contamination on microleakage of composite restorative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan, Nihad Hasan Musa

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a influência da contaminação com saliva na microinfiltração marginal de restaurações adesivas. Utilizaram-se 52 incisivos bovinos, sendo confeccionadas cavidades Classe V (vestibular/lingual, com margens em dentina e esmalte. As cavidades foram condicionadas com ácido fosfórico a 35% e divididas em quatro grupos. G1 – sem contaminação, os demais grupos foram contaminados com saliva fresca por 15s, sendo submetidos a diferentes tratamentos: G2 – secas com papel absorvente; G3 – lavadas com água; G4 – recondicionadas por 10s. O sistema adesivo (Single Bond/3M ESPE foi empregado segundo recomendações do fabricante e as cavidades restauradas com compósito (Filtek Z-250/3M ESPE. Após 24h as restaurações foram polidas e termocicladas (500 ciclos/5 e 55ºC/30s. Os dentes foram isolados, exceto as restaurações e a 1mm destas, imersos em fucsina básica a 1% (24h e lavados em água (24h. Foram seccionados e avaliados em lupa estereoscópica, utilizando-se escores predeterminados, por dois examinadores calibrados. Os valores obtidos foram submetidos à análise estatística (Kruskal-Wallis. A infiltração em dentina foi significantemente maior que aquela observada em esmalte (p < 0,05. Nas margens em dentina observou-se redução do selamento no G2 (p < 0,05. G3 e G4 restabeleceram o selamento a níveis similares ao controle (G1. Nas margens em esmalte G1 apresentou selamento similar ao G3 e ambos exibiram melhor selamento que G2 e G4 (p < 0,05, que foram similares. Conclusões: dentro das limitações do estudo, verificou-se que a contaminação com saliva após o condicionamento ácido interfere no selamento marginal de restaurações adesivas e os tratamentos propostos apresentaram resultados diversos

  13. Evaluation of flexural strength and surface properties of prepolymerized CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymers used for digital 3D complete dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Mustafa; Murat, Sema; Alp, Gulce; Zaimoglu, Ali

    2018-01-01

    The objectives of this in vitro study were to evaluate the flexural strength (FS), surface roughness (Ra), and hydrophobicity of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)-based computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) polymers and to compare the properties of different CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymers with conventional heat-polymerized PMMA following thermal cycling. Twenty rectangular-shaped specimens (64 × 10 × 3.3 mm) were fabricated from three CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymers (M-PM Disc [M], AvaDent Puck Disc [A], and Pink CAD/CAM Disc Polident [P], and one conventional heat-polymerized PMMA (Promolux [C]), according to ISO 20795-1:2013 standards. The specimens were divided into two subgroups (n = 10), a control and a thermocycled group. The specimens in the thermocycled group were subjected to 5000 thermal cycling procedures (5 to 55°C; 30 s dwell times). The Ra value was measured using a profilometer. Contact angle (CA) was assessed using the sessile drop method to evaluate surface hydrophobicity. In addition, the FS of the specimens was tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/min. Surface texture of the materials was assessed using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), followed by Tukey's HSD post-hoc test (α CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymers showed significantly higher FS than conventional heat-polymerized PMMA for each group (P CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymer [P] showed the highest FS, whereas conventional PMMA [C] showed the lowest FS before and after thermal cycling (P 0.05). In the thermocycled group, the lowest Ra value was observed for CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymer [M] (P CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymers [A] and [P], and conventional PMMA [C] had similar Ra values (P > 0.05). Conventional PMMA [C] had a significantly lower CA and consequently lower hydrophobicity compared to the CAD/CAM polymers in the control group (P CAD/CAM PMMA-based polymer [A] and conventional PMMA [C

  14. INFLUÊNCIA DE DIFERENTES pH DO MEIO DE AQUECIMENTO NA RESISTÊNCIA TÉRMICA DE Neosartorya fischeri ISOLADO DO PROCESSO PRODUTIVO DE NÉCTAR DE MAÇÃ INFLUENCE OF DISTINCT PH VALUES IN THE THERMAL RESISTANCE OF NEOSARTORYA FISCHERI ISOLATED FROM APPLE NECTAR PROCESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. C. M. SALOMÃ?O

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available

    A resistência térmica de ascósporos de N. fischeri, isolados do concentrado de maçã, foi verificada utilizando-se tubos TDT (Thermal Death Time selados, e suco de maçã, a diferentes pHs, como meio de aquecimento. As curvas obtidas a 80, 85 e 90°C mostraram um “ombro” inicial evidenciando comportamento de morte não logarítmica. Assim, o cálculo dos parâmetros cinéticos foi realizado através da linearização das mesmas. Os valores de “1/k” obtidos em pH 2,5 foram 81,3; 16,0 e 0,9 minutos para 80, 85 e 90°C, respectivamente; em pH 3,5 foram de 153,8; 22,0 e 1,0 minutos e em pH 4,5 foram de 312,5; 38,6 e 2,2 minutos, para as mesmas respectivas temperaturas. O valor de Z* (equivalente a Z foi 5,0°C a pH 2,5 e o mesmo valor (4,6°C foi encontrado em pH 3,5 e 4,5. Os valores de esterilização F(95°C nos pHs 2,5; 3,5 e 4,5 foram respectivamente 44,6; 36,8, e 77,0 segundos, considerando-se a redução da população inicial em 6 ciclos logarítmicos. Como o tratamento térmico comercial normalmente aplicado ao suco de maçã é de 95°C/30s, pode-se concluir que este não será suficientemente seguro para atingir a probabilidade de sobrevivência de 1 ascósporo a cada 105 embalagens, o que seria esperado.

    The heat resistance of N. fischeri ascospores isolated from apple concentrate was verified using closed TDT (Thermal Death Time tubes, and apple juice as heating medium (at different pHs. The curves at 80, 85 and 90°C showed an initial “shoulder” due to non logarithmic death behavior. Then, the kinetic parameters calculation was performed by linearization .The 1/k values obtained at pH 2.5 were 81.3, 16 and 0.9 minutes at 80, 85 and 90°C, respectively; at pH 3.5 were

  15. Desenvolvimento do perfil sensorial e avaliação sensorial/instrumental de suco de maracujá Sensory profile development and sensory/instrumental passion fruit juice evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina C. Della Modesta

    2005-06-01

    developing the sensory profile and evaluating the changes that may occur during the passion fruit juice processing. Three passion fruit juices were analyzed: the raw material (pulp, which was pasteurized, kept in tambour and frozen; the ready-to-drink (formulated with sugar and water; and the pasteurized at 98 ºC, 30s. The sensory profile was composed of 13 attributes The quantitative descriptive analysis design comprised two factors, i.e. type of juice and panelists. The results were also analyzed using principal components analysis. Significant differences were found among the three juices except for the attribute passion fruit aroma and sweet aroma. the artificial aroma, cooked aroma, fermented aroma and fermented flavor were significantly higher (p<0.05 on the processed passion fruit juice. The first two principal components accounted for 57% of the variance. There were significant differences among the three juices regarding the colour parameters, except for the haze. The frozen juice kept in tambour was darker than both the formulated juice and the pasteurized juice. The red color of the frozen juice kept in tambour and the formulated juice was similar. On the other hand, the red color for the pasteurized juice was less intense. However the yellow colour was higher on the formulated juice, presenting lower values on the pasteurized juice and on the frozen juice kept in tambour.

  16. Bond strength of resin composite to differently conditioned amalgam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, M; Vallittu, P K; Huysmans, M-C; Kalk, W; Vahlberg, T

    2006-01-01

    Bulk fracture of teeth, where a part of the amalgam restoration and/or the cusp is fractured, is a common clinical problem. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different surface conditioning methods on the shear bond strength of a hybrid resin composite to fresh amalgam. Amalgams (N=84) were condensed into acrylic and randomly assigned to one of the following treatments (N=6): (1) Alloy primer + opaquer, (2) Air-particle abrasion (50 micro m Al(2)O(3)) + alloy primer + opaquer, (3) Silica coating (30 micro m SiO(x)) + silanization + opaquer, (4) Opaquer + pre-impregnated continuous bidirectional E-glass fibre sheets, (5) Silica coating + silanization + fibre sheets, (6) Silica coating + silanization + opaquer + fibre sheet application. Non-conditioned amalgam surfaces were considered as control group (7). The mean surface roughness depth (R(Z)) was measured from the control group and air-abraded amalgam surfaces. The resin composite was bonded to the conditioned amalgam specimens using polyethylene molds. All specimens were tested under dry and thermocycled (6.000, 5-55 degrees C, 30 s) conditions. The shear bond strength of resin composite to amalgam substrates was measured in a universal testing machine (1 mm/min). Surface roughness values for the non-conditioned control group (R(Z) approximately 0.14 micro m) and for air-particle abraded surfaces with either Al(2)O(3) or SiO(x) (R(Z) approximately 0.19 micro m and R(Z) approximately 0.16 micro m, respectively) did not show significant differences (p=0.23) (One-way ANOVA). In dry conditions, silica coating and silanization followed by fibre sheet application exhibited significantly higher results (14.8+/-5.6 MPa) than those of the groups conditioned with alloy primer (2.2+/-0.7 MPa) (p<0.001), air-particle abrasion+alloy primer (4.4+/-2.0 MPa, p<0.001), silica coating+silanization alone (6.2+/-0.8 MPa, p=0.009) or non-conditioned group (1.4+/-0.6, p<0.001). Silica coating and silanization followed