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Sample records for glutaminase

  1. Pathological features of glutaminase toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskerville, A.; Hambleton, P.; Benbough, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    In an investigation of the toxicity of the anti-tumour enzyme glutaminase Rhesus monkeys, marmosets, rabbits and mice were given various doses of chemically modified glutaminase parenterally. The enzyme induced diarrhoea and dysentery and at all but the lowest doses caused illness which was fatal within 10 days. Pathological lesions produced were hepatic lipidosis and glycogen accumulation, and, in the primates, acute necrotizing colitis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6775661

  2. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ajit G; Rojas, Camilo; Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B; Auld, Douglas S; Ferraris, Dana V; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S

    2013-08-23

    Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC(1280))) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ajit G.; Rojas, Camilo [Brain Science Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B.; Auld, Douglas S. [National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, 9800 Medical Center Drive, Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Ferraris, Dana V. [Brain Science Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Tsukamoto, Takashi [Brain Science Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Slusher, Barbara S., E-mail: bslusher@jhmi.edu [Brain Science Institute, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Department of Neurology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Department of Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

    2013-08-23

    Highlights: •Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine were identified as glutaminase inhibitors. •These had greater affinities and efficiency of inhibition than known prototypes. •Their previously reported biological activity could be due to glutaminase inhibition. -- Abstract: Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC{sup 1280})) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease.

  4. Kinetic characterization of ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine as glutaminase inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, Ajit G.; Rojas, Camilo; Tanega, Cordelle; Shen, Min; Simeonov, Anton; Boxer, Matthew B.; Auld, Douglas S.; Ferraris, Dana V.; Tsukamoto, Takashi; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine were identified as glutaminase inhibitors. •These had greater affinities and efficiency of inhibition than known prototypes. •Their previously reported biological activity could be due to glutaminase inhibition. -- Abstract: Glutaminase catalyzes the hydrolysis of glutamine to glutamate and plays a central role in the proliferation of neoplastic cells via glutaminolysis, as well as in the generation of excitotoxic glutamate in central nervous system disorders such as HIV-associated dementia (HAD) and multiple sclerosis. Both glutaminase siRNA and glutaminase inhibition have been shown to be effective in in vitro models of cancer and HAD, suggesting a potential role for small molecule glutaminase inhibitors. However, there are no potent, selective inhibitors of glutaminase currently available. The two prototypical glutaminase inhibitors, BPTES and DON, are either insoluble or non-specific. In a search for more drug-like glutaminase inhibitors, we conducted a screen of 1280 in vivo active drugs (Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds (LOPAC 1280 )) and identified ebselen, chelerythrine and (R)-apomorphine. The newly identified inhibitors exhibited 10 to 1500-fold greater affinities than DON and BPTES and over 100-fold increased efficiency of inhibition. Although non-selective, it is noteworthy that the affinity of ebselen for glutaminase is more potent than any other activity yet described. It is possible that the previously reported biological activity seen with these compounds is due, in part, to glutaminase inhibition. Ebselen, chelerythrine and apomorphine complement the armamentarium of compounds to explore the role of glutaminase in disease

  5. Glutamate and Brain Glutaminases in Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Javier; Campos-Sandoval, José A; Peñalver, Ana; Matés, José M; Segura, Juan A; Blanco, Eduardo; Alonso, Francisco J; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez

    2017-03-01

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and its actions are related to the behavioral effects of psychostimulant drugs. In the last two decades, basic neuroscience research and preclinical studies with animal models are suggesting a critical role for glutamate transmission in drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse. Although most of the interest has been centered in post-synaptic glutamate receptors, the presynaptic synthesis of glutamate through brain glutaminases may also contribute to imbalances in glutamate homeostasis, a key feature of the glutamatergic hypothesis of addiction. Glutaminases are the main glutamate-producing enzymes in brain and dysregulation of their function have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders; however, the possible implication of these enzymes in drug addiction remains largely unknown. This mini-review focuses on brain glutaminase isozymes and their alterations by in vivo exposure to drugs of abuse, which are discussed in the context of the glutamate homeostasis theory of addiction. Recent findings from mouse models have shown that drugs induce changes in the expression profiles of key glutamatergic transmission genes, although the molecular mechanisms that regulate drug-induced neuronal sensitization and behavioral plasticity are not clear.

  6. Optimised production of L-glutaminase: A tumour inhibitor from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L-Glutaminase, an amidohydrolase enzyme has been a choice of interest in the treatment of lymphoblastic leukemia. This study investigates the production and optimization of extracellular glutaminase enzyme using several agro-industrial residues by Aspergillus flavus KUGF009 using SSF (solid state fermentation).

  7. TNF-α promotes extracellular vesicle release in mouse astrocytes through glutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kaizhe; Ye, Ling; Lu, Hongfang; Chen, Huili; Zhang, Yanyan; Huang, Yunlong; Zheng, Jialin C

    2017-04-20

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are membrane-contained vesicles shed from cells. EVs contain proteins, lipids, and nucleotides, all of which play important roles in intercellular communication. The release of EVs is known to increase during neuroinflammation. Glutaminase, a mitochondrial enzyme that converts glutamine to glutamate, has been implicated in the biogenesis of EVs. We have previously demonstrated that TNF-α promotes glutaminase expression in neurons. However, the expression and the functionality of glutaminase in astrocytes during neuroinflammation remain unknown. We posit that TNF-α can promote the release of EVs in astrocytes through upregulation of glutaminase expression. Release of EVs, which was demonstrated by electron microscopy, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA), and Western Blot, increased in mouse astrocytes when treated with TNF-α. Furthermore, TNF-α treatment significantly upregulated protein levels of glutaminase and increased the production of glutamate, suggesting that glutaminase activity is increased after TNF-α treatment. Interestingly, pretreatment with a glutaminase inhibitor blocked TNF-α-mediated generation of reactive oxygen species in astrocytes, which indicates that glutaminase activity contributes to stress in astrocytes during neuroinflammation. TNF-α-mediated increased release of EVs can be blocked by either the glutaminase inhibitor, antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine, or genetic knockout of glutaminase, suggesting that glutaminase plays an important role in astrocyte EV release during neuroinflammation. These findings suggest that glutaminase is an important metabolic factor controlling EV release from astrocytes during neuroinflammation.

  8. Optimised production of L-glutaminase: A tumour inhibitor from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-17

    Oct 17, 2011 ... on the production of L-glutaminase was studied and accordingly, optimum conditions were ... tumour cells has been specifically compared with that in ... will be produced more easily by solid state fermentation ... Erlenmeyer conical flasks and moistened with 10 ml of salt solution ..... in a packed bed reactor.

  9. Metformin inhibits glutaminase activity and protects against hepatic encephalopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Ampuero

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the influence of metformin use on liver dysfunction and hepatic encephalopathy in a retrospective cohort of diabetic cirrhotic patients. To analyze the impact of metformin on glutaminase activity and ammonia production in vitro. METHODS: Eighty-two cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes were included. Forty-one patients were classified as insulin sensitizers experienced (metformin and 41 as controls (cirrhotic patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus without metformin treatment. Baseline analysis included: insulin, glucose, glucagon, leptin, adiponectin, TNFr2, AST, ALT. HOMA-IR was calculated. Baseline HE risk was calculated according to minimal hepatic encephalopathy, oral glutamine challenge and mutations in glutaminase gene. We performed an experimental study in vitro including an enzymatic activity assay where glutaminase inhibition was measured according to different metformin concentrations. In Caco2 cells, glutaminase activity inhibition was evaluated by ammonia production at 24, 48 and 72 hours after metformina treatment. RESULTS: Hepatic encephalopathy was diagnosed during follow-up in 23.2% (19/82: 4.9% (2/41 in patients receiving metformin and 41.5% (17/41 in patients without metformin treatment (logRank 9.81; p=0.002. In multivariate analysis, metformin use [H.R.11.4 (95% CI: 1.2-108.8; p=0.034], age at diagnosis [H.R.1.12 (95% CI: 1.04-1.2; p=0.002], female sex [H.R.10.4 (95% CI: 1.5-71.6; p=0.017] and HE risk [H.R.21.3 (95% CI: 2.8-163.4; p=0.003] were found independently associated with hepatic encephalopathy. In the enzymatic assay, glutaminase activity inhibition reached 68% with metformin 100 mM. In Caco2 cells, metformin (20 mM decreased glutaminase activity up to 24% at 72 hours post-treatment (p<0.05. CONCLUSIONS: Metformin was found independently related to overt hepatic encephalopathy in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and high risk of hepatic encephalopathy. Metformin inhibits glutaminase

  10. Glutaminase-producing Meyerozyma (Pichia) guilliermondii isolated from Thai soy sauce fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryuman, Phichayaphorn; Lertsiri, Sittiwat; Visessanguan, Wonnop; Niamsiri, Nuttawee; Bhumiratana, Amaret; Assavanig, Apinya

    2015-01-02

    In this study, 34 yeast isolates were obtained from koji and moromi samples of Thai soy sauce fermentation. However, the most interesting yeast strain was isolated from the enriched 2 month-old (M2) moromi sample and identified as Meyerozyma (Pichia) guilliermondii EM2Y61. This strain is a salt-tolerant yeast that could tolerate up to 20% (w/v) NaCl and produce extracellular and cell-bound glutaminases. Interestingly, its glutaminases were more active in 18% (w/v) NaCl which is a salt concentration in moromi. The extracellular glutaminase's activity was found to be much higher than that of cell-bound glutaminase. The highest specific activity and stability of the extracellular glutaminase were found in 18% (w/v) NaCl at pH4.5 and 37°C. A challenge test by adding partially-purified extracellular glutaminase from M. guilliermondii EM2Y61 into 1 month-old (M1) moromi sample showed an increased conversion of L-glutamine to L-glutamic acid. This is the first report of glutaminase producing M. guilliermondii isolated from the moromi of Thai soy sauce fermentation. The results suggested the potential application of M. guilliermondii EM2Y61 as starter yeast culture to increase l-glutamic acid during soy sauce fermentation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Production of L-Glutaminase and its optimization from a novel marine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    organisms including bacteria, yeast and fungi. It is currently used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Another potential application of L-glutaminase is as flavor enhancing agent in soy ...

  12. Identification of the glutaminase genes of Aspergillus sojae involved in glutamate production during soy sauce fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kotaro; Koyama, Yasuji; Hanya, Yoshiki

    2013-01-01

    Glutaminase, an enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of L-glutamine to L-glutamate, enhances the umami taste in soy sauce. The Aspergillus sojae genome contains 10 glutaminase genes. In this study, we estimated that approximately 60% of the glutamate in soy sauce is produced through the glutaminase reaction. To determine which glutaminase is involved in soy sauce glutamate production, we prepared soy sauces using single and multiple glutaminase gene disruptants of A. sojae. The glutamate concentration in soy sauce prepared using the ΔgahA-ΔgahB-ΔggtA-Δgls disruptant was approximately 60% lower than that in the control strain, whereas it was decreased by approximately 20-30% in the ΔgahA-ΔgahB disruptant. However, the glutamate concentration was unchanged in the soy sauces prepared using the ΔgahA-ΔggtA-Δgls and ΔgahB-ΔggtA-Δgls disruptants. These results indicate that four glutaminases are involved in glutamate production in soy sauce, and that the peptidoglutaminase activities of GahA and GahB increase the glutamate concentration in soy sauce.

  13. First report on the structural exploration and prediction of new BPTES analogs as glutaminase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Sk. Abdul; Adhikari, Nilanjan; Gayen, Shovanlal; Jha, Tarun

    2017-09-01

    Glutaminase is one of the important key enzymes regulating cellular metabolism, growth, and proliferation in cancer. Therefore, it is being explored as a crucial target regarding anticancer drug design and development. However, none of the potent and selective glutaminase inhibitors is available in the market though two prototype glutaminase inhibitors are reported namely DON as well as BPTES. Due to severe toxicity in clinical trials, the use of DON is restricted. However, BPTES is an allosteric glutaminase inhibitor with less toxic profile and, therefore, lead optimization of BPTES may be a good option to develop newer drug candidates. In this study, a multi-QSAR modeling is carried out on a series of BPTES analogs. A significant connection between different descriptors and the glutaminase inhibitory activities is noticed by employing multiple linear regression, artificial neural network and support vector machine techniques. The classification-based QSAR such as linear discriminant analysis and Bayesian classification modeling are also performed to search important molecular fingerprints or substructures that may help in classifying the probability of finding 'active' and 'inactive' BPTES analogs. Moreover, HQSAR and Topomer CoMFA analyses are also performed. In addition, the SAR observations are interpreted with all these validated computational models along with the structure-based contours. Finally, new twenty two compounds are designed and predicted for their probable glutaminase inhibitory activity.

  14. Screening and kinetics of glutaminase and glutamate decarboxylase producing lactic acid bacteria from fermented Thai foods

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    Sasimar Woraharn

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available L-glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD catalyzes the hydrolysis of L-glutamine and glutamate, respectively. L-glutaminase widely used in cancer therapy along with a combination of other enzymes and most importantly these enzymes were used in food industries, as a major catalyst of bioconversion. The current investigation was aimed to screen and select L-glutaminase, and GAD producing lactic acid bacteria (LAB. A total of 338 LAB were isolated from fermented meat, fermented fish, fermented soya bean, fermented vegetables and fruits. Among 338 isolates, 22 and 237 LAB has been found to be positive for L-glutaminase and GAD, respectively. We found that 30 days of incubation at 35 ºC and pH 6.0 was the optimum condition for glutaminase activity by G507/1. G254/2 was found to be the best for GAD activity with the optimum condition of pH 6.5, temperature 40 ºC and ten days of incubation. These LAB strains, G507/1 and G254/2, were identified as close relative of Lactobacillus brevis ATCC 14869 and Lactobacillus fermentum NBRC 3956, respectively by 16S rRNA sequencing. Further, improvements in up-stream of the fermentation process with these LAB strains are currently under development.

  15. Ebselen: Mechanisms of Glutamate Dehydrogenase and Glutaminase Enzyme Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yan; Jin, Yanhong; Zhou, Jie; Ruan, Haoqiang; Zhao, Han; Lu, Shiying; Zhang, Yue; Li, Di; Ji, Xiaoyun; Ruan, Benfang Helen

    2017-12-15

    Ebselen modulates target proteins through redox reactions with selenocysteine/cysteine residues, or through binding to the zinc finger domains. However, a recent contradiction in ebselen inhibition of kidney type glutaminase (KGA) stimulated our interest in investigating its inhibition mechanism with glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), KGA, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), and glutathione S-transferase. Fluorescein- or biotin-labeled ebselen derivatives were synthesized for mechanistic analyses. Biomolecular interaction analyses showed that only GDH, KGA, and TrxR proteins can bind to the ebselen derivative, and the binding to GDH and KGA could be competed off by glutamine or glutamate. From the gel shift assays, the fluorescein-labeled ebselen derivative could co-migrate with hexameric GDH and monomeric/dimeric TrxR in a dose-dependent manner; it also co-migrated with KGA but disrupted the tetrameric form of the KGA enzyme at a high compound concentration. Further proteomic analysis demonstrated that the ebselen derivative could cross-link with proteins through a specific cysteine at the active site of GDH and TrxR proteins, but for KGA protein, the binding site is at the N-terminal appendix domain outside of the catalytic domain, which might explain why ebselen is not a potent KGA enzyme inhibitor in functional assays. In conclusion, ebselen could inhibit enzyme activity by binding to the catalytic domain or disruption of the protein complex. In addition, ebselen is a relatively potent selective GDH inhibitor that might provide potential therapeutic opportunities for hyperinsulinism-hyperammonemia syndrome patients who have the mutational loss of GTP inhibition.

  16. Effect of lysine to alanine mutations on the phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition of glutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Charles J; Acheff, Eric; Kennedy, Ryan; Taylor, Lynn; Curthoys, Norman P

    2015-09-01

    The GLS1 gene encodes a mitochondrial glutaminase that is highly expressed in brain, kidney, small intestine and many transformed cells. Recent studies have identified multiple lysine residues in glutaminase that are sites of N-acetylation. Interestingly, these sites are located within either a loop segment that regulates access of glutamine to the active site or the dimer:dimer interface that participates in the phosphate-dependent oligomerization and activation of the enzyme. These two segments also contain the binding sites for bis-2[5-phenylacetamido-1,2,4-thiadiazol-2-yl]ethylsulfide (BPTES), a highly specific and potent uncompetitive inhibitor of this glutaminase. BPTES is also the lead compound for development of novel cancer chemotherapeutic agents. To provide a preliminary assessment of the potential effects of N-acetylation, the corresponding lysine to alanine mutations were constructed in the hGACΔ1 plasmid. The wild type and mutated proteins were purified by Ni(+)-affinity chromatography and their phosphate activation and BPTES inhibition profiles were analyzed. Two of the alanine substitutions in the loop segment (K311A and K328A) and the one in the dimer:dimer interface (K396A) form enzymes that require greater concentrations of phosphate to produce half-maximal activation and exhibit greater sensitivity to BPTES inhibition. By contrast, the K320A mutation results in a glutaminase that exhibits near maximal activity in the absence of phosphate and is not inhibited by BPTES. Thus, lysine N-acetylation may contribute to the acute regulation of glutaminase activity in various tissues and alter the efficacy of BPTES-type inhibitors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Interferon-α regulates glutaminase 1 promoter through STAT1 phosphorylation: relevance to HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Zhao

    Full Text Available HIV-1 associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND develop during progressive HIV-1 infection and affect up to 50% of infected individuals. Activated microglia and macrophages are critical cell populations that are involved in the pathogenesis of HAND, which is specifically related to the production and release of various soluble neurotoxic factors including glutamate. In the central nervous system (CNS, glutamate is typically derived from glutamine by mitochondrial enzyme glutaminase. Our previous study has shown that glutaminase is upregulated in HIV-1 infected monocyte-derived-macrophages (MDM and microglia. However, how HIV-1 leads to glutaminase upregulation, or how glutaminase expression is regulated in general, remains unclear. In this study, using a dual-luciferase reporter assay system, we demonstrated that interferon (IFN α specifically activated the glutaminase 1 (GLS1 promoter. Furthermore, IFN-α treatment increased signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1 phosphorylation and glutaminase mRNA and protein levels. IFN-α stimulation of GLS1 promoter activity correlated to STAT1 phosphorylation and was reduced by fludarabine, a chemical that inhibits STAT1 phosphorylation. Interestingly, STAT1 was found to directly bind to the GLS1 promoter in MDM, an effect that was dependent on STAT1 phosphorylation and significantly enhanced by IFN-α treatment. More importantly, HIV-1 infection increased STAT1 phosphorylation and STAT1 binding to the GLS1 promoter, which was associated with increased glutamate levels. The clinical relevance of these findings was further corroborated with investigation of post-mortem brain tissues. The glutaminase C (GAC, one isoform of GLS1 mRNA levels in HIV associated-dementia (HAD individuals correlate with STAT1 (p<0.01, IFN-α (p<0.05 and IFN-β (p<0.01. Together, these data indicate that both HIV-1 infection and IFN-α treatment increase glutaminase expression through STAT1 phosphorylation and

  18. Genetic pharmacotherapy as an early CNS drug development strategy: testing glutaminase inhibition for schizophrenia treatment in adult mice

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    Susana eMingote

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic pharmacotherapy is an early drug development strategy for the identification of novel CNS targets in mouse models prior to the development of specific ligands. Here for the first time, we have implemented this strategy to address the potential therapeutic value of a glutamate-based pharmacotherapy for schizophrenia involving inhibition of the glutamate recycling enzyme phosphate-activated glutaminase. Mice constitutively heterozygous for GLS1, the gene encoding glutaminase, manifest a schizophrenia resilience phenotype, a key dimension of which is an attenuated locomotor response to propsychotic amphetamine challenge. If resilience is due to glutaminase deficiency in adulthood, then glutaminase inhibitors should have therapeutic potential. However, this has been difficult to test given the dearth of neuroactive glutaminase inhibitors. So, we used genetic pharmacotherapy to test the therapeutic potential of glutaminase inhibition. We specifically asked whether adult induction of GLS1 heterozygosity would attenuate amphetamine responsiveness. We generated conditional floxGLS1 mice and crossed them with global CAG ERT2 cre/+ mice to produce GLS1 iHET mice, susceptible to tamoxifen induction of GLS1 heterozygosity. One month after tamoxifen treatment of adult GLS1 iHET mice, we found a 50% reduction in GLS1 allelic abundance and glutaminase mRNA levels in the brain. While GLS1 iHET mice showed some recombination prior to tamoxifen, there was no impact on mRNA levels. We then asked whether induction of GLS heterozygosity would attenuate the locomotor response to propsychotic amphetamine challenge. Before tamoxifen, control and GLS1 iHET mice did not differ in their response to amphetamine. One month after tamoxifen treatment, amphetamine-induced hyperlocomotion was blocked in GLS1 iHET mice. The block was largely maintained after 5 months. Thus, a genetically induced glutaminase reduction — mimicking pharmacological inhibition — strongly

  19. The potential of halophilic and halotolerant bacteria for the production of antineoplastic enzymes: L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazian, Pejman; Asad, Sedigheh; Amoozegar, Mohammad Ali

    2016-01-01

    L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase can be effectively used for the treatment of patients who suffer from accute lymphoblastic leukemia and tumor cells. Microbial sources are the best source for the bulk production of these enzymes. However, their long-term administration may cause immunological responses, so screening for new enzymes with novel properties is required. Halophilic and halotolerant bacteria with novel enzymatic characteristics can be considered as a potential source for production of enzymes with different immunological properties. In this study, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production by halophilic bacteria isolated from Urmia salt lake was studied. Out of the 85 isolated halophilic and halotolerant bacterial strains, 16 (19 %) showed L-asparaginase activity and 3 strains (3.5 %) showed L-glutaminase activity. Strains with the highest activities were selected for further studies. Based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis, it was shown that the selected isolates for L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production belong to the genus Bacillus and Salicola, respectively. Both enzymes were produced extracellularly. The strain with the most L-asparaginase production did not show L-glutaminase production which is medically important. The effects of key parameters including temperature, initial pH of the solution, and concentrations of glucose, asparagine or glutamine, and sodium chloride were evaluated by means of response surface methodology (RSM) to optimize enzymes production. Under the obtained optimal conditions, L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase production was increased up to 1.5 (61.7 unit/mL) and 2.6 fold (46.4 unit/mL), respectively.

  20. Sequential Optimization Methods for Augmentation of Marine Enzymes Production in Solid-State Fermentation: l-Glutaminase Production a Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathish, T; Uppuluri, K B; Veera Bramha Chari, P; Kezia, D

    There is an increased l-glutaminase market worldwide due to its relevant industrial applications. Salt tolerance l-glutaminases play a vital role in the increase of flavor of different types of foods like soya sauce and tofu. This chapter is presenting the economically viable l-glutaminases production in solid-state fermentation (SSF) by Aspergillus flavus MTCC 9972 as a case study. The enzyme production was improved following a three step optimization process. Initially mixture design (MD) (augmented simplex lattice design) was employed to optimize the solid substrate mixture. Such solid substrate mixture consisted of 59:41 of wheat bran and Bengal gram husk has given higher amounts of l-glutaminase. Glucose and l-glutamine were screened as a finest additional carbon and nitrogen sources for l-glutaminase production with help of Plackett-Burman Design (PBD). l-Glutamine also acting as a nitrogen source as well as inducer for secretion of l-glutaminase from A. flavus MTCC 9972. In the final step of optimization various environmental and nutritive parameters such as pH, temperature, moisture content, inoculum concentration, glucose, and l-glutamine levels were optimized through the use of hybrid feed forward neural networks (FFNNs) and genetic algorithm (GA). Through sequential optimization methods MD-PBD-FFNN-GA, the l-glutaminase production in SSF could be improved by 2.7-fold (453-1690U/g). © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Glutaminase-Deficient Mice Display Hippocampal Hypoactivity, Insensitivity to Pro-Psychotic Drugs and Potentiated Latent Inhibition: Relevance to Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaisler-Salomon, Inna; Miller, Gretchen M; Chuhma, Nao; Lee, Sooyeon; Zhang, Hong; Ghoddoussi, Farhad; Lewandowski, Nicole; Fairhurst, Stephen; Wang, Yvonne; Conjard-Duplany, Agnès; Masson, Justine; Balsam, Peter; Hen, René; Arancio, Ottavio; Galloway, Matthew P; Moore, Holly M; Small, Scott A; Rayport, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Dysregulated glutamatergic neurotransmission has been strongly implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia (SCZ). Recently, presynaptic modulation of glutamate transmission has been shown to have therapeutic promise. We asked whether genetic knockdown of glutaminase (gene GLS1) to reduce glutamatergic transmission presynaptically by slowing the recycling of glutamine to glutamate, would produce a phenotype relevant to SCZ and its treatment. GLS1 heterozygous (GLS1 het) mice showed about a 50% global reduction in glutaminase activity, and a modest reduction in glutamate levels in brain regions relevant to SCZ pathophysiology, but displayed neither general behavioral abnormalities nor SCZ-associated phenotypes. Functional imaging, measuring regional cerebral blood volume, showed hippocampal hypometabolism mainly in the CA1 subregion and subiculum, the inverse of recent clinical imaging findings in prodromal and SCZ patients. GLS1 het mice were less sensitive to the behavioral stimulating effects of amphetamine, showed a reduction in amphetamine-induced striatal dopamine release and in ketamine-induced frontal cortical activation, suggesting that GLS1 het mice are resistant to the effects of these pro-psychotic challenges. Moreover, GLS1 het mice showed clozapine-like potentiation of latent inhibition, suggesting that reduction in glutaminase has antipsychotic-like properties. These observations provide further support for the pivotal role of altered glutamatergic synaptic transmission in the pathophysiology of SCZ, and suggest that presynaptic modulation of the glutamine–glutamate pathway through glutaminase inhibition may provide a new direction for the pharmacotherapy of SCZ. PMID:19516252

  2. Identification of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 as an interaction partner of glutaminase interacting protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zencir, Sevil; Ovee, Mohiuddin; Dobson, Melanie J.; Banerjee, Monimoy; Topcu, Zeki; Mohanty, Smita

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2) is a new partner protein for GIP. → BAI2 interaction with GIP was revealed by yeast two-hybrid assay. → Binding of BAI2 to GIP was characterized by NMR, CD and fluorescence. → BAI2 and GIP binding was mediated through the C-terminus of BAI2. -- Abstract: The vast majority of physiological processes in living cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions often specified by particular protein sequence motifs. PDZ domains, composed of 80-100 amino acid residues, are an important class of interaction motif. Among the PDZ-containing proteins, glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), also known as Tax Interacting Protein TIP-1, is unique in being composed almost exclusively of a single PDZ domain. GIP has important roles in cellular signaling, protein scaffolding and modulation of tumor growth and interacts with a number of physiological partner proteins, including Glutaminase L, β-Catenin, FAS, HTLV-1 Tax, HPV16 E6, Rhotekin and Kir 2.3. To identify the network of proteins that interact with GIP, a human fetal brain cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid assay with GIP as bait. We identified brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2), a member of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a new partner of GIP. BAI2 is expressed primarily in neurons, further expanding GIP cellular functions. The interaction between GIP and the carboxy-terminus of BAI2 was characterized using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy assays. These biophysical analyses support the interaction identified in the yeast two-hybrid assay. This is the first study reporting BAI2 as an interaction partner of GIP.

  3. Targeted Inhibition of EGFR and Glutaminase Induces Metabolic Crisis in EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momcilovic, Milica; Bailey, Sean T; Lee, Jason T; Fishbein, Michael C; Magyar, Clara; Braas, Daniel; Graeber, Thomas; Jackson, Nicholas J; Czernin, Johannes; Emberley, Ethan; Gross, Matthew; Janes, Julie; Mackinnon, Andy; Pan, Alison; Rodriguez, Mirna; Works, Melissa; Zhang, Winter; Parlati, Francesco; Demo, Susan; Garon, Edward; Krysan, Kostyantyn; Walser, Tonya C; Dubinett, Steven M; Sadeghi, Saman; Christofk, Heather R; Shackelford, David B

    2017-01-17

    Cancer cells exhibit increased use of nutrients, including glucose and glutamine, to support the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of proliferation. We tested the small-molecule inhibitor of glutaminase CB-839 in combination with erlotinib on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as a therapeutic strategy to simultaneously impair cancer glucose and glutamine utilization and thereby suppress tumor growth. Here, we show that CB-839 cooperates with erlotinib to drive energetic stress and activate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway in EGFR (del19) lung tumors. Tumor cells undergo metabolic crisis and cell death, resulting in rapid tumor regression in vivo in mouse NSCLC xenografts. Consistently, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with 18 F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose ( 18 F-FDG) and 11 C-glutamine ( 11 C-Gln) of xenografts indicated reduced glucose and glutamine uptake in tumors following treatment with CB-839 + erlotinib. Therefore, PET imaging with 18 F-FDG and 11 C-Gln tracers can be used to non-invasively measure metabolic response to CB-839 and erlotinib combination therapy. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Targeted Inhibition of EGFR and Glutaminase Induces Metabolic Crisis in EGFR Mutant Lung Cancer

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    Milica Momcilovic

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells exhibit increased use of nutrients, including glucose and glutamine, to support the bioenergetic and biosynthetic demands of proliferation. We tested the small-molecule inhibitor of glutaminase CB-839 in combination with erlotinib on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC as a therapeutic strategy to simultaneously impair cancer glucose and glutamine utilization and thereby suppress tumor growth. Here, we show that CB-839 cooperates with erlotinib to drive energetic stress and activate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK pathway in EGFR (del19 lung tumors. Tumor cells undergo metabolic crisis and cell death, resulting in rapid tumor regression in vivo in mouse NSCLC xenografts. Consistently, positron emission tomography (PET imaging with 18F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (18F-FDG and 11C-glutamine (11C-Gln of xenografts indicated reduced glucose and glutamine uptake in tumors following treatment with CB-839 + erlotinib. Therefore, PET imaging with 18F-FDG and 11C-Gln tracers can be used to non-invasively measure metabolic response to CB-839 and erlotinib combination therapy.

  5. Glutaminase enzyme biosensor for determination of glutamine in cerebrospinal fluid, human serum and l-glutamine capsule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagriyanik, D.B.; Karakus, E

    2014-01-01

    Ammonium-selective glutamine biosensor was prepared by immobilizing glutaminase on poly(vinylchloride) (PVC) ammonium membrane electrode containing palmitic acid prepared by using nonactine. The response of glutamine biosensor was linear over the concentration range of 1.0x10-11.0x10-4M and slope was Nernstian. We determined optimum working conditions of the biosensor such as buffer concentration, buffer pH, lifetime, response time, linear working range and other response characteristics. The optimum buffer concentration and pH of proposed glutamine biosensor were determined as 20mM and pH 7.5, respectively. The interference effects of some ions and amino acids that may be present in body fluids were also investigated. The Km and Vmax values of glutaminase were determined. Additionally, glutamine assay in several biological samples such as healthy human serum, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and commercial glutamine capsule were also successfully carried out by using the standard addition method. The results were good agreement with previously reported values. (author)

  6. Glutaminase 2 is a novel negative regulator of small GTPase Rac1 and mediates p53 function in suppressing metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cen; Liu, Juan; Zhao, Yuhan; Yue, Xuetian; Zhu, Yu; Wang, Xiaolong; Wu, Hao; Blanco, Felix; Li, Shaohua; Bhanot, Gyan; Haffty, Bruce G; Hu, Wenwei; Feng, Zhaohui

    2016-01-01

    Glutaminase (GLS) isoenzymes GLS1 and GLS2 are key enzymes for glutamine metabolism. Interestingly, GLS1 and GLS2 display contrasting functions in tumorigenesis with elusive mechanism; GLS1 promotes tumorigenesis, whereas GLS2 exhibits a tumor-suppressive function. In this study, we found that GLS2 but not GLS1 binds to small GTPase Rac1 and inhibits its interaction with Rac1 activators guanine-nucleotide exchange factors, which in turn inhibits Rac1 to suppress cancer metastasis. This function of GLS2 is independent of GLS2 glutaminase activity. Furthermore, decreased GLS2 expression is associated with enhanced metastasis in human cancer. As a p53 target, GLS2 mediates p53’s function in metastasis suppression through inhibiting Rac1. In summary, our results reveal that GLS2 is a novel negative regulator of Rac1, and uncover a novel function and mechanism whereby GLS2 suppresses metastasis. Our results also elucidate a novel mechanism that contributes to the contrasting functions of GLS1 and GLS2 in tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10727.001 PMID:26751560

  7. Enzymatic Synthesis of Theanine in the Presence of L-glutaminase Produced by Trichoderma koningii

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    Iran Alemzadeh

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Since ancient times, it has been said that drinking green tea brings relaxation. The substance that is responsible for a sense of relaxation is theanine. Theanine (γ-glutamylethylamide is a unique non-protein amino acid. It gives an umami taste and a unique flavor to the tea, and has many physiological and pharmaceutical effects such as anti-tumor, anti-cancer, neuro-protective, anti-hypertensive and anti-obesity effects; it may further help in relaxation and increase focus. So this compound is essential for human body; however, it is not synthesized in the body and should be administrated orally. In the present study, the enzymatic biosynthesis of theanine was examined in the presence of Ethylamine and L-glutamine, and for the first time the enzyme was produced by the fungal strain Trichoderma koningii. Material and Methods: At first, solid state fermentation was carried out for the production of L-glutaminase by the fungal strain Trichoderma koningii using sesamum oil cake as the solid substrate. Then the biosynthesis of theanine was performed in the presence of extracted enzyme solution, and ethylamine and L-glutamine as substrates. The concentration of effective parameters, namely L-glutamine and ethylamine, and the volume of enzyme solution on theanine production were evaluated based on the response surface methodology coupled with central composite design. 16 experiments were designed by the design expert software and carried out to examine the changes of theanine concentration with changes in the concentration of ethylamine and L-glutamine and the volume of enzyme solution. Results and Conclusion: This investigation indicated simultaneous synthesis of theanine as well as hydrolysis of L-glutamine and L-glutamic acid. Selected independent variables (including ethylamine concentration, L-glutamine concentration and enzyme solution volume were effective on theanine concentration. Increase of enzyme solution

  8. The Glutaminase-Dependent System Confers Extreme Acid Resistance to New Species and Atypical Strains of Brucella

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    Luca Freddi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Neutralophilic bacteria have developed specific mechanisms to cope with the acid stress encountered in environments such as soil, fermented foods, and host compartments. In Escherichia coli, the glutamate decarboxylase (Gad-dependent system is extremely efficient: it requires the concerted action of glutamate decarboxylase (GadA/GadB and of the glutamate (Glu/γ-aminobutyrate antiporter, GadC. Notably, this system is operative also in new strains/species of Brucella, among which Brucella microti, but not in the “classical” species, with the exception of marine mammals strains. Recently, the glutaminase-dependent system (named AR2_Q, relying on the deamination of glutamine (Gln into Glu and on GadC activity, was described in E. coli. In Brucella genomes, a putative glutaminase (glsA-coding gene is located downstream of the gadBC genes. We found that in B. microti these genes are expressed as a polycistronic transcript. Moreover, using a panel of Brucella genus-representative strains, we show that the AR2_Q system protects from extreme acid stress (pH ≤2.5, in the sole presence of Gln, only the Brucella species/strains predicted to have functional glsA and gadC. Indeed, mutagenesis approaches confirmed the involvement of glsA and gadC of B. microti in AR2_Q and that the acid-sensitive phenotype of B. abortus can be ascribed to a Ser248Leu substitution in GlsA, leading to loss of glutaminase activity. Furthermore, we found that the gene BMI_II339, of unknown function and downstream of the gadBC–glsA operon, positively affects Gad- and GlsA-dependent AR. Thus, we identified novel determinants that allow newly discovered and marine mammals Brucella strains to be better adapted to face hostile acidic environments. As for significance, this work may contribute to the understanding of the host preferences of Brucella species and opens the way to alternative diagnostic targets in epidemiological surveillance of brucellosis.

  9. Down-regulation of glutaminase C in human hepatocarcinoma cell by diphenylarsinic acid, a degradation product of chemical warfare agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kita, Kayoko; Suzuki, Toshihide; Ochi, Takafumi

    2007-01-01

    In a poisonous incident in Kamisu, Japan, it is understood that diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was a critical contaminant of ground water. Most patients showed dysfunction of the central nervous system. To understand the overall mechanism of DPAA toxicity and to gain some insight into the application of a remedy specific for intoxication, the molecular target must be clarified. As an approach, a high throughput analysis of cell proteins in cultured human hepatocarcinoma HpG2 exposed to DPAA was performed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Four proteins, which were up- and down-regulated by exposure of cultured HepG2 cells to DPAA, were identified. They were chaperonin containing TCP-1 (CCT) beta subunit, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), ribosomal protein P0 and glutaminase C (GAC). Of these, GAC was the only protein that was down-regulated by DPAA exposure, and cellular expression levels were reduced by DPAA in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Decrease in cellular GAC levels was accompanied by decreased activity of the enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Decreased expression of GAC by DPAA was also observed in human cervical carcinoma HeLa and neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, no significant changes in GAC protein expression were observed when cells were incubated with arsenite [iAs (III)] and trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA (III)]. In the central nervous system, GAC plays a role in the production of the neurotransmitter glutamic acid. Selective inhibition of GAC expression by DPAA may be a cause of dysfunction of glutamatergic neuronal transmission and the resultant neurological impairments

  10. Down-regulation of glutaminase C in human hepatocarcinoma cell by diphenylarsinic acid, a degradation product of chemical warfare agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kita, Kayoko [Laboratory of Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Teikyo University, 1091-1 Sagamiko-chou, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-0195 (Japan); Suzuki, Toshihide [Laboratory of Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Teikyo University, 1091-1 Sagamiko-chou, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-0195 (Japan); Ochi, Takafumi [Laboratory of Toxicology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Teikyo University, 1091-1 Sagamiko-chou, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 229-0195 (Japan)

    2007-05-01

    In a poisonous incident in Kamisu, Japan, it is understood that diphenylarsinic acid (DPAA) was a critical contaminant of ground water. Most patients showed dysfunction of the central nervous system. To understand the overall mechanism of DPAA toxicity and to gain some insight into the application of a remedy specific for intoxication, the molecular target must be clarified. As an approach, a high throughput analysis of cell proteins in cultured human hepatocarcinoma HpG2 exposed to DPAA was performed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Four proteins, which were up- and down-regulated by exposure of cultured HepG2 cells to DPAA, were identified. They were chaperonin containing TCP-1 (CCT) beta subunit, aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), ribosomal protein P0 and glutaminase C (GAC). Of these, GAC was the only protein that was down-regulated by DPAA exposure, and cellular expression levels were reduced by DPAA in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. Decrease in cellular GAC levels was accompanied by decreased activity of the enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Decreased expression of GAC by DPAA was also observed in human cervical carcinoma HeLa and neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. By contrast, no significant changes in GAC protein expression were observed when cells were incubated with arsenite [iAs (III)] and trivalent dimethylarsinous acid [DMA (III)]. In the central nervous system, GAC plays a role in the production of the neurotransmitter glutamic acid. Selective inhibition of GAC expression by DPAA may be a cause of dysfunction of glutamatergic neuronal transmission and the resultant neurological impairments.

  11. Crystal structure of salt-tolerant glutaminase from Micrococcus luteus K-3 in the presence and absence of its product L-glutamate and its activator Tris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimune, Kazuaki; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Wakayama, Mamoru; Yumoto, Isao

    2010-02-01

    Glutaminase from Micrococcus luteus K-3 [Micrococcus glutaminase (Mglu); 456 amino acid residues (aa); 48 kDa] is a salt-tolerant enzyme. Our previous study determined the structure of its major 42-kDa fragment. Here, using new crystallization conditions, we determined the structures of the intact enzyme in the presence and absence of its product L-glutamate and its activator Tris, which activates the enzyme by sixfold. With the exception of a 'lid' part (26-29 aa) and a few other short stretches, the structures were all very similar over the entire polypeptide chain. However, the presence of the ligands significantly reduced the length of the disordered regions: 41 aa in the unliganded structure (N), 21 aa for L-glutamate (G), 8 aa for Tris (T) and 6 aa for both L-glutamate and Tris (TG). L-glutamate was identified in both the G and TG structures, whereas Tris was only identified in the TG structure. Comparison of the glutamate-binding site between Mglu and salt-labile glutaminase (YbgJ) from Bacillus subtilis showed significantly smaller structural changes of the protein part in Mglu. A comparison of the substrate-binding pocket of Mglu, which is highly specific for L-glutamine, with that of Erwinia carotovora asparaginase, which has substrates other than L-glutamine, shows that Mglu has a larger substrate-binding pocket that prevents the binding of L-asparagine with proper interactions.

  12. Mesenchymal phenotype predisposes lung cancer cells to impaired proliferation and redox stress in response to glutaminase inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle B Ulanet

    Full Text Available Recent work has highlighted glutaminase (GLS as a key player in cancer cell metabolism, providing glutamine-derived carbon and nitrogen to pathways that support proliferation. There is significant interest in targeting GLS for cancer therapy, although the gene is not known to be mutated or amplified in tumors. As a result, identification of tractable markers that predict GLS dependence is needed for translation of GLS inhibitors to the clinic. Herein we validate a small molecule inhibitor of GLS and show that non-small cell lung cancer cells marked by low E-cadherin and high vimentin expression, hallmarks of a mesenchymal phenotype, are particularly sensitive to inhibition of the enzyme. Furthermore, lung cancer cells induced to undergo epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT acquire sensitivity to the GLS inhibitor. Metabolic studies suggest that the mesenchymal cells have a reduced capacity for oxidative phosphorylation and increased susceptibility to oxidative stress, rendering them unable to cope with the perturbations induced by GLS inhibition. These findings elucidate selective metabolic dependencies of mesenchymal lung cancer cells and suggest novel pathways as potential targets in this aggressive cancer type.

  13. Aging Reduces an ERRalpha-Directed Mitochondrial Glutaminase Expression Suppressing Glutamine Anaplerosis and Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tongling; Liu, Renzhong; Fu, Xuekun; Yao, Dongsheng; Yang, Meng; Liu, Qingli; Lu, William W; Wu, Chuanyue; Guan, Min

    2017-02-01

    Aging deteriorates osteogenic capacity of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs), contributing to imbalanced bone remodeling and osteoporosis. Glutaminase (Gls) catabolizes glutamine into glutamate at the first step of mitochondrial glutamine (Gln)-dependent anaplerosis which is essential for MSCs upon osteogenic differentiation. Estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) regulates genes required for mitochondrial function. Here, we found that ERRα and Gls are upregulated by osteogenic induction in human MSCs (hMSCs). In contrast, osteogenic differentiation capacity and glutamine consumption of MSCs, as well as ERRα, Gls and osteogenic marker genes are significantly reduced with age. We demonstrated that ERRα binds to response elements on Gls promoter and affects glutamine anaplerosis through transcriptional induction of Gls. Conversely, mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, ERRα inverse agonist compound 29 or Gls inhibitor BPTES leads to reduced Gln anaplerosis and deteriorated osteogenic differentiation of hMSCs. Importantly, overexpression of ERRα or Gls restored impairment by these inhibitors. Finally, we proved that compensated ERRα or Gls expression indeed potentiated Gln anaplerosis and osteogenic capability of elderly mice MSCs in vitro. Together, we establish that Gls is a novel ERRα target gene and ERRα/Gls signaling pathway plays an important role in osteogenic differentiation of MSCs, providing new sights into novel regenerative therapeutics development. Our findings suggest that restoring age-related mitochondrial Gln-dependent anaplerosis may be beneficial for degenerative bone disorders such as osteoporosis. Stem Cells 2017;35:411-424. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  14. Gene expression and enzyme activities of carbonic anhydrase and glutaminase in rat kidneys induced by chronic systemic hypoxia

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    Andi N.K. Syarifin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoxia can cause acidosis. Kidney plays an essential role in maintaining acid-base balance, which involves the activities of carbonic anhydrase (CA and glutaminase (GLS. This study is aimed to determine the expression and activities of the CA9 and GLS1 enzymes in relation to hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α, a transcription factor protein which is a marker of hypoxia.Methods: This study was an in vivo experimental study with coupled paralel design. used 25 male Sprague-Dawley rats weighing 150-200 g. Rats were divided into 5 groups: the control group (normoxic condition and 4 treatment groups. The latter were kept in a hypoxic chamber (10% O2: 90% N2 for 1, 3, 5 and 7 days. All rats were euthanized after treatment, kidneys excised, tissues homogenized and investigated for gene expression of CA9, GLS1 and HIF-1α. On protein level, total enzymatic activities of CA and GLS and protein of HIF-1α were also investigated. Data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA for significance, and as its alternative, used Mann-Whitney and Kruskal-Wallis test.Results: Results showed that HIF-1α mRNA increased during hypoxia, but not HIF-1α protein. It seemed that acidosis occurs in kidney tissue, indicated by increased CA9 and GLS1 mRNA expression and specific activity of total CA and GLS1. Expression of CA9 and GLS1 mRNA both showed strong positive correlation with HIF-1α mRNA, but not with HIF-1α protein.Conclusion: It is suggested that during chronic systemic hypoxia, gene expression of CA9 and GLS1 and their enzyme activities were increased as a response to acidosis and related with the expression of HIF-1α mRNA.

  15. Purification and Characterization of Glutaminase Free Asparaginase from Enterobacter cloacae: In-Vitro Evaluation of Cytotoxic Potential against Human Myeloid Leukemia HL-60 Cells.

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    Islam Husain

    Full Text Available Asparaginase is an important antileukemic agent extensively used worldwide but the intrinsic glutaminase activity of this enzymatic drug is responsible for serious life threatening side effects. Hence, glutaminase free asparaginase is much needed for upgradation of therapeutic index of asparaginase therapy. In the present study, glutaminase free asparaginase produced from Enterobacter cloacae was purified to apparent homogeneity. The purified enzyme was found to be homodimer of approximately 106 kDa with monomeric size of approximately 52 kDa and pI 4.5. Purified enzyme showed optimum activity between pH 7-8 and temperature 35-40°C, which is close to the internal environment of human body. Monovalent cations such as Na+ and K+ enhanced asparaginase activity whereas divalent and trivalent cations, Ca2+, Mg2+, Zn2+, Mn2+, and Fe3+ inhibited the enzyme activity. Kinetic parameters Km, Vmax and Kcat of purified enzyme were found to be 1.58×10-3 M, 2.22 IU μg-1 and 5.3 × 104 S-1, respectively. Purified enzyme showed prolonged in vitro serum (T1/2 = ~ 39 h and trypsin (T1/2 = ~ 32 min half life, which is therapeutically remarkable feature. The cytotoxic activity of enzyme was examined against a panel of human cancer cell lines, HL-60, MOLT-4, MDA-MB-231 and T47D, and highest cytotoxicity observed against HL-60 cells (IC50 ~ 3.1 IU ml-1, which was comparable to commercial asparaginase. Cell and nuclear morphological studies of HL-60 cells showed that on treatment with purified asparaginase symptoms of apoptosis were increased in dose dependent manner. Cell cycle progression analysis indicates that enzyme induces apoptosis by cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase. Mitochondrial membrane potential loss showed that enzyme also triggers the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Furthermore, the enzyme was found to be nontoxic for human noncancerous cells FR-2 and nonhemolytic for human erythrocytes.

  16. Glutamate and GABA-metabolizing enzymes in post-mortem cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Prokhorova, T A; Vorobyeva, E A

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes of glutamate and GABA metabolism in postmortem cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been comprehensively studied. The present work reports results of original comparative study on levels of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase isoenzymes (GAD65/67) in autopsied cerebellum samples from AD patients and matched controls (13 cases in each group) as well as summarizes published evidence for altered levels of PAG and GAD65/67 in AD brain. Altered (decreased) levels of these enzymes and changes in links between amounts of these enzymes and other glutamate-metabolizing enzymes (such as glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase-like protein) in AD cerebella suggest significantly impaired glutamate and GABA metabolism in this brain region, which was previously regarded as not substantially involved in AD pathogenesis.

  17. Evaluating the Toxicity of the Analgesic Glutaminase Inhibitor 6-Diazo-5-Oxo-L-Norleucine in vitro and on Rat Dermal Skin Fibroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Heith A; Ihnat, Michael; Miller, Kenneth E

    2018-01-01

    6-diazo-5-oxo-l-norleucine (DON) is a glutamine antagonist produced naturally by Streptomyces. It inhibits several glutamine-dependent enzyme pathways. Of particular note is its inhibitory effect on the mitochondrial enzyme, glutaminase (GLS), the primary producer of neuronal glutamate. Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter released by primary sensory peripheral nerve terminals and spinal synaptic terminals during pain signaling. Previous work using the tail incision and inflammatory models of pain has demonstrated that a single application of the glutaminase inhibitor, DON, into a surgical incision or the paw of arthritic animals results in pain relief. Even though this compound shows promise as a therapeutic agent, limited data exist regarding its dermal toxicity. As a first approach, we evaluated the effect of several concentrations of DON, on the viability, mitochondrial oxidative capacity and proliferation of rat skin fibroblasts, and then examined the effect of DON after incubation with human liver microsomes on proliferation. Finally, we evaluated DON treated rat skin (tail and hind paw) for cellular necrosis, inflammation and mitotic bodies. No significant effects (p > 0.05) of DON were noted on apoptosis, necrosis, and mitochondrial activity in experiments with cultured rat skin fibroblasts. Flow cytometry revealed the absence of apoptosis in cells treated at the IC50 of 232.5 μM. Enhanced toxicity post-exposure to human microsomes was not observed when compared to DON alone. The H&E staining of the rat skin revealed no obvious pathology in the DON treatment group (10 mM). DON has no/minimal cellular toxicity in vitro on dermal fibroblasts at concentrations that effectively provide analgesia. The local application of concentrations greater than the in vitro IC50 for DON revealed no in vivo skin toxicity. These data provide results indicating zero-to-minimal cellular toxicity with DON and support the further investigation of DON as an analgesic. PMID

  18. Purification and Characterization of a Novel and Robust L-Asparaginase Having Low-Glutaminase Activity from Bacillus licheniformis: In Vitro Evaluation of Anti-Cancerous Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Richi V.; Kumar, Vinod; Rajendran, Vinoth; Saran, Saurabh; Ghosh, Prahlad C.; Saxena, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    L-asparaginase having low glutaminase has been a key therapeutic agent in the treatment of acute lymphpoblastic leukemia (A.L.L). In the present study, an extracellular L-asparaginase with low glutaminase activity, produced by Bacillus licheniformis was purified to homogeneity. Protein was found to be a homotetramer of 134.8 KDa with monomeric size of 33.7 KDa and very specific for its natural substrate i.e. L-asparagine. The activity of purified L-asparaginase enhanced in presence of cations including Na+ and K+, whereas it was moderately inhibited in the presence of divalent cations and thiol group blocking reagents. The purified enzyme was maximally active over the range of pH 6.0 to 10.0 and temperature of 40°C and enzyme was stable maximum at pH 9.0 and −20°C. CD spectra of L-asparaginase predicted the enzyme to consist of 63.05% α- helix and 3.29% β-sheets in its native form with T222 of 58°C. Fluorescent spectroscopy showed the protein to be stable even in the presence of more than 3 M GdHCl. Kinetic parameters Km, Vmax and kcat of purified enzyme were found as 1.4×10−5 M, 4.03 IU and 2.68×103 s−1, respectively. The purified L-asparaginase had cytotoxic activity against various cancerous cell lines viz. Jurkat clone E6-1, MCF-7 and K-562 with IC50 of 0.22 IU, 0.78 IU and 0.153 IU respectively. However the enzyme had no toxic effect on human erythrocytes and CHO cell lines hence should be considered potential candidate for further pharmaceutical use as an anticancer drug. PMID:24905227

  19. Comparison of kokumi γ-[Glu](n>1)-Val and γ-[Glu](n>1)-Met synthesized through transpeptidation catalyzed by glutaminase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Xie, Jin; Wang, Lan; Chen, Hong-Zhang; Cui, Chun; Zhao, Mouming

    2018-05-01

    A series of γ-[Glu] (n=2,3,4) -Val or γ-[Glu] (n=2,3,4) -Met were synthesized in the presence of donor (Gln) and corresponding acceptor (Val or Met) through transpeptidation catalyzed by the glutaminase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Gln in excess significantly (p n>1) -Val/Met except for γ-Glu-Val/Met. The K m values for transpeptidase activity to yield γ-[Glu] (n=0,1,2,3) -Val increased with an elevated n, but remained essentially the same irrespective of n value for γ-[Glu] (n=0,1,2) -Met (which were 31-44% of that for γ-[Glu] 3 -Met). The highest K m value appearing when n = 3 (γ-[Glu] 3 -Val or γ-[Glu] 3 -Met) suggested the rising difficulty for synthesis when the number of donor increases. All the γ-[Glu] n -Val/Met substances exhibited kokumi properties and enhanced the continuity and umami taste of soy sauce as well as the thickness, mouthfulness and umaminess of model chicken broth. These results indicate the potential of the γ-[Glu] n -Val and γ-[Glu] n -Met as food flavor enhancers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Production of glutaminase(E.C. 3.2.1.5) from Zygosaccharomyces rouxii in solid-state fermentation and modeling the growth of Z. rouxii therein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Padma; Singhal, Rekha S

    2010-04-01

    Glutaminase production in Zygosacchromyces rouxii by solid-state fermentation (SSF) is detailed. Substrates screening showed best results with oatmeal (OM) and wheatbran (WB). Further, a 1:1 combination of OM: WB gave 0.614units/gds with artificial sea water (ASW) as moistening agent. Evaluation of additional carbon, nitrogen, aminoacids and minerals supplementation was done. A central composite design was employed to investigate effects of four variables, viz. moisture content, glucose, corn steep liquor and glutamine on production. A 4-fold increase in enzyme production was obtained. Studies were undertaken to analyze the time course model the microbial growth and nutrient utilization during SSF. Logistic equation (R2=0.8973), describing the growth model of Z.rouxii was obtained, with maximum values of micronm and Xm at 0.326h-1 and 7.35% of dry matter weight loss, respectively. A good-fit model to describe utilization of total carbohydrate (R2=0.9906) nitrogen concentration (R2=0.9869) with time was obtained. The model was used successfully to predict enzyme production (R2=0.7950).

  1. Optimization of Culture Conditions for Production of the Anti-Leukemic Glutaminase Free L-Asparaginase by Newly Isolated Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 Using Response Surface Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noura El-Ahmady El-Naggar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Among the antitumor drugs, bacterial enzyme L-asparaginase has been employed as the most effective chemotherapeutic agent in pediatric oncotherapy especially for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Glutaminase free L-asparaginase producing actinomycetes were isolated from soil samples collected from Egypt. Among them, a potential culture, strain NEAE-119, was selected and identified on the basis of morphological, cultural, physiological, and biochemical properties together with 16S rRNA sequence as Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 and sequencing product (1509 bp was deposited in the GenBank database under accession number KJ200342. The optimization of different process parameters for L-asparaginase production by Streptomyces olivaceus NEAE-119 using Plackett-Burman experimental design and response surface methodology was carried out. Fifteen variables (temperature, pH, incubation time, inoculum size, inoculum age, agitation speed, dextrose, starch, L-asparagine, KNO3, yeast extract, K2HPO4, MgSO4·7H2O, NaCl, and FeSO4·7H2O were screened using Plackett-Burman experimental design. The most positive significant independent variables affecting enzyme production (temperature, inoculum age, and agitation speed were further optimized by the face-centered central composite design-response surface methodology.

  2. Synthesis and Sensory Characteristics of Kokumi γ-[Glu]n-Phe in the Presence of Glutamine and Phenylalanine: Glutaminase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens or Aspergillus oryzae as the Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Cui, Chun; Dong, Keming; Wang, Wei

    2017-10-04

    The transpeptidase activity of glutaminase from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (GBA) and Aspergillus oryzae (GAO) to yield γ-[Glu] n -Phe peptides were verified for the first time. In the presence of Gln and Phe, γ-Glu-Phe and γ-Glu-γ-Glu-Phe were synthesized by GAO, and γ-Glu-Phe, γ-Glu-γ-Glu-Phe, γ-Glu-γ-Glu-γ-Glu-Phe, γ-Glu-γ-Glu-γ-Glu-γ-Glu-Phe, and γ-Glu-γ-Glu-γ-Glu-γ-Glu-γ-Glu-Phe were synthesized by GBA. The K m values for the transpeptidation catalyzed by GBA and GAO were 47.88 and 153.92 mM (Phe as the acceptor), 84.89 and 236.47 mM (γ-Glu-Phe as the acceptor), indicating that GBA had a greater affinity than GAO for Phe and γ-Glu-Phe in the transpeptidation reaction. The K m values for the transpeptidation catalyzed by GBA against acceptors, Phe and γ-[Glu] (1≤n<5) -Phe (47.88-206.47 mM), increased with an elevated number of γ-glutamyl residue within the acceptor. The optimal conditions for γ-[Glu] n -Phe synthesis were pH 10 and 37 °C for 3 h, 300 mM Gln, 100 mM Phe, 0.05 U/mL GBA. All the γ-[Glu] (1≤n≤5) -Phe exhibited astringency in water and imparted a kokumi taste to commercial soy sauce and model chicken broth. The astringent threshold values (2.5-3.92 mM) were approximately 3-fold of the kokumi threshold concentrations (0.78-1.53 mM). γ-[Glu] n -Phe or the post-enzymatic reaction mixture enhanced the umami intensity of commercial soy sauce and model chicken broth.

  3. Purification, characterization and antiproliferative activity of l-asparaginase from Aspergillus oryzae CCT 3940 with no glutaminase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Furlan Gonçalves Dias

    2016-09-01

    Conclusions: The sensitivity of the cells lines to purified l-asparaginase from A. oryzae CCT 3940 appeared to be concentration dependent affording a more significant decrease in cell growth than that observed for the commercial l-asparaginase from Escherichia coli. The l-asparaginase from A. oryzae CCT 3940 has a high potential for pharmaceutical exploitation in the treatment of leukemia.

  4. Effect of. gamma. radiation in relatively low dose on the activity of glutaminase in subcellular fraction of brain and liver cells. [Rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tkach, V M

    1973-01-01

    The effect of ..gamma..-irradiation at a dose of 40 rads was studied on the exchange of glutamine in rats. It has been shown that the irradiation leads to a significant lowering of the activity of glutaminamidohydrolase (I) in brain mitochondria and in the liver after 1, 3, 7, 15, and 30 days post exposure. In the fractions containing nuclei, fraction of myofibrillae and connective tissue, a slow down of the deamidation of glutamine also takes place, and only after 7 days the ammonium separation from glutamine increases and returns to normal. At the 15 and 30 days a second wave of the lower rate of the activity of I takes place. The type of the changes of I is the same in both organs, but in the liver it is expressed to a lesser degree. (JPRS)

  5. Glutamine domain of the chimeric protein, CAD, that initiates pyrimidine biosynthesis in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, R.E.; Kim, H.; Evans, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Glutamine dependent carbamyl phosphate synthesis, the first step in mammalian de novo pyrimidine biosynthesis, is catalyzed by a 240 kDa chimeric protein, CAD, that also has the aspartate transcarbamylase and dihydroorotase activities. The complex was found to have a separate glutaminase activity of 0.04 μmol/min/mg, that increased five fold in the presence of bicarbonate and ATP. To determine whether the glutaminase activity, which provides ammonia for carbamyl phosphate synthesis, is associated with a separate structural domain (GLN), CAD was subjected to controlled proteolysis with elastase. The glutaminase, glutamine and ammonia dependent carbamyl phosphate synthetase activities, as well as the partial reactions; carbamyl phosphate dependent ATP synthesis and bicarbonate dependent ATPase, were correlated with the concentration of the various proteolytic fragments that accumulated in the digest. While the glutamine dependent carbamyl phosphate synthetase was rapidly inactivated, the glutaminase activity was found to be very resistant to proteolysis. The glutamine binding site of CAD was also specifically modified with 6-diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON). The modification was accompanied by a loss of both glutaminase and glutamine dependent carbamyl phosphate synthetase activities. Bicarbonate and ATP increased the rate of reaction of CAD with DON, while glutamine protected against inactivation. The stoichiometry of the reaction and the identity of the modified proteolytic fragments was determined using 14 C labelled DON

  6. Construction of Potent Recombinant Strain Through Intergeneric Protoplast Fusion in Endophytic Fungi for Anticancerous Enzymes Production Using Rice Straw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gendy, Mervat Morsy Abbas Ahmed; Al-Zahrani, Salha Hassan Mastour; El-Bondkly, Ahmed Mohamed Ahmed

    2017-09-01

    Among all fungal endophytes isolates derived from different ethno-medical plants, the hyper-yield L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase wild strains Trichoderma sp. Gen 9 and Cladosporium sp. Gen 20 using rice straw under solid-state fermentation (SSF) were selected. The selected strains were used as parents for the intergeneric protoplast fusion program to construct recombinant strain for prompt improvement production of these enzymes in one recombinant strain. Among 21 fusants obtained, the recombinant strain AYA 20-1, with 2.11-fold and 2.58-fold increase in L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase activities more than the parental isolates Trichoderma sp. Gen 9 and Cladosporium sp. Gen 20, respectively, was achieved using rice straw under SSF. Both therapeutic enzymes L-asparaginase and L-glutaminase were purified and characterized from the culture supernatant of the recombinant AYA 20-1 strain with molecular weights of 50.6 and 83.2 kDa, respectively. Both enzymes were not metalloenzymes. Whereas thiol group blocking reagents such as p-chloromercurybenzoate and iodoacetamide totally inhibited L-asparaginase activity, which refer to sulfhydryl groups and cysteine residues involved in its catalytic activity, they have no effect toward L-glutaminase activity. Interestingly, potent anticancer, antioxidant, and antimicrobial activities were detected for both enzymes.

  7. Glutamine deficiency induces DNA alkylation damage and sensitizes cancer cells to alkylating agents through inhibition of ALKBH enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thai Q; Ishak Gabra, Mari B; Lowman, Xazmin H; Yang, Ying; Reid, Michael A; Pan, Min; O'Connor, Timothy R; Kong, Mei

    2017-11-01

    Driven by oncogenic signaling, glutamine addiction exhibited by cancer cells often leads to severe glutamine depletion in solid tumors. Despite this nutritional environment that tumor cells often experience, the effect of glutamine deficiency on cellular responses to DNA damage and chemotherapeutic treatment remains unclear. Here, we show that glutamine deficiency, through the reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate, inhibits the AlkB homolog (ALKBH) enzymes activity and induces DNA alkylation damage. As a result, glutamine deprivation or glutaminase inhibitor treatment triggers DNA damage accumulation independent of cell death. In addition, low glutamine-induced DNA damage is abolished in ALKBH deficient cells. Importantly, we show that glutaminase inhibitors, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) or CB-839, hypersensitize cancer cells to alkylating agents both in vitro and in vivo. Together, the crosstalk between glutamine metabolism and the DNA repair pathway identified in this study highlights a potential role of metabolic stress in genomic instability and therapeutic response in cancer.

  8. Product-selective blot: a technique for measuring enzyme activities in large numbers of samples and in native electrophoresis gels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, G.A.; Davies, H.M.; McDonald, N.

    1985-01-01

    A method termed product-selective blotting has been developed for screening large numbers of samples for enzyme activity. The technique is particularly well suited to detection of enzymes in native electrophoresis gels. The principle of the method was demonstrated by blotting samples from glutaminase or glutamate synthase reactions into an agarose gel embedded with ion-exchange resin under conditions favoring binding of product (glutamate) over substrates and other substances in the reaction mixture. After washes to remove these unbound substances, the product was measured using either fluorometric staining or radiometric techniques. Glutaminase activity in native electrophoresis gels was visualized by a related procedure in which substrates and products from reactions run in the electrophoresis gel were blotted directly into a resin-containing image gel. Considering the selective-binding materials available for use in the image gel, along with the possible detection systems, this method has potentially broad application

  9. p73 regulates basal and starvation-induced liver metabolism in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    He, Zhaoyue; Agostini, Massimiliano; Liu, He; Melino, Gerry; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2015-01-01

    As a member of the p53 gene family, p73 regulates cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, neurogenesis, immunity and inflammation. Recently, p73 has been shown to transcriptionally regulate selective metabolic enzymes, such as cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutaminase-2, resulting in significant effects on metabolism, including hepatocellular lipid metabolism, glutathione homeostasis and the pentose phosphate pathway. In order to further investigate th...

  10. Engineering of Helicobacter pylori L-asparaginase: characterization of two functionally distinct groups of mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maristella Maggi

    Full Text Available Bacterial L-asparaginases have been used as anti-cancer drugs for over 4 decades though presenting, along with their therapeutic efficacy, several side effects due to their bacterial origin and, seemingly, to their secondary glutaminase activity. Helicobacter pylori type II L-asparaginase possesses interesting features, among which a reduced catalytic efficiency for L-GLN, compared to the drugs presently used in therapy. In the present study, we describe some enzyme variants with catalytic and in vitro cytotoxic activities different from the wild type enzyme. Particularly, replacements on catalytic threonines (T16D and T95E deplete the enzyme of both its catalytic activities, once more underlining the essential role of such residues. One serendipitous mutant, M121C/T169M, had a preserved efficiency vs L-asparagine but was completely unable to carry out L-glutamine hydrolysis. Interestingly, this variant did not exert any cytotoxic effect on HL-60 cells. The M121C and T169M single mutants had reduced catalytic activities (nearly 2.5- to 4-fold vs wild type enzyme, respectively. Mutant Q63E, endowed with a similar catalytic efficiency versus asparagine and halved glutaminase efficiency with respect to the wild type enzyme, was able to exert a cytotoxic effect comparable to, or higher than, the one of the wild type enzyme when similar asparaginase units were used. These findings may be relevant to determine the role of glutaminase activity of L-asparaginase in the anti-proliferative effect of the drug and to shed light on how to engineer the best asparaginase/glutaminase combination for an ever improved, patients-tailored therapy.

  11. SIRT5 regulation of ammonia-induced autophagy and mitophagy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polletta, Lucia; Vernucci, Enza; Carnevale, Ilaria; Arcangeli, Tania; Rotili, Dante; Palmerio, Silvia; Steegborn, Clemens; Nowak, Theresa; Schutkowski, Mike; Pellegrini, Laura; Sansone, Luigi; Villanova, Lidia; Runci, Alessandra; Pucci, Bruna; Morgante, Emanuela; Fini, Massimo; Mai, Antonello; Russo, Matteo A; Tafani, Marco

    2015-01-01

    In liver the mitochondrial sirtuin, SIRT5, controls ammonia detoxification by regulating CPS1, the first enzyme of the urea cycle. However, while SIRT5 is ubiquitously expressed, urea cycle and CPS1 are only present in the liver and, to a minor extent, in the kidney. To address the possibility that SIRT5 is involved in ammonia production also in nonliver cells, clones of human breast cancer cell lines MDA-MB-231 and mouse myoblast C2C12, overexpressing or silenced for SIRT5 were produced. Our results show that ammonia production increased in SIRT5-silenced and decreased in SIRT5-overexpressing cells. We also obtained the same ammonia increase when using a new specific inhibitor of SIRT5 called MC3482. SIRT5 regulates ammonia production by controlling glutamine metabolism. In fact, in the mitochondria, glutamine is transformed in glutamate by the enzyme glutaminase, a reaction producing ammonia. We found that SIRT5 and glutaminase coimmunoprecipitated and that SIRT5 inhibition resulted in an increased succinylation of glutaminase. We next determined that autophagy and mitophagy were increased by ammonia by measuring autophagic proteolysis of long-lived proteins, increase of autophagy markers MAP1LC3B, GABARAP, and GABARAPL2, mitophagy markers BNIP3 and the PINK1-PARK2 system as well as mitochondrial morphology and dynamics. We observed that autophagy and mitophagy increased in SIRT5-silenced cells and in WT cells treated with MC3482 and decreased in SIRT5-overexpressing cells. Moreover, glutaminase inhibition or glutamine withdrawal completely prevented autophagy. In conclusion we propose that the role of SIRT5 in nonliver cells is to regulate ammonia production and ammonia-induced autophagy by regulating glutamine metabolism. PMID:25700560

  12. Targeting Metabolic Survival Pathways in Lung Cancer via Combination Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    H & Y Enterprise, Redwood City, CA). Following centrifugation at 750 3 g to remove unlysed cells and nuclei, mito - chondria were isolated by...clinically used for diabetes already) or phenformin and glutaminase inhibitors. Several compounds that inhibit GLS are currently under investigation at...Brian P. Fiske,1 Douglas McCloskey,2 Dan Y . Gui,1 Courtney R. Green,2 Natalie I. Vokes,1 Adam M. Feist,2 Matthew G. Vander Heiden,1,3,* and Christian M

  13. Halophilic Bacteria of Lunsu Produce an Array of Industrially Important Enzymes with Salt Tolerant Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonika Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The halophilic bacterial isolates SS1, SS2, SS3, SS5, and SS8 were characterized for production of industrially important enzymes like amylase, protease, lipase, and glutaminase. Halophilic bacterial isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited salt dependent extracellular amylase and protease activities. Both the halophilic isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited maximum amylase and protease activities in the presence of 1.5 and 1.0 M NaCl, respectively, with the optimum pH 8 and temperature 40°C. SS2 showed maximum extracellular protease and lipase activities in the presence of 0.75 M NaCl, at optimum pH of 7, and temperature 37°C. The glutaminase activity of SS3 increased with increase in concentration of NaCl up to 2.5 M. The optimum pH and temperature for L-glutaminase activity of SS3 was 8 and 40°C, respectively. The combined hydrolytic activities of these halophilic bacterial isolates can be used for bioconversion of organic materials to useful products.

  14. Halophilic Bacteria of Lunsu Produce an Array of Industrially Important Enzymes with Salt Tolerant Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sonika; Sharma, Parul; Dev, Kamal; Sourirajan, Anuradha

    2016-01-01

    The halophilic bacterial isolates SS1, SS2, SS3, SS5, and SS8 were characterized for production of industrially important enzymes like amylase, protease, lipase, and glutaminase. Halophilic bacterial isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited salt dependent extracellular amylase and protease activities. Both the halophilic isolates SS1 and SS3 exhibited maximum amylase and protease activities in the presence of 1.5 and 1.0 M NaCl, respectively, with the optimum pH 8 and temperature 40°C. SS2 showed maximum extracellular protease and lipase activities in the presence of 0.75 M NaCl, at optimum pH of 7, and temperature 37°C. The glutaminase activity of SS3 increased with increase in concentration of NaCl up to 2.5 M. The optimum pH and temperature for L-glutaminase activity of SS3 was 8 and 40°C, respectively. The combined hydrolytic activities of these halophilic bacterial isolates can be used for bioconversion of organic materials to useful products.

  15. Enhanced catalysis of L-asparaginase from Bacillus licheniformis by a rational redesign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhir, Ankit P; Agarwaal, Viplove V; Dave, Bhaumik R; Patel, Darshan H; Subramanian, R B

    2016-05-01

    L-Asparaginase (3.5.1.1) being antineoplastic in nature are used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However glutaminase activity is the cause of various side effects when used as a drug against acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Therefore, there is a need of a novel L-asparaginase (L-ASNase) with low or no glutaminase activity. Such a property has been observed with L-ASNase from B. licheniformis (BliA). The enzyme being glutaminase free in nature paved the way for its improvement to achieve properties similar to or near to the commercially available L-ASNases. Rational enzyme engineering approach resulted in four mutants: G238N, E232A, D103V and Q112H. Among these the mutant enzyme, D103V, had a specific activity of 597.7IU/mg, which is higher than native (rBliA) (407.65IU/mg). Moreover, when the optimum temperature and in vitro half life were studied and compared with native BliA, D103V mutant BliA was better, showing tolerance to higher temperatures and a 3 fold higher half life. Kinetic studies revealed that the mutant D103V L-ASNase has increased substrate affinity, with Km value of 0.42mM and Vmax of 2778.9μmolmin(-1). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Response of hydrolytic enzyme activities and nitrogen mineralization to fertilizer and organic matter application in subtropical paddy soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kader, Mohammed Abdul; Yeasmin, Sabina; Akter, Masuda; Sleutel, Steven

    2016-04-01

    Driving controllers of nitrogen (N) mineralization in paddy soils, especially under anaerobic soil conditions, remain elusive. The influence of exogenous organic matter (OM) and fertilizer application on the activities of five relevant enzymes (β-glucosaminidase, β-glucosidase, L-glutaminase, urease and arylamidase) was measured in two long-term field experiments. One 18-years field experiment was established on a weathered terrace soil with a rice-wheat crop rotation at the Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Agricultural University (BSMRAU) having five OM treatments combined with two mineral N fertilizer levels. Another 30-years experiment was established on a young floodplain soil with rice-rice crop rotation at the Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU) having eight mineral fertilizer treatments combined with organic manure. At BSMRAU, N fertilizer and OM amendments significantly increased all enzyme activities, suggesting them to be primarily determined by substrate availability. At BAU, non-responsiveness of β-glucosidase activity suggested little effect of the studied fertilizer and OM amendments on general soil microbial activity. Notwithstanding probably equal microbial demand for N, β-glucosaminidase and L-glutaminase activities differed significantly among the treatments (P>0.05) and followed strikingly opposite trends and correlations with soil organic N mineralization. So enzymatic pathways to acquire N differed by treatment at BAU, indicating differences in soil N quality and bio-availability. L-glutaminase activity was significantly positively correlated to the aerobic and anaerobic N mineralization rates at both field experiments. Combined with negative correlations between β-glucosaminidase activity and N mineralization rates, it appears that terminal amino acid NH2 hydrolysis was a rate-limiting step for soil N mineralization at BAU. Future investigations with joint quantification of polyphenol accumulation and binding of N, alongside an

  17. Glutamine deficiency induces DNA alkylation damage and sensitizes cancer cells to alkylating agents through inhibition of ALKBH enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thai Q Tran

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Driven by oncogenic signaling, glutamine addiction exhibited by cancer cells often leads to severe glutamine depletion in solid tumors. Despite this nutritional environment that tumor cells often experience, the effect of glutamine deficiency on cellular responses to DNA damage and chemotherapeutic treatment remains unclear. Here, we show that glutamine deficiency, through the reduction of alpha-ketoglutarate, inhibits the AlkB homolog (ALKBH enzymes activity and induces DNA alkylation damage. As a result, glutamine deprivation or glutaminase inhibitor treatment triggers DNA damage accumulation independent of cell death. In addition, low glutamine-induced DNA damage is abolished in ALKBH deficient cells. Importantly, we show that glutaminase inhibitors, 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON or CB-839, hypersensitize cancer cells to alkylating agents both in vitro and in vivo. Together, the crosstalk between glutamine metabolism and the DNA repair pathway identified in this study highlights a potential role of metabolic stress in genomic instability and therapeutic response in cancer.

  18. The kidney of chicken adapts to chronic metabolic acidosis: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craan, A G; Lemieux, G; Vinay, P; Gougoux, A

    1982-08-01

    Renal adaptation to chronic metabolic acidosis was studies in Arbor Acre hens receiving ammonium chloride by stomach tube 0.75 g/kg/day during 6 days. During a 14-day study, it was shown that the animals could excrete as much as 60% of the acid load during ammonium chloride administration. At the same time urate excretion fell markedly but the renal contribution to urate excretion (14%) did not change. During acidosis, blood glutamine increased twofold and the tissue concentration of glutamine rose in both liver and kidney. Infusion of L-glutamine led to increased ammonia excretion and more so in acidotic animals. Glutaminase I, glutamate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase (GPT), and malic enzyme activities increased in the kidney during acidosis but phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) activity did not change. Glutaminase I was not found in the liver, but hepatic glutamine synthetase rose markedly during acidosis. Glutamine synthetase was not found in the kidney. Renal tubules incubated with glutamine and alanine were ammoniagenic and gluconeogenic to the same degree as rat tubules with the same increments in acidosis. Lactate was gluconeogenic without increment during acidosis. The present study indicates that the avian kidney adapts to chronic metabolic acidosis with similarities and differences when compared to dog and rat. Glutamine originating from the liver appears to be the major ammoniagenic substrate. Our data also support the hypothesis that hepatic urate synthesis is decreased during acidosis.

  19. Enzymology of asparagine metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unnithan, S.

    1985-01-01

    A highly sensitive method for assaying asparagine synthetase and its glutaminase activity simultaneously was developed using reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The amino acids L-aspartate, L-asparagine, L-glutamate, and L-glutamine were separated after derivatization with O-phthaldialdehyde. This assay can detect picomoles of asparagine and glutamate when a fluorescence detector is used. Chemical modification of asparagine synthetase was carried out. Beef pancreatic asparagine synthetase was inactivated by treatment with the sulfhydryl reagent 5,5'-dithiobis(2-nitro benzoic acid), DTNB. Asparagine protected the glutamine-dependent and ammonia-dependent asparagine synthetase activities as well as the glutaminase activity. Kinetic studies with partially inactivated asparagine synthetase showed that the K/sub m/ values for aspartic acid and glutamine did not change when compared with the K/sub m/ values of the control enzyme. The stoichiometry of DTNB inhibition was measured using (/sup 14/C)DTNB. Differences in the enzymology of L-asparaginase sensitive and resistant L5178Y leukemia cells were examined. Finally, the transport characteristics of L-asparaginase sensitive and resistant cells were observed. The L-asparaginase sensitive cells showed a higher rate of transport of the amino acids glycine, serine, asparagine and aspartate into the cytoplasmic pool.

  20. Cloning and molecular analysis of L-asparaginase II gene (ansB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZEINAT K. MOHAMED

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The deamination of L-asparagine to L-aspartic acid and ammonia is catalyzed by L-asparaginases (L-asparagine amino hydrolase. The enzyme L-asparaginase is widely distributed in nature from different living organisms, starting from bacteria till mammals and plants. It has been recently thought to be a therapeutic agent in treatment of various lymphoblastic leukemia diseases. There have been many attempts to isolate microorganisms that produce L-asparaginase. L-ASNase producing bacteria, Escherichia coli MG27, was previously isolated from the River Nile and identified. In this study, ansB gene, encoding L-ASNase II from E. coli MG27, was amplified by PCR, cloned and characterized by DNA sequencing. The DNA sequence was then analyzed using bioinformatics analysis and translated into amino acid sequence. Identification of highly conserved amino acid sequence motifs was conducted by comparison against the InterPro database. Analysis revealed that the protein sequence had a catalytic domain of L-asparaginase type II (IPR004550 that belong to asparaginase/glutaminase family (IPR006034 and has asparaginase/glutaminase conserved site (IPR020827. According to results predicted using PSIpred tool, ansB consists of eight α-helices and 13 β-strands.

  1. Gut microbiota drive the development of neuro-inflammatory response in cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Dae Joong; Betrapally, Naga S; Ghosh, Siddhartha A; Sartor, R Balfour; Hylemon, Phillip B; Gillevet, Patrick M; Sanyal, Arun J; Heuman, Douglas M; Carl, Daniel; Zhou, Huiping; Liu, Runping; Wang, Xiang; Yang, Jing; Jiao, Chunhua; Herzog, Jeremy; Lippmann, H Robert; Sikaroodi, Masoumeh; Brown, Robert R; Bajaj, Jasmohan S

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the development of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) are unclear although hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation through gut dysbiosis have been proposed. Aim Define the individual contribution of hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation on neuro-inflammation in cirrhosis using germ-free (GF) and conventional mice. Methods GF and conventional C57BL/6 mice were made cirrhotic using CCl4 gavage. These were compared to their non-cirrhotic counterparts. Intestinal microbiota, systemic and neuro-inflammation (including microglial and glial activation), serum ammonia, intestinal glutaminase activity and cecal glutamine content were compared between groups. Results GF-cirrhotic mice developed similar cirrhotic changes to the conventional mice after four extra weeks (16 vs. 12 weeks) of CCL4 gavage. GF-cirrhotic mice exhibited higher ammonia compared to the GF controls but this was not associated with systemic or neuro-inflammation. Ammonia was generated through increased small intestinal glutaminase activity with concomitantly reduced intestinal glutamine levels. However, conventional cirrhotic mice had intestinal dysbiosis as well as systemic inflammation, associated with increased serum ammonia compared to conventional controls. This was associated with neuro-inflammation and glial/microglial activation. Correlation network analysis in conventional mice showed significant linkages between systemic/neuro-inflammation, intestinal microbiota and ammonia. Specifically beneficial, autochthonous taxa were negatively linked with brain and systemic inflammation, ammonia and with Staphylococcaceae, Lactobacillaceae and Streptococcaceae. Enterobacteriaceae were positively linked with serum inflammatory cytokines Conclusions Gut microbiota changes drive the development of neuro- and systemic inflammatory responses in cirrhotic animals. PMID:27339732

  2. On the analysis and comparison of conformer-specific essential dynamics upon ligand binding to a protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grosso, Marcos; Kalstein, Adrian; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian; Roitberg, Adrian E.

    2015-01-01

    The native state of a protein consists of an equilibrium of conformational states on an energy landscape rather than existing as a single static state. The co-existence of conformers with different ligand-affinities in a dynamical equilibrium is the basis for the conformational selection model for ligand binding. In this context, the development of theoretical methods that allow us to analyze not only the structural changes but also changes in the fluctuation patterns between conformers will contribute to elucidate the differential properties acquired upon ligand binding. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide the required information to explore these features. Its use in combination with subsequent essential dynamics analysis allows separating large concerted conformational rearrangements from irrelevant fluctuations. We present a novel procedure to define the size and composition of essential dynamics subspaces associated with ligand-bound and ligand-free conformations. These definitions allow us to compare essential dynamics subspaces between different conformers. Our procedure attempts to emphasize the main similarities and differences between the different essential dynamics in an unbiased way. Essential dynamics subspaces associated to conformational transitions can also be analyzed. As a test case, we study the glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), composed of a single PDZ domain. Both GIP ligand-free state and glutaminase L peptide-bound states are analyzed. Our findings concerning the relative changes in the flexibility pattern upon binding are in good agreement with experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data

  3. On the analysis and comparison of conformer-specific essential dynamics upon ligand binding to a protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grosso, Marcos; Kalstein, Adrian; Parisi, Gustavo; Fernandez-Alberti, Sebastian, E-mail: sfalberti@gmail.com [Universidad Nacional de Quilmes, Roque Saenz Peña 352, B1876BXD Bernal (Argentina); Roitberg, Adrian E. [Departments of Physics and Chemistry, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2015-06-28

    The native state of a protein consists of an equilibrium of conformational states on an energy landscape rather than existing as a single static state. The co-existence of conformers with different ligand-affinities in a dynamical equilibrium is the basis for the conformational selection model for ligand binding. In this context, the development of theoretical methods that allow us to analyze not only the structural changes but also changes in the fluctuation patterns between conformers will contribute to elucidate the differential properties acquired upon ligand binding. Molecular dynamics simulations can provide the required information to explore these features. Its use in combination with subsequent essential dynamics analysis allows separating large concerted conformational rearrangements from irrelevant fluctuations. We present a novel procedure to define the size and composition of essential dynamics subspaces associated with ligand-bound and ligand-free conformations. These definitions allow us to compare essential dynamics subspaces between different conformers. Our procedure attempts to emphasize the main similarities and differences between the different essential dynamics in an unbiased way. Essential dynamics subspaces associated to conformational transitions can also be analyzed. As a test case, we study the glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), composed of a single PDZ domain. Both GIP ligand-free state and glutaminase L peptide-bound states are analyzed. Our findings concerning the relative changes in the flexibility pattern upon binding are in good agreement with experimental Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data.

  4. Glutamate/glutamine metabolism coupling between astrocytes and glioma cells: neuroprotection and inhibition of glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Pei-Sen; Kang, De-Zhi; Lin, Ru-Ying; Ye, Bing; Wang, Wei; Ye, Zu-Cheng

    2014-07-18

    Glioma glutamate release has been shown to promote the growth of glioma cells and induce neuronal injuries from epilepsy to neuronal death. However, potential counteractions from normal astrocytes against glioma glutamate release have not been fully evaluated. In this study, we investigated the glutamate/glutamine cycling between glioma cells and astrocytes and their impact on neuronal function. Co-cultures of glioma cells with astrocytes (CGA) in direct contact were established under different mix ratio of astrocyte/glioma. Culture medium conditioned in these CGAs were sampled for HPLC measurement, for neuronal ratiometric calcium imaging, and for neuronal survival assay. We found: (1) High levels of glutaminase expression in glioma cells, but not in astrocytes, glutaminase enables glioma cells to release large amount of glutamate in the presence of glutamine. (2) Glutamate levels in CGAs were directly determined by the astrocyte/glioma ratios, indicating a balance between glioma glutamate release and astrocyte glutamate uptake. (3) Culture media from CGAs of higher glioma/astrocyte ratios induced stronger neuronal Ca(2+) response and more severe neuronal death. (4) Co-culturing with astrocytes significantly reduced the growth rate of glioma cells. These results indicate that normal astrocytes in the brain play pivotal roles in glioma growth inhibition and in reducing neuronal injuries from glioma glutamate release. However, as tumor growth, the protective role of astrocytes gradually succumb to glioma cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Analysis and physiological implications of renal 2-oxoglutaramate metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissim, I; Wehrli, S; States, B; Nissim, I; Yudkoff, M

    1991-07-01

    The relative significance of the flux through the glutamine aminotransferase (glutaminase II) pathway to renal ammoniagenesis is poorly understood. A basic and unresolved question is whether 2-oxoglutaramate (2-OGM), a product of the glutaminase II reaction, is deamidated to yield 2-oxoglutarate and NH3, or whether 2-OGM accumulates as an unreactive lactam, depending on the environmental pH. In the current studies we utilized 13C n.m.r. as well as 15N n.m.r. as well as 15N n.m.r. to demonstrate that 2-OGM occurs as a lactam, i.e. 5-hydroxypyroglutamate, regardless of the environmental pH. Our additional aims were to determine whether human kidney cells (HK cells) in culture can produce 2-OGM and to ascertain a pH-dependent relationship between NH3 and 2-OGM production from glutamine. We therefore developed an isotope dilution assay for 2-OGM utilizing 5-hydroxy[4-13C,1-15N]pyroglutamate as the labelled species. Incubations of HK cells in minimal essential medium supplemented with 1 mM-[2-15N]glutamine demonstrated significantly higher production of 2-OGM at pH 6.8 and lower production at pH 7.6 compared with pH 7.4. Similarly both 15NH3 and [15N]alanine formation were significantly higher in acute acidosis (pH 6.8) and lower in acute alkalosis (pH 7.6) compared with that at physiological pH. Addition of 1 mM-amino-oxyacetate to the incubation medium at pH 7.4 significantly diminished [15N]alanine and 2-OGM production, but the production of 15NH3 via the glutamate dehydrogenase pathway was significantly stimulated. The current observations indicate that the glutaminase II pathway plays a minor role and that flux through glutamate dehydrogenase is the predominant site for regulation of ammoniagenesis in human kidney.

  6. [Imbalance of system of glutamin - glutamic acid in the placenta and amniotic fluid at placental insufficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogorelova, T N; Gunko, V O; Linde, V A

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism of glutamine and glutamic acid has been investigated in the placenta and amniotic fluid under conditions of placental insufficiency. The development of placental insufficiency is characterized by the increased content of glutamic acid and a decrease of glutamine in both placenta and amniotic fluid. These changes changes were accompanied by changes in the activity of enzymes involved in the metabolism of these amino acids. There was a decrease in glutamate dehydrogenase activity and an increase in glutaminase activity with the simultaneous decrease of glutamine synthetase activity. The compensatory decrease in the activity of glutamine keto acid aminotransferase did not prevent a decrease in the glutamine level. The impairments in the system glutamic acid-glutamine were more pronounced during the development of premature labor.

  7. Determination of glutamine and glutamic acid in mammalian cell cultures using tetrathiafulvalene modified enzyme electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulchandani, A; Bassi, A S

    1996-01-01

    Tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) mediated amperometric enzyme electrodes have been developed for the monitoring of L-glutamine and L-glutamic acid in growing mammalian cell cultures. The detection of glutamine was accomplished by a coupled enzyme system comprised of glutaminase plus glutamate oxidase, while the detection of glutamic acid was carried out by a single enzyme, glutamate oxidase. The appropriate enzyme(s) were immoblized on the Triton-X treated surface of tetrathiafulvalene modified carbon paste electrodes by adsorption, in conjunction with entrapment by an electrochemically deposited copolymer film of 1,3-phenylenediamine and resorcinol. Operating conditions for the glutamine enzyme electrode were optimized with respect to the amount of enzymes immoblized, pH, temperature and mobile phase flow rate for operation in a flow injection (FIA) system. When applied to glutamine and glutamic acid measurements in mammalian cell culture in FIA, the results obtained with enzyme electrodes were in excellent agreement with those determined by enzymatic analysis.

  8. Structure-Function Relationship of Transporters in the Glutamate–Glutamine Cycle of the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariko Kato Hayashi

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Many kinds of transporters contribute to glutamatergic excitatory synaptic transmission. Glutamate is loaded into synaptic vesicles by vesicular glutamate transporters to be released from presynaptic terminals. After synaptic vesicle release, glutamate is taken up by neurons or astrocytes to terminate the signal and to prepare for the next signal. Glutamate transporters on the plasma membrane are responsible for transporting glutamate from extracellular fluid to cytoplasm. Glutamate taken up by astrocyte is converted to glutamine by glutamine synthetase and transported back to neurons through glutamine transporters on the plasma membranes of the astrocytes and then on neurons. Glutamine is converted back to glutamate by glutaminase in the neuronal cytoplasm and then loaded into synaptic vesicles again. Here, the structures of glutamate transporters and glutamine transporters, their conformational changes, and how they use electrochemical gradients of various ions for substrate transport are summarized. Pharmacological regulations of these transporters are also discussed.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of l-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wikman, Linnea E. K.; Krasotkina, Julya; Kuchumova, Anastasia; Sokolov, Nikolay N.; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C.

    2005-01-01

    Er. carotovoral-asparaginase, a potential antileukaemic agent, has been crystallized. Crystals diffract to 2.6 Å using a rotating-anode source and belong to space group P2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 78.0, b = 112.3, c = 78.7 Å, β = 101.9° and a homotetramer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Bacterial l-asparaginases have been used as therapeutic agents in the treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia for over 30 y. However, their use is limited owing to the glutaminase activity of the administered enzymes, which results in serious side effects. In contrast, l-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora exhibits low glutaminase activity at physiological concentrations of l-asparagine and l-glutamine in the blood. Recombinant Er. carotovoral-asparaginase was crystallized in the presence of l-glutamate by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 10 mg ml −1 purified enzyme, 16–18%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.2 M NaF. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å at 293 K using an in-house rotating-anode generator. The crystals belong to the monoclinic P2 1 space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.0, b = 112.3, c = 78.7 Å, β = 101.9° and a homotetramer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. A molecular-replacement solution has been found and refinement is currently in progress. The crystal structure may provide leads towards protein-engineering efforts aimed at safer asparaginase administration in leukaemia treatment

  10. Expression, purification and crystallization of Helicobacter pyloril-asparaginase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhavala, Prathusha [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi, Turku 20521 (Finland); Krasotkina, Julya [Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Dubreuil, Christine; Papageorgiou, Anastassios C., E-mail: tassos.papageorgiou@btk.fi [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi, Turku 20521 (Finland)

    2008-08-01

    l-Asparaginase from H. pylori was overexpressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. The crystals belonged to space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 63.6, b = 94.9, c = 100.2 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. A complete data set to 1.6 Å resolution was collected using synchrotron radiation. The l-asparaginases from Escherichia coli and Erwinia chrysanthemi are effective drugs that have been used in the treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia for over 30 years. However, despite their therapeutic potential, they can cause serious side effects as a consequence of their intrinsic glutaminase activity, which leads to l-glutamine depletion in the blood. Consequently, new asparaginases with low glutaminase activity, fewer side effects and high activity towards l-asparagine are highly desirable as better alternatives in cancer therapy. l-Asparaginase from Helicobacter pylori was overexpressed in E. coli and purified for structural studies. The enzyme was crystallized at pH 7.0 in the presence of 16–19%(w/v) PEG 4000 and 0.1 M magnesium formate. Data were collected to 1.6 Å resolution at 100 K from a single crystal at a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystals belong to space group I222, with unit-cell parameters a = 63.6, b = 94.9, c = 100.2 Å and one molecule of l-asparaginase in the asymmetric unit. Elucidation of the crystal structure will provide insight into the active site of the enzyme and a better understanding of the structure–activity relationship in l-asparaginases.

  11. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of l-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wikman, Linnea E. K. [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku 20521 (Finland); Krasotkina, Julya; Kuchumova, Anastasia; Sokolov, Nikolay N. [Institute for Biomedical Chemistry, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, 559-B, 10 Pogodinskay St, Moscow 119121 (Russian Federation); Papageorgiou, Anastassios C., E-mail: tassos.papageorgiou@btk.fi [Turku Centre for Biotechnology, University of Turku and Åbo Akademi University, Turku 20521 (Finland)

    2005-04-01

    Er. carotovoral-asparaginase, a potential antileukaemic agent, has been crystallized. Crystals diffract to 2.6 Å using a rotating-anode source and belong to space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.0, b = 112.3, c = 78.7 Å, β = 101.9° and a homotetramer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. Bacterial l-asparaginases have been used as therapeutic agents in the treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukaemia for over 30 y. However, their use is limited owing to the glutaminase activity of the administered enzymes, which results in serious side effects. In contrast, l-asparaginase from Erwinia carotovora exhibits low glutaminase activity at physiological concentrations of l-asparagine and l-glutamine in the blood. Recombinant Er. carotovoral-asparaginase was crystallized in the presence of l-glutamate by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using 10 mg ml{sup −1} purified enzyme, 16–18%(w/v) PEG 3350 and 0.2 M NaF. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.6 Å at 293 K using an in-house rotating-anode generator. The crystals belong to the monoclinic P2{sub 1} space group, with unit-cell parameters a = 78.0, b = 112.3, c = 78.7 Å, β = 101.9° and a homotetramer in the crystallographic asymmetric unit. A molecular-replacement solution has been found and refinement is currently in progress. The crystal structure may provide leads towards protein-engineering efforts aimed at safer asparaginase administration in leukaemia treatment.

  12. Jejunal gluconeogenesis associated with insulin resistance level and its evolution after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Repiso, Carolina; Garcia-Serrano, Sara; Moreno-Ruiz, Francisco J; Alcain-Martinez, Guillermo; Rodriguez-Pacheco, Francisca; Garcia-Fuentes, Eduardo

    2017-04-01

    Intestinal gluconeogenesis (GNG) may play an important role in glucose homeostasis, but there is little information about the condition in humans. To study the relationship between intestinal GNG and insulin resistance, its association with the evolution of morbidly obese patients after bariatric surgery, and the effect of insulin and or leptin. Regional university hospital, Malaga (Spain). Jejunal mRNA expression of genes involved in GNG was analyzed in 3 groups of morbidly obese patients who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass: with low insulin resistance (MO-low-IR), with high insulin resistance (MO-high-IR), and with type 2 diabetes treated with metformin (MO-metf-T2D). Also, intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) from MO-low-IR were incubated with different doses of insulin and or leptin. In MO-high-IR, glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), glucose 6-phosphatase (G6 Pase), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC-1 α), and sterol regulatory element-binding proteins 1 c (SREBP-1 c) expressions were significantly higher than in MO-low-IR. In MO-metf-T2 D, only PEPCK was significantly lower than in MO-high-IR. In IEC, an incubation with a high glucose and insulin dose produced an increase of PEPCK and SREBP-1 c, and a decrease of glutaminase, fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), and PGC-1 α expression. At high doses of leptin, G6 Pase and FBPase were significantly increased. The improvement of insulin resistance 3 months after bariatric surgery was positively associated with high G6 Pase and FBPase expression. mRNA expression of genes involved in GNG is increased in the jejunum of MO-high-IR, and regulated by insulin and or leptin. High mRNA expression of genes involved in GNG is associated with a better evolution of insulin resistance after bariatric surgery. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of acidity and alkalinity on the stability of amidohydrolases in freshwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frankenberger, W.T. Jr.; Page, A.L.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of acidity and alkalinity on the enzymatic hydrolysis of amide-N in the aquatic system was investigated by determining the stability of L-asparaginase (EC (Enzyme Commission) 3.5.1.1), L-glutaminase (EC 3.5.1.2), and amidase (EC 3.5.1.4), and urease (EC 3.5.1.5) with respect to pH in three freshwater lakes. The water samples were first incubated at the indicated buffer pH (1-13) for 24 h; then each enzyme was assayed at its optimal pH (pH/sub opt/) under standardized conditions. L-Asparaginase retained essentially 100% of its activity within the pH range of 6-7 in Lake Evans and Lake Matthews, and 5-7 in Lake Perris. L-Glutaminase was active between pH 6 and 7 in the water samples surveyed. Amidase remained completely active at pH ranges of 4-8 in Lake Evans, 4-7 in Lake Matthews, and 5-8 in Lake Perris. Urease remained active over a broad pH range of 5-9 in Lake Evans, 5-8 in Lake Matthews, and 4-8 in Lake Perris. There was a progressive loss in enzyme activity below and above these pH ranges. The results suggest that the decline in aquatic amidohydrolase activities in relation to the pH-profile near their pH/sub opt/ was caused by a reversible reaction involving the ionization or deionization of functional groups of the active center of the protein, but under highly acidic or alkaline conditions (pH <4 to >9) the reduced activitiy appears to be due to irreversible inactivation of the enzyme.

  14. DL-7-azatryptophan and citrulline metabolism in the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain 1F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.H.; Van Baalen, C.; Tabita, F.R.

    1987-01-01

    An alternative route for the primary assimilation of ammonia proceeds via glutamine synthetase-carbamyl phosphate synthetase and its inherent glutaminase activity in Anabaena sp. strain 1F, a marine filamentous, heterocystous cyanobacterium. Evidence for the presence of this possible alternative route to glutamate was provided by the use of amino acid analogs as specific enzyme inhibitors, enzymological studies, and radioistopic labeling experiments. The amino acid pool patterns of continuous cultures of Anabaena sp. strain 1F were markedly influenced by the nitrogen source. A relatively high concentration of glutamate was maintained in the amino acid pools of all cultures irrespective of the nitrogen source, reflecting the central role of glutamate in nitrogen metabolism. The addition of 1.0 microM azaserine increased the intracellular pools of glutamate and glutamine. All attempts to detect any enzymatic activity for glutamate synthase by measuring the formation of L-[ 14 C]glutamate from 2-keto-[1- 14 C]glutarate and glutamine failed. The addition of 10 microM DL-7-azatryptophan caused a transient accumulation of intracellular citrulline and alanine which was not affected by the presence of chloramphenicol. The in vitro activity of carbamyl phosphate synthetase and glutaminase increased severalfold in the presence of azatryptophan. Results from radioisotopic labeling experiments with [ 14 C]bicarbonate and L-[1- 14 C]ornithine also indicated that citrulline was formed via carbamyl phosphate synthetase and ornithine transcarbamylase. In addition to its effects on nitrogen metabolism, azatryptophan also affected carbon metabolism by inhibiting photosynthetic carbon assimilation and photosynthetic oxygen evolution

  15. Is there in vivo evidence for amino acid shuttles carrying ammonia from neurons to astrocytes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Douglas L; De Feyter, Henk M; Maciejewski, Paul K; Behar, Kevin L

    2012-11-01

    The high in vivo flux of the glutamate/glutamine cycle puts a strong demand on the return of ammonia released by phosphate activated glutaminase from the neurons to the astrocytes in order to maintain nitrogen balance. In this paper we review several amino acid shuttles that have been proposed for balancing the nitrogen flows between neurons and astrocytes in the glutamate/glutamine cycle. All of these cycles depend on the directionality of glutamate dehydrogenase, catalyzing reductive glutamate synthesis (forward reaction) in the neuron in order to capture the ammonia released by phosphate activated glutaminase, while catalyzing oxidative deamination of glutamate (reverse reaction) in the astrocytes to release ammonia for glutamine synthesis. Reanalysis of results from in vivo experiments using (13)N and (15)N labeled ammonia and (15)N leucine in rats suggests that the maximum flux of the alanine/lactate or branched chain amino acid/branched chain amino acid transaminase shuttles between neurons and astrocytes are approximately 3-5 times lower than would be required to account for the ammonia transfer from neurons to astrocytes needed for glutamine synthesis (amide nitrogen) to sustain the glutamate/glutamine cycle. However, in the rat brain both the total ammonia fixation rate by glutamate dehydrogenase and the total branched chain amino acid transaminase activity are sufficient to support a branched chain amino acid/branched chain keto acid shuttle, as proposed by Hutson and coworkers, which would support the de novo synthesis of glutamine in the astrocyte to replace the ~20 % of neurotransmitter glutamate that is oxidized. A higher fraction of the nitrogen needs of total glutamate neurotransmitter cycling could be supported by hybrid cycles in which glutamate and tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates act as a nitrogen shuttle. A limitation of all in vivo studies in animals conducted to date is that none have shown transfer of nitrogen for glutamine amide

  16. Development of a Live Attenuated Bivalent Oral Vaccine Against Shigella sonnei Shigellosis and Typhoid Fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yun; Chakravarty, Sumana; Li, Minglin; Wai, Tint T; Hoffman, Stephen L; Sim, B Kim Lee

    2017-01-15

    Shigella sonnei and Salmonella Typhi cause significant morbidity and mortality. We exploited the safety record of the oral, attenuated S. Typhi vaccine (Ty21a) by using it as a vector to develop a bivalent oral vaccine to protect against S. sonnei shigellosis and typhoid fever. We recombineered the S. sonnei form I O-antigen gene cluster into the Ty21a chromosome to create Ty21a-Ss, which stably expresses S. sonnei form I O antigen. To enhance survivability in the acid environment of the stomach, we created an acid-resistant strain, Ty21a-AR-Ss, by inserting Shigella glutaminase-glutamate decarboxylase systems coexpressed with S. sonnei form I O-antigen gene. Mice immunized intranasally with Ty21a-AR-Ss produced antibodies against S. sonnei and S. Typhi, and survived lethal intranasal S. sonnei challenge. This paves the way for proposed good manufacturing practices manufacture and clinical trials intended to test the clinical effectiveness of Ty21a-AR-Ss in protecting against S. sonnei shigellosis and typhoid fever, as compared with the current Ty21a vaccine. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Bioanalysis of 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine (DON) in plasma and brain by ultra-performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, Jesse; Potter, Michelle C.; Rojas, Camilo; Slusher, Barbara S.

    2015-01-01

    Glutamine is an abundant amino acid that plays pivotal roles in cell growth, cell metabolism and neurotransmission. Dysregulation of glutamine-utilizing pathways has been associated with pathological conditions such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. 6-Diazo-5-Oxo-L-Norleucine (DON) is a reactive glutamine analog that inhibits enzymes affecting glutamine metabolism such as glutaminase, 2-N-amidotransferase, L-asparaginase and several enzymes involved in pyrimidine and purine de novo synthesis. As a result, DON is actively used in preclinical models of cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Moreover, there have been several clinical trials using DON to treat a variety of cancers. Considerations of dose and exposure are especially important with DON treatment due to its narrow therapeutic window and significant side effects. Consequently, a robust quantification bioassay is of interest. DON is a polar unstable molecule which has made quantification challenging. Here we report on the characterization of a bioanalytical method to quantify DON in tissue samples involving DON derivatization with 3N HCl in butanol. The derivatized product is lipophilic and stable. Detection of this analyte by mass spectrometry is fast, specific and can be used to quantify DON in plasma and brain tissue with a limit of detection in the low nanomolar level. PMID:25584882

  18. Hypoxia-Like Signatures Induced by BCR-ABL Potentially Alter the Glutamine Uptake for Maintaining Oxidative Phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi Sontakke

    Full Text Available The Warburg effect is probably the most prominent metabolic feature of cancer cells, although little is known about the underlying mechanisms and consequences. Here, we set out to study these features in detail in a number of leukemia backgrounds. The transcriptomes of human CB CD34+ cells transduced with various oncogenes, including BCR-ABL, MLL-AF9, FLT3-ITD, NUP98-HOXA9, STAT5A and KRASG12V were analyzed in detail. Our data indicate that in particular BCR-ABL, KRASG12V and STAT5 could impose hypoxic signaling under normoxic conditions. This coincided with an upregulation of glucose importers SLC2A1/3, hexokinases and HIF1 and 2. NMR-based metabolic profiling was performed in CB CD34+ cells transduced with BCR-ABL versus controls, both cultured under normoxia and hypoxia. Lactate and pyruvate levels were increased in BCR-ABL-expressing cells even under normoxia, coinciding with enhanced glutaminolysis which occurred in an HIF1/2-dependent manner. Expression of the glutamine importer SLC1A5 was increased in BCR-ABL+ cells, coinciding with an increased susceptibility to the glutaminase inhibitor BPTES. Oxygen consumption rates also decreased upon BPTES treatment, indicating a glutamine dependency for oxidative phosphorylation. The current study suggests that BCR-ABL-positive cancer cells make use of enhanced glutamine metabolism to maintain TCA cell cycle activity in glycolytic cells.

  19. Interactive effects of glutamine and gamma-aminobutyric acid on growth performance and skeletal muscle amino acid metabolism of 22-42-day-old broilers exposed to hot environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hong; Bai, Xi; Shah, Assar Ali; Dai, Sifa; Wang, Like; Hua, Jinling; Che, Chuanyan; He, Shaojun; Wen, Aiyou; Jiang, Jinpeng

    2016-06-01

    The present experiment was conducted to investigate the interactive effects between dietary glutamine (Gln, 0 and 5 g/kg) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, 0 and 100 mg/kg) on growth performance and amino acid (AA) metabolism of broilers under hot environment. A total of 360 22-day-old Arbor Acres male chickens were randomly assigned to five treatment groups under thermoneutral chamber (PC, 23 °C) and cyclic heat stress (HS, 30-34 °C cycling) conditions. Compared with the PC group, cyclic HS decreased ( P muscle at 28, 35, and 42 days, while it increased ( P muscle, the Gln supplementation increased ( P muscle Gln concentrations, glutaminase activities, GS activities at 28 and 35 days, and DWG, GABA concentrations, and GABA-T activities at 28, 35, and 42 days in broilers under cyclic HS. In conclusion, the present results indicated that the interactions of exogenous Gln and GABA could offer a potential nutritional strategy to prevent HS-related depression in skeletal muscle Gln and GABA metabolism of broilers.

  20. Cell Death-Autophagy Loop and Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle in Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu Yuan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Although we know that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is correlated with the glutamate-mediated corticomotor neuronal hyperexcitability, detailed ALS pathology remains largely unexplained. While a number of drugs have been developed, no cure exists so far. Here, we propose a hypothesis of neuronal cell death—incomplete autophagy positive-feedback loop—and summarize the role of the neuron-astrocyte glutamate-glutamine cycle in ALS. The disruption of these two cycles might ideally retard ALS progression. Cerebrovascular injuries (such as multiple embolization sessions and strokes induce neuronal cell death and the subsequent autophagy. ALS impairs autophagosome-lysosome fusion and leads to magnified cell death. Trehalose rescues this impaired fusion step, significantly delaying the onset of the disease, although it does not affect the duration of the disease. Therefore, trehalose might be a prophylactic drug for ALS. Given that a major part of neuronal glutamate is converted from glutamine through neuronal glutaminase (GA, GA inhibitors may decrease the neuronal glutamate accumulation, and, therefore, might be therapeutic ALS drugs. Of these, Ebselen is the most promising one with strong antioxidant properties.

  1. Arginine Deprivation Inhibits the Warburg Effect and Upregulates Glutamine Anaplerosis and Serine Biosynthesis in ASS1-Deficient Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeff Charles Kremer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Targeting defects in metabolism is an underutilized strategy for the treatment of cancer. Arginine auxotrophy resulting from the silencing of argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1 is a common metabolic alteration reported in a broad range of aggressive cancers. To assess the metabolic effects that arise from acute and chronic arginine starvation in ASS1-deficient cell lines, we performed metabolite profiling. We found that pharmacologically induced arginine depletion causes increased serine biosynthesis, glutamine anaplerosis, oxidative phosphorylation, and decreased aerobic glycolysis, effectively inhibiting the Warburg effect. The reduction of glycolysis in cells otherwise dependent on aerobic glycolysis is correlated with reduced PKM2 expression and phosphorylation and upregulation of PHGDH. Concurrent arginine deprivation and glutaminase inhibition was found to be synthetic lethal across a spectrum of ASS1-deficient tumor cell lines and is sufficient to cause in vivo tumor regression in mice. These results identify two synthetic lethal therapeutic strategies exploiting metabolic vulnerabilities of ASS1-negative cancers.

  2. Cerebral ammonia metabolism in hyperammonemic rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, A J; Mora, S N; Cruz, N F; Gelbard, A S

    1985-06-01

    The short-term metabolic fate of blood-borne (/sup 13/N)ammonia was determined in the brains of chronically (8- or 14-week portacaval-shunted rats) or acutely (urease-treated) hyperammonemic rats. Using a freeze-blowing technique it was shown that the overwhelming route for metabolism of blood-borne (/sup 13/N)ammonia in normal, chronically hyperammonemic and acutely hyperammonemic rat brain was incorporation into glutamine (amide). However, the rate of turnover of (/sup 13/N)ammonia to L-(amide-/sup 13/N)glutamine was slower in the hyperammonemic rat brain than in the normal rat brain. The activities of several enzymes involved in cerebral ammonia and glutamate metabolism were also measured in the brains of 14-week portacaval-shunted rats. The rat brain appears to have little capacity to adapt to chronic hyperammonemia because there were no differences in activity compared with those of weight-matched controls for the following brain enzymes involved in glutamate/ammonia metabolism: glutamine synthetase, glutamate dehydrogenase, aspartate aminotransferase, glutamine transaminase, glutaminase, and glutamate decarboxylase. The present findings are discussed in the context of the known deleterious effects on the CNS of high ammonia levels in a variety of diseases.

  3. Breaking the ritual metabolic cycle in order to save acetyl CoA: A potential role for mitochondrial humanin in T2 bladder cancer aggressiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesreen Nabil Omar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Cancer cells may exhibit outsourcing of their high energy need in order to avoid the intrinsic mitochondrial apoptosis. Reduced mitochondrial respiration and accumulation of mitochondrial genome mutations are among metabolic transformations in this regard. Mitochondrial humanin (MT-RNR2 is a small peptide with anti-apoptotic activities attributed to binding some pro-apoptotic proteins. Aim of the work: The current study aims at investigating the expression of mitochondrial humanin in bladder tumor cells and the possible casting of humanin anti-apoptotic action through orchestrating some of the mitochondrial metabolic enzymes. Material and methods: Here messenger RNA of humanin, succinate dehydrogenase, glutaminase, isocitrate dehydrogenase were compared in tissues from patients with T2 bladder carcinoma in comparison to tumor associated normal tissues from the same patients. Levels of lactate and mitochondrial pyruvate carrier (MPC1 mRNA were determined to scrutinize the prevalence of aerobic glycolysis. Results: The present study found that tumor cells had suppressed aerobic glycolysis, augmented mitochondrial respiration and interrupted tricarboxylic acid cycle, all of which were suggested to serve tumor aggressiveness. MT-RNR2 was found closely related to the alterations in mitochondrial activity. Conclusion: MT-RNR2 plays its anti-apoptotic role partly by avoiding deploying energy from complete oxidation of organic compounds to inorganic wastes. Thus MT-RNR2 can potentially serve as a new biomarker in the diagnosis of bladder carcinoma especially that it is present in blood circulation.

  4. Dynamic Analyses of Alternative Polyadenylation from RNA-Seq Reveal 3′-UTR Landscape Across 7 Tumor Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zheng; Donehower, Lawrence A; Cooper, Thomas A.; Neilson, Joel R.; Wheeler, David A.; Wagner, Eric J.; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Alternative polyadenylation (APA) is a pervasive mechanism in the regulation of most human genes, and its implication in diseases including cancer is only beginning to be appreciated. Since conventional APA profiling has not been widely adopted, global cancer APA studies are very limited. Here we develop a novel bioinformatics algorithm (DaPars) for the de novo identification of dynamic APAs from standard RNA-seq. When applied to 358 TCGA Pan-Cancer tumor/normal pairs across 7 tumor types, DaPars reveals 1,346 genes with recurrent and tumor-specific APAs. Most APA genes (91%) have shorter 3′ UTRs in tumors that can avoid miRNA-mediated repression, including glutaminase (GLS), a key metabolic enzyme for tumor proliferation. Interestingly, selected APA events add strong prognostic power beyond common clinical and molecular variables, suggesting their potential as novel prognostic biomarkers. Finally, our results implicate CstF64, an essential polyadenylation factor, as a master regulator of 3′ UTR shortening across multiple tumor types. PMID:25409906

  5. Microbial activities in forest soils exposed to chronic depositions from a lignite power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klose, S.; Wernecke, K.D.; Makeschin, F. [Technical University of Dresden, Tharandt (Germany)

    2004-12-01

    Atmospheric emissions of fly ash and SO{sub 2} from lignite-fired power plants strongly affect large forest areas in Germany. The impact of different deposition loads on the microbial biomass and enzyme activities was studied at three forest sites (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) along an emission gradient of 3, 6, and 15 km downwind of a coal-fired power plant, representing high, moderate and low emission rates. An additional site at a distance of 3 km from the power plant was chosen to study the influence of forest type on microbial parameters in coniferous forest soils under fly ash and SO{sub 2} emissions. Soil microbial biomass C and N, CO{sub 2} evolved and activities of L-asparaginase, L-glutaminase, beta-glucosidase, acid phosphatase and arylsulfatase (expressed on dry soil and organic C basis) were determined in the forest floor (L, Of and Oh horizon) and mineral top soil (0-10 cm). It is concluded that chronic fly ash depositions decrease litter decomposition by influencing specific microbial and enzymatic processes in forest soils.

  6. Pyruvate carboxylase is required for glutamine-independent growth of tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tzuling; Sudderth, Jessica; Yang, Chendong; Mullen, Andrew R.; Jin, Eunsook S.; Matés, José M.; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.

    2011-01-01

    Tumor cells require a constant supply of macromolecular precursors, and interrupting this supply has been proposed as a therapeutic strategy in cancer. Precursors for lipids, nucleic acids, and proteins are generated in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and removed from the mitochondria to participate in biosynthetic reactions. Refilling the pool of precursor molecules (anaplerosis) is therefore crucial to maintain cell growth. Many tumor cells use glutamine to feed anaplerosis. Here we studied how “glutamine-addicted” cells react to interruptions of glutamine metabolism. Silencing of glutaminase (GLS), which catalyzes the first step in glutamine-dependent anaplerosis, suppressed but did not eliminate the growth of glioblastoma cells in culture and in vivo. Profiling metabolic fluxes in GLS-suppressed cells revealed induction of a compensatory anaplerotic mechanism catalyzed by pyruvate carboxylase (PC), allowing the cells to use glucose-derived pyruvate rather than glutamine for anaplerosis. Although PC was dispensable when glutamine was available, forcing cells to adapt to low-glutamine conditions rendered them absolutely dependent on PC for growth. Furthermore, in other cell lines, measuring PC activity in nutrient-replete conditions predicted dependence on specific anaplerotic enzymes. Cells with high PC activity were resistant to GLS silencing and did not require glutamine for survival or growth, but displayed suppressed growth when PC was silenced. Thus, PC-mediated, glucose-dependent anaplerosis allows cells to achieve glutamine independence. Induction of PC during chronic suppression of glutamine metabolism may prove to be a mechanism of resistance to therapies targeting glutaminolysis. PMID:21555572

  7. Intracellular synthesis of glutamic acid in Bacillus methylotrophicus SK19.001, a glutamate-independent poly(γ-glutamic acid)-producing strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yingyun; Zhang, Tao; Mu, Wanmeng; Miao, Ming; Jiang, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Bacillus methylotrophicus SK19.001 is a glutamate-independent strain that produces poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA), a polymer of D- and L-glutamic acids that possesses applications in food, the environment, agriculture, etc. This study was undertaken to explore the synthetic pathway of intracellular L- and D-glutamic acid in SK19.001 by investigating the effects of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and different amino acids as metabolic precursors on the production of γ-PGA and analyzing the activities of the enzymes involved in the synthesis of L- and D-glutamate. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and amino acids could participate in the synthesis of γ-PGA via independent pathways in SK19.001. L-Aspartate aminotransferase, L-glutaminase and L-glutamate synthase were the enzymatic sources of L-glutamate. Glutamate racemase was responsible for the formation of D-glutamate for the synthesis of γ-PGA, and the synthetase had stereoselectivity for glutamate substrate. The enzymatic sources of L-glutamate were investigated for the first time in the glutamate-independent γ-PGA-producing strain, and multiple enzymatic sources of L-glutamate were verified in SK19.001, which will benefit efforts to improve production of γ-PGA with metabolic engineering strategies. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Effect of dietary protein restriction on renal ammonia metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E.; Guo, Hui; Verlander, Jill W.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during protein restriction. Ammonia is the primary component of net acid excretion, and inappropriate ammonia excretion can lead to negative nitrogen balance. Accordingly, we examined ammonia excretion in response to protein restriction and then we determined the molecular mechanism of the changes observed. Wild-type C57Bl/6 mice fed a 20% protein diet and then changed to 6% protein developed an 85% reduction in ammonia excretion within 2 days, which persisted during a 10-day study. The expression of multiple proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism was altered, including the ammonia-generating enzymes phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and the ammonia-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase. Rhbg, an ammonia transporter, increased in expression in the inner stripe of outer medullary collecting duct intercalated cell (OMCDis-IC). However, collecting duct-specific Rhbg deletion did not alter the response to protein restriction. Rhcg deletion did not alter ammonia excretion in response to dietary protein restriction. These results indicate 1) dietary protein restriction decreases renal ammonia excretion through coordinated regulation of multiple components of ammonia metabolism; 2) increased Rhbg expression in the OMCDis-IC may indicate a biological role in addition to ammonia transport; and 3) Rhcg expression is not necessary to decrease ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction. PMID:25925252

  9. Proximal tubule-specific glutamine synthetase deletion alters basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E.; Lamers, Wouter H.; Chaudhry, Farrukh A.; Verlander, Jill W.

    2016-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the recycling of NH4+ with glutamate to form glutamine. GS is highly expressed in the renal proximal tubule (PT), suggesting ammonia recycling via GS could decrease net ammoniagenesis and thereby limit ammonia available for net acid excretion. The purpose of the present study was to determine the role of PT GS in ammonia metabolism under basal conditions and during metabolic acidosis. We generated mice with PT-specific GS deletion (PT-GS-KO) using Cre-loxP techniques. Under basal conditions, PT-GS-KO increased urinary ammonia excretion significantly. Increased ammonia excretion occurred despite decreased expression of key proteins involved in renal ammonia generation. After the induction of metabolic acidosis, the ability to increase ammonia excretion was impaired significantly by PT-GS-KO. The blunted increase in ammonia excretion occurred despite greater expression of multiple components of ammonia generation, including SN1 (Slc38a3), phosphate-dependent glutaminase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase, and Na+-coupled electrogenic bicarbonate cotransporter. We conclude that 1) GS-mediated ammonia recycling in the PT contributes to both basal and acidosis-stimulated ammonia metabolism and 2) adaptive changes in other proteins involved in ammonia metabolism occur in response to PT-GS-KO and cause an underestimation of the role of PT GS expression. PMID:27009341

  10. A conserved neuronal DAF-16/FoxO plays an important role in conveying pheromone signals to elicit repulsion behavior in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Donha; Hahm, Jeong-Hoon; Park, Saeram; Ha, Go; Chang, Gyeong-Eon; Jeong, Haelim; Kim, Heekyeong; Kim, Sunhee; Cheong, Eunji; Paik, Young-Ki

    2017-08-03

    Animals use pheromones as a conspecific chemical language to respond appropriately to environmental changes. The soil nematode Caenorhabditis elegans secretes ascaroside pheromones throughout the lifecycle, which influences entry into dauer phase in early larvae, in addition to sexual attraction and aggregation. In adult hermaphrodites, pheromone sensory signals perceived by worms usually elicit repulsion as an initial behavioral signature. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying neuronal pheromone sensory process from perception to repulsion in adult hermaphrodites remain poorly understood. Here, we show that pheromone signals perceived by GPA-3 is conveyed through glutamatergic neurotransmission in which neuronal DAF-16/FoxO plays an important modulatory role by controlling glutaminase gene expression. We further provide evidence that this modulatory role for DAF-16/FoxO seems to be conserved evolutionarily by electro-physiological study in mouse primary hippocampal neurons that are responsible for glutamatergic neurotransmission. These findings provide the basis for understanding the nematode pheromone signaling, which seems crucial for adaptation of adult hermaphrodites to changes in environmental condition for survival.

  11. Nitrogen Assimilation in Escherichia coli: Putting Molecular Data into a Systems Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heeswijk, Wally C.; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY We present a comprehensive overview of the hierarchical network of intracellular processes revolving around central nitrogen metabolism in Escherichia coli. The hierarchy intertwines transport, metabolism, signaling leading to posttranslational modification, and transcription. The protein components of the network include an ammonium transporter (AmtB), a glutamine transporter (GlnHPQ), two ammonium assimilation pathways (glutamine synthetase [GS]-glutamate synthase [glutamine 2-oxoglutarate amidotransferase {GOGAT}] and glutamate dehydrogenase [GDH]), the two bifunctional enzymes adenylyl transferase/adenylyl-removing enzyme (ATase) and uridylyl transferase/uridylyl-removing enzyme (UTase), the two trimeric signal transduction proteins (GlnB and GlnK), the two-component regulatory system composed of the histidine protein kinase nitrogen regulator II (NRII) and the response nitrogen regulator I (NRI), three global transcriptional regulators called nitrogen assimilation control (Nac) protein, leucine-responsive regulatory protein (Lrp), and cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (Crp), the glutaminases, and the nitrogen-phosphotransferase system. First, the structural and molecular knowledge on these proteins is reviewed. Thereafter, the activities of the components as they engage together in transport, metabolism, signal transduction, and transcription and their regulation are discussed. Next, old and new molecular data and physiological data are put into a common perspective on integral cellular functioning, especially with the aim of resolving counterintuitive or paradoxical processes featured in nitrogen assimilation. Finally, we articulate what still remains to be discovered and what general lessons can be learned from the vast amounts of data that are available now. PMID:24296575

  12. PDHA1 gene knockout in prostate cancer cells results in metabolic reprogramming towards greater glutamine dependence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaqing; Li, Xiaoran; Li, Xiaoli; Zhong, Yali; Ji, Yasai; Yu, Dandan; Zhang, Mingzhi; Wen, Jian-Guo; Zhang, Hongquan; Goscinski, Mariusz Adam; Nesland, Jahn M.; Suo, Zhenhe

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pathways of metabolism endowed cancer cells with metabolic stress. Inhibiting the related compensatory pathways might achieve synergistic anticancer results. This study demonstrated that pyruvate dehydrogenase E1α gene knockout (PDHA1 KO) resulted in alterations in tumor cell metabolism by rendering the cells with increased expression of glutaminase1 (GLS1) and glutamate dehydrogenase1 (GLUD1), leading to an increase in glutamine-dependent cell survival. Deprivation of glutamine induced cell growth inhibition, increased reactive oxygen species and decreased ATP production. Pharmacological blockade of the glutaminolysis pathway resulted in massive tumor cells apoptosis and dysfunction of ROS scavenge in the LNCaP PDHA1 KO cells. Further examination of the key glutaminolysis enzymes in human prostate cancer samples also revealed that higher levels of GLS1 and GLUD1 expression were significantly associated with aggressive clinicopathological features and poor clinical outcome. These insights supply evidence that glutaminolysis plays a compensatory role for cell survival upon alternative energy metabolism and targeting the glutamine anaplerosis of energy metabolism via GLS1 and GLUD1 in cancer cells may offer a potential novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:27462778

  13. Celiac Disease in Children with Moderate-to-Severe Iron-deficiency Anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Manish; Natarajan, Ravikumar; Shah, Dheeraj; Puri, Amarender Singh; Manchanda, Vikas; Kotru, Mrinalini

    2018-01-15

    To evaluate the proportion of children with moderate to severe iron-deficiency anemia who have associated celiac disease. This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted among children aged 1 to 12 years of age with moderate-to-severe iron deficiency anemia and control children without anemia. Serum IgA-tissue trans-glutaminase levels were assessed in both cases and controls. All children with positive celiac serology underwent upper gastrointestinal endoscopy and duodenal biopsy; biopsy finding of Marsh grade 3 was considered positive for celiac disease. There were 152 anemic children and 152 controls with mean (SD) hemoglobinof 7.7 (1.8) and 12.2 (0.74) g/dL, respectively. 16 (10.5%) cases and 3 (2%) control patients had positive serology for celiac disease [OR (95% CI) 5.33 (1.52-18.67), P=0.007]. Six (3.9%) children with iron-deficiency anemia and none of the controls had biopsy features diagnostic of celiac disease. In the Northern Indian tertiary-care hospital outpatient setting, Celiac disease was associated with 4% of children presenting with moderate-to-severe anemia.

  14. Cancerous epithelial cell lines shed extracellular vesicles with a bimodal size distribution that is sensitive to glutamine inhibition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santana, Steven Michael; Kirby, Brian J; Antonyak, Marc A; Cerione, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular shed vesicles (ESVs) facilitate a unique mode of cell–cell communication wherein vesicle uptake can induce a change in the recipient cell's state. Despite the intensity of ESV research, currently reported data represent the bulk characterization of concentrated vesicle samples with little attention paid to heterogeneity. ESV populations likely represent diversity in mechanisms of formation, cargo and size. To better understand ESV subpopulations and the signaling cascades implicated in their formation, we characterize ESV size distributions to identify subpopulations in normal and cancerous epithelial cells. We have discovered that cancer cells exhibit bimodal ESV distributions, one small-diameter and another large-diameter population, suggesting that two mechanisms may govern ESV formation, an exosome population and a cancer-specific microvesicle population. Altered glutamine metabolism in cancer is thought to fuel cancer growth but may also support metastatic niche formation through microvesicle production. We describe the role of a glutaminase inhibitor, compound 968, in ESV production. We have discovered that inhibiting glutamine metabolism significantly impairs large-diameter microvesicle production in cancer cells. (paper)

  15. Secretome analysis of the thermophilic xylanase hyper-producer Thermomyces lanuginosus SSBP cultivated on corn cobs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winger, A M; Heazlewood, J L; Chan, L J G; Petzold, C J; Permaul, K; Singh, S

    2014-11-01

    Thermomyces lanuginosus is a thermophilic fungus known for its ability to produce industrially important enzymes including large amounts of xylanase, the key enzyme in hemicellulose hydrolysis. The secretome of T. lanuginosus SSBP was profiled by shotgun proteomics to elucidate important enzymes involved in hemicellulose saccharification and to characterise the presence of other industrially interesting enzymes. This study reproducibly identified a total of 74 proteins in the supernatant following growth on corn cobs. An analysis of proteins revealed nine glycoside hydrolase (GH) enzymes including xylanase GH11, β-xylosidase GH43, β-glucosidase GH3, α-galactosidase GH36 and trehalose hydrolase GH65. Two commercially produced Thermomyces enzymes, lipase and amylase, were also identified. In addition, other industrially relevant enzymes not currently explored in Thermomyces were identified including glutaminase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and cyanate hydratase. Overall, these data provide insight into the novel ability of a cellulase-free fungus to utilise lignocellulosic material, ultimately producing a number of enzymes important to various industrial processes.

  16. Selecting Cells for Bioartificial Liver Devices and the Importance of a 3D Culture Environment: A Functional Comparison between the HepaRG and C3A Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Wenum, Martien; Adam, Aziza A A; Hakvoort, Theodorus B M; Hendriks, Erik J; Shevchenko, Valery; van Gulik, Thomas M; Chamuleau, Robert A F M; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the first clinical trials on Bioartificial Livers (BALs) loaded with a proliferative human hepatocyte cell source have started. There are two cell lines that are currently in an advanced state of BAL development; HepaRG and HepG2/C3A. In this study we aimed to compare both cell lines on applicability in BALs and to identify possible strategies for further improvement. We tested both cell lines in monolayer- and BAL cultures on growth characteristics, hepatic differentiation, nitrogen-, carbohydrate-, amino acid- and xenobiotic metabolism. Interestingly, both cell lines adapted the hepatocyte phenotype more closely when cultured in BALs; e.g. monolayer cultures produced lactate, while BAL cultures showed diminished lactate production (C3A) or conversion to elimination (HepaRG), and urea cycle activity increased upon BAL culturing in both cell lines. HepaRG-BALs outperformed C3A-BALs on xenobiotic metabolism, ammonia elimination and lactate elimination, while protein synthesis was comparable. In BAL cultures of both cell lines ammonia elimination correlated positively with glutamine production and glutamate consumption, suggesting ammonia elimination was mainly driven by the balance between glutaminase and glutamine synthetase activity. Both cell lines lacked significant urea cycle activity and both required multiple culture weeks before reaching optimal differentiation in BALs. In conclusion, culturing in BALs enhanced hepatic functionality of both cell lines and from these, the HepaRG cells are the most promising proliferative cell source for BAL application.

  17. Glutaminolysis and carcinogenesis of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetindis, Marcel; Biegner, Thorsten; Munz, Adelheid; Teriete, Peter; Reinert, Siegmar; Grimm, Martin

    2016-02-01

    Glutaminolysis is a crucial factor for tumor metabolism in the carcinogenesis of several tumors but has not been clarified for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) yet. Expression of glutaminolysis-related solute carrier family 1, member 5 (SLC1A5)/neutral amino acid transporter (ASCT2), glutaminase (GLS), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) was analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n = 5), oral precursor lesions (simple hyperplasia, n = 11; squamous intraepithelial neoplasia, SIN I-III, n = 35), and OSCC specimen (n = 42) by immunohistochemistry. SLC1A5/ASCT2 and GLS were significantly overexpressed in the carcinogenesis of OSCC compared with normal tissue, while GLDH was weakly detected. Compared with SIN I-III SLC1A5/ASCT2 and GLS expression were significantly increased in OSCC. GLDH expression did not significantly differ from SIN I-III compared with OSCC. This study shows the first evidence of glutaminolysis-related SLC1A5/ASCT2, GLS, and GLDH expression in OSCC. The very weak GLDH expression indicates that glutamine metabolism is rather related to nucleotide or protein/hexosamine biosynthesis or to the function as an antioxidant (glutathione) than to energy production or generation of lactate through entering the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Overcoming glutaminolysis by targeting c-Myc oncogene (e.g. by natural compounds) and thereby cross-activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 or SLC1A5/ASCT2, GLS inhibitors may be a useful strategy to sensitize cancer cells to common OSCC cancer therapies.

  18. Curcumin Requires Tumor Necrosis Factor α Signaling to Alleviate Cognitive Impairment Elicited by Lipopolysaccharide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.M. Kawamoto

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available A decline in cognitive ability is a typical feature of the normal aging process, and of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases. Although their etiologies differ, all of these disorders involve local activation of innate immune pathways and associated inflammatory cytokines. However, clinical trials of anti-inflammatory agents in neurodegenerative disorders have been disappointing, and it is therefore necessary to better understand the complex roles of the inflammatory process in neurological dysfunction. The dietary phytochemical curcumin can exert anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective actions. Here we provide evidence that curcumin ameliorates cognitive deficits associated with activation of the innate immune response by mechanisms requiring functional tumor necrosis factor α receptor 2 (TNFR2 signaling. In vivo, the ability of curcumin to counteract hippocampus-dependent spatial memory deficits, to stimulate neuroprotective mechanisms such as upregulation of BDNF, to decrease glutaminase levels, and to modulate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor levels was absent in mice lacking functional TNFRs. Curcumin treatment protected cultured neurons against glutamate-induced excitotoxicity by a mechanism requiring TNFR2 activation. Our results suggest the possibility that therapeutic approaches against cognitive decline designed to selectively enhance TNFR2 signaling are likely to be more beneficial than the use of anti-inflammatory drugs per se.

  19. It takes two to tango: defining an essential second active site in pyridoxal 5'-phosphate synthase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyril Moccand

    Full Text Available The prevalent de novo biosynthetic pathway of vitamin B6 involves only two enzymes (Pdx1 and Pdx2 that form an ornate multisubunit complex functioning as a glutamine amidotransferase. The synthase subunit, Pdx1, utilizes ribose 5-phosphate and glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate, as well as ammonia derived from the glutaminase activity of Pdx2 to directly form the cofactor vitamer, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Given the fact that a single enzyme performs the majority of the chemistry behind this reaction, a complicated mechanism is anticipated. Recently, the individual steps along the reaction co-ordinate are beginning to be unraveled. In particular, the binding of the pentose substrate and the first steps of the reaction have been elucidated but it is not known if the latter part of the chemistry, involving the triose sugar, takes place in the same or a disparate site. Here, we demonstrate through the use of enzyme assays, enzyme kinetics, and mutagenesis studies that indeed a second site is involved in binding the triose sugar and moreover, is the location of the final vitamin product, pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. Furthermore, we show that product release is triggered by the presence of a PLP-dependent enzyme. Finally, we provide evidence that a single arginine residue of the C terminus of Pdx1 is responsible for coordinating co-operativity in this elaborate protein machinery.

  20. LKB1 promotes metabolic flexibility in response to energy stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Seth J; Svensson, Robert U; Divakaruni, Ajit S; Lefebvre, Austin E; Murphy, Anne N; Shaw, Reuben J; Metallo, Christian M

    2017-09-01

    The Liver Kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor acts as a metabolic energy sensor to regulate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling and is commonly mutated in various cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Tumor cells deficient in LKB1 may be uniquely sensitized to metabolic stresses, which may offer a therapeutic window in oncology. To address this question we have explored how functional LKB1 impacts the metabolism of NSCLC cells using 13 C metabolic flux analysis. Isogenic NSCLC cells expressing functional LKB1 exhibited higher flux through oxidative mitochondrial pathways compared to those deficient in LKB1. Re-expression of LKB1 also increased the capacity of cells to oxidize major mitochondrial substrates, including pyruvate, fatty acids, and glutamine. Furthermore, LKB1 expression promoted an adaptive response to energy stress induced by anchorage-independent growth. Finally, this diminished adaptability sensitized LKB1-deficient cells to combinatorial inhibition of mitochondrial complex I and glutaminase. Together, our data implicate LKB1 as a major regulator of adaptive metabolic reprogramming and suggest synergistic pharmacological strategies for mitigating LKB1-deficient NSCLC tumor growth. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Salinidade, sodicidade e propriedades microbiológicas de Argissolo cultivado com erva-sal e irrigado com rejeito salino Salinity, sodicity and microbiological properties of an Ultisol cultivated with saltbush and irrigated with saline effluents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Maria Maganhotto de Souza Silva

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito da irrigação com rejeito da dessalinização, oriundo de tanques de produção de tilápia-rosa, sobre as propriedades químicas e microbiológicas de solos cultivados com erva-sal (Atriplex nummularia Lindl.. Quatro áreas foram usadas, das quais duas foram irrigadas com rejeito salino e cultivadas, durante um e cinco anos, com erva-sal. As outras duas áreas foram conduzidas sem irrigação: uma cultivada com vegetação natural e outra com a halófita. Avaliaram-se os parâmetros relativos à salinidade e sodicidade do solo, e também as seguintes características: carbono da biomassa microbiana (Cmic; relação Cmic/carbono orgânico; atividade das enzimas fosfatase ácida, fosfatase alcalina, beta-glucosidase, protease, L-asparaginase, L-glutaminase. A adição de sais afetou as propriedades físicas e químicas dos solos irrigados com rejeito salino, com tendência à salinização e sodificação. A salinidade afetou as propriedades microbiológicas nos solos irrigados, mas o cultivo da halófita favoreceu a produção das enzimas estudadas. O cultivo da erva-sal em áreas que recebem rejeito salino pela irrigação melhora a qualidade biológica dos solos e sua fertilidade, mas não impede a salinização.The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of irrigation with saline effluents, from red tilapia production ponds, on chemical and microbiological properties of soils cultivated with saltbush (Atriplex nummularia Lindl. Four areas were used, from which two were irrigated with saline waste and cultivated with A. nummularia, during one and five years. The other two areas were not irrigated, and one was cultivated with natural vegetation and the other with the halophyte. The parameters related to soil salinity and sodicity were evaluated, as well as the following characteristics: microbial biomass carbon (Cmic; Cmic/organic carbon; the activity of acid and alcaline phosphatase

  2. Protein and amino acid metabolism in skeletal muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guoyao.

    1989-01-01

    Isolated chick extensor digitorum communis (EDC) muscles and, in some experiments, rat skeletal muscles were used to study a number of aspects of protein and amino acid metabolism. (1) Chick EDC muscles synthesize and release large amounts of alanine and glutamine, which indirectly obtain their amino groups from branched-chain amino acids (BCAA). (2) Acetoacetate or DL-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (4 mM) decrease (P < 0.01) alanine synthesis and BCAA transamination in EDC muscles from 24-h fasted chicks by decreasing (P < 0.01) intracellular concentrations of pyruvate due to inhibition of glycolysis. (3) Glutamine is extensively degraded in skeletal muscles from both chicks and rats, thus challenging the traditional view that glutamine oxidation is negligible in skeletal muscle. The cytosolic glutamine aminotransferases L and K in the rat and the mitochondrial phosphate-activated glutaminase in the chick play important roles in the conversion of glutamine to {alpha}-ketoglutarate for further oxidation. (4) Although methionine has been reported to be extensively transaminated in rat skeletal muscle preparations in the absence of other amino acids, transamination of methionine is absent or negligible in chick and rat skeletal muscles in the presence of physiological concentrations of amino acids. (5) Glutamine at 1.0-15 mM increases (P < 0.01) protein synthesis ({sup 3}H-phenylalanine incorporation), and at 10.0-15.0 mM decreases (P < 0.05) protein degradation ({sup 3}H-phenylalanine release from prelabelled protein in vivo) in EDC muscles from fed chicks as compared to muscles incubated in the absence of glutamine. (6) Acetoacetate or DL-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (4 mM) has a small but significant inhibitory effect (P < 0.05) on the rate of protein synthesis, but has no effect (P > 0.05) on the rate of protein degradation in EDC muscles from fed chicks.

  3. Minimally-Myelosuppressive Asparaginase-Containing Induction Regimen for Treatment of a Jehovah’s Witness with mutant IDH1/NPM1/NRAS Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Emadi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML who do not wish to accept blood product transfusion, including Jehovah’s Witnesses, is extremely challenging. The use of conventional chemotherapy for induction of complete remission (CR results in profound anemia and thrombocytopenia requiring frequent transfusions of blood products, without which such treatment will be life-threatening. Finding a well tolerable, minimally myelosuppressive induction regimen for such patients with AML is a clear example of area of unmet medical need. Here, we report a successful treatment of a 52-year-old Jehovah’s Witness with newly diagnosed AML with peg-asparaginase, vincristine and methylprednisolone. The AML was characterized with normal karyotype, and mutations in isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1-Arg132Ser, nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1-Trp289Cysfs*12 and neuroblastoma RAS viral oncogene homolog (NRAS-G1y12Va1. After one 28-day cycle of treatment, the patient achieved complete remission with incomplete count recovery (CRi and after the second cycle, he achieved CR with full blood count recovery. The patient has never received any blood products. Notwithstanding that myeloperoxidase-induced oxidative degradation of vincristine results in its lack of activity as monotherapy in AML, its combination with corticosteroid and asparaginase has resulted in a robust remission in this patient. Diminished steroid clearance by asparaginase activity as well as reduction in serum glutamine level induced by glutaminase enzymatic activity of asparaginase may have contributed to effective killing of the myeloblasts that carry IDH1/NPM1/NRAS mutations. In conclusion, asparaginase-containing regimens, which are approved for treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL but not AML, can be used to treat patients with AML who do not accept blood transfusion.

  4. Study of relation between the onset age of type 1 diabetes and celiac disease in children andadole scents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    robabe Ghergherehchi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD is a chronic enteropathy caused by hypersensitivity to gluten. Most studies have showed more prevalence of CD in the patients with diabetes mellitus type 1. Both diseases are autoimmune and their incidence is related to inheritance and environmental factors. The aim of this research is the study of relation between CD prevalence and diabetic age onset. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 135 children with diabetes mellitus type 1 referring to Tabriz children hospital endocrine department and clinic between 2006-2008 were selected. After filling individual identity of the patients and the measurement of weight and height, the serumic level of anti-tissue Trans glutaminase IgA antibody (A-tTG-A-IgA, anti endomisial IgA antibody (AEA-IgA and anti-gliadin IgG antibody (AGA-IgG were measured. In the case that A-tTG-A either AEA alone or with AGA was high, small intestinal biopsy was preformed. The data was analysed using SPSS ver 16 software. Results: 28 of 135 patients with diabetes mellitus type 1, were serologically positive for celiac. Confirmed celiac prevalence based on biopsy was 6. 8%. From diabetic age onset and celiac incidence point of view there was not any significant relation (P=0. 996. Conclusion: Celiac disease in type1 diabetic patients dose not have correlation with the onset age of type 1 diabetes and diabetic patients should be followed up from celiac point of view during treatment and prevention.

  5. Clinical impact of a gluten-free diet on health-related quality of life in seven fibromyalgia syndrome patients with associated celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigo, Luis; Blanco, Ignacio; Bobes, Julio; de Serres, Frederick J

    2013-11-09

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder, characterized by the presence of gastrointestinal and multisystem symptoms, which occasionally mimic those of Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) and Fibromyalgia Syndrome (FMS). To assess the effectiveness of a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD) in seven adult female screening-detected CD subjects, categorized as severe IBS and FMS patients. All subjects showed villous atrophy in duodenal biopsies, were HLA-DQ2/DQ8-positive, and fulfilled the Rome III and ACR 1990 criteria respectively for IBS and FMS classification. GFD effectiveness was assessed at baseline and after 1 year, examining the score changes in the Tender Points (TPs) test, Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ), Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), Visual Analogue Scales (VAS) for gastrointestinal complaints, pain and tiredness, drug prescriptions and tissue-Trans-Glutaminase (tTG) serum levels. At baseline, all patients had poor Quality of Life and VAS scores, a high number of TPs and drug prescriptions, and increased tTG levels. After 1 year of GFD, all outcome measures significantly improved, with a decrease of 51-60% in TPs, FIQ, HAQ, and VAS scales, and in the number of prescribed drugs, accompanied by an increase of 48-60% in SF-36 Physical and Mental Component Summary scores, and a decrease of tTG to normal values. Results of this pilot study show that the adherence to a GFD by CD-related IBS/FMS patients can simultaneously improve CD and IBS/FMS symptoms, and indicate the merit of further research on a larger cohort.

  6. Dysregulation of the Glutamine Transporter Slc38a3 (SNAT3 and Ammoniagenic Enzymes in Obese, Glucose-Intolerant Mice

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    Stephanie M. Busque

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Uric acid nephrolithiasis is prevalent among patients with type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome; it is correlated with an acidic urine and lower urinary ammonium excretion and is likely associated with insulin resistance. Insulin stimulates ammoniagenesis in renal cell lines via increased phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG activity and glutamine metabolism. Ammonium excretion into the proximal tubule is mediated at least in part by the Na+/H+-exchanger NHE3 and in the collecting duct involving the Rhesus protein RhCG. Here we tested, whether obesity and insulin resistance in a diet-induced mouse model could contribute to deranged ammonium excretion. Methods: Obesity was induced by diet in mice and the impact on key molecules of proximal tubular ammoniagenesis and urinary acid excretion tested. Results: Diet-induced obesity was confirmed by pathological intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT. Three groups of mice were compared: control mice; obese, glucose-intolerant with abnormal IPGTT (O-GI; or moderate weight with normal IPGTT (Non-Responders, NR. Basal urinary ammonium excretion did not differ among groups. However, acid loading increased urinary ammonium excretion in all groups, but to a lesser extent in the O-GI group. SNAT3 mRNA expression was enhanced in both obese groups. PDG expression was elevated only in acid-loaded O-GI mice, whereas PEPCK was enhanced in both O-GI and NR groups given NH4CI. NHE activity in the brush border membrane of the proximal tubule was strongly reduced in the O-GI group whereas RhCG expression was similar. Conclusion: In sum, obesity and glucose intolerance impairs renal ammonium excretion in response to NH4CI feeding most likely through reduced NHE activity. The stimulation of SNAT3 and ammoniagenic enzyme expression may be compensatory but futile.

  7. Gross Nitrogen Mineralization in Surface Sediments of the Yangtze Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Li, Xiaofei; Yin, Guoyu; Zheng, Yanling; Deng, Fengyu

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen mineralization is a key biogeochemical process transforming organic nitrogen to inorganic nitrogen in estuarine and coastal sediments. Although sedimentary nitrogen mineralization is an important internal driver for aquatic eutrophication, few studies have investigated sedimentary nitrogen mineralization in these environments. Sediment-slurry incubation experiments combined with 15N isotope dilution technique were conducted to quantify the potential rates of nitrogen mineralization in surface sediments of the Yangtze Estuary. The gross nitrogen mineralization (GNM) rates ranged from 0.02 to 5.13 mg N kg-1 d-1 in surface sediments of the study area. The GNM rates were generally higher in summer than in winter, and the relative high rates were detected mainly at sites near the north branch and frontal edge of this estuary. The spatial and temporal distributions of GNM rates were observed to depend largely on temperature, salinity, sedimentary organic carbon and nitrogen contents, and extracellular enzyme (urease and L-glutaminase) activities. The total mineralized nitrogen in the sediments of the Yangtze Estuary was estimated to be about 6.17 × 105 t N yr-1, and approximately 37% of it was retained in the estuary. Assuming the retained mineralized nitrogen is totally released from the sediments into the water column, which contributed 12–15% of total dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN) sources in this study area. This result indicated that the mineralization process is a significant internal nitrogen source for the overlying water of the Yangtze Estuary, and thus may contribute to the estuarine and coastal eutrophication. PMID:26991904

  8. Proteomics as a Tool to Identify New Targets Against Aspergillus and Scedosporium in the Context of Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez-Garcia, Andoni; Pellon, Aize; Buldain, Idoia; Antoran, Aitziber; Arbizu-Delgado, Aitana; Guruceaga, Xabier; Rementeria, Aitor; Hernando, Fernando L

    2018-02-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a genetic disorder that increases the risk of suffering microbial, including fungal, infections. In this paper, proteomics-based information was collated relating to secreted and cell wall proteins with potential medical applications from the most common filamentous fungi in CF, i.e., Aspergillus and Scedosporium/Lomentospora species. Among the Aspergillus fumigatus secreted allergens, β-1,3-endoglucanase, the alkaline protease 1 (Alp1/oryzin), Asp f 2, Asp f 13/15, chitinase, chitosanase, dipeptidyl-peptidase V (DppV), the metalloprotease Asp f 5, mitogillin/Asp f 1, and thioredoxin reductase receive a special mention. In addition, the antigens β-glucosidase 1, catalase, glucan endo-1,3-β-glucosidase EglC, β-1,3-glucanosyltransferases Gel1 and Gel2, and glutaminase A were also identified in secretomes of other Aspergillus species associated with CF: Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus nidulans, and Aspergillus terreus. Regarding cell wall proteins, cytochrome P450 and eEF-3 were proposed as diagnostic targets, and alkaline protease 2 (Alp2), Asp f 3 (putative peroxiredoxin pmp20), probable glycosidases Asp f 9/Crf1 and Crf2, GPI-anchored protein Ecm33, β-1,3-glucanosyltransferase Gel4, conidial hydrophobin Hyp1/RodA, and secreted aspartyl protease Pep2 as protective vaccines in A. fumigatus. On the other hand, for Scedosporium/Lomentospora species, the heat shock protein Hsp70 stands out as a relevant secreted and cell wall antigen. Additionally, the secreted aspartyl proteinase and an ortholog of Asp f 13, as well as the cell wall endo-1,3-β-D-glucosidase and 1,3-β-glucanosyl transferase, were also found to be significant proteins. In conclusion, proteins mentioned in this review may be promising candidates for developing innovative diagnostic and therapeutic tools for fungal infections in CF patients.

  9. Uptake and metabolism of L-[3H]glutamate and L-[3H]glutamine in adult rat cerebellar slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Barry, J.; Vincendon, G.; Gombos, G.

    1983-01-01

    Using very low concentrations (1 mumol range) of L-2-3-[ 3 H]glutamate, ( 3 H-Glu) or L-2-3-[ 3 H]glutamine ( 3 H-Gln), the authors have previously shown by autoradiography that these amino acids were preferentially taken up in the molecular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Furthermore, the accumulation of 3 H-Glu was essentially glial in these conditions. Uptake and metabolism of either ( 3 H-Glu) or ( 3 H-Gln) were studied in adult rat cerebellar slices. Both amino acids were rapidly converted into other metabolic compounds: after seven minutes of incubation in the presence of exogenous 3 H-Glu, 70% of the tissue accumulated radioactivity was found to be in compounds other than glutamate. The main metabolites were Gln (42%), alpha-ketoglutarate (25%) and GABA (1,4%). In the presence of exogenous 3 H-Gln the rate of metabolism was slightly slower (50% after seven minutes of incubation) and the metabolites were also Glu (29%), alpha-ketoglutarate (15%) and GABA (5%). Using depolarizing conditions (56 mM KCl) with either exogenous 3 H-Glu or 3 H-Gln, the radioactivity was preferentially accumulated in glutamate compared to control. From these results we conclude: i) there are two cellular compartments for the neurotransmission-glutamate-glutamine cycle; one is glial, the other neuronal; ii) these two cellular compartments contain both Gln and Glu; iii) transmitter glutamate is always in equilibrium with the so-called ''metabolic'' pool of glutamate; iv) the regulation of the glutamate-glutamine cycle occurs at least at two different levels: the uptake of glutamate and the enzymatic activity of the neuronal glutaminase

  10. Comparative genome analysis of central nitrogen metabolism and its control by GlnR in the class Bacilli

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    Kormelink Tom

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The assimilation of nitrogen in bacteria is achieved through only a few metabolic conversions between alpha-ketoglutarate, glutamate and glutamine. The enzymes that catalyze these conversions are glutamine synthetase, glutaminase, glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine alpha-ketoglutarate aminotransferase. In low-GC Gram-positive bacteria the transcriptional control over the levels of the related enzymes is mediated by four regulators: GlnR, TnrA, GltC and CodY. We have analyzed the genomes of all species belonging to the taxonomic families Bacillaceae, Listeriaceae, Staphylococcaceae, Lactobacillaceae, Leuconostocaceae and Streptococcaceae to determine the diversity in central nitrogen metabolism and reconstructed the regulation by GlnR. Results Although we observed a substantial difference in the extent of central nitrogen metabolism in the various species, the basic GlnR regulon was remarkably constant and appeared not affected by the presence or absence of the other three main regulators. We found a conserved regulatory association of GlnR with glutamine synthetase (glnRA operon, and the transport of ammonium (amtB-glnK and glutamine/glutamate (i.e. via glnQHMP, glnPHQ, gltT, alsT. In addition less-conserved associations were found with, for instance, glutamate dehydrogenase in Streptococcaceae, purine catabolism and the reduction of nitrite in Bacillaceae, and aspartate/asparagine deamination in Lactobacillaceae. Conclusions Our analyses imply GlnR-mediated regulation in constraining the import of ammonia/amino-containing compounds and the production of intracellular ammonia under conditions of high nitrogen availability. Such a role fits with the intrinsic need for tight control of ammonia levels to limit futile cycling.

  11. Selection of metastatic breast cancer cells based on adaptability of their metabolic state.

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    Balraj Singh

    Full Text Available A small subpopulation of highly adaptable breast cancer cells within a vastly heterogeneous population drives cancer metastasis. Here we describe a function-based strategy for selecting rare cancer cells that are highly adaptable and drive malignancy. Although cancer cells are dependent on certain nutrients, e.g., glucose and glutamine, we hypothesized that the adaptable cancer cells that drive malignancy must possess an adaptable metabolic state and that such cells could be identified using a robust selection strategy. As expected, more than 99.99% of cells died upon glutamine withdrawal from the aggressive breast cancer cell line SUM149. The rare cells that survived and proliferated without glutamine were highly adaptable, as judged by additional robust adaptability assays involving prolonged cell culture without glucose or serum. We were successful in isolating rare metabolically plastic glutamine-independent (Gln-ind variants from several aggressive breast cancer cell lines that we tested. The Gln-ind cells overexpressed cyclooxygenase-2, an indicator of tumor aggressiveness, and they were able to adjust their glutaminase level to suit glutamine availability. The Gln-ind cells were anchorage-independent, resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs doxorubicin and paclitaxel, and resistant to a high concentration of a COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. The number of cells being able to adapt to non-availability of glutamine increased upon prior selection of cells for resistance to chemotherapy drugs or resistance to celecoxib, further supporting a linkage between cellular adaptability and therapeutic resistance. Gln-ind cells showed indications of oxidative stress, and they produced cadherin11 and vimentin, indicators of mesenchymal phenotype. Gln-ind cells were more tumorigenic and more metastatic in nude mice than the parental cell line as judged by incidence and time of occurrence. As we decreased the number of cancer cells in xenografts, lung metastasis

  12. ASTROCYTIC CONTROL OF BIOSYNTHESIS AND TURNOVER OF THE NEUROTRANSMITTERS GLUTAMATE AND GABA

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    Arne eSchousboe

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate and GABA are the quantitatively major neurotransmitters in the brain mediating excitatory and inhibitory signaling, respectively. These amino acids are metabolically interrelated and at the same time they are tightly coupled to the intermediary metabolism including energy homeostasis. Astrocytes play a pivotal role in the maintenance of the neurotransmitter pools of glutamate and GABA since only these cells express pyruvate carboxylase (PC, the enzyme required for de novo synthesis of the two amino acids. Such de novo synthesis is obligatory to compensate for catabolism of glutamate and GABA related to oxidative metabolism when the amino acids are used as energy substrates. This, in turn, is influenced by the extent to which the cycling of the amino acids between neurons and astrocytes may occur. This cycling is brought about by the glutamate/GABA – glutamine cycle the operation of which involves the enzymes glutamine synthetase (GS and glutaminase (PAG together with the plasma membrane transporters for glutamate, GABA and glutamine. The distribution of these proteins between neurons and astrocytes determines the efficacy of the cycle and it is of particular importance that GS is exclusively expressed in astrocytes. It should be kept in mind that the operation of the cycle is associated with movement of ammonia nitrogen between the two cell types and different mechanisms which can mediate this have been proposed.This review is intended to delineate the above mentioned processes and to discuss quantitatively their relative importance in the homeostatic mechanisms responsible for the maintenance of optimal conditions for the respective neurotransmission processes to operate.

  13. [Hanna Ivanivna Sylakova--a bright personality, scientist and pedagogue by vocation. On the 100th anniversary of birthday 4.12.1908-6.05.1980].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vynohradova, R P

    2008-01-01

    H. I. Sylakova, doctor of science in biology, senior scientific worker, assistant professor, was born in Kharkiv, graduated from the faculty of pediatry of the 1st Kharkiv Medical Institute (1927-1931) and passed through the postgraduate course. In 1938 she defended her thesis for the candidate's degree. In 1935-1941 she firstly worked as the assistant, and then the assistant professor of the Department of Biochemistry of the 1st Kharkiv Medical Institute. In the period of evacuation (1941-1946) she worked as the head of the Department of Biochemistry at the Chelyabinsk Medical Institute. From 1947 to 1980 H. I. Sylakova worked as the senior scientific worker at the Department of Muscle Biochemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the Ukr. SSR. She was given the scientific status of the assistant professor in 1941, senior scientific worker in 1949. In 1956 she defended her thesis for the doctor's degree. Jointly with D. L. Ferdman H. I. Sylakova firstly found and investigated physiological role and transformation ways of glutamine in muscles. She was the first to find and investigate the enzyme glutaminase in different muscles of animals (skeletal, heart, stomach, kidneys muscles) and in their subcellular elements in norm and under various pathologic conditions. She has elaborated the method of isolation of pure nuclear fraction with unchanged structure. The results of scientific investigations were reported at numerous congresses, conferences, symposia and published in more than 100 scientific works; she prepared 7 candidates of science and a lot of graduates. H. I. Sylakova worked as a secretary of the Kyiv Division of Biochemical Society, Scientific Secretary of the research problem Animal and Human Biochemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR and Ukr. SSR, Editor-in-chief of the Ukrainian Biochemical Journal, head of the State Examination Commission of Biologic faculty of the Kyiv State University, etc. Her work was marked by the medal For Distinguished

  14. Exocrine pancreas glutamate secretion help to sustain enterocyte nutritional needs under protein restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araya, S; Kuster, E; Gluch, D; Mariotta, L; Lutz, C; Reding, T V; Graf, R; Verrey, F; Camargo, S M R

    2018-04-01

    Glutamine (Gln) is the most concentrated amino acid in blood and considered conditionally essential. Its requirement is increased during physiological stress, such as malnutrition or illness, despite its production by muscle and other organs. In the malnourished state, Gln has been suggested to have a trophic effect on the exocrine pancreas and small intestine. However, the Gln transport capacity, the functional relationship of these two organs, and the potential role of the Gln-glutamate (Glu) cycle are unknown. We observed that pancreatic acinar cells express lower levels of Glu than Gln transporters. Consistent with this expression pattern, the rate of Glu influx into acinar cells was approximately sixfold lower than that of Gln. During protein restriction, acinar cell glutaminase expression was increased and Gln accumulation was maintained. Moreover, Glu secretion by acinar cells into pancreatic juice and thus into the lumen of the small intestine was maintained. In the intestinal lumen, Glu absorption was preserved and Glu dehydrogenase expression was augmented, potentially providing the substrates for increasing energy production via the TCA cycle. Our findings suggest that one mechanism by which Gln exerts a positive effect on exocrine pancreas and small intestine involves the Gln metabolism in acinar cells and the secretion of Glu into the small intestine lumen. The exocrine pancreas acinar cells not only avidly accumulate Gln but metabolize Gln to generate energy and to synthesize Glu for secretion in the pancreatic juice. Secreted Glu is suggested to play an important role during malnourishment in sustaining small intestinal homeostasis. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Glutamine (Gln) has been suggested to have a trophic effect on exocrine pancreas and small intestine in malnourished states, but the mechanism is unknown. In this study, we suggest that this trophic effect derives from an interorgan relationship between exocrine pancreas and small intestine for Gln

  15. Renal responses of trout to chronic respiratory and metabolic acidoses and metabolic alkalosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C M; Milligan, C L; Walsh, P J

    1999-08-01

    Exposure to hyperoxia (500-600 torr) or low pH (4.5) for 72 h or NaHCO(3) infusion for 48 h were used to create chronic respiratory (RA) or metabolic acidosis (MA) or metabolic alkalosis in freshwater rainbow trout. During alkalosis, urine pH increased, and [titratable acidity (TA) - HCO(-)(3)] and net H(+) excretion became negative (net base excretion) with unchanged NH(+)(4) efflux. During RA, urine pH did not change, but net H(+) excretion increased as a result of a modest rise in NH(+)(4) and substantial elevation in [TA - HCO(-)(3)] efflux accompanied by a large increase in inorganic phosphate excretion. However, during MA, urine pH fell, and net H(+) excretion was 3.3-fold greater than during RA, reflecting a similar increase in [TA - HCO(-)(3)] and a smaller elevation in phosphate but a sevenfold greater increase in NH(+)(4) efflux. In urine samples of the same pH, [TA - HCO(-)(3)] was greater during RA (reflecting phosphate secretion), and [NH(+)(4)] was greater during MA (reflecting renal ammoniagenesis). Renal activities of potential ammoniagenic enzymes (phosphate-dependent glutaminase, glutamate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, alanine aminotransferase, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase) and plasma levels of cortisol, phosphate, ammonia, and most amino acids (including glutamine and alanine) increased during MA but not during RA, when only alanine aminotransferase increased. The differential responses to RA vs. MA parallel those in mammals; in fish they may be keyed to activation of phosphate secretion by RA and cortisol mobilization by MA.

  16. Replication of the Shrimp Virus WSSV Depends on Glutamate-Driven Anaplerosis.

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    Chun-Yuan Li

    Full Text Available Infection with the white spot syndrome virus (WSSV induces a metabolic shift in shrimp that resembles the "Warburg effect" in mammalian cells. This effect is triggered via activation of the PI3K-Akt-mTOR pathway, and it is usually accompanied by the activation of other metabolic pathways that provide energy and direct the flow of carbon and nitrogen. Here we show that unlike the glutamine metabolism (glutaminolysis seen in most cancer cells to double deaminate glutamine to produce glutamate and the TCA cycle intermediate α-ketoglutarate (α-KG, at the WSSV genome replication stage (12 hpi, although glutaminase (GLS expression was upregulated, only glutamate was taken up by the hemocytes of WSSV-infected shrimp. At the same time, we observed an increase in the activity of the two enzymes that convert glutamate to α-KG, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH and aspartate aminotransferase (ASAT. α-ketoglutarate concentration was also increased. A series of inhibition experiments suggested that the up-regulation of GDH is regulated by mTORC2, and that the PI3K-mTORC1 pathway is not involved. Suppression of GDH and ASAT by dsRNA silencing showed that both of these enzymes are important for WSSV replication. In GDH-silenced shrimp, direct replenishment of α-KG rescued both ATP production and WSSV replication. From these results, we propose a model of glutamate-driven anaplerosis that fuels the TCA cycle via α-KG and ultimately supports WSSV replication.

  17. Identification and structural analysis of an L-asparaginase enzyme from guinea pig with putative tumor cell killing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schalk, Amanda M; Nguyen, Hien-Anh; Rigouin, Coraline; Lavie, Arnon

    2014-11-28

    The initial observation that guinea pig serum kills lymphoma cells marks the serendipitous discovery of a new class of anti-cancer agents. The serum cell killing factor was shown to be an enzyme with L-asparaginase (ASNase) activity. As a direct result of this observation, several bacterial L-asparaginases were developed and are currently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of the subset of hematological malignancies that are dependent on the extracellular pool of the amino acid asparagine. As drugs, these enzymes act to hydrolyze asparagine to aspartate, thereby starving the cancer cells of this amino acid. Prior to the work presented here, the precise identity of this guinea pig enzyme has not been reported in the peer-reviewed literature. We discovered that the guinea pig enzyme annotated as H0W0T5_CAVPO, which we refer to as gpASNase1, has the required low Km property consistent with that possessed by the cell-killing guinea pig serum enzyme. Elucidation of the ligand-free and aspartate complex gpASNase1 crystal structures allows a direct comparison with the bacterial enzymes and serves to explain the lack of L-glutaminase activity in the guinea pig enzyme. The structures were also used to generate a homology model for the human homolog hASNase1 and to help explain its vastly different kinetic properties compared with gpASNase1, despite a 70% sequence identity. Given that the bacterial enzymes frequently present immunogenic and other toxic side effects, this work suggests that gpASNase1 could be a promising alternative to these bacterial enzymes. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Protein phosphatase 2ACα gene knock-out results in cortical atrophy through activating hippo cascade in neuronal progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bo; Sun, Li-Hua; Huang, Yan-Fei; Guo, Li-Jun; Luo, Li-Shu

    2018-02-01

    Protein phosphatase 2ACα (PP2ACα), a vital member of the protein phosphatase family, has been studied primarily as a regulator for the development, growth and protein synthesis of a lot of cell types. Dysfunction of PP2ACα protein results in neurodegenerative disease; however, this finding has not been directly confirmed in the mouse model with PP2ACα gene knock-out. Therefore, in this study presented here, we generated the PP2ACα gene knock-out mouse model by the Cre-loxP targeting gene system, with the purpose to directly observe the regulatory role of PP2ACα gene in the development of mouse's cerebral cortex. We observe that knocking-out PP2ACα gene in the central nervous system (CNS) results in cortical neuronal shrinkage, synaptic plasticity impairments, and learning/memory deficits. Further study reveals that PP2ACα gene knock-out initiates Hippo cascade in cortical neuroprogenitor cells (NPCs), which blocks YAP translocation into the nuclei of NPCs. Notably, p73, directly targeted by Hippo cascade, can bind to the promoter of glutaminase2 (GLS2) that plays a dominant role in the enzymatic regulation of glutamate/glutamine cycle. Finally, we find that PP2ACα gene knock-out inhibits the glutamine synthesis through up-regulating the activity of phosphorylated-p73 in cortical NPCs. Taken together, it concludes that PP2ACα critically supports cortical neuronal growth and cognitive function via regulating the signaling transduction of Hippo-p73 cascade. And PP2ACα indirectly modulates the glutamine synthesis of cortical NPCs through targeting p73 that plays a direct transcriptional regulatory role in the gene expression of GLS2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

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    M. Ryan Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP, decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231 breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC protein levels, although other protein levels were

  20. Selection of Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Based on Adaptability of Their Metabolic State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Balraj; Tai, Karen; Madan, Simran; Raythatha, Milan R.; Cady, Amanda M.; Braunlin, Megan; Irving, LaTashia R.; Bajaj, Ankur; Lucci, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    A small subpopulation of highly adaptable breast cancer cells within a vastly heterogeneous population drives cancer metastasis. Here we describe a function-based strategy for selecting rare cancer cells that are highly adaptable and drive malignancy. Although cancer cells are dependent on certain nutrients, e.g., glucose and glutamine, we hypothesized that the adaptable cancer cells that drive malignancy must possess an adaptable metabolic state and that such cells could be identified using a robust selection strategy. As expected, more than 99.99% of cells died upon glutamine withdrawal from the aggressive breast cancer cell line SUM149. The rare cells that survived and proliferated without glutamine were highly adaptable, as judged by additional robust adaptability assays involving prolonged cell culture without glucose or serum. We were successful in isolating rare metabolically plastic glutamine-independent (Gln-ind) variants from several aggressive breast cancer cell lines that we tested. The Gln-ind cells overexpressed cyclooxygenase-2, an indicator of tumor aggressiveness, and they were able to adjust their glutaminase level to suit glutamine availability. The Gln-ind cells were anchorage-independent, resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs doxorubicin and paclitaxel, and resistant to a high concentration of a COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib. The number of cells being able to adapt to non-availability of glutamine increased upon prior selection of cells for resistance to chemotherapy drugs or resistance to celecoxib, further supporting a linkage between cellular adaptability and therapeutic resistance. Gln-ind cells showed indications of oxidative stress, and they produced cadherin11 and vimentin, indicators of mesenchymal phenotype. Gln-ind cells were more tumorigenic and more metastatic in nude mice than the parental cell line as judged by incidence and time of occurrence. As we decreased the number of cancer cells in xenografts, lung metastasis and then primary

  1. Exon expression in lymphoblastoid cell lines from subjects with schizophrenia before and after glucose deprivation

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    Martin Maureen V

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of glucose reduction stress on lymphoblastic cell line (LCL gene expression in subjects with schizophrenia compared to non-psychotic relatives. Methods LCLs were grown under two glucose conditions to measure the effects of glucose reduction stress on exon expression in subjects with schizophrenia compared to unaffected family member controls. A second aim of this project was to identify cis-regulated transcripts associated with diagnosis. Results There were a total of 122 transcripts with significant diagnosis by probeset interaction effects and 328 transcripts with glucose deprivation by probeset interaction probeset effects after corrections for multiple comparisons. There were 8 transcripts with expression significantly affected by the interaction between diagnosis and glucose deprivation and probeset after correction for multiple comparisons. The overall validation rate by qPCR of 13 diagnosis effect genes identified through microarray was 62%, and all genes tested by qPCR showed concordant up- or down-regulation by qPCR and microarray. We assessed brain gene expression of five genes found to be altered by diagnosis and glucose deprivation in LCLs and found a significant decrease in expression of one gene, glutaminase, in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC. One SNP with previously identified regulation by a 3' UTR SNP was found to influence IRF5 expression in both brain and lymphocytes. The relationship between the 3' UTR rs10954213 genotype and IRF5 expression was significant in LCLs (p = 0.0001, DLPFC (p = 0.007, and anterior cingulate cortex (p = 0.002. Conclusion Experimental manipulation of cells lines from subjects with schizophrenia may be a useful approach to explore stress related gene expression alterations in schizophrenia and to identify SNP variants associated with gene expression.

  2. Odor preference and olfactory memory are impaired in Olfaxin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Saiful; Ueda, Masashi; Nishida, Emika; Wang, Miao-Xing; Osawa, Masatake; Lee, Dongsoo; Itoh, Masanori; Nakagawa, Kiyomi; Tana; Nakagawa, Toshiyuki

    2018-06-01

    Olfaxin, which is a BNIP2 and Cdc42GAP homology (BCH) domain-containing protein, is predominantly expressed in mitral and tufted (M/T) cells in the olfactory bulb (OB). Olfaxin and Caytaxin, which share 56.3% amino acid identity, are similar in their glutamatergic terminal localization, kidney-type glutaminase (KGA) interaction, and caspase-3 substrate. Although the deletion of Caytaxin protein causes human Cayman ataxia and ataxia in the mutant mouse, the function of Olfaxin is largely unknown. In this study, we generated Prune2 gene mutant mice (Prune2 Ex16-/- ; knock out [KO] mice) using the CRISPR/Cas9 system, during which the exon 16 containing start codon of Olfaxin mRNA was deleted. Exon 16 has 80 nucleotides and is contained in four of five Prune2 isoforms, including PRUNE2, BMCC1, BNIPXL, and Olfaxin/BMCC1s. The levels of Olfaxin mRNA and Olfaxin protein in the OB and piriform cortex of KO mice significantly decreased. Although Prune2 mRNA also significantly decreased in the spinal cord, the gross anatomy of the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was intact. Further, disturbance of the sensory and motor system was not observed in KO mice. Therefore, in the current study, we examined the role of Olfaxin in the olfactory system where PRUNE2, BMCC1, and BNIPXL are scarcely expressed. Odor preference was impaired in KO mice using opposite-sex urinary scents as well as a non-social odor stimulus (almond). Results of the odor-aversion test demonstrated that odor-associative learning was disrupted in KO mice. Moreover, the NMDAR2A/NMDAR2B subunits switch in the piriform cortex was not observed in KO mice. These results indicated that Olfaxin may play a critical role in odor preference and olfactory memory. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of the potential lithium-mimetic, ebselen, on brain neurochemistry: a magnetic resonance spectroscopy study at 7 tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaki, Charles; Sharpley, Ann L; Godlewska, Beata R; Berrington, Adam; Hashimoto, Tasuku; Singh, Nisha; Vasudevan, Sridhar R; Emir, Uzay E; Churchill, Grant C; Cowen, Philip J

    2016-03-01

    Lithium is an effective treatment for bipolar disorder, but safety issues complicate its clinical use. The antioxidant drug, ebselen, may be a possible lithium-mimetic based on its ability to inhibit inositol monophosphatase (IMPase), an action which it shares with lithium. Our primary aim was to determine whether ebselen lowered levels of inositol in the human brain. We also assessed the effect of ebselen on other brain neurometabolites, including glutathione, glutamate, glutamine, and glutamate + glutamine (Glx) Twenty healthy volunteers were tested on two occasions receiving either ebselen (3600 mg over 24 h) or identical placebo in a double-blind, random-order, crossover design. Two hours after the final dose of ebselen/placebo, participants underwent proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H MRS) at 7 tesla (T) with voxels placed in the anterior cingulate and occipital cortex. Neurometabolite levels were calculated using an unsuppressed water signal as a reference and corrected for individual cerebrospinal fluid content in the voxel. Ebselen produced no effect on neurometabolite levels in the occipital cortex. In the anterior cingulate cortex, ebselen lowered concentrations of inositol (p = 0.028, Cohen's d = 0.60) as well as those of glutathione (p = 0.033, d = 0.58), glutamine (p = 0.024, d = 0.62), glutamate (p = 0.01, d = 0.73), and Glx (p = 0.001, d = 1.0). The study suggests that ebselen produces a functional inhibition of IMPase in the human brain. The effect of ebselen to lower glutamate is consistent with its reported ability to inhibit the enzyme, glutaminase. Ebselen may have potential as a repurposed treatment for bipolar disorder.

  4. Characterization of Glutamatergic Neurons in the Rat Atrial Intrinsic Cardiac Ganglia that Project to the Cardiac Ventricular Wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ting; Miller, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    The intrinsic cardiac nervous system modulates cardiac function by acting as an integration site for regulating autonomic efferent cardiac output. This intrinsic system is proposed to be composed of a short cardio-cardiac feedback control loop within the cardiac innervation hierarchy. For example, electrophysiological studies have postulated the presence of sensory neurons in intrinsic cardiac ganglia for regional cardiac control. There is still a knowledge gap, however, about the anatomical location and neurochemical phenotype of sensory neurons inside intrinsic cardiac ganglia. In the present study, rat intrinsic cardiac ganglia neurons were characterized neurochemically with immunohistochemistry using glutamatergic markers: vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 (VGLUT1; VGLUT2), and glutaminase (GLS), the enzyme essential for glutamate production. Glutamatergic neurons (VGLUT1/VGLUT2/GLS) in the ICG that have axons to the ventricles were identified by retrograde tracing of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) injected in the ventricular wall. Co-labeling of VGLUT1, VGLUT2, and GLS with the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) was used to evaluate the relationship between post-ganglionic autonomic neurons and glutamatergic neurons. Sequential labeling of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in adjacent tissue sections was used to evaluate the co-localization of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 in ICG neurons. Our studies yielded the following results: (1) intrinsic cardiac ganglia contain glutamatergic neurons with GLS for glutamate production and VGLUT1 and 2 for transport of glutamate into synaptic vesicles; (2) atrial intrinsic cardiac ganglia contain neurons that project to ventricle walls and these neurons are glutamatergic; (3) many glutamatergic ICG neurons also were cholinergic, expressing VAChT. (4) VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 co-localization occurred in ICG neurons with variation of their protein expression level. Investigation of both glutamatergic and cholinergic ICG

  5. Celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity? An approach to clinical differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabbani, Toufic A; Vanga, Rohini R; Leffler, Daniel A; Villafuerte-Galvez, Javier; Pallav, Kumar; Hansen, Joshua; Mukherjee, Rupa; Dennis, Melinda; Kelly, Ciaran P

    2014-05-01

    Differentiating between celiac disease (CD) and non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is important for appropriate management but is often challenging. We retrospectively reviewed records from 238 patients who presented for the evaluation of symptoms responsive to gluten restriction without prior diagnosis or exclusion of CD. Demographics, presenting symptoms, serologic, genetic, and histologic data, nutrient deficiencies, personal history of autoimmune diseases, and family history of CD were recorded. NCGS was defined as symptoms responsive to a gluten-free diet (GFD) in the setting of negative celiac serology and duodenal biopsies while on a gluten-containing diet or negative human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ2/DQ8 testing. Of the 238 study subjects, 101 had CD, 125 had NCGS, 9 had non-celiac enteropathy, and 3 had indeterminate diagnosis. CD subjects presented with symptoms of malabsorption 67.3% of the time compared with 24.8% of the NCGS subjects (Pdiseases (P=0.002), or nutrient deficiencies (P2× upper limit of normal IgA trans-glutaminase antibody (tTG) or IgA/IgG deaminated gliadan peptide antibody (DGP) with clinical response to GFD was 130 (confidence interval (CI): 18.5-918.3). The positive likelihood ratio of the combination of gluten-responsive symptoms and negative IgA tTG or IgA/IgG DGP on a regular diet for NCGS was 9.6 (CI: 5.5-16.9). When individuals with negative IgA tTG or IgA/IgG DGP also lacked symptoms of malabsorption (weight loss, diarrhea, and nutrient deficiencies) and CD risk factors (personal history of autoimmune diseases and family history of CD), the positive likelihood ratio for NCGS increased to 80.9. On the basis of our findings, we have developed a diagnostic algorithm to differentiate CD from NCGS. Subjects with negative celiac serologies (IgA tTG or IgA/IgG DGP) on a regular diet are unlikely to have CD. Those with negative serology who also lack clinical evidence of malabsorption and CD risk factors are highly likely to have

  6. Snail modulates cell metabolism in MDCK cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haraguchi, Misako, E-mail: haraguci@m3.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Indo, Hiroko P. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Iwasaki, Yasumasa [Health Care Center, Kochi University, Kochi 780-8520 (Japan); Iwashita, Yoichiro [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Fukushige, Tomoko [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Majima, Hideyuki J. [Department of Maxillofacial Radiology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Izumo, Kimiko; Horiuchi, Masahisa [Department of Environmental Medicine, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Kanekura, Takuro [Department of Dermatology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Furukawa, Tatsuhiko [Department of Molecular Oncology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ozawa, Masayuki [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2013-03-22

    Highlights: ► MDCK/snail cells were more sensitive to glucose deprivation than MDCK/neo cells. ► MDCK/snail cells had decreased oxidative phosphorylation, O{sub 2} consumption and ATP content. ► TCA cycle enzyme activity, but not expression, was lower in MDCK/snail cells. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced PDH activity and increased PDK1 expression. ► MDCK/snail cells showed reduced expression of GLS2 and ACLY. -- Abstract: Snail, a repressor of E-cadherin gene transcription, induces epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and is involved in tumor progression. Snail also mediates resistance to cell death induced by serum depletion. By contrast, we observed that snail-expressing MDCK (MDCK/snail) cells undergo cell death at a higher rate than control (MDCK/neo) cells in low-glucose medium. Therefore, we investigated whether snail expression influences cell metabolism in MDCK cells. Although gylcolysis was not affected in MDCK/snail cells, they did exhibit reduced pyruvate dehydrogenase (PDH) activity, which controls pyruvate entry into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle. Indeed, the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the TCA cycle was decreased in MDCK/snail cells, including that of mitochondrial NADP{sup +}-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH2), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and electron transport Complex II and Complex IV. Consequently, lower ATP content, lower oxygen consumption and increased survival under hypoxic conditions was also observed in MDCK/snail cells compared to MDCK/neo cells. In addition, the expression and promoter activity of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1), which phosphorylates and inhibits the activity of PDH, was increased in MDCK/snail cells, while expression levels of glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and ATP-citrate lyase (ACLY), which are involved in glutaminolysis and fatty acid synthesis, were decreased in MDCK/snail cells. These results suggest that snail modulates cell metabolism by altering the expression and activity of

  7. Recombinant deamidated mutants of Erwinia chrysanthemi L-asparaginase have similar or increased activity compared to wild-type enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, David; Foote, Nicholas

    2014-10-01

    The enzyme Erwinia chrysanthemi L-asparaginase (ErA) is an important biopharmaceutical product used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukaemia. Like all proteins, certain asparagine (Asn) residues of ErA are susceptible to deamidation to aspartic acid (Asp), which may be a concern with respect to enzyme activity and potentially to pharmaceutical efficacy. Recombinant ErA mutants containing Asn to Asp changes were expressed, purified and characterised. Two mutants with single deamidation sites (N41D and N281D) were found to have approximately the same specific activity (1,062 and 924 U/mg, respectively) as the wild-type (908 U/mg). However, a double mutant (N41D N281D) had an increased specific activity (1261 U/mg). The N41D mutation conferred a slight increase in the catalytic constant (k cat 657 s(-1)) when compared to the WT (k cat 565 s(-1)), which was further increased in the double mutant, with a k cat of 798 s(-1). Structural analyses showed that the slight changes caused by point mutation of Asn41 to Asp may have reduced the number of hydrogen bonds in this α-helical part of the protein structure, resulting in subtle changes in enzyme turnover, both structurally and catalytically. The increased α-helical content observed with the N41D mutation by circular dichroism spectroscopy correlates with the difference in k cat, but not K m. The N281D mutation resulted in a lower glutaminase activity compared with WT and the N41D mutant, however the N281D mutation also imparted less stability to the enzyme at elevated temperatures. Taken as a whole, these data suggest that ErA deamidation at the Asn41 and Asn281 sites does not affect enzyme activity and should not be a concern during processing, storage or clinical use. The production of recombinant deamidated variants has proven an effective and powerful means of studying the effect of these changes and may be a useful strategy for other biopharmaceutical products.

  8. Contribution of glutamate decarboxylase in Lactobacillus reuteri to acid resistance and persistence in sourdough fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Marcia S; Schlicht, Sabine; Gänzle, Michael G

    2011-08-30

    Acid stress impacts the persistence of lactobacilli in industrial sourdough fermentations, and in intestinal ecosystems. However, the contribution of glutamate to acid resistance in lactobacilli has not been demonstrated experimentally, and evidence for the contribution of acid resistance to the competitiveness of lactobacilli in sourdough is lacking. It was therefore the aim of this study to investigate the ecological role of glutamate decarboxylase in L. reuteri. A gene coding for a putative glutamate decarboxylase, gadB, was identified in the genome of L. reuteri 100-23. Different from the organization of genetic loci coding for glutamate decarboxylase in other lactic acid bacteria, gadB was located adjacent to a putative glutaminase gene, gls3. An isogenic deletion mutant, L. reuteri ∆gadB, was generated by a double crossover method. L. reuteri 100-23 but not L. reuteri ∆gadB converted glutamate to γ-aminobutyrate (GABA) in phosphate butter (pH 2.5). In sourdough, both strains converted glutamine to glutamate but only L. reuteri 100-23 accumulated GABA. Glutamate addition to phosphate buffer, pH 2.5, improved survival of L. reuteri 100-23 100-fold. However, survival of L. reuteri ∆gadB remained essentially unchanged. The disruption of gadB did not affect growth of L. reuteri in mMRS or in sourdough. However, the wild type strain L. reuteri 100-23 displaced L. reuteri ∆gadB after 5 cycles of fermentation in back-slopped sourdough fermentations. The conversion of glutamate to GABA by L. reuteri 100-23 contributes to acid resistance and to competitiveness in industrial sourdough fermentations. The organization of the gene cluster for glutamate conversion, and the availability of amino acids in cereals imply that glutamine rather than glutamate functions as the substrate for GABA formation. The exceptional coupling of glutamine deamidation to glutamate decarboxylation in L. reuteri likely reflects adaptation to cereal substrates.

  9. Induction of autophagy by ARHI (DIRAS3) alters fundamental metabolic pathways in ovarian cancer models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ornelas, Argentina; McCullough, Christopher R.; Lu, Zhen; Zacharias, Niki M.; Kelderhouse, Lindsay E.; Gray, Joshua; Yang, Hailing; Engel, Brian J.; Wang, Yan; Mao, Weiqun; Sutton, Margie N.; Bhattacharya, Pratip K.; Bast, Robert C. Jr.; Millward, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is a bulk catabolic process that modulates tumorigenesis, therapeutic resistance, and dormancy. The tumor suppressor ARHI (DIRAS3) is a potent inducer of autophagy and its expression results in necroptotic cell death in vitro and tumor dormancy in vivo. ARHI is down-regulated or lost in over 60 % of primary ovarian tumors yet is dramatically up-regulated in metastatic disease. The metabolic changes that occur during ARHI induction and their role in modulating death and dormancy are unknown. We employed Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic strategies to characterize changes in key metabolic pathways in both cell culture and xenograft models of ARHI expression and autophagy. These pathways were further interrogated by cell-based immunofluorescence imaging, tracer uptake studies, targeted metabolic inhibition, and in vivo PET/CT imaging. Induction of ARHI in cell culture models resulted in an autophagy-dependent increase in lactate production along with increased glucose uptake and enhanced sensitivity to glycolytic inhibitors. Increased uptake of glutamine was also dependent on autophagy and dramatically sensitized cultured ARHI-expressing ovarian cancer cell lines to glutaminase inhibition. Induction of ARHI resulted in a reduction in mitochondrial respiration, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential, and decreased Tom20 staining suggesting an ARHI-dependent loss of mitochondrial function. ARHI induction in mouse xenograft models resulted in an increase in free amino acids, a transient increase in [ 18 F]-FDG uptake, and significantly altered choline metabolism. ARHI expression has previously been shown to trigger autophagy-associated necroptosis in cell culture. In this study, we have demonstrated that ARHI expression results in decreased cellular ATP/ADP, increased oxidative stress, and decreased mitochondrial function. While this bioenergetic shock is consistent with programmed necrosis, our data indicates that the accompanying up

  10. A systematic review of p53 regulation of oxidative stress in skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyfuss, Kaitlyn; Hood, David A

    2018-12-01

    transcription factor 4; ATM: ATM serine/threonine kinase; Bax: BCL2 associated X, apoptosis regulator; Bcl-2: B cell Leukemia/Lymphoma 2 apoptosis regulator; Bhlhe40: basic helix-loop-helix family member e40; BH3: Borane; Bim: bcl-2 interacting mediator of cell death; Bok: Bcl-2 related ovarian killer; COX-IV: cytochrome c oxidase IV; cGMP: Cyclic guanosine monophosphate; c-myc: proto-oncogene protein; Cpt1b: carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B; Dr5: death receptor 5; eNOS: endothelial nitric oxide synthase; ERK: extracellular regulated MAP kinase; Fas: Fas Cell surface death receptor; FDXR: Ferredoxin Reductase; FOXO3a: forkhead box O3; Gadd45a: growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible 45 alpha; GLS2: glutaminase 2; GLUT 1 and 4: glucose transporter 1(endothelial) and 4 (skeletal muscle); GSH: Glutathione; Hes1: hes family bHLH transcription factor 1; Hey1: hes related family bHLH transcription factor with YRPW motif 1; HIFI-α: hypoxia-inducible factor 1, α-subunit; HK2: Hexokinase 2; HSP70: Heat Shock Protein 70; H 2 O 2 : Hydrogen Peroxide; Id2: inhibitor of DNA-binding 2; IGF-1-BP3: Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3; IL-1β: Interleukin 1 beta; iNOS: inducible nitric oxide synthase; IRS-1: Insulin receptor substrate 1; JNK: c-Jun N-terminal kinases; LY-83583: 6-anilino-5,8-quinolinedione; inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase and of cGMP production; Mdm 2/ 4: Mouse double minute 2 homolog (mouse) Mdm4 (humans); mtDNA: mitochondrial DNA; MURF1: Muscle RING-finger protein-1; MyoD: Myogenic differentiation 1; MyoG: myogenin; Nanog: Nanog homeobox; NF-kB: Nuclear factor-κB; NO: nitric oxide; NoxA: phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate-induced protein 1 (Pmaip1); NRF-1: nuclear respiratory factor 1; Nrf2: Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2; P21: Cdkn1a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (P21); P38 MAPK: mitogen-activated protein kinases; p53R2: p53 inducible ribonucleotide reductase gene; P66Shc: src homology 2 domain-containing transforming protein C1; PERP: p