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Sample records for glutamate release altered

  1. Fluorescence imaging of glutamate release in neurons

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    Wang, Ziqiang; Yeung, Edward S.

    1999-01-01

    A noninvasive detection scheme based on glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) enzymatic assay combined with microscopy was developed to measure the glutamate release in cultured cells from the central nervous system (CNS). The enzyme reaction is very specific and sensitive. The detection limit with charge-coupled device (CCD) imaging is down to μM levels of glutamate with reasonable response time (∼30 s). The standard glutamate test shows a linear response over 3 orders of magnitude, from μM to 0.1 mM range. The in vitro monitoring of glutamate release from cultured neuron cells demonstrated excellent spatial and temporal resolution. (c) 1999 Society for Applied Spectroscopy

  2. A Glutamate Homeostat Controls the Presynaptic Inhibition of Neurotransmitter Release

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    Xiling Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Summary: We have interrogated the synaptic dialog that enables the bi-directional, homeostatic control of presynaptic efficacy at the glutamatergic Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ. We find that homeostatic depression and potentiation use disparate genetic, induction, and expression mechanisms. Specifically, homeostatic potentiation is achieved through reduced CaMKII activity postsynaptically and increased abundance of active zone material presynaptically at one of the two neuronal subtypes innervating the NMJ, while homeostatic depression occurs without alterations in CaMKII activity and is expressed at both neuronal subtypes. Furthermore, homeostatic depression is only induced through excess presynaptic glutamate release and operates with disregard to the postsynaptic response. We propose that two independent homeostats modulate presynaptic efficacy at the Drosophila NMJ: one is an intercellular signaling system that potentiates synaptic strength following diminished postsynaptic excitability, while the other adaptively modulates presynaptic glutamate release through an autocrine mechanism without feedback from the postsynaptic compartment. : Homeostatic mechanisms stabilize synaptic strength, but the signaling systems remain enigmatic. Li et al. suggest the existence of a homeostat operating at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction that responds to excess glutamate through an autocrine mechanism to adaptively inhibit presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This system parallels forms of plasticity at central synapses. Keywords: homeostatic synaptic plasticity, glutamate homeostasis, synaptic depression, Drosophila neuromuscular junction

  3. Metabolic control of vesicular glutamate transport and release.

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    Juge, Narinobu; Gray, John A; Omote, Hiroshi; Miyaji, Takaaki; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Hara, Chiaki; Uneyama, Hisayuki; Edwards, Robert H; Nicoll, Roger A; Moriyama, Yoshinori

    2010-10-06

    Fasting has been used to control epilepsy since antiquity, but the mechanism of coupling between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission remains unknown. Previous work has shown that the vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) required for exocytotic release of glutamate undergo an unusual form of regulation by Cl(-). Using functional reconstitution of the purified VGLUTs into proteoliposomes, we now show that Cl(-) acts as an allosteric activator, and the ketone bodies that increase with fasting inhibit glutamate release by competing with Cl(-) at the site of allosteric regulation. Consistent with these observations, acetoacetate reduced quantal size at hippocampal synapses and suppresses glutamate release and seizures evoked with 4-aminopyridine in the brain. The results indicate an unsuspected link between metabolic state and excitatory neurotransmission through anion-dependent regulation of VGLUT activity. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

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    Lin, Tzu-Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan, 320, Taiwan (China); Lu, Cheng-Wei [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng [School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); Wang, Su-Jane, E-mail: med0003@mail.fju.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub C}), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat

  5. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Su-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K + channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca 2+ ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] C ), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca v 2.2 (N-type) and Ca v 2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na + /Ca 2+ exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca 2+ entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. ► This action did

  6. Palmitoylethanolamide Inhibits Glutamate Release in Rat Cerebrocortical Nerve Terminals

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    Tzu-Yu Lin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of palmitoylethanolamide (PEA, an endogenous fatty acid amide displaying neuroprotective actions, on glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals (synaptosomes was investigated. PEA inhibited the Ca2+-dependent release of glutamate, which was triggered by exposing synaptosomes to the potassium channel blocker 4-aminopyridine. This release inhibition was concentration dependent, associated with a reduction in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration, and not due to a change in synaptosomal membrane potential. The glutamate release-inhibiting effect of PEA was prevented by the Cav2.1 (P/Q-type channel blocker ω-agatoxin IVA or the protein kinase A inhibitor H89, not affected by the intracellular Ca2+ release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157, and partially antagonized by the cannabinoid CB1 receptor antagonist AM281. Based on these results, we suggest that PEA exerts its presynaptic inhibition, likely through a reduction in the Ca2+ influx mediated by Cav2.1 (P/Q-type channels, thereby inhibiting the release of glutamate from rat cortical nerve terminals. This release inhibition might be linked to the activation of presynaptic cannabinoid CB1 receptors and the suppression of the protein kinase A pathway.

  7. Response of hippocampal mossy fiber zinc to excessive glutamate release.

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    Takeda, Atsushi; Minami, Akira; Sakurada, Naomi; Nakajima, Satoko; Oku, Naoto

    2007-01-01

    The response of hippocampal mossy fiber zinc to excessive glutamate release was examined to understand the role of the zinc in excessive excitation in the hippocampus. Extracellular zinc and glutamate concentrations during excessive stimulation with high K(+) were compared between the hippocampal CA3 and CA1 by the in vivo microdialysis. Zinc concentration in the CA3 was more increased than that in the CA1, while glutamate concentration in the CA3 was less increased than that in the CA1. It is likely that more increase in extracellular zinc is linked with less increase in extracellular glutamate in the CA3. To see zinc action in mossy fiber synapses during excessive excitation, furthermore, 1mM glutamate was regionally delivered to the stratum lucidum in the presence of zinc or CaEDTA, a membrane-impermeable zinc chelator, and intracellular calcium signal was measured in the CA3 pyramidal cell layer. The persistent increase in calcium signal during stimulation with glutamate was significantly attenuated in the presence of 100 microM zinc, while significantly enhanced in the presence of 1mM CaEDTA. These results suggest that zinc released from mossy fibers attenuates the increase in intracellular calcium signal in mossy fiber synapses and postsynaptic CA3 neurons after excessive inputs to dentate granular cells.

  8. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors

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    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-01-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  9. Acacetin inhibits glutamate release and prevents kainic acid-induced neurotoxicity in rats.

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    Tzu-Yu Lin

    Full Text Available An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be a molecular mechanism associated with several neurological diseases that causes neuronal damage. Therefore, searching for compounds that reduce glutamate neurotoxicity is necessary. In this study, the possibility that the natural flavone acacetin derived from the traditional Chinese medicine Clerodendrum inerme (L. Gaertn is a neuroprotective agent was investigated. The effect of acacetin on endogenous glutamate release in rat hippocampal nerve terminals (synaptosomes was also investigated. The results indicated that acacetin inhibited depolarization-evoked glutamate release and cytosolic free Ca(2+ concentration ([Ca(2+]C in the hippocampal nerve terminals. However, acacetin did not alter synaptosomal membrane potential. Furthermore, the inhibitory effect of acacetin on evoked glutamate release was prevented by the Cav2.2 (N-type and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type channel blocker known as ω-conotoxin MVIIC. In a kainic acid (KA rat model, an animal model used for excitotoxic neurodegeneration experiments, acacetin (10 or 50 mg/kg was administrated intraperitoneally to the rats 30 min before the KA (15 mg/kg intraperitoneal injection, and subsequently induced the attenuation of KA-induced neuronal cell death and microglia activation in the CA3 region of the hippocampus. The present study demonstrates that the natural compound, acacetin, inhibits glutamate release from hippocampal synaptosomes by attenuating voltage-dependent Ca(2+ entry and effectively prevents KA-induced in vivo excitotoxicity. Collectively, these data suggest that acacetin has the therapeutic potential for treating neurological diseases associated with excitotoxicity.

  10. Vesicular glutamate release from central axons contributes to myelin damage.

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    Doyle, Sean; Hansen, Daniel Bloch; Vella, Jasmine; Bond, Peter; Harper, Glenn; Zammit, Christian; Valentino, Mario; Fern, Robert

    2018-03-12

    The axon myelin sheath is prone to injury associated with N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptor activation but the source of glutamate in this context is unknown. Myelin damage results in permanent action potential loss and severe functional deficit in the white matter of the CNS, for example in ischemic stroke. Here, we show that in rats and mice, ischemic conditions trigger activation of myelinic NMDA receptors incorporating GluN2C/D subunits following release of axonal vesicular glutamate into the peri-axonal space under the myelin sheath. Glial sources of glutamate such as reverse transport did not contribute significantly to this phenomenon. We demonstrate selective myelin uptake and retention of a GluN2C/D NMDA receptor negative allosteric modulator that shields myelin from ischemic injury. The findings potentially support a rational approach toward a low-impact prophylactic therapy to protect patients at risk of stroke and other forms of excitotoxic injury.

  11. 50 Hz hippocampal stimulation in refractory epilepsy: Higher level of basal glutamate predicts greater release of glutamate.

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    Cavus, Idil; Widi, Gabriel A; Duckrow, Robert B; Zaveri, Hitten; Kennard, Jeremy T; Krystal, John; Spencer, Dennis D

    2016-02-01

    The effect of electrical stimulation on brain glutamate release in humans is unknown. Glutamate is elevated at baseline in the epileptogenic hippocampus of patients with refractory epilepsy, and increases during spontaneous seizures. We examined the effect of 50 Hz stimulation on glutamate release and its relationship to interictal levels in the hippocampus of patients with epilepsy. In addition, we measured basal and stimulated glutamate levels in a subset of these patients where stimulation elicited a seizure. Subjects (n = 10) were patients with medically refractory epilepsy who were undergoing intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) evaluation in an epilepsy monitoring unit. Electrical stimulation (50 Hz) was delivered through implanted hippocampal electrodes (n = 11), and microdialysate samples were collected every 2 min. Basal glutamate, changes in glutamate efflux with stimulation, and the relationships between peak stimulation-associated glutamate concentrations, basal zero-flow levels, and stimulated seizures were examined. Stimulation of epileptic hippocampi in patients with refractory epilepsy caused increases in glutamate efflux (p = 0.005, n = 10), and 4 of ten patients experienced brief stimulated seizures. Stimulation-induced increases in glutamate were not observed during the evoked seizures, but rather were related to the elevation in interictal basal glutamate (R(2) = 0.81, p = 0.001). The evoked-seizure group had lower basal glutamate levels than the no-seizure group (p = 0.04), with no stimulation-induced change in glutamate efflux (p = 0.47, n = 4). Conversely, increased glutamate was observed following stimulation in the no-seizure group (p = 0.005, n = 7). Subjects with an atrophic hippocampus had higher basal glutamate levels (p = 0.03, n = 7) and higher stimulation-induced glutamate efflux. Electrical stimulation of the epileptic hippocampus either increased extracellular glutamate efflux or induced seizures. The magnitude of stimulated

  12. RANTES modulates the release of glutamate in human neocortex.

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    Musante, Veronica; Longordo, Fabio; Neri, Elisa; Pedrazzi, Marco; Kalfas, Fotios; Severi, Paolo; Raiteri, Maurizio; Pittaluga, Anna

    2008-11-19

    The effects of the recombinant chemokine human RANTES (hRANTES) on the release of glutamate from human neocortex glutamatergic nerve endings were investigated. hRANTES facilitated the spontaneous release of d [(3)H]D-aspartate ([(3)H]DASP-) by binding Pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), whose activation caused Ca(2+) mobilization from inositol trisphosphate-sensitive stores and cytosolic tyrosine kinase-mediated phosphorylations. Facilitation of release switched to inhibition when the effects of hRANTES on the 12 mM K(+)-evoked [(3)H]D-ASP exocytosis were studied. Inhibition of exocytosis relied on activation of Pertussis toxin-sensitive GPCRs negatively coupled to adenylyl cyclase. Both hRANTES effects were prevented by met-RANTES, an antagonist at the chemokine receptors (CCRs) of the CCR1, CCR3, and CCR5 subtypes. Interestingly, human neocortex glutamatergic nerve endings seem to possess all three receptor subtypes. Blockade of CCR1 and CCR5 by antibodies against the extracellular domain of CCRs prevented both the hRANTES effect on [(3)H]D-ASP release, whereas blockade of CCR3 prevented inhibition, but not facilitation, of release. The effects of RANTES on the spontaneous and the evoked release of [(3)H]D-ASP were also observed in experiments with mouse cortical synaptosomes, which may therefore represent an appropriate animal model to study RANTES-induced effects on neurotransmission. It is concluded that glutamate transmission can be modulated in opposite directions by RANTES acting at distinct CCR receptor subtypes coupled to different transduction pathways, consistent with the multiple and sometimes contrasting effects of the chemokine.

  13. Synaptic glutamate release by postnatal rat serotonergic neurons in microculture.

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    Johnson, M D

    1994-02-01

    Serotonergic neurons are thought to play a role in depression and obsessive compulsive disorder. However, their functional transmitter repertoire is incompletely known. To investigate this repertoire, intracellular recordings were obtained from 132 cytochemically identified rat mesopontine serotonergic neurons that had re-established synapses in microcultures. Approximately 60% of the neurons evoked excitatory glutamatergic potentials in themselves or in target neurons. Glutamatergic transmission was frequently observed in microcultures containing a solitary serotonergic neuron. Evidence for co-release of serotonin and glutamate from single raphe neurons was also obtained. However, evidence for gamma-aminobutyric acid release by serotonergic neurons was observed in only two cases. These findings indicate that many cultured serotonergic neurons form glutamatergic synapses and may explain several observations in slices and in vivo.

  14. Abnormal glutamate release in aged BTBR mouse model of autism.

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    Wei, Hongen; Ding, Caiyun; Jin, Guorong; Yin, Haizhen; Liu, Jianrong; Hu, Fengyun

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal reciprocal social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Most of the available research on autism is focused on children and young adults and little is known about the pathological alternation of autism in older adults. In order to investigate the neurobiological alternation of autism in old age stage, we compared the morphology and synaptic function of excitatory synapses between the BTBR mice with low level sociability and B6 mice with high level sociability. The results revealed that the number of excitatory synapse colocalized with pre- and post-synaptic marker was not different between aged BTBR and B6 mice. The aged BTBR mice had a normal structure of dendritic spine and the expression of Shank3 protein in the brain as well as that in B6 mice. The baseline and KCl-evoked glutamate release from the cortical synaptoneurosome in aged BTBR mice was lower than that in aged B6 mice. Overall, the data indicate that there is a link between disturbances of the glutamate transmission and autism. These findings provide new evidences for the hypothesis of excitation/inhibition imbalance in autism. Further work is required to determine the cause of this putative abnormality.

  15. Focal and temporal release of glutamate in the mushroom bodies improves olfactory memory in Apis mellifera.

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    Locatelli, Fernando; Bundrock, Gesine; Müller, Uli

    2005-12-14

    In contrast to vertebrates, the role of the neurotransmitter glutamate in learning and memory in insects has hardly been investigated. The reason is that a pharmacological characterization of insect glutamate receptors is still missing; furthermore, it is difficult to locally restrict pharmacological interventions. In this study, we overcome these problems by using locally and temporally defined photo-uncaging of glutamate to study its role in olfactory learning and memory formation in the honeybee, Apis mellifera. Uncaging glutamate in the mushroom bodies immediately after a weak training protocol induced a higher memory rate 2 d after training, mimicking the effect of a strong training protocol. Glutamate release before training does not facilitate memory formation, suggesting that glutamate mediates processes triggered by training and required for memory formation. Uncaging glutamate in the antennal lobes shows no effect on memory formation. These results provide the first direct evidence for a temporally and locally restricted function of glutamate in memory formation in honeybees and insects.

  16. Loss of Local Astrocyte Support Disrupts Action Potential Propagation and Glutamate Release Synchrony from Unmyelinated Hippocampal Axon Terminals In Vitro.

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    Sobieski, Courtney; Jiang, Xiaoping; Crawford, Devon C; Mennerick, Steven

    2015-08-05

    Neuron-astrocyte interactions are critical for proper CNS development and function. Astrocytes secrete factors that are pivotal for synaptic development and function, neuronal metabolism, and neuronal survival. Our understanding of this relationship, however, remains incomplete due to technical hurdles that have prevented the removal of astrocytes from neuronal circuits without changing other important conditions. Here we overcame this obstacle by growing solitary rat hippocampal neurons on microcultures that were comprised of either an astrocyte bed (+astrocyte) or a collagen bed (-astrocyte) within the same culture dish. -Astrocyte autaptic evoked EPSCs, but not IPSCs, displayed an altered temporal profile, which included increased synaptic delay, increased time to peak, and severe glutamate release asynchrony, distinct from previously described quantal asynchrony. Although we observed minimal alteration of the somatically recorded action potential waveform, action potential propagation was altered. We observed a longer latency between somatic initiation and arrival at distal locations, which likely explains asynchronous EPSC peaks, and we observed broadening of the axonal spike, which likely underlies changes to evoked EPSC onset. No apparent changes in axon structure were observed, suggesting altered axonal excitability. In conclusion, we propose that local astrocyte support has an unappreciated role in maintaining glutamate release synchrony by disturbing axonal signal propagation. Certain glial cell types (oligodendrocytes, Schwann cells) facilitate the propagation of neuronal electrical signals, but a role for astrocytes has not been identified despite many other functions of astrocytes in supporting and modulating neuronal signaling. Under identical global conditions, we cultured neurons with or without local astrocyte support. Without local astrocytes, glutamate transmission was desynchronized by an alteration of the waveform and arrival time of axonal

  17. Glutamate-induced glutamate release: A proposed mechanism for calcium bursting in astrocytes

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    Larter, Raima; Craig, Melissa Glendening

    2005-12-01

    Here we present a new model for the generation of complex calcium-bursting patterns in astrocytes, a type of brain cell recently implicated in a variety of neural functions including memory formation. The model involves two positive feedback processes, in which the key feedback species are calcium ion and glutamate. The latter is the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and has been shown to be involved in bidirectional communication between astrocytes and nearby neurons. The glutamate feedback process considered here is shown to be critical for the generation of complex bursting oscillations in the astrocytes and to, perhaps, code for information which may be passed from neuron to neuron via the astrocyte. These processes may be involved in memory storage and formation as well as in mechanisms which lead to dynamical diseases such as epilepsy.

  18. Pharmacological or genetic orexin 1 receptor inhibition attenuates MK-801 induced glutamate release in mouse cortex

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    Leah eAluisio

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The orexin/hypocretin neuropeptides are produced by a cluster of neurons within the lateral posterior hypothalamus and participate in neuronal regulation by activating their receptors (OX1 and OX2 receptors. The orexin system projects widely through the brain and functions as an interface between multiple regulatory systems including wakefulness, energy balance, stress, reward and emotion. Recent studies have demonstrated that orexins and glutamate interact at the synaptic level and that orexins facilitate glutamate actions. We tested the hypothesis that orexins modulate glutamate signaling via OX1 receptors by monitoring levels of glutamate in frontal cortex of freely moving mice using enzyme coated biosensors under inhibited OX1 receptor conditions. MK-801, an NMDA receptor antagonist, was administered subcutaneously (0.178 mg/kg to indirectly disinhibit pyramidal neurons and therefore increase cortical glutamate release. In wild-type mice, pretreatment with the OX1 receptor antagonist GSK-1059865 (10 mg/kg S.C. which had no effect by itself, significantly attenuated the cortical glutamate release elicited by MK-801. OX1 receptor knockout mice had a blunted glutamate release response to MK-801 and exhibited about half of the glutamate release observed in wild-type mice in agreement with the data obtained with transient blockade of OX1 receptors. These results indicate that pharmacological (transient or genetic (permanent inhibition of the OX1 receptor similarly interfere with glutamatergic function in the cortex. Selectively targeting the OX1 receptor with an antagonist may normalize hyperglutamatergic states and thus may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of various psychiatric disorders associated with hyperactive states.

  19. Ebselen increases cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration, stimulates glutamate release and increases GFAP content in rat hippocampal astrocytes

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    Salazar, Miguel; Pariente, Jose Antonio; Salido, Gines Maria; Gonzalez, Antonio

    2008-01-01

    We have investigated the effect of the seleno-organic compound and radical scavenger ebselen on rat hippocampal astrocytes in culture. Throughout our study we carried out determinations of [Ca 2+ ] c in fura-2-loaded cells by single cell imaging, glutamate secretion employing an enzymatic-based assay and GFAP expression, which was monitorized by immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. Our results show that ebselen (1-20 μM) dose dependently increases [Ca 2+ ] c , stimulates glutamate release and increases GFAP content, a hallmark of astrocyte reactivity. Ebselen did not alter significantly cell viability as assayed by determination of LDH release into the extracellular medium. Ebselen-evoked glutamate release and increase in GFAP content were Ca 2+ -dependent, because incubation of astrocytes in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+ (medium containing 0.5 mM EGTA) and in the presence of the intracellular Ca 2+ chelator BAPTA (10 μM) significantly reduced ebselen-evoked changes in these parameters. The effects of ebselen we have observed may underline various signalling pathways which are important for cell proliferation, differentiation and function. However, aberrations in astroglial physiology could significantly compromise brain function, due to their role as modulators of neuron activity. Therefore, we consider that careful attention should be paid when employing ebselen as a prophylactic agent against brain damage

  20. Subcellular fractionation on Percoll gradient of mossy fiber synaptosomes: evoked release of glutamate, GABA, aspartate and glutamate decarboxylase activity in control and degranulated rat hippocampus.

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    Taupin, P; Ben-Ari, Y; Roisin, M P

    1994-05-02

    Using discontinuous density gradient centrifugation in isotonic Percoll sucrose, we have characterized two subcellular fractions (PII and PIII) enriched in mossy fiber synaptosomes and two others (SII and SIII) enriched in small synaptosomes. These synaptosomal fractions were compared with those obtained from adult hippocampus irradiated at neonatal stage to destroy granule cells and their mossy fibers. Synaptosomes were viable as judged by their ability to release aspartate, glutamate and GABA upon K+ depolarization. After irradiation, compared to the control values, the release of glutamate and GABA was decreased by 57 and 74% in the PIII fraction, but not in the other fractions and the content of glutamate, aspartate and GABA was also decreased in PIII fraction by 62, 44 and 52% respectively. These results suggest that mossy fiber (MF) synaptosomes contain and release glutamate and GABA. Measurement of the GABA synthesizing enzyme, glutamate decarboxylase, exhibited no significant difference after irradiation, suggesting that GABA is not synthesized by this enzyme in mossy fibers.

  1. Deep brain stimulation results in local glutamate and adenosine release: investigation into the role of astrocytes.

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    Tawfik, Vivianne L; Chang, Su-Youne; Hitti, Frederick L; Roberts, David W; Leiter, James C; Jovanovic, Svetlana; Lee, Kendall H

    2010-08-01

    Several neurological disorders are treated with deep brain stimulation; however, the mechanism underlying its ability to abolish oscillatory phenomena associated with diseases as diverse as Parkinson's disease and epilepsy remain largely unknown. To investigate the role of specific neurotransmitters in deep brain stimulation and determine the role of non-neuronal cells in its mechanism of action. We used the ferret thalamic slice preparation in vitro, which exhibits spontaneous spindle oscillations, to determine the effect of high-frequency stimulation on neurotransmitter release. We then performed experiments using an in vitro astrocyte culture to investigate the role of glial transmitter release in high-frequency stimulation-mediated abolishment of spindle oscillations. In this series of experiments, we demonstrated that glutamate and adenosine release in ferret slices was able to abolish spontaneous spindle oscillations. The glutamate release was still evoked in the presence of the Na channel blocker tetrodotoxin, but was eliminated with the vesicular H-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin and the calcium chelator 2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester. Furthermore, electrical stimulation of purified primary astrocytic cultures was able to evoke intracellular calcium transients and glutamate release, and bath application of 2-bis (2-aminophenoxy)-ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetrakis acetoxymethyl ester inhibited glutamate release in this setting. Vesicular astrocytic neurotransmitter release may be an important mechanism by which deep brain stimulation is able to achieve clinical benefits.

  2. Co-release of glutamate and GABA from single vesicles in GABAergic neurons exogenously expressing VGLUT3

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    Johannes eZimmermann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The identity of the vesicle neurotransmitter transporter expressed by a neuron largely corresponds with the primary neurotransmitter that cell releases. However, the vesicular glutamate transporter subtype 3 (VGLUT3 is mainly expressed in non-glutamatergic neurons, including cholinergic, serotonergic, or GABAergic neurons. Though a functional role for glutamate release from these non-glutamatergic neurons has been demonstrated, the interplay between VGLUT3 and the neuron’s characteristic neurotransmitter transporter, particularly in the case of GABAergic neurons, at the synaptic and vesicular level is less clear. In this study, we explore how exogenous expression of VGLUT3 in striatal GABAergic neurons affects the packaging and release of glutamate and GABA in synaptic vesicles. We found that VGLUT3 expression in isolated, autaptic GABAergic neurons leads to action potential evoked release of glutamate. Under these conditions, glutamate and GABA could be packaged together in single vesicles release either spontaneously or asynchronously. However, the presence of glutamate in GABAergic vesicles did not affect uptake of GABA itself, suggesting a lack of synergy in vesicle filling for these transmitters. Finally, we found postsynaptic detection of glutamate released from GABAergic terminals difficult when bona fide glutamatergic synapses were present, suggesting that co-released glutamate cannot induce postsynaptic glutamate receptor clustering.

  3. Low dietary protein is associated with an increase in food intake and a decrease in the in vitro release of radiolabeled glutamate and GABA from the lateral hypothalamus.

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    White, B D; Du, F; Higginbotham, D A

    2003-12-01

    Moderately low-protein diets lead to a rapid increase in food intake and body fat. The increase in feeding is associated with a decrease in the concentration of serum urea nitrogen, suggesting that the low-protein-induced increase in food intake may be related to the decreased metabolism of nitrogen from amino acids. We hypothesized that low dietary protein would be associated with a decrease in the synaptic release of two nitrogen-containing neurotransmitters, GABA and glutamate, whose nitrogen can be derived from amino acids. In this study, we examined the effects of a low-protein diet (10% casein) in Sprague-Dawley rats on the in vitro release of 3H-GABA and 14C-glutamate from the lateral and medial hypothalamus. The low-protein diet increased food intake by about 25% after one day. After four days, the in vitro release of radiolabeled GABA and glutamate was assessed. The calcium-dependent, potassium-stimulated release of radiolabeled GABA and glutamate from the lateral hypothalamus was decreased in rats fed the low-protein diet. The magnitude of neurotransmitter release from the lateral hypothalamus inversely correlated with food intake. No dietary differences in the release of neurotransmitters from the medial hypothalamus were observed. These results support the contention that alterations in nitrogen metabolism are associated with low-protein-induced feeding.

  4. Role of astrocytes in depolarization-coupled release of glutamate in cerebellar cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Waagepetersen, Helle S; Schousboe, Arne

    2004-01-01

    Release of preloaded D-[3H]aspartate in response to depolarization induced by high potassium, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionate (AMPA) or the endogenous agonist glutamate was studied using cultured glutamatergic cerebellar granule neurons, cerebell...

  5. Evidence for evoked release of adenosine and glutamate from cultured cerebellar granule cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schousboe, A.; Frandsen, A.; Drejer, J.

    1989-01-01

    Evoked release of [ 3 H]-D-aspartate which labels the neurotransmitter glutamate pool in cultured cerebellar granule cells was compared with evoked release of adenosine from similar cultures. It was found that both adenosine and [3H]-D-aspartate could be released from the neurons in a calcium dependent manner after depolarization of the cells with either 10-100 microM glutamate or 50 mM KCl. Cultures of cerebellar granule cells treated with 50 microM kainate to eliminate GABAergic neurons behaved in the same way. This together with the observation that cultured astrocytes did not exhibit a calcium dependent, potassium stimulated adenosine release strongly suggest that cerebellar granule cells release adenosine in a neurotransmitter-like fashion together with glutamate which is the classical neurotransmitter of these neurons. Studies of the metabolism of adenosine showed that in the granule cells adenosine is rapidly metabolized to ATP, ADP, and AMP, but in spite of this, adenosine was found to be released preferential to ATP

  6. Interactions of MK-801 with glutamate-, glutamine- and methamphetamine-evoked release of [3H]dopamine from striatal slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, J.F.; Scallet, A.C.; Holson, R.R.; Lipe, G.W.; Slikker, W. Jr.; Ali, S.F.

    1991-01-01

    The interactions of MK-801 [(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d] cyclohepten-5,10-imine], glutamate and glutamine with methamphetamine (METH)-evoked release of [ 3 H]dopamine were assessed in vitro to determine whether MK-801 inhibition of METH neurotoxicity might be mediated presynaptically, and to evaluate the effects of glutamatergic stimulation on METH-evoked dopamine release. MK-801 inhibition of glutamate- or METH-evoked dopamine release might reduce synaptic dopamine levels during METH exposure and decrease the formation of 6-hydroxydopamine or other related neurotoxins. Without Mg 2+ present, 40 microM and 1 mM glutamate evoked a N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated [ 3 H]dopamine and [ 3 H]metabolite (tritium) release of 3 to 6 and 12 to 16% of total tritium stores, respectively, from striatal slices. With 1.50 mM Mg 2+ present, 10 mM glutamate alone or in combination with the dopamine uptake blocker nomifensine released only 2.1 or 4.2%, respectively, of total tritium stores, and release was only partially dependent on N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors. With or without 1.50 mM Mg 2+ present, 0.5 or 5 microM METH evoked a substantial release of tritium (5-8 or 12-21% of total stores, respectively). METH-evoked dopamine release was not affected by 5 microM MK-801 but METH-evoked release was additive with glutamate-evoked release. Without Mg 2+ present, 1 mM glutamine increased glutamate release and induced the release of [ 3 H]dopamine and metabolites. Both 0.5 and 5 microM METH also increased tritium release with 1 mM glutamine present. When striatal slices were exposed to 5 microM METH this glutamine-evoked release of glutamate was increased more than 50%

  7. The glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) mediates L-glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release via swelling-activated anion channels in cultured neonatal rodent astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Darius J R; Lawen, Alfons

    2013-03-01

    Vitamin C (ascorbate) plays important neuroprotective and neuromodulatory roles in the mammalian brain. Astrocytes are crucially involved in brain ascorbate homeostasis and may assist in regenerating extracellular ascorbate from its oxidised forms. Ascorbate accumulated by astrocytes can be released rapidly by a process that is stimulated by the excitatory amino acid, L-glutamate. This process is thought to be neuroprotective against excitotoxicity. Although of potential clinical interest, the mechanism of this stimulated ascorbate-release remains unknown. Here, we report that primary cultures of mouse and rat astrocytes release ascorbate following initial uptake of dehydroascorbate and accumulation of intracellular ascorbate. Ascorbate-release was not due to cellular lysis, as assessed by cellular release of the cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase, and was stimulated by L-glutamate and L-aspartate, but not the non-excitatory amino acid L-glutamine. This stimulation was due to glutamate-induced cellular swelling, as it was both attenuated by hypertonic and emulated by hypotonic media. Glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release was also sensitive to inhibitors of volume-sensitive anion channels, suggesting that the latter may provide the conduit for ascorbate efflux. Glutamate-stimulated ascorbate-release was not recapitulated by selective agonists of either ionotropic or group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, but was completely blocked by either of two compounds, TFB-TBOA and UCPH-101, which non-selectively and selectively inhibit the glial Na(+)-dependent excitatory amino acid transporter, GLAST, respectively. These results suggest that an impairment of astrocytic ascorbate-release may exacerbate neuronal dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders and acute brain injury in which excitotoxicity and/or GLAST deregulation have been implicated.

  8. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase deficiency alters levels of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in brain tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.M. Jadavji

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR is an enzyme key regulator in folate metabolism. Deficiencies in MTHFR result in increased levels of homocysteine, which leads to reduced levels of S-adenosylmethionine (SAM. In the brain, SAM donates methyl groups to catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, which is involved in neurotransmitter analysis. Using the MTHFR-deficient mouse model the purpose of this study was to investigate levels of monoamine neurotransmitters and amino acid levels in brain tissue. MTHFR deficiency affected levels of both glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid in within the cerebellum and hippocampus. Mthfr−/− mice had reduced levels of glutamate in the amygdala and γ-aminobutyric acid in the thalamus. The excitatory mechanisms of homocysteine through activation of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor in brain tissue might alter levels of glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid.

  9. Altered astrocyte glutamate transporter regulation of hypothalamic neurosecretory neurons in heart failure rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapenko, Evgeniy S; Biancardi, Vinicia C; Zhou, Yiqiang; Stern, Javier E

    2012-08-01

    Neurohumoral activation, which includes augmented plasma levels of the neurohormone vasopressin (VP), is a common finding in heart failure (HF) that contributes to morbidity and mortality in this disease. While an increased activation of magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs) and enhanced glutamate function in HF is well documented, the precise underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. Here, we combined electrophysiology and protein measurements to determine whether altered glial glutamate transporter function and/or expression occurs in the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus (SON) during HF. Patch-clamp recordings obtained from MNCs in brain slices show that pharmacological blockade of astrocyte glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1) function [500 μM dihydrokainate (DHK)], resulted in a persistent N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated inward current (tonic I(NMDA)) in sham rats, an effect that was significantly smaller in MNCs from HF rats. In addition, we found a diminished GLT1 protein content in plasma membrane (but not cytosolic) fractions of SON punches in HF rats. Conversely, astrocyte GLAST expression was significantly higher in the SON of HF rats, while nonselective blockade of glutamate transport activity (100 μM TBOA) evoked an enhanced tonic I(NMDA) activation in HF rats. Steady-state activation of NMDARs by extracellular glutamate levels was diminished during HF. Taken together, these results support a shift in the relative expression and function of two major glial glutamate transporters (from GLT1 to GLAST predominance) during HF. This shift may act as a compensatory mechanism to preserve an adequate basal glutamate uptake level in the face of an enhanced glutamatergic afferent activity in HF rats.

  10. Ischemic damage in hippocampal CA1 is dependent on glutamate release and intact innervation from CA3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benveniste, H; Jørgensen, M B; Sandberg, M

    1989-01-01

    The removal of glutamatergic afferents to CA1 by destruction of the CA3 region is known to protect CA1 pyramidal cells against 10 min of transient global ischemia. To investigate further the pathogenetic significance of glutamate, we measured the release of glutamate in intact and CA3-lesioned CA...

  11. Postnatal Administration of Allopregnanolone Modifies Glutamate Release but Not BDNF Content in Striatum Samples of Rats Prenatally Exposed to Ethanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Yunes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol consumption during pregnancy may induce profound changes in fetal CNS development. We postulate that some of the effects of ethanol on striatal glutamatergic transmission and neurotrophin expression could be modulated by allopregnanolone, a neurosteroid modulator of GABAA receptor activity. We describe the acute pharmacological effect of allopregnanolone (65 μg/kg, s.c. administered to juvenile male rats (day 21 of age on the corticostriatal glutamatergic pathway, in both control and prenatally ethanol-exposed rats (two ip injections of 2.9 g/kg in 24% v/v saline solution on gestational day 8. Prenatal ethanol administration decreased the K+-induced release of glutamate regarding the control group. Interestingly, this effect was reverted by allopregnanolone. Regarding BDNF, allopregnanolone decreases the content of this neurotrophic factor in the striatum of control groups. However, both ethanol alone and ethanol plus allopregnanolone treated animals did not show any change regarding control values. We suggest that prenatal ethanol exposure may produce an alteration of GABAA receptors which blocks the GABA agonist-like effect of allopregnanolone on rapid glutamate release, thus disturbing normal neural transmission. Furthermore, the reciprocal interactions found between GABAergic neurosteroids and BDNF could underlie mechanisms operating during the neuronal plasticity of fetal development.

  12. NMDAR-mediated calcium transients elicited by glutamate co-release at developing inhibitory synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Kalmbach

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Before hearing onset, the topographic organization of the inhibitory sound localization pathway from the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB to the lateral superior olive (LSO is refined by means of synaptic silencing and strengthening. During this refinement period MNTB-LSO synapses not only release GABA and glycine but also release glutamate. This co-released glutamate can elicit postsynaptic currents that are predominantly mediated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs. To gain a better understanding of how glutamate contributes to synaptic signaling at developing MNTB-LSO inhibitory synapse, we investigated to what degree and under what conditions NMDARs contribute to postsynaptic calcium responses. Our results demonstrate that MNTB-LSO synapses can elicit compartmentalized calcium responses along aspiny LSO dendrites. These responses are significantly attenuated by the NMDARs antagonist APV. APV, however, has no effect on somatically recorded electrical postsynaptic responses, indicating little, if any, contribution of NMDARs to spike generation. Small NMDAR-mediated calcium responses were also observed under physiological levels of extracellular magnesium concentrations indicating that MNTB-LSO synapses activate magnesium sensitive NMDAR on immature LSO dendrites. In Fura-2 AM loaded neurons, blocking GABAA and glycine receptors decreased NMDAR contribution to somatic calcium responses suggesting that GABA and glycine, perhaps by shunting backpropagating action potentials, decrease the level of NMDAR activation under strong stimulus conditions.

  13. The effect of nucleotides and adenosine on stimulus-evoked glutamate release from rat brain cortical slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, G C; Boarder, M R

    2000-10-01

    Evidence has previously been presented that P1 receptors for adenosine, and P2 receptors for nucleotides such as ATP, regulate stimulus-evoked release of biogenic amines from nerve terminals in the brain. Here we investigated whether adenosine and nucleotides exert presynaptic control over depolarisation-elicited glutamate release. Slices of rat brain cortex were perfused and stimulated with pulses of 46 mM K(+) in the presence of the glutamate uptake inhibitor L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic acid (0.2 mM). High K(+) substantially increased efflux of glutamate from the slices. Basal glutamate release was unchanged by the presence of nucleotides or adenosine at concentrations of 300 microM. Adenosine, ATP, ADP and adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphoshate) at 300 microM attenuated depolarisation-evoked release of glutamate. However UTP, 2-methylthio ATP, 2-methylthio ADP, and alpha,beta-methylene ATP at 300 microM had no effect on stimulated glutamate efflux. Adenosine deaminase blocked the effect of adenosine, but left the response to ATP unchanged. The A(1) antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine antagonised the inhibitory effect of both adenosine and ATP. Cibacron blue 3GA inhibited stimulus-evoked glutamate release when applied alone. When cibacron blue 3GA was present with ATP, stimulus-evoked glutamate release was almost eliminated. However, this P2 antagonist had no effect on the inhibition by adenosine. These results show that the release of glutamate from depolarised nerve terminals of the rat cerebral cortex is inhibited by adenosine and ATP. ATP appears to act directly and not through conversion to adenosine.

  14. Acute stress increases depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the rat prefrontal/frontal cortex: the dampening action of antidepressants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Musazzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral stress is recognized as a main risk factor for neuropsychiatric diseases. Converging evidence suggested that acute stress is associated with increase of excitatory transmission in certain forebrain areas. Aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism whereby acute stress increases glutamate release, and if therapeutic drugs prevent the effect of stress on glutamate release.Rats were chronically treated with vehicle or drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (fluoxetine, desipramine, venlafaxine, agomelatine and then subjected to unpredictable footshock stress. Acute stress induced marked increase in depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex in superfusion, and the chronic drug treatments prevented the increase of glutamate release. Stress induced rapid increase in the circulating levels of corticosterone in all rats (both vehicle- and drug-treated, and glutamate release increase was blocked by previous administration of selective antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (RU 486. On the molecular level, stress induced accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complexes in synaptic membranes (both in vehicle- and drug-treated rats. Patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex revealed that stress increased glutamatergic transmission through both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and that antidepressants may normalize it by reducing release probability.Acute footshock stress up-regulated depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex. Stress-induced increase of glutamate release was dependent on stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor by corticosterone. Because all drugs employed did not block either elevation of corticosterone or accumulation of SNARE complexes, the dampening action of the drugs on glutamate release must be downstream of these processes. This novel effect of antidepressants on the response to stress

  15. Deletion of glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (Glud1) in the central nervous system affects glutamate handling without altering synaptic transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigerio, Francesca; Karaca, Melis; De Roo, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH), encoded by GLUD1, participates in the breakdown and synthesis of glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter. In the CNS, besides its primary signaling function, glutamate is also at the crossroad of metabolic and neurotransmitter pathways. Importance of brain GDH...... was questioned here by generation of CNS-specific GDH-null mice (CnsGlud1(-/-)); which were viable, fertile and without apparent behavioral problems. GDH immunoreactivity as well as enzymatic activity were absent in Cns-Glud1(-/-) brains. Immunohistochemical analyses on brain sections revealed that the pyramidal...... oxidative catabolism of glutamate in astrocytes, showing that GDH is required for Krebs cycle pathway. As revealed by NMR studies, brain glutamate levels remained unchanged, whereas glutamine levels were increased. This pattern was favored by up-regulation of astrocyte-type glutamate and glutamine...

  16. Contribution of altered signal transduction associated to glutamate receptors in brain to the neurological alterations of hepatic encephalopathy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vicente Felipo

    2006-01-01

    Patients with liver disease may present hepatic encephalopathy (HE), a complex neuropsychiatric syndrome covering a wide range of neurological alterations,including cognitive and motor disturbances. HE reduces the quality of life of the patients and is associated with poor prognosis. In the worse cases HE may lead to coma or death.The mechanisms leading to HE which are not well known are being studied using animal models. The neurological alterations in HE are a consequence of impaired cerebral function mainly due to alterations in neurotransmission. We review here some studies indicating that alterations in neurotransmission associated to different types of glutamate receptors are responsible for some of the cognitive and motor alterations present in HE.These studies show that the function of the signal transduction pathway glutamate-nitric oxide-cGMP associated to the NMDA type of glutamate receptors is impaired in brain in vivo in HE animal models as well as in brain of patients died of HE. Activation of NMDA receptors in brain activates this pathway and increases cGMP. In animal models of HE this increase in cGMP induced by activation of NMDA receptors is reduced,which is responsible for the impairment in learning ability in these animal models. Increasing cGMP by pharmacological means restores learning ability in rats with HE and may be a new therapeutic approach to improve cognitive function in patients with HE.However, it is necessary to previously assess the possible secondary effects.Patients with HE may present psychomotor slowing,hypokinesia and bradykinesia. Animal models of HE also show hypolocomotion. It has been shown in rats with HE that hypolocomotion is due to excessive activation of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in substantia nigra pars reticulata. Blocking mGluR1 in this brain area normalizes motor activity in the rats, suggesting that a similar treatment for patients with HE could be useful to treat psychomotor slowing and

  17. Monte carlo simulation of vesicular release, spatiotemporal distribution of glutamate in synaptic cleft and generation of postsynaptic currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavinovíc, M I

    1999-02-01

    The release of vesicular glutamate, spatiotemporal changes in glutamate concentration in the synaptic cleft and the subsequent generation of fast excitatory postsynaptic currents at a hippocampal synapse were modeled using the Monte Carlo method. It is assumed that glutamate is released from a spherical vesicle through a cylindrical fusion pore into the synaptic cleft and that S-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy -5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptors are uniformly distributed postsynaptically. The time course of change in vesicular concentration can be described by a single exponential, but a slow tail is also observed though only following the release of most of the glutamate. The time constant of decay increases with vesicular size and a lower diffusion constant, and is independent of the initial concentration, becoming markedly shorter for wider fusion pores. The cleft concentration at the fusion pore mouth is not negligible compared to vesicular concentration, especially for wider fusion pores. Lateral equilibration of glutamate is rapid, and within approximately 50 micros all AMPA receptors on average see the same concentration of glutamate. Nevertheless the single-channel current and the number of channels estimated from mean-variance plots are unreliable and different when estimated from rise- and decay-current segments. Greater saturation of AMPA receptor channels provides higher but not more accurate estimates. Two factors contribute to the variability of postsynaptic currents and render the mean-variance nonstationary analysis unreliable, even when all receptors see on average the same glutamate concentration. Firstly, the variability of the instantaneous cleft concentration of glutamate, unlike the mean concentration, first rapidly decreases before slowly increasing; the variability is greater for fewer molecules in the cleft and is spatially nonuniform. Secondly, the efficacy with which glutamate produces a response changes with time. Understanding

  18. Potentiation of insulin release in response to amino acid methyl esters correlates to activation of islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofod, Hans; Lernmark, A; Hedeskov, C J

    1986-01-01

    Column perifusion of mouse pancreatic islets was used to study the ability of amino acids and their methyl esters to influence insulin release and activate islet glutamate dehydrogenase activity. In the absence of L-glutamine, L-serine and the methyl ester of L-phenylalanine, but neither L...... glutamate dehydrogenase activity showed that only the two methyl esters of L-phenylalanine and L-serine activated the enzyme. It is concluded that the mechanism by which methyl esters of amino acids potentiate insulin release is most likely to be mediated by the activation of pancreatic beta-cell glutamate...

  19. Effects of Chronic Alcohol Exposure on the Modulation of Ischemia-Induced Glutamate Release via Cannabinoid Receptors in the Dorsal Hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lei; Wu, Xiaoda; Dong, Xiao; Ding, Xinli; Song, Cunfeng

    2015-10-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption is a critical contributing factor to ischemic stroke, as it enhances ischemia-induced glutamate release, leading to more severe excitotoxicity and brain damage. But the neural mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. We evaluated the effects of chronic alcohol exposure on the modulation of ischemia-induced glutamate release via CB1 and CB2 cannabinoid receptors during middle cerebral artery occlusion, using in vivo microdialysis coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography, in alcohol-naïve rats or rats after 1 or 30 days of withdrawal from chronic ethanol intake (6% v/v for 14 days). Intra-dorsal hippocampus (DH) infusions of ACEA or JWH133, selective CB1 or CB2 receptor agonists, respectively, decreased glutamate release in the DH in alcohol-naïve rats in a dose-dependent manner. Such an effect was reversed by co-infusions of SR141716A or AM630, selective CB1 or CB2 receptor antagonists, respectively. After 30 days, but not 1 day of withdrawal, ischemia induced an enhancement in glutamate release in the DH, as compared with non-alcohol-treated control group. Intra-DH infusions of JWH133, but not ACEA, inhibited ischemia-induced glutamate release in the DH after 30 days of withdrawal. Finally, 1 day of withdrawal did not alter the protein level of CB1 or CB2 receptors in the DH, as compared to non-alcohol-treated control rats. Whereas 30 days of withdrawal robustly decreased the protein level of CB1 receptors, but failed to alter the protein level of CB2 receptors, in the DH, as compared to non-alcohol-treated control rats. Together, these findings suggest that loss of expression/function of CB1 receptors, but not CB2 receptors in the DH, is correlated with the enhancement of ischemia-induced glutamate release after prolonged alcohol withdrawal. Copyright © 2015 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  20. Cerebellar Kainate Receptor-Mediated Facilitation of Glutamate Release Requires Ca2+-Calmodulin and PKA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Falcón-Moya

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available We elucidated the mechanisms underlying the kainate receptor (KAR-mediated facilitatory modulation of synaptic transmission in the cerebellum. In cerebellar slices, KA (3 μM increased the amplitude of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs at synapses between axon terminals of parallel fibers (PF and Purkinje neurons. KA-mediated facilitation was antagonized by NBQX under condition where AMPA receptors were previously antagonized. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA suppressed the effect of KA on glutamate release, which was also obviated by the prior stimulation of adenylyl cyclase (AC. KAR-mediated facilitation of synaptic transmission was prevented by blocking Ca2+ permeant KARs using philanthotoxin. Furthermore, depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores by thapsigargin, or inhibition of Ca2+-induced Ca2+-release by ryanodine, abrogated the synaptic facilitation by KA. Thus, the KA-mediated modulation was conditional on extracellular Ca2+ entry through Ca2+-permeable KARs, as well as and mobilization of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Finally, KAR-mediated facilitation was sensitive to calmodulin inhibitors, W-7 and calmidazolium, indicating that the increased cytosolic [Ca2+] sustaining KAR-mediated facilitation of synaptic transmission operates through a downstream Ca2+/calmodulin coupling. We conclude that, at cerebellar parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses, presynaptic KARs mediate glutamate release facilitation, and thereby enhance synaptic transmission through Ca2+-calmodulin dependent activation of adenylyl cyclase/cAMP/protein kinase A signaling.

  1. Isolation of TRPV1 independent mechanisms of spontaneous and asynchronous glutamate release at primary afferent to NTS synapses.

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    Axel J. Fenwick

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cranial visceral afferents contained within the solitary tract (ST contact second-order neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS and release the excitatory amino acid glutamate via three distinct exocytosis pathways; synchronous, asynchronous, and spontaneous release. The presence of TRPV1 in the central terminals of a majority of ST afferents conveys activity-dependent asynchronous glutamate release and provides a temperature sensitive calcium conductance which largely determines the rate of spontaneous vesicle fusion. TRPV1 is present in unmyelinated C-fiber afferents and these facilitated forms of glutamate release may underlie the relative strength of C-fibers in activating autonomic reflex pathways. However, pharmacological blockade of TRPV1 signaling eliminates only ~50% of the asynchronous profile and attenuates the temperature sensitivity of spontaneous release indicating additional thermosensitive calcium influx pathways may exist which mediate these forms of vesicle release. In the present study we isolate the contribution of TRPV1 independent forms of glutamate release at ST-NTS synapses. We found ST afferent innervation at NTS neurons and synchronous vesicle release from TRPV1 KO mice was not different to control animals; however, only half of TRPV1 KO ST afferents completely lacked asynchronous glutamate release. Further, temperature driven spontaneous rates of vesicle release were not different from 33˚ - 37˚C between control and TRPV1 KO afferents. These findings suggest additional temperature dependent mechanisms controlling asynchronous and thermosensitive spontaneous release at physiological temperatures, possibly mediated by additional thermosensitive TRP channels in primary afferent terminals.

  2. Off-line concomitant release of dopamine and glutamate involvement in taste memory consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Ramos, Kioko; Osorio-Gómez, Daniel; Moreno-Castilla, Perla; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico

    2010-07-01

    It has been postulated that memory consolidation process requires post-learning molecular changes that will support long-term experiences. In the present study, we assessed with in vivo microdialysis and capillary electrophoresis whether such changes involve the release of neurotransmitters at post-acquisition stages. Using conditioned taste aversion paradigm we observed spontaneous off-line (i.e. in absence of stimulation) dopamine and glutamate reactivation within the insular cortex about 45 min after the stimuli association. These increments did not appear in control groups that were unable to acquire the task, and it seems to be dependent on amygdala activity since its reversible inactivation by tetrodotoxin impaired cortical off-line release of both neurotransmitters and memory consolidation. In addition, blockade of dopaminergic D1 and/or NMDA receptors before the off-line activity impaired long- but not short-term memory. These results suggest that off-line extracellular increments of glutamate and dopamine have a significant functional role in consolidation of taste memory.

  3. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilbride Seán M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2 and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1 are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  4. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kilbride, Sean M

    2011-07-26

    Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2) and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1) are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington\\'s disease and Alzheimer\\'s disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  5. Cocaine serves as a peripheral interoceptive conditioned stimulus for central glutamate and dopamine release.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy A Wise

    Full Text Available Intravenous injections of cocaine HCl are habit-forming because, among their many actions, they elevate extracellular dopamine levels in the terminal fields of the mesocorticolimbic dopamine system. This action, thought to be very important for cocaine's strong addiction liability, is believed to have very short latency and is assumed to reflect rapid brain entry and pharmacokinetics of the drug. However, while intravenous cocaine HCl has almost immediate effects on behavior and extracellular dopamine levels, recent evidence suggests that its central pharmacological effects are not evident until 10 or more seconds after IV injection. Thus the immediate effects of a given intravenous cocaine injection on extracellular dopamine concentration and behavior appear to occur before there is sufficient time for cocaine to act centrally as a dopamine uptake inhibitor. To explore the contribution of peripheral effects of cocaine to the early activation of the dopamine system, we used brain microdialysis to measure the effects of cocaine methiodide (MI--a cocaine analogue that does not cross the blood brain barrier--on glutamate (excitatory input to the dopamine cells. IP injections of cocaine MI were ineffective in cocaine-naïve animals but stimulated ventral tegmental glutamate release in rats previously trained to lever-press for cocaine HCl. This peripherally triggered glutamate input was sufficient to reinstate cocaine-seeking in previously trained animals that had undergone extinction of the habit. These findings offer an explanation for short-latency behavioral responses and immediate dopamine elevations seen following cocaine injections in cocaine-experienced but not cocaine-naïve animals.

  6. The effect of nucleotides and adenosine on stimulus-evoked glutamate release from rat brain cortical slices

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, Gillian C; Boarder, Michael R

    2000-01-01

    Evidence has previously been presented that P1 receptors for adenosine, and P2 receptors for nucleotides such as ATP, regulate stimulus-evoked release of biogenic amines from nerve terminals in the brain. Here we investigated whether adenosine and nucleotides exert presynaptic control over depolarisation-elicited glutamate release.Slices of rat brain cortex were perfused and stimulated with pulses of 46 mM K+ in the presence of the glutamate uptake inhibitor L-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxyl...

  7. TRPA1 activation by lidocaine in nerve terminals results in glutamate release increase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piao, L.-H.; Fujita, Tsugumi; Jiang, C.-Y.; Liu Tao; Yue, H.-Y.; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2009-01-01

    We examined the effects of local anesthetics lidocaine and procaine on glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory transmission in substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons in adult rat spinal cord slices with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Bath-applied lidocaine (1-5 mM) dose-dependently and reversibly increased the frequency but not the amplitude of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current (sEPSC) in SG neurons. Lidocaine activity was unaffected by the Na + -channel blocker, tetrodotoxin, and the TRPV1 antagonist, capsazepine, but was inhibited by the TRP antagonist, ruthenium red. In the same neuron, the TRPA1 agonist, allyl isothiocyanate, and lidocaine both increased sEPSC frequency. In contrast, procaine did not produce presynaptic enhancement. These results indicate that lidocaine activates TRPA1 in nerve terminals presynaptic to SG neurons to increase the spontaneous release of L-glutamate.

  8. Ciproxifan, a histamine H{sub 3} receptor antagonist and inverse agonist, presynaptically inhibits glutamate release in rat hippocampus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Lin, Tzu-Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei City 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan 320, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chia-Ying [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei City 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Chemistry, Fu Jen Catholic University, No. 510, Chung-Cheng Road, Hsin-Chuang District, New Taipei City 24205, Taiwan (China); Huang, Shu-Kuei [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei City 22060, Taiwan (China); Wang, Su-Jane, E-mail: med0003@mail.fju.edu.tw [School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No. 510, Chung-Cheng Rd., Hsin-Chuang, New Taipei 24205, Taiwan (China); Research Center for Chinese Herbal Medicine, College of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan City, Taiwan (China)

    2017-03-15

    Ciproxifan is an H{sub 3} receptor antagonist and inverse agonist with antipsychotic effects in several preclinical models; its effect on glutamate release has been investigated in the rat hippocampus. In a synaptosomal preparation, ciproxifan reduced 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-evoked Ca{sup 2+}-dependent glutamate release and cytosolic Ca{sup 2+} concentration elevation but did not affect the membrane potential. The inhibitory effect of ciproxifan on 4-AP-evoked glutamate release was prevented by the Gi/Go-protein inhibitor pertussis toxin and Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, but was not affected by the intracellular Ca{sup 2+}-release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157. Furthermore, the phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) inhibitor OBAA, prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), PGE2 subtype 2 (EP{sub 2}) receptor antagonist PF04418948, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) inhibitor FR180204 eliminated the inhibitory effect of ciproxifan on glutamate release. Ciproxifan reduced the 4-AP-evoked phosphorylation of ERK and synapsin I, a presynaptic target of ERK. The ciproxifan-mediated inhibition of glutamate release was prevented in synaptosomes from synapsin I-deficient mice. Moreover, ciproxifan reduced the frequency of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents without affecting their amplitude in hippocampal slices. Our data suggest that ciproxifan, acting through the blockade of Gi/Go protein-coupled H{sub 3} receptors present on hippocampal nerve terminals, reduces voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry by diminishing PLA{sub 2}/PGE{sub 2}/EP{sub 2} receptor pathway, which subsequently suppresses the ERK/synapsin I cascade to decrease the evoked glutamate release. - Highlights: • Ciproxifan presynaptically reduces glutamate release in the hippocampus in vitro. • Decrease in voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} influx is involved. • A role for the PLA{sub 2}/PGE{sub 2}/EP{sub 2} pathway in the action of

  9. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, Gert Helge; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    differences in the mode of action of the two depolarizing stimuli were reflected in the properties of the increase in [Ca++]i elicited by 55 mM K+ and 100 microM glutamate, respectively. The K(+)-induced increase in [Ca++]i was reduced by both verapamil and Ca(++)-free media whereas the corresponding...... neurotransmitter glutamate (100 microM). Both depolarizing stimuli exerted prompt increases in the release of preloaded [3H]GABA as well as in [Ca++]i. However, the basic properties of transmitter release and the increase in [Ca++]i under a variety of conditions were different during stimulation with K...... was also reduced by organic (verapamil) and inorganic (Co++) Ca++ channel blockers but was insensitive to the GABA transport inhibitor SKF 89976A. In contrast, the second phase was less sensitive to nocodazole and Ca++ channel antagonists but could be inhibited by SKF 89976A. The glutamate-induced [3H...

  10. Group I mGlu receptors potentiate synaptosomal [3H]glutamate release independently of exogenously applied arachidonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, M.E.; Toms, N.J.; Bedingfield, J.S.; Roberts, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    In the current study, we have characterized group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor enhancement of 4-aminopyridine (4AP)-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. The broad spectrum mGlu receptor agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid ((1S,3R)-ACPD, 10 μM) increased 4AP-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release (143.32±2.73% control) only in the presence of exogenously applied arachidonic acid; an effect reversed by the inclusion of bovine serum albumin (BSA, fatty acid free). In contrast, the selective group I mGlu receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) potentiated (EC 50 =1.60±0.25 μM; E max =147.61±10.96% control) 4AP-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release, in the absence of arachidonic acid. This potentiation could be abolished by either the selective mGlu 1 receptor antagonist (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA, 1 mM) or the selective PKC inhibitor (Ro 31-8220, 10 μM) and was BSA-insensitive. The selective mGlu 5 receptor agonist (R,S)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG, 300μM) was without effect. DHPG (100 μM) also potentiated both 30 mM and 50 mM K + -evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release (121.60±12.77% and 121.50±4.45% control, respectively). DHPG (100 μM) failed to influence both 4AP-stimulated 45 Ca 2+ influx and 50 mM K + -induced changes in synaptosomal membrane potential. Possible group I mGlu receptor suppression of tonic adenosine A 1 receptor, group II/III mGlu receptors or GABA B receptor activity is unlikely since 4AP-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release was insensitive to the selective inhibitory receptor antagonists 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine, (R,S)-α-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine or CGP55845A, respectively. These data suggest an 'mGlu 1 receptor-like' receptor potentiates [ 3 H]glutamate release from cerebrocortical synaptosomes in the absence of exogenously applied arachidonic acid. This PKC dependent effect is unlikely to be via modulation of synaptosomal membrane

  11. Binge Toluene Exposure Alters Glutamate, Glutamine and GABA in the Adolescent Rat Brain as Measured by Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrine, Shane A.; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K.; Galloway, Matthew P.; Hannigan, John H.; Bowen, Scott E.

    2010-01-01

    Despite the high incidence of toluene abuse in adolescents, little is known regarding the effect of binge exposure on neurochemical profiles during this developmental stage. In the current study, the effects of binge toluene exposure during adolescence on neurotransmitter levels were determined using high-resolution proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ex vivo at 11.7 T. Adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to toluene (0, 8,000 , or 12,000 ppm) for 15 min twice daily from postnatal day 28 (P28) through P34 and then euthanized either one or seven days later (on P35 or P42) to assess glutamate, glutamine, and GABA levels in intact tissue punches from the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), anterior striatum and hippocampus. In the mPFC, toluene reduced glutamate one day after exposure, with no effect on GABA, while after seven days, glutamate was no longer affected but there was an increase in GABA levels. In the hippocampus, neither GABA nor glutamate was altered one day after exposure, whereas seven days after exposure, increases were observed in GABA and glutamate. Striatal glutamate and GABA levels measured after either one or seven days were not altered after toluene exposure. These findings show that one week of binge toluene inhalation selectively alters these neurotransmitters in the mPFC and hippocampus in adolescent rats, and that some of these effects endure at least one week after the exposure. The results suggest that age-dependent, differential neurochemical responses to toluene may contribute to the unique behavioral patterns associated with drug abuse among older children and young teens. PMID:21126832

  12. Glutamate Counteracts Dopamine/PKA Signaling via Dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 Ser-97 and Alteration of Its Cytonuclear Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Akinori; Matamales, Miriam; Musante, Veronica; Valjent, Emmanuel; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Kitahara, Yosuke; Rebholz, Heike; Greengard, Paul; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Nairn, Angus C

    2017-01-27

    The interaction of glutamate and dopamine in the striatum is heavily dependent on signaling pathways that converge on the regulatory protein DARPP-32. The efficacy of dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling is regulated by DARPP-32 phosphorylated at Thr-34 (the PKA site), a process that inhibits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and potentiates PKA action. Activation of dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling also leads to dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 (the CK2 site), leading to localization of phospho-Thr-34 DARPP-32 in the nucleus where it also inhibits PP1. In this study the role of glutamate in the regulation of DARPP-32 phosphorylation at four major sites was further investigated. Experiments using striatal slices revealed that glutamate decreased the phosphorylation states of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 as well as Thr-34, Thr-75, and Ser-130 by activating NMDA or AMPA receptors in both direct and indirect pathway striatal neurons. The effect of glutamate in decreasing Ser-97 phosphorylation was mediated by activation of PP2A. In vitro phosphatase assays indicated that the PP2A/PR72 heterotrimer complex was likely responsible for glutamate/Ca 2+ -regulated dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97. As a consequence of Ser-97 dephosphorylation, glutamate induced the nuclear localization in cultured striatal neurons of dephospho-Thr-34/dephospho-Ser-97 DARPP-32. It also reduced PKA-dependent DARPP-32 signaling in slices and in vivo Taken together, the results suggest that by inducing dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 and altering its cytonuclear distribution, glutamate may counteract dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling at multiple cellular levels. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Glutamate Counteracts Dopamine/PKA Signaling via Dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 Ser-97 and Alteration of Its Cytonuclear Distribution*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Akinori; Matamales, Miriam; Musante, Veronica; Valjent, Emmanuel; Kuroiwa, Mahomi; Kitahara, Yosuke; Rebholz, Heike; Greengard, Paul; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Nairn, Angus C.

    2017-01-01

    The interaction of glutamate and dopamine in the striatum is heavily dependent on signaling pathways that converge on the regulatory protein DARPP-32. The efficacy of dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling is regulated by DARPP-32 phosphorylated at Thr-34 (the PKA site), a process that inhibits protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and potentiates PKA action. Activation of dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling also leads to dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 (the CK2 site), leading to localization of phospho-Thr-34 DARPP-32 in the nucleus where it also inhibits PP1. In this study the role of glutamate in the regulation of DARPP-32 phosphorylation at four major sites was further investigated. Experiments using striatal slices revealed that glutamate decreased the phosphorylation states of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 as well as Thr-34, Thr-75, and Ser-130 by activating NMDA or AMPA receptors in both direct and indirect pathway striatal neurons. The effect of glutamate in decreasing Ser-97 phosphorylation was mediated by activation of PP2A. In vitro phosphatase assays indicated that the PP2A/PR72 heterotrimer complex was likely responsible for glutamate/Ca2+-regulated dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97. As a consequence of Ser-97 dephosphorylation, glutamate induced the nuclear localization in cultured striatal neurons of dephospho-Thr-34/dephospho-Ser-97 DARPP-32. It also reduced PKA-dependent DARPP-32 signaling in slices and in vivo. Taken together, the results suggest that by inducing dephosphorylation of DARPP-32 at Ser-97 and altering its cytonuclear distribution, glutamate may counteract dopamine/D1 receptor/PKA signaling at multiple cellular levels. PMID:27998980

  14. Altered Gradients of Glutamate and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid Transcripts in the Cortical Visuospatial Working Memory Network in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoftman, Gil D; Dienel, Samuel J; Bazmi, Holly H; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Kehui; Lewis, David A

    2018-04-15

    Visuospatial working memory (vsWM), which is impaired in schizophrenia, requires information transfer across multiple nodes in the cerebral cortex, including visual, posterior parietal, and dorsolateral prefrontal regions. Information is conveyed across these regions via the excitatory projections of glutamatergic pyramidal neurons located in layer 3, whose activity is modulated by local inhibitory gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) neurons. Key properties of these neurons differ across these cortical regions. Consequently, in schizophrenia, alterations in the expression of gene products regulating these properties could disrupt vsWM function in different ways, depending on the region(s) affected. Here, we quantified the expression of markers of glutamate and GABA neurotransmission selectively in layer 3 of four cortical regions in the vsWM network from 20 matched pairs of schizophrenia and unaffected comparison subjects. In comparison subjects, levels of glutamate transcripts tended to increase, whereas GABA transcript levels tended to decrease, from caudal to rostral, across cortical regions of the vsWM network. Composite measures across all transcripts revealed a significant effect of region, with the glutamate measure lowest in the primary visual cortex and highest in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, whereas the GABA measure showed the opposite pattern. In schizophrenia subjects, the expression levels of many of these transcripts were altered. However, this disease effect differed across regions, such that the caudal-to-rostral increase in the glutamate measure was blunted and the caudal-to-rostral decline in the GABA measure was enhanced in the illness. Differential alterations in layer 3 glutamate and GABA neurotransmission across cortical regions may contribute to vsWM deficits in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Depolarization-induced release of [(3)H]D-aspartate from GABAergic neurons caused by reversal of glutamate transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J B; Pickering, D S; Schousboe, A

    2000-01-01

    if glutamate in addition to gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) could be released from these cultures. The neurons were preloaded with [(3)H]D-aspartate and subsequently its release was followed during depolarization induced by a high potassium concentration or the alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4......-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor agonists, AMPA and kainate. Depolarization of the neurons with 55 mM potassium increased the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate by more than 10-fold. When the non-specific calcium-channel blockers cobalt or lanthanum were included in the stimulation buffer with potassium......, the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate was decreased by about 40%. These results indicated that some of the released [(3)H]D-aspartate might originate from a vesicular pool. When AMPA was applied to the neurons, the release of [(3)H]D-aspartate was increased 2-fold and could not be prevented or decreased...

  16. Real-time monitoring of extracellular l-glutamate levels released by high-frequency stimulation at region CA1 of hippocampal slices with a glass capillary-based l-glutamate sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Ikegami

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Real-time monitoring of l-glutamate released by high-frequency stimulation in region CA1 of mouse hippocampal slices was performed with a glass capillary-based sensor, in combination with the recoding of excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs. A method for extracting l-glutamate currents from the recorded ones was described and applied for determining the level of extracellular l-glutamate released by 100 Hz stimulation. Recording of an l-glutamate current with a current sampling interval of 1 Hz was found to be useful for acquiring a Faradaic current that reflects l-glutamate level released by the high-frequency stimulation of 7 trains, each 20 stimuli at 100 Hz and inter-train interval of 3 s. The l-glutamate level was obtained as 15 ± 6 μM (n = 8 for the persistent enhancement of fEPSPs, i.e., the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP, and 3 ± 1 μM (n = 5 for the case of no LTP induction. Based on these observations, the level of the extracellular l-glutamate was shown to play a crucial role in the induction of LTP.

  17. Altered expression patterns of group I and II metabotropic glutamate receptors in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geurts, J. J. G.; Wolswijk, G.; Bö, L.; van der Valk, P.; Polman, C. H.; Troost, D.; Aronica, E.

    2003-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a role for glutamate receptors in the pathophysiology of multiple sclerosis. In the present study, we have focused specifically on the expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) in multiple sclerosis brain tissue. The expression of group I (mGluR1alpha and

  18. Altered medial temporal activation related to local glutamate levels in subjects with prodromal signs of psychosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Valli, I; Stone, J; Mechelli, A; Bhattacharyya, S; Raffin, M; Allen, P; Fusar-Poli, P; Lythgoe, D; O'Gorman, R; Seal, M; McGuire, P

    2011-01-01

    In individuals at high risk of psychosis, medial temporal dysfunction seemed related to a loss of the normal relationship with local glutamate levels. This study provides the first evidence that links medial temporal dysfunction with the central glutamate system in humans and is consistent with evidence that drugs that modulate glutamatergic transmission might be useful in the treatment of psychosis.

  19. Localized infusions of the partial alpha 7 nicotinic receptor agonist SSR180711 evoke rapid and transient increases in prefrontal glutamate release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bortz, D M; Mikkelsen, J D; Bruno, J P

    2013-01-01

    The ability of local infusions of the alpha 7 nicotinic acetycholine receptor (α7 nAChR) partial agonist SSR180711 to evoke glutamate release in prefrontal cortex was determined in awake rats using a microelectrode array. Infusions of SSR180711 produced dose-dependent increases in glutamate levels...

  20. Influence of Monosodium Glutamate on Radiation-Induced Biochemical Alterations in Male Albino Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saada, H. N.; Said, U. Z.; Shedid, S.M.; Mahdy, E. M. E.; Elmezayen, H. E.

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of foods and beverages containing additives has intensely increased over the past decades. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is one of the main flavor enhancer that can be consumed in high concentrations. Also, human exposure to ionizing radiation (RAD) has become inevitable with its vast application in diagnosis and industry. Humans are frequently exposed to RAD and MSG from various food additives, therapeutic treatments and the environment. Although the use of additives and exposure to RAD in therapeutic treatments are believed to be relatively safe, their combined effects remain unclear. The present study proposed to investigate neurotoxic potentials of exposure to MSG and/or RAD on oxidative stress, neurotransmitters disturbance and metabolic disorders in the rat’s brain tissue. MSG was supplemented daily by gavages to rats at a dose of 450 mg/Kg bwt/day (equivalent to 5 g/day human consumption) for 7 days pre- and 21 days post-exposure to whole body gamma rays at doses of 2 Gy/week up to a total dose of 8 Gy. Exposure to MSG and/or RAD -induced oxidative stress, neurotransmitters disturbance and metabolic disorders. Oxidative stress was manifested by a significant increase in lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) and decrease in the activity of antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione content. The administration of MSG daily during exposure to gamma radiation has potentiated oxidative stress regarding each single treatment. MSG-exposure induced a highly significant decrease of serotonin (P<0.01) and a slight non significant increase (P>0.05) of aspartic and glutamic acids levels while in RAD- group the decrease of serotonin and the increase of amino acids were very highly significant (P<0.001). MSG + RAD-exposure had potentiated the decrease of serotonin and produced an additive effect on the increase of neurotransmitters amino acids. MSG as well as RAD-exposure increased (P<0.05) glucose and insulin levels with

  1. Limited energy supply in Müller cells alters glutamate uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft-Kehler, Anne Katrine; Skytt, Dorte Marie; Poulsen, Kristian Arild

    2014-01-01

    The viability of retinal ganglion cells (RGC) is essential for the maintenance of visual function. RGC homeostasis is maintained by the surrounding retinal glial cells, the Müller cells, which buffer the extracellular concentration of neurotransmitters and provide the RGCs with energy. This study...... evaluates if glucose-deprivation of Müller cells interferes with their ability to remove glutamate from the extracellular space. The human Müller glial cell line, Moorfields/Institute of Ophthalmology-Müller 1, was used to study changes in glutamate uptake. Excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) proteins...... were up-regulated in glucose-deprived Müller cells and glutamate uptake was significantly increased in the absence of glucose. The present findings revealed an up-regulation of EAAT1 and EAAT2 in glucose-deprived Müller cells as well as an increased ability to take up glutamate. Hence, glucose...

  2. Altered medial temporal activation related to local glutamate levels in subjects with prodromal signs of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Isabel; Stone, James; Mechelli, Andrea; Bhattacharyya, Sagnik; Raffin, Marie; Allen, Paul; Fusar-Poli, Paolo; Lythgoe, David; O'Gorman, Ruth; Seal, Marc; McGuire, Philip

    2011-01-01

    Both medial temporal cortical dysfunction and perturbed glutamatergic neurotransmission are regarded as fundamental pathophysiological features of psychosis. However, although animal models of psychosis suggest that these two abnormalities are interrelated, their relationship in humans has yet to be investigated. We used a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate the relationship between medial temporal activation during an episodic memory task and local glutamate levels in 22 individuals with an at-risk mental state for psychosis and 14 healthy volunteers. We observed a significant between-group difference in the coupling of medial temporal activation with local glutamate levels. In control subjects, medial temporal activation during episodic encoding was positively associated with medial temporal glutamate. However, in the clinical population, medial temporal activation was reduced, and the relationship with glutamate was absent. In individuals at high risk of psychosis, medial temporal dysfunction seemed related to a loss of the normal relationship with local glutamate levels. This study provides the first evidence that links medial temporal dysfunction with the central glutamate system in humans and is consistent with evidence that drugs that modulate glutamatergic transmission might be useful in the treatment of psychosis. Copyright © 2011 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Lycopene depresses glutamate release through inhibition of voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry and protein kinase C in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Wei; Hung, Chi-Feng; Jean, Wei-Horng; Lin, Tzu-Yu; Huang, Shu-Kuei; Wang, Su-Jane

    2018-05-01

    Lycopene is a natural dietary carotenoid that was reported to exhibit a neuroprotective profile. Considering that excitotoxicity and cell death induced by glutamate are involved in many brain disorders, the effect of lycopene on glutamate release in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals and the possible mechanism involved in such effect was investigated. We observed here that lycopene inhibited 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-evoked glutamate release and intrasynaptosomal Ca 2+ concentration elevation. The inhibitory effect of lycopene on 4-AP-evoked glutamate release was markedly reduced in the presence of the Ca v 2.2 (N-type) and Ca v 2.1 (P/Q-type) channel blocker ω-conotoxin MVIIC, but was insensitive to the intracellular Ca 2+ -release inhibitors dantrolene and CGP37157. Furthermore, in the presence of the protein kinase C inhibitors GF109203X and Go6976, the action of lycopene on evoked glutamate release was prevented. These results are the first to suggest that lycopene inhibits glutamate release from rat cortical synaptosomes by suppressing presynaptic Ca 2+ entry and protein kinase C activity.

  4. Nanofiber mat spinal cord dressing-released glutamate impairs blood-spinal cord barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Sulejczak

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available An excessive glutamate level can result in excitotoxic damage and death of central nervous system (CNS cells, and is involved in the pathogenesis of many CNS diseases. It may also be related to a failure of the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB. This study was aimed at examining the effects of extended administration of monosodium glutamate on the BSCB and spinal cord cells in adult male Wistar rats. The glutamate was delivered by subarachnoidal application of glutamate-carrying electrospun nanofiber mat dressing at the lumbar enlargement level. Half of the rats with the glutamate-loaded mat application were treated systemically with the histone deacetylase inhibitor valproic acid. A group of intact rats and a rat group with subarachnoidal application of an ‘empty’ (i.e., carrying no glutamate nanofiber mat dressing served as controls. All the rats were euthanized three weeks later and lumbar fragments of their spinal cords were harvested for histological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies. The samples from controls revealed normal parenchyma and BSCB morphology, whereas those from rats with the glutamate-loaded nanofiber mat dressing showed many intraparenchymal microhemorrhages of variable sizes. The capillaries in the vicinity of the glutamate-carrying dressing (in the meninges and white matter alike were edematous and leaky, and their endothelial cells showed degenerative changes: extensive swelling, enhanced vacuo­lization and the presence of vascular intraluminal projections. However, endothelial tight junctions were generally well preserved. Some endothelial cells were dying by necrosis or apoptosis. The adjacent parenchyma showed astrogliosis with astrocytic hypertrophy and swelling of perivascular astrocytic feet. Neurons in the parenchyma revealed multiple symptoms of degeneration, including, inter alia, perikaryal, dendritic and axonal swelling, and destruction of organelles. All the damage symptoms were slightly less

  5. Group I mGlu receptors potentiate synaptosomal [{sup 3}H]glutamate release independently of exogenously applied arachidonic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, M.E.; Toms, N.J.; Bedingfield, J.S.; Roberts, P.J. [Department of Pharmacology, School of Medical Sciences, University of Bristol, University Walk, Bristol, BS8 1TD (United Kingdom)

    1999-04-01

    In the current study, we have characterized group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor enhancement of 4-aminopyridine (4AP)-evoked [{sup 3}H]glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. The broad spectrum mGlu receptor agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid ((1S,3R)-ACPD, 10 {mu}M) increased 4AP-evoked [{sup 3}H]glutamate release (143.32{+-}2.73% control) only in the presence of exogenously applied arachidonic acid; an effect reversed by the inclusion of bovine serum albumin (BSA, fatty acid free). In contrast, the selective group I mGlu receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) potentiated (EC{sub 50}=1.60{+-}0.25 {mu}M; E{sub max}=147.61{+-}10.96% control) 4AP-evoked [{sup 3}H]glutamate release, in the absence of arachidonic acid. This potentiation could be abolished by either the selective mGlu{sub 1} receptor antagonist (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA, 1 mM) or the selective PKC inhibitor (Ro 31-8220, 10 {mu}M) and was BSA-insensitive. The selective mGlu{sub 5} receptor agonist (R,S)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG, 300{mu}M) was without effect. DHPG (100 {mu}M) also potentiated both 30 mM and 50 mM K{sup +}-evoked [{sup 3}H]glutamate release (121.60{+-}12.77% and 121.50{+-}4.45% control, respectively). DHPG (100 {mu}M) failed to influence both 4AP-stimulated {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} influx and 50 mM K{sup +}-induced changes in synaptosomal membrane potential. Possible group I mGlu receptor suppression of tonic adenosine A{sub 1} receptor, group II/III mGlu receptors or GABA{sub B} receptor activity is unlikely since 4AP-evoked [{sup 3}H]glutamate release was insensitive to the selective inhibitory receptor antagonists 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine, (R,S)-{alpha}-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine or CGP55845A, respectively. These data suggest an 'mGlu{sub 1} receptor-like' receptor potentiates [{sup 3}H]glutamate release from cerebrocortical synaptosomes in the absence of

  6. Neuroprotective effects of the novel glutamate transporter inhibitor (-)-3-hydroxy-4,5,6,6a-tetrahydro-3aH-pyrrolo[3,4-d]-isoxazole-4-carboxylic acid, which preferentially inhibits reverse transport (glutamate release) compared with glutamate reuptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colleoni, Simona; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Landucci, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    on the three hEAAT subtypes. (-)-HIP-A maintained the remarkable property, previously reported with the racemates, of inhibiting synaptosomal glutamate-induced [3H]D-aspartate release (reverse transport) at concentrations significantly lower than those inhibiting [3H]L-glutamate uptake. New data suggest...

  7. Estradiol induces dendritic spines by enhancing glutamate release independent of transcription: A mechanism for organizational sex differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Jaclyn M.; Liang, Shu-Ling; Thompson, Scott M.; McCarthy, Margaret M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The naturally occurring sex difference in dendritic spine number on hypothalamic neurons offers a unique opportunity to investigate mechanisms establishing synaptic patterning during perinatal sensitive periods. A major advantage of the model is the ability to treat neonatal females with estradiol to permanently induce the male phenotype. During the development of other systems, exuberant innervation is followed by activity-dependent pruning necessary for elimination of spurious synapses. In contrast, we demonstrate that estradiol-induced organization in the hypothalamus involves the induction of new synapses on dendritic spines. Activation of estrogen receptors by estradiol triggers a non-genomic activation of PI3 kinase that results in enhanced glutamate release from presynaptic neurons. Subsequent activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors activates MAP kinases inducing dendritic spine formation. These results reveal a trans-neuronal mechanism by which estradiol acts during a sensitive period to establish a profound and lasting sex difference in hypothalamic synaptic patterning. PMID:18498739

  8. Activation of presynaptic oxytocin receptors enhances glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus of prenatally restraint stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairesse, Jérôme; Gatta, Eleonora; Reynaert, Marie-Line; Marrocco, Jordan; Morley-Fletcher, Sara; Soichot, Marion; Deruyter, Lucie; Camp, Gilles Van; Bouwalerh, Hammou; Fagioli, Francesca; Pittaluga, Anna; Allorge, Delphine; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Maccari, Stefania

    2015-12-01

    Oxytocin receptors are known to modulate synaptic transmission and network activity in the hippocampus, but their precise function has been only partially elucidated. Here, we have found that activation of presynaptic oxytocin receptor with the potent agonist, carbetocin, enhanced depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus with no effect on GABA release. This evidence paved the way for examining the effect of carbetocin treatment in "prenatally restraint stressed" (PRS) rats, i.e., the offspring of dams exposed to repeated episodes of restraint stress during pregnancy. Adult PRS rats exhibit an anxious/depressive-like phenotype associated with an abnormal glucocorticoid feedback regulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and, remarkably, with a reduced depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the ventral hippocampus. Chronic systemic treatment with carbetocin (1mg/kg, i.p., once a day for 2-3 weeks) in PRS rats corrected the defect in glutamate release, anxiety- and depressive-like behavior, and abnormalities in social behavior, in the HPA response to stress, and in the expression of stress-related genes in the hippocampus and amygdala. Of note, carbetocin treatment had no effect on these behavioral and neuroendocrine parameters in prenatally unstressed (control) rats, with the exception of a reduced expression of the oxytocin receptor gene in the amygdala. These findings disclose a novel function of oxytocin receptors in the hippocampus, and encourage the use of oxytocin receptor agonists in the treatment of stress-related psychiatric disorders in adult life. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Study of the Protective Effects of Quince (Cydonia Oblonga Leaf Extract on Fertility Alterations and Gonadal Dysfunction Induced by Monosodium Glutamate in Adult Male Wistar Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kianifard Davoud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Starting from the cytotoxic effects of monosodium glutamate (MSG, the aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of quince leaf extract as natural antioxidant on the reproductive dysfunction induced by monosodium glutamate in rats. Material and methods: Monosodium glutamate was administrated with a dose of 30 and 60 mg/kg and quince leaf extract was administrated with a dose of 500 mg/kg. At the end of study, body and testicular weight measurement, hormonal and epididymal sperm analysis were performed. Results: Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH and testosterone levels were reduced after administration of monosodium glutamate. The levels of luteinizing hormone (LH exhibited no significant changes. Treatment with quince leaf extract led to improvement in follicle stimulating hormone and testosterone levels. Epididymal sperm population was reduced after administration of monosodium glutamate and treatment with quince leaf extract. The increased sperm motility rate induced by monosodium glutamate was reduced after treatment with quince leaf extract. Administration of monosodium glutamate led to more body weight gain in comparison to combined administration monosodium glutamate and quince leaf extract. Conclusions: The quince leaf extract can be effective in reduction of functional alterations of reproductive system induced by monosodium glutamate.

  10. Altered Elementary Calcium Release Events and Enhanced Calcium Release by Thymol in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Szentesi, Péter; Szappanos, Henrietta; Szegedi, Csaba; Gönczi, Monika; Jona, István; Cseri, Julianna; Kovács, László; Csernoch, László

    2004-01-01

    The effects of thymol on steps of excitation-contraction coupling were studied on fast-twitch muscles of rodents. Thymol was found to increase the depolarization-induced release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which could not be attributed to a decreased calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium release channels/ryanodine receptors or altered intramembrane charge movement, but rather to a more efficient coupling of depolarization to channel opening. Thymol increased ryanodine bind...

  11. Glutamate signalling and secretory phospholipase A2 modulate the release of arachidonic acid from neuronal membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez De Turco, Elena B; Jackson, Fannie R; DeCoster, Mark A

    2002-01-01

    The lipid mediators generated by phospholipases A(2) (PLA(2)), free arachidonic acid (AA), eicosanoids, and platelet-activating factor, modulate neuronal activity; when overproduced, some of them become potent neurotoxins. We have shown, using primary cortical neuron cultures, that glutamate...... and secretory PLA(2) (sPLA(2)) from bee venom (bv sPLA(2)) and Taipan snake venom (OS2) elicit synergy in inducing neuronal cell death. Low concentrations of sPLA(2) are selective ligands of cell-surface sPLA(2) receptors. We investigated which neuronal arachidonoyl phospholipids are targeted by glutamate......) and in minor changes in other phospholipids. A similar profile, although of greater magnitude, was observed 20 hr posttreatment. Glutamate (80 microM) induced much less mobilization of (3)H-AA than did sPLA(2) and resulted in a threefold greater degradation of (3)H-AA PE than of (3)H-AA PC by 20 hr...

  12. Modelling of Pb release during Portland cement alteration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benard, A. [INERIS Mediterrannee, F-13545 Aix En Provence 04 (France); Rose, J.; Borschneck, D.; Bottero, J.Y. [Univ Paul Cezanne, CNRS, UMR 6635, CEREGE, IFR PMSE 112, F-13545 Aix En Provence, (France); Hazemann, J.L. [CNRS, Cristallog Lab, F-38042 Grenoble 09 (France); Proux, O. [Univ Grenoble 1, CNRS, UMR, LGIT, F-38400 St Martin Dheres (France); Trotignon, L. [CEA Cadarache, DTN, SMTM, Lab Modelisat Transferts Environm, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Nonat, A. [Univ Bourgogne, CNRS, UMR 5613, Fac Sci Mirande, Lab Rech Reactivite Solides, F-21078 Dijon (France); Chateau, L. [ADEME, F-49004 Angers (France)

    2009-07-01

    Complex cementitious matrices undergo weathering with environmental exchange and can release metallic pollutants during alteration. The molecular mechanisms responsible for metal release are difficult to identify, though this is necessary if such processes are to be controlled. The present study determines and models the molecular mechanisms of Pb release during Portland cement leaching. As Pb release is strongly related to its speciation (i.e. atomic environment and the nature of bearing phases), the first objective of the present study was to investigate the evolution of Pb retention sites together with the evolution of the cement mineralogy during leaching. Complementary and efficient investigation tools were used, namely X-ray diffraction, micro-X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption fine structures. The second objective was to reproduce our results with a reactive transport code (CHESS/HYTEC) in order to test the proposed speciation model of Pb. Combined results indicate that in both the unaltered core and the altered layer of the leached cement, Pb(II) would be retained through C-S-H 'nano-structure', probably linked to a Q(1) or Q(2P) silicate tetrahedra. Moreover in the altered layer, the presence of Fe atoms in the atomic environment of Pb is highly probable. Unfortunately little is known about Fe phases in cement, which makes the interpretation difficult. Can Fe-substituted hydrogranet (C(3)AH(6)) be responsible for Pb retention? Modelling results were consistent with Pb retention through C-S-H in layers and also in an additional, possibly Fe-containing, Pb-retention phase in the altered layer. (authors)

  13. Release of [3H]GABA formed from [3H]glutamate in rat hippocampal slices: comparison with endogenous and exogenous labeled GABA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szerb, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    To compare the storage and release of endogenous GABA, of [ 3 H]GABA formed endogenously from glutamate, and of exogenous [ 14 C]GABA, hippocampal slices were incubated with 5 microCi/ml [3,4- 3 H]1-glutamate and 0.5 microCi/ml [U- 14 C]GABA and then were superfused in the presence or absence of Ca + with either 50 mM K + or 50 microM veratridine. Exogenous [ 14 C]GABA content of the slices declined spontaneously while endogenous GABA and endogenously formed [ 3 H]GABA stayed constant over a 48 min period. In the presence of Ca + 50 mM K + and in the presence or absence of Ca2 + veratridine released exogenous [ 14 C]GABA more rapidly than endogenous or endogenously formed [ 3 H]GABA, the release of the latter two occurring always in parallel. The initial specific activity of released exogenous [ 14 C]GABA was three times, while that of endogenously formed [ 3 H]GABA was only 50% higher than that in the slices. The observation that endogenous GABA and [ 3 H]GABA formed endogenously from glutamate are stored and released in parallel but differently from exogenous labelled GABA, suggests that exogenous [ 3 H] glutamate can enter a glutamate pool that normally serves as precursor of GABA

  14. Synaptic function is modulated by LRRK2 and glutamate release is increased in cortical neurons of G2019S LRRK2 knock-in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beccano-Kelly, Dayne A; Kuhlmann, Naila; Tatarnikov, Igor; Volta, Mattia; Munsie, Lise N; Chou, Patrick; Cao, Li-Ping; Han, Heather; Tapia, Lucia; Farrer, Matthew J; Milnerwood, Austen J

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in Leucine-Rich Repeat Kinase-2 (LRRK2) result in familial Parkinson's disease and the G2019S mutation alone accounts for up to 30% in some ethnicities. Despite this, the function of LRRK2 is largely undetermined although evidence suggests roles in phosphorylation, protein interactions, autophagy and endocytosis. Emerging reports link loss of LRRK2 to altered synaptic transmission, but the effects of the G2019S mutation upon synaptic release in mammalian neurons are unknown. To assess wild type and mutant LRRK2 in established neuronal networks, we conducted immunocytochemical, electrophysiological and biochemical characterization of >3 week old cortical cultures of LRRK2 knock-out, wild-type overexpressing and G2019S knock-in mice. Synaptic release and synapse numbers were grossly normal in LRRK2 knock-out cells, but discretely reduced glutamatergic activity and reduced synaptic protein levels were observed. Conversely, synapse density was modestly but significantly increased in wild-type LRRK2 overexpressing cultures although event frequency was not. In knock-in cultures, glutamate release was markedly elevated, in the absence of any change to synapse density, indicating that physiological levels of G2019S LRRK2 elevate probability of release. Several pre-synaptic regulatory proteins shown by others to interact with LRRK2 were expressed at normal levels in knock-in cultures; however, synapsin 1 phosphorylation was significantly reduced. Thus, perturbations to the pre-synaptic release machinery and elevated synaptic transmission are early neuronal effects of LRRK2 G2019S. Furthermore, the comparison of knock-in and overexpressing cultures suggests that one copy of the G2019S mutation has a more pronounced effect than an ~3-fold increase in LRRK2 protein. Mutant-induced increases in transmission may convey additional stressors to neuronal physiology that may eventually contribute to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease.

  15. Alteration of glutamate/GABA balance during acute alcohol intoxication in rats: effect of Xingnaojing injection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jingjing; Yao, Limei; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Shi, Si; Cai, Qingyan; Chen, Dingsheng; Li, Weirong; Wang, Qi

    2015-05-26

    Xingnaojing Injection (XNJI) is a modern Chinese formula came from famous Chinese medicine An Gong Niu Huang Pill. XNJI has been used for treatment of cerebral diseases and stroke in China, and is approved by the State Food and Drug Administration of China for the treatment of acute alcohol intoxication (AAI). XNJI belongs to the ethnopharmacological family of medicines. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of the XNJI effect on AAI. To investigate the effects of XNJI on glutamate, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and related receptor in lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) of AAI rat. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with microdialysis probes in LHA. Rats were randomly divided into control, model, 1.36mg/kg XNJI, 0.68mg/kg XNJI and 0.34mg/kg XNJI groups. During microdialysis, baseline samples were collected from 1h to 2.5h; thereafter, the rats were given an intraperitoneal injection of 52% ethanol, 5.2g/kg, or saline for control group. Twenty minutes later, three doses of XNJI was given by unilateral injection respectively, while saline for control and model groups, and samples were collected for the next 4h. The extracellular glutamate and GABA levels were measured in the LHA by a high performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detector (HPLC-FLU). The expression levels of related receptors N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NR) subunit NR2A, NR2B and GABAA were analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Ethanol (5.2g/kg) significantly decreased the extracellular levels of glutamate and increased extracellular GABA in LHA. On the other hand ethanol significantly decreased NR2A and NR2B mRNAs expression, and increase GABAA mRNA expression. XNJI could increase the extracellular level of glutamate and decrease that of GABA; moreover, induced an increase in NR2A and NR2B mRNA expression, and a decrease in GABAA mRNA expression in LHA. The current changes in glutamate, GABA and mRNA expressions of related

  16. 7T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Glutamate, and Glutamine Reveals Altered Concentrations in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thakkar, Katharine N; Rösler, Lara; Wijnen, Jannie P

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia predicts dysfunction in both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission. We addressed this hypothesis by measuring GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate...... concentrations in vivo in patients with schizophrenia using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T, which allows separation of metabolites that would otherwise overlap at lower field strengths. In addition, we investigated whether altered levels of GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus...... glutamate reflect genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia by including healthy first-degree relatives. METHODS: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T was performed in 21 patients with chronic schizophrenia who were taking medication, 23 healthy first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia...

  17. Cyclic ADP ribose-dependent Ca2+ release by group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in acutely dissociated rat hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Woo Sohn

    Full Text Available Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (group I mGluRs; mGluR1 and mGluR5 exert diverse effects on neuronal and synaptic functions, many of which are regulated by intracellular Ca(2+. In this study, we characterized the cellular mechanisms underlying Ca(2+ mobilization induced by (RS-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG; a specific group I mGluR agonist in the somata of acutely dissociated rat hippocampal neurons using microfluorometry. We found that DHPG activates mGluR5 to mobilize intracellular Ca(2+ from ryanodine-sensitive stores via cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (cADPR, while the PLC/IP(3 signaling pathway was not involved in Ca(2+ mobilization. The application of glutamate, which depolarized the membrane potential by 28.5±4.9 mV (n = 4, led to transient Ca(2+ mobilization by mGluR5 and Ca(2+ influx through L-type Ca(2+ channels. We found no evidence that mGluR5-mediated Ca(2+ release and Ca(2+ influx through L-type Ca(2+ channels interact to generate supralinear Ca(2+ transients. Our study provides novel insights into the mechanisms of intracellular Ca(2+ mobilization by mGluR5 in the somata of hippocampal neurons.

  18. Dynamic changes in extracellular release of GABA and glutamate in the lateral septum during social play behavior in juvenile rats: Implications for sex-specific regulation of social play behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bredewold, Remco; Schiavo, Jennifer K.; van der Hart, Marieke; Verreij, Michelle; Veenema, Alexa H.

    2015-01-01

    Social play is a motivated and rewarding behavior that is displayed by nearly all mammals and peaks in the juvenile period. Moreover, social play is essential for the development of social skills and is impaired in social disorders like autism. We recently showed that the lateral septum (LS) is involved in the regulation of social play behavior in juvenile male and female rats. The LS is largely modulated by GABA and glutamate neurotransmission, but their role in social play behavior is unknown. Here, we determined whether social play behavior is associated with changes in the extracellular release of GABA and glutamate in the LS and to what extent such changes modulate social play behavior in male and female juvenile rats. Using intracerebral microdialysis in freely behaving rats, we found no sex difference in extracellular GABA concentrations, but extracellular glutamate concentrations are higher in males than in females under baseline condition and during social play. This resulted in a higher glutamate/GABA concentration ratio in males versus females and thus, an excitatory predominance in the LS of males. Furthermore, social play behavior in both sexes is associated with significant increases in extracellular release of GABA and glutamate in the LS. Pharmacological blockade of GABA-A receptors in the LS with bicuculline (100 ng/0.5 µl, 250 ng/0.5 µl) dose-dependently decreased the duration of social play behavior in both sexes. In contrast, pharmacological blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors (NMDA and AMPA/kainate receptors) in the LS with AP-5 + CNQX (2 mM+0.4 mM/0.5 µl, 30 mM+3 mM/0.5 µl) dose-dependently decreased the duration of social play behavior in females, but did not alter social play behavior in males. Together, these data suggest a role for GABA neurotransmission in the LS in the regulation of juvenile social play behavior in both sexes, while glutamate neurotransmission in the LS is involved in the sex-specific regulation of juvenile

  19. Alteration of Depressive-like Behaviors by Psilocybe cubensis Alkaloid Extract in Mice: the Role of Glutamate Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaheh Mahmoudi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Considering the increasing prevalence of depression, many studies are launched to investigate new antidepressant treatments. The present research has shown how psilocybin as an active compound of Psilocybe cubensis (Earle Singer extract (PCE can change the parameters related to depression and anxiety in animal models. Both serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine: 5-HT and glutamate modulate depressive-like behaviors and, therefore, we examined the possible interaction of psilocybin as 5-HT1 agonist with glutamate receptor N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA. Methods: Psilocybe cubensis extract of this mushroom was prepared by ethyl acetate. NMRI mice involved in all experiments and were treated with the vehicle, extract, or standard drug intraperitoneally. Open field (OFT, forced swimming (FST and tail suspension tests (TST were applied to measure the intended parameters. OFT was performed to verify the applied doses for measuring the following antidepressant activity.  Results: PCE at the doses of 100 mg/kg significantly changed the locomotion, time spent in center and velocity of the animals in OFT. While treatment of the animals with PCE 10 and 40 mg/kg or ketamine 1 mg/kg did not alter the locomotor activity, co-administration of these subeffective amounts significantly reduced the immobility time in both FST and TST. Conclusion: These effects may indicate possible implication of psilocybin with NMDA receptor which consequently produces the antidepressant effects.

  20. Glutamate-induced apoptosis in primary cortical neurons is inhibited by equine estrogens via down-regulation of caspase-3 and prevention of mitochondrial cytochrome c release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang YueMei

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Apoptosis plays a key role in cell death observed in neurodegenerative diseases marked by a progressive loss of neurons as seen in Alzheimer's disease. Although the exact cause of apoptosis is not known, a number of factors such as free radicals, insufficient levels of nerve growth factors and excessive levels of glutamate have been implicated. We and others, have previously reported that in a stable HT22 neuronal cell line, glutamate induces apoptosis as indicated by DNA fragmentation and up- and down-regulation of Bax (pro-apoptotic, and Bcl-2 (anti-apoptotic genes respectively. Furthermore, these changes were reversed/inhibited by estrogens. Several lines of evidence also indicate that a family of cysteine proteases (caspases appear to play a critical role in neuronal apoptosis. The purpose of the present study is to determine in primary cultures of cortical cells, if glutamate-induced neuronal apoptosis and its inhibition by estrogens involve changes in caspase-3 protease and whether this process is mediated by Fas receptor and/or mitochondrial signal transduction pathways involving release of cytochrome c. Results In primary cultures of rat cortical cells, glutamate induced apoptosis that was associated with enhanced DNA fragmentation, morphological changes, and up-regulation of pro-caspase-3. Exposure of cortical cells to glutamate resulted in a time-dependent cell death and an increase in caspase-3 protein levels. Although the increase in caspase-3 levels was evident after 3 h, cell death was only significantly increased after 6 h. Treatment of cells for 6 h with 1 to 20 mM glutamate resulted in a 35 to 45% cell death that was associated with a 45 to 65% increase in the expression of caspase-3 protein. Pretreatment with caspase-3-protease inhibitor z-DEVD or pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD significantly decreased glutamate-induced cell death of cortical cells. Exposure of cells to glutamate for 6 h in the presence or

  1. Characterization of depolarization-coupled release of glutamate from cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells using DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA) to distinguish between the vesicular and cytoplasmic pools

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2003-01-01

    Release of preloaded [3H]D-aspartate in response to depolarization induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) or the endogenous agonist glutamate was characterized using cultured glutamatergic cerebellar granule neurons. Release from the vesicular and the cytoplasmic glutamate pools, respectively, wa...

  2. Altered elementary calcium release events and enhanced calcium release by thymol in rat skeletal muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szentesi, Péter; Szappanos, Henrietta; Szegedi, Csaba; Gönczi, Monika; Jona, István; Cseri, Julianna; Kovács, László; Csernoch, László

    2004-03-01

    The effects of thymol on steps of excitation-contraction coupling were studied on fast-twitch muscles of rodents. Thymol was found to increase the depolarization-induced release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum, which could not be attributed to a decreased calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium release channels/ryanodine receptors or altered intramembrane charge movement, but rather to a more efficient coupling of depolarization to channel opening. Thymol increased ryanodine binding to heavy sarcoplasmic reticulum vesicles, with a half-activating concentration of 144 micro M and a Hill coefficient of 1.89, and the open probability of the isolated and reconstituted ryanodine receptors, from 0.09 +/- 0.03 to 0.22 +/- 0.04 at 30 micro M. At higher concentrations the drug induced long-lasting open events on a full conducting state. Elementary calcium release events imaged using laser scanning confocal microscopy in the line-scan mode were reduced in size, 0.92 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.70 +/- 0.01, but increased in duration, 56 +/- 1 vs. 79 +/- 1 ms, by 30 micro M thymol, with an increase in the relative proportion of lone embers. Higher concentrations favored long events, resembling embers in control, with duration often exceeding 500 ms. These findings provide direct experimental evidence that the opening of a single release channel will generate an ember, rather than a spark, in mammalian skeletal muscle.

  3. Aspects of dopamine and acetylcholine release induced by glutamate receptors; Aspectos das liberacoes de dopamina e acetilcolina mediadas por receptores de glutamato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paes, Paulo Cesar de Arruda

    2002-07-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in the motor control of rats and humans. This control involves different neurotransmitters and the mutual control of these key elements has been subject to several studies. In this work we determined the role of glutamate on the release of radioactively labelled dopamine and acetylcholine from chopped striatal tissue in vitro. The values of Effective Concentration 50% for glutamate, NMDA, kainic, quisqualic acids and AMPA on the release of dopamine and acetylcholine were obtained. The inhibitory effects of magnesium, tetrodotoxin, MK-801, AP5 and MCPG, as well as the effects of glycin were evaluated. The results suggested that dopamine is influenced by the NMDA type glutamate receptor while acetylcholine seems to be influenced by NMDA, kainate and AMPA receptors. Tetrodotoxin experiments suggested that kainate receptors are both present in cholinergic terminals and cell bodies while AMPA and NMDA receptors are preferentially distributed in cell bodies. Magnesium effectively blocked the NMDA stimulation and unexpectedly also AMPA- and quisqualate-induced acetylcholine release. The latter could not be blocked by MCPG ruling out the participation of methabotropic receptors. MK-801 also blocked NMDA-receptors. Results point out the importance of the glutamic acid control of dopamine and acetylcholine release in striatal tissue. (author)

  4. Gad1 mRNA as a reliable indicator of altered GABA release from orexigenic neurons in the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicken, Matthew S; Hughes, Alexander R; Hentges, Shane T

    2015-11-01

    The strength of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated inhibitory synaptic input is a principle determinant of neuronal activity. However, because of differences in the number of GABA afferent inputs and the sites of synapses, it is difficult to directly assay for altered GABA transmission between specific cells. The present study tested the hypothesis that the level of mRNA for the GABA synthetic enzyme glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) can provide a reliable proxy for GABA release. This was tested in a mouse hypothalamic circuit important in the regulation of energy balance. Fluorescent in situ hybridization results show that the expression of Gad1 mRNA (encoding the GAD67 enzyme) was increased in hypothalamic neuropeptide Y/agouti-related peptide (NPY/AgRP) neurons after an overnight fast, consistent with the ability of GABA from these neurons to stimulate food intake. Optogenetic studies confirmed that the observed increase in Gad1 mRNA correlated with an increase in the probability of GABA release from NPY/AgRP neurons onto downstream proopiomelanocortin neurons. Likewise, there was an increase in the readily releasable pool of GABA in NPY/AgRP neurons. Selective inhibition of GAD activity in NPY/AgRP neurons decreased GABA release, indicating that GAD67 activity, which is largely dictated by expression level, is a key determinant of GABA release. Altogether, it appears that Gad expression may be a reliable proxy of altered GABAergic transmission. Examining changes in Gad mRNA as a proxy for GABA release may be particularly helpful when the downstream targets are not known or when limited tools exist for detecting GABA release at a particular synapse. © 2015 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. 7T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Glutamate, and Glutamine Reveals Altered Concentrations in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Siblings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Katharine N; Rösler, Lara; Wijnen, Jannie P; Boer, Vincent O; Klomp, Dennis W J; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W

    2017-03-15

    The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia predicts dysfunction in both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission. We addressed this hypothesis by measuring GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate concentrations in vivo in patients with schizophrenia using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T, which allows separation of metabolites that would otherwise overlap at lower field strengths. In addition, we investigated whether altered levels of GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate reflect genetic vulnerability to schizophrenia by including healthy first-degree relatives. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7T was performed in 21 patients with chronic schizophrenia who were taking medication, 23 healthy first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia, and 24 healthy nonrelatives. Glutamate, glutamine, and GABA were measured cortically and subcortically in bilateral basal ganglia and occipital cortex. Patients with schizophrenia had reduced cortical GABA compared with healthy relatives and the combined sample of healthy relatives and healthy nonrelatives, suggesting that altered GABAergic systems in schizophrenia are associated with either disease state or medication effects. Reduced cortical glutamine relative to healthy control subjects was observed in patients with schizophrenia and the combined sample of healthy relatives and patients with schizophrenia, suggesting that altered glutamatergic metabolite levels are associated with illness liability. No group differences were found in the basal ganglia. Taken together, these findings are consistent with alterations in GABAergic and glutamatergic systems in patients with schizophrenia and provide novel insights into these systems in healthy relatives. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Long-term hippocampal glutamate synapse and astrocyte dysfunctions underlying the altered phenotype induced by adolescent THC treatment in male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamberletti, Erica; Gabaglio, Marina; Grilli, Massimo; Prini, Pamela; Catanese, Alberto; Pittaluga, Anna; Marchi, Mario; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Cannabis use has been frequently associated with sex-dependent effects on brain and behavior. We previously demonstrated that adult female rats exposed to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) during adolescence develop long-term alterations in cognitive performances and emotional reactivity, whereas preliminary evidence suggests the presence of a different phenotype in male rats. To thoroughly depict the behavioral phenotype induced by adolescent THC exposure in male rats, we treated adolescent animals with increasing doses of THC twice a day (PND 35-45) and, at adulthood, we performed a battery of behavioral tests to measure affective- and psychotic-like symptoms as well as cognition. Poorer memory performance and psychotic-like behaviors were present after adolescent THC treatment in male rats, without alterations in the emotional component. At cellular level, the expression of the NMDA receptor subunit, GluN2B, as well as the levels of the AMPA subunits, GluA1 and GluA2, were significantly increased in hippocampal post-synaptic fractions from THC-exposed rats compared to controls. Furthermore, increases in the levels of the pre-synaptic marker, synaptophysin, and the post-synaptic marker, PSD95, were also present. Interestingly, KCl-induced [(3)H]D-ASP release from hippocampal synaptosomes, but not gliosomes, was significantly enhanced in THC-treated rats compared to controls. Moreover, in the same brain region, adolescent THC treatment also resulted in a persistent neuroinflammatory state, characterized by increased expression of the astrocyte marker, GFAP, increased levels of the pro-inflammatory markers, TNF-α, iNOS and COX-2, as well as a concomitant reduction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. Notably, none of these alterations was observed in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Together with our previous findings in females, these data suggest that the sex-dependent detrimental effects induced by adolescent THC exposure on adult behavior may rely on its

  7. Lower expression of glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia: contribution of altered regulation by Zif268.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Sohei; Bazmi, H Holly; Lewis, David A

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive deficits of schizophrenia may be due at least in part to lower expression of the 67-kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), a key enzyme for GABA synthesis, in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of individuals with schizophrenia. However, little is known about the molecular regulation of lower cortical GAD67 levels in schizophrenia. The GAD67 promoter region contains a conserved Zif268 binding site, and Zif268 activation is accompanied by increased GAD67 expression. Thus, altered expression of the immediate early gene Zif268 may contribute to lower levels of GAD67 mRNA in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia. The authors used polymerase chain reaction to quantify GAD67 and Zif268 mRNA levels in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex area 9 from 62 matched pairs of schizophrenia and healthy comparison subjects, and in situ hybridization to assess Zif268 expression at laminar and cellular levels of resolution. The effects of potentially confounding variables were assessed in human subjects, and the effects of antipsychotic treatments were tested in antipsychotic-exposed monkeys. The specificity of the Zif268 findings was assessed by quantifying mRNA levels for other immediate early genes. GAD67 and Zif268 mRNA levels were significantly lower and were positively correlated in the schizophrenia subjects. Both Zif268 mRNA-positive neuron density and Zif268 mRNA levels per neuron were significantly lower in the schizophrenia subjects. These findings were robust to the effects of the confounding variables examined and differed from other immediate early genes. Deficient Zif268 mRNA expression may contribute to lower cortical GAD67 levels in schizophrenia, suggesting a potential mechanistic basis for altered cortical GABA synthesis and impaired cognition in schizophrenia.

  8. Cortical Regulation of Striatal Medium Spiny Neuron Dendritic Remodeling in Parkinsonism: Modulation of Glutamate Release Reverses Dopamine Depletion–Induced Dendritic Spine Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia, Bonnie G.; Neely, M. Diana; Deutch, Ariel Y.

    2010-01-01

    Striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) receive glutamatergic afferents from the cerebral cortex and dopaminergic inputs from the substantia nigra (SN). Striatal dopamine loss decreases the number of MSN dendritic spines. This loss of spines has been suggested to reflect the removal of tonic dopamine inhibitory control over corticostriatal glutamatergic drive, with increased glutamate release culminating in MSN spine loss. We tested this hypothesis in two ways. We first determined in vivo if dec...

  9. Blood Glutamate Scavenging: Insight into Neuroprotection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Zlotnik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Brain insults are characterized by a multitude of complex processes, of which glutamate release plays a major role. Deleterious excess of glutamate in the brain’s extracellular fluids stimulates glutamate receptors, which in turn lead to cell swelling, apoptosis, and neuronal death. These exacerbate neurological outcome. Approaches aimed at antagonizing the astrocytic and glial glutamate receptors have failed to demonstrate clinical benefit. Alternatively, eliminating excess glutamate from brain interstitial fluids by making use of the naturally occurring brain-to-blood glutamate efflux has been shown to be effective in various animal studies. This is facilitated by gradient driven transport across brain capillary endothelial glutamate transporters. Blood glutamate scavengers enhance this naturally occurring mechanism by reducing the blood glutamate concentration, thus increasing the rate at which excess glutamate is cleared. Blood glutamate scavenging is achieved by several mechanisms including: catalyzation of the enzymatic process involved in glutamate metabolism, redistribution of glutamate into tissue, and acute stress response. Regardless of the mechanism involved, decreased blood glutamate concentration is associated with improved neurological outcome. This review focuses on the physiological, mechanistic and clinical roles of blood glutamate scavenging, particularly in the context of acute and chronic CNS injury. We discuss the details of brain-to-blood glutamate efflux, auto-regulation mechanisms of blood glutamate, natural and exogenous blood glutamate scavenging systems, and redistribution of glutamate. We then propose different applied methodologies to reduce blood and brain glutamate concentrations and discuss the neuroprotective role of blood glutamate scavenging.

  10. The neuroprotective properties of the superoxide dismutase mimetic tempol correlate with its ability to reduce pathological glutamate release in a rodent model of stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohare, Preeti; Hyzinski-García, María C.; Vipani, Aarshi; Bowens, Nicole H.; Nalwalk, Julia W.; Feustel, Paul J.; Keller, Richard W.; Jourd’heuil, David; Mongin, Alexander A.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of oxidative stress to ischemic brain damage is well established. Nevertheless, for unknown reasons, several clinically tested antioxidant therapies failed to show benefits in human stroke. Based on our previous in vitro work, we hypothesized that the neuroprotective potency of antioxidants is related to their ability to limit release of the excitotoxic amino acids, glutamate and aspartate. We explored the effects of two antioxidants, tempol and edaravone, on amino acid release in the brain cortex, in a rat model of transient occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAo). Amino acid levels were quantified using a microdialysis approach, with the probe positioned in the ischemic penumbra as verified by a laser Doppler technique. Two-hour MCAo triggered a dramatic increase in the levels of glutamate, aspartate, taurine and alanine. Microdialysate delivery of 10 mM tempol reduced the amino acid release by 60–80%, while matching levels of edaravone had no effect. In line with these latter data, an intracerebroventri-cular injection of tempol but not edaravone (500 nmols each, 15 minutes prior to MCAo) reduced infarction volumes by ~50% and improved neurobehavioral outcomes. In vitro assays showed that tempol was superior in removing superoxide anion, whereas edaravone was more potent in scavenging hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, and peroxynitrite. Overall, our data suggests that the neuroprotective properties of tempol are likely related to its ability to reduce tissue levels of the superoxide anion and pathological glutamate release, and, in such a way, limit progression of brain infarction within ischemic penumbra. These new findings may be instrumental in developing new antioxidant therapies for treatment of stroke. PMID:25224033

  11. Chronic restraint stress causes anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, downregulates glucocorticoid receptor expression, and attenuates glutamate release induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Shuichi; Numakawa, Tadahiro; Ninomiya, Midori; Richards, Misty C; Wakabayashi, Chisato; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2012-10-01

    Stress and the resulting increase in glucocorticoid levels have been implicated in the pathophysiology of depressive disorders. We investigated the effects of chronic restraint stress (CRS: 6 hours × 28 days) on anxiety- and depression-like behaviors in rats and on the possible changes in glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression as well as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent neural function in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). We observed significant reductions in body weight gain, food intake and sucrose preference from 1 week after the onset of CRS. In the 5th week of CRS, we conducted open-field (OFT), elevated plus-maze (EPM) and forced swim tests (FST). We observed a decrease in the number of entries into open arms during the EPM (anxiety-like behavior) and increased immobility during the FST (depression-like behavior). When the PFC was removed after CRS and subject to western blot analysis, the GR expression reduced compared with control, while the levels of BDNF and its receptors remained unchanged. Basal glutamate concentrations in PFC acute slice which were measured by high performance liquid chromatography were not influenced by CRS. However, BDNF-induced glutamate release was attenuated after CRS. These results suggest that reduced GR expression and altered BDNF function may be involved in chronic stress-induced anxiety--and depression-like behaviors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Glutamate oxidation in astrocytes: Roles of glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKenna, Mary C; Stridh, Malin H; McNair, Laura Frendrup

    2016-01-01

    to the presynaptic neurons as the nonexcitatory amino acid glutamine. The cycle was initially thought to function with a 1:1 ratio between glutamate released and glutamine taken up by neurons. However, studies of glutamate metabolism in astrocytes have shown that a considerable proportion of glutamate undergoes...... the enzymes that mediate this conversion. Methods include pharmacological tools such as the transaminase inhibitor aminooxyacetic acid, studies using GDH knockout mice, and siRNA-mediated knockdown of GDH in astrocytes. Studies in brain slices incubated with [15N]glutamate demonstrated activity of GDH......The cellular distribution of transporters and enzymes related to glutamate metabolism led to the concept of the glutamate–glutamine cycle. Glutamate is released as a neurotransmitter and taken up primarily by astrocytes ensheathing the synapses. The glutamate carbon skeleton is transferred back...

  13. DDPH ameliorated oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced injury in rat hippocampal neurons via interrupting Ca2+ overload and glutamate release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhi; Lu, Qing; Xu, Xulin; Huang, Lin; Chen, Jianguo; Guo, Lianjun

    2009-01-28

    Our previous work has demonstrated that DDPH (1-(2, 6-dimethylphenoxy)-2-(3, 4-dimethoxyphenylethylamino) propane hydrochloride), a competitive alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist, could improve cognitive deficits, reduce histopathological damage and facilitate synaptic plasticity in vivo possibly via increasing NR2B (NMDA receptor 2B) expression and antioxidation of DDPH itself. The present study further evaluated effects of DDPH on OGD (Oxygen and glucose deprivation)-induced neuronal damage in rat primary hippocampal cells. The addition of DDPH to the cultured cells 12 h before OGD for 4 h significantly reduced neuronal damage as determined by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) release experiments. The effects of DDPH on intracellular calcium concentration were explored by Fura-2 based calcium imaging techniques and results showed that DDPH at the dosages of 5 microM and 10 microM suppressed the increase of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) stimulated by 50 mM KCl in Ca(2+)-containing extracellular solutions. However, DDPH couldn't suppress the increase of [Ca(2+)](i) induced by both 50 microM glutamate in Ca(2+)-containing extracellular solutions and 20 microM ATP (Adenosine Triphosphate) in Ca(2+)-free solution. These results indicated that DDPH prevented [Ca(2+)](i) overload in hippocampal neurons by blocking Ca(2+) influx (voltage-dependent calcium channel) but not Ca(2+) mobilization from the intracellular Ca(2+) store in endoplasm reticulum (ER). We also demonstrated that DDPH could decrease glutamate release when hippocampal cells were subjected to OGD. These observations demonstrated that DDPH protected hippocampal neurons against OGD-induced damage by preventing the Ca(2+) influx and decreasing glutamate release.

  14. Increased cerebral (R-[11C]PK11195 uptake and glutamate release in a rat model of traumatic brain injury: a longitudinal pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lammertsma Adriaan A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the present study was to investigate microglia activation over time following traumatic brain injury (TBI and to relate these findings to glutamate release. Procedures Sequential dynamic (R-[11C]PK11195 PET scans were performed in rats 24 hours before (baseline, and one and ten days after TBI using controlled cortical impact, or a sham procedure. Extracellular fluid (ECF glutamate concentrations were measured using cerebral microdialysis. Brains were processed for histopathology and (immuno-histochemistry. Results Ten days after TBI, (R-[11C]PK11195 binding was significantly increased in TBI rats compared with both baseline values and sham controls (p -1 as compared with the sham procedure (6.4 ± 3.6 μmol·L-1. Significant differences were found between TBI and sham for ED-1, OX-6, GFAP, Perl's, and Fluoro-Jade B. Conclusions Increased cerebral uptake of (R-[11C]PK11195 ten days after TBI points to prolonged and ongoing activation of microglia. This activation followed a significant acute posttraumatic increase in ECF glutamate levels.

  15. Enhanced pre-synaptic glutamate release in deep-dorsal horn contributes to calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 protein-mediated spinal sensitization and behavioral hypersensitivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickenson Anthony H

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nerve injury-induced expression of the spinal calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 subunit (Cavα2δ1 has been shown to mediate behavioral hypersensitivity through a yet identified mechanism. We examined if this neuroplasticity modulates behavioral hypersensitivity by regulating spinal glutamatergic neurotransmission in injury-free transgenic mice overexpressing the Cavα2δ1 proteins in neuronal tissues. The transgenic mice exhibited hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation (allodynia similar to the spinal nerve ligation injury model. Intrathecally delivered antagonists for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA and α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA/kainate receptors, but not for the metabotropic glutamate receptors, caused a dose-dependent allodynia reversal in the transgenic mice without changing the behavioral sensitivity in wild-type mice. This suggests that elevated spinal Cavα2δ1 mediates allodynia through a pathway involving activation of selective glutamate receptors. To determine if this is mediated by enhanced spinal neuronal excitability or pre-synaptic glutamate release in deep-dorsal horn, we examined wide-dynamic-range (WDR neuron excitability with extracellular recording and glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents with whole-cell patch recording in deep-dorsal horn of the Cavα2δ1 transgenic mice. Our data indicated that overexpression of Cavα2δ1 in neuronal tissues led to increased frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature excitatory post synaptic currents mediated mainly by AMPA/kainate receptors at physiological membrane potentials, and also by NMDA receptors upon depolarization, without changing the excitability of WDR neurons to high intensity stimulation. Together, these findings support a mechanism of Cavα2δ1-mediated spinal sensitization in which elevated Cavα2δ1 causes increased pre-synaptic glutamate release that leads to reduced excitation thresholds of post-synaptic dorsal

  16. Enhanced pre-synaptic glutamate release in deep-dorsal horn contributes to calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 protein-mediated spinal sensitization and behavioral hypersensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, David; Deng, Ping; Matthews, Elizabeth A; Kim, Doo-Sik; Feng, Guoping; Dickenson, Anthony H; Xu, Zao C; Luo, Z David

    2009-01-01

    Nerve injury-induced expression of the spinal calcium channel alpha-2-delta-1 subunit (Cavα2δ1) has been shown to mediate behavioral hypersensitivity through a yet identified mechanism. We examined if this neuroplasticity modulates behavioral hypersensitivity by regulating spinal glutamatergic neurotransmission in injury-free transgenic mice overexpressing the Cavα2δ1 proteins in neuronal tissues. The transgenic mice exhibited hypersensitivity to mechanical stimulation (allodynia) similar to the spinal nerve ligation injury model. Intrathecally delivered antagonists for N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptors, but not for the metabotropic glutamate receptors, caused a dose-dependent allodynia reversal in the transgenic mice without changing the behavioral sensitivity in wild-type mice. This suggests that elevated spinal Cavα2δ1 mediates allodynia through a pathway involving activation of selective glutamate receptors. To determine if this is mediated by enhanced spinal neuronal excitability or pre-synaptic glutamate release in deep-dorsal horn, we examined wide-dynamic-range (WDR) neuron excitability with extracellular recording and glutamate-mediated excitatory postsynaptic currents with whole-cell patch recording in deep-dorsal horn of the Cavα2δ1 transgenic mice. Our data indicated that overexpression of Cavα2δ1 in neuronal tissues led to increased frequency, but not amplitude, of miniature excitatory post synaptic currents mediated mainly by AMPA/kainate receptors at physiological membrane potentials, and also by NMDA receptors upon depolarization, without changing the excitability of WDR neurons to high intensity stimulation. Together, these findings support a mechanism of Cavα2δ1-mediated spinal sensitization in which elevated Cavα2δ1 causes increased pre-synaptic glutamate release that leads to reduced excitation thresholds of post-synaptic dorsal horn neurons to innocuous

  17. Monosodium glutamate-associated alterations in open field, anxiety-related and conditioned place preference behaviours in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onaolapo, Olakunle James; Aremu, Olaleye Samuel; Onaolapo, Adejoke Yetunde

    2017-07-01

    The present study investigated changes in behaviour associated with oral monosodium glutamate (a flavouring agent), using the open field, elevated plus maze and conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigms, respectively. Mice were assigned to two groups for CPP [monosodium glutamate (MSG)-naïve (n = 40) and MSG-pretreated (n = 40)] and two groups for open field (OF) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests [n = 40 each], respectively. Animals in respective groups were then divided into four subgroups (n = 10) (vehicle or MSG (80, 160 and 320 mg/kg)). MSG-naïve mice were observed in the CPP box in three phases (pre-conditioning, conditioning and post-conditioning). Mice were conditioned to MSG or an equivalent volume of saline. The MSG pretreatment group received vehicle or respective doses of MSG daily for 21 days, prior to conditioning. Mice in the OF or EPM groups received vehicle or doses of MSG (orally) for 21 days, at 10 ml/kg. Open field or EPM behaviours were assessed on days 1 and 21. At the end of the experiments, mice in the OF groups were sacrificed and brain homogenates used to assay glutamate and glutamine. Results showed that administration of MSG was associated with a decrease in rearing, dose-related mixed horizontal locomotor, grooming and anxiety-related response and an increase in brain glutamate/glutamine levels. Following exposure to the CPP paradigm, MSG-naïve and MSG-pretreated mice both showed 'drug-paired' chamber preference. The study concluded that MSG (at the administered doses) was associated with changes in open field activities, anxiety-related behaviours and brain glutamate/glutamine levels; its ingestion also probably leads to a stimulation of the brain reward system.

  18. Depolarization by K+ and glutamate activates different neurotransmitter release mechanisms in GABAergic neurons: vesicular versus non-vesicular release of GABA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A

    1993-01-01

    was also reduced by organic (verapamil) and inorganic (Co++) Ca++ channel blockers but was insensitive to the GABA transport inhibitor SKF 89976A. In contrast, the second phase was less sensitive to nocodazole and Ca++ channel antagonists but could be inhibited by SKF 89976A. The glutamate-induced [3H...

  19. Neuromodulatory properties of fluorescent carbon dots: effect on exocytotic release, uptake and ambient level of glutamate and GABA in brain nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Nazarova, Anastasia; Dekaliuk, Mariia; Krisanova, Natalia; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Borysov, Arsenii; Sivko, Roman; Demchenko, Alexander P

    2015-02-01

    Carbon dots (C-dots), a recently discovered class of fluorescent nano-sized particles with pure carbon core, have great bioanalytical potential. Neuroactive properties of fluorescent C-dots obtained from β-alanine by microwave heating were assessed based on the analysis of their effects on the key characteristics of GABA- and glutamatergic neurotransmission in isolated rat brain nerve terminals. It was found that C-dots (40-800 μg/ml) in dose-dependent manner: (1) decreased exocytotic release of [(3)H]GABA and L-[(14)C]glutamate; (2) reduced acidification of synaptic vesicles; (3) attenuated the initial velocity of Na(+)-dependent transporter-mediated uptake of [(3)H]GABA and L-[(14)C]glutamate; (4) increased the ambient level of the neurotransmitters, nevertheless (5) did not change significantly the potential of the plasma membrane of nerve terminals. Almost complete suppression of exocytotic release of the neurotransmitters was caused by C-dots at a concentration of 800 μg/ml. Fluorescent and neuromodulatory features combined in C-dots create base for their potential usage for labeling and visualization of key processes in nerve terminals, and also in theranostics. In addition, natural presence of carbon-containing nanoparticles in the human food chain and in the air may provoke the development of neurologic consequences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Neurological effects of inorganic arsenic exposure: altered cysteine/glutamate transport, NMDA expression and spatial memory impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio A Ramos-Chávez

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic arsenic (iAs is an important natural pollutant. Millions of individuals worldwide drink water with high levels of iAs. Chronic exposure to iAs has been associated with lower IQ and learning disabilities as well as memory impairment. iAs is methylated in tissues such as the brain generating mono and dimethylated species. iAs methylation requires cellular glutathione (GSH, which is the main antioxidant in the central nervous system. In humans, As species cross the placenta and are found in cord blood. A CD1 mouse model was used to investigate effects of gestational iAs exposure which can lead to oxidative damage, disrupted cysteine/glutamate transport and its putative impact in learning and memory. On postnatal days (PNDs 1, 15 and 90, the expression of membrane transporters related to GSH synthesis and glutamate transport and toxicity, such as xCT, EAAC1, GLAST and GLT1, as well as LAT1, were analyzed. Also, the expression of the glutamate receptor N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDAR subunits NR2A and B as well as the presence of As species in cortex and hippocampus were investigated. On PND 90, an object location task was performed to associate exposure with memory impairment. Gestational exposure to iAs affected the expression of cysteine/glutamate transporters in cortex and hippocampus and induced a negative modulation of NMDAR NR2B subunit in the hippocampus. Behavioral tasks showed significant spatial memory impairment in males while the effect was marginal in females.

  1. Glutamate acts as a neurotransmitter for gastrin releasing peptide-sensitive and insensitive itch-related synaptic transmission in mammalian spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Jennifer

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Itch sensation is one of the major sensory experiences of human and animals. Recent studies have proposed that gastrin releasing peptide (GRP is a key neurotransmitter for itch in spinal cord. However, no direct evidence is available to indicate that GRP actually mediate responses between primary afferent fibers and dorsal horn neurons. Here we performed integrative neurobiological experiments to test this question. We found that a small population of rat dorsal horn neurons responded to GRP application with increases in calcium signaling. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed that a part of superficial dorsal horn neurons responded to GRP application with the increase of action potential firing in adult rats and mice, and these dorsal horn neurons received exclusively primary afferent C-fiber inputs. On the other hands, few Aδ inputs receiving cells were found to be GRP positive. Finally, we found that evoked sensory responses between primary afferent C fibers and GRP positive superficial dorsal horn neurons are mediated by glutamate but not GRP. CNQX, a blocker of AMPA and kainate (KA receptors, completely inhibited evoked EPSCs, including in those Fos-GFP positive dorsal horn cells activated by itching. Our findings provide the direct evidence that glutamate is the principal excitatory transmitter between C fibers and GRP positive dorsal horn neurons. Our results will help to understand the neuronal mechanism of itch and aid future treatment for patients with pruritic disease.

  2. Vinpocetine inhibits glutamate release induced by the convulsive agent 4-aminopyridine more potently than several antiepileptic drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitges, M; Sanchez-Tafolla, B M; Chiu, L M; Aldana, B I; Guarneros, A

    2011-10-01

    4-Aminopyridine (4-AP) is a convulsing agent that in vivo preferentially releases Glu, the most important excitatory amino acid neurotransmitter in the brain. Here the ionic dependence of 4-AP-induced Glu release and the effects of several of the most common antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) and of the new potential AED, vinpocetine on 4-AP-induced Glu release were characterized in hippocampus isolated nerve endings pre-loaded with labelled Glu ([3H]Glu). 4-AP-induced [3H]Glu release was composed by a tetrodotoxin (TTX) sensitive and external Ca2+ dependent fraction and a TTX insensitive fraction that was sensitive to the excitatory amino acid transporter inhibitor, TBOA. The AEDs: carbamazepine, phenytoin, lamotrigine and oxcarbazepine at the highest dose tested only reduced [3H]Glu release to 4-AP between 50-60%, and topiramate was ineffective. Vinpocetine at a much lower concentration than the above AEDs, abolished [3H]Glu release to 4-AP. We conclude that the decrease in [3H]Glu release linked to the direct blockade of presynaptic Na+ channels, may importantly contribute to the anticonvulsant actions of all the drugs tested here (except topiramate); and that the significantly greater vinpocetine effect in magnitude and potency on [3H]Glu release when excitability is exacerbated like during seizures, may involve the increase additionally exerted by vinpocetine in some K+ channels permeability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Regional alterations of brain biogenic amines and GABA/glutamate levels in rats following chronic lead exposure during neonatal development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shailesh Kumar, M V; Desiraju, T [National Inst. of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore (India). Dept. of Neurophysiology

    1990-06-01

    Wistar rat pups were administered either a high dose of lead acetate (400 {mu}g lead-g body weight/day) or a low dose (100 {mu}g lead/g body weight/day) by gastric intubation, from 2 days through 60 days of age. The rats on both these doses exhibited statistically significant decreases in body and brain weights throughout the lead treatment period. A group of rats on high dose was also rehabilitated by discontinuing the lead from 60 days of age. In these rats, at 160 days of age, the body weight but not the brain weight recovered to normal levels. During the lead intake, the rats on high dose revealed significant elevations in the levels of noradrenaline (NA) in the hippocampus (HI), cerebellum (CE), hypothalamus (HY), brainstem (BS), and accumbens-striatum (SA). The elevated levels in all the above regions except in the HY persisted even after rehabilitation. The dopamine (DA) levels changed significantly in opposite directions in HY (elevation) and BS (reduction) during the lead treatment, and the HY recovered after rehabilitation. Under lead, the serotonin (5HT) levels were elevated significantly in the HI, BS and MC (motor cortex), while after rehabilitation the abnormality persisted only in the MC. Low dose lead treatment was also effective on the same areas of brain. In the low dose group, estimation of the levels of GABA and glutamate were also done, and a significant decrease of GABA in CE and glutamate in MC was observed. The differences observed in the neurotoxic effects (none or significant) of lead in the different regions for each of the transmitters (NA, DA, 5HT) supports the interesting conclusion that the vulnerability of the axon terminals of any given type is dependent on some regional factors, although the projections of the different regions originate from an apparently similar category of neurons in the brain stem. (orig.).

  4. 7T Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid, Glutamate, and Glutamine Reveals Altered Concentrations in Patients With Schizophrenia and Healthy Siblings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thakkar, Katharine N; Rösler, Lara; Wijnen, Jannie P; Boer, Vincent O.; Klomp, Dennis W J; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Neggers, Sebastiaan F W

    BACKGROUND: The N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor hypofunction model of schizophrenia predicts dysfunction in both glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) transmission. We addressed this hypothesis by measuring GABA, glutamate, glutamine, and the sum of glutamine plus glutamate

  5. Neonatal seizures alter NMDA glutamate receptor GluN2A and 3A subunit expression and function in hippocampal CA1 neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chengwen; Sun, Hongyu; Klein, Peter M.; Jensen, Frances E.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are commonly caused by hypoxic and/or ischemic injury during birth and can lead to long-term epilepsy and cognitive deficits. In a rodent hypoxic seizure (HS) model, we have previously demonstrated a critical role for seizure-induced enhancement of the AMPA subtype of glutamate receptor (GluA) in epileptogenesis and cognitive consequences, in part due to GluA maturational upregulation of expression. Similarly, as the expression and function of the N-Methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) subtype of glutamate receptor (GluN) is also developmentally controlled, we examined how early life seizures during the critical period of synaptogenesis could modify GluN development and function. In a postnatal day (P)10 rat model of neonatal seizures, we found that seizures could alter GluN2/3 subunit composition of GluNs and physiological function of synaptic GluNs. In hippocampal slices removed from rats within 48–96 h following seizures, the amplitudes of synaptic GluN-mediated evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents (eEPSCs) were elevated in CA1 pyramidal neurons. Moreover, GluN eEPSCs showed a decreased sensitivity to GluN2B selective antagonists and decreased Mg2+ sensitivity at negative holding potentials, indicating a higher proportion of GluN2A and GluN3A subunit function, respectively. These physiological findings were accompanied by a concurrent increase in GluN2A phosphorylation and GluN3A protein. These results suggest that altered GluN function and expression could potentially contribute to future epileptogenesis following neonatal seizures, and may represent potential therapeutic targets for the blockade of future epileptogenesis in the developing brain. PMID:26441533

  6. Assessment of the Alteration of Granitic Rocks and its Influence on Alkalis Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Ana Rita; Fernandes, Isabel; Soares, Dora; Santos Silva, António; Quinta-Ferreira, Mário

    2017-12-01

    Several concrete structures had shown signs of degradation some years after construction due to internal expansive reactions. Among these reactions there are the alkali-aggregate reactions (AAR) that occur between the aggregates and the concrete interstitial fluids which can be divided in two types: the alkali-silica reaction (ASR) and alkali-carbonate reaction (ACR). The more common is the ASR which occurs when certain types of reactive silica are present in the aggregates. In consequence, an expansive alkali-silica gel is formed leading to the concrete cracking and degradation. Granites are rocks composed essentially of quartz, micas and feldspars, the latter being the minerals which contain more alkalis in their structure and thus, able to release them in conditions of high alkalinity. Although these aggregates are of slow reaction, some structures where they were applied show evidence of deterioration due to ASR some years or decades after the construction. In the present work, the possible contribution of granitic aggregates to the interstitial fluids of concrete by alkalis release was studied by performing chemical attack with NaOH and KOH solutions. Due to the heterogeneity of the quarries in what concerns the degree of alteration and/or fracturing, rock samples with different alteration were analysed. The alteration degree was characterized both under optical microscope and image analysis and compared with the results obtained from the chemical tests. It was concluded that natural alteration reduces dramatically the releasable alkalis available in the rocks.

  7. Blood banking-induced alteration of red blood cell oxygen release ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaojin; Xiong, Yanlian; Wang, Ruofeng; Tang, Fuzhou; Wang, Xiang

    2016-05-01

    Current blood banking procedures may not fully preserve red blood cell (RBC) function during storage, contributing to the decrease of RBC oxygen release ability. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of routine cold storage on RBC oxygen release ability. RBC units were collected from healthy donors and each unit was split into two parts (whole blood and suspended RBC) to exclude possible donor variability. Oxygen dissociation measurements were performed on blood units stored at 4 °C during a 5-week period. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate levels and fluorescent micrographs of erythrocyte band 3 were also analysed. P50 and oxygen release capacity decreased rapidly during the first 3 weeks, and then did not change significantly. In contrast, the kinetic properties (PO2-t curve and T*50) of oxygen release changed slowly during the first 3 weeks of storage, but then decreased significantly in the last 2 weeks. 2,3-diphosphoglycerate decreased quickly during the first 3 weeks of storage to almost undetectable levels. Band 3 aggregated significantly during the last 2 weeks of storage. RBC oxygen release ability appears to be sensitive to routine cold storage. The thermodynamic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability changed mainly in the first 3 weeks of storage, due to the decrease of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, whereas the kinetic characteristics of RBC oxygen release ability decreased significantly at the end of storage, probably affected by alterations of band 3.

  8. The glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2006-01-01

    Neurons are metabolically handicapped in the sense that they are not able to perform de novo synthesis of neurotransmitter glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) from glucose. A metabolite shuttle known as the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle describes the release of neurotransmitter glutamate...... or GABA from neurons and subsequent uptake into astrocytes. In return, astrocytes release glutamine to be taken up into neurons for use as neurotransmitter precursor. In this review, the basic properties of the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle will be discussed, including aspects of transport and metabolism...... of intercellular transfer of ammonia produced in neurons (when glutamine is deamidated to glutamate) and utilized in astrocytes (for amidation of glutamate) when the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle is operating. A main objective of this review is to endorse the view that the glutamate/GABA-glutamine cycle must...

  9. Trehalose and sorbitol alter the kinetic pattern of inactivation of glutamate dehydrogenase during drying in levitated microdroplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzen, Elke; Lee, Geoffrey

    2013-12-01

    A single-droplet acoustic levitator was used to determine the drying rate and the kinetics of inactivation of glutamate dehydrogenase in the presence of added trehalose or sorbitol. The solution was also spray dried under the same process condition of drying gas temperature on a bench-top machine. Both trehalose and sorbitol delay the point of onset of enzyme inactivation which lies after the critical point of drying. Both carbohydrates also reduce the apparent rate constant of inactivation calculated during the subsequent inactivation phase. The carbohydrates stabilise, therefore, the enzyme during droplet drying and particle formation mainly during the falling rate drying period. There is no difference between the stabilising effects of the two carbohydrates when examined as levitated single droplets. This suggests the importance of water replacement as a stabilising mechanism in the levitated droplets/particles. On spray drying, the trehalose stabilises the enzyme better than does the sorbitol at a drying gas (outlet) temperature of 60°C. This suggests glass formation with the trehalose but not the sorbitol during the very rapid drying process of small-atomised droplets in the spray dryer. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  10. Role of glutamate receptors and nitric oxide on the effects of glufosinate ammonium, an organophosphate pesticide, on in vivo dopamine release in rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faro, Lilian R F; Ferreira Nunes, Brenda V; Alfonso, Miguel; Ferreira, Vania M; Durán, Rafael

    2013-09-15

    The purpose of the present work was to assess the possible role of glutamatergic receptors and nitric oxide (NO) production on effects of glufosinate ammonium (GLA), an organophosphate pesticide structurally related to glutamate, on in vivo striatal dopamine release in awake and freely moving rats. For this, we used antagonists of NMDA (MK-801 and AP5) or AMPA/kainate (CNQX) receptors, or nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors (l-NAME and 7-NI), to study the effects of GLA on release of dopamine from rat striatum. So, intrastriatal infusion of 10mM GLA significantly increased dopamine levels (1035±140%, compared with basal levels) and administration of GLA to MK-801 (250μM) or AP5 (650μM) pretreated animals, produced increases in dopamine overflow that were ∼40% and ∼90% smaller than those observed in animals not pretreated with MK-801 or AP5. Administration of GLA to CNQX (500μM) pretreated animals produced an effect that was not significantly different from the one produced in animals not pretreated with CNQX. On the other hand, administration of GLA to l-NAME (100μM) or 7-NI (100μM) pretreated animals, produced increases in dopamine overflow that were ∼80% and ∼75% smaller than those observed in animals not pretreated with these inhibitors. In summary, GLA appears to act, at least in part, through an overstimulation of NMDA (and not AMPA/kainate) receptors with possible NO production to induce in vivo dopamine release. Administration of NMDA receptor antagonists and NOS inhibitors partially blocks the release of dopamine from rat striatum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomechanical consequences of plantar fascial release or rupture during gait. Part II: alterations in forefoot loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, N A; Donahue, S W; Ferris, L

    1999-02-01

    With a model using feet from cadavers, we tested the hypothesis that plantar fascial release or rupture alters the loading environment of the forefoot during the latter half of the stance phase of gait. The model simulated the position and loading environment of the foot at two instants: early in terminal stance immediately after heel-off and late in terminal stance just preceding contralateral heel strike. Eight feet were loaded at both positions by simulated plantar flexor contraction, and the distribution of plantar pressure was measured before and after progressive release of the plantar fascia. Strain in the diaphysis of the second metatarsal was also measured, from which the bending moments and axial force imposed on the metatarsal were calculated. Cutting the medial half of the central plantar fascial band significantly increased peak pressure under the metatarsal heads but had little effect on pressures in other regions of the forefoot or on second metatarsal strain and loading. Dividing the entire central band or completely releasing the plantar fascia from the calcaneus had a much greater effect and caused significant shifts in plantar pressure and force from the toes to beneath the metatarsal heads. These shifts were accompanied by significantly increased strain and bending in the second metatarsal. Complete fasciotomy increased the magnitude of strain in the dorsal aspect of the second metatarsal by more than 80%, suggesting that plantar fascial release or rupture accelerates the accumulation of fatigue damage in these bones. Altered forefoot loading may be a potential complication of plantar fasciotomy.

  12. Mechanistic study of competitive releases of H2O, NH3 and CO2 from deprotonated aspartic and glutamic acids: Role of conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier Saint Hilaire, Pierre; Warnet, Anna; Gimbert, Yves; Hohenester, Ulli Martin; Giorgi, Gianluca; Olivier, Marie-Françoise; Fenaille, François; Colsch, Benoît; Junot, Christophe; Tabet, Jean-Claude

    2017-03-15

    The aims of this study were to highlight the impact of minor structural differences (e.g. an aminoacid side chain enlargement by one methylene group), on ion dissociation under collision-induced dissociation conditions, and to determine the underlying chemical mechanisms. Therefore, we compared fragmentations of deprotonated aspartic and glutamic acids generated in negative electrospray ionization. Energy-resolved mass spectrometry breakdown curves were recorded and MS 3 experiments performed on an Orbitrap Fusion for high-resolution and high-mass accuracy measurements. Activated fragmentations were performed using both the resonant and non-resonant excitation modes (i.e., CID and HCD, respectively) in order to get complementary information on the competitive and consecutive dissociative pathways. These experiments showed a specific loss of ammonia from the activated aspartate but not from the activated glutamate. We mainly focused on this specific observed loss from aspartate. Two different mechanisms based on intramolecular reactions (similar to those occurring in organic chemistry) were proposed, such as intramolecular elimination (i.e. Ei-like) and nucleophilic substitution (i.e. SNi-like) reactions, respectively, yielding anions as fumarate and α lactone from a particular conformation with the lowest steric hindrance (i.e. with antiperiplanar carboxyl groups). The detected deaminated aspartate anion can then release CO 2 as observed in the MS 3 experimental spectra. However, quantum calculations did not indicate the formation of such a deaminated aspartate product ion without loss of carbon dioxide. Actually, calculations displayed the double neutral (NH 3 +CO 2 ) loss as a concomitant pathway (from a particular conformation) with relative high activation energy instead of a consecutive process. This disagreement is apparent since the concomitant pathway may be changed into consecutive dissociations according to the collision energy i.e., at higher collision

  13. Exhaustive Exercise-induced Oxidative Stress Alteration of Erythrocyte Oxygen Release Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yanlian; Xiong, Yanlei; Wang, Yueming; Zhao, Yajin; Li, Yaojin; Ren, Yang; Wang, Ruofeng; Zhao, Mingzi; Hao, Yitong; Liu, Haibei; Wang, Xiang

    2018-05-24

    The aim of the present study is to explore the effect of exhaustive running exercise (ERE) in the oxygen release capacity of rat erythrocytes. Rats were divided into sedentary control (C), moderate running exercise (MRE) and exhaustive running exercise groups. The thermodynamics and kinetics properties of the erythrocyte oxygen release process of different groups were tested. We also determined the degree of band-3 oxidative and phosphorylation, anion transport activity and carbonic anhydrase isoform II(CAII) activity. Biochemical studies suggested that exhaustive running significantly increased oxidative injury parameters in TBARS and methaemoglobin levels. Furthermore, exhaustive running significantly decreased anion transport activity and carbonic anhydrase isoform II(CAII) activity. Thermodynamic analysis indicated that erythrocytes oxygen release ability also significantly increased due to elevated 2,3-DPG level after exhaustive running. Kinetic analysis indicated that exhaustive running resulted in significantly decreased T50 value. We presented evidence that exhaustive running remarkably impacted thermodynamics and kinetics properties of RBCs oxygen release. In addition, changes in 2,3-DPG levels and band-3 oxidation and phosphorylation could be the driving force for exhaustive running induced alterations in erythrocytes oxygen release thermodynamics and kinetics properties.

  14. Alteration of Nrf2 and Glutamate Cysteine Ligase expression contribute to lesions growth and fibrogenesis in ectopic endometriosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcellin, L; Santulli, P; Chouzenoux, S; Cerles, O; Nicco, C; Dousset, B; Pallardy, M; Kerdine-Römer, S; Just, P A; Chapron, C; Batteux, F

    2017-09-01

    The redox-sensitive nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2 (NRF2) controls endogenous antioxidant enzymes' transcription and protects against oxidative damage which is triggered by inflammation and known to favor progression of endometriosis. Glutamate Cysteine Ligase (GCL), a target gene of NRF2, is the first enzyme in the synthesis cascade of glutathione, an important endogenous antioxidant. Sixty-one patients, with thorough surgical examination of the abdominopelvic cavity, were recruited for the study: 31 with histologically-proven endometriosis and 30 disease-free women taken as controls. Expressions of NRF2 and GCL were investigated by quantitative RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry in eutopic and ectopic endometria from endometriosis-affected women and in endometrium of disease-free women. Ex vivo stromal and epithelial cells were extracted and purified from endometrial and endometriotic biopsies to explore expression of NRF2 and GCL in both stromal and epithelial compartments by western blot. Finally, in order to strengthen the role of NRF2 in endometriosis pathogenesis, we evaluated the drop of NRF2 expression in a mouse model of endometriosis using NRF2 knockout (NRF2 -/- ) mice. The mRNA levels of NRF2 and GCL were significantly lower in ectopic endometria of endometriosis-affected women compared to eutopic endometria of disease-free women. The immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the decreased expression of both NRF2 and GCL in ectopic endometriotic tissues compared to eutopic endometria of endometriosis-affected and disease-free women. Immunoblotting revealed a significant decreased of NRF2 and GCL expression in epithelial and stroma cells from ectopic lesions of endometriosis-affected women compared to eutopic endometria from controls. Using a murine model of endometriosis, NRF2 -/- implants were more fibrotic compared to wild-type with an increased weight and volume. These findings indicate that expression of the transcription factor NRF2 and its

  15. Effects of Bee Venom on Glutamate-Induced Toxicity in Neuronal and Glial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Min Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bee venom (BV, which is extracted from honeybees, is used in traditional Korean medical therapy. Several groups have demonstrated the anti-inflammatory effects of BV in osteoarthritis both in vivo and in vitro. Glutamate is the predominant excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system (CNS. Changes in glutamate release and uptake due to alterations in the activity of glutamate transporters have been reported in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. To assess if BV can prevent glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity, we examined cell viability and signal transduction in glutamate-treated neuronal and microglial cells in the presence and absence of BV. We induced glutamatergic toxicity in neuronal cells and microglial cells and found that BV protected against cell death. Furthermore, BV significantly inhibited the cellular toxicity of glutamate, and pretreatment with BV altered MAP kinase activation (e.g., JNK, ERK, and p38 following exposure to glutamate. These findings suggest that treatment with BV may be helpful in reducing glutamatergic cell toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 and corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor-1 gene expression is differently regulated by BDNF in rat primary cortical neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Christinna V; Klein, Anders B; El-Sayed, Mona

    2013-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is important for neuronal survival and plasticity. Incorporation of matured receptor proteins is an integral part of synapse formation. However, whether BDNF increases synthesis and integration of receptors in functional synapses directly is unclear. We...... are particularly interested in the regulation of the 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 2A (5-HT2A R). This receptor form a functional complex with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 2 (mGluR2) and is recruited to the cell membrane by the corticotrophin-releasing factor receptor 1 (CRF-R1). The effect of BDNF on gene...... expression for all these receptors, as well as a number of immediate-early genes, was pharmacologically characterized in primary neurons from rat frontal cortex. BDNF increased CRF-R1 mRNA levels up to fivefold, whereas mGluR2 mRNA levels were proportionally downregulated. No effect on 5-HT2A R mRNA was seen...

  17. Rosiglitazone Suppresses In Vitro Seizures in Hippocampal Slice by Inhibiting Presynaptic Glutamate Release in a Model of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Bing Wong

    Full Text Available Peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ is a nuclear hormone receptor whose agonist, rosiglitazone has a neuroprotective effect to hippocampal neurons in pilocarpine-induced seizures. Hippocampal slice preparations treated in Mg2+ free medium can induce ictal and interictal-like epileptiform discharges, which is regarded as an in vitro model of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor-mediated temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE. We applied rosiglitazone in hippocampal slices treated in Mg2+ free medium. The effects of rosiglitazone on hippocampal CA1-Schaffer collateral synaptic transmission were tested. We also examined the neuroprotective effect of rosiglitazone toward NMDA excitotoxicity on cultured hippocampal slices. Application of 10 μM rosiglitazone significantly suppressed amplitude and frequency of epileptiform discharges in CA1 neurons. Pretreatment with the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 did not block the effect of rosiglitazone on suppressing discharge frequency, but reverse the effect on suppressing discharge amplitude. Application of rosiglitazone suppressed synaptic transmission in the CA1-Schaffer collateral pathway. By miniature excitatory-potential synaptic current (mEPSC analysis, rosiglitazone significantly suppressed presynaptic neurotransmitter release. This phenomenon can be reversed by pretreating PPARγ antagonist GW9662. Also, rosiglitazone protected cultured hippocampal slices from NMDA-induced excitotoxicity. The protective effect of 10 μM rosiglitazone was partially antagonized by concomitant high dose GW9662 treatment, indicating that this effect is partially mediated by PPARγ receptors. In conclusion, rosiglitazone suppressed NMDA receptor-mediated epileptiform discharges by inhibition of presynaptic neurotransmitter release. Rosiglitazone protected hippocampal slice from NMDA excitotoxicity partially by PPARγ activation. We suggest that rosiglitazone could be a potential agent to treat patients with TLE.

  18. Emersion induces nitrogen release and alteration of nitrogen metabolism in the intertidal genus Porphyra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang K Kim

    Full Text Available We investigated emersion-induced nitrogen (N release from Porphyra umbilicalis Kütz. Thallus N concentration decreased during 4 h of emersion. Tissue N and soluble protein contents of P. umbilicalis were positively correlated and decreased during emersion. Growth of P. umbilicalis did not simply dilute the pre-emersion tissue N concentration. Rather, N was lost from tissues during emersion. We hypothesize that emersion-induced N release occurs when proteins are catabolized. While the δ(15N value of tissues exposed to emersion was higher than that of continuously submerged tissues, further discrimination of stable N isotopes did not occur during the 4 h emersion. We conclude that N release from Porphyra during emersion did not result from bacterial denitrification, but possibly as a consequence of photorespiration. The release of N by P. umbilicalis into the environment during emersion suggests a novel role of intertidal seaweeds in the global N cycle. Emersion also altered the physiological function (nitrate uptake, nitrate reductase and glutamine synthetase activity, growth rate of P. umbilicalis and the co-occurring upper intertidal species P. linearis Grev., though in a seasonally influenced manner. Individuals of the year round perennial species P. umbilicalis were more tolerant of emersion than ephemeral, cold temperate P. linearis in early winter. However, the mid-winter populations of both P. linearis and P. umbilicalis, had similar temporal physiological patterns during emersion.

  19. Dietary exposure to the PCB mixture aroclor 1254 may compromise osmoregulation by altering central vasopressin release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coburn, C G [Environmental Toxicology, Univ. of California at Riverside, CA (United States); Gillard, E; Curras-Collazo, M [Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Univ. of California at Riverside, CA (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Despite the importance of systemic osmoregulation, the potential deleterious effects of persistent organochlorines, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), on body fluid regulation has not been thoroughly investigated. In an effort to ameliorate this deficit, the current study explores the toxic effects of PCBs on osmoregulation, and in particular, on the activity of the magnocellular neuroendocrine cell (MNC) system of the hypothalamus. MNCs of the supraoptic nucleus (SON) release oxytocin (OXY) and vasopressin (VP) from terminals in the neurohypophysis in response to dehydration. The latter is released to effect water conservation in response to dehydration via its action upon the kidney and through extra-renal actions. MNCs also secrete VP from their cell bodies and dendrites locally i.e., into the extracellular space of the SON. Although it has been shown that both intranuclear and systemic release rise in response to dehydration the physiological significance of intranuclear release has not been fully elucidated. We chose to use voluntary ingestion as the route of PCB exposure since it is more reflective of natural exposure compared to ip injection. One unexpected observation that resulted from pilot studies using ip injection of PCBs was the deleterious effects of the vehicle (corn oil) resulting in pooling of lipid within the abdominal cavity, mottling of the liver, fatty liver and general discoloration of all abdominal viscera at time of sacrifice. Therefore, all work described in this series of experiments have employed voluntary ingestion of the toxin. Work described in this paper suggests that PCBs in concentrations reflecting realistic lifetime exposure levels may negatively impact homeostatic mechanisms responsible for body water balance by altering somatodendritic (intranuclear) VP secretion in response to dehydration in vivo. The downstream consequences of such influence is currently under investigation, and preliminary evidence suggests that the

  20. Altered cytochrome P450 activities and expression levels in the liver and intestines of the monosodium glutamate-induced mouse model of human obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomankova, Veronika; Liskova, Barbora; Skalova, Lenka; Bartikova, Hana; Bousova, Iva; Jourova, Lenka; Anzenbacher, Pavel; Ulrichova, Jitka; Anzenbacherova, Eva

    2015-07-15

    Cytochromes P450 (CYPs) are enzymes present from bacteria to man involved in metabolism of endogenous and exogenous compounds incl. drugs. Our objective was to assess whether obesity leads to changes in activities and expression of CYPs in the mouse liver, small intestine and colon. An obese mouse model with repeated injection of monosodium glutamate (MSG) to newborns was used. Controls were treated with saline. All mice were sacrificed at 8 months. In the liver and intestines, levels of CYP mRNA and proteins were analyzed using RT-PCR and Western blotting. Activities of CYP enzymes were measured with specific substrates of human orthologous forms. At the end of the experiment, body weight, plasma insulin and leptin levels as well as the specific content of hepatic CYP enzymes were increased in obese mice. Among CYP enzymes, hepatic CYP2A5 activity, protein and mRNA expression increased most significantly in obese animals. Higher activities and protein levels of hepatic CYP2E1 and 3A in the obese mice were also found. No or a weak effect on CYPs 2C and 2D was observed. In the small intestine and colon, no changes of CYP enzymes were detected except for increased expression of CYP2E1 and decreased expression of CYP3A mRNAs in the colon of the obese mice. Results of our study suggest that the specific content and activities of some liver CYP enzymes (especially CYP2A5) can be increased in obese mice. Higher activity of CYP2A5 (CYP2A6 human ortholog) could lead to altered metabolism of drug substrates of this enzyme (valproic acid, nicotine, methoxyflurane). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Aquatic contaminants alter genes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and gonadotropin release in largemouth bass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sanchez, Brian C. [Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and School of Civil Engineering, 195 Marsteller St., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Szabo, Nancy J.; Denslow, Nancy D. [Department of Physiological Sciences and Center for Environmental and Human Toxicology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Sepulveda, Maria S., E-mail: mssepulv@purdue.edu [Department of Forestry and Natural Resources and School of Civil Engineering, 195 Marsteller St., Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States)

    2009-10-19

    Many aquatic contaminants potentially affect the central nervous system, however the underlying mechanisms of how toxicants alter normal brain function are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of emerging and prevalent environmental contaminants on the expression of brain transcripts with a role in neurotransmitter synthesis and reproduction. Adult male largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were injected once for a 96 h duration with control (water or oil) or with one of two doses of a single chemical to achieve the following body burdens ({mu}g/g): atrazine (0.3 and 3.0), toxaphene (10 and 100), cadmium (CdCl{sub 2}) (0.000067 and 0.00067), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 (0.25 and 2.5), and phenanthrene (5 and 50). Partial largemouth bass gene segments were cloned for enzymes involved in neurotransmitter (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65; tyrosine hydroxylase) and estrogen (brain aromatase; CYP19b) synthesis for real-time PCR assays. In addition, neuropeptides regulating feeding (neuropeptide Y) and reproduction (chicken GnRH-II, cGnRH-II; salmon GnRH, sGnRH) were also investigated. Of the chemicals tested, only cadmium, PCB 126, and phenanthrene showed any significant effects on the genes tested, while atrazine and toxaphene did not. Cadmium (0.000067 {mu}g/g) significantly increased cGnRH-II mRNA while PCB 126 (0.25 {mu}g/g) decreased GAD65 mRNA. Phenanthrene decreased GAD65 and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels at the highest dose (50 {mu}g/g) but increased cGnRH-II mRNA at the lowest dose (5 {mu}g/g). CYP19b, NPY, and sGnRH mRNA levels were unaffected by any of the treatments. A hierarchical clustering dendrogram grouped PCB 126 and phenanthrene more closely than other chemicals with respect to the genes tested. This study demonstrates that brain transcripts important for neurotransmitter synthesis neuroendocrine function are potential targets for emerging and prevalent aquatic contaminants.

  2. Aquatic contaminants alter genes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and gonadotropin release in largemouth bass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J.; Sanchez, Brian C.; Szabo, Nancy J.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Sepulveda, Maria S.

    2009-01-01

    Many aquatic contaminants potentially affect the central nervous system, however the underlying mechanisms of how toxicants alter normal brain function are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of emerging and prevalent environmental contaminants on the expression of brain transcripts with a role in neurotransmitter synthesis and reproduction. Adult male largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were injected once for a 96 h duration with control (water or oil) or with one of two doses of a single chemical to achieve the following body burdens (μg/g): atrazine (0.3 and 3.0), toxaphene (10 and 100), cadmium (CdCl 2 ) (0.000067 and 0.00067), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 (0.25 and 2.5), and phenanthrene (5 and 50). Partial largemouth bass gene segments were cloned for enzymes involved in neurotransmitter (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65; tyrosine hydroxylase) and estrogen (brain aromatase; CYP19b) synthesis for real-time PCR assays. In addition, neuropeptides regulating feeding (neuropeptide Y) and reproduction (chicken GnRH-II, cGnRH-II; salmon GnRH, sGnRH) were also investigated. Of the chemicals tested, only cadmium, PCB 126, and phenanthrene showed any significant effects on the genes tested, while atrazine and toxaphene did not. Cadmium (0.000067 μg/g) significantly increased cGnRH-II mRNA while PCB 126 (0.25 μg/g) decreased GAD65 mRNA. Phenanthrene decreased GAD65 and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels at the highest dose (50 μg/g) but increased cGnRH-II mRNA at the lowest dose (5 μg/g). CYP19b, NPY, and sGnRH mRNA levels were unaffected by any of the treatments. A hierarchical clustering dendrogram grouped PCB 126 and phenanthrene more closely than other chemicals with respect to the genes tested. This study demonstrates that brain transcripts important for neurotransmitter synthesis neuroendocrine function are potential targets for emerging and prevalent aquatic contaminants.

  3. Aquatic contaminants alter genes involved in neurotransmitter synthesis and gonadotropin release in largemouth bass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyniuk, Christopher J; Sanchez, Brian C; Szabo, Nancy J; Denslow, Nancy D; Sepúlveda, Maria S

    2009-10-19

    Many aquatic contaminants potentially affect the central nervous system, however the underlying mechanisms of how toxicants alter normal brain function are not well understood. The objectives of this study were to compare the effects of emerging and prevalent environmental contaminants on the expression of brain transcripts with a role in neurotransmitter synthesis and reproduction. Adult male largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) were injected once for a 96 h duration with control (water or oil) or with one of two doses of a single chemical to achieve the following body burdens (microg/g): atrazine (0.3 and 3.0), toxaphene (10 and 100), cadmium (CdCl(2)) (0.000067 and 0.00067), polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 126 (0.25 and 2.5), and phenanthrene (5 and 50). Partial largemouth bass gene segments were cloned for enzymes involved in neurotransmitter (glutamic acid decarboxylase 65, GAD65; tyrosine hydroxylase) and estrogen (brain aromatase; CYP19b) synthesis for real-time PCR assays. In addition, neuropeptides regulating feeding (neuropeptide Y) and reproduction (chicken GnRH-II, cGnRH-II; salmon GnRH, sGnRH) were also investigated. Of the chemicals tested, only cadmium, PCB 126, and phenanthrene showed any significant effects on the genes tested, while atrazine and toxaphene did not. Cadmium (0.000067 microg/g) significantly increased cGnRH-II mRNA while PCB 126 (0.25 microg/g) decreased GAD65 mRNA. Phenanthrene decreased GAD65 and tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA levels at the highest dose (50 microg/g) but increased cGnRH-II mRNA at the lowest dose (5 microg/g). CYP19b, NPY, and sGnRH mRNA levels were unaffected by any of the treatments. A hierarchical clustering dendrogram grouped PCB 126 and phenanthrene more closely than other chemicals with respect to the genes tested. This study demonstrates that brain transcripts important for neurotransmitter synthesis neuroendocrine function are potential targets for emerging and prevalent aquatic contaminants.

  4. Feedback-induced glutamate spillover enhances negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroman, Rozan; Kamermans, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    In the retina, horizontal cells feed back negatively to cone photoreceptors. Glutamate released from cones can spill over to neighbouring cones. Here we show that cone glutamate release induced by negative feedback can also spill over to neighbouring cones. This glutamate activates the glutamate

  5. Effects of melatonin on prenatal dexamethasone-induced epigenetic alterations in hippocampal morphology and reelin and glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, Chun-Chung; Hsu, Mei-Hsin; Kuo, Ho-Chang; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Sheen, Jiunn-Ming; Yu, Hong-Ren; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Tain, You-Lin; Chang, Kow-Aung; Huang, Li-Tung

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal glucocorticoid exposure causes brain damage in adult offspring; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Melatonin has been shown to have beneficial effects in compromised pregnancies. Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were administered vehicle (VEH) or dexamethasone between gestation days 14 and 21. The programming effects of prenatal dexamethasone exposure on the brain were assessed at postnatal days (PND) 7, 42, and ∼120. Melatonin was administered from PND21 to the rats exposed to dexamethasone, and the outcome was assessed at ∼PND120. In total, there were four groups: VEH, vehicle plus melatonin (VEHM), prenatal dexamethasone-exposure (DEX), and prenatal dexamethasone exposure plus melatonin (DEXM). Spatial memory, gross hippocampal morphology, and hippocampal biochemistry were examined. Spatial memory assessed by the Morris water maze showed no significant differences among the four groups. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed that all rats with prenatal dexamethasone exposure (DEX + DEXM) exhibited increased T2-weighted signals in the hippocampus. There were no significant differences in the levels of mRNA expression of hippocampal reln, which encodes reelin, and GAD1, which encodes glutamic acid decarboxylase 67, at PND7. At both PND42 and ∼PND120, reln and GAD1 mRNA expression levels were decreased. At ∼PND120, melatonin restored the reduced levels of hippocampal reln and GAD1 mRNA expression in the DEXM group. In addition, melatonin restored the reln mRNA expression levels by (1) reducing DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) mRNA expression and (2) reducing the binding of DNMT1 and the methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) to the reln promoter. The present study showed that prenatal dexamethasone exposure induced gross alterations in hippocampal morphology and reduced the levels of hippocampal mRNA expression of reln and GAD1. Spatial memory was unimpaired. Thus, melatonin had a beneficial effect in restoring hippocampal reln m

  6. Alveolar macrophage phagocytosis is enhanced after blunt chest trauma and alters the posttraumatic mediator release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Daniel H; Palmer, Annette; Niesler, Ulrike; Fröba, Janine S; Heidemann, Vera; Rittlinger, Anne; Braumüller, Sonja T; Zhou, Shaoxia; Gebhard, Florian; Knöferl, Markus W

    2011-12-01

    Blunt chest trauma is known to induce a pulmonary invasion of short-lived polymorphonuclear neutrophils and apoptosis of alveolar epithelial type 2 (AT2) cells. Apoptotic cells are removed by alveolar macrophages (AMΦ). We hypothesized that chest trauma alters the phagocytic response of AMΦ as well as the mediator release of AMΦ during phagocytosis. To study this, male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to blunt chest trauma. Phagocytosis assays were performed in AMΦ isolated 2 or 24 h after trauma with apoptotic cells or opsonized beads. Phagocytosis of apoptotic AT2 cells by unstimulated AMΦ was significantly increased 2 h after trauma. At 24 h, AMΦ from traumatized animals, stimulated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate, ingested significantly more apoptotic polymorphonuclear neutrophils than AMΦ from sham animals. Alveolar macrophages after trauma released significantly higher levels of tumor necrosis factor α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant 1 when they incorporated latex beads, but significantly lower levels of interleukin 1β and macrophage inflammatory protein 1α when they ingested apoptotic cells. In vivo, phagocytosis of intratracheally instilled latex beads was decreased in traumatized rats. The bronchoalveolar lavage concentrations of the phagocytosis-supporting surfactant proteins A and D after blunt chest trauma were slightly decreased, whereas surfactant protein D mRNA expression in AT2 cells was significantly increased after 2 h. These findings indicate that chest trauma augments the phagocytosis of apoptotic cells by AMΦ. Phagocytosis of opsonized beads enhances and ingestion of apoptotic cells downregulates the immunologic response following lung contusion. Our data emphasize the important role of phagocytosis during posttraumatic inflammation after lung contusion.

  7. Inhibitors of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex alter [1-13C]glucose and [U-13C]glutamate metabolism in cerebellar granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sónia Sá; Gibson, Gary E; Cooper, Arthur J L; Denton, Travis T; Thompson, Charles M; Bunik, Victoria I; Alves, Paula M; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2006-02-15

    Diminished activity of the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (KGDHC), an important component of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, occurs in several neurological diseases. The effect of specific KGDHC inhibitors [phosphonoethyl ester of succinyl phosphonate (PESP) and the carboxy ethyl ester of succinyl phosphonate (CESP)] on [1-13C]glucose and [U-13C]glutamate metabolism in intact cerebellar granule neurons was investigated. Both inhibitors decreased formation of [4-13C]glutamate from [1-13C]glucose, a reduction in label in glutamate derived from [1-13C]glucose/[U-13C]glutamate through a second turn of the TCA cycle and a decline in the amounts of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), aspartate, and alanine. PESP decreased formation of [U-13C]aspartate and total glutathione, whereas CESP decreased concentrations of valine and leucine. The findings are consistent with decreased KGDHC activity; increased alpha-ketoglutarate formation; increased transamination of alpha-ketoglutarate with valine, leucine, and GABA; and new equilibrium position of the aspartate aminotransferase reaction. Overall, the findings also suggest that some carbon derived from alpha-ketoglutarate may bypass the block in the TCA cycle at KGDHC by means of the GABA shunt and/or conversion of valine to succinate. The results suggest the potential of succinyl phosphonate esters for modeling the biochemical and pathophysiological consequences of reduced KGDHC activity in brain diseases.

  8. The Influence of Glutamate on Axonal Compound Action Potential In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouelela, Ahmed; Wieraszko, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    Background  Our previous experiments demonstrated modulation of the amplitude of the axonal compound action potential (CAP) by electrical stimulation. To verify assumption that glutamate released from axons could be involved in this phenomenon, the modification of the axonal CAP induced by glutamate was investigated. Objectives  The major objective of this research is to verify the hypothesis that axonal activity would trigger the release of glutamate, which in turn would interact with specific axonal receptors modifying the amplitude of the action potential. Methods  Segments of the sciatic nerve were exposed to exogenous glutamate in vitro, and CAP was recorded before and after glutamate application. In some experiments, the release of radioactive glutamate analog from the sciatic nerve exposed to exogenous glutamate was also evaluated. Results  The glutamate-induced increase in CAP was blocked by different glutamate receptor antagonists. The effect of glutamate was not observed in Ca-free medium, and was blocked by antagonists of calcium channels. Exogenous glutamate, applied to the segments of sciatic nerve, induced the release of radioactive glutamate analog, demonstrating glutamate-induced glutamate release. Immunohistochemical examination revealed that axolemma contains components necessary for glutamatergic neurotransmission. Conclusion  The proteins of the axonal membrane can under the influence of electrical stimulation or exogenous glutamate change membrane permeability and ionic conductance, leading to a change in the amplitude of CAP. We suggest that increased axonal activity leads to the release of glutamate that results in changes in the amplitude of CAPs.

  9. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    . This is metabolically impossible unless it is assumed that at least two distinct pools of these amino acids exist. This combined with the finding that the enzyme synthesizing glutamine from glutamate was expressed in astrocytes but not in neurons formed the basis of the notion that a cycle must exist in which glutamate......The term 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' was coined several decades ago based on the observation that using certain (14)C-labeled precursors for studies of brain metabolism the specific radioactivity of glutamine generated from glutamate was higher than that of glutamate, its immediate precursor...... released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion...

  10. AMPK Activation Affects Glutamate Metabolism in Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voss, Caroline Marie; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    acid (TCA) cycle was studied using high-performance liquid chromatography analysis supplemented with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry technology. It was found that AMPK activation had profound effects on the pathways involved in glutamate metabolism since the entrance of the glutamate carbon...... on glutamate metabolism in astrocytes was studied using primary cultures of these cells from mouse cerebral cortex during incubation in media containing 2.5 mM glucose and 100 µM [U-(13)C]glutamate. The metabolism of glutamate including a detailed analysis of its metabolic pathways involving the tricarboxylic...... skeleton into the TCA cycle was reduced. On the other hand, glutamate uptake into the astrocytes as well as its conversion to glutamine catalyzed by glutamine synthetase was not affected by AMPK activation. Interestingly, synthesis and release of citrate, which are hallmarks of astrocytic function, were...

  11. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion......The term 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' was coined several decades ago based on the observation that using certain (14)C-labeled precursors for studies of brain metabolism the specific radioactivity of glutamine generated from glutamate was higher than that of glutamate, its immediate precursor....... This is metabolically impossible unless it is assumed that at least two distinct pools of these amino acids exist. This combined with the finding that the enzyme synthesizing glutamine from glutamate was expressed in astrocytes but not in neurons formed the basis of the notion that a cycle must exist in which glutamate...

  12. The effect of adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists on hydroxyl radical, dopamine, and glutamate in the striatum of rats with altered function of VMAT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Dziubina, Anna

    2012-08-01

    It has been shown that a decreased vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) function and the disruption of dopamine (DA) storage is an early contributor to oxidative damage of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). In our previous study, we demonstrated that adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists suppressed oxidative stress in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats suggesting that this effect may account for neuroprotective properties of drugs. In the present study, rats were injected with reserpine (10 mg/kg sc) and 18 h later the effect of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists 8-(3-chlorostyryl)caffeine (CSC) and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385) on extracellular DA, glutamate and hydroxyl radical formation was studied in the rat striatum using in vivo microdialysis. By disrupting VMAT2 function, reserpine depleted DA stores, and increased glutamate and hydroxyl radical levels in the rat striatum. CSC (1 mg/kg) but not ZM 241385 (3 mg/kg) increased extracellular DA level and production of hydroxyl radical in reserpinised rats. Both antagonists decreased the reserpine-induced increase in extracellular glutamate. L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) (25 mg/kg) significantly enhanced extracellular DA, had no effect on reserpine-induced hydroxyl radical production and decreased extracellular glutamate concentration. CSC but not ZM 241385 given jointly with L-DOPA increased the effect of L-DOPA on extracellular DA and augmented the reserpine-induced hydroxyl radical production. CSC and ZM 241385 did not influence extracellular glutamate level, which was decreased by L-DOPA. It seems that by decreasing the MAO-dependent DA metabolism rate, CSC raised cytosolic DA and by DA autoxidation, it induced hydroxyl radical overproduction. Thus, the methylxanthine A(2A) receptor antagonists bearing properties of MAO-B inhibitor, like CSC, may cause a risk of oxidative stress resulting from dysfunctional DA storage

  13. Dopamine Release and Uptake Impairments and Behavioral Alterations Observed in Mice that Model Fragile X Mental Retardation Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulks, Jenny L; O'Bryhim, Bliss E; Wenzel, Sara K; Fowler, Stephen C; Vorontsova, Elena; Pinkston, Jonathan W; Ortiz, Andrea N; Johnson, Michael A

    2010-10-20

    In this study we evaluated the relationship between amphetamine-induced behavioral alterations and dopamine release and uptake characteristics in Fmr1 knockout (Fmr1 KO) mice, which model fragile X syndrome. The behavioral analyses, obtained at millisecond temporal resolution and 2 mm spatial resolution using a force-plate actometer, revealed that Fmr1 KO mice express a lower degree of focused stereotypy compared to wild type (WT) control mice after injection with 10 mg/kg (ip) amphetamine. To identify potentially related neurochemical mechanisms underlying this phenomenon, we measured electrically-evoked dopamine release and uptake using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at carbon-fiber microelectrodes in striatal brain slices. At 10 weeks of age, dopamine release per pulse, which is dopamine release corrected for differences in uptake, was unchanged. However, at 15 (the age of behavioral testing) and 20 weeks of age, dopamine per pulse and the maximum rate of dopamine uptake was diminished in Fmr1 KO mice compared to WT mice. Dopamine uptake measurements, obtained at different amphetamine concentrations, indicated that dopamine transporters in both genotypes have equal affinities for amphetamine. Moreover, dopamine release measurements from slices treated with quinpirole, a D2-family receptor agonist, rule out enhanced D2 autoreceptor sensitivity as a mechanism of release inhibition. However, dopamine release, uncorrected for uptake and normalized against the corresponding pre-drug release peaks, increased in Fmr1 KO mice, but not in WT mice. Collectively, these data are consistent with a scenario in which a decrease in extracellular dopamine levels in the striatum result in diminished expression of focused stereotypy in Fmr1 KO mice.

  14. Feedback-induced glutamate spillover enhances negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vroman, Rozan; Kamermans, M.

    2015-01-01

    KEY POINTS: In the retina, horizontal cells feed back negatively to cone photoreceptors. Glutamate released from cones can spill over to neighbouring cones. Here we show that cone glutamate release induced by negative feedback can also spill over to neighbouring cones. This glutamate activates the

  15. Partial Loss of the Glutamate Transporter GLT-1 Alters Brain Akt and Insulin Signaling in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeker, Kole D; Meabon, James S; Cook, David G

    2015-01-01

    The glutamate transporter GLT-1 (also called EAAT2 in humans) plays a critical role in regulating extracellular glutamate levels in the central nervous system (CNS). In Alzheimer's disease (AD), EAAT2 loss is associated with neuropathology and cognitive impairment. In keeping with this, we have reported that partial GLT-1 loss (GLT-1+/-) causes early-occurring cognitive deficits in mice harboring familial AD AβPPswe/PS1ΔE9 mutations. GLT-1 plays important roles in several molecular pathways that regulate brain metabolism, including Akt and insulin signaling in astrocytes. Significantly, AD pathogenesis also involves chronic Akt activation and reduced insulin signaling in the CNS. In this report we tested the hypothesis that GLT-1 heterozygosity (which reduces GLT-1 to levels that are comparable to losses in AD patients) in AβPPswe/PS1ΔE9 mice would induce sustained activation of Akt and disturb components of the CNS insulin signaling cascade. We found that partial GLT-1 loss chronically increased Akt activation (reflected by increased phosphorylation at serine 473), impaired insulin signaling (reflected by decreased IRβ phosphorylation of tyrosines 1150/1151 and increased IRS-1 phosphorylation at serines 632/635 - denoted as 636/639 in humans), and reduced insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) activity in brains of mice expressing familial AβPPswe/PS1ΔE9 AD mutations. GLT-1 loss also caused an apparent compensatory increase in IDE activity in the liver, an organ that has been shown to regulate peripheral amyloid-β levels and expresses GLT-1. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that partial GLT-1 loss can cause insulin/Akt signaling abnormalities that are in keeping with those observed in AD.

  16. Glutamate: Tastant and Neuromodulator in Taste Buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbeuch, Aurelie; Kinnamon, Sue C

    2016-07-01

    In taste buds, glutamate plays a double role as a gustatory stimulus and neuromodulator. The detection of glutamate as a tastant involves several G protein-coupled receptors, including the heterodimer taste receptor type 1, member 1 and 3 as well as metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR1 and mGluR4). Both receptor types participate in the detection of glutamate as shown with knockout animals and selective antagonists. At the basal part of taste buds, ionotropic glutamate receptors [N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA] are expressed and participate in the modulation of the taste signal before its transmission to the brain. Evidence suggests that glutamate has an efferent function on taste cells and modulates the release of other neurotransmitters such as serotonin and ATP. This short article reviews the recent developments in the field with regard to glutamate receptors involved in both functions as well as the influence of glutamate on the taste signal. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  17. Effect of 8-bromo-cAMP and dexamethasone on glutamate metabolism in rat astrocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielke, H.R.; Tildon, J.T.; Landry, M.E.; Max, S.R.

    1990-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase (GS) activity in cultured rat astrocytes was measured in extracts and compared to the intracellular rate of glutamine synthesis by intact control astrocytes or astrocytes exposed to 1 mM 8-bromo-cAMP (8Br-cAMP) + 1 microM dexamethasone (DEX) for 4 days. GS activity in extracts of astrocytes treated with 8Br-cAMP + DEX was 7.5 times greater than the activity in extracts of control astrocytes. In contrast, the intracellular rate of glutamine synthesis by intact cells increased only 2-fold, suggesting that additional intracellular effectors regulate the expression of GS activity inside the intact cell. The rate of glutamine synthesis by astrocytes was 4.3 times greater in MEM than in HEPES buffered Hank's salts. Synthesis of glutamine by intact astrocytes cultured in MEM was independent of the external glutamine or ammonia concentrations but was increased by higher extracellular glutamate concentrations. In studies with intact astrocytes 80% of the original [U- 14 C]glutamate was recovered in the medium as radioactive glutamine, 2-3% as aspartate, and 7% as glutamate after 2 hours for both control and treated astrocytes. The results suggest: (1) astrocytes are highly efficient in the conversion of glutamate to glutamine; (2) induction of GS activity increases the rate of glutamate conversion to glutamine by astrocytes and the rate of glutamine release into the medium; (3) endogenous intracellular regulators of GS activity control the flux of glutamate through this enzymatic reaction; and (4) the composition of the medium alters the rate of glutamine synthesis from external glutamate

  18. Release and Decay Kinetics of Copeptin vs AVP in Response to Osmotic Alterations in Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenske, Wiebke K; Schnyder, Ingeborg; Koch, Gilbert; Walti, Carla; Pfister, Marc; Kopp, Peter; Fassnacht, Martin; Strauss, Konrad; Christ-Crain, Mirjam

    2018-02-01

    Copeptin is the C-terminal fragment of the arginine vasopressin (AVP) prohormone whose measurement is more robust than that of AVP. Similar release and clearance characteristics have been suggested promoting copeptin as a surrogate marker. To characterize the physiology of osmotically regulated copeptin release and its half-life in direct comparison with plasma AVP. Ninety-one healthy volunteers underwent a standardized three-phase test protocol including (1) osmotic stimulation into the hypertonic range by hypertonic-saline infusion followed by osmotic suppression via (2) oral water load and (3) subsequent glucose infusion. Plasma copeptin, AVP, serum sodium, and osmolality levels were measured in regular intervals. In phase 1, an increase in median osmotic pressure [289 (286; 291) to 311 (309; 314) mOsm/kg H2O] caused similar release kinetics of plasma copeptin [4 (3.1; 6) to 29.3 (18.6; 48.2) pmol/L] and AVP [1 (0.7; 1.6) to 10.3 (6.8; 18.8) pg/mL]. Subsequent osmotic suppression to 298 (295; 301) mOsm/kg at the end of phase 3 revealed markedly different decay kinetics between both peptides-an estimated initial half-life of copeptin being approximately 2 times longer than that of AVP (26 vs 12 minutes). Copeptin is released in equimolar amounts with AVP in response to osmotic stimulation, suggesting its high potential as an AVP surrogate for differentiation of osmotic disorders. Furthermore, we here describe the decay kinetics of copeptin in response to osmotic depression enabling to identify a half-life for copeptin in direct comparison with AVP. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  19. Ethanol Exposure History and Alcoholic Reward Differentially Alter Dopamine Release in the Nucleus Accumbens to a Reward-Predictive Cue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorenza, Amanda M; Shnitko, Tatiana A; Sullivan, Kaitlin M; Vemuru, Sudheer R; Gomez-A, Alexander; Esaki, Julie Y; Boettiger, Charlotte A; Da Cunha, Claudio; Robinson, Donita L

    2018-06-01

    Conditioned stimuli (CS) that predict reward delivery acquire the ability to induce phasic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). This dopamine release may facilitate conditioned approach behavior, which often manifests as approach to the site of reward delivery (called "goal-tracking") or to the CS itself (called "sign-tracking"). Previous research has linked sign-tracking in particular to impulsivity and drug self-administration, and addictive drugs may promote the expression of sign-tracking. Ethanol (EtOH) acutely promotes phasic release of dopamine in the accumbens, but it is unknown whether an alcoholic reward alters dopamine release to a CS. We hypothesized that Pavlovian conditioning with an alcoholic reward would increase dopamine release triggered by the CS and subsequent sign-tracking behavior. Moreover, we predicted that chronic intermittent EtOH (CIE) exposure would promote sign-tracking while acute administration of naltrexone (NTX) would reduce it. Rats received 14 doses of EtOH (3 to 5 g/kg, intragastric) or water followed by 6 days of Pavlovian conditioning training. Rewards were a chocolate solution with or without 10% (w/v) alcohol. We used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry to measure phasic dopamine release in the NAc core in response to the CS and the rewards. We also determined the effect of NTX (1 mg/kg, subcutaneous) on conditioned approach. Both CIE and alcoholic reward, individually but not together, associated with greater dopamine to the CS than control conditions. However, this increase in dopamine release was not linked to greater sign-tracking, as both CIE and alcoholic reward shifted conditioned approach from sign-tracking behavior to goal-tracking behavior. However, they both also increased sensitivity to NTX, which reduced goal-tracking behavior. While a history of EtOH exposure or alcoholic reward enhanced dopamine release to a CS, they did not promote sign-tracking under the current conditions. These findings are

  20. ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for glycyrrhizic acid-mediated neuroprotection against glutamate-induced toxicity in differentiated PC12 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; Guo, T.Q.; Wang, Z.Y.; Lu, J.H.; Liu, D.P.; Meng, Q.F.; Xie, J.; Zhang, X.L.; Liu, Y.; Teng, L.S.

    2014-01-01

    The present study focuses on the neuroprotective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA, a major compound separated from Glycyrrhiza Radix, which is a crude Chinese traditional drug) against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in differentiated PC12 (DPC12) cells. The results showed that GA treatment improved cell viability and ameliorated abnormal glutamate-induced alterations in mitochondria in DPC12 cells. GA reversed glutamate-suppressed B-cell lymphoma 2 levels, inhibited glutamate-enhanced expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, and reduced cytochrome C (Cyto C) release. Exposure to glutamate strongly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT (protein kinase B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); however, GA pretreatment enhanced activation of ERKs but not AKT. The presence of PD98059 (a mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase [MEK] inhibitor) but not LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase [PI3K] inhibitor) diminished the potency of GA for improving viability of glutamate-exposed DPC12 cells. These results indicated that ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for the neuroprotective effect of GA against glutamate-induced toxicity in DPC12 cells. The present study provides experimental evidence supporting GA as a potential therapeutic agent for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

  1. ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for glycyrrhizic acid-mediated neuroprotection against glutamate-induced toxicity in differentiated PC12 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, D. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); The State Engineering Laboratory of AIDS Vaccine, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Guo, T.Q. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Wang, Z.Y. [State Key Laboratory of Theoretical and Computational Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Lu, J.H.; Liu, D.P.; Meng, Q.F.; Xie, J. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Zhang, X.L. [Faculty of ScienceNational University of Singapore (Singapore); Liu, Y. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); Teng, L.S. [School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun (China); The State Engineering Laboratory of AIDS Vaccine, Jilin University, Changchun (China)

    2014-07-25

    The present study focuses on the neuroprotective effect of glycyrrhizic acid (GA, a major compound separated from Glycyrrhiza Radix, which is a crude Chinese traditional drug) against glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in differentiated PC12 (DPC12) cells. The results showed that GA treatment improved cell viability and ameliorated abnormal glutamate-induced alterations in mitochondria in DPC12 cells. GA reversed glutamate-suppressed B-cell lymphoma 2 levels, inhibited glutamate-enhanced expressions of Bax and cleaved caspase 3, and reduced cytochrome C (Cyto C) release. Exposure to glutamate strongly inhibited phosphorylation of AKT (protein kinase B) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs); however, GA pretreatment enhanced activation of ERKs but not AKT. The presence of PD98059 (a mitogen-activated protein/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase [MEK] inhibitor) but not LY294002 (a phosphoinositide 3-kinase [PI3K] inhibitor) diminished the potency of GA for improving viability of glutamate-exposed DPC12 cells. These results indicated that ERKs and mitochondria-related pathways are essential for the neuroprotective effect of GA against glutamate-induced toxicity in DPC12 cells. The present study provides experimental evidence supporting GA as a potential therapeutic agent for use in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  2. Co-administration of ethanol and nicotine: the enduring alterations in the rewarding properties of nicotine and glutamate activity within the mesocorticolimbic system of female alcohol-preferring (P) rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deehan, Gerald A; Hauser, Sheketha R; Waeiss, R Aaron; Knight, Christopher P; Toalston, Jamie E; Truitt, William A; McBride, William J; Rodd, Zachary A

    2015-12-01

    The co-abuse of ethanol (EtOH) and nicotine (NIC) increases the likelihood that an individual will relapse to drug use while attempting to maintain abstinence. There is limited research examining the consequences of long-term EtOH and NIC co-abuse. The current experiments determined the enduring effects of chronic EtOH, NIC, or EtOH + NIC intake on the reinforcing properties of NIC and glutamate (GLU) activity within the mesocorticolimbic (MCL) system. Alcohol-preferring (P) rats self-administered EtOH, Sacc + NIC, or EtOH + NIC combined for 10 weeks. The reinforcing properties of 0.1-3.0 μM NIC within the nucleus accumbens shell (AcbSh) were assessed following a 2-3-week drug-free period using intracranial self-administration (ICSA) procedures. The effects of EtOH, Sacc, Sacc + NIC, or EtOH + NIC intake on extracellular levels and clearance of glutamate (GLU) in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) were also determined. Binge intake of EtOH (96-100 mg%) and NIC (21-27 mg/mL) were attained. All groups of P rats self-infused 3.0 μM NIC directly into the AcbSh, whereas only animals in the EtOH + NIC co-abuse group self-infused the 0.3 and 1.0 μM NIC concentrations. Additionally, self-administration of EtOH + NIC, but not EtOH, Sacc or Sacc + NIC, resulted in enduring increases in basal extracellular GLU levels in the mPFC. Overall, the co-abuse of EtOH + NIC produced enduring neuronal alterations within the MCL which enhanced the rewarding properties of NIC in the AcbSh and elevated extracellular GLU levels within the mPFC.

  3. Prepubertal Development of Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neuron Activity Is Altered by Sex, Age, and Prenatal Androgen Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulka, Eden A; Moenter, Suzanne M

    2017-11-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons regulate reproduction though pulsatile hormone release. Disruption of GnRH release as measured via luteinizing hormone (LH) pulses occurs in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and in young hyperandrogenemic girls. In adult prenatally androgenized (PNA) mice, which exhibit many aspects of PCOS, increased LH is associated with increased GnRH neuron action potential firing. How GnRH neuron activity develops over the prepubertal period and whether this is altered by sex or prenatal androgen treatment are unknown. We hypothesized GnRH neurons are active before puberty and that this activity is sexually differentiated and altered by PNA. Dams were injected with dihydrotestosterone (DHT) on days 16 to 18 post copulation to generate PNA mice. Action potential firing of GFP-identified GnRH neurons in brain slices from 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-week-old and adult mice was monitored. GnRH neurons were active at all ages tested. In control females, activity increased with age through 3 weeks, then decreased to adult levels. In contrast, activity did not change in PNA females and was reduced at 3 weeks. Activity was higher in control females than males from 2 to 3 weeks. PNA did not affect GnRH neuron firing rate in males at any age. Short-term action potential patterns were also affected by age and PNA treatment. GnRH neurons are thus typically more active during the prepubertal period than adulthood, and PNA reduces prepubertal activity in females. Prepubertal activity may play a role in establishing sexually differentiated neuronal networks upstream of GnRH neurons; androgen-induced changes during this time may contribute to the adult PNA, and possibly PCOS, phenotype. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society.

  4. Do intracoelomic telemetry transmitters alter the post-release behaviour of migratory fish?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Alexander D.M.; Hayden, Todd A.; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Kraus, Richard T.; Dettmers, John M.; Cooke, Steven J.; Charles C. Krueger,

    2016-01-01

    Electronic tags have become a common tool in fish research, enhancing our understanding of how fish interact with their environment and move among different habitats, for estimating mortality and recording internal physiological states. An often-untested assumption of electronic tagging studies is that tagged fish are representative of untagged conspecifics and thus show ‘normal’ behaviour (e.g. movement rates, swimming activity, feeding). Here, we use a unique data set for potamadromous walleye (Sander vitreus) in Lake Huron and Lake Erie tributaries to assess whether the lack of appropriate controls in electronic tagging could seriously affect behavioural data. We used fish tagged in previous years and compared their migratory behaviour during the spawning season to fish tagged in a current year at the same location. The objective of the study was to determine whether intracoelomic acoustic tag implantation altered downstream movement of walleye after spawning. Fish tagged in a given season travelled slower downstream from two river spawning sites than fish tagged in previous years. Fish tagged one or two years earlier showed no differences between each other in downstream travel time, in contrast to fish tagged in a given year. Our results support notions that standard collection and intracoelomic tagging procedures can alter short-term behaviour (i.e. days, weeks, months), and as such, researchers should use caution when interpreting data collected over such time periods. Further, whenever possible, researchers should also explicitly evaluate post-tagging effects on behaviour as part of their experimental objectives.

  5. Non-Targeted Metabolomics Analysis of Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy-Affected Muscles Reveals Alterations in Arginine and Proline Metabolism, and Elevations in Glutamic and Oleic Acid In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Muhammad; Kornegay, Joe N.; Honcoop, Aubree; Parry, Traci L.; Balog-Alvarez, Cynthia J.; Muehlbauer, Michael J.; Newgard, Christopher B.; Patterson, Cam

    2017-01-01

    Background: Like Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog model of DMD is characterized by muscle necrosis, progressive paralysis, and pseudohypertrophy in specific skeletal muscles. This severe GRMD phenotype includes moderate atrophy of the biceps femoris (BF) as compared to unaffected normal dogs, while the long digital extensor (LDE), which functions to flex the tibiotarsal joint and serves as a digital extensor, undergoes the most pronounced atrophy. A recent microarray analysis of GRMD identified alterations in genes associated with lipid metabolism and energy production. Methods: We, therefore, undertook a non-targeted metabolomics analysis of the milder/earlier stage disease GRMD BF muscle versus the more severe/chronic LDE using GC-MS to identify underlying metabolic defects specific for affected GRMD skeletal muscle. Results: Untargeted metabolomics analysis of moderately-affected GRMD muscle (BF) identified eight significantly altered metabolites, including significantly decreased stearamide (0.23-fold of controls, p = 2.89 × 10−3), carnosine (0.40-fold of controls, p = 1.88 × 10−2), fumaric acid (0.40-fold of controls, p = 7.40 × 10−4), lactamide (0.33-fold of controls, p = 4.84 × 10−2), myoinositol-2-phosphate (0.45-fold of controls, p = 3.66 × 10−2), and significantly increased oleic acid (1.77-fold of controls, p = 9.27 × 10−2), glutamic acid (2.48-fold of controls, p = 2.63 × 10−2), and proline (1.73-fold of controls, p = 3.01 × 10−2). Pathway enrichment analysis identified significant enrichment for arginine/proline metabolism (p = 5.88 × 10−4, FDR 4.7 × 10−2), where alterations in L-glutamic acid, proline, and carnosine were found. Additionally, multiple Krebs cycle intermediates were significantly decreased (e.g., malic acid, fumaric acid, citric/isocitric acid, and succinic acid), suggesting that altered energy metabolism may be underlying the observed GRMD BF muscle

  6. Glutamate and Brain Glutaminases in Drug Addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Javier; Campos-Sandoval, José A; Peñalver, Ana; Matés, José M; Segura, Juan A; Blanco, Eduardo; Alonso, Francisco J; de Fonseca, Fernando Rodríguez

    2017-03-01

    Glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system and its actions are related to the behavioral effects of psychostimulant drugs. In the last two decades, basic neuroscience research and preclinical studies with animal models are suggesting a critical role for glutamate transmission in drug reward, reinforcement, and relapse. Although most of the interest has been centered in post-synaptic glutamate receptors, the presynaptic synthesis of glutamate through brain glutaminases may also contribute to imbalances in glutamate homeostasis, a key feature of the glutamatergic hypothesis of addiction. Glutaminases are the main glutamate-producing enzymes in brain and dysregulation of their function have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases and neurological disorders; however, the possible implication of these enzymes in drug addiction remains largely unknown. This mini-review focuses on brain glutaminase isozymes and their alterations by in vivo exposure to drugs of abuse, which are discussed in the context of the glutamate homeostasis theory of addiction. Recent findings from mouse models have shown that drugs induce changes in the expression profiles of key glutamatergic transmission genes, although the molecular mechanisms that regulate drug-induced neuronal sensitization and behavioral plasticity are not clear.

  7. Optogenetic release of norepinephrine from cardiac sympathetic neurons alters mechanical and electrical function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wengrowski, Anastasia M; Wang, Xin; Tapa, Srinivas; Posnack, Nikki Gillum; Mendelowitz, David; Kay, Matthew W

    2015-02-01

    Release of norepinephrine (NE) from sympathetic neurons enhances heart rate (HR) and developed force through activation of β-adrenergic receptors, and this sympathoexcitation is a key risk for the generation of cardiac arrhythmias. Studies of β-adrenergic modulation of cardiac function typically involve the administration of exogenous β-adrenergic receptor agonists to directly elicit global β-adrenergic receptor activation by bypassing the involvement of sympathetic nerve terminals. In this work, we use a novel method to activate sympathetic fibres within the myocardium of Langendorff-perfused hearts while measuring changes in electrical and mechanical function. The light-activated optogenetic protein channelrhodopsin-2 (ChR2) was expressed in murine catecholaminergic sympathetic neurons. Sympathetic fibres were then photoactivated to examine changes in contractile force, HR, and cardiac electrical activity. Incidence of arrhythmia was measured with and without exposure to photoactivation of sympathetic fibres, and hearts were optically mapped to detect changes in action potential durations and conduction velocities. Results demonstrate facilitation of both developed force and HR after photostimulated release of NE, with increases in contractile force and HR of 34.5 ± 5.5 and 25.0 ± 9.3%, respectively. Photostimulation of sympathetic fibres also made hearts more susceptible to arrhythmia, with greater incidence and severity. In addition, optically mapped action potentials displayed a small but significant shortening of the plateau phase (-5.5 ± 1.0 ms) after photostimulation. This study characterizes a powerful and clinically relevant new model for studies of cardiac arrhythmias generated by increasing the activity of sympathetic nerve terminals and the resulting activation of myocyte β-adrenergic receptors. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Alterations in the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurocircuitry: Insights into post stroke functional impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barra de la Tremblaye, P; Plamondon, H

    2016-07-01

    Although it is well accepted that changes in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis may increase susceptibility to affective disorders in the general population, this link has been less examined in stroke patients. Yet, the bidirectional association between depression and cardiovascular disease is strong, and stress increases vulnerability to stroke. Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) is the central stress hormone of the HPA axis pathway and acts by binding to CRH receptors (CRHR) 1 and 2, which are located in several stress-related brain regions. Evidence from clinical and animal studies suggests a role for CRH in the neurobiological basis of depression and ischemic brain injury. Given its importance in the regulation of the neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral correlates of adaptation and maladaptation to stress, CRH is likely associated in the pathophysiology of post stroke emotional impairments. The goals of this review article are to examine the clinical and experimental data describing (1) that CRH regulates the molecular signaling brain circuit underlying anxiety- and depression-like behaviors, (2) the influence of CRH and other stress markers in the pathophysiology of post stroke emotional and cognitive impairments, and (3) context and site specific interactions of CRH and BDNF as a basis for the development of novel therapeutic targets. This review addresses how the production and release of the neuropeptide CRH within the various regions of the mesocorticolimbic system influences emotional and cognitive behaviors with a look into its role in psychiatric disorders post stroke. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Brain microdialysis of GABA and glutamate : What does it signify?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, W; Westerink, B.H.C.

    1997-01-01

    Microdialysis has become a frequently used method to study extracellular levels of GABA and glutamate in the central nervous system. However, the fact that the major part of GABA and glutamate as measured by microdialysis does not fulfill the classical criteria for exocytotic release questions the

  10. Some Properties of Glutamate Dehydrogenase from the Marine Red ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: ammonia assimilation, glutamate dehydrogenase, GDH, Gracilaria sordida, red alga, enzyme activity. Glutamate dehydrogenases (GDH, EC ... Anabolic functions could be assimilation of ammonia released during photorespiration and synthesis of N-rich transport compounds. Western Indian Ocean Journal of ...

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cell Wall Fragments Released upon Bacterial Contact with the Human Lung Mucosa Alter the Neutrophil Response to Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scordo, Julia M; Arcos, Jesús; Kelley, Holden V; Diangelo, Lauren; Sasindran, Smitha J; Youngmin, Ellie; Wewers, Mark D; Wang, Shu-Hua; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel; Torrelles, Jordi B

    2017-01-01

    In 2016, the World Health Organization reported that one person dies of tuberculosis (TB) every 21 s. A host environment that Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( M.tb ) finds during its route of infection is the lung mucosa bathing the alveolar space located in the deepest regions of the lungs. We published that human lung mucosa, or alveolar lining fluid (ALF), contains an array of hydrolytic enzymes that can significantly alter the M.tb surface during infection by cleaving off parts of its cell wall. This interaction results in two different outcomes: modifications on the M.tb cell wall surface and release of M.tb cell wall fragments into the environment. Typically, one of the first host immune cells at the site of M.tb infection is the neutrophil. Neutrophils can mount an extracellular and intracellular innate immune response to M.tb during infection. We hypothesized that exposure of neutrophils to ALF-induced M.tb released cell wall fragments would prime neutrophils to control M.tb infection better. Our results show that ALF fragments activate neutrophils leading to an increased production of inflammatory cytokines and oxidative radicals. However, neutrophil exposure to these fragments reduces production of chemoattractants (i.e., interleukin-8), and degranulation, with the subsequent reduction of myeloperoxidase release, and does not induce cytotoxicity. Unexpectedly, these ALF fragment-derived modulations in neutrophil activity do not further, either positively or negatively, contribute to the intracellular control of M.tb growth during infection. However, secreted products from neutrophils primed with ALF fragments are capable of regulating the activity of resting macrophages. These results indicate that ALF-induced M.tb fragments could further contribute to the control of M.tb growth and local killing by resident neutrophils by switching on the total oxidative response and limiting migration of neutrophils to the infection site.

  12. Chronic Anabolic Androgenic Steroid Exposure Alters Corticotropin Releasing Factor Expression and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in the Female Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costine, Beth A; Oberlander, Joseph G; Davis, Matthew C; Penatti, Carlos A A; Porter, Donna M; Leaton, Robert N; Henderson, Leslie P

    2010-01-01

    Summary In the past several decades, the therapeutic use of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) has been overshadowed by illicit use of these drugs by elite athletes and a growing number of adolescents to enhance performance and body image. As with adults, AAS use by adolescents is associated with a range of behavioral effects, including increased anxiety and altered responses to stress. It has been suggested that adolescents, especially adolescent females, may be particularly susceptible to the effects of these steroids, but few experiments in animal models have been performed to test this assertion. Here we show that chronic exposure of adolescent female mice to a mixture of three commonly abused AAS (testosterone cypionate, nandrolone decanoate and methandrostenolone; 7.5 mg/kg/day for 5 days) significantly enhanced anxiety-like behavior as assessed by the acoustic startle response (ASR), but did not augment the fear-potentiated startle response (FPS) or alter sensorimotor gating as assessed by prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response (PPI). AAS treatment also significantly increased the levels of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) mRNA and somal-associated CRF immunoreactivity in the central amygdala (CeA), as well as neuropil-associated immunoreactivity in the dorsal aspect of the anterolateral division of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (dBnST). AAS treatment did not alter CRF receptor 1 or 2 mRNA in either the CeA or the dBnST; CRF immunoreactivity in the ventral BNST, the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) or the median eminence (ME); or peripheral levels of corticosterone. These results suggest that chronic AAS treatment of adolescent female mice may enhance generalized anxiety, but not sensorimotor gating or learned fear, via a mechanism that involves increased CRF-mediated signaling from CeA neurons projecting to the dBnST. PMID:20537804

  13. Effect of acute and chronic MK-801 administration on extracellular glutamate and ascorbic acid release in the prefrontal cortex of freely moving mice on line with open-field behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Dai-Ying; Zhang, Ya-Hong; Cao, Yue; Wu, Chun-Fu; Tanaka, Masatoshi; Wu, Ying-Liang

    2006-04-04

    The present study was designed to investigate the effects of acute and chronic administration of MK-801 (0.6 mg/kg), a noncompetitive NMDA-receptor antagonist on extracellular glutamate (Glu) and ascorbic acid (AA) release in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of freely moving mice using in vivo microdialysis with open-field behavior. In line with earlier studies, acute administration of MK-801 induced an increase of Glu in the PFC. We also observed single MK-801 treatment increased AA release in the PFC. In addition, our results indicated that the basal AA levels in the PFC after MK-801 administration for 7 consecutive days were significantly decreased, and basal Glu levels also had a decreased tendency. After chronic administration (0.6 mg/kg, 7 days), MK-801 (0.6 mg/kg) challenge significantly decreased dialysate levels of AA and Glu. Our study also found that both acute and chronic administration of MK-801 induced hyperactivity in mice, but the intensity of acute administration was more than that of chronic administration. Furthermore, in all acute treatment mice, individual changes in Glu dialysate concentrations and the numbers of locomotion were positively correlated. In conclusion, this study may provide new evidence that a single MK-801 administration induces increases of dialysate AA and Glu concentrations in the PFC of freely moving mice, which are opposite to those induced by repeated MK-801 administration, with an unknown mechanism. Our results suggested that redox-response might play an important role in the model of schizophrenic symptoms induced by MK-801.

  14. Antibody Binding Alters the Characteristics and Contents of Extracellular Vesicles Released by Histoplasma capsulatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltazar, Ludmila M.; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Sobreira, Tiago; Choi, Hyungwon; Casadevall, Arturo; Nimrichter, Leonardo; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2016-03-30

    ABSTRACT

    Histoplasma capsulatumproduces extracellular vesicles containing virulence-associated molecules capable of modulating host machinery, benefiting the pathogen. Treatment ofH. capsulatumcells with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) can change the outcome of infection in mice. We evaluated the sizes, enzymatic contents, and proteomic profiles of the vesicles released by fungal cells treated with either protective MAb 6B7 (IgG1) or nonprotective MAb 7B6 (IgG2b), both of which bindH. capsulatumheat shock protein 60 (Hsp60). Our results showed that treatment with either MAb was associated with changes in size and vesicle loading. MAb treatments reduced vesicle phosphatase and catalase activities compared to those of vesicles from untreated controls. We identified 1,125 proteins in vesicles, and 250 of these manifested differences in abundance relative to that of proteins in vesicles isolated from yeast cells exposed to Hsp60-binding MAbs, indicating that surface binding of fungal cells by MAbs modified protein loading in the vesicles. The abundance of upregulated proteins in vesicles upon MAb 7B6 treatment was 44.8% of the protein quantities in vesicles from fungal cells treated with MAb 6B7. Analysis of orthologous proteins previously identified in vesicles from other fungi showed that different ascomycete fungi have similar proteins in their extracellular milieu, many of which are associated with virulence. Our results demonstrate that antibody binding can modulate fungal cell responses, resulting in differential loading of vesicles, which could alter fungal cell susceptibility to host defenses. This finding provides additional evidence that antibody binding modulates microbial physiology and suggests a new function for specific immunoglobulins through alterations of fungal secretion.

    IMPORTANCEDiverse fungal species release extracellular vesicles, indicating that this is a

  15. Synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents in Spinal Dorsal Horn Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dougherty Patrick M

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Removing and sequestering synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space is carried out by specific plasma membrane transporters that are primarily located in astrocytes. Glial glutamate transporter function can be monitored by recording the currents that are produced by co-transportation of Na+ ions with the uptake of glutamate. The goal of this study was to characterize glutamate transporter function in astrocytes of the spinal cord dorsal horn in real time by recording synaptically evoked glutamate transporter currents. Results Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were obtained from astrocytes in the spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG area in spinal slices of young adult rats. Glutamate transporter currents were evoked in these cells by electrical stimulation at the spinal dorsal root entry zone in the presence of bicuculline, strychnine, DNQX and D-AP5. Transporter currents were abolished when synaptic transmission was blocked by TTX or Cd2+. Pharmacological studies identified two subtypes of glutamate transporters in spinal astrocytes, GLAST and GLT-1. Glutamate transporter currents were graded with stimulus intensity, reaching peak responses at 4 to 5 times activation threshold, but were reduced following low-frequency (0.1 – 1 Hz repetitive stimulation. Conclusion These results suggest that glutamate transporters of spinal astrocytes could be activated by synaptic activation, and recording glutamate transporter currents may provide a means of examining the real time physiological responses of glial cells in spinal sensory processing, sensitization, hyperalgesia and chronic pain.

  16. Glutamate and Neurodegenerative Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Eric; Duplantier, Allen

    As the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, glutamate is critically involved in most aspects of CNS function. Given this critical role, it is not surprising that glutamatergic dysfunction is associated with many CNS disorders. In this chapter, we review the literature that links aberrant glutamate neurotransmission with CNS pathology, with a focus on neurodegenerative diseases. The biology and pharmacology of the various glutamate receptor families are discussed, along with data which links these receptors with neurodegenerative conditions. In addition, we review progress that has been made in developing small molecule modulators of glutamate receptors and transporters, and describe how these compounds have helped us understand the complex pharmacology of glutamate in normal CNS function, as well as their potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Maternal Dexamethasone Exposure Alters Synaptic Inputs to Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Neurons in the Early Postnatal Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Ling Lim

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Maternal dexamethasone (DEX; a glucocorticoid receptor agonist exposure delays pubertal onset and alters reproductive behaviour in the adult offspring. However, little is known whether maternal DEX exposure affects the offspring’s reproductive function by disrupting the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neuronal function in the brain. Therefore, this study determined the exposure of maternal DEX on the GnRH neuronal spine development and synaptic cluster inputs to GnRH neurons using transgenic rats expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP under the control of GnRH promoter. Pregnant females were administered with DEX (0.1mg/kg or vehicle (VEH, water daily during gestation day 13-20. Confocal imaging was used to examine the spine density of EGFP-GnRH neurons by three-dimensional rendering and synaptic cluster inputs to EGFP-GnRH neurons by synapsin I immunohistochemistry on postnatal day 0 (P0 males. The spine morphology and number on GnRH neurons did not change between the P0 males following maternal DEX and VEH treatment. The number of synaptic clusters within the organum vasculosum of the lamina terminalis (OVLT was decreased by maternal DEX exposure in P0 males. Furthermore, the number and levels of synaptic cluster inputs in close apposition with GnRH neurons was decreased following maternal DEX exposure in the OVLT region of P0 males. In addition, the post synaptic marker molecule, post-synaptic density 95 was observed in GnRH neurons following both DEX and VEH treatment. These results suggest that maternal DEX exposure alters neural afferent inputs to GnRH neurons during early postnatal stage, which could lead to reproductive dysfunction during adulthood.

  18. Influence of Glutamic Acid on the Properties of Poly(xylitol glutamate sebacate Bioelastomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weifu Dong

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to further improve the biocompatibility of xylitol based poly(xylitol sebacate (PXS bioelastomer, a novel kind of amino acid based poly(xylitol glutamate sebacate (PXGS has been successfully prepared in this work by melt polycondensation of xylitol, N-Boc glutamic acid and sebacic acid. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC results indicated the glass-transition temperatures could be decreased by feeding N-Boc glutamic acid. In comparison to PXS, PXGS exhibited comparable tensile strength and much higher elongation at break at the same ratio of acid/xylitol. The introduction of glutamic acid increased the hydrophilicity and in vitro degradation rate of the bioelastomer. It was found that PXGS exhibited excellent properties, such as tensile properties, biodegradability and hydrophilicity, which could be easily tuned by altering the feeding monomer ratios. The amino groups in the PXGS polyester side chains are readily functionalized, thus the biomelastomers can be considered as potential biomaterials for biomedical application.

  19. Gating characteristics control glutamate receptor distribution and trafficking in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzoldt, Astrid G; Lee, Yü-Hien; Khorramshahi, Omid; Reynolds, Eric; Plested, Andrew J R; Herzel, Hanspeter; Sigrist, Stephan J

    2014-09-08

    Glutamate-releasing synapses dominate excitatory release in the brain. Mechanisms governing their assembly are of major importance for circuit development and long-term plasticity underlying learning and memory. AMPA/Kainate-type glutamate receptors (GluRs) are tetrameric ligand-gated ion channels that open their ion-conducting pores in response to binding of the neurotransmitter. Changes in subunit composition of postsynaptic GluRs are highly relevant for plasticity and development of glutamatergic synapses [1-4]. To date, posttranslational modifications, mostly operating via the intracellular C-terminal domains (CTDs) of GluRs, are presumed to be the major regulator of trafficking [5]. In recent years, structural and electrophysiological analyses have improved our understanding of GluR gating mechanism [6-11]. However, whether conformational changes subsequent to glutamate binding may per se be able to influence GluR trafficking has remained an unaddressed question. Using a Drosophila system allowing for extended visualization of GluR trafficking in vivo, we here provide evidence that mutations changing the gating behavior alter GluR distribution and trafficking. GluR mutants associated with reduced charge transfer segregated from coexpressed wild-type GluRs on the level of individual postsynaptic densities. Segregation was lost upon blocking of evoked glutamate release. Photobleaching experiments suggested increased mobility of mutants with reduced charge transfer, which accumulated prematurely during early steps of synapse assembly, but failed to further increase their level in accordance with assembly of the presynaptic scaffold. In summary, gating characteristics seem to be a new variable for the understanding of GluR trafficking relevant to both development and plasticity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Introduction to the Glutamate-Glutamine Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne

    2016-01-01

    The term 'glutamate-glutamine cycle' was coined several decades ago based on the observation that using certain 14 C-labeled precursors for studies of brain metabolism the specific radioactivity of glutamine generated from glutamate was higher than that of glutamate, its immediate precursor. This is metabolically impossible unless it is assumed that at least two distinct pools of these amino acids exist. This combined with the finding that the enzyme synthesizing glutamine from glutamate was expressed in astrocytes but not in neurons formed the basis of the notion that a cycle must exist in which glutamate released from neurons is transported into astrocytes, converted to glutamine which is subsequently returned to neurons and converted to glutamate by an enzyme the activity of which is much higher in neurons than in astrocytes. Originally this cycle was supposed to function in a stoichiometric fashion but more recent research has seriously questioned this.This volume of Advances in Neurobiology is intended to provide a detailed discussion of recent developments in research aimed at delineating the functional roles of the cycle taking into account that in order for this system to work there must be a tight coupling between metabolism of glutamate in astrocytes, transfer of glutamine to neurons and de novo synthesis of glutamine in astrocytes. To understand this, knowledge about the activity and regulation of the enzymes and transporters involved in these processes is required and as can be seen from the table of contents these issues will be dealt with in detail in the individual chapters of the book.

  1. Glutamate receptor agonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogensen, Stine Byskov; Greenwood, Jeremy R; Bunch, Lennart

    2011-01-01

    The neurotransmitter (S)-glutamate [(S)-Glu] is responsible for most of the excitatory neurotransmission in the central nervous system. The effect of (S)-Glu is mediated by both ionotropic and metabotropic receptors. Glutamate receptor agonists are generally a-amino acids with one or more...... stereogenic centers due to strict requirements in the agonist binding pocket of the activated state of the receptor. By contrast, there are many examples of achiral competitive antagonists. The present review addresses how stereochemistry affects the activity of glutamate receptor ligands. The review focuses...... mainly on agonists and discusses stereochemical and conformational considerations as well as biostructural knowledge of the agonist binding pockets, which is useful in the design of glutamate receptor agonists. Examples are chosen to demonstrate how stereochemistry not only determines how the agonist...

  2. Electrogenic glutamate uptake is a major current carrier in the membrane of axolotl retinal glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brew, Helen; Attwell, David

    1987-06-01

    Glutamate is taken up avidly by glial cells in the central nervous system1. Glutamate uptake may terminate the transmitter action of glutamate released from neurons1, and keep extracellular glutamate at concentrations below those which are neurotoxic. We report here that glutamate evokes a large inward current in retinal glial cells which have their membrane potential and intracellular ion concentrations controlled by the whole-cell patch-clamp technique2. This current seems to be due to an electrogenic glutamate uptake carrier, which transports at least two sodium ions with every glutamate anion carried into the cell. Glutamate uptake is strongly voltage-dependent, decreasing at depolarized potentials: when fully activated, it contributes almost half of the conductance in the part of the glial cell membrane facing the retinal neurons. The spatial localization, glutamate affinity and magnitude of the uptake are appropriate for terminating the synaptic action of glutamate released from photoreceptors and bipolar cells. These data challenge present explanations of how the b-wave of the electroretinogram is generated, and suggest a mechanism for non-vesicular voltage-dependent release of glutamate from neurons.

  3. pH modulation of glial glutamate transporters regulates synaptic transmission in the nucleus of the solitary tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCrimmon, Donald R.; Martina, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is the major site for termination of visceral sensory afferents contributing to homeostatic regulation of, for example, arterial pressure, gastric motility, and breathing. Whereas much is known about how different neuronal populations influence these functions, information about the role of glia remains scant. In this article, we propose that glia may contribute to NTS functions by modulating excitatory neurotransmission. We found that acidification (pH 7.0) depolarizes NTS glia by inhibiting K+-selective membrane currents. NTS glia also showed functional expression of voltage-sensitive glutamate transporters, suggesting that extracellular acidification regulates synaptic transmission by compromising glial glutamate uptake. To test this hypothesis, we evoked glutamatergic slow excitatory potentials (SEPs) in NTS neurons with repetitive stimulation (20 pulses at 10 Hz) of the solitary tract. This SEP depends on accumulation of glutamate following repetitive stimulation, since it was potentiated by blocking glutamate uptake with dl-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartic acid (TBOA) or a glia-specific glutamate transport blocker, dihydrokainate (DHK). Importantly, extracellular acidification (pH 7.0) also potentiated the SEP. This effect appeared to be mediated through a depolarization-induced inhibition of glial transporter activity, because it was occluded by TBOA and DHK. In agreement, pH 7.0 did not directly alter d-aspartate-induced responses in NTS glia or properties of presynaptic glutamate release. Thus acidification-dependent regulation of glial function affects synaptic transmission within the NTS. These results suggest that glia play a modulatory role in the NTS by integrating local tissue signals (such as pH) with synaptic inputs from peripheral afferents. PMID:23615553

  4. Effect of biotin on transcription levels of key enzymes and glutamate efflux in glutamate fermentation by Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan; Duan, Zuoying; Shi, Zhongping

    2014-02-01

    Biotin is an important factor affecting the performance of glutamate fermentation by biotin auxotrophic Corynebacterium glutamicum and glutamate is over-produced only when initial biotin content is controlled at suitable levels or initial biotin is excessive but with Tween 40 addition during fermentation. The transcription levels of key enzymes at pyruvate, isocitrate and α-ketoglutarate metabolic nodes, as well as transport protein (TP) of glutamate were investigated under the conditions of varied biotin contents and Tween 40 supplementation. When biotin was insufficient, the genes encoding key enzymes and TP were down-regulated in the early production phase, in particular, the transcription level of isocitrate dehydrogenase (ICDH) which was only 2% of that of control. Although the cells' morphology transformation and TP level were not affected, low transcription level of ICDH led to lower final glutamate concentration (64 g/L). When biotin was excessive, the transcription levels of key enzymes were at comparable levels as those of control with ICDH as an exception, which was only 3-22% of control level throughout production phase. In this case, little intracellular glutamate accumulation (1.5 mg/g DCW) and impermeable membrane resulted in non glutamate secretion into broth, even though the quantity of TP was more than 10-folds of control level. Addition of Tween 40 when biotin was excessive stimulated the expression of all key enzymes and TP, intracellular glutamate content was much higher (10-12 mg/g DCW), and final glutamate concentration reached control level (75-80 g/L). Hence, the membrane alteration and TP were indispensable in glutamate secretion. Biotin and Tween 40 influenced the expression level of ICDH and glutamate efflux, thereby influencing glutamate production.

  5. ATP secretion from nerve trunks and Schwann cells mediated by glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guo Jun; Bennett, Max R

    2003-11-14

    ATP release from rat sciatic nerves and from cultured Schwann cells isolated from the nerves was investigated using an online bioluminescence technique. ATP was released in relatively large amounts from rat sciatic nerve trunks during electrical stimulation. This release was blocked by the sodium channel inhibitor tetrodotoxin and the non-NMDA glutamate receptor blocker 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (CNQX). Schwann cells isolated from the nerve trunks did not release ATP when electrically stimulated but did in response to glutamate in a concentration-dependent manner. Glutamate-stimulated ATP release was inhibited by specific non-competitive AMPA receptor antagonist GYKI 52466 and competitive non-NMDA receptor antagonist CNQX. Glutamate-stimulated ATP release was decreased by inhibition of anion transporter inhibitors by furosemide, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator by glibenclamide and exocytosis by botulinum toxin A, indicating that anion transporters and exocytosis provide the main secretion mechanisms for ATP release from the Schwann cells.

  6. Nerve growth factor alters microtubule targeting agent-induced neurotransmitter release but not MTA-induced neurite retraction in sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Sherry K; Gracias, Neilia G; Fehrenbacher, Jill C

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral neuropathy is a dose-limiting side effect of anticancer treatment with the microtubule-targeted agents (MTAs), paclitaxel and epothilone B (EpoB); however, the mechanisms by which the MTAs alter neuronal function and morphology are unknown. We previously demonstrated that paclitaxel alters neuronal sensitivity, in vitro, in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). Evidence in the literature suggests that NGF may modulate the neurotoxic effects of paclitaxel. Here, we examine whether NGF modulates changes in neuronal sensitivity and morphology induced by paclitaxel and EpoB. Neuronal sensitivity was assessed using the stimulated release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), whereas morphology of established neurites was evaluated using a high content screening system. Dorsal root ganglion cultures, maintained in the absence or presence of NGF, were treated from day 7 to day 12 in culture with paclitaxel (300nM) or EpoB (30nM). Following treatment, the release of CGRP was stimulated using capsaicin or high extracellular potassium. In the presence of NGF, EpoB mimicked the effects of paclitaxel: capsaicin-stimulated release was attenuated, potassium-stimulated release was slightly enhanced and the total peptide content was unchanged. In the absence of NGF, both paclitaxel and EpoB decreased capsaicin- and potassium-stimulated release and the total peptide content, suggesting that NGF may reverse MTA-induced hyposensitivity. Paclitaxel and EpoB both decreased neurite length and branching, and this attenuation was unaffected by NGF in the growth media. These differential effects of NGF on neuronal sensitivity and morphology suggest that neurite retraction is not a causative factor to alter neuronal sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. In Vivo Measurements of Glutamate, GABA, and NAAG in Schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Rowland, Laura M.; Kontson, Kimberly; West, Jeffrey; Edden, Richard A.; Zhu, He; Wijtenburg, S. Andrea; Holcomb, Henry H.; Barker, Peter B.

    2012-01-01

    The major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), respectively, are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), a neuropeptide that modulates the Glu system, may also be altered in schizophrenia. This study investigated GABA, Glu + glutamine (Glx), and NAAG levels in younger and older subjects with schizophrenia. Forty-one subjects, 21 with chronic schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls, partic...

  8. Morphine Protects Spinal Cord Astrocytes from Glutamate-Induced Apoptosis via Reducing Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Zhang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is not only a neurotransmitter but also an important neurotoxin in central nervous system (CNS. Chronic elevation of glutamate induces both neuronal and glial cell apoptosis. However, its effect on astrocytes is complex and still remains unclear. In this study, we investigated whether morphine, a common opioid ligand, could affect glutamate-induced apoptosis in astrocytes. Primary cultured astrocytes were incubated with glutamate in the presence/absence of morphine. It was found that morphine could reduce glutamate-induced apoptosis of astrocytes. Furthermore, glutamate activated Ca2+ release, thereby inducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect. Using siRNA to reduce the expression of κ-opioid receptor, morphine could not effectively inhibit glutamate-stimulated Ca2+ release in astrocytes, the protective effect of morphine on glutamate-injured astrocytes was also suppressed. These results suggested that morphine could protect astrocytes from glutamate-induced apoptosis via reducing Ca2+ overload and ER stress pathways. In conclusion, this study indicated that excitotoxicity participated in the glutamate mediated apoptosis in astrocytes, while morphine attenuated this deleterious effect via regulating Ca2+ release and ER stress.

  9. Glutamate may be an efferent transmitter that elicits inhibition in mouse taste buds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yijen A Huang

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that l-glutamate may be an efferent transmitter released from axons innervating taste buds. In this report, we determined the types of ionotropic synaptic glutamate receptors present on taste cells and that underlie this postulated efferent transmission. We also studied what effect glutamate exerts on taste bud function. We isolated mouse taste buds and taste cells, conducted functional imaging using Fura 2, and used cellular biosensors to monitor taste-evoked transmitter release. The findings show that a large fraction of Presynaptic (Type III taste bud cells (∼50% respond to 100 µM glutamate, NMDA, or kainic acid (KA with an increase in intracellular Ca(2+. In contrast, Receptor (Type II taste cells rarely (4% responded to 100 µM glutamate. At this concentration and with these compounds, these agonists activate glutamatergic synaptic receptors, not glutamate taste (umami receptors. Moreover, applying glutamate, NMDA, or KA caused taste buds to secrete 5-HT, a Presynaptic taste cell transmitter, but not ATP, a Receptor cell transmitter. Indeed, glutamate-evoked 5-HT release inhibited taste-evoked ATP secretion. The findings are consistent with a role for glutamate in taste buds as an inhibitory efferent transmitter that acts via ionotropic synaptic glutamate receptors.

  10. Glutamate may be an efferent transmitter that elicits inhibition in mouse taste buds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yijen A; Grant, Jeff; Roper, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that l-glutamate may be an efferent transmitter released from axons innervating taste buds. In this report, we determined the types of ionotropic synaptic glutamate receptors present on taste cells and that underlie this postulated efferent transmission. We also studied what effect glutamate exerts on taste bud function. We isolated mouse taste buds and taste cells, conducted functional imaging using Fura 2, and used cellular biosensors to monitor taste-evoked transmitter release. The findings show that a large fraction of Presynaptic (Type III) taste bud cells (∼50%) respond to 100 µM glutamate, NMDA, or kainic acid (KA) with an increase in intracellular Ca(2+). In contrast, Receptor (Type II) taste cells rarely (4%) responded to 100 µM glutamate. At this concentration and with these compounds, these agonists activate glutamatergic synaptic receptors, not glutamate taste (umami) receptors. Moreover, applying glutamate, NMDA, or KA caused taste buds to secrete 5-HT, a Presynaptic taste cell transmitter, but not ATP, a Receptor cell transmitter. Indeed, glutamate-evoked 5-HT release inhibited taste-evoked ATP secretion. The findings are consistent with a role for glutamate in taste buds as an inhibitory efferent transmitter that acts via ionotropic synaptic glutamate receptors.

  11. Protective effect of cinnamaldehyde against glutamate-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Chao; Yuan, Xing; Zeng, Hua-Wu; Liu, Run-Hui; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2017-11-15

    Cinnamaldehyde is a main ingredient of cinnamon oils from the stem bark of Cinnamomum cassia, which has been widely used in food and traditional herbal medicine in Asia. In the present study, the neuroprotective effects and the potential mechanisms of cinnamaldehyde against glutamate-induced oxidative stress in PC12 cells were investigated. Exposure to 4mM glutamate altered the GSH, MDA levels and SOD activity, caused the generation of reactive oxygen species, resulted in the induction of oxidative stress in PC12 cell, ultimately induced cell death. However, pretreatment with cinnamaldehyde at 5, 10 and 20μM significantly attenuated cell viability loss, reduced the generation of reactive oxygen species, stabilised mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), decreased the release of cytochrome c and limited the activities of caspase-9 and -3. In addition, cinnamaldehyde also markedly increased Bcl-2 while inhibiting Bax expression,and decreased the LC3-II/LC3-I ratio. These results indicate that cinnamaldehyde exists a potential protective effect against glutamate-induced oxidative stress and apoptosis in PC12 cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Glutamate receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandt, Mette; Johansen, Tommy N; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Homologation and substitution on the carbon backbone of (S)-glutamic acid [(S)-Glu, 1], as well as absolute stereochemistry, are structural parameters of key importance for the pharmacological profile of (S)-Glu receptor ligands. We describe a series of methyl-substituted 2-aminoadipic acid (AA...

  13. Monosodium Glutamate Toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    The brain is reportedly sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) toxicity via oxidative stress. Sida acuta leaf ethanolic .... wherein the right hemisphere, was preserved for histology and fixed in 10% ... Biochemical Assays: The left hemisphere of the brain samples was ...... development in male and female rats. Exp Physiol.

  14. Glutamate/glutamine metabolism coupling between astrocytes and glioma cells: neuroprotection and inhibition of glioma growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Pei-Sen; Kang, De-Zhi; Lin, Ru-Ying; Ye, Bing; Wang, Wei; Ye, Zu-Cheng

    2014-07-18

    Glioma glutamate release has been shown to promote the growth of glioma cells and induce neuronal injuries from epilepsy to neuronal death. However, potential counteractions from normal astrocytes against glioma glutamate release have not been fully evaluated. In this study, we investigated the glutamate/glutamine cycling between glioma cells and astrocytes and their impact on neuronal function. Co-cultures of glioma cells with astrocytes (CGA) in direct contact were established under different mix ratio of astrocyte/glioma. Culture medium conditioned in these CGAs were sampled for HPLC measurement, for neuronal ratiometric calcium imaging, and for neuronal survival assay. We found: (1) High levels of glutaminase expression in glioma cells, but not in astrocytes, glutaminase enables glioma cells to release large amount of glutamate in the presence of glutamine. (2) Glutamate levels in CGAs were directly determined by the astrocyte/glioma ratios, indicating a balance between glioma glutamate release and astrocyte glutamate uptake. (3) Culture media from CGAs of higher glioma/astrocyte ratios induced stronger neuronal Ca(2+) response and more severe neuronal death. (4) Co-culturing with astrocytes significantly reduced the growth rate of glioma cells. These results indicate that normal astrocytes in the brain play pivotal roles in glioma growth inhibition and in reducing neuronal injuries from glioma glutamate release. However, as tumor growth, the protective role of astrocytes gradually succumb to glioma cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Synaptic glutamate spillover increases NMDA receptor reliability at the cerebellar glomerulus

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Cassie S.; Lee, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamate spillover in the mossy fiber to granule cell cerebellar glomeruli has been hypothesized to increase neurotransmission reliability. In this study, we evaluate this hypothesis using an experimentally-based quantitative model of glutamate spillover on the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDA-Rs) at the cerebellar glomerulus. The transient and steady-state responses of NMDA-Rs were examined over a physiological range of firing rates. Examined cases included direct glutamate release acti...

  16. Posttranslational Modification Biology of Glutamate Receptors and Drug Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Min eMao

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational covalent modifications of glutamate receptors remain a hot topic. Early studies have established that this family of receptors, including almost all ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptor subtypes, undergoes active phosphorylation at serine, threonine, or tyrosine residues on their intracellular domains. Recent evidence identifies several glutamate receptor subtypes to be direct substrates for palmitoylation at cysteine residues. Other modifications such as ubiquitination and sumoylation at lysine residues also occur to certain glutamate receptors. These modifications are dynamic and reversible in nature and are regulatable by changing synaptic inputs. The regulated modifications significantly impact the receptor in many ways, including interrelated changes in biochemistry (synthesis, subunit assembling and protein-protein interactions, subcellular redistribution (trafficking, endocytosis, synaptic delivery and clustering, and physiology, usually associated with changes in synaptic plasticity. Glutamate receptors are enriched in the striatum and cooperate closely with dopamine to regulate striatal signaling. Emerging evidence shows that modification processes of striatal glutamate receptors are sensitive to addictive drugs, such as psychostimulants (cocaine and amphetamines. Altered modifications are believed to be directly linked to enduring receptor/synaptic plasticity and drug-seeking. This review summarizes several major types of modifications of glutamate receptors and analyzes the role of these modifications in striatal signaling and in the pathogenesis of psychostimulant addiction.

  17. Fabrication of Implantable, Enzyme-Immobilized Glutamate Sensors for the Monitoring of Glutamate Concentration Changes in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina T.-C. Tseng

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate sensors based on the immobilization of glutamate oxidase (GlutOx were prepared by adsorption on electrodeposited chitosan (Method 1 and by crosslinking with glutaraldehyde (Method 2 on micromachined platinum microelectrodes. It was observed that glutamate sensors prepared by Method 1 have faster response time (<2 s and lower detection limit (2.5 ± 1.1 μM compared to that prepared by Method 2 (response time: <5 sec and detection limit: 6.5 ± 1.7 μM; glutamate sensors prepared by Method 2 have a larger linear detection range (20–352 μM and higher sensitivity (86.8 ± 8.8 nA·μM−1·cm−2, N = 12 compared to those prepared by Method 1 (linear detection range: 20–217 μM and sensitivity: 34.9 ± 4.8 nA·μM−1·cm−2, N = 8. The applicability of the glutamate sensors in vivo was also demonstrated. The glutamate sensors were implanted into the rat brain to monitor the stress-induced extracellular glutamate release in the hypothalamus of the awake, freely moving rat.

  18. A computational study of astrocytic glutamate influence on post-synaptic neuronal excitability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bronac Flanagan

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The ability of astrocytes to rapidly clear synaptic glutamate and purposefully release the excitatory transmitter is critical in the functioning of synapses and neuronal circuits. Dysfunctions of these homeostatic functions have been implicated in the pathology of brain disorders such as mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. However, the reasons for these dysfunctions are not clear from experimental data and computational models have been developed to provide further understanding of the implications of glutamate clearance from the extracellular space, as a result of EAAT2 downregulation: although they only partially account for the glutamate clearance process. In this work, we develop an explicit model of the astrocytic glutamate transporters, providing a more complete description of the glutamate chemical potential across the astrocytic membrane and its contribution to glutamate transporter driving force based on thermodynamic principles and experimental data. Analysis of our model demonstrates that increased astrocytic glutamate content due to glutamine synthetase downregulation also results in increased postsynaptic quantal size due to gliotransmission. Moreover, the proposed model demonstrates that increased astrocytic glutamate could prolong the time course of glutamate in the synaptic cleft and enhances astrocyte-induced slow inward currents, causing a disruption to the clarity of synaptic signalling and the occurrence of intervals of higher frequency postsynaptic firing. Overall, our work distilled the necessity of a low astrocytic glutamate concentration for reliable synaptic transmission of information and the possible implications of enhanced glutamate levels as in epilepsy.

  19. Glutamate in schizophrenia: clinical and research implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, D C; Wine, L

    1997-10-30

    The excitatory amino acids, glutamate and aspartate, are of interest to schizophrenia research because of their roles in neurodevelopment, neurotoxicity and neurotransmission. Recent evidence suggests that densities of glutamatergic receptors and the ratios of subunits composing these receptors may be altered in schizophrenia, although it is unclear whether these changes are primary or compensatory. Agents acting at the phencyclidine binding site of the NMDA receptor produce symptoms of schizophrenia in normal subjects, and precipitate relapse in patients with schizophrenia. The improvement of negative symptoms with agents acting at the glycine modulatory site of the NMDA receptor, as well as preliminary evidence that clozapine may differ from conventional neuroleptic agents in its effects on glutamatergic systems, suggest that clinical implications may follow from this model. While geriatric patients may be at increased risk for glutamate-mediated neurotoxicity, very little is known about the specific relevance of this model to geriatric patients with schizophrenia.

  20. Mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity induced by glyphosate-based herbicide in immature rat hippocampus: Involvement of glutamate excitotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattani, Daiane; Oliveira Cavalli, Liz Vera Lúcia de; Heinz Rieg, Carla Elise; Domingues, Juliana Tonietto; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Tasca, Carla Inês; Mena Barreto Silva, Fátima Regina; Zamoner, Ariane

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Roundup ® induces Ca 2+ influx through L-VDCC and NMDA receptor activation. • The mechanisms underlying Roundup ® neurotoxicity involve glutamatergic excitotoxicity. • Kinase pathways participate in Roundup ® -induced neural toxicity. • Roundup ® alters glutamate uptake, release and metabolism in hippocampal cells. - Abstract: Previous studies demonstrate that glyphosate exposure is associated with oxidative damage and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the mechanism of glyphosate-induced neurotoxic effects needs to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Roundup ® (a glyphosate-based herbicide) leads to neurotoxicity in hippocampus of immature rats following acute (30 min) and chronic (pregnancy and lactation) pesticide exposure. Maternal exposure to pesticide was undertaken by treating dams orally with 1% Roundup ® (0.38% glyphosate) during pregnancy and lactation (till 15-day-old). Hippocampal slices from 15 day old rats were acutely exposed to Roundup ® (0.00005–0.1%) during 30 min and experiments were carried out to determine whether glyphosate affects 45 Ca 2+ influx and cell viability. Moreover, we investigated the pesticide effects on oxidative stress parameters, 14 C-α-methyl-amino-isobutyric acid ( 14 C-MeAIB) accumulation, as well as glutamate uptake, release and metabolism. Results showed that acute exposure to Roundup ® (30 min) increases 45 Ca 2+ influx by activating NMDA receptors and voltage-dependent Ca 2+ channels, leading to oxidative stress and neural cell death. The mechanisms underlying Roundup ® -induced neurotoxicity also involve the activation of CaMKII and ERK. Moreover, acute exposure to Roundup ® increased 3 H-glutamate released into the synaptic cleft, decreased GSH content and increased the lipoperoxidation, characterizing excitotoxicity and oxidative damage. We also observed that both acute and chronic exposure to Roundup ® decreased 3 H-glutamate uptake and

  1. Glutamate and GABA-metabolizing enzymes in post-mortem cerebellum in Alzheimer's disease: phosphate-activated glutaminase and glutamic acid decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burbaeva, G Sh; Boksha, I S; Tereshkina, E B; Savushkina, O K; Prokhorova, T A; Vorobyeva, E A

    2014-10-01

    Enzymes of glutamate and GABA metabolism in postmortem cerebellum from patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) have not been comprehensively studied. The present work reports results of original comparative study on levels of phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG) and glutamic acid decarboxylase isoenzymes (GAD65/67) in autopsied cerebellum samples from AD patients and matched controls (13 cases in each group) as well as summarizes published evidence for altered levels of PAG and GAD65/67 in AD brain. Altered (decreased) levels of these enzymes and changes in links between amounts of these enzymes and other glutamate-metabolizing enzymes (such as glutamate dehydrogenase and glutamine synthetase-like protein) in AD cerebella suggest significantly impaired glutamate and GABA metabolism in this brain region, which was previously regarded as not substantially involved in AD pathogenesis.

  2. Overexpression of the WOX gene STENOFOLIA improves biomass yield and sugar release in transgenic grasses and display altered cytokinin homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Lignocellulosic biomass can be a significant source of renewable clean energy with continued improvement in biomass yield and bioconversion strategies. In higher plants, the leaf blade is the central energy convertor where solar energy and CO2 are assimilated to make the building blocks for biomass production. Here we report that introducing the leaf blade development regulator STENOFOLIA (STF, a WOX family transcription factor, into the biofuel crop switchgrass, significantly improves both biomass yield and sugar release. We found that STF overexpressing switchgrass plants produced approximately 2-fold more dry biomass and release approximately 1.8-fold more solubilized sugars without pretreatment compared to controls. The biomass increase was attributed mainly to increased leaf width and stem thickness, which was also consistent in STF transgenic rice and Brachypodium, and appeared to be caused by enhanced cell proliferation. STF directly binds to multiple regions in the promoters of some cytokinin oxidase/dehydrogenase (CKX genes and represses their expression in all three transgenic grasses. This repression was accompanied by a significant increase in active cytokinin content in transgenic rice leaves, suggesting that the increase in biomass productivity and sugar release could at least in part be associated with improved cytokinin levels caused by repression of cytokinin degrading enzymes. Our study provides a new tool for improving biomass feedstock yield in bioenergy crops, and uncovers a novel mechanistic insight in the function of STF, which may also apply to other repressive WOX genes that are master regulators of several key plant developmental programs.

  3. Oral glutamate intake reduces acute and chronic effects of ethanol in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    treatment, male Wistar rats were trained to consume ethanol-sucrose solution during a 2-h period daily, ... Oral treatment with 2.5 g/kg of glutamate reversed the acute motor effects of ethanol. ..... glutamate release in the prefrontal cortex-NAc.

  4. Crushed tablets: does the administration of food vehicles and thickened fluids to aid medication swallowing alter drug release?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique, Yady J; Lee, Danielle J; Islam, Faiza; Nissen, Lisa M; Cichero, Julie A Y; Stokes, Jason R; Steadman, Kathryn J

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of co-administered vehicles on in vitro dissolution in simulated gastric fluid of crushed immediate release tablets as an indicator for potential drug bioavailability compromise. Release and dissolution of crushed amlodipine, atenolol, carbamazepine and warfarin tablets were tested with six foods and drinks that are frequently used in the clinical setting as mixers for crushed medications (water, orange juice, honey, yoghurt, strawberry jam and water thickened with Easythick powder) in comparison to whole tablets. Five commercial thickening agents (Easythick Advanced, Janbak F, Karicare, Nutilis, Viscaid) at three thickness levels were tested for their effect on the dissolution of crushed atenolol tablets. Atenolol dissolution was unaffected by mixing crushed tablets with thin fluids or food mixers in comparison to whole tablets or crushed tablets in water, but amlodipine was delayed by mixing with jam. Mixing crushed warfarin and carbamazepine tablets with honey, jam or yoghurt caused them to resemble the slow dissolution of whole tablets rather than the faster dissolution of crushed tablets in water or orange juice. Crushing and mixing any of the four medications with thickened water caused a significant delay in dissolution. When tested with atenolol, all types of thickening agents at the greatest thickness significantly restricted dissolution, and products that are primarily based on xanthan gum also delayed dissolution at the intermediate thickness level. Dissolution testing, while simplistic, is a widely used and accepted method for comparing drug release from different formulations as an indicator for in vivo bioavailability. Thickened fluids have the potential to retard drug dissolution when used at the thickest levels. These findings highlight potential clinical implications of the addition of these agents to medications for the purpose of dose delivery and indicate that further investigation of thickened fluids and their

  5. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is associated with delayed endocervical clearance of Chlamydia trachomatis without alterations in vaginal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, Emma R; Bergin, Ingrid L; Bassis, Christine M; Chai, Daniel; LeBar, William; Young, Vincent B; Bell, Jason D

    2015-11-01

    Progestin-based contraception may impact women's susceptibility to sexually transmitted infection. We evaluated the effect of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) on cervical persistence of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) in a baboon model. Female olive baboons (Papio anubis) with or without an LNG-IUS received CT or sham inoculations. CT was detected in cervical epithelium with weekly nucleic acid amplification testing (NAAT) and culture. Presence of the LNG-IUS was associated with prolonged persistence of CT. Median time to post-inoculation clearance of CT as detected by NAAT was 10 weeks (range 7-12) for animals with an LNG-IUS and 3 weeks (range 0-12) for non-LNG-IUS animals (P = 0.06). Similarly, median time to post-inoculation clearance of CT by culture was 9 weeks (range 3-12) for LNG-IUS animals and 1.5 weeks (range 0-10) for non-LNG-IUS animals (P = 0.04). We characterized the community structure of the vaginal microbiota with the presence of the LNG-IUS to determine if alterations in CT colonization dynamics were associated with changes in vaginal commensal bacteria. Vaginal swabs were collected weekly for microbiome analysis. Endocervical CT infection was not correlated with alterations in the vaginal microbiota. Together, these results suggest that LNG-IUS may facilitate CT endocervical persistence through a mechanism distinct from vaginal microbial alterations. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. The release of organic compounds during biomass drying depends upon the feedstock and/or altering drying heating medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rupar, K.; Sanati, M.

    2003-01-01

    The release of organic compounds during the drying of biomass is a potential environmental problem, it may contribute to air pollution or eutrophication. In many countries there are legal restrictions on the amounts of terpenes that may be released into the atmosphere. When considering bioenergy in future energy systems, it is important that information on the environmental effects is available. The emissions of organic compounds from different green and dried biofuels that have been dried in hot air and steam medium, were analyzed by using different techniques. Gas chromatography and gas chromatography mass spectrometry have been used to identify the organic matter. The terpene content was significantly affected by the following factors: changing of the drying medium and the way the same biomass was handled from different localities in Sweden. Comparison between spectra from dried and green fuels reveal that the main compounds emitted during drying are monoterpene and sesquiterpene hydrocarbons, while the emissions of diterpene hydrocarbons seem to be negligible. The relative proportionality between emitted monoterpene, diterpene and sesquiterpene change when the drying medium shifts from steam to hot air. The obtained result of this work implies a parameter optimization study of the dryer with regard to environmental impact. With assistance of this result it might be foreseen that choice of special drying medium, diversity of biomass and low temperature reduce the emissions. A thermo-gravimetric analyzer was used for investigating the biomass drying rate. (author)

  7. An Fc engineering approach that modulates antibody-dependent cytokine release without altering cell-killing functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinder, Michelle; Greenplate, Allison R; Strohl, William R; Jordan, Robert E; Brezski, Randall J

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) often mediate target cell-killing by eliciting immune effector functions via Fc region interactions with cellular and humoral components of the immune system. Key functions include antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP), and complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC). However, there has been increased appreciation that along with cell-killing functions, the induction of antibody-dependent cytokine release (ADCR) can also influence disease microenvironments and therapeutic outcomes. Historically, most Fc engineering approaches have been aimed toward modulating ADCC, ADCP, or CDC. In the present study, we describe an Fc engineering approach that, while not resulting in impaired ADCC or ADCP, profoundly affects ADCR. As such, when peripheral blood mononuclear cells are used as effector cells against mAb-opsonized tumor cells, the described mAb variants elicit a similar profile and quantity of cytokines as IgG1. In contrast, although the variants elicit similar levels of tumor cell-killing as IgG1 with macrophage effector cells, the variants do not elicit macrophage-mediated ADCR against mAb-opsonized tumor cells. This study demonstrates that Fc engineering approaches can be employed to uncouple macrophage-mediated phagocytic and subsequent cell-killing functions from cytokine release.

  8. Altered β1-3-adrenoceptor influence on α2-adrenoceptor-mediated control of catecholamine release and vascular tension in hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torill eBerg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available α2- and β-adrenoceptors (AR reciprocally control catecholamine release and vascular tension. Disorders in these functions are present in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. The present study tested if α2AR dysfunctions resulted from altered α2AR/βAR interaction. Blood pressure was recorded through a femoral artery catheter and cardiac output by an ascending aorta flow probe. Total peripheral vascular resistance (TPR was calculated. Norepinephrine release was stimulated by a 15-min tyramine-infusion, which allows presynaptic release-control to be reflected as differences in overflow to plasma. Surgical stress activated some secretion of epinephrine. L-659,066 (α2AR-antagonist enhanced norepinephrine overflow in normotensive controls (WKY but not SHR. Nadolol (β1+2 and ICI-118551 (β2, but not atenolol (β1 or SR59230A (β(3/1L prevented this increase. All βAR antagonists allowed L-659,066 to augment tyramine-induced norepinephrine overflow in SHR and epinephrine secretion in both strains. Inhibition of cAMP-degradation with milrinone and β3AR agonist (BRL37344 enhanced the effect of L-659,066 on release of both catecholamines in SHR and epinephrine in WKY. β1/2AR antagonists and BRL37344 opposed the L-659,066-dependent elimination of the TPR-response to tyramine in WKY. α2AR/βAR antagonists had little influence on the TPR-response in SHR. Milrinone potentiated the L-659,066-dependent reduction of the TPR-response to tyramine. Conclusions: β2AR activity was a required substrate for α2AR auto inhibition of norepinephrine release in WKY. β1+2AR opposed α2AR inhibition of norepinephrine release in SHR and epinephrine secretion in both strains. βAR-α2AR reciprocal control of vascular tension was absent in SHR. Selective agonist provoked β3AR-Gi signaling and influenced the tyramine-induced TPR-response in WKY and catecholamine release in SHR.

  9. Transient increase in neuronal chloride concentration by neuroactive amino acids released from glioma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eBertollini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal chloride concentration ([Cl-]i is known to be dynamically modulated and alterations in Cl- homeostasis may occur in the brain at physiological and pathological conditions, being also likely involved in glioma-related seizures. However, the mechanism leading to changes in neuronal [Cl-]i during glioma invasion are still unclear. To characterize the potential effect of glioma released soluble factors on neuronal [Cl-]i, we used genetically encoded CFP/YFP-based ratiometric Cl-Sensor transiently expressed in cultured hippocampal neurons. Exposition of neurons to glioma conditioned medium (GCM caused rapid and transient elevation of [Cl-]i, resulting in the increase of fluorescence ratio, which was strongly reduced by blockers of ionotropic glutamate receptors APV and NBQX. Furthermore, in HEK cells expressing GluR1-AMPA receptors, GCM activated ionic current with efficacy similar to those caused by glutamate, supporting the notion that GCM contains glutamate or glutamatergic agonists, which cause neuronal depolarization, activation of NMDA and AMPA/KA receptors leading to elevation of [Cl-]i. Chromatographic analysis of the GCM showed that it contained several aminoacids, including glutamate, whose release from glioma cells did not occur via the most common glial mechanisms of transport, or in response to hypoosmotic stress. GCM also contained glycine, whose action contrasted the glutamate effect. Indeed, strychnine application significantly increased GCM-induced depolarization and [Cl-]i rise. GCM-evoked [Cl-]i elevation was not inhibited by antagonists of Cl- transporters and significantly reduced in the presence of anion channels blocker NPPB, suggesting that Cl-selective channels are a major route for GCM-induced Cl- influx. Altogether, these data show that glioma released aminoacids may dynamically alter Cl- equilibrium in surrounding neurons, deeply interfering with their inhibitory balance, likely leading to physiological and

  10. Cocaine modulates allosteric D2-σ1 receptor-receptor interactions on dopamine and glutamate nerve terminals from rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggiato, Sarah; Borelli, Andrea Celeste; Borroto-Escuela, Dasiel; Corbucci, Ilaria; Tomasini, Maria Cristina; Marti, Matteo; Antonelli, Tiziana; Tanganelli, Sergio; Fuxe, Kjell; Ferraro, Luca

    2017-12-01

    The effects of nanomolar cocaine concentrations, possibly not blocking the dopamine transporter activity, on striatal D 2 -σ 1 heteroreceptor complexes and their inhibitory signaling over Gi/o, have been tested in rat striatal synaptosomes and HEK293T cells. Furthermore, the possible role of σ 1 receptors (σ 1 Rs) in the cocaine-provoked amplification of D 2 receptor (D 2 R)-induced reduction of K + -evoked [ 3 H]-DA and glutamate release from rat striatal synaptosomes, has also been investigated. The dopamine D 2 -likeR agonist quinpirole (10nM-1μM), concentration-dependently reduced K + -evoked [ 3 H]-DA and glutamate release from rat striatal synaptosomes. The σ 1 R antagonist BD1063 (100nM), amplified the effects of quinpirole (10 and 100nM) on K + -evoked [ 3 H]-DA, but not glutamate, release. Nanomolar cocaine concentrations significantly enhanced the quinpirole (100nM)-induced decrease of K + -evoked [ 3 H]-DA and glutamate release from rat striatal synaptosomes. In the presence of BD1063 (10nM), cocaine failed to amplify the quinpirole (100nM)-induced effects. In cotransfected σ 1 R and D 2L R HEK293T cells, quinpirole had a reduced potency to inhibit the CREB signal versus D 2L R singly transfected cells. In the presence of cocaine (100nM), the potency of quinpirole to inhibit the CREB signal was restored. In D 2L singly transfected cells cocaine (100nM and 10μM) exerted no modulatory effects on the inhibitory potency of quinpirole to bring down the CREB signal. These results led us to hypothesize the existence of functional D 2 -σ 1 R complexes on the rat striatal DA and glutamate nerve terminals and functional D 2 -σ 1 R-DA transporter complexes on the striatal DA terminals. Nanomolar cocaine concentrations appear to alter the allosteric receptor-receptor interactions in such complexes leading to enhancement of Gi/o mediated D 2 R signaling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Exogenous glutamate induces short and long-term potentiation in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Frondaroli, A; Pessia, M; Pettorossi, V E

    2001-08-08

    In rat brain stem slices, high concentrations of exogenous glutamate induce long-term potentiation (LTP) of the field potentials evoked in the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) by vestibular afferent stimulation. At low concentrations, glutamate can also induce short-term potentiation (STP), indicating that LTP and STP are separate events depending on the level of glutamatergic synapse activation. LTP and STP are prevented by blocking NMDA receptors and nitric oxide (NO) synthesis. Conversely, blocking platelet-activating factor (PAF) and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors only prevents the full development of LTP. Moreover, in the presence of blocking agents, glutamate causes transient inhibition, suggesting that when potentiation is impeded, exogenous glutamate can activate presynaptic mechanisms that reduce glutamate release.

  12. Oleic acid blocks EGF-induced [Ca2+]i release without altering cellular metabolism in fibroblast EGFR T17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zugaza, J L; Casabiell, X A; Bokser, L; Casanueva, F F

    1995-02-06

    EGFR-T17 cells were pretreated with oleic acid and 5-10 minutes later stimulated with EGF, to study if early ionic signals are instrumental in inducing metabolic cellular response. Oleic acid blocks EGF-induced [Ca2+]i rise and Ca2+ influx without altering 2-deoxyglucose and 2-aminobutiryc acid uptake nor acute, nor chronically. Oleic acid it is shown, in the first minutes favors the entrance of both molecules to modify the physico-chemical membrane state. On the other hand, oleic acid is unable to block protein synthesis. The results suggest that EGF-induced Ins(1,4,5)P3/Ca2+ pathway does not seem to be decisive in the control of cellular metabolic activity.

  13. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. I...

  14. Immunochemical characterization of the brain glutamate binding protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.

    1986-01-01

    A glutamate binding protein (GBP) was purified from bovine and rat brain to near homogeneity. Polyclonal antibodies were raised against this protein. An enzyme-linked-immunosorbent-assay was used to quantify and determine the specificity of the antibody response. The antibodies were shown to strongly react with bovine brain GBP and the analogous protein from rat brain. The antibodies did not show any crossreactivity with the glutamate metabolizing enzymes, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase and glutamyl transpeptidase, however it crossreacted moderately with glutamate decarboxylase. The antibodies were also used to define the possible physiologic activity of GBP in synaptic membranes. The antibodies were shown: (i) to inhibit the excitatory amino-acid stimulation of thiocyanate (SCN)flux, (ii) had no effect on transport of L-Glutamic acid across the synaptic membrane, and (iii) had no effect on the depolarization-induced release of L-glutamate. When the anti-GBP antibodies were used to localize and quantify the GBP distribution in various subcellular fractions and in brain tissue samples, it was found that the hippocampus had the highest immunoreactivity followed by the cerebral cortex, cerebellar cortex and caudate-putamen. The distribution of immunoreactivity in the subcellular fraction were as follows: synaptic membranes > crude mitochondrial fraction > homogenate > myelin. In conclusion these studies suggest that: (a) the rat brain GBP and the bovine brain GBP are immunologically homologous protein, (b) there are no structural similarities between the GBP and the glutamate metabolizing enzymes with the exception of glutamate decarboxylase and (c) the subcellular and regional distribution of the GBP immunoreactivity followed a similar pattern as observed for L-[ 3 H]-binding

  15. Glutamate mechanisms underlying opiate memories

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peters, J.; de Vries, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    As the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, glutamate plays an undisputable integral role in opiate addiction. This relates, in part, to the fact that addiction is a disorder of learning and memory, and glutamate is required for most types of memory formation. As opiate addiction

  16. Leptin regulates glutamate and glucose transporters in hypothalamic astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuente-Martín, Esther; García-Cáceres, Cristina; Granado, Miriam; de Ceballos, María L.; Sánchez-Garrido, Miguel Ángel; Sarman, Beatrix; Liu, Zhong-Wu; Dietrich, Marcelo O.; Tena-Sempere, Manuel; Argente-Arizón, Pilar; Díaz, Francisca; Argente, Jesús; Horvath, Tamas L.; Chowen, Julie A.

    2012-01-01

    Glial cells perform critical functions that alter the metabolism and activity of neurons, and there is increasing interest in their role in appetite and energy balance. Leptin, a key regulator of appetite and metabolism, has previously been reported to influence glial structural proteins and morphology. Here, we demonstrate that metabolic status and leptin also modify astrocyte-specific glutamate and glucose transporters, indicating that metabolic signals influence synaptic efficacy and glucose uptake and, ultimately, neuronal function. We found that basal and glucose-stimulated electrical activity of hypothalamic proopiomelanocortin (POMC) neurons in mice were altered in the offspring of mothers fed a high-fat diet. In adulthood, increased body weight and fasting also altered the expression of glucose and glutamate transporters. These results demonstrate that whole-organism metabolism alters hypothalamic glial cell activity and suggest that these cells play an important role in the pathology of obesity. PMID:23064363

  17. Effects of pentylenetetrazole and glutamate on metabolism of [U-(13)C]glucose in cultured cerebellar granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eloqayli, Haytham; Qu, Hong; Unsgård, Geirmund; Sletvold, Olav; Hadidi, Hakam; Sonnewald, Ursula

    2002-02-01

    This study was performed to analyze the effects of glutamate and the epileptogenic agent pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) on neuronal glucose metabolism. Cerebellar granule neurons were incubated for 2 h in medium containing 3 mM [U-(13)C]glucose, with and without 0.25 mM glutamate and/or 10 mM PTZ. In the presence of PTZ, decreased glucose consumption with unchanged lactate release was observed, indicating decreased glucose oxidation. PTZ also slowed down tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity as evidenced by the decreased amounts of labeled aspartate and [1,2-(13)C]glutamate. When glutamate was present, glucose consumption was also decreased. However, the amount of glutamate, derived from [U-(13)C]glucose via the first turn of the TCA cycle, was increased. The decreased amount of [1,2-(13)C]glutamate, derived from the second turn in the TCA cycle, and increased amount of aspartate indicated the dilution of label due to the entrance of unlabeled glutamate into TCA cycle. In the presence of glutamate plus PTZ, the effect of PTZ was enhanced by glutamate. Labeled alanine was detected only in the presence of glutamate plus PTZ, which indicated that oxaloacetate was a better amino acid acceptor than pyruvate. Furthermore, there was also evidence for intracellular compartmentation of oxaloacetate metabolism. Glutamate and PTZ caused similar metabolic changes, however, via different mechanisms. Glutamate substituted for glucose as energy substrate in the TCA cycle, whereas, PTZ appeared to decrease mitochondrial activity.

  18. Chronic stress induces sex-specific alterations in methylation and expression of corticotropin-releasing factor gene in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Sterrenburg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the higher prevalence of depression in women than in men is well known, the neuronal basis of this sex difference is largely elusive. METHODS: Male and female rats were exposed to chronic variable mild stress (CVMS after which immediate early gene products, corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF mRNA and peptide, various epigenetic-associated enzymes and DNA methylation of the Crf gene were determined in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN, oval (BSTov and fusiform (BSTfu parts of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and central amygdala (CeA. RESULTS: CVMS induced site-specific changes in Crf gene methylation in all brain centers studied in female rats and in the male BST and CeA, whereas the histone acetyltransferase, CREB-binding protein was increased in the female BST and the histone-deacetylase-5 decreased in the male CeA. These changes were accompanied by an increased amount of c-Fos in the PVN, BSTfu and CeA in males, and of FosB in the PVN of both sexes and in the male BSTov and BSTfu. In the PVN, CVMS increased CRF mRNA in males and CRF peptide decreased in females. CONCLUSIONS: The data confirm our hypothesis that chronic stress affects gene expression and CRF transcriptional, translational and secretory activities in the PVN, BSTov, BSTfu and CeA, in a brain center-specific and sex-specific manner. Brain region-specific and sex-specific changes in epigenetic activity and neuronal activation may play, too, an important role in the sex specificity of the stress response and the susceptibility to depression.

  19. Chronic moderate alcohol drinking alters insulin release without affecting cognitive and emotion-like behaviors in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Nnamdi G; Suhaidi, Faten A; Law, Wen Xuan; Liang, Nu-Chu

    2017-12-16

    of insulin release for proper glucose clearance. Such an effect was not observed in females. This landmark study shows that chronic moderate alcohol consumption can have negative metabolic consequences in the absence of overt behavioral deficits, especially in males. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Minimal alteration in the ratio of circulatory fetal DNA to fetal corticotropin-releasing hormone mRNA level in preeclampsia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiao Yan; Holzgreve, Wolfgang; Gebhardt, Stefan; Hillermann, Renate; Tofa, Kashefa Carelse; Gupta, Anurag Kumar; Huppertz, Berthold; Hahn, Sinuhe

    2006-01-01

    We have recently observed that fetal DNA and fetal corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA are associated with in vitro generated syncytiotrophoblast-derived microparticles, and that the ratio of fetal DNA to mRNA (CRH) varied according to whether the particles were derived by predominantly apoptotic, apo-necrotic or necrotic pathways. Hence, we examined whether these ratios varied in maternal plasma samples taken from normotensive and preeclamptic pregnancies in vivo. Maternal plasma samples were collected from 18 cases with preeclampsia and 29 normotensive term controls. Circulatory fetal CRH mRNA and DNA levels were quantified by real-time PCR and RT-PCR. Circulatory fetal mRNA and fetal DNA levels were significantly elevated in the preeclampsia study group when compared to normotensive controls. Alterations in the fetal mRNA to DNA ratio between the study and control groups were minimal, even when stratified into early (34 weeks of gestation) onset preeclampsia. Our data suggest that although circulatory fetal DNA and mRNA levels are significantly elevated in preeclampsia, the ratios in maternal plasma are not dramatically altered. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Altered Na+ transport after an intracellular alpha-subunit deletion reveals strict external sequential release of Na+ from the Na/K pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaragatupalli, Siddhartha; Olivera, J Fernando; Gatto, Craig; Artigas, Pablo

    2009-09-08

    The Na/K pump actively exports 3 Na(+) in exchange for 2 K(+) across the plasmalemma of animal cells. As in other P-type ATPases, pump function is more effective when the relative affinity for transported ions is altered as the ion binding sites alternate between opposite sides of the membrane. Deletion of the five C-terminal residues from the alpha-subunit diminishes internal Na(+) (Na(i)(+)) affinity approximately 25-fold [Morth et al. (2007) Nature 450:1043-1049]. Because external Na(+) (Na(o)(+)) binding is voltage-dependent, we studied the reactions involving this process by using two-electrode and inside-out patch voltage clamp in normal and truncated (DeltaKESYY) Xenopus-alpha1 pumps expressed in oocytes. We observed that DeltaKESYY (i) decreased both Na(o)(+) and Na(i)(+) apparent affinities in the absence of K(o)(+), and (ii) did not affect apparent Na(o)(+) affinity at high K(o)(+). These results support a model of strict sequential external release of Na(+) ions, where the Na(+)-exclusive site releases Na(+) before the sites shared with K(+) and the DeltaKESYY deletion only reduces Na(o)(+) affinity at the shared sites. Moreover, at nonsaturating K(o)(+), DeltaKESYY induced an inward flow of Na(+) through Na/K pumps at negative potentials. Guanidinium(+) can also permeate truncated pumps, whereas N-methyl-D-glucamine cannot. Because guanidinium(o)(+) can also traverse normal Na/K pumps in the absence of both Na(o)(+) and K(o)(+) and can also inhibit Na/K pump currents in a Na(+)-like voltage-dependent manner, we conclude that the normal pathway transited by the first externally released Na(+) is large enough to accommodate guanidinium(+).

  2. Diphenyl ditelluride impairs short-term memory and alters neurochemical parameters in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangherlin, Eluza Curte; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if maternal exposure to 0.03 mg/kg of diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe)2 during the first 14 days of lactational period in Wistar rats alters recognition memory and neurochemical parameters in young rats. Object recognition memory task, evaluation of synaptosomal [3H]glutamate uptake and release as well as cerebral Na+/K+ATPase activity were evaluated in 4 week-old rats. There were no significant specific overt signs of maternal intoxication. The body weight gain of rats was similar among groups. (PhTe)2-exposed group showed a significantly lower time exploring the novel object when compared to the performance of the control group in short-term memory (STM) test. In addition, (PhTe)2 significantly inhibited synaptosomal [3H]glutamate uptake and cerebral Na+/K+ATPase activity in animals. The synaptosomal [3H]glutamate release was similar between (PhTe)2 and control groups. In conclusion, the present study establishes that young rats presented cognitive impairment after exposure to (PhTe)2 via maternal milk, demonstrated by the performance of animals in object recognition memory task. The possible mechanism involved in (PhTe)2 action in memory of recognition might involve inhibition of cerebral Na+/K+ATPase activity and synaptosomal [3H]glutamate uptake.

  3. Agmatine reduces extracellular glutamate during pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rat brain: A potential mechanism for the anticonvulsive effects

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Yangzheng; LeBlanc, Michael H.; Regunathan, Soundar

    2005-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the initiation and spread of seizure activity. Agmatine, an endogenous neuromodulator, is an antagonist of NMDA receptors and has anticonvulsive effects. Whether agmatine regulate glutamate release, as measured by in vivo microdialysis, is not known. In this study, we used pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure model to determine the effect of agmatine on extracellular glutamate in rat brain. We also determined the time course and the amount of agmatine that...

  4. Agmatine Prevents Adaptation of the Hippocampal Glutamate System in Chronic Morphine-Treated Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Zhao, Tai-Yun; Su, Rui-Bin; Wu, Ning; Li, Jin

    2016-12-01

    Chronic exposure to opioids induces adaptation of glutamate neurotransmission, which plays a crucial role in addiction. Our previous studies revealed that agmatine attenuates opioid addiction and prevents the adaptation of glutamate neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens of chronic morphine-treated rats. The hippocampus is important for drug addiction; however, whether adaptation of glutamate neurotransmission is modulated by agmatine in the hippocampus remains unknown. Here, we found that continuous pretreatment of rats with ascending doses of morphine for 5 days resulted in an increase in the hippocampal extracellular glutamate level induced by naloxone (2 mg/kg, i.p.) precipitation. Agmatine (20 mg/kg, s.c.) administered concurrently with morphine for 5 days attenuated the elevation of extracellular glutamate levels induced by naloxone precipitation. Furthermore, in the hippocampal synaptosome model, agmatine decreased the release and increased the uptake of glutamate in synaptosomes from chronic morphine-treated rats, which might contribute to the reduced elevation of glutamate levels induced by agmatine. We also found that expression of the hippocampal NR2B subunit, rather than the NR1 subunit, of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) was down-regulated after chronic morphine treatment, and agmatine inhibited this reduction. Taken together, agmatine prevented the adaptation of the hippocampal glutamate system caused by chronic exposure to morphine, including modulating extracellular glutamate concentration and NMDAR expression, which might be one of the mechanisms underlying the attenuation of opioid addiction by agmatine.

  5. Effects of chronic inhalation of electronic cigarettes containing nicotine on glial glutamate transporters and α-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in female CD-1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Crotty Alexander, Laura E; Nelson, Jessica A; Schiefer, Isaac T; Breen, Ellen; Drummond, Christopher A; Sari, Youssef

    2017-07-03

    Alteration in glutamate neurotransmission has been found to mediate the development of drug dependence, including nicotine. We and others, through using western blotting, have reported that exposure to drugs of abuse reduced the expression of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) as well as cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT), which consequently increased extracellular glutamate concentrations in the mesocorticolimbic area. However, our previous studies did not reveal any changes in glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST) following exposure to drugs of abuse. In the present study, for the first time, we investigated the effect of chronic exposure to electronic (e)-cigarette vapor containing nicotine, for one hour daily for six months, on GLT-1, xCT, and GLAST expression in frontal cortex (FC), striatum (STR), and hippocampus (HIP) in outbred female CD1 mice. In this study, we also investigated the expression of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α-7 nAChR), a major pre-synaptic nicotinic receptor in the glutamatergic neurons, which regulates glutamate release. We found that inhalation of e-cigarette vapor for six months increased α-7 nAChR expression in both FC and STR, but not in the HIP. In addition, chronic e-cigarette exposure reduced GLT-1 expression only in STR. Moreover, e-cigarette vapor inhalation induced downregulation of xCT in both the STR and HIP. We did not find any significant changes in GLAST expression in any brain region. Finally, using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) techniques, we detected high concentrations of nicotine and cotinine, a major metabolite of nicotine, in the FC tissues of e-cigarette exposed mice. These data provide novel evidence about the effects of chronic nicotine inhalation on the expression of key glial glutamate transporters as well as α-7 nAChR. Our work may suggest that nicotine exposure via chronic inhalation of e-cigarette vapor may be mediated in part by alterations in the glutamatergic

  6. Glutamate Concentration in the Superior Temporal Sulcus Relates to Neuroticism in Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Balz

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Clinical studies suggest aberrant neurotransmitter concentrations in the brains of patients with schizophrenia (SCZ. Numerous studies have indicated deviant glutamate concentrations in SCZ, although the findings are inconsistent. Moreover, alterations in glutamate concentrations could be linked to personality traits in SCZ. Here, we examined the relationships between personality dimensions and glutamate concentrations in a voxel encompassing the occipital cortex (OCC and another voxel encompassing the left superior temporal sulcus (STS. We used proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy to examine glutamate concentrations in the OCC and the STS in 19 SCZ and 21 non-psychiatric healthy control (HC participants. Personality dimensions neuroticism, extraversion, openness, agreeableness and conscientiousness were assessed using the NEO-FFI questionnaire. SCZ compared to HC showed higher glutamate concentrations in the STS, reduced extraversion scores, and enhanced neuroticism scores. No group differences were observed for the other personality traits and for glutamate concentrations in the OCC. For the SCZ group, glutamate concentrations in STS were negatively correlated with the neuroticism scores [r = -0.537, p = 0.018] but this was not found in HC [r(19 = 0.011, p = 0.962]. No other significant correlations were found. Our study showed an inverse relationship between glutamate concentrations in the STS and neuroticism scores in SCZ. Elevated glutamate in the STS might serve as a compensatory mechanism that enables patients with enhanced concentrations to control and prevent the expression of neuroticism.

  7. Glutamic acid as anticancer agent: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Satyajit; Ray, Supratim; Nagarajan, K

    2013-10-01

    The objective of the article is to highlight various roles of glutamic acid like endogenic anticancer agent, conjugates to anticancer agents, and derivatives of glutamic acid as possible anticancer agents. Besides these emphases are given especially for two endogenous derivatives of glutamic acid such as glutamine and glutamate. Glutamine is a derivative of glutamic acid and is formed in the body from glutamic acid and ammonia in an energy requiring reaction catalyzed by glutamine synthase. It also possesses anticancer activity. So the transportation and metabolism of glutamine are also discussed for better understanding the role of glutamic acid. Glutamates are the carboxylate anions and salts of glutamic acid. Here the roles of various enzymes required for the metabolism of glutamates are also discussed.

  8. Glucose replaces glutamate as energy substrate to fuel glutamate uptake in glutamate dehydrogenase-deficient astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pajęcka, Kamilla; Nissen, Jakob D; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    -500 µM) in the presence or in the absence of glucose, the metabolism of these substrates was studied by using tritiated glutamate or 2-deoxyglucose as tracers. In addition, the cellular contents of glutamate and ATP were determined. The astrocytes were able to maintain physiological levels of ATP...... regardless of the expression level of GDH and the incubation condition, indicating a high degree of flexibility with regard to regulatory mechanisms involved in maintaining an adequate energy level in the cells. Glutamate uptake was found to be increased in these cells when exposed to increasing levels...

  9. Circadian Regulation of Glutamate Transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donají Chi-Castañeda

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available L-glutamate is the major excitatory amino acid in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS. This neurotransmitter is essential for higher brain functions such as learning, cognition and memory. A tight regulation of extra-synaptic glutamate levels is needed to prevent a neurotoxic insult. Glutamate removal from the synaptic cleft is carried out by a family of sodium-dependent high-affinity transporters, collectively known as excitatory amino acid transporters. Dysfunction of glutamate transporters is generally involved in acute neuronal injury and neurodegenerative diseases, so characterizing and understanding the mechanisms that lead to the development of these disorders is an important goal in the design of novel treatments for the neurodegenerative diseases. Increasing evidence indicates glutamate transporters are controlled by the circadian system in direct and indirect manners, so in this contribution we focus on the mechanisms of circadian regulation (transcriptional, translational, post-translational and post-transcriptional regulation of glutamate transport in neuronal and glial cells, and their consequence in brain function.

  10. Exposure of mother rats to chronic unpredictable stress before pregnancy alters the metabolism of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate in the right hippocampus of offspring in early adolescence in a sexually dimorphic manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuejun; Shen, Zhiwei; Hu, Liu; Xia, Fang; Li, Yuewa; Zhuang, Jingwen; Chen, Peishan; Huang, Qingjun

    2016-12-30

    There is increasing evidence that mothers' exposure to stress before or during pregnancy is linked to an incidence of psychiatric disorders in offspring. However, a few studies have estimated the role of sex in the detrimental effects of pre-gestational stress on the offspring rats at early adolescence. Sex differences regarding the metabolism of gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate in the right hippocampus were investigated by MRS when the offspring rats reached 30 days. Additionally, the impact of pre-gestational stress exposed on an additional short-term acute stressor, such as forced swim, was examined in the male and female offspring rats. Our findings showed female offspring rats were more vulnerable to stressful conditions for either pre-gestational stress or acute stress in early adolescence, and had decreased GABA/Cr+PCr and Glu/Cr+PCr in the right hippocampus. Interestingly, in response to forced swim, male offspring rats whose mothers were exposed to pre-gestational stress were more affected by the short-term acute stressor and this was manifested by change of Glu/GABA and Glu/Gln in the right hippocampus. These data indicated that although female offspring rats were more vulnerable to pre-gestational stress from their mothers than males, in response to an additional acute stressor they showed better response. Therefore, both sexually dimorphic manner and combination of stressful procedures should be carefully considered in the study of stress-related psychiatric disorders in early adolescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Glutamate system, amyloid β peptides and tau protein: functional interrelationships and relevance to Alzheimer disease pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revett, Timothy J.; Baker, Glen B.; Jhamandas, Jack; Kar, Satyabrata

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is the most prevalent form of dementia globally and is characterized premortem by a gradual memory loss and deterioration of higher cognitive functions and postmortem by neuritic plaques containing amyloid β peptide and neurofibrillary tangles containing phospho-tau protein. Glutamate is the most abundant neurotransmitter in the brain and is essential to memory formation through processes such as long-term potentiation and so might be pivotal to Alzheimer disease progression. This review discusses how the glutamatergic system is impaired in Alzheimer disease and how interactions of amyloid β and glutamate influence synaptic function, tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration. Interestingly, glutamate not only influences amyloid β production, but also amyloid β can alter the levels of glutamate at the synapse, indicating that small changes in the concentrations of both molecules could influence Alzheimer disease progression. Finally, we describe how the glutamate receptor antagonist, memantine, has been used in the treatment of individuals with Alzheimer disease and discuss its effectiveness. PMID:22894822

  12. Evidence for a role of glutamate as an efferent transmitter in taste buds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson Catherine B

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutamate has been proposed as a transmitter in the peripheral taste system in addition to its well-documented role as an umami taste stimulus. Evidence for a role as a transmitter includes the presence of ionotropic glutamate receptors in nerve fibers and taste cells, as well as the expression of the glutamate transporter GLAST in Type I taste cells. However, the source and targets of glutamate in lingual tissue are unclear. In the present study, we used molecular, physiological and immunohistochemical methods to investigate the origin of glutamate as well as the targeted receptors in taste buds. Results Using molecular and immunohistochemical techniques, we show that the vesicular transporters for glutamate, VGLUT 1 and 2, but not VGLUT3, are expressed in the nerve fibers surrounding taste buds but likely not in taste cells themselves. Further, we show that P2X2, a specific marker for gustatory but not trigeminal fibers, co-localizes with VGLUT2, suggesting the VGLUT-expressing nerve fibers are of gustatory origin. Calcium imaging indicates that GAD67-GFP Type III taste cells, but not T1R3-GFP Type II cells, respond to glutamate at concentrations expected for a glutamate transmitter, and further, that these responses are partially blocked by NBQX, a specific AMPA/Kainate receptor antagonist. RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry confirm the presence of the Kainate receptor GluR7 in Type III taste cells, suggesting it may be a target of glutamate released from gustatory nerve fibers. Conclusions Taken together, the results suggest that glutamate may be released from gustatory nerve fibers using a vesicular mechanism to modulate Type III taste cells via GluR7.

  13. Glutamate modulation of GABA transport in retinal horizontal cells of the skate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitzer, Matthew A; Andersen, Kristen A; Malchow, Robert Paul

    2003-01-01

    Transport of the amino acid GABA into neurons and glia plays a key role in regulating the effects of GABA in the vertebrate retina. We have examined the modulation of GABA-elicited transport currents of retinal horizontal cells by glutamate, the likely neurotransmitter of vertebrate photoreceptors. Enzymatically isolated external horizontal cells of skate were examined using whole-cell voltage-clamp techniques. GABA (1 mm) elicited an inward current that was completely suppressed by the GABA transport inhibitors tiagabine (10 μm) and SKF89976-A (100 μm), but was unaffected by 100 μm picrotoxin. Prior application of 100 μm glutamate significantly reduced the GABA-elicited current. Glutamate depressed the GABA dose-response curve without shifting the curve laterally or altering the voltage dependence of the current. The ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists kainate and AMPA also reduced the GABA-elicited current, and the effects of glutamate and kainate were abolished by the ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonist 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline. NMDA neither elicited a current nor modified the GABA-induced current, and metabotropic glutamate analogues were also without effect. Inhibition of the GABA-elicited current by glutamate and kainate was reduced when extracellular calcium was removed and when recording pipettes contained high concentrations of the calcium chelator BAPTA. Caffeine (5 mm) and thapsigargin (2 nm), agents known to alter intracellular calcium levels, also reduced the GABA-elicited current, but increases in calcium induced by depolarization alone did not. Our data suggest that glutamate regulates GABA transport in retinal horizontal cells through a calcium-dependent process, and imply a close physical relationship between calcium-permeable glutamate receptors and GABA transporters in these cells. PMID:12562999

  14. Glutamate synapses in human cognitive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volk, Lenora; Chiu, Shu-Ling; Sharma, Kamal; Huganir, Richard L

    2015-07-08

    Accumulating data, including those from large genetic association studies, indicate that alterations in glutamatergic synapse structure and function represent a common underlying pathology in many symptomatically distinct cognitive disorders. In this review, we discuss evidence from human genetic studies and data from animal models supporting a role for aberrant glutamatergic synapse function in the etiology of intellectual disability (ID), autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and schizophrenia (SCZ), neurodevelopmental disorders that comprise a significant proportion of human cognitive disease and exact a substantial financial and social burden. The varied manifestations of impaired perceptual processing, executive function, social interaction, communication, and/or intellectual ability in ID, ASD, and SCZ appear to emerge from altered neural microstructure, function, and/or wiring rather than gross changes in neuron number or morphology. Here, we review evidence that these disorders may share a common underlying neuropathy: altered excitatory synapse function. We focus on the most promising candidate genes affecting glutamatergic synapse function, highlighting the likely disease-relevant functional consequences of each. We first present a brief overview of glutamatergic synapses and then explore the genetic and phenotypic evidence for altered glutamate signaling in ID, ASD, and SCZ.

  15. Inhibitory mechanism of l-glutamic acid on spawning of the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Masatoshi

    2017-03-01

    l-Glutamic acid was previously identified as an inhibitor of spawning in the starfish Patiria (Asterina) pectinifera; this study examined how l-glutamic acid works. Oocyte release from ovaries of P. pectinifera occurred after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD) and follicular envelope breakdown (FEBD) when gonads were incubated ex vivo with either relaxin-like gonad-stimulating peptide (RGP) or 1-methyladenine (1-MeAde). l-Glutamic acid blocked this spawning phenotype, causing the mature oocytes to remain within the ovaries. Neither RGP-induced 1-MeAde production in ovarian follicle cells nor 1-MeAde-induced GVBD and FEBD was affected by l-glutamic acid. l-Glutamic acid may act through metabotropic receptors in the ovaries to inhibit spawning, as l-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid, an agonist for metabotropic glutamate receptors, also inhibited spawning induced by 1-MeAde. Application of acetylcholine (ACH) to ovaries under inhibitory conditions with l-glutamic acid, however, brought about spawning, possibly by inducing contraction of the ovarian wall to discharge mature oocytes from the ovaries concurrently with GVBD and FEBD. Thus, l-glutamic acid may inhibit ACH secretion from gonadal nerve cells in the ovary. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 84: 246-256, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Availability of neurotransmitter glutamate is diminished when beta-hydroxybutyrate replaces glucose in cultured neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lund, Trine M; Risa, Oystein; Sonnewald, Ursula; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2009-07-01

    Ketone bodies serve as alternative energy substrates for the brain in cases of low glucose availability such as during starvation or in patients treated with a ketogenic diet. The ketone bodies are metabolized via a distinct pathway confined to the mitochondria. We have compared metabolism of [2,4-(13)C]beta-hydroxybutyrate to that of [1,6-(13)C]glucose in cultured glutamatergic neurons and investigated the effect of neuronal activity focusing on the aspartate-glutamate homeostasis, an essential component of the excitatory activity in the brain. The amount of (13)C incorporation and cellular content was lower for glutamate and higher for aspartate in the presence of [2,4-(13)C]beta-hydroxybutyrate as opposed to [1,6-(13)C]glucose. Our results suggest that the change in aspartate-glutamate homeostasis is due to a decreased availability of NADH for cytosolic malate dehydrogenase and thus reduced malate-aspartate shuttle activity in neurons using beta-hydroxybutyrate. In the presence of glucose, the glutamate content decreased significantly upon activation of neurotransmitter release, whereas in the presence of only beta-hydroxybutyrate, no decrease in the glutamate content was observed. Thus, the fraction of the glutamate pool available for transmitter release was diminished when metabolizing beta-hydroxybutyrate, which is in line with the hypothesis of formation of transmitter glutamate via an obligatory involvement of the malate-aspartate shuttle.

  17. Curcumin-Protected PC12 Cells Against Glutamate-Induced Oxidative Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Huang Chang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is a major excitatory neurotransmitter present in the central nervous system. The glutamate/cystine antiporter system xc– connects the antioxidant defense with neurotransmission and behaviour. Overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors induces neuronal death, a pathway called excitotoxicity. Glutamate-induced oxidative stress is a major contributor to neurodegenerative diseases including cerebral ischemia, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s disease. Curcuma has a wide spectrum of biological activities regarding neuroprotection and neurocognition. By reducing the oxidative damage, curcumin attenuates a spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury, seizures and hippocampal neuronal loss. The rat pheochromocytoma (PC12 cell line exhibits many characteristics useful for the study of the neuroprotection and neurocognition. This investigation was carried out to determine whether the neuroprotective effects of curcumin can be observed via the glutamate-PC12 cell model. Results indicate that glutamate (20 mM upregulated glutathione peroxidase 1, glutathione disulphide, Ca2+ influx, nitric oxide production, cytochrome c release, Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, caspase-3 activity, lactate dehydrogenase release, reactive oxygen species, H2O2, and malondialdehyde; and downregulated glutathione, glutathione reductase, superoxide dismutase and catalase, resulting in enhanced cell apoptosis. Curcumin alleviates all these adverse effects. Conclusively, curcumin can effectively protect PC12 cells against the glutamate-induced oxidative toxicity. Its mode of action involves two pathways: the glutathione-dependent nitric oxide-reactive oxygen species pathway and the mitochondria-dependent nitric oxide-reactive oxygen species pathway.

  18. Glucose, Lactate, β-Hydroxybutyrate, Acetate, GABA, and Succinate as Substrates for Synthesis of Glutamate and GABA in the Glutamine-Glutamate/GABA Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Leif; Rothman, Douglas L

    2016-01-01

    The glutamine-glutamate/GABA cycle is an astrocytic-neuronal pathway transferring precursors for transmitter glutamate and GABA from astrocytes to neurons. In addition, the cycle carries released transmitter back to astrocytes, where a minor fraction (~25 %) is degraded (requiring a similar amount of resynthesis) and the remainder returned to the neurons for reuse. The flux in the cycle is intense, amounting to the same value as neuronal glucose utilization rate or 75-80 % of total cortical glucose consumption. This glucose:glutamate ratio is reduced when high amounts of β-hydroxybutyrate are present, but β-hydroxybutyrate can at most replace 60 % of glucose during awake brain function. The cycle is initiated by α-ketoglutarate production in astrocytes and its conversion via glutamate to glutamine which is released. A crucial reaction in the cycle is metabolism of glutamine after its accumulation in neurons. In glutamatergic neurons all generated glutamate enters the mitochondria and its exit to the cytosol occurs in a process resembling the malate-aspartate shuttle and therefore requiring concomitant pyruvate metabolism. In GABAergic neurons one half enters the mitochondria, whereas the other one half is released directly from the cytosol. A revised concept is proposed for the synthesis and metabolism of vesicular and nonvesicular GABA. It includes the well-established neuronal GABA reuptake, its metabolism, and use for resynthesis of vesicular GABA. In contrast, mitochondrial glutamate is by transamination to α-ketoglutarate and subsequent retransamination to releasable glutamate essential for the transaminations occurring during metabolism of accumulated GABA and subsequent resynthesis of vesicular GABA.

  19. Exposure to high glutamate concentration activates aerobic glycolysis but inhibits ATP-linked respiration in cultured cortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yao; Tian, Yueyang; Shi, Xiaojie; Yang, Jianbo; Ouyang, Li; Gao, Jieqiong; Lu, Jianxin

    2014-08-01

    Astrocytes play a key role in removing the synaptically released glutamate from the extracellular space and maintaining the glutamate below neurotoxic level in the brain. However, high concentration of glutamate leads to toxicity in astrocytes, and the underlying mechanisms are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether energy metabolism disorder, especially impairment of mitochondrial respiration, is involved in the glutamate-induced gliotoxicity. Exposure to 10-mM glutamate for 48 h stimulated glycolysis and respiration in astrocytes. However, the increased oxygen consumption was used for proton leak and non-mitochondrial respiration, but not for oxidative phosphorylation and ATP generation. When the exposure time extended to 72 h, glycolysis was still activated for ATP generation, but the mitochondrial ATP-linked respiration of astrocytes was reduced. The glutamate-induced astrocyte damage can be mimicked by the non-metabolized substrate d-aspartate but reversed by the non-selective glutamate transporter inhibitor TBOA. In addition, the glutamate toxicity can be partially reversed by vitamin E. These findings demonstrate that changes of bioenergetic profile occur in cultured cortical astrocytes exposed to high concentration of glutamate and highlight the role of mitochondria respiration in glutamate-induced gliotoxicity in cortical astrocytes. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Chronic treatment with extended release methylphenidate does not alter dopamine systems or increase vulnerability for cocaine self-administration: a study in nonhuman primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Kathryn E; Pierre, Peter J; Daunais, James; Bennett, Allyson J; Martelle, Susan; Gage, H Donald; Swanson, James M; Nader, Michael A; Porrino, Linda J

    2012-11-01

    Despite the widespread use of stimulant medications for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, few studies have addressed their long-term effects on the developing brain or susceptibility to drug use in adolescence. Here, we determined the effects of chronic methylphenidate (MPH) treatment on brain dopamine (DA) systems, developmental milestones, and later vulnerability to substance abuse in juvenile nonhuman primates. Male rhesus monkeys (approximately 30 months old) were treated daily with either a sustained release formulation of MPH or placebo (N=8 per group). Doses were titrated to achieve initial drug blood serum levels within the therapeutic range in children and adjusted throughout the study to maintain target levels. Growth, including measures of crown-rump length and weight, was assessed before and after 1 year of treatment and after 3-5 months washout. In addition, positron emission tomography scans were performed to quantify binding availability of D2/D3 receptors and dopamine transporters (DATs). Distribution volume ratios were calculated to quantify binding of [¹⁸F]fluoroclebopride (DA D2/D3) and [¹⁸F]-(+)-N-(4-fluorobenzyl)-2β-propanoyl-3β-(4-chlorophenyl)tropane (DAT). Chronic MPH did not differentially alter the course of weight gain or other measures of growth, nor did it influence DAT or D2/D3 receptor availability after 1 year of treatment. However, after washout, the D2/D3 receptor availability of MPH-treated animals did not continue to decline at the same rate as control animals. Acquisition of intravenous cocaine self-administration was examined by first substituting saline for food reinforcement and then cocaine doses (0.001-0.1 mg/kg per injection) in ascending order. Each dose was available for at least five consecutive sessions. The lowest dose of cocaine that maintained response rates significantly higher than saline-contingent rates was operationally defined as acquisition of cocaine reinforcement. There

  1. Modeling of glutamate-induced dynamical patterns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurby-Bentzen, Christian Krefeld; Zhabotinsky, A.M.; Laugesen, Jakob Lund

    2009-01-01

    Based on established physiological mechanisms, the paper presents a detailed computer model, which supports the hypothesis that temporal lobe epilepsy may be caused by failure of glutamate reuptake from the extracellular space. The elevated glutamate concentration causes an increased activation...

  2. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone receptor (Gnrhr gene knock out: Normal growth and development of sensory, motor and spatial orientation behavior but altered metabolism in neonatal and prepubertal mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen R Busby

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH is important in the control of reproduction, but its actions in non-reproductive processes are less well known. In this study we examined the effect of disrupting the GnRH receptor in mice to determine if growth, metabolism or behaviors that are not associated with reproduction were affected. To minimize the effects of other hormones such as FSH, LH and sex steroids, the neonatal-prepubertal period of 2 to 28 days of age was selected. The study shows that regardless of sex or phenotype in the Gnrhr gene knockout line, there was no significant difference in the daily development of motor control, sensory detection or spatial orientation among the wildtype, heterozygous or null mice. This included a series of behavioral tests for touch, vision, hearing, spatial orientation, locomotory behavior and muscle strength. Neither the daily body weight nor the final weight on day 28 of the kidney, liver and thymus relative to body weight varied significantly in any group. However by day 28, metabolic changes in the GnRH null females compared with wildtype females showed a significant reduction in inguinal fat pad weight normalized to body weight; this was accompanied by an increase in glucose compared with wildtype females shown by Student-Newman-Keuls Multiple Comparison test and Student's unpaired t tests. Our studies show that the GnRH-GnRHR system is not essential for growth or motor/sensory/orientation behavior during the first month of life prior to puberty onset. The lack of the GnRH-GnRHR axis, however, did affect females resulting in reduced subcutaneous inguinal fat pad weight and increased glucose with possible insulin resistance; the loss of the normal rise of estradiol at postnatal days 15-28 may account for the altered metabolism in the prepubertal female pups.

  3. Shiga toxin 1 induces on lipopolysaccharide-treated astrocytes the release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha that alter brain-like endothelium integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica I Landoni

    Full Text Available The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal dysfunction. The typical form of HUS is generally associated with infections by Gram-negative Shiga toxin (Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC. Endothelial dysfunction induced by Stx is central, but bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS and neutrophils (PMN contribute to the pathophysiology. Although renal failure is characteristic of this syndrome, neurological complications occur in severe cases and is usually associated with death. Impaired blood-brain barrier (BBB is associated with damage to cerebral endothelial cells (ECs that comprise the BBB. Astrocytes (ASTs are inflammatory cells in the brain and determine the BBB function. ASTs are in close proximity to ECs, hence the study of the effects of Stx1 and LPS on ASTs, and the influence of their response on ECs is essential. We have previously demonstrated that Stx1 and LPS induced activation of rat ASTs and the release of inflammatory factors such as TNF-α, nitric oxide and chemokines. Here, we demonstrate that rat ASTs-derived factors alter permeability of ECs with brain properties (HUVECd; suggesting that functional properties of BBB could also be affected. Additionally, these factors activate HUVECd and render them into a proagregant state promoting PMN and platelets adhesion. Moreover, these effects were dependent on ASTs secreted-TNF-α. Stx1 and LPS-induced ASTs response could influence brain ECs integrity and BBB function once Stx and factors associated to the STEC infection reach the brain parenchyma and therefore contribute to the development of the neuropathology observed in HUS.

  4. Shiga Toxin 1 Induces on Lipopolysaccharide-Treated Astrocytes the Release of Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha that Alter Brain-Like Endothelium Integrity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landoni, Verónica I.; Schierloh, Pablo; de Campos Nebel, Marcelo; Fernández, Gabriela C.; Calatayud, Cecilia; Lapponi, María J.; Isturiz, Martín A.

    2012-01-01

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is characterized by hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal dysfunction. The typical form of HUS is generally associated with infections by Gram-negative Shiga toxin (Stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Endothelial dysfunction induced by Stx is central, but bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and neutrophils (PMN) contribute to the pathophysiology. Although renal failure is characteristic of this syndrome, neurological complications occur in severe cases and is usually associated with death. Impaired blood-brain barrier (BBB) is associated with damage to cerebral endothelial cells (ECs) that comprise the BBB. Astrocytes (ASTs) are inflammatory cells in the brain and determine the BBB function. ASTs are in close proximity to ECs, hence the study of the effects of Stx1 and LPS on ASTs, and the influence of their response on ECs is essential. We have previously demonstrated that Stx1 and LPS induced activation of rat ASTs and the release of inflammatory factors such as TNF-α, nitric oxide and chemokines. Here, we demonstrate that rat ASTs-derived factors alter permeability of ECs with brain properties (HUVECd); suggesting that functional properties of BBB could also be affected. Additionally, these factors activate HUVECd and render them into a proagregant state promoting PMN and platelets adhesion. Moreover, these effects were dependent on ASTs secreted-TNF-α. Stx1 and LPS-induced ASTs response could influence brain ECs integrity and BBB function once Stx and factors associated to the STEC infection reach the brain parenchyma and therefore contribute to the development of the neuropathology observed in HUS. PMID:22479186

  5. 21 CFR 182.1045 - Glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid. 182.1045 Section 182.1045 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1045 Glutamic acid. (a) Product. Glutamic acid. (b) [Reserved] (c) Limitations, restrictions, or...

  6. Paraventricular Stimulation with Glutamate Elicits Bradycardia and Pituitary Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Miyamoto, Michael; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1989-01-01

    The excitatory neurotransmitter, L-glutamate (0.5 M, pH 7.4), or the organic acid, acetate (0.5 M, pH 7.4), was microinjected (50 nl over 2 min) directly into the paraventricular nuclei (PVN) of pentobarbital sodium-anesthetized rats while arterial blood pressure and heart rate and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), vasopressin, and oxytocin were measured. Activation of PVN neurons with L-glutamate led to increases in plasma ACTH, vasopressin, and oxytocin and a profound bradycardia (-80 beats/min) with little change in arterial blood pressure. Microinjection of acetate had no effect on the above variables. The decrease in heart rate was shown to be dependent on the concentration of glutamate injected and the volume of injectate. The bradycardia was mediated through the autonomic nervous system because ganglionic blockade (pentolinium tartrate) eliminated the response; atropine and propranolol severely attenuated the bradycardia. The bradycardia was greatest when L-glutamate was microinjected into the caudal PVN. Injections into the rostral PVN or into nuclei surrounding the PVN led to small or nonsignificant decreases in heart rate. Focal electric stimulation (2-50 pA) of the PVN also led to decreases in heart rate and arterial blood pressure. These data suggest that activation of PVN neurons leads to the release of ACTH, vasopressin, and oxytocin from the pituitary and a bradycardia that is mediated by the autonomic nervous system.

  7. Peripheral Glutamate Receptors Are Required for Hyperalgesia Induced by Capsaicin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You-Hong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential vanilloid1 (TRPV1 and glutamate receptors (GluRs are located in small diameter primary afferent neurons (nociceptors, and it was speculated that glutamate released in the peripheral tissue in response to activation of TRPV1 might activate nociceptors retrogradely. But, it was not clear which types of GluRs are functioning in the nociceptive sensory transmission. In the present study, we examined the c-Fos expression in spinal cord dorsal horn following injection of drugs associated with glutamate receptors with/without capsaicin into the hindpaw. The subcutaneous injection of capsaicin or glutamate remarkably evoked c-Fos expression in ipsilateral sides of spinal cord dorsal horn. This capsaicin evoked increase of c-Fos expression was significantly prevented by concomitant administration of MK801, CNQX, and CPCCOEt. On the other hand, there were not any significant changes in coinjection of capsaicin and MCCG or MSOP. These results reveal that the activation of iGluRs and group I mGluR in peripheral afferent nerves play an important role in mechanisms whereby capsaicin evokes/maintains nociceptive responses.

  8. Intramuscular temperature modulates glutamate-evoked masseter muscle pain intensity in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hitoshi; Castrillon, Eduardo E; Cairns, Brian E; Bendixen, Karina H; Wang, Kelun; Nakagawa, Taneaki; Wajima, Koichi; Svensson, Peter

    2015-01-01

    To determine whether glutamate-evoked jaw muscle pain is altered by the temperature of the solution injected. Sixteen healthy volunteers participated and received injections of hot (48°C), neutral (36°C), or cold (3°C) solutions (0.5 mL) of glutamate or isotonic saline into the masseter muscle. Pain intensity was assessed with an electronic visual analog scale (eVAS). Numeric rating scale (NRS) scores of unpleasantness and temperature perception, pain-drawing areas, and pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) were also measured. Participants filled out the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ). Two-way or three-way repeated measures ANOVA were used for data analyses. Injection of hot glutamate and cold glutamate solutions significantly increased and decreased, respectively, the peak pain intensity compared with injection of neutral glutamate solution. The duration of glutamate-evoked pain was significantly longer when hot glutamate was injected than when cold glutamate was injected. No significant effect of temperature on pain intensity was observed when isotonic saline was injected. No effect of solution temperature was detected on unpleasantness, heat perception, cold perception, area of pain drawings, or PPTs. There was a significantly greater use of the "numb" term in the MPQ to describe the injection of cold solutions compared to the injection of both neutral and hot solutions. Glutamate-evoked jaw muscle pain was significantly altered by the temperature of the injection solution. Although temperature perception in the jaw muscle is poor, pain intensity is increased when the muscle tissue temperature is elevated.

  9. Silicon Wafer-Based Platinum Microelectrode Array Biosensor for Near Real-Time Measurement of Glutamate in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel T. Maidment

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Using Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS technologies, we have developed silicon wafer-based platinum microelectrode arrays (MEAs modified with glutamate oxidase (GluOx for electroenzymatic detection of glutamate in vivo. These MEAs were designed to have optimal spatial resolution for in vivo recordings. Selective detection of glutamate in the presence of the electroactive interferents, dopamine and ascorbic acid, was attained by deposition of polypyrrole and Nafion. The sensors responded to glutamate with a limit of detection under 1μM and a sub-1-second response time in solution. In addition to extensive in vitro characterization, the utility of these MEA glutamate biosensors was also established in vivo. In the anesthetized rat, these MEA glutamate biosensors were used for detection of cortically-evoked glutamate release in the ventral striatum. The MEA biosensors also were applied to the detection of stress-induced glutamate release in the dorsal striatum of the freely-moving rat.

  10. Excretion and intestinal absorption of tritiated glutamic acid by carp, Cyprinus Carpio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Terushia; Kistner, G.

    1986-01-01

    Excretion and intestinal absorption of tritiated glutamic acid by carp was investigated. Approximately 80% of orally administered tritium was excreted at a half life value of 1.4 h and an observed slower excretion of 7 days for the remainder. Tritium incorporated in glutamic acid was efficiently retained at the site of absorption, i.e. intestine, liver, gill, kidney, blood and muscle. A dual marking experiment using tritiated glutamic acid and 14 C-market glutamic acid showed higher excretion of tritium by factors 2.0 to 4.9 than that of 14 C. Tritiated glutamic acid is considered to be mainly incorporated in the citric acid cycle soon after administration and the release of tritium in tritiated water through the cycle is assumed as causing the initial rapid excretion of tritium in carp. The intestinal absorption of glutamic acid was likely to depend on its concentration in the administered solution. The maximum level of absorption is estimated to be 0.1 m mol/0.5 h for one year old carp. The results obtained here would make it possible to estimate the tritium contamination of fish due to tritiated glutamic acid entering the food chain. (orig.)

  11. Oleuropein isolated from Fraxinus rhynchophylla inhibits glutamate-induced neuronal cell death by attenuating mitochondrial dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Hye; Min, Ju-Sik; Lee, Joon Yeop; Chae, Unbin; Yang, Eun-Ju; Song, Kyung-Sik; Lee, Hyun-Shik; Lee, Hong Jun; Lee, Sang-Rae; Lee, Dong-Seok

    2017-04-27

    Glutamate-induced neurotoxicity is related to excessive oxidative stress accumulation and results in the increase of neuronal cell death. In addition, glutamate has been reported to lead to neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases.It is well known that Fraxinus rhynchophylla contains a significant level of oleuropein (Ole), which exerts various pharmacological effects. However, the mechanism of neuroprotective effects of Ole is still poorly defined. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether Ole prevents glutamate-induced toxicity in HT-22 hippocampal neuronal cells. The exposure of the glutamate treatment caused neuronal cell death through an alteration of Bax/Bcl-2 expression and translocation of mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to the cytoplasm of HT-22 cells. In addition, glutamate induced an increase in dephosphorylation of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), mitochondrial fragmentation, and mitochondrial dysfunction. The pretreatment of Ole decreased Bax expression, increased Bcl-2 expression, and inhibited the translocation of mitochondrial AIF to the cytoplasm. Furthermore, Ole amended a glutamate-induced mitochondrial dynamic imbalance and reduced the number of cells with fragmented mitochondria, regulating the phosphorylation of Drp1 at amino acid residue serine 637. In conclusion, our results show that Ole has a preventive effect against glutamate-induced toxicity in HT-22 hippocampal neuronal cells. Therefore, these data imply that Ole may be an efficient approach for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Bacterial cytolysin during meningitis disrupts the regulation of glutamate in the brain, leading to synaptic damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Wippel

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal meningitis is a common bacterial infection of the brain. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin represents a key factor, determining the neuropathogenic potential of the pneumococci. Here, we demonstrate selective synaptic loss within the superficial layers of the frontal neocortex of post-mortem brain samples from individuals with pneumococcal meningitis. A similar effect was observed in mice with pneumococcal meningitis only when the bacteria expressed the pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin. Exposure of acute mouse brain slices to only pore-competent pneumolysin at disease-relevant, non-lytic concentrations caused permanent dendritic swelling, dendritic spine elimination and synaptic loss. The NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 and D-AP5 reduced this pathology. Pneumolysin increased glutamate levels within the mouse brain slices. In mouse astrocytes, pneumolysin initiated the release of glutamate in a calcium-dependent manner. We propose that pneumolysin plays a significant synapto- and dendritotoxic role in pneumococcal meningitis by initiating glutamate release from astrocytes, leading to subsequent glutamate-dependent synaptic damage. We outline for the first time the occurrence of synaptic pathology in pneumococcal meningitis and demonstrate that a bacterial cytolysin can dysregulate the control of glutamate in the brain, inducing excitotoxic damage.

  13. Fast inhibition of glutamate-activated currents by caffeine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P Vyleta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caffeine stimulates calcium-induced calcium release (CICR in many cell types. In neurons, caffeine stimulates CICR presynaptically and thus modulates neurotransmitter release. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique we found that caffeine (20 mM reversibly increased the frequency and decreased the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs in neocortical neurons. The increase in mEPSC frequency is consistent with a presynaptic mechanism. Caffeine also reduced exogenously applied glutamate-activated currents, confirming a separate postsynaptic action. This inhibition developed in tens of milliseconds, consistent with block of channel currents. Caffeine (20 mM did not reduce currents activated by exogenous NMDA, indicating that caffeine block is specific to non-NMDA type glutamate receptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Caffeine-induced inhibition of mEPSC amplitude occurs through postsynaptic block of non-NMDA type ionotropic glutamate receptors. Caffeine thus has both pre and postsynaptic sites of action at excitatory synapses.

  14. Modulation of gene expression of adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors in rat's neuronal cells exposed to L-glutamate and [60]fullerene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giust, Davide; Da Ros, Tatiana; Martín, Mairena; Albasanz, José Luis

    2014-08-01

    L-Glutamate (L-Glu) has been often associated not only to fundamental physiological roles, as learning and memory, but also to neuronal cell death and the genesis and development of important neurodegenerative diseases. Herein we studied the variation in the adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors expression induced by L-Glu treatment in rat's cortical neurons. The possibility to have structural alteration of the cells induced by L-Glu (100 nM, 1 and 10 microM) has been addressed, studying the modulation of microtubule associated protein-2 (MAP-2) and neurofilament heavy polypeptide (NEFH), natively associated proteins to the dendritic shape maintenance. Results showed that the proposed treatments were not destabilizing the cells, so the L-Glu concentrations were acceptable to investigate fluctuation in receptors expression, which were studied by RT-PCR. Interestingly, C60 fullerene derivative t3ss elicited a protective effect against glutamate toxicity, as demonstrated by MTT assay. In addition, t3ss compound exerted a different effect on the adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors analyzed. Interestingly, A(2A) and mGlu1 mRNAs were significantly decreased in conditions were t3ss neuroprotected cortical neurons from L-Glu toxicity. In summary, t3ss protects neurons from glutamate toxicity in a process that appears to be associated with the modulation of the gene expression of adenosine and metabotropic glutamate receptors.

  15. Glutamate transporter activity promotes enhanced Na+/K+-ATPase -mediated extracellular K+ management during neuronal activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian R; Holm, Rikke; Vilsen, Bente

    2016-01-01

    , in addition, Na+ /K+ -ATPase-mediated K+ clearance could be governed by astrocytic [Na+ ]i . During most neuronal activity, glutamate is released in the synaptic cleft and is re-absorbed by astrocytic Na+ -coupled glutamate transporters, thereby elevating [Na+ ]i . It thus remains unresolved whether...... the different Na+ /K+ -ATPase isoforms are controlled by [K+ ]o or [Na+ ]i during neuronal activity. Hippocampal slice recordings of stimulus-induced [K+ ]o transients with ion-sensitive microelectrodes revealed reduced Na+ /K+ -ATPase-mediated K+ management upon parallel inhibition of the glutamate transporter......+ affinity to the α1 and α2 isoforms than the β2 isoform. In summary, enhanced astrocytic Na+ /K+ -ATPase-dependent K+ clearance was obtained with parallel glutamate transport activity. The astrocytic Na+ /K+ -ATPase isoform constellation α2β1 appeared to be specifically geared to respond to the [Na+ ]i...

  16. Sexual attraction enhances glutamate transmission in mammalian anterior cingulate cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Long-Jun

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Functional human brain imaging studies have indicated the essential role of cortical regions, such as the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC, in romantic love and sex. However, the neurobiological basis of how the ACC neurons are activated and engaged in sexual attraction remains unknown. Using transgenic mice in which the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP is controlled by the promoter of the activity-dependent gene c-fos, we found that ACC pyramidal neurons are activated by sexual attraction. The presynaptic glutamate release to the activated neurons is increased and pharmacological inhibition of neuronal activities in the ACC reduced the interest of male mice to female mice. Our results present direct evidence of the critical role of the ACC in sexual attraction, and long-term increases in glutamate mediated excitatory transmission may contribute to sexual attraction between male and female mice.

  17. Group I Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erichsen, Julie Ladeby; Blaabjerg, Morten; Bogetofte Thomasen, Helle

    2015-01-01

    differentiated an immortalized, forebrain-derived stem cell line in the presence or absence of glutamate and with addition of either the group I mGluR agonist DHPG or the selective antagonists; MPEP (mGluR5) and LY367385 (mGluR1). Characterization of differentiated cells revealed that both mGluR1 and mGluR5 were...

  18. Alterations in Ca2+-dependent and Ca2+-independent release of catecholamines in preparations of rat brain produced by ethanol treatment in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynch, M.A.; Pagonis, C.; Samuel, D.; Littleton, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Compared to preparations from control animals, superfused striatal slice preparations from brains of rats treated chronically with ethanol released a significantly greater fraction of stored [ 3 H] dopamine on depolarisation in 40 mM K + . Similarly, the electrically-evoked release of [ 3 H]-norepinephrine from cortical slices and of [ 3 H]-dopamine from striatal slices is also increased, although with this mechanism of depolarisation the change is significant only in the case of [ 3 H] norepinephrine release. In contrast to this tendency to enhancement of Ca 2+ -dependent depolarisation-induced release, a reduced fraction of stored [ 3 H]-catecholamines was released from these preparations by the indirect sympathomimetics tyramine and (+)-amphetamine. The catecholamine release induced by these indirect sympathomimetics is largely independent of external Ca 2+ and the results are interpreted as suggesting that chronic alcohol treatment changes the distribution of catecholamine neurotransmitters between storage pools in the nerve terminal which do or do not require Ca 2+ entry for release

  19. On the potential role of glutamate transport in mental fatigue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hansson Elisabeth

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mental fatigue, with decreased concentration capacity, is common in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases, often appearing prior to other major mental or physical neurological symptoms. Mental fatigue also makes rehabilitation more difficult after a stroke, brain trauma, meningitis or encephalitis. As increased levels of proinflammatory cytokines are reported in these disorders, we wanted to explore whether or not proinflammatory cytokines could induce mental fatigue, and if so, by what mechanisms. It is well known that proinflammatory cytokines are increased in major depression, "sickness behavior" and sleep deprivation, which are all disorders associated with mental fatigue. Furthermore, an influence by specific proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL-1, on learning and memory capacities has been observed in several experimental systems. As glutamate signaling is crucial for information intake and processing within the brain, and due to the pivotal role for glutamate in brain metabolism, dynamic alterations in glutamate transmission could be of pathophysiological importance in mental fatigue. Based on this literature and observations from our own laboratory and others on the role of astroglial cells in the fine-tuning of glutamate neurotransmission we present the hypothesis that the proinflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-1β and IL-6 could be involved in the pathophysiology of mental fatigue through their ability to attenuate the astroglial clearance of extracellular glutamate, their disintegration of the blood brain barrier, and effects on astroglial metabolism and metabolic supply for the neurons, thereby attenuating glutamate transmission. To test whether our hypothesis is valid or not, brain imaging techniques should be applied with the ability to register, over time and with increasing cognitive loading, the extracellular concentrations of glutamate and potassium (K+ in humans suffering from

  20. Chronic postnatal stress induces voluntary alcohol intake and modifies glutamate transporters in adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeon, María Mercedes; Andreu, Marcela; Yamauchi, Laura; Grosman, Mauricio; Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Postnatal stress alters stress responses for life, with serious consequences on the central nervous system (CNS), involving glutamatergic neurotransmission and development of voluntary alcohol intake. Several drugs of abuse, including alcohol and cocaine, alter glutamate transport (GluT). Here, we evaluated effects of chronic postnatal stress (CPS) on alcohol intake and brain glutamate uptake and transporters in male adolescent Wistar rats. For CPS from postnatal day (PD) 7, pups were separated from their mothers and exposed to cold stress (4 °C) for 1 h daily for 20 days; controls remained with their mothers. Then they were exposed to either voluntary ethanol (6%) or dextrose (1%) intake for 7 days (5-7 rats per group), then killed. CPS: (1) increased voluntary ethanol intake, (2) did not affect body weight gain or produce signs of toxicity with alcohol exposure, (3) increased glutamate uptake by hippocampal synaptosomes in vitro and (4) reduced protein levels (Western measurements) in hippocampus and frontal cortex of glial glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and excitatory amino-acid transporter-3 (EAAT-3) but increased glutamate aspartate transporter (GLAST) levels. We propose that CPS-induced decrements in GLT-1 and EAAT-3 expression levels are opposed by activation of a compensatory mechanism to prevent excitotoxicity. A greater role for GLAST in total glutamate uptake to prevent enlarged extracellular glutamate levels is inferred. Although CPS strongly increased intake of ethanol, this had little impact on effects of CPS on brain glutamate uptake or transporters. However, the impact of early life adverse events on glutamatergic neurotransmission may underlie increased alcohol consumption in adulthood.

  1. Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate inducible defense in the water flea Daphnia pulex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Miyakawa

    Full Text Available Phenotypic plasticity is the ability held in many organisms to produce different phenotypes with a given genome in response to environmental stimuli, such as temperature, nutrition and various biological interactions. It seems likely that environmental signals induce a variety of mechanistic responses that influence ontogenetic processes. Inducible defenses, in which prey animals alter their morphology, behavior and/or other traits to help protect against direct or latent predation threats, are among the most striking examples of phenotypic plasticity. The freshwater microcrustacean Daphnia pulex forms tooth-like defensive structures, "neckteeth," in response to chemical cues or signals, referred to as "kairomones," in this case released from phantom midge larvae, a predator of D. pulex. To identify factors involved in the reception and/or transmission of a kairomone, we used microarray analysis to identify genes up-regulated following a short period of exposure to the midge kairomone. In addition to identifying differentially expressed genes of unknown function, we also found significant up-regulation of genes encoding ionotropic glutamate receptors, which are known to be involved in neurotransmission in many animal species. Specific antagonists of these receptors strongly inhibit the formation of neckteeth in D. pulex, although agonists did not induce neckteeth by themselves, indicating that ionotropic glutamate receptors are necessary but not sufficient for early steps of neckteeth formation in D. pulex. Moreover, using co-exposure of D. pulex to antagonists and juvenile hormone (JH, which physiologically mediates neckteeth formation, we found evidence suggesting that the inhibitory effect of antagonists is not due to direct inhibition of JH synthesis/secretion. Our findings not only provide a candidate molecule required for the inducible defense response in D. pulex, but also will contribute to the understanding of complex mechanisms

  2. Abnormal glutamate release in aged BTBR mouse model of autism

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Hongen; Ding, Caiyun; Jin, Guorong; Yin, Haizhen; Liu, Jianrong; Hu, Fengyun

    2015-01-01

    Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by abnormal reciprocal social interactions, communication deficits, and repetitive behaviors with restricted interests. Most of the available research on autism is focused on children and young adults and little is known about the pathological alternation of autism in older adults. In order to investigate the neurobiological alternation of autism in old age stage, we compared the morphology and synaptic function of excitatory synapses betw...

  3. Prefrontal changes in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters in depression with and without suicide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, J.; Verwer, R.W.H.; van Wamelen, D.J.; Qi, X.R.; Gao, S.F.; Lucassen, P.J.; Swaab, D.F.

    2016-01-01

    There are indications for changes in glutamate metabolism in relation to depression or suicide. The glutamate-glutamine cycle and neuronal/glial glutamate transporters mediate the uptake of the glutamate and glutamine. The expression of various components of the glutamate-glutamine cycle and the

  4. Interactions between entorhinal axons and target hippocampal neurons: a role for glutamate in the development of hippocampal circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattson, M P; Lee, R E; Adams, M E; Guthrie, P B; Kater, S B

    1988-11-01

    A coculture system consisting of input axons from entorhinal cortex explants and target hippocampal pyramidal neurons was used to demonstrate that glutamate, released spontaneously from afferent axons, can influence both dendritic geometry of target neurons and formation of presumptive synaptic sites. Dendritic outgrowth was reduced in hippocampal neurons growing on entorhinal axons when compared with neurons growing off the axons. Presumptive presynaptic sites were observed in association with hippocampal neuron dendrites and somas. HPLC analysis showed that glutamate was released from the explants in an activity- and Ca2(+)-dependent manner. The general glutamate receptor antagonist D-glutamylglycine significantly increased dendritic outgrowth in pyramidal neurons associated with entorhinal axons and reduced presumptive presynaptic sites. Tetrodotoxin and reduction of extracellular Ca2+ also promoted dendritic outgrowth and reduced the formation of presumptive synaptic sites. The results suggest that the neurotransmitter glutamate may play important roles in the development of hippocampal circuitry.

  5. Arsenic release from chlorine-promoted alteration of a sulfide cement horizon: Evidence from batch studies on the St. Peter Sandstone, Wisconsin, USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, Nicole; Schreiber, Madeline; Gotkowitz, Madeline

    2012-01-01

    Elevated As concentrations have been measured in wells in the St. Peter Sandstone aquifer of eastern Wisconsin, USA. The primary source is As-bearing sulfide minerals (pyrite and marcasite) within the aquifer. There is concern that well disinfection by chlorination may facilitate As release to groundwater by increasing the rate and extent of sulfide oxidation. The objective of this study was to examine the abiotic processes that mobilize As from the aquifer solids during controlled exposure to chlorinated solutions. Thin sections made from sulfidic aquifer material were characterized by quantitative electron probe micro-analysis before and after 24 h exposure to solutions of different Cl 2 concentrations. Batch experiments using crushed aquifer solids were also conducted to examine changes in solution chemistry over 24 h. Results of the combined experiments indicate that Cl 2 addition affects As release and uptake in two ways. First, Cl 2 increases oxidation of sulfide minerals, releasing more As from the mineral structure. Chlorine addition also increases the rate of Fe(II) oxidation and subsequent hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) precipitation, allowing for increased uptake of As onto the mineral surface. Although HFOs can act as sinks for As, they can release As if biogeochemical conditions (e.g. redox, pH) change. These results have implications not only for disinfection of drinking water wells in the study area, but also suggest that introduction of oxidants may adversely affect water quality during aquifer storage and recovery programs in aquifers containing As-bearing minerals.

  6. Elevated glutamine/glutamate ratio in cerebrospinal fluid of first episode and drug naive schizophrenic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindström Leif H

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS studies report that glutamine is altered in the brains of schizophrenic patients. There were also conflicting findings on glutamate in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of schizophrenic patients, and absent for glutamine. This study aims to clarify the question of glutamine and glutamate in CSF of first episode and drug naive schizophrenic patients. Method Levels of glutamine and glutamate in CSF of 25 first episode and drug-naive male schizophrenic patients and 17 age-matched male healthy controls were measured by a high performance liquid chromatography. Results The ratio (126.1 (median, 117.7 ± 27.4 (mean ± S.D. of glutamine to glutamate in the CSF of patients was significantly (z = -3.29, p = 0.001 higher than that (81.01 (median, 89.1 ± 22.5 (mean ± S.D. of normal controls although each level of glutamine and glutamate in patients was not different from that of normal controls. Conclusion Our data suggests that a disfunction in glutamate-glutamine cycle in the brain may play a role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

  7. TAAR1 Modulates Cortical Glutamate NMDA Receptor Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Stefano; Lignani, Gabriele; Caffino, Lucia; Maggi, Silvia; Sukhanov, Ilya; Leo, Damiana; Mus, Liudmila; Emanuele, Marco; Ronzitti, Giuseppe; Harmeier, Anja; Medrihan, Lucian; Sotnikova, Tatyana D; Chieregatti, Evelina; Hoener, Marius C; Benfenati, Fabio; Tucci, Valter; Fumagalli, Fabio; Gainetdinov, Raul R

    2015-01-01

    Trace Amine-Associated Receptor 1 (TAAR1) is a G protein-coupled receptor expressed in the mammalian brain and known to influence subcortical monoaminergic transmission. Monoamines, such as dopamine, also play an important role within the prefrontal cortex (PFC) circuitry, which is critically involved in high-o5rder cognitive processes. TAAR1-selective ligands have shown potential antipsychotic, antidepressant, and pro-cognitive effects in experimental animal models; however, it remains unclear whether TAAR1 can affect PFC-related processes and functions. In this study, we document a distinct pattern of expression of TAAR1 in the PFC, as well as altered subunit composition and deficient functionality of the glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors in the pyramidal neurons of layer V of PFC in mice lacking TAAR1. The dysregulated cortical glutamate transmission in TAAR1-KO mice was associated with aberrant behaviors in several tests, indicating a perseverative and impulsive phenotype of mutants. Conversely, pharmacological activation of TAAR1 with selective agonists reduced premature impulsive responses observed in the fixed-interval conditioning schedule in normal mice. Our study indicates that TAAR1 plays an important role in the modulation of NMDA receptor-mediated glutamate transmission in the PFC and related functions. Furthermore, these data suggest that the development of TAAR1-based drugs could provide a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of disorders related to aberrant cortical functions. PMID:25749299

  8. Neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebenol on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Choi, Yung Hyun; Park, Geuntae; Choi, Young-Whan

    2015-09-01

    α-Iso-cubebenol is a natural compound isolated from Schisandra chinensis, and is reported to have beneficial bioactivity including anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor activities. Glutamate-induced oxidative neuronal damage has been implicated in a variety of neurodegenerative disorders. Here we investigated the mechanisms of α-iso-cubebenol protection of mouse hippocampus-derived neuronal cells (HT22 cells) from apoptotic cell death induced by the major excitatory neurotransmitter, glutamate. Pretreatment with α-iso-cubebenol markedly attenuated glutamate-induced loss of cell viability and release of lactate dehydrogenase), in a dose-dependent manner. α-Iso-cubebenol significantly reduced glutamate-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species and calcium accumulation. Strikingly, α-iso-cubebenol inhibited glutamate-induced mitochondrial depolarization, which releases apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria. α-Iso-cubebenol also suppressed glutamate-induced phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases. Furthermore, α-iso-cubebenol induced CREB phosphorylation and Nrf-2 nuclear accumulation and increased the promoter activity of ARE and CREB in HT22 cells. α-Iso-cubebenol also upregulated the expression of phase-II detoxifying/antioxidant enzymes such as HO-1 and NQO1. Subsequent studies revealed that the inhibitory effects of α-iso-cubebenol on glutamate-induced apoptosis were abolished by small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CREB and Nrf-2. These findings suggest that α-iso-cubebenol prevents excitotoxin-induced oxidative damage to neurons by inhibiting apoptotic cell death, and might be a potential preventive or therapeutic agent for neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Backpropagating Action Potentials Enable Detection of Extrasynaptic Glutamate by NMDA Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Wu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic NMDA receptors (NMDARs are crucial for neural coding and plasticity. However, little is known about the adaptive function of extrasynaptic NMDARs occurring mainly on dendritic shafts. Here, we find that in CA1 pyramidal neurons, backpropagating action potentials (bAPs recruit shaft NMDARs exposed to ambient glutamate. In contrast, spine NMDARs are “protected,” under baseline conditions, from such glutamate influences by perisynaptic transporters: we detect bAP-evoked Ca2+ entry through these receptors upon local synaptic or photolytic glutamate release. During theta-burst firing, NMDAR-dependent Ca2+ entry either downregulates or upregulates an h-channel conductance (Gh of the cell depending on whether synaptic glutamate release is intact or blocked. Thus, the balance between activation of synaptic and extrasynaptic NMDARs can determine the sign of Gh plasticity. Gh plasticity in turn regulates dendritic input probed by local glutamate uncaging. These results uncover a metaplasticity mechanism potentially important for neural coding and memory formation.

  10. Fronto-striatal glutamate in children with Tourette's disorder and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jilly Naaijen

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: We found no evidence for glutamatergic neuropathology in TD or ADHD within the fronto-striatal circuits. However, the correlation of OC-symptoms with ACC glutamate concentrations suggests that altered glutamatergic transmission is involved in OC-symptoms within TD, but this needs further investigation.

  11. Protein alterations induced by long-term agonist treatment of HEK293 cells expressing thyrotropin-releasing hormone receptor and G11alpha protein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Drastichová, Z.; Bouřová, Lenka; Hejnová, L.; Jedelský, P.; Svoboda, Petr; Novotný, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 1 (2010), s. 255-264 ISSN 0730-2312 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC554; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/06/0121; GA ČR(CZ) GD305/08/H037 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Thyrotropin-releasing hormone * Gq/11 protein * proteomics Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.122, year: 2010

  12. Reinforcing the inner phase of the filled hydrogels with CNTs alters drug release properties and human keratinocyte morphology: A study on the gelatin- tamarind gum filled hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maharana, Vivek; Gaur, Deepanjali; Nayak, Suraj K; Singh, Vinay K; Chakraborty, Subhabrata; Banerjee, Indranil; Ray, Sirsendu S; Anis, Arfat; Pal, Kunal

    2017-11-01

    The study reports the synthesis and characterization of gelatin-tamarind gum (TG) based filled hydrogels for drug delivery applications. In this study, three different types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were incorporated within the dispersed TG phase of the filled hydrogels. The prepared hydrogels were thoroughly characterised using bright field microscope, FESEM, FTIR spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimeter, and mechanical tester. The swelling and the drug (salicylic acid) release properties of the filled hydrogels were also evaluated. The micrographs revealed the formation of biphasic systems. The internal phase appeared as agglomerates, and the CNTs were confined within the dispersed TG phase. FTIR and XRD studies revealed that CNTs promoted associative interactions among the components of the hydrogel, which promoted the formation of large crystallite size. The mechanical study indicated better resistance to the breakdown of the architecture of the CNT-containing filled hydrogels. Drug release studies, both passive and iontophoretic, suggested that the non-Fickian diffusion of the drug was prevalent during its release from hydrogel matrices. The prepared hydrogels were cytocompatible with human keratinocytes. The results suggested the probable use of such hydrogels in wound healing, tissue engineering and drug delivery applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Murine elongation factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha) is posttranslationally modified by novel amide-linked ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol moieties. Addition of ethanolamine-phosphoglycerol to specific glutamic acid residues on EF-1 alpha

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiteheart, S.W.; Shenbagamurthi, P.; Chen, L.; Cotter, R.J.; Hart, G.W.

    1989-01-01

    Elongation Factor 1 alpha (EF-1 alpha), an important eukaryotic translation factor, transports charged aminoacyl-tRNA from the cytosol to the ribosomes during poly-peptide synthesis. Metabolic radiolabeling with [ 3 H] ethanolamine shows that, in all cells examined, EF-1 alpha is the major radiolabeled protein. Radiolabeled EF-1 alpha has an apparent Mr = 53,000 and a basic isoelectric point. It is cytosolic and does not contain N-linked oligosaccharides. Trypsin digestion of murine EF-1 alpha generated two major [ 3 H]ethanolamine-labeled peptides. Three peptides were sequenced and were identical to two distinct regions of the human EF-1 alpha protein. Blank sequencing cycles coinciding with glutamic acid in the human cDNA-derived sequence were also found to release [ 3 H]ethanolamine, and compositional analysis of these peptides confirmed the presence of glutamic acid. Dansylation analysis demonstrates that the amine group of the ethanolamine is blocked. These results indicate that EF-1 alpha is posttranslationally modified by the covalent attachment of ethanolamine via an amide bond to at least two specific glutamic acid residues (Glu-301 and Glu-374). The hydroxyl group of the attached ethanolamine was shown by mass spectrometry and compositional analysis, to be further modified by the addition of a phosphoglycerol unit. This novel posttranslational modification may represent an important alteration of EF-1 alpha, comparable to the regulatory effects of posttranslational methylation of EF-1 alpha lysine residues

  14. GLT-1 Transport Stoichiometry Is Constant at Low and High Glutamate Concentrations when Chloride Is Substituted by Gluconate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anatoli Y Kabakov

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter, but prolonged exposure even at micromolar concentrations causes neuronal death. Extracellular glutamate is maintained at nanomolar level by glutamate transporters, which, however, may reverse transport and release glutamate. If and when the reverse occurs depends on glutamate transport stoichiometry (GTS. Previously we found that in the presence of chloride, the coupled GLT-1 glutamate transporter current and its relationship to radiolabeled glutamate flux significantly decreased when extracellular glutamate concentration increased above 0.2 mM, which implies a change in GTS. Such high concentrations are feasible near GLT-1 expressed close to synaptic release site during excitatory neurotransmission. The aim of this study was to determine GLT-1 GTS at both low (19-75 μM and high (300-1200 μM glutamate concentration ranges. GTS experiments were conducted in the absence of chloride to avoid contributions by the GLT-1 uncoupled chloride conductance. Mathematical analysis of the transporter thermodynamic equilibrium allowed us to derive equations revealing the number of a particular type of ion transported per elementary charge based on the measurements of the transporter reversal potential. We found that GLT-1a expressed in COS-7 cells co-transports 1.5 Na+, 0.5 Glu-, 0.5 H+ and counter-transports 0.6 K+ per elementary charge in both glutamate concentration ranges, and at both 37°C and 26°C temperatures. The thermodynamic parameter Q10 = 2.4 for GLT-1 turnover rate of 19 s-1 (37°C, -50 mV remained constant in the 10 μM-10 mM glutamate concentration range. Importantly, the previously reported decrease in the current/flux ratio at high glutamate concentration was not seen in the absence of chloride in both COS-7 cells and cultured rat neurons. Therefore, only in the absence of chloride, GLT-1 GTS remains constant at all glutamate concentrations. Possible explanations for why apparent GTS might

  15. Distribution of radiolabeled L-glutamate and D-aspartate from blood into peripheral tissues in naive rats: Significance for brain neuroprotection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klin, Yael; Zlotnik, Alexander; Boyko, Matthew; Ohayon, Sharon; Shapira, Yoram; Teichberg, Vivian I.

    2010-01-01

    and serves as an origin for glutamate metabolites that redistribute into skeletal muscle and gut. The findings of this study suggest now that pharmacological manipulations that reduce the liver glutamate release rate or cause a boosting of the skeletal muscle glutamate pumping rate are likely to cause brain neuroprotection.

  16. Distribution of radiolabeled L-glutamate and D-aspartate from blood into peripheral tissues in naive rats: Significance for brain neuroprotection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klin, Yael [Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Zlotnik, Alexander; Boyko, Matthew; Ohayon, Sharon; Shapira, Yoram [The Division of Anesthesiology, Soroka Medical Center and Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva (Israel); Teichberg, Vivian I., E-mail: Vivian.teichberg@weizmann.ac.il [Department of Neurobiology, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel)

    2010-09-03

    , mainly in non-metabolized form. The liver plays a central role in glutamate metabolism and serves as an origin for glutamate metabolites that redistribute into skeletal muscle and gut. The findings of this study suggest now that pharmacological manipulations that reduce the liver glutamate release rate or cause a boosting of the skeletal muscle glutamate pumping rate are likely to cause brain neuroprotection.

  17. Intercellular signal communication among odontoblasts and trigeminal ganglion neurons via glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, A; Sato, M; Kimura, M; Katakura, A; Tazaki, M; Shibukawa, Y

    2016-11-01

    Various stimuli to the exposed surface of dentin induce changes in the hydrodynamic force inside the dentinal tubules resulting in dentinal pain. Recent evidences indicate that mechano-sensor channels, such as the transient receptor potential channels, in odontoblasts receive these hydrodynamic forces and trigger the release of ATP to the pulpal neurons, to generate dentinal pain. A recent study, however, has shown that odontoblasts also express glutamate receptors (GluRs). This implies that cells in the dental pulp tissue have the ability to release glutamate, which acts as a functional intercellular mediator to establish inter-odontoblast and odontoblast-trigeminal ganglion (TG) neuron signal communication. To investigate the intercellular signal communication, we applied mechanical stimulation to odontoblasts and measured the intracellular free Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ). During mechanical stimulation in the presence of extracellular Ca 2+ , we observed a transient [Ca 2+ ] i increase not only in single stimulated odontoblasts, but also in adjacent odontoblasts. We could not observe these responses in the absence of extracellular Ca 2+ . [Ca 2+ ] i increases in the neighboring odontoblasts during mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts were inhibited by antagonists of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) as well as glutamate-permeable anion channels. In the odontoblast-TG neuron coculture, we observed an increase in [Ca 2+ ] i in the stimulated odontoblasts and TG neurons, in response to direct mechanical stimulation of single odontoblasts. These [Ca 2+ ] i increases in the neighboring TG neurons were inhibited by antagonists for mGluRs. The [Ca 2+ ] i increases in the stimulated odontoblasts were also inhibited by mGluRs antagonists. We further confirmed that the odontoblasts express group I, II, and III mGluRs. However, we could not record any currents evoked from odontoblasts near the mechanically stimulated odontoblast, with or without

  18. Control of Amygdala Circuits by 5-HT Neurons via 5-HT and Glutamate Cotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Ayesha; Bocchio, Marco; Bannerman, David M; Sharp, Trevor; Capogna, Marco

    2017-02-15

    The serotonin (5-HT) system and the amygdala are key regulators of emotional behavior. Several lines of evidence suggest that 5-HT transmission in the amygdala is implicated in the susceptibility and drug treatment of mood disorders. Therefore, elucidating the physiological mechanisms through which midbrain 5-HT neurons modulate amygdala circuits could be pivotal in understanding emotional regulation in health and disease. To shed light on these mechanisms, we performed patch-clamp recordings from basal amygdala (BA) neurons in brain slices from mice with channelrhodopsin genetically targeted to 5-HT neurons. Optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals at low frequencies (≤1 Hz) evoked a short-latency excitation of BA interneurons (INs) that was depressed at higher frequencies. Pharmacological analysis revealed that this effect was mediated by glutamate and not 5-HT because it was abolished by ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists. Optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals at higher frequencies (10-20 Hz) evoked both slow excitation and slow inhibition of INs. These effects were mediated by 5-HT because they were blocked by antagonists of 5-HT 2A and 5-HT 1A receptors, respectively. These fast glutamate- and slow 5-HT-mediated responses often coexisted in the same neuron. Interestingly, fast-spiking and non-fast-spiking INs displayed differential modulation by glutamate and 5-HT. Furthermore, optical stimulation of 5-HT terminals did not evoke glutamate release onto BA principal neurons, but inhibited these cells directly via activation of 5-HT 1A receptors and indirectly via enhanced GABA release. Collectively, these findings suggest that 5-HT neurons exert a frequency-dependent, cell-type-specific control over BA circuitry via 5-HT and glutamate co-release to inhibit the BA output. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The modulation of the amygdala by serotonin (5-HT) is important for emotional regulation and is implicated in the pathogenesis and treatment of affective disorders

  19. The Role of Primary Motor Cortex (M1) Glutamate and GABA Signaling in l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia in Parkinsonian Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenbach, David; Conti, Melissa M; Ostock, Corinne Y; George, Jessica A; Goldenberg, Adam A; Melikhov-Sosin, Mitchell; Nuss, Emily E; Bishop, Christopher

    2016-09-21

    Long-term treatment of Parkinson's disease with l-DOPA almost always leads to the development of involuntary movements termed l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia. Whereas hyperdopaminergic signaling in the basal ganglia is thought to cause dyskinesia, alterations in primary motor cortex (M1) activity are also prominent during dyskinesia, suggesting that the cortex may represent a therapeutic target. The present study used the rat unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion model of Parkinson's disease to characterize in vivo changes in GABA and glutamate neurotransmission within M1 and determine their contribution to behavioral output. 6-Hydroxydopamine lesion led to parkinsonian motor impairment that was partially reversed by l-DOPA. Among sham-lesioned rats, l-DOPA did not change glutamate or GABA efflux. Likewise, 6-hydroxydopamine lesion did not impact GABA or glutamate among rats chronically treated with saline. However, we observed an interaction of lesion and treatment whereby, among lesioned rats, l-DOPA given acutely (1 d) or chronically (14-16 d) reduced glutamate efflux and enhanced GABA efflux. Site-specific microinjections into M1 demonstrated that l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia was reduced by M1 infusion of a D1 antagonist, an AMPA antagonist, or a GABAA agonist. Overall, the present study demonstrates that l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia is associated with increased M1 inhibition and that exogenously enhancing M1 inhibition may attenuate dyskinesia, findings that are in agreement with functional imaging and transcranial magnetic stimulation studies in human Parkinson's disease patients. Together, our study suggests that increasing M1 inhibitory tone is an endogenous compensatory response designed to limit dyskinesia severity and that potentiating this response is a viable therapeutic strategy. Most Parkinson's disease patients will receive l-DOPA and eventually develop hyperkinetic involuntary movements termed dyskinesia. Such symptoms can be as debilitating as the disease

  20. A radiometric microassay for glutamic acid decarboxylase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maderdrut, J.L.; North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill

    1979-01-01

    A simple method for purifying L-[ 3 H] glutamic acid and incubation conditions suitable for estimating L-glutamic acid decarboxylase activity are described. Routine and recycled cation-exchange procedure for separating γ-aminobutyric acid from L-glutamate are outlined and compared. Recycling increases the sensitivity of the cation-exchange method by 6-7 fold. L-Glutamate decarboxylase activity can be measured reliably in samples of embryonic neural tissue having wet-weights of approximately 1 μg. The cation-exchange method is compared with the anion-exchange and CO 2 -trapping methods. L-Glutamate decarboxylase activity has been detected in the lumbar spinal cord of the chick embryo at Day 21/4 (stage 14) using the cation-exchange method. This is 5-6 days earlier than L-glutamate decarboxylase activity has been detected in embryonic neural tissue by previous investigators. L-Glutamate decarboxylase is present in the lumbar spinal cord at least as early as the birth of the first lumbar spinal cord neurons and at least 1-2 days before the initiation of synaptogenesis. (author)

  1. Radiometric microassay for glutamic acid decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maderdrut, J L [North Carolina Dept. of Mental Health, Raleigh (USA); North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill (USA). School of Medicine)

    1979-01-01

    A simple method for purifying L-(/sup 3/H) glutamic acid and incubation conditions suitable for estimating L-glutamic acid decarboxylase activity are described. Routine and recycled cation-exchange procedure for separating ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid from L-glutamate are outlined and compared. Recycling increases the sensitivity of the cation-exchange method by 6-7 fold. L-Glutamate decarboxylase activity can be measured reliably in samples of embryonic neural tissue having wet-weights of approximately 1 ..mu..g. The cation-exchange method is compared with the anion-exchange and CO/sub 2/-trapping methods. L-Glutamate decarboxylase activity has been detected in the lumbar spinal cord of the chick embryo at Day 21/4 (stage 14) using the cation-exchange method. This is 5-6 days earlier than L-glutamate decarboxylase activity has been detected in embryonic neural tissue by previous investigators. L-Glutamate decarboxylase is present in the lumbar spinal cord at least as early as the birth of the first lumbar spinal cord neurons and at least 1-2 days before the initiation of synaptogenesis.

  2. Mitochondrial dysfunction associated with nitric oxide pathways in glutamate neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manucha, Walter

    Multiple mechanisms underlying glutamate-induced neurotoxicity have recently been discussed. Likewise, a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with neurodegeneration, oxidative stress, and inflammation. This article highlights nitric oxide, an atypical neurotransmitter synthesized and released on demand by the post-synaptic neurons, and has many important implications for nerve cell survival and differentiation. Consequently, synaptogenesis, synapse elimination, and neurotransmitter release, are nitric oxide-modulated. Interesting, an emergent role of nitric oxide pathways has been discussed as regards neurotoxicity from glutamate-induced apoptosis. These findings suggest that nitric oxide pathways modulation could prevent oxidative damage to neurons through apoptosis inhibition. This review aims to highlight the emergent aspects of nitric oxide-mediated signaling in the brain, and how they can be related to neurotoxicity, as well as the development of neurodegenerative diseases development. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. In vivo measurements of glutamate, GABA, and NAAG in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Laura M; Kontson, Kimberly; West, Jeffrey; Edden, Richard A; Zhu, He; Wijtenburg, S Andrea; Holcomb, Henry H; Barker, Peter B

    2013-09-01

    The major excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, glutamate (Glu) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA), respectively, are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), a neuropeptide that modulates the Glu system, may also be altered in schizophrenia. This study investigated GABA, Glu + glutamine (Glx), and NAAG levels in younger and older subjects with schizophrenia. Forty-one subjects, 21 with chronic schizophrenia and 20 healthy controls, participated in this study. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was used to measure GABA, Glx, and NAAG levels in the anterior cingulate (AC) and centrum semiovale (CSO) regions. NAAG in the CSO was higher in younger schizophrenia subjects compared with younger control subjects. The opposite pattern was observed in the older groups. Glx was reduced in the schizophrenia group irrespective of age group and brain region. There was a trend for reduced AC GABA in older schizophrenia subjects compared with older control subjects. Poor attention performance was correlated to lower AC GABA levels in both groups. Higher levels of CSO NAAG were associated with greater negative symptom severity in schizophrenia. These results provide support for altered glutamatergic and GABAergic function associated with illness course and cognitive and negative symptoms in schizophrenia. The study also highlights the importance of studies that combine MRS measurements of NAAG, GABA, and Glu for a more comprehensive neurochemical characterization of schizophrenia.

  4. Activity of the lactate-alanine shuttle is independent of glutamate-glutamine cycle activity in cerebellar neuronal-astrocytic cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse K; Sickmann, Helle M; Schousboe, Arne

    2004-01-01

    The glutamate-glutamine cycle describes the neuronal release of glutamate into the synaptic cleft, astrocytic uptake, and conversion into glutamine, followed by release for use as a neuronal glutamate precursor. This only explains the fate of the carbon atoms, however, and not that of the ammonia....... Recently, a role for alanine has been proposed in transfer of ammonia between glutamatergic neurons and astrocytes, denoted the lactate-alanine shuttle (Waagepetersen et al. [ 2000] J. Neurochem. 75:471-479). The role of alanine in this context has been studied further using cerebellar neuronal cultures...... and corresponding neuronal-astrocytic cocultures. A superfusion paradigm was used to induce repetitively vesicular glutamate release by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in the neurons, allowing the relative activity dependency of the lactate-alanine shuttle to be assessed. [(15)N]Alanine (0.2 mM), [2-(15)N]/[5-(15)N...

  5. Malaria-specific metabolite hemozoin mediates the release of several potent endogenous pyrogens (TNF, MIP-1 alpha, and MIP-1 beta) in vitro, and altered thermoregulation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherry, B A; Alava, G; Tracey, K J; Martiney, J; Cerami, A; Slater, A F

    1995-01-01

    A characteristic feature of malaria infection is the occurrence of periodic bouts of fever. Experimental and clinical studies have strongly implicated inflammatory cytokines, like tumour necrosis factor (TNF), in the induction of these intermittent fevers [Clark et al., Infect Immunol 32:1058-1066, 1981; Clark et al., Am J Pathol 129:192-199, 1987; Karunaweera et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89:3200-3203, 1992], but the malaria-specific metabolite(s) which induce the production of such endogenous pyrogens have not yet been fully characterized. It is well known that during the course of malaria infection, a unique schizont component, alternatively referred to as "malaria pigment" or hemozoin, is released along with merozoites as the host erythrocyte bursts [Urquhart, Clin Infect Dis 19:117-131, 1994]. We have recently determined that the core structure of hemozoin comprises a novel insoluble polymer of heme units linked by iron-carboxylate bonds [Slater et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 88:325-329, 1991; Slater et al., Nature 355:167-169, 1992]. We now report that purified native, as well as chemically synthesized, hemozoin crystals potently induce the release of several pyrogenic cytokines, including TNF, MIP-1 alpha, and MIP-1 beta, from murine macrophages and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. Also, intravenous administration of chemically synthesized preparations of hemozoin to anaesthetized rats results in a marked drop in body temperature. A similar drop in body temperature is observed following the intravenous injection of other well-characterized pyrogenic cytokines (e.g., TNF) which are known to induce a fever response in awake animals, and is thought to reflect the inability of rats to appropriately regulate their body temperature while anaesthetized. As a consequence of its ability to induce pyrogenic cytokines in vitro, and thermal dysregulation in vivo, we propose that this unique parasite metabolite is an important pyrogen released by malaria

  6. Combinations of physiologic estrogens with xenoestrogens alter calcium and kinase responses, prolactin release, and membrane estrogen receptor trafficking in rat pituitary cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Cheryl S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xenoestrogens such as alkylphenols and the structurally related plastic byproduct bisphenol A have recently been shown to act potently via nongenomic signaling pathways and the membrane version of estrogen receptor-α. Though the responses to these compounds are typically measured individually, they usually contaminate organisms that already have endogenous estrogens present. Therefore, we used quantitative medium-throughput screening assays to measure the effects of physiologic estrogens in combination with these xenoestrogens. Methods We studied the effects of low concentrations of endogenous estrogens (estradiol, estriol, and estrone at 10 pM (representing pre-development levels, and 1 nM (representing higher cycle-dependent and pregnancy levels in combinations with the same levels of xenoestrogens in GH3/B6/F10 pituitary cells. These levels of xenoestrogens represent extremely low contamination levels. We monitored calcium entry into cells using Fura-2 fluorescence imaging of single cells. Prolactin release was measured by radio-immunoassay. Extracellular-regulated kinase (1 and 2 phospho-activations and the levels of three estrogen receptors in the cell membrane (ERα, ERβ, and GPER were measured using a quantitative plate immunoassay of fixed cells either permeabilized or nonpermeabilized (respectively. Results All xenoestrogens caused responses at these concentrations, and had disruptive effects on the actions of physiologic estrogens. Xenoestrogens reduced the % of cells that responded to estradiol via calcium channel opening. They also inhibited the activation (phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases at some concentrations. They either inhibited or enhanced rapid prolactin release, depending upon concentration. These latter two dose-responses were nonmonotonic, a characteristic of nongenomic estrogenic responses. Conclusions Responses mediated by endogenous estrogens representing different life stages are

  7. De-coupling of blood flow and metabolism in the rat brain induced by glutamate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirose, Shinichiro; Momosaki, Sotaro; Sasaki, Kazunari; Hosoi, Rie; Abe, Kohji; Inoue, Osamu; Gee, A.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamate plays an essential role in neuronal cell death in many neurological disorders. In this study, we examined both glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow in the same rat following infusion of glutamate or ibotenic acid using the dual-tracer technique. The effects of MK-801, an N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, and 1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6-nitro-2,3-dioxo-benzo[f]quinoxaline-7-sulfonamide (NBQX), an α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)-kainate receptor antagonist, on the changes in the glucose metabolism and cerebral blood flow induced by glutamate were also examined. The rats were microinjected with glutamate (1 μmol/μl, 2 μl) or ibotenic acid (10 μg/μl, 1 μl) into the right striatum, and dual-tracer autoradiograms of [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and [ 14 C]iofetamine (IMP) were obtained. MK-801 and NBQX were injected intravenously about 45 and 30 min, respectively, after the infusion of glutamate. De-coupling of blood flow and metabolism was noted in the glutamate-infused hemisphere (as assessed by no alteration of [ 18 F]FDG uptake and significant decrease of [ 14 C]IMP uptake). Pretreatments with MK-801, NBQX, or combined use of MK-801 and NBQX did not affect the de-coupling of the blood flow and metabolism induced by glutamate. A histochemical study revealed that about 20% neuronal cell death had occurred in the striatum at 105 min after the infusion of glutamate. In addition, a significant increase of the [ 18 F]FDG uptake and decrease of [ 14 C]IMP uptake were also seen in the rat brain infused with ibotenic acid. These results indicate that glutamate and ibotenic acid caused a significant de-coupling of blood flow and glucose metabolism in the intact rat brain during the early phase of neurodegeneration. It is necessary to evaluate the relation between metabotropic glutamate receptors and de-coupling of blood flow and metabolism. (author)

  8. Peri-adolescent drinking of ethanol and/or nicotine modulates astroglial glutamate transporters and metabotropic glutamate receptor-1 in female alcohol-preferring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasmari, Fawaz; Bell, Richard L; Rao, P S S; Hammad, Alaa M; Sari, Youssef

    2018-07-01

    Impairment in glutamate neurotransmission mediates the development of dependence upon nicotine (NIC) and ethanol (EtOH). Previous work indicates that continuous access to EtOH or phasic exposure to NIC reduces expression of the glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1) and cystine/glutamate antiporter (xCT) but not the glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST). Additionally, metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) expression was affected following exposure to EtOH or NIC. However, little is known about the effects of EtOH and NIC co-consumption on GLT-1, xCT, GLAST, and mGluR1 expression. In this study, peri-adolescent female alcohol preferring (P) rats were given binge-like access to water, sucrose (SUC), SUC-NIC, EtOH, or EtOH-NIC for four weeks. The present study determined the effects of these reinforcers on GLT-1, xCT, GLAST, and mGluR1 expression in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), hippocampus (HIP) and prefrontal cortex (PFC). GLT-1 and xCT expression were decreased in the NAc following both SUC-NIC and EtOH-NIC. In addition, only xCT expression was downregulated in the HIP in both of these latter groups. Also, glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in the HIP was reduced following SUC, SUC-NIC, EtOH, and EtOH-NIC consumption. Similar to previous work, GLAST expression was not altered in any brain region by any of the reinforcers. However, mGluR1 expression was increased in the NAc in the SUC-NIC, EtOH, and EtOH-NIC groups. These results indicate that peri-adolescent binge-like drinking of EtOH or SUC with or without NIC may exert differential effects on astroglial glutamate transporters and receptors. Our data further parallel some of the previous findings observed in adult rats. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Biobased synthesis of acrylonitrile from glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Notre, le J.E.L.; Scott, E.L.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Glutamic acid was transformed into acrylonitrile in a two step procedure involving an oxidative decarboxylation in water to 3-cyanopropanoic acid followed by a decarbonylation-elimination reaction using a palladium catalyst

  10. Aβ42 oligomers selectively disrupt neuronal calcium release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzari, Cristian; Kipanyula, Maulilio J; Agostini, Mario; Pozzan, Tullio; Fasolato, Cristina

    2015-02-01

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides correlates with aging and progression of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aβ peptides, which cause early synaptic dysfunctions, spine loss, and memory deficits, also disturb intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis. By cytosolic and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) measurements, we here define the short-term effects of synthetic Aβ42 on neuronal Ca(2+) dynamics. When applied acutely at submicromolar concentration, as either oligomers or monomers, Aβ42 did not cause Ca(2+) release or Ca(2+) influx. Similarly, 1-hour treatment with Aβ42 modified neither the resting cytosolic Ca(2+) level nor the long-lasting Ca(2+) influx caused by KCl-induced depolarization. In contrast, Aβ42 oligomers, but not monomers, significantly altered Ca(2+) release from stores with opposite effects on inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3)- and caffeine-induced Ca(2+) mobilization without alteration of the total store Ca(2+) content. Ca(2+) dysregulation by Aβ42 oligomers involves metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and requires network activity and the intact exo-endocytotic machinery, being prevented by tetrodotoxin and tetanus toxin. These findings support the idea that Ca(2+) store dysfunction is directly involved in Aβ42 neurotoxicity and represents a potential therapeutic target in AD-like dementia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Functional Comparison of the Two Bacillus anthracis Glutamate Racemases▿

    OpenAIRE

    Dodd, Dylan; Reese, Joseph G.; Louer, Craig R.; Ballard, Jimmy D.; Spies, M. Ashley; Blanke, Steven R.

    2007-01-01

    Glutamate racemase activity in Bacillus anthracis is of significant interest with respect to chemotherapeutic drug design, because l-glutamate stereoisomerization to d-glutamate is predicted to be closely associated with peptidoglycan and capsule biosynthesis, which are important for growth and virulence, respectively. In contrast to most bacteria, which harbor a single glutamate racemase gene, the genomic sequence of B. anthracis predicts two genes encoding glutamate racemases, racE1 and rac...

  12. Atorvastatin and Fluoxetine Prevent Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction Evoked by Glutamate Toxicity in Hippocampal Slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludka, Fabiana K; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Binder, Luisa Bandeira; Constantino, Leandra Celso; Massari, Caio; Tasca, Carla I

    2017-07-01

    Atorvastatin has been shown to exert a neuroprotective action by counteracting glutamatergic toxicity. Recently, we have shown atorvastatin also exerts an antidepressant-like effect that depends on both glutamatergic and serotonergic systems modulation. Excitotoxicity is involved in several brain disorders including depression; thus, it is suggested that antidepressants may target glutamatergic system as a final common pathway. In this study, a comparison of the mechanisms involved in the putative neuroprotective effect of a repetitive atorvastatin or fluoxetine treatment against glutamate toxicity in hippocampal slices was performed. Adult Swiss mice were treated with atorvastatin (10 mg/kg, p.o.) or fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, p.o.), once a day during seven consecutive days. On the eighth day, animals were killed and hippocampal slices were obtained and subjected to an in vitro protocol of glutamate toxicity. An acute treatment of atorvastatin or fluoxetine was not neuroprotective; however, the repeated atorvastatin or fluoxetine treatment prevented the decrease in cellular viability induced by glutamate in hippocampal slices. The loss of cellular viability induced by glutamate was accompanied by increased D-aspartate release, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) production, and impaired mitochondrial membrane potential. Atorvastatin or fluoxetine repeated treatment also presented an antidepressant-like effect in the tail suspension test. Atorvastatin or fluoxetine treatment was effective in protecting mice hippocampal slices from glutamate toxicity by preventing the oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction.

  13. Glutamine synthetase activity and glutamate uptake in hippocampus and frontal cortex in portal hypertensive rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Gabriela Beatriz; Fernández, María Alejandra; Roselló, Diego Martín; Tomaro, María Luján; Balestrasse, Karina; Lemberg, Abraham

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To study glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and glutamate uptake in the hippocampus and frontal cortex (FC) from rats with prehepatic portal vein hypertension. METHODS: Male Wistar rats were divided into sham-operated group and a portal hypertension (PH) group with a regulated stricture of the portal vein. Animals were sacrificed by decapitation 14 d after portal vein stricture. GS activity was determined in the hippocampus and FC. Specific uptake of radiolabeled L-glutamate was studied using synaptosome-enriched fractions that were freshly prepared from both brain areas. RESULTS: We observed that the activity of GS increased in the hippocampus of PH rats, as compared to control animals, and decreased in the FC. A significant decrease in glutamate uptake was found in both brain areas, and was more marked in the hippocampus. The decrease in glutamate uptake might have been caused by a deficient transport function, significantly and persistent increase in this excitatory neurotransmitter activity. CONCLUSION: The presence of moderate ammonia blood levels may add to the toxicity of excitotoxic glutamate in the brain, which causes alterations in brain function. Portal vein stricture that causes portal hypertension modifies the normal function in some brain regions. PMID:19533812

  14. Glutamic acid promotes monacolin K production and monacolin K biosynthetic gene cluster expression in Monascus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chan; Liang, Jian; Yang, Le; Chai, Shiyuan; Zhang, Chenxi; Sun, Baoguo; Wang, Chengtao

    2017-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of glutamic acid on production of monacolin K and expression of the monacolin K biosynthetic gene cluster. When Monascus M1 was grown in glutamic medium instead of in the original medium, monacolin K production increased from 48.4 to 215.4 mg l -1 , monacolin K production increased by 3.5 times. Glutamic acid enhanced monacolin K production by upregulating the expression of mokB-mokI; on day 8, the expression level of mokA tended to decrease by Reverse Transcription-polymerase Chain Reaction. Our findings demonstrated that mokA was not a key gene responsible for the quantity of monacolin K production in the presence of glutamic acid. Observation of Monascus mycelium morphology using Scanning Electron Microscope showed glutamic acid significantly increased the content of Monascus mycelium, altered the permeability of Monascus mycelium, enhanced secretion of monacolin K from the cell, and reduced the monacolin K content in Monascus mycelium, thereby enhancing monacolin K production.

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury Increases Cortical Glutamate Network Activity by Compromising GABAergic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, David; Walker, Kendall; Andresen, Lauren; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Hampton, David; Tesco, Giuseppina; Dulla, Chris G

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor for developing pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Although disruptions in brain circuitry are associated with TBI, the precise mechanisms by which brain injury leads to epileptiform network activity is unknown. Using controlled cortical impact (CCI) as a model of TBI, we examined how cortical excitability and glutamatergic signaling was altered following injury. We optically mapped cortical glutamate signaling using FRET-based glutamate biosensors, while simultaneously recording cortical field potentials in acute brain slices 2-4 weeks following CCI. Cortical electrical stimulation evoked polyphasic, epileptiform field potentials and disrupted the input-output relationship in deep layers of CCI-injured cortex. High-speed glutamate biosensor imaging showed that glutamate signaling was significantly increased in the injured cortex. Elevated glutamate responses correlated with epileptiform activity, were highest directly adjacent to the injury, and spread via deep cortical layers. Immunoreactivity for markers of GABAergic interneurons were significantly decreased throughout CCI cortex. Lastly, spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency decreased and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current increased after CCI injury. Our results suggest that specific cortical neuronal microcircuits may initiate and facilitate the spread of epileptiform activity following TBI. Increased glutamatergic signaling due to loss of GABAergic control may provide a mechanism by which TBI can give rise to post-traumatic epilepsy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Bisphenol A Alters β-hCG and MIF Release by Human Placenta: An In Vitro Study to Understand the Role of Endometrial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Mannelli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A proper fetomaternal immune-endocrine cross-talk in pregnancy is fundamental for reproductive success. This might be unbalanced by exposure to environmental chemicals, such as bisphenol A (BPA. As fetoplacental contamination with BPA originates from the maternal compartment, this study investigated the role of the endometrium in BPA effects on the placenta. To this end, in vitro decidualized stromal cells were exposed to BPA 1 nM, and their conditioned medium (diluted 1 : 2 was used on chorionic villous explants from human placenta. Parallel cultures of placental explants were directly exposed to 0.5 nM BPA while, control cultures were exposed to the vehicle (EtOH 0.1%. After 24–48 h, culture medium from BPA-treated and control cultures was assayed for concentration of hormone human Chorionic Gonadotropin (β-hCG and cytokine Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF. The results showed that direct exposure to BPA stimulated the release of both MIF and β-hCG. These effects were abolished/diminished in placental cultures exposed to endometrial cell-conditioned medium. GM-MS analysis revealed that endometrial cells retain BPA, thus reducing the availability of this chemical for the placenta. The data obtained highlight the importance of in vitro models including the maternal component in reproducing the effects of environmental chemicals on human fetus/placenta.

  17. Intracellular synthesis of glutamic acid in Bacillus methylotrophicus SK19.001, a glutamate-independent poly(γ-glutamic acid)-producing strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yingyun; Zhang, Tao; Mu, Wanmeng; Miao, Ming; Jiang, Bo

    2016-01-15

    Bacillus methylotrophicus SK19.001 is a glutamate-independent strain that produces poly(γ-glutamic acid) (γ-PGA), a polymer of D- and L-glutamic acids that possesses applications in food, the environment, agriculture, etc. This study was undertaken to explore the synthetic pathway of intracellular L- and D-glutamic acid in SK19.001 by investigating the effects of tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and different amino acids as metabolic precursors on the production of γ-PGA and analyzing the activities of the enzymes involved in the synthesis of L- and D-glutamate. Tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates and amino acids could participate in the synthesis of γ-PGA via independent pathways in SK19.001. L-Aspartate aminotransferase, L-glutaminase and L-glutamate synthase were the enzymatic sources of L-glutamate. Glutamate racemase was responsible for the formation of D-glutamate for the synthesis of γ-PGA, and the synthetase had stereoselectivity for glutamate substrate. The enzymatic sources of L-glutamate were investigated for the first time in the glutamate-independent γ-PGA-producing strain, and multiple enzymatic sources of L-glutamate were verified in SK19.001, which will benefit efforts to improve production of γ-PGA with metabolic engineering strategies. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Role of Na,K-ATPase α1 and α2 isoforms in the support of astrocyte glutamate uptake.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina B Illarionova

    Full Text Available Glutamate released during neuronal activity is cleared from the synaptic space via the astrocytic glutamate/Na(+ co-transporters. This transport is driven by the transmembrane Na(+ gradient mediated by Na,K-ATPase. Astrocytes express two isoforms of the catalytic Na,K-ATPase α subunits; the ubiquitously expressed α1 subunit and the α2 subunit that has a more specific expression profile. In the brain α2 is predominantly expressed in astrocytes. The isoforms differ with regard to Na+ affinity, which is lower for α2. The relative roles of the α1 and α2 isoforms in astrocytes are not well understood. Here we present evidence that the presence of the α2 isoform may contribute to a more efficient restoration of glutamate triggered increases in intracellular sodium concentration [Na(+]i. Studies were performed on primary astrocytes derived from E17 rat striatum expressing Na,K-ATPase α1 and α2 and the glutamate/Na(+ co-transporter GLAST. Selective inhibition of α2 resulted in a modest increase of [Na(+]i accompanied by a disproportionately large decrease in uptake of aspartate, an indicator of glutamate uptake. To compare the capacity of α1 and α2 to handle increases in [Na(+]i triggered by glutamate, primary astrocytes overexpressing either α1 or α2 were used. Exposure to glutamate 200 µM caused a significantly larger increase in [Na(+]i in α1 than in α2 overexpressing cells, and as a consequence restoration of [Na(+]i, after glutamate exposure was discontinued, took longer time in α1 than in α2 overexpressing cells. Both α1 and α2 interacted with astrocyte glutamate/Na(+ co-transporters via the 1st intracellular loop.

  19. A novel reagentless glutamate microband biosensor for real-time cell toxicity monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, G.; Pemberton, R.M. [Centre for Research in Biosciences, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY (United Kingdom); Fielden, P.R. [Department of Chemistry, Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YB (United Kingdom); Hart, J.P., E-mail: john.hart@uwe.ac.uk [Centre for Research in Biosciences, Faculty of Health and Applied Sciences, University of the West of England, Bristol, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol, BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2016-08-24

    A reagentless glutamate biosensor was applied to the determination of glutamate released from liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) in response to toxic challenge from various concentrations of paracetamol. A screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) containing the electrocatalyst Meldola's Blue (MB-SPCE) served as the electron mediator for the oxidation of NADH. A mixture of the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD{sup +}) and the biopolymer chitosan (CHIT) were drop-coated onto the surface of the transducer (MB-SPCE) in a simple one step fabrication process. The reagentless biosensor was used with amperometry in stirred solution at an applied potential of +0.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). All experiments were carried out at the following conditions: pH 7, temperature 37 °C, atmosphere 5% CO{sub 2}. The linear range of the device was found to be 25–125 μM in phosphate buffer (75 mM, containing 0.05 M NaCl) and 25–150 μM in cell culture medium. The limits of detection (LOD) were found to be 1.2 μM and 4.2 μM based on three times signal to noise, using PBS and culture medium respectively. The sensitivity was calculated to be 106 nA μM{sup −1} cm{sup −2} and 210 nA μM{sup −1} cm{sup −2} in PBS and cell medium respectively. The response time was ∼60 s in an agitated solution. HepG2 cells were exposed to various concentrations of paracetamol (1 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM) in order to investigate the drug-induced release of glutamate into the culture medium in real time. Two toxicity studies were investigated using different methods of exposure and analysis. The first method consisted of a single measurement of the glutamate concentration, using the method of standard addition, after 24 h incubation. The concentrations of glutamate were found to be 52 μM, 93 μM and 177 μM, released on exposure to 1 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM paracetamol respectively. The second method involved the

  20. A novel reagentless glutamate microband biosensor for real-time cell toxicity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, G.; Pemberton, R.M.; Fielden, P.R.; Hart, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    A reagentless glutamate biosensor was applied to the determination of glutamate released from liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) in response to toxic challenge from various concentrations of paracetamol. A screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE) containing the electrocatalyst Meldola's Blue (MB-SPCE) served as the electron mediator for the oxidation of NADH. A mixture of the enzyme glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), cofactor nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD"+) and the biopolymer chitosan (CHIT) were drop-coated onto the surface of the transducer (MB-SPCE) in a simple one step fabrication process. The reagentless biosensor was used with amperometry in stirred solution at an applied potential of +0.1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl). All experiments were carried out at the following conditions: pH 7, temperature 37 °C, atmosphere 5% CO_2. The linear range of the device was found to be 25–125 μM in phosphate buffer (75 mM, containing 0.05 M NaCl) and 25–150 μM in cell culture medium. The limits of detection (LOD) were found to be 1.2 μM and 4.2 μM based on three times signal to noise, using PBS and culture medium respectively. The sensitivity was calculated to be 106 nA μM"−"1 cm"−"2 and 210 nA μM"−"1 cm"−"2 in PBS and cell medium respectively. The response time was ∼60 s in an agitated solution. HepG2 cells were exposed to various concentrations of paracetamol (1 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM) in order to investigate the drug-induced release of glutamate into the culture medium in real time. Two toxicity studies were investigated using different methods of exposure and analysis. The first method consisted of a single measurement of the glutamate concentration, using the method of standard addition, after 24 h incubation. The concentrations of glutamate were found to be 52 μM, 93 μM and 177 μM, released on exposure to 1 mM, 5 mM and 10 mM paracetamol respectively. The second method involved the continuous monitoring of glutamate

  1. The glutamate-glutamine(GABA cycle: importance of late postnatal development and potential reciprocal interactions between biosynthesis and degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif eHertz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The gold standard for studies of glutamate-glutamine(GABA cycling and its connections to brain biosynthesis from glucose of glutamate and GABA and their subsequent metabolism are the elegant in vivo studies by 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR, showing the large fluxes in the cycle. However, simpler experiments in intact brain tissue (e.g. immunohistochemistry, brain slices, cultured brain cells and mitochondria have also made important contributions to the understanding of details, mechanisms and functional consequences of glutamate/GABA biosynthesis and degradation. The purpose of this review is to attempt to integrate evidence from different sources regarding i the enzyme(s responsible for the initial conversion of -ketoglutarate to glutamate; ii the possibility that especially glutamate oxidation is essentially confined to astrocytes; and iii the ontogenetically very late onset and maturation of glutamine-glutamate(GABA cycle function. Pathway models based on the functional importance of aspartate for glutamate synthesis suggest the possibility of interacting pathways for biosynthesis and degradation of glutamate and GABA and the use of transamination as the default mechanism for initiation of glutamate oxidation. The late development and maturation are related to the late cortical gliogenesis and convert brain cortical function from being purely neuronal to becoming neuronal-astrocytic. This conversion is associated with huge increases in energy demand and production, and the character of potentially incurred gains of function are discussed. These may include alterations in learning mechanisms, in mice indicated by lack of pairing of odor learning with aversive stimuli in newborn animals but the development of such an association 10-12 days later. The possibility is suggested that analogous maturational changes may contribute to differences in the way learning is accomplished in the newborn human brain and during later development.

  2. Involvement of spinal glutamate transporter-1 in the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia associated with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi J

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Jinshan Shi,1,* Ke Jiang,2,* Zhaoduan Li,3 1Department of Anesthesiology, Guizhou Provincial People’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Tianjin Nankai Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Little is known about the effects of the development of type 2 diabetes on glutamate homeostasis in the spinal cord. Therefore, we quantified the extracellular levels of glutamate in the spinal cord of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rats using in vivo microdialysis. In addition, protein levels of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were measured using Western blot. Finally, the effects of repeated intrathecal injections of ceftriaxone, which was previously shown to enhance GLT-1 expression, on the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia as well as on basal extracellular level of glutamate and the expression of GLT-1 in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were evaluated. It was found that ZDF rats developed mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia, which were associated with increased basal extracellular levels of glutamate and attenuated levels of GLT-1 expression in the spinal cord, particularly in the dorsal horn. Furthermore, repeated intrathecal administrations of ceftriaxone dose-dependently prevented the development of mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia in ZDF rats, which were correlated with enhanced GLT-1 expression without altering the basal glutamate levels in the spinal cord of ZDF rats. Overall, the results suggested that impaired glutamate reuptake in the spinal cord may contribute to the development of neuropathic pains in type 2 diabetes. Keywords: diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, spinal cord, Zucker diabetic fatty rats, glutamate, glutamate transporter-1

  3. Escitalopram alters gene expression and HPA axis reactivity in rats following chronic overexpression of corticotropin-releasing factor from the central amygdala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flandreau, Elizabeth I.; Bourke, Chase H.; Ressler, Kerry J.; Vale, Wylie W.; Nemeroff, Charles B.; Owens, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary We have previously demonstrated that viral-mediated overexpression of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) within the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) reproduces many of the behavioral and endocrine consequences of chronic stress. The present experiment sought to determine whether administration of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) escitalopram reverses the adverse effects of CeA CRF overexpression. In a 2 × 2 design, adult male rats received bilateral infusions of a control lentivirus or a lentivirus in which a portion of the CRF promoter is used to drive increased expression of CRF peptide. Four weeks later, rats were then implanted with an Alzet minipump to deliver vehicle or 10 mg/kg/day escitalopram for a 4-week period of time. The defensive withdrawal (DW) test of anxiety and the sucrose-preference test (SPT) of anhedonia were performed both before and after pump implantation. Additional post-implant behavioral tests included the elevated plus maze (EPM) and social interaction (SI) test. Following completion of behavioral testing, the dexamethasone/CRF test was performed to assess HPA axis reactivity. Brains were collected and expression of HPA axis-relevant transcripts were measured using in situ hybridization. Amygdalar CRF overexpression increased anxiety-like behavior in the DW test at week eight, which was only partially prevented by escitalopram. In both CRF-overexpressing and control groups, escitalopram decreased hippocampal CRF expression while increasing hypothalamic and hippocampal expression of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). These gene expression changes were associated with a significant decrease in HPA axis reactivity in rats treated with escitalopram. Interestingly, escitalopram increased the rate of weight gain only in rats overexpressing CRF. Overall these data support our hypothesis that amygdalar CRF is critical in anxiety-like behavior; because the antidepressant was unable to reverse behavioral

  4. Specificity of exogenous acetate and glutamate as astrocyte substrates examined in acute brain slices from female mice using methionine sulfoximine (MSO) to inhibit glutamine synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Velde; McNair, Laura Frendrup; Schousboe, Arne

    2017-01-01

    Removal of endogenously released glutamate is mediated primarily by astrocytes and exogenous (13) C-labeled glutamate has been applied to study glutamate metabolism in astrocytes. Likewise, studies have clearly established the relevance of (13) C-labeled acetate as an astrocyte specific metabolic...... cortical slices from female NMRI mice were incubated in media containing [1,2-(13) C]acetate or [U-(13) C]glutamate, with or without methionine sulfoximine (MSO) to inhibit glutamine synthetase (GS). Tissue extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Blocking GS abolished the majority...... of glutamine (13) C-labeling from [1,2-(13) C]acetate as intended. However, (13) C-labeling of GABA was only 40-50% reduced by MSO, suggesting considerable neuronal uptake of acetate. Moreover, labeling of glutamate from [1,2-(13) C]acetate in the presence of MSO exceeded the level probable from exclusive...

  5. Opioid modulation of GABA release in the rat inferior colliculus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forge Andrew

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inferior colliculus, which receives almost all ascending and descending auditory signals, plays a crucial role in the processing of auditory information. While the majority of the recorded activities in the inferior colliculus are attributed to GABAergic and glutamatergic signalling, other neurotransmitter systems are expressed in this brain area including opiate peptides and their receptors which may play a modulatory role in neuronal communication. Results Using a perfusion protocol we demonstrate that morphine can inhibit KCl-induced release of [3H]GABA from rat inferior colliculus slices. DAMGO ([D-Ala(2, N-Me-Phe(4, Gly(5-ol]-enkephalin but not DADLE ([D-Ala2, D-Leu5]-enkephalin or U69593 has the same effect as morphine indicating that μ rather than δ or κ opioid receptors mediate this action. [3H]GABA release was diminished by 16%, and this was not altered by the protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I. Immunostaining of inferior colliculus cryosections shows extensive staining for glutamic acid decarboxylase, more limited staining for μ opiate receptors and relatively few neurons co-stained for both proteins. Conclusion The results suggest that μ-opioid receptor ligands can modify neurotransmitter release in a sub population of GABAergic neurons of the inferior colliculus. This could have important physiological implications in the processing of hearing information and/or other functions attributed to the inferior colliculus such as audiogenic seizures and aversive behaviour.

  6. Opioid modulation of GABA release in the rat inferior colliculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongjaroenbungam, Walaiporn; Jongkamonwiwat, Nopporn; Cunningham, Joanna; Phansuwan-Pujito, Pansiri; Dodson, Hilary C; Forge, Andrew; Govitrapong, Piyarat; Casalotti, Stefano O

    2004-01-01

    Background The inferior colliculus, which receives almost all ascending and descending auditory signals, plays a crucial role in the processing of auditory information. While the majority of the recorded activities in the inferior colliculus are attributed to GABAergic and glutamatergic signalling, other neurotransmitter systems are expressed in this brain area including opiate peptides and their receptors which may play a modulatory role in neuronal communication. Results Using a perfusion protocol we demonstrate that morphine can inhibit KCl-induced release of [3H]GABA from rat inferior colliculus slices. DAMGO ([D-Ala(2), N-Me-Phe(4), Gly(5)-ol]-enkephalin) but not DADLE ([D-Ala2, D-Leu5]-enkephalin or U69593 has the same effect as morphine indicating that μ rather than δ or κ opioid receptors mediate this action. [3H]GABA release was diminished by 16%, and this was not altered by the protein kinase C inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide I. Immunostaining of inferior colliculus cryosections shows extensive staining for glutamic acid decarboxylase, more limited staining for μ opiate receptors and relatively few neurons co-stained for both proteins. Conclusion The results suggest that μ-opioid receptor ligands can modify neurotransmitter release in a sub population of GABAergic neurons of the inferior colliculus. This could have important physiological implications in the processing of hearing information and/or other functions attributed to the inferior colliculus such as audiogenic seizures and aversive behaviour. PMID:15353008

  7. The oxidative stress-inducible cystine/glutamate antiporter, system x (c) (-) : cystine supplier and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Marcus; Sato, Hideyo

    2012-01-01

    The oxidative stress-inducible cystine/glutamate exchange system, system x (c) (-) , transports one molecule of cystine, the oxidized form of cysteine, into cells and thereby releases one molecule of glutamate into the extracellular space. It consists of two protein components, the 4F2 heavy chain, necessary for membrane location of the heterodimer, and the xCT protein, responsible for transport activity. Previously, system x (c) (-) has been regarded to be a mere supplier of cysteine to cells for the synthesis of proteins and the antioxidant glutathione (GSH). In that sense, oxygen, electrophilic agents, and bacterial lipopolysaccharide trigger xCT expression to accommodate with increased oxidative stress by stimulating GSH biosynthesis. However, emerging evidence established that system x (c) (-) may act on its own as a GSH-independent redox system by sustaining a redox cycle over the plasma membrane. Hallmarks of this cycle are cystine uptake, intracellular reduction to cysteine and secretion of the surplus of cysteine into the extracellular space. Consequently, increased levels of extracellular cysteine provide a reducing microenvironment required for proper cell signaling and communication, e.g. as already shown for the mechanism of T cell activation. By contrast, the enhanced release of glutamate in exchange with cystine may trigger neurodegeneration due to glutamate-induced cytotoxic processes. This review aims to provide a comprehensive picture from the early days of system x (c) (-) research up to now.

  8. Development of paradigm for the study of amino acid neurotransmitter release in human autopsy brain samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, K.-W.; Dodd, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: This study attempted to establish a release protocol to characterize both the vesicular and cytoplasmic components of amino acid transmitter release in human synaptosomes. Experiments with rat synaptosomes showed that, with depolarizing concentrations of K + ions, vesicular release could be successfully differentiated from cytoplasmic release for preloaded L-[ 3 H ]glutamate and [ 14 C ]GABA. However, human tissue studies did not give clear-cut results. Experiments were carried out to optimize the release paradigm as well as to improve the vesicular uptake of labeled transmitters. A 'pulse- chase' protocol, with an unlabelled D-aspartate chase, was performed in human tissue samples in order to enhance the L-[ 3 H ] glutamate release signal derived from exocytosis by removing the cytoplasmic pool of L-[ 3 H ] glutamate first. However, the results showed that total release was not enhanced effectively in comparison with the non-pulse-chase protocol. In brief, the pulse-chase protocol did not build up the vesicular pool of L-[ 3 H ]glutamate, though the cytoplasmic L- [ 3 H ] glutamate pool was effectively depressed by D-aspartate. Further studies applied 4- aminopyridine (4-AP) to trigger release, to circumvent the problem of the reversal of plasma membrane transporters caused by raised K + ion concentrations. The results showed that the application of 4-AP elicited the release of amino acid transmitters from rat synaptosomes, but failed to produce successful release signals in the human tissue experiments. Our findings suggest that the vesicular compartment may be impaired by freezing and affected by post-mortem delay (PMD). Rat studies showed that the freezing step had a major effect on Ca 2+-dependent release, as less L- [3 H ]glutamate and [ 14 C ]GABA were released from the frozen rat tissue preparations. Moreover, there was an indication of a decline in L-[ 3 H ]glutamate release with increasing PMD. Copyright (2001) Australian Neuroscience Society

  9. The Degradation of 14C-Glutamic Acid by L-Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Charles M; Dayan, Jean

    1982-01-01

    Describes procedures and semi-micro reaction apparatus (carbon dioxide trap) to demonstrate how a particular enzyme (L-Glutamic acid decarboxylase) may be used to determine the site or sites of labeling in its substrate (carbon-14 labeled glutamic acid). Includes calculations, solutions, and reagents used. (Author/SK)

  10. The application of glutamic acid alpha-decarboxylase for the valorization of glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, T.M.; Biase, De Daniela; Franssen, M.C.R.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    Glutamic acid is an important constituent of waste streams from biofuels production. It is an interesting starting material for the synthesis of nitrogen containing bulk chemicals, thereby decreasing the dependency on fossil fuels. On the pathway from glutamic acid to a range of molecules, the

  11. Mechanism of S100b release from rat cortical slices determined under basal and stimulated conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, Murat; Büyükuysal, R Levent

    2010-03-01

    Incubation of rat cortical slices in a medium that was not containing oxygen and glucose (oxygen-glucose deprivation, OGD) caused a 200% increase in the release of S100B. However, when slices were transferred to a medium containing oxygen and glucose (reoxygenation conditions, or REO), S100B release reached 500% of its control value. Neither inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase by L-NAME nor addition of the NO donors sodium nitroprussid (SNP) or hydroxylamine (HA) to the medium altered basal S100B release. Similarly, the presence of SNP, HA or NO precursor L: -arginine in the medium, or inhibition of NO synthase by L-NAME also failed to alter OGD- and REO-induced S100B outputs. Moreover, individual inhibition of PKC, PLA(2) or PLC all failed to attenuate the S100B release determined under control condition or enhanced by either OGD or REO. Blockade of calcium channels with verapamil, chelating the Ca(+2) ions with BAPTA or blockade of sodium channels with tetrodotoxin (TTX) did not alter OGD- and REO-induced S100B release. In contrast to the pharmacologic manipulations mentioned above, glutamate and alpha-ketoglutarate added at high concentrations to the medium prevented both OGD- and REO-induced S100B outputs. These results indicate that neither NO nor the activation of PKC, PLA(2) or PLC seem to be involved in basal or OGD- and REO-induced S100B outputs. Additionally, calcium and sodium currents that are sensitive to verapamil and TTX, respectively, are unlikely to contribute to the enhanced S100B release observed under these conditions.

  12. Disturbed mitochondrial function restricts glutamate uptake in the human Müller glia cell line, MIO-M1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohra, Rupali; Gurubaran, Iswariyaraja Sridevi; Henriksen, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    Using the human Müller cell line, MIO-M1, the aim was to study the impact of mitochondrial inhibition in Müller glia through antimycin A treatment. MIO-M1 cell survival, levels of released lactate, mitochondrial function, and glutamate uptake were studied in response to mitochondrial inhibition...... and glucose restriction. Lactate release decreased in response to glucose restriction. Combined glucose restriction and blocked mitochondrial activity decreased survival and caused collapse of the respiratory chain measured by oxygen consumption rate and extracellular acidification rate. Mitochondrial...... inhibition caused impaired glutamate uptake and decreased mRNA expression of the glutamate transporter, EAAT1. Over all, we show important roles of mitochondrial activity in MIO-M1 cell function and survival....

  13. Synaptosomal transport of radiolabel from N-acetyl-aspartyl-(/sup 3/H)glutamate suggests a mechanism of inactivation of an excitatory neuropeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blakely, R D; Ory-Lavollee, L; Thompson, R C; Coyle, J T

    1986-10-01

    This study was undertaken to explore in synaptosomal preparations the disposition of N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate (NAAG), an endogenous acidic dipeptide neurotransmitter candidate. Radiolabel from N-acetyl-aspartyl(/sup 3/H)glutamate was taken up rapidly into an osmotically sensitive compartment by rat brain synaptosomal preparations in a sodium-, temperature-, and time-dependent manner. HPLC analysis of the accumulated radiolabel indicated that the bulk of the tritium cochromatographed with glutamic acid and not with NAAG. In contrast, (/sup 14/C)NAAG, labeled on the N-terminal acetate, was not taken up by the synaptosomal preparation. All effective inhibitors of synaptosomal, Na+-dependent (/sup 3/H)glutamate uptake were found to exhibit similar potency in inhibiting uptake of tritium derived from (/sup 3/H)NAAG. However, certain alpha-linked acidic dipeptides, structurally similar to NAAG, as well as the potent convulsant quisqualic acid inhibited synaptosomal transport of (/sup 3/H)NAAG but were ineffective as inhibitors of (/sup 3/H)glutamate transport. Together with a demonstration of disparities between the regional accumulation of radiolabel from (/sup 3/H)NAAG and high-affinity (/sup 3/H)glutamate uptake, these data suggest the presence in brain of a specific peptidase targeting carboxy-terminal glutamate-containing dipeptides that may be coupled to the Na+-dependent glutamate transporter. These findings provide a possible mechanism for NAAG inactivation subsequent to its release from nerve endings.

  14. Pre-Ischemic Treadmill Training for Prevention of Ischemic Brain Injury via Regulation of Glutamate and Its Transporter GLT-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingchun Guo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Pre-ischemic treadmill training exerts cerebral protection in the prevention of cerebral ischemia by alleviating neurotoxicity induced by excessive glutamate release following ischemic stroke. However, the underlying mechanism of this process remains unclear. Cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury was observed in a rat model after 2 weeks of pre-ischemic treadmill training. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected using the microdialysis sampling method, and the concentration of glutamate was determined every 40 min from the beginning of ischemia to 4 h after reperfusion with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC-fluorescence detection. At 3, 12, 24, and 48 h after ischemia, the expression of the glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 protein in brain tissues was determined by Western blot respectively. The effect of pre-ischemic treadmill training on glutamate concentration and GLT-1 expression after cerebral ischemia in rats along with changes in neurobehavioral score and cerebral infarct volume after 24 h ischemia yields critical information necessary to understand the protection mechanism exhibited by pre-ischemic treadmill training. The results demonstrated that pre-ischemic treadmill training up-regulates GLT-1 expression, decreases extracellular glutamate concentration, reduces cerebral infarct volume, and improves neurobehavioral score. Pre-ischemic treadmill training is likely to induce neuroprotection after cerebral ischemia by regulating GLT-1 expression, which results in re-uptake of excessive glutamate.

  15. Green Tea Polyphenols Attenuated Glutamate Excitotoxicity via Antioxidative and Antiapoptotic Pathway in the Primary Cultured Cortical Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Cong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Green tea polyphenols are a natural product which has antioxidative and antiapoptotic effects. It has been shown that glutamate excitotoxicity induced oxidative stress is linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease. In this study we explored the neuroprotective effect of green teen polyphenols against glutamate excitotoxicity in the primary cultured cortical neurons. We found that green tea polyphenols protected against glutamate induced neurotoxicity in the cortical neurons as measured by MTT and TUNEL assays. Green tea polyphenols were then showed to inhibit the glutamate induced ROS release and SOD activity reduction in the neurons. Furthermore, our results demonstrated that green tea polyphenols restored the dysfunction of mitochondrial pro- or antiapoptotic proteins Bax, Bcl-2, and caspase-3 caused by glutamate. Interestingly, the neuroprotective effect of green tea polyphenols was abrogated when the neurons were incubated with siBcl-2. Taken together, these results demonstrated that green tea polyphenols protected against glutamate excitotoxicity through antioxidative and antiapoptotic pathways.

  16. Towards a glutamate hypothesis of depression: an emerging frontier of neuropsychopharmacology for mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanacora, Gerard; Treccani, Giulia; Popoli, Maurizio

    2012-01-01

    Half a century after the first formulation of the monoamine hypothesis, compelling evidence implies that long-term changes in an array of brain areas and circuits mediating complex cognitive-emotional behaviors represent the biological underpinnings of mood/anxiety disorders. A large number of clinical studies suggest that pathophysiology is associated with dysfunction of the predominant glutamatergic system, malfunction in the mechanisms regulating clearance and metabolism of glutamate, and cytoarchitectural/morphological maladaptive changes in a number of brain areas mediating cognitive-emotional behaviors. Concurrently, a wealth of data from animal models have shown that different types of environmental stress enhance glutamate release/transmission in limbic/cortical areas and exert powerful structural effects, inducing dendritic remodeling, reduction of synapses and possibly volumetric reductions resembling those observed in depressed patients. Because a vast majority of neurons and synapses in these areas and circuits use glutamate as neurotransmitter, it would be limiting to maintain that glutamate is in some way 'involved' in mood/anxiety disorders; rather it should be recognized that the glutamatergic system is a primary mediator of psychiatric pathology and, potentially, also a final common pathway for the therapeutic action of antidepressant agents. A paradigm shift from a monoamine hypothesis of depression to a neuroplasticity hypothesis focused on glutamate may represent a substantial advancement in the working hypothesis that drives research for new drugs and therapies. Importantly, despite the availability of multiple classes of drugs with monoamine-based mechanisms of action, there remains a large percentage of patients who fail to achieve a sustained remission of depressive symptoms. The unmet need for improved pharmacotherapies for treatment-resistant depression means there is a large space for the development of new compounds with novel mechanisms

  17. Effects of treadmill running on extracellular basal levels of glutamate and GABA at dentate gyrus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisi, Parham; Alaei, Hojjatallah; Babri, Shirin; Sharifi, Mohammad Reza; Mohaddes, Gisue; Soleimannejad, Elaheh; Rashidi, Bahman

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The present study evaluated the effects of treadmill running on extracellular basal levels of glutamate and GABA at dentate gyrus of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. METHODS: After 12 weeks of diabetes induction and exercise period, extracellular levels of glutamate and GABA were investigated. RESULTS: The results showed that glutamate levels were significantly decreased in diabetes-rest group comparing to the control-rest and the diabetes-exercise groups. CONCLUSIONS: The findings support the possibility that treadmill running is helpful in alleviating neurotransmitter homeostasis and alterations in transmission in diabetes mellitus. PMID:21526077

  18. Anorexigenic Lipopeptides Ameliorate Central Insulin Signaling and Attenuate Tau Phosphorylation in Hippocampi of Mice with Monosodium Glutamate-Induced Obesity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Špolcová, Andrea; Mikulášková, Barbora; Holubová, Martina; Nagelová, Veronika; Pirník, Zdenko; Zemenová, Jana; Haluzík, M.; Železná, Blanka; Galas, M. C.; Maletínská, Lenka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 3 (2015), s. 823-835 ISSN 1387-2877 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP303/12/0576 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Alzheimer's disease * insulin signaling * liraglutide * monosodium glutamate-obese mice * obesity * pre- diabetes * prolactin-releasing peptide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.920, year: 2015

  19. A neuroprotective role for microRNA miR-1000 mediated by limiting glutamate excitotoxicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verma, Pushpa; Augustine, George J; Ammar, Mohamed-Raafet

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has begun to emerge for microRNAs as regulators of synaptic signaling, specifically acting to control postsynaptic responsiveness during synaptic transmission. In this report, we provide evidence that Drosophila melanogaster miR-1000 acts presynaptically to regulate glutamate release at ...... a neuroprotective function in the brains of flies and mice. Drosophila miR-1000 showed activity-dependent expression, which might serve as a mechanism to allow neuronal activity to fine-tune the strength of excitatory synaptic transmission....

  20. Euglycemia Restoration by Central Leptin in Type 1 Diabetes Requires STAT3 Signaling but Not Fast-Acting Neurotransmitter Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuanzhong; Chang, Jeffrey T; Myers, Martin G; Xu, Yong; Tong, Qingchun

    2016-04-01

    Central leptin action is sufficient to restore euglycemia in insulinopenic type 1 diabetes (T1D); however, the underlying mechanism remains poorly understood. To examine the role of intracellular signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathways, we used LepRs/s mice with disrupted leptin-phosphorylated STAT3 signaling to test the effect of central leptin on euglycemia restoration. These mice developed streptozocin-induced T1D, which was surprisingly not associated with hyperglucagonemia, a typical manifestation in T1D. Further, leptin action on euglycemia restoration was abrogated in these mice, which was associated with refractory hypercorticosteronemia. To examine the role of fast-acting neurotransmitters glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), two major neurotransmitters in the brain, from leptin receptor (LepR) neurons, we used mice with disrupted release of glutamate, GABA, or both from LepR neurons. Surprisingly, all mice responded normally to leptin-mediated euglycemia restoration, which was associated with expected correction from hyperglucagonemia and hyperphagia. In contrast, mice with loss of glutamate and GABA appeared to develop an additive obesity effect over those with loss of single neurotransmitter release. Thus, our study reveals that STAT3 signaling, but not fast-acting neurotransmitter release, is required for leptin action on euglycemia restoration and that hyperglucagonemia is not required for T1D. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  1. Agmatine reduces extracellular glutamate during pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in rat brain: A potential mechanism for the anticonvulsive effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yangzheng; LeBlanc, Michael H.; Regunathan, Soundar

    2010-01-01

    Glutamate has been implicated in the initiation and spread of seizure activity. Agmatine, an endogenous neuromodulator, is an antagonist of NMDA receptors and has anticonvulsive effects. Whether agmatine regulate glutamate release, as measured by in vivo microdialysis, is not known. In this study, we used pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure model to determine the effect of agmatine on extracellular glutamate in rat brain. We also determined the time course and the amount of agmatine that reached brain after peripheral injection. After i.p. injection of agmatine (50 mg/kg), increase of agmatine in rat cortex and hippocampus was observed in 15 min with levels returning to baseline in one hour. Rats, naïve and implanted with microdialysis cannula into the cortex, were administered PTZ (60 mg/kg, i.p.) with prior injection of agmatine (100 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline. Seizure grades were recorded and microdialysis samples were collected every 15 min for 75 min. Agmatine pre-treatment significantly reduced the seizure grade and increased the onset time. The levels of extracellular glutamate in frontal cortex rose two- to three-fold after PTZ injection and agmatine significantly inhibited this increase. In conclusion, the present data suggest that the anticonvulsant activity of agmatine, in part, could be related to the inhibition glutamate release. PMID:16125317

  2. Impaired RNA splicing of 5'-regulatory sequences of the astroglial glutamate transporter EAAT2 in human astrocytoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Münch, C.; Penndorf, A.; Schwalenstöcker, B.; Troost, D.; Ludolph, A. C.; Ince, P.; Meyer, T.

    2001-01-01

    A loss of the glutamate transporter EAAT2 has been reported in the neoplastic transformation of astrocytic cells and astrocytoma. The RNA expression of EAAT2 and five 5'-regulatory splice variants was investigated to identify alterations of the post-transcriptional EAAT2 gene regulation in human

  3. Glutamate Efflux at the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cederberg-Helms, Hans Christian; Uhd-Nielsen, Carsten; Brodin, Birger

    2014-01-01

    is well known, however endothelial cells may also play an important role through mediating brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux. Expression of excitatory amino acid transporters has been demonstrated in brain endothelial cells of bovine, human, murine, rat and porcine origin. These can account for high...... affinity concentrative uptake of L-glutamate from the brain interstitial fluid into the capillary endothelial cells. The mechanisms in between L-glutamate uptake in the endothelial cells and L-glutamate appearing in the blood are still unclear and may involve a luminal transporter for L......-glutamate, metabolism of L-glutamate and transport of metabolites or a combination of the two. However, both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated blood-to-brain transport of L-glutamate, at least during pathological events. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux...

  4. GABA and glutamate in schizophrenia: a 7 T ¹H-MRS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsman, Anouk; Mandl, René C W; Klomp, Dennis W J; Bohlken, Marc M; Boer, Vincent O; Andreychenko, Anna; Cahn, Wiepke; Kahn, René S; Luijten, Peter R; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia is characterized by loss of brain volume, which may represent an ongoing pathophysiological process. This loss of brain volume may be explained by reduced neuropil rather than neuronal loss, suggesting abnormal synaptic plasticity and cortical microcircuitry. A possible mechanism is hypofunction of the NMDA-type of glutamate receptor, which reduces the excitation of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, resulting in a disinhibition of glutamatergic pyramidal neurons. Disinhibition of pyramidal cells may result in excessive stimulation by glutamate, which in turn could cause neuronal damage or death through excitotoxicity. In this study, GABA/creatine ratios, and glutamate, NAA, creatine and choline concentrations in the prefrontal and parieto-occipital cortices were measured in 17 patients with schizophrenia and 23 healthy controls using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at an ultra-high magnetic field strength of 7 T. Significantly lower GABA/Cr ratios were found in patients with schizophrenia in the prefrontal cortex as compared to healthy controls, with GABA/Cr ratios inversely correlated with cognitive functioning in the patients. No significant change in the GABA/Cr ratio was found between patients and controls in the parieto-occipital cortex, nor were levels of glutamate, NAA, creatine, and choline differed in patients and controls in the prefrontal and parieto-occipital cortices. Our findings support a mechanism involving altered GABA levels distinguished from glutamate levels in the medial prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia, particularly in high functioning patients. A (compensatory) role for GABA through altered inhibitory neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex may be ongoing in (higher functioning) patients with schizophrenia.

  5. Glutamate and GABA in autism spectrum disorder-a translational magnetic resonance spectroscopy study in man and rodent models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horder, Jamie; Petrinovic, Marija M; Mendez, Maria A; Bruns, Andreas; Takumi, Toru; Spooren, Will; Barker, Gareth J; Künnecke, Basil; Murphy, Declan G

    2018-05-25

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a pervasive neurodevelopmental syndrome with a high human and economic burden. The pathophysiology of ASD is largely unclear, thus hampering development of pharmacological treatments for the core symptoms of the disorder. Abnormalities in glutamate and GABA signaling have been hypothesized to underlie ASD symptoms, and may form a therapeutic target, but it is not known whether these abnormalities are recapitulated in humans with ASD, as well as in rodent models of the disorder. We used translational proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ([1H]MRS) to compare glutamate and GABA levels in adult humans with ASD and in a panel of six diverse rodent ASD models, encompassing genetic and environmental etiologies. [1H]MRS was performed in the striatum and the medial prefrontal cortex, of the humans, mice, and rats in order to allow for direct cross-species comparisons in specific cortical and subcortical brain regions implicated in ASD. In humans with ASD, glutamate concentration was reduced in the striatum and this was correlated with the severity of social symptoms. GABA levels were not altered in either brain region. The reduction in striatal glutamate was recapitulated in mice prenatally exposed to valproate, and in mice and rats carrying Nlgn3 mutations, but not in rodent ASD models with other etiologies. Our findings suggest that glutamate/GABA abnormalities in the corticostriatal circuitry may be a key pathological mechanism in ASD; and may be linked to alterations in the neuroligin-neurexin signaling complex.

  6. The Nucleus Accumbens: Mechanisms of Addiction across Drug Classes Reflect the Importance of Glutamate Homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinsbroek, J. A.; Gipson, C. D.; Kupchik, Y. M.; Spencer, S.; Smith, A. C. W.; Roberts-Wolfe, D.; Kalivas, P. W.

    2016-01-01

    The nucleus accumbens is a major input structure of the basal ganglia and integrates information from cortical and limbic structures to mediate goal-directed behaviors. Chronic exposure to several classes of drugs of abuse disrupts plasticity in this region, allowing drug-associated cues to engender a pathologic motivation for drug seeking. A number of alterations in glutamatergic transmission occur within the nucleus accumbens after withdrawal from chronic drug exposure. These drug-induced neuroadaptations serve as the molecular basis for relapse vulnerability. In this review, we focus on the role that glutamate signal transduction in the nucleus accumbens plays in addiction-related behaviors. First, we explore the nucleus accumbens, including the cell types and neuronal populations present as well as afferent and efferent connections. Next we discuss rodent models of addiction and assess the viability of these models for testing candidate pharmacotherapies for the prevention of relapse. Then we provide a review of the literature describing how synaptic plasticity in the accumbens is altered after exposure to drugs of abuse and withdrawal and also how pharmacological manipulation of glutamate systems in the accumbens can inhibit drug seeking in the laboratory setting. Finally, we examine results from clinical trials in which pharmacotherapies designed to manipulate glutamate systems have been effective in treating relapse in human patients. Further elucidation of how drugs of abuse alter glutamatergic plasticity within the accumbens will be necessary for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of addiction across all classes of addictive substances. PMID:27363441

  7. 21 CFR 182.1047 - Glutamic acid hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Glutamic acid hydrochloride. 182.1047 Section 182.1047 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Food Substances § 182.1047 Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (a) Product. Glutamic acid hydrochloride. (b...

  8. Preclinical Models of Traumatic Brain Injury: Emerging Role of Glutamate in the Pathophysiology of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darik A. O’Neil

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available More than 10 million people worldwide incur a traumatic brain injury (TBI each year, with two million cases occurring in the United States. TBI survivors exhibit long-lasting cognitive and affective sequelae that are associated with reduced quality of life and work productivity, as well as mental and emotional disturbances. While TBI-related disabilities often manifest physically and conspicuously, TBI has been linked with a “silent epidemic” of psychological disorders, including major depressive disorder (MDD. The prevalence of MDD post-insult is approximately 50% within the 1st year. Furthermore, given they are often under-reported when mild, TBIs could be a significant overall cause of MDD in the United States. The emergence of MDD post-TBI may be rooted in widespread disturbances in the modulatory role of glutamate, such that glutamatergic signaling becomes excessive and deleterious to neuronal integrity, as reported in both clinical and preclinical studies. Following this acute glutamatergic storm, regulators of glutamatergic function undergo various manipulations, which include, but are not limited to, alterations in glutamatergic subunit composition, release, and reuptake. This review will characterize the glutamatergic functional and signaling changes that emerge and persist following experimental TBI, utilizing evidence from clinical, molecular, and rodent behavioral investigations. Special care will be taken to speculate on how these manipulations may correlate with the development of MDD following injury in the clinic, as well as pharmacotherapies to date. Indisputably, TBI is a significant healthcare issue that warrants discovery and subsequent refinement of therapeutic strategies to improve neurobehavioral recovery and mental health.

  9. Microglia PACAP and glutamate: Friends or foes in seizure-induced autonomic dysfunction and SUDEP?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandare, Amol M; Kapoor, Komal; Farnham, Melissa M J; Pilowsky, Paul M

    2016-06-01

    Seizure-induced cardiorespiratory autonomic dysfunction is a major cause of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP), and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Seizures lead to increased synthesis, and release of glutamate, pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), and other neurotransmitters, and cause extensive activation of microglia at multiple regions in the brain including central autonomic cardiorespiratory brainstem nuclei. Glutamate contributes to neurodegeneration, and inflammation in epilepsy. PACAP has neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties, whereas microglia are key players in inflammatory responses in CNS. Seizure-induced increase in PACAP is neuroprotective. PACAP produces neuroprotective effects acting on microglial PAC1 and VPAC1 receptors. Microglia also express glutamate transporters, and their expression can be increased by PACAP in response to harmful or stressful situations such as seizures. Here we discuss the mechanism of autonomic cardiorespiratory dysfunction in seizure, and the role of PACAP, glutamate and microglia in regulating cardiorespiratory brainstem neurons in their physiological state that could provide future therapeutic options for SUDEP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Lipoic acid effects on glutamate and taurine concentrations in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P S Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pilocarpine-induced seizures can be mediated by increases in oxidative stress and by cerebral amino acid changes. The present research suggests that antioxidant compounds may afford some level of neuroprotection against the neurotoxicity of seizures in cellular level. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the lipoic acid (LA effects in glutamate and taurine contents in rat hippocampus after pilocarpine-induced seizures. Wistar rats were treated intraperitoneally (i.p. with 0.9% saline (Control, pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, Pilocarpine, LA (10 mg/kg, LA, and the association of LA (10 mg/kg plus pilocarpine (400 mg/kg, that was injected 30 min before of administration of LA (LA plus pilocarpine. Animals were observed during 24 h. The amino acid concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatograph (HPLC. In pilocarpine group, it was observed a significant increase in glutamate content (37% and a decrease in taurine level (18% in rat hippocampus, when compared to control group. Antioxidant pretreatment significantly reduced the glutamate level (28% and augmented taurine content (32% in rat hippocampus, when compared to pilocarpine group. Our findings strongly support amino acid changes in hippocampus during seizures induced by pilocarpine, and suggest that glutamate-induced brain damage plays a crucial role in pathogenic consequences of seizures, and imply that strong protective effect could be achieved using lipoic acid through the release or decrease in metabolization rate of taurine amino acid during seizures.

  11. L-glutamate Receptor In Paramecium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal-Martínez, Juan; Ortega-Soto, Arturo

    2004-09-01

    Behavioral, electrophysiological and biochemical experiments were performed in order to establish the presence of a glutamate receptor in the ciliate Paramecium. It was found that an AMPA/KA receptor is functionally expressed in Paramecium and that this receptor is immunologically and fillogenetically related to the AMPA/KA receptor present in vertebrates.

  12. Glutamate mediated astrocytic filtering of neuronal activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilad Wallach

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity.

  13. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Jacob, Eshel Ben; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocytes specifically respond to the frequency of neuronal stimulation by intracellular Ca2+ transients, with a clear onset of astrocytic activation at neuron firing rates around 3-5 Hz. The cell-to-cell heterogeneity of the astrocyte Ca2+ response was however large and increasing with stimulation frequency. Astrocytic activation by neurons was abolished with antagonists of type I metabotropic glutamate receptor, validating the glutamate-dependence of this neuron-to-astrocyte pathway. Using a realistic biophysical model of glutamate-based intracellular calcium signaling in astrocytes, we suggest that the stepwise response is due to the supralinear dynamics of intracellular IP3 and that the heterogeneity of the responses may be due to the heterogeneity of the astrocyte-to-astrocyte couplings via gap junction channels. Therefore our results present astrocyte intracellular Ca2+ activity as a nonlinear integrator of glutamate-dependent neuronal activity. PMID:25521344

  14. Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System-based amperometric detection of dopamine, adenosine, and glutamate for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Tye, Susannah J; Bledsoe, Jonathan M; Griessenauer, Christoph J; Kimble, Christopher J; Sieck, Gary C; Bennet, Kevin E; Garris, Paul A; Blaha, Charles D; Lee, Kendall H

    2009-10-01

    In a companion study, the authors describe the development of a new instrument named the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS), which couples digital telemetry with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine. In the present study, the authors describe the extended capability of the WINCS to use fixed potential amperometry (FPA) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine, as well as glutamate and adenosine. Compared with other electrochemical techniques such as FSCV or high-speed chronoamperometry, FPA offers superior temporal resolution and, in combination with enzyme-linked biosensors, the potential to monitor nonelectroactive analytes in real time. The WINCS design incorporated a transimpedance amplifier with associated analog circuitry for FPA; a microprocessor; a Bluetooth transceiver; and a single, battery-powered, multilayer, printed circuit board. The WINCS was tested with 3 distinct recording electrodes: 1) a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to measure dopamine; 2) a glutamate oxidase enzyme-linked electrode to measure glutamate; and 3) a multiple enzyme-linked electrode (adenosine deaminase, nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase) to measure adenosine. Proof-of-principle analyses included noise assessments and in vitro and in vivo measurements that were compared with similar analyses by using a commercial hardwired electrochemical system (EA161 Picostat, eDAQ; Pty Ltd). In urethane-anesthetized rats, dopamine release was monitored in the striatum following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ascending dopaminergic fibers in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). In separate rat experiments, DBS-evoked adenosine release was monitored in the ventrolateral thalamus. To test the WINCS in an operating room setting resembling human neurosurgery, cortical glutamate release in response to motor cortex stimulation (MCS) was monitored using a large-mammal animal model, the pig. The

  15. Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System–based amperometric detection of dopamine, adenosine, and glutamate for intraoperative neurochemical monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnesi, Filippo; Tye, Susannah J.; Bledsoe, Jonathan M.; Griessenauer, Christoph J.; Kimble, Christopher J.; Sieck, Gary C.; Bennet, Kevin E.; Garris, Paul A.; Blaha, Charles D.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2009-01-01

    Object In a companion study, the authors describe the development of a new instrument named the Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration System (WINCS), which couples digital telemetry with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine. In the present study, the authors describe the extended capability of the WINCS to use fixed potential amperometry (FPA) to measure extracellular concentrations of dopamine, as well as glutamate and adenosine. Compared with other electrochemical techniques such as FSCV or high-speed chronoamperometry, FPA offers superior temporal resolution and, in combination with enzyme-linked biosensors, the potential to monitor nonelectroactive analytes in real time. Methods The WINCS design incorporated a transimpedance amplifier with associated analog circuitry for FPA; a microprocessor; a Bluetooth transceiver; and a single, battery-powered, multilayer, printed circuit board. The WINCS was tested with 3 distinct recording electrodes: 1) a carbon-fiber microelectrode (CFM) to measure dopamine; 2) a glutamate oxidase enzyme-linked electrode to measure glutamate; and 3) a multiple enzyme-linked electrode (adenosine deaminase, nucleoside phosphorylase, and xanthine oxidase) to measure adenosine. Proof-of-principle analyses included noise assessments and in vitro and in vivo measurements that were compared with similar analyses by using a commercial hardwired electrochemical system (EA161 Picostat, eDAQ; Pty Ltd). In urethane-anesthetized rats, dopamine release was monitored in the striatum following deep brain stimulation (DBS) of ascending dopaminergic fibers in the medial forebrain bundle (MFB). In separate rat experiments, DBS-evoked adenosine release was monitored in the ventrolateral thalamus. To test the WINCS in an operating room setting resembling human neurosurgery, cortical glutamate release in response to motor cortex stimulation (MCS) was monitored using a large-mammal animal

  16. Sex Differences in Psychiatric Disease: A Focus on the Glutamate System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan M. Wickens

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in glutamate, the primary excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, are implicated in several psychiatric diseases. Many of these psychiatric diseases display epidemiological sex differences, with either males or females exhibiting different symptoms or disease prevalence. However, little work has considered the interaction of disrupted glutamatergic transmission and sex on disease states. This review describes the clinical and preclinical evidence for these sex differences with a focus on two conditions that are more prevalent in women: Alzheimer's disease and major depressive disorder, and three conditions that are more prevalent in men: schizophrenia, autism spectrum disorder, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. These studies reveal sex differences at multiple levels in the glutamate system including metabolic markers, receptor levels, genetic interactions, and therapeutic responses to glutamatergic drugs. Our survey of the current literature revealed a considerable need for more evaluations of sex differences in future studies examining the role of the glutamate system in psychiatric disease. Gaining a more thorough understanding of how sex differences in the glutamate system contribute to psychiatric disease could provide novel avenues for the development of sex-specific pharmacotherapies.

  17. Aberrant modulation of a delayed rectifier potassium channel by glutamate in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulopoulou, Cornelia; Markakis, Ioannis; Davaki, Panagiota; Tsaltas, Eleftheria; Rombos, Antonis; Hatzimanolis, Alexandros; Vassilopoulos, Dimitrios

    2010-02-01

    In Alzheimer's disease (AD), potassium channel abnormalities have been reported in both neural and peripheral tissues. Herein, using whole-cell patch-clamp, we demonstrate an aberrant glutamate-dependent modulation of K(V)1.3 channels in T lymphocytes of AD patients. Although intrinsic K(V)1.3 properties in patients were similar to healthy individuals, glutamate (1-1000 microM) failed to yield the hyperpolarizing shift normally observed in K(V)1.3 steady-state inactivation (-4.4+/-2.7 mV in AD vs. -14.3+/-2.5 mV in controls, 10 microM glutamate), resulting in a 4-fold increase of resting channel activity. Specific agonist and antagonist data indicate that this abnormality is due to dysfunction of cognate group II mGluRs. Given that glutamate is present in plasma and that both mGluRs and K(V)1.3 channels regulate T-lymphocyte responsiveness, our finding may account for the presence of immune-associated alterations in AD. Furthermore, if this aberration reflects a corresponding one in neural tissue, it could provide a potential target in AD pathogenesis.

  18. Independent and additive effects of glutamic acid and methionine on yeast longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ziyun; Song, Lixia; Liu, Shao Quan; Huang, Dejian

    2013-01-01

    It is established that glucose restriction extends yeast chronological and replicative lifespan, but little is known about the influence of amino acids on yeast lifespan, although some amino acids were reported to delay aging in rodents. Here we show that amino acid composition greatly alters yeast chronological lifespan. We found that non-essential amino acids (to yeast) methionine and glutamic acid had the most significant impact on yeast chronological lifespan extension, restriction of methionine and/or increase of glutamic acid led to longevity that was not the result of low acetic acid production and acidification in aging media. Remarkably, low methionine, high glutamic acid and glucose restriction additively and independently extended yeast lifespan, which could not be further extended by buffering the medium (pH 6.0). Our preliminary findings using yeasts with gene deletion demonstrate that glutamic acid addition, methionine and glucose restriction prompt yeast longevity through distinct mechanisms. This study may help to fill a gap in yeast model for the fast developing view that nutrient balance is a critical factor to extend lifespan.

  19. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Bo [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang, Shu [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Lang, Qiaolin [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui [Key Laboratory of Marine Chemistry Theory and Technology of Ministry of Education, Ocean University of China, 238 Songling Road, Qingdao 266100 (China); Liu, Aihua, E-mail: liuah@qibebt.ac.cn [Laboratory for Biosensing, Key Laboratory of Biofuels, and Shandong Provinicial Key Laboratory of Energy Genetics, Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy & Bioprocess Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 189 Songling Road, Qingdao 266101 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2015-07-16

    Highlights: • E. coli surface-dispalyed Gldh exhibiting excellent enzyme activity and stability. • Sensitive amperometric biosensor for glutamate using Gldh-bacteria and MWNTs. • The glutamate biosensor exhibited high specificity and stability. - Abstract: A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP{sup +}-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP{sup +} involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current–time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM–1 mM and 2–10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N = 3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection.

  20. Strontium D-Glutamate Hexahydrate and Strontium Di(hydrogen L-glutamate) Pentahydrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christgau, Stephan; Odderhede, Jette; Stahl, Kenny

    2005-01-01

    Sr(C5H7NO4)] center dot 6H(2)O, ( I), and [Sr(C5H8NO4)(2)] center dot 5H(2)O, (II), both crystallize with similar strontium - glutamate - water layers. In ( I), the neutral layers are connected through hydrogen bonds by water molecules, while in ( II), the positively charged layers are connected...... through hydrogen bonds and electrostatic interactions by interleaving layers of hydrogen glutamate anions and water molecules....

  1. Platelet-activating factor and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors interact for full development and maintenance of long-term potentiation in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Francescangeli, E; Goracci, G; Pettorossi, V E

    1999-01-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the interaction between platelet-activating factor and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors in mediating long-term potentiation within the medial vestibular nuclei. We analysed the N1 field potential wave evoked in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei by primary vestibular afferent stimulation. The group I metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid, prevented long-term potentiation induced by a platelet-activating factor analogue [1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-(methylcarbamyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine], as well as the full development of potentiation, induced by high-frequency stimulation under the blocking agent for synaptosomal platelet-activating factor receptors (ginkolide B), at drug washout. However, potentiation directly induced by the group I glutamate metabotropic receptor agonist, (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine, was reduced by ginkolide B. These findings suggest that platelet-activating factor, whether exogenous or released following potentiation induction, exerts its effect through presynaptic group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, mediating the increase of glutamate release. In addition, we found that this mechanism, which led to full potentiation through presynaptic group I metabotropic glutamate receptor activation, was inactivated soon after application of potentiation-inducing stimulus. In fact, the long-lasting block of the platelet-activating factor and metabotropic glutamate receptors prevented the full potentiation development and the induced potentiation progressively declined to null. Moreover, ginkolide B, given when high-frequency-dependent potentiation was established, only reduced it within 5 min after potentiation induction. We conclude that to fully develop vestibular long-term potentiation requires presynaptic events. Platelet-activating factor, released after the activation of postsynaptic mechanisms which induce potentiation, is necessary

  2. Amperometric L-glutamate biosensor based on bacterial cell-surface displayed glutamate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Bo; Zhang, Shu; Lang, Qiaolin; Song, Jianxia; Han, Lihui; Liu, Aihua

    2015-07-16

    A novel L-glutamate biosensor was fabricated using bacteria surface-displayed glutamate dehydrogenase (Gldh-bacteria). Here the cofactor NADP(+)-specific dependent Gldh was expressed on the surface of Escherichia coli using N-terminal region of ice nucleation protein (INP) as the anchoring motif. The cell fractionation assay and SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the majority of INP-Gldh fusion proteins were located on the surface of cells. The biosensor was fabricated by successively casting polyethyleneimine (PEI)-dispersed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), Gldh-bacteria and Nafion onto the glassy carbon electrode (Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE). The MWNTs could not only significantly lower the oxidation overpotential towards NAPDH, which was the product of NADP(+) involving in the oxidation of glutamate by Gldh, but also enhanced the current response. Under the optimized experimental conditions, the current-time curve of the Nafion/Gldh-bacteria/PEI-MWNTs/GCE was performed at +0.52 V (vs. SCE) by amperometry varying glutamate concentration. The current response was linear with glutamate concentration in two ranges (10 μM-1 mM and 2-10 mM). The low limit of detection was estimated to be 2 μM glutamate (S/N=3). Moreover, the proposed biosensor is stable, specific, reproducible and simple, which can be applied to real samples detection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Microbial production of poly-γ-glutamic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirisansaneeyakul, Sarote; Cao, Mingfeng; Kongklom, Nuttawut; Chuensangjun, Chaniga; Shi, Zhongping; Chisti, Yusuf

    2017-09-05

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a natural, biodegradable and water-soluble biopolymer of glutamic acid. This review is focused on nonrecombinant microbial production of γ-PGA via fermentation processes. In view of its commercial importance, the emphasis is on L-glutamic acid independent producers (i.e. microorganisms that do not require feeding with the relatively expensive amino acid L-glutamic acid to produce γ-PGA), but glutamic acid dependent production is discussed for comparison. Strategies for improving production, reducing costs and using renewable feedstocks are discussed.

  4. Inhibitors of glutamate dehydrogenase block sodium-dependent glutamate uptake in rat brain membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan S Whitelaw

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We recently found evidence for anatomic and physical linkages between the astroglial Na+-dependent glutamate transporters (GLT-1/EAAT2 and GLAST/EAAT1 and mitochondria. In these same studies, we found that the glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH inhibitor, epigallocatechin-monogallate (EGCG, inhibits both glutamate oxidation and Na+-dependent glutamate uptake in astrocytes. In the present study, we extend this finding by exploring the effects of EGCG on Na+-dependent L-[3H]-glutamate (Glu uptake in crude membranes (P2 prepared from rat brain cortex. In this preparation, uptake is almost exclusively mediated by GLT-1. EGCG inhibited L-[3H]-Glu uptake in cortical membranes with an IC50 value of 230 µM. We also studied the effects of two additional inhibitors of GDH, hexachlorophene (HCP and bithionol (BTH. Both of these compounds also caused concentration-dependent inhibition of glutamate uptake in cortical membranes. Pre-incubating with HCP for up to 15 min had no greater effect than that observed with no pre-incubation, showing that the effects occur rapidly. HCP decreased the Vmax for glutamate uptake without changing the Km, consistent with a non-competitive mechanism of action. EGCG, HCP, and BTH also inhibited Na+-dependent transport of D-[3H]-aspartate (Asp, a non-metabolizable substrate, and [3H]-γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA. In contrast to the forebrain, glutamate uptake in crude cerebellar membranes (P2 is likely mediated by GLAST (EAAT1. Therefore, the effects of these compounds were examined in cerebellar membranes. In this region, none of these compounds had any effect on uptake of either L-[3H]-Glu or D-[3H]-Asp, but they all inhibited [3H]-GABA uptake. Together these studies suggest that GDH is preferentially required for glutamate uptake in forebrain as compared to cerebellum, and GDH may be required for GABA uptake as well. They also provide further evidence for a functional linkage between glutamate transport and mitochondria.

  5. Glutamate Transporters in the Blood-Brain Barrier

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian Cederberg; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-01-01

    concentration of L-glutamate causes excitotoxicity. A tight control of the brain interstitial fluid L-glutamate levels is therefore imperative, in order to maintain optimal neurotransmission and to avoid such excitotoxicity. The blood-brain barrier, i.e., the endothelial lining of the brain capillaries...... cells. The mechanisms underlying transendothelial L-glutamate transport are however still not well understood. The present chapter summarizes the current knowledge on blood-brain barrier L-glutamate transporters and the suggested pathways for the brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux......., regulates the exchange of nutrients, gases, and metabolic waste products between plasma and brain interstitial fluid. It has been suggested that brain capillary endothelial cells could play an important role in L-glutamate homeostasis by mediating brain-to-blood L-glutamate efflux. Both in vitro and in vivo...

  6. Targeting Glia with N-Acetylcysteine Modulates Brain Glutamate and Behaviors Relevant to Neurodevelopmental Disorders in C57BL/6J Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durieux, Alice M. S.; Fernandes, Cathy; Murphy, Declan; Labouesse, Marie Anais; Giovanoli, Sandra; Meyer, Urs; Li, Qi; So, Po-Wah; McAlonan, Grainne

    2015-01-01

    An imbalance between excitatory (E) glutamate and inhibitory (I) GABA transmission may underlie neurodevelopmental conditions such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and schizophrenia. This may be direct, through alterations in synaptic genes, but there is increasing evidence for the importance of indirect modulation of E/I balance through glial mechanisms. Here, we used C57BL/6J mice to test the hypothesis that striatal glutamate levels can be shifted by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), which acts at the cystine-glutamate antiporter of glial cells. Striatal glutamate was quantified in vivo using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The effect of NAC on behaviors relevant to ASD was examined in a separate cohort. NAC induced a time-dependent decrease in striatal glutamate, which recapitulated findings of lower striatal glutamate reported in ASD. NAC-treated animals were significantly less active and more anxious in the open field test; and NAC-treated females had significantly impaired prepulse inhibition of startle response. This at least partly mimics greater anxiety and impaired sensorimotor gating reported in neurodevelopmental disorders. Thus glial mechanisms regulate glutamate acutely and have functional consequences even in adulthood. Glial cells may be a potential drug target for the development of new therapies for neurodevelopmental disorders across the life-span. PMID:26696857

  7. Targeting glia with N-Acetylcysteine modulates brain glutamate and behaviours relevant to neurodevelopmental disorders in C57BL/6J mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice Marie Sybille Durieux

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An imbalance between excitatory (E glutamate and inhibitory (I GABA transmission may underlie neurodevelopmental conditions such as Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD and schizophrenia. This may be direct, through alterations in synaptic genes, but there is increasing evidence for the importance of indirect modulation of E/I balance through glial mechanisms. Here we used C57BL/6J mice to test the hypothesis that striatal glutamate levels can be shifted by N-acetylcysteine (NAC, which acts at the cystine-glutamate antiporter of glial cells. Striatal glutamate was quantified in-vivo using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The effect of NAC on behaviours relevant to ASD was examined in a separate cohort. NAC induced a time-dependent decrease in striatal glutamate, which recapitulated findings of lower striatal glutamate reported in ASD. NAC-treated animals were significantly less active and more anxious in the open field test; and NAC-treated females had significantly impaired prepulse inhibition of startle response. This at least partly mimics greater anxiety and impaired sensorimotor gating reported in neurodevelopmental disorders. Thus glial mechanisms regulate glutamate acutely and have functional consequences even in adulthood. Glial cells may be a potential drug target for the development of new therapies for neurodevelopmental disorders across the life-span.

  8. Prostaglandin E(2) stimulates glutamate receptor-dependent astrocyte neuromodulation in cultured hippocampal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzgiri, R P; Araque, A; Haydon, P G

    1999-11-05

    Recent Ca(2+) imaging studies in cell culture and in situ have shown that Ca(2+) elevations in astrocytes stimulate glutamate release and increase neuronal Ca(2+) levels, and that this astrocyte-neuron signaling can be stimulated by prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). We investigated the electrophysiological consequences of the PGE(2)-mediated astrocyte-neuron signaling using whole-cell recordings on cultured rat hippocampal cells. Focal application of PGE(2) to astrocytes evoked a Ca(2+) elevation in the stimulated cell by mobilizing internal Ca(2+) stores, which further propagated as a Ca(2+) wave to neighboring astrocytes. Whole-cell recordings from neurons revealed that PGE(2) evoked a slow inward current in neurons adjacent to astrocytes. This neuronal response required the presence of an astrocyte Ca(2+) wave and was mediated through both N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and non-NMDA glutamate receptors. Taken together with previous studies, these data demonstrate that PGE(2)-evoked Ca(2+) elevations in astrocyte cause the release of glutamate which activates neuronal ionotropic receptors. Copyright 1999 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  9. Activation of β-adrenoceptor facilitates active avoidance learning through enhancement of glutamate levels in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Jing; Feng, Hao; Chen, Ling; Wang, Wei-Yao; Yue, Xue-Ling; Jin, Qing-Hua

    2017-10-18

    Long-term potentiation (LTP) is widely accepted as the best studied model for neurophysiological mechanisms that could underlie learning and memory formation. Despite a number of studies indicating that β-adrenoceptors in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) is involved in the modulation of learning and memory as well as LTP, few studies have used glutamate release as a visual indicator in awake animals to explore the role of β-adrenoceptors in learning-dependent LTP. Therefore, in the present study, the effects of propranolol (an antagonist of β-adrenoceptor) and isoproterenol (an agonist of β-adrenoceptor) on extracellular concentrations of glutamate and amplitudes of field excitatory postsynaptic potential were measured in the DG region during active avoidance learning in freely moving conscious rats. In the control group, the glutamate level in the DG was significantly increased during the acquisition of active avoidance behavior and returned to basal level following extinction training. In propranolol group, antagonism of β-adrenoceptors in the DG significantly reduced the change in glutamate level, and the acquisition of the active avoidance behavior was significantly inhibited. In contrast, the change in glutamate level was significantly enhanced by isoproterenol, and the acquisition of the active avoidance behavior was significantly accelerated. Furthermore, in all groups, the changes in glutamate level were accompanied by corresponding changes in field excitatory postsynaptic potential amplitude and active avoidance behavior. Our results suggest that activation of β-adrenoceptors in the hippocampal DG facilitates active avoidance learning by modulations of glutamate level and synaptic efficiency in rats.

  10. Neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene against glutamate-induced damage in the HT22 hippocampal neuronal cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sun Young; Jung, Won Jung; Kang, Jum Soon; Kim, Cheol-Min; Park, Geuntae; Choi, Young-Whan

    2015-02-01

    Since oxidative stress is critically involved in excitotoxic damage, we sought to determine whether the activation of the transcription factors, cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2, also known as NFE2L2), by α-iso-cubebene is involved in its protective effects against glutamate-induced neuronal cell death. Pre-treatment with α-iso-cubebene significantly attenuated glutamate-induced cytotoxicity in mouse hippocampus-derived neuronal cells. α-iso-cubebene also reduced the glutamate-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and calcium influx, thus preventing apoptotic cell death. α-iso-cubebene inhibited glutamate-induced mitochondrial membrane depolarization and, consequently, inhibited the release of the apoptosis-inducing factor from the mitochondria. Immunoblot anlaysis revealed that the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by glutamate was reduced in the presence of α-iso-cubebene. α-iso-cubebene activated protein kinase A (PKA), CREB and Nrf2, which mediate the expression of the antioxidant enzymes, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) and NAD(P)H dehydrogenase [quinone] 1 (NQO1), involved in neuroprotection. In addition, α-iso-cubebene induced the expression of antioxidant responsive element and CRE transcriptional activity, thus conferring neuroprotection against glutamate-induced oxidative injury. α-iso-cubebene also induced the expression of Nrf2-dependent genes encoding HO-1 and NQO1. Furthermore, the knockdown of CREB and Nrf2 by small interfering RNA attenuated the neuroprotective effects of α-iso-cubebene. Taken together, our results indicate that α-iso-cubebene protects HT22 cells from glutamate-induced oxidative damage through the activation of Nrf2/HO-1/NQO-1, as well as through the PKA and CREB signaling pathways.

  11. Agmatine protects against cell damage induced by NMDA and glutamate in cultured hippocampal neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Ping; Iyo, Abiye H.; Miguel-Hidalgo, Javier; Regunathan, Soundar; Zhu, Meng-Yang

    2010-01-01

    Agmatine is a polyamine and has been considered as a novel neurotransmitter or neuromodulator in the central nervous system. In the present study, the neuroprotective effect of agmatine against cell damage caused by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) and glutamate was investigated in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity assay, β-tubulin III immunocytochemical staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate (dUTP) nick end-labeling (TUNEL) assay were conducted to detect cell damage. Exposure of 12-day neuronal cultures of rat hippocampus to NMDA or glutamate for 1 h caused a concentration-dependent neurotoxicity, as indicated by the significant increase in released LDH activities. Addition of 100 µM agmatine into media ablated the neurotoxicity induced by NMDA or glutamate, an effect also produced by the specific NMDA receptor antagonist dizocilpine hydrogen maleate (MK801). Arcaine, an analog of agmatine with similar structure as agmatine, fully prevented the NMDA- or glutamate-induced neuronal damage. Spermine and putrescine, the endogenous polyamine and metabolic products of agmatine without the guanidine moiety of agmatine, failed to show this effect, indicating a structural relevance for this neuroprotection. Immunocytochemical staining and TUNEL assay confirmed the findings in the LDH measurement. That is, agmatine and MK801 markedly attenuated NMDA-induced neuronal death and significantly reduced TUNEL-positive cell numbers induced by exposure of cultured hippocampal neurons to NMDA. Taken together, these results demonstrate that agmatine can protect cultured hippocampal neurons from NMDA- or glutamate-induced excitotoxicity, through a possible blockade of the NMDA receptor channels or a potential anti-apoptotic property. PMID:16546145

  12. Glutamate monitoring in vitro and in vivo: recent progress in the field of glutamate biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieben, Nathalie Ines; Rose, Nadia Cherouati; Martinez, Karen Laurence

    2009-01-01

    is currently the most common method for in vivo glutamate sampling. However, the recent development and improvement of enzyme-based amperometric glutamate biosensors makes them a promising alternative to microdialysis for in vivo applications, as well as valuable devices for in vitro applications in basic......, and different techniques have been developed to this end. This review presents and discusses these techniques, especially the recent progress in the field of glutamate biosensors, as well as the great potential of nanotechnology in glutamate sensing. Microdialysis coupled to analytical detection techniques...... neurobiological research. Another interesting group of biosensors for glutamate are fluorescence-based glutamate biosensors, which have unsurpassed spatio-temporal resolution and are therefore important tools for investigating glutamate dynamics during signaling. Adding to this list are biosensors based on nano...

  13. GABA and glutamate in schizophrenia: A 7 T 1H-MRS study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anouk Marsman

    2014-01-01

    In this study, GABA/creatine ratios, and glutamate, NAA, creatine and choline concentrations in the prefrontal and parieto-occipital cortices were measured in 17 patients with schizophrenia and 23 healthy controls using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at an ultra-high magnetic field strength of 7 T. Significantly lower GABA/Cr ratios were found in patients with schizophrenia in the prefrontal cortex as compared to healthy controls, with GABA/Cr ratios inversely correlated with cognitive functioning in the patients. No significant change in the GABA/Cr ratio was found between patients and controls in the parieto-occipital cortex, nor were levels of glutamate, NAA, creatine, and choline differed in patients and controls in the prefrontal and parieto-occipital cortices. Our findings support a mechanism involving altered GABA levels distinguished from glutamate levels in the medial prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia, particularly in high functioning patients. A (compensatory role for GABA through altered inhibitory neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex may be ongoing in (higher functioning patients with schizophrenia.

  14. Glutamate and GABA as rapid effectors of hypothalamic peptidergic neurons

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    Cornelia eSchöne

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Vital hypothalamic neurons regulating hunger, wakefulness, reward-seeking, and body weight are often defined by unique expression of hypothalamus-specific neuropeptides. Gene-ablation studies show that some of these peptides, notably orexin/hypocretin (hcrt/orx, are themselves critical for stable states of consciousness and metabolic health. However, neuron-ablation studies often reveal more severe phenotypes, suggesting key roles for co-expressed transmitters. Indeed, most hypothalamic neurons, including hcrt/orx cells, contain fast transmitters glutamate and GABA, as well as several neuropeptides. What are the roles and relations between different transmitters expressed by the same neuron? Here, we consider signaling codes for releasing different transmitters in relation to transmitter and receptor diversity in behaviorally-defined, widely-projecting peptidergic neurons, such as hcrt/orx cells. We then discuss latest optogenetic studies of endogenous transmitter release from defined sets of axons in situ, which suggest that recently-characterized vital peptidergic neurons (e.g. hcrt/orx, proopiomelanocortin , and agouti-related peptide cells, as well as classical modulatory neurons (e.g. dopamine and acetylcholine cells, all use fast transmitters to control their postsynaptic targets. These optogenetic insights are complemented by recent observations of behavioral deficiencies caused by genetic ablation of fast transmission from specific neuropeptidergic and aminergic neurons. Powerful and fast (millisecond-scale GABAergic and glutamatergic signaling from neurons previously considered to be primarily modulatory raises new questions about the roles of slower co-transmitters they co-express.

  15. Increased response to glutamate in small diameter dorsal root ganglion neurons after sciatic nerve injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerui Gong

    Full Text Available Glutamate in the peripheral nervous system is involved in neuropathic pain, yet we know little how nerve injury alters responses to this neurotransmitter in primary sensory neurons. We recorded neuronal responses from the ex-vivo preparations of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG one week following a chronic constriction injury (CCI of the sciatic nerve in adult rats. We found that small diameter DRG neurons (30 µm were unaffected. Puff application of either glutamate, or the selective ionotropic glutamate receptor agonists alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA and kainic acid (KA, or the group I metabotropic receptor (mGluR agonist (S-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG, induced larger inward currents in CCI DRGs compared to those from uninjured rats. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-induced currents were unchanged. In addition to larger inward currents following CCI, a greater number of neurons responded to glutamate, AMPA, NMDA, and DHPG, but not to KA. Western blot analysis of the DRGs revealed that CCI resulted in a 35% increase in GluA1 and a 60% decrease in GluA2, the AMPA receptor subunits, compared to uninjured controls. mGluR1 receptor expression increased by 60% in the membrane fraction, whereas mGluR5 receptor subunit expression remained unchanged after CCI. These results show that following nerve injury, small diameter DRG neurons, many of which are nociceptive, have increased excitability and an increased response to glutamate that is associated with changes in receptor expression at the neuronal membrane. Our findings provide further evidence that glutamatergic transmission in the periphery plays a role in nociception.

  16. Brain glutamate in anorexia nervosa: a magnetic resonance spectroscopy case control study at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godlewska, Beata R; Pike, Alexandra; Sharpley, Ann L; Ayton, Agnes; Park, Rebecca J; Cowen, Philip J; Emir, Uzay E

    2017-02-01

    Anorexia nervosa (AN) is a serious psychiatric disorder with high morbidity and mortality. There are no established pharmacological treatments and the neurobiology of the condition is poorly understood. Previous studies using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have shown that AN may be associated with reductions in indices of brain glutamate; however, at conventional field strengths (≤3 T), it is difficult to separate glutamate from its precursor and metabolite, glutamine. The objective of the present study was to use high field (7 T) MRS to measure concentrations of glutamate, in three separate brain voxels, in women with AN. We studied 13 female participants with AN and 12 healthy female controls who underwent MRS scanning at 7 T with voxels placed in anterior cingulate cortex, occipital cortex and putamen. Neurometabolites were calculated using the unsuppressed water signal as a reference and corrected for individual cerebrospinal fluid concentration in the voxel. We found that participants with AN had significantly lower concentrations of glutamate in all three voxels (mean reduction 8%, p = 0.002) but glutamine levels were not altered. Concentrations of N-acetylaspartate, creatine, GABA and glutathione were also unchanged. However, inositol was lower in AN participants in anterior cingulate (p = 0.022) and occipital cortex (p = 0.002). Women with AN apparently have widespread reductions in brain glutamate. Further work will be needed to assess if this change has pathophysiological relevance or whether it is a consequence of the many physical changes produced in AN by food restriction.

  17. Intracellular Na+ concentration influences short-term plasticity of glutamate transporter-mediated currents in neocortical astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unichenko, Petr; Myakhar, Olga; Kirischuk, Sergei

    2012-04-01

    Fast synaptic transmission requires a rapid clearance of the released neurotransmitter from the extracellular space. Glial glutamate transporters (excitatory amino acid transporters, EAATs) strongly contribute to glutamate removal. In this work, we investigated the paired-pulse plasticity of synaptically activated, glutamate transporter-mediated currents (STCs) in cortical layer 2/3 astrocytes. STCs were elicited by local electrical stimulation in layer 4 in the presence of ionotropic glutamate (AMPA and NMDA), GABAA, and GABAB receptor antagonists. In experiments with low [Na(+)]i (5 mM) intrapipette solution, STCs elicited by paired-pulse stimulation demonstrated paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) at short (astrocytic [Na(+)]i, reduced the mean STC amplitude, decreased PPF at short ISIs, and slowed STC kinetics. All GABA-induced changes were blocked by NO-711 and SNAP-5114, GABA transporter (GATs) antagonists. In experiments with the low intrapipette solution, GAT blockade under control conditions decreased PPF at short ISIs both at room and at near physiological temperatures. Dialysis of single astrocyte with low [Na(+)]i solution increased the amplitude and reduced PPR of evoked field potentials recorded in the vicinity of the astrocyte. We conclude that (1) endogenous GABA via GATs may influence EAAT functioning and (2) astrocytic [Na(+)]i modulates the short-term plasticity of STCs and in turn the efficacy of glutamate removal. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in Bacillus licheniformis WX-02: Enzymatic properties and specific functions in glutamic acid synthesis for poly-γ-glutamic acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Guangming; Wang, Qin; Wei, Xuetuan; Ma, Xin; Chen, Shouwen

    2017-04-01

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA), a natural biopolymer, is widely used in cosmetics, medicine, food, water treatment, and agriculture owing to its features of moisture sequestration, cation chelation, non-toxicity and biodegradability. Intracellular glutamic acid, the substrate of γ-PGA, is a limiting factor for high yield in γ-PGA production. Bacillus subtilis and Bacillus licheniformis are both important γ-PGA producing strains, and B. subtilis synthesizes glutamic acid in vivo using the unique GOGAT/GS pathway. However, little is known about the glutamate synthesis pathway in B. licheniformis. The aim of this work was to characterize the glutamate dehydrogenase (RocG) in glutamic acid synthesis from B. licheniformis with both in vivo and in vitro experiments. By re-directing the carbon flux distribution, the rocG gene deletion mutant WX-02ΔrocG produced intracellular glutamic acid with a concentration of 90ng/log(CFU), which was only 23.7% that of the wild-type WX-02 (380ng/log(CFU)). Furthermore, the γ-PGA yield of mutant WX-02ΔrocG was 5.37g/L, a decrease of 45.3% compared to the wild type (9.82g/L). In vitro enzymatic assays of RocG showed that RocG has higher affinity for 2-oxoglutarate than glutamate, and the glutamate synthesis rate was far above degradation. This is probably the first study to reveal the glutamic acid synthesis pathway and the specific functions of RocG in B. licheniformis. The results indicate that γ-PGA production can be enhanced through improving intracellular glutamic acid synthesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential splicing and glycosylation of Apoer2 alters synaptic plasticity and fear learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasser, Catherine R; Masiulis, Irene; Durakoglugil, Murat S; Lane-Donovan, Courtney; Xian, Xunde; Beffert, Uwe; Agarwala, Anandita; Hammer, Robert E; Herz, Joachim

    2014-11-25

    Apoer2 is an essential receptor in the central nervous system that binds to the apolipoprotein ApoE. Various splice variants of Apoer2 are produced. We showed that Apoer2 lacking exon 16, which encodes the O-linked sugar (OLS) domain, altered the proteolytic processing and abundance of Apoer2 in cells and synapse number and function in mice. In cultured cells expressing this splice variant, extracellular cleavage of OLS-deficient Apoer2 was reduced, consequently preventing γ-secretase-dependent release of the intracellular domain of Apoer2. Mice expressing Apoer2 lacking the OLS domain had increased Apoer2 abundance in the brain, hippocampal spine density, and glutamate receptor abundance, but decreased synaptic efficacy. Mice expressing a form of Apoer2 lacking the OLS domain and containing an alternatively spliced cytoplasmic tail region that promotes glutamate receptor signaling showed enhanced hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP), a phenomenon associated with learning and memory. However, these mice did not display enhanced spatial learning in the Morris water maze, and cued fear conditioning was reduced. Reducing the expression of the mutant Apoer2 allele so that the abundance of the protein was similar to that of Apoer2 in wild-type mice normalized spine density, hippocampal LTP, and cued fear learning. These findings demonstrated a role for ApoE receptors as regulators of synaptic glutamate receptor activity and established differential receptor glycosylation as a potential regulator of synaptic function and memory. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Glutamine and glutamate as vital metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newsholme P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose is widely accepted as the primary nutrient for the maintenance and promotion of cell function. This metabolite leads to production of ATP, NADPH and precursors for the synthesis of macromolecules such as nucleic acids and phospholipids. We propose that, in addition to glucose, the 5-carbon amino acids glutamine and glutamate should be considered to be equally important for maintenance and promotion of cell function. The functions of glutamine/glutamate are many, i.e., they are substrates for protein synthesis, anabolic precursors for muscle growth, they regulate acid-base balance in the kidney, they are substrates for ureagenesis in the liver and for hepatic and renal gluconeogenesis, they act as an oxidative fuel for the intestine and cells of the immune system, provide inter-organ nitrogen transport, and act as precursors of neurotransmitter synthesis, of nucleotide and nucleic acid synthesis and of glutathione production. Many of these functions are interrelated with glucose metabolism. The specialized aspects of glutamine/glutamate metabolism of different glutamine-utilizing cells are discussed in the context of glucose requirements and cell function.

  1. Potentiation of lead-induced cell death in PC12 cells by glutamate: Protection by N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA), a novel thiol antioxidant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penugonda, Suman; Mare, Suneetha; Lutz, P.; Banks, William A.; Ercal, Nuran

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been implicated as an important factor in many neurological diseases. Oxidative toxicity in a number of these conditions is induced by excessive glutamate release and subsequent glutamatergic neuronal stimulation. This, in turn, causes increased generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, and neuronal damage. Recent studies indicate that the glutamatergic neurotransmitter system is involved in lead-induced neurotoxicity. Therefore, this study aimed to (1) investigate the potential effects of glutamate on lead-induced PC12 cell death and (2) elucidate whether the novel thiol antioxidant N-acetylcysteine amide (NACA) had any protective abilities against such cytotoxicity. Our results suggest that glutamate (1 mM) potentiates lead-induced cytotoxicity by increased generation of ROS, decreased proliferation (MTS), decreased glutathione (GSH) levels, and depletion of cellular adenosine-triphosphate (ATP). Consistent with its ability to decrease ATP levels and induce cell death, lead also increased caspase-3 activity, an effect potentiated by glutamate. Exposure to glutamate and lead elevated the cellular malondialdehyde (MDA) levels and phospholipase-A 2 (PLA 2 ) activity and diminished the glutamine synthetase (GS) activity. NACA protected PC12 cells from the cytotoxic effects of glutamate plus lead, as evaluated by MTS assay. NACA reduced the decrease in the cellular ATP levels and restored the intracellular GSH levels. The increased levels of ROS and MDA in glutamate-lead treated cells were significantly decreased by NACA. In conclusion, our data showed that glutamate potentiated the effects of lead-induced PC12 cell death by a mechanism involving mitochondrial dysfunction (ATP depletion) and oxidative stress. NACA had a protective role against the combined toxic effects of glutamate and lead by inhibiting lipid peroxidation and scavenging ROS, thus preserving intracellular GSH

  2. Ceftriaxone attenuates ethanol drinking and restores extracellular glutamate concentration through normalization of GLT-1 in nucleus accumbens of male alcohol-preferring rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sujan C; Yamamoto, Bryan K; Hristov, Alexandar M; Sari, Youssef

    2015-10-01

    Alteration of glutamatergic-neurotransmission is a hallmark of alcohol dependence. We have previously reported that chronic ethanol-drinking downregulated glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1) in nucleus accumbens (NAc) in male P rats in a manner that was reversed by ceftriaxone treatment. However, the effect of ceftriaxone on extracellular glutamate concentrations in NAc after chronic ethanol-drinking has not yet been studied. In the present study, male P rats were treated with ceftriaxone (100 mg/kg/day, i.p.) for five consecutive days following five-weeks of free choice ethanol (15% and 30%) drinking. In vivo microdialysis was performed to measure the extracellular glutamate concentrations in NAc and the effect of blockade of GLT-1 with dihydrokainic acid (DHK) on extracellular glutamate in NAc of ceftriaxone-treated rats was determined. Ceftriaxone treatment attenuated ethanol intake as well as ethanol preference. Extracellular glutamate was significantly higher in NAc after five-weeks of ethanol drinking in saline-treated compared to water control rats. Ceftriaxone treatment blocked the increase extracellular glutamate produced by ethanol intake. Blockade of GLT-1 by DHK reversed the effects of ceftriaxone on glutamate and implicated the role of GLT-1 in the normalization of extracellular glutamate by ceftriaxone. In addition, GLT-1 protein was decreased in ethanol exposed animals and ceftriaxone treatment reversed this deficit. Ceftriaxone treatment also increased glutamine synthetase activity in NAc but not in PFC as compared to ethanol drinking saline-treated rats. Our present study demonstrates that ceftriaxone treatment prevents ethanol drinking in part through normalization of extracellular glutamate concentrations in NAc of male P rats via GLT-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Amperometric Microsensors Monitoring Glutamate-Evoked In Situ Responses of Nitric Oxide and Carbon Monoxide from Live Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yejin Ha

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the brain, nitric oxide (NO and carbon monoxide (CO are important signaling gases which have multifaceted roles, such as neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, and vasodilators. Even though it is difficult to measure NO and CO in a living system due to their high diffusibility and extremely low release levels, electrochemical sensors are promising tools to measure in vivo and in vitro NO and CO gases. In this paper, using amperometric dual and septuple NO/CO microsensors, real-time NO and CO changes evoked by glutamate were monitored simultaneously for human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y cells. In cultures, the cells were differentiated and matured into functional neurons by retinoic acid and brain-derived neurotrophic factor. When glutamate was administrated to the cells, both NO and CO increases and subsequent decreases returning to the basal levels were observed with a dual NO/CO microsensor. In order to facilitate sensor’s measurement, a flower-type septuple NO/CO microsensor was newly developed and confirmed in terms of the sensitivity and selectivity. The septuple microsensor was employed for the measurements of NO and CO changes as a function of distances from the position of glutamate injection. Our sensor measurements revealed that only functionally differentiated cells responded to glutamate and released NO and CO.

  4. Region-specific changes in presynaptic agmatine and glutamate levels in the aged rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Y; Liu, P; Leitch, B

    2016-01-15

    During the normal aging process, the brain undergoes a range of biochemical and structural alterations, which may contribute to deterioration of sensory and cognitive functions. Age-related deficits are associated with altered efficacy of synaptic neurotransmission. Emerging evidence indicates that levels of agmatine, a putative neurotransmitter in the mammalian brain, are altered in a region-specific manner during the aging process. The gross tissue content of agmatine in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) of aged rat brains is decreased whereas levels in the temporal cortex (TE) are increased. However, it is not known whether these changes in gross tissue levels are also mirrored by changes in agmatine levels at synapses and thus could potentially contribute to altered synaptic function with age. In the present study, agmatine levels in presynaptic terminals in the PFC and TE regions (300 terminals/region) of young (3month; n=3) and aged (24month; n=3) brains of male Sprague-Dawley rats were compared using quantitative post-embedding immunogold electron-microscopy. Presynaptic levels of agmatine were significantly increased in the TE region (60%; pagmatine and glutamate were co-localized in the same synaptic terminals, and quantitative analyses revealed significantly reduced glutamate levels in agmatine-immunopositive synaptic terminals in both regions in aged rats compared to young animals. This study, for the first time, demonstrates differential effects of aging on agmatine and glutamate in the presynaptic terminals of PFC and TE. Future research is required to understand the functional significance of these changes and the underlying mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. [Determination of glutamic acid in biological material by capillary electrophoresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narezhnaya, E; Krukier, I; Avrutskaya, V; Degtyareva, A; Igumnova, E A

    2015-01-01

    The conditions for the identification and determination of Glutamic acid by capillary zone electrophoresis without their preliminary derivatization have been optimized. The effect of concentration of buffer electrolyte and pH on determination of Glutamic acid has been investigated. It is shown that the 5 Mm borate buffer concentration and a pH 9.15 are optimal. Quantitative determination of glutamic acid has been carried out using a linear dependence between the concentration of the analyte and the area of the peak. The accuracy and reproducibility of the determination are confirmed by the method "introduced - found". Glutamic acid has been determined in the placenta homogenate. The duration of analysis doesn't exceed 30 minutes. The results showed a decrease in the level of glutamic acid in cases of pregnancy complicated by placental insufficiency compared with the physiological, and this fact allows to consider the level of glutamic acid as a possible marker of complicated pregnancy.

  6. Tolerance to LSD and DOB induced shaking behaviour: differential adaptations of frontocortical 5-HT(2A) and glutamate receptor binding sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchborn, Tobias; Schröder, Helmut; Dieterich, Daniela C; Grecksch, Gisela; Höllt, Volker

    2015-03-15

    Serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and dimethoxy-bromoamphetamine (DOB), provoke stereotype-like shaking behaviour in rodents, which is hypothesised to engage frontocortical glutamate receptor activation secondary to serotonin2A (5-HT2A) related glutamate release. Challenging this hypothesis, we here investigate whether tolerance to LSD and DOB correlates with frontocortical adaptations of 5-HT2A and/or overall-glutamate binding sites. LSD and DOB (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) induce a ketanserin-sensitive (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., 30-min pretreatment) increase in shaking behaviour (including head twitches and wet dog shakes), which with repeated application (7× in 4 ds) is undermined by tolerance. Tolerance to DOB, as indexed by DOB-sensitive [(3)H]spiroperidol and DOB induced [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S binding, is accompanied by a frontocortical decrease in 5-HT2A binding sites and 5-HT2 signalling, respectively; glutamate-sensitive [(3)H]glutamate binding sites, in contrast, remain unchanged. As to LSD, 5-HT2 signalling and 5-HT2A binding, respectively, are not or only marginally affected, yet [(3)H]glutamate binding is significantly decreased. Correlation analysis interrelates tolerance to DOB to the reduced 5-HT2A (r=.80) as well as the unchanged [(3)H]glutamate binding sites (r=.84); tolerance to LSD, as opposed, shares variance with the reduction in [(3)H]glutamate binding sites only (r=.86). Given that DOB and LSD both induce tolerance, one correlating with 5-HT2A, the other with glutamate receptor adaptations, it might be inferred that tolerance can arise at either level. That is, if a hallucinogen (like LSD in our study) fails to induce 5-HT2A (down-)regulation, glutamate receptors (activated postsynaptic to 5-HT2A related glutamate release) might instead adapt and thus prevent further overstimulation of the cortex. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Synergy by secretory phospholipase A2 and glutamate on inducing cell death and sustained arachidonic acid metabolic changes in primary cortical neuronal cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolko, M; DeCoster, M A; de Turco, E B

    1996-01-01

    glutamate and sPLA2 from bee venom. sPLA2, at concentrations eliciting low neurotoxicity (acid into triacylglycerols. Free [3H]arachidonic acid accumulated at higher enzyme concentrations......, from Taipan snake venom. The NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 blocked glutamate effects and partially inhibited sPLA2 OS2 but not sPLA2 from bee venom-induced arachidonic acid release. Thus, the synergy with glutamate and very low concentrations of exogenously added sPLA2 suggests a potential role......Secretory and cytosolic phospholipases A2 (sPLA2 and cPLA2) may contribute to the release of arachidonic acid and other bioactive lipids, which are modulators of synaptic function. In primary cortical neuron cultures, neurotoxic cell death and [3H]arachidonate metabolism was studied after adding...

  8. Alleviation of glutamate mediated neuronal insult by piroxicam in rodent model of focal cerebral ischemia: a possible mechanism of GABA agonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Pallab; Pandey, Anand Kumar; Paul, Sudip; Patnaik, Ranjana

    2014-12-01

    Neurotransmitter imbalance is an inevitable outcome in cerebral ischemia that leads to neuronal death. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of piroxicam, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), on extracellular brain glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release, survival time, and neuronal cell death. Transient focal cerebral ischemia in male Charles Foster rat led to neuronal infarction and compromised intrinsic antioxidant status. Thirty-minute preadministration of piroxicam (10 mg/kg b.w.) showed a significant (P piroxicam administration in stroke rat significantly reduced (P piroxicam attenuates extracellular glutamate release and also reduces neuronal cell death due to reduction in oxidative stress in cerebral ischemia. Our results also indicate a consequent increase of extracellular GABA in brain regions administered with piroxicam, which hints that piroxicam alleviates glutamate excitotoxicity possibly by GABA agonism.

  9. Glutamate. Its applications in food and contribution to health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jinap, S; Hajeb, P

    2010-08-01

    This article reviews application of glutamate in food and its benefits and role as one of the common food ingredients used. Monosodium glutamate is one of the most abundant naturally occurring amino acids which frequently added as a flavor enhancer. It produced a unique taste that cannot be provided by other basic taste (saltiness, sourness, sweetness and bitterness), referred to as a fifth taste (umami). Glutamate serves some functions in the body as well, serving as an energy source for certain tissues and as a substrate for glutathione synthesis. Glutamate has the potential to enhance food intake in older individuals and dietary free glutamate evoked a visceral sensation from the stomach, intestine and portal vein. Small quantities of glutamate used in combination with a reduced amount of table salt during food preparation allow for far less salt to be used during and after cooking. Because glutamate is one of the most intensely studied food ingredients in the food supply and has been found safe, the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and World Health Organization placed it in the safest category for food additives. Despite a widespread belief that glutamate can elicit asthma, migraine headache and Chinese Restaurant Syndrome (CRS), there are no consistent clinical data to support this claim. In addition, findings from the literature indicate that there is no consistent evidence to suggest that individuals may be uniquely sensitive to glutamate. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Alteration effect of the PGFsub(2α) inhibition on the 3H-norepinephrine release caused by α2 receptor blocking, sodium loading and 4-aminopyridine addition in isolated pulmonary arteries of rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunyevacs, Zs.; Toeroek, T.; Hadhazy, P.; Magyar, K.; Feher, L.; Vizi, E.Sz.

    1983-01-01

    The tritium labelled norepinephrine release was measured in isolated pulmonary artery of rabbit. If the 3 H-norepinephrine release was induced by nerves stimulated with electric current, the PGFsub(2α) inhibited the release by 62%. In the presence of Yohimbin the inhibitory effect of FGFsub(2α) was increased to 78.8%. If the Na + pump activity was reduced by potassium-free medium the PGFsub(2α) inhibition remained at 62%. In the presence of 4-aminopyridine the potassium channel was blocked and the PGFsub(2α) inhibition decreased to 32.1%. The endogen prostaglandin may serve as a modulator of the neurotransmitter release. (L.G.)

  11. Glutamate Water Gates in the Ion Binding Pocket of Na(+) Bound Na(+), K(+)-ATPase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Minwoo; Kopec, Wojciech; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2017-01-01

    III is always protonated. Glutamic acid residues in the three binding sites act as water gates, and their deprotonation triggers water entry to the binding sites. From DFT calculations of Na(+) binding energies, we conclude that three protons in the binding site are needed to effectively bind Na......The dynamically changing protonation states of the six acidic amino acid residues in the ion binding pocket of the Na(+), K(+) -ATPase (NKA) during the ion transport cycle are proposed to drive ion binding, release and possibly determine Na(+) or K(+) selectivity. We use molecular dynamics (MD......(+) from water and four are needed to release them in the next step. Protonation of Asp926 in site III will induce Na(+) release, and Glu327, Glu954 and Glu779 are all likely to be protonated in the Na(+) bound occluded conformation. Our data provides key insights into the role of protons in the Na...

  12. Influence of the glutamic acid content of the diet on the catabolic rate of labelled glutamic acid in rats. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilke, A.; Simon, O.; Bergner, H.

    1984-01-01

    40 rats with a body weight of 100 g received 7 semisynthetic diets with different contents of glutamic acid and one diet contained whole-egg. A L-amino acid mixture corresponding to the pattern of egg protein was the protein source of the semisynthetic diets. Glutamic acid was supplemented succesively from 0 to 58 mol-% of the total amino acid content. On the 8th day of the experimental feeding the animals were labelled by subcutaneous injection of 14 C-glutamic acid. Subsequently the CO 2 and the 14 CO 2 excretion were measured for 24 hours. In this period 64 to 68 % of the injected radioactivity were recovered as 14 CO 2 . The curve pattern of 14 CO 2 excretion indicates two different processes of 14 CO 2 formation. One characterizing the direct degradation of glutamic acid to CO 2 with a high rate constant and a second one with a lower rate constant characterizing the 14 CO 2 formation via metabolites of glutamic acid. 77 % of the total 14 CO 2 excretion in 24 hours resulted from the direct oxidation of glutamic acid and 23 % from the oxidation of intermediates. When 14 CO 2 formation was measured 10 to 24 hours after injection of 14 C-glutamic acid a positive correlation to the content of glutamic acid in the diet was observed. The intestinal tissue contributes considerably to the catabolization of glutamic acid, however, there seems to exist an upper limit for this capacity. (author)

  13. Effect of basal forebrain stimulation on extracellular acetylcholine release and blood flow in the olfactory bulb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, Sae; Kagitani, Fusako

    2017-05-12

    The olfactory bulb receives cholinergic basal forebrain input, as does the neocortex; however, the in vivo physiological functions regarding the release of extracellular acetylcholine and regulation of regional blood flow in the olfactory bulb are unclear. We used in vivo microdialysis to measure the extracellular acetylcholine levels in the olfactory bulb of urethane-anesthetized rats. Focal chemical stimulation by microinjection of L-glutamate into the horizontal limb of the diagonal band of Broca (HDB) in the basal forebrain, which is the main source of cholinergic input to the olfactory bulb, increased extracellular acetylcholine release in the ipsilateral olfactory bulb. When the regional cerebral blood flow was measured using laser speckle contrast imaging, the focal chemical stimulation of the HDB did not significantly alter the blood flow in the olfactory bulb, while increases were observed in the neocortex. Our results suggest a functional difference between the olfactory bulb and neocortex regarding cerebral blood flow regulation through the release of acetylcholine by cholinergic basal forebrain input.

  14. Effect of Low Level Laser Irradiation at Wavelengths 488 and 515 nm on Glutamate Neurotransmitter in Mitochondria of Visual Brain Cortex in Albino Rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omran, M.F.; El-Ahdal, M.A.; El-Kady, M.H.; Yousri, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of glutamate in the visual cortex and mitochondria could be used as a measure for the argon laser effect having wavelengths 488 and 515 nm, on the mitochondria. A comparative response for the bound and free glutamate was found. Irradiation with different energies 0.2, 0.5 and 1.0 J for both wavelengths were accomplished. This study makes us to recommend the advantage of using argon laser having wavelength 515 nm to enhance the blocking of glutamate and hence the reduction of brain toxicity. Most of the energy required for cellular functions comes from mitochondria (Shepherd, 1994). Glutamate, which is present in central nervous system at very high level is essential for brain intermediary metabolism (Frazer et al., 1994; Meldrum et al., 2000 and Blumcke et al., 2000). Glutamate is enriched in synaptic vesicles, the subcellular organelles, which are associated with the storage and release of neurotransmitters. Also, biochemical evidence for glutamate as neurotransmitter in fibers from the visual cortex to the subcortical visual relay nuclei has been indicated (Fose and Fonnum, 1987 and George, 1998)

  15. Glutamic Acid Residues in HIV-1 p6 Regulate Virus Budding and Membrane Association of Gag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Melanie; Setz, Christian; Hahn, Friedrich; Matthaei, Alina; Fraedrich, Kirsten; Rauch, Pia; Henklein, Petra; Traxdorf, Maximilian; Fossen, Torgils; Schubert, Ulrich

    2016-04-25

    The HIV-1 Gag p6 protein regulates the final abscission step of nascent virions from the cell membrane by the action of its two late (L-) domains, which recruit Tsg101 and ALIX, components of the ESCRT system. Even though p6 consists of only 52 amino acids, it is encoded by one of the most polymorphic regions of the HIV-1 gag gene and undergoes various posttranslational modifications including sumoylation, ubiquitination, and phosphorylation. In addition, it mediates the incorporation of the HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr into budding virions. Despite its small size, p6 exhibits an unusually high charge density. In this study, we show that mutation of the conserved glutamic acids within p6 increases the membrane association of Pr55 Gag followed by enhanced polyubiquitination and MHC-I antigen presentation of Gag-derived epitopes, possibly due to prolonged exposure to membrane bound E3 ligases. The replication capacity of the total glutamic acid mutant E0A was almost completely impaired, which was accompanied by defective virus release that could not be rescued by ALIX overexpression. Altogether, our data indicate that the glutamic acids within p6 contribute to the late steps of viral replication and may contribute to the interaction of Gag with the plasma membrane.

  16. Inducible nitric oxide inhibitors block NMDA antagonist-stimulated motoric behaviors and medial prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadley C Bergstrom

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO plays a critical role in the motoric and glutamate releasing action of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA-antagonist stimulants. Earlier studies utilized neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (nNOS for studying the neurobehavioral effects of noncompetitive NMDA-antagonist stimulants such as dizocilpine (MK-801 and phencyclidine (PCP. This study explores the role of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors (iNOS aminoguanidine (AG and (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG in NMDA-antagonist induced motoric behavior and prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux. Adult male rats were administered a dose range of AG, EGCG or vehicle prior to receiving NMDA antagonists MK-801, PCP or a conventional psychostimulant (cocaine and tested for motoric behavior in an open arena. Glutamate in the medial prefrontal cortex was measured using in vivo microdialysis after a combination of AG or EGCG prior to MK-801. Acute administration of AG or EGCG dose-dependently attenuated the locomotor and ataxic properties of MK-801 and PCP. Both AG and EGCG were unable to block the motoric effects of cocaine, indicating the acute pharmacologic action of AG and EGCG is specific to NMDA antagonism and not generalizable to all stimulant class drugs. AG and EGCG normalized MK-801-stimulated medial prefrontal cortical glutamate efflux. These data demonstrate that AG and EGCG attenuates NMDA antagonist-stimulated motoric behavior and cortical glutamate efflux. Our results suggest that EGCG-like polyphenol nutraceuticals (contained in green tea and chocolate may be clinically useful in protecting against the adverse behavioral dissociative and cortical glutamate stimulating effects of NMDA antagonists. Medications that interfere with NMDA antagonists such as MK-801 and PCP have been proposed as treatments for schizophrenia.

  17. Dexamethasone rapidly increases GABA release in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus via retrograde messenger-mediated enhancement of TRPV1 activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei V Derbenev

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids influence vagal parasympathetic output to the viscera via mechanisms that include modulation of neural circuitry in the dorsal vagal complex, a principal autonomic regulatory center. Glucocorticoids can modulate synaptic neurotransmitter release elsewhere in the brain by inducing release of retrograde signalling molecules. We tested the hypothesis that the glucocorticoid agonist dexamethasone (DEX modulates GABA release in the rat dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings revealed that DEX (1-10 µM rapidly (i.e. within three minutes increased the frequency of tetrodotoxin-resistant, miniature IPSCs (mIPSCs in 67% of DMV neurons recorded in acutely prepared slices. Glutamate-mediated mEPSCs were also enhanced by DEX (10 µM, and blockade of ionotropic glutamate receptors reduced the DEX effect on mIPSC frequency. Antagonists of type I or II corticosteroid receptors blocked the effect of DEX on mIPSCs. The effect was mimicked by application of the membrane-impermeant BSA-conjugated DEX, and intracellular blockade of G protein function with GDP βS in the recorded cell prevented the effect of DEX. The enhancement of GABA release was blocked by the TRPV1 antagonists, 5'-iodoresiniferatoxin or capsazepine, but was not altered by the cannabinoid type 1 receptor antagonist AM251. The DEX effect was prevented by blocking fatty acid amide hydrolysis or by inhibiting anandamide transport, implicating involvement of the endocannabinoid system in the response. These findings indicate that DEX induces an enhancement of GABA release in the DMV, which is mediated by activation of TRPV1 receptors on afferent terminals. The effect is likely induced by anandamide or other 'endovanilloid', suggesting activation of a local retrograde signal originating from DMV neurons to enhance synaptic inhibition locally in response to glucocorticoids.

  18. The Nucleus Accumbens: Mechanisms of Addiction across Drug Classes Reflect the Importance of Glutamate Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scofield, M D; Heinsbroek, J A; Gipson, C D; Kupchik, Y M; Spencer, S; Smith, A C W; Roberts-Wolfe, D; Kalivas, P W

    2016-07-01

    The nucleus accumbens is a major input structure of the basal ganglia and integrates information from cortical and limbic structures to mediate goal-directed behaviors. Chronic exposure to several classes of drugs of abuse disrupts plasticity in this region, allowing drug-associated cues to engender a pathologic motivation for drug seeking. A number of alterations in glutamatergic transmission occur within the nucleus accumbens after withdrawal from chronic drug exposure. These drug-induced neuroadaptations serve as the molecular basis for relapse vulnerability. In this review, we focus on the role that glutamate signal transduction in the nucleus accumbens plays in addiction-related behaviors. First, we explore the nucleus accumbens, including the cell types and neuronal populations present as well as afferent and efferent connections. Next we discuss rodent models of addiction and assess the viability of these models for testing candidate pharmacotherapies for the prevention of relapse. Then we provide a review of the literature describing how synaptic plasticity in the accumbens is altered after exposure to drugs of abuse and withdrawal and also how pharmacological manipulation of glutamate systems in the accumbens can inhibit drug seeking in the laboratory setting. Finally, we examine results from clinical trials in which pharmacotherapies designed to manipulate glutamate systems have been effective in treating relapse in human patients. Further elucidation of how drugs of abuse alter glutamatergic plasticity within the accumbens will be necessary for the development of new therapeutics for the treatment of addiction across all classes of addictive substances. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  19. Taste responses to monosodium glutamate after alcohol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrobel, Elzbieta; Skrok-Wolska, Dominika; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Korkosz, Agnieszka; Habrat, Boguslaw; Woronowicz, Bohdan; Kukwa, Andrzej; Kostowski, Wojciech; Bienkowski, Przemyslaw; Scinska, Anna

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of acute and chronic exposure to alcohol on taste responses to a prototypic umami substance, monosodium glutamate (MSG). The rated intensity and pleasantness of MSG taste (0.03-10.0%) was compared in chronic male alcoholics (n = 35) and control subjects (n = 25). In a separate experiment, the effects of acute exposure of the oral mucosa to ethanol rinse (0.5-4.0%) on MSG taste (0.3-3.0%) were studied in 10 social drinkers. The alcoholic and control group did not differ in terms of the rated intensity and pleasantness of MSG taste. Electrogustometric thresholds were significantly (P alcohol-dependent subjects. The difference remained significant after controlling for between-group differences in cigarette smoking and coffee drinking. Rinsing with ethanol did not alter either intensity or pleasantness of MSG taste in social drinkers. The present results suggest that: (i) neither acute nor chronic alcohol exposure modifies taste responses to MSG; (ii) alcohol dependence may be associated with deficit in threshold taste reactivity, as assessed by electrogustometry.

  20. Roles and regulation of brain glutamate transporters in normal and pathological brain function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Shea, R.D.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: Glutamate (Glu) is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian CNS. Synaptically released Glu acts on both ionotropic (iGluR) and metabotropic receptors, and excessive iGluR activation results in neuronal death (termed excitotoxicity). Removal of Glu from the synapse is thus critical for normal transmission and to prevent excitotoxicity, and is performed exclusively by a family of excitatory amino acid transporters (EAATs, also known as glutamate transporters). Disregulation of Glu transport may contribute to the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative conditions, and altered expression or function of EAATs has been identified in a number of these pathologies. These studies investigated the functional and pathological effects of EAAT inhibitors in vitro, and developed a novel screening assay for compounds with activity at EAATs. Astrocytic EAATs are responsible for the majority of Glu uptake in brain, so preparations containing both astrocytes and neurones are required to analyse the contribution of EAATs to neuroprotection. Organotypic hippocampal cultures (OHCs), which exhibit many of the features of the intact CNS, were prepared from 11-14 day old Sprague Dawley rats (anaesthetised with halothane). Hippocampal slices (350 μm thick) were maintained on culture well inserts in chemically defined medium. After 2 weeks, cultures were treated with EAAT inhibitors for 3-7 days in the presence or absence of 300 μM Glu. Treatment with most EAAT inhibitors resulted in cell death that was proportional to the Glu concentration in the medium. In contrast, (2S,3S,4R)-2-(carboxycyclopropyl)glycine (L-CCG-III), a competitive substrate at EAATs (and possibly an antagonist at the kainate subtype of iGluR), appeared to be neuroprotective: increased Glu was not toxic in the presence of this drug. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of OHCs to inhibition of Glu uptake, highlighting the importance of EAATs in preventing excitotoxicity. Since modulation of

  1. Interaction of medullary P2 and glutamate receptors mediates the vasodilation in the hindlimb of rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korim, Willian Seiji; Ferreira-Neto, Marcos L; Pedrino, Gustavo R; Pilowsky, Paul M; Cravo, Sergio L

    2012-12-01

    In the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) of rats, blockade of extracellular ATP breakdown to adenosine reduces arterial blood pressure (AP) increases that follow stimulation of the hypothalamic defense area (HDA). The effects of ATP on NTS P2 receptors, during stimulation of the HDA, are still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine whether activation of P2 receptors in the NTS mediates cardiovascular responses to HDA stimulation. Further investigation was taken to establish if changes in hindlimb vascular conductance (HVC) elicited by electrical stimulation of the HDA, or activation of P2 receptors in the NTS, are relayed in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM); and if those responses depend on glutamate release by ATP acting on presynaptic terminals. In anesthetized and paralyzed rats, electrical stimulation of the HDA increased AP and HVC. Blockade of P2 or glutamate receptors in the NTS, with bilateral microinjections of suramin (10 mM) or kynurenate (50 mM) reduced only the evoked increase in HVC by 75 % or more. Similar results were obtained with the blockade combining both antagonists. Blockade of P2 and glutamate receptors in the RVLM also reduced the increases in HVC to stimulation of the HDA by up to 75 %. Bilateral microinjections of kynurenate in the RVLM abolished changes in AP and HVC to injections of the P2 receptor agonist α,β-methylene ATP (20 mM) into the NTS. The findings suggest that HDA-NTS-RVLM pathways in control of HVC are mediated by activation of P2 and glutamate receptors in the brainstem in alerting-defense reactions.

  2. Influence of the glutamic acid content of the diet on the catabolic rate of labelled glutamic acid in rats. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, O.; Wilke, A.; Bergner, H.

    1984-01-01

    Mal rats received during a 8 days experimental feeding period diets with different contents in glutamic acid. The daily feed intake was restricted to the energy maintenance level of 460 kJ/kg/sup 0.75/. The diet contained a mixture of L-amino acids corresponding to the pattern of egg protein except glutamic acid. Glutamic acid was added successively at 10 levels (0 to 14.8 % of dry matter) and the resulting diets were fed to groups of 4 animals each. At the end of the experimental feeding period 14 C- and 15 N-labelled glutamic acid were applied by intragastric infusion. CO 2 and 14 CO 2 excretion was measured during the following 4 hours and the urinary N and 15 N excretion during the following 24 hours. The CO 2 excretion decreased from 53 to 44 mmol CO 2 /100g body weight with increasing levels of dietary glutamic acid. This change seems to result from the increasing proportion of amino acids as an energetic fuel. While the amount of oxidized glutamic acid increased with increasing supplements of glutamic acid the relative 14 CO 2 excretion decreased from 57 to 48 % of the applied radioactivity. The urinary 15 N excretion during 24 hours was 31 % of the given amount of 15 N if no glutamic acid was included in the diet. This proportion increased successively up to 52 % in the case of the highest supply of glutamic acid. Because the total N excretion increased at the same extent as the 15 N excretion a complete mixing of the NH 2 groups resulting from glutamic acid due to desamination with the ammonia pool was assumed. No correlation between glutamic acid content of the diet and specific radioactivity of CO 2 or atom-% 15 N excess of urinary N was observed. (author)

  3. 78 FR 76321 - Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... (Preliminary)] Monosodium Glutamate From China and Indonesia Determinations On the basis of the record \\1... injured by reason of imports from China and Indonesia of monosodium glutamate, provided for in subheading... United States at less than fair value (LTFV) and subsidized by the Governments of China and Indonesia. \\1...

  4. Surface grafting of poly(L-glutamates). 3. Block copolymerization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, RH; Siesling, EA; Werkman, PJ; Vorenkamp, EJ; Schouten, AJ

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes for the first time the synthesis of surface-grafted AB-block copolypeptides, consisting of poly(gamma -benzyl L-glutamate) (PBLG) as the A-block and poly(gamma -methyl L-glutamate) (PMLG) as the B-block. Immobilized primary amine groups of (,gamma -aminopropyl)triethoxysilane

  5. Microscopic picture of the aqueous solvation of glutamic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leenders, E.J.M.; Bolhuis, P.G.; Meijer, E.J.

    2008-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics simulations of glutamic acid and glutamate solvated in water, using both density functional theory (DFT) and the Gromos96 force field. We focus on the microscopic aspects of the solvation−particularly on the hydrogen bond structures and dynamics−and investigate the

  6. probing the cob(ii)alamin conductor hypothesis with glutamate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    Glutamate mutase activity was also demonstrated upon incubation of GlmS and E with 3',5'- ... overproduced in E.coli (Huhta et al. 2001,. Huhta et ..... Biochemistry. 37: 9704-9715. Buckel W 2001 Unusual enzymes involved in five pathways of glutamate fermentation. Appl. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 57: 263-273. Buckel W and ...

  7. Is glutamate involved in transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hirsch, D. P.; Tytgat, G. N. J.; Boeckxstaens, G. E. E.

    2002-01-01

    Glutamate is an important excitatory amino acid and plays a major role in brain stem neurotransmission. Although the effect of glutamate on esophaoreal motility is well studied, its role in the triggering of transient lower esophageal sphincter relaxations (TLESRs) remains to be determined.

  8. 21 CFR 522.1125 - Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). 522.1125 Section... (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS IMPLANTATION OR INJECTABLE DOSAGE FORM NEW ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.1125 Hemoglobin glutamer-200 (bovine). (a) Specifications. Each 125 milliliter bag contains 13...

  9. In SilicoModel-driven Assessment of the Effects of Brain-derived Neurotrophic Factor Deficiency on Glutamate and Gamma-Aminobutyric Acid: Implications for Understanding Schizophrenia Pathophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Rimjhim; Kalmady, Sunil Vasu; Venkatasubramanian, Ganesan

    2017-05-31

    Deficient brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is one of the important mechanisms underlying the neuroplasticity abnormalities in schizophrenia. Aberration in BDNF signaling pathways directly or circuitously influences neurotransmitters like glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). For the first time, this study attempts to construct and simulate the BDNF-neurotransmitter network in order to assess the effects of BDNF deficiency on glutamate and GABA. Using CellDesigner, we modeled BDNF interactions with calcium influx via N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)- Calmodulin activation; synthesis of GABA via cell cycle regulators protein kinase B, glycogen synthase kinase and β-catenin; transportation of glutamate and GABA. Steady state stability, perturbation time-course simulation and sensitivity analysis were performed in COPASI after assigning the kinetic functions, optimizing the unknown parameters using random search and genetic algorithm. Study observations suggest that increased glutamate in hippocampus, similar to that seen in schizophrenia, could potentially be contributed by indirect pathway originated from BDNF. Deficient BDNF could suppress Glutamate decarboxylase 67-mediated GABA synthesis. Further, deficient BDNF corresponded to impaired transport via vesicular glutamate transporter, thereby further increasing the intracellular glutamate in GABAergic and glutamatergic cells. BDNF also altered calcium dependent neuroplasticity via NMDAR modulation. Sensitivity analysis showed that Calmodulin, cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and CREB regulated transcription coactivator-1 played significant role in this network. The study presents in silico quantitative model of biochemical network constituting the key signaling molecules implicated in schizophrenia pathogenesis. It provides mechanistic insights into putative contribution of deficient BNDF towards alterations in neurotransmitters and neuroplasticity that are consistent with current

  10. A Computational Model to Investigate Astrocytic Glutamate Uptake Influence on Synaptic Transmission and Neuronal Spiking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Lakshmi Allam

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, our view of astrocytes has switched from passive support cells to active processing elements in the brain. The current view is that astrocytes shape neuronal communication and also play an important role in many neurodegenerative diseases. Despite the growing awareness of the importance of astrocytes, the exact mechanisms underlying neuron-astrocyte communication and the physiological consequences of astrocytic-neuronal interactions remain largely unclear. In this work, we define a modeling framework that will permit to address unanswered questions regarding the role of astrocytes. Our computational model of a detailed glutamatergic synapse facilitates the analysis of neural system responses to various stimuli and conditions that are otherwise difficult to obtain experimentally, in particular the readouts at the sub-cellular level. In this paper, we extend a detailed glutamatergic synaptic model, to include astrocytic glutamate transporters. We demonstrate how these glial transporters, responsible for the majority of glutamate uptake, modulate synaptic transmission mediated by ionotropic AMPA and NMDA receptors at glutamatergic synapses. Furthermore, we investigate how these local signaling effects at the synaptic level are translated into varying spatio-temporal patterns of neuron firing. Paired pulse stimulation results reveal that the effect of astrocytic glutamate uptake is more apparent when the input inter-spike interval is sufficiently long to allow the receptors to recover from desensitization. These results suggest an important functional role of astrocytes in spike timing dependent processes and demand further investigation of the molecular basis of certain neurological diseases specifically related to alterations in astrocytic glutamate uptake, such as epilepsy.

  11. Serum Glutamic-Oxaloacetic Transaminase (GOT) and Glutamic-Pyruvic Transaminase (GPT) Levels in Children and Adolescents with Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Ding; Lin, Pei-Ying; Chen, Li-Mei; Fang, Wen-Hui; Lin, Lan-Ping; Loh, Ching-Hui

    2010-01-01

    The elevated serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT) and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase (GPT) rate among people with intellectual disabilities (ID) is unknown and have not been sufficiently studies. The present paper aims to provide the profile of GOT and GPT, and their associated relationship with other biochemical levels of children or…

  12. Effects of metabotropic glutamate receptor block on the synaptic transmission and plasticity in the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, S; Malfagia, C; Pettorossi, V E

    1998-11-01

    In rat brainstem slices, we investigated the possible role of metabotropic glutamate receptors in modulating the synaptic transmission within the medial vestibular nuclei, under basal and plasticity inducing conditions. We analysed the effect of the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine on the amplitude of the field potentials and latency of unitary potentials evoked in the ventral portion of the medial vestibular nuclei by primary vestibular afferent stimulation, and on the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation, after high-frequency stimulation. Two effects were observed, consisting of a slight increase of the field potentials and reduction of unit latency during the drug infusion, and a further long-lasting development of these modifications after the drug wash-out. The long-term effect depended on N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, as D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid prevented its development. We suggest that (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4carboxyphenylglycine enhances the vestibular responses and induces N-methyl-D-aspartate-dependent long-term potentiation by increasing glutamate release, through the block of presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors which actively inhibit it. The block of these receptors was indirectly supported by the fact that the agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid reduced the vestibular responses and blocked the induction of long-term potentiation by high-frequency stimulation. The simultaneous block of metabotropic glutamate receptors facilitating synaptic plasticity, impedes the full expression of the long-term effect throughout the (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine infusion. The involvement of such a facilitatory mechanism in the potentiation is supported by its reversible reduction following a second (R,S)-alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine infusion. The drug also reduced the expression of potentiation induced by high-frequency stimulation

  13. Delineation of glutamate pathways and secretory responses in pancreatic islets with ß-cell-specific abrogation of the glutamate dehydrogenase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vetterli, Laurene; Carobbio, Stefania; Pournourmohammadi, Shirin

    2012-01-01

    isolated from βGlud1(-/-) mice exhibited half of the response measured in control islets. The amplifying pathway, tested at stimulatory glucose concentrations in the presence of KCl and diazoxide, was markedly inhibited in βGlud1(-/-) islets. On glucose stimulation, net synthesis of glutamate from α......-ketoglutarate was impaired in GDH-deficient islets. Accordingly, glucose-induced elevation of glutamate levels observed in control islets was absent in βGlud1(-/-) islets. Parallel biochemical pathways, namely alanine and aspartate aminotransferases, could not compensate for the lack of GDH. However, the secretory response...... to glucose was fully restored by the provision of cellular glutamate when βGlud1(-/-) islets were exposed to dimethyl glutamate. This shows that permissive levels of glutamate are required for the full development of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and that GDH plays an indispensable role...

  14. The role of glutamate and its receptors in autism and the use of glutamate receptor antagonists in treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Donald C.

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain and may be a key neurotransmitter involved in autism. Literature pertaining to glutamate and autism or related disorders (e.g., Fragile X syndrome) is reviewed in this article. Interest in glutamatergic dysfunction in autism is high due to increasing convergent evidence implicating the system in the disorder from peripheral biomarkers, neuroimaging, protein expression, genetics and animal models. Currently, there are no pharmaceutical interventions approved for autism that address glutamate deficits in the disorder. New treatments related to glutamatergic neurotransmission, however, are emerging. In addition, older glutamate-modulating medications with approved indications for use in other disorders are being investigated for re-tasking as treatments for autism. This review presents evidence in support of glutamate abnormalities in autism and the potential for translation into new treatments for the disorder. PMID:24752754

  15. Glutamate reduces glucose utilization while concomitantly enhancing AQP9 and MCT2 expression in cultured rat hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio eTescarollo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate has been reported to have a major impact on brain energy metabolism. Using primary cultures of rat hippocampal neurons, we observed that glutamate reduces glucose utilization in this cell type, suggesting alteration in mitochondrial oxidative metabolism. The aquaglyceroporin AQP9 and the monocarboxylate transporter MCT2, two transporters for oxidative energy substrates, appear to be present in mitochondria of these neurons. Moreover, they not only co-localize but they interact with each other as they were found to co-immunoprecipitate from hippocampal neuron homogenates. Exposure of cultured hippocampal neurons to glutamate 100 µM for 1 hour led to enhanced expression of both AQP9 and MCT2 at the protein level without any significant change at the mRNA level. In parallel, a similar increase in the protein expression of LDHA was evidenced without an effect on the mRNA level. These data suggest that glutamate exerts an influence on neuronal energy metabolism likely through a regulation of the expression of some key mitochondrial proteins.

  16. BDNF regulates the expression and distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos V Melo

    Full Text Available BDNF is a pro-survival protein involved in neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. BDNF strengthens excitatory synapses and contributes to LTP, presynaptically, through enhancement of glutamate release, and postsynaptically, via phosphorylation of neurotransmitter receptors, modulation of receptor traffic and activation of the translation machinery. We examined whether BDNF upregulated vesicular glutamate receptor (VGLUT 1 and 2 expression, which would partly account for the increased glutamate release in LTP. Cultured rat hippocampal neurons were incubated with 100 ng/ml BDNF, for different periods of time, and VGLUT gene and protein expression were assessed by real-time PCR and immunoblotting, respectively. At DIV7, exogenous application of BDNF rapidly increased VGLUT2 mRNA and protein levels, in a dose-dependent manner. VGLUT1 expression also increased but only transiently. However, at DIV14, BDNF stably increased VGLUT1 expression, whilst VGLUT2 levels remained low. Transcription inhibition with actinomycin-D or α-amanitine, and translation inhibition with emetine or anisomycin, fully blocked BDNF-induced VGLUT upregulation. Fluorescence microscopy imaging showed that BDNF stimulation upregulates the number, integrated density and intensity of VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 puncta in neurites of cultured hippocampal neurons (DIV7, indicating that the neurotrophin also affects the subcellular distribution of the transporter in developing neurons. Increased VGLUT1 somatic signals were also found 3 h after stimulation with BDNF, further suggesting an increased de novo transcription and translation. BDNF regulation of VGLUT expression was specifically mediated by BDNF, as no effect was found upon application of IGF-1 or bFGF, which activate other receptor tyrosine kinases. Moreover, inhibition of TrkB receptors with K252a and PLCγ signaling with U-73122 precluded BDNF-induced VGLUT upregulation. Hippocampal neurons express both isoforms during

  17. Different metabotropic glutamate receptors play opposite roles in synaptic plasticity of the rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Silvarosa; Frondaroli, Adele; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2002-09-15

    In the medial vestibular nuclei (MVN) of rat brainstem slices, the role of group II and III metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and of the subtypes of group I mGluRs: mGluR1, mGluR5, was investigated in basal synaptic transmission and in the induction and maintenance of long-term potentiation (LTP). We used selective antagonists and agonists for mGluRs and we analysed the field potentials evoked by vestibular afferent stimulation before and after high-frequency stimulation (HFS) to induce LTP. The group II and III mGluR antagonist, (R,S)-alpha-2-methyl-4sulphonophenylglycine (MSPG), induced LTP per se and caused a reduction of the paired-pulse facilitation (PPF) ratio indicating an enhancement of glutamate release. This suggests that group II and III mGluRs are activated under basal conditions to limit glutamate release. Both the group II and III mGluR selective antagonists, 2S-2-amino-2-(1S,2S-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl)-3-(xanth-9-yl)propanoate (LY341495) and (R,S)-alpha-methylserine-O-phosphate (MSOP), induced LTP, and the selective agonists, (2R,4R)-4-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate (APDC) and L(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid (L-AP4) depressed the field potentials and prevented HFS-LTP, with a prevailing contribution of group II mGluRs over that of group III mGluRs. The mGluR1 antagonist, 7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester (CPCCOEt) prevented the full development and maintenance of HFS-LTP. By contrast, the mGluR5 antagonist, 2-methyl-6-phenylethynylpyridine (MPEP) induced LTP per se, which was impeded by CPCCOEt, and it had no effect on LTP once induced by HFS. The PPF analysis showed an enhancement of glutamate release during MPEP potentiation. The group I mGluR agonist, (R,S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) induced LTP per se, which was blocked by CPCCOEt. By contrast the mGluR5 agonist, (R,S)-2-chloro-5-hydroxypheylglycine (CHPG) prevented LTP elicited by HFS and DHPG as well. In conclusion vestibular LTP is

  18. Depolarization-induced release of amino acids from the vestibular nuclear complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Donald A; Sun, Yizhe; Frisch, Christopher; Godfrey, Matthew A; Rubin, Allan M

    2012-04-01

    There is evidence from immunohistochemistry, quantitative microchemistry, and pharmacology for several amino acids as neurotransmitters in the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC), including glutamate, γ-aminobutyrate (GABA), and glycine. However, evidence from measurements of release has been limited. The purpose of this study was to measure depolarization-stimulated calcium-dependent release of amino acids from the VNC in brain slices. Coronal slices containing predominantly the VNC were prepared from rats and perfused with artificial cerebrospinal fluid (ACSF) in an interface chamber. Fluid was collected from the chamber just downstream from the VNC using a microsiphon. Depolarization was induced by 50 mM potassium in either control calcium and magnesium concentrations or reduced calcium and elevated magnesium. Amino acid concentrations in effluent fluid were measured by high performance liquid chromatography. Glutamate release increased fivefold during depolarization in control calcium concentration and twofold in low calcium/high magnesium. These same ratios were 6 and 1.5 for GABA, 2 and 1.3 for glycine, and 2 and 1.5 for aspartate. Differences between release in control and low calcium/high magnesium ACSF were statistically significant for glutamate, GABA, and glycine. Glutamine release decreased during and after depolarization, and taurine release slowly increased. No evidence for calcium-dependent release was found for serine, glutamine, alanine, threonine, arginine, taurine, or tyrosine. Our results support glutamate and GABA as major neurotransmitters in the VNC. They also support glycine as a neurotransmitter and some function for taurine.

  19. Glutamate and GABA in appetite regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Cardoso Delgado

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Appetite is regulated by a coordinated interplay between gut, adipose tissue and brain. A primary site for the regulation of appetite is the hypothalamus where interaction between orexigenic neurons, expressing Neuropeptide Y/Agouti-related protein, and anorexigenic neurons, expressing Pro-opiomelanocortin cocaine/Amphetamine-related transcript, controls energy homeostasis. Within the hypothalamus, several peripheral signals have been shown to modulate the activity of these neurons, including the orexigenic peptide ghrelin and the anorexigenic hormones insulin and leptin. In addition to the accumulated knowledge on neuropeptide signaling, presence and function of amino acid neurotransmitters in key hypothalamic neurons brought a new light into appetite regulation. Therefore, the principal aim of this review will be to describe the current knowledge of the role of amino acid neurotransmitters in the mechanism of neuronal activation during appetite regulation and the associated neuronal-astrocytic metabolic coupling mechanisms.Glutamate and GABA dominate synaptic transmission in the hypothalamus and administration of their receptors agonists into hypothalamic nuclei stimulates feeding. By using 13C High-Resolution Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy based analysis, the Cerdán group has shown that increased neuronal firing in mice hypothalamus, as triggered by appetite during the feeding-fasting paradigm, may stimulate the use of lactate as neuronal fuel leading to increased astrocytic glucose consumption and glycolysis. Moreover, fasted mice showed increased hypothalamic [2-13C]GABA content, which may be explained by the existence of GABAergic neurons in key appetite regulation hypothalamic nuclei. Interestingly, increased [2-13C]GABA concentration in the hypothalamus of fasted animals appears to result mainly from reduction in GABA metabolizing pathways, rather than increased GABA synthesis by augmented activity of the

  20. Food Application of Newly Developed Handy-type Glutamate Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukai, Yuuka; Oikawa, Tsutomu

    2016-01-01

    Tests on physiological functions of umami have been actively conducted and a need recognized for a high-performance quantification device that is simple and cost-effective, and whose use is not limited to a particular location or user. To address this need, Ajinomoto Co. and Tanita Corp. have jointly been researching and developing a simple device for glutamate measurement. The device uses L-glutamate oxidase immobilized on a hydrogen peroxide electrode. L-glutamate in the sample is converted to α-ketoglutaric acid, which produces hydrogen peroxide. Subsequently, the electrical current from the electrochemical reaction of hydrogen peroxide is measured to determine the L-glutamate concentration. In order to evaluate its basic performance, we used this device to measure the concentration of L-glutamate standard solutions. In a concentration range of 0-1.0%, the difference from the theoretical value was minimal. The coefficient of variation (CV) value of 3 measurements was 4% or less. This shows that the device has a reasonable level of precision and accuracy. The device was also used in trial measurements of L-glutamate concentrations in food. There was a good correlation between the results obtained using the developed device and those obtained with an amino acid analyzer; the correlation coefficient was R=0.997 (n=24). In this review, we demonstrate the use of our device to measure the glutamate concentration in miso soup served daily at a home for elderly people, and other foods and ingredients.

  1. Role of aminotransferases in glutamate metabolism of human erythrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellinger, James J. [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biochemistry (United States); Lewis, Ian A. [Princeton University, Lewis-Sigler Institute for Integrative Genomics (United States); Markley, John L., E-mail: markley@nmrfam.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Biochemistry (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Human erythrocytes require a continual supply of glutamate to support glutathione synthesis, but are unable to transport this amino acid across their cell membrane. Consequently, erythrocytes rely on de novo glutamate biosynthesis from {alpha}-ketoglutarate and glutamine to maintain intracellular levels of glutamate. Erythrocytic glutamate biosynthesis is catalyzed by three enzymes, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and glutamine aminohydrolase (GA). Although the presence of these enzymes in RBCs has been well documented, the relative contributions of each pathway have not been established. Understanding the relative contributions of each biosynthetic pathway is critical for designing effective therapies for sickle cell disease, hemolytic anemia, pulmonary hypertension, and other glutathione-related disorders. In this study, we use multidimensional {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and multiple reaction mode mass spectrometry (MRM-MS) to measure the kinetics of de novo glutamate biosynthesis via AST, ALT, and GA in intact cells and RBC lysates. We show that up to 89% of the erythrocyte glutamate pool can be derived from ALT and that ALT-derived glutamate is subsequently used for glutathione synthesis.

  2. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H; Skytt, Dorte M; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2015-12-01

    Astrocytes take up glutamate in the synaptic area subsequent to glutamatergic transmission by the aid of high affinity glutamate transporters. Glutamate is converted to glutamine or metabolized to support intermediary metabolism and energy production. Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and aspartate aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte glutamate and glucose metabolism employing siRNA mediated knock down (KD) of GDH in cultured astrocytes using stable and radioactive isotopes for metabolic mapping. An increased level of aspartate was observed upon exposure to [U-(13) C]glutamate in astrocytes exhibiting reduced GDH activity. (13) C Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle. A reduction in GDH activity seems to cause the astrocytes to up-regulate activity in pathways involved in maintaining the amount of TCA cycle intermediates such as pyruvate carboxylation as well as utilization of alternate substrates such as branched chain amino acids. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Role of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors 2/3 and group I metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 in developing rat medial vestibular nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grassi, Silvarosa; Frondaroli, Adele; Pettorossi, Vito Enrico

    2005-08-22

    In brainstem slices from developing rats, metabotropic glutamate receptors mGluR2/3 and mGluR5 play different inhibitory roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity of the medial vestibular nuclei. The mGluR2/3 block (LY341495) reduces the occurrence of long-term depression after vestibular afferent high frequency stimulation at P8-P10, and increases that of long-term potentiation, while the mGluR5 block prevents high frequency stimulation long-term depression. Later on, the receptor block does not influence high frequency stimulation effects. In addition, while mGluR2/3 agonist (APDC) always provokes a transient reduction of synaptic responses, that of mGluR5 (CHPG) induces long-term depression per se at P8-P10. These results show a key role of mGluR5 in inducing high frequency stimulation long-term depression in developing medial vestibular nuclei, while mGluR2/3 modulate synaptic transmission, probably through presynaptic control of glutamate release.

  4. Dual inhibitory action of enadoline (CI977) on release of amino acids in the rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millan, M H; Chapman, A G; Meldrum, B S

    1995-06-06

    The effect of the kappa-opioid receptor agonist enadoline (CI977, (5R)-(5 alpha,7 alpha,8 beta)-N-methyl-N-[7-(1-pyrrilidinyl)-1-oxaspiro [4,5]dec-8-yl-4-benzofuranacetamide monohydrochloride), on the release of amino acids was studied in the hippocampus of freely moving rats. K+, 100 mM, or veratrine, 100 microM, were applied for 10 min via the dialysis probe, either alone (control groups) or together with CI977 (after a 10 min pretreatment with CI977 in the perfusion medium). To test the specificity of the response to CI977, nor-binaltorphimine, a selective kappa-opioid receptor antagonist, was delivered together with CI977 in two groups of animals. To test the effect of systemic injection, CI977 was given subcutaneously 30 min prior to either stimulus. K(+)-induced release of glutamate and aspartate was significantly reduced by CI977, 2.5 mM; release of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was reduced by 250 microM CI977 in the probe. The effect of CI977 on release of glutamate and aspartate, but not of GABA, was reversed by nor-binaltorphimine (45 microM). Systemic treatment with CI977, 1 or 10 mg/kg, did not reduce K(+)-induced release of glutamate. Veratrine-induced release of aspartate and glutamate was significantly inhibited by 25 microM and release of GABA by 250 microM CI977 in the probe, and this effect was not modified by nor-binaltorphimine (58 microM). Systemic injection of CI977 1 mg/kg significantly reduced veratrine-induced release of glutamate. These results indicate that CI977 regulates release of amino acids by two independent mechanisms.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. Inhibition of the Mitochondrial Glutamate Carrier SLC25A22 in Astrocytes Leads to Intracellular Glutamate Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Goubert

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The solute carrier family 25 (SLC25 drives the import of a large diversity of metabolites into mitochondria, a key cellular structure involved in many metabolic functions. Mutations of the mitochondrial glutamate carrier SLC25A22 (also named GC1 have been identified in early epileptic encephalopathy (EEE and migrating partial seizures in infancy (MPSI but the pathophysiological mechanism of GC1 deficiency is still unknown, hampered by the absence of an in vivo model. This carrier is mainly expressed in astrocytes and is the principal gate for glutamate entry into mitochondria. A sufficient supply of energy is essential for the proper function of the brain and mitochondria have a pivotal role in maintaining energy homeostasis. In this work, we wanted to study the consequences of GC1 absence in an in vitro model in order to understand if glutamate catabolism and/or mitochondrial function could be affected. First, short hairpin RNA (shRNA designed to specifically silence GC1 were validated in rat C6 glioma cells. Silencing GC1 in C6 resulted in a reduction of the GC1 mRNA combined with a decrease of the mitochondrial glutamate carrier activity. Then, primary astrocyte cultures were prepared and transfected with shRNA-GC1 or mismatch-RNA (mmRNA constructs using the Neon® Transfection System in order to target a high number of primary astrocytes, more than 64%. Silencing GC1 in primary astrocytes resulted in a reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (Phosphate (NAD(PH formation upon glutamate stimulation. We also observed that the mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC was functional after glucose stimulation but not activated by glutamate, resulting in a lower level of cellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP in silenced astrocytes compared to control cells. Moreover, GC1 inactivation resulted in an intracellular glutamate accumulation. Our results show that mitochondrial glutamate transport via GC1 is important in sustaining glutamate homeostasis in

  6. Long-term activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors increases functional TRPV1-expressing neurons in mouse dorsal root ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayoshi eMasuoka

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Damaged tissues release glutamate and other chemical mediators for several hours. These chemical mediators contribute to modulation of pruritus and pain. Herein, we investigated the effects of long-term activation of excitatory glutamate receptors on functional expression of transient receptor potential vaniloid type 1 (TRPV1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons and then on thermal pain behavior. In order to detect the TRPV1-mediated responses in cultured DRG neurons, we monitored intracellular calcium responses to capsaicin, a TRPV1 agonist, with Fura-2. Long-term (4 h treatment with glutamate receptor agonists (glutamate, quisqualate or DHPG increased the proportion of neurons responding to capsaicin through activation of metabotropic glutamate receptor mGluR1, and only partially through the activation of mGluR5; engagement of these receptors was evident in neurons responding to allylisothiocyanate (AITC, a transient receptor potential ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1 agonist. Increase in the proportion was suppressed by phospholipase C, protein kinase C, mitogen/extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase or transcription inhibitors. Whole-cell recording was performed to record TRPV1-mediated membrane current; TRPV1 current density significantly increased in the AITC-sensitive neurons after the quisqualate treatment. To elucidate the physiological significance of this phenomenon, a hot plate test was performed. Intraplantar injection of quisqualate or DHPG induced heat hyperalgesia that lasted for 4 h post injection. This chronic hyperalgesia was attenuated by treatment with either mGluR1 or mGluR5 antagonists. These results suggest that long-term activation of mGluR1/5 by peripherally released glutamate may increase the number of neurons expressing functional TRPV1 in DRG, which may be strongly associated with chronic hyperalgesia.

  7. In vitro evidence for the brain glutamate efflux hypothesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Hans Christian; Madelung, Rasmus; Waagepetersen, Helle Sønderby

    2012-01-01

    resistance values of 1014 ± 70 O cm(2) , and (14) C-D-mannitol permeability values of 0.88 ± 0.13 × 10(-6) cm s(-1) . Unidirectional flux studies showed that L-aspartate and L-glutamate, but not D-aspartate, displayed polarized transport in the brain-to-blood direction, however, all three amino acids......The concentration of the excitotoxic amino acid, L-glutamate, in brain interstitial fluid is tightly regulated by uptake transporters and metabolism in astrocytes and neurons. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible role of the blood-brain barrier endothelium in brain L......-glutamate homeostasis. Transendothelial transport- and accumulation studies of (3) H-L-glutamate, (3) H-L-aspartate, and (3) H-D-aspartate in an electrically tight bovine endothelial/rat astrocyte blood-brain barrier coculture model were performed. After 6 days in culture, the endothelium displayed transendothelial...

  8. Histochemical Studies of the Effects of Monosodium Glutamate on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uche

    Key words: Monosodium glutamate; histochemical effect; liver enzymes; hepatocytes; atrophic and degenerative changes;. Wistar rats. ... disease, Huntington‟s disease, and amyotrophic ... ascending grade of alcohol (ethanol), cleared in.

  9. Cyanidin-3-glucoside inhibits glutamate-induced Zn2+ signaling and neuronal cell death in cultured rat hippocampal neurons by inhibiting Ca2+-induced mitochondrial depolarization and formation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji Seon; Perveen, Shazia; Ha, Tae Joung; Kim, Seong Yun; Yoon, Shin Hee

    2015-05-05

    Cyanidin-3-glucoside (C3G), a member of the anthocyanin family, is a potent natural antioxidant. However, effects of C3G on glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase and neuronal cell death remain unknown. We studied the effects of C3G on glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase and cell death in cultured rat hippocampal neurons from embryonic day 17 maternal Sprague-Dawley rats using digital imaging methods for Zn(2+), Ca(2+), reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential and a MTT assay for cell survival. Treatment with glutamate (100 µM) for 7 min induces reproducible [Zn(2+)]i increase at 35 min interval in cultured rat hippocampal neurons. The intracellular Zn(2+)-chelator TPEN markedly blocked glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase, but the extracellular Zn(2+) chelator CaEDTA did not affect glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase. C3G inhibited the glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i response in a concentration-dependent manner (IC50 of 14.1 ± 1.1 µg/ml). C3G also significantly inhibited glutamate-induced [Ca(2+)]i increase. Two antioxidants such as Trolox and DTT significantly inhibited the glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i response, but they did not affect the [Ca(2+)]i responses. C3G blocked glutamate-induced formation of ROS. Trolox and DTT also inhibited the formation of ROS. C3G significantly inhibited glutamate-induced mitochondrial depolarization. However, TPEN, Trolox and DTT did not affect the mitochondrial depolarization. C3G, Trolox and DTT attenuated glutamate-induced neuronal cell death in cultured rat hippocampal neurons, respectively. Taken together, all these results suggest that cyanidin-3-glucoside inhibits glutamate-induced [Zn(2+)]i increase through a release of Zn(2+) from intracellular sources in cultured rat hippocampal neurons by inhibiting Ca(2+)-induced mitochondrial depolarization and formation of ROS, which is involved in neuroprotection against glutamate-induced cell death. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection and quantitation of glutamate carboxypeptidase II in human blood

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knedlík, Tomáš; Navrátil, Václav; Vik, V.; Pacík, D.; Šácha, Pavel; Konvalinka, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 74, č. 7 (2014), s. 768-780 ISSN 0270-4137 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP304/12/0847 Grant - others:OPPC(CZ) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : serum marker * glutamate carboxypeptidase II * plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase * prostate cancer * prostate -specific membrane antigen Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.565, year: 2014

  11. Glutamic Acid Selective Chemical Cleavage of Peptide Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalbone, Joseph M; Lahankar, Neelam; Buissereth, Lyssa; Raj, Monika

    2016-03-04

    Site-specific hydrolysis of peptide bonds at glutamic acid under neutral aqueous conditions is reported. The method relies on the activation of the backbone amide chain at glutamic acid by the formation of a pyroglutamyl (pGlu) imide moiety. This activation increases the susceptibility of a peptide bond toward hydrolysis. The method is highly specific and demonstrates broad substrate scope including cleavage of various bioactive peptides with unnatural amino acid residues, which are unsuitable substrates for enzymatic hydrolysis.

  12. Brain glycogen and its role in supporting glutamate and GABA homeostasis in a type 2 diabetes rat model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sickmann, Helle Mark; Waagepetersen, Helle S.; Schousboe, Arne

    2012-01-01

    -(13)C]glucose was used to monitor metabolism. Brain levels of (13)C labeling in glucose, lactate, alanine, glutamate, GABA, glutamine and aspartate were determined. Our results show that inhibition of brain glycogen metabolism reduced the amounts of glutamate in both the control and type 2 diabetes......The number of people suffering from diabetes is hastily increasing and the condition is associated with altered brain glucose homeostasis. Brain glycogen is located in astrocytes and being a carbohydrate reservoir it contributes to glucose homeostasis. Furthermore, glycogen has been indicated...... to be important for proper neurotransmission under normal conditions. Previous findings from our laboratory suggested that glucose metabolism was reduced in type 2 diabetes, and thus we wanted to investigate more specifically how brain glycogen metabolism contributes to maintain energy status in the type 2...

  13. Monosodium Glutamate Analysis in Meatballs Soup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlina, D.; Amran, A.; Ulianas, A.

    2018-04-01

    The analysis of monosodium glutamate (MSG) in meatball soup using Cu2+ ion as a MSG complex by UV-Vis spectrophotometry has carried out. Reaction of MSG with Cu2+ ions have formed complex compounds [Cu(C5H8NO4)2]2+ characterized by the color change of Cu2+ ion solution from light blue to dark blue. Maximum of complex absorbance [Cu(C5H8NO4)2]2+ is at 621 nm wavelength. The results showed that, the greatest condition of complex [Cu(C5H8NO4)2]2+ was at pH 10, concentration of Cu2+ 0.01 M, complex time is a 30 minute and stable for 170 minutes. Linear response and detection limit of MSG analysis with Cu2+ ions are 0.0005-0.025 M (R2 = 0.994) and (LOD) 0.0003 M. repeatability and recovery method is quite good (% RSD = 0.89% and %recovery = 93%). The analysis of MSG content in meatball soup with MSG complex method was 0.00372 M in sample A and 0.00370 M in sample B.

  14. Enhancing poly-γ-glutamic acid production in Bacillus amyloliquefaciens by introducing the glutamate synthesis features from Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jun; Quan, Yufen; Gu, Yanyan; Liu, Fenghong; Huang, Xiaozhong; Shen, Haosheng; Dang, Yulei; Cao, Mingfeng; Gao, Weixia; Lu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Yi; Song, Cunjiang; Wang, Shufang

    2017-05-22

    Poly-γ-glutamic acid (γ-PGA) is a valuable polymer with glutamate as its sole precursor. Enhancement of the intracellular glutamate synthesis is a very important strategy for the improvement of γ-PGA production, especially for those glutamate-independent γ-PGA producing strains. Corynebacterium glutamicum has long been used for industrial glutamate production and it exhibits some unique features for glutamate synthesis; therefore introduction of these metabolic characters into the γ-PGA producing strain might lead to increased intracellular glutamate availability, and thus ultimate γ-PGA production. In this study, the unique glutamate synthesis features from C. glutamicum was introduced into the glutamate-independent γ-PGA producing Bacillus amyloliquefaciens NK-1 strain. After introducing the energy-saving NADPH-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NADPH-GDH) pathway, the NK-1 (pHT315-gdh) strain showed slightly increase (by 9.1%) in γ-PGA production. Moreover, an optimized metabolic toggle switch for controlling the expression of ɑ-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (ODHC) was introduced into the NK-1 strain, because it was previously shown that the ODHC in C. glutamicum was completely inhibited when glutamate was actively produced. The obtained NK-PO1 (pHT01-xylR) strain showed 66.2% higher γ-PGA production than the NK-1 strain. However, the further combination of these two strategies (introducing both NADPH-GDH pathway and the metabolic toggle switch) did not lead to further increase of γ-PGA production but rather the resultant γ-PGA production was even lower than that in the NK-1 strain. We proposed new metabolic engineering strategies to improve the γ-PGA production in B. amyloliquefaciens. The NK-1 (pHT315-gdh) strain with the introduction of NADPH-GDH pathway showed 9.1% improvement in γ-PGA production. The NK-PO1 (pHT01-xylR) strain with the introduction of a metabolic toggle switch for controlling the expression of ODHC showed 66.2% higher

  15. Influence of the glutamic acid content of the diet on the catabolisc rate of labelled glutamic acid in rats. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergner, H.; Wilke, A.; Simon, O.; Wolf, E.

    1984-01-01

    Male rats received in 8 groups of 10 animals each for a period of 7 days 7 synthetic diets and one semisynthetic diet on maintenance requirement level. A L-amino acid mixture corresponding to the pattern of egg protein without glutamic acid was the protein source of the synthetic diets. Glutamic acid was supplemented successively from 0 to 58 mol-% of the total amino acid content. The crude protein source of diet 8 was whole-egg powder. On the 8th day of experiment 5 animals per group were labelled by intragastric infusion with 14 C-glutamic acid. During the following 24 hours the excretion of CO 2 and 14 CO 2 was measured. Throughout the experimental feeding body weight was relative constant, however, when the synthetic diets were fed it was necessary to increase the daily amount of energy from 460 to 480 kJ/kg/sup 0.67/. The relative 14 CO 2 excretion within 24 hours was 68-75 % of the dose. However, the main part of the amount of radioactivity excreted during 24 hours was already found after 4 to 6 hours. Exponential functions calculated from the data of cumulative 14 CO 2 excretion suggest the existence of a fast process of 14 CO 2 formation directly from 14 C-glutamic acid, reaching a plateau within 2 hours and a slow process of oxidation of intermediates of glutamic acid metabolism, causing a continued 14 CO 2 formation even after 24 hours. The oxidation of 14 C-glutamic acid to CO 2 decreased 2 to 14 hours after labelling if the glutamic acid content of the diet increased. The same was found for the specific radioactivity of 14 CO 2 . A storage of intermediates of glutamic acid before degradation was assumed. (author)

  16. Cholinergic basal forebrain structures are not essential for mediation of the arousing action of glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelkes, Zoltán; Abdurakhmanova, Shamsiiat; Porkka-Heiskanen, Tarja

    2017-09-18

    The cholinergic basal forebrain contributes to cortical activation and receives rich innervations from the ascending activating system. It is involved in the mediation of the arousing actions of noradrenaline and histamine. Glutamatergic stimulation in the basal forebrain results in cortical acetylcholine release and suppression of sleep. However, it is not known to what extent the cholinergic versus non-cholinergic basal forebrain projection neurones contribute to the arousing action of glutamate. To clarify this question, we administered N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA), a glutamate agonist, into the basal forebrain in intact rats and after destruction of the cholinergic cells in the basal forebrain with 192 immunoglobulin (Ig)G-saporin. In eight Han-Wistar rats with implanted electroencephalogram/electromyogram (EEG/EMG) electrodes and guide cannulas for microdialysis probes, 0.23 μg 192 IgG-saporin was administered into the basal forebrain, while the eight control animals received artificial cerebrospinal fluid. Two weeks later, a microdialysis probe targeted into the basal forebrain was perfused with cerebrospinal fluid on the baseline day and for 3 h with 0.3 mmNMDA on the subsequent day. Sleep-wake activity was recorded for 24 h on both days. NMDA exhibited a robust arousing effect in both the intact and the lesioned rats. Wakefulness was increased and both non-REM and REM sleep were decreased significantly during the 3-h NMDA perfusion. Destruction of the basal forebrain cholinergic neurones did not abolish the wake-enhancing action of NMDA. Thus, the cholinergic basal forebrain structures are not essential for the mediation of the arousing action of glutamate. © 2017 European Sleep Research Society.

  17. Upregulation of transmitter release probability improves a conversion of synaptic analogue signals into neuronal digital spikes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Action potentials at the neurons and graded signals at the synapses are primary codes in the brain. In terms of their functional interaction, the studies were focused on the influence of presynaptic spike patterns on synaptic activities. How the synapse dynamics quantitatively regulates the encoding of postsynaptic digital spikes remains unclear. We investigated this question at unitary glutamatergic synapses on cortical GABAergic neurons, especially the quantitative influences of release probability on synapse dynamics and neuronal encoding. Glutamate release probability and synaptic strength are proportionally upregulated by presynaptic sequential spikes. The upregulation of release probability and the efficiency of probability-driven synaptic facilitation are strengthened by elevating presynaptic spike frequency and Ca2+. The upregulation of release probability improves spike capacity and timing precision at postsynaptic neuron. These results suggest that the upregulation of presynaptic glutamate release facilitates a conversion of synaptic analogue signals into digital spikes in postsynaptic neurons, i.e., a functional compatibility between presynaptic and postsynaptic partners. PMID:22852823

  18. Methane release

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifert, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Swiss Gas Industry has carried out a systematic, technical estimate of methane release from the complete supply chain from production to consumption for the years 1992/1993. The result of this survey provided a conservative value, amounting to 0.9% of the Swiss domestic output. A continuation of the study taking into account new findings with regard to emission factors and the effect of the climate is now available, which provides a value of 0.8% for the target year of 1996. These results show that the renovation of the network has brought about lower losses in the local gas supplies, particularly for the grey cast iron pipelines. (author)

  19. VGLUT3 does not synergize GABA/glycine release during functional refinement of an inhibitory auditory circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Case

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The vesicular glutamate transporter VGLUT3 is expressed at several locations not normally associated with glutamate release. Although the function of this protein remains generally elusive, when expressed in non-glutamatergic synaptic terminals, VGLUT3 can not only allow glutamate co-transmission but also synergize the action of non-glutamate vesicular transporters. Interestingly, in the immature glycinergic projection between the medial nucleus of the trapezoid body (MNTB and the lateral superior olive (LSO of auditory brainstem, the transient early expression of VGLUT3 is required for normal developmental refinement. It has however been unknown whether the primary function of VGLUT3 in development of these inhibitory synapses is to enable glutamate release or to promote loading of inhibitory neurotransmitter through vesicular synergy. Using tissue from young mice in which Vglut3 had been genetically deleted, we evaluated inhibitory neurotransmission in the MNTB-LSO pathway. Our results show, in contrast to what has been seen at adult synapses, that VGLUT3 expression has little or no effect on vesicular synergy at the immature glycinergic synapse of brainstem. This finding supports the model that the primary function of increased VGLUT3 expression in the immature auditory brainstem is to enable glutamate release in a developing inhibitory circuit.

  20. The glutamate and the immune systems: new targets for the pharmacological treatment of OCD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marazziti, Donatella; Albert, Umberto; Mucci, Federico; Piccinni, Armando

    2017-11-08

    In the last decades the pharmacological treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) has been significantly promoted by the effectiveness of selective serotonin (5-HT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and the subsequent development of the 5-HT hypothesis of OCD. However, since a large majority of patients (between 40% and 60 %) do not respond to SSRIs or strategies based on the modulation of the 5-HT system, it is now essential to search for other possible therapeutic targets. The aim of this paper was to review current literature through a PubMed and Google Scholar search of novel hypotheses and related compounds for the treatment of OCD, with a special focus on the glutammate and the immune systems. The literature would indicate that glutamate, the main excitatory neurotransmitter, might play an important role in the pathophysiology of OCD. In addition, a series of clinical study would also support the potential efficacy of drugs modulating the glutamate system. The role of the immune system alterations in OCD in both children and adults needs to be more deeply elucidated. In children, it has been widely described a subtype of OCD resulting from infections driven by group A streptococcus β-hemolitic and belonging to the so-called "pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcus" (PANDAS). In adults, available findings are meager and controversial, although interesting. The glutamate and the immune systems represent two intriguing topics of research that hold promises of development of open novel treatment strategies in OCD. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  1. Glutamate metabotropic receptors as targets for drug therapy in epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldrich, Randal X; Chapman, Astrid G; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Meldrum, Brian S

    2003-08-22

    Metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors have multiple actions on neuronal excitability through G-protein-linked modifications of enzymes and ion channels. They act presynaptically to modify glutamatergic and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic transmission and can contribute to long-term changes in synaptic function. The recent identification of subtype-selective agonists and antagonists has permitted evaluation of mGlu receptors as potential targets in the treatment of epilepsy. Agonists acting on group I mGlu receptors (mGlu1 and mGlu5) are convulsant. Antagonists acting on mGlu1 or mGlu5 receptors are anticonvulsant against 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG)-induced seizures and in mouse models of generalized motor seizures and absence seizures. The competitive, phenylglycine mGlu1/5 receptor antagonists generally require intracerebroventricular administration for potent anticonvulsant efficacy but noncompetitive antagonists, e.g., (3aS,6aS)-6a-naphthalen-2-ylmethyl-5-methyliden-hexahydrocyclopenta[c]furan-1-on (BAY36-7620), 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP), and 2-methyl-6-(2-phenylethenyl)pyridine (SIB-1893) block generalized seizures with systemic administration. Agonists acting on group II mGlu receptors (mGlu2, mGlu3) to reduce glutamate release are anticonvulsant, e.g., 2R,4R-aminopyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylate [(2R,4R)-APDC], (+)-2-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-2,6-dicarboxylic acid (LY354740), and (-)-2-oxa-4-aminobicyclo[3.1.0]hexane-4,6-dicarboxylate (LY379268). The classical agonists acting on group III mGlu receptors such as L-(+)-2-amino-4-phosphonobutyric acid, and L-serine-O-phosphate are acutely proconvulsant with some anticonvulsant activity. The more recently identified agonists (R,S)-4-phosphonophenylglycine [(R,S)-PPG] and (S)-3,4-dicarboxyphenylglycine [(S)-3,4-DCPG] and (1S,3R,4S)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,2,4-tricarboxylic acid [ACPT-1] are all anticonvulsant without proconvulsant effects. Studies in animal models of kindling

  2. Metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1 autoimmunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Chiriboga, A. Sebastian; Komorowski, Lars; Kümpfel, Tania; Probst, Christian; Hinson, Shannon R.; Pittock, Sean J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe retrospectively the clinical associations of immunoglobulin G (IgG) targeting metabotropic glutamate receptor 1 (mGluR1-IgG). Methods: Specimens of 9 patients evaluated on a service basis in the Mayo Clinic Neuroimmunology Laboratory by tissue-based immunofluorescence assay (IFA) yielded a robust, synaptic immunostaining pattern consistent with mGluR1-IgG (serum, 9; CSF, 2 available). Transfected HEK293 cell-based assay (CBA) confirmed mGluR1 specificity in all 11 specimens. A further 2 patients were detected in Germany primarily by CBA. Results: The median symptom onset age for the 11 patients was 58 years (range 33–81 years); 6 were male. All 9 Mayo Clinic patients had subacute onset of cerebellar ataxia, 4 had dysgeusia, 1 had psychiatric symptoms, and 1 had cognitive impairment. All were evaluated for malignancy, but only 1 was affected (cutaneous T-cell lymphoma). One developed ataxia post–herpes zoster infection. Head MRIs were generally atrophic or normal-appearing, and CSF was inflammatory in just 1 of 5 tested, though mGluR1-IgG was detected in both specimens submitted. Five patients improved (attributable to immunotherapy in 4, spontaneously in 1), 3 stabilized (attributable to immunotherapy in 2, cancer therapy in 1), and 1 progressively declined (untreated). The 2 German patients had ataxia, but fulfilled multiple sclerosis diagnostic criteria (1 relapsing-remitting, 1 progressive). However, both had histories of hematologic malignancy (acute lymphocytic leukemia and mantle cell lymphoma), and had mGluR1-IgG detected in serum by CBA (weakly positive on tissue-based IFA). Conclusions: mGluR1 autoimmunity represents a treatable form of cerebellar ataxia. Dysgeusia may be a diagnostic clue. Paraneoplastic, parainfectious, or idiopathic causes may occur. PMID:26888994

  3. pH-jump induced α-helix folding of poly-L-glutamic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donten, Mateusz L.; Hamm, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► pH-jump as truly biomimetic tool to initiate non-equilibrium dynamics of biomolecules. ► Design criteria to widen the applicability of pH-jumps are developed. ► Folding of poly-L-Glu in dependence of starting pH, pH jump size and helix length. ► Length dependence provides strong evidence for a nucleation–propagation scenario. - Abstract: pH jumps are a truly biomimetic technique to initiate non-equilibrium dynamics of biomolecules. In this work, the pH jump induced α-helix folding of poly-L-glutamic acid is investigated upon proton release from o-nitrobenzaldehyde. The aim of this work is twofold: On the one hand, design criteria of pH jump experiments are discussed, on the other hand, the folding mechanism of poly-L-glutamic acid is clarified by probing the IR response of the amide I band. Its folding kinetics is studied in dependence of the starting pD, the size of the pD jump and the length of the helix. While no dependence on the first two parameters could be detected, the folding time varies from 0.6 μs to 1.8 μs for helix lengths of 20 residue to 440 residue, respectively. It converges to a long-length limit at about 50 residue, a result which is attributed to a nucleation–propagation mechanism

  4. Poly (γ-glutamic acid)/beta-TCP nanocomposites via in situ copolymerization: Preparation and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Xiu-Lin; Shi, Qing-Shan; Feng, Jin; Yang, Yun-Hua; Zhou, Gang; Li, Wen-Ru

    2016-07-01

    A series biodegradable poly (γ-glutamic acid)/beta-tricalcium phosphate (γ-PGA/TCP) nanocomposites were prepared which were composed of poly-γ-glutamic acid polymerized in situ with β-tricalcium phosphate and physiochemically characterized as bone graft substitutes. The particle size via dynamic light scattering, the direct morphological characterization via transmission electron microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscope, which showed that γ-PGA and β-TCP were combined compactly at 80℃, and the γ-PGA/TCP nanocomposites had homogenous and nano-sized grains with narrow particle size distributions. The water uptake and retention abilities, in vitro degradation properties, cytotoxicity in the simulated medium, and protein release of these novel γ-PGA/TCP composites were investigated. Cell proliferation in composites was nearly twice than β-TCP when checked in vitro using MC3T3 cell line. We also envision the potential use of γ-PGA/TCP systems in bone growth factor or orthopedic drug delivery applications in future bone tissue engineering applications. These observations suggest that the γ-PGA/TCP are novel nanocomposites with great potential for application in the field of bone tissue engineering. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Smectite alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, D.M.

    1984-11-01

    This report contains the proceedings of a second workshop in Washington DC December 8-9, 1983 on the alteration of smectites intended for use as buffer materials in the long-term containment of nuclear wastes. It includes extended summaries of all presentations and a transcript of the detailed scientific discussion. The discussions centered on three main questions: What is the prerequisite for and what is the precise mechanism by which smectite clays may be altered to illite. What are likly sources of potassium with respect to the KBS project. Is it likely that the conversion of smectite to illite will be of importance in the 10 5 to the 10 6 year time frame. The workshop was convened to review considerations and conclusions in connection to these questions and also to broaden the discussion to consider the use of smectite clays as buffer materials for similar applications in different geographical and geological settings. SKBF/KBS technical report 83-03 contains the proceedings from the first workshop on these matters that was held at the State University of New York, Buffalo May 26-27, 1982. (Author)

  6. A Novel Corynebacterium glutamicum l-Glutamate Exporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Guoqiang; Xu, Deyu; Fan, Liwen; Wu, Xinyang; Ni, Xiaomeng; Zhao, Shuxin; Zheng, Ping; Sun, Jibin; Ma, Yanhe

    2018-03-15

    Besides metabolic pathways and regulatory networks, transport systems are also pivotal for cellular metabolism and hyperproduction of biochemicals using microbial cell factories. The identification and characterization of transporters are therefore of great significance for the understanding and engineering of transport reactions. Herein, a novel l-glutamate exporter, MscCG2, which exists extensively in Corynebacterium glutamicum strains but is distinct from the only known l-glutamate exporter, MscCG, was discovered in an industrial l-glutamate-producing C. glutamicum strain. MscCG2 was predicted to possess three transmembrane helices in the N-terminal region and located in the cytoplasmic membrane, which are typical structural characteristics of the mechanosensitive channel of small conductance. MscCG2 has a low amino acid sequence identity (23%) to MscCG and evolved separately from MscCG with four transmembrane helices. Despite the considerable differences between MscCG2 and MscCG in sequence and structure, gene deletion and complementation confirmed that MscCG2 also functioned as an l-glutamate exporter and an osmotic safety valve in C. glutamicum Besides, transcriptional analysis showed that MscCG2 and MscCG genes were transcribed in similar patterns and not induced by l-glutamate-producing conditions. It was also demonstrated that MscCG2-mediated l-glutamate excretion was activated by biotin limitation or penicillin treatment and that constitutive l-glutamate excretion was triggered by a gain-of-function mutation of MscCG2 (A151V). Discovery of MscCG2 will enrich the understanding of bacterial amino acid transport and provide additional targets for exporter engineering. IMPORTANCE The exchange of matter, energy, and information with surroundings is fundamental for cellular metabolism. Therefore, studying transport systems that are essential for these processes is of great significance. Besides, transport systems of bacterial cells are usually related to

  7. Deletion of Type 2 Metabotropic Glutamate Receptor Decreases Sensitivity to Cocaine Reward in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Ju; Zhang, Hai-Ying; Bi, Guo-Hua; He, Yi; Gao, Jun-Tao; Xi, Zheng-Xiong

    2017-07-11

    Cocaine users show reduced expression of the metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR2), but it is not clear whether this is a predisposing trait for addiction or a consequence of drug exposure. In this study, we found that a nonsense mutation at the mGluR2 gene decreased mGluR2 expression and altered the seeking and taking of cocaine. mGluR2 mutant rats show reduced sensitivity to cocaine reward, requiring more cocaine to reach satiation when it was freely available and ceasing their drug-seeking behavior sooner than controls when the response requirement was increased. mGluR2 mutant rats also show a lower propensity to relapse after a period of cocaine abstinence, an effect associated with reduced cocaine-induced dopamine and glutamate overflow in the nucleus accumbens. These findings suggest that mGluR2 polymorphisms or reduced availability of mGluR2 might be risk factors for the initial development of cocaine use but could actually protect against addiction by reducing sensitivity to cocaine reward. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Neurochemical and behavioral characterization of neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3 heterozygous mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis F. González

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obsessive–compulsive disorder (OCD is a severe neuropsychiatric condition affecting 1–3% of the worldwide population. OCD has a strong genetic component, and the SLC1A1 gene that encodes neuronal glutamate transporter EAAT3 is a strong candidate for this disorder. To evaluate the impact of reduced EAAT3 expression in vivo, we studied male EAAT3 heterozygous and wild-type littermate mice using a battery of behavioral paradigms relevant to anxiety (open field test, elevated plus maze and compulsivity (marble burying, as well as locomotor activity induced by amphetamine. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, we also determined tissue neurotransmitter levels in cortex, striatum and thalamus—brain areas that are relevant to OCD. Results Compared to wild-type littermates, EAAT3 heterozygous male mice have unaltered baseline anxiety-like, compulsive-like behavior and locomotor activity. Administration of acute amphetamine (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally increased locomotion with no differences across genotypes. Tissue levels of glutamate, GABA, dopamine and serotonin did not vary between EAAT3 heterozygous and wild-type mice. Conclusions Our results indicate that reduced EAAT3 expression does not impact neurotransmitter content in the corticostriatal circuit nor alter anxiety or compulsive-like behaviors.

  9. Inactivation of glutamate racemase (MurI) eliminates virulence in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianying; Liu, Jia; Ling, Junqi; Tong, Zhongchun; Fu, Yun; Liang, Min

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of enzymes required for bacterial cell wall synthesis is often lethal or leads to virulence defects. Glutamate racemase (MurI), an essential enzyme in peptidoglycan biosynthesis, has been an attractive target for therapeutic interventions. Streptococcus mutans, one of the many etiological factors of dental caries, possesses a series of virulence factors associated with cariogenicity. However, little is known regarding the mechanism by which MurI influences pathogenesis of S. mutans. In this work, a stable mutant of S. mutans deficient in glutamate racemase (S. mutans FW1718) was constructed to investigate the impact of murI inactivation on cariogenic virulence in S. mutans UA159. Microscopy revealed that the murI mutant exhibited an enlarged cell size, longer cell chains, diminished cell⬜cell aggregation, and altered cell surface ultrastructure compared with the wild-type. Characterization of this mutant revealed that murI deficiency weakened acidogenicity, aciduricity, and biofilm formation ability of S. mutans (Pmutans virulence properties, making MurI a potential target for controlling dental caries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. High glutamate attenuates S100B and LDH outputs from rat cortical slices enhanced by either oxygen-glucose deprivation or menadione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircan, Celaleddin; Gül, Zülfiye; Büyükuysal, R Levent

    2014-07-01

    One hour incubation of rat cortical slices in a medium without oxygen and glucose (oxygen-glucose deprivation, OGD) increased S100B release to 6.53 ± 0.3 ng/ml/mg protein from its control value of 3.61 ± 0.2 ng/ml/mg protein. When these slices were then transferred to a medium containing oxygen and glucose (reoxygenation, REO), S100B release rose to 344 % of its control value. REO also caused 192 % increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage. Glutamate added at millimolar concentration into the medium decreased OGD or REO-induced S100B release and REO-induced LDH leakage. Alpha-ketoglutarate, a metabolic product of glutamate, was found to be as effective as glutamate in decreasing the S100B and LDH outputs. Similarly lactate, 2-ketobutyrate and ethyl pyruvate, a lipophilic derivative of pyruvate, also exerted a glutamate-like effect on S100B and LDH outputs. Preincubation with menadione, which produces H2O2 intracellularly, significantly increased S100B and LDH levels in normoxic medium. All drugs tested in the present study, with the exception of pyruvate, showed a complete protection against menadione preincubation. Additionally, each OGD-REO, menadione or H2O2-induced mitochondrial energy impairments determined by 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining and OGD-REO or menadione-induced increases in reactive oxygen substances (ROS) determined by 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) were also recovered by glutamate. Interestingly, H2O2-induced increase in fluorescence intensity derived from DCFH-DA in a slice-free physiological medium was attenuated significantly by glutamate and alpha-keto acids. All these drug actions support the conclusion that high glutamate, such as alpha-ketoglutarate and other keto acids, protects the slices against OGD- and REO-induced S100B and LDH outputs probably by scavenging ROS in addition to its energy substrate metabolite property.

  11. Glutamate abnormalities in obsessive compulsive disorder: neurobiology, pathophysiology, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittenger, Christopher; Bloch, Michael H; Williams, Kyle

    2011-12-01

    Obsessive compulsive disorder is prevalent, disabling, incompletely understood, and often resistant to current therapies. Established treatments consist of specialized cognitive-behavioral psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy with medications targeting serotonergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission. However, remission is rare, and more than a quarter of OCD sufferers receive little or no benefit from these approaches, even when they are optimally delivered. New insights into the disorder, and new treatment strategies, are urgently needed. Recent evidence suggests that the ubiquitous excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate is dysregulated in OCD, and that this dysregulation may contribute to the pathophysiology of the disorder. Here we review the current state of this evidence, including neuroimaging studies, genetics, neurochemical investigations, and insights from animal models. Finally, we review recent findings from small clinical trials of glutamate-modulating medications in treatment-refractory OCD. The precise role of glutamate dysregulation in OCD remains unclear, and we lack blinded, well-controlled studies demonstrating therapeutic benefit from glutamate-modulating agents. Nevertheless, the evidence supporting some important perturbation of glutamate in the disorder is increasingly strong. This new perspective on the pathophysiology of OCD, which complements the older focus on monoaminergic neurotransmission, constitutes an important focus of current research and a promising area for the ongoing development of new therapeutics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Distribution of vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika eVigneault

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Glutamate is the major excitatory transmitter in the brain. Vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1-3 are responsible for uploading glutamate into synaptic vesicles. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 are considered as specific markers of canonical glutamatergic neurons, while VGLUT3 is found in neurons previously shown to use other neurotransmitters than glutamate. Although there exists a rich literature on the localization of these glutamatergic markers in the rodent brain, little is currently known about the distribution of VGLUT1-3 in the human brain. In the present study, using subtype specific probes and antisera, we examined the localization of the three vesicular glutamate transporters in the human brain by in situ hybridization, immunoautoradiography and immunohistochemistry. We found that the VGLUT1 transcript was highly expressed in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, whereas VGLUT2 mRNA was mainly found in the thalamus and brainstem. VGLUT3 mRNA was localized in scarce neurons within the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, striatum and raphe nuclei. Following immunoautoradiographic labeling, intense VGLUT1- and VGLUT2-immunoreactivities were observed in all regions investigated (cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate-putamen, cerebellum, thalamus, amygdala, substantia nigra, raphe while VGLUT3 was absent from the thalamus and cerebellum. This extensive mapping of VGLUT1-3 in human brain reveals distributions that correspond for the most part to those previously described in rodent brains.

  13. Influence of glutamic acid enantiomers on C-mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formánek, Pavel; Vranová, Valerie; Lojková, Lea

    2015-02-01

    Seasonal dynamics in the mineralization of glutamic acid enantiomers in soils from selected ecosystems was determined and subjected to a range of treatments: ambient x elevated CO2 level and meadow x dense x thinned forest environment. Mineralization of glutamic acid was determined by incubation of the soil with 2 mg L- or D-glutamic acid g(-1) of dry soil to induce the maximum respiration rate. Mineralization of glutamic acid enantiomers in soils fluctuates over the course of a vegetation season, following a similar trend across a range of ecosystems. Mineralization is affected by environmental changes and management practices, including elevated CO2 level and thinning intensity. L-glutamic acid metabolism is more dependent on soil type as compared to metabolism of its D-enantiomer. The results support the hypothesis that the slower rate of D- compared to L- amino acid mineralization is due to different roles in anabolism and catabolism of the soil microbial community. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Frontal glutamate and reward processing in adolescence and adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleich, Tobias; Lorenz, Robert C; Pöhland, Lydia; Raufelder, Diana; Deserno, Lorenz; Beck, Anne; Heinz, Andreas; Kühn, Simone; Gallinat, Jürgen

    2015-11-01

    The fronto-limbic network interaction, driven by glutamatergic and dopaminergic neurotransmission, represents a core mechanism of motivated behavior and personality traits. Reward seeking behavior undergoes tremendous changes in adolescence paralleled by neurobiological changes of this network including the prefrontal cortex, striatum and amygdala. Since fronto-limbic dysfunctions also underlie major psychiatric diseases beginning in adolescence, this investigation focuses on network characteristics separating adolescents from adults. To investigate differences in network interactions, the brain reward system activity (slot machine task) together with frontal glutamate concentration (anterior cingulate cortex, ACC) was measured in 28 adolescents and 26 adults employing functional magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy, respectively. An inverse coupling of glutamate concentrations in the ACC and activation of the ventral striatum was observed in adolescents. Further, amygdala response in adolescents was negatively correlated with the personality trait impulsivity. For adults, no significant associations of network components or correlations with impulsivity were found. The inverse association between frontal glutamate concentration and striatal activation in adolescents is in line with the triadic model of motivated behavior stressing the important role of frontal top-down inhibition on limbic structures. Our data identified glutamate as the mediating neurotransmitter of this inhibitory process and demonstrates the relevance of glutamate on the reward system and related behavioral traits like impulsivity. This fronto-limbic coupling may represent a vulnerability factor for psychiatric disorders starting in adolescence but not in adulthood.

  15. Glutamine and glutamate: Nonessential or essential amino acids?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malcolm Watford

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Glutamine and glutamate are not considered essential amino acids but they play important roles in maintaining growth and health in both neonates and adults. Although glutamine and glutamate are highly abundant in most feedstuffs there is increasing evidence that they may be limiting during pregnancy, lactation and neonatal growth, particularly when relatively low protein diets are fed. Supplementation of diets with glutamine, glutamate or both at 0.5 to 1.0% to both suckling and recently weaned piglets improves intestinal and immune function and results in better growth. In addition such supplementation to the sow prevents some of the loss of lean body mass during lactation, and increases milk glutamine content. However, a number of important questions related to physiological condition, species under study and the form and amount of the supplements need to be addressed before the full benefits of glutamine and glutamate supplementation in domestic animal production can be realized. Keywords: Amino acid, Glutamate, Glutamine, Lactation, Pregnancy, Growth

  16. Chronic glutamate toxicity in neurodegenerative diseases-what is the evidence?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela eMaher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Together with aspartate, glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Glutamate binds and activates both ligand-gated ion channels (ionotropic glutamate receptors and a class of G-protein coupled receptors (metabotropic glutamate receptors. Although the intracellular glutamate concentration in the brain is in the millimolar range, the extracellular glutamate concentration is kept in the low micromolar range by the action of excitatory amino acid transporters that import glutamate and aspartate into astrocytes and neurons. Excess extracellular glutamate may lead to excitotoxicity in vitro and in vivo in acute insults like ischemic stroke via the overactivation of ionotropic glutamate receptors. In addition, chronic excitotoxicity has been hypothesized to play a role in numerous neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer’s disease and Huntington’s disease. Based on this hypothesis, a good deal of effort has been devoted to develop and test drugs that either inhibit glutamate receptors or decrease extracellular glutamate. In this review, we provide an overview of the different pathways that are thought to lead to an over-activation of the glutamatergic system and glutamate toxicity in neurodegeneration. In addition, we summarize the available experimental evidence for glutamate toxicity in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Selective cerebral perfusion prevents abnormalities in glutamate cycling and neuronal apoptosis in a model of infant deep hypothermic circulatory arrest and reperfusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajimoto, Masaki; Ledee, Dolena R.; Olson, Aaron K.; Isern, Nancy G.; Robillard-Frayne, Isabelle; Des Rosiers, Christine; Portman, Michael A.

    2016-10-01

    Rationale: Deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA) is often required for the repair of complex congenital cardiac defects in infants. However, DHCA induces neuroapoptosis associated with later development of neurocognitive abnormalities. Selective cerebral perfusion (SCP) theoretically provides superior neural protection possibly through modifications in cerebral substrate oxidation and closely integrated glutamate cycling. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that SCP modulates glucose entry into the citric acid cycle, and ameliorates abnormalities in glutamate flux which occur in association neuroapoptosis during DHCA. Methods and Results: Eighteen male Yorkshire piglets (age 34-44 days) were assigned randomly to 2 groups of 7 (DHCA or DHCA with SCP for 60 minutes at 18 °C) and 4 control pigs without cardiopulmonary bypass support. After the completion of rewarming from DHCA, 13-Carbon-labeled (13C) glucose as a metabolic tracer was infused. We used gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GCMS) and nuclear magnetic resonance for metabolic analysis in the frontal cortex. Following 2.5 hours of cerebral reperfusion, we observed similar cerebral ATP levels, absolute levels of lactate and citric acid cycle intermediates, and 13C-enrichment. However, DHCA induced significant abnormalities in glutamate cycling resulting in reduced glutamate/glutamine and elevated γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)/glutamate along with neuroapoptosis (TUNEL), which were all prevented by SCP. Conclusions: DHCA alone induces abnormalities in cycling of the major neurotransmitters in association with neuroapoptosis, but does not alter cerebral glucose utilization during reperfusion. The data suggest that SCP prevents these modifications in glutamate/glutamine/GABA cycling and protects the cerebral cortex from neuroapoptosis.

  18. Complex formation between glutamic acid and molybdenum (VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gharib, Farrokh; Khorrami, S.A.; Sharifi, Sasan

    1997-01-01

    Equilibria of the reaction of molybdenum (VI) with L-glutamic acid have been studied in aqueous solution in the pH range 2.5 to 9.5, using spectrophotometric and optical rotation methods at constant ionic strength (0.15 mol dm -3 sodium perchlorate) and temperature 25 ± 0.1 degC. Our studies have shown that glutamic acid forms a mononuclear complex with Mo(VI) of the type MoO 3 L 2- at pH 5.5. The stability constant of this complexation and the dissociation constants of L-glutamic acid have been determined. (author). 17 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Dysfunctional TCA-Cycle Metabolism in Glutamate Dehydrogenase Deficient Astrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Jakob D; Pajęcka, Kamilla; Stridh, Malin H

    2015-01-01

    aminotransferase (AAT) catalyze the reversible reaction between glutamate and α-ketoglutarate, which is the initial step for glutamate to enter TCA cycle metabolism. In contrast to GDH, AAT requires a concomitant interconversion of oxaloacetate and aspartate. We have investigated the role of GDH in astrocyte...... Labeling of aspartate and TCA cycle intermediates confirmed that the increased amount of aspartate is associated with elevated TCA cycle flux from α-ketoglutarate to oxaloacetate, i.e. truncated TCA cycle. (13) C Glucose metabolism was elevated in GDH deficient astrocytes as observed by increased de novo...... synthesis of aspartate via pyruvate carboxylation. In the absence of glucose, lactate production from glutamate via malic enzyme was lower in GDH deficient astrocytes. In conclusions, our studies reveal that metabolism via GDH serves an important anaplerotic role by adding net carbon to the TCA cycle...

  20. Aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities in lactobacilli and streptococci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Hugo Peralta

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Aminotransferases and glutamate dehydrogenase are two main types of enzymes involved in the initial steps of amino acid catabolism, which plays a key role in the cheese flavor development. In the present work, glutamate dehydrogenase and aminotransferase activities were screened in twenty one strains of lactic acid bacteria of dairy interest, either cheese-isolated or commercial starters, including fifteen mesophilic lactobacilli, four thermophilic lactobacilli, and two streptococci. The strains of Streptococcus thermophilus showed the highest glutamate dehydrogenase activity, which was significantly elevated compared with the lactobacilli. Aspartate aminotransferase prevailed in most strains tested, while the levels and specificity of other aminotransferases were highly strain- and species-dependent. The knowledge of enzymatic profiles of these starter and cheese-isolated cultures is helpful in proposing appropriate combinations of strains for improved or increased cheese flavor.

  1. Zinc and glutamate dehydrogenase in putative glutamatergic brain structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, G; Schmidt, W

    1983-01-01

    A certain topographic parallelism between the distribution of histochemically (TIMM staining) identified zinc and putative glutamatergic structures in the rat brain was demonstrated. Glutamate dehydrogenase as a zinc containing protein is in consideration to be an enzyme synthesizing transmitter glutamate. In a low concentration range externally added zinc ions (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) induced an increase in the activity of glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) originating from rat hippocampal formation, neocortex, and cerebellum up to 142.4%. With rising molarity of Zn(II) in the incubation medium, the enzyme of hippocampal formation and cerebellum showed a biphasic course of activation. Zinc ions of a concentration higher than 10(-6) M caused a strong inhibition of GDH. The effect of Zn(II) on GDH originating from spinal ganglia and liver led only to a decrease of enzyme activity. These results are discussed in connection with a functional correlation between zinc and putatively glutamatergic system.

  2. Enzymatic production of α-ketoglutaric acid from l-glutamic acid via l-glutamate oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Panqing; Dong, Xiaoxiang; Wang, Yuancai; Liu, Liming

    2014-06-10

    In this study, a novel strategy for α-ketoglutaric acid (α-KG) production from l-glutamic acid using recombinant l-glutamate oxidase (LGOX) was developed. First, by analyzing the molecular structure characteristics of l-glutamic acid and α-KG, LGOX was found to be the best catalyst for oxidizing the amino group of l-glutamic acid to a ketonic group without the need for exogenous cofactor. Then the LGOX gene was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) in a soluble and active form, and the recombinant LGOX activity reached to a maximum value of 0.59U/mL at pH 6.5, 30°C. Finally, the maximum α-KG concentration reached 104.7g/L from 110g/L l-glutamic acid in 24h, under the following optimum conditions: 1.5U/mL LGOX, 250U/mL catalase, 3mM MnCl2, 30°C, and pH 6.5. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Therapeutic effects of glutamic acid in piglets challenged with deoxynivalenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Miaomiao; Xiao, Hao; Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Tan, Bie; Liu, Gang; Li, Lili; Nyachoti, Charles Martin; Xiong, Xia; Wu, Guoyao

    2014-01-01

    The mycotoxin deoxynivalenol (DON), one of the most common food contaminants, primarily targets the gastrointestinal tract to affect animal and human health. This study was conducted to examine the protective function of glutamic acid on intestinal injury and oxidative stress caused by DON in piglets. Twenty-eight piglets were assigned randomly into 4 dietary treatments (7 pigs/treatment): 1) uncontaminated control diet (NC), 2) NC+DON at 4 mg/kg (DON), 3) NC+2% glutamic acid (GLU), and 4) NC+2% glutamic acid + DON at 4 mg/kg (DG). At day 15, 30 and 37, blood samples were collected to determine serum concentrations of CAT (catalase), T-AOC (total antioxidant capacity), H2O2 (hydrogen peroxide), NO (nitric oxide), MDA (maleic dialdehyde), DAO (diamine oxidase) and D-lactate. Intestinal morphology, and the activation of Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway, as well as the concentrations of H2O2, MDA, and DAO in kidney, liver and small intestine, were analyzed at day 37. Results showed that DON significantly (Pglutamic acid supplementation according to the change of oxidative parameters in blood and tissues. Meanwhile, DON caused obvious intestinal injury from microscopic observations and permeability indicators, which was alleviated by glutamic acid supplementation. Moreover, the inhibition of DON on Akt/mTOR/4EBP1 signal pathway was reduced by glutamic acid supplementation. Collectively, these data suggest that glutamic acid may be a useful nutritional regulator for DON-induced damage manifested as oxidative stress, intestinal injury and signaling inhibition.

  4. CCL5–Glutamate Cross-Talk in Astrocyte-Neuron Communication in Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Pittaluga

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The immune system (IS and the central nervous system (CNS are functionally coupled, and a large number of endogenous molecules (i.e., the chemokines for the IS and the classic neurotransmitters for the CNS are shared in common between the two systems. These interactions are key elements for the elucidation of the pathogenesis of central inflammatory diseases. In recent years, evidence has been provided supporting the role of chemokines as modulators of central neurotransmission. It is the case of the chemokines CCL2 and CXCL12 that control pre- and/or post-synaptically the chemical transmission. This article aims to review the functional cross-talk linking another endogenous pro-inflammatory factor released by glial cells, i.e., the chemokine Regulated upon Activation Normal T-cell Expressed and Secreted (CCL5 and the principal neurotransmitter in CNS (i.e., glutamate in physiological and pathological conditions. In particular, the review discusses preclinical data concerning the role of CCL5 as a modulator of central glutamatergic transmission in healthy and demyelinating disorders. The CCL5-mediated control of glutamate release at chemical synapses could be relevant either to the onset of psychiatric symptoms that often accompany the development of multiple sclerosis (MS, but also it might indirectly give a rationale for the progression of inflammation and demyelination. The impact of disease-modifying therapies for the cure of MS on the endogenous availability of CCL5 in CNS will be also summarized. We apologize in advance for omission in our coverage of the existing literature.

  5. Synthesis of edatrexate (2-13C-glutamate)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeGraw, J.I.; Colwell, W.T.; Jue, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    The experimental antitumor drug Edatrexate, labeled with 99% 13 C at the 2-position of the glutamate acid group was required for 13 C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in biological media. Coupling of 2,4-diamino-4-deoxy-10-ethyl-10-deazapteroic acid with diethyl L-2- 13 C-glutamate as promoted by BOP reagent afforded Edatrexate (2- 13 C-glu) diethyl ester in 60% yield following purification by column chromatography. Saponification by aqueous NaOH in 2-methoxyethanol gave the target molecule in 44% yield or 26% overall. (author)

  6. Activity-dependent volume transmission by transgene NPY attenuates glutamate release and LTP in the subiculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Andreas T; Kanter-Schlifke, Irene; Lin, En-Ju D

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene transduction of the brain using viral vectors in epileptogenic regions can effectively suppress seizures in animals, and is being considered as a promising alternative treatment strategy for epilepsy. Therefore, it is fundamental to understand the detailed mechanisms...

  7. Interaction of glutamate- and adenosine-induced decrease of acetylcholine quantal release at frog neuromuscular junction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adámek, S.; Shakirzyanova, V.; Malomouzh, A. I.; Naumenko, N. V.; Vyskočil, František

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 59, č. 5 (2010), s. 803-810 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA500110905; GA ČR GA202/09/0806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : Endplate potentials * Guanylyl cyclase Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 1.646, year: 2010

  8. Glutamate regulation of non-quantal release of acetylcholine in the rat neuromuscular junction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malomouzh, A. I.; Mukhtarov, M. R.; Nikolsky, E. E.; Vyskočil, František; Lieberman, E. M.; Urazaev, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 1 (2003), s. 206-213 ISSN 0022-3042 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA7011902; GA ČR GA305/02/1333; GA ČR GA202/02/1213 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922; CEZ:MSM 113100003 Keywords : muscle endplate * nitric oxide * N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.825, year: 2003

  9. Lack of cardioprotection from metabolic support with glutamine or glutamate in a porcine coronary occlusion model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Jens; Mæng, Michael; Mortensen, Ulrik

    2005-01-01

    vascular resistance, while glutamate preserved cardiac output during infusion. CONCLUSION: Substrate supplementation with the anaplerotic precursors glutamine and glutamate is ineffective as adjunctive therapy for severe myocardial ischemia. Beneficial effects documented in less complex experimental...

  10. Characterization and expression of glutamate dehydrogenase in response to acute salinity stress in the Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueru Wang

    Full Text Available Glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH is a key enzyme for the synthesis and catabolism of glutamic acid, proline and alanine, which are important osmolytes in aquatic animals. However, the response of GDH gene expression to salinity alterations has not yet been determined in macro-crustacean species.GDH cDNA was isolated from Eriocheir sinensis. Then, GDH gene expression was analyzed in different tissues from normal crabs and the muscle of crabs following transfer from freshwater (control directly to water with salinities of 16‰ and 30‰, respectively. Full-length GDH cDNA is 2,349 bp, consisting of a 76 bp 5'- untranslated region, a 1,695 bp open reading frame encoding 564 amino acids and a 578 bp 3'- untranslated region. E. sinensis GDH showed 64-90% identity with protein sequences of mammalian and crustacean species. Muscle was the dominant expression source among all tissues tested. Compared with the control, GDH expression significantly increased at 6 h in crabs transferred to 16‰ and 30‰ salinity, and GDH expression peaked at 48 h and 12 h, respectively, with levels approximately 7.9 and 8.5 fold higher than the control. The free amino acid (FAA changes in muscle, under acute salinity stress (16‰ and 30‰ salinities, correlated with GDH expression levels. Total FAA content in the muscle, which was based on specific changes in arginine, proline, glycine, alanine, taurine, serine and glutamic acid, tended to increase in crabs following transfer to salt water. Among these, arginine, proline and alanine increased significantly during salinity acclimation and accounted for the highest proportion of total FAA.E. sinensis GDH is a conserved protein that serves important functions in controlling osmoregulation. We observed that higher GDH expression after ambient salinity increase led to higher FAA metabolism, especially the synthesis of glutamic acid, which increased the synthesis of proline and alanine to meet the demand of osmoregulation at

  11. Capillary electrophoresis tandem mass spectrometry determination of glutamic acid and homocysteine's metabolites: Potential biomarkers of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieslarova, Zuzana; Lopes, Fernando Silva; do Lago, Claudimir Lucio; França, Marcondes Cavalcante; Colnaghi Simionato, Ana Valéria

    2017-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease that affects both lower and upper motor neurons, leading to muscle atrophy, paralysis, and death caused by respiratory failure or infectious complications. Altered levels of homocysteine, cysteine, methionine, and glutamic acid have been observed in plasma of ALS patients. In this context, a method for determination of these potential biomarkers in plasma by capillary electrophoresis tandem mass spectrometry (CE-MS/MS) is proposed herein. Sample preparation was carefully investigated, since sulfur-containing amino acids may interact with plasma proteins. Owing to the non-thiol sulfur atom in methionine, it was necessary to split sample preparation into two methods: i) determination of homocysteine and cysteine as S-acetyl amino acids; ii) determination of glutamic acid and methionine. All amino acids were separated within 25min by CE-MS/MS using 5molL -1 acetic acid as background electrolyte and 5mmolL -1 acetic acid in 50% methanol/H 2 O (v/v) as sheath liquid. The proposed CE-MS/MS method was validated, presenting RSD values below 6% and 11% for intra- and inter-day precision, respectively, for the middle concentration level within the linear range. The limits of detection ranged from 35 (homocysteine) to 268nmolL -1 (glutamic acid). The validated method was applied to the analysis of plasma samples from a group of healthy individuals and patients with ALS, showing the potential of glutamic acid and homocysteine metabolites as biomarkers of ALS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Multifunctional antitumor magnetite/chitosan-l-glutamic acid (core/shell) nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Daniela P.; Ruiz, M. Adolfina; Gallardo, Visitación; Zanoni, Maria Valnice B.; Arias, José L.

    2011-01-01

    The development of anticancer drug delivery systems based on biodegradable nanoparticles has been intended to maximize the localization of chemotherapy agents within tumor interstitium, along with negligible drug distribution into healthy tissues. Interestingly, passive and active drug targeting strategies to cancer have led to improved nanomedicines with great tumor specificity and efficient chemotherapy effect. One of the most promising areas in the formulation of such nanoplatforms is the engineering of magnetically responsive nanoparticles. In this way, we have followed a chemical modification method for the synthesis of magnetite/chitosan-l-glutamic acid (core/shell) nanostructures. These magnetic nanocomposites (average size ≈340 nm) exhibited multifunctional properties based on its capability to load the antitumor drug doxorubicin (along with an adequate sustained release) and its potential for hyperthermia applications. Compared to drug surface adsorption, doxorubicin entrapment into the nanocomposites matrix yielded a higher drug loading and a slower drug release profile. Heating characteristics of the magnetic nanocomposites were investigated in a high-frequency alternating magnetic gradient: a stable maximum temperature of 46 °C was successfully achieved within 40 min. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such kind of stimuli-sensitive nanoformulation with very important properties (i.e., magnetic targeting capabilities, hyperthermia, high drug loading, and little burst drug release) has been formulated for combined antitumor therapy against cancer.

  13. Multifunctional antitumor magnetite/chitosan- l-glutamic acid (core/shell) nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Daniela P.; Ruiz, M. Adolfina; Gallardo, Visitación; Zanoni, Maria Valnice B.; Arias, José L.

    2011-09-01

    The development of anticancer drug delivery systems based on biodegradable nanoparticles has been intended to maximize the localization of chemotherapy agents within tumor interstitium, along with negligible drug distribution into healthy tissues. Interestingly, passive and active drug targeting strategies to cancer have led to improved nanomedicines with great tumor specificity and efficient chemotherapy effect. One of the most promising areas in the formulation of such nanoplatforms is the engineering of magnetically responsive nanoparticles. In this way, we have followed a chemical modification method for the synthesis of magnetite/chitosan- l-glutamic acid (core/shell) nanostructures. These magnetic nanocomposites (average size ≈340 nm) exhibited multifunctional properties based on its capability to load the antitumor drug doxorubicin (along with an adequate sustained release) and its potential for hyperthermia applications. Compared to drug surface adsorption, doxorubicin entrapment into the nanocomposites matrix yielded a higher drug loading and a slower drug release profile. Heating characteristics of the magnetic nanocomposites were investigated in a high-frequency alternating magnetic gradient: a stable maximum temperature of 46 °C was successfully achieved within 40 min. To our knowledge, this is the first time that such kind of stimuli-sensitive nanoformulation with very important properties (i.e., magnetic targeting capabilities, hyperthermia, high drug loading, and little burst drug release) has been formulated for combined antitumor therapy against cancer.

  14. Conformational Studies on γ - Benzyl- L- Glutamate and L- Valine Containing Block Copolypeptides

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    Conformational studies on γ - benzyl-L- glutamate and L- valine containing block copolypeptides are reported using IR and CD spectra. The block copolypeptides contain valine block in the center and on both sides of the valine are γ - benzyl- L- glutamate blocks. The changes in conformation with increase in chain length of γ - benzyl- L- glutamate blocks are observed. When the chain length of γ - benzyl-L- glutamate block is 13, the block copolypeptide crystallized into beta conformation. With...

  15. Coupled ion binding and structural transitions along the transport cycle of glutamate transporters

    OpenAIRE

    Verdon, Grégory; Oh, SeCheol; Serio, Ryan N; Boudker, Olga

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest Molecules of glutamate can carry messages between cells in the brain, and these signals are essential for thought and memory. Glutamate molecules can also act as signals to build new connections between brain cells and to prune away unnecessary ones. However, too much glutamate outside of the cells kills the brain tissue and can lead to devastating brain diseases. In a healthy brain, special pumps called glutamate transporters move these molecules back into the brain cells, where...

  16. In Vitro-In Vivo Predictive Dissolution-Permeation-Absorption Dynamics of Highly Permeable Drug Extended-Release Tablets via Drug Dissolution/Absorption Simulating System and pH Alteration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zi-Qiang; Tian, Shuang; Gu, Hui; Wu, Zeng-Guang; Nyagblordzro, Makafui; Feng, Guo; He, Xin

    2018-05-01

    Each of dissolution and permeation may be a rate-limiting factor in the absorption of oral drug delivery. But the current dissolution test rarely took into consideration of the permeation property. Drug dissolution/absorption simulating system (DDASS) valuably gave an insight into the combination of drug dissolution and permeation processes happening in human gastrointestinal tract. The simulated gastric/intestinal fluid of DDASS was improved in this study to realize the influence of dynamic pH change on the complete oral dosage form. To assess the effectiveness of DDASS, six high-permeability drugs were chosen as model drugs, including theophylline (pK a1  = 3.50, pK a2  = 8.60), diclofenac (pK a  = 4.15), isosorbide 5-mononitrate (pK a  = 7.00), sinomenine (pK a  = 7.98), alfuzosin (pK a  = 8.13), and metoprolol (pK a  = 9.70). A general elution and permeation relationship of their commercially available extended-release tablets was assessed as well as the relationship between the cumulative permeation and the apparent permeability. The correlations between DDASS elution and USP apparatus 2 (USP2) dissolution and also between DDASS permeation and beagle dog absorption were developed to estimate the predictability of DDASS. As a result, the common elution-dissolution relationship was established regardless of some variance in the characteristic behavior between DDASS and USP2 for drugs dependent on the pH for dissolution. Level A in vitro-in vivo correlation between DDASS permeation and dog absorption was developed for drugs with different pKa. The improved DDASS will be a promising tool to provide a screening method on the predictive dissolution-permeation-absorption dynamics of solid drug dosage forms in the early-phase formulation development.

  17. Zinc release from Schaffer collaterals and its significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Atsushi; Nakajima, Satoko; Fuke, Sayuri; Sakurada, Naomi; Minami, Akira; Oku, Naoto

    2006-02-15

    On the basis of the evidence that approximately 45% of Schaffer collateral boutons are zinc-positive, zinc release from Schaffer collaterals and its action were examined in hippocampal slices. When zinc release from Schaffer collaterals was examined using ZnAF-2, a membrane-impermeable zinc indicator, ZnAF-2 signal in the stratum radiatum of the CA1 was increased by tetanic stimuli at 100 Hz for 1s, suggesting that zinc is released from Schaffer collaterals in a calcium- and impulse-dependent manner. An in vivo microdialysis experiment indicated that the perfusion with 10 microM zinc significantly decreases extracellular glutamate concentration in the CA1. When tetanic stimuli at 100 Hz for 5s were delivered to the dentate granule cells, the increase in calcium signal in the stratum radiatum of the CA1, as well as in the stratum lucidum of the CA3, was attenuated by addition of 10 microM zinc, while enhanced by addition of 1mM CaEDTA, a membrane-impermeable zinc chelator. The increase in calcium signal in the CA1, in which Schaffer collateral synapses exist, during delivery of tetanic stimuli at 100 Hz for 1s to the Schaffer collateral-commissural pathway was also significantly enhanced by addition of 1mM CaEDTA. These results suggest that zinc released from Schaffer collaterals suppressively modulates presynaptic and postsynaptic calcium signaling in the CA1, followed by the suppression of glutamate release.

  18. GnRH dysregulation in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a manifestation of an altered neurotransmitter profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Nirja; Dawalbhakta, Mitali; Nampoothiri, Laxmipriya

    2018-04-11

    GnRH is the master molecule of reproduction that is influenced by several intrinsic and extrinsic factors such as neurotransmitters and neuropeptides. Any alteration in these regulatory loops may result in reproductive-endocrine dysfunction such as the polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Although low dopaminergic tone has been associated with PCOS, the role of neurotransmitters in PCOS remains unknown. The present study was therefore aimed at understanding the status of GnRH regulatory neurotransmitters to decipher the neuroendocrine pathology in PCOS. PCOS was induced in rats by oral administration of letrozole (aromatase inhibitor). Following PCOS validation, animals were assessed for gonadotropin levels and their mRNA expression. Neurotrasnmitter status was evaluated by estimating their levels, their metabolism and their receptor expression in hypothalamus, pituitary, hippocampus and frontal cortex of PCOS rat model. We demonstrate that GnRH and LH inhibitory neurotransmitters - serotonin, dopamine, GABA and acetylcholine - are reduced while glutamate, a major stimulator of GnRH and LH release, is increased in the PCOS condition. Concomitant changes were observed for neurotransmitter metabolising enzymes and their receptors as well. Our results reveal that increased GnRH and LH pulsatility in PCOS condition likely result from the cumulative effect of altered GnRH stimulatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters in hypothalamic-pituitary centre. This, we hypothesise, is responsible for the depression and anxiety-like mood disorders commonly seen in PCOS women.

  19. Glutamate metabolism is down-regulated in astrocytes during experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hardin-Pouzet, H; Krakowski, M; Bourbonnière, L

    1997-01-01

    dehydrogenase (GDH) expression were dramatically reduced. These two astrocytic enzymes are responsible for degradation of glutamate, the most abundant excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Since elevated levels of glutamate may be neurotoxic, we propose that the decreased capacity of astrocytes...... to metabolize glutamate may contribute to EAE pathology....

  20. Synthesis and distribution of L-glutamic acid with three different labels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, M.B.; Spolter, Leonard; Chia Chin Chang; MacDonald, N.S.

    1982-01-01

    A study was performed to compare the distribution of C-11 L-glutamic acid, labeled on the carboxyl group of either the alpha or gamma carbon with that of N-13 L-glutamic acid in order to determine if the position of the label is of importance in the study of the distribution of glutamic acid

  1. 40 CFR 721.3820 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-, disodium salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3820 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-, disodium salt. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1187 - L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false L-glutamic acid; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1187 L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. L-glutamic acid is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance on all food commodities when used in accordance...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3821 - L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl... Substances § 721.3821 L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)-. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as L-Glutamic acid, N-(1-oxododecyl)- (PMN P...

  4. Immunocytochemical localization of the glutamate transporter GLT-1 in goldfish (Carassius auratus) retina

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vandenbranden, C. A.; Yazulla, S.; Studholme, K. M.; Kamphuis, W.; Kamermans, M.

    2000-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the retina of vertebrates. Electrophysiological experiments in goldfish and salamander have shown that neuronal glutamate transporters play an important role in the clearance of glutamate from cone synaptic clefts. In this study, the localization

  5. GRP1 PH Domain, Like AKT1 PH Domain, Possesses a Sentry Glutamate Residue Essential for Specific Targeting to Plasma Membrane PI(3,4,5)P3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilling, Carissa; Landgraf, Kyle E.; Falke, Joseph J.

    2011-01-01

    During the appearance of the signaling lipid PI(3,4,5)P3, an important subset of pleckstrin homology (PH) domains target signaling proteins to the plasma membrane. To ensure proper pathway regulation, such PI(3,4,5)P3-specific PH domains must exclude the more prevalant, constitutive plasma membrane lipid PI(4,5)P2 and bind the rare PI(3,4,5)P3 target lipid with sufficiently high affinity. Our previous study of the E17K mutant of protein kinase B (AKT1) PH domain, together with evidence from Carpten et al (1), revealed that the native AKT1 E17 residue serves as a sentry glutamate that excludes PI(4,5)P2, thereby playing an essential role in specific PI(3,4,5)P3 targeting (2). The sentry glutamate hypothesis proposes that an analogous sentry glutamate residue is a widespread feature of PI(3,4,5)P3-specific PH domains, and that charge reversal mutation at the sentry glutamate position will yield both increased PI(4,5)P2 affinity and constitutive plasma membrane targeting. To test this hypothesis the present study investigates the E345 residue, a putative sentry glutamate, of General Receptor for Phosphoinositides 1 (GRP1) PH domain. The results show that incorporation of the E345K charge reversal mutation into GRP1 PH domain enhances PI(4,5)P2 affinity 8-fold and yields constitutive plasma membrane targeting in cells, reminiscent of the effects of the E17K mutation in AKT1 PH domain. Hydrolysis of plasma membrane PI(4,5)P2 releases E345K GRP1 PH domain into the cytoplasm and the efficiency of this release increases when target Arf6 binding is disrupted. Overall, the findings provide strong support for the sentry glutamate hypothesis and suggest that the GRP1 E345K mutation will be linked to changes in cell physiology and human pathologies, as demonstrated for AKT1 E17K (1, 3). Analysis of available PH domain structures suggests that a lone glutamate residue (or, in some cases an aspartate) is a common, perhaps ubiquitous, feature of PI(3,4,5)P3-specific binding

  6. Caffeine Reverts Memory But Not Mood Impairment in a Depression-Prone Mouse Strain with Up-Regulated Adenosine A2A Receptor in Hippocampal Glutamate Synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Nuno J; Simões, Ana Patrícia; Silva, Henrique B; Ardais, Ana Paula; Kaster, Manuella P; Garção, Pedro; Rodrigues, Diana I; Pochmann, Daniela; Santos, Ana Isabel; Araújo, Inês M; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Tomé, Ângelo R; Köfalvi, Attila; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Agostinho, Paula; El Yacoubi, Malika; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Gomes, Catarina A

    2017-03-01

    Caffeine prophylactically prevents mood and memory impairments through adenosine A 2A receptor (A 2A R) antagonism. A 2A R antagonists also therapeutically revert mood and memory impairments, but it is not known if caffeine is also therapeutically or only prophylactically effective. Since depression is accompanied by mood and memory alterations, we now explored if chronic (4 weeks) caffeine consumption (0.3 g/L) reverts mood and memory impairment in helpless mice (HM, 12 weeks old), a bred-based model of depression. HM displayed higher immobility in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests, greater anxiety in the elevated plus maze, and poorer memory performance (modified Y-maze and object recognition). HM also had reduced density of synaptic (synaptophysin, SNAP-25), namely, glutamatergic (vGluT1; -22 ± 7 %) and GABAergic (vGAT; -23 ± 8 %) markers in the hippocampus. HM displayed higher A 2A R density (72 ± 6 %) in hippocampal synapses, an enhanced facilitation of hippocampal glutamate release by the A 2A R agonist, CGS21680 (30 nM), and a larger LTP amplitude (54 ± 8 % vs. 21 ± 5 % in controls) that was restored to control levels (30 ± 10 %) by the A 2A R antagonist, SCH58261 (50 nM). Notably, caffeine intake reverted memory deficits and reverted the loss of hippocampal synaptic markers but did not affect helpless or anxiety behavior. These results reinforce the validity of HM as an animal model of depression by showing that they also display reference memory deficits. Furthermore, caffeine intake selectively reverted memory but not mood deficits displayed by HM, which are associated with an increased density and functional impact of hippocampal A 2A R controlling synaptic glutamatergic function.

  7. Corticotropin-releasing factor overexpression in mice abrogates sex differences in body weight, visceral fat, and food intake response to a fast and alters levels of feeding regulatory hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lixin; Goebel-Stengel, Miriam; Yuan, Pu-Qing; Stengel, Andreas; Taché, Yvette

    2017-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing factor overexpressing (CRF-OE) male mice showed an inhibited feeding response to a fast, and lower plasma acyl ghrelin and Fos expression in the arcuate nucleus compared to wild-type (WT) mice. We investigated whether hormones and hypothalamic feeding signals are impaired in CRF-OE mice and the influence of sex. Male and female CRF-OE mice and WT littermates (4-6 months old) fed ad libitum or overnight fasted were assessed for body, adrenal glands and perigonadal fat weights, food intake, plasma hormones, blood glucose, and mRNA hypothalamic signals. Under fed conditions, compared to WT, CRF-OE mice have increased adrenal glands and perigonadal fat weight, plasma corticosterone, leptin and insulin, and hypothalamic leptin receptor and decreased plasma acyl ghrelin. Compared to male, female WT mice have lower body and perigonadal fat and plasma leptin but higher adrenal glands weights. CRF-OE mice lost these sex differences except for the adrenals. Male CRF-OE and WT mice did not differ in hypothalamic expression of neuropeptide Y (NPY) and proopiomelanocortin (POMC), while female CRF-OE compared to female WT and male CRF-OE had higher NPY mRNA levels. After fasting, female WT mice lost more body weight and ate more food than male WT, while CRF-OE mice had reduced body weight loss and inhibited food intake without sex difference. In male WT mice, fasting reduced plasma insulin and leptin and increased acyl ghrelin and corticosterone while female WT showed only a rise in corticosterone. In CRF-OE mice, fasting reduced insulin while leptin, acyl ghrelin and corticosterone were unchanged with no sex difference. Fasting blood glucose was higher in CRF-OE with female > male. In WT mice, fasting increased hypothalamic NPY expression in both sexes and decreased POMC only in males, while in CRF-OE mice, NPY did not change, and POMC decreased in males and increased in females. These data indicate that CRF-OE mice have abnormal basal and fasting

  8. Blood and Brain Glutamate Levels in Children with Autistic Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Tamer H.; Abdelrahman, Hadeel M.; Fattah, Nelly R. Abdel; El-Masry, Nagda M.; Hashim, Haitham M.; El-Gerby, Khaled M.; Fattah, Nermin R. Abdel

    2013-01-01

    Despite of the great efforts that move forward to clarify the pathophysiologic mechanisms in autism, the cause of this disorder, however, remains largely unknown. There is an increasing body of literature concerning neurochemical contributions to the pathophysiology of autism. We aimed to determine blood and brain levels of glutamate in children…

  9. Monosodium glutamate toxicity: Sida acuta leaf extract ameliorated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The brain is reportedly sensitive to monosodium glutamate (MSG) toxicity via oxidative stress. Sida acuta leaf ethanolic extract (SALEE) possesses antioxidant activity which can mitigate this neurotoxicity. The present study investigated the possible protective effect of SALEE on MSG-induced toxicity in rats. Twenty-six ...

  10. Synthesis of Biobased Succinonitrile from Glutamic Acid and Glutamine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lammens, T.M.; Nôtre, Le J.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Scott, E.L.; Sanders, J.P.M.

    2011-01-01

    Succinonitrile is the precursor of 1,4-diaminobutane, which is used for the industrial production of polyamides. This paper describes the synthesis of biobased succinonitrile from glutamic acid and glutamine, amino acids that are abundantly present in many plant proteins. Synthesis of the

  11. Examining the role of glutamic acid 183 in chloroperoxidase catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, X.; Conesa, A.; Punt, P.J.; Hager, L.P.

    2003-01-01

    Site-directed mutagenesis has been used to investigate the role of glutamic acid 183 in chloroperoxidase catalysis. Based on the x-ray crystallographic structure of chloroperoxidase, Glu-183 is postulated to function on distal side of the heme prosthetic group as an acid-base catalyst in

  12. Assay of partially purified glutamate dehydrogenase isolated from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Glutamate dehydrogenase (E C 1.4.1.1) isolated from the seeds of asparagus beans was partially purified to a factor of 22 by dialysis after fractional precipitation with solid ammonium sulphate at 40 and 60% saturation. A specific activity of 11.78μmol min-1 mg-1 protein was